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Sample records for sulfur trioxide

  1. An Aerosol Condensation Model for Sulfur Trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, K E

    2008-02-07

    This document describes a model for condensation of sulfuric acid aerosol given an initial concentration and/or source of gaseous sulfur trioxide (e.g. fuming from oleum). The model includes the thermochemical effects on aerosol condensation and air parcel buoyancy. Condensation is assumed to occur heterogeneously onto a preexisting background aerosol distribution. The model development is both a revisiting of research initially presented at the Fall 2001 American Geophysical Union Meeting [1] and a further extension to provide new capabilities for current atmospheric dispersion modeling efforts [2]. Sulfuric acid is one of the most widely used of all industrial chemicals. In 1992, world consumption of sulfuric acid was 145 million metric tons, with 42.4 Mt (mega-tons) consumed in the United States [10]. In 2001, of 37.5 Mt consumed in the U.S., 74% went into producing phosphate fertilizers [11]. Another significant use is in mining industries. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] estimate that, in 1996, 68% of use was for fertilizers and 5.8% was for mining. They note that H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} use has been and should continue to be very stable. In the United States, the elimination of MTBE (methyl tertiary-butyl ether) and the use of ethanol for gasoline production are further increasing the demand for petroleum alkylate. Alkylate producers have a choice of either a hydrofluoric acid or sulfuric acid process. Both processes are widely used today. Concerns, however, over the safety or potential regulation of hydrofluoric acid are likely to result in most of the growth being for the sulfuric acid process, further increasing demand [11]. The implication of sulfuric acid being a pervasive industrial chemical is that transport is also pervasive. Often, this is in the form of oleum tankers, having around 30% free sulfur trioxide. Although sulfuric acid itself is not a volatile substance, fuming sulfuric acid (referred to as oleum) is [7], the volatile product being sulfur trioxide

  2. Globins Scavenge Sulfur Trioxide Anion Radical.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Paul R; Gardner, Daniel P; Gardner, Alexander P

    2015-11-06

    Ferrous myoglobin was oxidized by sulfur trioxide anion radical (STAR) during the free radical chain oxidation of sulfite. Oxidation was inhibited by the STAR scavenger GSH and by the heme ligand CO. Bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of STAR with several ferrous globins and biomolecules were determined by kinetic competition. Reaction rate constants for myoglobin, hemoglobin, neuroglobin, and flavohemoglobin are large at 38, 120, 2,600, and ≥ 7,500 × 10(6) m(-1) s(-1), respectively, and correlate with redox potentials. Measured rate constants for O2, GSH, ascorbate, and NAD(P)H are also large at ∼100, 10, 130, and 30 × 10(6) m(-1) s(-1), respectively, but nevertheless allow for favorable competition by globins and a capacity for STAR scavenging in vivo. Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking sulfite oxidase and deleted of flavohemoglobin showed an O2-dependent growth impairment with nonfermentable substrates that was exacerbated by sulfide, a precursor to mitochondrial sulfite formation. Higher O2 exposures inactivated the superoxide-sensitive mitochondrial aconitase in cells, and hypoxia elicited both aconitase and NADP(+)-isocitrate dehydrogenase activity losses. Roles for STAR-derived peroxysulfate radical, superoxide radical, and sulfo-NAD(P) in the mechanism of STAR toxicity and flavohemoglobin protection in yeast are suggested.

  3. Globins Scavenge Sulfur Trioxide Anion Radical*

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Paul R.; Gardner, Daniel P.; Gardner, Alexander P.

    2015-01-01

    Ferrous myoglobin was oxidized by sulfur trioxide anion radical (STAR) during the free radical chain oxidation of sulfite. Oxidation was inhibited by the STAR scavenger GSH and by the heme ligand CO. Bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of STAR with several ferrous globins and biomolecules were determined by kinetic competition. Reaction rate constants for myoglobin, hemoglobin, neuroglobin, and flavohemoglobin are large at 38, 120, 2,600, and ≥ 7,500 × 106 m−1 s−1, respectively, and correlate with redox potentials. Measured rate constants for O2, GSH, ascorbate, and NAD(P)H are also large at ∼100, 10, 130, and 30 × 106 m−1 s−1, respectively, but nevertheless allow for favorable competition by globins and a capacity for STAR scavenging in vivo. Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking sulfite oxidase and deleted of flavohemoglobin showed an O2-dependent growth impairment with nonfermentable substrates that was exacerbated by sulfide, a precursor to mitochondrial sulfite formation. Higher O2 exposures inactivated the superoxide-sensitive mitochondrial aconitase in cells, and hypoxia elicited both aconitase and NADP+-isocitrate dehydrogenase activity losses. Roles for STAR-derived peroxysulfate radical, superoxide radical, and sulfo-NAD(P) in the mechanism of STAR toxicity and flavohemoglobin protection in yeast are suggested. PMID:26381408

  4. EMISSIONS OF SULFUR TRIOXIDE FROM COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions of sulfur trioxide (SO3) are a key component of plume opacity and acid deposition. Consequently, these emissions need to be low enough not to cause opacity violations and acid deposition. Generally, a small fraction of sulfur in coal is converted to SO3 in coal-fired co...

  5. EMISSIONS OF SULFUR TRIOXIDE FROM COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions of sulfur trioxide (SO3) are a key component of plume opacity and acid deposition. Consequently, these emissions need to be low enough not to cause opacity violations and acid deposition. Generally, a small fraction of sulfur in coal is converted to SO3 in coal-fired co...

  6. Gas phase reaction of sulfur trioxide with water vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, C.E.; Molina, M.J.; Jayne, J.T.; Meads, R.F.; Worsnop, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    Sulfur trioxide (SO3) has long been known to react with water to produce sulfuric acid (H2S04). It has been commonly assumed that the gas phase reaction in the Earth`s atmosphere between SO3 and water vapor to produce sulfuric acid vapor is an important step in the production of sulfuric acid aerosol particles. The kinetics of the gas phase reaction of SO3 with water vapor have previously been studied by Castleman and co-workers, Wang et al and Reiner and Arnold. Each of these studies was carried out in a flow reactor, with the first two studies performed at low pressure (1-10 Torr) and the latter from approx. 30 to 260 Torr. Each of these studies measured SO3 decays over a range of H2O vapor levels, obtaining data consistent with interpreting the reaction of gaseous SO3 and H2O as a bimolecular process. It is not clear why previous experimental studies failed to observe a nonlinear dependence of SO3 consumption on water vapor concentration. It is probable that sufficient water dimer exists in much of the Earth`s atmosphere to allow dimer reactions to participate in sulfuric acid vapor formation.

  7. Emissions of sulfur trioxide from coal-fired power plants.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, R K; Miller, C A; Erickson, C; Jambhekar, R

    2004-06-01

    Emissions of sulfur trioxide (SO3) are a key component of plume opacity and acid deposition. Consequently, these emissions need to be low enough to not cause opacity violations and acid deposition. Generally, a small fraction of sulfur (S) in coal is converted to SO3 in coal-fired combustion devices such as electric utility boilers. The emissions of SO3 from such a boiler depend on coal S content, combustion conditions, flue gas characteristics, and air pollution devices being used. It is well known that the catalyst used in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for nitrogen oxides control oxidizes a small fraction of sulfur dioxide in the flue gas to SO3. The extent of this oxidation depends on the catalyst formulation and SCR operating conditions. Gas-phase SO3 and sulfuric acid, on being quenched in plant equipment (e.g., air preheater and wet scrubber), result in fine acidic mist, which can cause increased plume opacity and undesirable emissions. Recently, such effects have been observed at plants firing high-S coal and equipped with SCR systems and wet scrubbers. This paper investigates the factors that affect acidic mist production in coal-fired electric utility boilers and discusses approaches for mitigating emission of this mist.

  8. Photoresist removal using gaseous sulfur trioxide cleaning technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Puppo, Helene; Bocian, Paul B.; Waleh, Ahmad

    1999-06-01

    A novel cleaning method for removing photoresists and organic polymers from semiconductor wafers is described. This non-plasma method uses anhydrous sulfur trioxide gas in a two-step process, during which, the substrate is first exposed to SO3 vapor at relatively low temperatures and then is rinsed with de-ionized water. The process is radically different from conventional plasma-ashing methods in that the photoresist is not etched or removed during the exposure to SO3. Rather, the removal of the modified photoresist takes place during the subsequent DI-water rinse step. The SO3 process completely removes photoresist and polymer residues in many post-etch applications. Additional advantages of the process are absence of halogen gases and elimination of the need for other solvents and wet chemicals. The process also enjoys a very low cost of ownership and has minimal environmental impact. The SEM and SIMS surface analysis results are presented to show the effectiveness of gaseous SO3 process after polysilicon, metal an oxide etch applications. The effects of both chlorine- and fluorine-based plasma chemistries on resist removal are described.

  9. PREVENTION REFERENCE MANUAL: CHEMICAL SPECIFIC. VOL. 15: CONTROL OF ACCIDENTAL RELEASES OF SULFUR TRIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report, discussing sulfur trioxide (SO3), is one of a series addressing the prevention of accidental releases of toxic chemicals. SO3, a clear oily liquid or solid at typical ambient conditions, has an Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health (IDLH) concentration of 20 ppm, w...

  10. Mechanism for forming hydrogen chloride and sodium sulfate from sulfur trioxide, water, and sodium chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, A. B.

    1984-01-01

    A molecular orbital study of sodium sulfate and hydrogen chloride formation from sulfur trioxide, water, and sodium chloride shows no activation barrier, in agreement with recent experimental work of Kohl, Fielder, and Stearns. Two overall steps are found for the process. First, gas-phase water reacts with sulfur trioxide along a pathway involving a linear O-H-O transition state yielding closely associated hydroxyl and bisulfite which rearrange to become a hydrogen sulfate molecule. Then the hydrogen sulfate molecule transfers a hydrogen atom to a surface chloride in solid sodium chloride while an electron and a sodium cation simultaneously transfer to yield sodium bisulfate and gas-phase hydrogen chloride. This process repeats. Both of these steps represent well-known reactions for which mechanisms have not been previously determined.

  11. PREPARATION OF URANIUM TRIOXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Buckingham, J.S.

    1959-09-01

    The production of uranium trioxide from aqueous solutions of uranyl nitrate is discussed. The uranium trioxide is produced by adding sulfur or a sulfur-containing compound, such as thiourea, sulfamic acid, sulfuric acid, and ammonium sulfate, to the uranyl solution in an amount of about 0.5% by weight of the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate, evaporating the solution to dryness, and calcining the dry residue. The trioxide obtained by this method furnished a dioxide with a considerably higher reactivity with hydrogen fluoride than a trioxide prepared without the sulfur additive.

  12. Studies of the fate of sulfur trioxide in coal-fired utility boilers based on modified selected condensation methods.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yan; Zhou, Hongcang; Jiang, Wu; Chen, Chien-Wei; Pan, Wei-Ping

    2010-05-01

    The formation of sulfur trioxide (SO(3)) in coal-fired utility boilers can have negative effects on boiler performance and operation, such as fouling and corrosion of equipment, efficiency loss in the air preheater (APH), increase in stack opacity, and the formation of PM(2.5). Sulfur trioxide can also compete with mercury when bonding with injected activated carbons. Tests in a lab-scale reactor confirmed there are major interferences between fly ash and SO(3) during SO(3) sampling. A modified SO(3) procedure to maximize the elimination of measurement biases, based on the inertial-filter-sampling and the selective-condensation-collecting of SO(3), was applied in SO(3) tests in three full-scale utility boilers. For the two units burning bituminous coal, SO(3) levels starting at 20 to 25 ppmv at the inlet to the selective catalytic reduction (SCR), increased slightly across the SCR, owing to catalytic conversion of SO(2) to SO(3,) and then declined in other air pollutant control device (APCD) modules downstream to approximately 5 ppmv and 15 ppmv at the two sites, respectively. In the unit burning sub-bituminous coal, the much lower initial concentration of SO(3) estimated to be approximately 1.5 ppmv at the inlet to the SCR was reduced to about 0.8 ppmv across the SCR and to about 0.3 ppmv at the exit of the wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD). The SO(3) removal efficiency across the WFGD scrubbers at the three sites was generally 35% or less. Reductions in SO(3) across either the APH or the dry electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in units burning high-sulfur bituminous coal were attributed to operating temperatures being below the dew point of SO(3).

  13. Thiocyanate potentiates antimicrobial photodynamic therapy: In situ generation of the sulfur trioxide radical anion by singlet oxygen

    PubMed Central

    St Denis, Tyler G.; Vecchio, Daniela; Zadlo, Andrzej; Rineh, Ardeshir; Sadasivam, Magesh; Avci, Pinar; Huang, Liyi; Kozinska, Anna; Chandran, Rakkiyappan; Sarna, Tadeusz; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used for the eradication of pathogenic microbial cells and involves the light excitation of dyes in the presence of O2, yielding reactive oxygen species including the hydroxyl radical (•OH) and singlet oxygen (1O2). In order to chemically enhance PDT by the formation of longer-lived radical species, we asked whether thiocyanate (SCN−) could potentiate the methylene blue (MB) and light-mediated killing of the gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and the gram-negative Escherichia coli. SCN− enhanced PDT (10 μM MB, 5J/cm2 660 nm hv) killing in a concentration-dependent manner of S. aureus by 2.5 log10 to a maximum of 4.2 log10 at 10 mM (P < 0.001) and increased killing of E. coli by 3.6 log10 to a maximum of 5.0 log10 at 10 mM (P < 0.01). We determined that SCN− rapidly depleted O2 from an irradiated MB system, reacting exclusively with 1O2, without quenching the MB excited triplet state. SCN− reacted with 1O2, producing a sulfur trioxide radical anion (a sulfur-centered radical demonstrated by EPR spin trapping). We found that MB-PDT of SCN− in solution produced both sulfite and cyanide anions, and that addition of each of these salts separately enhanced MB-PDT killing of bacteria. We were unable to detect EPR signals of •OH, which, together with kinetic data, strongly suggests that MB, known to produce •OH and 1O2, may, under the conditions used, preferentially form 1O2. PMID:23969112

  14. Mechanism of enhanced photocatalytic activities on tungsten trioxide doped with sulfur: Dopant-type effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dan; Huang, Wei-Qing; Xie, Zhong; Xu, Liang; Yang, Yin-Cai; Hu, Wangyu; Huang, Gui-Fang

    2016-09-01

    The enhanced photocatalytic activity of tungsten trioxide (WO3) has been observed experimentally via doping with S element as different dopant types. Herein, a comparative study on the effect of different types of S dopant and native vacancy defects on the electronic structure and optical properties of WO3 is presented by using hybrid Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof 2006 (HSE06) density functional methods. Six possible models (SO-WO3, SW-WO3, VO-WO3, VW-WO3, SO + VW-WO3 and SW + VO-WO3) based on WO3 are tentatively put forward. It is found that cationic S doping (the substitution of W by S) is more favorable than anionic S doping (replacing O with S), and both cases become easier to form as native vacancy defect is accompanied. The electronic structures of doped WO3 depend on the type of dopant: anionic S doping results into three isolated levels in the upper part of valence band, while cationic S doping only induces an effective band gap reduction, which is critical for efficient light-to-current conversion. Interestingly, the isolated states near gap of WO3 would appear as long as native vacancy defects exist. The introduced levels or reduced band gaps make the systems responsed to the visible light, even further to a range of 400-700 nm. These findings can rationalize the available experimental results and pave the way for developing WO3-based photocatalysts.

  15. The Centrifugally Induced Pure Rotational Spectrum and the Structure of Sulfur Trioxide. A Microwave Fourier Transform Study of a Nonpolar Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Volker; Sutter, Dieter Hermann; Dreizler, Helmut

    1991-08-01

    The pure rotational spectrum of sulfur trioxide has been observed for the first time. A total of 25 high-J transitions could be assigned. The rotational constants, two quartic centrifugal distortion constants, and three sextic centrifugal distortion constants were determined as: B= 10 449.0667(23) MHz, C = 5216.0330(12) MHz, DJ = 9.2651 (18) kHz, DJK = -16.3922(18) kHz, HJ, = -8.8(34) • 10-3 Hz, HJK= -15.8(73) • 10-3 Hz, and HKJ = 34.2(73) • 10-3 Hz. An r0- and an re -structure are presented: r0= 1.4198(7) Å (calculated from B), r0 = 1.4210(7) Å (calculated from C), and re = 1.4175 Å

  16. Antimony trioxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Antimony trioxide ; CASRN 1309 - 64 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  17. Method for removing sulfur oxide from waste gases and recovering elemental sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Raymond H.

    1977-01-01

    A continuous catalytic fused salt extraction process is described for removing sulfur oxides from gaseous streams. The gaseous stream is contacted with a molten potassium sulfate salt mixture having a dissolved catalyst to oxidize sulfur dioxide to sulfur trioxide and molten potassium normal sulfate to solvate the sulfur trioxide to remove the sulfur trioxide from the gaseous stream. A portion of the sulfur trioxide loaded salt mixture is then dissociated to produce sulfur trioxide gas and thereby regenerate potassium normal sulfate. The evolved sulfur trioxide is reacted with hydrogen sulfide as in a Claus reactor to produce elemental sulfur. The process may be advantageously used to clean waste stack gas from industrial plants, such as copper smelters, where a supply of hydrogen sulfide is readily available.

  18. Sulfonate activation of the electrophilic reactivity of chlorine and alkyl hypochlorides by the insertion of sulfur trioxide at the C1-C1 and O-C1 bonds. Addition of chlorine chloro- and ethoxysulfate to olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Zefirov, N.S.; Koz'min, A.S.; Sorokin, V.D.; Zhdankin, V.V.

    1986-10-10

    At low temperatures (-40 to -80/sup 0/C) sulfur trioxide enters the chlorine molecule (with the formation of chlorine chlorosulfate) and the ethyl hypochlorite molecule (giving chlorine ethoxysulfate). Both new compounds are highly reactive electrophilic chlorinating reagents and add to ethylene, activated alkenes (1-hexene and cyclohexene), and deactivated olefins (methyl methacrylate, tri- and tetrachloroethylene) in methylene chloride solution at low temperatures. The addition of chlorine chlorosulfate leads to the formation of ..beta..-chloroalkyl chlorosulfates with yields of 24-85%, and the addition of chlorine ethoxysulfate leads to ..beta..-chloroalkyl ethylsulfates with yields of 65-85%. The reactions with unsymmetrical olefins lead to mixtures of the regioisomers with a preference for the products from addition according to the Markovnikov rule; the addition to cyclohexene is trans-stereospecific. The investigated processes represent a new simple approach to the production of sulfate-activated chlorinating reagents and extend the possibilities for functional substitution of olefins.

  19. Arsenic Trioxide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the white blood cells).Arsenic trioxide may cause a serious or life-threatening group of symptoms ... medications to treat the syndrome.Arsenic trioxide may cause QT prolongation (heart muscles take longer to recharge ...

  20. Sulfur

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, elemental sulfur and the byproduct sulfuric acid were produced at 109 operations in 29 states and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Total shipments were valued at about $1.6 billion. Elemental sulfur production was 8.2 Mt (9 million st); Louisiana and Texas accounted for about 53 percent of domestic production.

  1. Sulfur-oxygen processes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Robert M.; Smythe, William D.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory studies of irradiated sulfur dioxide frost have found that sulfur trioxide should be formed as a consequence of the irradiation process. The spectral reflectance of solid sulfur trioxide was measured in the laboratory and it was found that the compound has strong absorption features at 3.37 and 3.70 microns. These features are not present in the spectral geometric albedo of Io. This is interpreted as an indication that sulfur trioxide may exist in such limited abundance that it is undetectable in disk averaged spectrophotometry. It is suggested that the Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on the Galileo spacecraft should be able to identify condensed sulfur trioxide on Io particularly in regions bordering the sulfur dioxide deposits. The presence of elemental sulfur on Io's surface has been questioned on several grounds, most notably the suggested production process (quenched molten sulfur extrusions) and the effect of radiation (particularly X-rays) on some of the allotropes. Mixtures of sulfur allotropes were produced in the laboratory by quenching molten sulfur and it was found that the spectra indicate the presence of certain red-colored allotropes which are preserved upon quenching. The color of the sulfur glass produced is redder when the temperature of the original melt is higher. This is consistent with the suggestion that Io's spectral geometric albedo can be partly explained by the presence of quenched sulfur glasses.

  2. Sulfur-oxygen processes on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Robert M.; Smythe, William D.

    1987-05-01

    Laboratory studies of irradiated sulfur dioxide frost have found that sulfur trioxide should be formed as a consequence of the irradiation process. The spectral reflectance of solid sulfur trioxide was measured in the laboratory and it was found that the compound has strong absorption features at 3.37 and 3.70 microns. These features are not present in the spectral geometric albedo of Io. This is interpreted as an indication that sulfur trioxide may exist in such limited abundance that it is undetectable in disk averaged spectrophotometry. It is suggested that the Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on the Galileo spacecraft should be able to identify condensed sulfur trioxide on Io particularly in regions bordering the sulfur dioxide deposits. The presence of elemental sulfur on Io's surface has been questioned on several grounds, most notably the suggested production process (quenched molten sulfur extrusions) and the effect of radiation (particularly X-rays) on some of the allotropes. Mixtures of sulfur allotropes were produced in the laboratory by quenching molten sulfur and it was found that the spectra indicate the presence of certain red-colored allotropes which are preserved upon quenching. The color of the sulfur glass produced is redder when the temperature of the original melt is higher. This is consistent with the suggestion that Io's spectral geometric albedo can be partly explained by the presence of quenched sulfur glasses.

  3. SULFUR DIOXIDE - SULFUR TRIOXIDE REGENERATIVE FUEL CELL RESEARCH

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The thermodynamics and electrolytic characteristics are discussed of an SO2-SO3 regenerative, closed-cycle fuel cell , and summarizes the electrolytic...electrochemical, and phase separation research conducted during a study program to determine the practicability of such a fuel cell . The...experimental results obtained were at such wide variance with the theoretical concept that it became apparent that a fuel cell of this type is not feasible. (Author)

  4. An evaluation of possible mechanisms for conversion of sulfur dioxide to sulfuric acid and sulfate aerosols in the troposphere

    Treesearch

    Jack G. Calvert

    1976-01-01

    The mechanisms and rates of conversion of sulfur dioxide to sulfur trioxide, sulfuric acid, and other "sulfate" aerosol precursors are considered in view of current knowledge related to atmospheric reactions and chemical kinetics. Several heterogeneous pathways exist for SO2 oxidation promoted on solid catalyst particles and in aqueous...

  5. Method for measuring gaseous sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Q.G.; Worrell, W.L.

    1986-11-11

    A method is described for measuring sulfur dioxide or sulfur trioxide in an oxygen-containing gas comprising: contacting the gas with a solid electrolyte comprising lithium sulfate and silver sulfate, the electrolyte being in electrical contact with a solid reference electrode comprising lithium sulfate, silver sulfate and silver in intimate admixture; and measuring the electrical potential between the electrolyte and the reference electrode; the electrolyte being maintained at a temperature during the contacting wherein it comprises two conductive phases.

  6. Sulphur trioxide absorption apparatus and process

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, G.M.

    1987-03-31

    This patent describes a contact process for producing a concentrated sulphuric acid from dry sulphur dioxide and oxygen containing mixtures which employs the absorption of sulphur trioxide from a hot, dry gas stream containing sulphur trioxide into at least one sulphuric acid stream. The improvement described here comprises: (a) feeding the gas stream to a lower packed absorption zone contained within an absorption tower; (b) feeding a first sulphuric acid stream to the lower absorption zone to effect absorption of a major portion of the sulphur trioxide from the gas stream into the first sulphuric acid stream to produce a first enriched sulphuric acid stream and a depleted sulphur trioxide gas stream; (c) feeding the depleted sulphur trioxide gas stream to an upper packed absorption zone above the lower absorption zone within the tower; and (d) feeding a second sulphuric acid stream to the upper absorption zone to effect absorption of substantially all of the sulphur trioxide remaining in the depleted sulphur trioxide gas stream to produce a second enriched sulphuric acid stream and a substantially sulphur trioxide-free gas stream.

  7. Processes for preparing carbon fibers using gaseous sulfur trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Bryan E.; Lysenko, Zenon; Bernius, Mark T.; Hukkanen, Eric J.

    2016-01-05

    Disclosed herein are processes for preparing carbonized polymers, such as carbon fibers, comprising: sulfonating a polymer with a sulfonating agent that comprises SO.sub.3 gas to form a sulfonated polymer; treating the sulfonated polymer with a heated solvent, wherein the temperature of said solvent is at least 95.degree. C.; and carbonizing the resulting product by heating it to a temperature of 500-3000.degree. C.

  8. Producing bismuth trioxide and its application in fire assaying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Zack; Ojebuoboh, Funsho

    2002-04-01

    Bismuth trioxide (Bi2O3) is the prevalent commercial oxide of bismuth. A precursor to the preparation of other compounds of bismuth, including the chemical reagents, bismuth trioxide has specialized uses in optical glass, flame-retardant paper, and, increasingly, in glaze formulations where it substitutes for lead oxides. In the last decade, bismuth trioxide has also become a key ingredient in flux formulations used by mineral analysts in fire assaying. The production of bismuth trioxide generally begins with the minor metal bismuth. This paper describes bismuth trioxide production and the properties and basis for its use in environmentally sound fire assaying.

  9. Infrared detection of Criegee intermediates formed during the ozonolysis of β-pinene and their reactivity towards sulfur dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Jennifer; Carlsson, Philip T M; Hertl, Nils; Olzmann, Matthias; Pfeifle, Mark; Wolf, J Lennard; Zeuch, Thomas

    2014-01-13

    Recently, direct kinetic experiments have shown that the oxidation of sulfur dioxide to sulfur trioxide by reaction with stabilized Criegee intermediates (CIs) is an important source of sulfuric acid in the atmosphere. So far, only small CIs, generated in photolysis experiments, have been directly detected. Herein, it is shown that large, stabilized CIs can be detected in the gas phase by FTIR spectroscopy during the ozonolysis of β-pinene. Their transient absorption bands between 930 and 830 cm(-1) appear only in the initial phase of the ozonolysis reaction when the scavenging of stabilized CIs by the reaction products is slow. The large CIs react with sulfur dioxide to give sulfur trioxide and nopinone with a yield exceeding 80%. Reactant consumption and product formation in time-resolved β-pinene ozonolysis experiments in the presence of sulfur dioxide have been kinetically modeled. The results suggest a fast reaction of sulfur dioxide with CIs arising from β-pinene ozonolysis.

  10. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 52 - Determination of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions From Stationary Sources by Continuous Monitors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Stationary Sources by Continuous Monitors 1. Definitions. 1.1Concentration Measurement System. The total... computational portions of Method 8 as they relate to determination of sulfuric acid mist and sulfur trioxide, as... mist are not required. For measurement systems employing extractive sampling, place the measurement...

  11. Microwave Characterization of Propiolic Sulfuric Anhydride and Two Conformers of Acrylic Sulfuric Anhydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, CJ; Huff, Anna; Mackenzie, Becca; Leopold, Ken

    2017-06-01

    Sulfur trioxide reacts with propiolic acid and acrylic acid to form propiolic sulfuric anhydride (HC\\equivC-COOSO_{2}OH) and acrylic sulfuric anhydride (H_{2}C=CH-COOSO_{2}OH), respectively. Both species have been observed by chirped-pulse and conventional cavity microwave spectroscopy. In the case of acrylic acid, two conformers derived from the cis and trans form of the acid have been observed. The reaction mechanism and energetics are investigated by density functional theory and CCSD calculations. These results add to a growing body of evidence that establishes carboxylic sulfuric anhydrides, RCOOSO_{2}OH, as a class of molecules formed readily from SO_{3} + RCOOH in the gas phase and which, therefore, may be of significance in the nucleation and growth of atmospheric aerosol particles.

  12. Sandwich heterostructures of antimony trioxide and bismuth trioxide films: Structural, morphological and optical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condurache-Bota, Simona; Praisler, Mirela; Gavrila, Raluca; Tigau, Nicolae

    2017-01-01

    Thin film heterostructures can be advantageous since they either exhibit novel or a combination of the properties of their components. Here we propose sandwich-type of heterostructures made of antimony trioxide and bismuth trioxide thin films, which were deposited on glass substrates by thermal vacuum deposition at three substrate temperatures, 50° Celsius apart. Their morphology and optical properties are studied as compared to the corresponding monolayers. It was found that even small substrate temperature changes strongly influence their morphology, increasing their roughness, while the optical transmittance shows a slight decrease as compared with the individual layers. The corresponding absorption coefficient exhibits intermediate values as compared to the component oxides, while the energy bandgaps for the indirect allowed transitions move towards the Infrared when overlapping the antimony and bismuth trioxides.

  13. Sulfur Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal, Eliel; Santiago, Patricia; Escudero, Roberto; Mendoza, Doroteo

    2000-03-01

    We have synthetized sulfur nanowires by a template approach using nanoporous anodic alumina. High resolution electron microscopy shows that isolated sulfur nanowires (15 nanometers of diameter) present crystalline structure different to that observed in the stable bulk allotrope (orthorhombic alfa-sulfur). Melting behavior of the sulfur nanowires embedded into the nanoporous alumina matrix was studied by differential scanning calorimetry, showing again very different behavior of the nanowires compared to that of the bulk sulfur. On the other hand, in order to study the bonding configuration of the sulfur atoms in the nanowires, we will present infrared spectroscopy characterization of the nanowires confined into the nanoporous alumina. Finally, on the base of the experimental observations, we will present a structural model for the sulfur nanowires.

  14. Organic transformations catalyzed by methylrhenium trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Zuolin

    1995-10-06

    Methylrhenium trioxide (MTO), CH3ReO3, was first prepared in 1979. MTO forms stable or unstable adducts with electron-rich ligands, such as amines (quinuclidine, 1,4-diazabicyclo-octane, pyridine, aniline, 2,2'-bipyridine), alkynes, olefins, 1,2-diols, catechols, hydrogen peroxide, water, thiophenols, 1,2-dithiols, triphenylphosphine, 2-aminophenols, 2-aminothiophenols, 8-hydroxyquinoline and halides (Cl-, Br-, I-). After coordination, different further reactions will occur for different reagents. Reactions described in this report include the dehydration of alcohols, direct amination of alcohols, activation of hydrogen peroxide, oxygen transfer, and decomposition of ethyl diazoacetate.

  15. Sulfur revisited.

    PubMed

    Lin, A N; Reimer, R J; Carter, D M

    1988-03-01

    Sulfur is a time-honored therapeutic agent useful in a variety of dermatologic disorders. Its keratolytic action is due to formation of hydrogen sulfide through a reaction that depends upon direct interaction between sulfur particles and keratinocytes. The smaller the particle size, the greater the degree of such interaction and the greater the therapeutic efficacy. When applied topically, sulfur induces various histologic changes, including hyperkeratosis, acanthosis, and dilatation of dermal vasculature. One study showed that sulfur was comedogenic when applied onto human and rabbit skin, findings that were not reproduced in other studies. About 1% of topically applied sulfur is systemically absorbed. Adverse effects from topically applied sulfur are uncommon and are mainly limited to the skin. In infants, however, fatal outcome after extensive application has been reported.

  16. Sulfur Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariss, R.; Niki, H.

    1985-01-01

    Among the general categories of tropospheric sulfur sources, anthropogenic sources have been quantified the most accurately. Research on fluxes of sulfur compounds from volcanic sources is now in progress. Natural sources of reduced sulfur compounds are highly variable in both space and time. Variables, such as soil temperature, hydrology (tidal and water table), and organic flux into the soil, all interact to determine microbial production and subsequent emissions of reduced sulfur compounds from anaerobic soils and sediments. Available information on sources of COS, CS2, DMS, and H2S to the troposphere in the following paragraphs are summarized; these are the major biogenic sulfur species with a clearly identified role in tropospheric chemistry. The oxidation of SO2 to H2SO4 can often have a significant impact on the acidity of precipitation. A schematic representation of some important transformations and sinks for selected sulfur species is illustrated.

  17. Phase Transformations upon Doping in Tungsten Trioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wennie; Janotti, Anderson; van de Walle, Chris G.

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) is an emerging semiconductor material, with a growing number of applications in Li-ion batteries, photocatalysis, gas sensors and electrochromic devices. As an electrochromic material, WO3 turns from transparent to blue upon doping with monovalent species. Due to it having an empty A-site in the ABO3 perovskite structure, high doping concentrations are possible through intercalation. Tungsten trioxide has been experimentally shown to transform from the ground-state monoclinic symmetry to cubic symmetry with increasing monovalent doping. We use first-principles calculations to understand this transformation. Our calculations show that the addition of electrons to the conduction band is a primary driver of the phase transformation. We quantify the energetics and structural aspects of this transformation using density functional theory, allowing us to elucidate the mechanism. Comparison with experiment, role of the dopant species, and implications of structural changes for device applications will be discussed. This work is supported by the DOE and NSF GRFP.

  18. Can MTA be: Miracle trioxide aggregate?

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Reshma M; Pudakalkatti, Pushpa S; Hattarki, Sanjeevini A

    2014-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been used for more than 10 years in the dental community and has often been thought of as a material of choice for the endodontist. The dental pulp is closely related to periodontal tissues through apical foramina, accessory canals, and dentinal tubules. Due to this interrelationship, pulpal diseases may influence periodontal health and periodontal infections may affect pulpal integrity. It is estimated that pulpal and periodontal problems are responsible for more than 50% of tooth mortality. Thus, these associations recommend an interdisciplinary approach. MTA appears to exhibit significant results even in periodontal procedures as it is the first restorative material that consistently allows for over-growth of cementum and may facilitate periodontal tissue regeneration. Thus, in the present review, an attempt is made to discuss the clinical applications of MTA as an interdisciplinary approach. PMID:24744536

  19. Arsenic Trioxide Negatively Affects Echinococcus granulosus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Zhuo; Li, Fangfang; Xing, Guoqiang; Peng, Xinyu; Zhang, Shijie

    2015-01-01

    Spillage of cyst contents during surgery is the major cause of recurrences of hydatidosis, also called cystic echinococcosis (CE). Currently, many scolicidal agents are used for inactivation of the cyst contents. However, due to complications in the use of those agents, new and more-effective treatment options are urgently needed. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro efficacy of arsenic trioxide (ATO) against Echinococcus granulosus protoscolices. Protoscolices of E. granulosus were incubated in vitro with 2, 4, 6, and 8 μmol/liter ATO; viability of protoscolices was assessed daily by microscopic observation of movements and 0.1% eosin staining. A small sample from each culture was processed for scanning and transmission electron microscopy. ATO demonstrated a potent ability to kill protoscolices, suggesting that ATO may represent a new strategy in treating hydatid cyst echinococcosis. However, the in vivo efficacy and possible side effects of ATO need to be explored. PMID:26324279

  20. Mineral trioxide aggregate apexification: A novel approach

    PubMed Central

    Purra, Aamir Rashid; Ahangar, Fayaz Ahmed; Chadgal, Sachin; Farooq, Riyaz

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of choice for necrotic teeth with immature root is apexification, which is induction of apical closure to produce more favorable conditions for conventional root canal filling. The most commonly advocated medicament is calcium hydroxide although recently considerable interest has been expressed in the use of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). MTA offers the option of a two-visit apexification procedure so that the fragile tooth can be restored immediately. However, difficulty in placing the material in the wide apical area requires the use of an apical matrix. Materials such as collagen, calcium sulfate, and hydroxyapatite have been used for this purpose. This article describes the use of resorbable suture material to form the apical matrix which offers many advantages over the contemporary materials. PMID:27563191

  1. Lunar sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuck, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Ideas introduced by Vaniman, Pettit and Heiken in their 1988 Uses of Lunar Sulfur are expanded. Particular attention is given to uses of SO2 as a mineral-dressing fluid. Also introduced is the concept of using sulfide-based concrete as an alternative to the sulfur-based concretes proposed by Leonard and Johnson. Sulfur is abundant in high-Ti mare basalts, which range from 0.16 to 0.27 pct. by weight. Terrestrial basalts with 0.15 pct. S are rare. For oxygen recovery, sulfur must be driven off with other volatiles from ilmenite concentrates, before reduction. Troilite (FeS) may be oxidized to magnetite (Fe3O4) and SO2 gas, by burning concentrates in oxygen within a magnetic field, to further oxidize ilmenite before regrinding the magnetic reconcentration. SO2 is liquid at -20 C, the mean temperature underground on the Moon, at a minimum of 0.6 atm pressure. By using liquid SO2 as a mineral dressing fluid, all the techniques of terrestrial mineral separation become available for lunar ores and concentrates. Combination of sulfur and iron in an exothermic reaction, to form iron sulfides, may be used to cement grains of other minerals into an anhydrous iron-sulfide concrete. A sulfur-iron-aggregate mixture may be heated to the ignition temperature of iron with sulfur to make a concrete shape. The best iron, sulfur, and aggregate ratios need to be experimentally established. The iron and sulfur will be by-products of oxygen production from lunar minerals.

  2. Lunar sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuck, David L.

    Ideas introduced by Vaniman, Pettit and Heiken in their 1988 Uses of Lunar Sulfur are expanded. Particular attention is given to uses of SO2 as a mineral-dressing fluid. Also introduced is the concept of using sulfide-based concrete as an alternative to the sulfur-based concretes proposed by Leonard and Johnson. Sulfur is abundant in high-Ti mare basalts, which range from 0.16 to 0.27 pct. by weight. Terrestrial basalts with 0.15 pct. S are rare. For oxygen recovery, sulfur must be driven off with other volatiles from ilmenite concentrates, before reduction. Troilite (FeS) may be oxidized to magnetite (Fe3O4) and SO2 gas, by burning concentrates in oxygen within a magnetic field, to further oxidize ilmenite before regrinding the magnetic reconcentration. SO2 is liquid at -20 C, the mean temperature underground on the Moon, at a minimum of 0.6 atm pressure. By using liquid SO2 as a mineral dressing fluid, all the techniques of terrestrial mineral separation become available for lunar ores and concentrates. Combination of sulfur and iron in an exothermic reaction, to form iron sulfides, may be used to cement grains of other minerals into an anhydrous iron-sulfide concrete. A sulfur-iron-aggregate mixture may be heated to the ignition temperature of iron with sulfur to make a concrete shape. The best iron, sulfur, and aggregate ratios need to be experimentally established. The iron and sulfur will be by-products of oxygen production from lunar minerals.

  3. Arsenic Trioxide – An Old Drug Rediscovered

    PubMed Central

    Emadi, Ashkan; Gore, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last 17 years, clinical trials conducted worldwide have demonstrated the efficacy of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) in the treatment of relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Currently, the role of As2O3 in front-line therapy is under investigation. Recent trials in the US have demonstrated that the addition of As2O3 to standard treatment regimens improves survival outcomes in patients with APL and may allow a reduction in cytotoxic chemotherapy exposure. As2O3 has also shown efficacy in other malignancies, particularly multiple myeloma and myelodysplastic syndromes. Therapeutic doses of As2O3 are well tolerated, with no evidence of long-term toxicity. Adverse events include APL differentiation syndrome, electrocardiographic abnormalities, and mild elevations in liver enzymes. This review highlights trials investigating the role of As2O3 in induction and consolidation for newly diagnosed APL, as well as its role in other hematologic malignancies. The chemistry, mechanisms of action, and clinical side effects of As2O3 are also discussed. PMID:20471733

  4. Sulfur Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, B. H.

    2007-12-01

    Variations in surface tension affect the buoyancy of objects floating in a liquid. Thus an object floating in water will sink deeper in the presence of dishwater fluid. This is a very minor but measurable effect. It causes for instance ducks to drown in aqueous solutions with added surfactant. The surface tension of liquid iron is very strongly affected by the presence of sulfur which acts as a surfactant in this system varying between 1.9 and 0.4 N/m at 10 mass percent Sulfur (Lee & Morita (2002), This last value is inferred to be the maximum value for Sulfur inferred to be present in the liquid outer core. Venting of Sulfur from the liquid core manifests itself on the Earth surface by the 105 to 106 ton of sulfur vented into the atmosphere annually (Wedepohl, 1984). Inspection of surface Sulfur emission indicates that venting is non-homogeneously distributed over the Earth's surface. The implication of such large variation in surface tension in the liquid outer core are that at locally low Sulfur concentration, the liquid outer core does not wet the predominantly MgSiO3 matrix with which it is in contact. However at a local high in Sulfur, the liquid outer core wets this matrix which in the fluid state has a surface tension of 0.4 N/m (Bansal & Doremus, 1986), couples with it, and causes it to sink. This differential and diapiric movement is transmitted through the essentially brittle mantle (1024 Pa.s, Lambeck & Johnson, 1998; the maximum value for ice being about 1030 Pa.s at 0 K, in all likely hood representing an upper bound of viscosity for all materials) and manifests itself on the surface by the roughly 20 km differentiation, about 0.1 % of the total mantle thickness, between topographical heights and lows with concomitant lateral movement in the crust and upper mantle resulting in thin skin tectonics. The brittle nature of the medium though which this movement is transmitted suggests that the extremes in topography of the D" layer are similar in range to

  5. Facile Formation of Acetic Sulfuric Anhydride in a Supersonic Jet: Characterization by Microwave Spectroscopy and Computational Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Anna; Smith, CJ; Mackenzie, Becca; Leopold, Ken

    2017-06-01

    Sulfur trioxide and acetic acid are shown to react under supersonic jet conditions to form acetic sulfuric anhydride, CH_{3}COOSO_{2}OH. Rotational spectra of the parent, ^{34}S, methyl ^{13}C, and fully deuterated isotopologues have been observed by chirped-pulse and conventional cavity microwave spectroscopy. A and E internal rotation states have been observed for each isotopologue studied and the methyl group internal rotation barriers have been determined (241.043(65) \\wn for the parent species). The reaction is analogous to that of our previous report on the reaction of sulfur trioxide and formic acid. DFT and CCSD calculations are also presented which indicate that the reaction proceeds via a π_{2} + π_{2} + σ_{2} cycloaddition reaction. These results support our previous conjecture that the reaction of SO_{3} with carboxylic acids is both facile and general. Possible implications for atmospheric aerosol formation are discussed.

  6. Uses of lunar sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D.; Pettit, D.; Heiken, G.

    1992-01-01

    Sulfur and sulfur compounds have a wide range of applications for their fluid, electrical, chemical, and biochemical properties. Although known abundances on the Moon are limited (approximately 0.1 percent in mare soils), sulfur is relatively extractable by heating. Coproduction of sulfur during oxygen extraction from ilmenite-rich mare soils could yield sulfur in masses up to 10 percent of the mass of oxygen produced. Sulfur deserves serious consideration as a lunar resource.

  7. Uses of lunar sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Vaniman, D.T.; Pettit, D.R.; Heiken, G.

    1988-01-01

    Sulfur and sulfur compounds have a wide range of applications for their fluid, electrical, chemical and biochemical properties. Although low in abundance on the Moon (/approximately/0.1% in mare soils), sulfur is surface-correlated and relatively extractable. Co-production of sulfur during oxygen extraction from ilmenite-rich soils could yield sulfur in masses up to 10% of the mass of oxygen produced. Sulfur deserves serious consideration as a lunar resource. 29 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA): its history, composition, and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Tawil, Peter Z; Duggan, Derek J; Galicia, Johnah C

    2015-04-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been a revolutionary material in endodontics. Since its introduction in the 1990s several studies have demonstrated its use in various clinical applications. MTA has been extensively studied and is currently used for perforation repairs, apexifications, regenerative procedures, apexogenesis, pulpotomies, and pulp capping. This article will review the history, composition, research findings, and clinical applications of this versatile endodontic material.

  9. Sulfuric acid-sulfur heat storage cycle

    DOEpatents

    Norman, John H.

    1983-12-20

    A method of storing heat is provided utilizing a chemical cycle which interconverts sulfuric acid and sulfur. The method can be used to levelize the energy obtained from intermittent heat sources, such as solar collectors. Dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated by evaporation of water, and the concentrated sulfuric acid is boiled and decomposed using intense heat from the heat source, forming sulfur dioxide and oxygen. The sulfur dioxide is reacted with water in a disproportionation reaction yielding dilute sulfuric acid, which is recycled, and elemental sulfur. The sulfur has substantial potential chemical energy and represents the storage of a significant portion of the energy obtained from the heat source. The sulfur is burned whenever required to release the stored energy. A particularly advantageous use of the heat storage method is in conjunction with a solar-powered facility which uses the Bunsen reaction in a water-splitting process. The energy storage method is used to levelize the availability of solar energy while some of the sulfur dioxide produced in the heat storage reactions is converted to sulfuric acid in the Bunsen reaction.

  10. Properties of Sulfur Concrete.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-06

    This report summarizes the state of the art of sulfur concrete . Sulfur concrete is created by mixing molten sulfur with aggregate and allowing the...and many organic compounds. It works well as a rapid runway repair material. Sulfur concrete also has unfavorable properties. It has poor durability

  11. High-temperature corrosion of ceramics. Progress report, June 15, 1981-June 14, 1982. [Sulfur trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Blachere, J.R.; Pettit, F.S.

    1983-02-01

    In this program, the corrosion of ceramics is studied from a mechanistic point of view. In an integrated fundamental approach the gaseous corrosion investigation is followed by that of deposit-modified gaseous corrosion and eventually by deep melt corrosion. The study of the gaseous corrosion of Al H CO/sub 2/ and SO/sub 2/-SO/sub 3/ is almost completed. Particular emphasis has been placed on the interaction between SO/sub 3/ and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ at the lower temperatures. A few additional experiments remain to characterize better the products and check some interpretations but the following conclusions have been obtained: (1) SiO/sub 2/ and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ are very resistant to gaseous corrosion, (2) pure oxides had no measureable weight changes during exposure to all gases at 700/sup 0/C and 1000/sup 0/C, and (3) at 1400/sup 0/C, silica devitrified and was reduced in wet hydrogen. The reaction of the aluminas at this temperature is related to their impurities and no reaction occurred with higher purity alumina single crystal. The reaction of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ with SO/sub 3/ follows qualitatively the general trends predicted by thermodynamics: (1) decrease in sulfate formation with decreasing SO/sub 3/ pressure, (2) decrease in sulfate formation with increasing temperature, and (3) however the sulfate product formed at slightly lower SO/sub 3/ pressures than expected from thermodynamics. The corrosion products on the higher purity polycrystalline Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ are not uniform. Some regions of th samples formed little or no product. This appears associated with different grains in polished specimen and different faces of grains in the as-received alumina suggesting impurity and orientation effects. The distribution and morphology of the products will be studied in more detail.

  12. Processes for preparing carbon fibers using sulfur trioxide in a halogenated solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, Jasson T.; Barton, Bryan E.; Bernius, Mark T.; Chen, Xiaoyun; Hukkanen, Eric J.; Rhoton, Christina A.; Lysenko, Zenon

    2015-12-29

    Disclosed here are processes for preparing carbonized polymers (preferably carbon fibers), comprising sulfonating a polymer with a sulfonating agent that comprises SO.sub.3 dissolved in a solvent to form a sulfonated polymer; treating the sulfonated polymer with a heated solvent, wherein the temperature of the solvent is at least 95.degree. C.; and carbonizing the resulting product by heating it to a temperature of 500-3000.degree. C. Carbon fibers made according to these methods are also disclosed herein.

  13. Cellulose acetate-based composites with antimicrobial properties from embedded molybdenum trioxide particles.

    PubMed

    Shafaei, S; Dörrstein, J; Guggenbichler, J P; Zollfrank, C

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop novel cellulose acetate (biopolymer) composite materials with an excellent antimicrobial activity by embedding molybdenum trioxide particles with unique high specific surface area. High surface area molybdenum trioxide particles were prepared from freshly precipitated molybdenum trioxide dihydrate (MoO3 ·2H2 O) and subsequent calcination at 340°C under H2 /N2 gas. Microbiological evaluation against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were performed applying a roll-on test and excellent antimicrobial activities were determined for composites with embedded anhydrous molybdenum trioxide with a high specific surface area. Cellulose acetate composites comprising MoO3 particles can eliminate three harmful bacteria as a result of the release of protons from the material and surface enlargement of the molybdenum trioxide particles. The findings support a proposed antimicrobial mechanism based on local acidity increase due to large specific surface areas.

  14. Sulfur metabolism in phototrophic sulfur bacteria.

    PubMed

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Dahl, Christiane

    2009-01-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria are characterized by oxidizing various inorganic sulfur compounds for use as electron donors in carbon dioxide fixation during anoxygenic photosynthetic growth. These bacteria are divided into the purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) and the green sulfur bacteria (GSB). They utilize various combinations of sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate and sometimes also ferrous iron and hydrogen as electron donors. This review focuses on the dissimilatory and assimilatory metabolism of inorganic sulfur compounds in these bacteria and also briefly discusses these metabolisms in other types of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. The biochemistry and genetics of sulfur compound oxidation in PSB and GSB are described in detail. A variety of enzymes catalyzing sulfur oxidation reactions have been isolated from GSB and PSB (especially Allochromatium vinosum, a representative of the Chromatiaceae), and many are well characterized also on a molecular genetic level. Complete genome sequence data are currently available for 10 strains of GSB and for one strain of PSB. We present here a genome-based survey of the distribution and phylogenies of genes involved in oxidation of sulfur compounds in these strains. It is evident from biochemical and genetic analyses that the dissimilatory sulfur metabolism of these organisms is very complex and incompletely understood. This metabolism is modular in the sense that individual steps in the metabolism may be performed by different enzymes in different organisms. Despite the distant evolutionary relationship between GSB and PSB, their photosynthetic nature and their dependency on oxidation of sulfur compounds resulted in similar ecological roles in the sulfur cycle as important anaerobic oxidizers of sulfur compounds.

  15. Solubility of Sulfur Dioxide in Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, K. K.; Compton, L. E.; Lawson, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    The solubility of sulfur dioxide in 50% (wt./wt.) sulfuric acid was evaluated by regular solution theory, and the results verified by experimental measurements in the temperature range of 25 C to 70 C at pressures of 60 to 200 PSIA. The percent (wt./wt.) of sulfur dioxide in 50% (wt./wt.) sulfuric acid is given by the equation %SO2 = 2.2350 + 0.0903P - 0.00026P 10 to the 2nd power with P in PSIA.

  16. The Sulfur Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellogg, W. W.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    A model estimating the contributions of sulfur compounds by natural and human activities, and the rate of removal of sulfur from the atmosphere, is based on a review of the existing literature. Areas requiring additional research are identified. (AL)

  17. The Sulfur Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellogg, W. W.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    A model estimating the contributions of sulfur compounds by natural and human activities, and the rate of removal of sulfur from the atmosphere, is based on a review of the existing literature. Areas requiring additional research are identified. (AL)

  18. [Effects of arsenic trioxide on human coronary smooth muscle cells: experiment in vitro].

    PubMed

    Luan, Tian-Zhu; Fu, Song-Bin; Zhou, Li-Jun; Li, Wei-Min; Huang, Yong-Lin

    2009-01-13

    To study the apoptotic effects of arsenic trioxide on human coronary smooth muscle cells (HCSMCs). HCSMCs were cultured and randomly divided into 5 groups to be treated by arsenic trioxide of the concentrations 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0 micromol/L for 48 h. Cell growth curve was drawn by MTT method. DNA electrophoresis was used to observe the apoptosis. Western blotting was conducted to examine the protein expression of Bax, an apoptosis-promoting gene, and Bcl-2, an apoptosis-inhibiting gene. Other HCSMCs were cultured with 4.0 micromol/L arsenic trioxide for 48 h, then transmission electron microscopy was used to observe the ultra-structure and TUNEL was used to detect the percentage of apoptotic cells. HCSMCs not treated with arsenic trioxide were used as control group. Arsenic trioxide of different concentrations inhibited the proliferation of HCSMCs dose and time-dependently. When the concentration of arsenic trioxide was 5.0 micromol/L the number of living cells was (4.41 +/- 0.10) x 10(5)/ml, significantly lower than that of the control group [(30.11 +/- 0.93) x 10(5)/ml, P < 0.05]. Apoptosis bodies were observed under the transmission electron microscope. DNA electrophoresis showed hazy ladders, especially when the concentrations were 3.0 - 4.0 micromol/L. When the concentration was 5.0 micromol/L the number of necrotic cells increased remarkably and apoptosis became less significant. TUNEL showed that the apoptotic cells increased from 16.0% +/- 3.1% to 38.7% +/- 2.7% (P < 0.05). MTT test showed that arsenic trioxide decreased the absorbance of HCSMCs dose and time-dependently. Western blotting showed that the Bcl-2 expression was decreased and the expression of Bax increased after treatment of arsenic trioxide. Arsenic trioxide exerts an apoptotic effect on HCSMCs.

  19. Band gap engineering and optical properties of tungsten trioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Yuan; Li, Yan; Rocca, Dario; Gygi, Francois; Galli, Giulia

    2012-02-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) is a good photoanode material for water oxidation but it is not an efficient absorber of sunlight because of its large band gap (2.6 eV). Recently, stable clathrates of WO3 with interstitial N2 molecules were synthesized [1], which are isostructural to monoclinic WO3 but have a substantially smaller bang gap, 1.8 eV. We have studied the structural, electronic, an vibrational properties of N2-WO3 clathrates using ab-initio calculations and analyzed the physical origin of their gap reduction. We also studied the effect of atomic dopants, in particular rare gases. Substantial band gap reduction has been observed, especially in the case of doping with Xe, due to both electronic and structural effects. Absorption spectra have been computed by solving the Bethe-Salpeter Equation [2] to gain a thourough insight into the optical properties of pure and doped tungsten trioxide. [1] Q. Mi, Y. Ping, Y. Li., B.S. Brunschwig, G. Galli, H B. Gray, N S. Lewis (preprint) [2]D. Rocca, D. Lu and G. Galli, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 164109 (2010)

  20. Carcinomas of the respiratory tract in hamsters given arsenic trioxide and/or benzo(a)pyrene by the pulmonary route

    SciTech Connect

    Pershagen, G.; Nordberg, G.; Bjoerklund, N.E.

    1984-08-01

    The pulmonary carcinogenicity of arsenic trioxide (As) alone and in combination with benzo(a)pyrene (BP) was studied in male Syrian golden hamsters given 15 weekly intratracheal instillations. The animals were divided into four groups: As, BP, As + BP, and controls. At each instillation about 3 mg/kg body wt As arsenic and/or 6 mg/kg body wt of BP was administered. All groups received a carrier dust (charcoal carbon), which increased the lung retention of arsenic, as well as sulfuric acid. Carcinomas of the larynx, trachea, bronchi, or lungs were found in 3, 17, and 25 of 47, 40, and 54 animals examined in the As, BP, and As + BP groups. No respiratory tract carcinomas were found in 53 control animals. The incidence of pulmonary adenomas, papillomas, and adenomatoid lesions was markedly higher in the As group than in the control group. Taken together the data provide strong evidence that arsenic trioxide can induce lung carcinomas. Furthermore, there was some evidence of a positive interaction between arsenic and BP in relation to adenomatous lung tumors, which could be of importance for the synergism between arsenic and smoking observed in smelter workers.

  1. Resveratrol enhances the suppressive effects of arsenic trioxide on primitive leukemic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Edward J; Goussetis, Dennis J; Beauchamp, Elspeth; Kosciuczuk, Ewa M; Altman, Jessica K; Eklund, Elizabeth A; Platanias, Leonidas C

    2014-04-01

    Efforts to enhance the antileukemic properties of arsenic trioxide are clinically relevant and may lead to the development of new therapeutic approaches for the management of certain hematological malignancies. We provide evidence that concomitant treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells or chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells with resveratrol potentiates arsenic trioxide-dependent induction of apoptosis. Importantly, clonogenic assays in methylcellulose demonstrate potent suppressive effects of the combination of these agents on primitive leukemic progenitors derived from patients with AML or CML. Taken together, these findings suggest that combinations of arsenic trioxide with resveratrol may provide an approach for targeting of early leukemic precursors and, possibly, leukemia initiating stem cells.

  2. Sulfuric acid on Europa and the radiolytic sulfur cycle.

    PubMed

    Carlson, R W; Johnson, R E; Anderson, M S

    1999-10-01

    A comparison of laboratory spectra with Galileo data indicates that hydrated sulfuric acid is present and is a major component of Europa's surface. In addition, this moon's visually dark surface material, which spatially correlates with the sulfuric acid concentration, is identified as radiolytically altered sulfur polymers. Radiolysis of the surface by magnetospheric plasma bombardment continuously cycles sulfur between three forms: sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, and sulfur polymers, with sulfuric acid being about 50 times as abundant as the other forms. Enhanced sulfuric acid concentrations are found in Europa's geologically young terrains, suggesting that low-temperature, liquid sulfuric acid may influence geological processes.

  3. Sulfuric acid on Europa and the radiolytic sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Johnson, R. E.; Anderson, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of laboratory spectra with Galileo data indicates that hydrated sulfuric acid is present and is a major component of Europa's surface. In addition, this moon's visually dark surface material, which spatially correlates with the sulfuric acid concentration, is identified as radiolytically altered sulfur polymers. Radiolysis of the surface by magnetospheric plasma bombardment continuously cycles sulfur between three forms: sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, and sulfur polymers, with sulfuric acid being about 50 times as abundant as the other forms. Enhanced sulfuric acid concentrations are found in Europa's geologically young terrains, suggesting that low-temperature, liquid sulfuric acid may influence geological processes.

  4. Biochemistry of sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Huxtable, R.J.; LaFranconi, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: the chemistry of sulfur; the oxidation states of sulfur; the reduction of sulfate and the oxidation of sulfide; the sulfur cycle; oxidation of inorganic sulfide; the metabolism and functions of methionine; taurine and the oxidative metabolism of cysteine; thiols, disulfides, and thioesters; thioethers; thiamine; biotin; sulfates; inherited disorders of sulfur metabolism; cystinuria; sulfur and the metabolism of xenobiotics; general aspects of xenobiotic metabolism; glutathione and sulfation of xenobiotics; and metabolic activation as a result of sulfate conjugation.

  5. Sulfur tolerant anode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-02-01

    The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

  6. Sulfur tolerant anode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

  7. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-09-30

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain. This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer. Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA02500

  8. Cardiac conduction block at multiple levels caused by arsenic trioxide therapy.

    PubMed

    Kathirgamanathan, Kala; Angaran, Paul; Lazo-Langner, Alejandro; Gula, Lorne J

    2013-01-01

    We present a rare case of a woman aged 62 years with refractory acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with arsenic trioxide leading to progressive, multilevel cardiac conduction block. After chelation treatment with dimercaprol, there was normalization of conduction.

  9. Chitosan coated tungsten trioxide nanoparticles as a contrast agent for X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Firouzi, Mehdi; Poursalehi, Reza; Delavari H, Hamid; Saba, Fakhredin; Oghabian, Mohammad A

    2017-05-01

    Recent advances have shown that inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) based on heavy elements are highly appropriate for X-ray computed tomography (CT). In this contribution, tungsten trioxide NPs are prepared by the electrical arc discharge (EAD) method in DI water. The effect of chitosan (CTS) and glutaraldehyde (GTA) as coating and cross-linking agent, respectively, on the hydrodynamic size and zeta potential of prepared tungsten trioxide NPs is investigated. It is found that zeta potential increases by increasing the amounts of CTS. Meanwhile, by increasing the volume of glutaraldehyde (GTA), the final particle size increases whereas the zeta potential deceases. Chitosan coated tungsten trioxide demonstrated no significant cytotoxicity at concentration up to 5mg/mL after 24h. Finally, the X-ray attenuation of prepared chitosan coated tungsten trioxide NPs are higher than Iohexol as the commercially available iodinated contrasting agent at the same concentrations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. 78 FR 67141 - Antimony Trioxide (ATO) TSCA Chemical Risk Assessment; Notice of Public Meetings and Opportunity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Antimony Trioxide (ATO) TSCA Chemical Risk Assessment; Notice of Public Meetings and Opportunity To Comment AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: On September 27...

  11. Antimony Trioxide (ATO) - Summary of External Peer Review and Public Comments and Disposition

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document summarizes the public and external peer review comments that the EPA’s Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) received for the draft work plan risk assessment for Antimony Trioxide (ATO).

  12. Electrochromic properties of molybdenum trioxide thin films prepared by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Toshiro; Kanagawa, Tetsuya

    1995-05-01

    Electrochromic molybdenum trioxide thin films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition. The source material was molybdenum carbonyl. Amorphous molybdenum trioxide thin films were produced at a substrate temperature 300 C. Reduction and oxidation of the films in a 0.3M LiClO{sub 4} propylene carbonate solution caused desirable changes in optical absorption. Coulometry indicated that the coloration efficiency was 25.8 cm{sup 2}/C.

