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Sample records for sulfur trioxide

  1. Determination of sulfur trioxide in engine exhaust.

    PubMed

    Arnold, D R

    1975-04-01

    Sulfur trioxide in the exhaust gas of an internal combustion engine is removed and concentrated by absorption in a solution of 80% isopropyl alcohol, which quantitatively absorbs it and inhibits the oxidation of any sulfur dioxide which may be absorbed. The absorbed sulfur trioxide (sulfuric acid) is determined by an absorption titration by using barium chloride as the titrant and thorin as the indicator. The sulfur dioxide content of the exhaust is measured continuously by means of a DuPont Model 411 ultraviolet photoanalyzer.

  2. Determination of sulfur trioxide in engine exhaust.

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, D R

    1975-01-01

    Sulfur trioxide in the exhaust gas of an internal combustion engine is removed and concentrated by absorption in a solution of 80% isopropyl alcohol, which quantitatively absorbs it and inhibits the oxidation of any sulfur dioxide which may be absorbed. The absorbed sulfur trioxide (sulfuric acid) is determined by an absorption titration by using barium chloride as the titrant and thorin as the indicator. The sulfur dioxide content of the exhaust is measured continuously by means of a DuPont Model 411 ultraviolet photoanalyzer. PMID:50930

  3. An Aerosol Condensation Model for Sulfur Trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, K E

    2008-02-07

    This document describes a model for condensation of sulfuric acid aerosol given an initial concentration and/or source of gaseous sulfur trioxide (e.g. fuming from oleum). The model includes the thermochemical effects on aerosol condensation and air parcel buoyancy. Condensation is assumed to occur heterogeneously onto a preexisting background aerosol distribution. The model development is both a revisiting of research initially presented at the Fall 2001 American Geophysical Union Meeting [1] and a further extension to provide new capabilities for current atmospheric dispersion modeling efforts [2]. Sulfuric acid is one of the most widely used of all industrial chemicals. In 1992, world consumption of sulfuric acid was 145 million metric tons, with 42.4 Mt (mega-tons) consumed in the United States [10]. In 2001, of 37.5 Mt consumed in the U.S., 74% went into producing phosphate fertilizers [11]. Another significant use is in mining industries. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] estimate that, in 1996, 68% of use was for fertilizers and 5.8% was for mining. They note that H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} use has been and should continue to be very stable. In the United States, the elimination of MTBE (methyl tertiary-butyl ether) and the use of ethanol for gasoline production are further increasing the demand for petroleum alkylate. Alkylate producers have a choice of either a hydrofluoric acid or sulfuric acid process. Both processes are widely used today. Concerns, however, over the safety or potential regulation of hydrofluoric acid are likely to result in most of the growth being for the sulfuric acid process, further increasing demand [11]. The implication of sulfuric acid being a pervasive industrial chemical is that transport is also pervasive. Often, this is in the form of oleum tankers, having around 30% free sulfur trioxide. Although sulfuric acid itself is not a volatile substance, fuming sulfuric acid (referred to as oleum) is [7], the volatile product being sulfur trioxide

  4. EMISSIONS OF SULFUR TRIOXIDE FROM COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions of sulfur trioxide (SO3) are a key component of plume opacity and acid deposition. Consequently, these emissions need to be low enough not to cause opacity violations and acid deposition. Generally, a small fraction of sulfur in coal is converted to SO3 in coal-fired co...

  5. Environmental management of sulfur trioxide emission: impact of SO3 on human health.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, R

    2001-06-01

    The major contributors to global acidification are sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides emitted mostly by the burning of fossil fuels. From the scientific point of view, it is necessary to make a clear distinction between sulfur dioxide and sulfur trioxide when referring to sulfur oxides. These two air pollutants have different properties. This paper reports the following aspects: the strong effect of sulfur trioxide on local human health (a case study of asthma in Yokkaichi), the problem of corrosion caused by sulfur trioxide, the difference in analytical methods for determining sulfur dioxide concentrations and sulfur trioxide concentrations, and the difference in removal methods for sulfur dioxide and sulfur trioxide. An important initiative at the third European conference of environment ministers was that the issue of human health related to local air pollution should be given priority over that of global pollution. The declines in the emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides have mainly been effective in reducing acidification due to long-range transport. The reduction in sulfur trioxide may be more effective in improving local human health mentioned in the initiative.

  6. Emissions of sulfur trioxide from coal-fired power plants.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, R K; Miller, C A; Erickson, C; Jambhekar, R

    2004-06-01

    Emissions of sulfur trioxide (SO3) are a key component of plume opacity and acid deposition. Consequently, these emissions need to be low enough to not cause opacity violations and acid deposition. Generally, a small fraction of sulfur (S) in coal is converted to SO3 in coal-fired combustion devices such as electric utility boilers. The emissions of SO3 from such a boiler depend on coal S content, combustion conditions, flue gas characteristics, and air pollution devices being used. It is well known that the catalyst used in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for nitrogen oxides control oxidizes a small fraction of sulfur dioxide in the flue gas to SO3. The extent of this oxidation depends on the catalyst formulation and SCR operating conditions. Gas-phase SO3 and sulfuric acid, on being quenched in plant equipment (e.g., air preheater and wet scrubber), result in fine acidic mist, which can cause increased plume opacity and undesirable emissions. Recently, such effects have been observed at plants firing high-S coal and equipped with SCR systems and wet scrubbers. This paper investigates the factors that affect acidic mist production in coal-fired electric utility boilers and discusses approaches for mitigating emission of this mist. PMID:15242154

  7. Photoresist removal using gaseous sulfur trioxide cleaning technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Puppo, Helene; Bocian, Paul B.; Waleh, Ahmad

    1999-06-01

    A novel cleaning method for removing photoresists and organic polymers from semiconductor wafers is described. This non-plasma method uses anhydrous sulfur trioxide gas in a two-step process, during which, the substrate is first exposed to SO3 vapor at relatively low temperatures and then is rinsed with de-ionized water. The process is radically different from conventional plasma-ashing methods in that the photoresist is not etched or removed during the exposure to SO3. Rather, the removal of the modified photoresist takes place during the subsequent DI-water rinse step. The SO3 process completely removes photoresist and polymer residues in many post-etch applications. Additional advantages of the process are absence of halogen gases and elimination of the need for other solvents and wet chemicals. The process also enjoys a very low cost of ownership and has minimal environmental impact. The SEM and SIMS surface analysis results are presented to show the effectiveness of gaseous SO3 process after polysilicon, metal an oxide etch applications. The effects of both chlorine- and fluorine-based plasma chemistries on resist removal are described.

  8. High resolution spectroscopy of sulfur trioxide and carbon suboxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiello, Tony

    High resolution spectroscopy was used to study the properties of two simple polyatomic molecules, sulfur trioxide, SO3, and carbon suboxide, C3O2. The fundamental modes and several hot bands of the 18O isotopic forms of SO3 (32S18O 3 and 34S18O3) have been investigated using both infrared spectroscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy (CARS). The Raman-active symmetric stretching mode, nu 1, shows complex Q-branch patterns due to indirect Coriolis couplings, l-resonances, and Fermi resonances with infrared inaccessible nu2, nu4 combination/overtone levels. 18O isotopic substitution changes the character of these interactions in such a way that their effect on the nu1 CARS spectrum is unique among the different isotopomers studied. Accurate rovibrational constants are determined for all of the mixed states for the first time, leading to deperturbed values for the nu1 band origin of 1004.661(24) and 1004.693(23) for 34S18O 3 and 32S18O3 respectively. The strong Coriolis coupling is very noticeable in these species due to the close proximity of the nu2 and nu4 fundamental vibrations. The effect that this and other interaction terms have on the nu1 CARS spectrum of 34S18O3 is examined by selectively turning off the coupling between the hot bands. A global force field analysis was performed with the fundamental frequency values of all of the isotopomers studied that revealed a counterintuitive trend in the bond lengths between sulfur oxide species. In addition, band center frequencies for all the mixed 16O-18O isotopic species are computed. High-resolution CARS Spectroscopy was also used to study the nu 1 symmetric CO stretching mode of the quasi-linear molecule carbon suboxide, C3O2. Q-branches are seen that originate from the ground state and from thermally-populated levels of the unusually low frequency nu7 bending mode. The intensity variation of these on cooling to about 110 K in a jet expansion requires reversal of the order of assignment

  9. Mechanism for forming hydrogen chloride and sodium sulfate from sulfur trioxide, water, and sodium chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, A. B.

    1984-01-01

    A molecular orbital study of sodium sulfate and hydrogen chloride formation from sulfur trioxide, water, and sodium chloride shows no activation barrier, in agreement with recent experimental work of Kohl, Fielder, and Stearns. Two overall steps are found for the process. First, gas-phase water reacts with sulfur trioxide along a pathway involving a linear O-H-O transition state yielding closely associated hydroxyl and bisulfite which rearrange to become a hydrogen sulfate molecule. Then the hydrogen sulfate molecule transfers a hydrogen atom to a surface chloride in solid sodium chloride while an electron and a sodium cation simultaneously transfer to yield sodium bisulfate and gas-phase hydrogen chloride. This process repeats. Both of these steps represent well-known reactions for which mechanisms have not been previously determined.

  10. PREPARATION OF URANIUM TRIOXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Buckingham, J.S.

    1959-09-01

    The production of uranium trioxide from aqueous solutions of uranyl nitrate is discussed. The uranium trioxide is produced by adding sulfur or a sulfur-containing compound, such as thiourea, sulfamic acid, sulfuric acid, and ammonium sulfate, to the uranyl solution in an amount of about 0.5% by weight of the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate, evaporating the solution to dryness, and calcining the dry residue. The trioxide obtained by this method furnished a dioxide with a considerably higher reactivity with hydrogen fluoride than a trioxide prepared without the sulfur additive.

  11. Studies of the fate of sulfur trioxide in coal-fired utility boilers based on modified selected condensation methods.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yan; Zhou, Hongcang; Jiang, Wu; Chen, Chien-Wei; Pan, Wei-Ping

    2010-05-01

    The formation of sulfur trioxide (SO(3)) in coal-fired utility boilers can have negative effects on boiler performance and operation, such as fouling and corrosion of equipment, efficiency loss in the air preheater (APH), increase in stack opacity, and the formation of PM(2.5). Sulfur trioxide can also compete with mercury when bonding with injected activated carbons. Tests in a lab-scale reactor confirmed there are major interferences between fly ash and SO(3) during SO(3) sampling. A modified SO(3) procedure to maximize the elimination of measurement biases, based on the inertial-filter-sampling and the selective-condensation-collecting of SO(3), was applied in SO(3) tests in three full-scale utility boilers. For the two units burning bituminous coal, SO(3) levels starting at 20 to 25 ppmv at the inlet to the selective catalytic reduction (SCR), increased slightly across the SCR, owing to catalytic conversion of SO(2) to SO(3,) and then declined in other air pollutant control device (APCD) modules downstream to approximately 5 ppmv and 15 ppmv at the two sites, respectively. In the unit burning sub-bituminous coal, the much lower initial concentration of SO(3) estimated to be approximately 1.5 ppmv at the inlet to the SCR was reduced to about 0.8 ppmv across the SCR and to about 0.3 ppmv at the exit of the wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD). The SO(3) removal efficiency across the WFGD scrubbers at the three sites was generally 35% or less. Reductions in SO(3) across either the APH or the dry electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in units burning high-sulfur bituminous coal were attributed to operating temperatures being below the dew point of SO(3).

  12. DFT study of hydrogen fluoride and sulfur trioxide interactions on the surface of Pt-decorated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rad, Ali Shokuhi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we investigate the adsorption properties of hydrogen florid (HF) and sulfur trioxide (SO3) on the surface of platinum decorated graphene (PtG) using density functional theory. We found one optimized configuration for HF and two ones for SO3 upon adsorption on the surface of PtG. Our result show significant adsorption on PtG with calculated energy adsorption of -73.6 (-54.2 BSSE) kJ/mol for HF at its only position and -172.4 (-144.8 BSSE) and -62.7 (-53.7 BSSE) kJ/mol for SO3 at its two positions; P1 and P2, respectively), whereas there is weak physisorption of these analytes on pristine graphene (PG). Results of charge analyses reveled interesting net charge transfer; while the direction of charge is from HF to PtG, reverse direction is found for SO3 for its two configurations. To deep understand the concept of adsorption properties, we used orbital analyses including density of states for interaction of mentioned analytes on the surface of PtG.

  13. Antimony trioxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Antimony trioxide ; CASRN 1309 - 64 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  14. Method for removing sulfur oxide from waste gases and recovering elemental sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Raymond H.

    1977-01-01

    A continuous catalytic fused salt extraction process is described for removing sulfur oxides from gaseous streams. The gaseous stream is contacted with a molten potassium sulfate salt mixture having a dissolved catalyst to oxidize sulfur dioxide to sulfur trioxide and molten potassium normal sulfate to solvate the sulfur trioxide to remove the sulfur trioxide from the gaseous stream. A portion of the sulfur trioxide loaded salt mixture is then dissociated to produce sulfur trioxide gas and thereby regenerate potassium normal sulfate. The evolved sulfur trioxide is reacted with hydrogen sulfide as in a Claus reactor to produce elemental sulfur. The process may be advantageously used to clean waste stack gas from industrial plants, such as copper smelters, where a supply of hydrogen sulfide is readily available.

  15. Sulfur rate control system

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, T.A.; Mullendore, M.G.; Kleinfeldt, T.E.; Walker, H.G. Jr.

    1993-07-20

    A sulfur rate control system is described for substantially optimizing particulate removal performance of an electrostatic precipitator in fluid communication with a flue carrying combustion products of a fossil fuel, comprising: an electrostatic precipitator having an inlet for receiving a flue gas: means for injecting sulfur trioxide into a flue for mixing with said flue gas at a location preceding entry of said flue gas into said electrostatic precipitator, said injection of sulfur trioxide being varied responsive to a proportional control signal; and, control means coupled to both said flue and said sulfur trioxide injection means for generating said proportional control signal, said control means including (1) means for measuring a sulfur dioxide concentration quantity in said flue gas at a location preceding said sulfur trioxide injection means, (2) means for measuring a flow rate of particulates in said flue gas at a location preceding said sulfur trioxide injection means, and (3) a controller for calculating a ratio between said sulfur dioxide concentration quantity and said flow rate of particulates, said ratio calculating controller having a first input coupled to said sulfur dioxide measuring means and a second input coupled to said particulate flow rate measuring means for generating said proportional control signal in proportion to a difference between a predetermined value and said ratio between said sulfur dioxide concentration quantity and said flow rate of particulates, said ratio controller having an output coupled to said sulfur trioxide injection means for maximizing particulate removal efficiency of said electrostatic precipitator.

  16. Arsenic Trioxide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Arsenic trioxide is used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL; a type of cancer in which there ... worsened following treatment with other types of chemotherapy. Arsenic trioxide is in a class of medications called ...

  17. Sulfur

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, elemental sulfur and the byproduct sulfuric acid were produced at 109 operations in 29 states and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Total shipments were valued at about $1.6 billion. Elemental sulfur production was 8.2 Mt (9 million st); Louisiana and Texas accounted for about 53 percent of domestic production.

  18. Sulfur-oxygen processes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Robert M.; Smythe, William D.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory studies of irradiated sulfur dioxide frost have found that sulfur trioxide should be formed as a consequence of the irradiation process. The spectral reflectance of solid sulfur trioxide was measured in the laboratory and it was found that the compound has strong absorption features at 3.37 and 3.70 microns. These features are not present in the spectral geometric albedo of Io. This is interpreted as an indication that sulfur trioxide may exist in such limited abundance that it is undetectable in disk averaged spectrophotometry. It is suggested that the Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on the Galileo spacecraft should be able to identify condensed sulfur trioxide on Io particularly in regions bordering the sulfur dioxide deposits. The presence of elemental sulfur on Io's surface has been questioned on several grounds, most notably the suggested production process (quenched molten sulfur extrusions) and the effect of radiation (particularly X-rays) on some of the allotropes. Mixtures of sulfur allotropes were produced in the laboratory by quenching molten sulfur and it was found that the spectra indicate the presence of certain red-colored allotropes which are preserved upon quenching. The color of the sulfur glass produced is redder when the temperature of the original melt is higher. This is consistent with the suggestion that Io's spectral geometric albedo can be partly explained by the presence of quenched sulfur glasses.

  19. Infrared detection of Criegee intermediates formed during the ozonolysis of β-pinene and their reactivity towards sulfur dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Jennifer; Carlsson, Philip T M; Hertl, Nils; Olzmann, Matthias; Pfeifle, Mark; Wolf, J Lennard; Zeuch, Thomas

    2014-01-13

    Recently, direct kinetic experiments have shown that the oxidation of sulfur dioxide to sulfur trioxide by reaction with stabilized Criegee intermediates (CIs) is an important source of sulfuric acid in the atmosphere. So far, only small CIs, generated in photolysis experiments, have been directly detected. Herein, it is shown that large, stabilized CIs can be detected in the gas phase by FTIR spectroscopy during the ozonolysis of β-pinene. Their transient absorption bands between 930 and 830 cm(-1) appear only in the initial phase of the ozonolysis reaction when the scavenging of stabilized CIs by the reaction products is slow. The large CIs react with sulfur dioxide to give sulfur trioxide and nopinone with a yield exceeding 80%. Reactant consumption and product formation in time-resolved β-pinene ozonolysis experiments in the presence of sulfur dioxide have been kinetically modeled. The results suggest a fast reaction of sulfur dioxide with CIs arising from β-pinene ozonolysis.

  20. Organic transformations catalyzed by methylrhenium trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Z.

    1995-11-01

    Methylrhenium trioxide (MTO), CH{sub 3}ReO{sub 3}, was first prepared in 1979. MTO forms stable or unstable adducts with electron-rich ligands, such as amines (quinuclidine, 1,4-diazabicyclo-octane, pyridine, aniline, 2,2{prime}-bipyridine), alkynes, olefins, 1,2-diols, catechols, hydrogen peroxide, water, thiophenols, 1,2-dithiols, triphenylphosphine, 2-aminophenols, 2-aminothiophenols, 8-hydroxyquinoline and halides (Cl-, Br-, I-). After coordination, different further reactions will occur for different reagents. Reactions described in this report include the dehydration of alcohols, direct amination of alcohols, activation of hydrogen peroxide, oxygen transfer, and decomposition of ethyl diazoacetate.

  1. Arsenic Trioxide-Induced Mandibular Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Pei-Chen; Wu, Ju-Hui; Chen, Chun-Ming; Du, Je-Kang

    2015-09-01

    Previously, arsenic was a popular devitalizing agent used to necrotize inflamed dental pulp to lower the pulp sensitivity owing to the unavailability of appropriate anesthesia. However, leakage from the apical foramen, lateral or accessory canals, or cracks in the tooth is common. This can be dangerous because of the reportedly high toxic effects of arsenic in both hard and soft tissues, leading to gingival and osseous necrosis and, consequently, osteomyelitis. Therefore, arsenic can prove fatal for both bones and teeth and is no longer used. We encountered a case involving a 50-year-old man who had developed mandibular osteomyelitis with lower lip paresthesia caused by arsenic trioxide used during endodontic treatment. The patient was treated with appropriate antibiotics, adjunctive hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and adequate surgical debridement. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy can induce neovascularization in necrosed tissues and improve bone and soft tissue healing. At a 4-year follow-up visit, bone healing was observed, with restoration of periodontal health, although the paresthesia had persisted. We describe this case, present a review of the relevant published data, and discuss the possible causes, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up protocol of mandibular osteomyelitis caused by arsenic trioxide. PMID:25896568

  2. Arsenic Trioxide Negatively Affects Echinococcus granulosus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Zhuo; Li, Fangfang; Xing, Guoqiang; Peng, Xinyu; Zhang, Shijie

    2015-01-01

    Spillage of cyst contents during surgery is the major cause of recurrences of hydatidosis, also called cystic echinococcosis (CE). Currently, many scolicidal agents are used for inactivation of the cyst contents. However, due to complications in the use of those agents, new and more-effective treatment options are urgently needed. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro efficacy of arsenic trioxide (ATO) against Echinococcus granulosus protoscolices. Protoscolices of E. granulosus were incubated in vitro with 2, 4, 6, and 8 μmol/liter ATO; viability of protoscolices was assessed daily by microscopic observation of movements and 0.1% eosin staining. A small sample from each culture was processed for scanning and transmission electron microscopy. ATO demonstrated a potent ability to kill protoscolices, suggesting that ATO may represent a new strategy in treating hydatid cyst echinococcosis. However, the in vivo efficacy and possible side effects of ATO need to be explored. PMID:26324279

  3. Mineral trioxide aggregate apexification: A novel approach

    PubMed Central

    Purra, Aamir Rashid; Ahangar, Fayaz Ahmed; Chadgal, Sachin; Farooq, Riyaz

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of choice for necrotic teeth with immature root is apexification, which is induction of apical closure to produce more favorable conditions for conventional root canal filling. The most commonly advocated medicament is calcium hydroxide although recently considerable interest has been expressed in the use of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). MTA offers the option of a two-visit apexification procedure so that the fragile tooth can be restored immediately. However, difficulty in placing the material in the wide apical area requires the use of an apical matrix. Materials such as collagen, calcium sulfate, and hydroxyapatite have been used for this purpose. This article describes the use of resorbable suture material to form the apical matrix which offers many advantages over the contemporary materials. PMID:27563191

  4. Mineral trioxide aggregate apexification: A novel approach.

    PubMed

    Purra, Aamir Rashid; Ahangar, Fayaz Ahmed; Chadgal, Sachin; Farooq, Riyaz

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of choice for necrotic teeth with immature root is apexification, which is induction of apical closure to produce more favorable conditions for conventional root canal filling. The most commonly advocated medicament is calcium hydroxide although recently considerable interest has been expressed in the use of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). MTA offers the option of a two-visit apexification procedure so that the fragile tooth can be restored immediately. However, difficulty in placing the material in the wide apical area requires the use of an apical matrix. Materials such as collagen, calcium sulfate, and hydroxyapatite have been used for this purpose. This article describes the use of resorbable suture material to form the apical matrix which offers many advantages over the contemporary materials. PMID:27563191

  5. Arsenic trioxide negatively affects Echinococcus granulosus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Jiang, Yufeng; Wang, Zhuo; Li, Fangfang; Xing, Guoqiang; Peng, Xinyu; Zhang, Shijie; Lv, Hailong

    2015-11-01

    Spillage of cyst contents during surgery is the major cause of recurrences of hydatidosis, also called cystic echinococcosis (CE). Currently, many scolicidal agents are used for inactivation of the cyst contents. However, due to complications in the use of those agents, new and more-effective treatment options are urgently needed. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro efficacy of arsenic trioxide (ATO) against Echinococcus granulosus protoscolices. Protoscolices of E. granulosus were incubated in vitro with 2, 4, 6, and 8 μmol/liter ATO; viability of protoscolices was assessed daily by microscopic observation of movements and 0.1% eosin staining. A small sample from each culture was processed for scanning and transmission electron microscopy. ATO demonstrated a potent ability to kill protoscolices, suggesting that ATO may represent a new strategy in treating hydatid cyst echinococcosis. However, the in vivo efficacy and possible side effects of ATO need to be explored.

  6. Sulfur Mustard

    MedlinePlus

    ... the environment. Sulfur mustard was introduced in World War I as a chemical warfare agent. Historically it ... fatal. When sulfur mustard was used during World War I, it killed fewer than 5% of the ...

  7. Understanding the Oxygen Vacancy in Tungsten Trioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wennie; Janotti, Anderson; van de Walle, Chris G.

    2015-03-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) has a variety of applications in gas sensors, photocatalysis, and smart windows. As an electrochromic BO3 perovskite, WO3 turns from transparent to blue upon doping. This color change is correlated with a drop in transmittance of near-IR radiation, and is used in smart windows for energy efficiency. In addition to monovalent species doping that modulates optical properties, oxygen deficiencies have been found to have a similar electrochromic effect. The influence of oxygen vacancies on electronic structure and how it corresponds to electrochromic behavior remains a topic of debate. In this work, we examine the oxygen vacancy in monoclinic WO3 and its influence on electronic structure using density functional theory with a hybrid functional. We investigate the relative stability of different charge states and its implications for electrical properties, such as conductivity and electrochromism. We find oxygen vacancies to be shallow donors, and explore similarities and differences with monovalent species doping. Finally, we compare our theoretical findings with experiment to elucidate how vacancies may contribute to electrochromic behavior. This work is supported by DOE and NSF.

  8. Sulfur Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariss, R.; Niki, H.

    1985-01-01

    Among the general categories of tropospheric sulfur sources, anthropogenic sources have been quantified the most accurately. Research on fluxes of sulfur compounds from volcanic sources is now in progress. Natural sources of reduced sulfur compounds are highly variable in both space and time. Variables, such as soil temperature, hydrology (tidal and water table), and organic flux into the soil, all interact to determine microbial production and subsequent emissions of reduced sulfur compounds from anaerobic soils and sediments. Available information on sources of COS, CS2, DMS, and H2S to the troposphere in the following paragraphs are summarized; these are the major biogenic sulfur species with a clearly identified role in tropospheric chemistry. The oxidation of SO2 to H2SO4 can often have a significant impact on the acidity of precipitation. A schematic representation of some important transformations and sinks for selected sulfur species is illustrated.

  9. Lunar sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuck, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Ideas introduced by Vaniman, Pettit and Heiken in their 1988 Uses of Lunar Sulfur are expanded. Particular attention is given to uses of SO2 as a mineral-dressing fluid. Also introduced is the concept of using sulfide-based concrete as an alternative to the sulfur-based concretes proposed by Leonard and Johnson. Sulfur is abundant in high-Ti mare basalts, which range from 0.16 to 0.27 pct. by weight. Terrestrial basalts with 0.15 pct. S are rare. For oxygen recovery, sulfur must be driven off with other volatiles from ilmenite concentrates, before reduction. Troilite (FeS) may be oxidized to magnetite (Fe3O4) and SO2 gas, by burning concentrates in oxygen within a magnetic field, to further oxidize ilmenite before regrinding the magnetic reconcentration. SO2 is liquid at -20 C, the mean temperature underground on the Moon, at a minimum of 0.6 atm pressure. By using liquid SO2 as a mineral dressing fluid, all the techniques of terrestrial mineral separation become available for lunar ores and concentrates. Combination of sulfur and iron in an exothermic reaction, to form iron sulfides, may be used to cement grains of other minerals into an anhydrous iron-sulfide concrete. A sulfur-iron-aggregate mixture may be heated to the ignition temperature of iron with sulfur to make a concrete shape. The best iron, sulfur, and aggregate ratios need to be experimentally established. The iron and sulfur will be by-products of oxygen production from lunar minerals.

  10. Lunar sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuck, David L.

    Ideas introduced by Vaniman, Pettit and Heiken in their 1988 Uses of Lunar Sulfur are expanded. Particular attention is given to uses of SO2 as a mineral-dressing fluid. Also introduced is the concept of using sulfide-based concrete as an alternative to the sulfur-based concretes proposed by Leonard and Johnson. Sulfur is abundant in high-Ti mare basalts, which range from 0.16 to 0.27 pct. by weight. Terrestrial basalts with 0.15 pct. S are rare. For oxygen recovery, sulfur must be driven off with other volatiles from ilmenite concentrates, before reduction. Troilite (FeS) may be oxidized to magnetite (Fe3O4) and SO2 gas, by burning concentrates in oxygen within a magnetic field, to further oxidize ilmenite before regrinding the magnetic reconcentration. SO2 is liquid at -20 C, the mean temperature underground on the Moon, at a minimum of 0.6 atm pressure. By using liquid SO2 as a mineral dressing fluid, all the techniques of terrestrial mineral separation become available for lunar ores and concentrates. Combination of sulfur and iron in an exothermic reaction, to form iron sulfides, may be used to cement grains of other minerals into an anhydrous iron-sulfide concrete. A sulfur-iron-aggregate mixture may be heated to the ignition temperature of iron with sulfur to make a concrete shape. The best iron, sulfur, and aggregate ratios need to be experimentally established. The iron and sulfur will be by-products of oxygen production from lunar minerals.

  11. Construction of carbon nanodots/tungsten trioxide and their visible-light sensitive photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fanyong; Kong, Depeng; Fu, Yang; Ye, Qianghua; Wang, Yinyin; Chen, Li

    2016-03-15

    Herein we designed a simple and effective method for synthesizing carbon nanodots/tungsten trioxide nanocomposite with high photocatalytic activity. The as-prepared carbon nanodots/ tungsten trioxide has strong photoabsorption under visible light irradiation. Then, carbon nanodots/tungsten trioxide was successfully applied to the degradation of methylene blue. The photodegradation efficiency of methylene blue can be reached as high as 100% after 0.5 h visible light illumination. In addition, carbon nanodots/tungsten trioxide could also be used to degrade rhodamine B and methyl orange. Most importantly, the photocatalytic activity of carbon nanodots/tungsten trioxide did not exhibit obvious changes after five cycles. The results indicate that carbon nanodots/tungsten trioxide has potential applications in the degradation of organic pollutants in industrial waste water.

  12. Factors Determining Sensitivity and Resistance of Tumor Cells to Arsenic Trioxide

    PubMed Central

    Sertel, Serkan; Tome, Margaret; Briehl, Margaret M.; Bauer, Judith; Hock, Kai; Plinkert, Peter K.; Efferth, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Previously, arsenic trioxide showed impressive regression rates of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Here, we investigated molecular determinants of sensitivity and resistance of cell lines of different tumor types towards arsenic trioxide. Arsenic trioxide was the most cytotoxic compound among 8 arsenicals investigated in the NCI cell line panel. We correlated transcriptome-wide microarray-based mRNA expression to the IC50 values for arsenic trioxide by bioinformatic approaches (COMPARE and hierarchical cluster analyses, Ingenuity signaling pathway analysis). Among the identified pathways were signaling routes for p53, integrin-linked kinase, and actin cytoskeleton. Genes from these pathways significantly predicted cellular response to arsenic trioxide. Then, we analyzed whether classical drug resistance factors may also play a role for arsenic trioxide. Cell lines transfected with cDNAs for catalase, thioredoxin, or the anti-apoptotic bcl-2 gene were more resistant to arsenic trioxide than mock vector transfected cells. Multidrug-resistant cells overexpressing the MDR1, MRP1 or BCRP genes were not cross-resistant to arsenic trioxide. Our approach revealed that response of tumor cells towards arsenic trioxide is multi-factorial. PMID:22590507

  13. Processes for preparing carbon fibers using sulfur trioxide in a halogenated solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, Jasson T.; Barton, Bryan E.; Bernius, Mark T.; Chen, Xiaoyun; Hukkanen, Eric J.; Rhoton, Christina A.; Lysenko, Zenon

    2015-12-29

    Disclosed here are processes for preparing carbonized polymers (preferably carbon fibers), comprising sulfonating a polymer with a sulfonating agent that comprises SO.sub.3 dissolved in a solvent to form a sulfonated polymer; treating the sulfonated polymer with a heated solvent, wherein the temperature of the solvent is at least 95.degree. C.; and carbonizing the resulting product by heating it to a temperature of 500-3000.degree. C. Carbon fibers made according to these methods are also disclosed herein.

  14. Mortality experience in relation to a measured arsenic trioxide exposure.

    PubMed

    Pinto, S S; Enterline, P E; Henderson, V; Varner, M O

    1977-08-01

    This report examines the mortality experience of 527 men who retired from a copper smelter where they were exposed to airborne arsenic trioxide. Urinary arsenic values of all plant employees were determined in 1973, and the relative arsenic exposure in the various departments of the plant were determined. The relationship of airborne arsenic concentrations to urinary arsenic values was studied in a separate experiment, and the feasibility of using urinary arsenic values as a measure of arsenic exposure was established. The mortality experience of the cohort under study showed them to have a mortality 12.2% higher than was found for males of the same area at the same ages and in the same time period. The excess mortality was due chiefly to respiratory cancer. When the deaths were classified by total lifetime arsenic exposure, the respiratory cancer mortality was linearly related to the amount of exposure. The 1973 figures for arsenic exposure underestimated the exposure of the cohort group by a factor of possibly 10. Evidence was obtained which suggests that after removal from arsenic exposure, the risk of lung cancer declines. Certain of the data which are presented suggests there may be a threshold value for airborne arsenic trioxide exposure below which no adverse effects may be expected.

  15. [Two different clinical cases of acute arsenic trioxide intoxication].

    PubMed

    Magdalan, Jan; Smolarek, Małgorzata; Porebska, Barbara; Zawadzki, Marcin; Dyś, Piotr

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes two different cases of acute suicidal arsenic trioxide intoxication. Case no 1. A 38-year-old man, alcohol abuser, who ingested 4-5 g dental paste, which corresponds to 2.2-2.7 g of pure arsenic trioxide, developed gastritis with vomiting and abdominal pain, but without diarrhea. No cardiovascular collapse or renal failure were observed. The patient developed also symptoms of central nervous system injury (minor left paresis) and transient hepatic impairment. A head CT revealed no pathological changes in the brain. Hepatic disturbance recovered in a few days and the patient could be discharged on the 12 day. Case no 2. A 57-year-old man, who ingested few grams of pure arsenic developed vomiting, abdominal pain and severe diarrhea. Cardiovascular collapse as a result of intravascular volume depletion, vasodilatation and myocardial dysfunction was observed. The patient died on the first day of hospitalization. In both cases treatment included gastric lavage, BAL therapy, haemodialysis and supportive measures.

  16. Uses of lunar sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D.; Pettit, D.; Heiken, G.

    1992-01-01

    Sulfur and sulfur compounds have a wide range of applications for their fluid, electrical, chemical, and biochemical properties. Although known abundances on the Moon are limited (approximately 0.1 percent in mare soils), sulfur is relatively extractable by heating. Coproduction of sulfur during oxygen extraction from ilmenite-rich mare soils could yield sulfur in masses up to 10 percent of the mass of oxygen produced. Sulfur deserves serious consideration as a lunar resource.

  17. Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Portland Cement for Direct Pulp Capping in Dog: A Histopathological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Bidar, Maryam; Naghavi, Neda; Mohtasham, Nooshin; Sheik-Nezami, Mahshid; Fallahrastegar, Amir; Afkhami, Farzaneh; Attaran Mashhadi, Negin; Nargesi, Iman

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Mineral trioxide aggregate and calcium hydroxide are considered the gold standard pulp-capping materials. Recently, Portland cement has been introduced with properties similar to those of mineral trioxide aggregate. Histopathological effects of direct pulp capping using mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cements on dog dental pulp tissue were evaluated in the present study. Materials and methods. This histopatological study was carried out on 64 dog premolars. First, the pulp was exposed with a sterile bur. Then, the exposed pulp was capped with white or gray mineral trioxide aggregates and white or gray Portland cements in each quadrant and sealed with glass-ionomer. The specimens were evaluated under a light microscope after 6 months. Statistical analysis was carried out using Kruskal-Wallis test. Statistical significance was defined at α=5%. Results. There was no acute inflammation in any of the specimens. Chronic inflammation in white and gray mineral trioxide aggregates and white and gray Portland cements was reported to be 45.5%, 27.3%, 57.1% and 34.1%, respectively. Although the differences were not statistically significant, severe inflammation was observed mostly adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate. The largest extent of increased vascularization (45%) and the least increase in fibrous tissue were observed adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate, with no significant differences. In addition, the least calcified tissue formed adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate, although the difference was not significant. Conclusion. The materials used in this study were equally effective as pulp protection materials following direct pulp capping in dog teeth. PMID:25346831

  18. Electrochromic properties of molybdenum trioxide thin films prepared by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Toshiro; Kanagawa, Tetsuya

    1995-05-01

    Electrochromic molybdenum trioxide thin films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition. The source material was molybdenum carbonyl. Amorphous molybdenum trioxide thin films were produced at a substrate temperature 300 C. Reduction and oxidation of the films in a 0.3M LiClO4 propylene carbon ate solution caused desirable changes in optical absorption. Coulometry indicated that the coloration efficiency was 25.8 sq cm center-dot C(exp -1).

  19. Sulfuric acid-sulfur heat storage cycle

    DOEpatents

    Norman, John H.

    1983-12-20

    A method of storing heat is provided utilizing a chemical cycle which interconverts sulfuric acid and sulfur. The method can be used to levelize the energy obtained from intermittent heat sources, such as solar collectors. Dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated by evaporation of water, and the concentrated sulfuric acid is boiled and decomposed using intense heat from the heat source, forming sulfur dioxide and oxygen. The sulfur dioxide is reacted with water in a disproportionation reaction yielding dilute sulfuric acid, which is recycled, and elemental sulfur. The sulfur has substantial potential chemical energy and represents the storage of a significant portion of the energy obtained from the heat source. The sulfur is burned whenever required to release the stored energy. A particularly advantageous use of the heat storage method is in conjunction with a solar-powered facility which uses the Bunsen reaction in a water-splitting process. The energy storage method is used to levelize the availability of solar energy while some of the sulfur dioxide produced in the heat storage reactions is converted to sulfuric acid in the Bunsen reaction.

  20. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA)-like materials: an update review.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Shalavi, Sousan; Soltani, Mohammad Karim

    2014-09-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a multi-application material used in endodontics. It is a mixture of a refined Portland cement and bismuth oxide and trace amounts of SiO₂, CaO, MgO, K₂SO₄, and Na₂SO₄. MTA powder is mixed with supplied sterile water in a 3:1 powder/liquid. Hydrated MTA has an initial pH of 10.2, which rises to 12.5 three hours after mixing. There are several materials derived from MTA such as Endo-CPM Sealer, Ortho MTA, MTA-Fillapex, DiaRoot BioAggregate, MTA Bio, light-cured MTA, tricalcium silicate, and iRoot SP. The purpose of this article is to review MTA-like materials. PMID:25199028

  1. Clinical Applications of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: Report of Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    Battepati, Prashant M

    2010-01-01

    The greatest threats to developing teeth are dental caries and traumatic injuries. The primary goal of all restorative treatment is to maintain pulp vitality so that normal root development or apexogenesis can occur. If pulpal exposure occurs, then a pulpotomy procedure aims to preserve pulp vitality to allow for normal root development. Historically, calcium hydroxide has been the material of choice for pulpotomy procedures. Recently, an alternative material called mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has demonstrated the ability to induce hard-tissue formation in pulpal tissue. This article describes the clinical and radiographic outcome of a series of cases involving the use of MTA in pulpotomy, apexogenesis and apexification procedures and root perforations repair.

  2. Chemical characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate and its hydration reaction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was developed in early 1990s and has been successfully used for root perforation repair, root end filling, and one-visit apexification. MTA is composed mainly of tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate. When MTA is hydrated, calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) and calcium hydroxide is formed. Formed calcium hydroxide interacts with the phosphate ion in body fluid and form amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) which finally transforms into calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA). These mineral precipitate were reported to form the MTA-dentin interfacial layer which enhances the sealing ability of MTA. Clinically, the use of zinc oxide euginol (ZOE) based materials may retard the setting of MTA. Also, the use of acids or contact with excessive blood should be avoided before complete set of MTA, because these conditions could adversely affect the hydration reaction of MTA. Further studies on the chemical nature of MTA hydration reaction are needed. PMID:23429542

  3. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA)-like materials: an update review.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Shalavi, Sousan; Soltani, Mohammad Karim

    2014-09-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a multi-application material used in endodontics. It is a mixture of a refined Portland cement and bismuth oxide and trace amounts of SiO₂, CaO, MgO, K₂SO₄, and Na₂SO₄. MTA powder is mixed with supplied sterile water in a 3:1 powder/liquid. Hydrated MTA has an initial pH of 10.2, which rises to 12.5 three hours after mixing. There are several materials derived from MTA such as Endo-CPM Sealer, Ortho MTA, MTA-Fillapex, DiaRoot BioAggregate, MTA Bio, light-cured MTA, tricalcium silicate, and iRoot SP. The purpose of this article is to review MTA-like materials.

  4. Survival after a massive overdose of arsenic trioxide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Lawrence H C; Abel, Simon J C

    2009-03-01

    Arsenic poisoning remains a therapeutic challenge, and outcomes are often poor. An 18-year-old man deliberately ingested termiticide containing a massive dose of arsenic trioxide. Arsenic concentration was 6.3 micromol/L in serum on ICU Day 1, and 253 micromol/L in the first 24-hour urine sample, with a urinary arsenic/creatinine ratio of 84 200 micromol/mol. He was treated with the chelating agent meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) (replaced by dimercaprol on Days 2-5) and required intensive support for multisystem organ failure, but recovered slowly. Nine weeks after the ingestion the only ongoing clinical issue was persistent but slowly improving peripheral neuropathy.