  13. Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Portland Cement for Direct Pulp Capping in Dog: A Histopathological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Bidar, Maryam; Naghavi, Neda; Mohtasham, Nooshin; Sheik-Nezami, Mahshid; Fallahrastegar, Amir; Afkhami, Farzaneh; Attaran Mashhadi, Negin; Nargesi, Iman

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Mineral trioxide aggregate and calcium hydroxide are considered the gold standard pulp-capping materials. Recently, Portland cement has been introduced with properties similar to those of mineral trioxide aggregate. Histopathological effects of direct pulp capping using mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cements on dog dental pulp tissue were evaluated in the present study. Materials and methods. This histopatological study was carried out on 64 dog premolars. First, the pulp was exposed with a sterile bur. Then, the exposed pulp was capped with white or gray mineral trioxide aggregates and white or gray Portland cements in each quadrant and sealed with glass-ionomer. The specimens were evaluated under a light microscope after 6 months. Statistical analysis was carried out using Kruskal-Wallis test. Statistical significance was defined at α=5%. Results. There was no acute inflammation in any of the specimens. Chronic inflammation in white and gray mineral trioxide aggregates and white and gray Portland cements was reported to be 45.5%, 27.3%, 57.1% and 34.1%, respectively. Although the differences were not statistically significant, severe inflammation was observed mostly adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate. The largest extent of increased vascularization (45%) and the least increase in fibrous tissue were observed adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate, with no significant differences. In addition, the least calcified tissue formed adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate, although the difference was not significant. Conclusion. The materials used in this study were equally effective as pulp protection materials following direct pulp capping in dog teeth. PMID:25346831

  14. Mineral trioxide aggregate and portland cement for direct pulp capping in dog: a histopathological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bidar, Maryam; Naghavi, Neda; Mohtasham, Nooshin; Sheik-Nezami, Mahshid; Fallahrastegar, Amir; Afkhami, Farzaneh; Attaran Mashhadi, Negin; Nargesi, Iman

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Mineral trioxide aggregate and calcium hydroxide are considered the gold standard pulp-capping materials. Recently, Portland cement has been introduced with properties similar to those of mineral trioxide aggregate. Histopathological effects of direct pulp capping using mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cements on dog dental pulp tissue were evaluated in the present study. Materials and methods. This histopatological study was carried out on 64 dog premolars. First, the pulp was exposed with a sterile bur. Then, the exposed pulp was capped with white or gray mineral trioxide aggregates and white or gray Portland cements in each quadrant and sealed with glass-ionomer. The specimens were evaluated under a light microscope after 6 months. Statistical analysis was carried out using Kruskal-Wallis test. Statistical significance was defined at α=5%. Results. There was no acute inflammation in any of the specimens. Chronic inflammation in white and gray mineral trioxide aggregates and white and gray Portland cements was reported to be 45.5%, 27.3%, 57.1% and 34.1%, respectively. Although the differences were not statistically significant, severe inflammation was observed mostly adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate. The largest extent of increased vascularization (45%) and the least increase in fibrous tissue were observed adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate, with no significant differences. In addition, the least calcified tissue formed adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate, although the difference was not significant. Conclusion. The materials used in this study were equally effective as pulp protection materials following direct pulp capping in dog teeth.

  15. Dye leakage and modification of fast-setting mineral trioxide aggregate.

    PubMed

    Challenger, Hereward; Lane, Jason; Becker, Ryan; Nassiripour, Sepehr; Torabinejad, Mahmoud

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine and decrease dye leakage of fast-setting mineral trioxide aggregate (FSMTA). Specimens using differing setting times or concentrations of calcium sulfate modified FSMTA were assessed for dye penetration. Based on the results, no statistical difference was found in the dye leakage of FSMTA compared with regular mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). The addition of 10 percent calcium sulfate resulted in a statistical reduction in dye leakage compared to both unmodified FSMTA and regular MTA.

  16. Hematite modified tungsten trioxide nanoparticle photoanode for solar water oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Aiming; Kim, Jung Kyu; Shin, Kahee; Wang, Dong Hwan; Yoo, Pil J.; Han, Gui Young; Park, Jong Hyeok

    2012-07-01

    Hematite (α-Fe2O3) film is electrochemically deposited onto the surface of tungsten trioxide (WO3) nanoparticulate film. The synthesis of the WO3 nanostructure is directed by surfactants for control of its morphology. The resulting composite shows visible light harvesting and is tested as photoanodes in heterojunction photoelectrochemical cells for the possibility of direct water splitting under visible illumination. The composite's structural and optical properties are characterized by FESEM, EDS, XRD, XPS, and UV-vis spectrometry; its photocurrent responses are also investigated under simulated solar illumination. Coupling WO3 with hematite results in over 9 times greater photocurrent density than that shown by pure WO3 in sodium sulfate electrolyte. This simple modification can significantly improve the performance of WO3.

  17. Ethanol Reduced Molybdenum Trioxide for Li-ion Capacitors

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Tianqi; Beidaghi, Majid; Xiao, Xu; ...

    2016-05-06

    Orthorhombic molybdenum trioxide (α-MoO3) is a layered oxide with promising performance as electrode material for Li-ion capacitors. In this study, we show that expansion of the interlayer spacing (by ~0.32 Å) of the structure along the b-axis, introduced by partial reduction of α-MoO3 and formation of MoO3-x (x=0.06–0.43), results in enhanced diffusion of Li ions. Binder-free hybrid electrodes made of MoO3-x nanobelts and carbon nanotubes show excellent electrical conductivity. The combination of increased interlayer spacing and enhanced electron transport leads to high gravimetric and volumetric capacitances of about 420 F/g or F/cm3 and excellent cycle life of binder-free MoO3-x electrodes.

  18. Ethanol Reduced Molybdenum Trioxide for Li-ion Capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tianqi; Beidaghi, Majid; Xiao, Xu; Huang, Liang; Hu, Zhimi; Sun, Wanmei; Chen, Xun; Gogotsi, Yury G.; Zhou, Jun

    2016-05-06

    Orthorhombic molybdenum trioxide (α-MoO3) is a layered oxide with promising performance as electrode material for Li-ion capacitors. In this study, we show that expansion of the interlayer spacing (by ~0.32 Å) of the structure along the b-axis, introduced by partial reduction of α-MoO3 and formation of MoO3-x (x=0.06–0.43), results in enhanced diffusion of Li ions. Binder-free hybrid electrodes made of MoO3-x nanobelts and carbon nanotubes show excellent electrical conductivity. The combination of increased interlayer spacing and enhanced electron transport leads to high gravimetric and volumetric capacitances of about 420 F/g or F/cm3 and excellent cycle life of binder-free MoO3-x electrodes.

  19. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA)-like materials: an update review.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Shalavi, Sousan; Soltani, Mohammad Karim

    2014-09-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a multi-application material used in endodontics. It is a mixture of a refined Portland cement and bismuth oxide and trace amounts of SiO₂, CaO, MgO, K₂SO₄, and Na₂SO₄. MTA powder is mixed with supplied sterile water in a 3:1 powder/liquid. Hydrated MTA has an initial pH of 10.2, which rises to 12.5 three hours after mixing. There are several materials derived from MTA such as Endo-CPM Sealer, Ortho MTA, MTA-Fillapex, DiaRoot BioAggregate, MTA Bio, light-cured MTA, tricalcium silicate, and iRoot SP. The purpose of this article is to review MTA-like materials.

  20. Chemical characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate and its hydration reaction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was developed in early 1990s and has been successfully used for root perforation repair, root end filling, and one-visit apexification. MTA is composed mainly of tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate. When MTA is hydrated, calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) and calcium hydroxide is formed. Formed calcium hydroxide interacts with the phosphate ion in body fluid and form amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) which finally transforms into calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA). These mineral precipitate were reported to form the MTA-dentin interfacial layer which enhances the sealing ability of MTA. Clinically, the use of zinc oxide euginol (ZOE) based materials may retard the setting of MTA. Also, the use of acids or contact with excessive blood should be avoided before complete set of MTA, because these conditions could adversely affect the hydration reaction of MTA. Further studies on the chemical nature of MTA hydration reaction are needed. PMID:23429542

  1. Clinical Applications of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: Report of Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    Battepati, Prashant M

    2010-01-01

    The greatest threats to developing teeth are dental caries and traumatic injuries. The primary goal of all restorative treatment is to maintain pulp vitality so that normal root development or apexogenesis can occur. If pulpal exposure occurs, then a pulpotomy procedure aims to preserve pulp vitality to allow for normal root development. Historically, calcium hydroxide has been the material of choice for pulpotomy procedures. Recently, an alternative material called mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has demonstrated the ability to induce hard-tissue formation in pulpal tissue. This article describes the clinical and radiographic outcome of a series of cases involving the use of MTA in pulpotomy, apexogenesis and apexification procedures and root perforations repair. PMID:27625556

  2. Ethanol Reduced Molybdenum Trioxide for Li-ion Capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tianqi; Beidaghi, Majid; Xiao, Xu; Huang, Liang; Hu, Zhimi; Sun, Wanmei; Chen, Xun; Gogotsi, Yury G.; Zhou, Jun

    2016-05-06

    Orthorhombic molybdenum trioxide (α-MoO3) is a layered oxide with promising performance as electrode material for Li-ion capacitors. In this study, we show that expansion of the interlayer spacing (by ~0.32 Å) of the structure along the b-axis, introduced by partial reduction of α-MoO3 and formation of MoO3-x (x=0.06–0.43), results in enhanced diffusion of Li ions. Binder-free hybrid electrodes made of MoO3-x nanobelts and carbon nanotubes show excellent electrical conductivity. The combination of increased interlayer spacing and enhanced electron transport leads to high gravimetric and volumetric capacitances of about 420 F/g or F/cm3 and excellent cycle life of binder-free MoO3-x electrodes.

  3. Reactions of ethyl diazoacetate catalyzed by methylrhenium trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Z.; Espenson, H.

    1995-11-03

    Methylrhenium trioxide (CH{sub 3}ReO{sub 3} or MTO) has found wise use in catalysis, including the epoxidation and metathesis of olefins, aldehyde olefination, and oxygen transfer. Extensive reports have now appeared in the area of MTO-catalyzed substrate oxidations with hydrogen peroxide. Certain catalytic applications of MTO for organic reactions that do not utilize peroxide have now been realized. In particular, a catalytic amount of MTO with ethyl diazoacetate (EDA) will convert aromatic imines to aziridines and convert aldehydes and ketones to epoxides. The aziridine preparation proceeds in high yields under anaerobic conditions more conveniently than with existing methods. Compounds with a three-membered heterocyclic ring can be obtained with the EDA/MTO catalytic system. Aromatic imines undergo cycloaddition reactions to give aziridines under mild conditions.

  4. [Mineral trioxide aggregate in the pulp capping treatment tooth].

    PubMed

    Góra, Monika; Nowicka, Alicja; Łagocka, Ryta; Buczkowska-Radlińska, Jadwiga; Lipski, Mariusz; Górski, Maciej

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic procedure for the treatment of tooth pulp exposure or pulp injury is a conservative treatment using direct pulp capping. Achievements to date in biological pulp treatment and the case of treatment of tooth pulp injury by odontotropic preparation Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (ProRoot MTA, Dentsply Maillefer, U.S.A.) has been presented in this paper. Applied treatment consisted in total processing of cariotic cavity, covering the place of cavity with compomer Dyract and composite Herculite (SDS, Kerr, U.S.A.) material. Pulp of a treated tooth remained its vitality during control study and pathological changes of pulp and within adjacent periapical tissues were not detected by means of an X-ray photography. After 12 months of observation a positive therapeutic result of pulp vitality preservation in a tooth was achieved.

  5. Arsenic trioxide-induced apoptosis through oxidative stress in cells of colon cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Akao, Yukihiro; Morikawa, Hiroshi; Hirata, Ichiro; Katsu, Kenichi; Naoe, Tomoki; Ohishi, Nobuko; Yagi, Kunio

    2002-03-29

    Exposure of three colon cancer cell lines, SW480, DLD-1, and COLO201, to arsenic trioxide in the medium induced a marked concentration-dependent suppression of cell growth. The intracellular contents of reduced glutathione (GSH) in these cell lines tended to be inversely correlated with the sensitivity of the cells to arsenic trioxide. Among the cell lines, SW480 cells underwent apoptosis at the low arsenic trioxide concentration of 2 microM, which was prevented by pretreatment of the cells with N-acetylcysteine and was enhanced by buthionine sulfoximine. The production of reactive oxygen intermediates which were examined by 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H2DCF-DA), increased with time after treatment with arsenic trioxide. The apoptosis was executed by the activation of caspase 3, which was shown by Western blot, enzymatic activity, and apoptosis inhibition assay. The mitochondrial membrane potential of adherent apoptotic SW480 cells and the cells from intermediate layer separated by density gradient centrifugation, both of which showed the active form of caspase 3 by Western blot analysis, was not lost. The overexpression of Bcl-2 protein in SW480 cells could not prevent the apoptosis induced by the treatment with arsenic trioxide. All these findings indicate that arsenic trioxide-induced apoptosis in SW480 cells is executed by the activation of caspase 3 without mediating by mitochondria under the overproduction of reactive oxygen species.

  6. Mineral trioxide aggregate: part 2 - a review of the material aspects.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Neeraj; Agarwal, Antara; Mala, Kundabala

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this two-part series is to review the composition, properties, and products of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) materials. PubMed and MedLine electronic databases were used to identify scientific papers from January 1991 to May 2010. Based on the selected inclusion criteria, citations were referenced from the scientific peer-reviewed dental literature. Mineral trioxide aggregate is a refined form of the parent compound, Portland cement (PC), and demonstrates a strong biocompatibility due to the high pH level and the material's ability to form hydroxyapatite. Mineral trioxide aggregate materials provide better microleakage protection than traditional endodontic materials as observed in findings from dye-leakage, fluid-filtration, protein-leakage, and bacterial penetration-leakage studies and has been recognized as a bioactive material. Various MTA commercial products are available, including gray mineral trioxide aggregate (GMTA), white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA), and mineral trioxide aggregate-Angelus (AMTA). Although these materials are indicated for various dental uses and applications, long-term in-vivo clinical studies are needed. Part 1 of this article highlighted and discussed the composition and characteristics of the material. Part 2 provides an overview of commercially available MTA materials.

  7. The global sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, D. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The results of the planetary biology microbial ecology's 1984 Summer Research Program, which examined various aspects of the global sulfur cycle are summarized. Ways in which sulfur flows through the many living and chemical species that inhabit the surface of the Earth were investigated. Major topics studied include: (1) sulfur cycling and metabolism of phototropic and filamentous sulfur bacteria; (2) sulfur reduction in sediments of marine and evaporite environments; (3) recent cyanobacterial mats; (4) microanalysis of community metabolism in proximity to the photic zone in potential stromatolites; and (5) formation and activity of microbial biofilms on metal sulfides and other mineral surfaces. Relationships between the global sulfur cycle and the understanding of the early evolution of the Earth and biosphere and current processes that affect global habitability are stressed.

  8. Sulfur removal from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Lompa-Krzymien, L.

    1985-01-01

    Coal is treated to remove both pyritic and organic sulfur by contacting with an aqueous solution comprising cupric ions at temperatures of about 140/sup 0/ C.-200/sup 0/ C. under autogenic pressure, until substantial amounts of the sulfur are solubilized, separating the coal solids, and washing the solids with water to remove soluble forms of sulfur, iron and copper therefrom. The copper can be recovered and recycled as a cupric salt.

  9. Elemental sulfur coarsening kinetics.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Angel A; Druschel, Gregory K

    Elemental sulfur exists is a variety of forms in natural systems, from dissolved forms (noted as S8(diss) or in water as S8(aq)) to bulk elemental sulfur (most stable as α-S8). Elemental sulfur can form via several biotic and abiotic processes, many beginning with small sulfur oxide or polysulfidic sulfur molecules that coarsen into S8 rings that then coalesce into larger forms: [Formula: see text] Formation of elemental sulfur can be possible via two primary techniques to create an emulsion of liquid sulfur in water called sulfur sols that approximate some mechanisms of possible elemental sulfur formation in natural systems. These techniques produce hydrophobic (S8(Weimarn)) and hydrophilic (S8(polysulfide)) sols that exist as nanoparticle and colloidal suspensions. These sols begin as small sulfur oxide or polysulfidic sulfur molecules, or dissolved S8(aq) forms, but quickly become nanoparticulate and coarsen into micron sized particles via a combination of classical nucleation, aggregation processes, and/or Ostwald ripening. We conducted a series of experiments to study the rate of elemental sulfur particle coarsening using dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis under different physical and chemical conditions. Rates of nucleation and initial coarsening occur over seconds to minutes at rates too fast to measure by DLS, with subsequent coarsening of S8(nano) and S8(sol) being strongly temperature dependent, with rates up to 20 times faster at 75°C compared to 20°C. The addition of surfactants (utilizing ionic and nonionic surfactants as model compounds) results in a significant reduction of coarsening rates, in addition to known effects of these molecules on elemental sulfur solubility. DLS and cryo-SEM results suggest coarsening is largely a product of ripening processes rather than particle aggregation, especially at higher temperatures. Fitting of the coarsening rate data to established models for Ostwald ripening additionally support this as a primary

  10. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal; William J. McMichael; Jeffrey W. Portzer

    2003-01-01

    Conventional sulfur removal in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants involves numerous steps: COS (carbonyl sulfide) hydrolysis, amine scrubbing/regeneration, Claus process, and tail-gas treatment. Advanced sulfur removal in IGCC systems involves typically the use of zinc oxide-based sorbents. The sulfides sorbent is regenerated using dilute air to produce a dilute SO{sub 2} (sulfur dioxide) tail gas. Under previous contracts the highly effective first generation Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for catalytic reduction of this SO{sub 2} tail gas to elemental sulfur was developed. This process is currently undergoing field-testing. In this project, advanced concepts were evaluated to reduce the number of unit operations in sulfur removal and recovery. Substantial effort was directed towards developing sorbents that could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur in an Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP). Development of this process has been described in detail in Appendices A-F. RTI began the development of the Single-step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP) to eliminate the use of sorbents and multiple reactors in sulfur removal and recovery. This process showed promising preliminary results and thus further process development of AHGP was abandoned in favor of SSRP. The SSRP is a direct Claus process that consists of injecting SO{sub 2} directly into the quenched coal gas from a coal gasifier, and reacting the H{sub 2}S-SO{sub 2} mixture over a selective catalyst to both remove and recover sulfur in a single step. The process is conducted at gasifier pressure and 125 to 160 C. The proposed commercial embodiment of the SSRP involves a liquid phase of molten sulfur with dispersed catalyst in a slurry bubble-column reactor (SBCR).

  11. The Effects of Arsenic Trioxide on DNA Synthesis and Genotoxicity in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Jacqueline J.; Graham, Barbara; Walker, Alice M.; Tchounwou, Paul B.; Rogers, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Recent studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that arsenic trioxide is cytotoxic in human colon cancer (HT-29), lung (A549) and breast (MCF-7) carcinoma cells. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effects of arsenic trioxide on DNA synthesis and the possible genotoxic effects on human colon cancer cells. HT-29 cells were cultured according to standard protocol, followed by exposure to various doses (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 μg/mL) of arsenic trioxide for 24 h. The proliferative response (DNA synthesis) to arsenic trioxide was assessed by [3H]thymidine incorporation. The genotoxic effects of arsenic-induced DNA damage in a human colon cancer cell line was evaluated by the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis. Results indicated that arsenic trioxide affected DNA synthesis in HT-29 cells in a biphasic manner; showing a slight but not significant increase in cell proliferation at lower levels of exposure (2, 4 and 6 μg/mL) followed by a significant inhibition of cell proliferation at higher doses (i.e., 8 and 10 μg/mL). The study also confirmed that arsenic trioxide exposure caused genotoxicity as revealed by the significant increase in DNA damage, comet tail-lengths, and tail moment when compared to non-exposed cells. Results of the [3H]thymidine incorporation assay and comet assay revealed that exposure to arsenic trioxide affected DNA synthesis and exhibited genotoxic effects in human colon cancer cells. PMID:20623008

  12. The Phases of Sulfur.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdwhistell, Kurt R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a demonstration that illustrates the dramatic changes that sulfur undergoes upon heating to 200 degrees centigrade and then cooling to room temperature. Supplements the demonstration of the rubberlike properties of catenasulfur made by rapid cooling of the sulfur melt in ice water. (JRH)

  13. Sulfur isotopic data

    SciTech Connect

    Rye, R.O.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary sulfur isotope data have been determined for samples of the Vermillion Creek coal bed and associated rocks in the Vermillion Creek basin and for samples of evaporites collected from Jurassic and Triassic formations that crop out in the nearby Uinta Mountains. The data are inconclusive, but it is likely that the sulfur in the coal was derived from the evaporites.

  14. Advanced sulfur control concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.P.

    1995-11-01

    Regenerable metal oxide sorbents, such as zinc titanate, are being developed to efficiently remove hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gas in advanced power systems. Dilute air regeneration of the sorbents produces a tailgas containing a few percent sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). Catalytic reduction of the SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur with a coal gas slipstream using the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) is a leading first-generation technology. Currently the DSRP is undergoing field testing at gasifier sites. The objective of this study is to develop second-generation processes that produce elemental sulfur without coal gas or with limited use. Novel approaches that were evaluated to produce elemental sulfur from sulfided sorbents include (1) sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) regeneration, (2) substoichiometric (partial) oxidation, (3) steam regeneration followed by H{sub 2}S oxidation, and (4) steam-air regeneration. Preliminary assessment of these approaches indicated that developing SO{sub 2} regeneration faced the fewest technical and economic problems among the four process options. Elemental sulfur is the only likely product of SO{sub 2} regeneration and the SO{sub 2} required for the regeneration can be obtained by burning a portion of the sulfur produced. Experimental efforts have thus been concentrated on SO{sub 2}-based regeneration processes. Results from laboratory investigations are presented and discussed.

  15. The Phases of Sulfur.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdwhistell, Kurt R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a demonstration that illustrates the dramatic changes that sulfur undergoes upon heating to 200 degrees centigrade and then cooling to room temperature. Supplements the demonstration of the rubberlike properties of catenasulfur made by rapid cooling of the sulfur melt in ice water. (JRH)

  16. Sulfurization of α-MoO{sub 3} nanostructured thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Prabhat; Singh, Megha; Sharma, Rabindar K. Reddy, G. B.

    2015-08-28

    In this report, the sulfurization of vertically aligned molybdenum trioxide (α- MoO{sub 3}) nanoflakes (NFs) with high aspect ratio (height/thickness >20) on the nickel coated glass substrates in a mixture of H{sub 2}S and argon gas at atmospheric pressure has been studied. The effect of sulfurization have been investigated to understand the basic reaction mechanism and the morphology, structural properties of grown nanoflakes. XPS and XRD indicate the formation of MoS{sub 2} along with the other intermediate phase such as MoO{sub 2} at temperature 200 °C. The surface morphology of samples have been studied systematically by using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results demonstrate partial conversion of MoO{sub 3} NFs into MoS{sub 2} along with the change in the morphology of nanoflakes. All the observed results are well in consonance with each other.

  17. Sulfur-rich Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldhaber, M. B.

    2003-12-01

    Marine sediments with more than a few tenths of a percent of organic carbon, as well as organic-matter-bearing, nonmarine sediments with significant concentrations of sulfate in the depositional waters contain the mineral pyrite (FeS2). Pyrite, along with sulfur-bearing organic compounds, form indirectly through the metabolic activities of sulfate-reducing microorganisms. The geochemical transformations of sulfur in sediments leading to these products significantly impact the pathway of early sedimentary diagenesis, conditions for the localization of mineral deposits (Ohmoto and Goldhaber, 1997), the global cycling of sulfur and carbon, the abundance of oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere, and perhaps even the emergence of life on Earth (e.g., Russell and Hall, 1997). This chapter provides an overview of sedimentary-sulfur geochemistry from its microbial and abiologic pathways to the global consequences of these processes.The geochemistry of sulfur is complicated by its wide range of oxidation states (Table 1). Under oxidizing conditions (e.g., in the presence of atmospheric oxygen) sulfate, with sulfur in the +6 valence state, is the stable form of sulfur. Under reducing conditions (e.g., in the presence of H2), sulfide (S=-2 valent) is the stable oxidation state. However, a range of additional aqueous and solid-phase sulfur species exist with valences between these two end-members. What makes the study of sulfur geochemistry so exciting and challenging is that many of these intermediate-valent forms play key roles in sedimentary-sulfur transformations. Furthermore, many of these reactions are microbially mediated. As detailed below, these complex biogeochemical pathways are now yielding to research whose scope ranges from molecular to global level. Table 1. Forms of sulfur in marine sediments and their oxidation states Aqueous species or mineralFormulaOxidation state(s) of sulfur SulfideH2S(aq), HS-(aq)-2 Iron sulfideaFeS(s)-2 GreigiteFe3S4(s)-2, 0 PyriteFeS2(s)-2

  18. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Hu, Zhicheng

    1993-01-01

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO.sub.2 -containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO.sub.2 to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO.sub.2 in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst.

  19. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

    1993-09-07

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

  20. Regional river sulfur runoff

    SciTech Connect

    Husar, R.B.; Husar, J.D.

    1985-01-20

    The water and sulfur runoff data for 54 large river basins were assembled, covering 65% of the nondesert land area of the world. The sulfur concentration ranges from 0.5 mg S/L for the West African rivers Niger and Volta to 100 mg S/L in the Colorado River; the world average is 3.2 mg S/L. The concentrations in central and eastern Europe as well as central and eastern North America exceed 8 mg S/L. The sulfur runoff density is also highest in the river basins over these industrialized regions, exceeding 2 g S/m/sup 2//yr. However, high sulfur runoff density in excess of 3 g S/m/sup 2//yr is also measured over the Pacific islands New Zealand and New Guinea and the archipelagos of Indonesia and the Philippines. The natural background sulfur runoff was estimated by assuming that South America, Africa, Australia, and the Pacific Islands are unperturbed by man and that the average river sulfur concentration is in the range 1--3 mg S/L. Taking these background concentration values, the man-induced sulfur runoff for Europe ranges between 2 and 8 times the natural flow, and over North America, man's contribution ranges between 1 and 5 times the natural runoff. The global sulfur flow from nondesert land to the oceans and the Caspian Sea is estimated as 131 Tg S/yr, of which 46--85 Tg S/yr is attributed to natural causes. The regional river sulfur runoff pattern discussed in this paper does not have enough spatial resolution to be directly applicable to studies of the environmental effects of man-induced sulfur flows. However, it points to the continental-size regions where those perturbations are most evident and to the magnitude of the perturbations as expressed in units of the natural flows.

  1. Regional river sulfur runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husar, Rudolf B.; Husar, Janja Djukic

    1985-01-01

    The water and sulfur runoff data for 54 large river basins were assembled, covering 65% of the nondesert land area of the world. The sulfur concentration ranges from 0.5 mg S/L for the West African rivers Niger and Volta to 100 mg S/L in the Colorado River; the world average is 3.2 mg S/L. The concentrations in central and eastern Europe as well as central and eastern North America exceed 8 mg S/L. The sulfur runoff density is also highest in the river basins over these industrialized regions, exceeding 2 g S/m2/yr. However, high sulfur runoff density in excess of 3 g S/m2/yr is also measured over the Pacific islands New Zealand and New Guinea and the archipelagos of Indonesia and the Philippines. The natural background sulfur runoff was estimated by assuming that South America, Africa, Australia, and the Pacific Islands are unperturbed by man and that the average river sulfur concentration is in the range 1-3 mg S/L. Taking these background concentration values, the man-induced sulfur runoff for Europe ranges between 2 and 8 times the natural flow, and over North America, man's contribution ranges between 1 and 5 times the natural runoff. The global sulfur flow from nondesert land to the oceans and the Caspian Sea is estimated as 131 Tg S/yr, of which 46-85 Tg S/yr is attributed to natural causes. The regional river sulfur runoff pattern discussed in this paper does not have enough spatial resolution to be directly applicable to studies of the environmental effects of man-induced sulfur flows. However, it points to the continental-size regions where those perturbations are most evident and to the magnitude of the perturbations as expressed in units of the natural flows.

  2. Effect of plasma voltage on sulfurization of α-MoO{sub 3} nanostructured thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Prabhat Singh, Megha; Sharma, Rabindar K.; Reddy, G. B.

    2016-05-06

    In this report, the effect of plasma voltage on plasma assisted sulfurization (PAS) of vertically aligned molybdenum trioxide (α- MoO{sub 3}) nanoflakes (NFs) on glass substrates has been studied systematically. MoO{sub 3} NFs were deposited using plasma assisted sublimation process. These nanoflakes were subjected to H{sub 2}S/Ar plasma at two different plasma voltages 600 and 1000 volts; to study the effect of plasma ionization on degree of sulfurization of MoO{sub 3} into MoS{sub 2}. XRD and Raman analysis show that film sulfurized at 1000 volts have relatively higher degree of conversion into MoS{sub 2}, as more intense peaks of MoS{sub 2} and MoO{sub 2} are obtained than that sulfurized at 600 volts. HRTEM of sulfurized film shows that outer surface of nanoflake has been converted into MoS{sub 2} (4-5 monolayers). Meanwhile, MoO{sub 3} was reduced into MoO{sub 2} as confirmed by XRD and Raman results. All the observed results are well in consonance with each other.

  3. Successful apexification with resolution of the periapical lesion using mineral trioxide aggregate and demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Naveen; Singbal, Kiran P; Kamat, Sharad

    2010-01-01

    Immature teeth with necrotic pulp and large periapical lesion are difficult to treat via conventional endodontic therapy. The role of materials such as calcium hydroxide and mineral trioxide aggregate in apexification is indispensable. This case report presents the successful healing and apexification with combined use of white mineral trioxide aggregate and demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft. PMID:20859486

  4. Kinetics and mechanism of photopromoted oxidative dissolution of antimony trioxide.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xingyun; Kong, Linghao; He, Mengchang

    2014-12-16

    Light (sunlight, ultraviolet, simulated sunlight) irradiation was used to initiate the dissolution of antimony trioxide (Sb2O3). Dissolution rate of Sb2O3 was accelerated and dissolved trivalent antimony (Sb(III)) was oxidized in the irradiation of light. The photopromoted oxidative dissolution mechanism of Sb2O3 was studied through experiments investigating the effects of pH, free radicals scavengers, dissolved oxygen removal and Sb2O3 dosage on the release rate of antimony from Sb2O3 under simulated sunlight irradiation. The key oxidative components were hydroxyl free radicals, photogenerated holes and superoxide free radicals; their contribution ratios were roughly estimated. In addition, a conceptual model of the photocatalytic oxidation dissolution of Sb2O3 was proposed. The overall pH-dependent dissolution rate of Sb2O3 and the oxidation of Sb(III) under light irradiation were expressed by r = 0.08 ·[OH(-)](0.63) and rox = 0.10 ·[OH(-)](0.79). The present study on the mechanism of the photo-oxidation dissolution of Sb2O3 could help clarify the geochemical cycle and fate of Sb in the environment.

  5. Uranium trioxide behavior during electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, Claude; Alekseev, Evgeny V.

    2015-03-01

    A sample of uranium trioxide (UO3) was produced by focused ion beam (~10 μm×~10 μm×<0.5 μm) for transmission electron and electron energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy examinations in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The EEL spectra were recorded as a function of the thickness for the P and O edges in the low energy range 0-350 eV and were compared to spectra of UO3 small grains attached to a TEM grid. The EEL spectrum was studied through a range of thicknesses going from ~60 to ~260 nm. The EEL spectra recorded for UO3 are compared with those recorded for UO2. The reduction of UO3 into U4O9 and/or UO2 is readily observed apparently during the TEM investigations and as confirmed by electron diffraction (eD). This redox effect is similar to that known for other redox sensitive oxides. Recommendations are suggested to avoid sample decomposition.

  6. Resveratrol attenuates hepatotoxicity of rats exposed to arsenic trioxide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiqian; Xue, Jiangdong; Ge, Ming; Yu, Meiling; Liu, Lian; Zhang, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) is an environmental pollutant and potent toxicant to humans. However, it also shows substantial anti-cancer activity in individuals with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Unfortunately, As(2)O(3)-treated leukemia patients suffer hepatotoxicity. Resveratrol has been demonstrated to have efficient antioxidant and antineoplastic activities. The study that how As(2)O(3) in combination with resveratrol affects hepatotoxicity and arsenic accumulation in the liver is lacking, and the present study tackles this question. Wistar rats were injected with 3mg/kg As(2)O(3) on alternate days; resveratrol (8mg/kg) was administered 1h before As(2)O(3). Rats were killed on the 8th day to determine histological liver damage, the antioxidant enzymes in serum, the ratio of reduced glutathione (GSH) to oxidized glutathione (GSSG), and arsenic accumulation in the liver. In the resveratrol+As(2)O(3) group, activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase in serum and GSH/GSSG were significantly increased, histopathological effects were reduced, and arsenic accumulation markedly decreased in the liver, compared with the As(2)O(3)-treated group. Thus, resveratrol attenuated As(2)O(3)-induced hepatotoxicity by decreasing oxidative stress and arsenic accumulation in the liver. These data suggest that use of resveratrol as post-remission therapy of APL and adjunctive therapy in patients with chronic exposure to arsenic may decrease arsenic hepatotoxicity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Photocatalysis and photoelectrochemical properties of tungsten trioxide nanostructured films.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chin Wei

    2014-01-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO₃) possesses a small band gap energy of 2.4-2.8 eV and is responsive to both ultraviolet and visible light irradiation including strong absorption of the solar spectrum and stable physicochemical properties. Thus, controlled growth of one-dimensional (1D) WO₃ nanotubular structures with desired length, diameter, and wall thickness has gained significant interest. In the present study, 1D WO₃ nanotubes were successfully synthesized via electrochemical anodization of tungsten (W) foil in an electrolyte composed of 1 M of sodium sulphate (Na₂SO₄) and ammonium fluoride (NH₄F). The influence of NH₄F content on the formation mechanism of anodic WO₃ nanotubular structure was investigated in detail. An optimization of fluoride ions played a critical role in controlling the chemical dissolution reaction in the interface of W/WO₃. Based on the results obtained, a minimum of 0.7 wt% of NH₄F content was required for completing transformation from W foil to WO₃ nanotubular structure with an average diameter of 85 nm and length of 250 nm within 15 min of anodization time. In this case, high aspect ratio of WO₃ nanotubular structure is preferred because larger active surface area will be provided for better photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical (PEC) reactions.

  8. Photocatalysis and Photoelectrochemical Properties of Tungsten Trioxide Nanostructured Films

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chin Wei

    2014-01-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) possesses a small band gap energy of 2.4–2.8 eV and is responsive to both ultraviolet and visible light irradiation including strong absorption of the solar spectrum and stable physicochemical properties. Thus, controlled growth of one-dimensional (1D) WO3 nanotubular structures with desired length, diameter, and wall thickness has gained significant interest. In the present study, 1D WO3 nanotubes were successfully synthesized via electrochemical anodization of tungsten (W) foil in an electrolyte composed of 1 M of sodium sulphate (Na2SO4) and ammonium fluoride (NH4F). The influence of NH4F content on the formation mechanism of anodic WO3 nanotubular structure was investigated in detail. An optimization of fluoride ions played a critical role in controlling the chemical dissolution reaction in the interface of W/WO3. Based on the results obtained, a minimum of 0.7 wt% of NH4F content was required for completing transformation from W foil to WO3 nanotubular structure with an average diameter of 85 nm and length of 250 nm within 15 min of anodization time. In this case, high aspect ratio of WO3 nanotubular structure is preferred because larger active surface area will be provided for better photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical (PEC) reactions. PMID:24782669

  9. [Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) a success story in apical surgery].

    PubMed

    von Arx, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The objective of apical surgery is to retain teeth with persistent apical pathosis following orthograde root canal treatment if endodontic non-surgical revision is difficult or associated with risks, or is even declined by the patient. Since the most frequent cause of recurrent apical disease is bacterial reinfection from the (remaining) root canal system, the bacteria-tight root-end filling is the most important step in apical surgery. In the early 1990s, mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was developed at the Loma Linda University in California/USA. Preclinical studies clearly showed that MTA has a high sealing capability, a good material stability and an excellent biocompatbility. Multiple experimental studies in animals highlighted the mild tissue reactions observed adjacent to this material. Furthermore, histological analysis of the periapical regions demonstrated a frequent deposition of new cementum not only onto the resection plane (cut dentinal surface), but also directly onto MTA. For these reasons, MTA is considered a bioactive material. In 1997 MTA was cleared for clinical use in patients. Multiple prospective clinical and randomized studies have documented high and constant success rates of MTA-treated teeth in apical surgery. A recently published longitudinal study showed that MTA-treated teeth remained stable over five years; hence the high healed rates documented after one year are maintained during long-term observation.

  10. Liquid phase deposition synthesis of hexagonal molybdenum trioxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Deki, Shigehito; Beleke, Alexis Bienvenu; Kotani, Yuki; Mizuhata, Minoru

    2009-09-15

    Hexagonal molybdenum trioxide thin films with good crystallinity and high purity have been fabricated by the liquid phase deposition (LPD) technique using molybdic acid (H{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}) dissolved in 2.82% hydrofluoric acid (HF) and H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} as precursors. The crystal was found to belong to a hexagonal hydrate system MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O (napprox0.56). The unit cell lattice parameters are a=10.651 A, c=3.725 A and V=365.997 A{sup 3}. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the as-deposited samples showed well-shaped hexagonal rods nuclei that grew and where the amount increased with increase in reaction time. X-ray photon electron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra showed a Gaussian shape of the doublet of Mo 3d core level, indicating the presence of Mo{sup 6+} oxidation state in the deposited films. The deposited films exhibited an electrochromic behavior by lithium intercalation and deintercalation, which resulted in coloration and bleaching of the film. Upon dehydration at about 450 deg. C, the hexagonal MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O was transformed into the thermodynamically stable orthorhombic phase. - Abstract: SEM photograph of typical h-MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O thin film nuclei obtained after 36 h at 40 deg. C by the LPD method. Display Omitted

  11. Effect of ultrasonication on physical properties of mineral trioxide aggregate.

    PubMed

    Parashos, Peter; Phoon, Amanda; Sathorn, Chankhrit

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect on physical properties of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) of using direct hand compaction during placement and when using hand compaction with indirect ultrasonic activation with different application times. One hundred acrylic canals were obturated in 3 increments with MTA in sample sizes of 10. One group was obturated by hand with an endodontic plugger and the remainder obturated with indirect ultrasonic application, with times ranging from 2 seconds to 18 seconds per increment. Microhardness values, dye penetration depths, and radiographs of the samples were evaluated. As ultrasonic application time per increment increased, microhardness values fell significantly (P < 0.001) while dye penetration values increased (P < 0.001). Microhardness of MTA ultrasonicated for 2 seconds was significantly higher than hand compaction (P = 0.03). Most radiographic voids were visible in the hand-compacted group (P < 0.001), which also had higher dye penetration depths than the 2-second ultrasonicated samples. Ultrasonication of MTA for 10-18 seconds resulted in significantly more voids than 2-8 seconds of ultrasonication (P = 0.02). The use of ultrasonics with MTA improved the compaction and flow of MTA, but excessive ultrasonication adversely affected MTA properties. A time of 2 seconds of ultrasonication per increment presented the best compromise between microhardness values, dye penetration depths, and lack of radiographic voids.

  12. Timing for composite resin placement on mineral trioxide aggregate.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Masaki; Tsujimoto, Yasuhisa; Ookubo, Atsushi; Shiraishi, Takanobu; Watanabe, Ikuya; Yamada, Shizuka; Hayashi, Yoshihiko

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the proper time to restore composite resin over mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Thirty-five samples of MTA blocks were divided into 7 groups with 3 different times (10 minutes, 1 day, and 7 days) selected for restoring the composite resin over MTA with and without bonding resin, and a control group was included for comparison. After 21 days, the distances between MTA and the composite resin or between MTA and the bonding agent on sectioned planes along the long axis were measured using a scanning electron microscope (×2,000 magnification). The hardness of the MTA near the composite resin was presented as the Vickers microhardness. There were no gaps at the interface in the 10-minute groups, the 1-day group with a bonding agent, and the 7-day group with a bonding agent. The groups without a bonding agent at 1 and 7 days presented a separation or gap at the interface. The value of the Vickers microhardness in the 1-day groups was significantly decreased compared with those of the other groups regardless of the presence or absence of a bonding agent. These findings suggest that composite resin with a bonding agent over MTA can be restored almost immediately after MTA mixing during a single visit. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Compressive Strength of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate with Propylene Glycol

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Negin; Rahimi, Saeed; Shahi, Shahriar; Salem Milani, Amin; Rezaei, Yashar; Nobakht, Mahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding propylene glycol (PG) to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) liquid with volume ratio of 20% on the compressive strength (CS) of MTA in two time periods (4 and 21 days) after mixing. Methods and Materials: Four groups of steel cylinders (n=15) with an internal diameter of 3 and a height of 6 mm were prepared and MTA (groups 1 and 2) and MTA+PG (80% MTA liquid+20% PG) (groups 3 and 4) were placed in to the cylinders. In groups 1 and 3 the CS was evaluated after 4 days and in groups 2 and 4 after 21 days. Data were calculated using the two-ways ANOVA. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: The highest (52.22±18.92 MPa) and lowest (4.5±0.67 MPa) of CS was obtained in 21-day MTA samples and 4-day MTA+PG specimen, respectively. The effect of time and PG were significant on the CS (P<0.05). Mixing MTA with PG significantly reduced the CS; but passing the time from 4 to 21 days significantly increased the CS. Conclusion: Considering the limitations of this study, PG had a negative effect on CS of MTA. PMID:27790264

  14. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain.

    This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer.

    Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks.

    Galileo, launched in 1989, has been orbiting Jupiter and its moons since December 1995. JPL manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  15. Sulfur volcanoes on Io?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Fink, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    The unusual rheological properties of sulfur are discussed in order to determine the distinctive volcanic flow morphologies which indicate the presence of sulfur volcanoes on the Saturnian satellite Io. An analysis of high resolution Voyager imagery reveals three features which are considered to be possible sulfur volcanoes: Atar Patera, Daedalus Patera, and Kibero Patera. All three features are distinguished by circular-to-oval central masses surrounded by irregular widespread flows. The central zones of the features are interpreted to be domes formed of high temperature sulfur. To confirm the interpretations of the satellite data, molten sulfur was extruded in the laboratory at a temperature of 210 C on a flat surface sloping 0.5 deg to the left. At this temperature, the sulfur formed a viscous domelike mass over the event. As parts of the mass cooled to 170 C the viscosity decreased to a runny stage, forming breakout flows. It is concluded that a case can be made for sulfur volcanoes on Io sufficient to warrant further study, and it is recommended that the upcoming Galileo mission examine these phenomena.

  16. Cytoplasmic sulfur trafficking in sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    Persulfide groups are chemically versatile and participate in a wide array of biochemical pathways. Although it is well documented that persulfurated proteins supply a number of important and elaborate biosynthetic pathways with sulfane sulfur, it is far less acknowledged that the enzymatic generation of persulfidic sulfur, the successive transfer of sulfur as a persulfide between multiple proteins, and the oxidation of sulfane sulfur in protein-bound form are also essential steps during dissimilatory sulfur oxidation in bacteria and archaea. Here, the currently available information on sulfur trafficking in sulfur oxidizing prokaryotes is reviewed, and the idea is discussed that sulfur is always presented to cytoplasmic oxidizing enzymes in a protein-bound form, thus preventing the occurrence of free sulfide inside of the prokaryotic cell. Thus, sulfur trafficking emerges as a central element in sulfur-oxidizing pathways, and TusA homologous proteins appear to be central and common elements in these processes.

  17. Arsenic trioxide versus tetraarsenic oxide in biomedical research: misunderstandings and misinterpretations.

    PubMed

    Slejkovec, Zdenka; Falnoga, Ingrid; van Elteren, Johannes T

    2012-02-01

    This work presents an analytical chemist's view on the sometimes unconscious use of arsenic trioxide in (bio)medical research. Arsenic trioxide is a frequently used chemical in cancer treatment research and its action to various malignant cells has been extensively studied and published. Unfortunately some research articles show trivial errors with regards to background knowledge of the chemical, handling the chemical, experimental design and interpretation of results like e.g. in a range of articles comparing advantages of tetraarsenic oxide over arsenic trioxide (dimeric/monomeric) although the dissolution of both yields the same active compound (HAsO(2)). To fully understand the implications of these errors we will highlight some of them with the intent to harmonize future work in this field.

  18. The embryotoxic response to maternal chromium trioxide exposure in different strains of hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, T.F.

    1982-10-01

    This paper compares the chromium trioxide-induced embryotoxic effects among one noninbred (LVG) and five inbred (CB, LHC, LSH, MHA, PD4) strains of hamsters. A single dose of chromium trioxide (8 mg/kg, iv) was injected into pregnant hamsters on the morning of gestation Day 8. Treated and control animals were killed on gestation Day 15 and studied for the types and incidence of external and internal abnormalities, as well as the frequency of resorption sites per uterus. The embryotoxic effects described in this study include significant rates of resorptions, external abnormalities, cleft palate, and hydrocephalus. The results indicate that the MHA, LSH, and LVG strains are susceptible, while the CB, LHC, and PD4 strains are resistant to chromium trioxide-induced embryotoxicity. This study was compared with prior work in which the same hamster strains were treated with either cadmium, lead, or mercury.

  19. Reactions of connective tissue to amalgam, intermediate restorative material, mineral trioxide aggregate, and mineral trioxide aggregate mixed with chlorhexidine.

    PubMed

    Sumer, Mahmut; Muglali, Mehtap; Bodrumlu, Emre; Guvenc, Tolga

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to histopathologically examine the biocompatibility of the high-copper amalgam, intermediate restorative material (IRM), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and MTA mixed with chlorhexidine (CHX). This study was conducted to observe the rat subcutaneous connective tissue reaction to the implanted tubes filled with amalgam, IRM, MTA, and MTA mixed with CHX. The animals were sacrificed 15, 30, and 60 days after the implantation procedure. The implant sites were excised and prepared for histological evaluation. Sections of 5 to 6 microm thickness were cut by a microtome and stained with hemotoxylin eosin and examined under a light microscope. The inflammatory reactions were categorized as weak (none or few inflammatory cells < or =25 cells), moderate (>25 cells), and severe (a lot of inflammatory cells not to be counted, giant cells, and granulation tissue). Thickness of fibrous capsules measured five different areas by the digital imaging and the mean values were scored. Amalgam, IRM, and MTA mixed with CHX caused a weak inflammatory response on days 15, 30, and 60. MTA provoked an initial severe inflammatory response that subsided at the 30 and 60 day study period. A clear fibrous capsule was observed beginning from the 15 days in all of the groups. Within the limits of this study, amalgam, IRM, MTA, and MTA mixed with CHX materials were surrounded by fibrous connective tissue indicated that they were well tolerated by the tissues, therefore, MTA/CHX seemed to be biocompatible.

  20. Non surgical perforation repair by mineral trioxide aggregate under dental operating microscope

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Mousumi; Mazumdar, Dibyendu; Neyogi, Abhijit

    2011-01-01

    Root perforation repair has historically been an unpredictable treatment modality, with an unacceptably high rate of clinical failure. Recent developments in the techniques and materials utilized in root perforation repair have dramatically enhanced the prognosis of both surgical and nonsurgical procedures. Mineral Trioxide Aggregate is a relatively new material that is being successfully used to repair perforations. Technological advancements such as the use of a Dental Operating Microscope for correction of these inevitable procedural errors are a major breakthrough in dentistry today. This article presents one clinical case of nonsurgical root perforation repair by Mineral Trioxide Aggregate, using the Dental Operating Microscope. PMID:21691514

  1. Sulfur Dioxide Designations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This area provides information on the process EPA, the states, and the tribes follow to designate areas as attainment (meeting) or nonattainment (not meeting) the sulfur dioxide air quality standards.

  2. Sulfur compounds in coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attar, A.; Corcoran, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    The literature on the chemical structure of the organic sulfur compounds (or functional groups) in coal is reviewed. Four methods were applied in the literature to study the sulfur compounds in coal: direct spectrometric and chemical analysis, depolymerization in drastic conditions, depolymerization in mild conditions, and studies on simulated coal. The data suggest that most of the organic sulfur in coal is in the form of thiophenic structures and aromatic and aliphatic sulfides. The relative abundance of the sulfur groups in bituminous coal is estimated as 50:30:20%, respectively. The ratio changes during processing and during the chemical analysis. The main effects are the transformation during processing of sulfides to the more stable thiophenic compounds and the elimination of hydrogen sulfide.

  3. Sulfur compounds in coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attar, A.; Corcoran, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    The literature on the chemical structure of the organic sulfur compounds (or functional groups) in coal is reviewed. Four methods were applied in the literature to study the sulfur compounds in coal: direct spectrometric and chemical analysis, depolymerization in drastic conditions, depolymerization in mild conditions, and studies on simulated coal. The data suggest that most of the organic sulfur in coal is in the form of thiophenic structures and aromatic and aliphatic sulfides. The relative abundance of the sulfur groups in bituminous coal is estimated as 50:30:20%, respectively. The ratio changes during processing and during the chemical analysis. The main effects are the transformation during processing of sulfides to the more stable thiophenic compounds and the elimination of hydrogen sulfide.

  4. No sulfur flows on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, A. T.

    1984-05-01

    Physical and chemical properties of elemental sulfur are incompatible with the suggestion that the colored flows associated with volcanoes on Io are quenched unstable allotropes of sulfur. Either the volcanic flows are not sulfur, or some mechanism other than quenching is required to produce colored forms of sulfur in them. The properties of sulfur are unsuited to the production and survival of colored unstable allotropes on Io. The color of this object is probably due to some other material, possibly iron compounds.

  5. No sulfur flows on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, A. T.

    1984-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties of elemental sulfur are incompatible with the suggestion that the colored flows associated with volcanoes on Io are quenched unstable allotropes of sulfur. Either the volcanic flows are not sulfur, or some mechanism other than quenching is required to produce colored forms of sulfur in them. The properties of sulfur are unsuited to the production and survival of colored unstable allotropes on Io. The color of this object is probably due to some other material, possibly iron compounds.

  6. Sulfur cycling in freshwater sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klug, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Organic sulfur containing compounds represent greater than 80% of the total sulfur in sediments of eutrophic freshwater lakes. Although sedimentary sulfur is predominantly in the form of organic compounds, more sulfur is transformed by sulfate reduction than by any other process. Rates of sulfate reduction in these sediments average 7 mmol/sq m/day. This rate is 19 times greater than the net rate of production of inorganic sulfur from organic compounds on an annual basis.

  7. Separation of sulfur isotopes

    DOEpatents

    DeWitt, Robert; Jepson, Bernhart E.; Schwind, Roger A.

    1976-06-22

    Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO.sub.3). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO.sub.3, and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H.sub.2 SO.sub.4) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO.sub.4) and SO.sub.2 gas which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO.sub.2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO.sub.4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4) which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 components which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials.

  8. ELECTRON IRRADIATION OF CARBON DISULFIDE-OXYGEN ICES: TOWARD THE FORMATION OF SULFUR-BEARING MOLECULES IN INTERSTELLAR ICES

    SciTech Connect

    Maity, Surajit; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2013-08-20

    The formation of sulfur-bearing molecules in interstellar ices was investigated during the irradiation of carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2})-oxygen (O{sub 2}) ices with energetic electrons at 12 K. The irradiation-induced chemical processing of these ices was monitored online and in situ via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to probe the newly formed products quantitatively. The sulfur-bearing molecules produced during the irradiation were sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}), and carbonyl sulfide (OCS). Formations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), and ozone (O{sub 3}) were observed as well. To fit the temporal evolution of the newly formed products and to elucidate the underlying reaction pathways, kinetic reaction schemes were developed and numerical sets of rate constants were derived. Our studies suggest that carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}) can be easily transformed to carbonyl sulfide (OCS) via reactions with suprathermal atomic oxygen (O), which can be released from oxygen-containing precursors such as water (H{sub 2}O), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), and/or methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) upon interaction with ionizing radiation. This investigation corroborates that carbonyl sulfide (OCS) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) are the dominant sulfur-bearing molecules in interstellar ices.

  9. Electron Irradiation of Carbon Disulfide-Oxygen Ices: Toward the Formation of Sulfur-bearing Molecules in Interstellar Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Surajit; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2013-08-01

    The formation of sulfur-bearing molecules in interstellar ices was investigated during the irradiation of carbon disulfide (CS2)-oxygen (O2) ices with energetic electrons at 12 K. The irradiation-induced chemical processing of these ices was monitored online and in situ via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to probe the newly formed products quantitatively. The sulfur-bearing molecules produced during the irradiation were sulfur dioxide (SO2), sulfur trioxide (SO3), and carbonyl sulfide (OCS). Formations of carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and ozone (O3) were observed as well. To fit the temporal evolution of the newly formed products and to elucidate the underlying reaction pathways, kinetic reaction schemes were developed and numerical sets of rate constants were derived. Our studies suggest that carbon disulfide (CS2) can be easily transformed to carbonyl sulfide (OCS) via reactions with suprathermal atomic oxygen (O), which can be released from oxygen-containing precursors such as water (H2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), and/or methanol (CH3OH) upon interaction with ionizing radiation. This investigation corroborates that carbonyl sulfide (OCS) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) are the dominant sulfur-bearing molecules in interstellar ices.

  10. Particle size changes in unsealed mineral trioxide aggregate powder.

    PubMed

    Ha, William N; Kahler, Bill; Walsh, Laurence James

    2014-03-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is commonly supplied in 1-g packages of powder that are used by some clinicians across several treatments against the manufacturer's instructions. ProRoot MTA cannot be resealed after opening, whereas MTA Angelus has a resealable lid. This study assessed changes in particle size distribution once the packaging had been opened. Fresh ProRoot MTA and MTA Angelus powder were analyzed by using laser diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and compared with powder from packages that had been opened once and kept in storage for 2 years. The ProRoot packet was folded over, whereas the MTA Angelus jar had the lid twisted back to its original position. After 2 years, ProRoot MTA powder showed a 6-fold increase in particle size (lower 10% from 1.13 to 4.37 μm, median particle size from 1.99 to 12.87 μm, and upper 10% from 4.30 to 34.67 μm), with an accompanying 50-fold change in particle surface area. MTA Angelus showed only a 2-fold increase in particle size (4.15 to 8.32 μm, 12.72 to 23.79 μm, and 42.66 to 47.91 μm, respectively) and a 2-fold change in particle size surface area. MTA reacts with atmospheric moisture, causing an increase in particle size that may adversely affect the properties and shelf life of the material. Smaller particles have a greater predisposition to absorb moisture. Single-use systems are advised. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Interaction between arsenic trioxide (ATO) and human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Chiasson, Sonia; Girard, Denis

    2011-05-01

    The cytotoxic effect of arsenic trioxide (ATO) is known to be mediated by its ability to induce cell apoptosis in a variety of cells, including neutrophils. More recently, we demonstrated that ATO induced several parameters involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced neutrophil apoptosis but that caspase-4 was not involved. The aim of this study was to better understand how neutrophils are activated by ATO and to further demonstrate that ATO is an ER stressor. Human neutrophils were isolated from healthy blood donors and incubated in vitro in the presence or absence of ATO and several parameters were investigated. We found that ATO induced the expression of the proapoptotic GADD153 protein, a key player involved in ER stress-induced apoptosis, activated nuclear nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) DNA binding activities, and increased prostaglandine E2 (PGE2) production. Using an antibody array approach, we found that ATO increased the production of several cytokines, with interleukin 8 (IL-8) being the predominant one. We confirmed that ATO increased the production of IL-8 by enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Treatment with a caspase-4 inhibitor did not inhibit IL-8 production. The results of the present study further support the notion that ATO is an ER stressor and that, although its toxic effect is mediated by induction of apoptosis, this chemical also induced, in parallel, NF-κB activation, the production of PGE2 and several cytokines probably involved in other cell functions. Also, we conclude that the production of IL-8 is not induced by a caspase-4-dependent mechanism, suggesting that ATO-induced caspase-4 activation is involved in other as yet unidentified functions in human neutrophils.

  12. Mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement promote biomineralization in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dreger, Luonothar Antunes Schmitt; Felippe, Wilson Tadeu; Reyes-Carmona, Jessie Fabiola; Felippe, Gabriela Santos; Bortoluzzi, Eduardo Antunes; Felippe, Mara Cristina Santos

    2012-03-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Portland cement have been shown to be bioactive because of their ability to produce biologically compatible carbonated apatite. This study analyzed the interaction of MTA and white Portland cement with dentin in vivo. Seventy-two human dentin tubes were filled with MTA Branco, MTA BIO, and white Portland cement + 20% bismuth oxide (PC1) or PC1 + 10% of calcium chloride (PC2) and implanted subcutaneously in 18 rats at 4 sites from the dorsal area. Empty dentin tubes, implanted in rats of a pilot study, were used as control. After 30, 60, and 90 days, the animals were killed, and the dentin tubes were retrieved for scanning electron microscope analysis. In the periods of 30 and 60 days, the mineral deposition in the material-dentin interface (interfacial layer) and in the interior of dentinal tubules was detected in more tubes filled with MTA Branco and MTA BIO than in tubes filled with PC1 and PC2. After 90 days, the interfacial layer and intratubular mineralization were detected in all tubes except for 3 and 1 of the tubes filled with PC2, respectively. It was concluded that all the cements tested were bioactive. The cements released some of their components in the tissue capable of stimulating mineral deposition in the cement-dentin interface and in the interior of the dentinal tubules. MTA BIO and MTA Branco were more effective in promoting the biomineralization process than Portland cements, mainly after 30 and 60 days. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Combination treatment with arsenic trioxide and phytosphingosine enhances apoptotic cell death in arsenic trioxide-resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Moon-Taek; Kang, Young-Hee; Park, In-Chul; Kim, Chun-Ho; Lee, Yun-Sil; Chung, Hee Yong; Lee, Su-Jae

    2007-01-01

    Resistance to anticancer drugs can sometimes be overcome by combination treatment with other therapeutic drugs. Here, we showed that phytosphingosine treatment in combination with arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) enhanced cell death of naturally As(2)O(3)-resistant human myeloid leukemia cells. The combination treatment induced an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species level, mitochondrial relocalization of Bax, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation, and cytochrome c release from the mitochondria. N-acetyl-l-cysteine, a thiol-containing antioxidant, completely blocked Bax relocalization, PARP-1 activation, and cytochrome c release. Pretreatment of 3,4-dihydro-5-[4-(1-piperidinyl)butoxy]-1(2H)-isoquinolinone, a PARP-1 inhibitor, or PARP-1/small interfering RNA partially attenuated cytochrome c release, whereas the same treatment did not affect Bax relocalization. The combination treatment induced selective activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Inhibition of p38 MAPK by treatment of SB203580 or expression of dominant-negative forms of p38 MAPK suppressed the combination treatment-induced Bax relocalization but did not affect PARP-1 activation. In addition, antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine completely blocked p38 MAPK activation. These results indicate that phytosphingosine in combination with As(2)O(3) induces synergistic apoptosis in As(2)O(3)-resistant leukemia cells through the p38 MAPK-mediated mitochondrial translocation of Bax and the PARP-1 activation, and that p38 MAPK and PARP-1 activations are reactive oxygen species dependent. The molecular mechanism that we elucidated in this study may provide insight into the design of future combination cancer therapies to cells intrinsically less sensitive to As(2)O(3) treatment.

  14. Arsenic trioxide induced indirect and direct inhibition of glutathione reductase leads to apoptosis in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ray, Atish; Chatterjee, Sarmishtha; Mukherjee, Sandip; Bhattacharya, Shelley

    2014-06-01

    Glutathione reductase (GR) is an essential enzyme which maintains the reduced state of a cell. Therefore GR malfunction is closely associated with several disorders related to oxidative damage. The present study reports toxic manifestation of arsenic trioxide in respect of GR leading to apoptosis. Isolated rat hepatocytes exposed to arsenic trioxide were analyzed for GR expression and activity. Arsenic resulted in a time dependent inhibition of GR mediated by the superoxide anion. The cellular demand of functional enzyme is achieved by concomitant rise in gene expression. However, direct inhibition of GR by arsenic trioxide was also evident. Furthermore, arsenic induced free radical mediated inhibition of GR was found to be partially uncompetitive and associated with time dependent decrease in the substrate binding rate. Externalization of phosphatidylserine, nuclear degradation, apoptosis inducing factor leakage, apoptosome formation, caspase activation, DNA damage and break down of PARP suggest consequential induction of apoptosis due to inhibition of GR. The implication of GR was further established from the reduced rate of caspase activation in the arsenic trioxide treated cell, supplemented with complete and incomplete enzyme systems.