  5. Chemical characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate and its hydration reaction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Seok-Woo

    2012-11-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was developed in early 1990s and has been successfully used for root perforation repair, root end filling, and one-visit apexification. MTA is composed mainly of tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate. When MTA is hydrated, calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) and calcium hydroxide is formed. Formed calcium hydroxide interacts with the phosphate ion in body fluid and form amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) which finally transforms into calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA). These mineral precipitate were reported to form the MTA-dentin interfacial layer which enhances the sealing ability of MTA. Clinically, the use of zinc oxide euginol (ZOE) based materials may retard the setting of MTA. Also, the use of acids or contact with excessive blood should be avoided before complete set of MTA, because these conditions could adversely affect the hydration reaction of MTA. Further studies on the chemical nature of MTA hydration reaction are needed. PMID:23429542

  6. Cytotoxicity patterns of arsenic trioxide exposure on HaCaT keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Udensi, Udensi K; Graham-Evans, Barbara E; Rogers, Christian; Isokpehi, Raphael D

    2011-01-01

    Background Arsenic is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant, and abnormalities of the skin are the most common outcomes of long-term, low-dose, chronic arsenic exposure. If the balance between keratinocyte proliferation, differentiation, and death is perturbed, pathologic changes of the epidermis may result, including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and certain forms of ichthyosis. Therefore, research investigations using in vitro human epidermal cells could help elucidate cellular and molecular processes in keratinocytes affected by arsenic. Data from such investigations could also provide the basis for developing cosmetic intervention for skin diseases caused by arsenic. Methods The viability of HaCaT keratinocyte cultures with or without prior exposure to low-dose arsenic trioxide was compared for varying concentrations of arsenic trioxide over a time course of 14 days because in untreated control cultures, approximately 2 weeks is required to complete cell differentiation. Long-term cultures were established by culturing HaCaT cells on collagen IV, and cells were subsequently exposed to 0 parts per million (ppm), 1 ppm, 5 ppm, 7.5 ppm, 10 ppm, and 15 ppm of arsenic trioxide. The percentages of viable cells as well as DNA damage after exposure were determined on Day 2, Day 5, Day 8, and Day 14. Results Using both statistical and visual analytics approaches for data analysis, we have observed a biphasic response at a 5 ppm dose with cell viability peaking on Day 8 in both chronic and acute exposures. Further, a low dose of 1 ppm arsenic trioxide enhanced HaCaT keratinocyte proliferation, whereas doses above 7.5 ppm inhibited growth. Conclusion The time course profiling of arsenic trioxide cytotoxicity using long-term HaCaT keratinocyte cultures presents an approach to modeling the human epidermal cellular responses to varying doses of arsenic trioxide treatment or exposure. A low dose of arsenic trioxide appears to aid cell growth but concomitantly disrupts the DNA

  7. Solubility of Sulfur Dioxide in Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, K. K.; Compton, L. E.; Lawson, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    The solubility of sulfur dioxide in 50% (wt./wt.) sulfuric acid was evaluated by regular solution theory, and the results verified by experimental measurements in the temperature range of 25 C to 70 C at pressures of 60 to 200 PSIA. The percent (wt./wt.) of sulfur dioxide in 50% (wt./wt.) sulfuric acid is given by the equation %SO2 = 2.2350 + 0.0903P - 0.00026P 10 to the 2nd power with P in PSIA.

  8. Severe Acute Axonal Neuropathy following Treatment with Arsenic Trioxide for Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Marcus; Sammartin, Kety; Nabergoj, Mitja; Vianello, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of arsenic toxicity. Symptoms are usually mild and reversible following discontinuation of treatment. A more severe chronic sensorimotor polyneuropathy characterized by distal axonal-loss neuropathy can be seen in chronic arsenic exposure. The clinical course of arsenic neurotoxicity in patients with coexistence of thiamine deficiency is only anecdotally known but this association may potentially lead to severe consequences. We describe a case of acute irreversible axonal neuropathy in a patient with hidden thiamine deficiency who was treated with a short course of arsenic trioxide for acute promyelocytic leukemia. Thiamine replacement therapy and arsenic trioxide discontinuation were not followed by neurological recovery and severe polyneuropathy persisted at 12-month follow-up. Thiamine plasma levels should be measured in patients who are candidate to arsenic trioxide therapy. Prophylactic administration of vitamin B1 may be advisable. The appearance of polyneuropathy signs early during the administration of arsenic trioxide should prompt electrodiagnostic testing to rule out a pattern of axonal neuropathy which would need immediate discontinuation of arsenic trioxide. PMID:27158436

  9. Mineral trioxide aggregate: a review of physical properties.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Neeraj; Agarwal, Antara; Mala, Kundabala

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this two-part series is to review the composition, properties, products, and clinical aspects of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) materials. Electronic search of scientific papers from January 1991 to May 2010 was accomplished using PubMed and MedLine search engines to include relevant scientific citations from the peer-reviewed journals published in English. MTA is a refined form of the parent compound, Portland cement (PC). It demonstrates a strong biocompatible nature owing to the high pH and its ability to form hydroxyapatite. MTA materials provide a better seal than traditional endodontic materials as observed in dye leakage, fluid filtration, protein leakage, and bacterial penetration leakage studies, and it has been recognized as a bioactive material. Currently a variety of MTA commercial products are available, including Proroot Gray MTA and White MTA both from DENTSPLY Tulsa Dental Specialties (www.DENTSPLY.com), and MTA Angelus (Angelus,www.angelus.ind.br). Although these materials are indicated for various dental uses/applications, long-term in-vivo clinical studies are still needed to claim the same. This first of this series highlights and discusses the composition, physical, and/or chemical properties of MTA. A subsequent article will offer an overview of the material aspect (commercial products) and clinical considerations for MTA materials.

  10. Potassium Bromate Assay by Redox Titrimetry Using Arsenic Trioxide.

    PubMed

    Smeller, Johanna M; Leigh, Stefan D

    2003-01-01

    Bromate, a disinfectant, is one of the analytes of interest in wastewater analysis. Environmental laboratories have a regulatory need for their measurements to be traceable to NIST standards. Bromate is not currently certified as a NIST Standard Reference Material (SRM). Therefore, a traceable assay of potassium bromate (KBrO3) is needed. KBrO3 was dissolved in water and assayed by redox titrimetry using arsenic trioxide (As2O3). A nominal (0.1 g) sample of As2O3 was dissolved in 10 mL of 5 mol/L sodium hydroxide. The solution was acidified with hydrochloric acid and about 95 % of the KBrO3 titrant was added gravimetrically. The end point was determined by addition of dilute (1:3) titrant using an automated titrator. The KBrO3 assay was determined to be 99.76 % ± 0.20 %. The expanded uncertainty considered the titrations of three independently prepared KBrO3 solutions.

  11. Compressive Strength of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate with Propylene Glycol

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Negin; Rahimi, Saeed; Shahi, Shahriar; Salem Milani, Amin; Rezaei, Yashar; Nobakht, Mahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding propylene glycol (PG) to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) liquid with volume ratio of 20% on the compressive strength (CS) of MTA in two time periods (4 and 21 days) after mixing. Methods and Materials: Four groups of steel cylinders (n=15) with an internal diameter of 3 and a height of 6 mm were prepared and MTA (groups 1 and 2) and MTA+PG (80% MTA liquid+20% PG) (groups 3 and 4) were placed in to the cylinders. In groups 1 and 3 the CS was evaluated after 4 days and in groups 2 and 4 after 21 days. Data were calculated using the two-ways ANOVA. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: The highest (52.22±18.92 MPa) and lowest (4.5±0.67 MPa) of CS was obtained in 21-day MTA samples and 4-day MTA+PG specimen, respectively. The effect of time and PG were significant on the CS (P<0.05). Mixing MTA with PG significantly reduced the CS; but passing the time from 4 to 21 days significantly increased the CS. Conclusion: Considering the limitations of this study, PG had a negative effect on CS of MTA. PMID:27790264

  12. Uranium trioxide behavior during electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, Claude; Alekseev, Evgeny V.

    2015-03-01

    A sample of uranium trioxide (UO3) was produced by focused ion beam (~10 μm×~10 μm×<0.5 μm) for transmission electron and electron energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy examinations in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The EEL spectra were recorded as a function of the thickness for the P and O edges in the low energy range 0-350 eV and were compared to spectra of UO3 small grains attached to a TEM grid. The EEL spectrum was studied through a range of thicknesses going from ~60 to ~260 nm. The EEL spectra recorded for UO3 are compared with those recorded for UO2. The reduction of UO3 into U4O9 and/or UO2 is readily observed apparently during the TEM investigations and as confirmed by electron diffraction (eD). This redox effect is similar to that known for other redox sensitive oxides. Recommendations are suggested to avoid sample decomposition.

  13. Kinetics and mechanism of photopromoted oxidative dissolution of antimony trioxide.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xingyun; Kong, Linghao; He, Mengchang

    2014-12-16

    Light (sunlight, ultraviolet, simulated sunlight) irradiation was used to initiate the dissolution of antimony trioxide (Sb2O3). Dissolution rate of Sb2O3 was accelerated and dissolved trivalent antimony (Sb(III)) was oxidized in the irradiation of light. The photopromoted oxidative dissolution mechanism of Sb2O3 was studied through experiments investigating the effects of pH, free radicals scavengers, dissolved oxygen removal and Sb2O3 dosage on the release rate of antimony from Sb2O3 under simulated sunlight irradiation. The key oxidative components were hydroxyl free radicals, photogenerated holes and superoxide free radicals; their contribution ratios were roughly estimated. In addition, a conceptual model of the photocatalytic oxidation dissolution of Sb2O3 was proposed. The overall pH-dependent dissolution rate of Sb2O3 and the oxidation of Sb(III) under light irradiation were expressed by r = 0.08 ·[OH(-)](0.63) and rox = 0.10 ·[OH(-)](0.79). The present study on the mechanism of the photo-oxidation dissolution of Sb2O3 could help clarify the geochemical cycle and fate of Sb in the environment.

  14. Arsenic trioxide rewires mantle cell lymphoma response to bortezomib.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ling-Ling; Liu, Yuan-Fang; Peng, Li-Jun; Fei, Ai-Mei; Cui, Wen; Miao, Sheng-Chao; Hermine, Olivier; Gressin, Remy; Khochbin, Saadi; Chen, Sai-Juan; Wang, Jin; Mi, Jian-Qing

    2015-11-01

    Although most of the mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) patients initially responded well to bortezomib (BTZ), the dose-dependent toxicities have greatly limited the application of BTZ to MCL. To investigate the efficacy and mechanism of arsenic trioxide (ATO) with BTZ in inducing apoptosis of MCL cells, two MCL cell lines, along with primary cells from MCL patients (n = 4), were used. Additionally, the NOD-SCID mice xenograft model of Jeko-1 cells was established to study the anti-MCL mechanisms in an in vivo setting. ATO treatment highly improved BTZ capacity to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of MCL cells. Furthermore, the interaction of Noxa and Mcl-1 leads Bak to release from Mcl-1 or from Bcl-xl, which could further activate Bak and Bax and then induce cell apoptosis. We also found that when lower doses of BTZ were used in combination with ATO, more effective proapoptotic effects in both the cell lines and the primary cells were obtained compared to the effects of BTZ used alone at higher doses. Simultaneously, the combination of these two drugs delayed the tumor growth in mice more effectively than BTZ alone. The cooperative anti-MCL effects of this combination therapy both in vitro and in vivo strongly provided a new strategy to the clinical treatment of MCL. PMID:26310857

  15. Liquid phase deposition synthesis of hexagonal molybdenum trioxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Deki, Shigehito; Beleke, Alexis Bienvenu; Kotani, Yuki; Mizuhata, Minoru

    2009-09-15

    Hexagonal molybdenum trioxide thin films with good crystallinity and high purity have been fabricated by the liquid phase deposition (LPD) technique using molybdic acid (H{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}) dissolved in 2.82% hydrofluoric acid (HF) and H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} as precursors. The crystal was found to belong to a hexagonal hydrate system MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O (napprox0.56). The unit cell lattice parameters are a=10.651 A, c=3.725 A and V=365.997 A{sup 3}. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the as-deposited samples showed well-shaped hexagonal rods nuclei that grew and where the amount increased with increase in reaction time. X-ray photon electron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra showed a Gaussian shape of the doublet of Mo 3d core level, indicating the presence of Mo{sup 6+} oxidation state in the deposited films. The deposited films exhibited an electrochromic behavior by lithium intercalation and deintercalation, which resulted in coloration and bleaching of the film. Upon dehydration at about 450 deg. C, the hexagonal MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O was transformed into the thermodynamically stable orthorhombic phase. - Abstract: SEM photograph of typical h-MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O thin film nuclei obtained after 36 h at 40 deg. C by the LPD method. Display Omitted

  16. Photocatalysis and photoelectrochemical properties of tungsten trioxide nanostructured films.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chin Wei

    2014-01-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO₃) possesses a small band gap energy of 2.4-2.8 eV and is responsive to both ultraviolet and visible light irradiation including strong absorption of the solar spectrum and stable physicochemical properties. Thus, controlled growth of one-dimensional (1D) WO₃ nanotubular structures with desired length, diameter, and wall thickness has gained significant interest. In the present study, 1D WO₃ nanotubes were successfully synthesized via electrochemical anodization of tungsten (W) foil in an electrolyte composed of 1 M of sodium sulphate (Na₂SO₄) and ammonium fluoride (NH₄F). The influence of NH₄F content on the formation mechanism of anodic WO₃ nanotubular structure was investigated in detail. An optimization of fluoride ions played a critical role in controlling the chemical dissolution reaction in the interface of W/WO₃. Based on the results obtained, a minimum of 0.7 wt% of NH₄F content was required for completing transformation from W foil to WO₃ nanotubular structure with an average diameter of 85 nm and length of 250 nm within 15 min of anodization time. In this case, high aspect ratio of WO₃ nanotubular structure is preferred because larger active surface area will be provided for better photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical (PEC) reactions.

  17. Mineral trioxide aggregate: a review of physical properties.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Neeraj; Agarwal, Antara; Mala, Kundabala

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this two-part series is to review the composition, properties, products, and clinical aspects of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) materials. Electronic search of scientific papers from January 1991 to May 2010 was accomplished using PubMed and MedLine search engines to include relevant scientific citations from the peer-reviewed journals published in English. MTA is a refined form of the parent compound, Portland cement (PC). It demonstrates a strong biocompatible nature owing to the high pH and its ability to form hydroxyapatite. MTA materials provide a better seal than traditional endodontic materials as observed in dye leakage, fluid filtration, protein leakage, and bacterial penetration leakage studies, and it has been recognized as a bioactive material. Currently a variety of MTA commercial products are available, including Proroot Gray MTA and White MTA both from DENTSPLY Tulsa Dental Specialties (www.DENTSPLY.com), and MTA Angelus (Angelus,www.angelus.ind.br). Although these materials are indicated for various dental uses/applications, long-term in-vivo clinical studies are still needed to claim the same. This first of this series highlights and discusses the composition, physical, and/or chemical properties of MTA. A subsequent article will offer an overview of the material aspect (commercial products) and clinical considerations for MTA materials. PMID:23627406

  18. The Sulfur Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellogg, W. W.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    A model estimating the contributions of sulfur compounds by natural and human activities, and the rate of removal of sulfur from the atmosphere, is based on a review of the existing literature. Areas requiring additional research are identified. (AL)

  19. The embryotoxic response to maternal chromium trioxide exposure in different strains of hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, T.F.

    1982-10-01

    This paper compares the chromium trioxide-induced embryotoxic effects among one noninbred (LVG) and five inbred (CB, LHC, LSH, MHA, PD4) strains of hamsters. A single dose of chromium trioxide (8 mg/kg, iv) was injected into pregnant hamsters on the morning of gestation Day 8. Treated and control animals were killed on gestation Day 15 and studied for the types and incidence of external and internal abnormalities, as well as the frequency of resorption sites per uterus. The embryotoxic effects described in this study include significant rates of resorptions, external abnormalities, cleft palate, and hydrocephalus. The results indicate that the MHA, LSH, and LVG strains are susceptible, while the CB, LHC, and PD4 strains are resistant to chromium trioxide-induced embryotoxicity. This study was compared with prior work in which the same hamster strains were treated with either cadmium, lead, or mercury.

  20. Avulsed Immature Permanent Central Incisors Obturated With Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kahtani, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    The endodontic management of immature permanent incisors in young children can be challenging. This case reported an avulsed immature maxillary central incisors that underwent complete endodontic obturation using mineral trioxide aggregate. A 10-year-old male who suffered a fall injury avulsed both his central incisors. The revascularization process was not possible due to patient compliance and geographic reasons. Mineral trioxide aggregate was utilized as a novel endodontic treatment. After one year post-injury, the teeth remained symptom-free, the clinical and radiographic follow-up showed evidence of healthy periodontium. How to cite this article: Al-Kahtani A. Avulsed Immature Permanent Central Incisors Obturated With Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: A Case Report. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(3):88-96. PMID:24155609

  1. Reactions of connective tissue to amalgam, intermediate restorative material, mineral trioxide aggregate, and mineral trioxide aggregate mixed with chlorhexidine.

    PubMed

    Sumer, Mahmut; Muglali, Mehtap; Bodrumlu, Emre; Guvenc, Tolga

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to histopathologically examine the biocompatibility of the high-copper amalgam, intermediate restorative material (IRM), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and MTA mixed with chlorhexidine (CHX). This study was conducted to observe the rat subcutaneous connective tissue reaction to the implanted tubes filled with amalgam, IRM, MTA, and MTA mixed with CHX. The animals were sacrificed 15, 30, and 60 days after the implantation procedure. The implant sites were excised and prepared for histological evaluation. Sections of 5 to 6 microm thickness were cut by a microtome and stained with hemotoxylin eosin and examined under a light microscope. The inflammatory reactions were categorized as weak (none or few inflammatory cells < or =25 cells), moderate (>25 cells), and severe (a lot of inflammatory cells not to be counted, giant cells, and granulation tissue). Thickness of fibrous capsules measured five different areas by the digital imaging and the mean values were scored. Amalgam, IRM, and MTA mixed with CHX caused a weak inflammatory response on days 15, 30, and 60. MTA provoked an initial severe inflammatory response that subsided at the 30 and 60 day study period. A clear fibrous capsule was observed beginning from the 15 days in all of the groups. Within the limits of this study, amalgam, IRM, MTA, and MTA mixed with CHX materials were surrounded by fibrous connective tissue indicated that they were well tolerated by the tissues, therefore, MTA/CHX seemed to be biocompatible.

  2. Dye leakage and modification of fast-setting mineral trioxide aggregate.

    PubMed

    Challenger, Hereward; Lane, Jason; Becker, Ryan; Nassiripour, Sepehr; Torabinejad, Mahmoud

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine and decrease dye leakage of fast-setting mineral trioxide aggregate (FSMTA). Specimens using differing setting times or concentrations of calcium sulfate modified FSMTA were assessed for dye penetration. Based on the results, no statistical difference was found in the dye leakage of FSMTA compared with regular mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). The addition of 10 percent calcium sulfate resulted in a statistical reduction in dye leakage compared to both unmodified FSMTA and regular MTA. PMID:25868222

  3. Sulfuric acid on Europa and the radiolytic sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Johnson, R. E.; Anderson, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of laboratory spectra with Galileo data indicates that hydrated sulfuric acid is present and is a major component of Europa's surface. In addition, this moon's visually dark surface material, which spatially correlates with the sulfuric acid concentration, is identified as radiolytically altered sulfur polymers. Radiolysis of the surface by magnetospheric plasma bombardment continuously cycles sulfur between three forms: sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, and sulfur polymers, with sulfuric acid being about 50 times as abundant as the other forms. Enhanced sulfuric acid concentrations are found in Europa's geologically young terrains, suggesting that low-temperature, liquid sulfuric acid may influence geological processes.

  4. Sulfur tolerant anode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

  5. Biochemistry of sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Huxtable, R.J.; LaFranconi, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: the chemistry of sulfur; the oxidation states of sulfur; the reduction of sulfate and the oxidation of sulfide; the sulfur cycle; oxidation of inorganic sulfide; the metabolism and functions of methionine; taurine and the oxidative metabolism of cysteine; thiols, disulfides, and thioesters; thioethers; thiamine; biotin; sulfates; inherited disorders of sulfur metabolism; cystinuria; sulfur and the metabolism of xenobiotics; general aspects of xenobiotic metabolism; glutathione and sulfation of xenobiotics; and metabolic activation as a result of sulfate conjugation.

  6. Sulfur tolerant anode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

  7. Sulfur tolerant anode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-02-01

    The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

  8. Metabolism of arsenic trioxide in acute promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Khaleghian, Ali; Ghaffari, Seyed H; Ahmadian, Shahin; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2014-10-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) effectively induces complete clinical and molecular remissions in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients and triggers apoptosis in APL cells. The effect induced by As2O3 is also associated with extensive genomic-wide epigenetic changes with large-scale alterations in DNA methylation. We investigated the As2O3 metabolism in association with factors involved in the production of its methylated metabolites in APL-derived cell line, NB4. We used high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique to detect As2O3 metabolites in NB4 cells. The effects of As2O3 on glutathione level, S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) levels were investigated. Also, we studied the expression levels of arsenic methyltransferase (AS3MT) and DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1, DNMT3a, and DNMT3b) by real-time PCR. Our results show that after As2O3 entry into the cell, it was converted into methylated metabolites, mono-methylarsenic (MMA) and dimethylarsenic (DMA). The glutathione (GSH) production was increased in parallel with the methylated metabolites formations. As2O3 treatment inhibited DNMTs (DNMT1, DNMT3a, and DNMT3b) in dose- and time-dependent manners. The SAH levels in As2O3-treated cells were increased; however, the SAM level was not affected. The present study shows that APL cell is capable of metabolizing As2O3. The continuous formation of intracellular methylated metabolites, the inhibition of DNMTs expression levels and the increase of SAH level by As2O3 biotransformation would probably affect the DNMTs-methylated DNA methylation in a manner related to the extent of DNA hypomethylation. Production of intracellular methylated metabolites and epigenetic changes of DNA methylation during As2O3 metabolism may contribute to the therapeutic effect of As2O3 in APL. PMID:24819152

  9. Thermal behaviour of arsenic trioxide adsorbed on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Cuypers, Frederic; De Dobbelaere, Christopher; Hardy, An; Van Bael, Marlies K; Helsen, Lieve

    2009-07-30

    The thermal stability and desorption of arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) adsorbed on activated carbon (AC) was investigated as this phenomenon is expected to influence the arsenic release during low temperature pyrolysis of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) wood waste. Firstly, a thermogravimetric (TG) experiment with arsenolite, an allotropic form of As(2)O(3), was performed. The sample starts to sublime at temperatures lower than 200 degrees C with a sublimation peak temperature of 271 degrees C. Subsequently, TG experiments with samples of As(2)O(3) adsorbed on AC revealed that only very little (max. 6+/-3 wt%) As(2)O(3) was volatilized at temperatures below 280 degrees C, while still 41.6 (+/-5)wt% of the original arsenic concentration was retained at 440 degrees C and 28.5 (+/-3)wt% at 600 degrees C. The major arsenic volatilization occurred between 300 degrees C and 500 degrees C. The kinetic parameters of desorption, activation energy of desorption (E(d)) and pre-exponential factor (A), were determined by fitting an Arrhenius model to the experimental data, resulting in E(d)=69 kJ/mol, A=1.21 x 10(4)s(-1). It can be concluded that the adsorption of As(2)O(3) on AC can contribute to the thermal stabilisation of As(2)O(3). Consequently, during low temperature pyrolysis of CCA wood arsenic release may be prevented by adsorption of As(2)O(3) on the coal-type product formed during the thermal decomposition of the wood. PMID:19136209

  10. Interaction between arsenic trioxide (ATO) and human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Chiasson, Sonia; Girard, Denis

    2011-05-01

    The cytotoxic effect of arsenic trioxide (ATO) is known to be mediated by its ability to induce cell apoptosis in a variety of cells, including neutrophils. More recently, we demonstrated that ATO induced several parameters involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced neutrophil apoptosis but that caspase-4 was not involved. The aim of this study was to better understand how neutrophils are activated by ATO and to further demonstrate that ATO is an ER stressor. Human neutrophils were isolated from healthy blood donors and incubated in vitro in the presence or absence of ATO and several parameters were investigated. We found that ATO induced the expression of the proapoptotic GADD153 protein, a key player involved in ER stress-induced apoptosis, activated nuclear nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) DNA binding activities, and increased prostaglandine E2 (PGE2) production. Using an antibody array approach, we found that ATO increased the production of several cytokines, with interleukin 8 (IL-8) being the predominant one. We confirmed that ATO increased the production of IL-8 by enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Treatment with a caspase-4 inhibitor did not inhibit IL-8 production. The results of the present study further support the notion that ATO is an ER stressor and that, although its toxic effect is mediated by induction of apoptosis, this chemical also induced, in parallel, NF-κB activation, the production of PGE2 and several cytokines probably involved in other cell functions. Also, we conclude that the production of IL-8 is not induced by a caspase-4-dependent mechanism, suggesting that ATO-induced caspase-4 activation is involved in other as yet unidentified functions in human neutrophils.

  11. Contribution to the photometric determination of small amounts of boron trioxide in glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markova, D.

    1985-01-01

    The photometric determination for boron trioxide is described in amounts of 0-75 micrograms B2O3 with an azomethin H reagent. The yellow colored complex which occurs in a medium held at a pH of 4.5 was measured in light of a wavelength of 415 nm.

  12. A note on the biological activity of the noble gas compound xenon trioxide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, S. M.; Smith, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    Comparison of xenon trioxide for toxicity in the few common oxidants using three bioassays. On a molar basis XeO3 and HOCl were similar, but XeO3 was less active than expected when comparisons were based on normality.

  13. Sulfurization of α-MoO{sub 3} nanostructured thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Prabhat; Singh, Megha; Sharma, Rabindar K. Reddy, G. B.

    2015-08-28

    In this report, the sulfurization of vertically aligned molybdenum trioxide (α- MoO{sub 3}) nanoflakes (NFs) with high aspect ratio (height/thickness >20) on the nickel coated glass substrates in a mixture of H{sub 2}S and argon gas at atmospheric pressure has been studied. The effect of sulfurization have been investigated to understand the basic reaction mechanism and the morphology, structural properties of grown nanoflakes. XPS and XRD indicate the formation of MoS{sub 2} along with the other intermediate phase such as MoO{sub 2} at temperature 200 °C. The surface morphology of samples have been studied systematically by using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results demonstrate partial conversion of MoO{sub 3} NFs into MoS{sub 2} along with the change in the morphology of nanoflakes. All the observed results are well in consonance with each other.

  14. The global sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, D. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The results of the planetary biology microbial ecology's 1984 Summer Research Program, which examined various aspects of the global sulfur cycle are summarized. Ways in which sulfur flows through the many living and chemical species that inhabit the surface of the Earth were investigated. Major topics studied include: (1) sulfur cycling and metabolism of phototropic and filamentous sulfur bacteria; (2) sulfur reduction in sediments of marine and evaporite environments; (3) recent cyanobacterial mats; (4) microanalysis of community metabolism in proximity to the photic zone in potential stromatolites; and (5) formation and activity of microbial biofilms on metal sulfides and other mineral surfaces. Relationships between the global sulfur cycle and the understanding of the early evolution of the Earth and biosphere and current processes that affect global habitability are stressed.

  15. DSRP, Direct Sulfur Production

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; McMichael, W.J.; Agarwal, S.K.; Jang, B.L.; Howe, G.B.; Chen, D.H.; Hopper, J.R.

    1993-08-01

    Hot-gas desulfurization processes for IGCC and other advanced power applications utilize regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents to remove hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from raw coal gas. Regeneration of these sorbents produces an off-gas typically containing I to 3 percent sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). Production of elemental sulfur is a highly desirable option for the ultimate disposal of the SO{sub 2} content of this off-gas. Elemental sulfur, an essential industrial commodity, is easily stored and transported. As shown in Figure 1, the DSRP consists of two catalytic reactors, each followed by a sulfur condenser. Hot regenerator off-gas is mixed with a hot coal-gas slip stream and fed to the first DSRP reactor. Approximately 95 percent of the sulfur gas in the inlet stream of the first reactor is converted to elemental sulfur. The outlet gas of the first DSRP reactor is cooled, condensing out sulfur. The gas could be recycled after the Stage I condenser. Alteratively, by adjusting the proportion of coal gas to regenerator off-gas, the effluent composition of the first reactor can be controlled to produce an H{sub 2}S-to-SO{sub 2} ratio of 2 to 1 at 95 percent sulfur conversion. The cooled gas stream is then passed to the second DSRP reactor where 80 to 90 percent of the remaining sulfur compounds are converted to elemental sulfur via the modified Claus reaction at high pressure. The total efficiency of the two reactors for the conversion of sulfur compounds to elemental sulfur is projected to be about 99.5 percent.

  16. Fly ash sulfur concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Head, W.J.; Liao, M.

    1981-05-01

    Two waste products, flyash and elemental sulfur, can be combined with a modifying agent to produce a potentially useful construction material, flyash sulfur concrete. Manufacturing processes and characteristics of this concrete are described. Compared with a conventional crushed stone aggregate, flyash sulfur concrete is a viable highway pavement base course material. The material's strength characteristics are analyzed. (1 diagram, 4 graphs, 2 photos, 9 references, 5 tables)

  17. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal; William J. McMichael; Jeffrey W. Portzer

    2003-01-01

    Conventional sulfur removal in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants involves numerous steps: COS (carbonyl sulfide) hydrolysis, amine scrubbing/regeneration, Claus process, and tail-gas treatment. Advanced sulfur removal in IGCC systems involves typically the use of zinc oxide-based sorbents. The sulfides sorbent is regenerated using dilute air to produce a dilute SO{sub 2} (sulfur dioxide) tail gas. Under previous contracts the highly effective first generation Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for catalytic reduction of this SO{sub 2} tail gas to elemental sulfur was developed. This process is currently undergoing field-testing. In this project, advanced concepts were evaluated to reduce the number of unit operations in sulfur removal and recovery. Substantial effort was directed towards developing sorbents that could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur in an Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP). Development of this process has been described in detail in Appendices A-F. RTI began the development of the Single-step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP) to eliminate the use of sorbents and multiple reactors in sulfur removal and recovery. This process showed promising preliminary results and thus further process development of AHGP was abandoned in favor of SSRP. The SSRP is a direct Claus process that consists of injecting SO{sub 2} directly into the quenched coal gas from a coal gasifier, and reacting the H{sub 2}S-SO{sub 2} mixture over a selective catalyst to both remove and recover sulfur in a single step. The process is conducted at gasifier pressure and 125 to 160 C. The proposed commercial embodiment of the SSRP involves a liquid phase of molten sulfur with dispersed catalyst in a slurry bubble-column reactor (SBCR).

  18. Advanced sulfur control concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.P.

    1995-11-01

    Regenerable metal oxide sorbents, such as zinc titanate, are being developed to efficiently remove hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gas in advanced power systems. Dilute air regeneration of the sorbents produces a tailgas containing a few percent sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). Catalytic reduction of the SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur with a coal gas slipstream using the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) is a leading first-generation technology. Currently the DSRP is undergoing field testing at gasifier sites. The objective of this study is to develop second-generation processes that produce elemental sulfur without coal gas or with limited use. Novel approaches that were evaluated to produce elemental sulfur from sulfided sorbents include (1) sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) regeneration, (2) substoichiometric (partial) oxidation, (3) steam regeneration followed by H{sub 2}S oxidation, and (4) steam-air regeneration. Preliminary assessment of these approaches indicated that developing SO{sub 2} regeneration faced the fewest technical and economic problems among the four process options. Elemental sulfur is the only likely product of SO{sub 2} regeneration and the SO{sub 2} required for the regeneration can be obtained by burning a portion of the sulfur produced. Experimental efforts have thus been concentrated on SO{sub 2}-based regeneration processes. Results from laboratory investigations are presented and discussed.

  19. Sulfur isotopic data

    SciTech Connect

    Rye, R.O.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary sulfur isotope data have been determined for samples of the Vermillion Creek coal bed and associated rocks in the Vermillion Creek basin and for samples of evaporites collected from Jurassic and Triassic formations that crop out in the nearby Uinta Mountains. The data are inconclusive, but it is likely that the sulfur in the coal was derived from the evaporites.

  20. The Phases of Sulfur.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdwhistell, Kurt R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a demonstration that illustrates the dramatic changes that sulfur undergoes upon heating to 200 degrees centigrade and then cooling to room temperature. Supplements the demonstration of the rubberlike properties of catenasulfur made by rapid cooling of the sulfur melt in ice water. (JRH)

  1. Arsenic trioxide-mediated growth inhibition in gallbladder carcinoma cells via down-regulation of Cyclin D1 transcription mediated by Sp1 transcription factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, Zhilong; Lu, Weiqi; Ton, Saixiong; Liu, Houbao; Sou, Tao; Shen, Zhenbin; Qin, Xinyu . E-mail: smc_jjh@yahoo.com.cn

    2007-08-31

    Gallbladder carcinoma (GBC), an aggressive and mostly lethal malignancy, is known to be resistant to a number of drug stimuli. Here, we demonstrated that arsenic trioxide inhibited the proliferation of gallbladder carcinoma in vivo and in vitro as well as the transcription of cell cycle-related protein Cyclin D1. And, Cyclin D1 overexpression inhibited the negative role of arsenic trioxide in cell cycle progression. We further explored the mechanisms by which arsenic trioxide affected Cyclin D1 transcription and found that the Sp1 transcription factor was down-regulated by arsenic trioxide, with a corresponding decrease in Cyclin D1 promoter activity. Taken together, these results suggested that arsenic trioxide inhibited gallbladder carcinoma cell proliferation via down-regulation of Cyclin D1 transcription in a Sp1-dependent manner, which provided a new mechanism of arsenic trioxide-involved cell proliferation and may have important therapeutic implications in gallbladder carcinoma patients.

  2. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

    1993-09-07

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

  3. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Hu, Zhicheng

    1993-01-01

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO.sub.2 -containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO.sub.2 to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO.sub.2 in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst.

  4. Regional river sulfur runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husar, Rudolf B.; Husar, Janja Djukic

    1985-01-01

    The water and sulfur runoff data for 54 large river basins were assembled, covering 65% of the nondesert land area of the world. The sulfur concentration ranges from 0.5 mg S/L for the West African rivers Niger and Volta to 100 mg S/L in the Colorado River; the world average is 3.2 mg S/L. The concentrations in central and eastern Europe as well as central and eastern North America exceed 8 mg S/L. The sulfur runoff density is also highest in the river basins over these industrialized regions, exceeding 2 g S/m2/yr. However, high sulfur runoff density in excess of 3 g S/m2/yr is also measured over the Pacific islands New Zealand and New Guinea and the archipelagos of Indonesia and the Philippines. The natural background sulfur runoff was estimated by assuming that South America, Africa, Australia, and the Pacific Islands are unperturbed by man and that the average river sulfur concentration is in the range 1-3 mg S/L. Taking these background concentration values, the man-induced sulfur runoff for Europe ranges between 2 and 8 times the natural flow, and over North America, man's contribution ranges between 1 and 5 times the natural runoff. The global sulfur flow from nondesert land to the oceans and the Caspian Sea is estimated as 131 Tg S/yr, of which 46-85 Tg S/yr is attributed to natural causes. The regional river sulfur runoff pattern discussed in this paper does not have enough spatial resolution to be directly applicable to studies of the environmental effects of man-induced sulfur flows. However, it points to the continental-size regions where those perturbations are most evident and to the magnitude of the perturbations as expressed in units of the natural flows.

  5. Regional river sulfur runoff

    SciTech Connect

    Husar, R.B.; Husar, J.D.

    1985-01-20

    The water and sulfur runoff data for 54 large river basins were assembled, covering 65% of the nondesert land area of the world. The sulfur concentration ranges from 0.5 mg S/L for the West African rivers Niger and Volta to 100 mg S/L in the Colorado River; the world average is 3.2 mg S/L. The concentrations in central and eastern Europe as well as central and eastern North America exceed 8 mg S/L. The sulfur runoff density is also highest in the river basins over these industrialized regions, exceeding 2 g S/m/sup 2//yr. However, high sulfur runoff density in excess of 3 g S/m/sup 2//yr is also measured over the Pacific islands New Zealand and New Guinea and the archipelagos of Indonesia and the Philippines. The natural background sulfur runoff was estimated by assuming that South America, Africa, Australia, and the Pacific Islands are unperturbed by man and that the average river sulfur concentration is in the range 1--3 mg S/L. Taking these background concentration values, the man-induced sulfur runoff for Europe ranges between 2 and 8 times the natural flow, and over North America, man's contribution ranges between 1 and 5 times the natural runoff. The global sulfur flow from nondesert land to the oceans and the Caspian Sea is estimated as 131 Tg S/yr, of which 46--85 Tg S/yr is attributed to natural causes. The regional river sulfur runoff pattern discussed in this paper does not have enough spatial resolution to be directly applicable to studies of the environmental effects of man-induced sulfur flows. However, it points to the continental-size regions where those perturbations are most evident and to the magnitude of the perturbations as expressed in units of the natural flows.

  6. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain.

    This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer.

    Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks.

    Galileo, launched in 1989, has been orbiting Jupiter and its moons since December 1995. JPL manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  7. Sulfur volcanoes on Io?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Fink, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    The unusual rheological properties of sulfur are discussed in order to determine the distinctive volcanic flow morphologies which indicate the presence of sulfur volcanoes on the Saturnian satellite Io. An analysis of high resolution Voyager imagery reveals three features which are considered to be possible sulfur volcanoes: Atar Patera, Daedalus Patera, and Kibero Patera. All three features are distinguished by circular-to-oval central masses surrounded by irregular widespread flows. The central zones of the features are interpreted to be domes formed of high temperature sulfur. To confirm the interpretations of the satellite data, molten sulfur was extruded in the laboratory at a temperature of 210 C on a flat surface sloping 0.5 deg to the left. At this temperature, the sulfur formed a viscous domelike mass over the event. As parts of the mass cooled to 170 C the viscosity decreased to a runny stage, forming breakout flows. It is concluded that a case can be made for sulfur volcanoes on Io sufficient to warrant further study, and it is recommended that the upcoming Galileo mission examine these phenomena.

  8. Torsades de pointes in 3 patients with leukemia treated with arsenic trioxide.

    PubMed

    Unnikrishnan, D; Dutcher, J P; Varshneya, N; Lucariello, R; Api, M; Garl, S; Wiernik, P H; Chiaramida, S

    2001-03-01

    Arsenic trioxide is used in clinical trials in the treatment of relapsed and resistant cases of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Adverse effects from arsenic in these studies have been multisystemic. Arsenic is known to cause corrected QT-interval prolongation and T-wave changes, but the potential for serious ventricular arrhythmias is less well understood. Torsades de pointes, a form of ventricular tachycardia, has been reported with arsenic poisoning but not at therapeutic doses used in protocols for hematologic malignancies. We describe 3 patients in whom this arrhythmia developed while they were treated with arsenic trioxide. Early recognition of the arrhythmia or correction of contributory factors is important because arsenic induced ventricular arrhythmias are known to be resistant to most chemical methods and electrical cardioversion.

  9. Summary of the Preliminary Analysis of Savannah River Depleted Uranium Trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-10-13

    This report summarizes a preliminary special analysis of the Savannah River Depleted Uranium Trioxide waste stream (SVRSURANIUM03, Revision 2). The analysis is considered preliminary because a final waste profile has not been submitted for review. The special analysis is performed to determine the acceptability of the waste stream for shallow land burial at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The Savannah River Depleted Uranium Trioxide waste stream requires a special analysis because the waste stream’s sum of fractions exceeds one. The 99Tc activity concentration is 98 percent of the NNSS Waste Acceptance Criteria and the largest single contributor to the sum of fractions.

  10. Nitrogen oxides, sulfur trioxide, and mercury emissions during oxy-fuel fluidized bed combustion of Victorian brown coal.

    PubMed

    Roy, Bithi; Chen, Luguang; Bhattacharya, Sankar

    2014-12-16

    This study investigates, for the first time, the NOx, N2O, SO3, and Hg emissions from combustion of a Victorian brown coal in a 10 kWth fluidized bed unit under oxy-fuel combustion conditions. Compared to air combustion, lower NOx emissions and higher N2O formation were observed in the oxy-fuel atmosphere. These NOx reduction and N2O formations were further enhanced with steam in the combustion environment. The NOx concentration level in the flue gas was within the permissible limit in coal-fired power plants in Victoria. Therefore, an additional NOx removal system will not be required using this coal. In contrast, both SO3 and gaseous mercury concentrations were considerably higher under oxy-fuel combustion compared to that in the air combustion. Around 83% of total gaseous mercury released was Hg(0), with the rest emitted as Hg(2+). Therefore, to control harmful Hg(0), a mercury removal system may need to be considered to avoid corrosion in the boiler and CO2 separation units during the oxy-fuel fluidized-bed combustion using this coal. PMID:25402169

  11. Nitrogen oxides, sulfur trioxide, and mercury emissions during oxy-fuel fluidized bed combustion of Victorian brown coal.

    PubMed

    Roy, Bithi; Chen, Luguang; Bhattacharya, Sankar

    2014-12-16

    This study investigates, for the first time, the NOx, N2O, SO3, and Hg emissions from combustion of a Victorian brown coal in a 10 kWth fluidized bed unit under oxy-fuel combustion conditions. Compared to air combustion, lower NOx emissions and higher N2O formation were observed in the oxy-fuel atmosphere. These NOx reduction and N2O formations were further enhanced with steam in the combustion environment. The NOx concentration level in the flue gas was within the permissible limit in coal-fired power plants in Victoria. Therefore, an additional NOx removal system will not be required using this coal. In contrast, both SO3 and gaseous mercury concentrations were considerably higher under oxy-fuel combustion compared to that in the air combustion. Around 83% of total gaseous mercury released was Hg(0), with the rest emitted as Hg(2+). Therefore, to control harmful Hg(0), a mercury removal system may need to be considered to avoid corrosion in the boiler and CO2 separation units during the oxy-fuel fluidized-bed combustion using this coal.

  12. Comparison of radiation shielding ratios of nano-sized bismuth trioxide and molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, J. H.; Kim, M. S.; Rhim, J. D.

    2015-07-01

    In this study, radiation shielding fibers using non-hazardous nano-sized bismuth trioxide and molybdenum instead of lead were developed and evaluated. Among the elements with high densities and atomic numbers, non-hazardous elements such as bismuth trioxide and molybdenum were chosen as a shielding element. Then, bismuth trioxide (Bi2O3) with average particle size 1-500 µm was ball milled for 10 min to produce a powdered form of nanoparticles with average particle size of 10-100 nm. Bismuth trioxide nanoparticles were dispersed to make a colloidal suspension, followed by spreading and hardening onto one or two sides of fabric, to create the radiation shielding fabric. The thicknesses of the shielding sheets using nano-sized bismuth and molybdenum were 0.4 and 0.7 mm. According to the lead equivalent test of X-ray shielding products suggested by KS, the equivalent dose was measured, followed by calculation of the shielding rate. The shielding rate of bismuth with 0.4 mm thickness and at 50 kVp was 90.5%, which is comparable to lead of 0.082 mm thickness. The shielding rate of molybdenum was 51.89%%, which is comparable to lead of 0.034 mm. At a thickness of 0.7 mm, the shielding rate of bismuth was 98.73%, equivalent to 0.101 mm Pb, whereas the shielding rate of molybdenum was 74.68%, equivalent to 0.045 mm Pb. In conclusion, the radiation shielding fibers using nano-sized bismuth developed in this study are capable of reducing radiation exposure by X-ray and its low-dose scatter ray.