  15. The potential DNA toxic changes among workers exposed to antimony trioxide.

    PubMed

    El Shanawany, Safaa; Foda, Nermine; Hashad, Doaa I; Salama, Naglaa; Sobh, Zahraa

    2017-05-01

    Occupational exposure to antimony has gained much interest when specific toxic effects were noticed among workers processing antimony. Thus, the aim of the present work was to investigate the potential DNA oxidative damage occurring among Egyptian workers occupationally exposed to antimony trioxide. The study was conducted on 25 subjects exposed to antimony trioxide while working in the polymerization process of polyester in Misrayon and Polyester Fiber Company, KafrEldawwar, Beheira, Egypt. Urinary antimony levels were assessed using inductive coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and considered as a biological exposure index. DNA damage and total oxidant capacity (TOC) were assessed using ELISA. DNA damage was detected in the form of increased apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites among antimony trioxide-exposed workers compared to control subjects, but it could not be explained by oxidative mechanisms due to lack of significant correlation between DNA damage and measured TOC. Antimony trioxide might have a genotoxic impact on occupationally exposed workers which could not be attributed to oxidative stress in the studied cases.

  16. Relativistic Multireference Quantum Chemical Study of the Electronic Structure of Actinide Trioxide Molecules.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Attila

    2017-03-17

    Actinide trioxide (AnO3, An = U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm) molecules have been investigated by relativistic multireference quantum chemical calculations with the goal to elucidate their electronic structures. The molecular geometries of the ground and selected excited electronic states have been optimized at the spin-orbit-free complete active space second-order perturbation theory (SF-CASPT2) level. The low-lying vertical excitation states have been computed and characterized by CASPT2 calculations taking into account spin-orbit coupling. The reason for the considerable lengthening of the equatorial An-O bond in AmO3 and CmO3 with respect to the other trioxides has been analyzed on the basis of valence molecular orbitals of the SF ground electronic states. For the bond in question a singly occupied π orbital has been identified, this orbital is doubly occupied in the other (An = U, Np, Pu) trioxides. The clarified electronic structures of the investigated AnO3 molecules confirmed the pentavalent character of Am and Cm in their trioxides in contrast to the hexavalent character of U, Np, and Pu.

  17. Contribution to the photometric determination of small amounts of boron trioxide in glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markova, D.

    1985-01-01

    The photometric determination for boron trioxide is described in amounts of 0-75 micrograms B2O3 with an azomethin H reagent. The yellow colored complex which occurs in a medium held at a pH of 4.5 was measured in light of a wavelength of 415 nm.

  18. Sulfur Volcanoes on Io?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Fink, J.

    1985-01-01

    The unusual rheological properties of molten sulfur, in which viscosity decreases approximately four orders of magnitude as it cools from 170 to 120 C, may result in distinctive volcanic flow morphologies that allow sulfur flows and volcanoes to be identified on Io. Search of high resolution Voyager images reveals three features--Atar Patera, Daedalus Patera, and Kibero Patera--considered to be possible sulfur volcanoes based on their morphology. All three average 250 km in diameter and are distinguished by circular-to-oval central masses surrounded by irregular, widespread flows. Geometric relations indicate that the flows were emplaced after the central zone and appear to have emanated from their margins. The central zones are interpreted to be domes representing the high temperature stage of sulfur formed initially upon eruption. Rapid quenching formed a crust which preserved this phase of the emplacement. Upon cooling to 170 C, the sulfur reached a low viscosity runny stage and was released as the thin, widespread flows.

  19. Corrosion-resistant sulfur concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBee, W. C.; Sullivan, T. A.; Jong, B. W.

    1983-04-01

    Sulfur concretes have been developed by the Bureau of Mines as construction materials with physical and mechanical properties that suit them for use in acid and salt corrosive environments where conventional concretes fail. Mixture design methods were established for preparing sulfur concretes using different types of aggregates and recently developed mixed-modified sulfur cements. Bench-scale testing of the sulfur concretes has shown their potential value. Corrosion resistance, strength, and durability of sulfur concrete are superior to those of conventional materials. Field in situ evaluation tests of the sulfur concretes as replacement for conventional concrete materials are in progress in corrosive areas of 24 commercial chemical, fertilizer, and metallurgical plants.

  20. A dental implant: aluminium trioxide exhibited no effect on mouse reproductive and mutanogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Zelić, O; Dimitrijević, B; Vasilijevska, M; Dujić, A; Lekić, P C

    1998-11-01

    Several diseases as well as trauma can affect the composition and integrity of periodontal tissues leading eventually to the destruction of connective tissue matrix and cells, loss of attachment and resorption of alveolar bone, often followed by tooth loss. Replacement of the missing tooth could then be provided by endosseous dental implants healing in a form of osseo- or fibrosteal integration to the alveolar bone. Aluminium oxide ceramics, a form of endosseous implant, allows osseointegration type of healing and has demonstrated excellent biocompatibility. However, potential aluminium toxicity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of clinical disorders and for this reason we examined the reproductive and mutagenic effect of aluminium trioxide ceramic implant in experimental mice. 720 female and 45 fertile male BALB-cAn NCR mice were included in the study. 3 experimental groups of fertile male mice (15 for each group) were treated with an intraperitoneal injection of aluminium trioxide (1 g/ kg of body weight, group I), with ethyl-methane-sulphonate as a positive control (200 mg/kg, group II) and with Tween-80 (10 mg/kg as a negative control, Group III). Each of the labeled male mice fertilized previously uncoupled female mice during 8 weeks (a pair per week) to facilitate appropriate pre- and post-meiotic conditions of spermatogenesis to occur. Female mice were sacrificed with cervical dislocation at day 13 after fertilization. Immediately upon sacrifice the uterus was removed and the number of alive and healthy, or alive but mutated and/or dead embryos was computed to determine the dominant lethal or mutagenic effect. Animals treated with aluminium trioxide demonstrated similar effects on the reproductive and mutagenic capacity as the negative control, whereas the animals treated as positive controls exhibited significantly reduced reproductive and mutagenic capacity. Collectively, we concluded that aluminium trioxide has a very low rate of

  1. Advanced sulfur control concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, D.P.; Lopez-Ortiz, A.; White, J.D.; Groves, F.R. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    The primary objective of this study is the direct production of elemental sulfur during the regeneration of high temperature desulfurization sorbents. Three possible regeneration concepts were identified as a result of a literature search. The potential for elemental sulfur production from a number of candidate metal oxide sorbents using each regeneration concept was evaluated on the basis of a thermodynamic analysis. Two candidate sorbents, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CeO{sub 2} were chosen for experimental testing. The experimental test program using both electrobalance and fixed-bed reactor sis now getting underway. The objective is to determine reaction conditions--temperature, pressure, space velocity, and regeneration feed gas composition--which will maximize the yield of elemental sulfur in the regeneration product gas. Experimental results are to be used to define a conceptual desulfurization-regeneration process and to provide a preliminary economic evaluation.

  2. Sulfur activation in Hiroshima

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.; Pace, J.V. III

    1987-01-01

    In 1979, we attempted to establish the validity of source terms for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs using experimental data on sulfur activation. Close agreement was observed between measured and calculated values for test firings of Nagasaki-type bombs. The calculated values were based on source terms developed by W.E. Preeg at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A discrepancy was found, however, when we compared calculated values for the two bombs because a 1956 report by R.R. Wilson stated that sulfur acitvation by fast neutrons in Hiroshima was approximately three times greater than in Nagasaki. Our calculations based on Preeg's source-term data predicted about equal sulfur activation in the two cities.

  3. Sodium sulfur battery seal

    DOEpatents

    Mikkor, Mati

    1981-01-01

    This disclosure is directed to an improvement in a sodium sulfur battery construction in which a seal between various battery compartments is made by a structure in which a soft metal seal member is held in a sealing position by holding structure. A pressure applying structure is used to apply pressure on the soft metal seal member when it is being held in sealing relationship to a surface of a container member of the sodium sulfur battery by the holding structure. The improvement comprises including a thin, well-adhered, soft metal layer on the surface of the container member of the sodium sulfur battery to which the soft metal seal member is to be bonded.

  4. Interstellar sulfur chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, S. S.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a chemical model of SO, CS, and OCS chemistry in dense clouds are summarized. The results are obtained from a theoretical study of sulfur chemistry in dense interstellar clouds using a large-scale time-dependent model of gas-phase chemistry. Among the results are the following: (1) owing to activation energy, the reaction of CS with O atoms is efficient as a loss mechanism of CS during the early phases of cloud evolution or in hot and oxygen-rich sources such as the KL nebula; (2) if sulfur is not abnormally depleted in dense clouds, then the observed abundances of SO, SO2, H2S, CS, OCS, H2CS, and SiS indicate that sulfur is mostly atomic in dense clouds; and (3) OCS is stable against reactions with neutral atoms and radicals in dense clouds.

  5. Catalyst for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Yun; Yu, Qiquan; Chang, Shih-Ger

    1996-01-01

    The inventive catalysts allow for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur in smokestack scrubber environments. The catalysts have a very high sulfur yield of over 90% and space velocity of 10,000 h.sup.-1. They also have the capacity to convert waste gases generated during the initial conversion into elemental sulfur. The catalysts have inexpensive components, and are inexpensive to produce. The net impact of the invention is to make this technology practically available to industrial applications.

  6. Method for preventing sulfur emissions from vessels containing molten sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, R. H.

    1984-10-23

    Emissions from sulfur pits or other vessels containing molten sulfur are prevented or minimized by use of an air purge drawn into the vessel from the atmosphere and subsequently utilized as a portion of the oxidant required in a process for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur.

  7. Zeolites Remove Sulfur From Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1991-01-01

    Zeolites remove substantial amounts of sulfur compounds from diesel fuel under relatively mild conditions - atmospheric pressure below 300 degrees C. Extracts up to 60 percent of sulfur content of high-sulfur fuel. Applicable to petroleum refineries, natural-gas processors, electric powerplants, and chemical-processing plants. Method simpler and uses considerably lower pressure than current industrial method, hydro-desulfurization. Yields cleaner emissions from combustion of petroleum fuels, and protects catalysts from poisoning by sulfur.

  8. Mineral resource of the month: sulfur

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, Joyce A.

    2003-01-01

    Since domestic sulfur production peaked at nearly 11 million metric tons in 1974, the sulfur industry has undergone dramatic change. In 1974, mined sulfur produced using the Frasch hot water method provided 8 million tons of sulfur, representing 75 percent of total elemental sulfur production. (In the Frasch process, hot water is injected directly into the sulfur-containing mineral strata, melting the crystalline sulfur, which then lifts to the surface with air.) The remaining 25 percent was produced as byproduct sulfur.

  9. Nitrogen oxides, sulfur trioxide, and mercury emissions during oxy-fuel fluidized bed combustion of Victorian brown coal.

    PubMed

    Roy, Bithi; Chen, Luguang; Bhattacharya, Sankar

    2014-12-16

    This study investigates, for the first time, the NOx, N2O, SO3, and Hg emissions from combustion of a Victorian brown coal in a 10 kWth fluidized bed unit under oxy-fuel combustion conditions. Compared to air combustion, lower NOx emissions and higher N2O formation were observed in the oxy-fuel atmosphere. These NOx reduction and N2O formations were further enhanced with steam in the combustion environment. The NOx concentration level in the flue gas was within the permissible limit in coal-fired power plants in Victoria. Therefore, an additional NOx removal system will not be required using this coal. In contrast, both SO3 and gaseous mercury concentrations were considerably higher under oxy-fuel combustion compared to that in the air combustion. Around 83% of total gaseous mercury released was Hg(0), with the rest emitted as Hg(2+). Therefore, to control harmful Hg(0), a mercury removal system may need to be considered to avoid corrosion in the boiler and CO2 separation units during the oxy-fuel fluidized-bed combustion using this coal.

  10. Sulfur oxygen processes on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. M.; Smythe, W. D.

    1985-04-01

    The presence of allotropic sulfur as a possible major constituent of Io's surface and the properties of sulfur in combination with various sulfur-oxygen compounds believed to be present on Io's surface and in its atmosphere are studied by a series of laboratory experiments.

  11. Process for forming sulfuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Wen-Tong P.

    1981-01-01

    An improved electrode is disclosed for the anode in a sulfur cycle hydrogen generation process where sulfur dioxie is oxidized to form sulfuric acid at the anode. The active compound in the electrode is palladium, palladium oxide, an alloy of palladium, or a mixture thereof. The active compound may be deposited on a porous, stable, conductive substrate.

  12. Sulfur Oxygen Processes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, R. M.; Smythe, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of allotropic sulfur as a possible major constituent of Io's surface and the properties of sulfur in combination with various sulfur-oxygen compounds believed to be present on Io's surface and in its atmosphere are studied by a series of laboratory experiments.

  13. Meteoritic Sulfur Isotopic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiemens, Mark H.

    1996-01-01

    Funds were requested to continue our program in meteoritic sulfur isotopic analysis. We have recently detected a potential nucleosynthetic sulfur isotopic anomaly. We will search for potential carriers. The documentation of bulk systematics and the possible relation to nebular chemistry and oxygen isotopes will be explored. Analytical techniques for delta(sup 33), delta(sup 34)S, delta(sup 36)S isotopic analysis were improved. Analysis of sub milligram samples is now possible. A possible relation between sulfur isotopes and oxygen was detected, with similar group systematics noted, particularly in the case of aubrites, ureilites and entstatite chondrites. A possible nucleosynthetic excess S-33 has been noted in bulk ureilites and an oldhamite separate from Norton County. High energy proton (approximately 1 GeV) bombardments of iron foils were done to experimentally determine S-33, S-36 spallogenic yields for quantitation of isotopic measurements in iron meteorites. Techniques for measurement of mineral separates were perfected and an analysis program initiated. The systematic behavior of bulk sulfur isotopes will continue to be explored.

  14. Sodium sulfur battery seal

    DOEpatents

    Topouzian, Armenag

    1980-01-01

    This invention is directed to a seal for a sodium sulfur battery in which a flexible diaphragm sealing elements respectively engage opposite sides of a ceramic component of the battery which separates an anode compartment from a cathode compartment of the battery.

  15. Sulfur Dioxide Pollution Monitor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    The sulfur dioxide pollution monitor described in this document is a government-owed invention that is available for licensing. The background of the invention is outlined, and drawings of the monitor together with a detailed description of its function are provided. A sample stream of air, smokestack gas or the like is flowed through a…

  16. Sulfur Dioxide Pollution Monitor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    The sulfur dioxide pollution monitor described in this document is a government-owed invention that is available for licensing. The background of the invention is outlined, and drawings of the monitor together with a detailed description of its function are provided. A sample stream of air, smokestack gas or the like is flowed through a…

  17. [The Experiment Study and Mechanism of Aspirin Enhances Cellular Sensitivity of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Line to Arsenic Trioxide].

    PubMed

    Hu, Ya-nan; Gu, Shi-yan; Zhang, Zun-zhen

    2016-03-01

    To explore whether aspirin could sensitize arsenic trioxide on human hepatocelluar carcinoma cell line and understanding the combination mechanisms underlying co-treatment. Cell viability was detected by MTT assay, cell apoptosis rate and reactive oxygen species (ROS) level were measured by flow cytometry, and Western blot assay was used to estimated the protein expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in total protein and NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in nuclear protein. 10 μmol/L arsenic trioxide can decreased the cell viability, while cell apoptosis rate, ROS level, HO-1 and Nrf2 protein expression was increased (P < 0.05). When compared with arsenic trioxide alone, co-treatment of arsenic trioxide with aspirin in different concentration (0, 0.1, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 mmol/L) exhibited dual effects in intracellular ROS level, HO-1 and Nrf2 expression. Specifically, with the increasing of aspirin concentrations, the level of ROS induced by arsenic trioxide showed a rising trend after the first reduction, whereas, HO-1 and Nrf2 protein expression were decreased at first and then increased. Low concentration, less than 2.5 mmol/L, of aspirin may reduce the ROS accumulation through activating of Nrf2-HO-1 pathway, therefore decreasing the apoptotic cell death induced by arsenic trioxide. On the contrary, 5 mmol/L aspirin could increase the sensitivity of HepG2 to arsenic trioxide through enhancing the arsenic trioxide-induced apoptosis by ROS accumulation resulting in inhibiting the Nrf2-HO-1 pathway.

  18. SULFUR POLYMER ENCAPSULATION.

    SciTech Connect

    KALB, P.

    2001-08-22

    Sulfur polymer cement (SPC) is a thermoplastic polymer consisting of 95 wt% elemental sulfur and 5 wt% organic modifiers to enhance long-term durability. SPC was originally developed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines as an alternative to hydraulic cement for construction applications. Previous attempts to use elemental sulfur as a construction material in the chemical industry failed due to premature degradation. These failures were caused by the internal stresses that result from changes in crystalline structure upon cooling of the material. By reacting elemental sulfur with organic polymers, the Bureau of Mines developed a product that successfully suppresses the solid phase transition and significantly improves the stability of the product. SPC, originally named modified sulfur cement, is produced from readily available, inexpensive waste sulfur derived from desulfurization of both flue gases and petroleum. The commercial production of SPC is licensed in the United States by Martin Resources (Odessa, Texas) and is marketed under the trade name Chement 2000. It is sold in granular form and is relatively inexpensive ({approx}$0.10 to 0.12/lb). Application of SPC for the treatment of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes was initially developed and patented by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in the mid-1980s (Kalb and Colombo, 1985; Colombo et al., 1997). The process was subsequently investigated by the Commission of the European Communities (Van Dalen and Rijpkema, 1989), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (Darnell, 1991), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Mattus and Mattus, 1994). SPC has been used primarily in microencapsulation applications but can also be used for macroencapsulation of waste. SPC microencapsulation has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment for a wide variety of wastes, including incinerator hearth and fly ash; aqueous concentrates such as sulfates, borates, and chlorides; blowdown solutions; soils; and sludges. It is not

  19. Hydrate sulfuric acid after sulfur implantation in water ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strazzulla, G.; Baratta, G. A.; Leto, G.; Gomis, O.

    2007-12-01

    For many years an ongoing research program performed at our laboratory has had the aim to investigate the implantation of reactive ions in ices relevant to planetology by using IR spectroscopy. We present new results obtained by implanting 200 keV sulfur ions into water ice at 80 K. We have looked at the formation of sulfur-bearing molecules such as sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide and hydrogen sulfide. We find that hydrated sulfuric acid is formed with high yield ( 0.65±0.1 molecules/ion). An upper limit to the production yield of SO 2 ( Y⩽0.025 molecules/ion) has been estimated; no hydrogen sulfide has been detected. The formation of hydrogen peroxide is confirmed. Ozone is not detected. The results are discussed relevant to the inquiry on the radiolytic sulfur cycle considered responsible for the formation of sulfur-bearing molecules on the surfaces of the Galilean satellites. We demonstrate that sulfur implantation efficiently forms hydrated sulfuric acid whose observed abundance is explained as caused by an exogenic process. It is more difficult to say if the observed sulfur dioxide is quantitatively supported by only sulfur implantation; additional experimental studies are necessary along with direct observations, especially at UV wavelengths such as those that could be performed by instruments on board Hubble Space Telescope or by the forthcoming World Space Observatory (WSO/UV).

  20. Inorganic sulfur oxidizing system in green sulfur bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Hidehiro; Ogawa, Takuro; Shiga, Michiko; Inoue, Kazuhito

    2010-06-01

    Green sulfur bacteria use various reduced sulfur compounds such as sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate as electron donors for photoautotrophic growth. This article briefly summarizes what is known about the inorganic sulfur oxidizing systems of these bacteria with emphasis on the biochemical aspects. Enzymes that oxidize sulfide in green sulfur bacteria are membrane-bound sulfide-quinone oxidoreductase, periplasmic (sometimes membrane-bound) flavocytochrome c sulfide dehydrogenase, and monomeric flavocytochrome c (SoxF). Some green sulfur bacteria oxidize thiosulfate by the multienzyme system called either the TOMES (thiosulfate oxidizing multi-enzyme system) or Sox (sulfur oxidizing system) composed of the three periplasmic proteins: SoxB, SoxYZ, and SoxAXK with a soluble small molecule cytochrome c as the electron acceptor. The oxidation of sulfide and thiosulfate by these enzymes in vitro is assumed to yield two electrons and result in the transfer of a sulfur atom to persulfides, which are subsequently transformed to elemental sulfur. The elemental sulfur is temporarily stored in the form of globules attached to the extracellular surface of the outer membranes. The oxidation pathway of elemental sulfur to sulfate is currently unclear, although the participation of several proteins including those of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase system etc. is suggested from comparative genomic analyses.

  1. [Periapical regeneration. About one case of necrotic immature tooth treated with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA)].

    PubMed

    Dhaimy, S; Lahlou, K; Karami, M; Elmerini, H; Elouazzani, A

    2013-09-01

    Therapeutic of apexification with calcium hydroxide has been extensively used in clinical practice, but this technique has some drawbacks (long duration of treatment, weakening of the radicular walls). Different studies have proposed to close the apex opened with MTA (Mineral trioxide Aggregate) which is biocompatible, bacteriostatic, this material induces regeneration of the periapical region through the formation of cementum, bone and periodontal ligament (1, 2). This case report describes the technique of setting up in a single step of the Mineral trioxide Aggregate as an apical barrier for immature permanent roots. This method has allowed us an immediate apical sealing and a root canal filling and a coronary restore permanently as soon as possible. The radiological control confirmed that this type of apexification could be successful with periapical regeneration ad-integrum.

  2. Arsenic trioxide and Ascorbic Acid Demonstrates Promising Activity against Primary Human CLL Cells in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Sabyasachi; Zhao, Xiaobin B.; Mone, Andrew P; Mo, Xiaokui; Vargo, Melissa; Jarjoura, David; Byrd, John C; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2014-01-01

    The compromised antioxidant defense system in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) suggested a potential use for Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generating Arsenic Trioxide (ATO) and Ascorbic Acid. While both ATO and ascorbic acid mediated cytotoxicity in CLL B cells as single agents, the efficacy of ATO is enhanced by ascorbic acid. This effect is dependent on increased ROS accumulation, as pretreatment of B-CLL cells with a glutathione reducing buthionine sulfoximine or catalase inhibiting aminotriazole, enhanced ATO/ascorbic acid mediated cytotoxicity. Petreatment with reducing agents such as catalase, or thiol anti-oxidant, N-acetyl cysteine or GSH also abrogated ATO/ascorbic acid mediated cytotoxicity. Furthermore, Hu1D10 mediated cell death was enhanced with ATO and ascorbic acid, thus justifying potential combination of ATO/arsenic trioxide therapy with antibodies such as Hu1D10 that also cause accumulation of ROS. PMID:20171736

  3. Arsenic trioxide and ascorbic acid demonstrate promising activity against primary human CLL cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sabyasachi; Zhao, Xiaobin; Mone, Andrew P; Mo, Xiaokui; Vargo, Melissa; Jarjoura, David; Byrd, John C; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2010-07-01

    The compromised antioxidant defense system in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) suggested a potential use for reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating arsenic trioxide (ATO) and ascorbic acid. While both ATO and ascorbic acid mediate cytotoxicity in CLL B cells as single agents, the efficacy of ATO is enhanced by ascorbic acid. This effect is dependent on increased ROS accumulation, as pretreatment of B-CLL cells with a glutathione reducing buthionine sulfoximine or catalase inhibiting aminotriazole, enhanced ATO/ascorbic acid-mediated cytotoxicity. Pretreatment with reducing agents such as catalase, or thiol antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine or GSH also abrogated ATO/ascorbic acid-mediated cytotoxicity. Furthermore, Hu1D10-mediated cell death was enhanced with ATO and ascorbic acid, thus justifying potential combination of ATO/arsenic trioxide therapy with antibodies such as Hu1D10 that also cause accumulation of ROS. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Treatment of Internal Resorption with Mineral Trioxide Aggregates: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Pankaj; Rao, Yogesh; Jain, Anurag; Relhan, Nikhil; Gupta, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Tooth resorption is a common sequel which follows injuries or irritation to the periodontal ligament and/or tooth pulp. The course of tooth resorption involves an elaborate interaction among inflammatory cells, resorbing cells, and hard tissue structures. The key cells which are involved in resorption are multi–nucleated giant cells. Internal root resorptions are usually non–symptomatic and they are discovered occasionally through periapical radiographs, which reveal very defined and regular outlines. Many techniques and materials have been used to fill internal resorptive defects. Among them, Mineral Trioxide Aggregates (MTAs) have satisfactory properties, which include: biocompatibility, a favourable sealing ability, mechanical strength and a capacity to promote a periradicular tissue healing. Thus, a Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) repair of a maxillary left central incisor tooth with an inflammatory resorptive defect, in the middle third of the root canal, has been reported here. PMID:24298543

  5. Summary of the Preliminary Analysis of Savannah River Depleted Uranium Trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-10-13

    This report summarizes a preliminary special analysis of the Savannah River Depleted Uranium Trioxide waste stream (SVRSURANIUM03, Revision 2). The analysis is considered preliminary because a final waste profile has not been submitted for review. The special analysis is performed to determine the acceptability of the waste stream for shallow land burial at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The Savannah River Depleted Uranium Trioxide waste stream requires a special analysis because the waste stream’s sum of fractions exceeds one. The 99Tc activity concentration is 98 percent of the NNSS Waste Acceptance Criteria and the largest single contributor to the sum of fractions.

  6. Acidophilic sulfur disproportionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardisty, Dalton S.; Olyphant, Greg A.; Bell, Jonathan B.; Johnson, Adam P.; Pratt, Lisa M.

    2013-07-01

    Bacterial disproportionation of elemental sulfur (S0) is a well-studied metabolism and is not previously reported to occur at pH values less than 4.5. In this study, a sediment core from an abandoned-coal-mine-waste deposit in Southwest Indiana revealed sulfur isotope fractionations between S0 and pyrite (Δ34Ses-py) of up to -35‰, inferred to indicate intense recycling of S0 via bacterial disproportionation and sulfide oxidation. Additionally, the chemistry of seasonally collected pore-water profiles were found to vary, with pore-water pH ranging from 2.2 to 3.8 and observed seasonal redox shifts expressed as abrupt transitions from Fe(III) to Fe(II) dominated conditions, often controlled by fluctuating water table depths. S0 is a common product during the oxidation of pyrite, a process known to generate acidic waters during weathering and production of acid mine drainage. The H2S product of S0 disproportionation, fractionated by up to -8.6‰, is rapidly oxidized to S0 near redox gradients via reaction with Fe(III) allowing for the accumulation of isotopically light S0 that can then become subject to further sulfur disproportionation. A mass-balance model for S0 incorporating pyrite oxidation, S0 disproportionation, and S0 oxidation readily explains the range of observed Δ34Ses-py and emphasizes the necessity of seasonally varying pyrite weathering and metabolic rates, as indicated by the pore water chemistry. The findings of this research suggest that S0 disproportionation is potentially a common microbial process at a pH < 4.5 and can create large sulfur isotope fractionations, even in the absence of sulfate reduction.

  7. Sulfur plumes off Namibia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur plumes rising up from the bottom of the ocean floor produce colorful swirls in the waters off the coast of Namibia in southern Africa. The plumes come from the breakdown of marine plant matter by anaerobic bacteria that do not need oxygen to live. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on April 24, 2002 Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  8. Sulfur plumes off Namibia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur plumes rising up from the bottom of the ocean floor produce colorful swirls in the waters off the coast of Namibia in southern Africa. The plumes come from the breakdown of marine plant matter by anaerobic bacteria that do not need oxygen to live. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on April 24, 2002 Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  9. Optical characteristics of aerosol trioxide dialuminum at the IR wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitsekhovskaya, O. K.; Shefer, O. V.; Kashirskii, D. E.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a numerical study of the transmission function, extinction coefficient, scattering coefficient, and absorption coefficient of the aerosol generated by the jet engine emissions was performed. Analyzing the calculation results of the IR optical characteristics of anthropogenic emissions containing the dialuminum trioxide was carried out. The spectral features of the optical characteristics of the medium caused by the average size, concentration and complex refractive index of the particles were illustrated.

  10. The Charge and Discharge Behavior of Molybdenum Trioxide Electrodes in Lithium Perchlorate-Propylene Carbonate Electrolyte.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    AMM/§ Diet. specialAK f* I, THE CHARGE AND DISCHARGE BEHAVIOR OF MOLYBDENUM TRIOXIDE ELECTRODES IN LITHIUM PERCHLORATE-PROPYLENE CARBONATE ELECTROLYTE...SHE). Thus, the propylene carbonate oxidation potential is +3.145 V versus SHE or since the potential of the reversible lithium electrode in propylene... carbonate is -3.265 V versus the SHE potential, the solvent oxidation potential should be +6.4 V versus lithium . Thus, another anodic process must be

  11. Comparison of radiation shielding ratios of nano-sized bismuth trioxide and molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, J. H.; Kim, M. S.; Rhim, J. D.

    2015-07-01

    In this study, radiation shielding fibers using non-hazardous nano-sized bismuth trioxide and molybdenum instead of lead were developed and evaluated. Among the elements with high densities and atomic numbers, non-hazardous elements such as bismuth trioxide and molybdenum were chosen as a shielding element. Then, bismuth trioxide (Bi2O3) with average particle size 1-500 µm was ball milled for 10 min to produce a powdered form of nanoparticles with average particle size of 10-100 nm. Bismuth trioxide nanoparticles were dispersed to make a colloidal suspension, followed by spreading and hardening onto one or two sides of fabric, to create the radiation shielding fabric. The thicknesses of the shielding sheets using nano-sized bismuth and molybdenum were 0.4 and 0.7 mm. According to the lead equivalent test of X-ray shielding products suggested by KS, the equivalent dose was measured, followed by calculation of the shielding rate. The shielding rate of bismuth with 0.4 mm thickness and at 50 kVp was 90.5%, which is comparable to lead of 0.082 mm thickness. The shielding rate of molybdenum was 51.89%%, which is comparable to lead of 0.034 mm. At a thickness of 0.7 mm, the shielding rate of bismuth was 98.73%, equivalent to 0.101 mm Pb, whereas the shielding rate of molybdenum was 74.68%, equivalent to 0.045 mm Pb. In conclusion, the radiation shielding fibers using nano-sized bismuth developed in this study are capable of reducing radiation exposure by X-ray and its low-dose scatter ray.

  12. A study of tungsten trioxide and polyaniline composite films; Electrochemical and electrochromic behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, P.K.; Huang, H.T.; Tseung, A.C.C. )

    1992-07-01

    This paper discusses tungstic oxide/polyaniline composite films prepared by a double-pulse electrodeposition technique, and their properties which were investigated by in situ optical and electrochemical techniques. Such composite films are more conducting than pure WO{sub 3} films. The films have an electrochromic window between the anodic coloration of polyaniline and the cathodic coloration of tungsten trioxide. The films should find useful applications as multicolor display devices.

  13. Advanced Sulfur Control Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; Portzer, J.W.; Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.

    1996-12-31

    The primary objective of this project is to determine the feasibility of an alternate concept for the regeneration of high temperature desulfurization sorbents in which elemental sulfur, instead of SO{sub 2}, is produced. If successful, this concept will eliminate or alleviate problems caused by the highly exothermic nature of the regeneration reaction, the tendency for metal sulfate formation, and the need to treat the regeneration off-gas to prevent atmospheric SO{sub 2}, emissions. Iron and cerium-based sorbents were chosen on the basis of thermodynamic analysis to determine the feasibility of elemental sulfur production. The ability of both to remove H{sub 2}S during the sulfidation phase is less than that of zinc-based sorbents, and a two-stage desulfurization process will likely be required. Preliminary experimental work used electrobalance reactors to compare the relative rates of reaction of O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O with FeS. More detailed studies of the regeneration of FeS as well as the sulfidation of CeO{sub 2} and regeneration of Ce{sub 2}O{sub 2}S are being carried out in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor equipped with a unique analytical system which permits semi-continuous analysis of the distribution of elemental sulfur, H{sub 2}S, and SO{sub 2} in the reaction product gas.

  14. Sulfur oxides scrubbing process

    SciTech Connect

    Reeder, P.E.

    1986-07-15

    A process is described for removing sulfur oxides and solid particulates from a gaseous effluent. The steps of the process consist of: contacting within a venturi structure a gaseous effluent containing sulfur oxides with a liquid scrubbing mixture; passing the admixture of the gaseous effluent and liquid scrubbing mixture through a constricted passage of the venturi structure to increase the velocity thereof; separating the admixture into a liquid portion and a gas portion; delivering the gas portion of the separation step to a packed tower beneath the packed section thereof; contacting the gas portion with liquid scrubbing mixture in the packed section of the tower to form a gaseous overhead effluent substantially free of sulfur oxides and a bottoms liquid; combining the bottom liquid from the packed section of the tower with the liquid portion from the separating step to form a combined liquid bottoms; adjusting the pH of the combined liquid bottoms with a basic solution to form a liquid scrubbing mixture, the basic solution selected from the group consisting of alkali metal hydroxides, ammonium hydroxide, and ammonia; and dividing the liquid scrubbing mixture into a tower bottoms products, a first recycle stream providing the liquid scrubbing mixture to the first contacting step, and a second recycle stream providing the liquid scrubbing mixture to the second contacting step.

  15. Efficient photoelectrochemical hydrogen production from bismuth vanadate-decorated tungsten trioxide helix nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xinjian; Choi, Il Yong; Zhang, Kan; Kwon, Jeong; Kim, Dong Yeong; Lee, Ja Kyung; Oh, Sang Ho; Kim, Jong Kyu; Park, Jong Hyeok

    2014-09-02

    Tungsten trioxide/bismuth vanadate heterojunction is one of the best pairs for solar water splitting, but its photocurrent densities are insufficient. Here we investigate the advantages of using helical nanostructures in photoelectrochemical solar water splitting. A helical tungsten trioxide array is fabricated on a fluorine-doped tin oxide substrate, followed by subsequent coating with bismuth vanadate/catalyst. A maximum photocurrent density of ~5.35±0.15 mA cm(-2) is achieved at 1.23 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode, and related hydrogen and oxygen evolution is also observed from this heterojunction. Theoretical simulations and analyses are performed to verify the advantages of this helical structure. The combination of effective light scattering, improved charge separation and transportation, and an enlarged contact surface area with electrolytes due to the use of the bismuth vanadate-decorated tungsten trioxide helical nanostructures leads to the highest reported photocurrent density to date at 1.23 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode, to the best of our knowledge.

  16. Efficient photoelectrochemical hydrogen production from bismuth vanadate-decorated tungsten trioxide helix nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xinjian; Choi, Il Yong; Zhang, Kan; Kwon, Jeong; Kim, Dong Yeong; Lee, Ja Kyung; Oh, Sang Ho; Kim, Jong Kyu; Park, Jong Hyeok

    2014-09-01

    Tungsten trioxide/bismuth vanadate heterojunction is one of the best pairs for solar water splitting, but its photocurrent densities are insufficient. Here we investigate the advantages of using helical nanostructures in photoelectrochemical solar water splitting. A helical tungsten trioxide array is fabricated on a fluorine-doped tin oxide substrate, followed by subsequent coating with bismuth vanadate/catalyst. A maximum photocurrent density of ~5.35±0.15 mA cm-2 is achieved at 1.23 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode, and related hydrogen and oxygen evolution is also observed from this heterojunction. Theoretical simulations and analyses are performed to verify the advantages of this helical structure. The combination of effective light scattering, improved charge separation and transportation, and an enlarged contact surface area with electrolytes due to the use of the bismuth vanadate-decorated tungsten trioxide helical nanostructures leads to the highest reported photocurrent density to date at 1.23 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode, to the best of our knowledge.

  17. Effects of arsenic trioxide inhalation exposure on pulmonary antibacterial defenses in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Aranyi, C.; Bradof, J.N.; O'Shea, W.J.; Graham, J.A.; Miller, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of single and multiple (5 and 20) 3-h inhalation exposures to aerosols of arsenic trioxide on the pulmonary defense system of mice were investigated. Arsenic trioxide mist was generated from an aqueous solution and dried to produce particulate aerosols of 0. 4 micron mass median aerodynamic diameter. Aerosol mass concentration ranged from 125 to 1000 micrograms As/m3. Effects of the exposures were evaluated by determination of changes in susceptibility to experimentally induced streptococcal aerosol infection and in pulmonary bactericidal activity to /sup 35/S-labeled Klebsiella pneumoniae. Significant increases in mortality due to the infectious challenge and decreases in bactericidal activity were seen after single 3-h exposures to 270, 500, and 940 micrograms As/m3. Similarly, 5 or 20 multiple 3-h exposures to 500 micrograms As/m3 produced consistently significant increases in mortality and decreases in pulmonary bactericidal activity. At 125 or 250 micrograms As/m3, a decrease in bactericidal activity was seen only after 20 exposures to 250 micrograms/m3. Results from earlier studies with an arsenic-containing copper smelter dust were compared to these data. The possibility of the development of adaptation during multiple exposures to arsenic trioxide is also considered.

  18. The Effect of Tungsten Trioxide Thin Films at Ferroelectric-Electrode Boundaries on Fatigue Behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Paul; Bowman, Robert M.; Gregg, J. Marty

    2008-05-01

    A conventional thin film capacitor heterostructure, consisting of sol-gel deposited lead zirconium titanate (PZT) layers with sputtered platinum top and bottom electrodes, was subjected to fatiguing pulses at a variety of frequencies. The fatigue characteristics were compared to those of a similarly processed capacitor in which a ˜20 nm tungsten trioxide layer had been deposited, using pulsed laser deposition, between the ferroelectric and upper electrode. The expectation was that, because of its ability to accommodate considerable oxygen non-stoichiometry, tungsten trioxide (WO3) might act as an efficient sink for any oxygen vacancies flushed to the electrode-ferroelectric boundary layer during repetitive switching, and hence would improve the fatigue characteristics of the thin film capacitor. However, it was found that, in general, the addition of tungsten trioxide actually increases the rate of fatigue. It appears that any potential benefit from the WO3, in terms of absorbing oxygen vacancies, is far outweighed by it causing dramatically increased charge injection in the system.

  19. Electrosprayed molybdenum trioxide aqueous solution and its application in organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Katsumi; Fukuda, Takeshi; Liao, Yingjie

    2014-01-01

    A molybdenum trioxide thin film with smooth surface and uniform thickness was successfully achieved by an electrospray deposition method using an aqueous solution with a drastically low concentration of 0.05 wt%. Previous papers demonstrated that an additive solvent technique is useful for depositing the thin film by the electrospray deposition, and the high vapor pressure and a low surface tension of an additive solvent were found to be important factors. As a result, the smooth molybdenum trioxide thin film was obtained when the acetonitrile was used as the additive solvent. Furthermore, the vapor pressure of acetone is much higher than that of aqueous solution, and this indicates that the acetone is easily evaporated after spraying from the glass capillary. By optimizing a concentration of acetone in the molybdenum aqueous solution, a minimum root mean square roughness of the MoO3 thin film became 3.7 nm. In addition, an organic photovoltaic cell was also demonstrated using the molybdenum trioxide as a hole transport layer. Highest photoconversion efficiency was 1.72%, a value comparable to that using conventional thermal evaporation process even though the aqueous solution was used for the solution process. The photovonversion efficiency was not an optimized value, and the higher value can be achieved by optimizing the coating condition of the active layer.

  20. Setting expansion of gray and white mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement.

    PubMed

    Storm, Buffy; Eichmiller, Frederick C; Tordik, Patricia A; Goodell, Gary G

    2008-01-01

    One possible reason for the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is its slight expansion upon setting. Both gray mineral trioxide aggregate (GMTA) and white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) are composed of approximately 75% Portland cement (PC). WMTA differs from GMTA in its lower content of tetracalcium aluminoferrite. This difference in composition may affect setting expansion. The purpose of this study was to compare the hydroscopic linear setting expansions of GMTA, WMTA, and PC with a new device. Materials were mixed with water, placed into a cylindrical mold, and covered with sterile water or Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS). Expansion changes were measured by using a linear variable displacement transformer dilatometer. One-way analysis of variance and post hoc tests (alpha = 0.05) showed the mean expansion at 24 hours was 1.02% for GMTA, 0.29% for PC, and 0.08% for WMTA in water immersion and 0.68% for GMTA and 0.11% for WMTA in HBSS immersion. GMTA expanded significantly more than WMTA in either water or HBSS immersion.

  1. Immobilization of sulfur in microgels for lithium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Aiping; Wu, Qingshi; Du, Xue; Chen, Shoumin; Shen, Jing; Song, Qiuyi; Xie, Jianda; Wu, Weitai

    2016-03-25

    Immobilization of sulfur in microgels is achieved via free radical polymerization of commercial poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate in the solution of sulfur-terminated poly(3-oligo(ethylene oxide)4-thiophene), a copolymer prepared by the inverse vulcanization of S8 with allyl-terminated poly(3-oligo(ethylene oxide)4-thiophene). This microgelation leads to enhanced Li-S battery performance over the sulfur-terminated polymer.

  2. Sulfur content of hybrid poplar cuttings fumigated with sulfur dioxide

    Treesearch

    Keith F. Jensen

    1975-01-01

    Hybrid poplar cuttings were fumigated with sulfur dioxide ranging in concentration from 0.1 to 5 ppm for periods of 5 to 80 hours. At the end of the fumigation periods, the cuttings were harvested and the sulfur and chlorophyll contents of the leaves were measured. At 0.1 ppm and 0.25 ppm the sulfur content initially increased, but decreased as fumigation continued. At...

  3. Lunar Sulfur Capture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berggren, Mark; Zubrin, Robert; Bostwick-White, Emily

    2013-01-01

    The Lunar Sulfur Capture System (LSCS) protects in situ resource utilization (ISRU) hardware from corrosion, and reduces contaminant levels in water condensed for electrolysis. The LSCS uses a lunar soil sorbent to trap over 98 percent of sulfur gases and about two-thirds of halide gases evolved during hydrogen reduction of lunar soils. LSCS soil sorbent is based on lunar minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that trap sulfur and halide gas contaminants in a fixed-bed reactor held at temperatures between 250 and 400 C, allowing moisture produced during reduction to pass through in vapor phase. Small amounts of Earth-based polishing sorbents consisting of zinc oxide and sodium aluminate are used to reduce contaminant concentrations to one ppm or less. The preferred LSCS configuration employs lunar soil beneficiation to boost concentrations of reactive sorbent minerals. Lunar soils contain sulfur in concentrations of about 0.1 percent, and halogen compounds including chlorine and fluorine in concentrations of about 0.01 percent. These contaminants are released as gases such as H2S, COS, CS2,HCl, and HF during thermal ISRU processing with hydrogen or other reducing gases. Removal of contaminant gases is required during ISRU processing to prevent hardware corrosion, electrolyzer damage, and catalyst poisoning. The use of Earth-supplied, single-use consumables to entirely remove contaminants at the levels existing in lunar soils would make many ISRU processes unattractive due to the large mass of consumables relative to the mass of oxygen produced. The LSCS concept of using a primary sorbent prepared from lunar soil was identified as a method by which the majority of contaminants could be removed from process gas streams, thereby substantially reducing the required mass of Earth-supplied consumables. The LSCS takes advantage of minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that are present in lunar soil to trap sulfur and halide gases in a fixedbed reactor

  4. Pyrolysis of waste electrical and electronic equipment: effect of antinomy trioxide on the pyrolysis of styrenic polymers.

    PubMed

    Hall, W J; Bhaskar, T; Merpati, N M M; Muto, A; Sakata, Y; Williams, P T

    2007-09-01

    This work has investigated the effect that antimony trioxide has on the pyrolysis of styrenic polymers and the effect that different types of brominated flame retardants used in plastics have on the composition of the pyrolysis products. Brominated high impact polystyrene (Br-HIPS) which contained either 5% or 0% antimony trioxide and either decabromodiphenyl oxide (DDO) or decabromodiphenyl ethane (DDE) was pyrolysed in a fixed bed reactor at 430 degrees C. Some experiments on the fixed bed reactor involved mixing the Br-HIPS with polystyrene. The gaseous products were analysed by GC-FID and GC-TCD and it was found that antimony trioxide caused an increase in the proportion of ethane and ethene and suppressed the proportion of butane and butene. When DDE was the flame retardant increased proportions of ethane and ethene were found in the pyrolysis gas compared to when DDO used. When polystyrene was mixed with the Br-HIPS it suppressed the trends observed in the gas composition during the pyrolysis of Br-HIPS. The pyrolysis oils were characterised using FT-IR, GC-MS, GC-FID, and GC-ECD. It was found that the plastic which did not contain antimony trioxide pyrolysed to form mainly toluene, ethylbenzene, styrene, cumene, and alpha-methylstyrene. The oils produced from the pyrolysis of the plastic that contained antimony trioxide did not contain any styrene or alpha-methylstyrene, but instead contained greater concentrations of ethylbenzene and cumene. The absence of styrene and alpha-methylstyrene from the pyrolysis oil occurred even when the Br-HIPS was mixed with polystyrene. GC-ECD analysis of the oils showed that the plastics which did not contain antimony trioxide pyrolysed to form (1-bromoethyl)benzene, which was totally absent from the pyrolysis oils when antimony trioxide was present in the plastic.

  5. Utilization of 'elemental' sulfur by different phototrophic sulfur bacteria (Chromatiaceae, Ectothiorhodospiraceae): A sulfur K-edge XANES spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, B.; Lichtenberg, H.; Dahl, C.; Hormes, J.; Prange, A.

    2009-11-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria are generally able to use elemental sulfur as an electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis. Elemental sulfur is mainly a mixture of cyclo-octasulfur and polymeric sulfur. The purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum strongly prefers the polymeric sulfur fraction showing that sulfur speciation has a strong influence on availability of elemental sulfur. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was used to investigate whether polymeric sulfur is also the preferred sulfur species in other purple sulfur bacteria belonging to the families Chromatiaceae and Ecothiorodospiraceae. The cultures were fed with 50 mM of elemental sulfur consisting of 68% polymeric sulfur and 30% cyclo-octasulfur. In all cultures, elemental sulfur was converted into intra- or extracellular sulfur globules, respectively, and further oxidized to sulfate. Sulfate concentrations were determined by HPLC and turbidometric assays, respectively. However, the added elemental sulfur was only partly used by the bacteria, one part of the 'elemental sulfur' remained in the cultures and was not taken up. XANES spectroscopy revealed that only the polymeric sulfur fraction was taken up by all cultures investigated. This strongly indicates that polymeric 'chain-like' sulfur is the form preferably used by phototrophic sulfur bacteria.

  6. Catalyst for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Y.; Yu, Q.; Chang, S.G.

    1996-02-27

    The inventive catalysts allow for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur in smokestack scrubber environments. The catalysts have a very high sulfur yield of over 90% and space velocity of 10,000 h{sup {minus}1}. They also have the capacity to convert waste gases generated during the initial conversion into elemental sulfur. The catalysts have inexpensive components, and are inexpensive to produce. The net impact of the invention is to make this technology practically available to industrial applications. 21 figs.

  7. Rethinking the Ancient Sulfur Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fike, David A.; Bradley, Alexander S.; Rose, Catherine V.

    2015-05-01

    The sulfur biogeochemical cycle integrates the metabolic activity of multiple microbial pathways (e.g., sulfate reduction, disproportionation, and sulfide oxidation) along with abiotic reactions and geological processes that cycle sulfur through various reservoirs. The sulfur cycle impacts the global carbon cycle and climate primarily through the remineralization of organic carbon. Over geological timescales, cycling of sulfur is closely tied to the redox state of Earth's exosphere through the burial of oxidized (sulfate) and reduced (sulfide) sulfur species in marine sediments. Biological sulfur cycling is associated with isotopic fractionations that can be used to trace the fluxes through various metabolic pathways. The resulting isotopic data provide insights into sulfur cycling in both modern and ancient environments via isotopic signatures in sedimentary sulfate and sulfide phases. Here, we review the deep-time δ34S record of marine sulfates and sulfides in light of recent advances in understanding how isotopic signatures are generated by microbial activity, how these signatures are encoded in marine sediments, and how they may be altered following deposition. The resulting picture shows a sulfur cycle intimately coupled to ambient carbon cycling, where sulfur isotopic records preserved in sedimentary rocks are critically dependent on sedimentological and geochemical conditions (e.g., iron availability) during deposition.

  8. Method of removing and recovering elemental sulfur from highly reducing gas streams containing sulfur gases

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, Santosh K.; Nikolopoulos, Apostolos A.; Dorchak, Thomas P.; Dorchak, Mary Anne

    2005-11-08

    A method is provided for removal of sulfur gases and recovery of elemental sulfur from sulfur gas containing supply streams, such as syngas or coal gas, by contacting the supply stream with a catalyst, that is either an activated carbon or an oxide based catalyst, and an oxidant, such as sulfur dioxide, in a reaction medium such as molten sulfur, to convert the sulfur gases in the supply stream to elemental sulfur, and recovering the elemental sulfur by separation from the reaction medium.

  9. Sulfur dioxide oxidation induced mechanistic branching and particle formation during the ozonolysis of β-pinene and 2-butene.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Philip T M; Keunecke, Claudia; Krüger, Bastian C; Maaß, Mona-C; Zeuch, Thomas

    2012-12-05

    Recent studies have suggested that the reaction of stabilised Criegee Intermediates (CIs) with sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), leading to the formation of a carbonyl compound and sulfur trioxide, is a relevant atmospheric source of sulfuric acid. Here, the significance of this pathway has been examined by studying the formation of gas phase products and aerosol during the ozonolysis of β-pinene and 2-butene in the presence of SO(2) in the pressure range of 10 to 1000 mbar. For β-pinene at atmospheric pressure, the addition of SO(2) suppresses the formation of the secondary ozonide and leads to highly increased nopinone yields. A complete consumption of SO(2) is observed at initial SO(2) concentrations below the yield of stabilised CIs. In experiments using 2-butene a significant consumption of SO(2) and additional formation of acetaldehyde are observed at 1 bar. A consistent kinetic simulation of the experimental findings is possible when a fast CI + SO(2) reaction rate in the range of recent direct measurements [Welz et al., Science, 2012, 335, 204] is used. For 2-butene the addition of SO(2) drastically increases the observed aerosol yields at higher pressures. Below 60 mbar the SO(2) oxidation induced particle formation becomes inefficient pointing to the critical role of collisional stabilisation for sulfuric acid controlled nucleation at low pressures.

  10. Gingival and localized alveolar bone necrosis related to the use of arsenic trioxide paste--two case reports.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gin; Sung, Po-Ta

    2014-03-01

    The leakage of arsenic trioxide paste from tooth fillings has been associated with widespread necrosis of the supporting periodontal tissues. This report describes two cases of arsenic trioxide paste-induced gingival and localized alveolar bone necrosis in the mandible, following the use of arsenic trioxide paste as a pulp-devitalized agent. The first case was a 54-year-old female complaining of a painful white patch on the gingival tissue of the left mandibular second molar (tooth #37) after treatment by a private dentist. She underwent completely debridement of all necrotic soft tissue with physical saline irrigation. The gingival tissue was gradually replaced with vascular tissue and completely healed after 7 weeks. The second case was a 30-year-old female complaining of severe pain and continuous gingival bleeding from the right maxillary first bicuspid (tooth #14) following treatment by a private dentist. She finally accepted debridement of the sequestrum and necrotic alveolar bone with decortication to induce active bleeding. A partial thickness gingival flap was made to cover the wound. Four weeks later, the supporting tissues had completely healed. Arsenic trioxide paste is a cytotoxic agent and may cause harmful adverse effects on adjacent periodontium and supporting hard tissue if leakage occurs, or it is used carelessly. There is no indication for the use of arsenic trioxide paste in modern dental practice. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia in a hemodialysis-dependent patient treated with arsenic trioxide: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In the relapsed setting, arsenic trioxide remains the backbone of treatment. Scant literature exists regarding treatment of relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia in patients with renal failure. To the best of our knowledge we are the first to report a safe and effective means of treatment for relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia in the setting of advanced renal failure, employing titration of arsenic trioxide based on clinical parameters rather than arsenic trioxide levels. Case presentation A 33-year-old Caucasian man with a history of acute promyelocytic leukemia in remission for 3 years, as well as dialysis-dependent chronic renal failure secondary to a solitary kidney and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and human immunodeficiency virus infection, receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy presented to our hospital with bone marrow biopsy-confirmed relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia. Arsenic trioxide was begun at a low dose with dose escalation based only on side effect profile monitoring and not laboratory testing for induction as well as maintenance without undue toxicity. Our patient achieved and remains in complete hematologic and molecular remission as of this writing. Conclusion Arsenic trioxide can be used safely and effectively to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia in patients with advanced renal failure using careful monitoring of side effects rather than blood levels of arsenic to guide therapeutic dosing. PMID:23078653

  12. Electronic structure of trioxide, oxoperoxide, oxosuperoxide, and ozonide clusters of the 3d elements: density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Uzunova, Ellie L

    2011-03-03

    The trioxide clusters with stoichiometry MO3, and the structural isomers with side-on and end-on bonded oxygen atoms, are studied by DFT with the B1LYP functional. For the first half of the 3d elements row (Sc to Cr), pyramidal or distorted pyramidal structures dominate among the trioxide and oxoperoxide ground states, while the remaining elements form planar trioxides, oxoperoxides, oxosuperoxides, and ozonides. Low-lying trioxide clusters are formed by Ti, V, Cr, and Mn, among which the distorted pyramidal VO3 in the (2)A'' state, the pyramidal CrO3 in the (1)A1 state, and the planar MnO3 in the (2)A1' state are global minima. With the exception of the middle-row elements Mn, Fe, and Co, the magnetic moment of the ground-state clusters is formed with a major contribution from unpaired electrons located at the oxygen atoms. The stability of trioxides and oxoperoxides toward release of molecular oxygen is significantly higher for Sc, Ti, and V than for the remaining elements of the row. A trend of increasing the capability to dissociate one oxygen molecule is observed from Cr to Cu, with the exception of OFe(O2) being more reactive than OCo(O2). A gradual increase of reactivity from Ti to Cu is observed for the complete fragmentation reaction M + O + O2.

  13. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  14. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  15. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  16. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  17. Process for removing sulfur from sulfur-containing gases

    DOEpatents

    Rochelle, Gary T.; Jozewicz, Wojciech

    1989-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to improved processes for treating hot sulfur-containing flue gas to remove sulfur therefrom. Processes in accorda The government may own certain rights in the present invention pursuant to EPA Cooperative Agreement CR 81-1531.

  18. Sulfuric acid as autocatalyst in the formation of sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Francisco, Joseph S; Anglada, Josep M

    2012-12-26

    Sulfuric acid can act as a catalyst of its own formation. We have carried out a computational investigation on the gas-phase formation of H(2)SO(4) by hydrolysis of SO(3) involving one and two water molecules, and also in the presence of sulfuric acid and its complexes with one and two water molecules. The hydrolysis of SO(3) requires the concurrence of two water molecules, one of them acting as a catalyzer, and our results predict an important catalytic effect, ranging between 3 and 11 kcal·mol(-1) when the catalytic water molecule is substituted by a sulfuric acid molecule or one of its hydrates. In these cases, the reaction products are either bare sulfuric acid dimer or sulfuric acid dimer complexed with a water molecule. There are broad implications from these new findings. The results of the present investigation show that the catalytic effect of sulfuric acid in the SO(3) hydrolysis can be important in the Earth's stratosphere, in the heterogeneous formation of sulfuric acid and in the formation of aerosols, in H(2)SO(4) formation by aircraft engines, and also in understanding the formation of sulfuric acid in the atmosphere of Venus.

  19. Lithium sulfur batteries and electrolytes and sulfur cathodes thereof

    DOEpatents

    Visco, Steven J.; Goncharenko, Nikolay; Nimon, Vitaliy; Petrov, Alexei; Nimon, Yevgeniy S.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Katz, Bruce D.; Loginova, Valentina

    2017-05-23

    Lithium sulfur battery cells that use water as an electrolyte solvent provide significant cost reductions. Electrolytes for the battery cells may include water solvent for maintaining electroactive sulfur species in solution during cell discharge and a sufficient amount of a cycle life-enhancing compound that facilitates charging at the cathode. The combination of these two components enhances one or more of the following cell attributes: energy density, power density and cycle life. For instance, in applications where cost per Watt-Hour (Wh) is paramount, such as grid storage and traction applications, the use of an aqueous electrolyte in combination with inexpensive sulfur as the cathode active material can be a key enabler for the utility and automotive industries, for example, providing a cost effective and compact solution for load leveling, electric vehicles and renewable energy storage. Sulfur cathodes, and methods of fabricating lithium sulfur cells, in particular for loading lithium sulfide into the cathode structures, provide further advantages.

  20. Sulfur in Cometary Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fomenkova, M. N.

    1997-01-01

    The computer-intensive project consisted of the analysis and synthesis of existing data on composition of comet Halley dust particles. The main objective was to obtain a complete inventory of sulfur containing compounds in the comet Halley dust by building upon the existing classification of organic and inorganic compounds and applying a variety of statistical techniques for cluster and cross-correlational analyses. A student hired for this project wrote and tested the software to perform cluster analysis. The following tasks were carried out: (1) selecting the data from existing database for the proposed project; (2) finding access to a standard library of statistical routines for cluster analysis; (3) reformatting the data as necessary for input into the library routines; (4) performing cluster analysis and constructing hierarchical cluster trees using three methods to define the proximity of clusters; (5) presenting the output results in different formats to facilitate the interpretation of the obtained cluster trees; (6) selecting groups of data points common for all three trees as stable clusters. We have also considered the chemistry of sulfur in inorganic compounds.

  1. Demonstrating Allotropic Modifications of Sulfur.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Jillian L.; Dragojlovic, Veljko

    2002-01-01

    Shows how a common demonstration that consists of slowly heating sulfur powder in a test tube to illustrate sulfur's allotropic modifications can convince students of conclusions about the moon Io which they often find surprising. Describes the demonstration in full. (Author/MM)

  2. Volume efficient sodium sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Mikkor, Mati

    1980-01-01

    In accordance with the teachings of this specification, a sodium sulfur battery is formed as follows. A plurality of box shaped sulfur electrodes are provided, the outer surfaces of which are defined by an electrolyte material. Each of the electrodes have length and width dimensions substantially greater than the thicknesses thereof as well as upwardly facing surface and a downwardly facing surface. An electrode structure is contained in each of the sulfur electrodes. A holding structure is provided for holding the plurality of sulfur electrodes in a stacked condition with the upwardly facing surface of one sulfur electrode in facing relationship to the downwardly facing surface of another sulfur electrode thereabove. A small thickness dimension separates each of the stacked electrodes thereby defining between each pair of sulfur electrodes a volume which receives the sodium reactant. A reservoir is provided for containing sodium. A manifold structure interconnects the volumes between the sulfur electrodes and the reservoir. A metering structure controls the flow of sodium between the reservoir and the manifold structure.

  3. Demonstrating Allotropic Modifications of Sulfur.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Jillian L.; Dragojlovic, Veljko

    2002-01-01

    Shows how a common demonstration that consists of slowly heating sulfur powder in a test tube to illustrate sulfur's allotropic modifications can convince students of conclusions about the moon Io which they often find surprising. Describes the demonstration in full. (Author/MM)

  4. Spectrophotometric analysis of tooth discolouration induced by mineral trioxide aggregate after final irrigation with sodium hypochlorite: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Voveraityte, Valdone; Gleizniene, Simona; Lodiene, Greta; Grabliauskiene, Zivile; Machiulskiene, Vita

    2016-03-09

    The aim of this study was to evaluate specific chromatic alterations induced by white mineral trioxide aggregate after final irrigation with sodium hypochlorite. Sixty specimens were prepared mechanically and filled with mineral trioxide aggregate after different final irrigation protocols: Group 1 - distilled water, Group 2 - sodium hypochlorite followed by distilled water, Group 3 - sodium hypochlorite, only. Colour changes were recorded with a spectrophotometer at baseline, and then after 1, 2 and 4 months. The Commision Internationale de l'éclairage colour system was used and the total colour changes ΔE were calculated. In groups where sodium hypochlorite was used, parameter L* decreased significantly after the first month (Group 2 (P < 0.006), Group 3 (P < 0.009)). Group 3 demonstrated greater colour change ΔE than Group 1, after the first month (P < 0.02). In conclusion, white mineral trioxide aggregate can lead to tooth discolouration by contact with sodium hypochlorite residues in dentinal tubules.