  13. ELECTRON IRRADIATION OF CARBON DISULFIDE-OXYGEN ICES: TOWARD THE FORMATION OF SULFUR-BEARING MOLECULES IN INTERSTELLAR ICES

    SciTech Connect

    Maity, Surajit; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2013-08-20

    The formation of sulfur-bearing molecules in interstellar ices was investigated during the irradiation of carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2})-oxygen (O{sub 2}) ices with energetic electrons at 12 K. The irradiation-induced chemical processing of these ices was monitored online and in situ via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to probe the newly formed products quantitatively. The sulfur-bearing molecules produced during the irradiation were sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}), and carbonyl sulfide (OCS). Formations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), and ozone (O{sub 3}) were observed as well. To fit the temporal evolution of the newly formed products and to elucidate the underlying reaction pathways, kinetic reaction schemes were developed and numerical sets of rate constants were derived. Our studies suggest that carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}) can be easily transformed to carbonyl sulfide (OCS) via reactions with suprathermal atomic oxygen (O), which can be released from oxygen-containing precursors such as water (H{sub 2}O), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), and/or methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) upon interaction with ionizing radiation. This investigation corroborates that carbonyl sulfide (OCS) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) are the dominant sulfur-bearing molecules in interstellar ices.

  14. Cytoplasmic sulfur trafficking in sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    Persulfide groups are chemically versatile and participate in a wide array of biochemical pathways. Although it is well documented that persulfurated proteins supply a number of important and elaborate biosynthetic pathways with sulfane sulfur, it is far less acknowledged that the enzymatic generation of persulfidic sulfur, the successive transfer of sulfur as a persulfide between multiple proteins, and the oxidation of sulfane sulfur in protein-bound form are also essential steps during dissimilatory sulfur oxidation in bacteria and archaea. Here, the currently available information on sulfur trafficking in sulfur oxidizing prokaryotes is reviewed, and the idea is discussed that sulfur is always presented to cytoplasmic oxidizing enzymes in a protein-bound form, thus preventing the occurrence of free sulfide inside of the prokaryotic cell. Thus, sulfur trafficking emerges as a central element in sulfur-oxidizing pathways, and TusA homologous proteins appear to be central and common elements in these processes.

  15. Synthesis and performance of bismuth trioxide nanoparticles for high energy gas generator use.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, K S; Wang, L; Vicent, A; Luss, D

    2009-10-01

    Our experiments showed that the combustion of an Al-Bi2O3 nanoparticle mixture generated the highest pressure pulse among common nanothermite reactions and can potentially be used as a nanoenergetic gas generator. The combustion front propagation velocity and rate of energy release increased by up to three orders of magnitude when the particle size was reduced to a nanosize range for both the aluminum and the oxidizer. We developed a novel one-step (metal nitrate-glycine) combustion synthesis of nanostructured amorphous-like and highly crystalline bismuth trioxide nanoparticles. The combustion synthesis was conducted using a solution of molten bismuth nitrate as an oxidizer and glycine as a fuel. The glycine was completely combusted during the thermal decomposition of the bismuth nitrate pentahydrate and generated a temperature front that propagated through the sample. Increasing the fuel concentration increased the maximum combustion temperature from 280 to 1200 degrees C and the Bi2O3 particle size from 20 to 100 nm. The oxidizer/fuel ratio had a strong impact on the bismuth trioxide particle crystallinity. At low temperature (280 degrees C), amorphous-like bismuth trioxide nanoparticles formed, while at T > or =370 degrees C the structures were crystalline. A peak pressure of approximately 12 MPa and a thermal front propagating velocity of approximately 2500 m s(-1) were achieved during the combustion of an Al-Bi2O3 mixture containing 80 wt% of the synthesized Bi2O3 crystalline nanoparticles (size: 40-50 nm).

  16. Synthesis and performance of bismuth trioxide nanoparticles for high energy gas generator use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martirosyan, K. S.; Wang, L.; Vicent, A.; Luss, D.

    2009-10-01

    Our experiments showed that the combustion of an Al-Bi2O3 nanoparticle mixture generated the highest pressure pulse among common nanothermite reactions and can potentially be used as a nanoenergetic gas generator. The combustion front propagation velocity and rate of energy release increased by up to three orders of magnitude when the particle size was reduced to a nanosize range for both the aluminum and the oxidizer. We developed a novel one-step (metal nitrate-glycine) combustion synthesis of nanostructured amorphous-like and highly crystalline bismuth trioxide nanoparticles. The combustion synthesis was conducted using a solution of molten bismuth nitrate as an oxidizer and glycine as a fuel. The glycine was completely combusted during the thermal decomposition of the bismuth nitrate pentahydrate and generated a temperature front that propagated through the sample. Increasing the fuel concentration increased the maximum combustion temperature from 280 to 1200 °C and the Bi2O3 particle size from 20 to 100 nm. The oxidizer/fuel ratio had a strong impact on the bismuth trioxide particle crystallinity. At low temperature (280 °C), amorphous-like bismuth trioxide nanoparticles formed, while at T>=370 °C the structures were crystalline. A peak pressure of ~12 MPa and a thermal front propagating velocity of ~2500 m s-1 were achieved during the combustion of an Al-Bi2O3 mixture containing 80 wt% of the synthesized Bi2O3 crystalline nanoparticles (size: 40-50 nm).

  17. Effects of arsenic trioxide inhalation exposure on pulmonary antibacterial defenses in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Aranyi, C.; Bradof, J.N.; O'Shea, W.J.; Graham, J.A.; Miller, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of single and multiple (5 and 20) 3-h inhalation exposures to aerosols of arsenic trioxide on the pulmonary defense system of mice were investigated. Arsenic trioxide mist was generated from an aqueous solution and dried to produce particulate aerosols of 0. 4 micron mass median aerodynamic diameter. Aerosol mass concentration ranged from 125 to 1000 micrograms As/m3. Effects of the exposures were evaluated by determination of changes in susceptibility to experimentally induced streptococcal aerosol infection and in pulmonary bactericidal activity to /sup 35/S-labeled Klebsiella pneumoniae. Significant increases in mortality due to the infectious challenge and decreases in bactericidal activity were seen after single 3-h exposures to 270, 500, and 940 micrograms As/m3. Similarly, 5 or 20 multiple 3-h exposures to 500 micrograms As/m3 produced consistently significant increases in mortality and decreases in pulmonary bactericidal activity. At 125 or 250 micrograms As/m3, a decrease in bactericidal activity was seen only after 20 exposures to 250 micrograms/m3. Results from earlier studies with an arsenic-containing copper smelter dust were compared to these data. The possibility of the development of adaptation during multiple exposures to arsenic trioxide is also considered.

  18. Electrosprayed molybdenum trioxide aqueous solution and its application in organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Katsumi; Fukuda, Takeshi; Liao, Yingjie

    2014-01-01

    A molybdenum trioxide thin film with smooth surface and uniform thickness was successfully achieved by an electrospray deposition method using an aqueous solution with a drastically low concentration of 0.05 wt%. Previous papers demonstrated that an additive solvent technique is useful for depositing the thin film by the electrospray deposition, and the high vapor pressure and a low surface tension of an additive solvent were found to be important factors. As a result, the smooth molybdenum trioxide thin film was obtained when the acetonitrile was used as the additive solvent. Furthermore, the vapor pressure of acetone is much higher than that of aqueous solution, and this indicates that the acetone is easily evaporated after spraying from the glass capillary. By optimizing a concentration of acetone in the molybdenum aqueous solution, a minimum root mean square roughness of the MoO3 thin film became 3.7 nm. In addition, an organic photovoltaic cell was also demonstrated using the molybdenum trioxide as a hole transport layer. Highest photoconversion efficiency was 1.72%, a value comparable to that using conventional thermal evaporation process even though the aqueous solution was used for the solution process. The photovonversion efficiency was not an optimized value, and the higher value can be achieved by optimizing the coating condition of the active layer.

  19. Efficient photoelectrochemical hydrogen production from bismuth vanadate-decorated tungsten trioxide helix nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xinjian; Choi, Il Yong; Zhang, Kan; Kwon, Jeong; Kim, Dong Yeong; Lee, Ja Kyung; Oh, Sang Ho; Kim, Jong Kyu; Park, Jong Hyeok

    2014-01-01

    Tungsten trioxide/bismuth vanadate heterojunction is one of the best pairs for solar water splitting, but its photocurrent densities are insufficient. Here we investigate the advantages of using helical nanostructures in photoelectrochemical solar water splitting. A helical tungsten trioxide array is fabricated on a fluorine-doped tin oxide substrate, followed by subsequent coating with bismuth vanadate/catalyst. A maximum photocurrent density of ~5.35±0.15 mA cm(-2) is achieved at 1.23 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode, and related hydrogen and oxygen evolution is also observed from this heterojunction. Theoretical simulations and analyses are performed to verify the advantages of this helical structure. The combination of effective light scattering, improved charge separation and transportation, and an enlarged contact surface area with electrolytes due to the use of the bismuth vanadate-decorated tungsten trioxide helical nanostructures leads to the highest reported photocurrent density to date at 1.23 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode, to the best of our knowledge. PMID:25179126

  20. Electrosprayed Molybdenum Trioxide Aqueous Solution and Its Application in Organic Photovoltaic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Katsumi; Fukuda, Takeshi; Liao, Yingjie

    2014-01-01

    A molybdenum trioxide thin film with smooth surface and uniform thickness was successfully achieved by an electrospray deposition method using an aqueous solution with a drastically low concentration of 0.05 wt%. Previous papers demonstrated that an additive solvent technique is useful for depositing the thin film by the electrospray deposition, and the high vapor pressure and a low surface tension of an additive solvent were found to be important factors. As a result, the smooth molybdenum trioxide thin film was obtained when the acetonitrile was used as the additive solvent. Furthermore, the vapor pressure of acetone is much higher than that of aqueous solution, and this indicates that the acetone is easily evaporated after spraying from the glass capillary. By optimizing a concentration of acetone in the molybdenum aqueous solution, a minimum root mean square roughness of the MoO3 thin film became 3.7 nm. In addition, an organic photovoltaic cell was also demonstrated using the molybdenum trioxide as a hole transport layer. Highest photoconversion efficiency was 1.72%, a value comparable to that using conventional thermal evaporation process even though the aqueous solution was used for the solution process. The photovonversion efficiency was not an optimized value, and the higher value can be achieved by optimizing the coating condition of the active layer. PMID:25148047

  1. Sulfur compounds in coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attar, A.; Corcoran, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    The literature on the chemical structure of the organic sulfur compounds (or functional groups) in coal is reviewed. Four methods were applied in the literature to study the sulfur compounds in coal: direct spectrometric and chemical analysis, depolymerization in drastic conditions, depolymerization in mild conditions, and studies on simulated coal. The data suggest that most of the organic sulfur in coal is in the form of thiophenic structures and aromatic and aliphatic sulfides. The relative abundance of the sulfur groups in bituminous coal is estimated as 50:30:20%, respectively. The ratio changes during processing and during the chemical analysis. The main effects are the transformation during processing of sulfides to the more stable thiophenic compounds and the elimination of hydrogen sulfide.

  2. Separation of sulfur isotopes

    DOEpatents

    DeWitt, Robert; Jepson, Bernhart E.; Schwind, Roger A.

    1976-06-22

    Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO.sub.3). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO.sub.3, and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H.sub.2 SO.sub.4) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO.sub.4) and SO.sub.2 gas which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO.sub.2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO.sub.4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4) which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 components which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials.

  3. Sulfur cycling in freshwater sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klug, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Organic sulfur containing compounds represent greater than 80% of the total sulfur in sediments of eutrophic freshwater lakes. Although sedimentary sulfur is predominantly in the form of organic compounds, more sulfur is transformed by sulfate reduction than by any other process. Rates of sulfate reduction in these sediments average 7 mmol/sq m/day. This rate is 19 times greater than the net rate of production of inorganic sulfur from organic compounds on an annual basis.

  4. Upper critical field study in organic superconductor beta"-(ET) sulfur pentafluoride methylene difluoromethylene sulfur trioxide: Possibility of the FFLO state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kyuil

    2009-07-01

    We conducted in-plane rf penetration depth measurements by using the tunnel diode oscillator technique. In the metal-free-all-organic superconductor beta"-(ET) 2SF5CH2 CF2SO3 the penetration depth measurements were carried out by changing the strength and direction of the magnetic field. When the magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the conducting planes, the Shubnikov-de Haas quantum oscillations are observed revealing the geometry of the Fermi surface. When the magnetic field is applied parallel to the conducting planes, the low temperature upper critical fields are found to exceed the Pauli paramagnetic limiting field calculated by using a semi-empirical method. Furthermore, we found the possible existence of an additional superconducting state which stablizes above the Pauli limiting field when the superconducting order parameter lowers its free energy by becoming spatially inhomogeneous in a high magnetic field. The additional superconducting state is called the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) state and was predicted independently by Fulde and Ferrell [10] and by Larkin and Ovchinnikov [11] in 1964. The signature of the FFLO state observed in this thesis occurs as a kink during the superconducting vortex state (SCVS)-to-FFLO phase transition. In organic superconductors there have been several reports of the possible existence of the FFLO state [23, 24, 25, 62]. Even though these reports are all based on the fact that the upper critical field increases as the temperature decreases down to very low temperature, the obvious phase transition between the SCVS and the FFLO states has not been observed. To our best knowledge, the FFLO observation in beta"-(ET)2SF5CH2 CF2SO3 in this thesis is the first clear success which shows both the upper critical field enhancement at low temperature and the phase transition between the SCVS and the FFLO states.

  5. Electronic structure of trioxide, oxoperoxide, oxosuperoxide, and ozonide clusters of the 3d elements: density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Uzunova, Ellie L

    2011-03-01

    The trioxide clusters with stoichiometry MO3, and the structural isomers with side-on and end-on bonded oxygen atoms, are studied by DFT with the B1LYP functional. For the first half of the 3d elements row (Sc to Cr), pyramidal or distorted pyramidal structures dominate among the trioxide and oxoperoxide ground states, while the remaining elements form planar trioxides, oxoperoxides, oxosuperoxides, and ozonides. Low-lying trioxide clusters are formed by Ti, V, Cr, and Mn, among which the distorted pyramidal VO3 in the (2)A'' state, the pyramidal CrO3 in the (1)A1 state, and the planar MnO3 in the (2)A1' state are global minima. With the exception of the middle-row elements Mn, Fe, and Co, the magnetic moment of the ground-state clusters is formed with a major contribution from unpaired electrons located at the oxygen atoms. The stability of trioxides and oxoperoxides toward release of molecular oxygen is significantly higher for Sc, Ti, and V than for the remaining elements of the row. A trend of increasing the capability to dissociate one oxygen molecule is observed from Cr to Cu, with the exception of OFe(O2) being more reactive than OCo(O2). A gradual increase of reactivity from Ti to Cu is observed for the complete fragmentation reaction M + O + O2.

  6. Sulfur Volcanoes on Io?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Fink, J.

    1985-01-01

    The unusual rheological properties of molten sulfur, in which viscosity decreases approximately four orders of magnitude as it cools from 170 to 120 C, may result in distinctive volcanic flow morphologies that allow sulfur flows and volcanoes to be identified on Io. Search of high resolution Voyager images reveals three features--Atar Patera, Daedalus Patera, and Kibero Patera--considered to be possible sulfur volcanoes based on their morphology. All three average 250 km in diameter and are distinguished by circular-to-oval central masses surrounded by irregular, widespread flows. Geometric relations indicate that the flows were emplaced after the central zone and appear to have emanated from their margins. The central zones are interpreted to be domes representing the high temperature stage of sulfur formed initially upon eruption. Rapid quenching formed a crust which preserved this phase of the emplacement. Upon cooling to 170 C, the sulfur reached a low viscosity runny stage and was released as the thin, widespread flows.

  7. Corrosion-resistant sulfur concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBee, W. C.; Sullivan, T. A.; Jong, B. W.

    1983-04-01

    Sulfur concretes have been developed by the Bureau of Mines as construction materials with physical and mechanical properties that suit them for use in acid and salt corrosive environments where conventional concretes fail. Mixture design methods were established for preparing sulfur concretes using different types of aggregates and recently developed mixed-modified sulfur cements. Bench-scale testing of the sulfur concretes has shown their potential value. Corrosion resistance, strength, and durability of sulfur concrete are superior to those of conventional materials. Field in situ evaluation tests of the sulfur concretes as replacement for conventional concrete materials are in progress in corrosive areas of 24 commercial chemical, fertilizer, and metallurgical plants.

  8. Sulfur activation in Hiroshima

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.; Pace, J.V. III

    1987-01-01

    In 1979, we attempted to establish the validity of source terms for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs using experimental data on sulfur activation. Close agreement was observed between measured and calculated values for test firings of Nagasaki-type bombs. The calculated values were based on source terms developed by W.E. Preeg at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A discrepancy was found, however, when we compared calculated values for the two bombs because a 1956 report by R.R. Wilson stated that sulfur acitvation by fast neutrons in Hiroshima was approximately three times greater than in Nagasaki. Our calculations based on Preeg's source-term data predicted about equal sulfur activation in the two cities.

  9. Sodium sulfur battery seal

    DOEpatents

    Mikkor, Mati

    1981-01-01

    This disclosure is directed to an improvement in a sodium sulfur battery construction in which a seal between various battery compartments is made by a structure in which a soft metal seal member is held in a sealing position by holding structure. A pressure applying structure is used to apply pressure on the soft metal seal member when it is being held in sealing relationship to a surface of a container member of the sodium sulfur battery by the holding structure. The improvement comprises including a thin, well-adhered, soft metal layer on the surface of the container member of the sodium sulfur battery to which the soft metal seal member is to be bonded.

  10. Catalyst for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Yun; Yu, Qiquan; Chang, Shih-Ger

    1996-01-01

    The inventive catalysts allow for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur in smokestack scrubber environments. The catalysts have a very high sulfur yield of over 90% and space velocity of 10,000 h.sup.-1. They also have the capacity to convert waste gases generated during the initial conversion into elemental sulfur. The catalysts have inexpensive components, and are inexpensive to produce. The net impact of the invention is to make this technology practically available to industrial applications.

  11. Absence of prenatal developmental toxicity from inhaled arsenic trioxide in rats.

    PubMed

    Holson, J F; Stump, D G; Ulrich, C E; Farr, C H

    1999-09-01

    A review of the literature revealed no published inhalational developmental toxicity studies of arsenic performed according to modern regulatory guidelines and with exposure throughout gestation. In the present study, inorganic arsenic, as arsenic trioxide (As(+3), As2O3), was administered via whole-body inhalational exposure to groups of twenty-five Crl:CD(SD)BR female rats for six h per day every day, beginning fourteen days prior to mating and continuing throughout mating and gestation. Exposures were begun prior to mating in order to achieve a biological steady state of As(+3) in the dams prior to embryonal-fetal development. In a preliminary exposure range-finding study, half of the females that had been exposed to arsenic trioxide at 25 mg/m3 died or were euthanized in extremis. In the definitive study, target exposure levels were 0.3, 3.0, and 10.0 mg/m3. Maternal toxicity, which was determined by the occurrence of rales, a decrease in net body weight gain, and a decrease in food intake during pre-mating and gestational exposure, was observed only at the 10 mg/m3 exposure level. Intrauterine parameters (mean numbers of corpora lutea, implantation sites, resorptions and viable fetuses, and mean fetal weights) were unaffected by treatment. No treatment-related malformations or developmental variations were noted at any exposure level. The no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for maternal toxicity was 3.0 mg/m3; the NOAEL for developmental toxicity was greater than or equal to 10 mg/m3, 760 times both the time-weighted average threshold limit value (TLV) and the permissible exposure limit (PEL) for humans. Based on the results of this study, we conclude that arsenic trioxide, when administered via whole-body inhalation to pregnant rats, is not a developmental toxicant.

  12. Self-assembled flower-like antimony trioxide microstructures with high infrared reflectance performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Shengsong; Yang, Xiaokun; Shao, Qian; Liu, Qingyun; Wang, Tiejun; Wang, Lingyun; Wang, Xiaojie

    2013-04-15

    A simple hydrothermal process was adopted to self-assembly prepare high infrared reflective antimony trioxide with three-dimensional flower-like microstructures. The morphologies of antimony trioxide microstructures were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) respectively. It is also found that experimental parameters, such as NaOH concentration, surfactant concentration and volume ratio of ethanol–water played crucial roles in controlling the morphologies of Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} microstructures. A possible growth mechanism of flower-like Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} microstructure was proposed based on the experimental data. UV–vis–NIR spectra verified that the near infrared reflectivity of the obtained flower-like microstructures could averagely achieve as 92% with maximum reflectivity of 98%, obviously higher than that of other different morphologies of antimony trioxide microstructures. It is expected that the flower-like Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures have some applications in optical materials and heat insulation coatings. - Graphical abstract: Flower-like Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} microstructures that composed of nanosheets with thickness of ca. 100 nm exhibit high reflectivity under UV–vis–NIR spectra. Highlights: ► Uniform flower-like microstructures were synthesized via simple hydrothermal reaction. ► The flower-like Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} microstructures exhibited higher reflectivity than other morphologies under the UV–vis–NIR light. ► Influencing parameters on the Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} morphologies have been discussed in detail. ► Possible mechanism leading to flower-like microstructures was proposed.

  13. Polymerization of aniline in the interlayer space of molybdenum trioxide and its electrochemical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yanping; Xiang Yixian; Dong Xiaowen; Xu Jiaqiang; Ruan Fei; Pan Qingyi

    2009-08-15

    Molybdenum trioxide/polyaniline (MoO{sub 3}/PANI) composite was prepared first by ion-exchange reaction between aniline (ANI) and dodecylamine (DDA) which was intercalated precursor, and then was formed under the polymerization of ANI within the interlayer space of MoO{sub 3} at 120 deg. C for 3 d in air. According to powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, infrared spectroscopy and electrochemical testing, MoO{sub 3}/PANI composite has layered structure, and its interlayer spacing is 1.127 nm. Moreover, it has high thermal stability with the compound and completes its weight loss at 751.9 deg. C. Electrochemical investigation shows that MoO{sub 3} is the major active substance in the MoO{sub 3}/PANI electrode, and MoO{sub 3}/PANI electrode demonstrates better conductivity and electrochemical activity than pure MoO{sub 3} electrode, attributed to the promotion of Li{sup +} and/or electron transport. In addition, the alternating current impedance proves that if the resistance of MoO{sub 3}/PANI electrode reduces apparently, the electrochemical activity will increase correspondingly, the same as the relationship between the ohmic resistance and the electrical conductivity. - Graphical abstract: Aniline (ANI) monomer was intercalated into the interlayer space of molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) and heat-treated at 120 deg. C for 3 d in air, and then polymerized to form layered structure of molybdenum trioxide/polyaniline (MoO{sub 3}/PANI) composite. Its interlayer spacing of MoO{sub 3}/PANI composite is 1.127 nm.

  14. Photoelectrochemical and physical properties of tungsten trioxide films obtained by aerosol pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sadale, S.B.; Chaqour, S.M.; Gorochov, O.; Neumann-Spallart, M.

    2008-06-03

    Aerosol pyrolysis (AP) was used for preparing semiconducting films of tungsten trioxide using peroxotungstic acid as a precursor. The films were characterized by SEM, XRD, and by their photoelectrochemical response. Porous, polycrystalline (monoclinic) films of thickness up to 3 {mu}m were prepared. An incident photon to current efficiency (IPCE) of 0.55 at 365 nm was obtained for films of 1 {mu}m thickness on conducting F:SnO{sub 2}/glass substrates under depletion conditions, in junctions with aqueous electrolytes. The spectral (photocurrent) response extended into the visible region (up to 470 nm) which is of importance for solar applications like photocatalysis.

  15. Obturating teeth with wide open apices using mineral trioxide aggregate: a case report.

    PubMed

    Levenstein, H

    2002-07-01

    The conventional approach in handling a tooth with a wide open apex requiring endodontic treatment is by means of a procedure called apexification. The objective of treatment is to introduce calcium hydroxide mixed with sterile water or local anaesthetic into the root canal to create a hard-tissue-like formation or an apical plug to prevent extrusion of filling materials during obturation of teeth with wide open apices. This procedure may take anything from 6 months to 2 years. In 1999 a new material called mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was introduced to the dental profession for clinical use which has the ability to create an apical plug within a few weeks.

  16. Photoelectrochemical water splitting at titanium dioxide nanotubes coated with tungsten trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong Hyeok; Park, O Ok; Kim, Sungwook

    2006-10-16

    The photocatalytic splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen using solar light is a potentially clean and renewable source for hydrogen fuel. Titanium oxide nanotubes coated with tungsten oxide were prepared to harvest more solar light for the first time and characterized their water splitting efficiency. The tungsten trioxide coatings significantly enhanced the visible spectrum absorption of the titanium dioxide nanotube array, as well as their solar-spectrum induced photocurrents. For the sample, upon white light illumination at 150 mW/cm{sup 2}, hydrogen gas generated at the overall conversion efficiency of 0.87%.

  17. Furcal-perforation repair with mineral trioxide aggregate: Two years follow-up.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal; Andrade, Carlos Vieira; Tay, Lidia Yileng; Herrera, Daniel Rodrigo

    2012-01-01

    Furcal perforations are significant iatrogenic complications of endodontic treatment and could lead to endodontic failure. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been regarded as an ideal material for perforation repair, retrograde filling, pulp capping, and apexification. This case report describes a furcal perforation in a maxillary first molar, which was repaired using MTA. The tooth was endodontically treated and coronally restored with resin composite. After 2 years, the absence of periradicular radiolucent lesions, pain, and swelling along with functional tooth stability indicated a successful outcome of sealing the perforation using MTA. PMID:23257493

  18. White mineral trioxide aggregate pulpotomies: Two case reports with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Emine, Sen Tunc; Tuba, Ulusoy Ayca

    2011-10-01

    This case report describes the partial pulpotomy treatment of complicated crown fractures of two cases by using white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) with long-term follow-up. In the cases presented here, to injured incisor teeth were open apices and the pulp exposure site was large, so it was decided to perform vital pulpotomy with WMTA. Long-term follow-up examinations revealed that the treatment preserved pulpal vitality with continued root development and apex formation. WMTA may be considered as an alternative option for the treatment of traumatized immature permanent teeth.

  19. Zeolites Remove Sulfur From Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1991-01-01

    Zeolites remove substantial amounts of sulfur compounds from diesel fuel under relatively mild conditions - atmospheric pressure below 300 degrees C. Extracts up to 60 percent of sulfur content of high-sulfur fuel. Applicable to petroleum refineries, natural-gas processors, electric powerplants, and chemical-processing plants. Method simpler and uses considerably lower pressure than current industrial method, hydro-desulfurization. Yields cleaner emissions from combustion of petroleum fuels, and protects catalysts from poisoning by sulfur.

  20. Sulfur dioxide removal process

    SciTech Connect

    Sliger, A.G.; O'Donnell, J.J.; Northup, A.H. Jr.

    1987-01-06

    A process is described for removing sulfur dioxide from a gas stream with a buffered, aqueous thiosulfate/polythionate solution which comprises: (a) introducing sulfur dioxide-containing gas, recovered hydrogen sulfide, and a buffered, aqueous, lean thiosulfate/polythionate solution to an SO/sub 2/-gas/liquid contacting zone; (b) recovering cleaned gas and a buffered, aqueous, enriched thiosulfate/polythionate solution from the SO/sub 2/-gas/liquid contacting zone; (c) introducing the recovered, enriched solution to a regeneration zone; (d) introducing externally supplied hydrogen sulfide to the regeneration zone to react a portion of the recovered, enriched solution therein to form a slurry of elemental sulfur in a buffered, aqueous, lean thiosulfate/polythionate solution; (e) recovering unreacted excess hydrogen sulfide from the regeneration zone for use in step (a); and (f) withdrawing the slurry from the regeneration zone, separating elemental sulfur from the slurry, and recovering the buffered, aqueous, lean thiosulfate/polythionate solution for use in step (a).

  1. Sulfur Dioxide Pollution Monitor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    The sulfur dioxide pollution monitor described in this document is a government-owed invention that is available for licensing. The background of the invention is outlined, and drawings of the monitor together with a detailed description of its function are provided. A sample stream of air, smokestack gas or the like is flowed through a…

  2. Meteoritic Sulfur Isotopic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiemens, Mark H.

    1996-01-01

    Funds were requested to continue our program in meteoritic sulfur isotopic analysis. We have recently detected a potential nucleosynthetic sulfur isotopic anomaly. We will search for potential carriers. The documentation of bulk systematics and the possible relation to nebular chemistry and oxygen isotopes will be explored. Analytical techniques for delta(sup 33), delta(sup 34)S, delta(sup 36)S isotopic analysis were improved. Analysis of sub milligram samples is now possible. A possible relation between sulfur isotopes and oxygen was detected, with similar group systematics noted, particularly in the case of aubrites, ureilites and entstatite chondrites. A possible nucleosynthetic excess S-33 has been noted in bulk ureilites and an oldhamite separate from Norton County. High energy proton (approximately 1 GeV) bombardments of iron foils were done to experimentally determine S-33, S-36 spallogenic yields for quantitation of isotopic measurements in iron meteorites. Techniques for measurement of mineral separates were perfected and an analysis program initiated. The systematic behavior of bulk sulfur isotopes will continue to be explored.

  3. Sodium sulfur battery seal

    DOEpatents

    Topouzian, Armenag

    1980-01-01

    This invention is directed to a seal for a sodium sulfur battery in which a flexible diaphragm sealing elements respectively engage opposite sides of a ceramic component of the battery which separates an anode compartment from a cathode compartment of the battery.

  4. Mineral resource of the month: sulfur

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, Joyce A.

    2003-01-01

    Since domestic sulfur production peaked at nearly 11 million metric tons in 1974, the sulfur industry has undergone dramatic change. In 1974, mined sulfur produced using the Frasch hot water method provided 8 million tons of sulfur, representing 75 percent of total elemental sulfur production. (In the Frasch process, hot water is injected directly into the sulfur-containing mineral strata, melting the crystalline sulfur, which then lifts to the surface with air.) The remaining 25 percent was produced as byproduct sulfur.

  5. SULFUR POLYMER ENCAPSULATION.

    SciTech Connect

    KALB, P.

    2001-08-22

    Sulfur polymer cement (SPC) is a thermoplastic polymer consisting of 95 wt% elemental sulfur and 5 wt% organic modifiers to enhance long-term durability. SPC was originally developed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines as an alternative to hydraulic cement for construction applications. Previous attempts to use elemental sulfur as a construction material in the chemical industry failed due to premature degradation. These failures were caused by the internal stresses that result from changes in crystalline structure upon cooling of the material. By reacting elemental sulfur with organic polymers, the Bureau of Mines developed a product that successfully suppresses the solid phase transition and significantly improves the stability of the product. SPC, originally named modified sulfur cement, is produced from readily available, inexpensive waste sulfur derived from desulfurization of both flue gases and petroleum. The commercial production of SPC is licensed in the United States by Martin Resources (Odessa, Texas) and is marketed under the trade name Chement 2000. It is sold in granular form and is relatively inexpensive ({approx}$0.10 to 0.12/lb). Application of SPC for the treatment of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes was initially developed and patented by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in the mid-1980s (Kalb and Colombo, 1985; Colombo et al., 1997). The process was subsequently investigated by the Commission of the European Communities (Van Dalen and Rijpkema, 1989), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (Darnell, 1991), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Mattus and Mattus, 1994). SPC has been used primarily in microencapsulation applications but can also be used for macroencapsulation of waste. SPC microencapsulation has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment for a wide variety of wastes, including incinerator hearth and fly ash; aqueous concentrates such as sulfates, borates, and chlorides; blowdown solutions; soils; and sludges. It is not

  6. Process for forming sulfuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Wen-Tong P.

    1981-01-01

    An improved electrode is disclosed for the anode in a sulfur cycle hydrogen generation process where sulfur dioxie is oxidized to form sulfuric acid at the anode. The active compound in the electrode is palladium, palladium oxide, an alloy of palladium, or a mixture thereof. The active compound may be deposited on a porous, stable, conductive substrate.

  7. Correlation of electrochromic properties and oxidation states in nanocrystalline tungsten trioxide.

    PubMed

    Darmawi, S; Burkhardt, S; Leichtweiss, T; Weber, D A; Wenzel, S; Janek, J; Elm, M T; Klar, P J

    2015-06-28

    Although tungsten trioxide (WO3) has been extensively studied since its electrochromic properties were first discovered, the mechanism responsible for the coloration or bleaching effect is still disputed. New insights into the coloration mechanism of electrochromic, nanocrystalline WO3 are provided in this paper by studying thin WO3 films combining the electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques. By employing in situ UV-Vis transmission spectroscopy at a fixed spectral band pass during electrochemical experiments, such as cyclic voltammetry, a two-step insertion process for both protons and lithium ions is identified, of which one step exhibits a significantly higher coloration efficiency than the other. To obtain a better understanding of the insertion process AxWO3 (A = H, Li,…) thin films were studied at different stages of intercalation using UV-Vis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results show that the first step of the intercalation process represents the reduction from initial W(6+) to W(5+) and the second step the reduction of W(5+) to W(4+). We found that the blue coloration of this nanocrystalline tungsten trioxide is mainly due to the presence of W(4+) rather than that of W(5+). PMID:26018838

  8. Use of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate in Surgical and Conventional Endodontics: A Report of Five Cases

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Mridula

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Facial trauma that results in fractured, displaced or lost teeth can have significant negative functional, esthetic and psychological effects on children. An acute dental trauma may imply impact to the hard dental tissues and damage to the pulp and periodontium, ultimately leading to partial or total pulp necrosis and/or root resorption. Apexification is a commonly used procedure for treating and preserving immature permanent teeth that have lost pulp vitality. Immature teeth undergoing apexification were earlier filled with calcium hydroxide paste for the purpose of disinfection and induction of an apical calcific barrier. However, certain drawbacks led to the use of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) to fill the apical end without the need for calcific barrier formation. This article demonstrates the use of MTA as an apical barrier material for root-end closure in the permanent teeth of five patients. How to cite this article: Gupta S, Goswami M. Use of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate in Surgical and Conventional Endodontics: A Report of Five Cases. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(2): 134-139. PMID:25206209

  9. Dissimilatory antimonate reduction and production of antimony trioxide microcrystals by a novel microorganism.

    PubMed

    Abin, Christopher A; Hollibaugh, James T

    2014-01-01

    Antimony (Sb) is a metalloid that has been exploited by humans since the beginning of modern civilization. The importance of Sb to such diverse industries as nanotechnology and health is underscored by the fact that it is currently the ninth-most mined metal worldwide. Although its toxicity mirrors that of its Group 15 neighbor arsenic, its environmental chemistry is very different, and, unlike arsenic, relatively little is known about the fate and transport of Sb, especially with regard to biologically mediated redox reactions. To further our understanding of the interactions between microorganisms and Sb, we have isolated a bacterium that is capable of using antimonate [Sb(V)] as a terminal electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration, resulting in the precipitation of antimonite [Sb(III)] as microcrystals of antimony trioxide. The bacterium, designated strain MLFW-2, is a sporulating member of a deeply branching lineage within the order Bacillales (phylum Firmicutes). This report provides the first unequivocal evidence that a bacterium is capable of conserving energy for growth and reproduction from the reduction of antimonate. Moreover, microbiological antimonate reduction may serve as a novel route for the production of antimony trioxide microcrystals of commercial significance to the nanotechnology industry.

  10. The charge and discharge behavior of molybdenum trioxide electrodes in lithium perchlorate-propylene carbonate electrolyte. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hunger, H.F.; Ellison, J.E.

    1980-07-01

    The anodic and cathodic behavior of molybdenum trioxide electrodes in various states of lithiation was investigated in 1M LiClO/sub 4/-PC electrolytes at room temperature. A comparison was made between the anodic and cathodic rate capabilities of the electrodes. From cycling experiments at various depths of discharge, cycle life data were obtained. Problems observed after deep discharges are discussed.

  11. Acidophilic sulfur disproportionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardisty, Dalton S.; Olyphant, Greg A.; Bell, Jonathan B.; Johnson, Adam P.; Pratt, Lisa M.

    2013-07-01

    Bacterial disproportionation of elemental sulfur (S0) is a well-studied metabolism and is not previously reported to occur at pH values less than 4.5. In this study, a sediment core from an abandoned-coal-mine-waste deposit in Southwest Indiana revealed sulfur isotope fractionations between S0 and pyrite (Δ34Ses-py) of up to -35‰, inferred to indicate intense recycling of S0 via bacterial disproportionation and sulfide oxidation. Additionally, the chemistry of seasonally collected pore-water profiles were found to vary, with pore-water pH ranging from 2.2 to 3.8 and observed seasonal redox shifts expressed as abrupt transitions from Fe(III) to Fe(II) dominated conditions, often controlled by fluctuating water table depths. S0 is a common product during the oxidation of pyrite, a process known to generate acidic waters during weathering and production of acid mine drainage. The H2S product of S0 disproportionation, fractionated by up to -8.6‰, is rapidly oxidized to S0 near redox gradients via reaction with Fe(III) allowing for the accumulation of isotopically light S0 that can then become subject to further sulfur disproportionation. A mass-balance model for S0 incorporating pyrite oxidation, S0 disproportionation, and S0 oxidation readily explains the range of observed Δ34Ses-py and emphasizes the necessity of seasonally varying pyrite weathering and metabolic rates, as indicated by the pore water chemistry. The findings of this research suggest that S0 disproportionation is potentially a common microbial process at a pH < 4.5 and can create large sulfur isotope fractionations, even in the absence of sulfate reduction.

  12. Sulfur plumes off Namibia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur plumes rising up from the bottom of the ocean floor produce colorful swirls in the waters off the coast of Namibia in southern Africa. The plumes come from the breakdown of marine plant matter by anaerobic bacteria that do not need oxygen to live. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on April 24, 2002 Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  13. Sulfur compounds in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.; Ahearn, M.

    1989-01-01

    Cometary atmospheres exhibit abundant sulfur and sulfur compounds, which are absent in planetary atmospheres. Sulfur compounds were also detected in interstellar media, including SO, SO2, CS, etc., but excluding S2 which was identified only in IRAS-Araki-Alcock 1983d. Fluorescence calculations are used to analyze the B-X system of S2 which appeared in IUE and ground-based spectra of IRAS-Araki-Alcock 1983d. Single- and multiple-cycle fluorescence calculations indicate that fluorescent equilibrium accounts for the observed spectra despite the fact that the S2 lifetime against solar ultraviolet radiation is relatively short. This analysis confirms unambiguously that emission peaks in the 3000 to 4000 A spectral range of the ground-based data are due to the B-X bands of S2. New evidence is presented of at least one S2 outburst before it was detected by A'Hearn, Feldman, and Schleicher. The time variation of S2 outgassing rates and discussion on the correlation between solar wind flux and the S2 outbursts will be presented.

  14. Sulfur dioxide oxidation induced mechanistic branching and particle formation during the ozonolysis of β-pinene and 2-butene.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Philip T M; Keunecke, Claudia; Krüger, Bastian C; Maaß, Mona-C; Zeuch, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the reaction of stabilised Criegee Intermediates (CIs) with sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), leading to the formation of a carbonyl compound and sulfur trioxide, is a relevant atmospheric source of sulfuric acid. Here, the significance of this pathway has been examined by studying the formation of gas phase products and aerosol during the ozonolysis of β-pinene and 2-butene in the presence of SO(2) in the pressure range of 10 to 1000 mbar. For β-pinene at atmospheric pressure, the addition of SO(2) suppresses the formation of the secondary ozonide and leads to highly increased nopinone yields. A complete consumption of SO(2) is observed at initial SO(2) concentrations below the yield of stabilised CIs. In experiments using 2-butene a significant consumption of SO(2) and additional formation of acetaldehyde are observed at 1 bar. A consistent kinetic simulation of the experimental findings is possible when a fast CI + SO(2) reaction rate in the range of recent direct measurements [Welz et al., Science, 2012, 335, 204] is used. For 2-butene the addition of SO(2) drastically increases the observed aerosol yields at higher pressures. Below 60 mbar the SO(2) oxidation induced particle formation becomes inefficient pointing to the critical role of collisional stabilisation for sulfuric acid controlled nucleation at low pressures.