  5. Impact of free calcium oxide content of fly ash on dust and sulfur dioxide emissions in a lignite-fired power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrios Sotiropoulos; Andreas Georgakopoulos; Nestoras Kolovos

    2005-07-01

    Emitted pollutants from the Agios Dimitrios lignite-fired power plant in northern Greece show a very strong linear correlation with the free calcium oxide content of the lignite ash. Dust (fly ash) emissions are positively correlated to free calcium oxide content, whereas sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions are negatively correlated. As a result, at present, the Agios Dimitrios Power Plant operates very strictly within the legislative limits on atmospheric particulate emission. In the study reported, the factors to be considered in assessing the impact of lignite combustion on the environment are presented and evaluated statistically. The ash appears to have a remarkable SO{sub 2} natural dry scrubbing capability when the free calcium oxide content ranges between 4 and 7%. Precipitator operating problems attributable to high ash resistivity can be overcome by injecting sulfur trioxide to reduce the ash resistivity, with, of course, a probable increase in operating costs. 27 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Improve operations and enhance refinery sulfur recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Bourdon, J.C.

    1997-04-01

    Sulfur is a common contaminant in fossil fuels, released when these fuels are combusted. It causes acid rain and other environmental problems. Sulfur emissions have gained worldwide attention, resulting in tighter requirements for sulfur recovery facilities. New technologies and enhancements to existing technologies have emerged as a result. This overview presents many technologies used for sulfur recovery. It is organized around the unit operations of gas and liquid sweetening, sour water stripping, sulfur recovery, sulfur degassing and solidification, tail gas treating, and incineration. New technical and equipment innovations have resulted in sulfur recovery facilities that are more reliable, recover more sulfur, are easier to operate, and reduce capital and operating costs.

  7. Treatment of horizontal root fractures using a triple antibiotic paste and mineral trioxide aggregate: a case report.

    PubMed

    Er, Kürşat; Celik, Davut; Taşdemir, Tamer; Yildirim, Tahsin

    2009-07-01

    This case report describes the treatment of a horizontal root fracture in a maxillary central incisor (tooth #8) using a triple antibiotic paste and mineral trioxide aggregate. A nonsurgical endodontic treatment was performed to a coronal root canal fragment of tooth #8. During the treatment procedure, 1% sodium hypochlorite solution was used for irrigation and a triple antibiotic paste was used as an intracanal medicament. The coronal part of the canal was obturated with mineral trioxide aggregate totally. At follow-up examination after 12 months, the tooth was asymptomatic and radiographically showed repair of the fracture region. Healing was achieved without any need for further interventions.

  8. Monoblock obturation technique for non-vital immature permanent maxillary incisors using mineral trioxide aggregate: results from case series.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Zahid; Qureshi, Abdul Hakeem

    2014-01-01

    Ten patients presented with non-vital immature teeth for root canal treatment. In all these cases the pre-operative clinical examination revealed apical periodontitis with a buccal sinus tract of endodontic origin. These cases were treated by a mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) monoblock obturation technique. Follow-up evaluations were performed at 1 - 2 years after treatment. Eight out of 10 cases were associated with periradicular healing at follow-up evaluation. Mineral trioxide aggregate Monoblock obturation technique appears to be a valid material to obtain periradicular healing in teeth with open apices and necrotic pulps.

  9. Polymerization of aniline in the interlayer space of molybdenum trioxide and its electrochemical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yanping; Xiang Yixian; Dong Xiaowen; Xu Jiaqiang; Ruan Fei; Pan Qingyi

    2009-08-15

    Molybdenum trioxide/polyaniline (MoO{sub 3}/PANI) composite was prepared first by ion-exchange reaction between aniline (ANI) and dodecylamine (DDA) which was intercalated precursor, and then was formed under the polymerization of ANI within the interlayer space of MoO{sub 3} at 120 deg. C for 3 d in air. According to powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, infrared spectroscopy and electrochemical testing, MoO{sub 3}/PANI composite has layered structure, and its interlayer spacing is 1.127 nm. Moreover, it has high thermal stability with the compound and completes its weight loss at 751.9 deg. C. Electrochemical investigation shows that MoO{sub 3} is the major active substance in the MoO{sub 3}/PANI electrode, and MoO{sub 3}/PANI electrode demonstrates better conductivity and electrochemical activity than pure MoO{sub 3} electrode, attributed to the promotion of Li{sup +} and/or electron transport. In addition, the alternating current impedance proves that if the resistance of MoO{sub 3}/PANI electrode reduces apparently, the electrochemical activity will increase correspondingly, the same as the relationship between the ohmic resistance and the electrical conductivity. - Graphical abstract: Aniline (ANI) monomer was intercalated into the interlayer space of molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) and heat-treated at 120 deg. C for 3 d in air, and then polymerized to form layered structure of molybdenum trioxide/polyaniline (MoO{sub 3}/PANI) composite. Its interlayer spacing of MoO{sub 3}/PANI composite is 1.127 nm.

  10. Self-assembled flower-like antimony trioxide microstructures with high infrared reflectance performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Shengsong; Yang, Xiaokun; Shao, Qian; Liu, Qingyun; Wang, Tiejun; Wang, Lingyun; Wang, Xiaojie

    2013-04-15

    A simple hydrothermal process was adopted to self-assembly prepare high infrared reflective antimony trioxide with three-dimensional flower-like microstructures. The morphologies of antimony trioxide microstructures were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) respectively. It is also found that experimental parameters, such as NaOH concentration, surfactant concentration and volume ratio of ethanol–water played crucial roles in controlling the morphologies of Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} microstructures. A possible growth mechanism of flower-like Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} microstructure was proposed based on the experimental data. UV–vis–NIR spectra verified that the near infrared reflectivity of the obtained flower-like microstructures could averagely achieve as 92% with maximum reflectivity of 98%, obviously higher than that of other different morphologies of antimony trioxide microstructures. It is expected that the flower-like Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures have some applications in optical materials and heat insulation coatings. - Graphical abstract: Flower-like Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} microstructures that composed of nanosheets with thickness of ca. 100 nm exhibit high reflectivity under UV–vis–NIR spectra. Highlights: ► Uniform flower-like microstructures were synthesized via simple hydrothermal reaction. ► The flower-like Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} microstructures exhibited higher reflectivity than other morphologies under the UV–vis–NIR light. ► Influencing parameters on the Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} morphologies have been discussed in detail. ► Possible mechanism leading to flower-like microstructures was proposed.

  11. Studies on nanosized molybdenum trioxide (α-MoO3) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalate, S. A.; Kate, R. S.; Deokate, R. J.

    2017-05-01

    The molybdenum trioxide (α-MoO3) thin films of single orthorhombic phase have been deposited by using spray pyrolysis technique on the glass substrates. α-MoO3 thin films were characterized for structural, morphological and optical measurements. XRD results shows that α-MoO3 thin films are polycrystalline, crystallizes in orthorhombic structure crystalline quality improved with substrate temperature. Surface morphological study shows the conversion of grains into nanorod like structure with increasing substrate temperature. The value of optical band gap shows 2.72 eV at the substrate temperature 400 °C.

  12. Enthalpies of the formation and decomposition of hydrogen trioxide HOOOH in an aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levanov, A. V.; Isaikina, O. Ya.; Lunin, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    The enthalpies of the formation and decomposition of hydrogen trioxide are estimated from the heating curves of peroxide-radical condensates synthesized from gaseous O2 + H2 mixtures. Enthalpy of decomposition H2O3(aq.) → H2O(liq.) + O2(gas) is -31.2 ± 1.5 kcal/mol, and enthalpy of formation Δf H(H2O3, aq.) =-37.5 ± 1.6 kcal/mol. Both values correspond to the temperature range of 240-265 K.

  13. Photoelectrochemical water splitting at titanium dioxide nanotubes coated with tungsten trioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong Hyeok; Park, O. Ok; Kim, Sungwook

    2006-10-01

    The photocatalytic splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen using solar light is a potentially clean and renewable source for hydrogen fuel. Titanium oxide nanotubes coated with tungsten oxide were prepared to harvest more solar light for the first time and characterized their water splitting efficiency. The tungsten trioxide coatings significantly enhanced the visible spectrum absorption of the titanium dioxide nanotube array, as well as their solar-spectrum induced photocurrents. For the sample, upon white light illumination at 150mW/cm2, hydrogen gas generated at the overall conversion efficiency of 0.87%.

  14. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) apexification: a novel approach for traumatised young immature permanent teeth

    PubMed Central

    Vijayran, Manisha; Chaudhary, Seema; Manuja, Naveen; Kulkarni, Adwait Uday

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report a case of 9-year-old boy who came with a chief complaint of pain and fractured upper front teeth. Significant history of trauma was revealed 6 months before reporting, during playing at his school time. Proper diagnosis was made with the help of radiological investigations. The available treatment options were discussed with the patient's parents and root canal therapy, using mineral trioxide aggregate, as an apical barrier was carried out in his upper right front teeth. However, later on, the boy was aesthetically rehabilitated in relation to his fractured upper front teeth with the help of post and core and acrylic crown. PMID:23314456

  15. A patient with progressive multiple myeloma treated successfully with arsenic trioxide after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gesundheit, B; Shapira, M Y; Ackerstein, A; Resnik, I B; Bitan, M; Or, R

    2007-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable progressive disease. Many therapeutic options are available to delay progression, including autologous and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. At advanced stages, MM is often refractory to treatment. We report a heavily pretreated patient with graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplantations, treated at a terminal stage with a modified protocol for arsenic trioxide (ATO). This patient with poor clinical status tolerated the treatment very well. He had a remarkable clinical response and achieved complete remission. The mechanisms of ATO are presented and the potential role of ATO for MM is discussed.

  16. White mineral trioxide aggregate pulpotomies: Two case reports with long-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Emine, Sen Tunc; Tuba, Ulusoy Ayca

    2011-01-01

    This case report describes the partial pulpotomy treatment of complicated crown fractures of two cases by using white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) with long-term follow-up. In the cases presented here, to injured incisor teeth were open apices and the pulp exposure site was large, so it was decided to perform vital pulpotomy with WMTA. Long-term follow-up examinations revealed that the treatment preserved pulpal vitality with continued root development and apex formation. WMTA may be considered as an alternative option for the treatment of traumatized immature permanent teeth. PMID:22346173

  17. Photoelectrochemical water splitting at titanium dioxide nanotubes coated with tungsten trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong Hyeok; Park, O Ok; Kim, Sungwook

    2006-10-16

    The photocatalytic splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen using solar light is a potentially clean and renewable source for hydrogen fuel. Titanium oxide nanotubes coated with tungsten oxide were prepared to harvest more solar light for the first time and characterized their water splitting efficiency. The tungsten trioxide coatings significantly enhanced the visible spectrum absorption of the titanium dioxide nanotube array, as well as their solar-spectrum induced photocurrents. For the sample, upon white light illumination at 150 mW/cm{sup 2}, hydrogen gas generated at the overall conversion efficiency of 0.87%.

  18. Fossilization of melanosomes via sulfurization.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Maria E; van Dongen, Bart E; Lockyer, Nick P; Bull, Ian D; Orr, Patrick J

    2016-05-01

    Fossil melanin granules (melanosomes) are an important resource for inferring the evolutionary history of colour and its functions in animals. The taphonomy of melanin and melanosomes, however, is incompletely understood. In particular, the chemical processes responsible for melanosome preservation have not been investigated. As a result, the origins of sulfur-bearing compounds in fossil melanosomes are difficult to resolve. This has implications for interpretations of original colour in fossils based on potential sulfur-rich phaeomelanosomes. Here we use pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (Py-GCMS), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to assess the mode of preservation of fossil microstructures, confirmed as melanosomes based on the presence of melanin, preserved in frogs from the Late Miocene Libros biota (NE Spain). Our results reveal a high abundance of organosulfur compounds and non-sulfurized fatty acid methyl esters in both the fossil tissues and host sediment; chemical signatures in the fossil tissues are inconsistent with preservation of phaeomelanin. Our results reflect preservation via the diagenetic incorporation of sulfur, i.e. sulfurization (natural vulcanization), and other polymerization processes. Organosulfur compounds and/or elevated concentrations of sulfur have been reported from melanosomes preserved in various invertebrate and vertebrate fossils and depositional settings, suggesting that preservation through sulfurization is likely to be widespread. Future studies of sulfur-rich fossil melanosomes require that the geochemistry of the host sediment is tested for evidence of sulfurization in order to constrain interpretations of potential phaeomelanosomes and thus of original integumentary colour in fossils.

  19. Sulfur cycling and metabolism of phototrophic and filamentous sulfur bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerrero, R.; Brune, D.; Poplawski, R.; Schmidt, T. M.

    1985-01-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria taken from different habitate (Alum Rock State Park, Palo Alto salt marsh, and Big Soda Lake) were grown on selective media, characterized by morphological and pigment analysis, and compared with bacteria maintained in pure culture. A study was made of the anaerobic reduction of intracellular sulfur globules by a phototrophic sulfur bacterium (Chromatium vinosum) and a filamentous aerobic sulfur bacterium (Beggiatoa alba). Buoyant densities of different bacteria were measured in Percoll gradients. This method was also used to separate different chlorobia in mixed cultures and to assess the relative homogeneity of cultures taken directly or enriched from natural samples (including the purple bacterial layer found at a depth of 20 meters at Big Soda Lake.) Interactions between sulfide oxidizing bacteria were studied.

  20. JWA is required for arsenic trioxide induced apoptosis in HeLa and MCF-7 cells via reactive oxygen species and mitochondria linked signal pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Jinhong; Ye Jian; Zhao Xiaojia; Li Aiping; Zhou Jianwei

    2008-07-01

    Arsenic trioxide, emerging as a standard therapy for refractory acute promyelocytic leukemia, induces apoptosis in a variety of malignant cell lines. JWA, a novel retinoic acid-inducible gene, is known to be involved in apoptosis induced by various agents, for example, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate, N-4-hydroxy-phenyl-retinamide and arsenic trioxide. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying how JWA gene is functionally involved in apoptosis remain largely unknown. Herein, our studies demonstrated that treatment of arsenic trioxide produced apoptosis in HeLa and MCF-7 cells in a dose-dependent manner and paralleled with increased JWA expression. JWA expression was dependent upon generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species induced by arsenic trioxide. Knockdown of JWA attenuated arsenic trioxide induced apoptosis, and was accompanied by significantly reduced activity of caspase-9, enhanced Bad phosphorylation and inhibited MEK1/2, ERK1/2 and JNK phosphorylations. Arsenic trioxide induced loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential was JWA-dependent. These findings suggest that JWA may serve as a pro-apoptotic molecule to mediate arsenic trioxide triggered apoptosis via a reactive oxygen species and mitochondria-associated signal pathway.

  1. Production of sulfur from sulfur dioxide obtained from flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.

    1989-06-06

    This patent describes a regenerable process for recovery of elemental sulfur from a gas containing sulfur dioxide comprising the steps of: contacting the gas with an aqueous, alkaline reaction medium containing sodium sulfite in concentration sufficient so that a slurry containing solid sodium sulfide is formed to react sulfur dioxide with sodium sulfite to form a solution containing dissolved sodium pyrosulfite and sodium sulfite; separating sulfur dioxide from the solution produced to leave a residual mixture containing water, sodium sulfite and a sodium pyrosulfite, the amount of sulfur dioxide separated being equal to about one-third the amount of sulfur dioxide which reacted with sodium sulfite; adding, in substantial absence of air, sufficient water and sodium bicarbonate to the residual mixture to react with the dissolved sodium pyrsulfide and form a slurry of solid sodium sulfite suspended in the resulting aqueous, alkaline reaction medium and gaseous carbon dioxide; separating the gaseous carbon dioxide; separating the solid sodium sulfite from the aqueous alkaline reaction medium and recycling the separated reaction medium; reducing the separated sodium sulfite to sodium sulfide; adding the sodium sulfide to an aqueous reaction medium containing sodium bicarbonate and, in the substantial absence of air, carbonating the resulting mixture with the gaseous carbon dioxide to form a slurry of solid particles of sodium bicarbonate dispersed in an aqueous reactor medium containing sodium bicarbonate, along with a gas composed primarily of hydrogen sulfide.

  2. Method of preparing graphene-sulfur nanocomposites for rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Lemmon, John P; Yang, Zhenguo; Cao, Yuliang; Li, Xiaolin

    2015-04-07

    A method of preparing a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite for a cathode in a rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery comprising thermally expanding graphite oxide to yield graphene layers, mixing the graphene layers with a first solution comprising sulfur and carbon disulfide, evaporating the carbon disulfide to yield a solid nanocomposite, and grinding the solid nanocomposite to yield the graphene-sulfur nanocomposite. Rechargeable-lithium-sulfur batteries having a cathode that includes a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can exhibit improved characteristics. The graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can be characterized by graphene sheets with particles of sulfur adsorbed to the graphene sheets. The sulfur particles have an average diameter of less than 50 nm.

  3. Mineral resource of the month: sulfur

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2010-01-01

    The article presents information on sulfur. Sulfur is said to be among the few solid elements found in elemental form in nature and has industrial uses. Changes in the sulfur production process over the years are discussed as well as the mining process developed by German engineer Herman Frasch that involves melting the sulfur underground and pumping it to the surface.

  4. Sulfuric Acid in the Venus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sill, G. T.

    1972-01-01

    The visible and ultraviolet transmission features of a thin layer of elemental bromine and hydrobromic acid dissolved in sulfuric acid somewhat resemble the Venus spectrum, up to 14 microns. The chemical process postulated for forming sulfuric acid involves the oxidation of sulfur and its compounds to sulfuric acid through the agency of elemental bromine, produced by the photolytic decomposition of hydrogen bromide.

  5. 46 CFR 148.04-20 - Sulfur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sulfur. 148.04-20 Section 148.04-20 Shipping COAST GUARD... Special Additional Requirements for Certain Material § 148.04-20 Sulfur. (a) When sulfur is loaded in a deep hold with general cargo in the 'tween deck hold above the sulfur, a dust proof wooden...

  6. Deep sulfur cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, N.; Mandeville, C. W.

    2009-12-01

    Geochemical cycle of sulfur in near-surface reservoirs has been a subject of intense studies for decades. It has been shown that sulfur isotopic compositions of sedimentary sulfides and sulfates record interactions of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and lithosphere, with δ34S of sedimentary sulfides continuously decreasing from 0‰ toward present-day values of ~-30 to -40‰ over the Phanerozoic (e.g., Canfield, 2004). It has also been shown that microbial reduction of the present-day seawater sulfate (δ34S=+21‰) results in large shifts in isotopic compositions of secondary pyrites in altered oceanic crust (to δ34S=-70‰: Rouxel et al., 2009). How much of these near surface isotopic variations survive during deep geochemical cycle of sulfur interacting with the mantle infinite reservoir with δ34S=0‰? Could extent of their survival be used as a tracer of processes and dynamics involved in deep geochemical cycle? As a first step toward answering these questions, δ34S was determined in-situ using a Cameca IMS 1280 ion microprobe at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in materials representing various domains of deep geochemical cycle. They include pyrites in altered MORB as potential subducting materials and pyrites in UHP eclogites as samples that have experienced subduction zone processes, and mantle-derived melts are represented by olivine-hosted melt inclusions in MORB and those in IAB, and undegassed submarine OIB glasses. Salient features of the results include: (1) pyrites in altered MORB (with O. Rouxel; from ODP site 801 and ODP Hole 1301B) range from -70 to +19‰, (2) pyrites in UHP eclogites from the Western Gneiss Region, Norway (with B. Hacker and A. Kylander-Clark) show a limited overall range from -3.4 to + 2.8‰ among five samples, with one of them covering almost the entire range, indicating limited scale lengths of isotopic equilibration during subduction, (3) olivine-hosted melt inclusions in arc basalts from Galunggung (-2

  7. Graphene-sulfur nanocomposites for rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Lemmon, John P; Yang, Zhenguo; Cao, Yuiliang; Li, Xiaolin

    2014-06-17

    Rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries having a cathode that includes a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can exhibit improved characteristics. The graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can be characterized by graphene sheets with particles of sulfur adsorbed to the graphene sheets. The sulfur particles have an average diameter less than 50 nm..

  8. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  9. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  10. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  11. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  12. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  13. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). Link to an... to or greater than 0.005 ppm shall be rounded up). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the...

  14. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  15. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  16. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  17. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  18. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  19. Toxicology of sulfur in ruminants: review

    SciTech Connect

    Kandylis, K.

    1984-10-01

    This review deals with the toxicology of sulfur in ruminants including toxicity, neurotoxic effects, and mechanism of toxic action of hydrogen sulfide, clinical signs, and treatment. It will report effects of excessive intake of sulfur by ruminants on feed intake, animal performance, ruminal digestion and motility, rumination, and other physiological functions. Poisoning of animals with sulfur from industrial emissions (sulfur dioxide) also is discussed. Excessive quantities of dietary sulfur (above .3 to .4%) as sulfate or elemental sulfur may cause toxic effects and in extreme cases can be fatal. The means is discussed whereby consumption of excessive amounts of sulfur leads to toxic effects. 53 references, 1 table.

  20. Capping a Pulpotomy with Calcium Aluminosilicate Cement: Comparison to Mineral Trioxide Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Phillip R.; Woodmansey, Karl F.; White, Robert; Primus, Carolyn M.; Opperman, Lynne A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Calcium aluminate cements have shown little affinity for bacterial growth, low toxicity, and immunogenicity when used as a restoration material, but calcium aluminate cements have not been tested in vivo in pulpotomy procedures. Methods To address this question, a calcium aluminate cement (Quick-Set) was tested along with 2 mineral trioxide aggregates, ProRoot MTA and MTA Plus. These cements were used as a capping agent after pulpotomy. Control rats had no pulpotomy, or the pulpotomy was not capped. Proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-1α were measured, and histology was performed at 30 and 60 days after capping. The nociceptive response was determined by measuring the lengthening of the rat's meal duration. Results and Conclusions: IL-1β and IL-1α concentrations were reduced in the capped teeth, but no differences were observed among the 3 cements. Dentinal bridging could be detected at both 30 and 60 days with each of the 3 cements, and the pulps were still vital 60 days after capping. Meal duration significantly shortened after placement of the 3 different cements, indicating a nociceptive response, but there were no differences among the materials. Calcium aluminate cements had similar properties to mineral trioxide aggregates and is a viable option for pulpotomy procedures. PMID:25146026

  1. Use of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate in Surgical and Conventional Endodontics: A Report of Five Cases

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Mridula

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Facial trauma that results in fractured, displaced or lost teeth can have significant negative functional, esthetic and psychological effects on children. An acute dental trauma may imply impact to the hard dental tissues and damage to the pulp and periodontium, ultimately leading to partial or total pulp necrosis and/or root resorption. Apexification is a commonly used procedure for treating and preserving immature permanent teeth that have lost pulp vitality. Immature teeth undergoing apexification were earlier filled with calcium hydroxide paste for the purpose of disinfection and induction of an apical calcific barrier. However, certain drawbacks led to the use of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) to fill the apical end without the need for calcific barrier formation. This article demonstrates the use of MTA as an apical barrier material for root-end closure in the permanent teeth of five patients. How to cite this article: Gupta S, Goswami M. Use of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate in Surgical and Conventional Endodontics: A Report of Five Cases. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(2): 134-139. PMID:25206209

  2. Dissimilatory antimonate reduction and production of antimony trioxide microcrystals by a novel microorganism.

    PubMed

    Abin, Christopher A; Hollibaugh, James T

    2014-01-01

    Antimony (Sb) is a metalloid that has been exploited by humans since the beginning of modern civilization. The importance of Sb to such diverse industries as nanotechnology and health is underscored by the fact that it is currently the ninth-most mined metal worldwide. Although its toxicity mirrors that of its Group 15 neighbor arsenic, its environmental chemistry is very different, and, unlike arsenic, relatively little is known about the fate and transport of Sb, especially with regard to biologically mediated redox reactions. To further our understanding of the interactions between microorganisms and Sb, we have isolated a bacterium that is capable of using antimonate [Sb(V)] as a terminal electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration, resulting in the precipitation of antimonite [Sb(III)] as microcrystals of antimony trioxide. The bacterium, designated strain MLFW-2, is a sporulating member of a deeply branching lineage within the order Bacillales (phylum Firmicutes). This report provides the first unequivocal evidence that a bacterium is capable of conserving energy for growth and reproduction from the reduction of antimonate. Moreover, microbiological antimonate reduction may serve as a novel route for the production of antimony trioxide microcrystals of commercial significance to the nanotechnology industry.

  3. Effect of mineral trioxide aggregate on proliferation of cultured human dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Takita, T; Hayashi, M; Takeichi, O; Ogiso, B; Suzuki, N; Otsuka, K; Ito, K

    2006-05-01

    To investigate the effect of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) on the proliferation of human dental pulp (HDP) cells ex-vivo. Human dental pulp cells were cultured with MTA or calcium hydroxide-containing cement (Dycal) using culture plate inserts. Control cells were cultured with culture plate inserts only. Cell proliferation was measured for up to 14 days using a Cell Counting kit, and the concentration of calcium ions released from the tested materials was assessed using a Calcium E-test kit. To confirm that the effect of MTA was attributable to released calcium ions, cell proliferation was measured in the presence of exogenous calcium chloride as a source of calcium ions while in the absence of MTA. Mineral trioxide aggregate significantly stimulated cell proliferation after 12 days, whereas Dycal had no such effect. The number of calcium ions released from MTA was significantly higher than that released from Dycal. Following the addition of calcium chloride, cell proliferation increased in a dose-dependent manner after 12 days. Moreover, cell proliferation showed a similar pattern whether a given concentration of calcium ions was produced by calcium chloride or by release from MTA. In this ex-vivo study, the elution components such as calcium ions from MTA had higher proliferation ability of HDP cells than control and Dycal.

  4. Mineral trioxide aggregate in primary teeth pulpotomy. A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Simancas-Pallares, Miguel-Angel; Díaz-Caballero, Antonio-José; Luna-Ricardo, Luz-Mayda

    2010-11-01

    Evidence-based dentistry is a critical evaluation, awareness of the available evidence to improve decision making about the care of individual patients and/or communities. To systematically analyze the available scientific literature on clinical and radiographic results of two materials used in pulpotomy in primary teeth: formocresol and mineral trioxide aggregate. It was identified relevant publications through a search of electronic databases such as MEDLINE (Ovid) and The Cochrane Library. To be included in the review, studies had to define the material used in child patients with pulp exposure by caries or tooth-alveolar trauma. Of the 21 articles obtained in the initial phase of the review, only 19 were available in full text and of these only met the requirements for inclusion 6 items, which were confronted, analyzed and discussed later. The clinical evidence available showed significant differences regarding the use of a material or another. In addition to the findings of clinical follow--radiographic and taking into account the potential toxicity of formocresol suggest the use of mineral trioxide aggregate pulpotomy of primary teeth.

  5. Direct Hydrothermal Precipitation of Pyrochlore-Type Tungsten Trioxide Hemihydrate from Alkaline Sodium Tungstate Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaobin; Li, Jianpu; Zhou, Qiusheng; Peng, Zhihong; Liu, Guihua; Qi, Tiangui

    2012-04-01

    Pyrochlore-type tungsten trioxide hemihydrate (WO3·0.5H2O) powder with the average particle size of 0.5 μm was prepared successfully from the weak alkaline sodium tungstate solution by using organic substances of sucrose or cisbutenedioic acid as the acidification agent. The influences of solution pH and acidification agents on the precipitation process were investigated. The results showed that organic acidification agents such as sucrose and cisbutenedioic acid could improve the precipitation of pyrochlore WO3·0.5H2O greatly from sodium tungstate solution compared with the traditional acidification agent of hydrochloric acid. In addition, the pH value of the hydrothermal system played a critical role in the precipitation process of WO3·0.5H2O, and WO3·0.5H2O precipitation mainly occured in the pH range of 7.0 to 8.5. The precipitation rate of tungsten species in the sodium tungstate solution could reach up to 98 pct under the optimized hydrothermal conditions. This article proposed also the hydrothermal precipitation mechanism of WO3·0.5H2O from the weak alkaline sodium tungstate solution. The novel method reported in this study has a great potential to improve the efficiency of advanced tungsten trioxide-based functional material preparation, as well as for the pollution-reducing and energy-saving tungsten extractive metallurgy.

  6. Mineral trioxide aggregate and formocresol pulpotomy of primary teeth: a 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ansari, G; Ranjpour, M

    2010-05-01

    To compare the clinical and radiographic response of primary teeth to vital pulpotomy using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) or formocresol (FC). A group of 17 children aged 4-9 were selected from those referred to the Paedodontic Department at Shahid Beheshti University, Dental School. Cases with at least two matching teeth were selected (40 teeth), showing signs of pulp involvement. A pulpotomy procedure was carried out in all cases with FC in control teeth whilst MTA was placed in experimental teeth. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed at 1-, 6-, 12- and 24-month recall. Statistical analysis using a Fischer exact test was performed on the data to determine significant differences between the groups. Overall, 22 second and 18 first primary molars were included. The gender ratio was one male to three female. No significant difference was found between the clinical and radiographic outcomes of the two groups at 6-, 12- and 24-month follow-up (P > 0.05). Internal resorption was seen significantly more often in FC cases after 12 months than MTA cases. Overall radiographic appearance of normal structures at 24th month was seen in more than 95% of the cases in MTA and 90% in the FC-treated group (P > 0.05). Mineral trioxide aggregate for pulp treatment of primary teeth can be considered a replacement for FC.

  7. Pure total flavonoids from Citrus paradisi Macfadyen actmsynergistically with arsenic trioxide in inducingmapoptosis of Kasumi-1 leukemia cells in vitro *

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Lin, Sheng-yun; Shen, Ying-ying; Wu, Li-qiang; Chen, Zhen-zhen; Li, Jing; Chen, Zhi; Qian, Wen-bin; Jiang, Jian-ping

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the potential effects of pure total flavonoid compounds (PTFCs) from Citrus paradisi Macfadyen separately or combined with arsenic trioxide on the proliferation of human myeloid leukemia cells and the mechanisms underlying the action of PTFCs. The effects of PTFCs separately or combined with arsenic trioxide on the proliferation and apoptosis of leukemia cells were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), fluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry. Their effects on the expression levels of apoptosis-related regulators were determined by Western blot assay. PTFCs combined with arsenic trioxide significantly inhibited the growth of Kasumi-1 cells, and apoptosis was confirmed by flow cytometry analysis. Hoechst 33258 staining showed more significant morphological changes and more apoptosis following the combined treatment. Western blots showed changes in the expression of genes for poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), caspase 3/9, and P65. The results indicated that PTFCs separately or combined with arsenic trioxide inhibited proliferation of leukemia cells in vitro and induced their apoptosis by modulating the expression of apoptosis-related regulator genes. PMID:26160715

  8. The charge and discharge behavior of molybdenum trioxide electrodes in lithium perchlorate-propylene carbonate electrolyte. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hunger, H.F.; Ellison, J.E.

    1980-07-01

    The anodic and cathodic behavior of molybdenum trioxide electrodes in various states of lithiation was investigated in 1M LiClO/sub 4/-PC electrolytes at room temperature. A comparison was made between the anodic and cathodic rate capabilities of the electrodes. From cycling experiments at various depths of discharge, cycle life data were obtained. Problems observed after deep discharges are discussed.

  9. Clinical and radiographic comparison of biodentine, mineral trioxide aggregate and formocresol as pulpotomy agents in primary molars.

    PubMed

    Juneja, P; Kulkarni, S

    2017-08-05

    To compare the clinical and radiographic success rates of three different pulpotomy agents in primary molars after 18 months. The study was carried out with 51 primary molars of children aged 5-9 years old. The teeth were randomly assigned to the experimental or control groups. After coronal pulp removal and haemostasis, the remaining pulp tissue was covered with Biodentine(®) or mineral trioxide aggregate in the experimental groups. In the control group, formocresol was placed with a cotton pellet over the pulp tissue for 5 min and after removal the pulp tissue was covered with zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) paste. All teeth were immediately restored with reinforced ZOE base and resin modified glass-ionomer cement, and later with pre-formed metal crowns. Follow-up assessments were carried out after 3, 6, 12 and 18 months. Forty-five teeth were available for follow up at the end of 18 months. All of the available teeth for mineral trioxide aggregate and Biodentine(®) were clinically successful, as were 73.3% of the FC group. Radiographic success rate for the formocresol group at 18 months follow up was 73.3, 100% for mineral trioxide aggregate and 86.6% for Biodentine(®) group. Mineral Trioxide aggregate and Biodentine(®) showed more favourable results than formocresol.

  10. Sulfur diagenesis in marine sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhaber, M.

    1985-01-01

    Bacterial sulfate reduction occurs in all marine sediments that contain organic matter. Aqueous sulfide (HS-, H2S), one of the initial products of bacterial sulfide reduction, is extremely reactive with iron bearing minerals: sulfur is fixed into sediments as iron sulfide (first FeS and then Fe2S2). A working definition is given of sulfur diagenesis in marine sediments. Controls and consequences of sulfate reduction rates in marine sediments are examined.

  11. Alkali metal/sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Joginder N.

    1978-01-01

    Alkali metal/sulfur batteries in which the electrolyte-separator is a relatively fragile membrane are improved by providing means for separating the molten sulfur/sulfide catholyte from contact with the membrane prior to cooling the cell to temperatures at which the catholyte will solidify. If the catholyte is permitted to solidify while in contact with the membrane, the latter may be damaged. The improvement permits such batteries to be prefilled with catholyte and shipped, at ordinary temperatures.

  12. Plant sulfur and Big Data.

    PubMed

    Kopriva, Stanislav; Calderwood, Alexander; Weckopp, Silke C; Koprivova, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Sulfur is an essential mineral nutrient for plants, therefore, the pathways of its uptake and assimilation have been extensively studied. Great progress has been made in elucidation of the individual genes and enzymes and their regulation. Sulfur assimilation has been intensively investigated by -omics technologies and has been target of several genome wide genetic approaches. This brought a significant step in our understanding of the regulation of the pathway and its integration in cellular metabolism. However, the large amount of information derived from other experiments not directly targeting sulfur has also brought new and exciting insights into processes affecting sulfur homeostasis. In this review we will integrate the findings of the targeted experiments with those that brought unintentional progress in sulfur research, and will discuss how to synthesize the large amount of information available in various repositories into a meaningful dissection of the regulation of a specific metabolic pathway. We then speculate how this might be used to further advance knowledge on control of sulfur metabolism and what are the main questions to be answered. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. In vitro arsenic trioxide induces apoptosis in T cells of asthmatic patients by a Bcl-2 related mechanism.

    PubMed

    Qin, Dong-Yun; Huang, Ren; Wu, Tie

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effects of arsenic trioxide on apoptosis and interleukin-4 release in T cells of asthmatic patients in vitro and investigated the role of Bcl-2 in the active mechanism. T cells were isolated from asthmatic patients (n = 21) and healthy controls (n = 20), and then treated with arsenic trioxide and dexamethasone. Cell apoptosis was measured using fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry and a cytochrome c ELISA kit. Interleukin-4 levels in the serum and in supernatants from T cells were quantified by ELISA. Flow cytometric analysis and immunofluorescence studies were performed to determine Bcl-2 expression. T cells of the asthmatic patients (i. e. without treatment) exhibited decelerated spontaneous apoptosis after 24 h incubation in vitro when compared to T cells of the healthy controls. With dexamethasone treatment, an increase in apoptosis of T cells was not significantly different between both groups, irrespective of the method used. Arsenic trioxide treatment, however, significantly increased the apoptosis of T cells of the asthmatic group and showed a slight effect on the control group. In asthmatic patients, elevated levels of interleukin-4 and up-regulated Bcl-2 expression were detected. Moreover, in vitro, T cells of asthmatic patients spontaneously released more interleukin-4 and exhibited more Bcl-2 expression than T cells from the control group. Arsenic trioxide treatment significantly decreased interleukin-4 release and down-regulated Bcl-2 expression in asthmatic patients, while it only slightly affected healthy controls. Dexamethasone treatment decreased interleukin-4 release in both groups examined. It did not significantly influence Bcl-2 expression. These results suggest that arsenic trioxide induces T cell apoptosis and decreases interleukin-4 release in T cells of asthmatic patients in vitro and that down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression may be an important mechanism.

  14. Effects of Combined Treatment With Arsenic Trioxide and Itraconazole in Patients With Refractory Metastatic Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ally, Mina S.; Ransohoff, Katherine; Sarin, Kavita; Atwood, Scott X.; Rezaee, Melika; Bailey-Healy, Irene; Kim, Jynho; Beachy, Philip A.; Chang, Anne Lynn S.; Oro, Anthony; Tang, Jean Y.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Tumor resistance is an emerging problem for Smoothened (SMO) inhibitor–treated metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Arsenic trioxide and itraconazole antagonize the hedgehog (HH) pathway at sites distinct from those treated by SMO inhibitors. OBJECTIVE To determine whether administration of intravenous arsenic trioxide and oral itraconazole in patients with metastatic BCC is associated with a reduction in GLI1 messenger RNA expression in tumor and/or normal skin biopsy samples. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Five men with metastatic BCC who experienced relapse after SMO inhibitor treatment underwent intravenous arsenic trioxide treatment for 5 days, every 28 days, and oral itraconazole treatment on days 6 to 28. Data were collected from April 10 to November 14, 2013. Follow-up was completed on October 3, 2015, and data were analyzed from June 5 to October 6, 2015. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome was the change in messenger RNA levels of the GLI family zinc finger 1 (GLI1) gene (HH-pathway target gene) in biopsy specimens of normal skin or BCC before and after treatment. Secondary objectives were evaluation of tumor response and tolerability. RESULTS Of the 5 patients (mean [SD] age, 52 [9] years; age range, 43-62 years), 3 completed 3 cycles of treatment and 2 discontinued treatment early owing to disease progression or adverse events. Adverse effects included grade 2 transaminitis and grade 4 leukopenia with a grade 3 infection. Overall, arsenic trioxide and itraconazole reduced GLI1 messenger RNA levels by 75% from baseline (P < .001). The best overall response after 3 treatment cycles was stable disease in 3 patients. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Targeting the HH pathway with sequential arsenic trioxide and itraconazole treatment is a feasible treatment for metastatic BCC. Although some patients experienced stable disease for 3 months, none had tumor shrinkage, which may be owing to transient GLI1 suppression with sequential dosing

  15. Effects of Combined Treatment With Arsenic Trioxide and Itraconazole in Patients With Refractory Metastatic Basal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ally, Mina S; Ransohoff, Katherine; Sarin, Kavita; Atwood, Scott X; Rezaee, Melika; Bailey-Healy, Irene; Kim, Jynho; Beachy, Philip A; Chang, Anne Lynn S; Oro, Anthony; Tang, Jean Y; Colevas, A Dimitrios

    2016-04-01

    Tumor resistance is an emerging problem for Smoothened (SMO) inhibitor-treated metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Arsenic trioxide and itraconazole antagonize the hedgehog (HH) pathway at sites distinct from those treated by SMO inhibitors. To determine whether administration of intravenous arsenic trioxide and oral itraconazole in patients with metastatic BCC is associated with a reduction in GLI1 messenger RNA expression in tumor and/or normal skin biopsy samples. Five men with metastatic BCC who experienced relapse after SMO inhibitor treatment underwent intravenous arsenic trioxide treatment for 5 days, every 28 days, and oral itraconazole treatment on days 6 to 28. Data were collected from April 10 to November 14, 2013. Follow-up was completed on October 3, 2015, and data were analyzed from June 5 to October 6, 2015. The primary outcome was the change in messenger RNA levels of the GLI family zinc finger 1 (GLI1) gene (HH-pathway target gene) in biopsy specimens of normal skin or BCC before and after treatment. Secondary objectives were evaluation of tumor response and tolerability. Of the 5 patients (mean [SD] age, 52 [9] years; age range, 43-62 years), 3 completed 3 cycles of treatment and 2 discontinued treatment early owing to disease progression or adverse events. Adverse effects included grade 2 transaminitis and grade 4 leukopenia with a grade 3 infection. Overall, arsenic trioxide and itraconazole reduced GLI1 messenger RNA levels by 75% from baseline (P < .001). The best overall response after 3 treatment cycles was stable disease in 3 patients. Targeting the HH pathway with sequential arsenic trioxide and itraconazole treatment is a feasible treatment for metastatic BCC. Although some patients experienced stable disease for 3 months, none had tumor shrinkage, which may be owing to transient GLI1 suppression with sequential dosing. Continuous dosing may be required to fully inhibit the HH pathway and achieve clinical response.

  16. Optimizing stratospheric sulfur geoengineering by seasonally changing sulfur injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, Anton; Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Kokkola, Harri; Lehtinen, Kari; Korhonen, Hannele

    2015-04-01

    Solar radiation management (SRM) by stratospheric sulfur injection has been shown to have potential in counteracting global warming if reducing of greenhouse gases has not been achieved fast enough and if climate warming will continue. Injecting large amounts of sulfate particles to the stratosphere would increase the reflectivity of the atmosphere and less sunlight would reach the surface. However, the effectivity (per injected sulphur mass unit) of this kind of geoengineering would decrease when amount of injected sulfur is increased. When sulfur concentration increases, stratospheric particles would grow to larger sizes which have larger gravitational settling velocity and which do not reflect radiation as efficiently as smaller particles. In many previous studies, sulfur has been assumed to be injected along the equator where yearly mean solar intensity is the highest and from where sulfur is spread equally to both hemispheres. However, the solar intensity will change locally during the year and sulfate has been assumed to be injected and spread to the hemisphere also during winter time, when the solar intensity is low. Thus sulfate injection could be expected to be more effective, if sulfur injection area is changed seasonally. Here we study effects of the different SRM injection scenarios by using two versions of the MPI climate models. First, aerosol spatial and temporal distributions as well as the resulting radiative properties from the SRM are defined by using the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM6.1-HAM2.2-SALSA. After that, the global and regional climate effects from different injection scenarios are predicted by using the Max Planck Institute's Earth System Model (MPI-ESM). We carried out simulations, where 8 Tg of sulfur is injected as SO2 to the stratosphere at height of 20-22 km in an area ranging over a 20 degree wide latitude band. Results show that changing the sulfur injection area seasonally would lead to similar global mean shortwave

  17. Smaller sulfur molecules promise better lithium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Xin, Sen; Gu, Lin; Zhao, Na-Hong; Yin, Ya-Xia; Zhou, Long-Jie; Guo, Yu-Guo; Wan, Li-Jun

    2012-11-14

    The lithium-sulfur battery holds a high theoretical energy density, 4-5 times that of today's lithium-ion batteries, yet its applications have been hindered by poor electronic conductivity of the sulfur cathode and, most importantly, the rapid fading of its capacity due to the formation of soluble polysulfide intermediates (Li(2)S(n), n = 4-8). Despite numerous efforts concerning this issue, combatting sulfur loss remains one of the greatest challenges. Here we show that this problem can be effectively diminished by controlling the sulfur as smaller allotropes. Metastable small sulfur molecules of S(2-4) were synthesized in the confined space of a conductive microporous carbon matrix. The confined S(2-4) as a new cathode material can totally avoid the unfavorable transition between the commonly used large S(8) and S(4)(2-). Li-S batteries based on this concept exhibit unprecedented electrochemical behavior with high specific capacity, good cycling stability, and superior rate capability, which promise a practicable battery with high energy density for applications in portable electronics, electric vehicles, and large-scale energy storage systems.

  18. Analysis of six heavy metals in Ortho mineral trioxide aggregate and ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kum, Kee-Yeon; Zhu, Qiang; Safavi, Kamran; Gu, Yu; Bae, Kwang-Shik; Chang, Seok Woo

    2013-12-01

    Ortho mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a mineral aggregate newly developed for perforation repair, root end filling and pulp capping. The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) in Ortho MTA and ProRoot MTA. A total of 0.2 g of each MTA was digested using a mixture of hydrochloric and nitric acids and filtered. Six heavy metals in the resulting filtrates were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (n = 5). The results were statistically analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U-test. The concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn in Ortho MTA were 0.10, 7.73, 49.51, 2.58, 0.82 and 10.09 p.p.m., respectively. The concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn in ProRoot MTA were 0.16, 9.38, 1438.11, 74.51, 18.98 and 4.05 p.p.m., respectively. In conclusion, Ortho MTA had lower levels of Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn and Ni than ProRoot MTA.

  19. Sulfur-doped ordered mesoporous carbons: A stability-improving sulfur host for lithium-sulfur battery cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitze, Florian; Fossum, Kjell; Xiong, Shizhao; Matic, Aleksandar; Palmqvist, Anders E. C.

    2016-06-01

    We report on sulfur-functionalized ordered mesoporous carbons aimed for lithium-sulfur battery electrode applications with improved charge capacity retention. The carbons were obtained by a hard-template strategy using a mixture of furfuryl alcohol and furfuryl mercaptan. For the application as electrode material in lithium-sulfur batteries, the carbons were additionally loaded with sulfur following a traditional melt-diffusion approach. It was found that the sulfur interacts stronger with the sulfur-functionalized carbon matrix than with the non-functionalized material. Electrodes showed very high capacity in the second discharge-charge cycle amounting to approximately 1500, 1200 and 1400 mAh/g (sulfur) for carbon materials with no, medium and high degrees of sulfur functionalization, respectively. More importantly, the sulfur-functionalization of the carbon was found to increase the capacity retention after 50 discharge-charge cycles by 8 and 5% for the carbons with medium and high degrees of sulfur-functionalization, respectively, compared to carbon with no sulfur-functionalization. We attribute this significant improvement to the presence of covalently bound sulfur groups at the internal surface of the functionalized carbon providing efficient anchoring sites for catenation to the sulfur loaded into the pores of the carbons and provide experimental support for this in the form of results from cyclic voltammetry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  20. Arsenic trioxide as a radiation sensitizer for 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine therapy: Results of a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Modak, Shakeel; Zanzonico, Pat; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Kushner, Brian H.; Kramer, Kim; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Larson, Steven M.; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide has in vitro and in vivo radiosensitizing properties. We hypothesized that Arsenic trioxide would enhance the efficacy of the targeted radiotherapeutic agent 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (131I-MIBG), and tested the combination in a phase II clinical trial. Methods Patients with recurrent or refractory stage 4 neuroblastoma or metastatic paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma (MP) were treated on an institutional review board-approved protocol (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00107289). Planned treatment was 131I-MIBG (444 or 666MBq/kg) intravenously on day 1 plus arsenic trioxide (0.15 or 0.25mg/m2) intravenously on days 6–10 and 13–17. Toxicity was evaluated using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria version 3.0. Response was assessed by International NB response criteria or (for MP) by changes in 123I-MIBG or PET scans. Results Twenty-one patients were treated: 19 with neuroblastoma and 2 with MP. Fourteen patients received 131I-MIBG and AT both at maximal dosages, 2 patients received a 444MBq/kg dose of 131I-MIBG plus a 0.15mg/kg/dose dose of arsenic trioxide; and 3 patients received a 666MBq/kg dose of 131I-MIBG plus a 0.15mg/kg/dose dose of arsenic trioxide. One did not receive arsenic trioxide because of transient central line-induced cardiac arrhythmia and another received only 6 of 10 planned doses of arsenic trioxide because of grade 3 diarrhea and vomiting with concurrent grade 3 hypokalemia and hyponatremia. Nineteen patients experienced myelosuppression higher than grade 2, most frequently, thrombocytopenia (n=18), though none required autologous stem cell rescue. 12 of 13 evaluable patients experienced hyperamylasemia higher than grade 2 from transient sialoadenitis. By International Neuroblastoma Response Criteria, 12 NB patients had no response and 7 had progressive disease, including 6 of 8 entering the study with progressive disease. Objective improvements in semiquantitative 131I-MIBG scores were observed in 6 patients

  1. Inorganic arsenic trioxide induces gap junction loss in association with the downregulation of connexin43 and E-cadherin in rat hepatic "stem-like" cells.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Pi-Jung; Jao, Jo-Chi; Tsai, Jin-Lian; Chang, Wen-Tsan; Jeng, Kuo-Shyang; Kuo, Kung-Kai

    2014-02-01

    Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic trioxide causes tumors of the skin, urinary bladder, lung, and liver. Several cancer initiators and promoters have been shown to alter cell-cell signaling by interference with gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and/or modulation of cell adhesion molecules, such as connexin43 (Cx43), E-cadherin, and β-catenin. The aim of this study was to determine whether the disruption of cell-cell interactions occurs in liver epithelial cells after exposure to arsenic trioxide. WB-F344 cells were treated with arsenic trioxide (6.25-50 μM) for up to 8 hours, and gap junction function was analyzed using the scrape-load/dye transfer assay. In addition, the changes in mRNA and protein levels of Cx43, E-cadherin, and β-catenin were determined. A significant dose- and time-dependent decrease in GJIC was observed when WB-F344 cells were exposed to arsenic trioxide (p < 0.05). Consistent with the inhibition of GJIC, cells' exposure to arsenic trioxide resulted in dose- and time-dependent decreases in Cx43 and E-cadherin mRNA expression and protein levels. However, arsenic trioxide did not alter the mRNA or protein levels of β-catenin. In an immunofluorescence study, nuclei were heavily stained with anti-β-catenin antibody, indicating significant nuclear translocation. In this study, we also demonstrated that arsenic trioxide-induced GJIC loss was a reversible process. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that disruption of cell-cell communication may contribute to the tumor-promoting effect of inorganic arsenic trioxide.

  2. Signal transduction pathways and transcription factors triggered by arsenic trioxide in leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sumi, Daigo; Shinkai, Yasuhiro; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2010-05-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is widely used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Several lines of evidence have indicated that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} affects signal transduction and transactivation of transcription factors, resulting in the stimulation of apoptosis in leukemia cells, because some transcription factors are reported to associate with the redox condition of the cells, and arsenicals cause oxidative stress. Thus, the disturbance and activation of the cellular signaling pathway and transcription factors due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation during arsenic exposure may explain the ability of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} to induce a complete remission in relapsed APL patients. In this report, we review recent findings on ROS generation and alterations in signal transduction and in transactivation of transcription factors during As{sub 2}O{sub 3} exposure in leukemia cells.

  3. Joint effects of microwave and chromium trioxide on root tip cells of Vicia faba *

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xiao-Wei; Luo, Wei-Hua; Zheng, Ou-Xiang

    2006-01-01

    The mutagenic effects of microwave and chromium trioxide (CrO3) on Vicia faba root tip were studied. Micronucleus assay and chromosomal aberration assay were used to determine the mitotic index, the micronucleus frequency and chromosomal aberration frequency of Vicia faba root tip cells induced by microwave and CrO3. The results showed that the micronucleus frequency decreased, and that the mitotic index and chromosomal aberration frequency showed linear dose responses to CrO3, in treatment of microwave for 5 s. In microwave of 25 s, the mitotic index decreased, the micronucleus frequency and chromosomal aberration frequency increased with increase of CrO3 concentration. We concluded that microwave and CrO3 had antagonistic effect on the mitotic index of Vicia faba root tip cells, but had synergetic effect on micronucleus frequency and chromosomal aberration frequency of Vicia faba root tip cells. PMID:16502510

  4. Evaluation of genetic damage in human peripheral lymphocytes exposed to mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cements.

    PubMed

    Braz, M G; Camargo, E A; Salvadori, D M F; Marques, M E A; Ribeiro, D A

    2006-03-01

    summary Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Portland cement are being used in dentistry as root-end-filling material for periapical surgery and for the sealing of communications between the root canal system and the surrounding tissues. However, genotoxicity tests for complete risk assessment of these compounds have not been conducted up to now. In the present study, the genotoxic effects of MTA and Portland cements were evaluated in peripheral lymphocytes from 10 volunteers by the alkaline single cell gel (comet) assay. The results pointed out that the single cell gel (comet) assay failed to detect the presence of DNA damage after a treatment of peripheral lymphocytes by MTA and Portland cements for concentrations up to 1000 mug mL(-1). In summary, our results indicate that exposure to MTA or Portland cements may not be a factor that increases the level of DNA lesions in human peripheral lymphocytes as detected by single cell gel (comet) assay.

  5. Conservative Management of Unset Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Root-End Filling: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Parirokh, Masoud; Farzaneh, Sedigheh; Hallajmofrad, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    This case report presents conservative management of unset mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) after being placed as a root-end filling material following periapical surgery. Periapical surgery was indicated for a maxillary lateral incisor of a 15-year-old male due to persistent exudate and a large periapical lesion. During surgery Angelus MTA was placed as root-end filling. The next session it was noticed that MTA had failed to completely set. In an orthograde approach, calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement was used to obturate the root canal space. The patient was followed up for 27 months and did not exhibit any clinical signs and symptoms. Radiographic images showed complete healing of the lesion. PMID:27471540

  6. The effect of using propylene glycol as a vehicle on the microhardness of mineral trioxide aggregate.

    PubMed

    Salem Milani, Amin; Banifatemeh, Alireza; Rahimi, Saeed; Jafarabadi, Mohammad Asghari

    2015-01-01

    While it has been proven that the handling properties of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) are improved upon mixing it with propylene glycol (PG), this study sought to evaluate how PG affects the microhardness of MTA in terms of setting quality. MTA was mixed with different proportions of distilled water (DW) and PG to prepare 5 groups (n = 30). The DW/PG percent proportions used in Groups 1-5 were 100/0, 80/20, 50/50, 20/80, and 0/100, respectively. The mixed MTA was condensed into acrylic molds. Half of the samples of each group were evaluated on Day 4, the other half on Day 28. The results indicated that PG reduces the microhardness of MTA, thus adversely affecting its setting process. Group 2 (80% DW/20% PG) best improved the handling of MTA without a significant reduction in setting quality.

  7. The use of mineral trioxide aggregate to achieve root end closure: three case reports.

    PubMed

    Albadri, Sondos; Chau, Yang See; Jarad, Fadi

    2013-12-01

    The use of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) to achieve root end closure has many advantages over the traditional calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) technique including the reduced number of visits and the reduced mechanical damage to dentine. Limited studies have reported the outcome of using MTA as an apexification material and a one-stage obturation technique in non-vital immature teeth. This article illustrates three successful clinical cases where MTA was used as an apexification material. In case study one: Type 1 Dens Invaginatus tooth with incomplete root formation, case study two: an immature tooth that suffered pulp necrosis following an enamel and dentine fracture trauma and case study three: a non-vital tooth following an apical root fracture.

  8. Mineral trioxide aggregate repair of a perforating internal resorption in a mandibular molar.

    PubMed

    Meire, Maarten; De Moor, Roeland

    2008-02-01

    Internal resorption is a rare condition in permanent teeth that poses difficulties for treatment. The challenge is complicated further if the resorption extends beyond the confines of the root. This article describes treatment of a perforating internal resorption in the mesial root of a second lower molar, with adjacent destruction of the alveolar bone. After cleaning the root canal space and the resorption lacuna by mechanical instrumentation, irrigation, and interim calcium hydroxide dressing, the defect was filled with mineral trioxide aggregate, and the canals were obturated conventionally with gutta percha and epoxy resin sealer. At a 2-year follow-up examination, no clinical abnormalities were found, and complete resolution of the alveolar bone lesion and establishment of a new periodontal ligament were observed.

  9. Mineral trioxide aggregate as a pulpotomy agent in immature teeth: Long-term case report

    PubMed Central

    Subay, Rustem Kemal; Ilhan, Banu; Ulukapi, Hasmet

    2013-01-01

    This case report aimed to present the long-term clinical performance of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) pulpotomies in immature permanent teeth. Four patients with complicated crown fractures of five maxillary immature central incisor teeth were treated with pulpotomy using gray MTA. An immature mandibular first molar showing signs of reversible pulpitis that was exposed mechanically during cavity preparation was also treated with MTA pulpotomy. Four of the 6 immature teeth were diagnosed vitally with complete root maturation and with the presence of dentin bridges after 55 months (mean time of follow-ups). MTA pulpotomy was assessed unsuccessfully in two fractured central incisors. Severe discoloration in the crowns was present in all 6 cases. MTA may induce pulp healing with dentin bridge formation and prevent necrosis at long-term periods in most of the pulpotomy cases. However, discoloration following MTA pulpotomy is a significant clinical complication. PMID:23408174

  10. Effect of Dentin Bonding Agent on the Prevention of Tooth Discoloration Produced by Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Majid; Rouhani, Armita; Samiee, Sadeq; Jafarzadeh, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Determination of the effect of dentin bonding agent (DBA) on the prevention of tooth discoloration produced by mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Methods. 50 teeth were endodontically treated and after removal of 3 mm of obturating materials were divided into five groups. In white MTA (WMTA) and grey MTA (GMTA) groups, these materials were placed in root canal below the orifice. In DBA + WMTA and DBA + GMTA groups, DBAs were applied in the access cavity. Then, 3 mm of WMTA and GMTA was placed. The last 10 teeth served as control. All of teeth were restored and color measurement was recorded for each specimen at this time and 6 months later. Results. The mean tooth discoloration in WMTA and GMTA groups was significantly more than DBA + WMTA and DBA + GMTA groups, respectively. There was no significant difference between DBA + WMTA and DBA + GMTA groups and control group. Conclusion. Application of DBA before MTA may prevent tooth discoloration. PMID:22114601

  11. Comparing gray mineral trioxide aggregate and diluted formocresol in pulpotomized human primary molars.

    PubMed

    Zealand, Cameron M; Briskie, Daniel M; Botero, Tatiana M; Boynton, James R; Hu, Jan C C

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this multisite, multioperator, prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial was to evaluate the 6-month outcomes of diluted formocresol (DFC) compared to gray mineral trioxide aggregate (GMTA) as pulpotomy medicament. Determined by a power analysis, 252 molars of 152 children were recruited. The teeth were randomly assigned to receive GMTA or DFC. At the 6-month follow-up, 118 children with 203 treated teeth were evaluated. Four blinded and calibrated evaluators scored each radiograph for pathologies. Clinical success was similar for DFC (97%) and GMTA (100%), (P<.09). Radiographic success differed significantly (P<.04) for DFC (86%) and GMTA (95%). Pulp canal obliteration was radiographically observed in 25% of the DFC group and in 37% of the GMTA group (P=.07). Dentin bridging was observed in 22% of the GMTA group but was not found in the DFC group (P<.01). Teeth treated with GMTA showed more favorable radiographic outcomes than DFC at 6 months post-treatment.

  12. Biochemistry of Dissimilatory Sulfur Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Blake II, R.

    2003-05-30

    The long term goals of this research were to define the substrate oxidation pathways, the electron transport mechanisms, and the modes of energy conservation employed during the dissimilatory oxidation of sulfur practiced by various species of the thiobacilli. Specific adhesion of the thiobacilli to elemental sulfur was studied by electrical impedance, dynamic light scattering, laser Doppler velocimetry, and optical trapping methods. The conclusion is that the thiobacilli appear to express specific receptors that enable the bacteria to recognize and adhere to insoluble sulfur. The enzyme tetrathionate oxidase was purified from two species of the thiobacilli. Extensive structural and functional studies were conducted on adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase purified from cell-free extracts of Thiobacillus denitrificans. The kinetic mechanism of rhodanese was studied.

  13. Outcome of orthograde retreatment after failed apicoectomy: use of a mineral trioxide aggregate apical plug.

    PubMed

    Mente, Johannes; Leo, Meltem; Michel, Annemarie; Gehrig, Holger; Saure, Daniel; Pfefferle, Thorsten

    2015-05-01

    This controlled, single-center historic cohort study project evaluates treatment outcomes of a nonsurgical treatment approach after failed apicoectomy. The treatment outcomes of nonsurgical retreatment after a failed apicoectomy were evaluated clinically and radiographically. The study cohort consisted of teeth that had received primary root canal treatment and subsequent apicoectomy elsewhere before the patients presented with post-treatment disease. Orthograde retreatment and obturation using an apical mineral trioxide aggregate plug was performed by postgraduate students and endodontic specialists in 25 cases between 2004 and 2012. Pre-, intra-, and postoperative information and the potential effect on the retreatment outcome were evaluated and statistically analyzed using the chi-square test. Twenty-two patients with 23 teeth attended the follow-up examinations (recall rate = 92%). The follow-up periods ranged from 12 to 102 months (median = 35 months). Twenty teeth (87%) were classified as "success," and 3 teeth were considered (17%) "failure." The chi-square test confirmed that the preoperative factor "number of roots" had a statistically significant effect on treatment outcome (odds ratio = 0.08; 95% confidence interval, 0-1.76; P = .03). The factor "tooth location" was of borderline significance (odds ratio = 0.1; 95% confidence interval, 0-2.14; P = .05). The results of the present study suggest that orthograde retreatment combined with orthograde placement of an apical mineral trioxide aggregate plug is a promising long-term treatment option for teeth with postsurgical pathosis. The success rates were higher for single-rooted teeth. The use of cone-beam computed tomographic imaging in cases of inconclusive periapical radiographs is recommended to minimize the risk of misinterpretation when assessing treatment outcome. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of two histopathologic methods for evaluating subcutaneous reaction to mineral trioxide aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Lotfi, Mehrdad; Moradzadeh, Monir; Aghbali, Amirala; Rahimi, Saeed; Saghiri, Mohammadali; Zand, Vahid; Mehdipour, Masoumeh; Ranjkesh, Bahram; Doosti, Sirvan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: One of the most important factors for suitable materials for pulp therapy is biocompatibility. Two histopathologic methods of Cox and Federation Dentaire International (FDI) were used to evaluate inflammation. In Cox method, density of inflammatory cells, tissue reactions like fibrosis, vascular responses like congestion and fibrin extravasation have been used to evaluate inflammatory reactions. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of pathologists’ interpretations using two different methods. Study design: Three pathologists observed the degree of inflammation in 225 histopathologic sections. These sections showed inflammation in subcutaneous connective tissue of rats adjacent to polyethylene tubes, filled with white or gray mineral trioxide aggregate. Empty tubes served as controls. Samples were harvested after 7-, 15-, 30-, 60-, and 90-days. All pathologists examined the sections under a light microscope (Carl Zeiss, Oberkochen, Germany) at ×400 magnifications. Chi-Square test was used to evaluate the difference between inflammation grades when one pathologist used two methods. Cohen’s Kappa value was used to measure agreement of three pathologists to recognize the degrees of inflammations when using one of the methods. Results: There were no significant differences between the two methods when one of the pathologist used these methods to report the degree of inflammation (p=0.054). However, two other pathologists reported significant differences between two methods (p=0.005, p=0.001). In the FDI method, there was an acceptable agreement between first and second, and first and third pathologist in terms of the degree of inflammation, and intermediate agreement existed between the second and third pathologist. With the Cox method, no agreement among the pathologists could be found. Conclusion: The results of three pathologists in terms of rating inflammation with the FDI method showed better agreement than with the Cox method

  15. The effectiveness of mineral trioxide aggregate, calcium hydroxide and formocresol for pulpotomies in primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Moretti, A B S; Sakai, V T; Oliveira, T M; Fornetti, A P C; Santos, C F; Machado, M A A M; Abdo, R C C

    2008-07-01

    To compare the effectiveness of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), calcium hydroxide (CH) and formocresol (FC) as pulp dressing agents in carious primary teeth. Forty-five primary mandibular molars with dental caries in 23 children [AUTHOR QUERY: How many children?] between 5 and 9 years old were treated by a conventional pulpotomy technique. The teeth were randomly assigned to the experimental (CH or MTA) or control (FC) groups. After coronal pulp removal and haemostasis, remaining pulp tissue was covered with MTA paste or CH powder in the experimental groups. In the control group, diluted FC was placed with a cotton pellet over the pulp tissue for 5 min and removed; the pulp tissue was then covered with zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) paste. All teeth were restored with reinforced ZOE base and resin modified glass-ionomer cement. Clinical and radiographic successes and failures were recorded at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 month follow-up. Forty-three teeth were available for follow-up. In the FC and MTA groups, 100% of the available teeth were clinically and radiographically successful at all follow-up appointments; dentine bridge formation could be detected in 29% of the teeth treated with MTA. In the CH group, 64% of the teeth presented clinical and radiographic failures detected throughout the follow-up period, and internal resorption was a frequent radiographic finding. Mineral trioxide aggregate was superior to CH and equally as effective as FC as a pulpotomy dressing in primary mandibular molars. Internal resorption was the most common radiographic finding up to 24 month after pulpotomies performed with CH.

  16. Apparatus and process for producing particulate sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Harbolt, B.A.; Howell, D.W.

    1989-09-05

    This patent describes apparatus for producing relatively large, high bulk density sulfur particles from molten sulfur. The apparatus including a means disposed beneath the porous belt for receiving both quenching liquid drained from sulfur particles on the belt and sulfur particles falling from the porous belt which are not discharged onto the second conveyor belt, and including means for recycling the received fallen particles back onto a particle receiving end region of the porous belt.

  17. The sulfur cycle in the marine atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Kasting, James F.; Turco, Richard P.; Liu, May S.

    1987-01-01

    The simulation of the sulfur cycle in the marine atmosphere using a one-dimensional photochemical model is described and evaluated. Theoretical uncertainties concerning the operation of the marine sulfur cycle are examined, and measurements of sulfur gases in the marine atmosphere necessary for developing the model are derived. Previous modeling studies are reviewed, and the data from these studies are compared to the model simulations. Recommendations for improving the simulation of the sulfur cycle in the marine atmosphere are discussed.

  18. Behavior of sulfur during coal pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shao, D.; Hutchinson, E.J.; Heidbrink, J.; Pan, W.-P.; Chou, C.-L.

    1994-01-01

    The behavior of sulfur in Illinois coals during pyrolysis was evaluated by thermogravimetry/ Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (TG/FT-IR) techniques. SO2, COS, and H2S were major gaseous sulfur-containing products observed during coal pyrolysis. The release rates of the gaseous sulfur species showed several peaks within the temperature ranges, which were due to the emission of different forms of sulfur in coal. ?? 1994.

  19. Two stage sorption of sulfur compounds

    DOEpatents

    Moore, William E.

    1992-01-01

    A two stage method for reducing the sulfur content of exhaust gases is disclosed. Alkali- or alkaline-earth-based sorbent is totally or partially vaporized and introduced into a sulfur-containing gas stream. The activated sorbent can be introduced in the reaction zone or the exhaust gases of a combustor or a gasifier. High efficiencies of sulfur removal can be achieved.

  20. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external tank...

  1. 21 CFR 582.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 582.1095 Section 582.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Product. Sulfuric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  2. 21 CFR 582.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 582.1095 Section 582.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Product. Sulfuric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  3. 21 CFR 582.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 582.1095 Section 582.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Product. Sulfuric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  4. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external tank...

  5. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external tank...

  6. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external tank...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 582.1095 Section 582.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Product. Sulfuric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 184.1095 Section 184.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Sulfuric acid (H2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7664-93-9), also known as oil of vitriol, is...

  9. 21 CFR 582.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 582.1095 Section 582.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Product. Sulfuric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  10. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external tank...

  11. 46 CFR 148.315 - Sulfur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sulfur. 148.315 Section 148.315 Shipping COAST GUARD... SPECIAL HANDLING Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.315 Sulfur. (a) This part applies to lump or coarse grain powder sulfur only. Fine-grained powder (“flowers of sulfur”) may not...

  12. 21 CFR 182.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 182.3862 Section 182.3862 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance...

  13. 21 CFR 182.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sulfur dioxide. 182.3862 Section 182.3862 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance...

  14. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 582.3862 Section 582.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  15. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 582.3862 Section 582.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  16. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 582.3862 Section 582.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  17. 46 CFR 148.315 - Sulfur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sulfur. 148.315 Section 148.315 Shipping COAST GUARD... SPECIAL HANDLING Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.315 Sulfur. (a) This part applies to lump or coarse grain powder sulfur only. Fine-grained powder (“flowers of sulfur”) may not...

  18. 46 CFR 148.315 - Sulfur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sulfur. 148.315 Section 148.315 Shipping COAST GUARD... SPECIAL HANDLING Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.315 Sulfur. (a) This part applies to lump or coarse grain powder sulfur only. Fine-grained powder (“flowers of sulfur”) may not...

  19. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 582.3862 Section 582.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  20. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 582.3862 Section 582.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  1. 21 CFR 182.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 182.3862 Section 182.3862 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance...

  2. 46 CFR 148.315 - Sulfur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sulfur. 148.315 Section 148.315 Shipping COAST GUARD... SPECIAL HANDLING Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.315 Sulfur. (a) This part applies to lump or coarse grain powder sulfur only. Fine-grained powder (“flowers of sulfur”) may not...

  3. Air Quality Criteria for Sulfur Oxides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Air Pollution Control Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Included is a literature review which comprehensively discusses knowledge of the sulfur oxides commonly found in the atmosphere. The subject content is represented by the 10 chapter titles: Physical and Chemical Properties and the Atmospheric Reactions of the Oxides of Sulfur; Sources and Methods of Measurements of Sulfur Oxides in the Atmosphere;…

  4. 21 CFR 182.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 182.3862 Section 182.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur...

  5. 21 CFR 182.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 182.3862 Section 182.3862 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance...

  6. An ex-vivo comparative study of root-end marginal adaptation using grey mineral trioxide aggregate, white mineral trioxide aggregate, and Portland cement under scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baranwal, Akash Kumar; Paul, Mohan L.; Mazumdar, Dibyendu; Adhikari, Haridas Das; Vyavahare, Nishant K.; Jhajharia, Kapil

    2015-01-01

    Context: Where nonsurgical endodontic intervention is not possible, or it will not solve the problem, surgical endodontic treatment must be considered. A major cause of surgical endodontic failures is an inadequate apical seal, so the use of the suitable substance as root-end filling material that prevents egress of potential contaminants into periapical tissue is very critical. Aims: The aim of the present ex-vivo study was to compare and evaluate the three root-end filling materials of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) family (white MTA [WMTA], grey MTA [GMTA] and Portland cement [PC]) for their marginal adaptation at the root-end dentinal wall using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Sixty human single-rooted teeth were decoronated, instrumented, and obturated with Gutta-percha. After the root-end resection and apical cavity preparation, the teeth were randomly divided into three-experimental groups (each containing 20 teeth) and each group was filled with their respective experimental materials. After longitudinal sectioning of root, SEM examination was done to determine the overall gap between retrograde materials and cavity walls in terms of length and width of the gap (maximum) at the interface. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed to calculate the means with corresponding standard errors, median and ranges along with an analysis of variance and Tukey's test. Results: The least overall gap was observed in GMTA followed by PC and WMTA. While after statistically analyzing the various data obtained from different groups, there was no significant difference among these three groups in terms of marginal adaptation. Conclusion: GMTA showed the best overall adaptation to root dentinal wall compared to PC and WMTA. Being biocompatible and cheaper, the PC may be an alternative but not a substitute for MTA. PMID:26430305

  7. Flexible neutron shielding composite material of EPDM rubber with boron trioxide: Mechanical, thermal investigations and neutron shielding tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, T.; Güngör, A.; Reyhancan, İ. A.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, EPDM and boron trioxide composite was produced and mechanical, thermal and neutron shielding tests were performed. EPDM rubber (Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer) having a considerably high hydrogen content is an effective neutron shielding material. On the other hand, the materials containing boron components have effective thermal neutron absorption crossection. The composite of EPDM and boron trioxide would be an effective solution for both respects of flexibility and effectiveness for developing a neutron shielding material. Flexible nature of EPDM would be a great asset for the shielding purpose in case of intervention action to a radiation accident. The theoretical calculations and experimental neutron absorption tests have shown that the results were in parallel and an effective neutron shielding has been achieved with the use of the developed composite material.

  8. TRENDS IN RURAL SULFUR CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents an analysis of regional trends in atmospheric concentrations in sulfur dioxide (502) and particulate sulfate (50~- ) at rural monitoring sites in the Clean Air Act Status and Trends Monitoring Network (CAsTNet) from 1990 to 1999. A two-stage approach is used t...

  9. Sulfur monochloride in organic synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinova, L. S.; Rakitin, O. A.

    2014-03-01

    The data on the reactivity of sulfur monochloride published in the past 15 years have been reviewed and systematized. The review focuses on the synthesis of acyclic and heterocyclic compounds with the use of S2Cl2. The bibliography includes 154 references.

  10. Sulfur Dioxide and Material Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillette, Donald G.

    1975-01-01

    This study relates sulfur dioxide levels with material damage in heavily populated or polluted areas. Estimates of loss were determined from increased maintenance and replacement costs. The data indicate a decrease in losses during the past five years probably due to decline in pollution levels established by air quality standards. (MR)

  11. Seal for sodium sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Topouzian, Armenag; Minck, Robert W.; Williams, William J.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is directed to a seal for a sodium sulfur battery in which the sealing is accomplished by a radial compression seal made on a ceramic component of the battery which separates an anode compartment from a cathode compartment of the battery.

  12. Sulfur Dioxide and Material Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillette, Donald G.

    1975-01-01

    This study relates sulfur dioxide levels with material damage in heavily populated or polluted areas. Estimates of loss were determined from increased maintenance and replacement costs. The data indicate a decrease in losses during the past five years probably due to decline in pollution levels established by air quality standards. (MR)

  13. TRENDS IN RURAL SULFUR CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents an analysis of regional trends in atmospheric concentrations in sulfur dioxide (502) and particulate sulfate (50~- ) at rural monitoring sites in the Clean Air Act Status and Trends Monitoring Network (CAsTNet) from 1990 to 1999. A two-stage approach is used t...

  14. Sulfur isotope distribution in solfatares, Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoen, R.; Rye, R.O.

    1970-01-01

    Sulfur isotope data on hydrogen sulfide, native sulfur, and sulfates from acid hot-spring areas at Yellowstone National Park suggest that hydrogen sulfide oxidizes to sulfur analogically, whereas sulfur undergoes biological oxidation to sulfuric acid. An exception occurs at Mammoth Hot Springs where hydrogen sulfide apparently undergoes biochemical oxidation to sulfur.

  15. Sulfur isotope distribution in solfataras, yellowstone national park.

    PubMed

    Schoen, R; Rye, R O

    1970-12-04

    Sulfur isotope data on hydrogen sulfide, native sulfur, and sulfates from acid hot-spring areas at Yellowstone National Park suggest that hydrogen sulfide oxidizes to sulfur abiologically, whereas sulfur undergoes biological oxidation to sulfuric acid. An exception occurs at Mammoth Hot Springs where hydrogen sulfide apparently undergoes biochemical oxidation to sulfur.

  16. Wet Chemistry Synthesis of Multidimensional Nanocarbon-Sulfur Hybrid Materials with Ultrahigh Sulfur Loading for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Du, Wen-Cheng; Yin, Ya-Xia; Zeng, Xian-Xiang; Shi, Ji-Lei; Zhang, Shuai-Feng; Wan, Li-Jun; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2016-02-17

    An optimized nanocarbon-sulfur cathode material with ultrahigh sulfur loading of up to 90 wt % is realized in the form of sulfur nanolayer-coated three-dimensional (3D) conducting network. This 3D nanocarbon-sulfur network combines three different nanocarbons, as follows: zero-dimensional carbon nanoparticle, one-dimensional carbon nanotube, and two-dimensional graphene. This 3D nanocarbon-sulfur network is synthesized by using a method based on soluble chemistry of elemental sulfur and three types of nanocarbons in well-chosen solvents. The resultant sulfur-carbon material shows a high specific capacity of 1115 mA h g(-1) at 0.02C and good rate performance of 551 mA h g(-1) at 1C based on the mass of sulfur-carbon composite. Good battery performance can be attributed to the homogeneous compositing of sulfur with the 3D hierarchical hybrid nanocarbon networks at nanometer scale, which provides efficient multidimensional transport pathways for electrons and ions. Wet chemical method developed here provides an easy and cost-effective way to prepare sulfur-carbon cathode materials with high sulfur loading for application in high-energy Li-S batteries.

  17. Arsenic trioxide prevents nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide -stimulated RAW 264.7 by inhibiting a TRIF-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Miyuki; Ota, Akinobu; Karnan, Sivasundaram; Hossain, Ekhtear; Konishi, Yuko; Damdindorj, Lkhagvasuren; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Yokochi, Takashi; Nitta, Masakazu; Hosokawa, Yoshitaka

    2013-02-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is one of the most potent drugs in cancer chemotherapy, and is highly effective in treating both newly diagnosed and relapse patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Despite a number of reports regarding the molecular mechanisms by which ATO promotes anti-tumor or pro-apoptotic activity in hematological and other solid malignancies, the effects of ATO on immune responses remain poorly understood. To further understand and clarify the effects of ATO on immune responses, we sought to examine whether ATO affects the production of nitric oxide (NO) in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated mouse macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7. Arsenic trioxide was found to prevent NO production in a dose-dependent manner. Arsenic trioxide significantly inhibited the increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) at both the mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, our analyses revealed that the inhibitory effect of ATO on iNOS expression was ascribed to the prevention of IRF3 phosphorylation, interferon (IFN)-β expression, and STAT1 phosphorylation, but not the prevention of the MyD88-dependent pathway. Taken together, our results indicate that ATO prevents NO production by inhibiting the TIR-domain-containing adaptor protein inducing IFN-β (TRIF)-dependent pathway, thus highlighting an anti-inflammatory property of ATO in innate immunity.

  18. Blood biochemistry, thyroid hormones, and oxidant/antioxidant status of guinea pigs challenged with sodium arsenite or arsenic trioxide.

    PubMed

    Mohanta, Ranjan Kumar; Garg, Anil Kumar; Dass, Ram Sharan; Behera, Suvendu Kumar

    2014-08-01

    The present experiment aimed to compare the two most commonly used compounds of arsenic (sodium arsenite and arsenic trioxide) for their effect on blood metabolites, thyroid hormones, and oxidant/antioxidant status in guinea pigs. Twenty-one adult guinea pigs were randomly divided into three equal groups. Animals in group T1 (control) were fed a basal diet, whereas 50 ppm arsenic was added in the basal diet either as sodium arsenite (T2) or arsenic trioxide (T3) and fed for 11 weeks. Serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities were significantly increased along with a decrease in blood hemoglobin level in both the arsenic-administered groups. The level of erythrocytic antioxidants (catalase, superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione, glutathione-S-transferase, and glutathione reductase) was decreased and lipid peroxidation was elevated upon arsenic exposure. Serum thyroid hormone levels were reduced and arsenic levels in tissues increased in both the arsenic-exposed groups, irrespective of the arsenic compound. Thus, sodium arsenite and arsenic trioxide exerted similar adverse effects on blood metabolic profile, antioxidant status, and thyroid hormones in guinea pigs.

  19. Template-free fabrication of hierarchically flower-like tungsten trioxide assemblies with enhanced visible-light-driven photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiaguo; Qi, Lifang

    2009-09-30

    Hierarchically flower-like tungsten trioxide assemblies were fabricated on a large scale by a simple hydrothermal treatment of sodium tungstate in aqueous solution of nitric acid. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and N(2) adsorption-desorption measurements. The photocatalytic activity was evaluated by photocatalytic decolorization of rhodamine B aqueous solution under visible-light irradiation. It was found that the three-dimensional tungsten trioxide assemblies were constructed from two-dimensional layers, which were further composed of a large number of interconnected lathy nanoplates with different sizes. Such flower-like assemblies exhibited hierarchically porous structure and higher visible-light photocatalytic activity than the samples without such hierarchical structures due to their specific hierarchical pores that served as the transport paths for light and reactants. After five recycles for the photodegradation of RhB, the catalyst did not exhibit any great loss in activity, confirming hierarchically flower-like tungsten trioxide was stability and not photocorroded. This study may provide new insight into environmentally benign preparation and design of novel photocatalytic materials and enhancement of photocatalytic activity.

  20. Rhodanese Functions as Sulfur Supplier for Key Enzymes in Sulfur Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Aussignargues, Clément; Giuliani, Marie-Cécile; Infossi, Pascale; Lojou, Elisabeth; Guiral, Marianne; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Ilbert, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    How microorganisms obtain energy is a challenging topic, and there have been numerous studies on the mechanisms involved. Here, we focus on the energy substrate traffic in the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. This bacterium can use insoluble sulfur as an energy substrate and has an intricate sulfur energy metabolism involving several sulfur-reducing and -oxidizing supercomplexes and enzymes. We demonstrate that the cytoplasmic rhodanese SbdP participates in this sulfur energy metabolism. Rhodaneses are a widespread family of proteins known to transfer sulfur atoms. We show that SbdP has also some unusual characteristics compared with other rhodaneses; it can load a long sulfur chain, and it can interact with more than one partner. Its partners (sulfur reductase and sulfur oxygenase reductase) are key enzymes of the sulfur energy metabolism of A. aeolicus and share the capacity to use long sulfur chains as substrate. We demonstrate a positive effect of SbdP, once loaded with sulfur chains, on sulfur reductase activity, most likely by optimizing substrate uptake. Taken together, these results lead us to propose a physiological role for SbdP as a carrier and sulfur chain donor to these key enzymes, therefore enabling channeling of sulfur substrate in the cell as well as greater efficiency of the sulfur energy metabolism of A. aeolicus. PMID:22496367

  1. Rhodanese functions as sulfur supplier for key enzymes in sulfur energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Aussignargues, Clément; Giuliani, Marie-Cécile; Infossi, Pascale; Lojou, Elisabeth; Guiral, Marianne; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Ilbert, Marianne

    2012-06-08

    How microorganisms obtain energy is a challenging topic, and there have been numerous studies on the mechanisms involved. Here, we focus on the energy substrate traffic in the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. This bacterium can use insoluble sulfur as an energy substrate and has an intricate sulfur energy metabolism involving several sulfur-reducing and -oxidizing supercomplexes and enzymes. We demonstrate that the cytoplasmic rhodanese SbdP participates in this sulfur energy metabolism. Rhodaneses are a widespread family of proteins known to transfer sulfur atoms. We show that SbdP has also some unusual characteristics compared with other rhodaneses; it can load a long sulfur chain, and it can interact with more than one partner. Its partners (sulfur reductase and sulfur oxygenase reductase) are key enzymes of the sulfur energy metabolism of A. aeolicus and share the capacity to use long sulfur chains as substrate. We demonstrate a positive effect of SbdP, once loaded with sulfur chains, on sulfur reductase activity, most likely by optimizing substrate uptake. Taken together, these results lead us to propose a physiological role for SbdP as a carrier and sulfur chain donor to these key enzymes, therefore enabling channeling of sulfur substrate in the cell as well as greater efficiency of the sulfur energy metabolism of A. aeolicus.

  2. Unexpected extracellular and intracellular sulfur species during growth of Allochromatium vinosum with reduced sulfur compounds.

    PubMed

    Franz, Bettina; Gehrke, Thomas; Lichtenberg, Henning; Hormes, Josef; Dahl, Christiane; Prange, Alexander

    2009-08-01

    Before its uptake and oxidation by purple sulfur bacteria, elemental sulfur probably first has to be mobilized. To obtain more insight into this mobilization process in the phototrophic purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum, we used HPLC analysis and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy for the detection and identification of sulfur compounds in culture supernatants and bacterial cells. We intended to identify soluble sulfur compounds that specifically occur during growth on elemental sulfur, and therefore compared spectra of cultures grown on sulfur with those of cultures grown on sulfide or thiosulfate. While various unexpected oxidized organic sulfur species (sulfones, C-SO(2)-C, and sulfonates, C-SO(3)(-)) were observed via XANES spectroscopy in the supernatants, we obtained evidence for the presence of monosulfane sulfonic acids inside the bacterial cells by HPLC analysis. The concentrations of the latter compounds showed a tight correlation with the content of intracellular sulfur, reaching their maximum when sulfur began to be oxidized. None of the detected sulfur compounds appeared to be a specific soluble intermediate or product of elemental sulfur mobilization. It therefore seems unlikely that mobilization of elemental sulfur by purple sulfur bacteria involves excretion of soluble sulfur-containing substances that would be able to act on substrate distant from the cells.

  3. In Situ Analysis of Sulfur Species in Sulfur Globules Produced from Thiosulfate by Thermoanaerobacter sulfurigignens and Thermoanaerobacterium thermosulfurigenes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-Jin; Prange, Alexander; Lichtenberg, Henning; Rohde, Manfred; Dashti, Mona; Wiegel, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    The Firmicutes Thermoanaerobacter sulfurigignens and Thermoanaerobacterium thermosulfurigenes convert thiosulfate, forming sulfur globules inside and outside cells. X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis revealed that the sulfur consisted mainly of sulfur chains with organic end groups similar to sulfur formed in purple sulfur bacteria, suggesting the possibility that the process of sulfur globule formation by bacteria is an ancient feature. PMID:17644590

  4. Antibotulinal efficacy of sulfur dioxide in meat.

    PubMed Central

    Tompkin, R B; Christiansen, L N; Shaparis, A B

    1980-01-01

    The addition of sodium metabisulfite as a source of sulfur dioxide delayed botulinal outgrowth in perishable canned comminuted pork when it was temperature abused at 27 degree C. The degree of inhibition was directly related to the level of sulfur dioxide. Levels greater than 100 microgram of sulfur dioxide per g were necessary to achieve significant inhibition when a target level of 100 botulinal spores per g was used. Sodium nitrite partially reduced the efficacy of the sulfur dioxide. Sulfur dioxide offers a new option for the control of botulinal outgrowth in cured or noncured meat and poultry products. PMID:6996613

  5. Process for reducing sulfur in coal char

    DOEpatents

    Gasior, Stanley J.; Forney, Albert J.; Haynes, William P.; Kenny, Richard F.

    1976-07-20

    Coal is gasified in the presence of a small but effective amount of alkaline earth oxide, hydroxide or carbonate to yield a char fraction depleted in sulfur. Gases produced during the reaction are enriched in sulfur compounds and the alkaline earth compound remains in the char fraction as an alkaline earth oxide. The char is suitable for fuel use, as in a power plant, and during combustion of the char the alkaline earth oxide reacts with at least a portion of the sulfur oxides produced from the residual sulfur contained in the char to further lower the sulfur content of the combustion gases.

  6. Comparative uptake of sulfur in sulfur dioxide and acid rain by corn (Zea mays L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    This study has compared and evaluated the absorption and accumulation of sulfur from the two major forms of sulfur pollution (sulfur dioxide and sulfur containing acid rain), by seedlings of corn (Zea mays L.). Plants were exposed to matched treatments containing equivalent ..mu..moles S/treatment in sulfur dioxide or simulated acid rain containing sulfuric acid. Pollution levels were chosen to represent low, medium and high ambient pollutant concentrations (0.13, 1.3 and 130.0 ..mu..moles S/treatment). The uptake and distribution of sulfur by plants was followed by using radioactively labelled sulfur (35-S) in both pollutants. Plants were exposed to the pollutants via a single injection of sulfur dioxide or by rainfall simulators with acid rain treatments. From the sulfur dioxide concentrations evaluated (0.67; 1.00; 2.60; 6.70; and 16 ppm), maximum absorption occurred at the highest concentration while sulfur was more efficiently absorbed at lower concentrations. Absorption of sulfur by plants exposed to acid rain (pH 5.4; 4.4; 3.4; and 2.6) was higher with high sulfur/low pH treatments. pH per se, was not responsible for increased sulfur absorption at low pH treatments. Of the total sulfur associated with the plant following exposure to sulfur dioxide and acid rain, 55% and 97%, respectively was not absorbed, and could be released after one minute of a foliar wash. At each equivalent concentration of sulfur, corn seedlings absorbed significantly greater amounts of sulfur from sulfur dioxide than from acid rain.

  7. Effect of temperature on the setting time of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA).

    PubMed

    Sharifi, R; Araghid, A; Ghanem, S; Fatahi, A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has numerous applications in dentistry due to various advantages. However, its long setting time has still remained a problem. The current study was conducted to investigate the effect of temperature (ambient and distilled water temperature) on the setting time of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Materials and methods: This experimental study comprised of two parts. In the first part, MTA and distilled water samples were kept at ambient temperature for 24 hours (before mixing: effect of distilled water temperature on the setting time of MTA and after mixing: effect of distilled water and ambient temperature on the setting time of MTA), and analyzed and divided into three groups: group 1 (4°C), group 2 (37°C) and group 3 (90°C). The mixed samples were placed in the glass cylinders with an internal diameter of 8 mm and a height of 10 mm, and kept at 37°C temperature and 100% humidity. In the second part, the samples were prepared the same as those of the first part and divided into three groups according to the terms of maintenance: group 1 (4°C), group 2 (37°C) and group 3 (75°C). The mixed samples were then put in glass cylinders with an internal diameter of 8 mm and a height of 10 mm and the samples of groups 1, 2 and 3 were kept at 4, 37 and 75 °C, respectively. At the end of each part, the primary and final setting times were measured by Gilmore needle. Data were analyzed by SPSS using Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Results: The findings of this study showed a significant reduction of the primary and final setting time of MTA for the samples of both parts of the study with an increase in ambient temperature (p<0.05). Conclusion: This study indicated that increased ambient temperature caused a reduction in the setting time of MTA.

  8. Low dose of arsenic trioxide triggers oxidative stress in zebrafish brain: expression of antioxidant genes.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Shuvasree; Mukherjee, Sandip; Chattopadhyay, Ansuman; Bhattacharya, Shelley

    2014-09-01

    Occurrence of arsenic in the aquatic environment of West Bengal (India), Bangladesh and other countries are of immediate environmental concern. In the present study, zebrafish (Danio rerio) was used as a model to investigate oxidative stress related enzyme activities and expression of antioxidant genes in the brain to 50µg/L arsenic trioxide for 90 days. In treated fish, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA) and conjugated diene (CD) showed a triphasic response attaining a peak at the end of the exposure. In addition, a gradual increase in GSH level was noted until 60 days and at 90 days, a sudden fall was recorded which heightened arsenic toxicity. However, GSH level does not correlate well with the glutathione reductase (GR) activity. Generation of ROS in zebrafish brain due to As2O3 exposure was further evidenced by significant alteration of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase (CAT) activity, which converts H2O2 to water and helps in detoxication. Moreover, enhanced mRNA level of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) in As2O3 exposed zebrafish indicates a protective role of Nrf2. kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), a negative regulator of Nrf2, inversely correlates with the mRNA expression of Nrf2. As2O3 induced toxicity was also validated by the alteration in NRF2 and NRF2 dependent expression of proteins such as heme oxygenase1 (HO1) and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone1 (NQO1). The mRNA expression of glutathione peroxidase (Gpx1), catalase (Cat), manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-Sod), copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn Sod) and cytochrome c oxidase1 (Cox1) were also up regulated. The expression of uncoupling protein 2 (Ucp2), an important mitochondrial enzyme was also subdued in arsenic exposed zebrafish. The oxidative stress induced by arsenic also cause reduced mRNA expression of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) present in the inner mitochondrial membrane and thereby indicating onset of apoptosis in

  9. Effect of temperature on the setting time of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA)

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, R; Araghid, A; Ghanem, S; Fatahi, A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has numerous applications in dentistry due to various advantages. However, its long setting time has still remained a problem. The current study was conducted to investigate the effect of temperature (ambient and distilled water temperature) on the setting time of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Materials and methods: This experimental study comprised of two parts. In the first part, MTA and distilled water samples were kept at ambient temperature for 24 hours (before mixing: effect of distilled water temperature on the setting time of MTA and after mixing: effect of distilled water and ambient temperature on the setting time of MTA), and analyzed and divided into three groups: group 1 (4°C), group 2 (37°C) and group 3 (90°C). The mixed samples were placed in the glass cylinders with an internal diameter of 8 mm and a height of 10 mm, and kept at 37°C temperature and 100% humidity. In the second part, the samples were prepared the same as those of the first part and divided into three groups according to the terms of maintenance: group 1 (4°C), group 2 (37°C) and group 3 (75°C). The mixed samples were then put in glass cylinders with an internal diameter of 8 mm and a height of 10 mm and the samples of groups 1, 2 and 3 were kept at 4, 37 and 75 °C, respectively. At the end of each part, the primary and final setting times were measured by Gilmore needle. Data were analyzed by SPSS using Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Results: The findings of this study showed a significant reduction of the primary and final setting time of MTA for the samples of both parts of the study with an increase in ambient temperature (p<0.05). Conclusion: This study indicated that increased ambient temperature caused a reduction in the setting time of MTA. PMID:28255404

  10. [Mechanism of apoptosis of NB4 cells induced by arsenic trioxide and cyclooxygenase-2 expression].

    PubMed

    Qin, Da-Bing; Chen, Jie-Ping; Wang, Sheng-Qi

    2011-06-01

    Objective of this study was to investigate the changes of cyclooxygenase-2 expression and mitochondrial membrane potential in apoptotic NB4 cells induced by arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)). The morphological changes in apoptosis process of NB4 cells treated by arsenic trioxide were observed under immunofluorescence microscope and DNA electrophoresis method, and the apoptosis rate of NB4 cells and the variations of mitochondrial membrane potential were detected by flow cytometry. Furthermore, the variations of expression level of cyclooxygenase-2 protein were analyzed by using Western blot method. The results indicated that after NB4 cells were treated with 2 µmol/L As(2)O(3) for 48 hours, some variations of NB4 cells were observed, such as pyknosis, chromatin segmentation, even fragmentation. Meanwhile, the typical DNA Ladder phenomenon was observed. The apoptosis rate of NB4 cells treated with 3 µmol/L As(2)O(3) for 48 hours was 33.34%, Furthermore the apoptosis rate of NB4 cells was enhanced along with the increase of concentration of As(2)O(3). After NB4 cells were treated with 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 8 µmol/L As(2)O(3) for 48 hours, the mitochondrial membrane potential decreased by 12.8%, 21.6%, 66.9%, 83.7% and 83.8% respectively. The Western blot detection results showed that the expression level of cyclooxygenase-2 protein in NB4 cells was lower than that in control cells and decreased along with the rise of As(2)O(3) concentration, then the negative dose-dependent manner was observed between these 2 groups. It is concluded that As(2)O(3) can effectively induce NB4 cell apoptosis, and the dose-dependent manner existed in certain extent of concentrations. The decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential may be related with NB4 cell apoptosis induced by As(2)O(3). Cyclooxygenase-2 participates in the process of NB4 cell apoptosis induced by As(2)O(3).

  11. Crystalline structure of sulfur nanowires.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal, Eliel; Santiago, Patricia; Mendoza, Doroteo

    2001-03-01

    Sulfur nanowires have been synthesized by a nanoporous alumina template approach. Two types of wires were obtained, some of them straight and very long but the most of them curly. The diameter was 15nm, typically more than 1000nm of length and the longest of these wires seems to be almost monocrystalline.A first sight on them by electron microscopy showed differences, on the crystalline structure, compared to the most stable bulk allotrope. Studying carefully the wires' structure by X-ray diffraction on the confined wires, and by high resolution electron microscopy and electron diffraction, on the released ones, we found that the cell parameters are near the ones for α bulk sulfur.

  12. Transporters in plant sulfur metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gigolashvili, Tamara; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur is an essential nutrient, necessary for synthesis of many metabolites. The uptake of sulfate, primary and secondary assimilation, the biosynthesis, storage, and final utilization of sulfur (S) containing compounds requires a lot of movement between organs, cells, and organelles. Efficient transport systems of S-containing compounds across the internal barriers or the plasma membrane and organellar membranes are therefore required. Here, we review a current state of knowledge of the transport of a range of S-containing metabolites within and between the cells as well as of their long distance transport. An improved understanding of mechanisms and regulation of transport will facilitate successful engineering of the respective pathways, to improve the plant yield, biotic interaction and nutritional properties of crops. PMID:25250037

  13. [Sulfur isotopic ratios indicating sulfur cycling in slope soils of karst areas].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Cong-qiang; Li, Xiao-dong; Liu, Tao-ze; Zhang, Li-li

    2010-02-01

    Sequential extraction methods for soil sulfur were used to determine delta34 S ratios and sulfur contents of total sulfur, organic sulfur, SO4(21) and FeS2 in slope soils of karst areas. In general, FeS2 has the lowest delta34 S ratios, ranging from -6.86% per hundred to -4.229% per hundred, followed in ascending order by SO4(2-) (-2.64% per hundred - -1.34% per hundred), total sulfur (-3.25% per hundred - -1.03% per hundred) and organic sulfur (-1.63% per hundred -0.50% per hundred) in surface soils of profiles, and delta34 S ratios in different sulfur forms all show increasing trend with profiles deepening. Covariations of delta34 S ratios of SO4(2-) and FeS2 with increasing depth are related to SO4(2-) dissimilatory reduction, while the increase in parallel of delta34 S ratios of total sulfur and organic sulfur could be resulted from organic sulfur cycling. delta34 S ratios have been extensively used to indicate sulfur sources, moreover, SO4(2-) dissimilatory reduction and organic sulfur mineralization result in significant sulfur isotopic fractionation, and sulfides oxidation and SO4(2-) assimilation have no isotopic fractionation occurred, the vertical variations of delta34 S ratios in different sulfur forms can therefore be good records for depth-dependant sulfur cycling processes. Furthermore, by comparing depth distributions of sulfur contents and delta34 S ratios in different sulfur forms, it is easily to discuss the migration of SO4(-1) and organic sulfur fractions in soil profiles.

  14. Effect of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate, Calcium-Enriched Mixture Cement and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate with Disodium Hydrogen Phosphate on BMP-2 Production.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Negin; Rahimi, Saeed; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Solaimanirad, Jafar; Shahi, Shahriar; Shafaie, Hajar; Salem Milani, Amin; Shakuie, Sahar; Zand, Vahid; Abdolrahimi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    One of the hypotheses regarding the calcification induction by mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is the involvement of transforming growth factor-Beta (TGF-β) super family. Calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement is one of the endodontic biomaterials with clinical applications similar to MTA. The aim of the present in vitro study was to compare the induction of bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2) by a combination of disodium hydrogen phosphate (DSHP) and tooth colored ProRoot MTA (WMTA), to that of CEM cement and WMTA. Human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) were obtained from the attached gingiva of human premolars. HGFs were cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's medium, supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum, penicillin, and streptomycin. Cells in groups 1, 2 and 3 were exposed to WMTA, CEM and WMTA+DSHP discs, respectively. The fourth group served as the control. After 72 h of exposure, HGF viability was determined by Mosmann's tetrazolium toxicity (MTT) assay. BMP-2 levels in cell-free culture media were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Statistical analysis was performed using the one-way ANOVA, followed by the post hoc Games-Howell test for BMP-2 and post hoc Tukey's test for the results of MTT assay. Cellular viability was significantly higher in group 3 compared to the other groups (P<0.05); however, CEM and WMTA did not exhibit significant differences (P=0.08). The control group exhibited significantly higher cellular viability in comparison to the other groups of the study (P<0.05). The highest and lowest protein production rates were observed in the WMTA (3167±274.46 pg/mL) and WMTA+DSHP (1796±839.49 pg/mL) groups, respectively. There were no significant differences between the control, WMTA and CEM groups (P>0.05). WMTA and CEM did not exhibit any significant differences in terms of inducing BMP-2 production; however, incorporation of DSHP into WMTA resulted in a decrease in the induction of this protein.

  15. Effect of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate, Calcium-Enriched Mixture Cement and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate with Disodium Hydrogen Phosphate on BMP-2 Production

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Negin; Rahimi, Saeed; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Solaimanirad, Jafar; Shahi, Shahriar; Shafaie, Hajar; Salem Milani, Amin; Shakuie, Sahar; Zand, Vahid; Abdolrahimi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: One of the hypotheses regarding the calcification induction by mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is the involvement of transforming growth factor-Beta (TGF-β) super family. Calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement is one of the endodontic biomaterials with clinical applications similar to MTA. The aim of the present in vitro study was to compare the induction of bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2) by a combination of disodium hydrogen phosphate (DSHP) and tooth colored ProRoot MTA (WMTA), to that of CEM cement and WMTA. Methods and Materials: Human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) were obtained from the attached gingiva of human premolars. HGFs were cultured in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s medium, supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum, penicillin, and streptomycin. Cells in groups 1, 2 and 3 were exposed to WMTA, CEM and WMTA+DSHP discs, respectively. The fourth group served as the control. After 72 h of exposure, HGF viability was determined by Mosmann’s tetrazolium toxicity (MTT) assay. BMP-2 levels in cell-free culture media were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Statistical analysis was performed using the one-way ANOVA, followed by the post hoc Games-Howell test for BMP-2 and post hoc Tukey’s test for the results of MTT assay. Results: Cellular viability was significantly higher in group 3 compared to the other groups (P<0.05); however, CEM and WMTA did not exhibit significant differences (P=0.08). The control group exhibited significantly higher cellular viability in comparison to the other groups of the study (P<0.05). The highest and lowest protein production rates were observed in the WMTA (3167±274.46 pg/mL) and WMTA+DSHP (1796±839.49 pg/mL) groups, respectively. There were no significant differences between the control, WMTA and CEM groups (P>0.05). Conclusion: WMTA and CEM did not exhibit any significant differences in terms of inducing BMP-2 production; however, incorporation of DSHP into WMTA resulted in a

  16. Sodium Sulfur Technology Program Nastec

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Highley, Bob; Somerville, W. Andrew

    1992-01-01

    The NaSTEC program focuses on developing currently available sodium sulfur cells for use in space applications and investigating the operational parameters of the cells. The specific goals of the program are to determine the operational parameters and verify safety limits of Na/S technology battery cells; test long term zero-g operation; and create a life test database. The program approach and ground and flight test objectives are described in textual and graphic form.

  17. Arsenic trioxide treatment of rabbit liver VX-2 carcinoma via hepatic arterial cannulation-induced apoptosis and decreased levels of survivin in the tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Gong, Jian; Jiang, Xuyuan; Shao, Haibo

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the role of tumor apoptosis-inhibitory protein survivin in arsenic trioxide-induced apoptosis in VX-2 carcinoma in the rabbit liver by means of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization. Sixteen rabbits with 32 implanted hepatic VX-2 tumors were randomly divided into two groups. The experimental group received 2 mg of arsenic trioxide and 1 mL of ultra-fluid lipiodol co-injected via hepatic arterial cannulation and the control group received only 1 mL of lipiodol. Animals were sacrificed 3 weeks after trans-catheterial arterial chemoembolization. Tumor tissue and tumor-peripheral tissue were collected for analysis. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end-labeling staining was used to assess tumor cells apoptosis. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess the presence of survivin protein. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the expression of survivin gene. The number of apoptotic cells significantly increased in the tumor tissue (5.20 ± 0.60%) compared to tumor-peripheral tissue (1.29 ± 0.42%) of the arsenic trioxide-treated group. Survivin expression levels in the tumor tissue were significantly reduced in arsenic trioxide-treated group (7.68 ± 0.65) compared to the control group (35.30 ± 4.63). Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization with arsenic trioxide induced apoptosis of VX-2 carcinoma, in which tumor apoptosis-inhibitory protein survivin may have played a role.

  18. Arsenic trioxide mediates HAPI microglia inflammatory response and the secretion of inflammatory cytokine IL-6 via Akt/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Mao, Jiamin; Zhao, Jianmei; Zhang, Yan; Li, Ting; Wang, Cheng; Xu, Lingfei; Hu, Qiaoyun; Wang, Xiaoke; Jiang, Shengyang; Nie, Xiaoke; Wu, Qiyun

    2016-11-01

    Arsenic is a widely distributed toxic metalloid in around the world. Inorganic arsenic species are deemed to affect astrocytes functions and to cause neuron apoptosis. Microglia are the key cell type involved in innate immune responses in CNS, and microglia activation has been linked to inflammation and neurotoxicity. In this study, using ELISA and reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), we showed that Arsenic trioxide up-regulated the expression and secretion of IL-6 in a dose-dependent manner and a time-dependent manner in cultured HAPI microglia cells. These pro-inflammatory responses were inhibited by the Akt blocker, LY294002. Further, Arsenic trioxide exposure could induce phospho rylationand degradation of IкBα, and the translocation of NF-κB p65 from the cytosol to the nucleus in this HAPI microglia cell line. Thus, the NF-кB signaling pathway can be activated after Arsenic trioxide treatment. Besides, Akt blocker LY294002 also obviously attenuated NF-кB activation and transnuclear induced by Arsenic trioxide. In concert with these results, we highlighted that the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokine and NF-кB activation induced by Arsenic trioxide can be mediated by elevation of p-Akt in HAPI microglia cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Utilization of solid "elemental" sulfur by the phototrophic purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum: a sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Franz, Bettina; Lichtenberg, Henning; Hormes, Josef; Modrow, Hartwig; Dahl, Christiane; Prange, Alexander

    2007-04-01

    The purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum can use elemental sulfur as an electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis. The elemental sulfur is taken up, transformed into intracellular sulfur globules and oxidized to sulfate. Commercially available "elemental" sulfur usually consists of the two species cyclo-octasulfur and polymeric sulfur. The authors investigated whether only one sulfur species is used or at least preferred when Alc. vinosum takes up elemental sulfur and forms globules. To this end, Alc. vinosum was cultivated photolithoautotrophically with two types of elemental sulfur that differed in their cyclo-octasulfur : polymeric sulfur ratio, as well as with pure polymeric sulfur. Sulfur speciation was analysed using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and sulfate contents were determined by HPLC to quantify the amount of elemental sulfur being taken up and oxidized by Alc. vinosum. The results show that Alc. vinosum uses only the polymeric sulfur (sulfur chain) fraction of elemental sulfur and is probably unable to take up and form sulfur globules from cyclo-octasulfur. Furthermore, direct cell-sulfur contact appears to be necessary for uptake of elemental sulfur by Alc. vinosum.

  20. Successful sulfur recovery in low sulfurate compounds obtained from the zinc industry: Evaporation-condensation method.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Gómez, Sergio Luis; Sánchez, Maria Luisa; Blanco, Francisco; Ayala, Julia; de Cos Juez, Francisco Javier

    2017-08-15

    The improvement of an evaporation-condensation method allows for successful recovery of elemental sulfur from sulfide concentrates from the zinc industry. Elemental sulfur can be obtained with this method in samples with a low (60%) sulfur content. The effects of heating temperature between 150°C and 250°C and heating time up to 120min on the recovery of sulfur are also studied. Elemental sulfur obtained in this way is of high purity and therefore, there is no need for further purification. The treatment of these industrial residues would help removing sulfur from the environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Incorporating Sulfur Inside the Pores of Carbons for Advanced Lithium-Sulfur Batteries: An Electrolysis Approach.

    PubMed

    He, Bin; Li, Wen-Cui; Yang, Chao; Wang, Si-Qiong; Lu, An-Hui

    2016-01-26

    We have developed an electrolysis approach that allows effective and uniform incorporation of sulfur inside the micropores of carbon nanosheets for advanced lithium-sulfur batteries. The sulfur-carbon hybrid can be prepared with a 70 wt % sulfur loading, in which no nonconductive sulfur agglomerations are formed. Because the incorporated sulfur is electrically connected to the carbon matrix in nature, the hybrid cathode shows excellent electrochemical performance, including a high reversible capacity, good rate capability, and good cycling stability, as compared to one prepared using the popular melt-diffusion method.

  2. Robust, heat-resistant and multifunctional superhydrophobic coating of carbon microflowers with molybdenum trioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Zhao, Meiyun; Guo, Zhiguang

    2017-11-15

    Superhydrophobic materials have triggered large interest due to their widespread applications, such as self-cleaning, corrosion resistance, anti-icing, and oil/water separation. However, suffering from weak mechanical strength, plenty of superhydrophobic materials are limited in practical application. Herein, we prepared hierarchical carbon microflowers (CMF) dispersed with molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) nanoparticles (MoO3/CMF) via a two-step preparation method. Taking advantage of high-adhesion epoxy resin and the modification with 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltriethoxysilane (PDES), the modified MoO3/CMF (PDES-MoO3/CMF) coating on various substrates shows great waterproof ability, excellent chemical stability, good mechanical durability, and self-cleaning property. More significantly, the prepared PDES-MoO3/CMF powder with high thermal stability (250°C) can be used for oil/water separation due to its special flower-like structure and superhydrophobicity/superoleophilicity. All of these advantages endow the superhydrophobic powders with huge potential in the practical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Synchronization in the Heart Rate and the Vasomotion in Rat Aorta: Effect of Arsenic Trioxide.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Fredi; Palacios, Javier; Nwokocha, Chukwuemeka R

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is used clinically in the management of acute promyelocytic leukemia, and the use of electrocardiogram (ECG) in this management is important as arsenic use may cause distortion of the electrical properties with its attendant sequel. We studied the effect of As2O3 on vasomotion in rat aortic rings using isometric tension recordings and ECG in anesthetized rats. The results showed that As2O3 (10(-5) M) significantly (p < 0.01) reduced the frequency of acetylcholine (10(-5) M ACh)- and KCl (10 mM)-induced vasomotion, and it also increased the relaxation time (R t) of vasomotion. This effect was restored by 10(-8) M sodium nitroprusside (nitric oxide donor). ACh-induced NO release in the aorta was blunted in the presence of As2O3. The corrected QT interval (QTc) of the ECG, and time dilation (T d) of the pulse wave in the tail artery of the anesthetized rat were significantly (p < 0.05) increased in the arsenic-treated group (50 ppb As) versus control. In conclusion, data suggest that arsenic-induced reduction in vasomotion frequency of the isolated aortic rings is associated with a decreased bioavailability of NO, an increase in QTc and a decrease in the frequency of the pulse wave generated by the cardiac cycle in anesthetized rats.

  4. Heat shock protein inhibitors, 17-DMAG and KNK437, enhance arsenic trioxide-induced mitotic apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yichen; Yen Wenyen; Lee, T.-C. Yih, L.-H.

    2009-04-15

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has recently emerged as a promising therapeutic agent in leukemia because of its ability to induce apoptosis. However, there is no sufficient evidence to support its therapeutic use for other types of cancers. In this study, we investigated if, and how, 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin (17-DMAG), an antagonist of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), and KNK437, a HSP synthesis inhibitor, potentiated the cytotoxic effect of ATO. Our results showed that cotreatment with ATO and either 17-DMAG or KNK437 significantly increased ATO-induced cell death and apoptosis. siRNA-mediated attenuation of the expression of the inducible isoform of HSP70 (HSP70i) or HSP90{alpha}/{beta} also enhanced ATO-induced apoptosis. In addition, cotreatment with ATO and 17-DMAG or KNK437 significantly increased ATO-induced mitotic arrest and ATO-induced BUBR1 phosphorylation and PDS1 accumulation. Cotreatment also significantly increased the percentage of mitotic cells with abnormal mitotic spindles and promoted metaphase arrest as compared to ATO treatment alone. These results indicated that 17-DMAG or KNK437 may enhance ATO cytotoxicity by potentiating mitotic arrest and mitotic apoptosis possibly through increased activation of the spindle checkpoint.

  5. Effects of arsenic trioxide on the expression of ezrin in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Yang, Chao; Du, Peng; Zhang, Jun-Li; Zhang, Jia-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) treatment on the expression of ezrin and serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A total of 24 patients (20 males and 4 females) with resectable HCC were treated with venous injection of As2O3 for 14 days (10 mg/d) before surgery. The ezrin expression and serum AFP levels were assessed before and after treatment, respectively. The serum AFP levels were 325.5 ng/L before treatment and 278.6 ng/L after treatment, with statistical significant difference (Z = −2.360, P < .05). The expression of ezrin was negative, weak positive, and strong positive in 11, 7, and 6 cases, respectively, before As2O3 treatment, and 17, 5, 2 cases respectively after the treatment. The difference between the 2 groups was statistically significant (χ2 = 5.619, P < .05). Also, the results showed that there was a significant correlation between the high serum AFP level (AFP ≥ 500 ng/L) and high expression of ezrin (χ2 = 8.080, P < .05). As2O3 treatment can significantly downregulate the expression of ezrin in HCC. PMID:28858082

  6. Density-functional studies of tungsten trioxide, tungsten bronzes, and related systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingham, B.; Hendy, S. C.; Chong, S. V.; Tallon, J. L.

    2005-08-01

    Tungsten trioxide adopts a variety of structures which can be intercalated with charged species to alter the electronic properties, thus forming “tungsten bronzes.” Similar effects are observed upon removing oxygen from WO3 . We present a computational study of cubic and hexagonal alkali bronzes and examine the effects on cell size and band structure as the size of the intercalated ion is increased. With the exception of hydrogen (which is predicted to be unstable as an intercalate), the behavior of the bronzes are relatively consistent. NaWO3 is the most stable of the cubic systems, although in the hexagonal system the larger ions are more stable. The band structures are identical, with the intercalated atom donating its single electron to the tungsten 5d valence band. A study of fractional doping in the NaxWO3 system (0⩽x⩽1) showed a linear variation in cell parameter and a systematic shift in the Fermi level into the conduction band. In the oxygen-deficient WO3-x system the Fermi level undergoes a sudden jump into the conduction band at around x=0.2 . Lastly, three compounds of a layered WO4•α,ω -diaminoalkane hybrid series were studied and found to be insulating, with features in the band structure similar to those of the parent WO3 compound that relate well to experimental UV-visible spectroscopy results.

  7. Short-term antimicrobial properties of mineral trioxide aggregate with incorporated silver-zeolite.

    PubMed

    Odabaş, Mesut E; Cinar, Cağdaş; Akça, Gülçin; Araz, Ibrahim; Ulusu, Tezer; Yücel, Hayrettin

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine whether adding silver-zeolite (SZ) to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) would enhance the antimicrobial activity of MTA against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC #25923), Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC #29212), Escherichia coli (ATCC#25922), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC #27853), Candida albicans (ATCC #90028), Porphyromonas gingivalis (ATCC #33277), Actinomyces israelii (ATCC #12102), and Prevotella intermedia (ATCC# 15032). SZ was added at 0.2% and 2% mass fraction concentration to MTA powder. The control group was MTA powder with no SZ. The antimicrobial effect test was accomplished by placing freshly mixed MTA specimens on agar plates inoculated with microorganisms and comparing the zones of inhibition at 24, 48, and 72 h. The amounts of silver ion release from MTA specimens were measured with atomic absorption spectrophotometry at 10-min, 24-, 48-, and 72-h periods. The pH of MTA specimens was measured with a pH meter at 10-min, 24-, 48-, and 72-h periods. MTA with 2% and 0.2% SZ specimens showed inhibitory effects on some microorganisms at all time periods, whereas no antimicrobial activity showed for P. intermedia and A. israelii. MTA without SZ inhibited C. albicans, E. Coli, and P. intermedia. The highest silver release was detected in 2% SZ MTA at 24 h. The incorporation of SZ may enhance the antimicrobial activity of MTA.

  8. Arsenic trioxide alters the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cell into cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Rebuzzini, Paola; Cebral, Elisa; Fassina, Lorenzo; Alberto Redi, Carlo; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Garagna, Silvia

    2015-10-08

    Chronic arsenic exposure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality for cardiovascular diseases. Arsenic increases myocardial infarction mortality in young adulthood, suggesting that exposure during foetal life correlates with cardiac alterations emerging later. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of arsenic trioxide (ATO) cardiomyocytes disruption during their differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cells. Throughout 15 days of differentiation in the presence of ATO (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 μM) we analysed: the expression of i) marker genes of mesoderm (day 4), myofibrillogenic commitment (day 7) and post-natal-like cardiomyocytes (day 15); ii) sarcomeric proteins and their organisation; iii) Connexin 43 and iv) the kinematics contractile properties of syncytia. The higher the dose used, the earlier the stage of differentiation affected (mesoderm commitment, 1.0 μM). At 0.5 or 1.0 μM the expression of cardiomyocyte marker genes is altered. Even at 0.1 μM, ATO leads to reduction and skewed ratio of sarcomeric proteins and to a rarefied distribution of Connexin 43 cardiac junctions. These alterations contribute to the dysruption of the sarcomere and syncytium organisation and to the impairment of kinematic parameters of cardiomyocyte function. This study contributes insights into the mechanistic comprehension of cardiac diseases caused by in utero arsenic exposure.

  9. Evaluation of mineral trioxide aggregate as root canal sealer: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Sophia; Emil, Jonathan; Paulaian, Benin

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the clinical and radiological outcome of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) or epoxy resin as a root canal sealer compared with zinc oxide eugenol sealer. Materials and Methods: 45 single rooted teeth with periapical index Score 2 or more were allotted to three groups with 15 teeth in each group. Root canal treatment was performed in two visits and obturated with Gutta-percha as obturating material and zinc oxide eugenol as sealer in Group 1, epoxy resin as sealer in Group 2 and MTA mixed with propylene glycol as sealer in Group 3. Visual analog scale, periapical index and VixWin digital Pro image analysis software were used for evaluation. The quantitative data was analyzed by t-test and analysis of variance. Ordinal data was analyzed by Wilcoxon's signed rank test, Mann-Whitney and Kruskall-Wallis test. Results: Results suggested that there exists no statistically significant difference in clinical or radiological outcome of root canal therapy with three different types of sealers used in this study. Conclusions: MTA could be used as a root canal sealer with equal effectiveness compared with epoxy resin and zinc oxide eugenol sealers. Further long-term studies should be carried out to prove the effectiveness. PMID:24347880

  10. Identifying arsenic trioxide (ATO) functions in leukemia cells by using time series gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong; Lin, Shan; Cui, Jingru

    2014-02-10

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is presently the most active single agent in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). In order to explore the molecular mechanism of ATO in leukemia cells with time series, we adopted bioinformatics strategy to analyze expression changing patterns and changes in transcription regulation modules of time series genes filtered from Gene Expression Omnibus database (GSE24946). We totally screened out 1847 time series genes for subsequent analysis. The KEGG (Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes) pathways enrichment analysis of these genes showed that oxidative phosphorylation and ribosome were the top 2 significantly enriched pathways. STEM software was employed to compare changing patterns of gene expression with assigned 50 expression patterns. We screened out 7 significantly enriched patterns and 4 tendency charts of time series genes. The result of Gene Ontology showed that functions of times series genes mainly distributed in profiles 41, 40, 39 and 38. Seven genes with positive regulation of cell adhesion function were enriched in profile 40, and presented the same first increased model then decreased model as profile 40. The transcription module analysis showed that they mainly involved in oxidative phosphorylation pathway and ribosome pathway. Overall, our data summarized the gene expression changes in ATO treated K562-r cell lines with time and suggested that time series genes mainly regulated cell adhesive. Furthermore, our result may provide theoretical basis of molecular biology in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Blockage of JNK pathway enhances arsenic trioxide-induced apoptosis in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.-S.; Liu, Z.-M.; Hong, D.-Y.

    2010-04-15

    Arsenic is well known as a carcinogen predisposing humans to some severe diseases and also as an effective medicine for treating acute promyelocytic leukemia, syphilis, and psoriasis. Multiple active mechanisms, including cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, have been proposed in therapy; however, the opposing effects of arsenic remain controversial. Our previous study found that arsenic trioxide (ATO)-induced activation of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} (p21) led to A431 cell death through the antagonistic effects of the signaling of ERK1/2 and JNK1. In the current study, the inhibitory effects of JNK1 on ATO-induced p21 expression were explored. Over-expression of JNK1 in A431 cells could inhibit p21 expression, which was associated with HDAC1 and TGIF. Using the GST pull-down assay and fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis, N-terminal domain (amino acids 1-108) of TGIF, critical to its binding with c-Jun, was found. Using reporter assays, requirement of the C-terminal domain (amino acids 138-272) of TGIF to suppress ATO-induced p21 expression was observed. Thus, the domains of TGIF that carried out its inhibitory effects on p21 were identified. Finally, treatment with JNK inhibitor SP600125 could enhance ATO-induced apoptosis of HaCaT keratinocytes by using flow cytometry.

  12. Grape seed and skin extract protects against arsenic trioxide induced oxidative stress in rat heart.

    PubMed

    Sfaxi, Ichraf; Charradi, Kamel; Limam, Ferid; El May, Michèle Veronique; Aouani, Ezzedine

    2015-07-29

    Arsenic is a metalloid found in water, soil, and air from natural and anthropogenic sources, and is commonly found in inorganic as well as organic forms. The clinical use of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is limited by its cardiotoxic side effects. Grape seed and skin extract (GSSE) is a polyphenolic mixture with antioxidant properties. This study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of GSSE on arsenic-induced cardiac oxidative stress and injury. Animals exposed to 2.5 mg/kg As2O3 for 21 days exhibited a relevant increase in heart lipoperoxidation, protein carbonylation, and inflammation, as well as a drop in the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). In addition, As2O3 disturbed heart lipidemia and lipase activity, transition metals distribution and the associated enzymes, intracellular mediators such as calcium and the associated calpain activity, as well as myocardial architecture. Treatment with 4 g/kg GSSE protected against most of the deleterious effects provoked by As2O3. Our data suggest that GSSE has the potential to protect against As2O3-induced cardiotoxicity.

  13. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell proliferation and human papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Peng; Zheng, Jie

    2014-09-05

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has shown therapeutic effects in some leukemias and solid cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of its anticancer efficacy have not been clearly elucidated, particularly in solid cancers. Our previous data showed that As2O3 induced apoptosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA-immortalized human cervical epithelial cells and cervical cancer cells and inhibited the expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. In the present study, we systemically examined the effects of As2O3 on five human cervical cancer cell lines and explored the possible molecular mechanisms. MTT assay showed that HPV-negative C33A cells were more sensitive to growth inhibition induced by As2O3 than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, and HPV 18-positive HeLa and C4-I cells were more sensitive to As2O3 than HPV 16-positive CaSki and SiHa cells. After As2O3 treatment, both mRNA and protein levels of HPV E6 and E7 obviously decreased in all HPV positive cell lines. In contrast, p53 and Rb protein levels increased in all tested cell lines. Transcription factor AP-1 protein expression decreased significantly in HeLa, CaSki and C33A cells with ELISA method. These results suggest that As2O3 is a potential anticancer drug for cervical cancer.