  15. Lunar Sulfur Capture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berggren, Mark; Zubrin, Robert; Bostwick-White, Emily

    2013-01-01

    The Lunar Sulfur Capture System (LSCS) protects in situ resource utilization (ISRU) hardware from corrosion, and reduces contaminant levels in water condensed for electrolysis. The LSCS uses a lunar soil sorbent to trap over 98 percent of sulfur gases and about two-thirds of halide gases evolved during hydrogen reduction of lunar soils. LSCS soil sorbent is based on lunar minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that trap sulfur and halide gas contaminants in a fixed-bed reactor held at temperatures between 250 and 400 C, allowing moisture produced during reduction to pass through in vapor phase. Small amounts of Earth-based polishing sorbents consisting of zinc oxide and sodium aluminate are used to reduce contaminant concentrations to one ppm or less. The preferred LSCS configuration employs lunar soil beneficiation to boost concentrations of reactive sorbent minerals. Lunar soils contain sulfur in concentrations of about 0.1 percent, and halogen compounds including chlorine and fluorine in concentrations of about 0.01 percent. These contaminants are released as gases such as H2S, COS, CS2,HCl, and HF during thermal ISRU processing with hydrogen or other reducing gases. Removal of contaminant gases is required during ISRU processing to prevent hardware corrosion, electrolyzer damage, and catalyst poisoning. The use of Earth-supplied, single-use consumables to entirely remove contaminants at the levels existing in lunar soils would make many ISRU processes unattractive due to the large mass of consumables relative to the mass of oxygen produced. The LSCS concept of using a primary sorbent prepared from lunar soil was identified as a method by which the majority of contaminants could be removed from process gas streams, thereby substantially reducing the required mass of Earth-supplied consumables. The LSCS takes advantage of minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that are present in lunar soil to trap sulfur and halide gases in a fixedbed reactor

  16. Immobilization of sulfur in microgels for lithium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Aiping; Wu, Qingshi; Du, Xue; Chen, Shoumin; Shen, Jing; Song, Qiuyi; Xie, Jianda; Wu, Weitai

    2016-03-25

    Immobilization of sulfur in microgels is achieved via free radical polymerization of commercial poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate in the solution of sulfur-terminated poly(3-oligo(ethylene oxide)4-thiophene), a copolymer prepared by the inverse vulcanization of S8 with allyl-terminated poly(3-oligo(ethylene oxide)4-thiophene). This microgelation leads to enhanced Li-S battery performance over the sulfur-terminated polymer. PMID:26936016

  17. Immobilization of sulfur in microgels for lithium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Aiping; Wu, Qingshi; Du, Xue; Chen, Shoumin; Shen, Jing; Song, Qiuyi; Xie, Jianda; Wu, Weitai

    2016-03-25

    Immobilization of sulfur in microgels is achieved via free radical polymerization of commercial poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate in the solution of sulfur-terminated poly(3-oligo(ethylene oxide)4-thiophene), a copolymer prepared by the inverse vulcanization of S8 with allyl-terminated poly(3-oligo(ethylene oxide)4-thiophene). This microgelation leads to enhanced Li-S battery performance over the sulfur-terminated polymer.

  18. Catalyst for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Y.; Yu, Q.; Chang, S.G.

    1996-02-27

    The inventive catalysts allow for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur in smokestack scrubber environments. The catalysts have a very high sulfur yield of over 90% and space velocity of 10,000 h{sup {minus}1}. They also have the capacity to convert waste gases generated during the initial conversion into elemental sulfur. The catalysts have inexpensive components, and are inexpensive to produce. The net impact of the invention is to make this technology practically available to industrial applications. 21 figs.

  19. Analysis of six heavy metals in Ortho mineral trioxide aggregate and ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kum, Kee-Yeon; Zhu, Qiang; Safavi, Kamran; Gu, Yu; Bae, Kwang-Shik; Chang, Seok Woo

    2013-12-01

    Ortho mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a mineral aggregate newly developed for perforation repair, root end filling and pulp capping. The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) in Ortho MTA and ProRoot MTA. A total of 0.2 g of each MTA was digested using a mixture of hydrochloric and nitric acids and filtered. Six heavy metals in the resulting filtrates were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (n = 5). The results were statistically analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U-test. The concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn in Ortho MTA were 0.10, 7.73, 49.51, 2.58, 0.82 and 10.09 p.p.m., respectively. The concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn in ProRoot MTA were 0.16, 9.38, 1438.11, 74.51, 18.98 and 4.05 p.p.m., respectively. In conclusion, Ortho MTA had lower levels of Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn and Ni than ProRoot MTA. PMID:24279659

  20. Impact of free calcium oxide content of fly ash on dust and sulfur dioxide emissions in a lignite-fired power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrios Sotiropoulos; Andreas Georgakopoulos; Nestoras Kolovos

    2005-07-01

    Emitted pollutants from the Agios Dimitrios lignite-fired power plant in northern Greece show a very strong linear correlation with the free calcium oxide content of the lignite ash. Dust (fly ash) emissions are positively correlated to free calcium oxide content, whereas sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions are negatively correlated. As a result, at present, the Agios Dimitrios Power Plant operates very strictly within the legislative limits on atmospheric particulate emission. In the study reported, the factors to be considered in assessing the impact of lignite combustion on the environment are presented and evaluated statistically. The ash appears to have a remarkable SO{sub 2} natural dry scrubbing capability when the free calcium oxide content ranges between 4 and 7%. Precipitator operating problems attributable to high ash resistivity can be overcome by injecting sulfur trioxide to reduce the ash resistivity, with, of course, a probable increase in operating costs. 27 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Effect of n-propylthiouracil or thyroxine on arsenic trioxide toxicity in the liver of rat.

    PubMed

    Allen, Tanu; Rana, Suresh Vir Singh

    2007-01-01

    Involvement of thyroid gland in the hepatotoxic manifestations of arsenic trioxide (As(III)) has been studied in rat. The effects of n-propylthiouracil (PTU) (a thyrotoxic compound) and L-thyroxine (a thyroid hormone) have been studied with reference to T(3) and T(4) values in the serum, arsenic concentration in the liver, Ca(2+) accumulation in the liver, aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase and bilirubin values as the indicators of liver function, histopathological observations and finally the ultrastructural studies. It is concluded that hypothyroid condition protects against As(III) toxicity. Scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that significantly contribute in As(III) toxicity, by high intracellular concentration of reduced glutathione, as a consequence of PTU treatment is proposed as the plausible protective mechanism.

  2. Signal transduction pathways and transcription factors triggered by arsenic trioxide in leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sumi, Daigo; Shinkai, Yasuhiro; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2010-05-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is widely used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Several lines of evidence have indicated that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} affects signal transduction and transactivation of transcription factors, resulting in the stimulation of apoptosis in leukemia cells, because some transcription factors are reported to associate with the redox condition of the cells, and arsenicals cause oxidative stress. Thus, the disturbance and activation of the cellular signaling pathway and transcription factors due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation during arsenic exposure may explain the ability of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} to induce a complete remission in relapsed APL patients. In this report, we review recent findings on ROS generation and alterations in signal transduction and in transactivation of transcription factors during As{sub 2}O{sub 3} exposure in leukemia cells.

  3. Nonsurgical Endodontic Retreatment of Advanced Inflammatory External Root Resorption Using Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Obturation

    PubMed Central

    Utneja, Shivani; Garg, Gaurav; Arora, Shipra; Talwar, Sangeeta

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory external root resorption is one of the major complications after traumatic dental injury. In this case report, we describe treatment of a maxillary central incisor affected by severe, perforating external root resorption. An 18-year-old patient presented with a previously traumatized, root-filled maxillary central incisor associated with pain and sinus tract. Radiographic examination revealed periradicular lesion involving pathologic resorption of the apical region of the root and lateral root surface both mesially and distally. After removal of the root canal filling, the tooth was disinfected with intracanal triple antibiotic paste for 2 weeks. The antibiotic dressing was then removed, and the entire root canal was filled with mineral trioxide aggregate. The endodontic access cavity was restored with composite resin. After 18 months, significant osseous healing of the periradicular region and lateral periodontium had occurred with arrest of external root resorption, and no clinical symptoms were apparent. PMID:23304567

  4. Hyperoside enhances the suppressive effects of arsenic trioxide on acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Zhu, Fang-Bing; Li, Jia-Jia; Zhang, Ping-Ping; Zhu, Jun-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Hyperoside (Hyp) is the chief component of some Chinese herbs which has anticancer effect and the present study is to identify whether it could enhance the anti leukemic properties of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We provide evidence on the concomitant treatment of HL-60 human AML cells with hyperoside potentiates As2O3-dependent induction of apoptosis. The activation of caspase-9, Bcl-2-associated agonist of cell death (BAD), p-BAD, p27 was assessed by Western blot. Results showed that hyperoside inhibited BAD from phosphorylating, reactivated caspase-9, and increased p27 levels. Importantly, hyperoside demonstrated its induction of autophagy effect by upregulation of LC-II in HL-60 AML cell line. Taken together, hyperoside may serve as a great candidate of concomitant treatment for leukemia; these effects were probably related to induction of autophagy and enhancing apoptosis-inducing action of As2O3. PMID:26629016

  5. Conservative Management of Unset Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Root-End Filling: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Parirokh, Masoud; Farzaneh, Sedigheh; Hallajmofrad, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    This case report presents conservative management of unset mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) after being placed as a root-end filling material following periapical surgery. Periapical surgery was indicated for a maxillary lateral incisor of a 15-year-old male due to persistent exudate and a large periapical lesion. During surgery Angelus MTA was placed as root-end filling. The next session it was noticed that MTA had failed to completely set. In an orthograde approach, calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement was used to obturate the root canal space. The patient was followed up for 27 months and did not exhibit any clinical signs and symptoms. Radiographic images showed complete healing of the lesion. PMID:27471540

  6. Apexification with calcium hydroxide and mineral trioxide aggregate: Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Gawthaman, Murugesan; Vinodh, Selvaraj; Mathian, Veerabadhran Mahesh; Vijayaraghavan, Rangasamy; Karunakaran, Ramachandran

    2013-01-01

    The completion of root development and closure of the apex occurs up to 3 years after the eruption of the tooth. The treatment of pulpal injury during this period provides a significant challenge for the clinician. The importance of careful case assessment and accurate pulpal diagnosis in the treatment of immature teeth with pulpal injury cannot be overemphasized. The treatment of choice for necrotic teeth is apexification, which is induction of apical closure to produce more favorable conditions for conventional root canal filling. The most commonly advocated medicament is calcium hydroxide, although recently considerable interest has been expressed in the use of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). We report a case series wherein calcium hydroxide and MTA were used successfully for one step apexification in teeth with open apex. PMID:23956590

  7. Enhancement of the antimicrobial properties of orthorhombic molybdenum trioxide by thermal induced fracturing of the hydrates.

    PubMed

    Shafaei, Shahram; Van Opdenbosch, Daniel; Fey, Tobias; Koch, Marcus; Kraus, Tobias; Guggenbichler, Josef Peter; Zollfrank, Cordt

    2016-01-01

    The oxides of the transition metal molybdenum exhibit excellent antimicrobial properties. We present the preparation of molybdenum trioxide dihydrate (MoO3 × 2H2O) by an acidification method and demonstrate the thermal phase development and morphological evolution during and after calcination from 25 °C to 600 °C. The thermal dehydration of the material was found to proceed in two steps. Microbiological roll-on tests using Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were performed and exceptional antimicrobial activities were determined for anhydrous samples with orthorhombic lattice symmetry and a large specific surface area. The increase in the specific surface area is due to crack formation and to the loss of the hydrate water after calcination at 300 °C. The results support the proposed antimicrobial mechanism for transition metal oxides, which based on a local acidity increase as a consequence of the augmented specific surface area.

  8. Erythema multiforme due to arsenic trioxide in a case of acute promyelocytic leukemia: A diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Badarkhe, Girish V.; Sil, Amrita; Bhattacharya, Sabari; Nath, Uttam Kumar; Das, Nilay Kanti

    2016-01-01

    Erythema multiforme (EM) is an acute, self-limited, Type IV hypersensitivity reactions associated with infections and drugs. In this case of acute promyelocytic leukemia, EM diagnosed during the induction phase was mistakenly attributed to vancomycin used to treat febrile neutropenia during that period. However, the occurrence of the lesions of EM again during the consolidation phase with arsenic trioxide (ATO) lead to a re-evaluation of the patient and both the Naranjo and World Health Organization-Uppsala Monitoring Centre scale showed the causality association as “probable.” The rash responded to topical corticosteroids and antihistamines. This rare event of EM being caused by ATO may be attributed to the genetic variation of methyl conjugation in the individual which had triggered the response, and the altered metabolic byproducts acted as a hapten in the subsequent keratinocyte necrosis. PMID:27114640

  9. Enhancement of the antimicrobial properties of orthorhombic molybdenum trioxide by thermal induced fracturing of the hydrates.

    PubMed

    Shafaei, Shahram; Van Opdenbosch, Daniel; Fey, Tobias; Koch, Marcus; Kraus, Tobias; Guggenbichler, Josef Peter; Zollfrank, Cordt

    2016-01-01

    The oxides of the transition metal molybdenum exhibit excellent antimicrobial properties. We present the preparation of molybdenum trioxide dihydrate (MoO3 × 2H2O) by an acidification method and demonstrate the thermal phase development and morphological evolution during and after calcination from 25 °C to 600 °C. The thermal dehydration of the material was found to proceed in two steps. Microbiological roll-on tests using Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were performed and exceptional antimicrobial activities were determined for anhydrous samples with orthorhombic lattice symmetry and a large specific surface area. The increase in the specific surface area is due to crack formation and to the loss of the hydrate water after calcination at 300 °C. The results support the proposed antimicrobial mechanism for transition metal oxides, which based on a local acidity increase as a consequence of the augmented specific surface area. PMID:26478404

  10. Chemical and morphological characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cements.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahbaz; Kaleem, Muhammad; Fareed, Muhammad Amber; Habib, Amir; Iqbal, Kefi; Aslam, Ayesha; Ud Din, Shahab

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the chemical composition and particle morphology of white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) and two white Portland cements (CEM 1 and CEM 2). Compositional analysis was performed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and X-ray diffraction whereas, morphological characteristics were analyzed by scanning electron microscope and Laser scattering particle size distribution analyzer. The elemental composition of WMTA, CEM 1 and CEM 2 were similar except for the presence of higher amounts of bismuth in WMTA. Calcium oxide and silicon oxide constitute the major portion of the three materials whereas, tricalcium silicate was detected as the major mineral phase. The particle size distribution and morphology of WMTA was finer compared to CEM 1 and CEM 2. The three tested materials had relatively similar chemical composition and irregular particle morphologies.

  11. Tungsten Trioxide (WO3) Nanoparticles as a New Anode Material for Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Santhosha, A L; Das, Shyamal K; Bhattacharyya, Aninda J

    2016-04-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) is investigated for the first time as an anode material for sodium-ion batteries. Pristine WO3 displays a discharge potential plateau at 1 V and exhibits a 1st discharge cycle sodium storage capacity of 640 mAh g-1. Electronic wiring of WO3 with graphene oxide (GO, 1% by weight) led to a significant increase in the storage capacity and cyclability of WO3. As a result, the discharge capacity of 1% GO-WO3 is enhanced to 927 mAh g-1 in the 1st discharge cycle. The electrochemical intercalation of Na in to WO3 and (1%) GO-WO3 as obtained from galvanostatic charge/discharge cycling is also supported by cyclic voltammetry. PMID:27451776

  12. Analysis of mineral trioxide aggregate surface when set in the presence of fetal bovine serum.

    PubMed

    Tingey, Mark C; Bush, Peter; Levine, Ming Shih

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the chemical and physical characteristics of set mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) surface can provide insight into its bioactivity. The purpose of this study was to describe the surface chemistry and morphology of gray and white MTA set in the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS). Eight MTA blocks were prepared: four set in the presence of water and four in FBS. The surface morphologic characteristics were studied via scanning electron microscopy. The surface chemical composition of the set cement was investigated by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray fluorescence. No difference was found between gray and white MTA when set in the same solution. However, MTA/FBS and MTA/water present differing surface morphology and chemical distributions. When set in FBS, MTA's surface had a homogenous distribution of chemicals and a relatively smooth globular appearance. MTA/water's surface was biphasic, containing large hexagonal crystalline plates composed of calcium embedded in a pool of globular crystals.

  13. Erythema multiforme due to arsenic trioxide in a case of acute promyelocytic leukemia: A diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Badarkhe, Girish V; Sil, Amrita; Bhattacharya, Sabari; Nath, Uttam Kumar; Das, Nilay Kanti

    2016-01-01

    Erythema multiforme (EM) is an acute, self-limited, Type IV hypersensitivity reactions associated with infections and drugs. In this case of acute promyelocytic leukemia, EM diagnosed during the induction phase was mistakenly attributed to vancomycin used to treat febrile neutropenia during that period. However, the occurrence of the lesions of EM again during the consolidation phase with arsenic trioxide (ATO) lead to a re-evaluation of the patient and both the Naranjo and World Health Organization-Uppsala Monitoring Centre scale showed the causality association as "probable." The rash responded to topical corticosteroids and antihistamines. This rare event of EM being caused by ATO may be attributed to the genetic variation of methyl conjugation in the individual which had triggered the response, and the altered metabolic byproducts acted as a hapten in the subsequent keratinocyte necrosis. PMID:27114640

  14. Management of External Invasive Cervical Resorption Tooth with Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ikhar, Anuja; Thakur, Nikita; Patel, Aditya; Bhede, Rohan; Patil, Pranav; Gupta, Surbhi

    2013-01-01

    Invasive cervical resorption is entirely uncommon entities and the etiology is poorly understood. A 19 year old patient presented with fractured upper left central incisor and sinus tract opening on the distobuccal aspect in cervical region. Radiographic examination shows irregular radiolucency over the coronal one-third and it extended externally towards the external invasive resorption. After sectional obturation, the defect was accessed surgically. The resorption area was chemomechanically debrided using irrigant solution. Fibre post placement using flowable composite resin and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) was used to fill the resorptive defect, and the coronal access was temporarily sealed. Composite restoration was subsequently replaced with ceramic crown after 4 years. Radiographs at 1 and 4 years showed adequate repair of the resorption and endodontic success. Clinically and radiographically the tooth was asymptomatic, and no periodontal pocket was found after a 4-year followup. PMID:23476658

  15. Stabilized sulfur dissolving compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, M.J.

    1991-07-02

    This patent describes a storage-stable composition for the dissolution of sulfur. It comprises a major proportion of a sulfide of the formula R{sup 1}SS{sub A}SR{sup 2} where R{sup 1} and R{sup 2} are independently alkyl, aryl, alkaryl, alkoxyalkyl or hydroxyalkyl radicals wherein the alkyl moiety has from 1 to 24 carbon atoms and A is an average number ranging from 0 to 3, a catalytic amount of a mixture of an amine and a mercaptan, and a stabilizing component effective for an in an amount sufficient to inhibit loss of catalyst activity on storage.

  16. Comparison of two histopathologic methods for evaluating subcutaneous reaction to mineral trioxide aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Lotfi, Mehrdad; Moradzadeh, Monir; Aghbali, Amirala; Rahimi, Saeed; Saghiri, Mohammadali; Zand, Vahid; Mehdipour, Masoumeh; Ranjkesh, Bahram; Doosti, Sirvan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: One of the most important factors for suitable materials for pulp therapy is biocompatibility. Two histopathologic methods of Cox and Federation Dentaire International (FDI) were used to evaluate inflammation. In Cox method, density of inflammatory cells, tissue reactions like fibrosis, vascular responses like congestion and fibrin extravasation have been used to evaluate inflammatory reactions. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of pathologists’ interpretations using two different methods. Study design: Three pathologists observed the degree of inflammation in 225 histopathologic sections. These sections showed inflammation in subcutaneous connective tissue of rats adjacent to polyethylene tubes, filled with white or gray mineral trioxide aggregate. Empty tubes served as controls. Samples were harvested after 7-, 15-, 30-, 60-, and 90-days. All pathologists examined the sections under a light microscope (Carl Zeiss, Oberkochen, Germany) at ×400 magnifications. Chi-Square test was used to evaluate the difference between inflammation grades when one pathologist used two methods. Cohen’s Kappa value was used to measure agreement of three pathologists to recognize the degrees of inflammations when using one of the methods. Results: There were no significant differences between the two methods when one of the pathologist used these methods to report the degree of inflammation (p=0.054). However, two other pathologists reported significant differences between two methods (p=0.005, p=0.001). In the FDI method, there was an acceptable agreement between first and second, and first and third pathologist in terms of the degree of inflammation, and intermediate agreement existed between the second and third pathologist. With the Cox method, no agreement among the pathologists could be found. Conclusion: The results of three pathologists in terms of rating inflammation with the FDI method showed better agreement than with the Cox method

  17. Method of removing and recovering elemental sulfur from highly reducing gas streams containing sulfur gases

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, Santosh K.; Nikolopoulos, Apostolos A.; Dorchak, Thomas P.; Dorchak, Mary Anne

    2005-11-08

    A method is provided for removal of sulfur gases and recovery of elemental sulfur from sulfur gas containing supply streams, such as syngas or coal gas, by contacting the supply stream with a catalyst, that is either an activated carbon or an oxide based catalyst, and an oxidant, such as sulfur dioxide, in a reaction medium such as molten sulfur, to convert the sulfur gases in the supply stream to elemental sulfur, and recovering the elemental sulfur by separation from the reaction medium.

  18. Sulfuric acid as autocatalyst in the formation of sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Francisco, Joseph S; Anglada, Josep M

    2012-12-26

    Sulfuric acid can act as a catalyst of its own formation. We have carried out a computational investigation on the gas-phase formation of H(2)SO(4) by hydrolysis of SO(3) involving one and two water molecules, and also in the presence of sulfuric acid and its complexes with one and two water molecules. The hydrolysis of SO(3) requires the concurrence of two water molecules, one of them acting as a catalyzer, and our results predict an important catalytic effect, ranging between 3 and 11 kcal·mol(-1) when the catalytic water molecule is substituted by a sulfuric acid molecule or one of its hydrates. In these cases, the reaction products are either bare sulfuric acid dimer or sulfuric acid dimer complexed with a water molecule. There are broad implications from these new findings. The results of the present investigation show that the catalytic effect of sulfuric acid in the SO(3) hydrolysis can be important in the Earth's stratosphere, in the heterogeneous formation of sulfuric acid and in the formation of aerosols, in H(2)SO(4) formation by aircraft engines, and also in understanding the formation of sulfuric acid in the atmosphere of Venus.

  19. Process for removing sulfur from sulfur-containing gases

    DOEpatents

    Rochelle, Gary T.; Jozewicz, Wojciech

    1989-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to improved processes for treating hot sulfur-containing flue gas to remove sulfur therefrom. Processes in accorda The government may own certain rights in the present invention pursuant to EPA Cooperative Agreement CR 81-1531.

  20. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  1. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  2. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  3. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  4. Demonstrating Allotropic Modifications of Sulfur.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Jillian L.; Dragojlovic, Veljko

    2002-01-01

    Shows how a common demonstration that consists of slowly heating sulfur powder in a test tube to illustrate sulfur's allotropic modifications can convince students of conclusions about the moon Io which they often find surprising. Describes the demonstration in full. (Author/MM)

  5. Volume efficient sodium sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Mikkor, Mati

    1980-01-01

    In accordance with the teachings of this specification, a sodium sulfur battery is formed as follows. A plurality of box shaped sulfur electrodes are provided, the outer surfaces of which are defined by an electrolyte material. Each of the electrodes have length and width dimensions substantially greater than the thicknesses thereof as well as upwardly facing surface and a downwardly facing surface. An electrode structure is contained in each of the sulfur electrodes. A holding structure is provided for holding the plurality of sulfur electrodes in a stacked condition with the upwardly facing surface of one sulfur electrode in facing relationship to the downwardly facing surface of another sulfur electrode thereabove. A small thickness dimension separates each of the stacked electrodes thereby defining between each pair of sulfur electrodes a volume which receives the sodium reactant. A reservoir is provided for containing sodium. A manifold structure interconnects the volumes between the sulfur electrodes and the reservoir. A metering structure controls the flow of sodium between the reservoir and the manifold structure.

  6. An ex-vivo comparative study of root-end marginal adaptation using grey mineral trioxide aggregate, white mineral trioxide aggregate, and Portland cement under scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baranwal, Akash Kumar; Paul, Mohan L.; Mazumdar, Dibyendu; Adhikari, Haridas Das; Vyavahare, Nishant K.; Jhajharia, Kapil

    2015-01-01

    Context: Where nonsurgical endodontic intervention is not possible, or it will not solve the problem, surgical endodontic treatment must be considered. A major cause of surgical endodontic failures is an inadequate apical seal, so the use of the suitable substance as root-end filling material that prevents egress of potential contaminants into periapical tissue is very critical. Aims: The aim of the present ex-vivo study was to compare and evaluate the three root-end filling materials of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) family (white MTA [WMTA], grey MTA [GMTA] and Portland cement [PC]) for their marginal adaptation at the root-end dentinal wall using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Sixty human single-rooted teeth were decoronated, instrumented, and obturated with Gutta-percha. After the root-end resection and apical cavity preparation, the teeth were randomly divided into three-experimental groups (each containing 20 teeth) and each group was filled with their respective experimental materials. After longitudinal sectioning of root, SEM examination was done to determine the overall gap between retrograde materials and cavity walls in terms of length and width of the gap (maximum) at the interface. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed to calculate the means with corresponding standard errors, median and ranges along with an analysis of variance and Tukey's test. Results: The least overall gap was observed in GMTA followed by PC and WMTA. While after statistically analyzing the various data obtained from different groups, there was no significant difference among these three groups in terms of marginal adaptation. Conclusion: GMTA showed the best overall adaptation to root dentinal wall compared to PC and WMTA. Being biocompatible and cheaper, the PC may be an alternative but not a substitute for MTA. PMID:26430305

  7. Clinical outcomes of artificial root-end barriers with mineral trioxide aggregate in teeth with immature apices.

    PubMed

    Holden, David T; Schwartz, Scott A; Kirkpatrick, Timothy C; Schindler, William G

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate used as an artificial apical barrier in teeth with immature apices. Twenty teeth from 19 patients were included in this study. A healed diagnosis was based on periapical index scores of 1 or 2 and no clinical signs or symptoms at recall examinations. Eighty-five percent (17/20) of these teeth were healed, and improvements in periapical index scores at recall appointments were shown to be statistically significant (P < .001, Wilcoxon signed-rank test). Chi-square test indicated that age, gender, primary treatment versus retreatment, presence of preoperative lesion, and differences in recall times did not significantly influence healing outcome. Overall, these results indicated that the mineral trioxide aggregate apical barrier technique is a successful method for obturating teeth with immature apices. PMID:18570985

  8. Comparative effects of single intraperitoneal or oral doses of sodium arsenate or arsenic trioxide during in utero development.

    PubMed

    Stump, D G; Holson, J F; Fleeman, T L; Nemec, M D; Farr, C H

    1999-11-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that single-day intraperitoneal (IP) injection of inorganic arsenic results in failure of neural tube closure and other malformations in rats, hamsters, and mice. Most of these studies involved treatment of limited numbers of animals with maternally toxic doses of arsenic (generally As(V)), without defining a dose-response relationship. In the present Good Laboratory Practice-compliant study, sodium arsenate (As(V)) was administered IP and arsenic trioxide (As(III)) was administered either IP or orally (by gavage) on gestational day 9 to groups of 25 mated Crl:CD(R)(SD)BR rats. Only at dose levels that caused severe maternal toxicity, including lethality, did IP injection of arsenic trioxide produce neural tube and ocular defects; oral administration of higher doses of arsenic trioxide caused some maternal deaths but no treatment-related fetal malformations. In contrast, IP injection of similar amounts of sodium arsenate (based on the molar amount of arsenic) caused mild maternal toxicity but a large increase in malformations, including neural tube, eye, and jaw defects. In summary, neural tube and craniofacial defects were observed after IP injection of both As(V) and As(III); however, no increase in malformations was seen following oral administration of As(III), even at maternally lethal doses. These results demonstrate that the frequently cited association between prenatal exposure to inorganic arsenic and malformations in laboratory animals is dependent on a route of administration that is not appropriate for human risk assessment.

  9. Effect of Synthetic Tissue Fluid on Microleakage of Grey and White Mineral Trioxide Aggregate as Root-End Filling Materials

    PubMed Central

    Lotfi, Mehrdad; Vosoughhosseini, Sepideh; Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Rahimi, Saeed; Zand, Vahid; Reyhani, Mohammad Forough; Samiei, Mohammad; Ghasemi, Negin; Mehrvarzfar, Payman; Azimi, Shahram; Shokohinejad, Noushin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The success of endodontic surgery has been shown to depend partly on the apical seal. Grey mineral trioxide aggregate (GMTA) produces hydroxyapatite twice as often as white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) when suspended in a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the microleakage phenomenon of gray and white mineral trioxide aggregates as root-end filling materials after immersion in synthetic tissue fluid (STF). Methods: 55 single-rooted extracted maxillary anterior human teeth were divided into two experimental groups of 20 teeth each, plus 3 groups of 5 teeth each as two negative and one positive control groups. The root canals were cleaned, shaped, and laterally compacted with gutta-percha. The root ends were resected and 3 mm deep cavities were prepared. The root-end preparations were filled with GMTA or WMTA in the experimental groups. Leakage was determined using a dye penetration method. Data were analysed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) at the 0.05 level of significance. Results: The mean dye leakage was 0.40 ± 0.1 mm for GMTA and 0.50±0.1 mm for WMTA groups, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two experimental groups (P = 0.14). Conclusion: Despite the different properties and behaviours of GMTA and WMTA in STF, there were no significant differences in microleakage when using GMTA or WMTA. PMID:22912925

  10. Sulfur cycling and metabolism of phototrophic and filamentous sulfur bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerrero, R.; Brune, D.; Poplawski, R.; Schmidt, T. M.

    1985-01-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria taken from different habitate (Alum Rock State Park, Palo Alto salt marsh, and Big Soda Lake) were grown on selective media, characterized by morphological and pigment analysis, and compared with bacteria maintained in pure culture. A study was made of the anaerobic reduction of intracellular sulfur globules by a phototrophic sulfur bacterium (Chromatium vinosum) and a filamentous aerobic sulfur bacterium (Beggiatoa alba). Buoyant densities of different bacteria were measured in Percoll gradients. This method was also used to separate different chlorobia in mixed cultures and to assess the relative homogeneity of cultures taken directly or enriched from natural samples (including the purple bacterial layer found at a depth of 20 meters at Big Soda Lake.) Interactions between sulfide oxidizing bacteria were studied.

  11. Sulfur condensation in Claus catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Schoffs, G.R.

    1985-02-01

    The heterogeneous reactions in which catalyst deactivation by pore plugging occur are listed and include: coke formation in petroleum processing, especially hydrocracking and hydrodesulfurization catalysts; steam reforming and methnation catalysts; ammonia synthesis catalyst; and automobile exhause catalysts. The authors explain how the Claus process converts hydrogen sulfide produced by petroleum desulfurization units and gas treatment processes into elemental sulfur and water. More than 15 million tons of sulfur are recovered annually by this process. Commercial Claus plants appear to operate at thermodynamic equilibrium. Depending on the H2S content of the feed and the number of reactors, total H2S conversion to elemental sulfur can exceed 95%.

  12. Deep sulfur cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, N.; Mandeville, C. W.

    2009-12-01

    Geochemical cycle of sulfur in near-surface reservoirs has been a subject of intense studies for decades. It has been shown that sulfur isotopic compositions of sedimentary sulfides and sulfates record interactions of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and lithosphere, with δ34S of sedimentary sulfides continuously decreasing from 0‰ toward present-day values of ~-30 to -40‰ over the Phanerozoic (e.g., Canfield, 2004). It has also been shown that microbial reduction of the present-day seawater sulfate (δ34S=+21‰) results in large shifts in isotopic compositions of secondary pyrites in altered oceanic crust (to δ34S=-70‰: Rouxel et al., 2009). How much of these near surface isotopic variations survive during deep geochemical cycle of sulfur interacting with the mantle infinite reservoir with δ34S=0‰? Could extent of their survival be used as a tracer of processes and dynamics involved in deep geochemical cycle? As a first step toward answering these questions, δ34S was determined in-situ using a Cameca IMS 1280 ion microprobe at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in materials representing various domains of deep geochemical cycle. They include pyrites in altered MORB as potential subducting materials and pyrites in UHP eclogites as samples that have experienced subduction zone processes, and mantle-derived melts are represented by olivine-hosted melt inclusions in MORB and those in IAB, and undegassed submarine OIB glasses. Salient features of the results include: (1) pyrites in altered MORB (with O. Rouxel; from ODP site 801 and ODP Hole 1301B) range from -70 to +19‰, (2) pyrites in UHP eclogites from the Western Gneiss Region, Norway (with B. Hacker and A. Kylander-Clark) show a limited overall range from -3.4 to + 2.8‰ among five samples, with one of them covering almost the entire range, indicating limited scale lengths of isotopic equilibration during subduction, (3) olivine-hosted melt inclusions in arc basalts from Galunggung (-2

  13. Production of sulfur from sulfur dioxide obtained from flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.

    1989-06-06

    This patent describes a regenerable process for recovery of elemental sulfur from a gas containing sulfur dioxide comprising the steps of: contacting the gas with an aqueous, alkaline reaction medium containing sodium sulfite in concentration sufficient so that a slurry containing solid sodium sulfide is formed to react sulfur dioxide with sodium sulfite to form a solution containing dissolved sodium pyrosulfite and sodium sulfite; separating sulfur dioxide from the solution produced to leave a residual mixture containing water, sodium sulfite and a sodium pyrosulfite, the amount of sulfur dioxide separated being equal to about one-third the amount of sulfur dioxide which reacted with sodium sulfite; adding, in substantial absence of air, sufficient water and sodium bicarbonate to the residual mixture to react with the dissolved sodium pyrsulfide and form a slurry of solid sodium sulfite suspended in the resulting aqueous, alkaline reaction medium and gaseous carbon dioxide; separating the gaseous carbon dioxide; separating the solid sodium sulfite from the aqueous alkaline reaction medium and recycling the separated reaction medium; reducing the separated sodium sulfite to sodium sulfide; adding the sodium sulfide to an aqueous reaction medium containing sodium bicarbonate and, in the substantial absence of air, carbonating the resulting mixture with the gaseous carbon dioxide to form a slurry of solid particles of sodium bicarbonate dispersed in an aqueous reactor medium containing sodium bicarbonate, along with a gas composed primarily of hydrogen sulfide.

  14. Sulfuric Acid in the Venus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sill, G. T.

    1972-01-01

    The visible and ultraviolet transmission features of a thin layer of elemental bromine and hydrobromic acid dissolved in sulfuric acid somewhat resemble the Venus spectrum, up to 14 microns. The chemical process postulated for forming sulfuric acid involves the oxidation of sulfur and its compounds to sulfuric acid through the agency of elemental bromine, produced by the photolytic decomposition of hydrogen bromide.

  15. Mineral resource of the month: sulfur

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2010-01-01

    The article presents information on sulfur. Sulfur is said to be among the few solid elements found in elemental form in nature and has industrial uses. Changes in the sulfur production process over the years are discussed as well as the mining process developed by German engineer Herman Frasch that involves melting the sulfur underground and pumping it to the surface.

  16. 46 CFR 148.04-20 - Sulfur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sulfur. 148.04-20 Section 148.04-20 Shipping COAST GUARD... Special Additional Requirements for Certain Material § 148.04-20 Sulfur. (a) When sulfur is loaded in a deep hold with general cargo in the 'tween deck hold above the sulfur, a dust proof wooden...

  17. Method of preparing graphene-sulfur nanocomposites for rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Lemmon, John P; Yang, Zhenguo; Cao, Yuliang; Li, Xiaolin

    2015-04-07

    A method of preparing a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite for a cathode in a rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery comprising thermally expanding graphite oxide to yield graphene layers, mixing the graphene layers with a first solution comprising sulfur and carbon disulfide, evaporating the carbon disulfide to yield a solid nanocomposite, and grinding the solid nanocomposite to yield the graphene-sulfur nanocomposite. Rechargeable-lithium-sulfur batteries having a cathode that includes a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can exhibit improved characteristics. The graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can be characterized by graphene sheets with particles of sulfur adsorbed to the graphene sheets. The sulfur particles have an average diameter of less than 50 nm.

  18. Toxicology of sulfur in ruminants: review

    SciTech Connect

    Kandylis, K.

    1984-10-01

    This review deals with the toxicology of sulfur in ruminants including toxicity, neurotoxic effects, and mechanism of toxic action of hydrogen sulfide, clinical signs, and treatment. It will report effects of excessive intake of sulfur by ruminants on feed intake, animal performance, ruminal digestion and motility, rumination, and other physiological functions. Poisoning of animals with sulfur from industrial emissions (sulfur dioxide) also is discussed. Excessive quantities of dietary sulfur (above .3 to .4%) as sulfate or elemental sulfur may cause toxic effects and in extreme cases can be fatal. The means is discussed whereby consumption of excessive amounts of sulfur leads to toxic effects. 53 references, 1 table.

  19. Graphene-sulfur nanocomposites for rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Lemmon, John P; Yang, Zhenguo; Cao, Yuiliang; Li, Xiaolin

    2014-06-17

    Rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries having a cathode that includes a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can exhibit improved characteristics. The graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can be characterized by graphene sheets with particles of sulfur adsorbed to the graphene sheets. The sulfur particles have an average diameter less than 50 nm..

  20. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  1. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  2. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  3. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  4. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  5. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  6. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  7. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  8. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  9. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). Link to an... to or greater than 0.005 ppm shall be rounded up). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the...

  10. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  11. Sulfur diagenesis in marine sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhaber, M.

    1985-01-01

    Bacterial sulfate reduction occurs in all marine sediments that contain organic matter. Aqueous sulfide (HS-, H2S), one of the initial products of bacterial sulfide reduction, is extremely reactive with iron bearing minerals: sulfur is fixed into sediments as iron sulfide (first FeS and then Fe2S2). A working definition is given of sulfur diagenesis in marine sediments. Controls and consequences of sulfate reduction rates in marine sediments are examined.

  12. Alkali metal/sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Joginder N.

    1978-01-01

    Alkali metal/sulfur batteries in which the electrolyte-separator is a relatively fragile membrane are improved by providing means for separating the molten sulfur/sulfide catholyte from contact with the membrane prior to cooling the cell to temperatures at which the catholyte will solidify. If the catholyte is permitted to solidify while in contact with the membrane, the latter may be damaged. The improvement permits such batteries to be prefilled with catholyte and shipped, at ordinary temperatures.

  13. Sulfur minimization in bacterial leaching

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, R.; Prasad, D.; Henry, J.G.

    1996-11-01

    The production of sewage biosolids in Ontario in 1989 was estimated to be 7 million m{sup 3} of wet sludge per year. Of this amount, land application accounts for between 20 and 30% of the total. Unfortunately, the use of sewage biosolids on agricultural land is often prohibited because of heavy metal contamination of the biosolids. High cost and operational problems have made chemical methods of metal extraction unattractive. Consequently, microbiological methods of leaching of heavy metals have been studied for over a decade. A relatively simple microbiological process has been investigated in recent years in flask level experiments and recently in a semicontinuous system. The process exploits nonacidophilic and acidophilic indigenous thiobacilli to extract heavy metals from sewage biosolids. These thiobacilli use elemental sulfur as the energy source, producing sulfuric acid. However, the resulting decontaminated biosolids can cause environmental problems like acidification of the soil, when acid is generated from the residual sulfur in the biosolids. The present study examines the possibility of reducing the amount of sulfur added in batch and semicontinuous bacterial leaching systems, and maximizing sulfur oxidation efficiency, thereby reducing the residual sulfur in leached biosolids.

  14. Plant sulfur and Big Data.

    PubMed

    Kopriva, Stanislav; Calderwood, Alexander; Weckopp, Silke C; Koprivova, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Sulfur is an essential mineral nutrient for plants, therefore, the pathways of its uptake and assimilation have been extensively studied. Great progress has been made in elucidation of the individual genes and enzymes and their regulation. Sulfur assimilation has been intensively investigated by -omics technologies and has been target of several genome wide genetic approaches. This brought a significant step in our understanding of the regulation of the pathway and its integration in cellular metabolism. However, the large amount of information derived from other experiments not directly targeting sulfur has also brought new and exciting insights into processes affecting sulfur homeostasis. In this review we will integrate the findings of the targeted experiments with those that brought unintentional progress in sulfur research, and will discuss how to synthesize the large amount of information available in various repositories into a meaningful dissection of the regulation of a specific metabolic pathway. We then speculate how this might be used to further advance knowledge on control of sulfur metabolism and what are the main questions to be answered. PMID:26706053

  15. Plant sulfur and Big Data.

    PubMed

    Kopriva, Stanislav; Calderwood, Alexander; Weckopp, Silke C; Koprivova, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Sulfur is an essential mineral nutrient for plants, therefore, the pathways of its uptake and assimilation have been extensively studied. Great progress has been made in elucidation of the individual genes and enzymes and their regulation. Sulfur assimilation has been intensively investigated by -omics technologies and has been target of several genome wide genetic approaches. This brought a significant step in our understanding of the regulation of the pathway and its integration in cellular metabolism. However, the large amount of information derived from other experiments not directly targeting sulfur has also brought new and exciting insights into processes affecting sulfur homeostasis. In this review we will integrate the findings of the targeted experiments with those that brought unintentional progress in sulfur research, and will discuss how to synthesize the large amount of information available in various repositories into a meaningful dissection of the regulation of a specific metabolic pathway. We then speculate how this might be used to further advance knowledge on control of sulfur metabolism and what are the main questions to be answered.

  16. Targeting catalase but not peroxiredoxins enhances arsenic trioxide-induced apoptosis in K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Li-Li; Tu, Yao-Yao; Xia, Li; Wang, Wei-Wei; Wei, Wei; Ma, Chun-Min; Wen, Dong-Hua; Lei, Hu; Xu, Han-Zhang; Wu, Ying-Li

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable efficacy of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) treatment, other non-APL leukemias, such as chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), are less sensitive to As2O3 treatment. However, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Here we show that relative As2O3-resistant K562 cells have significantly lower ROS levels than As2O3-sensitive NB4 cells. We compared the expression of several antioxidant enzymes in these two cell lines and found that peroxiredoxin 1/2/6 and catalase are expressed at high levels in K562 cells. We further investigated the possible role of peroxirdoxin 1/2/6 and catalase in determining the cellular sensitivity to As2O3. Interestingly, knockdown of peroxiredoxin 1/2/6 did not increase the susceptibility of K562 cells to As2O3. On the contrary, knockdown of catalase markedly enhanced As2O3-induced apoptosis. In addition, we provide evidence that overexpression of BCR/ABL cannot increase the expression of PRDX 1/2/6 and catalase. The current study reveals that the functional role of antioxidant enzymes is cellular context and treatment agents dependent; targeting catalase may represent a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of As2O3 in CML treatment.

  17. Arsenic trioxide alters the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cell into cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rebuzzini, Paola; Cebral, Elisa; Fassina, Lorenzo; Alberto Redi, Carlo; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Garagna, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality for cardiovascular diseases. Arsenic increases myocardial infarction mortality in young adulthood, suggesting that exposure during foetal life correlates with cardiac alterations emerging later. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of arsenic trioxide (ATO) cardiomyocytes disruption during their differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cells. Throughout 15 days of differentiation in the presence of ATO (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 μM) we analysed: the expression of i) marker genes of mesoderm (day 4), myofibrillogenic commitment (day 7) and post-natal-like cardiomyocytes (day 15); ii) sarcomeric proteins and their organisation; iii) Connexin 43 and iv) the kinematics contractile properties of syncytia. The higher the dose used, the earlier the stage of differentiation affected (mesoderm commitment, 1.0 μM). At 0.5 or 1.0 μM the expression of cardiomyocyte marker genes is altered. Even at 0.1 μM, ATO leads to reduction and skewed ratio of sarcomeric proteins and to a rarefied distribution of Connexin 43 cardiac junctions. These alterations contribute to the dysruption of the sarcomere and syncytium organisation and to the impairment of kinematic parameters of cardiomyocyte function. This study contributes insights into the mechanistic comprehension of cardiac diseases caused by in utero arsenic exposure. PMID:26447599

  18. Arsenic trioxide disrupts glioma stem cells via promoting PML degradation to inhibit tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenchao; Cheng, Lin; Shi, Yu; Ke, Susan Q.; Huang, Zhi; Fang, Xiaoguang; Chu, Cheng-wei; Xie, Qi; Bian, Xiu-wu; Rich, Jeremy N.; Bao, Shideng

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal brain tumor. Tumor relapse in GBM is inevitable despite maximal therapeutic interventions. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) have been found to be critical players in therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence. Therapeutic drugs targeting GSCs may significantly improve GBM treatment. In this study, we demonstrated that arsenic trioxide (As2O3) effectively disrupted GSCs and inhibited tumor growth in the GSC-derived orthotopic xenografts by targeting the promyelocytic leukaemia (PML). As2O3 treatment induced rapid degradation of PML protein along with severe apoptosis in GSCs. Disruption of the endogenous PML recapitulated the inhibitory effects of As2O3 treatment on GSCs both in vitro and in orthotopic tumors. Importantly, As2O3 treatment dramatically reduced GSC population in the intracranial GBM xenografts and increased the survival of mice bearing the tumors. In addition, As2O3 treatment preferentially inhibited cell growth of GSCs but not matched non-stem tumor cells (NSTCs). Furthermore, As2O3 treatment or PML disruption potently diminished c-Myc protein levels through increased poly-ubiquitination and proteasome degradation of c-Myc. Our study indicated a potential implication of As2O3 in GBM treatment and highlighted the important role of PML/c-Myc axis in the maintenance of GSCs. PMID:26510911

  19. Cytotoxic effects of mineral trioxide aggregate, calcium enrichedmixture cement, Biodentine and octacalcium pohosphate onhuman gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    A Saberi, Eshagh; Farhadmollashahi, Narges; Ghotbi, Faroogh; Karkeabadi, Hamed; Havaei, Roholla

    2016-01-01

    Background. This in vitro study compared the effects of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), calcium enriched mixture(CEM) cement, Biodentine (BD) and octacalcium phosphate (OCP) on the viability of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). Methods. After completion of the setting time of the materials under study, fibroblasts were placed in 24-well insert platesand 1 mg of each material was added to the respective wells. The plates were then incubated at 37°C. The inserts were removedat 24, 48 and 168 hours and 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide was added to assess cytotoxicity via the MTT colorimetricassay. Data were analyzed at different time intervals using repeated-measures ANOVA, followed by the Bonferronitest at three levels of significance of P < 0.05, P < 0.01 and P < 0.001. Results. Cytotoxicity of the materials under study was not significantly different at 24 and 48 hours compared to the controlgroup. However, at 168 hours, a significant difference was noted between MTA (P < 0.05) and Biodentine (P < 0.01)and the control group. Conclusion. Cytotoxicity of MTA, CEM, Biodentine and OCP against HGFs was similar to that of the control group at 24and 48 hours. Over time, MTA and Biodentine exhibited less cytotoxicity than other materials.

  20. Chronic arsenic trioxide exposure leads to enhanced aggressiveness via Met oncogene addiction in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kryeziu, Kushtrim; Pirker, Christine; Englinger, Bernhard; van Schoonhoven, Sushilla; Spitzwieser, Melanie; Mohr, Thomas; Körner, Wilfried; Weinmüllner, Regina; Tav, Koray; Grillari, Johannes; Cichna-Markl, Margit; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra

    2016-01-01

    As an environmental poison, arsenic is responsible for many cancer deaths. Paradoxically, arsenic trioxide (ATO) presents also a powerful therapy used to treat refractory acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and is intensively investigated for treatment of other cancer types. Noteworthy, cancer therapy is frequently hampered by drug resistance, which is also often associated with enhancement of tumor aggressiveness. In this study, we analyzed ATO-selected cancer cells (A2780ATO) for the mechanisms underlying their enhanced tumorigenicity and aggressiveness. These cells were characterized by enhanced proliferation and spheroid growth as well as increased tumorigenicity of xenografts in SCID mice. Noteworthy, subsequent studies revealed that overexpression of Met receptor was the underlying oncogenic driver of these effects, as A2780ATO cells were characterized by collateral sensitivity against Met inhibitors. This finding was also confirmed by array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and whole genome gene expression arrays, which revealed that Met overexpression by chronic ATO exposure was based on the transcriptional regulation via activation of AP-1. Finally, it was shown that treatment with the Met inhibitor crizotinib was also effective against A2780ATO cell xenografts in vivo, indicating that targeting of Met presents a promising strategy for the treatment of Met-overexpressing tumors after either arsenic exposure or failure to ATO treatment. PMID:27036042

  1. In vitro investigations into the etiology of mineral trioxide tooth staining

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Todd; Baratz, Adam Z.; Gutmann, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the role of bismuth oxide, a constituent of contemporary mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) materials, and its response to various solutions that may contribute to the potential discoloration that occurs following MTA applications within the scope of endodontics. Setting and Design: Laboratory assessment of chemical reactions with white ProRoot® MTA and white Portland cement (WPC). Materials and Methods: Set specimens and freshly mixed specimens of white ProRoot® MTA and white ProRoot® MTA powder, along with specimens of WPC were exposed to distilled water, phosphate buffered saline (PBS), 10% formalin, hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), sodium hypochlorite, sodium hydroxide (NaOH) base, and hydrochloric acid (HCl) acid. Specimens were visually inspected periodically for color changes. Results: All forms of ProRoot MTA showed discoloration when exposed to 10% formalin within 30 min, as opposed to WPC, and were completely blackened at 4 days. Bismuth oxide alone and with calcium oxide also turned black within 30 min after exposure to 10% formalin. No discoloration was seen when exposed to the other solutions. Conclusions: Exposing MTA in various forms to a variety of liquids has determined that bismuth oxidein combination with other chemical moieties is the prime cause of staining observed by clinicians. PMID:25506138

  2. Optimization of combination therapy of arsenic trioxide and fractionated radiotherapy for malignant glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Ning Shoucheng; Knox, Susan J. . E-mail: sknox@stanford.edu

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: The primary objective was to optimize the combined treatment regimen using arsenic trioxide (ATO) and fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of malignant glioma. Methods and Materials: Nude mice with human glioma xenograft tumors were treated with fractionated local tumor radiation of 250 cGy/fraction/day and 5 mg/kg ATO for 5-10 days. Results: Time course experiments demonstrated that maximal tumor growth delay occurred when ATO was administered between 0 and 4 h after radiation. The combination treatment of ATO and radiation synergistically inhibited tumor growth and produced a tumor growth delay time of 13.2 days, compared with 1.4 days and 6.5 days for ATO and radiation alone (p < 0.01), respectively. The use of concurrent therapy of radiation and ATO initially, followed by ATO as maintenance therapy, was superior to the use of preloading with ATO before combined therapy and produced a tumor growth delay time of 22.7 days as compared with 11.7 days for the ATO preloading regimen (p < 0.01). The maintenance dose of ATO after concurrent therapy was effective and important for continued inhibition of tumor growth. Conclusions: The combined use of fractionated radiation and ATO is effective for the treatment of glioma xenograft tumors. ATO was most effective when administered 0-4 h after radiation without pretreatment with ATO. These results have important implications for the optimization of treatment regimen using ATO and fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of brain tumors.

  3. Polymerization of aniline in the interlayer space of molybdenum trioxide and its electrochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanping; Xiang, Yixian; Dong, Xiaowen; Xu, Jiaqiang; Ruan, Fei; Pan, Qingyi

    2009-08-01

    Molybdenum trioxide/polyaniline (MoO 3/PANI) composite was prepared first by ion-exchange reaction between aniline (ANI) and dodecylamine (DDA) which was intercalated precursor, and then was formed under the polymerization of ANI within the interlayer space of MoO 3 at 120 °C for 3 d in air. According to powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, infrared spectroscopy and electrochemical testing, MoO 3/PANI composite has layered structure, and its interlayer spacing is 1.127 nm. Moreover, it has high thermal stability with the compound and completes its weight loss at 751.9 °C. Electrochemical investigation shows that MoO 3 is the major active substance in the MoO 3/PANI electrode, and MoO 3/PANI electrode demonstrates better conductivity and electrochemical activity than pure MoO 3 electrode, attributed to the promotion of Li + and/or electron transport. In addition, the alternating current impedance proves that if the resistance of MoO 3/PANI electrode reduces apparently, the electrochemical activity will increase correspondingly, the same as the relationship between the ohmic resistance and the electrical conductivity.

  4. Density-functional studies of tungsten trioxide, tungsten bronzes, and related systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingham, B.; Hendy, S. C.; Chong, S. V.; Tallon, J. L.

    2005-08-01

    Tungsten trioxide adopts a variety of structures which can be intercalated with charged species to alter the electronic properties, thus forming “tungsten bronzes.” Similar effects are observed upon removing oxygen from WO3 . We present a computational study of cubic and hexagonal alkali bronzes and examine the effects on cell size and band structure as the size of the intercalated ion is increased. With the exception of hydrogen (which is predicted to be unstable as an intercalate), the behavior of the bronzes are relatively consistent. NaWO3 is the most stable of the cubic systems, although in the hexagonal system the larger ions are more stable. The band structures are identical, with the intercalated atom donating its single electron to the tungsten 5d valence band. A study of fractional doping in the NaxWO3 system (0⩽x⩽1) showed a linear variation in cell parameter and a systematic shift in the Fermi level into the conduction band. In the oxygen-deficient WO3-x system the Fermi level undergoes a sudden jump into the conduction band at around x=0.2 . Lastly, three compounds of a layered WO4•α,ω -diaminoalkane hybrid series were studied and found to be insulating, with features in the band structure similar to those of the parent WO3 compound that relate well to experimental UV-visible spectroscopy results.

  5. Identifying arsenic trioxide (ATO) functions in leukemia cells by using time series gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong; Lin, Shan; Cui, Jingru

    2014-02-10

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is presently the most active single agent in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). In order to explore the molecular mechanism of ATO in leukemia cells with time series, we adopted bioinformatics strategy to analyze expression changing patterns and changes in transcription regulation modules of time series genes filtered from Gene Expression Omnibus database (GSE24946). We totally screened out 1847 time series genes for subsequent analysis. The KEGG (Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes) pathways enrichment analysis of these genes showed that oxidative phosphorylation and ribosome were the top 2 significantly enriched pathways. STEM software was employed to compare changing patterns of gene expression with assigned 50 expression patterns. We screened out 7 significantly enriched patterns and 4 tendency charts of time series genes. The result of Gene Ontology showed that functions of times series genes mainly distributed in profiles 41, 40, 39 and 38. Seven genes with positive regulation of cell adhesion function were enriched in profile 40, and presented the same first increased model then decreased model as profile 40. The transcription module analysis showed that they mainly involved in oxidative phosphorylation pathway and ribosome pathway. Overall, our data summarized the gene expression changes in ATO treated K562-r cell lines with time and suggested that time series genes mainly regulated cell adhesive. Furthermore, our result may provide theoretical basis of molecular biology in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia.

  6. Cytotoxicity of calcium enriched mixture cement compared with mineral trioxide aggregate and intermediate restorative material.

    PubMed

    Mozayeni, Mohammad A; Milani, Amin S; Marvasti, Laleh A; Asgary, Saeed

    2012-08-01

    Calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement has been recently invented by the last author. It is composed of calcium oxide, calcium phosphate, calcium silicate and calcium sulphate; however, it has a different chemical composition to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). The purpose of this ex vivo study was to investigate the cytotoxicity of CEM cement, and compare it with intermediate restorative material (IRM) and MTA. The materials were tested in fresh and set states on L929 fibroblasts to assess their cytotoxicity. The cell viability responses were evaluated with methyl-tetrazolium bromide assay and Elisa reader at 1, 24 and 168 h (7 days). The tested materials were eluted with L929 culture medium according to international standard organisation 109935 standard. Distilled water and culture medium served as positive and negative controls, respectively. Differences in cytotoxicity were evaluated by one-way anova and t-tests. The cytotoxicity of the materials was statistically different at the three time intervals (P < 0.01). The lowest cytotoxic values recorded were expressed by MTA subgroups followed by CEM cement; IRM subgroups were the most cytotoxic root-end/dental material (P < 0.001). CEM cement and MTA are reasonable alternatives to IRM because of lower cytotoxicity. CEM cement also has good biocompatibility as well as lower estimated cost to MTA and seems to be a promising dental material.

  7. Effect of methods of evaluation on sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate apical plug

    PubMed Central

    Nikhil, Vineeta; Jha, Padmanabh; Suri, Navleen Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of the study was to evaluate and compare the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) with three different methods. Materials and Methods: Forty single canal teeth were decoronated, and root canals were enlarged to simulate immature apex. The samples were randomly divided into Group MD = MTA-angelus mixed with distilled water and Group MC = MTA-angelus mixed with 2% chlorhexidine, and apical seal was recorded with glucose penetration method, fluid filtration method, and dye penetration methods and compared. Results: The three methods of evaluation resulted differently. The glucose penetration method showed that MD sealed better than MC, but difference was statistically insignificant (P > 0.05). The fluid filtration method resulted that Group MC was statistically insignificant superior to Group MD (P > 0.05). The dye penetration method showed that Group MC sealed statistically better than Group MD. Conclusion: No correlation was found among the results obtained with the three methods of evaluation. Addition of chlorhexidine enhanced the sealing ability of MTA according to the fluid filtration test and dye leakage while according to the glucose penetration test, chlorhexidine did not enhance the sealing ability of MTA. This study showed that relying on the results of apical sealing by only method can be misleading. PMID:27217635

  8. Targeting thioredoxin reductase is a basis for cancer therapy by arsenic trioxide.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Chew, Eng-Hui; Holmgren, Arne

    2007-07-24

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is an effective cancer therapeutic drug for acute promyelocytic leukemia and has potential anticancer activity against a wide range of solid tumors. ATO exerts its effect mainly through elevated oxidative stress, but the exact molecular mechanism remains elusive. The thioredoxin (Trx) system comprising NADPH, thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), and Trx and the glutathione (GSH) system composed of NADPH, glutathione reductase, and GSH supported by glutaredoxin are the two electron donor systems that control cellular proliferation, viability, and apoptosis. Recently, the selenocysteine-dependent TrxR enzyme has emerged as an important molecular target for anticancer drug development. Here, we have discovered that ATO irreversibly inhibits mammalian TrxR with an IC(50) of 0.25 microM. Both the N-terminal redox-active dithiol and the C-terminal selenothiol-active site of reduced TrxR may participate in the reaction with ATO. The inhibition of MCF-7 cell growth by ATO was correlated with irreversible inactivation of TrxR, which subsequently led to Trx oxidation. Furthermore, the inhibition of TrxR by ATO was attenuated by GSH, and GSH depletion by buthionine sulfoximine enhanced ATO-induced cell death. These results strongly suggest that the ATO anticancer activity is by means of a Trx system-mediated apoptosis. Blocking cancer cell DNA replication and repair and induction of oxidative stress by the inhibition of both Trx and GSH systems are suggested as cancer chemotherapeutic strategies.

  9. Morphology-tailored synthesis of tungsten trioxide (hydrate) thin films and their photocatalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Zhihui; Wang, Jinmin; Ke, Lin; Sun, Xiao Wei; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2011-02-01

    Tungsten trioxide hydrate (3WO(3)·H(2)O) films with different morphologies were directly grown on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate via a facile crystal-seed-assisted hydrothermal method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed that 3WO(3)·H(2)O thin films composed of platelike, wedgelike, and sheetlike nanostructures could be selectively synthesized by adding Na(2)SO(4), (NH(4))(2)SO(4), and CH(3)COONH(4) as capping agents, respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies indicated that these films were of orthorhombic structure. The as-prepared thin films after dehydration showed obvious photocatalytic activities. The best film grown using CH(3)COONH(4) as a capping agent generated anodic photocurrents of 1.16 mA/cm(2) for oxidization of methanol and 0.5 mA/cm(2) for water splitting with the highest photoconversion efficiency of about 0.3% under simulated solar illumination. PMID:21218846

  10. Performances and mechanistic investigations of a triphosphine trioxide/ionic liquid system for rare earth extraction.

    PubMed

    Turgis, R; Arrachart, G; Dubois, V; Dourdain, S; Virieux, D; Michel, S; Legeai, S; Lejeune, M; Draye, M; Pellet-Rostaing, S

    2016-01-21

    The extraction of rare earth elements (REEs) from nitric acid solution with a triphosphine trioxide (TPO) is presented. Performances of such a ligand in ionic liquids vs. a classical solvent (benzyl ether) are compared. TPO seems to be 10 to 100 times more efficient when it is dissolved in ionic media whatever the concentration of nitric acid involved. Mechanistic investigations reveal that cation exchange classically observed in ionic liquids is not consistent with the experimental data. Moreover, clear differences in the TPO/Ln complexes between classical and ionic media are highlighted. A stable complex of 1 lanthanide for 3 TPO is formed in an ionic liquid whereas a complex of 1 lanthanide for 6 to 9 TPO is formed in benzyl ether. Back extraction is also studied and good recovery of REEs could be obtained. The TPO/ionic liquid system shows remarkable performances i.e. efficiency and selectivity towards lanthanides in a simulated leaching solution of a Nd/Fe/B/Dy magnet.

  11. Protective effect of resveratrol on arsenic trioxide-induced nephrotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiqian; Liu, Yan; Ge, Ming; Jing, Jiang; Chen, Yan; Jiang, Huijie; Yu, Hongxiang; Li, Ning

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUD/OBEJECTIVES Arsenic, which causes human carcinogenicity, is ubiquitous in the environment. This study was designed to evaluate modulation of arsenic induced cancer by resveratrol, a phytoalexin found in vegetal dietary sources that has antioxidant and chemopreventive properties, in arsenic trioxide (As2O3)-induced Male Wistar rats. MATERIALS/METHODS Adult rats received 3 mg/kg As2O3 (intravenous injection, iv.) on alternate days for 4 days. Resveratrol (8 mg/kg) was administered (iv.) 1 h before As2O3 treatment. The plasma and homogenization enzymes associated with oxidative stress of rat kidneys were measured, the kidneys were examined histologically and trace element contents were assessed. RESULTS Rats treated with As2O3 had significantly higher oxidative stress and kidney arsenic accumulation; however, pretreatment with resveratrol reversed these changes. In addition, prior to treatment with resveratrol resulted in lower blood urea nitrogen, creatinine and insignificant renal tubular epithelial cell necrosis. Furthermore, the presence of resveratrol preserved the selenium content (0.805 ± 0.059 µg/g) of kidneys in rats treated with As2O3. However, resveratrol had no effect on zinc level in the kidney relative to As2O3-treated groups. CONCLUSIONS Our data show that supplementation with resveratrol alleviated nephrotoxicity by improving antioxidant capacity and arsenic efflux. These findings suggest that resveratrol has the potential to protect against kidney damage in populations exposed to arsenic. PMID:24741408

  12. Mitigation of hepatotoxic effects of arsenic trioxide through omega-3 fatty acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Varghese V; Paul, Mv Sauganth; Abhilash, M; Manju, Alex; Abhilash, S; Nair, R Harikumaran

    2014-10-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) is an effective drug in the treatment of leukaemia and many solid tumours. In clinical trials, arsenic therapy is closely associated with hepatic toxicity. The present study was designed to investigate the efficacy of omega-3 fatty acid against As(2)O(3)-induced hepatotoxicity. A 4 mg/kg body weight (bw) of As(2)O(3) was orally administered to Wistar male rats for 45 days. Hepatotoxicity was evaluated by biochemical tests, antioxidant assays and histopathological examinations. Arsenic accumulation was found in the liver tissue of rats treated with As(2)O(3). Hepatoprotective efficacy of omega-3 fatty acid was analysed by the combination therapy with As(2)O(3). In vivo studies revealed a significant rise in lipid peroxidation with concomitant decline in reduced glutathione, glutathione-dependant antioxidant enzymes and antiperoxidative enzymes in the liver tissue of rats treated with arsenic. The supplementation of omega-3 fatty acid at a dose of 50 mg/kg bw with As(2)O(3) offers ameliorative effect against hepatocellular toxicity. Omega-3 fatty acid maintained hepatic marker enzymes, antioxidant enzymes and decreased lipid peroxidation. The combination treatment clearly reduced the hepatic structural abnormalities such as haemorrhage, necrosis and cholangiofibrosis in the rats treated with arsenic. This study concludes that the omega-3 fatty acid might be useful for the protection against As(2)O(3)-induced hepatotoxicity.

  13. Blockage of JNK pathway enhances arsenic trioxide-induced apoptosis in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.-S.; Liu, Z.-M.; Hong, D.-Y.

    2010-04-15

    Arsenic is well known as a carcinogen predisposing humans to some severe diseases and also as an effective medicine for treating acute promyelocytic leukemia, syphilis, and psoriasis. Multiple active mechanisms, including cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, have been proposed in therapy; however, the opposing effects of arsenic remain controversial. Our previous study found that arsenic trioxide (ATO)-induced activation of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} (p21) led to A431 cell death through the antagonistic effects of the signaling of ERK1/2 and JNK1. In the current study, the inhibitory effects of JNK1 on ATO-induced p21 expression were explored. Over-expression of JNK1 in A431 cells could inhibit p21 expression, which was associated with HDAC1 and TGIF. Using the GST pull-down assay and fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis, N-terminal domain (amino acids 1-108) of TGIF, critical to its binding with c-Jun, was found. Using reporter assays, requirement of the C-terminal domain (amino acids 138-272) of TGIF to suppress ATO-induced p21 expression was observed. Thus, the domains of TGIF that carried out its inhibitory effects on p21 were identified. Finally, treatment with JNK inhibitor SP600125 could enhance ATO-induced apoptosis of HaCaT keratinocytes by using flow cytometry.

  14. Cytotoxic effects of mineral trioxide aggregate, calcium enrichedmixture cement, Biodentine and octacalcium pohosphate onhuman gingival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    A. Saberi, Eshagh; Farhadmollashahi, Narges; Ghotbi, Faroogh; Karkeabadi, Hamed; Havaei, Roholla

    2016-01-01

    Background. This in vitro study compared the effects of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), calcium enriched mixture(CEM) cement, Biodentine (BD) and octacalcium phosphate (OCP) on the viability of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). Methods. After completion of the setting time of the materials under study, fibroblasts were placed in 24-well insert platesand 1 mg of each material was added to the respective wells. The plates were then incubated at 37°C. The inserts were removedat 24, 48 and 168 hours and 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide was added to assess cytotoxicity via the MTT colorimetricassay. Data were analyzed at different time intervals using repeated-measures ANOVA, followed by the Bonferronitest at three levels of significance of P < 0.05, P < 0.01 and P < 0.001. Results. Cytotoxicity of the materials under study was not significantly different at 24 and 48 hours compared to the controlgroup. However, at 168 hours, a significant difference was noted between MTA (P < 0.05) and Biodentine (P < 0.01)and the control group. Conclusion. Cytotoxicity of MTA, CEM, Biodentine and OCP against HGFs was similar to that of the control group at 24and 48 hours. Over time, MTA and Biodentine exhibited less cytotoxicity than other materials. PMID:27429722

  15. Tooth discoloration induced by a novel mineral trioxide aggregate-based root canal sealer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae-Sung; Lim, Myung-Jin; Choi, Yoorina; Rosa, Vinicius; Hong, Chan-Ui; Min, Kyung-San

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate tooth discoloration caused by contact with a novel injectable mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA)-based root canal sealer (Endoseal; Maruchi, Wonju, Korea) compared with a widely used resin-based root canal sealer (AHplus; Dentsply De Trey, Konstanz, Germany) and conventional MTA (ProRoot; Dentsply, Tulsa, OK, USA). Materials and Methods: Forty standardized bovine tooth samples were instrumented and divided into three experimental groups and one control group (n = 10/group). Each material was inserted into the cavity, and all specimens were sealed with a self-adhesive resin. Based on CIE Lab system, brightness change (ΔL) and total color change (ΔE) of each specimen between baseline and 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks were obtained. Results: At all time points, Endoseal showed no significant difference in ΔL and ΔE compared to AHplus and control group (P > 0.05), whereas the ProRoot group showed significantly higher ΔL and ΔE values than the Endoseal group at 2, 4, and 8 weeks (P < 0.05). Therefore, Endoseal showed less discoloration than conventional MTA and a similar color change to AHplus. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, our data indicate that the MTA-based sealer produces a similar amount of tooth discoloration as AHplus which is considered to be acceptable. PMID:27403062

  16. Morphine Attenuated the Cytotoxicity Induced by Arsenic Trioxide in H9c2 Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Amini-Khoei, Hossein; Hosseini, Mir-Jamal; Momeny, Majid; Rahimi-Balaei, Maryam; Amiri, Shayan; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Khedri, Mostafa; Jahanabadi, Samane; Mohammadi-Asl, Ali; Mehr, Shahram Ejtemaie; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is an efficient drug for the treatment of the patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Inhibition of proliferation as well as apoptosis, attenuation of migration, and induction of differentiation in tumor cells are the main mechanisms through which ATO acts against APL. Despite advantages of ATO in treatment of some malignancies, certain harmful side effects, such as cardiotoxicity, have been reported. It has been well documented that morphine has antioxidant, anti-apoptotic, and cytoprotective properties and is able to attenuate cytotoxicity. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to investigate the protective effects of morphine against ATO toxicity in H9c2 myocytes using multi-parametric assay including thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, caspase 3 activity, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) phosphorylation assay, and expression of apoptotic markers. Our results showed that morphine (1 μM) attenuated cytotoxicity induced by ATO in H9c2 cells. Results of this study suggest that morphine may have protective properties in management of cardiac toxicity in patients who receive ATO as an anti-cancer treatment. PMID:26815588

  17. Arsenic trioxide disrupts glioma stem cells via promoting PML degradation to inhibit tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenchao; Cheng, Lin; Shi, Yu; Ke, Susan Q; Huang, Zhi; Fang, Xiaoguang; Chu, Cheng-wei; Xie, Qi; Bian, Xiu-wu; Rich, Jeremy N; Bao, Shideng

    2015-11-10

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal brain tumor. Tumor relapse in GBM is inevitable despite maximal therapeutic interventions. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) have been found to be critical players in therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence. Therapeutic drugs targeting GSCs may significantly improve GBM treatment. In this study, we demonstrated that arsenic trioxide (As2O3) effectively disrupted GSCs and inhibited tumor growth in the GSC-derived orthotopic xenografts by targeting the promyelocytic leukaemia (PML). As2O3 treatment induced rapid degradation of PML protein along with severe apoptosis in GSCs. Disruption of the endogenous PML recapitulated the inhibitory effects of As2O3 treatment on GSCs both in vitro and in orthotopic tumors. Importantly, As2O3 treatment dramatically reduced GSC population in the intracranial GBM xenografts and increased the survival of mice bearing the tumors. In addition, As2O3 treatment preferentially inhibited cell growth of GSCs but not matched non-stem tumor cells (NSTCs). Furthermore, As2O3 treatment or PML disruption potently diminished c-Myc protein levels through increased poly-ubiquitination and proteasome degradation of c-Myc. Our study indicated a potential implication of As2O3 in GBM treatment and highlighted the important role of PML/c-Myc axis in the maintenance of GSCs. PMID:26510911

  18. Endothelial to mesenchymal transition contributes to arsenic-trioxide-induced cardiac fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Wu, Xianxian; Li, Yang; Zhang, Haiying; Li, Zhange; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Longyin; Ju, Jiaming; Liu, Xin; Chen, Xiaohui; Glybochko, Peter V.; Nikolenko, Vladimir; Kopylov, Philipp; Xu, Chaoqian; Yang, Baofeng

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence has suggested the critical role of endothelial to mesenchymal transition (EndMT) in fibrotic diseases. The present study was designed to examine whether EndMT is involved in arsenic trioxide (As2O3)-induced cardiac fibrosis and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Cardiac dysfunction was observed in rats after exposure to As2O3 for 15 days using echocardiography, and the deposition of collagen was detected by Masson’s trichrome staining and electron microscope. EndMT was indicated by the loss of endothelial cell markers (VE-cadherin and CD31) and the acquisition of mesenchymal cell markers (α-SMA and FSP1) determined by RT-PCR at the mRNA level and Western blot and immunofluorescence analysis at the protein level. In the in-vitro experiments, endothelial cells acquired a spindle-shaped morphology accompanying downregulation of the endothelial cell markers and upregulation of the mesenchymal cell markers when exposed to As2O3. As2O3 activated the AKT/GSK-3β/Snail signaling pathway, and blocking this pathway with PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) abolished EndMT in As2O3-treated endothelial cells. Our results highlight that As2O3 is an EndMT-promoting factor during cardiac fibrosis, suggesting that targeting EndMT is beneficial for preventing As2O3-induced cardiac toxicity. PMID:27671604

  19. Arsenic trioxide alters the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cell into cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Rebuzzini, Paola; Cebral, Elisa; Fassina, Lorenzo; Alberto Redi, Carlo; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Garagna, Silvia

    2015-10-08

    Chronic arsenic exposure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality for cardiovascular diseases. Arsenic increases myocardial infarction mortality in young adulthood, suggesting that exposure during foetal life correlates with cardiac alterations emerging later. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of arsenic trioxide (ATO) cardiomyocytes disruption during their differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cells. Throughout 15 days of differentiation in the presence of ATO (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 μM) we analysed: the expression of i) marker genes of mesoderm (day 4), myofibrillogenic commitment (day 7) and post-natal-like cardiomyocytes (day 15); ii) sarcomeric proteins and their organisation; iii) Connexin 43 and iv) the kinematics contractile properties of syncytia. The higher the dose used, the earlier the stage of differentiation affected (mesoderm commitment, 1.0 μM). At 0.5 or 1.0 μM the expression of cardiomyocyte marker genes is altered. Even at 0.1 μM, ATO leads to reduction and skewed ratio of sarcomeric proteins and to a rarefied distribution of Connexin 43 cardiac junctions. These alterations contribute to the dysruption of the sarcomere and syncytium organisation and to the impairment of kinematic parameters of cardiomyocyte function. This study contributes insights into the mechanistic comprehension of cardiac diseases caused by in utero arsenic exposure.

  20. Heat shock protein inhibitors, 17-DMAG and KNK437, enhance arsenic trioxide-induced mitotic apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yichen; Yen Wenyen; Lee, T.-C. Yih, L.-H.

    2009-04-15

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has recently emerged as a promising therapeutic agent in leukemia because of its ability to induce apoptosis. However, there is no sufficient evidence to support its therapeutic use for other types of cancers. In this study, we investigated if, and how, 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin (17-DMAG), an antagonist of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), and KNK437, a HSP synthesis inhibitor, potentiated the cytotoxic effect of ATO. Our results showed that cotreatment with ATO and either 17-DMAG or KNK437 significantly increased ATO-induced cell death and apoptosis. siRNA-mediated attenuation of the expression of the inducible isoform of HSP70 (HSP70i) or HSP90{alpha}/{beta} also enhanced ATO-induced apoptosis. In addition, cotreatment with ATO and 17-DMAG or KNK437 significantly increased ATO-induced mitotic arrest and ATO-induced BUBR1 phosphorylation and PDS1 accumulation. Cotreatment also significantly increased the percentage of mitotic cells with abnormal mitotic spindles and promoted metaphase arrest as compared to ATO treatment alone. These results indicated that 17-DMAG or KNK437 may enhance ATO cytotoxicity by potentiating mitotic arrest and mitotic apoptosis possibly through increased activation of the spindle checkpoint.

  1. Tissue Reaction and Biocompatibility of Implanted Mineral Trioxide Aggregate with Silver Nanoparticles in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Zand, Vahid; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Aghbali, Amirala; Mesgariabbasi, Mehran; Janani, Maryam; Mokhtari, Hadi; Tehranchi, Pardis; Pakdel, Seyyed Mahdi Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Biocompatibility and antimicrobial activity of endodontic materials are of utmost importance. Considering the extensive applications of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) in dentistry and antimicrobial properties of silver nanoparticles, this study aimed to evaluate the subcutaneous inflammatory reaction of rat connective tissues to white MTA with and without nanosilver (NS) particles. Methods and Materials: Polyethylene tubes (1.1×8 mm) containing experimental materials (MTA and MTA+NS and empty control tubes) were implanted in subcutaneous tissues of seventy-five male rats. Animals were divided into five groups (n=15) according to the time of evaluation: group 1; after 7 days, group 2; after 15 days, group 3; after 30 days, group 4; after 60 days and group 5; after 90 days. The inflammatory reaction was graded and data was analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Statistical significance was defined at 0.05. Results: Comparison of cumulative inflammatory reaction at all intervals revealed that the mean grade of inflammatory reaction to MTA, MTA+NS and control samples were 3, 2 and 2, respectively. According to the Mann-Whitney analysis there were no significant differences between MTA+NS and MTA (P=0.42). Conclusion: Incorporation of 1% nanosilver to MTA does not affect the inflammatory reaction of subcutaneous tissue in rat models. PMID:26843871

  2. Tungsten trioxide as a visible light photocatalyst for volatile organic carbon removal.

    PubMed

    Wicaksana, Yossy; Liu, Sanly; Scott, Jason; Amal, Rose

    2014-10-31

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) has been demonstrated to possess visible light photoactivity and presents a means of overcoming the UV-light dependence of photocatalysts, such as titanium dioxide. In this study, WO3 nanostructures have been synthesised by a hydrothermal method using sodium tungstate (Na2WO4·2H2O), sulphate precursors and pH as structure-directing agents and parameters, respectively. By altering the concentration of the sulphate precursors and pH, it was shown that different morphologies and phases of WO3 can be achieved. The effect of the morphology of the final WO3 product on the visible light photoactivity of ethylene degradation in the gas phase was investigated. In addition, platinum (Pt) was photodeposited on the WO3 structures with various morphologies to enhance the photocatalytic properties. It was found that the photocatalytic properties of the WO3 samples greatly depend on their morphology, chemical composition and surface modification. WO3 with a cuboid morphology exhibited the highest visible light photoactivity compared to other morphologies, while adding Pt to the surface improved the performance of certain WO3 structures.

  3. Electron Transfer Governed Crystal Transformation of Tungsten Trioxide upon Li Ions Intercalation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiguo; He, Yang; Gu, Meng; Du, Yingge; Mao, Scott X; Wang, Chongmin

    2016-09-21

    Reversible insertion/extraction of foreign ions into/from a host lattice constitutes the fundamental operating principle of rechargeable battery and electrochromic materials. The insertion of foreign ions is a far more commonly observed structural evolution of the host lattice, and for the most cases such a lattice evolution is subtle. However, it has not been clear what factors control such a lattice structural evolution. Based on the tungsten trioxide (WO3) model crystal, we use in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with density functional theory calculations to explore the nature of Li ions intercalation induced crystal symmetry evolution of WO3. We discovered that Li insertion into the octahedral cavity of the WO3 lattice will lead to a low to high symmetry transition, featuring a sequential monoclinic → tetragonal → cubic phase transition. The density functional theory results reveal that the phase transition is essentially governed by the electron transfer from Li to the WO6 octahedrons, which effectively leads to the weakening the W-O bond and modifies system band structure, resulting in an insulator-to-metal transition. The observation of the electronic effect on crystal symmetry and conductivity is significant, providing deep insights on the intercalation reactions in secondary rechargeable ion batteries and the approach for tailoring the functionalities of material based on insertion of ions in the lattice. PMID:27575951

  4. Cytotoxic effects of mineral trioxide aggregate, calcium enrichedmixture cement, Biodentine and octacalcium pohosphate onhuman gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    A Saberi, Eshagh; Farhadmollashahi, Narges; Ghotbi, Faroogh; Karkeabadi, Hamed; Havaei, Roholla

    2016-01-01

    Background. This in vitro study compared the effects of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), calcium enriched mixture(CEM) cement, Biodentine (BD) and octacalcium phosphate (OCP) on the viability of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). Methods. After completion of the setting time of the materials under study, fibroblasts were placed in 24-well insert platesand 1 mg of each material was added to the respective wells. The plates were then incubated at 37°C. The inserts were removedat 24, 48 and 168 hours and 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide was added to assess cytotoxicity via the MTT colorimetricassay. Data were analyzed at different time intervals using repeated-measures ANOVA, followed by the Bonferronitest at three levels of significance of P < 0.05, P < 0.01 and P < 0.001. Results. Cytotoxicity of the materials under study was not significantly different at 24 and 48 hours compared to the controlgroup. However, at 168 hours, a significant difference was noted between MTA (P < 0.05) and Biodentine (P < 0.01)and the control group. Conclusion. Cytotoxicity of MTA, CEM, Biodentine and OCP against HGFs was similar to that of the control group at 24and 48 hours. Over time, MTA and Biodentine exhibited less cytotoxicity than other materials. PMID:27429722

  5. Bortezomib and Arsenic Trioxide Activity on a Myelodysplastic Cell Line (P39): A Gene Expression Study

    PubMed Central

    Savlı, Hakan; Galimberti, Sara; Sünnetçi, Deniz; Canestraro, Martina; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Nagy, Balint; Raimondo, Francesco Di; Petrini, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to understand the molecular pathways affected by bortezomib and arsenic trioxide treatment on myelomonocytoid cell line P39. Materials and Methods: Oligonucleotide microarray platforms were used for gene expression and pathway analysis. Confirmation studies were performed using quantitative real time PCR. Results: Bortezomib treatment has shown upregulated DIABLO and NF-κBIB (a NF-κB inhibitor) and downregulated NF-κB1, NF-κB2, and BIRC1 gene expressions. Combination treatment of the two compounds showed gene expression deregulations in concordance by the results of single bortezomib treatment. Especially, P53 was a pathway more significantly modified and a gene network centralized around the beta estradiol gene. Beta estradiol, BRCA2, and FOXA1 genes were remarkable deregulations in our findings. Conclusion: Results support the suggestions about possible use of proteasome inhibitors in the treatment of high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). NF-κB was observed as an important modulator in leukemic transformation of MDS. PMID:25913414

  6. Targeting hedgehog signalling by arsenic trioxide reduces cell growth and induces apoptosis in rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Karen A; Zaborski, Julian J; Riester, Rosa; Schweiss, Sabrina K; Hopp, Ulrike; Traub, Frank; Kluba, Torsten; Handgretinger, Rupert; Schleicher, Sabine B

    2016-02-01

    Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) are soft tissue tumours treated with a combination of surgery and chemotherapy. However, mortality rates remain high in case of recurrences and metastatic disease due to drug resistance and failure to undergo apoptosis. Therefore, innovative approaches targeting specific signalling pathways are urgently needed. We analysed the impact of different hedgehog (Hh) pathway inhibitors on growth and survival of six RMS cell lines using MTS assay, colony formation assay, 3D spheroid cultures, flow cytometry and western blotting. Especially the glioma-associated oncogene family (GLI) inhibitor arsenic trioxide (ATO) effectively reduced viability as well as clonal growth and induced cell death in RMS cell lines of embryonal, alveolar and sclerosing, spindle cell subtype, whereas normal skeletal muscle cells were hardly compromised by ATO. Combination of ATO with itraconazole potentiated the reduction of colony formation and spheroid size. These results show that ATO is a promising substance for treatment of relapsed and refractory RMS by directly targeting GLI transcription factors. The combination with itraconazole or other chemotherapeutic drugs has the opportunity to enforce the treatment efficiency of resistant and recurrent RMS.

  7. Interaction between arsenic trioxide and human primary cells: emphasis on human cells of myeloid origin.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Antoine, Francis; Girard, Denis

    2009-03-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3); ATO) is considered to be one of the most potent drugs in cancer chemotherapy and is highly effective in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). It is well established that treatment of APL patients with ATO is associated with the disappearance of the PML-RARalpha fusion transcript, the characteristic APL gene product of the chromosomal translocation t(15;17). Although its mode of action is still not fully understood, ATO is known to induce cell apoptosis via generation of reactive oxygen species and activation of caspases. Several reports have indicated that ATO acts principally by inducing cell apoptosis not only in APL, but in a variety of non-APL cells including myeloma cells, chronic myeloid leukemia cells and cells of immune origin, including B or T lymphocytes, macrophages and, more recently, neutrophils. There is an increasing amount of data, including some from our laboratory, concerning the interaction between ATO and human primary cells. The focus of this review will be to cover the role of ATO in human immune primary cells with special emphasis on cells of myeloid origin.