  14. Nanostructured thin-film tungsten trioxide photoanodes for solar water and sea-water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustynski, Jan; Solarska, Renata; Hagemann, Hans; Santato, Clara

    2006-08-01

    About 3 μm thick tungsten trioxide film electrodes consisting of partly sintered, 40-80 nm in diameter, particles deposited on conducting glass substrates exhibit high photon-to-current conversion efficiencies for the photooxidation of water, exceeding 70% at 400 nm. This is facilitated by a ca. 40% film porosity resulting in high contact area with the electrolyte. It is shown that the activity of the WO 3 electrodes towards photooxidation of water is enhanced by addition of even small amounts of halide (Cl -, Br -) ions to the acidic electrolyte. Photoelectrolysis experiments performed either in acidic electrolytes containing chloride or bromide anions or in a 0.5 M NaCl solution, under simulated 1.5 AM solar illumination, demonstrated long term stability of the photocurrents. Oxygen remains the main product of the photoanodic reaction even in a 0.5 M NaCl solution, a composition close to the sea water, with chlorine accounting for ca. 20% of current efficiency.

  15. The influence of mineral trioxide aggregate on adaptive immune responses to endodontic pathogens in mice.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Taia Maria Berto; Vieira, Leda Quercia; Sobrinho, Antônio Paulino Ribeiro; Oliveira, Ricardo Reis; Taubman, Martin A; Kawai, Toshihisa

    2008-09-01

    This study assessed the influence of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) on adaptive immune responses. BALB/c mice were immunized with heat-killed Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) in MTA or other control adjuvants, and serum IgG responses to Fn were measured. Either Fn- or Peptostreptococcus anaerobius (Pa)-reactive memory T cells (Tm) were preincubated in vitro with/without MTA and restimulated with Fn or Pa. Tm proliferation and cytokine production were assessed. Compared with control groups, immunoglobulin G-antibody responses were upregulated in mice immunized with Fn in MTA in a similar manner to animals immunized with Fn in Freund's adjuvant or aluminum hydroxide adjuvant. Although MTA did not affect the upregulated expression of interleukin 10, tumor necrosis factor alpha, or RANKL by Tm, it suppressed the proliferation of Pa- or Fn-Tm and inhibited their production of Th1- or Th2-signature cytokines. MTA upregulated the adaptive humoral immune responses but had little or no effect on pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokine production by Tm.

  16. Effect of mineral trioxide aggregate on cytokine production by peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rezende, T M B; Vargas, D L; Cardoso, F P; Sobrinho, A P R; Vieira, L Q

    2005-12-01

    To test the effect of two commercial brands of grey mineral trioxide aggregate (ProRoot and MTA-Angelus) on cytokine production by M1 and M2 inflammatory macrophages. M1 (from C57BL/6 mice) and M2 peritoneal inflammatory macrophages (from C57BL/6 IL12p40-/- mice) were obtained and cultured in vitro in the presence of MTA. The cellular viability and the production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-10 in response to stimulation with interferon-gamma and Fusobacterium nucleatum or Peptostreptococcus anaerobius were evaluated. Data were analysed by Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis and anova tests. The cements did not interfere with cellular viability or with cytokine production by either type of macrophage. However, M2 macrophages produced higher levels of IL-10 when stimulated with F. nucleatum than M1 macrophages (P < 0.05). The brands of MTA evaluated did not interfere in the cytokine response by M1 or M2 macrophages to the two bacteria tested. However, a difference in cytokine production between the two types of macrophages was found.

  17. Performances and mechanistic investigations of a triphosphine trioxide/ionic liquid system for rare earth extraction.

    PubMed

    Turgis, R; Arrachart, G; Dubois, V; Dourdain, S; Virieux, D; Michel, S; Legeai, S; Lejeune, M; Draye, M; Pellet-Rostaing, S

    2016-01-21

    The extraction of rare earth elements (REEs) from nitric acid solution with a triphosphine trioxide (TPO) is presented. Performances of such a ligand in ionic liquids vs. a classical solvent (benzyl ether) are compared. TPO seems to be 10 to 100 times more efficient when it is dissolved in ionic media whatever the concentration of nitric acid involved. Mechanistic investigations reveal that cation exchange classically observed in ionic liquids is not consistent with the experimental data. Moreover, clear differences in the TPO/Ln complexes between classical and ionic media are highlighted. A stable complex of 1 lanthanide for 3 TPO is formed in an ionic liquid whereas a complex of 1 lanthanide for 6 to 9 TPO is formed in benzyl ether. Back extraction is also studied and good recovery of REEs could be obtained. The TPO/ionic liquid system shows remarkable performances i.e. efficiency and selectivity towards lanthanides in a simulated leaching solution of a Nd/Fe/B/Dy magnet.

  18. Treatment of pulp floor and stripping perforation by mineral trioxide aggregate.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Ling; Lan, Wan-Hong; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2006-06-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been widely used to repair various kinds of tooth perforations, but its use for obturation of the entire root canal has not been reported. We report two cases of tooth perforation successfully repaired with MTA. The first patient was a 78-year-old male with calcified canal and pulp floor perforation in the left maxillary first premolar. After bypass of the calcified palatal canal, both buccal and palatal canals were filled with gutta percha, and the pulp floor perforation was repaired with MTA. Clinical success with no evident radicular lesion was found at the 18-month follow-up. The second patient was a 51-year-old female with a stripping perforation in a C-shaped root canal of the right mandibular second molar detected after removal of a post. Following root canal debridement and calcium hydroxide therapy to control inflammation at the stripping perforation site, apical and furcation bone healing were observed by radiographic examination. The stripping perforation was repaired by obturation of the entire C-shaped root canal with MTA. Observation at the 9-month follow-up revealed bone healing without any clinical symptoms and signs. These cases suggest that MTA is an alternative root canal obturation material for treatment of stripping perforation in a C-shaped root canal and for repair of pulp floor perforation.

  19. Understanding mineral trioxide aggregate/Portland-cement: a review of literature and background factors.

    PubMed

    Steffen, R; van Waes, H

    2009-06-01

    This was to carry out a review of the literature concerning mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Portland cement with regards to clinical, biological and mechanical findings and a possible substitution of MTA through Portland cement for endodontic use. Electronic literature search of scientific papers from January 1993 to January 2009 was carried out on the MEDLINE and Scopus databases using specific key words. In total, 57 papers were identified that dealt with MTA and Portland cement in a relevant way. The review of 50 papers conforming to the applied criteria showed that MTA and Portland cements have the same clinical, biological and mechanical properties. In animal experiments and technical characterisations both materials seemed to have very similar properties. The only difference is bismuth oxide in MTA added for better radio opacity. It seems likely that MTA materials are based on industrial Portland cements mixed with bismuth oxide. More studies, especially some long-term studies comparing MTA and Portland cement, are necessary. The existing literature gives a solid base for clinical studies with Portland cement in order to replace MTA as an endodontic material. Portland cement could be a substitute for most endodontic materials used in primary teeth.

  20. Cytotoxic effects of mineral trioxide aggregate, calcium enrichedmixture cement, Biodentine and octacalcium pohosphate onhuman gingival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    A. Saberi, Eshagh; Farhadmollashahi, Narges; Ghotbi, Faroogh; Karkeabadi, Hamed; Havaei, Roholla

    2016-01-01

    Background. This in vitro study compared the effects of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), calcium enriched mixture(CEM) cement, Biodentine (BD) and octacalcium phosphate (OCP) on the viability of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). Methods. After completion of the setting time of the materials under study, fibroblasts were placed in 24-well insert platesand 1 mg of each material was added to the respective wells. The plates were then incubated at 37°C. The inserts were removedat 24, 48 and 168 hours and 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide was added to assess cytotoxicity via the MTT colorimetricassay. Data were analyzed at different time intervals using repeated-measures ANOVA, followed by the Bonferronitest at three levels of significance of P < 0.05, P < 0.01 and P < 0.001. Results. Cytotoxicity of the materials under study was not significantly different at 24 and 48 hours compared to the controlgroup. However, at 168 hours, a significant difference was noted between MTA (P < 0.05) and Biodentine (P < 0.01)and the control group. Conclusion. Cytotoxicity of MTA, CEM, Biodentine and OCP against HGFs was similar to that of the control group at 24and 48 hours. Over time, MTA and Biodentine exhibited less cytotoxicity than other materials. PMID:27429722

  1. Electron Transfer Governed Crystal Transformation of Tungsten Trioxide upon Li Ions Intercalation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiguo; He, Yang; Gu, Meng; Du, Yingge; Mao, Scott X.; Wang, Chongmin

    2016-09-21

    Reversible insertion/extraction of ions into a host lattice constitutes the fundamental operating principle of rechargeable battery and electrochromic materials. It is far more commonly observed that insertion of ions into a host lattice can lead to structural evolution of the host lattice, and for the most cases such a lattice evolution is subtle. However, it has never been clear as what kind of factors to control such a lattice structural evolution. Based on tungsten trioxide (WO3) model crystal, we use in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and first principles calculation to explore the nature of Li ions intercalation induced crystal symmetry evolution of WO3. We discovered that Li insertion into the octahedral cavity of WO3 lattice will lead to a low to high symmetry transition, featuring a sequential monoclinic→tetragonal→cubic phase transition. The first principle calculation reveals that the phase transition is essentially governed by the electron transfer from Li to the WO6 octahedrons, which effectively leads to the weakening the W-O bond and modifying system band structure, resulting in an insulator to metal transition. The observation of the electronic effect on crystal symmetry and conductivity is significant, providing deep insights on the intercalation reactions in secondary rechargeable ion batteries and the approach for tailoring the functionalities of material based on insertion of ions in the lattice.

  2. Tungsten trioxide as a visible light photocatalyst for volatile organic carbon removal.

    PubMed

    Wicaksana, Yossy; Liu, Sanly; Scott, Jason; Amal, Rose

    2014-10-31

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) has been demonstrated to possess visible light photoactivity and presents a means of overcoming the UV-light dependence of photocatalysts, such as titanium dioxide. In this study, WO3 nanostructures have been synthesised by a hydrothermal method using sodium tungstate (Na2WO4·2H2O), sulphate precursors and pH as structure-directing agents and parameters, respectively. By altering the concentration of the sulphate precursors and pH, it was shown that different morphologies and phases of WO3 can be achieved. The effect of the morphology of the final WO3 product on the visible light photoactivity of ethylene degradation in the gas phase was investigated. In addition, platinum (Pt) was photodeposited on the WO3 structures with various morphologies to enhance the photocatalytic properties. It was found that the photocatalytic properties of the WO3 samples greatly depend on their morphology, chemical composition and surface modification. WO3 with a cuboid morphology exhibited the highest visible light photoactivity compared to other morphologies, while adding Pt to the surface improved the performance of certain WO3 structures.

  3. Arsenic trioxide alters the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cell into cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rebuzzini, Paola; Cebral, Elisa; Fassina, Lorenzo; Alberto Redi, Carlo; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Garagna, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality for cardiovascular diseases. Arsenic increases myocardial infarction mortality in young adulthood, suggesting that exposure during foetal life correlates with cardiac alterations emerging later. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of arsenic trioxide (ATO) cardiomyocytes disruption during their differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cells. Throughout 15 days of differentiation in the presence of ATO (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 μM) we analysed: the expression of i) marker genes of mesoderm (day 4), myofibrillogenic commitment (day 7) and post-natal-like cardiomyocytes (day 15); ii) sarcomeric proteins and their organisation; iii) Connexin 43 and iv) the kinematics contractile properties of syncytia. The higher the dose used, the earlier the stage of differentiation affected (mesoderm commitment, 1.0 μM). At 0.5 or 1.0 μM the expression of cardiomyocyte marker genes is altered. Even at 0.1 μM, ATO leads to reduction and skewed ratio of sarcomeric proteins and to a rarefied distribution of Connexin 43 cardiac junctions. These alterations contribute to the dysruption of the sarcomere and syncytium organisation and to the impairment of kinematic parameters of cardiomyocyte function. This study contributes insights into the mechanistic comprehension of cardiac diseases caused by in utero arsenic exposure. PMID:26447599

  4. Galectin-3 inhibition sensitizes human renal cell carcinoma cells to arsenic trioxide treatment

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yangyang; Gu, Xin; Gong, Mancheng; Guo, Guiying; Han, Kaiyu; An, Ruihua

    2013-01-01

    The anti-tumor effects of arsenic trioxide (ATO) were well established in acute promyelocytic leukemia, but not in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Recent evidences indicate that galectin-3 (Gal-3) plays an anti-apoptotic role in chemotherapy induced tumor cell death. This study was intended to clarify the exact roles of Gal-3 performed in ATO-induced apoptosis in RCC cells. Weak apoptosis was observed in Gal-3-positive RCC cells (Caki-1, Caki-2, 786-0, and ACHN) following ATO treatment. However, ATO treatment upregulated Gal-3 expression concurrently caused a Synexin-cooperated translocation of Gal-3 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Gal-3-knockdown cells were more sensitive to ATO treatment as indicated by a strong mitochondria-dependent apoptosis following ATO treatment. Meanwhile, Gal-3 was found to inhibit ATO-induced apoptosis through enhancing Bcl-2 expression and stabilizing mitochondria. To confirm the results obtained from genetic method, we employed a Gal-3 inhibitor, modified citrus prectin (MCP), and co-treated the RCC cells with ATO. The cells showed an increased apoptosis in the syngeneic application of Gal-3 inhibition and ATO compared with ATO application alone. Based on these results, we conclude that Gal-3 inhibition sensitizes human renal cell carcinoma cells to ATO treatment through increasing mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. Our studies implicate synergetic application of ATO and Gal-3 inhibition as a potential strategy for RCC treatment. PMID:23917726

  5. Bacterial entombment by intratubular mineralization following orthograde mineral trioxide aggregate obturation: a scanning electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jun Sang; Chang, Seok-Woo; Oh, So Ram; Perinpanayagam, Hiran; Lim, Sang-Min; Yoo, Yeon-Jee; Oh, Yeo-Rok; Woo, Sang-Bin; Han, Seung-Hyun; Zhu, Qiang; Kum, Kee-Yeon

    2014-12-01

    The time domain entombment of bacteria by intratubular mineralization following orthograde canal obturation with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Single-rooted human premolars (n=60) were instrumented to an apical size #50/0.06 using ProFile and treated as follows: Group 1 (n=10) was filled with phosphate buffered saline (PBS); Group 2 (n=10) was incubated with Enterococcus faecalis for 3 weeks, and then filled with PBS; Group 3 (n=20) was obturated orthograde with a paste of OrthoMTA (BioMTA, Seoul, Korea) and PBS; and Group 4 (n=20) was incubated with E. faecalis for 3 weeks and then obturated with OrthoMTA-PBS paste. Following their treatments, the coronal openings were sealed with PBS-soaked cotton and intermediate restorative material (IRM), and the roots were then stored in PBS for 1, 2, 4, 8 or 16 weeks. After each incubation period, the roots were split and their dentin/MTA interfaces examined in both longitudinal and horizontal directions by SEM. There appeared to be an increase in intratubular mineralization over time in the OrthoMTA-filled roots (Groups 3 and 4). Furthermore, there was a gradual entombment of bacteria within the dentinal tubules in the E. faecalis inoculated MTA-filled roots (Group 4). Therefore, the orthograde obturation of root canals with OrthoMTA mixed with PBS may create a favorable environment for bacterial entombment by intratubular mineralization.

  6. Cytotoxicity of calcium enriched mixture cement compared with mineral trioxide aggregate and intermediate restorative material.

    PubMed

    Mozayeni, Mohammad A; Milani, Amin S; Marvasti, Laleh A; Asgary, Saeed

    2012-08-01

    Calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement has been recently invented by the last author. It is composed of calcium oxide, calcium phosphate, calcium silicate and calcium sulphate; however, it has a different chemical composition to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). The purpose of this ex vivo study was to investigate the cytotoxicity of CEM cement, and compare it with intermediate restorative material (IRM) and MTA. The materials were tested in fresh and set states on L929 fibroblasts to assess their cytotoxicity. The cell viability responses were evaluated with methyl-tetrazolium bromide assay and Elisa reader at 1, 24 and 168 h (7 days). The tested materials were eluted with L929 culture medium according to international standard organisation 109935 standard. Distilled water and culture medium served as positive and negative controls, respectively. Differences in cytotoxicity were evaluated by one-way anova and t-tests. The cytotoxicity of the materials was statistically different at the three time intervals (P < 0.01). The lowest cytotoxic values recorded were expressed by MTA subgroups followed by CEM cement; IRM subgroups were the most cytotoxic root-end/dental material (P < 0.001). CEM cement and MTA are reasonable alternatives to IRM because of lower cytotoxicity. CEM cement also has good biocompatibility as well as lower estimated cost to MTA and seems to be a promising dental material.

  7. Tooth discoloration induced by a novel mineral trioxide aggregate-based root canal sealer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae-Sung; Lim, Myung-Jin; Choi, Yoorina; Rosa, Vinicius; Hong, Chan-Ui; Min, Kyung-San

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate tooth discoloration caused by contact with a novel injectable mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA)-based root canal sealer (Endoseal; Maruchi, Wonju, Korea) compared with a widely used resin-based root canal sealer (AHplus; Dentsply De Trey, Konstanz, Germany) and conventional MTA (ProRoot; Dentsply, Tulsa, OK, USA). Materials and Methods: Forty standardized bovine tooth samples were instrumented and divided into three experimental groups and one control group (n = 10/group). Each material was inserted into the cavity, and all specimens were sealed with a self-adhesive resin. Based on CIE Lab system, brightness change (ΔL) and total color change (ΔE) of each specimen between baseline and 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks were obtained. Results: At all time points, Endoseal showed no significant difference in ΔL and ΔE compared to AHplus and control group (P > 0.05), whereas the ProRoot group showed significantly higher ΔL and ΔE values than the Endoseal group at 2, 4, and 8 weeks (P < 0.05). Therefore, Endoseal showed less discoloration than conventional MTA and a similar color change to AHplus. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, our data indicate that the MTA-based sealer produces a similar amount of tooth discoloration as AHplus which is considered to be acceptable. PMID:27403062

  8. Effect of methods of evaluation on sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate apical plug

    PubMed Central

    Nikhil, Vineeta; Jha, Padmanabh; Suri, Navleen Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of the study was to evaluate and compare the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) with three different methods. Materials and Methods: Forty single canal teeth were decoronated, and root canals were enlarged to simulate immature apex. The samples were randomly divided into Group MD = MTA-angelus mixed with distilled water and Group MC = MTA-angelus mixed with 2% chlorhexidine, and apical seal was recorded with glucose penetration method, fluid filtration method, and dye penetration methods and compared. Results: The three methods of evaluation resulted differently. The glucose penetration method showed that MD sealed better than MC, but difference was statistically insignificant (P > 0.05). The fluid filtration method resulted that Group MC was statistically insignificant superior to Group MD (P > 0.05). The dye penetration method showed that Group MC sealed statistically better than Group MD. Conclusion: No correlation was found among the results obtained with the three methods of evaluation. Addition of chlorhexidine enhanced the sealing ability of MTA according to the fluid filtration test and dye leakage while according to the glucose penetration test, chlorhexidine did not enhance the sealing ability of MTA. This study showed that relying on the results of apical sealing by only method can be misleading. PMID:27217635

  9. Immediate and delayed solubility of mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement.

    PubMed

    Bodanezi, Augusto; Carvalho, Nara; Silva, Daniela; Bernardineli, Norberti; Bramante, Clovis Monteiro; Garcia, Roberto Brandão; de Moraes, Ivaldo Gomes

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the solubility of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Portland cement since its mixture until 672 hours, by means of two complimentary methods. Metal ring molds filled with the cements were covered with distilled water and, at each experimental time (3, 24, 72, 168, 336 and 672 hours), were weighed as soon as the plates in which the samples have been placed. Empty rings served as the control group (n=8). Mean weight gain and loss was determined and analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test for all pairwise comparisons. Only Portland cement showed less than 3% weight loss through 24 hours. Detached MTA residues were heavier than those of Portland cement over the 3 to 168 hours. The weight of MTA rings increased more than that of Portland rings within 672 hours (p=0.05). The findings of the present study indicate that, in an aqueous environment MTA is more soluble than Portland cement and exceeds the maximum weight loss considered acceptable by ISO 6876 standard (2001).

  10. Use of Arsenic Trioxide as an Antivascular and Thermosensitizing Agent in Solid Tumors1

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Robert J; Lee, Sang H; Rood, Kelly L; Stewart, Michael J; Lyons, John C; Lew, Young S; Park, Heonjoo; Song, Chang W

    2000-01-01

    Abstract Arsenic trioxide, As2O3 (ATO), has been found to be an effective chemotherapy drug for acute promyelocytic leukemia but its effect on solid tumors has not been fully explored. In the present report, we describe our observation that ATO is a potent antivascular agent and that it markedly enhances the effect of hyperthermia on tumors. The tumor blood perfusion in SCK tumors of A/J mice and FSall tumors of C3H mice was significantly suppressed for up to 24 hours after an i.p. injection of 8 mg/kg ATO. ATO was also found to be able to increase the thermosensitivity of tumor cells in vitro. As a probable consequence of these effects, ATO treatment markedly increased the tumor growth delay caused by hyperthermia at 41.5–42.5°C. Immunohistochemical staining of tumor tissue revealed that the expression levels of several adhesion molecules and TNFα are noticeably increased in tumors 2–6 hours after systemic ATO treatment. It is concluded that ATO is potentially useful to enhance the effect of hyperthermia on tumors at a clinically relevant temperature. PMID:11228548

  11. Delayed Root Development by Displaced Mineral Trioxide Aggregate after Regenerative Endodontics: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, Aovana; Parashos, Peter

    2017-02-01

    This case report presents the treatment of a 16-year-old boy with a maxillary lateral incisor (tooth #10) presenting with Oehlers type II dens invaginatus and diagnosed with previously initiated therapy and asymptomatic apical periodontitis. A regenerative endodontic procedure (REP) was performed for the tooth but complicated by apically displaced mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Clinical and radiographic examination was undertaken yearly, and a cone-beam computed tomography scan was taken to investigate further the formation of hard tissues within the root canal. Subsequently, tooth #10 was re-accessed and then root-filled with MTA. There was complete periapical healing, thickening of the dentinal root walls, and completed apex formation 3 years after REP. Hard tissue formation was noted within the root canal, on the root canal wall, and the root apex through clinical and radiographic examination. Less hard tissue formation was noted on the labial root canal wall where the displaced MTA was located, which was identified on the cone-beam computed tomography scan. This report demonstrates that REP can potentially provide excellent treatment outcomes for structurally compromised teeth. REP should be considered as a first-line treatment before proceeding with a root filling when root development is incomplete, but attention to technical detail is essential. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The status of mineral trioxide aggregate in endodontics education in dental schools in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tanalp, Jale; Karapinar-Kazandag, Meriç; Ersev, Handan; Bayirli, Gündüz

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the current status of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as an educational material in dental schools in Turkey. A survey was sent to senior members of the endodontic departments of seventeen dental schools; fourteen responded. All respondents reported that they used MTA in their clinical practice, with apexification, perforations, retrograde fillings, and root resorptions being the most frequently occurring treatment procedures. All reported that information was given to students regarding MTA mainly as part of the curriculum. The third and fourth years were the periods when MTA was introduced to students in most of the schools. Twelve schools reported that students had the opportunity to observe procedures in which MTA was used, but students had the chance to use the material in a very minor proportion of the schools, mainly under the supervision of clinical instructors. Ten schools agreed that MTA should be included in the regular endodontic curriculum. Financial constraints seemed to be the predominant reason for those who answered this question negatively, followed by difficult handling properties and low radiopacity of the material. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that ways should be sought to prevent financial difficulties from depriving dental students of the opportunity to receive information about contemporary methodologies such as MTA utilization.

  13. Morphine Attenuated the Cytotoxicity Induced by Arsenic Trioxide in H9c2 Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Amini-Khoei, Hossein; Hosseini, Mir-Jamal; Momeny, Majid; Rahimi-Balaei, Maryam; Amiri, Shayan; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Khedri, Mostafa; Jahanabadi, Samane; Mohammadi-Asl, Ali; Mehr, Shahram Ejtemaie; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is an efficient drug for the treatment of the patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Inhibition of proliferation as well as apoptosis, attenuation of migration, and induction of differentiation in tumor cells are the main mechanisms through which ATO acts against APL. Despite advantages of ATO in treatment of some malignancies, certain harmful side effects, such as cardiotoxicity, have been reported. It has been well documented that morphine has antioxidant, anti-apoptotic, and cytoprotective properties and is able to attenuate cytotoxicity. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to investigate the protective effects of morphine against ATO toxicity in H9c2 myocytes using multi-parametric assay including thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, caspase 3 activity, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) phosphorylation assay, and expression of apoptotic markers. Our results showed that morphine (1 μM) attenuated cytotoxicity induced by ATO in H9c2 cells. Results of this study suggest that morphine may have protective properties in management of cardiac toxicity in patients who receive ATO as an anti-cancer treatment.

  14. Properties of Hydrogen Sulfide Sensors Based on Thin Films of Tin Dioxide and Tungsten Trioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevastianov, E. Yu.; Maksimova, N. K.; Chernikov, E. V.; Sergeichenko, N. V.; Rudov, F. V.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of hydrogen sulfide in the concentration range of 0-100 ppm on the characteristics of thin films of tin dioxide and tungsten trioxide obtained by the methods of magnetron deposition and modified with gold in the bulk and on the surface is studied. The impurities of antimony and nickel have been additionally introduced into the SnO2 bulk. An optimal operating temperature of sensors 350°C was determined, at which there is a satisfactory correlation between the values of the response to H2S and the response time. Degradation of the sensor characteristics is investigated in the long-term ( 0.5-1.5 years) tests at operating temperature and periodic exposure to hydrogen sulfide, as well as after conservation of samples in the laboratory air. It is shown that for the fabrication of H2S sensors, the most promising are thin nanocrystalline Au/WO3:Au films characterized by a linear concentration dependence of the response and high stability of parameters during exploitation.

  15. Clinical evaluation of mineral trioxide aggregate and biodentine as direct pulp capping agents in carious teeth.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Swaroop; Sowmya, B; Mathew, Sylvia; Bhandi, Shilpa H; Nagaraja, Shruthi; Dinesh, K

    2017-01-01

    Root canal treatment has been a routine treatment option for carious exposure of the dental pulp. In the context of minimally invasive dentistry, direct pulp capping (DPC) procedure with a reliable biomaterial may be considered as an alternative provided the pulp status is favorable. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), a bioactive cement with excellent sealing ability and biocompatibility is capable of regenerating relatively damaged pulp and formation of dentin bridge when used as DPC agent. Biodentine is comparatively a new biomaterial claimed to possess properties similar to MTA and is currently explored for vital pulp therapy procedures. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical response of pulp-dentin complex after DPC with MTA and biodentine in carious teeth. Twenty-four permanent molars with carious exposure having no signs and symptoms of irreversible pulpitis were selected and assigned to one of the two groups, Group I - MTA and Group II - biodentine. Patients were recalled at 3 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months for clinical and radiographic evaluation. Fisher's exact test was used along with Chi-square test for statistical analysis. Over a period of 6 months, MTA and biodentine showed 91.7% and 83.3% success rate, respectively, based on the subjective symptoms, pulp sensibility tests, and radiographic appearance. MTA and biodentine may be used as DPC agents when the pulpal diagnosis is not more than reversible pulpitis.

  16. A histological comparison of a new pulp capping material and mineral trioxide aggregate in rat molars.

    PubMed

    Moazzami, Fariborz; Ghahramani, Yasmin; Tamaddon, Ali Mohammad; Dehghani Nazhavani, Ali; Adl, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Recent investigations have attempted to improve regenerative endodontics with the help of stem cell therapy. In vitro studies have shown the ability of different agents to stimulate the differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) into odontoblast-like cells. A combination of dexamethasone, β-glycerophosphate and Vitamin D has been proven to induce a successful differentiation. The aim of this animal study was to evaluate the effect of this combination, named odontoblastic differentiating material (ODM), on pulp tissue when used as a capping material. Sixty maxillary right and left molars of 30 Sprague-dawley rats were selected for this study. The teeth were exposed under sterile condition. Half of the teeth were capped with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and the other half with ODM. All cavities were restored with glass ionomer. The rats were sacrificed at post-operative intervals of 2 weeks and 2 months. Samples were histologically evaluated for the degree of inflammation and reparative dentin formation. Finally the data was analyzed with Mann-Whitney and Chi-Square tests. Reparative dentin formed in all groups within both time periods and there was no statistically significant difference between the groups in the mentioned time periods. The MTA group, however, showed a statistically significant reduction in inflammation at both time intervals (P<0.05). Compared to MTA, ODM samples showed a greater amount of inflammation in the pulp tissue. ODM, as a pulp capping material, can induce dentinal bridge formation.

  17. A Histological Comparison of a New Pulp Capping Material and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate in Rat Molars

    PubMed Central

    Moazzami, Fariborz; Ghahramani, Yasmin; Tamaddon, Ali Mohammad; Dehghani Nazhavani, Ali; Adl, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Recent investigations have attempted to improve regenerative endodontics with the help of stem cell therapy. In vitro studies have shown the ability of different agents to stimulate the differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) into odontoblast-like cells. A combination of dexamethasone, β-glycerophosphate and Vitamin D has been proven to induce a successful differentiation. The aim of this animal study was to evaluate the effect of this combination, named odontoblastic differentiating material (ODM), on pulp tissue when used as a capping material. Materials and Methods: Sixty maxillary right and left molars of 30 Sprague-dawley rats were selected for this study. The teeth were exposed under sterile condition. Half of the teeth were capped with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and the other half with ODM. All cavities were restored with glass ionomer. The rats were sacrificed at post-operative intervals of 2 weeks and 2 months. Samples were histologically evaluated for the degree of inflammation and reparative dentin formation. Finally the data was analyzed with Mann-Whitney and Chi-Square tests. Results: Reparative dentin formed in all groups within both time periods and there was no statistically significant difference between the groups in the mentioned time periods. The MTA group, however, showed a statistically significant reduction in inflammation at both time intervals (P<0.05). Compared to MTA, ODM samples showed a greater amount of inflammation in the pulp tissue. Conclusion: ODM, as a pulp capping material, can induce dentinal bridge formation. PMID:24396376

  18. Targeting catalase but not peroxiredoxins enhances arsenic trioxide-induced apoptosis in K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Li-Li; Tu, Yao-Yao; Xia, Li; Wang, Wei-Wei; Wei, Wei; Ma, Chun-Min; Wen, Dong-Hua; Lei, Hu; Xu, Han-Zhang; Wu, Ying-Li

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable efficacy of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) treatment, other non-APL leukemias, such as chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), are less sensitive to As2O3 treatment. However, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Here we show that relative As2O3-resistant K562 cells have significantly lower ROS levels than As2O3-sensitive NB4 cells. We compared the expression of several antioxidant enzymes in these two cell lines and found that peroxiredoxin 1/2/6 and catalase are expressed at high levels in K562 cells. We further investigated the possible role of peroxirdoxin 1/2/6 and catalase in determining the cellular sensitivity to As2O3. Interestingly, knockdown of peroxiredoxin 1/2/6 did not increase the susceptibility of K562 cells to As2O3. On the contrary, knockdown of catalase markedly enhanced As2O3-induced apoptosis. In addition, we provide evidence that overexpression of BCR/ABL cannot increase the expression of PRDX 1/2/6 and catalase. The current study reveals that the functional role of antioxidant enzymes is cellular context and treatment agents dependent; targeting catalase may represent a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of As2O3 in CML treatment.

  19. Tandem organic light-emitting diode with a molybdenum tri-oxide thin film interconnector layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Fei-Ping; Wang, Qian; Zhou, Xiang

    2013-03-01

    A 10-nm-thick molybdenum tri-oxide (MoO3) thin film was used as the interconnector layer in tandem organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs). The tandem OLEDs with two identical emissive units consisting of N,N'-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N'-bis(phenyl)-benzidine (NPB)/tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) exhibited current efficiency-current density characteristics superior to the conventional single-unit devices. At 20 mA/cm2, the current efficiency of the tandem OLEDs using the interconnector layers of MoO3 thin film was about 4.0 cd/A, which is about twice that of the corresponding conventional single-unit device (1.8 cd/A). The tandem OLED showed a higher power efficiency than the conventional single-unit device for luminance over 1200 cd/m2. The experimental results demonstrated that a MoO3 thin film with a proper thickness can be used as an effective interconnector layer in tandem OLEDs. Such an interconnector layer can be easily fabricated by simple thermal evaporation, greatly simplifying the device processing and fabrication processes required by previously reported interconnector layers. A possible explanation was proposed for the carrier generation of the MoO3 interconnector layer.

  20. Endothelial to mesenchymal transition contributes to arsenic-trioxide-induced cardiac fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Wu, Xianxian; Li, Yang; Zhang, Haiying; Li, Zhange; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Longyin; Ju, Jiaming; Liu, Xin; Chen, Xiaohui; Glybochko, Peter V.; Nikolenko, Vladimir; Kopylov, Philipp; Xu, Chaoqian; Yang, Baofeng

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence has suggested the critical role of endothelial to mesenchymal transition (EndMT) in fibrotic diseases. The present study was designed to examine whether EndMT is involved in arsenic trioxide (As2O3)-induced cardiac fibrosis and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Cardiac dysfunction was observed in rats after exposure to As2O3 for 15 days using echocardiography, and the deposition of collagen was detected by Masson’s trichrome staining and electron microscope. EndMT was indicated by the loss of endothelial cell markers (VE-cadherin and CD31) and the acquisition of mesenchymal cell markers (α-SMA and FSP1) determined by RT-PCR at the mRNA level and Western blot and immunofluorescence analysis at the protein level. In the in-vitro experiments, endothelial cells acquired a spindle-shaped morphology accompanying downregulation of the endothelial cell markers and upregulation of the mesenchymal cell markers when exposed to As2O3. As2O3 activated the AKT/GSK-3β/Snail signaling pathway, and blocking this pathway with PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) abolished EndMT in As2O3-treated endothelial cells. Our results highlight that As2O3 is an EndMT-promoting factor during cardiac fibrosis, suggesting that targeting EndMT is beneficial for preventing As2O3-induced cardiac toxicity. PMID:27671604

  1. Chronic arsenic trioxide exposure leads to enhanced aggressiveness via Met oncogene addiction in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kryeziu, Kushtrim; Pirker, Christine; Englinger, Bernhard; van Schoonhoven, Sushilla; Spitzwieser, Melanie; Mohr, Thomas; Körner, Wilfried; Weinmüllner, Regina; Tav, Koray; Grillari, Johannes; Cichna-Markl, Margit; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra

    2016-01-01

    As an environmental poison, arsenic is responsible for many cancer deaths. Paradoxically, arsenic trioxide (ATO) presents also a powerful therapy used to treat refractory acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and is intensively investigated for treatment of other cancer types. Noteworthy, cancer therapy is frequently hampered by drug resistance, which is also often associated with enhancement of tumor aggressiveness. In this study, we analyzed ATO-selected cancer cells (A2780ATO) for the mechanisms underlying their enhanced tumorigenicity and aggressiveness. These cells were characterized by enhanced proliferation and spheroid growth as well as increased tumorigenicity of xenografts in SCID mice. Noteworthy, subsequent studies revealed that overexpression of Met receptor was the underlying oncogenic driver of these effects, as A2780ATO cells were characterized by collateral sensitivity against Met inhibitors. This finding was also confirmed by array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and whole genome gene expression arrays, which revealed that Met overexpression by chronic ATO exposure was based on the transcriptional regulation via activation of AP-1. Finally, it was shown that treatment with the Met inhibitor crizotinib was also effective against A2780ATO cell xenografts in vivo, indicating that targeting of Met presents a promising strategy for the treatment of Met-overexpressing tumors after either arsenic exposure or failure to ATO treatment. PMID:27036042

  2. Sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) combined with distilled water, chlorhexidine, and doxycycline.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Roberta A A; Cunha, Rodrigo S; Miguita, Kenner B; Silveira, Cláudia F M; De Martin, Alexandre S; Pinheiro, Sérgio L; Rocha, Daniel G P; Bueno, Carlos E S

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA Bio) combined with different mixing agents (distilled water, chlorhexidine, doxycycline), used as an apical root-end filling material. Forty-two extracted human teeth were divided into three groups (n = 12); six teeth were used as controls. Root-ends were resected at 90 degrees, 3 mm from the apex. Root-end cavities were prepared using ultrasonic tips and filled with MTA Bio plus distilled water, 2% chlorhexidine solution, or 10% doxycycline solution. Apical sealing was assessed by microleakage of 50% silver nitrate solution. Roots were longitudinally sectioned in a buccolingual plane and analyzed using an operating microscope (20× magnification). Depth of dye leakage into the dentinal walls was measured in millimeters. Results were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (P = 0.05). MTA Bio plus distilled water showed significantly higher mean leakage results (1.06 mm) when compared with MTA Bio plus doxycycline (0.61 mm), and higher, although not significant, results when compared with MTA Bio plus chlorhexidine (0.79 mm). In conclusion, replacing distilled water with two biologically active mixing agents (doxycycline and chlorhexidine) did not alter the sealing properties of MTABio. The antimicrobial properties of these combinations should be further investigated.

  3. Pulpotomy of Symptomatic Permanent Teeth with Carious Exposure Using Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Barngkgei, Imad Hassan; Halboub, Esam Saleh; Alboni, Roula Safouh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of pulpotomy treatment with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) in symptomatic mature permanent teeth with carious exposure. Materials and Methods Ten patients aged 27-54 years presented with 11 symptomatic permanent teeth (n=11). Each offending carious tooth was clinically and radiographically determined. We removed caries as conservatively as possible; however pulp exposure was inevitable. ProRoot MTA pulpotomy was performed on these teeth. The patients were followed-up clinically and radiographically for 24-42 months. Results Immediate relief of patients` symptoms occurred. Moreover, teeth responses to the electric pulp tester were within normal range on follow-up appointment and the radiographs did not reveal any abnormality/lesion in the periapical areas. Conclusion Pulpotomy using MTA could be a good alternative for root canal therapy (RCT) for managing symptomatic mature permanent teeth with carious exposure, however further large-scale multicenter clinical trials are highly encouraged to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:23717332

  4. Dose Response of MTLn3 Cells to Serial Dilutions of Arsenic Trioxide and Ionizing Radiation.

    PubMed

    Raja, Waseem Khan; Satti, Jahangir; Liu, Gang; Castracane, James

    2013-01-01

    MTLn3 cells derived from mouse mammary epithelium are known to be highly malignant and are resistant to both radio- and chemo-therapy. We exposed MTLn3 cells to various doses of inorganic Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) in combination with ionizing radiation. Cells were treated with a series of As2O3 concentrations ranging from 20 μM to 1.22 nM for 8 hour, 24 hour and 48 hour periods. Post-treated cell proliferation was quantified by measuring mitochondrial activity and DNA analysis. Cells exposed to radiation and As2O3 at concentration greater than 1.25 μM showed apoptosis and radiations alone treated cells were statistically not different from the control. Hormesis was observed for As2O3 concentrations in the range of 0.078 μM to 0.625 μM while the combined chemo and radiation treatments of the cells did not affect the hormetic effect. We have demonstrated that As2O3 (in the presence and absence of ionizing radiation) in specific low concentrations induced apoptosis in the otherwise chemoresistant cancer cells. This low concentration-mediated cell death is immediately followed by a surge in cell survival. Low dosing dosimetry is highly desirable in metronomic therapy however, it has a narrow window since necrosis, hormesis, apoptosis and other dose-dependent biological processes take place in this region. Further quantifiable dosimetry is highly desired for routine clinical practice.

  5. Enhancement of the antimicrobial properties of orthorhombic molybdenum trioxide by thermal induced fracturing of the hydrates.

    PubMed

    Shafaei, Shahram; Van Opdenbosch, Daniel; Fey, Tobias; Koch, Marcus; Kraus, Tobias; Guggenbichler, Josef Peter; Zollfrank, Cordt

    2016-01-01

    The oxides of the transition metal molybdenum exhibit excellent antimicrobial properties. We present the preparation of molybdenum trioxide dihydrate (MoO3 × 2H2O) by an acidification method and demonstrate the thermal phase development and morphological evolution during and after calcination from 25 °C to 600 °C. The thermal dehydration of the material was found to proceed in two steps. Microbiological roll-on tests using Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were performed and exceptional antimicrobial activities were determined for anhydrous samples with orthorhombic lattice symmetry and a large specific surface area. The increase in the specific surface area is due to crack formation and to the loss of the hydrate water after calcination at 300 °C. The results support the proposed antimicrobial mechanism for transition metal oxides, which based on a local acidity increase as a consequence of the augmented specific surface area. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Pulp Revascularization in Immature Permanent Tooth with Apical Periodontitis Using Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Saeki, Katsura; Shiono, Yasuhiro; Maki, Kenshi

    2014-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a material that has been used worldwide in several clinical applications, such as apical barriers in teeth with immature apices, repair of root perforations, root-end filling, pulp capping, and pulpotomy. The purpose of this case report was to describe successful revascularization treatment of an immature mandibular right second premolar with apical periodontitis in a 9-year-old female patient. After preparing an access cavity without anesthesia, the tooth was isolated using a rubber dam and accessed. The canal was gently debrided using 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and 3% hydrogen peroxide irrigant. And then MTA was packed into the canal. X-ray photographic examination showed the dentin bridge 5 months after the revascularization procedure. Thickening of the canal wall and complete apical closure were confirmed 10 months after the treatment. In this case, MTA showed clinical and radiographic success at revascularization treatment in immature permanent tooth. The successful outcome of this case suggests that MTA is reliable and effective for endodontic treatment in the pediatric dentistry. PMID:24959181

  7. Morphological and chemical analysis of different precipitates on mineral trioxide aggregate immersed in different fluids.

    PubMed

    Han, Linlin; Okiji, Takashi; Okawa, Seigo

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the ultrastructures and chemical compositions of precipitates formed on mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA; White ProRoot MTA) immersed in distilled water (DW) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS), based on the attribution that MTA's bioactivity and sealing ability are influenced by its interaction with the external fluid environment. After 1 and 14 days of immersion, precipitates formed on MTA disks were analyzed using wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy electron probe microanalyzer with image observation function (SEM-EPMA; EPMA1601, Shimadzu, Kyoto, Japan), and Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. On DW specimens, cubic-like crystals containing Ca, O, and C (17, 66, and 17 at% respectively) were produced. State analysis of calcium k(β)spectrum also revealed calcium hydroxide. On PBS specimens, acicular-spherical and lath-like crystals with Ca/P molar ratios of 1.42 and 1.58 respectively were produced. In conclusion, the precipitates formed on DW specimens were identified as calcium carbonate and calcium hydroxide primarily, whereas the precipitates on PBS specimens were inferred to be amorphous calcium phosphate.

  8. Effects of EDTA on the hydration mechanism of mineral trioxide aggregate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y-L; Lin, F-H; Wang, W-H; Ritchie, H H; Lan, W-H; Lin, C-P

    2007-06-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is commonly used during the preparation of obstructed root canals that face a high risk of root perforation. Such perforations may be repaired with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Due to EDTA's ability to chelate calcium ions, we hypothesized that EDTA may disrupt the hydration of MTA. Using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, we found that MTA specimens stored in an EDTA solution had no crystalline structure and a Ca/Si molar ratio considerably lower than those obtained for specimens stored in distilled water and normal saline. Poor cell adhesion in EDTA-treated MTA was also noted. X-ray diffraction indicated that the peak corresponding to portlandite, which is normally present in hydrated MTA, was not shown in the EDTA group. The microhardness of EDTA-treated specimens was also significantly reduced (p < 0.0001). These findings suggest that EDTA interferes with the hydration of MTA, resulting in decreased hardness and poor biocompatibility.

  9. Protective effects of oxymatrine against arsenic trioxide-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Liu, Qinghai; Fan, Long; Xiao, Wei; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Yu; Ye, Weiguang; Lan, Fei; Jia, Bin; Feng, Hua; Zhou, Changman; Yue, Xiuqin; Xing, Guogang; Wang, Tianlong

    2017-02-21

    Oxymatrine, a quinolizidine natural drug extracted from Sophora japonica, has been reported to have neuroprotective effect and cardioprotective effect. However, the protective effect of oxymatrine on arsenic trioxide (As2O3)-induced liver injury has not been reported. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of oxymatrine on As2O3-induced liver injury in rats. Male Wistar rats were administrated 3mg/kg As2O3 intravenous injection on alternate days for 4 days. Oxymatrine was given 1 h before As2O3 treatment. The results showed that oxymatrine inhibited As2O3-induced hepatic pathological damage, liver ROS level and MDA level in a dose-dependent manner. As2O3 decreased the antioxidant enzymes SOD, GPX, and CAT activity and the decrease was inhibited by treatment of oxymatrine. Furthermore, oxymatrine attenuated the retention of arsenic in liver tissues and improved the expression of Nrf2 and HO-1. In conclusion, our results suggested that oxymatrine protected against As2O3-induced oxidative damage by activating Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway.

  10. Bortezomib and Arsenic Trioxide Activity on a Myelodysplastic Cell Line (P39): A Gene Expression Study

    PubMed Central

    Savlı, Hakan; Galimberti, Sara; Sünnetçi, Deniz; Canestraro, Martina; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Nagy, Balint; Raimondo, Francesco Di; Petrini, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to understand the molecular pathways affected by bortezomib and arsenic trioxide treatment on myelomonocytoid cell line P39. Materials and Methods: Oligonucleotide microarray platforms were used for gene expression and pathway analysis. Confirmation studies were performed using quantitative real time PCR. Results: Bortezomib treatment has shown upregulated DIABLO and NF-κBIB (a NF-κB inhibitor) and downregulated NF-κB1, NF-κB2, and BIRC1 gene expressions. Combination treatment of the two compounds showed gene expression deregulations in concordance by the results of single bortezomib treatment. Especially, P53 was a pathway more significantly modified and a gene network centralized around the beta estradiol gene. Beta estradiol, BRCA2, and FOXA1 genes were remarkable deregulations in our findings. Conclusion: Results support the suggestions about possible use of proteasome inhibitors in the treatment of high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). NF-κB was observed as an important modulator in leukemic transformation of MDS. PMID:25913414

  11. Effects of mineral trioxide aggregate on the differentiation of rat dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Masuda-Murakami, Yoshiko; Kobayashi, Miho; Wang, Xiaogu; Yamada, Yoshishige; Kimura, Yuichi; Hossain, Mossamal; Matsumoto, Koukichi

    2010-09-01

    The effect of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) on the odontoblast-like differentiation of pulp cells was evaluated using heat-shock protein 25 (hsp25) as a marker for odontoblast differentiation. The cells were cultured with tooth-colored MTA or calcium hydroxide-containing cement (Dycal). The effects of the materials on the pulp cells were observed using a confocal laser scanning microscope. The cells were labelled immunocytochemically using polyclonal antibodies against hsp25 and actin. The mRNA expression of hsp25 and dspp in the pulp cells at 2 days were examined by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Most of the cells cultured with MTA showed an intense immunolabelling for hsp25 and the mRNA expressions of hsp25 and dspp at 2 days were higher than those cultured with Dycal. These findings indicate that MTA is an effective pulp capping material and is able to induce the differentiation of odontoblast-like cells and the formation of reparative tertiary dentin with minimum apoptosis. 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. [Using mineral trioxide aggregate as a direct pulp-capping material in dogs].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ya-qin; Xia, Lie

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dental pulp responses in dogs after MTA (Mineral Trioxide Aggregate) and a calcium hydroxide (Dycal) were applied as pulp-capping materials. Twelve cuspids in three healthy adult beagle dogs were divided into two groups randomly. MTA or Dycal was used to repair the exposed site which was created with a fissure bur in a high-speed handpiece with copious water spray at the labial cervical access. Then the cavity was filled with glass ionomer cement (GIC). Four months later, the specimens were processed for histologic examination to observe the pulpal inflammation and dentin bridge formation. Five of six samples capped with MTA were free of pulpal inflammation, and all of samples in this group had dentin bridge formation. In contrast, all of samples capped with Dycal showed pulpal inflammation, and dentin bridge formation occurred in only 2 samples. MTA is a biocompatible material which can promote dentin bridge formation. It can be used as a direct pulp-capping material during vital pulp therapy.

  13. Expression of bone extracellular matrix proteins on osteoblast cells in the presence of mineral trioxide.

    PubMed

    Tani-Ishii, Nobuyuki; Hamada, Nobushiro; Watanabe, Kiyoko; Tujimoto, Yasuhisa; Teranaka, Toshio; Umemoto, Toshio

    2007-07-01

    The biocompatibility of periapical tissue with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) affects its ability to repair and regenerate itself. Here we report the cytotoxicity of MTA and how it affects the expression of bone extracellular matrix protein in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells. We quantified the cytotoxicity of MTA, amalgam, and Dycal (Dentsply/Caulk, Milford, DE) on MC3T3-E1 cells by measuring the ability of cells to cleave a tetrazolium salt to produce formazan dye during a period of 24, 48, or 96 hours. We used reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction with primer sets for type I collagen, osteocalcin, and bone sialoprotein to measure the gene-expression response of MC3T3-E1 cells treated with MTA. MTA, amalgam, and Dycal were less toxic after 48 hours. MC3T3-E1 cell growth with MTA and Dycal was greater than nonstimulated controls. MTA caused an upregulation of type I collagen and osteocalcin messenger RNA expression after 24 hours. These results showed that, in the presence of MTA, cells grow faster and produce more mineralized matrix gene expression in osteoblasts.

  14. Absorbable Suture as an Apical Matrix in Single Visit Apexification with Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Padmanabh

    2016-01-01

    Several procedures have been recommended to induce the root end barrier formation in teeth with open apices. Conventional treatment for such cases will require many appointments with an average duration of 12.9 months. During this period, the root canal is susceptible to reinfection from around the provisional restoration, which may promote apical periodontitis and arrest of apical repair. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been successfully used for one visit apexification wherein the root canal can be obturated within 24 hours after placement of MTA. Using a matrix prior to the placement of MTA avoids its extrusion, reduces leakage in the sealing material, and allows favorable response of the periapical tissues. This report presents a case of apexification where an absorbable suture was used as an apical matrix. Use of an absorbable suture circumvents all the problems associated with other conventional materials. Conclusion. Placement of the matrix made from the suture material is predictable and is easily positioned at the apex and the length can be adjusted as required. 10-month follow-up of the case shows resorbed matrix and bone healing in the periapical region. The patient was asymptomatic during the whole follow-up period and tooth exhibited mobility within physiologic limits and was functioning normally. PMID:28058120

  15. Optimization of combination therapy of arsenic trioxide and fractionated radiotherapy for malignant glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Ning Shoucheng; Knox, Susan J. . E-mail: sknox@stanford.edu

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: The primary objective was to optimize the combined treatment regimen using arsenic trioxide (ATO) and fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of malignant glioma. Methods and Materials: Nude mice with human glioma xenograft tumors were treated with fractionated local tumor radiation of 250 cGy/fraction/day and 5 mg/kg ATO for 5-10 days. Results: Time course experiments demonstrated that maximal tumor growth delay occurred when ATO was administered between 0 and 4 h after radiation. The combination treatment of ATO and radiation synergistically inhibited tumor growth and produced a tumor growth delay time of 13.2 days, compared with 1.4 days and 6.5 days for ATO and radiation alone (p < 0.01), respectively. The use of concurrent therapy of radiation and ATO initially, followed by ATO as maintenance therapy, was superior to the use of preloading with ATO before combined therapy and produced a tumor growth delay time of 22.7 days as compared with 11.7 days for the ATO preloading regimen (p < 0.01). The maintenance dose of ATO after concurrent therapy was effective and important for continued inhibition of tumor growth. Conclusions: The combined use of fractionated radiation and ATO is effective for the treatment of glioma xenograft tumors. ATO was most effective when administered 0-4 h after radiation without pretreatment with ATO. These results have important implications for the optimization of treatment regimen using ATO and fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of brain tumors.

  16. Reaction of rat connective tissue to mineral trioxide aggregate and diaket

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the reaction of rat connective tissue to two root-end filling materials: white Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (WMTA) and Diaket. Methods Each of the materials was placed in dentine tubes and implanted subcutaneously in the dorsal connective tissue of 21 Wistar albino rats. Tissue biopsies were collected 7, 30, and 60 days after the implantation procedure. The specimens were processed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin and examined microscopically. After determining inflammatory cell numbers in sections from each specimen, inflammatory reaction scores were defined as follows: 0; no or few inflammatory cells (no reaction), 1; less than 25 cells (mild reaction), 2; 25 to 125 cells, (moderate reaction), and 3; 125 or more cells (severe reaction). Statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. Results There were statistically significant differences in the median inflammatory cell numbers throughout the three test periods, with the most severe degree of inflammation observed at the one-week period. Few cases of necrosis were observed with WMTA. Diaket exhibited the most severe degree of inflammation and necrosis. After 30 days, both materials provoked moderate inflammatory reaction. The eight-week period showed the least severe degree of inflammation in all groups. Conclusions It was concluded that WMTA exhibits a more favourable tissue response compared with Diaket which induced more severe inflammatory reaction than WMTA and the control. PMID:21569463

  17. Bacterial entombment by intratubular mineralization following orthograde mineral trioxide aggregate obturation: a scanning electron microscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jun Sang; Chang, Seok-Woo; Oh, So Ram; Perinpanayagam, Hiran; Lim, Sang-Min; Yoo, Yeon-Jee; Oh, Yeo-Rok; Woo, Sang-Bin; Han, Seung-Hyun; Zhu, Qiang; Kum, Kee-Yeon

    2014-01-01

    The time domain entombment of bacteria by intratubular mineralization following orthograde canal obturation with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Single-rooted human premolars (n=60) were instrumented to an apical size #50/0.06 using ProFile and treated as follows: Group 1 (n=10) was filled with phosphate buffered saline (PBS); Group 2 (n=10) was incubated with Enterococcus faecalis for 3 weeks, and then filled with PBS; Group 3 (n=20) was obturated orthograde with a paste of OrthoMTA (BioMTA, Seoul, Korea) and PBS; and Group 4 (n=20) was incubated with E. faecalis for 3 weeks and then obturated with OrthoMTA–PBS paste. Following their treatments, the coronal openings were sealed with PBS-soaked cotton and intermediate restorative material (IRM), and the roots were then stored in PBS for 1, 2, 4, 8 or 16 weeks. After each incubation period, the roots were split and their dentin/MTA interfaces examined in both longitudinal and horizontal directions by SEM. There appeared to be an increase in intratubular mineralization over time in the OrthoMTA-filled roots (Groups 3 and 4). Furthermore, there was a gradual entombment of bacteria within the dentinal tubules in the E. faecalis inoculated MTA-filled roots (Group 4). Therefore, the orthograde obturation of root canals with OrthoMTA mixed with PBS may create a favorable environment for bacterial entombment by intratubular mineralization. PMID:25012869

  18. In vivo toxicity of arsenic trioxide for human cells in diffusion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, K.R.; Butler, T.A.; Callahan, A.P.; Ferren, L.A.

    1986-12-01

    The diffusion chamber system was used to monitor the toxicity of trivalnet arsenic for human target cells in vivo. Cell-impermeable diffusion chambers containing human embryonic lung cells were implanted into the peritoneal cavity of hamsters that one day later were injected i.v. or i.p. with arsenic trioxide (As/sub 2/O/sub 3/) as aqueous solution (AsO/sub 2//sup -/). /sup 74/AsO/sub 2//sup -/ was employed to quantitate the concentration of arsenic reaching the chambered target cells and to describe the toxicokinetics of arsenic in the hamster. Trivalent arsenic induced a growth inhibition in the target cells with the dosage level determining the extent of inhibition at 24 h and the recovery of cell proliferation at 48 h. The maximum concentration of arsenic in the chamber fluid was detected 2 h post i.p. injection, after which the elimination of /sup 74/As from the chamber fluid paralleled the decline of /sup 74/As activity in the plasma of the host animal. Limited tissue distribution studies showed that arsenic was retained primarily in the pelt. 22 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Cytotoxicity of two available mineral trioxide aggregate cements and a new formulation on human gingival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Torshabi, Maryam; Amid, Reza; Kadkhodazadeh, Mahdi; Shahrbabaki, Sara Eslami; Tabatabaei, Fahimeh S.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate the cytotoxicity of nanohybrid mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) in comparison with calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement and MTA-Angelus, using human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). Materials and Methods: Nine disc-shaped specimens of each material (in 2 set stat: A, set for 24 h; B, set for 30 min; and C, fresh stat) were prepared. HGFs were exposed to tested materials’ extracts or control media. Cytotoxicity testing was performed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide assay in two time intervals. Statistical Analysis: Results were evaluated by one-way ANOVA and t-test. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: CEM cement demonstrated favorable cell viability values when completely set (24 h set MTA = 24 h set CEM) at both time intervals. Interestingly, 24 h after incubation, CEM in Groups B and C demonstrated higher cell viability values than MTA (P < 0.05). However, after 72 h of incubation, these groups of CEM and MTA showed equal cell viability. All samples of nanohybrid MTA had slight cytotoxic effects after 24 h of incubation, and moderate cytotoxic effects after 72 h of incubation. Conclusion: Set CEM and set MTA-Angelus exerted similar, favorable effects on cell viability. However, within the limitations of this in vitro study, the results suggest that nanohybrid MTA could not be recommended as a material of choice for cervical root resorption. PMID:27994312

  20. Epoxidation of styrenes by hydrogen peroxide as catalyzed by methylrhenium trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ajlouni, A.M.; Espenson, J.H. |

    1995-09-13

    Methylrhenium trioxide, CH{sub 3}ReO{sub 3}, catalyzes the oxidation of styrenes by hydrogen peroxide. Kinetic studies by three methods were carried out in acidic CH{sub 3}CN/H{sub 2}O (1:1 v/v) solutions. The catalytically-active species are the mono-peroxide, CH{sub 3}Rc(O){sub 2}(O{sub 2}), A, and the bis-peroxide, CH{sub 3}Re(O)(O{sub 2}){sub 2}, B, which epoxidize a given styrene at a similar rate. The rate constants are relatively insensitive to steric hindrance, but increase with the nucleophilicity of the styrene, electron-donating groups on the olefinic carbons or on the aromatic ring enhancing the rate. The rate constants for meta- and para-substituted styrenes follow a linear Hammett relationship; correlation with {sigma}{sup +} gave {rho} = -0.93 {+-} 0.05. In CD{sub 3}CN, epoxides were observed by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. cis-{beta}-Methylstyrene and trans-{beta}-methylstyrene led to the cis epoxide and the trans epoxide, respectively. In acidic CH{sub 3}CN/H{sub 2}O, the major products were 1,2-diols. In some cases C-C bond cleavage products were also observed, the extreme case being {beta}-methoxystyrene where the C-C bond was completely cleaved to yield benzaldehyde, formaldehyde, and methanol. 32 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Cytotoxic effects of mineral trioxide aggregate, calcium enrichedmixture cement, Biodentine and octacalcium pohosphate onhuman gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    A Saberi, Eshagh; Farhadmollashahi, Narges; Ghotbi, Faroogh; Karkeabadi, Hamed; Havaei, Roholla

    2016-01-01

    Background. This in vitro study compared the effects of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), calcium enriched mixture(CEM) cement, Biodentine (BD) and octacalcium phosphate (OCP) on the viability of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). Methods. After completion of the setting time of the materials under study, fibroblasts were placed in 24-well insert platesand 1 mg of each material was added to the respective wells. The plates were then incubated at 37°C. The inserts were removedat 24, 48 and 168 hours and 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide was added to assess cytotoxicity via the MTT colorimetricassay. Data were analyzed at different time intervals using repeated-measures ANOVA, followed by the Bonferronitest at three levels of significance of P < 0.05, P < 0.01 and P < 0.001. Results. Cytotoxicity of the materials under study was not significantly different at 24 and 48 hours compared to the controlgroup. However, at 168 hours, a significant difference was noted between MTA (P < 0.05) and Biodentine (P < 0.01)and the control group. Conclusion. Cytotoxicity of MTA, CEM, Biodentine and OCP against HGFs was similar to that of the control group at 24and 48 hours. Over time, MTA and Biodentine exhibited less cytotoxicity than other materials.

  2. Influence of acidic environment on properties of biodentine and white mineral trioxide aggregate: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Elnaghy, Amr M

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surface microhardness, compressive strength, bond strength, and morphologic microstructures of Biodentine (BD; Septodont, Saint Maur des Fossés, France) and white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) after exposure to a range of acidic pH levels. For each test, 4 groups of each material were exposed to pH values of 7.4, 6.4, 5.4, and 4.4, respectively, for 7 days. The surface hardness was determined using Vickers microhardness. The compressive strength and micro-push-out bond strength were determined using the universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The morphologic microstructures of specimens were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. BD showed higher surface hardness, compressive strength, and bond strength to root dentin compared with WMTA after exposure to different pH values. A substantial change in the microstructure of BD and WMTA occurred after exposure to different pH values. WMTA appeared to be more sensitive to acidic pH environments than BD. BD material seems more appropriate for use when exposed to an acidic environment compared with WMTA. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Response of human dental pulp capped with biodentine and mineral trioxide aggregate.