  8. Arsenic trioxide induces endoplasmic reticulum stress-related events in neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Chiasson, Sonia; Girard, Denis

    2010-04-01

    We recently reported that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-induced cell pathway of apoptosis is operational in human neutrophils and that some ER stressors can accelerate this process. Recent data suggest that arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3) or ATO), may also act as an ER stressor. The aims of the present study were to elucidate if other ER stress-related events occur in ATO-induced neutrophils, and to determine the role of caspase-4 in the proapoptotic activity of ATO. We found that ATO induced ubiquitination of proteins, and increased calcium concentration and gene expression of calcineurin in neutrophils. In addition to caspase-4, activities of caspase-3, -8 and -9 were increased by ATO. The processing of caspase-4 was reversed by a caspase-8 inhibitor, indicating that caspase-4 activation requires the action of upstream initiator components, questioning on the role of caspase-4 in ATO-induced ER stress-mediated cell apoptosis. Using caspase-4 deficient THP-1 cells, we demonstrated that the proapoptotic effect of ATO was similar to that of control caspase-4-positive cells. We conclude that ATO is an ER stressor that can induce cell apoptosis by a mechanism which does not require caspase-4. In addition, we conclude that caspase-4 activation in ATO-induced neutrophils could be involved in functions other than apoptosis.

  9. Arsenic trioxide alters the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cell into cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Rebuzzini, Paola; Cebral, Elisa; Fassina, Lorenzo; Alberto Redi, Carlo; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Garagna, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality for cardiovascular diseases. Arsenic increases myocardial infarction mortality in young adulthood, suggesting that exposure during foetal life correlates with cardiac alterations emerging later. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of arsenic trioxide (ATO) cardiomyocytes disruption during their differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cells. Throughout 15 days of differentiation in the presence of ATO (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 μM) we analysed: the expression of i) marker genes of mesoderm (day 4), myofibrillogenic commitment (day 7) and post-natal-like cardiomyocytes (day 15); ii) sarcomeric proteins and their organisation; iii) Connexin 43 and iv) the kinematics contractile properties of syncytia. The higher the dose used, the earlier the stage of differentiation affected (mesoderm commitment, 1.0 μM). At 0.5 or 1.0 μM the expression of cardiomyocyte marker genes is altered. Even at 0.1 μM, ATO leads to reduction and skewed ratio of sarcomeric proteins and to a rarefied distribution of Connexin 43 cardiac junctions. These alterations contribute to the dysruption of the sarcomere and syncytium organisation and to the impairment of kinematic parameters of cardiomyocyte function. This study contributes insights into the mechanistic comprehension of cardiac diseases caused by in utero arsenic exposure. PMID:26447599

  10. Process for removing sulfur and sulfur compounds from the effluent of industrial processes

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, A.V.

    1981-03-10

    Sulfur dioxide in the stack gas from an industrial process is converted to elemental sulfur in a claus reactor at low temperature to produce sulfur fume. The sulfur is condensed by direct heat transfer with a continuously flowing countercurrent recirculating catalyst and a substantially sulfur dioxide-free gas is discharged. Catalyst and condensed sulfur are fed into the top of a sulfur recovery column and heated in the top of the column by direct heat transfer with a countercurrent stream of recycle gas. The sulfur and catalyst descend into a vaporization zone of the column where sulfur is vaporized. The vaporized sulfur is carried by the recycle gas back towards the top of the column and condensed to a fume by incoming sulfur bearing catalyst. The sulfur fume is carried from the top of the column in cold recycle gas. Hot catalyst from the vaporization section of the column is cooled by recycle gas entering the bottom of the column. Sulfur fume is recovered conventionally. Regenerated catalyst from the column is returned to the sulfur dioxide reactor. Claus plant tail gas with air passes into the base of an incinerator and passes countercurrent to recycled heat transfer solids and is oxidized to convert sulfur and sulfur bearing compounds to sulfur dioxide. The sulfur dioxide is then converted to sulfur in the process just described.

  11. Optimizing stratospheric sulfur geoengineering by seasonally changing sulfur injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, Anton; Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Kokkola, Harri; Lehtinen, Kari; Korhonen, Hannele

    2015-04-01

    Solar radiation management (SRM) by stratospheric sulfur injection has been shown to have potential in counteracting global warming if reducing of greenhouse gases has not been achieved fast enough and if climate warming will continue. Injecting large amounts of sulfate particles to the stratosphere would increase the reflectivity of the atmosphere and less sunlight would reach the surface. However, the effectivity (per injected sulphur mass unit) of this kind of geoengineering would decrease when amount of injected sulfur is increased. When sulfur concentration increases, stratospheric particles would grow to larger sizes which have larger gravitational settling velocity and which do not reflect radiation as efficiently as smaller particles. In many previous studies, sulfur has been assumed to be injected along the equator where yearly mean solar intensity is the highest and from where sulfur is spread equally to both hemispheres. However, the solar intensity will change locally during the year and sulfate has been assumed to be injected and spread to the hemisphere also during winter time, when the solar intensity is low. Thus sulfate injection could be expected to be more effective, if sulfur injection area is changed seasonally. Here we study effects of the different SRM injection scenarios by using two versions of the MPI climate models. First, aerosol spatial and temporal distributions as well as the resulting radiative properties from the SRM are defined by using the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM6.1-HAM2.2-SALSA. After that, the global and regional climate effects from different injection scenarios are predicted by using the Max Planck Institute's Earth System Model (MPI-ESM). We carried out simulations, where 8 Tg of sulfur is injected as SO2 to the stratosphere at height of 20-22 km in an area ranging over a 20 degree wide latitude band. Results show that changing the sulfur injection area seasonally would lead to similar global mean shortwave

  12. Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.

    1992-01-01

    Elemental sulfur recovery from SO[sub 2]-containing gas streams is highly attractive as it produces a saleable. Product and no waste to dispose of. However, commercially available schemes are complex and involve multi-stage reactors, such as, most notably in the Resox (reduction of SO[sub 2] with coke) and Claus plants(reaction of SO[sub 2] with H[sub 2]S over catalyst). This project win investigate a cerium oxide catalyst for the single-stage selective reduction SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as carbon monoxide. Cerium oxide has been identified as a superior catalyst for SO[sub 2] reduction by CO to elemental sulfur because of its high activity and high selectivity to sulfur over COS over a wide temperature range(400--650C). Kinetic and parametric studies of SO[sub 2] reduction planned over various CeO[sub 2]-formulations will provide the necessary basis for development of a simplified process, a single-stage elemental sulfur recovery scheme from variable concentration gas streams. A first apparent application is treatment of regenerator off-gases in power plants using regenerative flue gas desulfurization. Such a simple catalytic converter may offer the long-sought Claus-alternative'' for coal-fired power plant applications.

  13. Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Loftus, P.J.; Benedek, K.R.; Lunt, R.R.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.

    1996-12-31

    More than 170 wet scrubber systems applied to 72,000 MW of US, coal-fired, utility boilers are in operation or under construction. A small fraction of these systems produce a useable byproduct (gypsum): the remainder generate approximately 20 million tons per annum of disposable flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproduct, which are transported and disposed of in landfills. The use of regenerable sorbent technologies has the potential to reduce or eliminate this solid waste production, transportation and disposal. All regenerable FGD systems produce an off-gas stream from the regenerator that must be processed further in order to obtain a saleable byproduct, such as elemental sulfur, sulfuric acid or liquid SO{sub 2}. This off-gas has only a fraction of the flue gas volume, and contains no oxygen. Recovery of sulfur from this stream in a single-stage catalytic converter, avoiding a multi-stage Claus plant, could decrease the cost and accelerate the commercialization of many regenerable FGD processes. The paper describes the plan to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is based on a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide such as ceria and zirconia.

  14. Sulfur-doped ordered mesoporous carbons: A stability-improving sulfur host for lithium-sulfur battery cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitze, Florian; Fossum, Kjell; Xiong, Shizhao; Matic, Aleksandar; Palmqvist, Anders E. C.

    2016-06-01

    We report on sulfur-functionalized ordered mesoporous carbons aimed for lithium-sulfur battery electrode applications with improved charge capacity retention. The carbons were obtained by a hard-template strategy using a mixture of furfuryl alcohol and furfuryl mercaptan. For the application as electrode material in lithium-sulfur batteries, the carbons were additionally loaded with sulfur following a traditional melt-diffusion approach. It was found that the sulfur interacts stronger with the sulfur-functionalized carbon matrix than with the non-functionalized material. Electrodes showed very high capacity in the second discharge-charge cycle amounting to approximately 1500, 1200 and 1400 mAh/g (sulfur) for carbon materials with no, medium and high degrees of sulfur functionalization, respectively. More importantly, the sulfur-functionalization of the carbon was found to increase the capacity retention after 50 discharge-charge cycles by 8 and 5% for the carbons with medium and high degrees of sulfur-functionalization, respectively, compared to carbon with no sulfur-functionalization. We attribute this significant improvement to the presence of covalently bound sulfur groups at the internal surface of the functionalized carbon providing efficient anchoring sites for catenation to the sulfur loaded into the pores of the carbons and provide experimental support for this in the form of results from cyclic voltammetry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  15. Improving chemical vapor deposition graphene conductivity using molybdenum trioxide: An in-situ field effect transistor study

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Cheng; Lin, Jiadan; Xiang, Du; Wang, Chaocheng; Wang, Li; Chen, Wei

    2013-12-23

    By using in situ field effect transistor characterization integrated with molecular beam epitaxy technique, we demonstrate the strong surface transfer p-type doping effect of single layer chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene, through the surface functionalization of molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) layer. After doping, both the hole and electron mobility of CVD graphene are nearly retained, resulting in significant enhancement of graphene conductivity. With coating of 10 nm MoO{sub 3}, the conductivity of CVD graphene can be increased by about 7 times, showing promising application for graphene based electronics and transparent, conducting, and flexible electrodes.

  16. Efficient synthesis of plate-like crystalline hydrated tungsten trioxide thin films with highly improved electrochromic performance.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Zhihui; Wang, Xiu; Wang, Jinmin; Ke, Lin; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Koh, Tien Wei; Sun, Xiao Wei

    2012-01-11

    Plate-like hydrated tungsten trioxide (3WO(3)·H(2)O) films were grown on a fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) coated transparent conductive substrate via an efficient, facile and template-free hydrothermal method. The film exhibited a fast coloration/bleaching response (t(c90%) = 4.3 s and t(b90%) = 1.4 s) and a high coloration efficiency (112.7 cm(2) C(-1)), which were probably due to a large surface area. PMID:22083170

  17. Effects of freshwater exposure to arsenic trioxide on the parr-smolt transformation of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.W.; Wedemeyer, G.A.; Mayer, F.L.; Dickhoff, Walton W.; Gregory, S.V.; Yasutake, W.T.; Smith, S.D.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of chronic (6 months) exposure to arsenic trioxide in fresh water on the Parr-smolt transformation of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) were evaluated. Exposure to 300 μg As/L (as As2O3) appeared to delay the onset of the normal increase in plasma thyroxine concentration and cause a transient reduction of gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity. Fish exposed to 300 μg As/L also migrated to the sea less successfully than did nonexposed smolts, but there were no effects on the survival and growth of smolts held in 28‰ salt water for 6 months.

  18. Porous dimanganese trioxide microflowers derived from microcoordinations for flexible solid-state asymmetric supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Huan; Li, Xinran; Li, Bing; Zhang, Yizhou; Zhao, Qunxing; Lai, Wen-Yong; Huang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Dimanganese trioxide microflowers are easily obtained from a Mn(ii) 8-hydroxyquinoline microcoordination after calcination in air. We also look into the possible formation mechanism of the flower-like morphology, and find that the reaction time affects the morphology of the coordination. Furthermore, the as-prepared porous Mn2O3 microflowers are made of many nanoplates which form many nanogaps and nanochannels. Interestingly, the assembled electrode based on the as-prepared porous Mn2O3 microflowers proves to be a high-performance electrode material for supercapacitors. The electrode shows a specific capacitance of 994 F g-1, which can work well even after 4000 cycles at 0.75 A g-1. More importantly, the porous Mn2O3 microflowers and activated carbons are assembled into a high-performance flexible solid-state asymmetric supercapacitor with a specific capacitance of 312.5 mF cm-2. The cycle test shows that the device can offer 95.6% capacity of the initial capacitance at 2.0 mA cm-2 after 5000 cycles with little decay. The maximum energy density of the device can achieve 6.56 mWh cm-3 and the maximum power density can also achieve 283.5 mW cm-3, which are among the best results for manganese based materials.Dimanganese trioxide microflowers are easily obtained from a Mn(ii) 8-hydroxyquinoline microcoordination after calcination in air. We also look into the possible formation mechanism of the flower-like morphology, and find that the reaction time affects the morphology of the coordination. Furthermore, the as-prepared porous Mn2O3 microflowers are made of many nanoplates which form many nanogaps and nanochannels. Interestingly, the assembled electrode based on the as-prepared porous Mn2O3 microflowers proves to be a high-performance electrode material for supercapacitors. The electrode shows a specific capacitance of 994 F g-1, which can work well even after 4000 cycles at 0.75 A g-1. More importantly, the porous Mn2O3 microflowers and activated carbons are

  19. Arsenic trioxide therapy for relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia: an useful salvage therapy.

    PubMed

    Huan, S Y; Yang, C H; Chen, Y C

    2000-07-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) was recently identified as a very potent agent against acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Intravenous infusion of 10 mg As2O3 daily for one to two months can induce significant complete remission (CR) of APL, and there is no cross drug-resistance between As2O3 and other antileukemic agents, including all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). The CR rate of relapsed and/or refractory APL patients who received As2O3 treatment ranged from 52.3% to 93.3%. The median duration to CR ranged from 38 to 51 days, with accumulative As2O3 dosage of 340-430 mg. Although most adverse reactions of As2O3 treatment were tolerable, certain infrequent but severe toxicities related to As2O3 were observed, including renal failure, hepatic damage, cardiac arrhythmia and chronic neuromuscular degeneration, which should be monitored carefully. As2O3 can induce partial differentiation and subsequent apoptosis of APL cells through degradation of wild type PML and PML/RAR alpha chimeric proteins and possible anti-mitochondrial effects. Like the treatment of ATRA in APL, early relapses from As2O3 treatment within a few months were not infrequently seen, indicating that rapid emerging resistance to As2O3 can occur. Nevertheless, the PML/RAR alpha fusion protein was reported to disappear in some APL patients who received As2O3, and who might earn long-survival. However, the follow-up is still too short to draw the conclusion. Intriguingly, it has been shown that As2O3 can also induce apoptosis of other non-APL tumor cells with clinical achievable concentrations. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Further studies regarding to the pharmacological characters, clinical efficacies, toxicities, apoptogenic mechanisms, and spectrum of anti-tumor activity of As2O3 are warranted.

  20. Using mineral trioxide aggregate powder as an apical barrier: a bacterial leakage study.

    PubMed

    Milani, Amin Salem; Jafarabadi, Mohammad Asghari; Pakdel, Mahdi Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been used successfully for the treatment of necrotic immature teeth as part of a 2-step apical barrier. Recently, some researchers have used MTA powder instead of wet-mix MTA. It has also been used in a single-step approach in order to decrease the number of patient appointments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bacterial microleakage of MTA powder in comparison with wet-mix MTA, in single or 2-step barrier approaches. This ex vivo study was carried out on 70 extracted single-rooted teeth. The canals were enlarged to simulate immature teeth. The prepared specimens were assigned to 4 experimental (n = 15) and 2 control (n = 5) groups. In Group 1, a wet paper point was placed in the canal following placement of wet-mix MTA. In Group 2, a dry paper point was placed on wet-mix MTA. In Group 3, the samples were treated similar to Group 1, but MTA powder was used instead of wet-mix MTA. In Group 4, the same procedures were followed as Group 3 except that a dry paper point was used. Microleakage of the samples was compared using a 2-chamber bacterial leakage apparatus. Results showed that there were no significant differences in the number of leaked samples or rate of leakage over time (P > 0.05) among the experimental groups. It can be concluded that MTA used in a single step approach has the same resistance against bacterial penetration as in a 2-step approach, and MTA powder provides the same sealing ability as wet-mix MTA. PMID:25184718

  1. Dynamic intratubular biomineralization following root canal obturation with pozzolan‐based mineral trioxide aggregate sealer cement

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yeon‐Jee; Baek, Seung‐Ho; Kum, Kee‐Yeon; Shon, Won‐Jun; Woo, Kyung‐Mi

    2015-01-01

    Summary The application of mineral trioxide aggregates (MTA) cement during the root canal obturation is gaining concern due to its bioactive characteristic to form an apatite in dentinal tubules. In this regard, this study was to assess the biomineralization of dentinal tubules following root canal obturation by using pozzolan‐based (Pz‐) MTA sealer cement (EndoSeal MTA, Maruchi). Sixty curved roots (mesiobuccal, distobuccal) from human maxillary molars were instrumented and prepared for root canal obturation. The canals were obturated with gutta‐percha (GP) and Pz‐MTA sealer by using continuous wave of condensation technique. Canals obturated solely with ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental) or Pz‐MTA sealer were used for comparison. In order to evaluate the biomineralization ability under different conditions, the PBS pretreatment before the root canal obturation was performed in each additional samples. At dentin‐material interfaces, the extension of intratubular biomineralization was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy. When the root canal was obturated with GP and Pz‐MTA sealer, enhanced biomineralization of the dentinal tubules beyond the penetrated sealer tag was confirmed under the SEM observation (p < 0.05). Mineralized apatite structures (calcium/phosphorous ratio, 1.45–1.89) connecting its way through the dentinal tubules were detected at 350–400 μm from the tubule orifice, and the pre‐crystallization seeds were also observed along the intra‐ and/or inter‐tubular collagen fiber. Intratubular biomineralization depth was significantly enhanced in all PBS pretreated canals (p < 0.05). Pz‐MTA cement can be used as a promising bioactive root canal sealer to enhance biomineralization of dentinal tubules under controlled environment. SCANNING 38:50–56, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Scanning Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26179659

  2. In vitro chemical and cellular tests applied to uranium trioxide with different hydration states.

    PubMed Central

    Ansoborlo, E; Chalabreysse, J; Hengé-Napoli, M H; Pujol, E

    1992-01-01

    A simple and rapid in vitro chemical solubility test applicable to industrial uranium trioxide (UO3) was developed together with two in vitro cellular tests using rat alveolar macrophages maintained either in gas phase or in alginate beads at 37 degrees C. Industrial UO3 was characterized by particle size, X-ray, and IR spectra, and chemical transformation (e.g., aging and hydration of the dust) was also studied. Solvents used for the in vitro chemical solubility study included carbonates, citrates, phosphates, water, Eagle's basal medium, and Gamble's solution (simulated lung fluid), alone, with oxygen, or with superoxide ions. Results, expressed in terms of the half-time of dissolution, according to International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) classification (D,W,Y), varied for different hydration states of UO3, showing a lower solubility of hydrated UO3 in solvents compared to basic UO3 or UO3 heated at 450 degrees C. Two in vitro cellular tests on cultured rat alveolar macrophages (cells maintained in gas phase and cells immobilized in alginate beads) were used on the same UO3 samples and generally showed a lower solution transfer rate in the presence of macrophages than in the culture medium alone. The results of in vitro chemical and cellular tests were compared, with four main conclusions: a good reproducibility of the three tests in Eagle's basal medium the effect of hydration state on solubility, the classification of UO3 in terms of ICRP solubility criteria, and the ability of macrophages to decrease uranium solubility in medium. PMID:1396449

  3. A New Simulated Plasma for Assessing the Solubility of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Samiei, Mohammad; Shahi, Shahriar; Aslaminabadi, Naser; Valizadeh, Hadi; Aghazadeh, Zahra; Pakdel, Seyyed Mahdi Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Solubility of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is an important characteristic that affects other properties such as microleakage and biocompatibility. Distilled water (DW) has previously been used for solubility tests. This experimental study compared the solubility of MTA in DW, synthetic tissue fluid (STF) and new simulated plasma (SP). Methods and Materials: In this study, 36 samples of tooth-colored ProRoot MTA were prepared and divided into three groups (n=12) to be immersed in three different solutions (DW, STF, and SP). Solubility tests were conducted at 2, 5, 9, 14, 21, 30, 50, and 78-day intervals. The unequal variance F-test (Welch test) was utilized to determine the effect of solubility media and Games-Howell analysis was used for pairwise comparisons. The repeated-measures ANOVA was used to assess the importance of immersion duration. Results: Welch test showed significant differences in solubility rates of samples between all the different solubility media at all the study intervals (P<0.05) except for the 14-day interval (P=0.094). The mixed repeated-measures ANOVA revealed a significant difference in solubility rate of MTA in three different solutions at all time-intervals (P=0.000). Games-Howell post-hoc test revealed that all pairwise comparisons were statistically significant at all time-intervals (P=0.000). Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, the long-term solubility of MTA in simulated plasma was less than that in synthetic tissue fluid and distilled water. PMID:25598806

  4. The cytotoxic evaluation of mineral trioxide aggregate and bioaggregate in the subcutaneous connective tissue of rats

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Gözde; Yalcin, Yagmur; Dindar, Seckin; Sancakli, Hande; Erdemir, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the cytotoxic effects of ProRoot MTA and DiaRoot BA, a bioceramic nanoparticulate cement, on subcutaneous rat tissue. Study Design: Fifty Sprouge Dawley rats were used in this study. Polyethylene tubes filled with ProRoot MTA and DiaRoot BioAggregate, along with a control group of empty, were implanted into dorsal connective tissue of rats for 7, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days. After estimated time intervals the rats were sacrificed. The specimens were fixed, stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and then evaluated under a light microscope for inflammatory reactions and mineralization. Results: All groups evoked a severe to moderate chronic inflammatory reaction at 7 and 15 days, which decreased with time. Both the MTA and BioAggregate groups showed similar inflammatory reactions, except at 90 days when MTA showed statistically significant greater inflammation (p>0.05). The MTA group showed foreign body reaction at all times. Compared to BioAggregate, MTA showed significantly more foreign body reaction at 60 and 90 days (p<0.0001). After 30 days foreign body reaction of BioAggregate decreased significantly. Both MTA and BioAggregate groups showed similar necrosis at 7 and 15 days (p=0.094 and p=0.186 respectively). No necrosis was observed after 15 days. Similarly there was no fibrosis after 30 days for both MTA and BioAggregate groups (p>0.05). Conclusions: Since DiaRoot BioAggregate showed significantly better results than MTA, we can conclude that it is more biocompatible. However, further studies are required to confirm this result. Key words:Biocompatibility, mineral trioxide aggregate, bioAggregate. PMID:23722144

  5. Hexagonal nanorods of tungsten trioxide: Synthesis, structure, electrochemical properties and activity as supporting material in electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmaoui, Samiha; Sediri, Faouzi; Gharbi, Néji; Perruchot, Christian; Aeiyach, Salah; Rutkowska, Iwona A.; Kulesza, Pawel J.; Jouini, Mohamed

    2011-07-01

    Tungsten trioxide, unhydrated with hexagonal structure (h-WO 3), has been prepared by hydrothermal method at a temperature of 180 °C in acidified sodium tungstate solution. Thus prepared h-WO 3 has been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) method and using electrochemical techniques. The morphology has been examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopies (SEM and TEM) and it is consistent with existence of nanorods of 50-70 nm diameter and up to 5 μm length. Cyclic voltammetric characterization of thin films of h-WO 3 nanorods has revealed reversible redox behaviour with charge-discharge cycling corresponding to the reversible lithium intercalation/deintercalation into the crystal lattice of the h-WO 3 nanorods. In propylene carbonate containing LiClO 4, two successive redox processes of hexagonal WO 3 nanorods are observed at the scan rate of 50 mV/s. Such behaviour shall be attributed to the presence of at least two W atoms of different surroundings in the lattice structure of h-WO 3 nanorods. On the other hand, in aqueous LiClO 4 solution, only one redox process is observed at the scan rate of 10 mV/s. The above observations can be explained in terms of differences in the diffusion of ions inside two types of channel cavities existing in the structure of the h-WO 3 nanorods. Moreover, the material can be applied as active support for the catalytic bi-metallic Pt-Ru nanoparticles during electrooxidation of ethanol in acid medium (0.5 mol dm -3 H 2SO 4).

  6. Resveratrol protects against arsenic trioxide-induced nephrotoxicity by facilitating arsenic metabolism and decreasing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Yu, Meiling; Xue, Jiangdong; Li, Yijing; Zhang, Weiqian; Ma, Dexing; Liu, Lian; Zhang, Zhigang

    2013-06-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) is an environmental toxicant and a potent antineoplastic agent. Exposure to arsenic causes renal cancer. Resveratrol is a well-known polyphenolic compound that is reported to reduce As(2)O(3)-induced cardiotoxicity. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of resveratrol on As(2)O(3)-induced nephrotoxicity and arsenic metabolism. Chinese Dragon-Li cats were injected with 1 mg/kg As(2)O(3) on alternate days; resveratrol (3 mg/kg) was administered via the forearm vein 1 h before the As(2)O(3) treatment. On the sixth day, the cats were killed to determine the histological renal damage, renal function, the accumulation of arsenic, and antioxidant activities in the kidney. Urine samples were taken for arsenic speciation. In the resveratrol + As(2)O(3)-treated group, activities of glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase, the ratio of reduced glutathione to oxidized glutathione, the total arsenic concentrations, and the percentage of methylated arsenic in urine were significantly increased. The concentrations of renal malondialdehyde, reactive oxygen species, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, and renal arsenic accumulation were significantly decreased and reduced renal morphologic injury was observed compared with the As(2)O(3)-treated group. These results demonstrate that resveratrol could significantly scavenge reactive oxygen species, inhibit As(2)O(3)-induced oxidative damage, and significantly attenuate the accumulation of arsenic in renal tissues by facilitating As(2)O(3) metabolism. These data suggest that use of resveratrol as postremission therapy for acute promyelocytic leukemia as well as adjunctive therapy in patients with exposure to arsenic may decrease arsenic nephrotoxicity. PMID:23471352

  7. Dynamic intratubular biomineralization following root canal obturation with pozzolan-based mineral trioxide aggregate sealer cement.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yeon-Jee; Baek, Seung-Ho; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Shon, Won-Jun; Woo, Kyung-Mi; Lee, WooCheol

    2016-01-01

    The application of mineral trioxide aggregates (MTA) cement during the root canal obturation is gaining concern due to its bioactive characteristic to form an apatite in dentinal tubules. In this regard, this study was to assess the biomineralization of dentinal tubules following root canal obturation by using pozzolan-based (Pz-) MTA sealer cement (EndoSeal MTA, Maruchi). Sixty curved roots (mesiobuccal, distobuccal) from human maxillary molars were instrumented and prepared for root canal obturation. The canals were obturated with gutta-percha (GP) and Pz-MTA sealer by using continuous wave of condensation technique. Canals obturated solely with ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental) or Pz-MTA sealer were used for comparison. In order to evaluate the biomineralization ability under different conditions, the PBS pretreatment before the root canal obturation was performed in each additional samples. At dentin-material interfaces, the extension of intratubular biomineralization was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy. When the root canal was obturated with GP and Pz-MTA sealer, enhanced biomineralization of the dentinal tubules beyond the penetrated sealer tag was confirmed under the SEM observation (p < 0.05). Mineralized apatite structures (calcium/phosphorous ratio, 1.45-1.89) connecting its way through the dentinal tubules were detected at 350-400 μm from the tubule orifice, and the pre-crystallization seeds were also observed along the intra- and/or inter-tubular collagen fiber. Intratubular biomineralization depth was significantly enhanced in all PBS pretreated canals (p < 0.05). Pz-MTA cement can be used as a promising bioactive root canal sealer to enhance biomineralization of dentinal tubules under controlled environment.

  8. Fracture resistance of immature teeth filled with mineral trioxide aggregate, bioaggregate, and biodentine

    PubMed Central

    Bayram, Emre; Bayram, Huda Melike

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate fracture resistance of teeth with immature apices treated with coronal placement of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), bioaggregate (BA), and Biodentine. Materials and Methods: Forty-one freshly extracted, single-rooted human premolar teeth were used for the study. At first, the root length was standardized to 9 mm. The crown-down technique was used for the preparation of the root canals using the rotary ProTaper system (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) of F3 (30). Peeso reamer no. 6 was stepped out from the apex to simulate an incompletely formed root. The prepared roots were randomly assigned to one control (n = 5) and three experimental (n = 12) groups, as described below. Group 1: White MTA (Angelus, Londrina, Brazil) was prepared as per the manufacturer's instructions and compacted into the root canal using MAP system (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) and condensed by pluggers (Angelus, Londrina, Brazil). Group 2: The canals were filled with DiaRoot-BA (DiaDent Group International, Canada). Group 3: Biodentine (Septodont, Saint Maur des Fosses, France) solution was mixed with the capsule powder and condensed using pluggers. Instron was used to determine the maximum horizontal load to fracture the tooth, placing the tip 3 mm incisal to the cementoenamel junction. Mean values of the fracture strength were compared by ANOVA followed by a post hoc test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: No significant difference was observed among the MTA, BA, and biodentine experimental groups. Conclusion: All the three materials tested, may be used as effective strengthening agents for immature teeth. PMID:27095900

  9. Comparison of Tooth Discoloration Induced by Calcium-Enriched Mixture and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Armita; Akbari, Majid; Farhadi-faz, Aida

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the tooth discoloration induced by calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Methods and Materials: Forty five endodontically treated human maxillary central incisors were selected and divided into three groups (n=15) after removing the coronal 3 mm of the obturating materials. In the MTA group, white MTA plug was placed in pulp chamber and coronal zone of the root canal. In CEM cement group, CEM plug was placed in the tooth in the same manner. In both groups, a wet cotton pellet was placed in the access cavity and the teeth were temporarily sealed. After 24 h the teeth were restored with resin composite. In the negative control group the teeth were also restored with resin composite. The color change in the cervical third of teeth was measured with a colorimeter and was repeated 3 times for each specimen. The teeth were kept in artificial saliva for 6 months. After this period, the color change was measured again. Data were collected by Commission International de I'Eclairage's L*a*b color values, and corresponding ΔE values were calculated. The results were analyzed using the one-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey’s test with the significance level defined as 0.05. Results: There was no significant differences between CEM group and control group in mean discoloration. The mean tooth discoloration in MTA group was significantly greater than CEM and control groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: According to the result of the present study CEM cement did not induce tooth discoloration after six months. Therefore it can be used in vital pulp therapy of esthetically sensitive teeth. PMID:27471526

  10. Arsenic trioxide phosphorylates c-Fos to transactivate p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} expression

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zimiao; Huang, H.-S.

    2008-12-01

    An infamous poison, arsenic also has been used as a drug for nearly 2400 years; in recently years, arsenic has been effective in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Increasing evidence suggests that opposite effects of arsenic trioxide (ATO) on tumors depend on its concentrations. For this reason, the mechanisms of action of the drug should be elucidated, and it should be used therapeutically only with extreme caution. Previously, we demonstrated the opposing effects of ERK1/2 and JNK on p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} (p21) expression in response to ATO in A431 cells. In addition, JNK phosphorylates c-Jun (Ser{sup 63/73}) to recruit TGIF/HDAC1 to suppress p21 gene expression. Presently, we demonstrated that a high concentration of ATO sustains ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and increases c-Fos biosynthesis and stability, which enhances p21 gene expression. Using site-directed mutagenesis, a DNA affinity precipitation assay, and functional assays, we demonstrated that phosphorylation of the C-terminus of c-Fos (Thr{sup 232}, Thr{sup 325}, Thr{sup 331}, and Ser{sup 374}) plays an important role in its binding to the p21 promoter, and in conjunction with N-terminus phosphorylation of c-Fos (Ser{sup 70}) to transactivate p21 promoter expression. In conclusion, a high concentration of ATO can sustain ERK1/2 activation to enhance c-Fos expression, then dimerize with dephosphorylated c-Jun (Ser{sup 63/73}) and recruit p300/CBP to the Sp1 sites (- 84/- 64) to activate p21 gene expression in A431 cells.

  11. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling regulates arsenic trioxide-mediated macrophage innate immune function disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Li, Changzhao; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Ballestas, Mary E.; Elmets, Craig A.; Robbins, David J.; Matalon, Sadis; Deshane, Jessy S.; Afaq, Farrukh; Bickers, David R.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic exposure is known to disrupt innate immune functions in humans and in experimental animals. In this study, we provide a mechanism by which arsenic trioxide (ATO) disrupts macrophage functions. ATO treatment of murine macrophage cells diminished internalization of FITC-labeled latex beads, impaired clearance of phagocytosed fluorescent bacteria and reduced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These impairments in macrophage functions are associated with ATO-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway characterized by the enhancement in proteins such as GRP78, p-PERK, p-eIF2α, ATF4 and CHOP. The expression of these proteins is altered both at transcriptional and translational levels. Pretreatment with chemical chaperon, 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) attenuated the ATO-induced activation in UPR signaling and afforded protection against ATO-induced disruption of macrophage functions. This treatment also reduced ATO-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Interestingly, treatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prior to ATO exposure, not only reduced ROS production and UPR signaling but also improved macrophage functions. These data demonstrate that UPR signaling and ROS generation are interdependent and are involved in the arsenic-induced pathobiology of macrophage. These data also provide a novel strategy to block the ATO-dependent impairment in innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Inorganic arsenic to humans and experimental animals disrupt innate immune responses. • The mechanism underlying arsenic impaired macrophage functions involves UPR signaling. • Chemical chaperon attenuates arsenic-mediated macrophage function impairment. • Antioxidant, NAC blocks impairment in arsenic-treated macrophage functions.

  12. Dissolution of a mineral trioxide aggregate sealer in endodontic solvents compared to conventional sealers.

    PubMed

    Alzraikat, Hanan; Taha, Nessrin Ahmad; Hassouneh, Layla

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the solubility of a Mineral Trioxide Aggregate sealer (MTA-Fillapex) compared with five other sealers, calcium hydroxide (Sealapex), resin (Realseal), zinc oxide-eugenol (Tubli-Seal), and two epoxy resins (AH-26 and AH-Plus), in chloroform and eucalyptoil in static and ultrasonic environments. Samples of each sealer were prepared (n = 180) and then divided into 12 groups that were immersed in solvents for 5 and 10 min in static and ultrasonic environments. The mean weight loss was determined, and the values were compared using Student's t-test, One-way ANOVA, and Tukey's HSD post-hoc test (p < 0.05). In chloroform, MTA-Fillapex, AH-26, and Sealapex displayed moderate solubility with no significant difference in dissolution (p = 0.125); however, their dissolution was significantly lower than that of AH-Plus (p < 0.001), which was almost fully dissolved after 10 minutes. Realseal was significantly less soluble than all sealers (p < 0.001). In eucalyptoil, MTA-Fillapex showed low solubility, as all of the sealers did, but Tubli-Seal was significantly more soluble than other sealers (p < 0.001). Using ultrasonic activation resulted in a significantly higher dissolution rate in chloroform for all sealers except MTA-Fillapex after 10 min (p = 0.226). In eucalyptoil, ultrasonic activation significantly increased the dissolution rate of all sealers except MTA-Fillapex after 5 and 10 min, Sealapex at 10 min, and AH-Plus at 5 min (p > 0.05). In conclusion, MTA-Fillapex was not sufficiently dissolved in either solvent. Ultrasonic activation had limited effectiveness on MTA-Fillapex dissolution, whereas it significantly increased the efficiency of solvents in dissolving a number of endodontic sealers. PMID:26910018

  13. Mineral Trioxide Aggregate vs. Calcium Hydroxide in Primary Molar Pulpotomy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Shirvani, Armin; Hassanizadeh, Raheleh; Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this quantitative systematic review/meta-analysis was to compare the treatment outcomes of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium hydroxide (CH) in pulpotomy of human primary molars. The focused PICO question was “in case of pulp exposure in vital primary molars, how does MTA pulpotomy compare to CH in terms of clinical/radiographic success?” Methods and Materials: We retrieved published randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of at least 6-month duration; our search included articles published up to March 2013 in five following databases: PubMed (Medline), Cochrane database of systematic reviews, Science Citation Index, EMBASE, and Google Scholar. Mantel Haenszel and Inverse Variance-weighted methods were applied by STATA; the relative risk (RR) was calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: A total of 282 English articles were collected. Two authors independently screened the articles and five RCTs were selected; data extraction and quality assessment were then carried out. Four RCTs were appropriate for meta-analysis according to their follow-up times by Mantel Haenszel method. Statistically significant difference was found between success rate of MTA compared to CH, with RR=0.08 (95% CI, 0.02-0.39), RR=0.19 (95% CI, 0.08-0.46), and RR=0.38 (95% CI, 0.21-0.68) for 6-, 12-, and 24-month follow-ups, respectively. A significant difference was also observed for all included RCTs after analyses using the Inverse Variance-weighted method (RR=0.44; 95% CI, 0.27-0.72). Conclusions: Systematic review/meta-analysis of included RCTs revealed that for pulpotomy of vital primary molars, MTA has better treatment outcomes compared to CH. PMID:24688575

  14. Twenty Years of Research on Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: A Scientometric Report

    PubMed Central

    Asgary, Saeed; Motazedian, Hamid Reza; Parirokh, Masoud; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Kheirieh, Sanam

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been suggested for root-end filling, vital pulp therapy, apical plug, perforations repair, and root canal filling. Since the introduction of MTA in 1993, many studies about this material have been published. The aim of this survey was to illustrate statistical information about published articles in PubMed-index journals vis-à-vis the various aspects of this biomaterial. Material and Methods A PubMed search was performed to retrieve the relative articles from 1993 to August 2012. The data of each article including publication year, journal name, number of authors, first author name, affiliations and study design were recorded. Citation of each article till 2009 was obtained from Scopus and Google scholar databases. Data were analyzed to determine the related scientometric indicators. Results In total, 1027 articles were found in PubMed-indexed journals which show considerable increase from 2 papers in 1993 to 139 in 2011. While ~62% of articles had no level of evidence, only ~5% could be classified as having the highest level of evidence (LOE1); however, the majority of LOE1 articles originated from Iran (~1%: n=10). Journal of Endodontics, as the top rank journal, published 31.7% of MTA related articles. The majority of articles were four-authored (19.6%). Most of the articles originated from USA (21.9%), Brazil (18.5%) and Iran (8.76%). The average number of citation for the top ten articles from Scopus was 231. Conclusion This data demonstrates that during the past two decades, research on this novel endodontic biomaterial had a rapid positive trend especially during the last 5 years. Further high-level evidence articles for the various clinical applications of MTA would result in superior clinical decision making and stronger scientific-based endodontic practice. PMID:23411944

  15. Therapeutic Potential of Delivering Arsenic Trioxide into HPV-Infected Cervical Cancer Cells Using Liposomal Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Li, Dong; Ghali, Lucy; Xia, Ruidong; Munoz, Leonardo P.; Garelick, Hemda; Bell, Celia; Wen, Xuesong

    2016-02-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been used successfully to treat acute promyelocytic leukaemia, and since this discovery, it has also been researched as a possible treatment for other haematological and solid cancers. Even though many positive results have been found in the laboratory, wider clinical use of ATO has been compromised by its toxicity at higher concentrations. The aim of this study was to explore an improved method for delivering ATO using liposomal nanotechnology to evaluate whether this could reduce drug toxicity and improve the efficacy of ATO in treating human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers. HeLa, C33a, and human keratinocytes were exposed to 5 μm of ATO in both free and liposomal forms for 48 h. The stability of the prepared samples was tested using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES) to measure the intracellular arsenic concentrations after treatment. Fluorescent double-immunocytochemical staining was carried out to evaluate the protein expression levels of HPV-E6 oncogene and caspase-3. Cell apoptosis was analysed by flow cytometry. Results showed that liposomal ATO was more effective than free ATO in reducing protein levels of HPV-E6 and inducing cell apoptosis in HeLa cells. Moreover, lower toxicity was observed when liposomal-delivered ATO was used. This could be explained by lower intracellular concentrations of arsenic. The slowly accumulated intracellular ATO through liposomal delivery might act as a reservoir which releases ATO gradually to maintain its anti-HPV effects. To conclude, liposome-delivered ATO could protect cells from the direct toxic effects induced by higher concentrations of intracellular ATO. Different pathways may be involved in this process, depending on local architecture of the tissues and HPV status.

  16. Biocompatibility of Accelerated Mineral Trioxide Aggregate on Stem Cells Derived from Human Dental Pulp.

    PubMed

    Kulan, Pinar; Karabiyik, Ozge; Kose, Gamze T; Kargul, Betul

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of several additives on the setting time and cytotoxicity of accelerated-set mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) on stem cells of human dental pulp. ProRoot white MTA (WMTA) (Dentsply Tulsa Dental, Johnson City, TN) was mixed with various additives including distilled water, 2.5% disodium hydrogen phosphate (Na2HPO4) (Merck, Darmstadt, Germany), K-Y Jelly (Johnson & Johnson, Markham, ON, Canada), and 5% and 10% calcium chloride (CaCl2) (Merck). The setting times were evaluated using a Vicat apparatus (Alsa Lab, Istanbul, Turkey). Human dental pulp stem cells were isolated and seeded into 48-well plates at 2 × 10(3) cells per well and incubated with MTA samples for 24 hours, 3 days, and 7 days. Cell viability was evaluated using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium assay. MTA mixed with 10% CaCl2 showed the lowest setting time (P < .05). According to the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium results on the 1st, 3rd, and 7th days, a statistically significant difference was found (P < .05) between MTA groups and the control group. MTA mixed with K-Y Jelly in all groups showed the lowest cell viability at all time points (P < .05). The cell viability of MTA mixed with distilled water, 5% CaCl2, 10% CaCl2, and Na2HPO4 increased significantly through time (P < .05). This in vitro study found MTA mixed with 5% and 10% CaCl2 and Na2HPO4 is biocompatible with dental pulp stem cells in terms of cell viability. Further in vitro and in vivo investigations are required to prove the clinical applications of MTA mixed with various additives.

  17. Biochemistry of Dissimilatory Sulfur Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Blake II, R.

    2003-05-30

    The long term goals of this research were to define the substrate oxidation pathways, the electron transport mechanisms, and the modes of energy conservation employed during the dissimilatory oxidation of sulfur practiced by various species of the thiobacilli. Specific adhesion of the thiobacilli to elemental sulfur was studied by electrical impedance, dynamic light scattering, laser Doppler velocimetry, and optical trapping methods. The conclusion is that the thiobacilli appear to express specific receptors that enable the bacteria to recognize and adhere to insoluble sulfur. The enzyme tetrathionate oxidase was purified from two species of the thiobacilli. Extensive structural and functional studies were conducted on adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase purified from cell-free extracts of Thiobacillus denitrificans. The kinetic mechanism of rhodanese was studied.

  18. Method for removing sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ermini, E.

    1980-12-16

    Sulfur dioxide is removed from waste gases generated in a thermoelectric plant by contacting the gases countercurrently with an aqueous alkaline solution having a ph of about 9-12 and containing both sodium hydroxide and manganic hydroxide, whereby the sulfur dioxide reacts with the sodium hydroxide to form sodium sulfite until the ph of the solution is about 6-7 and the sodium hydroxide is substantially exhausted and wherein the sulfur dioxide then reacts with the manganic hydroxide to form manganese sulfite. The resultant sodium sulfite and manganese sulfite are oxidized and transformed into sodium sulfate and manganese sulfate respectively, by the action of oxygen in the mixture, in the presence of the manganic ion and also by the direct oxidizing action of the manganic ion.

  19. Monoclinic sulfur cathode utilizing carbon for high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sung Chul; Han, Young-Kyu

    2016-09-01

    Sulfur cathodes for lithium-sulfur batteries have been designed to be combined with conductive carbon because the insulating nature of sulfur causes low active material utilization and poor rate capability. This paper is the first to report that carbon can induce a phase transition in a sulfur cathode. The stable form of a sulfur crystal at ambient temperature is orthorhombic sulfur. We found that monoclinic sulfur becomes more stable than orthorhombic sulfur if carbon atoms penetrate into the sulfur at elevated temperatures and the carbon density exceeds a threshold of C0.3S8. The high stability of the carbon-containing monoclinic sulfur persists during lithiation and is attributed to locally formed linear SC3S chains with marked stability. This study provides a novel perspective on the role of carbon in the sulfur cathode and suggests control of the crystal phase of electrodes by composite elements as a new way of designing efficient electrode materials.

  20. Reduction mechanism of sulfur in lithium-sulfur battery: From elemental sulfur to polysulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Dong; Zhang, Xuran; Wang, Jiankun; Qu, Deyu; Yang, Xiaoqing; Qu, Deyang

    2016-01-01

    The polysulfide ions formed during the first reduction wave of sulfur in Li-S battery were determined through both in-situ and ex-situ derivatization of polysulfides. By comparing the cyclic voltammetric results with and without the derivatization reagent (methyl triflate) as well as the in-situ and ex-situ derivatization results under potentiostatic condition, in-situ derivatization was found to be more appropriate than its ex-situ counterpart, since subsequent fast chemical reactions between the polysulfides and sulfur may occur during the timeframe of ex-situ procedures. It was found that the major polysulfide ions formed at the first reduction wave of elemental sulfur were the S4 2 - and S5 2 - species, while the widely accepted reduction products of S8 2 - and S6 2 - for the first reduction wave were in low abundance.

  1. Effect of decabromodiphenyl ether and antimony trioxide on controlled pyrolysis of high-impact polystyrene mixed with polyolefins.

    PubMed

    Mitan, Nona Merry M; Bhaskar, Thallada; Hall, William J; Muto, Akinori; Williams, Paul T; Sakata, Yusaku

    2008-07-01

    The controlled pyrolysis of polyethylene/polypropylene/polystyrene mixed with brominated high-impact polystyrene containing decabromodiphenyl ether as a brominated flame-retardant with antimony trioxide as a synergist was performed. The effect of decabromodiphenyl ether and antimony trioxide on the formation of its congeners and their effect on distribution of pyrolysis products were investigated. The controlled pyrolysis significantly affected the decomposition behavior and the formation of products. Analysis with gas chromatograph with electron capture detector confirmed that the bromine content was rich in step 1 (oil 1) liquid products leaving less bromine content in the step 2 (oil 2) liquid products. In the presence of antimony containing samples, the major portion of bromine was observed in the form of antimony bromide and no flame-retardant species were found in oil 1. In the presence of synergist, the step 1 and step 2 oils contain both light and heavy compounds. In the absence of synergist, the heavy compounds in step 1 oil and light compounds in step 2 oils were observed. The presence of antimony bromide was confirmed in the step 1 oils but not in step 2 oils. PMID:18499216

  2. A potentized homeopathic drug, Arsenicum Album 200, can ameliorate genotoxicity induced by repeated injections of arsenic trioxide in mice.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, P; Biswas, S J; Belon, P; Khuda-Bukhsh, A R

    2007-09-01

    Groundwater arsenic contamination has become a menacing global problem. No drug is available until now to combat chronic arsenic poisoning. To examine if a potentized homeopathic remedy, Arsenicum Album-200, can effectively combat chronic arsenic toxicity induced by repeated injections of Arsenic trioxide in mice, the following experimental design was adopted. Mice (Mus musculus) were injected subcutaneously with 0.016% arsenic trioxide at the rate of 1 ml/100 g body weight, at an interval of 7 days until they were killed at day 30, 60, 90 or 120 and were divided into three groups: (i) one receiving a daily dose of Arsenicum Album-200 through oral administration, (ii) one receiving the same dose of diluted succussed alcohol (Alcohol-200) and (iii) another receiving neither drug, nor succussed alcohol. The remedy or the placebo, as the case may be, was fed from the next day onwards after injection until the day before the next injection, and the cycle was repeated until the mice were killed. Two other control groups were also maintained: one receiving only normal diet, and the other receiving normal diet and succussed alcohol. Several toxicity assays, such as cytogenetical (chromosome aberrations, micronuclei, mitotic index, sperm head anomaly) and biochemical (acid and alkaline phosphatases, lipid peroxidation), were periodically made. Compared with controls, the drug fed mice showed reduced toxicity at statistically significant levels in respect of all the parameters studied, thereby indicating protective potentials of the homeopathic drug against chronic arsenic poisoning.

  3. Current-voltage characteristics and grain growth of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-doped tungsten trioxide ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Yang, X.S.; Li, Z.Q.; Yao, K.L.; Liu, Z.L

    2004-08-03

    Ceramics samples of tungsten trioxide doped with lithium carbonate from 0.5 to 5 mol% were prepared by conventional electroceramic technique. The current-voltage characteristics of these ceramics were measured under various ambient temperatures. All of the I-V curves showed non-ohmic electrical properties with obvious negative-resistance characteristic at room temperature. It is found that there exists a direct correlation between the negative-resistance phenomenon in the I-V curves and the electrical history of these samples. The suitability of some models regarding the negative-resistance characteristics is discussed. X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed coexistence of two phases of tungsten trioxide, which depends on the amount of lithium. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed great differences for both grain shape and size between the Li-doped and undoped WO{sub 3} ceramics, and this indicates that Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} doped into WO{sub 3} influences strongly the growing of WO{sub 3} during sintering process.

  4. Apparatus and process for producing particulate sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Harbolt, B.A.; Howell, D.W.

    1989-09-05

    This patent describes apparatus for producing relatively large, high bulk density sulfur particles from molten sulfur. The apparatus including a means disposed beneath the porous belt for receiving both quenching liquid drained from sulfur particles on the belt and sulfur particles falling from the porous belt which are not discharged onto the second conveyor belt, and including means for recycling the received fallen particles back onto a particle receiving end region of the porous belt.

  5. The sulfur cycle in the marine atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Kasting, James F.; Turco, Richard P.; Liu, May S.

    1987-01-01

    The simulation of the sulfur cycle in the marine atmosphere using a one-dimensional photochemical model is described and evaluated. Theoretical uncertainties concerning the operation of the marine sulfur cycle are examined, and measurements of sulfur gases in the marine atmosphere necessary for developing the model are derived. Previous modeling studies are reviewed, and the data from these studies are compared to the model simulations. Recommendations for improving the simulation of the sulfur cycle in the marine atmosphere are discussed.

  6. Behavior of sulfur during coal pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shao, D.; Hutchinson, E.J.; Heidbrink, J.; Pan, W.-P.; Chou, C.-L.

    1994-01-01

    The behavior of sulfur in Illinois coals during pyrolysis was evaluated by thermogravimetry/ Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (TG/FT-IR) techniques. SO2, COS, and H2S were major gaseous sulfur-containing products observed during coal pyrolysis. The release rates of the gaseous sulfur species showed several peaks within the temperature ranges, which were due to the emission of different forms of sulfur in coal. ?? 1994.

  7. Growth mechanism of largescale MoS2 monolayer by sulfurization of MoO3 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, Payam; Wang, Jieqiong; Xing, Hui; Destino, Joel F.; Murat Arik, Mumtaz; Zhao, Chuan; Kang, Kaifei; Blizzard, Brett; Zhang, Lijie; Zhao, Puqin; Huang, Shaoming; Yang, Sen; Bright, Frank V.; Cerne, John; Zeng, Hao

    2016-07-01

    Monolayer two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) such as MoS2 with broken inversion symmetry possesses two degenerate yet inequivalent valleys that can be selectively excited by circularly polarized light. This unique property renders interesting valley physics. The ability to manipulate valley degrees of freedom with light or external field makes them attractive for optoelectronic and spintronic applications. There is great demand for large area monolayer (ML) TMDCs for certain measurements and device applications. Recent reports on large area ML TDMCs focus on chemical vapor deposition growth. In this work, we report a facile approach to grow largescale continuous ML MoS2 nearly free of overgrowth and voids, by sulfurizing evaporated molybdenum trioxide ultrathin films. Photo conductivity scales with device sizes up to 4.5 mm, suggesting excellent film uniformity. The growth mechanism is found to be vaporization, diffusion, sulfurization and lateral growth, all at local micrometer scale. Our approach provides a new pathway for large-area ML TMDC growth and lithography-free device fabrication.

  8. Recovering sulfur from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    Linde AG (Hoellriegeiskreuth, Germany) has developed ClinSulf-SDP process, a two-reactor system that offers better than 99.5% sulfur recovery at low capital and operating costs. In a traditional Claus plant, sulfur-recovery rates of 99.3% can be achieved by combining a two- or three-stage Claus plant with a separate tail-gas cleanup unit (TGCU). Common TGCU methods include H{sub 2}S scrubbing, subdewpoint condensation and direct oxidation. Such combined units are not only costly and complicated to build and maintain, but many of today`s operators require higher sulfur-recovery rates--on the order of 99.3%--99.8%. The Clin-Sulf-SDP combines several catalytic stages of a Claus plant with a subdewpoint, tailgas-treatment system, and the process uses only two reactors. At the heart of the process are two identical, internally cooled reactors. Two four-way valves periodically reverse the sequence of the matching reactors, allowing them to alternate between sulfur-adsorption and catalyst-regeneration modes.

  9. Sulfur Dioxide and Material Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillette, Donald G.

    1975-01-01

    This study relates sulfur dioxide levels with material damage in heavily populated or polluted areas. Estimates of loss were determined from increased maintenance and replacement costs. The data indicate a decrease in losses during the past five years probably due to decline in pollution levels established by air quality standards. (MR)

  10. Seal for sodium sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Topouzian, Armenag; Minck, Robert W.; Williams, William J.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is directed to a seal for a sodium sulfur battery in which the sealing is accomplished by a radial compression seal made on a ceramic component of the battery which separates an anode compartment from a cathode compartment of the battery.

  11. TRENDS IN RURAL SULFUR CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents an analysis of regional trends in atmospheric concentrations in sulfur dioxide (502) and particulate sulfate (50~- ) at rural monitoring sites in the Clean Air Act Status and Trends Monitoring Network (CAsTNet) from 1990 to 1999. A two-stage approach is used t...

  12. Sulfur monochloride in organic synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinova, L. S.; Rakitin, O. A.

    2014-03-01

    The data on the reactivity of sulfur monochloride published in the past 15 years have been reviewed and systematized. The review focuses on the synthesis of acyclic and heterocyclic compounds with the use of S2Cl2. The bibliography includes 154 references.

  13. Two stage sorption of sulfur compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, W.E.

    1991-12-31

    A two stage method for reducing the sulfur content of exhaust gases is disclosed. Alkali- or alkaline-earth-based sorbent is totally or partially vaporized 10 and introduced into a sulfur-containing gas stream. The activated sorbent can be introduced in the reaction zone or the exhaust gases of a combustor or a gasifier. High efficiencies of sulfur removal can be achieved.

  14. Eagle-Picher Industries Sodium Sulfur Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silvey, Ronald L.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs of the sodium sulfur program are presented. Sodium sulfur low earth orbit (LEO) cells are described. Topics covered include cell sizes, areas of improvement, and NaS cell testing. Sodium sulfur cell and battery designs continue to evolve with significant improvement demonstrated in resistance, rechargeability, cycle life, energy density, and electrolyte characterization.

  15. Air Quality Criteria for Sulfur Oxides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Air Pollution Control Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Included is a literature review which comprehensively discusses knowledge of the sulfur oxides commonly found in the atmosphere. The subject content is represented by the 10 chapter titles: Physical and Chemical Properties and the Atmospheric Reactions of the Oxides of Sulfur; Sources and Methods of Measurements of Sulfur Oxides in the Atmosphere;…

  16. Two stage sorption of sulfur compounds

    DOEpatents

    Moore, William E.

    1992-01-01

    A two stage method for reducing the sulfur content of exhaust gases is disclosed. Alkali- or alkaline-earth-based sorbent is totally or partially vaporized and introduced into a sulfur-containing gas stream. The activated sorbent can be introduced in the reaction zone or the exhaust gases of a combustor or a gasifier. High efficiencies of sulfur removal can be achieved.

  17. Sulfur: its clinical and toxicologic aspects.

    PubMed

    Komarnisky, Lioudmila A; Christopherson, Robert J; Basu, Tapan K

    2003-01-01

    Although there is no known dietary requirement for inorganic sulfur, it is an essential element for all animal species in as much as they all require the sulfur-containing amino acid methionine. There are three predominate forms of organic sulfur in animals and humans: 1). the thiomethyl of methionine residues in protein; 2). the sulfhydryl disulfides of protein; and 3). the compounds containing ester or amide bound sulfates of glycosaminoglycans, steroids, and many xenobiotic metabolites. Thus, sulfur becomes an important constituent of amino acids, proteins, enzymes, vitamins and other biomolecules. Unlike mammalian species, plants can use inorganic sulfur and synthesize methionine from which are synthesized all the other important sulfur compounds. Hence, sulfur deficiency occurs mainly when plants are grown in sulfur-depleted soils and when humans and animals consume low-protein diets. In recent times, however, the increasing prevalence of refining petroleum and smelting sulfur compounds of metallic minerals into free metals are having a large impact on the balance of sulfur in the environment. Sulfur toxicity is associated mainly with high levels of the element and its toxic volatile substances in the environment. Sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), a major air pollutant, may adversely affect animal and human health by causing bronchitis, bronchoconstriction, and increased pulmonary resistance.

  18. 21 CFR 182.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 182.3862 Section 182.3862 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance...

  19. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 582.3862 Section 582.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  20. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 582.3862 Section 582.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  1. 21 CFR 182.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 182.3862 Section 182.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur...

  2. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 582.3862 Section 582.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  3. 21 CFR 182.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 182.3862 Section 182.3862 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance...

  4. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 582.3862 Section 582.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  5. 21 CFR 182.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 182.3862 Section 182.3862 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance...

  6. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external...

  7. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sulfuric acid. 184.1095 Section 184.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Sulfuric acid (H2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7664-93-9),...

  9. 21 CFR 582.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 582.1095 Section 582.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Product. Sulfuric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  10. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external...

  11. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external...

  12. 21 CFR 582.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 582.1095 Section 582.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Product. Sulfuric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  13. 21 CFR 582.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 582.1095 Section 582.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Product. Sulfuric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  14. 21 CFR 582.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 582.1095 Section 582.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Product. Sulfuric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 184.1095 Section 184.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Sulfuric acid (H2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7664-93-9),...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 582.1095 Section 582.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Product. Sulfuric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  17. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 184.1095 Section 184.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Sulfuric acid (H2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7664-93-9),...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 184.1095 Section 184.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Sulfuric acid (H2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7664-93-9),...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 184.1095 Section 184.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Sulfuric acid (H2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7664-93-9), also known as oil of vitriol,...

  1. Have all-trans retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide replaced all-trans retinoic acid and anthracyclines in APL as standard of care.

    PubMed

    Iland, Harry J; Wei, Andrew; Seymour, John F

    2014-03-01

    Until recently, the standard of care in the treatment of APL has involved the combination of all-trans retinoic acid with anthracycline-based chemotherapy during both induction and consolidation. Additionally, the intensity of consolidation chemotherapy has evolved according to a universally accepted relapse-risk stratification algorithm based on the white cell and platelet counts at presentation. That standard of care is being challenged by the increasing incorporation of arsenic trioxide into front-line treatment protocols, based on two complementary observations. The first is the undoubted anti-leukaemic activity of arsenic trioxide as shown in the relapsed and refractory setting, and in the initial management of low- and intermediate-risk patients. The second is an improved understanding of the action of both all-trans retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide in mediating APL cell eradication, with increasing recognition that PML-RARA fusion protein degradation rather than direct induction of terminal differentiation is the primary mechanism for their ability to eliminate leukaemia initiating cells. As a result, we believe the standard of care for initial therapy in APL is shifting towards an all-trans retinoic acid plus arsenic trioxide-based approach, with additional chemotherapy reserved for patients with high-risk disease. PMID:24907016

  2. Sulfur isotope distribution in solfatares, Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoen, R.; Rye, R.O.

    1970-01-01

    Sulfur isotope data on hydrogen sulfide, native sulfur, and sulfates from acid hot-spring areas at Yellowstone National Park suggest that hydrogen sulfide oxidizes to sulfur analogically, whereas sulfur undergoes biological oxidation to sulfuric acid. An exception occurs at Mammoth Hot Springs where hydrogen sulfide apparently undergoes biochemical oxidation to sulfur.

  3. Wet Chemistry Synthesis of Multidimensional Nanocarbon-Sulfur Hybrid Materials with Ultrahigh Sulfur Loading for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Du, Wen-Cheng; Yin, Ya-Xia; Zeng, Xian-Xiang; Shi, Ji-Lei; Zhang, Shuai-Feng; Wan, Li-Jun; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2016-02-17

    An optimized nanocarbon-sulfur cathode material with ultrahigh sulfur loading of up to 90 wt % is realized in the form of sulfur nanolayer-coated three-dimensional (3D) conducting network. This 3D nanocarbon-sulfur network combines three different nanocarbons, as follows: zero-dimensional carbon nanoparticle, one-dimensional carbon nanotube, and two-dimensional graphene. This 3D nanocarbon-sulfur network is synthesized by using a method based on soluble chemistry of elemental sulfur and three types of nanocarbons in well-chosen solvents. The resultant sulfur-carbon material shows a high specific capacity of 1115 mA h g(-1) at 0.02C and good rate performance of 551 mA h g(-1) at 1C based on the mass of sulfur-carbon composite. Good battery performance can be attributed to the homogeneous compositing of sulfur with the 3D hierarchical hybrid nanocarbon networks at nanometer scale, which provides efficient multidimensional transport pathways for electrons and ions. Wet chemical method developed here provides an easy and cost-effective way to prepare sulfur-carbon cathode materials with high sulfur loading for application in high-energy Li-S batteries. PMID:26378622

  4. Activity of Nanobins Loaded with Cisplatin and Arsenic Trioxide in Primary and Metastatic Breast Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindell, Elden Peter, III

    Despite recent advances in breast cancer screening and detection, the disease is still a leading cause of death for women of all ages. Young, African-American women are disproportionally affected with a type of breast cancer, triple-negative breast cancer, which is particularly difficult to treat and has the worst prognosis of any breast cancer subtype. These tumors often spread to the lungs, liver, bones and brains of patients, which is ultimately fatal. This dissertation presents results from a series of in vivo and in vitro experiments that investigate the clinical utility of a novel nanoparticulate formulation of cisplatin and arsenic trioxide, NB(Pt,As) for treating primary and metastatic triple-negative breast cancer. These nanobins consist of a solid, crystalline metal nanoparticle surrounded by a lipid bilayer with 80-90 nm diameter. This drug payload is extremely stable, and so NB(Pt,As) is extremely well tolerated in mice. Furthermore, NB(Pt,As) is effective in two different mouse models of breast cancer, one of primary tumor growth an another of lung metastases. A discovery presented here, that thiol containing compounds are required for drug release, may explain these seemingly incongruous results. The large amount of intracellular thiol can trigger drug release, while the low concentration of free thiols in blood is insufficient to cause drug release. To improve the treatment of brain tumors with this unique drug, we added transferrin to the surface of the nanobin using copper-catalyzed "click" chemistry, which preserves protein activity. The addition of transferrin to the nanobins enables 10 fold greater uptake in the brains of mice treated with the transferrin-targeted nanobins Tf-NB(Pt,A) compared to NB(Pt,As). By penetrating the blood brain barrier, the Tf-NB(Pt,As) was able to reduce breast cancer metastases in the brains of mice, whereas NB(Pt,As) had no effect. Taken together, these results demonstrate the intricate balance of drug release

  5. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell proliferation and human papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Peng; Zheng, Jie

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • As{sub 2}O{sub 3} inhibits growth of cervical cancer cells and expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. • HPV-negative cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. • HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-16 positive cancer cells. • Down-regulation of HPV oncogenes by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is partially due to the diminished AP-1 binding. - Abstract: Arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) has shown therapeutic effects in some leukemias and solid cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of its anticancer efficacy have not been clearly elucidated, particularly in solid cancers. Our previous data showed that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} induced apoptosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA-immortalized human cervical epithelial cells and cervical cancer cells and inhibited the expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. In the present study, we systemically examined the effects of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} on five human cervical cancer cell lines and explored the possible molecular mechanisms. MTT assay showed that HPV-negative C33A cells were more sensitive to growth inhibition induced by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, and HPV 18-positive HeLa and C4-I cells were more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV 16-positive CaSki and SiHa cells. After As{sub 2}O{sub 3} treatment, both mRNA and protein levels of HPV E6 and E7 obviously decreased in all HPV positive cell lines. In contrast, p53 and Rb protein levels increased in all tested cell lines. Transcription factor AP-1 protein expression decreased significantly in HeLa, CaSki and C33A cells with ELISA method. These results suggest that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a potential anticancer drug for cervical cancer.

  6. Downregulation of thymidylate synthase and E2F1 by arsenic trioxide in mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sze-Kwan; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Zheng, Chun-Yan; Ho, James Chung-Man

    2015-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a global health issue. Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been shown to suppress thymidylate synthase (TYMS) in lung adenocarcinoma and colorectal cancer, and induce apoptosis in acute promyelocytic leukemia. With TYMS as a putative therapeutic target, the effect of ATO in mesothelioma was therefore studied. A panel of 5 mesothelioma cell lines was used to study the effect of ATO on cell viability, protein expression, mRNA expression and TYMS activity by MTT assay, western blot, qPCR and tritium-release assay, respectively. The knockdown of TYMS and E2F1 was performed with a specific siRNA. Phosphatidylserine externalization and mitochondrial membrane depolarization were measured by Annexin V and JC-1 staining respectively. The in vivo effect of ATO was studied using a nude mouse xenograft model. Application of ATO demonstrated anticancer effects in the cell line model with clinically achievable concentrations. Downregulation of TYMS protein (except H226 cells and 1.25 µM ATO in H2052 cells) and mRNA expression (H28 cells), pRB1 (H28 cells) and E2F1 and TYMS activity (except H226 cells) were also evident. E2F1 knockdown decreased cell viability more significantly than TYMS knockdown. In general, thymidine kinase 1, ribonucleotide reductase M1, c-myc and skp2 were downregulated by ATO. p-c-Jun was downregulated in H28 cells while upregulated in 211H cells. Phosphatidylserine externalization, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, downregulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, and upregulation of Bak and cleaved caspase-3 were observed. In the H226 xenograft model, the relative tumor growth was aborted, and E2F1 was downregulated while cleaved caspase-3 was elevated and localized to the nucleus in the ATO treatment group. ATO has potent antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects in mesothelioma in vitro and in vivo, partially mediated through E2F1 targeting (less effect through TYMS targeting). There is sound scientific evidence to support the

  7. hsa-miR-203 enhances the sensitivity of leukemia cells to arsenic trioxide.

    PubMed

    He, Jin-Hua; Li, Yu-Min; Li, Yu-Guang; Xie, Xing-Yi; Wang, Li; Chun, Shun-Yi; Cheng, Wu-Jia

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a eukaryotic expression vector expressing hsa-miR-203 on the sensitivity of K562 leukemia cells to arsenic trioxide (ATO) and the possible mechanism of action. The eukaryotic expression vector expressing the hsa-miR-203 plasmid (PmiR-203) was transfected into K562 cells using Lipofectamine 2000. bcr/abl 3' untranslated region (UTR) and bcr/abl mutated 3'UTR dual luciferase report vectors (psi-CHECK-2) were used to validate the regulation of bcr/abl by miR-203. The inhibitory effects of ATO and PmiR-203, used singly or in combination, on cell proliferation were detected by MTT assay. Apoptosis of the K562 cells was detected by flow cytometry using double-staining with Annexin V and propidium iodide (PI). The activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9 were detected by a colorimetric method and the cytochrome c protein levels were detected by western blotting. When used in combination with PmiR-203, the IC50 of ATO was reduced from 6.49 to 2.45 μg/ml and the sensitivity of cells to ATO increased 2.64-fold. In addition, PmiR-203 and ATO caused growth inhibition, apoptosis and G1-phase arrest in K562 cells. Furthermore, PmiR-203 significantly promoted ATO-mediated growth inhibition and apoptosis, affecting the G1 phase. JC-1 fluorescent staining revealed that the membrane potential of the mitochondria had changed. The activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9 increased, the expression levels of cytochrome c were upregulated and the expression level of bcr/abl mRNA was significantly suppressed. Furthermore, the dual-luciferase reporter vector, containing tandem miR-203 binding sites from the bcr/abl 3'UTR, demonstrated that bcr/abl was directly regulated by miR-203. PmiR-203 sensitized K562 leukemia cells to ATO by inducing apoptosis and downregulating bcr/ abl gene levels. The induction of apoptosis may occur through the mitochondrial pathway. The combination of ATO and PmiR-203 presents therapeutic potential for chronic

  8. Arsenic trioxide and reduced glutathione act synergistically to augment inhibition of thyroid peroxidase activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Palazzolo, Dominic L; Ely, Emily A

    2015-05-01

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) is the enzyme involved in thyroid hormone synthesis. Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is known to inhibit TPO activity in vitro. This inhibition is believed to occur when As2O3 binds to TPO's free sulfhydryl groups. Reduced glutathione (GSH) is also known to inhibit TPO activity in vitro. This inhibition may occur because GSH acts as a competitive substrate for hydrogen peroxide, or possibly reduce the oxidized form of iodide, requirements for TPO action. On the other hand, one could speculate that GSH reduces arsenic-induced TPO inhibition by interacting directly with arsenic or TPO, consequently limiting arsenic's ability to inhibit TPO activity. Since GSH is known to inhibit thyroid hormone synthesis while at the same time it is also known to be an important antioxidant preventing cellular damage induced by oxidative stress and protecting the thyroid gland from oxidative damage induced by arsenic, we wanted to determine if a combination of As2O3 and reduced GSH would either attenuate or augment the As2O3-induced inhibition on TPO activity. Using an in vitro system, TPO was assayed spectrophotometrically in the presence of As2O3 (0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 ppm), GSH (0.1, 1, 5, and 10 ppm), and As2O3 (0.1 ppm) and GSH (0.01, 0.1, 1, or 10 ppm) combinations. Our results show that 0.1, 1.0, and 10 ppm As2O3 inhibit TPO activity. Similarly, 5 and 10 ppm GSH also inhibit TPO activity. When 0.1 ppm As2O3 (i.e., the lowest dose of arsenic able to partially inhibit TPO activity) is combined with 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, or 10 ppm GSH inhibition of in vitro TPO activity is augmented as indicated by complete inhibition of TPO. The mechanism of this augmentation and whether it translates to living systems remains unclear.

  9. Differential effects of arsenic trioxide on chemosensitization in human hepatic tumor and stellate cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Crosstalk between malignant hepatocytes and the surrounding peritumoral stroma is a key modulator of hepatocarcinogenesis and therapeutic resistance. To examine the chemotherapy resistance of these two cellular compartments in vitro, we evaluated a well-established hepatic tumor cell line, HepG2, and an adult hepatic stellate cell line, LX2. The aim was to compare the chemosensitization potential of arsenic trioxide (ATO) in combination with sorafenib or fluorouracil (5-FU), in both hepatic tumor cells and stromal cells. Methods Cytotoxicity of ATO, 5-FU, and sorafenib, alone and in combination against HepG2 cells and LX2 cells was measured by an automated high throughput cell-based proliferation assay. Changes in survival and apoptotic signaling pathways were analyzed by flow cytometry and western blot. Gene expression of the 5-FU metabolic enzyme, thymidylate synthase, was analyzed by real time PCR. Results Both HepG2 and LX2 cell lines were susceptible to single agent sorafenib and ATO at 24 hr (ATO IC50: 5.3 μM in LX2; 32.7 μM in HepG2; Sorafenib IC50: 11.8 μM in LX2; 9.9 μM in HepG2). In contrast, 5-FU cytotoxicity required higher concentrations and prolonged (48–72 hr) drug exposure. Concurrent ATO and 5-FU treatment of HepG2 cells was synergistic, leading to increased cytotoxicity due in part to modulation of thymidylate synthase levels by ATO. Concurrent ATO and sorafenib treatment showed a trend towards increased HepG2 cytotoxicity, possibly due to a significant decrease in MAPK activation in comparison to treatment with ATO alone. Conclusions ATO differentially sensitizes hepatic tumor cells and adult hepatic stellate cells to 5-FU and sorafenib. Given the importance of both of these cell types in hepatocarcinogenesis, these data have implications for the rational development of anti-cancer therapy combinations for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). PMID:22963400

  10. Process for reducing sulfur in coal char

    DOEpatents

    Gasior, Stanley J.; Forney, Albert J.; Haynes, William P.; Kenny, Richard F.

    1976-07-20

    Coal is gasified in the presence of a small but effective amount of alkaline earth oxide, hydroxide or carbonate to yield a char fraction depleted in sulfur. Gases produced during the reaction are enriched in sulfur compounds and the alkaline earth compound remains in the char fraction as an alkaline earth oxide. The char is suitable for fuel use, as in a power plant, and during combustion of the char the alkaline earth oxide reacts with at least a portion of the sulfur oxides produced from the residual sulfur contained in the char to further lower the sulfur content of the combustion gases.

  11. Sulfur and sulfides in chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocchi, Yves; Libourel, Guy

    2013-10-01

    The nature and distribution of sulfides within type I PO, POP and PP chondrules of the carbonaceous chondrite Vigarano (CV3) have been studied by secondary electron microscopy and electron microprobe. They occur predominantly as spheroidal blebs composed entirely of low-Ni iron sulfide (troilite, FeS) or troilite + magnetite but in less abundance in association with metallic Fe-Ni beads in opaque assemblages. Troilites are mainly located within the low-Ca pyroxene outer zone and their amounts increase with the abundance of low-Ca pyroxene within chondrules, suggesting co-crystallization of troilite and low-Ca pyroxene during high-temperature events. We show that sulfur concentration and sulfide occurrence in chondrules obey high temperature sulfur solubility and saturation laws. Depending on the fS2 and fO2 of the surrounding gas and on the melt composition, mainly the FeO content, sulfur dissolved in chondrule melts may eventually reach a concentration limit, the sulfur content at sulfide saturation (SCSS), at which an immiscible iron sulfide liquid separates from the silicate melt. The occurrence of both a silicate melt and an immiscible iron sulfide liquid is further supported by the non-wetting behavior of sulfides on silicate phases in chondrules due to the high interfacial tension between their precursor iron-sulfide liquid droplets and the surrounding silicate melt during the high temperature chondrule-forming event. The evolution of chondrule melts from PO to PP towards more silicic compositions, very likely due to high PSiO(g) of the surrounding nebular gas, induces saturation of FeS at much lower S content in PP than in PO chondrules, leading to the co-crystallization of iron sulfides and low-Ca pyroxenes. Conditions of co-saturation of low-Ca pyroxene and FeS are only achieved in non canonical environments characterized by high partial pressures of sulfur and SiO and redox conditions more oxidizing than IW-3. Fe and S mass balance calculations also

  12. Transporters in plant sulfur metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gigolashvili, Tamara; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur is an essential nutrient, necessary for synthesis of many metabolites. The uptake of sulfate, primary and secondary assimilation, the biosynthesis, storage, and final utilization of sulfur (S) containing compounds requires a lot of movement between organs, cells, and organelles. Efficient transport systems of S-containing compounds across the internal barriers or the plasma membrane and organellar membranes are therefore required. Here, we review a current state of knowledge of the transport of a range of S-containing metabolites within and between the cells as well as of their long distance transport. An improved understanding of mechanisms and regulation of transport will facilitate successful engineering of the respective pathways, to improve the plant yield, biotic interaction and nutritional properties of crops. PMID:25250037

  13. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of alkenes and silanes by hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by methylrhenium trioxide (MTO) and a novel application of electrospray mass spectrometry to study the hydrolysis of MTO

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Haisong

    1999-11-08

    Conjugated dienes were oxidized by hydrogen peroxide with methylrhenium trioxide (MTO) as catalyst. Methylrhenium bis-peroxide was the major reactive catalyst present. Hydroxyalkenes and trisubstituted silane were also tested. Mechanisms for each of these reactions are presented.

  14. [Sulfur isotopic ratios indicating sulfur cycling in slope soils of karst areas].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Cong-qiang; Li, Xiao-dong; Liu, Tao-ze; Zhang, Li-li

    2010-02-01

    Sequential extraction methods for soil sulfur were used to determine delta34 S ratios and sulfur contents of total sulfur, organic sulfur, SO4(21) and FeS2 in slope soils of karst areas. In general, FeS2 has the lowest delta34 S ratios, ranging from -6.86% per hundred to -4.229% per hundred, followed in ascending order by SO4(2-) (-2.64% per hundred - -1.34% per hundred), total sulfur (-3.25% per hundred - -1.03% per hundred) and organic sulfur (-1.63% per hundred -0.50% per hundred) in surface soils of profiles, and delta34 S ratios in different sulfur forms all show increasing trend with profiles deepening. Covariations of delta34 S ratios of SO4(2-) and FeS2 with increasing depth are related to SO4(2-) dissimilatory reduction, while the increase in parallel of delta34 S ratios of total sulfur and organic sulfur could be resulted from organic sulfur cycling. delta34 S ratios have been extensively used to indicate sulfur sources, moreover, SO4(2-) dissimilatory reduction and organic sulfur mineralization result in significant sulfur isotopic fractionation, and sulfides oxidation and SO4(2-) assimilation have no isotopic fractionation occurred, the vertical variations of delta34 S ratios in different sulfur forms can therefore be good records for depth-dependant sulfur cycling processes. Furthermore, by comparing depth distributions of sulfur contents and delta34 S ratios in different sulfur forms, it is easily to discuss the migration of SO4(-1) and organic sulfur fractions in soil profiles.

  15. Ozone and carbon trioxide synthesis by low energy ion implantation onto solid carbon dioxide and implications to astrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaraman, Bhalamurugan; Raja Sekhar, B. N.; Fulvio, Daniele; Hunniford, Adam; McCullough, Bob; Palumbo, Maria Elisabetta; Mason, Nigel

    2013-08-01

    Ion implantation experiments were carried out on amorphous (30 K) and crystalline (80 K) solid CO2 using both reactive (D+, H+) and non-reactive (He+) ions, simulating different irradiation environments on satellite and dust grain surfaces. Such ion irradiation synthesized several new species in the ice including ozone (O3), carbon trioxide (CO3), and carbon monoxide (CO) the main dissociation product of carbon dioxide. The yield of these products was found to be strongly dependent upon the ion used for irradiation and the sample temperature. Ion implantation changes the chemical composition of the ice with recorded infrared spectra clearly showing the coexistence of D3h and C2v isomers of CO3, for the first time, in ion irradiated CO2 ice.

  16. Comparison of root canal filling quality by mineral trioxide aggregate and gutta percha cones/AH plus sealer.

    PubMed

    Jho, Wonkyung; Park, Jeong-Won; Kim, Euiseong; Song, Minju; Seo, Deok-Gyu; Yang, Dong-Kyu; Shin, Su-Jung

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the quality of canal filling using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and gutta-percha (GP) in root canals, and to investigate the differences in the percentage of voids between mesial and distal canals by using microcomputed tomography. Twenty-two extracted human mandibular molars were instrumented using rotary files. Two teeth without canal fillings served as negative controls, and the other teeth were obturated with either ProRoot(®) MTA or gutta-percha and AH Plus(®) sealer. Obturated teeth were scanned with microcomputed tomography, and the percentage of voids (V%) was calculated. These specimens were also examined under a scanning electron microscope. The MTA group showed a significantly higher V% than the GP groups (p<0.05). The mesial canal groups showed significantly higher V% than did the distal canal groups (p<0.05). In orthograde filling, MTA exhibited significantly lower filling quality than did GP.

  17. Efficient degradation of methylene blue dye over tungsten trioxide/multi-walled carbon nanotube system as a novel photocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinari, Mohammad; Momeni, Mohamad Mohsen; Ahangarpour, Marzieh

    2016-10-01

    Combination of acid-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube/tungsten trioxide (MWCNT/WO3) with different MWCNT's weight percentages as visible light-induced photocatalysts for photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) dye was synthesized. These photocatalysts were characterized by Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Their photocatalytic activities were tested by using MB as a model compound. The results show that the MWCNT/WO3 hybrid nanostructures exhibit higher photocatalytic activity than pure WO3 or MWCNTs due to their higher absorption enhancement in visible light region and effective separation of electrons and holes. The stability of the hybrid was characterized through cyclic photocatalytic test.

  18. Retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide trigger degradation of mutated NPM1, resulting in apoptosis of AML cells.

    PubMed

    El Hajj, Hiba; Dassouki, Zeina; Berthier, Caroline; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Ades, Lionel; Legrand, Olivier; Hleihel, Rita; Sahin, Umut; Tawil, Nadim; Salameh, Ala; Zibara, Kazem; Darwiche, Nadine; Mohty, Mohamad; Dombret, Hervé; Fenaux, Pierre; de Thé, Hugues; Bazarbachi, Ali

    2015-05-28

    Nucleophosmin-1 (NPM1) is the most frequently mutated gene in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Addition of retinoic acid (RA) to chemotherapy was proposed to improve survival of some of these patients. Here, we found that RA or arsenic trioxide synergistically induce proteasomal degradation of mutant NPM1 in AML cell lines or primary samples, leading to differentiation and apoptosis. NPM1 mutation not only delocalizes NPM1 from the nucleolus, but it also disorganizes promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies. Combined RA/arsenic treatment significantly reduced bone marrow blasts in 3 patients and restored the subnuclear localization of both NPM1 and PML. These findings could explain the proposed benefit of adding RA to chemotherapy in NPM1 mutant AMLs, and warrant a broader clinical evaluation of regimen comprising a RA/arsenic combination.

  19. Mineral trioxide aggregate pulpotomy in autotransplanted immature mandibular third molar with a 4-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Dharmani, Umesh; Jadhav, Ganesh Ranganath; Kaur Dharmani, Charan Kamal; Devi, Takhellambam Premlata

    2016-01-01

    Autotransplantation is the surgical transposition of a tooth from its original site to another, replacing a lost or a compromised tooth by another tooth, usually the third molar in the same individual. This technique is considered a viable method due to its high success rate, well-grounded treatment option, provided the case selection and the procedure followed is within the acceptable limits. Autotransplantation is considered as an alternative approach of oral rehabilitations in a conservative manner mainly in young patients with compromised financial conditions to perform a high cost treatment. It is a fast way to recover function and aesthetic properties without interfering with the orofacial growth. This report describes a successful 4-year follow-up of a case of immediately performed mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) pulpotomy in autotransplantated mandibular left immature third molar to replace the mandibular left first molar that was extracted due to extensive carious lesion. PMID:27217648

  20. Mineral trioxide aggregate pulpotomy in autotransplanted immature mandibular third molar with a 4-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Dharmani, Umesh; Jadhav, Ganesh Ranganath; Kaur Dharmani, Charan Kamal; Devi, Takhellambam Premlata

    2016-01-01

    Autotransplantation is the surgical transposition of a tooth from its original site to another, replacing a lost or a compromised tooth by another tooth, usually the third molar in the same individual. This technique is considered a viable method due to its high success rate, well-grounded treatment option, provided the case selection and the procedure followed is within the acceptable limits. Autotransplantation is considered as an alternative approach of oral rehabilitations in a conservative manner mainly in young patients with compromised financial conditions to perform a high cost treatment. It is a fast way to recover function and aesthetic properties without interfering with the orofacial growth. This report describes a successful 4-year follow-up of a case of immediately performed mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) pulpotomy in autotransplantated mandibular left immature third molar to replace the mandibular left first molar that was extracted due to extensive carious lesion.