    PubMed

    Nowicka, Alicja; Lipski, Mariusz; Parafiniuk, Mirosław; Sporniak-Tutak, Katarzyna; Lichota, Damian; Kosierkiewicz, Anita; Kaczmarek, Wojciech; Buczkowska-Radlińska, Jadwiga

    2013-06-01

    Biodentine is a new bioactive cement that is similar to the widely used mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). It has dentin-like mechanical properties, which may be considered a suitable material for clinical indications of dentin-pulp complex regeneration such as direct pulp capping. The purpose of the present study was to compare the response of the pulp-dentin complex in human teeth after direct capping with this new tricalcium silicate-based cement with that of MTA. Pulps in 28 caries-free maxillary and mandibular permanent intact human molars scheduled for extraction for orthodontic reasons were mechanically exposed and assigned to 1 of 2 experimental groups, Biodentine or MTA, and 1 control group. Assay of periapical response and clinical examination were performed. After 6 weeks, the teeth were extracted, stained with hematoxylin-eosin, and categorized by using a histologic scoring system. The majority of specimens showed complete dentinal bridge formation and an absence of inflammatory pulp response. Layers of well-arranged odontoblast and odontoblast-like cells were found to form tubular dentin under the osteodentin. Statistical analysis showed no significant differences between the Biodentine and MTA experimental groups during the observation period. Within the limitations of this study, Biodentine had a similar efficacy in the clinical setting and may be considered an interesting alternative to MTA in pulp-capping treatment during vital pulp therapy. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical evaluation of mineral trioxide aggregate and biodentine as direct pulp capping agents in carious teeth

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Swaroop; Sowmya, B.; Mathew, Sylvia; Bhandi, Shilpa H.; Nagaraja, Shruthi; Dinesh, K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Root canal treatment has been a routine treatment option for carious exposure of the dental pulp. In the context of minimally invasive dentistry, direct pulp capping (DPC) procedure with a reliable biomaterial may be considered as an alternative provided the pulp status is favorable. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), a bioactive cement with excellent sealing ability and biocompatibility is capable of regenerating relatively damaged pulp and formation of dentin bridge when used as DPC agent. Biodentine is comparatively a new biomaterial claimed to possess properties similar to MTA and is currently explored for vital pulp therapy procedures. Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical response of pulp-dentin complex after DPC with MTA and biodentine in carious teeth. Subjects and Methods: Twenty-four permanent molars with carious exposure having no signs and symptoms of irreversible pulpitis were selected and assigned to one of the two groups, Group I - MTA and Group II - biodentine. Patients were recalled at 3 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months for clinical and radiographic evaluation. Fisher's exact test was used along with Chi-square test for statistical analysis. Results: Over a period of 6 months, MTA and biodentine showed 91.7% and 83.3% success rate, respectively, based on the subjective symptoms, pulp sensibility tests, and radiographic appearance. Conclusion: MTA and biodentine may be used as DPC agents when the pulpal diagnosis is not more than reversible pulpitis. PMID:28855754

  5. Osteoblasts survive the arsenic trioxide treatment by activation of ATM-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yu-Chen; Hsieh, Bau-Shan; Cheng, Hsiao-Ling; Huang, Li-Wen; Huang, Tzu-Ching; Huang, I-Yu; Chang, Kee-Lung

    2013-04-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is widely used in tumor treatment, but excessive arsenic exposure can have adverse effects. We recently found that, in primary osteoblasts, ATO produces oxidative stress and causes DNA tailing, but does not induce apoptosis. We further examined the signaling pathway by which osteoblasts survive ATO treatment, and found that they were arrested at G2/M phase of the cell cycle at 30h and overrode the G2/M boundary at 48h. After treatment for 30h, there was increased Cdc2 phosphorylation and expression of Wee1, a Cdc2 kinase, and expression of the cell cycle inhibitor, p21(waf1/cip1), which interacts with Cdc2. Furthermore, levels of the phosphatase Cdc25C, which activates Cdc2, were decreased, while the ratio of its phosphorylated/inactivated form to the total amount was increased. Moreover, phosphorylation/activation of the checkpoint kinases Chk1, Chk2 and p53 levels were increased, as were levels of activated ATM and γ-H2AX. The cell viability was decreased as an ATM inhibitor was added. Additionally, these effects of ATO on γ-H2AX, Chk1, Chk2, p53, and p21(waf1/cip1) were reduced by an ATM inhibitor. These findings suggest that G2/M phase arrest of osteoblasts is mediated by Chk1/Chk2 activation via an ATM-dependent pathway by which osteoblasts survive.

  6. Physical and Chemical Properties and Subcutaneous Implantation of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Mixed with Propylene Glycol.

    PubMed

    Marciano, Marina Angélica; Guimarães, Bruno Martini; Amoroso-Silva, Pablo; Camilleri, Josette; Hungaro Duarte, Marco Antonio

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the physical, chemical, and biological properties of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) mixed with 80% distilled water and 20% propylene glycol (PG) compared with MTA mixed with distilled water only. Flowability, film thickness, and solubility were analyzed according to American National Standards Institute/American Dental Association specification 57/2000. Initial and final setting times were assessed according to American Society for Testing and Materials specification C266/08. Porosity was assessed by using mercury intrusion porosimetry after 1 and 28 days of hydration, and the pH and calcium ion release were assessed after 3, 24, 72, and 168 hours. For the tissue reaction, the cements were implanted in 24 albino rats (2 groups, n = 12). An analysis of the inflammatory infiltrate was performed after 15, 30, and 60 days. MTA + PG exhibited lower film thickness and higher final setting time. No differences were verified for flowability (P > .05). MTA + PG showed high porosity at 1 day of hydration (P < .05). All the test cements demonstrated an alkaline pH. Microscopic analysis of the specimens revealed neoformation of connective tissue in contact with the cements. The introduction of PG as a mixing vehicle alters the physical and chemical properties of MTA and is biologically acceptable. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Resveratrol ameliorates the oxidative damage induced by arsenic trioxide in the feline lung.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yanyan; Xue, Jiangdong; Yao, Chunyu; Gao, Li; Ma, Dexing; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the possible protection of resveratrol against lung injury induced by arsenic trioxide (As2O3). Twenty-four healthy Chinese Dragon Li cats of either sex were randomly divided into four groups: control (1 ml/kg physiological saline), As2O3 (1 mg/kg), resveratrol (3 mg/kg) and resveratrol (3 mg/kg) + As2O3 (1 mg/kg). The resveratrol + As2O3- treated group was given resveratrol 1 hr before As2O3 (1 mg/kg) administration. We found that pretreatment with resveratrol in a clinically comparable dose regimen can reversed the changes in morphological and biochemical parameters induced by As2O3 in the lung. Resveratrol treatment also upregulated the activities of antioxidant enzymes and attenuated As2O3-induced increases in reactive oxygen species, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and malondialdehyde production in the lung. In addition, resveratrol attenuated the As2O3-induced reduction in the ratio of reduced glutathione to oxidized glutathione, the content of total glutathione and lung arsenic burden. These findings indicated that resveratrol can provide significant protection against As2O3-induced oxidative damage.

  8. Arsenic trioxide targets MTHFD1 and SUMO-dependent nuclear de novo thymidylate biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kamynina, Elena; Lachenauer, Erica R; DiRisio, Aislyn C; Liebenthal, Rebecca P; Field, Martha S; Stover, Patrick J

    2017-03-06

    Arsenic exposure increases risk for cancers and is teratogenic in animal models. Here we demonstrate that small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)- and folate-dependent nuclear de novo thymidylate (dTMP) biosynthesis is a sensitive target of arsenic trioxide (As2O3), leading to uracil misincorporation into DNA and genome instability. Methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1 (MTHFD1) and serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) generate 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate for de novo dTMP biosynthesis and translocate to the nucleus during S-phase, where they form a multienzyme complex with thymidylate synthase (TYMS) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), as well as the components of the DNA replication machinery. As2O3 exposure increased MTHFD1 SUMOylation in cultured cells and in in vitro SUMOylation reactions, and increased MTHFD1 ubiquitination and MTHFD1 and SHMT1 degradation. As2O3 inhibited de novo dTMP biosynthesis in a dose-dependent manner, increased uracil levels in nuclear DNA, and increased genome instability. These results demonstrate that MTHFD1 and SHMT1, which are key enzymes providing one-carbon units for dTMP biosynthesis in the form of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate, are direct targets of As2O3-induced proteolytic degradation, providing a mechanism for arsenic in the etiology of cancer and developmental anomalies.

  9. Tissue Reaction and Biocompatibility of Implanted Mineral Trioxide Aggregate with Silver Nanoparticles in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Zand, Vahid; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Aghbali, Amirala; Mesgariabbasi, Mehran; Janani, Maryam; Mokhtari, Hadi; Tehranchi, Pardis; Pakdel, Seyyed Mahdi Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Biocompatibility and antimicrobial activity of endodontic materials are of utmost importance. Considering the extensive applications of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) in dentistry and antimicrobial properties of silver nanoparticles, this study aimed to evaluate the subcutaneous inflammatory reaction of rat connective tissues to white MTA with and without nanosilver (NS) particles. Methods and Materials: Polyethylene tubes (1.1×8 mm) containing experimental materials (MTA and MTA+NS and empty control tubes) were implanted in subcutaneous tissues of seventy-five male rats. Animals were divided into five groups (n=15) according to the time of evaluation: group 1; after 7 days, group 2; after 15 days, group 3; after 30 days, group 4; after 60 days and group 5; after 90 days. The inflammatory reaction was graded and data was analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Statistical significance was defined at 0.05. Results: Comparison of cumulative inflammatory reaction at all intervals revealed that the mean grade of inflammatory reaction to MTA, MTA+NS and control samples were 3, 2 and 2, respectively. According to the Mann-Whitney analysis there were no significant differences between MTA+NS and MTA (P=0.42). Conclusion: Incorporation of 1% nanosilver to MTA does not affect the inflammatory reaction of subcutaneous tissue in rat models. PMID:26843871

  10. Organic reactions catalyzed by methylrhenium trioxide: Reactions of ethyl diazoacetate and organic azides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Z.; Espenson, J.H. |

    1996-10-16

    Methylrhenium trioxide (CH{sub 3}ReO{sub 3} or MTO) catalyzes several classes of reactions of ethyl diazoacetate, EDA. It is the first high valent oxo complex for carbene transfer. Under mild conditions and in the absence of other substrates, EDA was converted to a 9:1 mixture of diethyl maleate and diethyl fumarate. In the presence of alcohols, {alpha}-alkoxy ethyl acetates were obtained in good yield. The yields dropped for the larger and more branched alcohols, the balance of material being diethyl maleate and fumarate. An electron-donating group in the para position of phenols favors the formation of {alpha}-phenoxy ethyl acetates. The use of EDA to form {alpha}-thio ethyl acetates and N-substituted glycine ethyl esters, on the other hand, is hardly affected by the size or structure of the parent thiol or amine, with all of these reactions proceeding in high yield. MTO-catalyzed cycloaddition reactions occur between EDA and aromatic imines, olefins, and carbonyl compounds. Three-membered ring products are formed: aziridines, cyclopropanes, and epoxides, respectively. The reactions favor the formation of trans products, and provide a convenient route for the preparation of aziridines. Intermediate carbenoid and nitrenoid species have been proposed. In the presence of an oxygen source such as an epoxide, ethyl diazoacetate and azibenzil are converted to an oxalic acid monoethyl ester and to benzil; at the same time the epoxide was converted to an olefin. 75 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  11. In vitro investigations into the etiology of mineral trioxide tooth staining

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Todd; Baratz, Adam Z.; Gutmann, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the role of bismuth oxide, a constituent of contemporary mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) materials, and its response to various solutions that may contribute to the potential discoloration that occurs following MTA applications within the scope of endodontics. Setting and Design: Laboratory assessment of chemical reactions with white ProRoot® MTA and white Portland cement (WPC). Materials and Methods: Set specimens and freshly mixed specimens of white ProRoot® MTA and white ProRoot® MTA powder, along with specimens of WPC were exposed to distilled water, phosphate buffered saline (PBS), 10% formalin, hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), sodium hypochlorite, sodium hydroxide (NaOH) base, and hydrochloric acid (HCl) acid. Specimens were visually inspected periodically for color changes. Results: All forms of ProRoot MTA showed discoloration when exposed to 10% formalin within 30 min, as opposed to WPC, and were completely blackened at 4 days. Bismuth oxide alone and with calcium oxide also turned black within 30 min after exposure to 10% formalin. No discoloration was seen when exposed to the other solutions. Conclusions: Exposing MTA in various forms to a variety of liquids has determined that bismuth oxidein combination with other chemical moieties is the prime cause of staining observed by clinicians. PMID:25506138

  12. Color stability of white mineral trioxide aggregate in contact with hypochlorite solution.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Josette

    2014-03-01

    One of the uses of white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is as an apical barrier in immature teeth. Although this treatment has been reported to have high success rates, a number of cases of discoloration have been noted. The aim of this research was to investigate the color stability of white MTA in contact with various solutions used in endodontics. The change in color of white MTA after immersion in water, sodium hypochlorite, or hydrogen peroxide was assessed by viewing the color change on digital photographs and also by using a spectrophotometer. White MTA, white Portland cement, and bismuth oxide were assessed. The changes in the material after immersion in the different solutions were assessed by x-ray diffraction analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Immersion of white MTA and bismuth oxide in sodium hypochlorite resulted in the formation of a dark brown discoloration. This change was not observed in Portland cement. X-ray diffraction analysis and Fourier transform infrared analysis displayed the reduction of sodium hypochlorite in contact with bismuth oxide and MTA to sodium chloride. Contact of white MTA and other bismuth-containing materials with sodium hypochlorite solution should be avoided. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of the formocresol versus mineral trioxide aggregate primary molar pulpotomy: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Li; Ye, Ling; Tan, Hong; Zhou, Xuedong

    2006-12-01

    To apply meta-analysis to compare the clinical and radiographic effects of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) with formocresol (FC) when used as wound dressing for pulpotomy of primary molars. The study list was obtained by searching MEDLINE, The Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and SCI. Only those papers that met the inclusion criteria were analyzed. Six studies met the inclusion criteria. There was significant difference between the success rates of FC- and MTA-treated pulpotomized primary molars (P < .05). Clinical assessments and radiographic findings of the MTA versus FC pulpotomy suggested that MTA was superior to FC in pulpotomy resulting in a lower failure rate, with the RR (Relative Risk) being 0.32 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.11 to 0.90) and 0.31 (95% CI 0.13 to 0.74), respectively. Internal root resorption happened less in the MTA group with RR 0.29, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.77. MTA induces less undesirable responses and might be FC's suitable replacement.

  14. Comparison of mineral trioxide aggregate and formocresol as pulp medicaments for pulpotomies in primary molars.

    PubMed

    Noorollahian, H

    2008-06-14

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) to that of formocresol (FC) as pulp dressing agents in pulpotomised primary molars. In this clinical trial study, 60 lower second primary molars of 46 children were treated by a conventional pulpotomy technique. The teeth were randomly assigned to the MTA (experimental) and FC (control) groups by random numbered table. Following removal of the coronal pulp and haemostasis, the pulp stumps were covered with an MTA paste in the experimental group. In the control group, FC was placed with a cotton pellet over the pulp stumps. The teeth of both groups were restored with stainless steel crowns. Children arrived for clinical and radiographic follow-up evaluation after 6, 12 and 24 months. The treated teeth in FC group (n = 18) were clinically and radiographically successful after 24 months. The radiographic follow-up evaluation revealed one failure (furcation involvement) in 18 molars treated with MTA after 24 months. The treated teeth in MTA group were clinically successful 24 months postoperatively. Pulp canal obliteration was observed in one of the teeth treated with MTA and four of the teeth treated with FC. MTA could be used as a safe medicament for pulpotomy in cariously exposed primary molars and could be a substitute for FC.

  15. Comparative evaluation of formocresol and mineral trioxide aggregate as pulpotomy agents in deciduous teeth.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Daya; Jayanthi, M

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate and compare mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and formocresol as pulpotomy medicaments by clinical and radiographic assessments and to assess the histological features of both pulpotomy medicaments in deciduous teeth. This study was performed on 100 mandibular deciduous molar teeth requiring pulpotomy treatment. Children between age four and six years were randomly selected and divided into formocresol or MTA group. The patients were recalled after 3, 6, 9, 12 months respectively and evaluated clinically and radiographically. Histological assessment was done on lower deciduous canine teeth, which were undergoing serial extraction for interceptive orthodontic purpose. Pulpotomy was done on four teeth with formocresol and another four teeth with MTA. The teeth were extracted after six months following pulpotomy procedure and histologically evaluated. Two freshly extracted carious teeth were taken as controls. Clinical and radiographic criteria were laid and Chi analysis revealed significant difference in mobility ( P≤0.05), periodontal ligament widening ( P≤0.01 level) and inter - radicular radiolucency ( P≤0.02 level) between two groups at the end of 12 months. Histologically, in MTA group, a layer of new dentine formation with less dentinal tubules at the pulpotomized site was found. In formocresol group, increased inflammatory cells, a zone of atrophy, were noted in radicular portion of pulp. MTA is superior to formocresol clinically, radiographically. Histological analysis showed better reparative ability with hard tissue barrier formation with MTA compared to formocresol.

  16. Success rates of mineral trioxide aggregate, ferric sulfate, and formocresol pulpotomies: a 24-month study.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Arzu Pinar; Guven, Yeliz; Balli, Beyza; Ilhan, Banu; Sepet, Elif; Ulukapi, Isin; Aktoren, Oya

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the total success rates of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), ferric sulfate (FS), and formocresol (FC) as pulpotomy agents in primary molars. A randomized, split-mouth study design was used in 32 healthy 5- to 7-year-old children with 128 carious primary molars without clinical or radiographic evidence of pulp degeneration. The pulpotomy agents were assigned as follows: Group 1=MTA; Group 2=FS; Group 3=1:5 diluted Buckley's FC; and Group 4=zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE) base. Clinical and radiographic follow-up at 6, 12, and 24 months used the following criteria: pain; swelling; sinus tract; mobility; internal root resorption; and furcation and/or periapical bone destruction. The data were analyzed using chi-square. No significant differences in success rates were found among the groups at 6 and 12 months. Success rates in groups 1 to 4 at 24 months were 96%, 88%, 88%, and 68% respectively. There was a significant difference (P<.001) between the MTA and ZOE groups at 24 months. ZOE, as the only pulpotomy medicament, had a significantly lower success rate than MTA. No significant differences were observed, among the 3 experimental materials (MTA, FC, and FS) at 2 years follow-up.

  17. Comparing Gray Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Diluted Formocresol in Pulpotomized Human Primary Molars

    PubMed Central

    Zealand, Cameron M.; Briskie, Daniel M.; Botero, Tatiana M.; Boynton, James R.; Hu, Jan C.C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this multisite, multioperator, prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial was to evaluate the 6-month outcomes of diluted formocresol (DFC) compared to gray mineral trioxide aggregate (GMTA) as pulpotomy medicament. Methods Determined by a power analysis, 252 molars of 152 children were recruited. The teeth were randomly assigned to receive GMTA or DFC. At the 6-month follow-up, 118 children with 203 treated teeth were evaluated. Results Four blinded and calibrated evaluators scored each radiograph for pathologies. Clinical success was similar for DFC (97%) and GMTA (100%), (P<.09). Radiographic success differed significantly (P<.04) for DFC (86%) and GMTA (95%). Pulp canal obliteration was radiographically observed in 25% of the DFC group and in 37% of the GMTA group (P=.07). Dentin bridging was observed in 22% of the GMTA group but was not found in the DFC group (P<.01). Conclusion Teeth treated with GMTA showed more favorable radiographic outcomes than DFC at 6 months post-treatment. PMID:21070705

  18. Comparative evaluation of formocresol and mineral trioxide aggregate in pulpotomized primary molars--2 year follow up.

    PubMed

    Airen, Priyanka; Shigli, Anand; Airen, Bhuvnesh

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to clinically and radiographically evaluate Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) as an agent for pulpotomy in primary teeth and to compare it with that of Formocresol (FC) pulpotomy. Seventy first and second primary mandibular molars of children were chosen on patients who required minimum two pulpotomies in either arch or same arch. After the standardized technique of Pulpotomy with MTA and Formocresol, all molars were treated with a thick mix of Zinc oxide Eugenol cement into the coronal pulp chamber followed by preformed stainless steel crown. The children were followed up for clinical and radio graphical examination after 6, 12 and 24 month for Pain, Swelling, Sinus/fistula, Periapical changes, Furcation radiolucency and internal resorption. MTA represents 97% clinical success rate in comparison to Formocresol with 85% success. Radiographically also MTA showed more promising results with 88.6% success in comparison to Formocresol with 54.3%. Thus, MTA pulpotomy has emerged as an easier line of treatment to save the premature loss of primary teeth due to caries or trauma.

  19. Long-term evaluation of pulpotomy in primary molars using mineral trioxide aggregate or formocresol.

    PubMed

    Holan, Gideon; Eidelman, Eliezer; Fuks, Anna B

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as pulp dressing material following pulpotomy in primary molars with carious pulp exposure and compare them to those of formocresol (FC). Of 33 children, primary molars treated via a conventional pulpotomy technique were randomly assigned to the MTA group (33 teeth) or FC group (29 teeth). Clinical and radiographic follow-up ranged between 4 and 74 months. The mean follow-up time was 38 months, with no difference between the groups. Twenty-nine teeth were followed until uneventful shedding (mean=33 months). Failures were detected after a mean period of 16 months (range=4 to 30). The success rate of pulpotomy was 97% for MTA (1 failure) and 83% for FC (5 failures). Eight teeth presented internal resorption. In 4 of them (2 of each group), progress of the resorption process stopped and the pulp tissue was replaced by a radioopaque calcified tissue. Pulp canal obliteration was observed in 58% of the MTA group and in 52% of the FC group (total=55%). MTA showed a higher (though not statistically significant) long-term clinical and radiographic success rate than formocresol, and can be recommended as its replacement as, unlike FC, MTA does not induce undesirable responses.

  20. Mineral trioxide aggregate vs. formocresol in pulpotomized primary molars: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Eidelman, E; Holan, G; Fuks, A B

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) to that of formocresol (FC) as pulp dressing agents in pulpotomized primary molars with carious pulp exposure. Forty-five primary molars of 26 children were treated by a conventional pulpotomy technique. The teeth were randomly assigned to the MTA (experimental) or FC (control) group by a toss of a coin. Following removal of the coronal pulp and hemostasis the pulp stumps were covered with an MTA paste in the experimental group. In the control group, FC was placed with a cotton pellet over the pulp stumps for 5 minutes and removed; the pulp stumps were then covered by zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) paste. The teeth of both groups were restored with stainless steel crowns. Eighteen children with 32 teeth arrived for clinical and radiographic follow-up evaluation ranging from 6 to 30 months. The follow-up evaluations revealed only one failure (internal resorption detected at a 17 months postoperative evaluation) in a molar treated with formocresol. None of the MTA-treated teeth showed any clinical or radiographic pathology. Pulp canal obliteration was observed in 9 of 32 (28%) evaluated molars. This finding was detected in 2 out of the 15 teeth treated with FC (13%) and in 7 out of the 17 treated with MTA (41%). MTA showed clinical and radiographic success as a dressing material following pulpotomy in primary teeth and seems to be a suitable replacement for formocresol in primary teeth.

  1. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of root canal sealers based on mineral trioxide aggregate.

    PubMed

    Bin, Claudia V; Valera, Marcia C; Camargo, Samira E A; Rabelo, Sylvia B; Silva, Gleyce O; Balducci, Ivan; Camargo, Carlos Henrique R

    2012-04-01

    MTA has good biological properties, and it is a mineralization-inducing material with different indications in endodontics. Initially this material was not recommended as root canal sealer. However, a resin sealer based on mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA Fillapex) was recently released with this indication. Because MTA is in contact with the periodontal tissues, bone, and pulp, it is important to know its cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of MTA canal sealer (Fillapex) compared with white MTA cement and AH Plus. Chinese hamster fibroblasts (V79) were placed in contact with different dilutions of culture media previously exposed to such materials. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by methol-thiazol-diphenyl tetrazolium assay in spectrophotometer to check the viability rate and cell survival. The genotoxicity was accessed by the micronucleus formation assay. Cell survival rate and micronuclei number were assessed before and after exposure to cement extracts, and the results were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (P < .05). The results showed that the cell viability remained above 50% in white MTA group for all dilutions. AH Plus induced an intermediate cytotoxicity in a dilution-dependent manner, followed by Fillapex MTA. White MTA group was the less cytotoxic material in this study. Both AH Plus and Fillapex MTA sealer showed the lowest cell viability rates and caused an increased micronucleus formation when compared with control untreated group. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Antimicrobial Efficacy of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate with and without Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Samiei, Mohammad; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Shakoei, Sahar; Aghazadeh, Zahra; Vahid Pakdel, Seyyed Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Most current root-end filling materials do not provide a perfect seal. Thus, a microscopic space is likely to exist in the interface between walls of the root-end cavity and filling material, which allows microorganisms and their products to penetrate. In addition to good sealing ability and biocompatibility, root-end filling materials should ideally have some antimicrobial activity. Therefore, this in vitro study aimed to evaluate the antimicrobial properties of Angelus white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and the mixture of MTA with silver nanoparticles (1% weight; MTA/SN). Materials and Methods Antimicrobial properties of MTA and MTA/SN were tested by agar diffusion technique against Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans. The microbial inhibition zones around the materials were measured by a caliper with 0.1-mm accuracy. Student’s t-test was used for comparison between the two groups in normal data distribution and Man-Whitney U test for non-normal distribution. Results Student’s t-test revealed that for E. faecalis, C. albicans, and P. aeruginosa, microbial inhibition zone of MTA/SN was significantly greater than that of MTA (P = 0.000). Mann-Whitney U test indicated no significant difference between the effect of MTA and MTA/SN on S. aureus (P > 0.05). Conclusion Based on the results of this study, adding silver nanoparticles to MTA improved its antimicrobial efficacy. PMID:24171023

  3. Power Hydrogen Evaluation of Apexification Materials: EndoCal 10, Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Calasept Plus.

    PubMed

    Çiçek, Ersan; Bodrumlu, Emre

    2015-06-01

    The present study was to evaluate pH values of apexification materials. The materials were placed in 1 cm long and 4 mm diameter tubes. After sample immersion, glass flasks were hermetically sealed with rubber caps to attenuate any effects of external environmental factors and maintained at 37°C. The power hydrogen of the pastes was measured 1 hour, 3 hours, 8 hours, 24 hours, 72 hours and 7 days after preparation. pH was calibrated with solutions of known pH (7.0). Mann-Whitney test were used to determine significant differences. The mean pH of all medications was < 12.0 throughout the experiment. At 24 hours, EndoCal 10 had the highest pH of all the materials (p < 0.05). According to the results obtained, it may be concluded that calcium oxide (EndoCal 10) presented the highest pH compared with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Calasept Plus [Ca(OH)2]. Apexification is an important treatment in immature teeth. For this reason, used materials in apexification should have some properties, such as high pH and stimulating to be hard tissue. Therefore, the material should be chosen carefully in apexification of immature teeth.

  4. Arsenic trioxide induces endoplasmic reticulum stress-related events in neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Chiasson, Sonia; Girard, Denis

    2010-04-01

    We recently reported that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-induced cell pathway of apoptosis is operational in human neutrophils and that some ER stressors can accelerate this process. Recent data suggest that arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3) or ATO), may also act as an ER stressor. The aims of the present study were to elucidate if other ER stress-related events occur in ATO-induced neutrophils, and to determine the role of caspase-4 in the proapoptotic activity of ATO. We found that ATO induced ubiquitination of proteins, and increased calcium concentration and gene expression of calcineurin in neutrophils. In addition to caspase-4, activities of caspase-3, -8 and -9 were increased by ATO. The processing of caspase-4 was reversed by a caspase-8 inhibitor, indicating that caspase-4 activation requires the action of upstream initiator components, questioning on the role of caspase-4 in ATO-induced ER stress-mediated cell apoptosis. Using caspase-4 deficient THP-1 cells, we demonstrated that the proapoptotic effect of ATO was similar to that of control caspase-4-positive cells. We conclude that ATO is an ER stressor that can induce cell apoptosis by a mechanism which does not require caspase-4. In addition, we conclude that caspase-4 activation in ATO-induced neutrophils could be involved in functions other than apoptosis.

  5. Interaction between arsenic trioxide and human primary cells: emphasis on human cells of myeloid origin.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Antoine, Francis; Girard, Denis

    2009-03-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3); ATO) is considered to be one of the most potent drugs in cancer chemotherapy and is highly effective in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). It is well established that treatment of APL patients with ATO is associated with the disappearance of the PML-RARalpha fusion transcript, the characteristic APL gene product of the chromosomal translocation t(15;17). Although its mode of action is still not fully understood, ATO is known to induce cell apoptosis via generation of reactive oxygen species and activation of caspases. Several reports have indicated that ATO acts principally by inducing cell apoptosis not only in APL, but in a variety of non-APL cells including myeloma cells, chronic myeloid leukemia cells and cells of immune origin, including B or T lymphocytes, macrophages and, more recently, neutrophils. There is an increasing amount of data, including some from our laboratory, concerning the interaction between ATO and human primary cells. The focus of this review will be to cover the role of ATO in human immune primary cells with special emphasis on cells of myeloid origin.

  6. Remineralization of artificial dentinal caries lesions by biomimetically modified Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yi-pin; Li, Nan; Niu, Li-na; Primus, Carolyn M.; Ling, Jun-Qi; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2011-01-01

    Fluoride-releasing restorative materials are available for remineralization of enamel and root caries. However, dentin remineralization is more difficult than enamel remineralization due to the paucity of apatite seed crystallites along the lesion surface for heterogeneous crystal growth. Extracellular matrix proteins play critical roles in controlling apatite nucleation/growth in collagenous tissues. This study examined the remineralization efficacy of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) in phosphate-containing simulated body fluid (SBF) by incorporating polyacrylic acid and sodium tripolyphosphate as biomimetic analogs of matrix proteins for remineralizing caries-like dentin. Artificial caries-like dentin lesions incubated in SBF were remineralized over a 6-week period using MTA or MTA containing biomimetic analogs in the absence or presence of dentin adhesive application. Lesion depths and integrated mineral loss were monitored with micro-computed tomography. Ultrastructure of baseline and remineralized lesions were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Dentin remineralization was best achieved using MTA containing biomimetic analogs regardless of whether an adhesive was applied; dentinal tubules within the remineralized dentin were occluded by apatite. It is concluded that the MTA version employed in the study may be doped with biomimetic analogs for remineralization of unbonded and bonded artificial caries-like lesions in the presence of SBF. PMID:22085925

  7. Placement in an acidic environment increase the solubility of white mineral trioxide aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Yavari, Hamid Reza; Borna, Zahra; Rahimi, Saeed; Shahi, Shahriar; Valizadeh, Hadi; Ghojazadeh, Morteza

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the present study was to evaluate solubility of white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) in an acidic environment. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four metal rings were prepared, filled with WMTA and randomly divided into two groups. The samples in groups 1 and 2 were set in synthetic tissue fluid with pH values of 7.4 and 4.4, respectively and then were transferred to beakers containing synthetic tissue fluid with pH values of 7.7 and 4.4. Solubility of WMTA samples were calculated at the 9 experimental intervals. Data was analyzed with two-factor ANOVA and Bonferroni test (P < 0.03). Results: The total solubility of WMTA in groups 1 and 2 were −9.1796 ± 1.9158% and −1.1192 ± 2.6236%, (P = 0.028) with weight changes of 9.1574 ± 2.1432% and 7.3276 ± 1.5823%, respectively (P = 0.002). Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between the two groups. Conclusions: It was concluded that solubility of WMTA increases in acidic environments and additional therapeutic precautions should be taken to decrease inflammation in endodontic treatment. PMID:23833462

  8. Reduction mechanism of sulfur in lithium-sulfur battery: From elemental sulfur to polysulfide

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Dong; Yang, Xuran; Zhang, Xiaoqing; ...

    2015-10-30

    In this study, the polysulfide ions formed during the first reduction wave of sulfur in Li–S battery were determined through both in-situ and ex-situ derivatization of polysulfides. By comparing the cyclic voltammetric results with and without the derivatization reagent (methyl triflate) as well as the in-situ and ex-situ derivatization results under potentiostatic condition, in-situ derivatization was found to be more appropriate than its ex-situ counterpart, since subsequent fast chemical reactions between the polysulfides and sulfur may occur during the timeframe of ex-situ procedures. It was found that the major polysulfide ions formed at the first reduction wave of elemental sulfurmore » were the S42– and S52– species, while the widely accepted reduction products of S82– and S62– for the first reduction wave were in low abundance.« less

  9. Radiolysis of Sulfuric Acid, Sulfuric Acid Monohydrate, and Sulfuric Acid Tetrahydrate and Its Relevance to Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.; Carlson, R. W.

    2011-01-01

    We report laboratory studies on the 0.8 MeV proton irradiation of ices composed of sulfuric acid (H2SO4), sulfuric acid monohydrate (H2SO4 H2O), and sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (H2SO4 4H2O) between 10 and 180 K. Using infrared spectroscopy, we identify the main radiation products as H2O, SO2, (S2O3)x, H3O+, HSO4(exp -), and SO4(exp 2-). At high radiation doses, we find that H2SO4 molecules are destroyed completely and that H2SO4 H2O is formed on subsequent warming. This hydrate is significantly more stable to radiolytic destruction than pure H2SO4, falling to an equilibrium relative abundance of 50% of its original value on prolonged irradiation. Unlike either pure H2SO4 or H2SO4 H2O, the loss of H2SO4 4H2O exhibits a strong temperature dependence, as the tetrahydrate is essentially unchanged at the highest irradiation temperatures and completely destroyed at the lowest ones, which we speculate is due to a combination of radiolytic destruction and amorphization. Furthermore, at the lower temperatures it is clear that irradiation causes the tetrahydrate spectrum to transition to one that closely resembles the monohydrate spectrum. Extrapolating our results to Europa s surface, we speculate that the variations in SO2 concentrations observed in the chaotic terrains are a result of radiation processing of lower hydration states of sulfuric acid and that the monohydrate will remain stable on the surface over geological times, while the tetrahydrate will remain stable in the warmer regions but be destroyed in the colder regions, unless it can be reformed by other processes, such as thermal reactions induced by diurnal cycling.

  10. Radiolysis of Sulfuric Acid, Sulfuric Acid Monohydrate, and Sulfuric Acid Tetrahydrate and Its Relevance to Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.; Carlson, R. W.

    2011-01-01

    We report laboratory studies on the 0.8 MeV proton irradiation of ices composed of sulfuric acid (H2SO4), sulfuric acid monohydrate (H2SO4 H2O), and sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (H2SO4 4H2O) between 10 and 180 K. Using infrared spectroscopy, we identify the main radiation products as H2O, SO2, (S2O3)x, H3O+, HSO4(exp -), and SO4(exp 2-). At high radiation doses, we find that H2SO4 molecules are destroyed completely and that H2SO4 H2O is formed on subsequent warming. This hydrate is significantly more stable to radiolytic destruction than pure H2SO4, falling to an equilibrium relative abundance of 50% of its original value on prolonged irradiation. Unlike either pure H2SO4 or H2SO4 H2O, the loss of H2SO4 4H2O exhibits a strong temperature dependence, as the tetrahydrate is essentially unchanged at the highest irradiation temperatures and completely destroyed at the lowest ones, which we speculate is due to a combination of radiolytic destruction and amorphization. Furthermore, at the lower temperatures it is clear that irradiation causes the tetrahydrate spectrum to transition to one that closely resembles the monohydrate spectrum. Extrapolating our results to Europa s surface, we speculate that the variations in SO2 concentrations observed in the chaotic terrains are a result of radiation processing of lower hydration states of sulfuric acid and that the monohydrate will remain stable on the surface over geological times, while the tetrahydrate will remain stable in the warmer regions but be destroyed in the colder regions, unless it can be reformed by other processes, such as thermal reactions induced by diurnal cycling.

  11. Reduction mechanism of sulfur in lithium-sulfur battery: From elemental sulfur to polysulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Dong; Yang, Xuran; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Jiankun; Qu, Deyu; Qu, Deyang

    2015-10-30

    In this study, the polysulfide ions formed during the first reduction wave of sulfur in Li–S battery were determined through both in-situ and ex-situ derivatization of polysulfides. By comparing the cyclic voltammetric results with and without the derivatization reagent (methyl triflate) as well as the in-situ and ex-situ derivatization results under potentiostatic condition, in-situ derivatization was found to be more appropriate than its ex-situ counterpart, since subsequent fast chemical reactions between the polysulfides and sulfur may occur during the timeframe of ex-situ procedures. It was found that the major polysulfide ions formed at the first reduction wave of elemental sulfur were the S42– and S52– species, while the widely accepted reduction products of S82– and S62– for the first reduction wave were in low abundance.

  12. Cytochromes and iron sulfur proteins in sulfur metabolism of phototrophic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, U.

    1985-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulfur metabolism in phototrophic sulfur bacteria provides the bacteria with electrons for photosynthetic electron transport chain and, with energy. Assimilatory sulfate reduction is necessary for the biosynthesis of sulfur-containing cell components. Sulfide, thiosulfate, and elemental sulfur are the sulfur compounds most commonly used by phototrophic bacteria as electron donors for anoxygenic photosynthesis. Cytochromes or other electron transfer proteins, like high-potential-iron-sulfur protein (HIPIP) function as electron acceptors or donors for most enzymatic steps during the oxidation pathways of sulfide or thiosulfate. Yet, heme- or siroheme-containing proteins themselves undergo enzymatic activities in sulfur metabolism. Sirohemes comprise a porphyrin-like prosthetic group of sulfate reductase. eenzymatic reactions involve electron transfer. Electron donors or acceptors are necessary for each reaction. Cytochromes and iron sulfur problems, are able to transfer electrons.

  13. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ. Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis. PMID:23781126

  14. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 184.1095 Section 184.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Sulfuric acid (H2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7664-93-9), also...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 184.1095 Section 184.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Sulfuric acid (H2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7664-93-9), also...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 184.1095 Section 184.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Sulfuric acid (H2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7664-93-9), also...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sulfuric acid. 184.1095 Section 184.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Sulfuric acid (H2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7664-93-9), also...

  18. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-06-01

    Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ. Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis.

  19. HYDROCARBON AND SULFUR SENSORS FOR SOFC SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    A.M. Azad; Chris Holt; Todd Lesousky; Scott Swartz

    2003-11-01

    The following report summarizes work conducted during the Phase I program Hydrocarbon and Sulfur Sensors for SOFC Systems under contract No. DE-FC26-02NT41576. For the SOFC application, sensors are required to monitor hydrocarbons and sulfur in order to increase the operation life of SOFC components. This report discusses the development of two such sensors, one based on thick film approach for sulfur monitoring and the second galvanic based for hydrocarbon monitoring.

  20. Sulfur Doping of InAs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-04

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: We investigated the sulfur doping limits of InAs using ion implantation and rapid thermal annealing for plasmonic...applications. Previous studies suggested that higher electron concentrations would be possible using sulfur doping than silicon, which represents the...current state-of-the-art dopant. While we achieved near record active electron concentrations with sulfur , we found that dopant diffusion ultimately

  1. Environmentally relevant concentration of arsenic trioxide and humic acid promoted tumor progression of human cervical cancer cells: In vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Min-Ling; Yen, Cheng-Chieh; Lu, Fung-Jou; Ting, Hung-Chih; Chang, Horng-Rong

    2016-09-01

    In a previous study, treatment at higher concentrations of arsenic trioxide or co-exposure to arsenic trioxide and humic acid was found to be inhibited cell growth of cervical cancer cells (SiHa cells) by reactive oxygen species generation. However, treatment at lower concentrations slightly increased cell viability. Here, we investigate the enhancement of progression effects of environmentally relevant concentration of humic acid and arsenic trioxide in SiHa cell lines in vitro and in vivo by measuring cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and the carcinogenesis-related protein (MMP-2, MMP-9, and VEGF-A) expressions. SiHa cells treated with low concentrations of humic acid and arsenic trioxide alone or in co-exposure significantly increased reactive oxygen species, glutathione levels, cell proliferation, scratch wound-healing activities, migration abilities, and MMP-2 expression as compared to the untreated control. In vivo the tumor volume of either single drug (humic acid or arsenic trioxide) or combined drug-treated group was significantly larger than that of the control for an additional 45 days after tumor cell injection on the back of NOD/SCID mice. Levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, and VEGF-A, also significantly increased compared to the control. Histopathologic effects of all tumor cells appeared round in cell shape with high mitosis, focal hyperkeratosis and epidermal hyperplasia in the skin, and some tumor growth in the muscle were observed. Our results may indicate that exposure to low concentrations of arsenic trioxide and humic acid is associated with the progression of cervical cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1121-1132, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Active microbial sulfur disproportionation in the Mesoproterozoic.

    PubMed

    Johnston, David T; Wing, Boswell A; Farquhar, James; Kaufman, Alan J; Strauss, Harald; Lyons, Timothy W; Kah, Linda C; Canfield, Donald E

    2005-12-02

    The environmental expression of sulfur compound disproportionation has been placed between 640 and 1050 million years ago (Ma) and linked to increases in atmospheric oxygen. These arguments have their basis in temporal changes in the magnitude of 34S/32S fractionations between sulfate and sulfide. Here, we present a Proterozoic seawater sulfate isotope record that includes the less abundant sulfur isotope 33S. These measurements imply that sulfur compound disproportionation was an active part of the sulfur cycle by 1300 Ma and that progressive Earth surface oxygenation may have characterized the Mesoproterozoic.

  3. Are the clouds of Venus sulfuric acid.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, A. T.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown that strong aqueous sulfuric acid solutions have the right refractive index and freeze at Venusian cloud temperature, explain the dryness of the Venusian stratosphere, are consistent with some features of the Venusian IR spectrum, and do not absorb in highly reflecting areas of Venus. It is also indicated that such solutions should be produced by reactions between known atmospheric constituents and most sulfur-bearing rock at the Venusian surface temperature, and require only small amounts of sulfur consistent with its cosmic abundance and with the amounts of other volatile elements present in the atmosphere. It is believed therefore that the clouds of Venus consist of sulfuric acid solutions.

  4. Charles H. Winston and Confederate Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reithmiller, Steven

    1995-07-01

    Sulfuric acid turned out to be one of the critical chemicals made in the South during the Civil War. It was necessary for the manufacture of mercury fulminate which was used in the production of percussion caps and sulfuric acid was used in the Daniells cell to produce electricity. Charles H. Winston, president of the Richmond Female Institute and later professor at the University of Richmond (VA) was instrumental in the establishment of a plant to manufacture sulfuric acid in Charlotte, North Carolina. His patent and method of manufacture plus the uses of sulfuric acid during the Civil War are discussed.

  5. Elemental sulfur in Eddy County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinds, Jim S.; Cunningham, Richard R.

    1970-01-01

    Sulfur has been reported in Eddy County, N. Mex., in rocks ranging from Silurian to Holocene in age at depths of 0-15,020 feet. Targets of present exploration are Permian formations in the Delaware Basin and northwest shelf areas at depths of less than 4,000 feet. Most of the reported sulfur occurrences in the shelf area are in the 'Abo' (as used by some subsurface geologists), Yeso, and San Andres Formations and the Artesia Group. Sulfur deposition in the dense dolomites of the 'Abo,' Yeso, and San Andres Formations is attributed to the reduction of ionic sulfate by hydrogen sulfide in formation waters in zones of preexisting porosity and permeability. A similar origin accounts for most of the sulfur deposits in the formations of the Artesia Group, but some of the sulfur in these formations may have originated in place through the alteration of anhydrite to carbonate and sulfur by the metabolic processes of bacteria in the presence of hydrocarbons. Exploration in the Delaware Basin area is directed primarily toward the Castile Formation. Sulfur deposits in the Castile Formation are found in irregular masses of cavernous brecciated secondary carbonate rock enveloped by impermeable anhydrite. The carbonate masses, or 'castiles,' probably originated as collapse features resulting from subsurface solution and upward stopping. Formation of carbonate rock and sulfur in the castiles is attributed to the reduction of brecciated anhydrite by bacteria and hydrocarbons in the same process ascribed to the formation of carbonate and sulfur in the caprocks of salt domes.

  6. Improved sulfur removal processes evaluated for IGCC

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    An inherent advantage of Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) electric power generation is the ability to easily remove and recover sulfur. During the last several years, a number of new, improved sulfur removal and recovery processes have been commercialized. An assessment is given of alternative sulfur removal processes for IGCC based on the Texaco coal gasifier. The Selexol acid gas removal system, Claus sulfur recovery, and SCOT tail gas treating are currently used in Texaco-based IGCC. Other processes considered are: Purisol, Sulfinol-M, Selefning, 50% MDEA, Sulften, and LO-CAT. 2 tables.

  7. Characterization of Sulfur Compounds in Coffee Beans by Sulfur K-XANES Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenberg, H.; Prange, A.; Modrow, H.; Hormes, J.

    2007-02-01

    In this `feasibility study' the influence of roasting on the sulfur speciation in Mexican coffee beans was investigated by sulfur K-XANES Spectroscopy. Spectra of green and slightly roasted beans could be fitted to a linear combination of `standard' reference spectra for biological samples, whereas longer roasting obviously involves formation of additional sulfur compounds in considerable amounts.

  8. Characterization of Sulfur Compounds in Coffee Beans by Sulfur K-XANES Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenberg, H.; Hormes, J.; Prange, A.; Modrow, H.

    2007-02-02

    In this 'feasibility study' the influence of roasting on the sulfur speciation in Mexican coffee beans was investigated by sulfur K-XANES Spectroscopy. Spectra of green and slightly roasted beans could be fitted to a linear combination of 'standard' reference spectra for biological samples, whereas longer roasting obviously involves formation of additional sulfur compounds in considerable amounts.

  9. Characterization of Sulfur and Nanostructured Sulfur Battery Cathodes in Electron Microscopy Without Sublimation Artifacts.

    PubMed

    Levin, Barnaby D A; Zachman, Michael J; Werner, Jörg G; Sahore, Ritu; Nguyen, Kayla X; Han, Yimo; Xie, Baoquan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A; Giannelis, Emmanuel P; Wiesner, Ulrich; Kourkoutis, Lena F; Muller, David A

    2017-02-01

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) batteries have the potential to provide higher energy storage density at lower cost than conventional lithium ion batteries. A key challenge for Li-S batteries is the loss of sulfur to the electrolyte during cycling. This loss can be mitigated by sequestering the sulfur in nanostructured carbon-sulfur composites. The nanoscale characterization of the sulfur distribution within these complex nanostructured electrodes is normally performed by electron microscopy, but sulfur sublimates and redistributes in the high-vacuum conditions of conventional electron microscopes. The resulting sublimation artifacts render characterization of sulfur in conventional electron microscopes problematic and unreliable. Here, we demonstrate two techniques, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning electron microscopy in air (airSEM), that enable the reliable characterization of sulfur across multiple length scales by suppressing sulfur sublimation. We use cryo-TEM and airSEM to examine carbon-sulfur composites synthesized for use as Li-S battery cathodes, noting several cases where the commonly employed sulfur melt infusion method is highly inefficient at infiltrating sulfur into porous carbon hosts.

  10. The NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response pathway is associated with tumor cell resistance to arsenic trioxide across the NCI-60 panel

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Drinking water contaminated with inorganic arsenic is associated with increased risk for different types of cancer. Paradoxically, arsenic trioxide can also be used to induce remission in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) with a success rate of approximately 80%. A comprehensive study examining the mechanisms and potential signaling pathways contributing to the anti-tumor properties of arsenic trioxide has not been carried out. Methods Here we applied a systems biology approach to identify gene biomarkers that underlie tumor cell responses to arsenic-induced cytotoxicity. The baseline gene expression levels of 14,500 well characterized human genes were associated with the GI50 data of the NCI-60 tumor cell line panel from the developmental therapeutics program (DTP) database. Selected biomarkers were tested in vitro for the ability to influence tumor susceptibility to arsenic trioxide. Results A significant association was found between the baseline expression levels of 209 human genes and the sensitivity of the tumor cell line panel upon exposure to arsenic trioxide. These genes were overlayed onto protein-protein network maps to identify transcriptional networks that modulate tumor cell responses to arsenic trioxide. The analysis revealed a significant enrichment for the oxidative stress response pathway mediated by nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) with high expression in arsenic resistant tumor cell lines. The role of the NRF2 pathway in protecting cells against arsenic-induced cell killing was validated in tumor cells using shRNA-mediated knock-down. Conclusions In this study, we show that the expression level of genes in the NRF2 pathway serve as potential gene biomarkers of tumor cell responses to arsenic trioxide. Importantly, we demonstrate that tumor cells that are deficient for NRF2 display increased sensitivity to arsenic trioxide. The results of our study will be useful in understanding the mechanism of

  11. Graphene-wrapped sulfur nanospheres with ultra-high sulfur loading for high energy density lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya; Guo, Jinxin; Zhang, Jun; Su, Qingmei; Du, Gaohui

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery with high theoretical energy density is one of the most promising energy storage systems for electric vehicles and intermittent renewable energy. However, due to the poor conductivity of the active material, considerable weight of the electrode is occupied by the conductive additives. Here we report a graphene-wrapped sulfur nanospheres composite (S-nanosphere@G) with sulfur content up to 91 wt% as the high energy density cathode material for Li-S battery. The sulfur nanospheres with diameter of 400-500 nm are synthesized through a solution-based approach with the existence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Then the sulfur nanospheres are uniformly wrapped by conductive graphene sheets through the electrostatic interaction between graphene oxide and PVP, followed by reducing of graphene oxide with hydrazine. The design of graphene wrapped sulfur nanoarchitecture provides flexible conductive graphene coating with void space to accommodate the volume expansion of sulfur and to minimize polysulfide dissolution. As a result, the S-nanosphere@G nanocomposite with 91 wt% sulfur shows a reversible initial capacity of 970 mA h g-1 and an average columbic efficiency > 96% over 100 cycles at a rate of 0.2 C. Taking the total mass of electrode into account, the S-nanosphere@G composite is a promising cathode material for high energy density Li-S batteries.

  12. Facile synthesis of single crystalline rhenium (VI) trioxide nanocubes with high catalytic efficiency for photodegradation of methyl orange.

    PubMed

    Chong, Yuan Yi; Fan, Wai Yip

    2013-05-01

    Single-crystalline rhenium trioxide (ReO3) nanocubes have been prepared for the first time without the need of surfactants via controlled reduction of rhenium (VII) oxide (Re2O7), sandwiched between silicon wafers at 250°C. The metallic ReO3 nanocubes are magnetic and possess surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands down to the NIR region. The nanocubes also show very high catalytic activity toward the photodegradation of methyl orange (MO) under ambient conditions. A mechanism has been proposed to account for the photodegradation process.

  13. Healing process of dog dental pulp after pulpotomy and pulp covering with mineral trioxide aggregate or Portland cement.

    PubMed

    Holland, R; de Souza, V; Murata, S S; Nery, M J; Bernabé, P F; Otoboni Filho, J A; Dezan Júnior, E

    2001-01-01

    Considering several reports about the similarity between the chemical compositions of the mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Portland cement (PC), the subject of this investigation was to analyze the behavior of dog dental pulp after pulpotomy and direct pulp protection with these materials. After pulpotomy, the pulp stumps of 26 roots of dog teeth were protected with MTA or PC. Sixty days after treatment, the animal was sacrificed and the specimens removed and prepared for histomorphological analysis. There was a complete tubular hard tissue bridge in almost all specimens. In conclusion, MTA and PC show similar comparative results when used in direct pulp protection after pulpotomy.

  14. Clinical manipulation of mineral trioxide aggregate: lessons from the construction industry and their relevance to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Ha, William N; Kahler, Bill; Walsh, Laurence J

    2015-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is based on ordinary Portland cement (with added radiopaque agents) and, thus, shares many of its features. Although MTA is reported to be difficult to handle clinically, concrete materials made using Portland cement are the foundation of the construction industry. In this paper, we summarize important lessons from the construction literature that are relevant to the successful use of MTA in clinical practice, including behaviour during storage, susceptibility to acidic environments, the effects of exposure of the setting material to moisture and interactions with substances that may interfere with the speed of setting and the quality of the end product.

  15. Improving chemical vapor deposition graphene conductivity using molybdenum trioxide: An in-situ field effect transistor study

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Cheng; Lin, Jiadan; Xiang, Du; Wang, Chaocheng; Wang, Li; Chen, Wei

    2013-12-23

    By using in situ field effect transistor characterization integrated with molecular beam epitaxy technique, we demonstrate the strong surface transfer p-type doping effect of single layer chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene, through the surface functionalization of molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) layer. After doping, both the hole and electron mobility of CVD graphene are nearly retained, resulting in significant enhancement of graphene conductivity. With coating of 10 nm MoO{sub 3}, the conductivity of CVD graphene can be increased by about 7 times, showing promising application for graphene based electronics and transparent, conducting, and flexible electrodes.

  16. Effect of bismuth oxide on white mineral trioxide aggregate: chemical characterization and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Grazziotin-Soares, R; Nekoofar, M H; Davies, T E; Bafail, A; Alhaddar, E; Hübler, R; Busato, A L S; Dummer, P M H

    2014-06-01

    To assess the effect of bismuth oxide (Bi2 O3 ) on the chemical characterization and physical properties of White mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) Angelus. Commercially available White MTA Angelus and White MTA Angelus without Bi2 O3 provided by the manufacturer especially for this study were subjected to the following tests: Rietveld X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), compressive strength, Vickers microhardness test and setting time. Chemical analysis data were reported descriptively, and physical properties were expressed as means and standard deviations. Data were analysed using Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney U test (P = 0.05). Calcium silicate peaks were reduced in the diffractograms of both hydrated materials. Bismuth particles were found on the surface of White MTA Angelus, and a greater amount of particles characterized as calcium hydroxide was observed by visual examination on White MTA without Bi2 O3 . The material without Bi2 O3 had the shortest final setting time (38.33 min, P = 0.002), the highest Vickers microhardness mean value (72.35 MPa, P = 0.000) and similar compressive strength results (P = 0.329) when compared with the commercially available White MTA Angelus containing Bi2 O3 . The lack of Bi2 O3 was associated with an increase in Vickers microhardness, a reduction in final setting time, absence of Bi2 O3 peaks in diffractograms, as well as a large amount of calcium and a morphology characteristic of calcium hydroxide in EDX/SEM analysis. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Protects Against Arsenic Trioxide-Induced Cardiotoxicity In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Mathews V; Abhilash, M; Paul, M V Sauganth; Alex, Manju; Nair, R Harikumaran

    2017-04-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is a highly effective therapeutic against acute promyelocytic leukaemia, but its clinical efficacy is burdened by serious cardiac toxicity. The present study was performed to evaluate the effect of omega (ω)-3 fatty acid on As2O3-induced cardiac toxicity in in vivo and in vitro settings. In in vivo experiments, male Wistar rats were orally administered with As2O3 4 mg/kg body weight for a period of 45 days and cardiotoxicity was assessed. As2O3 significantly increased the tissue arsenic deposition, micronuclei frequency and creatine kinase (CK)-MB activity. There were a rise in lipid peroxidation and a decline in reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, superoxide dismutase and catalase in heart tissue of arsenic-administered rats. The cardioprotective role of ω-3 fatty acid was assessed by combination treatment with As2O3. ω-3 fatty acid co-administration with As2O3 significantly alleviated these changes. In in vitro study using H9c2 cardiomyocytes, As2O3 treatment induced alterations in cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, lipid peroxidation, cellular calcium levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (∆Ψm). ω-3 fatty acid co-treatment significantly increased cardiomyocyte viability, reduced LDH release, lipid peroxidation and intracellular calcium concentration and improved the ∆Ψm. These findings suggested that the ω-3 fatty acid has the potential to protect against As2O3-induced cardiotoxicity.

  18. The cytotoxic evaluation of mineral trioxide aggregate and bioaggregate in the subcutaneous connective tissue of rats

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Gözde; Yalcin, Yagmur; Dindar, Seckin; Sancakli, Hande; Erdemir, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the cytotoxic effects of ProRoot MTA and DiaRoot BA, a bioceramic nanoparticulate cement, on subcutaneous rat tissue. Study Design: Fifty Sprouge Dawley rats were used in this study. Polyethylene tubes filled with ProRoot MTA and DiaRoot BioAggregate, along with a control group of empty, were implanted into dorsal connective tissue of rats for 7, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days. After estimated time intervals the rats were sacrificed. The specimens were fixed, stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and then evaluated under a light microscope for inflammatory reactions and mineralization. Results: All groups evoked a severe to moderate chronic inflammatory reaction at 7 and 15 days, which decreased with time. Both the MTA and BioAggregate groups showed similar inflammatory reactions, except at 90 days when MTA showed statistically significant greater inflammation (p>0.05). The MTA group showed foreign body reaction at all times. Compared to BioAggregate, MTA showed significantly more foreign body reaction at 60 and 90 days (p<0.0001). After 30 days foreign body reaction of BioAggregate decreased significantly. Both MTA and BioAggregate groups showed similar necrosis at 7 and 15 days (p=0.094 and p=0.186 respectively). No necrosis was observed after 15 days. Similarly there was no fibrosis after 30 days for both MTA and BioAggregate groups (p>0.05). Conclusions: Since DiaRoot BioAggregate showed significantly better results than MTA, we can conclude that it is more biocompatible. However, further studies are required to confirm this result. Key words:Biocompatibility, mineral trioxide aggregate, bioAggregate. PMID:23722144

  19. Marginal Adaptation of New Bioceramic Materials and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: A Scanning Electron Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Nekoofar, Mohmmad Hossein; Ashoftehyazdi, Kazem; Zahraee, Shohreh; Khoshkhounejad, Mehrfam

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to compare the marginal adaptation of new bioceramic materials, EndoSequence Root Repair Material (ERRM putty and ERRM paste), to that of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as root-end filling materials. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six extracted human single-rooted teeth were prepared and obturated with gutta-percha and AH-26 sealer. The roots were resected 3 mm from the apex. Root-end cavities were then prepared with an ultrasonic retrotip. The specimens were divided into three groups (n=12) and filled with MTA, ERRM putty or ERRM paste. Epoxy resin replicas from the resected root-end surfaces and longitudinally sectioned roots were fabricated. The gaps at the material/dentin interface were measured using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Transversal, longitudinal, and overall gap sizes were measured for each specimen. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: In transversal sections, no significant difference was found between MTA, ERRM putty and ERRM paste (P=0.31). However, in longitudinal sections, larger gaps were evident between ERRM paste and dentinal walls compared to MTA and ERRM putty (P=0.002 and P=0.033, respectively). Considering the overall gap size values, the difference between three tested materials was not statistically significant (P=0.17). Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, the marginal adaptation of ERRM paste and putty was comparable to that of MTA. However, ERRM putty might be more suitable for filling the root-end cavities because of its superior adaptation compared to ERRM paste in longitudinal sections. PMID:24688585

  20. Biocompatibility of mineral trioxide aggregate and three new endodontic cements: An animal study

    PubMed Central

    Aminozarbian, Mohammad-Ghasem; Barati, Masoud; Salehi, Iman; Mousavi, Seyed Behrouz

    2012-01-01

    Background: Introducing new endodontic cements should await comprehensive investigations and new formulations have to be tested in vivo before applying in human beings. So, the purpose of this study was to compare the biocompatibility of new endodontic cements, calcium aluminate α-aluminate cement (CAAC), calcium aluminate α-aluminate plus cement (CAAC plus), and a mixture of wollastonite and CAAC cement (WOLCA) and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), in subcutaneous connective tissue of rats. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven Wistar rats were divided into three groups of 7, 14, and 30 experimental days. Sterile polyethylene tubes were filled with MTA, CAAC, CAAC Plus, and WOLCA cement and implanted subcutaneously. Empty tubes were implanted as negative control. After the experimental periods, animals were sacrificed by anesthetic overdosing. The occurrence of inflammatory responses was scored according to the previously established scores. Data were statistically analyzed using Friedman, Wilcoxon, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney tests. The level of significance was 5% (P<0.05). Results: There was a statistically significant difference between experimental and negative control sites in each group (P<0.05). CAAC Plus showed the highest mean scores of inflammation, compared with MTA, CAAC, and WOLCA cement sits at the end of all periods (P<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between inflammatory scores of each site in different experimental groups, except CAAC plus sites, in which inflammation increased significantly with time (P<0.05). Conclusion: According to the results of the current study, biocompatibility of CAAC and WOLCA cement were comparable with that of MTA, but CAAC Plus induced an inflammatory response higher than MTA, therefore is not biocompatible. PMID:22363364

  1. Biocompatibility of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate with TiO2 Nanoparticles on Human Gingival Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Samiei, Mohammad; Aghazadeh, Marzieh; Divband, Baharak; Akbarzadeh, Farzaneh

    2017-01-01

    Background The New compositions of white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) or use of various additives like nanoparticles might affect MTA’s ideal characteristics This study was performed to evaluate the cytotoxicity of WMTA and WMTA with Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (1% weight ratio) at different storage times after mixing on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). Material and Methods HGFs were obtained from the attached gingiva of human premolars. HGFs were cultured in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle medium, supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum, penicillin and streptomycin. The cells were exposed to WMTA (groups 1 and 2) and WMTA+TiO2 (groups 3 and 4). The fifth and sixth groups served as controls. Each group contained 15 wells. After 24h (groups 1, 3 and 5) and 48 h (groups 2, 4 and 6) of exposure, HGF viability was determined by Mosmann’s tetrazolium toxicity (MTT) assay. Statistical analysis of the data was performed by using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test, with significance of p < 0.05. Results With both materials, the viability of HGFs significantly decrased with increasing the incubation time from 24h to 48 h (P<0.05). There was no significant difference between the materials regarding HGF viability (P>0.05). Conclusions Under the limitations of the present study, incorporation of TiO2 nanoparticles into MTA at 1 wt% had no negative effect on its biocompatibility. Key words:Cytotoxicity, fibroblast, MTA, MTT assay, nanoparticle, TiO2. PMID:28210432

  2. Resveratrol protects against arsenic trioxide-induced cardiotoxicity in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, X-Y; Li, G-Y; Liu, Y; Chai, L-M; Chen, J-X; Zhang, Y; Du, Z-M; Lu, Y-J; Yang, B-F

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose The clinical use of arsenic trioxide (As2O3), a potent antineoplastic agent, is limited by its severe cardiotoxic effects. QT interval prolongation and apoptosis have been implicated in the cardiotoxicity of As2O3. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of resveratrol on As2O3-induced apoptosis and cardiac injury. Experimental approach In a mouse model of As2O3-induced cardiomyopathy in vivo, QT intervals and plasma enzyme activities were measured; cardiac tissues were examined histologically and apoptosis assessed. In H9c2 cardiomyocyte cells, viability, apoptosis, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cellular calcium levels were measured. Key results In the mouse model, resveratrol reduced As2O3-induced QT interval prolongation and cardiomyocyte injury (apoptosis, myofibrillar loss and vacuolization). In addition, increased lactate dehydrogenase activity and decreased activities of glutathione peroxidase, catalase and superoxide dismutase were observed in the plasma of As2O3-treated mice; these changes were prevented by pretreatment with resveratrol. In As2O3-treated H9c2 cardiomyocytes, resveratrol significantly increased cardiomyocyte viability and attenuated cell apoptosis as measured by acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labelling assay and caspase-3 activity. As2O3-induced generation of ROS and intracellular calcium mobilization in H9c2 cells was also suppressed by pretreatment with resveratrol. Conclusions and implications Our results showed that resveratrol significantly attenuated As2O3-induced QT prolongation, structural abnormalities and oxidative damage in the heart. In H9c2 cardiomyocytes, resveratrol also decreased apoptosis, production of ROS and intracellular calcium mobilization induced by treatment with As2O3. These observations suggested that resveratrol has the potential to protect against cardiotoxicity in As2O3-exposed patients. PMID:18332854

  3. Arsenic trioxide and resveratrol show synergistic anti-leukemia activity and neutralized cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuhua; Chen, Meng; Meng, Jia; Yu, Lei; Tu, Yingfeng; Wan, Lin; Fang, Kun; Zhu, Wenliang

    2014-01-01

    Cardiotoxicity is an aggravating side effect of many clinical antineoplastic agents such as arsenic trioxide (As2O3), which is the first-line treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Clinically, drug combination strategies are widely applied for complex disease management. Here, an optimized, cardiac-friendly therapeutic strategy for APL was investigated using a combination of As2O3 and genistein or resveratrol. Potential combinations were explored with respect to their effects on mitochondrial membrane potential, reactive oxygen species, superoxide dismutase activity, autophagy, and apoptosis in both NB4 cells and neonatal rat left ventricular myocytes. All experiments consistently suggested that 5 µM resveratrol remarkably alleviates As2O3-induced cardiotoxicity. To achieve an equivalent effect, a 10-fold dosage of genistein was required, thus highlighting the dose advantage of resveratrol, as poor bioavailability is a common concern for its clinical application. Co-administration of resveratrol substantially amplified the anticancer effect of As2O3 in NB4 cells. Furthermore, resveratrol exacerbated oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage, and apoptosis, thereby reflecting its full range of synergism with As2O3. Addition of 5 µM resveratrol to the single drug formula of As2O3 also further increased the expression of LC3, a marker of cellular autophagy activity, indicating an involvement of autophagy-mediated tumor cell death in the synergistic action. Our results suggest a possible application of an As2O3 and resveratrol combination to treat APL in order to achieve superior therapeutics effects and prevent cardiotoxicity.

  4. Resveratrol protects against arsenic trioxide-induced cardiotoxicity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X-Y; Li, G-Y; Liu, Y; Chai, L-M; Chen, J-X; Zhang, Y; Du, Z-M; Lu, Y-J; Yang, B-F

    2008-05-01

    The clinical use of arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)), a potent antineoplastic agent, is limited by its severe cardiotoxic effects. QT interval prolongation and apoptosis have been implicated in the cardiotoxicity of As(2)O(3). The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of resveratrol on As(2)O(3)-induced apoptosis and cardiac injury. In a mouse model of As(2)O(3)-induced cardiomyopathy in vivo, QT intervals and plasma enzyme activities were measured; cardiac tissues were examined histologically and apoptosis assessed. In H9c2 cardiomyocyte cells, viability, apoptosis, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cellular calcium levels were measured. In the mouse model, resveratrol reduced As(2)O(3)-induced QT interval prolongation and cardiomyocyte injury (apoptosis, myofibrillar loss and vacuolization). In addition, increased lactate dehydrogenase activity and decreased activities of glutathione peroxidase, catalase and superoxide dismutase were observed in the plasma of As(2)O(3)-treated mice; these changes were prevented by pretreatment with resveratrol. In As(2)O(3)-treated H9c2 cardiomyocytes, resveratrol significantly increased cardiomyocyte viability and attenuated cell apoptosis as measured by acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labelling assay and caspase-3 activity. As(2)O(3)-induced generation of ROS and intracellular calcium mobilization in H9c2 cells was also suppressed by pretreatment with resveratrol. Our results showed that resveratrol significantly attenuated As(2)O(3)-induced QT prolongation, structural abnormalities and oxidative damage in the heart. In H9c2 cardiomyocytes, resveratrol also decreased apoptosis, production of ROS and intracellular calcium mobilization induced by treatment with As(2)O(3). These observations suggested that resveratrol has the potential to protect against cardiotoxicity in As(2)O(3)-exposed patients.

  5. Evaluation of arsenic trioxide genotoxicity in wheat seedlings using oxidative system and RAPD assays.

    PubMed

    Aksakal, Ozkan; Esim, Nevzat

    2015-05-01

    Arsenic is a metalloid that is toxic to living organisms. It is known that high concentration of arsenic causes toxic damage to cells and tissues of plants. While the toxic effect of arsenic is known, limited efforts have been made to study its genotoxic effect on the crops. In the present study, effects of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) on seed germination, root length, reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde (MDA)), and activities of antioxidant enzymes, as well as DNA in wheat seedlings were investigated. Seedlings were exposed to different (10 to 40 mg/L) As2O3 concentrations for 7 days. Seed germination and root elongation decreased with increase of As2O3 concentration. The values of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion (O2 (·-)), and MDA contents significantly increased by As2O3 concentrations. The highest values for H2O2, O2 (·-), and MDA were obtained in 40 mg/L treated wheat seedling. A significant increase of peroxidase (POX) and catalase (CAT) activity in seedlings were observed with increased concentration of As2O3, then decreased when reaching a value of 40 mg/L, whereas the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) were gradually enhanced with increasing As2O3 concentration. Alterations of DNA in wheat seedlings were detected using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. The changes occurring in RAPD profiles of seedlings following As2O3 treatment included loss of normal bands and appearance of new bands in comparison to that of control seedlings. The results of our study showed that As2O3 induced DNA damage in a dose-dependent meaner, and the root cells of wheat studied showed a defense against As2O3-induced oxidative stress by enhancing their antioxidant activities.

  6. Arsenic Trioxide and Resveratrol Show Synergistic Anti-Leukemia Activity and Neutralized Cardiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jia; Yu, Lei; Tu, Yingfeng; Wan, Lin; Fang, Kun; Zhu, Wenliang

    2014-01-01

    Cardiotoxicity is an aggravating side effect of many clinical antineoplastic agents such as arsenic trioxide (As2O3), which is the first-line treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Clinically, drug combination strategies are widely applied for complex disease management. Here, an optimized, cardiac-friendly therapeutic strategy for APL was investigated using a combination of As2O3 and genistein or resveratrol. Potential combinations were explored with respect to their effects on mitochondrial membrane potential, reactive oxygen species, superoxide dismutase activity, autophagy, and apoptosis in both NB4 cells and neonatal rat left ventricular myocytes. All experiments consistently suggested that 5 µM resveratrol remarkably alleviates As2O3-induced cardiotoxicity. To achieve an equivalent effect, a 10-fold dosage of genistein was required, thus highlighting the dose advantage of resveratrol, as poor bioavailability is a common concern for its clinical application. Co-administration of resveratrol substantially amplified the anticancer effect of As2O3 in NB4 cells. Furthermore, resveratrol exacerbated oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage, and apoptosis, thereby reflecting its full range of synergism with As2O3. Addition of 5 µM resveratrol to the single drug formula of As2O3 also further increased the expression of LC3, a marker of cellular autophagy activity, indicating an involvement of autophagy-mediated tumor cell death in the synergistic action. Our results suggest a possible application of an As2O3 and resveratrol combination to treat APL in order to achieve superior therapeutics effects and prevent cardiotoxicity. PMID:25144547

  7. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling regulates arsenic trioxide-mediated macrophage innate immune function disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Li, Changzhao; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Ballestas, Mary E.; Elmets, Craig A.; Robbins, David J.; Matalon, Sadis; Deshane, Jessy S.; Afaq, Farrukh; Bickers, David R.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic exposure is known to disrupt innate immune functions in humans and in experimental animals. In this study, we provide a mechanism by which arsenic trioxide (ATO) disrupts macrophage functions. ATO treatment of murine macrophage cells diminished internalization of FITC-labeled latex beads, impaired clearance of phagocytosed fluorescent bacteria and reduced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These impairments in macrophage functions are associated with ATO-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway characterized by the enhancement in proteins such as GRP78, p-PERK, p-eIF2α, ATF4 and CHOP. The expression of these proteins is altered both at transcriptional and translational levels. Pretreatment with chemical chaperon, 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) attenuated the ATO-induced activation in UPR signaling and afforded protection against ATO-induced disruption of macrophage functions. This treatment also reduced ATO-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Interestingly, treatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prior to ATO exposure, not only reduced ROS production and UPR signaling but also improved macrophage functions. These data demonstrate that UPR signaling and ROS generation are interdependent and are involved in the arsenic-induced pathobiology of macrophage. These data also provide a novel strategy to block the ATO-dependent impairment in innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Inorganic arsenic to humans and experimental animals disrupt innate immune responses. • The mechanism underlying arsenic impaired macrophage functions involves UPR signaling. • Chemical chaperon attenuates arsenic-mediated macrophage function impairment. • Antioxidant, NAC blocks impairment in arsenic-treated macrophage functions.

  8. Fracture resistance and stress distribution of simulated immature teeth after apexification with mineral trioxide aggregate.

    PubMed

    Brito-Júnior, M; Pereira, R D; Veríssimo, C; Soares, C J; Faria-e-Silva, A L; Camilo, C C; Sousa-Neto, M D

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of adhesive restorations on fracture resistance and stress distribution in teeth with simulated immature apices and apical plugs of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Sixty bovine incisors were sectioned 8 mm above and 12 mm below the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). The root canal was enlarged using a diamond bur, resulting in remaining root canal walls with 0.1-0.2 mm of thickness. A 5-mm apical plug of MTA was placed and the teeth were restored according to the following groups: GP--the root canal was filled with gutta-percha and endodontic sealer; CR--the root canal was filled with light-cured composite resin inserted incrementally; FP--a fibre post was cemented into the root canal; and RFP--the fibre post was relined with composite resin prior to the cementation into the root canal. A load was applied on the crown of all teeth at 135° to their long axis until fracture. Data was analysed by one-way anova and SNK tests (α = 0.05), whilst the fracture pattern was evaluated according to the position of the fracture. Stress distributions in the restored teeth were verified by finite element analysis. Teeth restored with fibre posts and relined fibre posts were associated with the highest fracture resistance, whilst the GP group had the lowest values. GP and RC groups had similar fracture resistance values (P = 0.109). All fractures types involved the cervical and middle thirds of roots. The GP model had high levels of stress concentration in the cervical and middle thirds of roots. No difference was found amongst the stress concentration in the RC, FP and RFP models. Restorative protocols alter the fracture resistance and stress distribution of immature teeth after placement of MTA apical plugs. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Effect of nifedipine on the differentiation of human dental pulp cells cultured with mineral trioxide aggregate.

    PubMed

    Woo, Su-Mi; Hwang, Yun-Chan; Lim, Hoi-Soon; Choi, Nam-Ki; Kim, Sun-Hun; Kim, Won-Jae; Kim, Seon-Mi; Jung, Ji-Yeon

    2013-06-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) can induce differentiation of the dental pulp cells into odontoblast-like cells and generate a dentin-like mineral structure. The mechanisms underlying MTA-induced odontoblastic differentiation in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) are not completely understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of nifedipine as calcium channel blocker on MTA-induced odontoblastic differentiation in HDPCs. HDPCs extracted from maxillary supernumerary incisors and third molars were directly cultured on MTA with or without nifedipine in the culture medium. Cell growth and expression of odontoblastic differentiation markers were determined by using methyl-thiazol-diphenyl-tetrazolium assay and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis, respectively. Phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase was measured by Western blotting, and calcium deposition was assessed by using alizarin red S staining. MTA at a concentration of 1 mg/mL significantly up-regulated the expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein and dentin matrix protein-1 and enhanced mineralized nodule formation. However, nifedipine attenuated the MTA-induced odontoblastic differentiation in HDPCs. In addition, MTA-induced mineralization was blocked by inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by using U0126, SB203580, and SP600125, respectively. Furthermore, phosphorylation of ERK and JNK in response to MTA was inhibited when the medium was supplemented with nifedipine. This study showed that calcium ions released from MTA play an important role in odontoblastic differentiation of HDPCs via modulation of ERK and JNK activation. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Apical Plug Thickness on Fracture Resistance of Immature Teeth.

    PubMed

    Çiçek, Ersan; Yılmaz, Neslihan; Koçak, M Murat; Sağlam, Baran Can; Koçak, Sibel; Bilgin, Burcu

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the fracture resistance of simulated immature teeth after using different thicknesses of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) apical plugs. Fifty-two human maxillary anterior teeth were used. Five teeth were the positive control group; they were prepared using Peeso reamers to simulate immature teeth without any access cavity preparation. Access cavities of the 47 teeth were prepared, and the canals were instrumented with Peeso reamers. Five teeth served as the negative control; they were filled with calcium hydroxide. Forty-two teeth were divided into 3 groups; in groups 1, 2, and 3, MTA was placed into canals as a 3-mm and a 6-mm apical plug and a thorough canal length, respectively. The rest of the canals in groups 1 and 2 were filled with gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer (Dentsply DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany). After the storage period, the roots were covered with a polyether impression material and were embedded into self-curing resin blocks. Each specimen was then subjected to fracture testing using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance with the Tukey post hoc test for multiple comparisons. The negative group showed the lowest fracture resistance compared with the other groups. The 3-mm apical plug group showed the highest fracture resistance (P < .05). No significant differences were found between the 3-mm and 6-mm apical plug groups (P > .05). MTA should be used as an apical plug instead of root canal filling material to increase the fracture resistance of immature teeth. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fracture resistance of immature teeth filled with mineral trioxide aggregate, bioaggregate, and biodentine

    PubMed Central

    Bayram, Emre; Bayram, Huda Melike

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate fracture resistance of teeth with immature apices treated with coronal placement of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), bioaggregate (BA), and Biodentine. Materials and Methods: Forty-one freshly extracted, single-rooted human premolar teeth were used for the study. At first, the root length was standardized to 9 mm. The crown-down technique was used for the preparation of the root canals using the rotary ProTaper system (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) of F3 (30). Peeso reamer no. 6 was stepped out from the apex to simulate an incompletely formed root. The prepared roots were randomly assigned to one control (n = 5) and three experimental (n = 12) groups, as described below. Group 1: White MTA (Angelus, Londrina, Brazil) was prepared as per the manufacturer's instructions and compacted into the root canal using MAP system (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) and condensed by pluggers (Angelus, Londrina, Brazil). Group 2: The canals were filled with DiaRoot-BA (DiaDent Group International, Canada). Group 3: Biodentine (Septodont, Saint Maur des Fosses, France) solution was mixed with the capsule powder and condensed using pluggers. Instron was used to determine the maximum horizontal load to fracture the tooth, placing the tip 3 mm incisal to the cementoenamel junction. Mean values of the fracture strength were compared by ANOVA followed by a post hoc test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: No significant difference was observed among the MTA, BA, and biodentine experimental groups. Conclusion: All the three materials tested, may be used as effective strengthening agents for immature teeth. PMID:27095900

  12. Comparison of physical and mechanical properties of mineral trioxide aggregate and Biodentine.

    PubMed

    Butt, Naziya; Talwar, Sangeeta; Chaudhry, Sarika; Nawal, Ruchika Roongta; Yadav, Seema; Bali, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) fulfills many of the ideal properties of the root-end filling material. However, its low cohesive property often makes it difficult to handle. Biodentine, new calcium-silicate-based cement has been developed to improve some MTA drawbacks such as its difficult handling property and long-setting time. The objective of this study was to compare at different times the microleakage of roots filled with Biodentine and white MTA (WMTA)-Angelus and to investigate their setting time, handling properties and compressive strength. Root canals of single-rooted teeth were instrumented, filled with either Biodentine or WMTA-Angelus (n=15 each) with two positive and two negative control roots and stored at 37°C. Sealing was assessed at 4, 24 h, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks by a fluid filtration method. The initial setting time, handling properties, and compressive strength of the test groups were investigated by a vicat needle, questionnaire of operational hand feel, and universal instron machine, respectively. Significant differences in microleakage were found between two groups at 4-h and 24 h (P<0.05) and no difference at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. No significant difference was seen in the setting time of MTA-Angelus and Biodentine, though latter was found to have better handling consistency. Compressive strength of Biodentine was significantly higher than MTA-Angelus. The results suggest that the new calcium-silicate-based endodontic cement provides improvement in sealing ability as well as clinical manageability of dental filling materials.

  13. The Effect of Different Concentrations of Chlorhexidine Gluconate on the Compressive Strength of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Bidar, Maryam; Eslami, Neda; Naghavi, Neda; Fasihi, Zohreh; Attaran Mashhadi, Negin

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Substituting chlorhexidine (CHX) for water has been shown to enhance antimicrobial activity of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). The purpose of this study was to compare the compressive strength of MTA mixed with distilled water, 0.12% and 0.2% chlorhexidine. Materials and methods. MTA was mixed according to manufacturer's instructions in group I (n = 20). In groups II & III, 0.12% and 0.2% CHX liquid was substituted for water, respectively. Samples were condensed with moderate force into 20 tubes with 1.5×5 mm dimensions and were allowed to set for 72 hours at 37°C in 100% humidity. After being removed from the molds, their compressive strength was determined using Instron testing machine. Each group was divided into two subgroups according to the time of testing (at 72 hours, and one week). Fractured surfaces of 4 specimens in each group were then evaluated under Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) to determine their microstructure. One-way ANOVA, Tukey, and paired sample t-test was used for statistical analysis. P < 0.05 was set as significant. Results. There was no significant difference between three groups in terms of their compressive strength after 72 hours. However, the compressive strength of group II was significantly higher than group I (P = 0.034) and group III (P = 0.021) after one week. Crystalline microstructure was similar in all groups. Conclusion. Substitution of 0.012% chlorhexidine for water significantly increased the compressive strength of MTA at 1 week without significant change in crystalline structure. PMID:25973146

  14. Dissolution of a mineral trioxide aggregate sealer in endodontic solvents compared to conventional sealers.

    PubMed

    Alzraikat, Hanan; Taha, Nessrin Ahmad; Hassouneh, Layla

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the solubility of a Mineral Trioxide Aggregate sealer (MTA-Fillapex) compared with five other sealers, calcium hydroxide (Sealapex), resin (Realseal), zinc oxide-eugenol (Tubli-Seal), and two epoxy resins (AH-26 and AH-Plus), in chloroform and eucalyptoil in static and ultrasonic environments. Samples of each sealer were prepared (n = 180) and then divided into 12 groups that were immersed in solvents for 5 and 10 min in static and ultrasonic environments. The mean weight loss was determined, and the values were compared using Student's t-test, One-way ANOVA, and Tukey's HSD post-hoc test (p < 0.05). In chloroform, MTA-Fillapex, AH-26, and Sealapex displayed moderate solubility with no significant difference in dissolution (p = 0.125); however, their dissolution was significantly lower than that of AH-Plus (p < 0.001), which was almost fully dissolved after 10 minutes. Realseal was significantly less soluble than all sealers (p < 0.001). In eucalyptoil, MTA-Fillapex showed low solubility, as all of the sealers did, but Tubli-Seal was significantly more soluble than other sealers (p < 0.001). Using ultrasonic activation resulted in a significantly higher dissolution rate in chloroform for all sealers except MTA-Fillapex after 10 min (p = 0.226). In eucalyptoil, ultrasonic activation significantly increased the dissolution rate of all sealers except MTA-Fillapex after 5 and 10 min, Sealapex at 10 min, and AH-Plus at 5 min (p > 0.05). In conclusion, MTA-Fillapex was not sufficiently dissolved in either solvent. Ultrasonic activation had limited effectiveness on MTA-Fillapex dissolution, whereas it significantly increased the efficiency of solvents in dissolving a number of endodontic sealers.

  15. Comparison of Tooth Discoloration Induced by Calcium-Enriched Mixture and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Armita; Akbari, Majid; Farhadi-faz, Aida

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the tooth discoloration induced by calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Methods and Materials: Forty five endodontically treated human maxillary central incisors were selected and divided into three groups (n=15) after removing the coronal 3 mm of the obturating materials. In the MTA group, white MTA plug was placed in pulp chamber and coronal zone of the root canal. In CEM cement group, CEM plug was placed in the tooth in the same manner. In both groups, a wet cotton pellet was placed in the access cavity and the teeth were temporarily sealed. After 24 h the teeth were restored with resin composite. In the negative control group the teeth were also restored with resin composite. The color change in the cervical third of teeth was measured with a colorimeter and was repeated 3 times for each specimen. The teeth were kept in artificial saliva for 6 months. After this period, the color change was measured again. Data were collected by Commission International de I'Eclairage's L*a*b color values, and corresponding ΔE values were calculated. The results were analyzed using the one-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey’s test with the significance level defined as 0.05. Results: There was no significant differences between CEM group and control group in mean discoloration. The mean tooth discoloration in MTA group was significantly greater than CEM and control groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: According to the result of the present study CEM cement did not induce tooth discoloration after six months. Therefore it can be used in vital pulp therapy of esthetically sensitive teeth. PMID:27471526

  16. Preferential action of arsenic trioxide in solid-tumor microenvironment enhances radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Robert J. . E-mail: griff007@umn.edu; Williams, Brent W.; Park, Heon Joo; Song, Chang W.

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of arsenic trioxide, Trisenox (TNX), on primary cultures of endothelial cells and tumor tissue under varying pH and pO{sub 2} environments and the effects of combined TNX and radiation therapy on experimental tumors. Methods and Materials: Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells were cultured in vitro and exposed to TNX under various combinations of aerobic, hypoxic, neutral, or acidic conditions, and levels of activated JNK MAP kinase were assessed by Western blotting. FSaII fibrosarcoma cells grown in the hind limb of female C3H mice were used to study the effect of TNX on tumor blood perfusion and oxygenation. The tumor-growth delay after a single or fractionated irradiation with or without TNX treatment was assessed. Results: A single intraperitoneal injection of 8 mg/kg TNX reduced the blood perfusion in FSaII tumors by 53% at 2 hours after injection. To increase the oxygenation of the tumor vasculature during TNX treatment, some animals were allowed to breathe carbogen (95% O{sub 2}/5% CO{sub 2}). Carbogen breathing alone for 2 hours reduced tumor perfusion by 33%. When carbogen breathing was begun immediately after TNX injection, no further reduction occurred in tumor blood perfusion at 2 hours after injection. In vitro, TNX exposure increased activity JNK MAP kinase preferentially in endothelial cells cultured in an acidic or hypoxic environment. In vivo, the median oxygenation in FSaII tumors measured at 3 or 5 days after TNX injection was found to be significantly elevated compared with control tumors. Subsequently, radiation-induced tumor-growth delay was synergistically increased when radiation and TNX injection were fractionated at 3-day or 5-day intervals. Conclusions: Trisenox has novel vascular-damaging properties, preferentially against endothelium in regions of low pH or pO{sub 2}, which leads to tumor cell death and enhancement of the response of tumors to radiotherapy.

  17. In vitro chemical and cellular tests applied to uranium trioxide with different hydration states.

    PubMed Central

    Ansoborlo, E; Chalabreysse, J; Hengé-Napoli, M H; Pujol, E

    1992-01-01

    A simple and rapid in vitro chemical solubility test applicable to industrial uranium trioxide (UO3) was developed together with two in vitro cellular tests using rat alveolar macrophages maintained either in gas phase or in alginate beads at 37 degrees C. Industrial UO3 was characterized by particle size, X-ray, and IR spectra, and chemical transformation (e.g., aging and hydration of the dust) was also studied. Solvents used for the in vitro chemical solubility study included carbonates, citrates, phosphates, water, Eagle's basal medium, and Gamble's solution (simulated lung fluid), alone, with oxygen, or with superoxide ions. Results, expressed in terms of the half-time of dissolution, according to International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) classification (D,W,Y), varied for different hydration states of UO3, showing a lower solubility of hydrated UO3 in solvents compared to basic UO3 or UO3 heated at 450 degrees C. Two in vitro cellular tests on cultured rat alveolar macrophages (cells maintained in gas phase and cells immobilized in alginate beads) were used on the same UO3 samples and generally showed a lower solution transfer rate in the presence of macrophages than in the culture medium alone. The results of in vitro chemical and cellular tests were compared, with four main conclusions: a good reproducibility of the three tests in Eagle's basal medium the effect of hydration state on solubility, the classification of UO3 in terms of ICRP solubility criteria, and the ability of macrophages to decrease uranium solubility in medium. PMID:1396449

  18. White mineral trioxide aggregate mixed with calcium chloride dihydrate: chemical analysis and biological properties

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the chemical and biological properties of fast-set white mineral trioxide aggregate (FS WMTA), which was WMTA combined with calcium chloride dihydrate (CaCl2·2H2O), compared to that of WMTA. Materials and Methods Surface morphology, elemental, and phase analysis were examined using scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The cytotoxicity and cell attachment properties were evaluated on human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (HPLFs) using methyl-thiazol-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT) assay and under SEM after 24 and 72 hours, respectively. Results Results showed that the addition of CaCl2·2H2O to WMTA affected the surface morphology and chemical composition. Although FS WMTA exhibited a non-cytotoxic profile, the cell viability values of this combination were lesser than WMTA, and the difference was significant in 7 out of 10 concentrations at the 2 time intervals (p < 0.05). HPLFs adhered over the surface of WMTA and at the interface, after 24 hours of incubation. After 72 hours, there were increased numbers of HPLFs with prominent cytoplasmic processes. Similar findings were observed with FS WMTA, but the cells were not as confluent as with WMTA. Conclusions The addition of CaCl2·2H2O to WMTA affected its chemical properties. The favorable biological profile of FS WMTA towards HPLFs may have a potential impact on its clinical application for repair of perforation defects. PMID:28808634

  19. Analyses of heavy metals in mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement.

    PubMed

    Schembri, Matthew; Peplow, George; Camilleri, Josette

    2010-07-01

    Portland cement is used in the construction industry as a binder in concrete. It is manufactured from chalk, limestone, and clay, which are clinkered at very high temperatures and ground with gypsum to form Portland cement. The raw materials and the manufacturing process can result in the inclusion of heavy metals in Portland cement. Portland cement with a four to one addition of bismuth oxide is marketed as mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), which is used mainly as a dental material. Heavy metal inclusion can be of concern because MTA is in contact with hard and soft tissues. Measurements of arsenic, lead, and chromium in hydrated gray and white Portland cement, ProRoot MTA, and MTA Angelus were conducted with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry after acid digestion on the hydrated material. The leaching of the metal ions from the solid material in water and simulated body fluid (SBF) was also determined. All cement types showed high relative values of leached chromium compared with arsenic and lead in both the total metal content and leached species. The gray Portland cement showed the highest total amount of metal. The white Portland and both MTAs had lower values for all the leached metal ions. Both MTAs released more arsenic than the amount specified in ISO 9917-1 (2007). Portland cements and MTAs showed evidence of heavy metals in the acid-soluble form as well as leaching in deionized water and SBF. MTA contained levels of arsenic higher than the safe limit specified by the ISO 9917-1 (2007). Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Using mineral trioxide aggregate powder as an apical barrier: a bacterial leakage study.

    PubMed

    Milani, Amin Salem; Jafarabadi, Mohammad Asghari; Pakdel, Mahdi Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been used successfully for the treatment of necrotic immature teeth as part of a 2-step apical barrier. Recently, some researchers have used MTA powder instead of wet-mix MTA. It has also been used in a single-step approach in order to decrease the number of patient appointments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bacterial microleakage of MTA powder in comparison with wet-mix MTA, in single or 2-step barrier approaches. This ex vivo study was carried out on 70 extracted single-rooted teeth. The canals were enlarged to simulate immature teeth. The prepared specimens were assigned to 4 experimental (n = 15) and 2 control (n = 5) groups. In Group 1, a wet paper point was placed in the canal following placement of wet-mix MTA. In Group 2, a dry paper point was placed on wet-mix MTA. In Group 3, the samples were treated similar to Group 1, but MTA powder was used instead of wet-mix MTA. In Group 4, the same procedures were followed as Group 3 except that a dry paper point was used. Microleakage of the samples was compared using a 2-chamber bacterial leakage apparatus. Results showed that there were no significant differences in the number of leaked samples or rate of leakage over time (P > 0.05) among the experimental groups. It can be concluded that MTA used in a single step approach has the same resistance against bacterial penetration as in a 2-step approach, and MTA powder provides the same sealing ability as wet-mix MTA.

  1. Therapeutic Potential of Delivering Arsenic Trioxide into HPV-Infected Cervical Cancer Cells Using Liposomal Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Li, Dong; Ghali, Lucy; Xia, Ruidong; Munoz, Leonardo P.; Garelick, Hemda; Bell, Celia; Wen, Xuesong

    2016-02-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been used successfully to treat acute promyelocytic leukaemia, and since this discovery, it has also been researched as a possible treatment for other haematological and solid cancers. Even though many positive results have been found in the laboratory, wider clinical use of ATO has been compromised by its toxicity at higher concentrations. The aim of this study was to explore an improved method for delivering ATO using liposomal nanotechnology to evaluate whether this could reduce drug toxicity and improve the efficacy of ATO in treating human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers. HeLa, C33a, and human keratinocytes were exposed to 5 μm of ATO in both free and liposomal forms for 48 h. The stability of the prepared samples was tested using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES) to measure the intracellular arsenic concentrations after treatment. Fluorescent double-immunocytochemical staining was carried out to evaluate the protein expression levels of HPV-E6 oncogene and caspase-3. Cell apoptosis was analysed by flow cytometry. Results showed that liposomal ATO was more effective than free ATO in reducing protein levels of HPV-E6 and inducing cell apoptosis in HeLa cells. Moreover, lower toxicity was observed when liposomal-delivered ATO was used. This could be explained by lower intracellular concentrations of arsenic. The slowly accumulated intracellular ATO through liposomal delivery might act as a reservoir which releases ATO gradually to maintain its anti-HPV effects. To conclude, liposome-delivered ATO could protect cells from the direct toxic effects induced by higher concentrations of intracellular ATO. Different pathways may be involved in this process, depending on local architecture of the tissues and HPV status.

  2. Expression of Mineralization Markers during Pulp Response to Biodentine and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate.

    PubMed

    Daltoé, Mariana O; Paula-Silva, Francisco Wanderley G; Faccioli, Lúcia H; Gatón-Hernández, Patrícia M; De Rossi, Andiara; Bezerra Silva, Léa Assed

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the cell viability of dental pulp cells treated with Biodentine (Septodont, Saint-Maur, France) and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and the in vitro and in vivo expression of mineralization markers induced by the 2 materials. Human dental pulp cells isolated from 6 permanent teeth were stimulated with Biodentine and MTA extracts. Cell viability was determined using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay, and quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the expression of mineralization markers. Specimens of teeth from dogs treated with Biodentine and MTA after pulpotomy were used to determine the presence of osteopontin and alkaline phosphatase by immunohistochemistry and runt-related transcription factor 2 by immunofluorescence. No significant differences in cell viability were found between MTA and Biodentine extracts and controls after 24 and 48 hours (P > .05). After 48 hours, osteopontin (SPP1), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) expression was higher in MTA and Biodentine than in controls (P < .05). Osteopontin staining was more intense and spread over a greater number of areas in Biodentine than in MTA samples (P < .0001). Alkaline phosphatase staining of a mineralized tissue bridge was significantly different between materials (P < .0001), but no difference in alkaline phosphatase staining of pulp tissue was found between MTA and Biodentine (P = .2). Also, no significant difference in the number of cells labeled for runt-related transcription factor 2 by immunofluorescence was observed between materials (P > .05). Biodentine stimulated similar markers as MTA, but staining was more intense and spread over a larger area of the pulp tissue. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Biodentine and mineral trioxide aggregate induce similar cellular responses in a fibroblast cell line.

    PubMed

    Corral Nuñez, Camila M; Bosomworth, Helen J; Field, Claire; Whitworth, John M; Valentine, Ruth A

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the cell viability and messenger RNA expression of interleukin (IL)-1α and IL-6 in 3T3 fibroblast cells when in direct contact with Biodentine (Septodont, Saint Maur de Fossés, France) and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Biodentine and MTA were coated onto coverslips and allowed to set. An uncoated coverslip and one coated with GC Fuji IX (GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) were used as controls. Coverslips were cultured with 3T3 fibroblast cells. Cell viability was assessed quantitatively using AlamarBlue dye (Serotec, Oxford, UK) after 3, 6, 24, and 72 hours. Morphologic cell changes of 3T3 cells in contact with BD and MTA were observed by scanning electron microscopy, and cytokine expression was assessed at the messenger RNA level by semiquantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction after 3 and 24 hours of direct contact with the materials. Cells in contact with Biodentine and MTA showed similar viability to untreated control cells at all time points, with the exception of 6 hours when viability was decreased with both treatments. Examination by scanning electron microscopy revealed cells adhering to most of the Biodentine surface after 24 hours. However, for MTA samples, significantly fewer cells were observed. The messenger RNA expression of IL-1α and IL-6 by cells in contact with Biodentine was similar to cells in contact with MTA. Biodentine and MTA showed similar cytotoxicity and induced a similar pattern of cytokine expression. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Twenty Years of Research on Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: A Scientometric Report

    PubMed Central

    Asgary, Saeed; Motazedian, Hamid Reza; Parirokh, Masoud; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Kheirieh, Sanam

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been suggested for root-end filling, vital pulp therapy, apical plug, perforations repair, and root canal filling. Since the introduction of MTA in 1993, many studies about this material have been published. The aim of this survey was to illustrate statistical information about published articles in PubMed-index journals vis-à-vis the various aspects of this biomaterial. Material and Methods A PubMed search was performed to retrieve the relative articles from 1993 to August 2012. The data of each article including publication year, journal name, number of authors, first author name, affiliations and study design were recorded. Citation of each article till 2009 was obtained from Scopus and Google scholar databases. Data were analyzed to determine the related scientometric indicators. Results In total, 1027 articles were found in PubMed-indexed journals which show considerable increase from 2 papers in 1993 to 139 in 2011. While ~62% of articles had no level of evidence, only ~5% could be classified as having the highest level of evidence (LOE1); however, the majority of LOE1 articles originated from Iran (~1%: n=10). Journal of Endodontics, as the top rank journal, published 31.7% of MTA related articles. The majority of articles were four-authored (19.6%). Most of the articles originated from USA (21.9%), Brazil (18.5%) and Iran (8.76%). The average number of citation for the top ten articles from Scopus was 231. Conclusion This data demonstrates that during the past two decades, research on this novel endodontic biomaterial had a rapid positive trend especially during the last 5 years. Further high-level evidence articles for the various clinical applications of MTA would result in superior clinical decision making and stronger scientific-based endodontic practice. PMID:23411944

  5. Effect of acid-etching procedure on selected physical properties of mineral trioxide aggregate.

    PubMed

    Kayahan, M B; Nekoofar, M H; Kazandağ, M; Canpolat, C; Malkondu, O; Kaptan, F; Dummer, P M H

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of acid-etch procedures on the compressive strength and surface microhardness of tooth-coloured mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). White ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental) was mixed and packed into cylindrical tubes of 4 mm in diameter and 6 mm in height. Three groups, each of 15 specimens were subjected to an acid-etch procedure either 4, 24 or 96 h after mixing. The compressive strength was measured and compared with unetched control groups. Differences between groups were analysed using the Kruskall-Wallis test. A further batch of cylindrical specimens of 6 mm in diameter and 12 mm in height were prepared for testing surface microhardness. Three groups of 15 specimens were subjected to the acid-etch procedure at either 4, 24 or 96 h following mixing. Data were subjected to one-way anova. Changes in the surface microstructure before and after the acid-etch procedures were analysed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). There was a general trend for the compressive strength and surface microhardness of specimens to increase with time. In terms of compressive strength, the increase was significant between 4 h and the other time periods for both experimental and control groups (P < 0.0001); however, there was no significant difference between 24 and 96 h. The increase in surface microhardness was significant between 4, 24 and 96 h (P < 0.0001). In addition, there was a significant difference between experimental and control groups at all time periods (P < 0.0001). SEM examination revealed morphological differences between the intact and the etched MTA surfaces. Acid-etch procedures affected the compressive strength and surface microhardness of ProRoot MTA. This indicates that it may be better to postpone restorative procedures for at least 96 h after mixing MTA. Etching created surface changes that might have the potential to enhance bonding of resinous materials.

  6. Mineral Trioxide Aggregate vs. Calcium Hydroxide in Primary Molar Pulpotomy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Shirvani, Armin; Hassanizadeh, Raheleh; Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this quantitative systematic review/meta-analysis was to compare the treatment outcomes of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium hydroxide (CH) in pulpotomy of human primary molars. The focused PICO question was “in case of pulp exposure in vital primary molars, how does MTA pulpotomy compare to CH in terms of clinical/radiographic success?” Methods and Materials: We retrieved published randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of at least 6-month duration; our search included articles published up to March 2013 in five following databases: PubMed (Medline), Cochrane database of systematic reviews, Science Citation Index, EMBASE, and Google Scholar. Mantel Haenszel and Inverse Variance-weighted methods were applied by STATA; the relative risk (RR) was calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: A total of 282 English articles were collected. Two authors independently screened the articles and five RCTs were selected; data extraction and quality assessment were then carried out. Four RCTs were appropriate for meta-analysis according to their follow-up times by Mantel Haenszel method. Statistically significant difference was found between success rate of MTA compared to CH, with RR=0.08 (95% CI, 0.02-0.39), RR=0.19 (95% CI, 0.08-0.46), and RR=0.38 (95% CI, 0.21-0.68) for 6-, 12-, and 24-month follow-ups, respectively. A significant difference was also observed for all included RCTs after analyses using the Inverse Variance-weighted method (RR=0.44; 95% CI, 0.27-0.72). Conclusions: Systematic review/meta-analysis of included RCTs revealed that for pulpotomy of vital primary molars, MTA has better treatment outcomes compared to CH. PMID:24688575

  7. Resveratrol protects against arsenic trioxide-induced nephrotoxicity by facilitating arsenic metabolism and decreasing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Yu, Meiling; Xue, Jiangdong; Li, Yijing; Zhang, Weiqian; Ma, Dexing; Liu, Lian; Zhang, Zhigang

    2013-06-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) is an environmental toxicant and a potent antineoplastic agent. Exposure to arsenic causes renal cancer. Resveratrol is a well-known polyphenolic compound that is reported to reduce As(2)O(3)-induced cardiotoxicity. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of resveratrol on As(2)O(3)-induced nephrotoxicity and arsenic metabolism. Chinese Dragon-Li cats were injected with 1 mg/kg As(2)O(3) on alternate days; resveratrol (3 mg/kg) was administered via the forearm vein 1 h before the As(2)O(3) treatment. On the sixth day, the cats were killed to determine the histological renal damage, renal function, the accumulation of arsenic, and antioxidant activities in the kidney. Urine samples were taken for arsenic speciation. In the resveratrol + As(2)O(3)-treated group, activities of glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase, the ratio of reduced glutathione to oxidized glutathione, the total arsenic concentrations, and the percentage of methylated arsenic in urine were significantly increased. The concentrations of renal malondialdehyde, reactive oxygen species, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, and renal arsenic accumulation were significantly decreased and reduced renal morphologic injury was observed compared with the As(2)O(3)-treated group. These results demonstrate that resveratrol could significantly scavenge reactive oxygen species, inhibit As(2)O(3)-induced oxidative damage, and significantly attenuate the accumulation of arsenic in renal tissues by facilitating As(2)O(3) metabolism. These data suggest that use of resveratrol as postremission therapy for acute promyelocytic leukemia as well as adjunctive therapy in patients with exposure to arsenic may decrease arsenic nephrotoxicity.

  8. Neuroprotective effect of resveratrol on arsenic trioxide-induced oxidative stress in feline brain.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y; Xue, J; Jiang, H; Wang, M; Gao, L; Ma, D; Zhang, Z

    2014-07-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is a known environmental toxicant and potent chemotherapeutic agent. Significant correlation has been reported between arsenic exposure (including consumption of arsenic-contaminated water and clinical use of As2O3) and dysfunction in the nervous system. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the effect of resveratrol with neuroprotective activities on As2O3-induced oxidative damage and cerebral cortex injury. Twenty-four healthy Chinese Dragon Li cats of either sex were randomly divided into four groups: control (1 ml/kg physiological saline), As2O3 (1 mg/kg), resveratrol (3 mg/kg) and As2O3 (1 mg/kg) + resveratrol (3 mg/kg). As2O3+resveratrol-treated group were given resveratrol (3 mg/kg) 1 h before As2O3 (1 mg/kg) administration. Pretreatment with resveratrol upregulated the activities of antioxidant enzymes and attenuated As2O3-induced increases in reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde production. In addition, resveratrol attenuated the As2O3-induced reduction in the level of reduced glutathione and the ratio of reduced glutathione to oxidised glutathione, and accumulation of arsenic in the cerebral cortex. These findings support neuroprotective effect of resveratrol on As2O3 toxicity in feline brain and provide a better understanding of the mechanism that resveratrol modulates As2O3-induced oxidative damage and a stronger rational for clinical use of resveratrol to protect brain against the toxicity of arsenic. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Resveratrol and Arsenic Trioxide Act Synergistically to Kill Tumor Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Shen; Chen, You-Ran; Li, Pei-Chun; Dou, Meng-Meng; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Arsenic trioxide (As2O3), which used as an effective agent in the treatment of leukaemia and other solid tumors, is largely limited by its toxicity. QT prolongation, torsades de pointes and sudden heart death have been implicated in the cardiotoxicity of As2O3. The present study was designed to explore whether the combination of As2O3 and resveratrol could generate a more powerful anti-cancer effect both in vitro and in vivo. Materials and Methods MTT assay was performed to assess the proliferation of Hela, MCF-7 and NB4 cells. Isobolographic analysis was used to evaluate combination index values from cell viability data. The apoptosis and the cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level were assessed by fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry separately in vitro. The effect of As2O3, alone and in combination with resveratrol on Hela tumor growth in an orthotopic nude mouse model was also investigated. The tumor volume and the immunohistochemical analysis of CD31, CD34 and VEGF were determined. Results Resveratrol dramatically enhanced the anti-cancer effect induced by As2O3 in vitro. In addition, isobolographic analysis further demonstrated that As2O3 and resveratrol generated a synergistic action. More apoptosis and ROS generation were observed in the combination treatment group. Similar synergistic effects were found in nude mice in vivo. The combination of As2O3 and resveratrol dramatically suppressed both tumor growth and angiogenesis in nude mice. Conclusions Combining As2O3 with resveratrol would be a novel strategy to treat cancer in clinical practice. PMID:24901647

  10. Arsenic trioxide (ATO) and MEK1 inhibition synergize to induce apoptosis in acute promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Lunghi, P; Tabilio, A; Lo-Coco, F; Pelicci, P G; Pelicci, P; Bonati, A

    2005-02-01

    Recent studies suggest that components of the prosurvival signal transduction pathways involving the Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) can confer an aggressive, apoptosis-resistant phenotype to leukemia cells. In this study, we report that acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells exploit the Ras-MAPK activation pathway to phosphorylate at Ser112 and to inactivate the proapoptotic protein Bad, delaying arsenic trioxide (ATO)-induced apoptosis. Both in APL cell line NB4 and in APL primary blasts, the inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and Bad phosphorylation by MEK1 inhibitors enhanced apoptosis in ATO-treated cells. We isolated an arsenic-resistant NB4 subline (NB4-As(R)), which showed stronger ERK1/2 activity (2.7-fold increase) and Bad phosphorylation (2.4-fold increase) compared to parental NB4 cells in response to ATO treatment. Upon ATO exposure, both NB4 and NB4-As(R) cell lines doubled protein levels of the death antagonist Bcl-xL, but the amount of free Bcl-xL that did not heterodimerize with Bad was 1.8-fold greater in NB4-As(R) than in the parental line. MEK1 inhibitors dephosphorylated Bad and inhibited the ATO-induced increase of Bcl-xL, overcoming ATO resistance in NB4-As(R). These results may provide a rationale to develop combined or sequential MEK1 inhibitors plus ATO therapy in this clinical setting.

  11. Dynamic intratubular biomineralization following root canal obturation with pozzolan‐based mineral trioxide aggregate sealer cement

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yeon‐Jee; Baek, Seung‐Ho; Kum, Kee‐Yeon; Shon, Won‐Jun; Woo, Kyung‐Mi

    2015-01-01

    Summary The application of mineral trioxide aggregates (MTA) cement during the root canal obturation is gaining concern due to its bioactive characteristic to form an apatite in dentinal tubules. In this regard, this study was to assess the biomineralization of dentinal tubules following root canal obturation by using pozzolan‐based (Pz‐) MTA sealer cement (EndoSeal MTA, Maruchi). Sixty curved roots (mesiobuccal, distobuccal) from human maxillary molars were instrumented and prepared for root canal obturation. The canals were obturated with gutta‐percha (GP) and Pz‐MTA sealer by using continuous wave of condensation technique. Canals obturated solely with ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental) or Pz‐MTA sealer were used for comparison. In order to evaluate the biomineralization ability under different conditions, the PBS pretreatment before the root canal obturation was performed in each additional samples. At dentin‐material interfaces, the extension of intratubular biomineralization was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy. When the root canal was obturated with GP and Pz‐MTA sealer, enhanced biomineralization of the dentinal tubules beyond the penetrated sealer tag was confirmed under the SEM observation (p < 0.05). Mineralized apatite structures (calcium/phosphorous ratio, 1.45–1.89) connecting its way through the dentinal tubules were detected at 350–400 μm from the tubule orifice, and the pre‐crystallization seeds were also observed along the intra‐ and/or inter‐tubular collagen fiber. Intratubular biomineralization depth was significantly enhanced in all PBS pretreated canals (p < 0.05). Pz‐MTA cement can be used as a promising bioactive root canal sealer to enhance biomineralization of dentinal tubules under controlled environment. SCANNING 38:50–56, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Scanning Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26179659

  12. Randomized controlled trial of mineral trioxide aggregate and formocresol for pulpotomy in primary molar teeth.

    PubMed

    Aeinehchi, M; Dadvand, S; Fayazi, S; Bayat-Movahed, S

    2007-04-01

    To compare the outcome after 6 months of the application of formocresol (FC) or mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) during pulpotomy in primary molar teeth. A maximum of 126 children (aged 5-9 years) with carious primary teeth that required pulpotomy were selected. Following randomization, a standard pulpotomy preparation was undertaken, and the coronal pulp removed and bleeding arrested. In the FC group, cotton balls, soaked in FC, were placed for 5 min, and then the pulp chamber was filled with Zonalin, a pulpotomy agent. In the MTA group, a 1-mm-thick paste of MTA was used as a pulpotomy agent. The crowns in both groups were restored with amalgam or glass ionomer. The teeth of 100 patients were evaluated and compared clinically and radiographically after 3 and 6 months. No signs of clinical failure were observed at the 3- and 6-month follow-up appointments in either group. There were no significant differences in the radiographic findings of the teeth and surrounding tissue at the 3-month follow-up. However, at the 6-month follow-up, significantly more cases (P = 0.036) with root resorption were seen in the FC group; no cases of resorption occurred amongst the MTA cases. The surrounding tissue showed radiographic signs of post-treatment disease in four FC cases; none was seen in the MTA cases. After 6 months, pulpotomy with MTA was associated with fewer cases of root resorption and post-treatment disease. MTA appears to be a reliable alternative material for pulpotomy in primary molar teeth.

  13. Comparison of mineral trioxide aggregate and formocresol as pulp-capping agents in pulpotomized primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Agamy, Hadeer A; Bakry, Niveen S; Mounir, Maha M F; Avery, David R

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use clinical, radiographic, and histologic examinations to compare the relative success of gray mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), white MTA, and formocresol as pulp dressings in pulpotomized primary teeth. Twenty-four children, each with at least 3 primary molars requiring pulpotomy, were selected for this study's clinical and radiographic portion. An additional 15 carious primary teeth planned for serial extraction were selected for this study's histologic portion. All selected teeth were evenly divided into 3 test groups and treated with pulpotomies. Gray MTA was used as the pulp dressing for one third of the teeth, white MTA was the dressing for one third, and the remaining one third were treated with formocresol. The treated teeth selected for the clinical and radiographic evaluations were monitored periodically for 12 months. The treated teeth selected for histologic study were monitored periodically and extracted 6 months postoperatively. Four children with 12 pulpotomized teeth failed to return for any follow-up evaluations in the clinical and radiographic study. Of the remaining 60 teeth in 20 patients, 1 tooth (gray MTA) exfoliated normally and 6 teeth (4 white MTA and 2 formocresol) failed due to abscesses. The remaining 53 teeth appeared to be clinically and radiographically successful 12 months postoperatively. Pulp canal obliteration was a radiographic finding in 11 teeth treated with gray MTA and 1 tooth treated with white MTA. In the histologic study, both types of MTA successfully induced thick dentin bridge formation at the amputation sites, while formocresol induced thin, poorly calcified dentin. Teeth treated with gray MTA demonstrated pulp architecture nearest to normal pulp by preserving the odontoblastic layer and delicate fibrocellular matrix, yet few inflammatory cells or isolated calcified bodies were seen. Teeth treated with white MTA showed a denser fibrotic pattern, with more isolated calcifications in the

  14. Biocompatibility of Accelerated Mineral Trioxide Aggregate on Stem Cells Derived from Human Dental Pulp.

    PubMed

    Kulan, Pinar; Karabiyik, Ozge; Kose, Gamze T; Kargul, Betul

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of several additives on the setting time and cytotoxicity of accelerated-set mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) on stem cells of human dental pulp. ProRoot white MTA (WMTA) (Dentsply Tulsa Dental, Johnson City, TN) was mixed with various additives including distilled water, 2.5% disodium hydrogen phosphate (Na2HPO4) (Merck, Darmstadt, Germany), K-Y Jelly (Johnson & Johnson, Markham, ON, Canada), and 5% and 10% calcium chloride (CaCl2) (Merck). The setting times were evaluated using a Vicat apparatus (Alsa Lab, Istanbul, Turkey). Human dental pulp stem cells were isolated and seeded into 48-well plates at 2 × 10(3) cells per well and incubated with MTA samples for 24 hours, 3 days, and 7 days. Cell viability was evaluated using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium assay. MTA mixed with 10% CaCl2 showed the lowest setting time (P < .05). According to the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium results on the 1st, 3rd, and 7th days, a statistically significant difference was found (P < .05) between MTA groups and the control group. MTA mixed with K-Y Jelly in all groups showed the lowest cell viability at all time points (P < .05). The cell viability of MTA mixed with distilled water, 5% CaCl2, 10% CaCl2, and Na2HPO4 increased significantly through time (P < .05). This in vitro study found MTA mixed with 5% and 10% CaCl2 and Na2HPO4 is biocompatible with dental pulp stem cells in terms of cell viability. Further in vitro and in vivo investigations are required to prove the clinical applications of MTA mixed with various additives.

  15. Antibacterial and Odontogenesis Efficacy of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Combined with CO2 Laser Treatment.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tuan-Ti; Yeh, Chia-Hung; Kao, Chia-Tze; Chen, Yi-Wen; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Yang, Jaw-Ji; Shie, Ming-You

    2015-07-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been successfully used in clinical applications in endodontics. Studies show that the antibacterial effects of CO2 laser irradiation are highly efficient when bacteria are embedded in biofilm because of a photothermal mechanism. The aim of this study was to confirm the effects of CO2 laser irradiation on MTA with regard to both material characterization and cell viability. MTA was irradiated with a dental CO2 laser using directly mounted fiber optics in the wound healing mode with a spot area of 0.25 cm(2) and then stored in an incubator at 100% relative humidity and 37°C for 1 day to set. The human dental pulp cells cultured on MTA were analyzed along with their proliferation and odontogenic differentiation behaviors. The results indicate that the setting time of MTA after irradiation by the CO2 laser was significantly reduced to 118 minutes rather than the usual 143 minutes. The maximum diametral tensile strength and x-ray diffraction patterns were similar to those obtained without CO2 laser irradiation. However, the CO2 laser irradiation increased the amount of Ca and Si ions released from the MTA and regulated cell behavior. CO2 laser-irradiated MTA promoted odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs, with the increased formation of mineralized nodules on the substrate's surface. It also up-regulated the protein expression of multiple markers of odontogenic and the expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein protein. The current study provides new and important data about the effects of CO2 laser irradiation on MTA with regard to the decreased setting time and increased ion release. Taking cell functions into account, the Si concentration released from MTA with laser irradiation may be lower than a critical value, and this information could lead to the development of new regenerative therapies for dentin and periodontal tissue. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    McCulloch, Derek; Brown, Christina; Iland, Harry

    2017-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a distinct subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with a unique morphological appearance, associated coagulopathy and canonical balanced translocation of genetic material between chromosomes 15 and 17. APL was first described as a distinct subtype of AML in 1957 by Dr Leif Hillestad who recognized the pattern of an acute leukemia associated with fibrinolysis, hypofibrinogenemia and catastrophic hemorrhage. In the intervening years, the characteristic morphology of APL has been described fully with both classical hypergranular and variant microgranular forms. Both are characterized by a balanced translocation between the long arms of chromosomes 15 and 17, [t(15;17)(q24;q21)], giving rise to a unique fusion gene PML-RARA and an abnormal chimeric transcription factor (PML-RARA), which disrupts normal myeloid differentiation programs. The success of current treatments for APL is in marked contrast to the vast majority of patients with non-promyelocytic AML. The overall prognosis in non-promyelocytic AML is poor, and although there has been an improvement in overall survival in patients aged <60 years, only 30%–40% of younger patients are still alive 5 years after diagnosis. APL therapy has diverged from standard AML therapy through the empirical discovery of two agents that directly target the molecular basis of the disease. The evolution of treatment over the last 4 decades to include all-trans retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide, with chemotherapy limited to patients with high-risk disease, has led to complete remission in 90%–100% of patients in trials and rates of overall survival between 86% and 97%. PMID:28352191

  17. A New Simulated Plasma for Assessing the Solubility of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Samiei, Mohammad; Shahi, Shahriar; Aslaminabadi, Naser; Valizadeh, Hadi; Aghazadeh, Zahra; Pakdel, Seyyed Mahdi Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Solubility of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is an important characteristic that affects other properties such as microleakage and biocompatibility. Distilled water (DW) has previously been used for solubility tests. This experimental study compared the solubility of MTA in DW, synthetic tissue fluid (STF) and new simulated plasma (SP). Methods and Materials: In this study, 36 samples of tooth-colored ProRoot MTA were prepared and divided into three groups (n=12) to be immersed in three different solutions (DW, STF, and SP). Solubility tests were conducted at 2, 5, 9, 14, 21, 30, 50, and 78-day intervals. The unequal variance F-test (Welch test) was utilized to determine the effect of solubility media and Games-Howell analysis was used for pairwise comparisons. The repeated-measures ANOVA was used to assess the importance of immersion duration. Results: Welch test showed significant differences in solubility rates of samples between all the different solubility media at all the study intervals (P<0.05) except for the 14-day interval (P=0.094). The mixed repeated-measures ANOVA revealed a significant difference in solubility rate of MTA in three different solutions at all time-intervals (P=0.000). Games-Howell post-hoc test revealed that all pairwise comparisons were statistically significant at all time-intervals (P=0.000). Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, the long-term solubility of MTA in simulated plasma was less than that in synthetic tissue fluid and distilled water. PMID:25598806

  18. Sulfur Dioxide Analyzer Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Springston, Stephen R

    2016-05-01

    The Sulfur Dioxide Analyzer measures sulfur dioxide based on absorbance of UV light at one wavelength by SO2 molecules which then decay to a lower energy state by emitting UV light at a longer wavelength. Specifically, SO2 + hυ1 →SO2 *→SO2 + hυ2 The emitted light is proportional to the concentration of SO2 in the optical cell. External communication with the analyzer is available through an Ethernet port configured through the instrument network of the AOS systems. The Model 43i-TLE is part of the i-series of Thermo Scientific instruments. The i-series instruments are designed to interface with external computers through the proprietary Thermo Scientific iPort Software. However, this software is somewhat cumbersome and inflexible. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has written an interface program in National Instruments LabView that both controls the Model 43i-TLE Analyzer AND queries the unit for all measurement and housekeeping data. The LabView vi (the software program written by BNL) ingests all raw data from the instrument and outputs raw data files in a uniform data format similar to other instruments in the AOS and described more fully in Section 6.0 below.

  19. Sulfur-carbon nanocomposites and their application as cathode materials in lithium-sulfur batteries

    DOEpatents

    Liang, Chengdu; Dudney, Nancy J.; Howe, Jane Y.

    2017-08-01

    The invention is directed in a first aspect to a sulfur-carbon composite material comprising: (i) a bimodal porous carbon component containing therein a first mode of pores which are mesopores, and a second mode of pores which are micropores; and (ii) elemental sulfur contained in at least a portion of said micropores. The invention is also directed to the aforesaid sulfur-carbon composite as a layer on a current collector material; a lithium ion battery containing the sulfur-carbon composite in a cathode therein; as well as a method for preparing the sulfur-composite material.

  20. Sulfur-carbon nanocomposites and their application as cathode materials in lithium-sulfur batteries

    DOEpatents

    Liang, Chengdu; Dudney, Nancy J; Howe, Jane Y

    2015-05-05

    The invention is directed in a first aspect to a sulfur-carbon composite material comprising: (i) a bimodal porous carbon component containing therein a first mode of pores which are mesopores, and a second mode of pores which are micropores; and (ii) elemental sulfur contained in at least a portion of said micropores. The invention is also directed to the aforesaid sulfur-carbon composite as a layer on a current collector material; a lithium ion battery containing the sulfur-carbon composite in a cathode therein; as well as a method for preparing the sulfur-composite material.