  1. Reduction mechanism of sulfur in lithium-sulfur battery: From elemental sulfur to polysulfide

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Dong; Yang, Xuran; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Jiankun; Qu, Deyu; Qu, Deyang

    2015-10-30

    In this study, the polysulfide ions formed during the first reduction wave of sulfur in Li–S battery were determined through both in-situ and ex-situ derivatization of polysulfides. By comparing the cyclic voltammetric results with and without the derivatization reagent (methyl triflate) as well as the in-situ and ex-situ derivatization results under potentiostatic condition, in-situ derivatization was found to be more appropriate than its ex-situ counterpart, since subsequent fast chemical reactions between the polysulfides and sulfur may occur during the timeframe of ex-situ procedures. It was found that the major polysulfide ions formed at the first reduction wave of elemental sulfurmore » were the S42– and S52– species, while the widely accepted reduction products of S82– and S62– for the first reduction wave were in low abundance.« less

  2. Radiolysis of Sulfuric Acid, Sulfuric Acid Monohydrate, and Sulfuric Acid Tetrahydrate and Its Relevance to Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.; Carlson, R. W.

    2011-01-01

    We report laboratory studies on the 0.8 MeV proton irradiation of ices composed of sulfuric acid (H2SO4), sulfuric acid monohydrate (H2SO4 H2O), and sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (H2SO4 4H2O) between 10 and 180 K. Using infrared spectroscopy, we identify the main radiation products as H2O, SO2, (S2O3)x, H3O+, HSO4(exp -), and SO4(exp 2-). At high radiation doses, we find that H2SO4 molecules are destroyed completely and that H2SO4 H2O is formed on subsequent warming. This hydrate is significantly more stable to radiolytic destruction than pure H2SO4, falling to an equilibrium relative abundance of 50% of its original value on prolonged irradiation. Unlike either pure H2SO4 or H2SO4 H2O, the loss of H2SO4 4H2O exhibits a strong temperature dependence, as the tetrahydrate is essentially unchanged at the highest irradiation temperatures and completely destroyed at the lowest ones, which we speculate is due to a combination of radiolytic destruction and amorphization. Furthermore, at the lower temperatures it is clear that irradiation causes the tetrahydrate spectrum to transition to one that closely resembles the monohydrate spectrum. Extrapolating our results to Europa s surface, we speculate that the variations in SO2 concentrations observed in the chaotic terrains are a result of radiation processing of lower hydration states of sulfuric acid and that the monohydrate will remain stable on the surface over geological times, while the tetrahydrate will remain stable in the warmer regions but be destroyed in the colder regions, unless it can be reformed by other processes, such as thermal reactions induced by diurnal cycling.

  3. Ebb-and-flow of macroautophagy and chaperone-mediated autophagy in Raji cells induced by starvation and arsenic trioxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Cai-Li; Wei, Hu-Lai; Chen, Jing; Wang, Bei; Xie, Bei; Fan, Lin-Lan; Li, Lin-Jing

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is crucial in the maintenance of homeostasis and regenerated energy of mammalian cells. Macroautophagy and chaperone-mediated autophagy(CMA) are the two best-identified pathways. Recent research has found that in normal cells, decline of macroautophagy is appropriately parallel with activation of CMA. However, whether it is also true in cancer cells has been poorly studied. Here we focused on cross-talk and conversion between macroautophagy and CMA in cultured Burkitt lymphoma Raji cells when facing serum deprivation and exposure to a toxic compound, arsenic trioxide. The results showed that both macroautophagy and CMA were activated sequentially instead of simultaneously in starvation-induced Raji cells, and macroautophagy was quickly activated and peaked during the first hours of nutrition deprivation, and then gradually decreased to near baseline. With nutrient deprivation persisted, CMA progressively increased along with the decline of macroautophagy. On the other hand, in arsenic trioxide-treated Raji cells, macroautophagy activity was also significantly increased, but CMA activity was not rapidly enhanced until macroautophagy was inhibited by 3-methyladenine, an inhibitor. Together, we conclude that cancer cells exhibit differential responses to diverse stressor-induced damage by autophagy. The sequential switch of the first-aider macroautophagy to the homeostasis-stabilizer CMA, whether active or passive, might be conducive to the adaption of cancer cells to miscellaneous intracellular or extracellular stressors. These findings must be helpful to understand the characteristics, compensatory mechanisms and answer modes of different autophagic pathways in cancer cells, which might be very important and promising to the development of potential targeting interventions for cancer therapies via regulation of autophagic pathways. PMID:25081691

  4. Reduction mechanism of sulfur in lithium-sulfur battery: From elemental sulfur to polysulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Dong; Yang, Xuran; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Jiankun; Qu, Deyu; Qu, Deyang

    2015-10-30

    In this study, the polysulfide ions formed during the first reduction wave of sulfur in Li–S battery were determined through both in-situ and ex-situ derivatization of polysulfides. By comparing the cyclic voltammetric results with and without the derivatization reagent (methyl triflate) as well as the in-situ and ex-situ derivatization results under potentiostatic condition, in-situ derivatization was found to be more appropriate than its ex-situ counterpart, since subsequent fast chemical reactions between the polysulfides and sulfur may occur during the timeframe of ex-situ procedures. It was found that the major polysulfide ions formed at the first reduction wave of elemental sulfur were the S42– and S52– species, while the widely accepted reduction products of S82– and S62– for the first reduction wave were in low abundance.

  5. World petroleum-derived sulfur production

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, A.

    1982-08-02

    Research efforts in new uses for sulfur, among them those of the Sulfur Development Institute of Canada, have resulted in the development of several new product markets. Petroleum and natural gas derived sulfurs are finding use as asphalt extenders in road construction throughout North America and as concrete extenders and substitutes for Portland cement in the construction industries of Mexico and the Middle East. Their use in masonry blocks is now being commercialized. Canada is the world's largest producer of commercial sulfur; 80% of it is used as a processing chemical in the form of sulfuric acid. Saudi Arabia, recently having begun to commercialize its vast resources, is constructing plants for the extraction of sulfur from natural gas and plans to export between 6 and 7 x 10/sup 5/ tons annually, much of it for fertilizer manufacture to India, Tunisia, Italy, Pakistan, Greece, Morocco, and Thailand.

  6. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-06-01

    Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ. Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis. PMID:23781126

  7. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-06-01

    Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ. Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis.

  8. HYDROCARBON AND SULFUR SENSORS FOR SOFC SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    A.M. Azad; Chris Holt; Todd Lesousky; Scott Swartz

    2003-11-01

    The following report summarizes work conducted during the Phase I program Hydrocarbon and Sulfur Sensors for SOFC Systems under contract No. DE-FC26-02NT41576. For the SOFC application, sensors are required to monitor hydrocarbons and sulfur in order to increase the operation life of SOFC components. This report discusses the development of two such sensors, one based on thick film approach for sulfur monitoring and the second galvanic based for hydrocarbon monitoring.

  9. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ. Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis. PMID:23781126

  10. Cytochromes and iron sulfur proteins in sulfur metabolism of phototrophic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, U.

    1985-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulfur metabolism in phototrophic sulfur bacteria provides the bacteria with electrons for photosynthetic electron transport chain and, with energy. Assimilatory sulfate reduction is necessary for the biosynthesis of sulfur-containing cell components. Sulfide, thiosulfate, and elemental sulfur are the sulfur compounds most commonly used by phototrophic bacteria as electron donors for anoxygenic photosynthesis. Cytochromes or other electron transfer proteins, like high-potential-iron-sulfur protein (HIPIP) function as electron acceptors or donors for most enzymatic steps during the oxidation pathways of sulfide or thiosulfate. Yet, heme- or siroheme-containing proteins themselves undergo enzymatic activities in sulfur metabolism. Sirohemes comprise a porphyrin-like prosthetic group of sulfate reductase. eenzymatic reactions involve electron transfer. Electron donors or acceptors are necessary for each reaction. Cytochromes and iron sulfur problems, are able to transfer electrons.

  11. Ceramic-metal seals for advanced battery systems. [sodium sulfur and lithium sulfur batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, L.

    1978-01-01

    The search for materials which are electrochemically compatible with the lithium sulfur and sodium sulfur systems is discussed. The use liquid or braze alloys, titanium hydrite coatings, and tungsten yttria for bonding beryllium with ceramic is examined.

  12. Are the clouds of Venus sulfuric acid.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, A. T.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown that strong aqueous sulfuric acid solutions have the right refractive index and freeze at Venusian cloud temperature, explain the dryness of the Venusian stratosphere, are consistent with some features of the Venusian IR spectrum, and do not absorb in highly reflecting areas of Venus. It is also indicated that such solutions should be produced by reactions between known atmospheric constituents and most sulfur-bearing rock at the Venusian surface temperature, and require only small amounts of sulfur consistent with its cosmic abundance and with the amounts of other volatile elements present in the atmosphere. It is believed therefore that the clouds of Venus consist of sulfuric acid solutions.

  13. Elemental sulfur in Eddy County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinds, Jim S.; Cunningham, Richard R.

    1970-01-01

    Sulfur has been reported in Eddy County, N. Mex., in rocks ranging from Silurian to Holocene in age at depths of 0-15,020 feet. Targets of present exploration are Permian formations in the Delaware Basin and northwest shelf areas at depths of less than 4,000 feet. Most of the reported sulfur occurrences in the shelf area are in the 'Abo' (as used by some subsurface geologists), Yeso, and San Andres Formations and the Artesia Group. Sulfur deposition in the dense dolomites of the 'Abo,' Yeso, and San Andres Formations is attributed to the reduction of ionic sulfate by hydrogen sulfide in formation waters in zones of preexisting porosity and permeability. A similar origin accounts for most of the sulfur deposits in the formations of the Artesia Group, but some of the sulfur in these formations may have originated in place through the alteration of anhydrite to carbonate and sulfur by the metabolic processes of bacteria in the presence of hydrocarbons. Exploration in the Delaware Basin area is directed primarily toward the Castile Formation. Sulfur deposits in the Castile Formation are found in irregular masses of cavernous brecciated secondary carbonate rock enveloped by impermeable anhydrite. The carbonate masses, or 'castiles,' probably originated as collapse features resulting from subsurface solution and upward stopping. Formation of carbonate rock and sulfur in the castiles is attributed to the reduction of brecciated anhydrite by bacteria and hydrocarbons in the same process ascribed to the formation of carbonate and sulfur in the caprocks of salt domes.

  14. Sulfur recovery process including removal of residual sulfur from Claus catalyst after regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Cabanaw, B.E.

    1990-03-13

    This patent describes a process for the recovery of sulfur. It comprises: passing an acid gas feedstream having as a sulfur species essentially only hydrogen sulfide therein to a Claus plant comprising a thermal conversion zone and at least one Claus catalytic reaction zone operated under adsorption conditions including temperature for forming and depositing a preponderance of sulfur formed on catalyst therein.

  15. 40 CFR 52.1881 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... amount of hydrogen peroxide absorbent. (ii) The test methods and procedures used for determining... sulfuric acid by the contact process by burning elemental sulfur, alkylation acid, hydrogen sulfide... gas containing a total sulfur content expressed as hydrogen sulfide in excess of 350 grains...

  16. Binding mechanism of sulfur and dehydrogenated polyacrylonitrile in sulfur/polymer composite cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, The Nam Long; Ghaznavi, Mahmoudreza; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Yongguang; Konarov, Aishuak; Sadhu, Mikhail; Tangirala, Ravichandra; Chen, P.

    2013-11-01

    A composite consisting of sulfur/dehydrogenated polyacrylonitrile is one of the most promising cathode materials for use in rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries. However, the reported sulfur contents have been low, less than 50 wt%, which compromise the intrinsic high specific capacity and energy of elemental sulfur and hence decrease significantly the specific energy of the composite. To identify the potential to further increase the sulfur content, we elucidate the binding mechanism of sulfur and polyacrylonitrile in their composite. The heat treatment experiments at varying timespans with excess sulfur showed a constancy of sulfur content after a critical length of timespan, indicating the saturation of sulfur in the structure of dehydrogenated polyacrylonitrile. Based on molecular structure and size consideration, it is proposed that the binding involves the formation of an 8 membered ring of sulfur embedded between 4 heterocyclic rings of dehydrogenated polyacrylonitrile. From this model and experimental results, we show that there exists an upper limit of sulfur content in the sulfur/dehydrogenated polyacrylonitrile composite at 56 wt%.

  17. Characterization of Sulfur Compounds in Coffee Beans by Sulfur K-XANES Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenberg, H.; Hormes, J.; Prange, A.; Modrow, H.

    2007-02-02

    In this 'feasibility study' the influence of roasting on the sulfur speciation in Mexican coffee beans was investigated by sulfur K-XANES Spectroscopy. Spectra of green and slightly roasted beans could be fitted to a linear combination of 'standard' reference spectra for biological samples, whereas longer roasting obviously involves formation of additional sulfur compounds in considerable amounts.

  18. One-step apexification in immature tooth using grey mineral trioxide aggregate as an apical barrier and autologus platelet rich fibrin membrane as an internal matrix

    PubMed Central

    Rudagi, Kavitarani B; Rudagi, BM

    2012-01-01

    Immature teeth with necrotic pulp and periapical lesion are difficult to treat via conventional endodontic therapy. Numerous procedures and materials have been utilized to induce root-end barrier formation. Traditionally, calcium hydroxide has been the material of choice for the apexification of immature permanent teeth; however, Mineral Trioxide Aggregate holds significant promise as an alternative to multiple treatments with calcium hydroxide. One of the technical problems associated with the placement of the restorative materials used as artificial barrier is to prevent overfill and underfill. Using a matrix avoids the extrusion of the material into the periodontal tissues. This case report presents the successful healing and apexification with combined use of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate as an apical barrier, and autologus platelet rich fibrin membrane as an internal matrix. PMID:22557824

  19. Graphene-wrapped sulfur nanospheres with ultra-high sulfur loading for high energy density lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya; Guo, Jinxin; Zhang, Jun; Su, Qingmei; Du, Gaohui

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery with high theoretical energy density is one of the most promising energy storage systems for electric vehicles and intermittent renewable energy. However, due to the poor conductivity of the active material, considerable weight of the electrode is occupied by the conductive additives. Here we report a graphene-wrapped sulfur nanospheres composite (S-nanosphere@G) with sulfur content up to 91 wt% as the high energy density cathode material for Li-S battery. The sulfur nanospheres with diameter of 400-500 nm are synthesized through a solution-based approach with the existence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Then the sulfur nanospheres are uniformly wrapped by conductive graphene sheets through the electrostatic interaction between graphene oxide and PVP, followed by reducing of graphene oxide with hydrazine. The design of graphene wrapped sulfur nanoarchitecture provides flexible conductive graphene coating with void space to accommodate the volume expansion of sulfur and to minimize polysulfide dissolution. As a result, the S-nanosphere@G nanocomposite with 91 wt% sulfur shows a reversible initial capacity of 970 mA h g-1 and an average columbic efficiency > 96% over 100 cycles at a rate of 0.2 C. Taking the total mass of electrode into account, the S-nanosphere@G composite is a promising cathode material for high energy density Li-S batteries.

  20. Inspection, testing, and operating requiremens for the packaging and shipping of uranium trioxide in 55-gallon Department of Transportation (DOT) Specification 6M shipping packagings

    SciTech Connect

    Toomer, D.V.

    1991-06-01

    This document identifies the inspection, testing and operating requirements for the packaging, loading, and shipping of uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}) in 55-gallon DOT Specification 6M shipping packagings from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Compliance with this document assures established controls for the purchasing, packaging, loading, and shipping of DOT Specification 6M shipping packagings are maintained in strict accordance with applicable Code of Federal Regulations (CFRs) and Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Sulfur-bridged BODIPY DYEmers.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Johannes; Böker, Birte; Brandhorst, Kai; Funk, Markus; Bröring, Martin

    2013-08-19

    Reactions of BODIPY monomers with sulfur nucleophiles and electrophiles result in the formation of new BODIPY dimers. Mono- and disulfur bridges are established, and the new dyestuff molecules were studied with respect to their structural, optical, and electrochemical properties. X-ray diffraction analyses reveal individual angulated orientations of the BODIPY subunits in all cases. DFT calculations provide solution conformers of the DYEmers which deviate in a specific manner from the crystallographic results. Clear exciton-like splittings are observed in the absorption spectra, with maxima at up to 628 nm, in combination with the expected weak fluorescence in polar solvents. A strong communication between the BODIPY subunits was detected by cyclic voltammetry, where two separated one-electron oxidation and reduction waves with peak-to-peak potential differences of 120-400 mV are observed. The qualitative applicability of the exciton model by Kasha for the interpretation of the absorption spectral shape with respect to the conformational state, subunit orientation and distance, and conjugation through the different sulfur bridges, is discussed in detail for the new BODIPY derivatives. This work is part of our concept of DYEmers, where the covalent oligomerisation of BODIPY-type dye molecules with close distances is leading to new functional dyes with predictable properties. PMID:23843344

  2. Sulfur-carbon nanocomposites and their application as cathode materials in lithium-sulfur batteries

    DOEpatents

    Liang, Chengdu; Dudney, Nancy J; Howe, Jane Y

    2015-05-05

    The invention is directed in a first aspect to a sulfur-carbon composite material comprising: (i) a bimodal porous carbon component containing therein a first mode of pores which are mesopores, and a second mode of pores which are micropores; and (ii) elemental sulfur contained in at least a portion of said micropores. The invention is also directed to the aforesaid sulfur-carbon composite as a layer on a current collector material; a lithium ion battery containing the sulfur-carbon composite in a cathode therein; as well as a method for preparing the sulfur-composite material.

  3. Sulfur recovery plant and process using oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, J.W.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes a process for recovery of sulfur from a gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide. The process consists the steps of: introducing a thermal reaction mixture comprising the gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide, and an oxygen-enriched stream of air or pure oxygen into a combustion zone of a Claus furnace; combusting the thermal reaction mixture in the Claus furnace to thereby produce hot combustion gases comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; introducing the hot combustion gases into a Claus catalytic reactor; subjecting the hot combustion gases in the catalytic reactor to Claus reaction conditions in the presence of a Claus catalyst to thereby produce a Claus plant gaseous effluent stream comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; introducing the Claus plant gaseous effluent into a condenser to thereby produce liquid sulfur, which is recovered, and a gaseous condenser effluent, which comprises hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide and water and which is divided into a recycle portion and a tailgas portion; converting substantially all sulfur species in the recycle portion of the gaseous condenser effluent to hydrogen sulfide to thereby form condenser effluent comprising hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and water; removing water from the recycle portion of the condenser; and moderating the temperature in the Claus furnace by returning at least a portion of the dried recycle condenser, as a diluent stream, to a combustion zone of the Claus furnace.

  4. Sulfur recovery plant and process using oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, J.W.

    1989-01-17

    This patent describes a process for the recovery of sulfur from a gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide, the process comprising the steps of: (a) introducing a thermal reaction mixture comprising (1) the gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide, and (2) an oxygen-enriched stream of air or pure oxygen into a combustion zone of a Claus furnace; (b) combusting the thermal reaction mixture in the Claus furnace to thereby produce hot combustion gases comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; (c) introducing the hot combustion gases into a Claus catalytic reactor; (d) subjecting the hot combustion gases in the catalytic reactor to Claus reaction conditions in the presence of a Claus catalyst to thereby produce a Claus plant gaseous effluent stream comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; (e) introducing the Claus plant gaseous effluent into a condenser to thereby produce liquid sulfur, which is recovered, and a gaseous condenser effluent, which comprises hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide and water; (f) converting substantially all sulfur species in the gaseous condenser effluent to hydrogen sulfide, to thereby form a condenser effluent comprising hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and water; (g) removing water from the condenser effluent from step (f); and (h) moderating the temperature in the Claus furnace by returning at least a portion of the dried condenser effluent from step (g), as a diluent stream, to a combustion zone of the Claus furnace in step (a) above.

  5. Stability of sulfur slopes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clow, G. D.; Carr, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanical properties of elemental sulfur are such that the upper crust of Io cannot be primarily sulfur. For heat flows in the range 100-1000 ergs/sq cm sec sulfur becomes ductile within several hundred meters of the surface and would prevent the formation of calderas with depths greater than this. However, the one caldera for which precise depth data are available is 2 km deep, and this value may be typical. A study of the mechanical equilibrium of simple slopes shows that the depth to the zone of rapid ductile flow strongly controls the maximum heights for sulfur slopes. Sulfur scarps with heights greater than 1 km will fail for all heat flows greater than 180 ergs/sq cm sec and slope angles greater than 22.5 deg. The observed relief on Io is inconsistent with that anticipated for a predominantly sulfur crust. However, a silicate crust with several percent sulfur included satisfies both the mechanical constraints and the observed presence of sulfur on Io.

  6. Stabilized sulfur binding using activated fillers

    DOEpatents

    Kalb, Paul D.; Vagin, Vyacheslav P.; Vagin, Sergey P.

    2015-07-21

    A method of making a stable, sulfur binding composite comprising impregnating a solid aggregate with an organic modifier comprising unsaturated hydrocarbons with at least one double or triple covalent bond between adjacent carbon atoms to create a modifier-impregnated aggregate; heating and drying the modifier-impregnated aggregate to activate the surface of the modifier-impregnated aggregate for reaction with sulfur.

  7. Sulfur extended asphalt pavement evaluation: Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, J. P.

    1982-09-01

    This summary report overviews two previously issued study reports. One report assesses The availability and pricing of sulfur with respect to sulfur extended asphalt (SEA) paving mixture is assessed. A laboratory oriented testing program which was principally used to examine the durability and aging characteristics of SEA paving mixtures is reported.

  8. Ambient Air Monitoring for Sulfur Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, Joseph; Newman, Leonard

    1973-01-01

    A literature review of analytical techniques available for the study of compounds at low concentrations points up some of the areas where further research is needed. Compounds reviewed are sulfur dioxide, sulfuric acid, ammonium sulfate and bisulfate, metal sulfates, hydrogen sulfide, and organic sulfides. (BL)

  9. Sulfur in Distillers Grains for Dairy Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sulfur is an essential element needed by animals for many functions. About 0.15% of the body weight is sulfur. It is found in the amino acids methionine, cysteine, cystine, homocysteine, and taurine; in chondroitin sulfate of cartilage; and in the B-vitamins, thiamin and biotin. Methionine, thiam...

  10. Heterogeneous photocatalytic reactions of sulfur aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Samokhvalov, Alexander

    2011-11-18

    Sulfur aromatic compounds, such as mono-, di-, tri-, and tetraalkyl-substituted thiophene, benzothiophenes, dibenzothiophenes, are the molecular components of many fossils (petroleum, oil shale, tar sands, bitumen). Structural units of natural, cross-linked heteroaromatic polymers present in brown coals, turf, and soil are similar to those of sulfur aromatic compounds. Many sulfur aromatic compounds are found in the streams of petroleum refining and upgrading (naphthas, gas oils) and in the consumer products (gasoline, diesel, jet fuels, heating fuels). Besides fossils, the structural fragments of sulfur aromatic compounds are present in molecules of certain organic semiconductors, pesticides, small molecule drugs, and in certain biomolecules present in human body (pheomelanin pigments). Photocatalysis is the frontier area of physical chemistry that studies chemical reactions initiated by absorption of photons by photocatalysts, that is, upon electronic rather than thermal activation, under "green" ambient conditions. This review provides systematization and critical review of the fundamental chemical and physicochemical information on heterogeneous photocatalysis of sulfur aromatic compounds accumulated in the last 20-30 years. Specifically, the following topics are covered: physicochemical properties of sulfur aromatic compounds, major classes of heterogeneous photocatalysts, mechanisms and reactive intermediates of photocatalytic reactions of sulfur aromatic compounds, and the selectivity of these reactions. Quantum chemical calculations of properties and structures of sulfur aromatic compounds, their reactive intermediates, and the structure of adsorption complexes formed on the surface of the photocatalysts are also discussed.

  11. Sulfur oxide adsorbents and emissions control

    DOEpatents

    Li, Liyu; King, David L.

    2006-12-26

    High capacity sulfur oxide absorbents utilizing manganese-based octahedral molecular sieve (Mn--OMS) materials are disclosed. An emissions reduction system for a combustion exhaust includes a scrubber 24 containing these high capacity sulfur oxide absorbents located upstream from a NOX filter 26 or particulate trap.

  12. Fate of excess sulfur in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Rennenberg, H.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanisms which have evolved in higher plants to cope with excess sulfur in their environments are reviewed. Survival in a sulfur-rich environment is seldom achieved through avoidance of the intake of sulfur. The presence of excess sulfur in the soil or in the air usually results in an intake of excess sulfur into plants. An immediate injury by the excess sulfur taken up is, however, prevented by a series of metabolic processes. Storage of excess sulfur in a metabolically inactive compartment, i.e. the vacuole, appears to occur in most plants. The finding of a storage of glutathione is several investigations suggests that with increasing accumulation of sulfate its reduction also increases. Under these conditions the cysteine concentration in different compartments of the cell may still be maintained at a low level by the incorporation of the excess cysteine synthesized into glutathione. This peptide appears to be the storage form of reduced sulfur in higher plants. 167 references, 2 figures.

  13. Sulfuric Acid and Water: Paradoxes of Dilution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenson, I. A.

    2004-01-01

    On equilibrium properties of aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid, Julius Thomsen has marked that the heat evolved on diluting liquid sulfuric acid with water is a continuous function of the water used, and excluded absolutely the acceptance of definite hydrates as existing in the solution. Information about thermochemical measurement, a discussion…

  14. Temperature anisotropy of the Jovian sulfur nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eviatar, A.; Siscoe, G. L.; Mekler, Y.

    1979-01-01

    The apparent paradox between the reported observation of a 3-eV gyration energy of Jupiter's ionized sulfur nebula and its observed thickness is discussed. An observation of the thickness of the cloud taken nearly edge-on is presented and shown to imply a large bounce-averaged anisotropy of the sulfur in temperature. These observations are used to construct a self-consistent model of the sulfur nebula in which the sulfur ions are injected by Io as ions and remain sufficiently collisionless in the magnetosphere to maintain the anisotropy for a time longer than a characteristic diffusion time. It is also shown that the proton-electron plasma is collisionally thermalized and provides an adequate means of tapping the rotational energy of the planet to provide the power radiated in the sulfur lines.

  15. Drug Targets in Mycobacterial Sulfur Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Devayani P.; Muse, Wilson B.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2011-01-01

    The identification of new antibacterial targets is urgently needed to address multidrug resistant and latent tuberculosis infection. Sulfur metabolic pathways are essential for survival and the expression of virulence in many pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, microbial sulfur metabolic pathways are largely absent in humans and therefore, represent unique targets for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the enzymes associated with the production of sulfated and reduced sulfur-containing metabolites in Mycobacteria. Small molecule inhibitors of these catalysts represent valuable chemical tools that can be used to investigate the role of sulfur metabolism throughout the Mycobacterial lifecycle and may also represent new leads for drug development. In this light, we also summarize recent progress in the development of inhibitors of sulfur metabolism enzymes. PMID:17970225

  16. Sulfur chemistry in bacterial leaching of pyrite.

    PubMed

    Schippers, A; Jozsa, P; Sand, W

    1996-09-01

    In the case of pyrite bioleaching by Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, an organism without sulfur-oxidizing capacity, besides the production of tetra- and pentathionate, a considerable accumulation of elemental sulfur occurred. A similar result was obtained for chemical oxidation assays with acidic, sterile iron(III) ion-containing solutions. In the case of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, only slight amounts of elemental sulfur were detectable because of the organism's capacity to oxidize sulfur compounds. In the course of oxidative, chemical pyrite degradation under alkaline conditions, the accumulation of tetrathionate, trithionate, and thiosulfate occurred. The data indicate that thiosulfate, trithionate, tetrathionate, and disulfane-monosulfonic acid are key intermediate sulfur compounds in oxidative pyrite degradation. A novel (cyclic) leaching mechanism is proposed which basically is indirect.

  17. Sulfur Chemistry in Bacterial Leaching of Pyrite

    PubMed Central

    Schippers, A.; Jozsa, P.; Sand, W.

    1996-01-01

    In the case of pyrite bioleaching by Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, an organism without sulfur-oxidizing capacity, besides the production of tetra- and pentathionate, a considerable accumulation of elemental sulfur occurred. A similar result was obtained for chemical oxidation assays with acidic, sterile iron(III) ion-containing solutions. In the case of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, only slight amounts of elemental sulfur were detectable because of the organism's capacity to oxidize sulfur compounds. In the course of oxidative, chemical pyrite degradation under alkaline conditions, the accumulation of tetrathionate, trithionate, and thiosulfate occurred. The data indicate that thiosulfate, trithionate, tetrathionate, and disulfane-monosulfonic acid are key intermediate sulfur compounds in oxidative pyrite degradation. A novel (cyclic) leaching mechanism is proposed which basically is indirect. PMID:16535406

  18. Seawater sulfur isotope fluctuations in the Cretaceous.

    PubMed

    Paytan, Adina; Kastner, Miriam; Campbell, Douglas; Thiemens, Mark H

    2004-06-11

    The exogenic sulfur cycle is tightly coupled with the carbon and oxygen cycles, and therefore a central component of Earth's biogeochemistry. Here we present a high-resolution record of the sulfur isotopic composition of seawater sulfate for the Cretaceous. The general enrichment of isotopically light sulfur that prevailed during the Cretaceous may have been due to increased volcanic and hydrothermal activity. Two excursions toward isotopically lighter sulfur represent periods of lower rates of pyrite burial, implying a shift in the location of organic carbon burial to terrestrial or open-ocean settings. The concurrent changes in seawater sulfur and inorganic carbon isotopic compositions imply short-term variability in atmospheric oxygen partial pressure.

  19. A facile route to core-shell nanoparticulate formation of arsenic trioxide for effective solid tumor treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zongjun; Liu, Hanyu; Zhou, Hualu; Zhu, Xianglong; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Chi, Xiaoqin; Shan, Hong; Gao, Jinhao

    2016-02-01

    Arsenic trioxide has achieved great clinical success in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). However, it is difficult to replicate the success in other cancers, such as solid tumors, in part because of the rapid renal clearance and dose-limiting toxicity. Nanotechnology is expected to overcome these disadvantages through altering its pharmacokinetics and concentrating the drug at the desired sites. Herein, we report a ``one-pot'' method to develop arsenic-based nanodrugs by in situ coating the as-prepared arsenic nanocomplexes with porous silica shells. This process can be easily reproduced and scaled up because no complicated synthesis and purification steps are involved. This core-shell embedding method endows nanodrugs with high loading capacity (57.9 wt%) and a prolonged pH-responsive releasing profile, which is crucial to increase the drug concentration at tumor sites and improve the drug efficacy. Based on these unique features, the nanodrugs significantly inhibit the growth of solid tumors without adverse side effects. Therefore, we anticipate that the arsenic-based nanodrugs generated by this facile synthetic route may be a powerful and alternative strategy for solid tumor therapy.Arsenic trioxide has achieved great clinical success in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). However, it is difficult to replicate the success in other cancers, such as solid tumors, in part because of the rapid renal clearance and dose-limiting toxicity. Nanotechnology is expected to overcome these disadvantages through altering its pharmacokinetics and concentrating the drug at the desired sites. Herein, we report a ``one-pot'' method to develop arsenic-based nanodrugs by in situ coating the as-prepared arsenic nanocomplexes with porous silica shells. This process can be easily reproduced and scaled up because no complicated synthesis and purification steps are involved. This core-shell embedding method endows nanodrugs with high loading capacity

  20. Sulfur nanocrystals anchored graphene composite with highly improved electrochemical performance for lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Dong, Zimin; Wang, Xiuli; Zhao, Xuyang; Tu, Jiangping; Su, Qingmei; Du, Gaohui

    2014-12-01

    Two kinds of graphene-sulfur composites with 50 wt% of sulfur are prepared using hydrothermal method and thermal mixing, respectively. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectra mapping show that sulfur nanocrystals with size of ∼5 nm dispersed on graphene sheets homogeneously for the sample prepared by hydrothermal method (NanoS@G). While for the thermal mixed graphene-sulfur composite (S-G mixture), sulfur shows larger and uneven size (50-200 nm). X-ray Photoelectron Spectra (XPS) reveals the strong chemical bonding between the sulfur nanocrystals and graphene. Comparing with the S-G mixture, the NanoS@G composite shows highly improved electrochemical performance as cathode for lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery. The NanoS@G composite delivers an initial capacity of 1400 mAh g-1 with the sulfur utilization of 83.7% at a current density of 335 mA g-1. The capacity keeps above 720 mAh g-1 over 100 cycles. The strong adherence of the sulfur nanocrystals on graphene immobilizes sulfur and polysulfides species and suppressed the "shuttle effect", resulting higher coulombic efficiency and better capacity retention. Electrochemical impedance also suggests that the strong bonding enabled rapid electronic/ionic transport and improved electrochemical kinetics, therefore good rate capability is obtained. These results demonstrate that the NanoS@G composite is a very promising candidate for high-performance Li-S batteries.

  1. A mesoporous carbon–sulfur composite as cathode material for high rate lithium sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hyunji; Zhao, Xiaohui; Kim, Dul-Sun; Ahn, Hyo-Jun; Kim, Ki-Won; Cho, Kwon-Koo; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • CMK-3 mesoporous carbon was synthesized as conducting reservoir for housing sulfur. • Sulfur/CMK-3 composites were prepared by two-stage thermal treatment. • The composite at 300 °C for 20 h shows improved electrochemical properties. - Abstract: Sulfur composite was prepared by encapsulating sulfur into CMK-3 mesoporous carbon with different heating times and then used as the cathode material for lithium sulfur batteries. Thermal treatment at 300 °C plays an important role in the sulfur encapsulation process. With 20 h of heating time, a portion of sulfur remained on the surface of carbon, whereas with 60 h of heating time, sulfur is confined deeply in the small pores of carbon that cannot be fully exploited in the redox reaction, thus causing low capacity. The S/CMK-3 composite with thermal treatment for 40 h at 300 °C contained 51.3 wt.% sulfur and delivered a high initial capacity of 1375 mA h g{sup −1} at 0.1 C. Moreover, it showed good capacity retention of 704 mA h g{sup −1} at 0.1 C and 578 mA h g{sup −1} at 2 C even after 100 cycles, which proves its potential as a cathode material for high capability lithium sulfur batteries.

  2. Phanerozoic cycles of sedimentary carbon and sulfur

    PubMed Central

    Garrels, Robert M.; Lerman, Abraham

    1981-01-01

    A reservoir model of a Recent steady-state sedimentary system in which the reduced sulfur and oxidized sulfur reservoirs were coupled with the oxidized carbon and reduced carbon reservoirs was constructed. The time curve of the sulfur isotope ratios of the sedimentary sulfate reservoir was used to drive the model back to the beginning of Cambrian time (600 million years ago), producing the reservoir sizes and isotope values and material fluxes of the carbon-sulfur system. The predicted values of carbon isotope ratios of the carbonate reservoir agree well with observed values, showing that the model is basically sound. Some general conclusions from this success are (i) material flux rates in the carbon-oxygen-sulfur system of the geologic past (averaged over tens of millions of years) lie within about a factor of 2 of Recent rates. (ii) The oxidation-reduction balances of Phanerozoic time were dominated by reciprocal relationships between carbon and sulfur compounds. (iii) The rate of production of atmospheric oxygen by storage in sediments of organic carbon of photosynthetic origin increased from the Cambrian Period to the Permian Period and declined somewhat from the Permian Period to the Present. (iv) The storage of oxygen in oxidized sulfur compounds kept pace (within the limits of the data) with oxygen production. (v) Transfer of oxygen from CO2 to SO4 from the Cambrian to the Permian Period was several times the Recent free oxygen content of the atmosphere. PMID:16593066

  3. Phanerozoic cycles of sedimentary carbon and sulfur.

    PubMed

    Garrels, R M; Lerman, A

    1981-08-01

    A reservoir model of a Recent steady-state sedimentary system in which the reduced sulfur and oxidized sulfur reservoirs were coupled with the oxidized carbon and reduced carbon reservoirs was constructed. The time curve of the sulfur isotope ratios of the sedimentary sulfate reservoir was used to drive the model back to the beginning of Cambrian time (600 million years ago), producing the reservoir sizes and isotope values and material fluxes of the carbon-sulfur system. The predicted values of carbon isotope ratios of the carbonate reservoir agree well with observed values, showing that the model is basically sound. Some general conclusions from this success are (i) material flux rates in the carbon-oxygen-sulfur system of the geologic past (averaged over tens of millions of years) lie within about a factor of 2 of Recent rates. (ii) The oxidation-reduction balances of Phanerozoic time were dominated by reciprocal relationships between carbon and sulfur compounds. (iii) The rate of production of atmospheric oxygen by storage in sediments of organic carbon of photosynthetic origin increased from the Cambrian Period to the Permian Period and declined somewhat from the Permian Period to the Present. (iv) The storage of oxygen in oxidized sulfur compounds kept pace (within the limits of the data) with oxygen production. (v) Transfer of oxygen from CO(2) to SO(4) from the Cambrian to the Permian Period was several times the Recent free oxygen content of the atmosphere.

  4. Sodium sulfur battery flight experiment definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Rebecca R.; Minck, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Sodium-sulfur batteries were identified as the most likely successor to nickel-hydrogen batteries for space applications. One advantage of the Na/S battery system is that the usable specific energy is two to three times that of nickel-hydrogen batteries. This represents a significant launch cost savings or increased payload mass capabilities. Sodium-sulfur batteries support NASA OAST's proposed Civil Space Technology Initiative goal of a factor of two improvement in spacecraft power system performance, as well as the proposed Spacecraft 2000 initiative. The sodium-sulfur battery operates at between 300 and 400 C, using liquid sodium and sulfur/polysulfide electrodes and solid ceramic electrolyte. The transport of the electrode materials to the surface of the electrolyte is through wicking/capillary forces. These critical transport functions must be demonstrated under actual microgravity conditions before sodium-sulfur batteries can be confidently utilized in space. Ford Aerospace Corporation, under contract to NASA Lewis Research Center, is currently working on the sodium-sulfur battery space flight experiment definition study. The objective is to design the experiment that will demonstrate operation of the sodium-sulfur battery/cell in the space environment with particular emphasis on evaluation of microgravity effects. Experimental payload definitions were completed and preliminary designs of the experiment were defined.

  5. Phanerozoic cycles of sedimentary carbon and sulfur.

    PubMed

    Garrels, R M; Lerman, A

    1981-08-01

    A reservoir model of a Recent steady-state sedimentary system in which the reduced sulfur and oxidized sulfur reservoirs were coupled with the oxidized carbon and reduced carbon reservoirs was constructed. The time curve of the sulfur isotope ratios of the sedimentary sulfate reservoir was used to drive the model back to the beginning of Cambrian time (600 million years ago), producing the reservoir sizes and isotope values and material fluxes of the carbon-sulfur system. The predicted values of carbon isotope ratios of the carbonate reservoir agree well with observed values, showing that the model is basically sound. Some general conclusions from this success are (i) material flux rates in the carbon-oxygen-sulfur system of the geologic past (averaged over tens of millions of years) lie within about a factor of 2 of Recent rates. (ii) The oxidation-reduction balances of Phanerozoic time were dominated by reciprocal relationships between carbon and sulfur compounds. (iii) The rate of production of atmospheric oxygen by storage in sediments of organic carbon of photosynthetic origin increased from the Cambrian Period to the Permian Period and declined somewhat from the Permian Period to the Present. (iv) The storage of oxygen in oxidized sulfur compounds kept pace (within the limits of the data) with oxygen production. (v) Transfer of oxygen from CO(2) to SO(4) from the Cambrian to the Permian Period was several times the Recent free oxygen content of the atmosphere. PMID:16593066

  6. A comparative evaluation of the effect of various additives on selected physical properties of white mineral trioxide aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Anushree; Pushpa, Shankarappa; Arunagiri, Doraiswamy; Sawhny, Asheesh; Misra, Abhinav; Sujatha, Ramamurthy

    2015-01-01

    Aims: This study examined the setting time, compressive strength, and pH of white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) mixed with various additives: Calcium chloride (CaCl2), calcium formate (CaF), disodium hydrogen orthophosphate (Na2HPO4). Materials and Methods: Group 1 (Control) was obtained by mixing MTA with distilled water. In Groups 2 and 3, MTA containing 10% CaCl2 and 20% CaF, respectively, was mixed with distilled water. In Group 4, MTA was mixed with 15% Na2HPO4. Setting time, compressive strength, and pH of each group were examined. Statistical Analysis Used: Analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 14. A P-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Comparison of mean values was done using analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post-hoc Games-Howell test. Results: The setting time of test groups were significantly shorter than that of control group (P < 0.001). The compressive strengths of test groups were lower than that of control group (P < 0.001). The pH value obtained for Groups 3 and 4 were higher than that of the control group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Study result showed that additives significantly reduced the setting time of MTA and also maintained the pH at a high value. However, there was not much improvement in the compressive strength of the material. PMID:26069412

  7. Root canal filling in primary molars without successors: Mineral trioxide aggregate versus gutta-percha/AH-Plus.

    PubMed

    Bezgin, Tugba; Ozgul, Betul Memiş; Arikan, Volkan; Sari, Saziye

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical and radiographical success of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and gutta-percha/AH-Plus used as a root canal filling material in primary second molars without successors. A total of 16 patients (9 girls, 7 boys) aged 6-13 years (mean: 10.5) were selected and randomly distributed into the treatment groups. Children were recalled for clinical and radiographic examination at 6, 12, 18, 24 and 36 months. Differences in treatment outcomes were analysed using chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests. Clinically, there was no significant difference in the success rates between the groups at the end of a 3-year follow-up period (MTA: 100%; Gutta-percha/AH-Plus: 70%) (P > 0.05). However, radiographically, there was a significant difference between the groups (MTA: 80%; gutta-percha/AH-Plus: 30%) (P < 0.05). The present study showed that MTA can be recommended for use in root canal treatment of primary molars without successors based on better radiographic success.

  8. Effective targeting of chronic myeloid leukemia initiating activity with the combination of arsenic trioxide and interferon alpha.

    PubMed

    El Eit, Rabab M; Iskandarani, Ahmad N; Saliba, Jessica L; Jabbour, Mark N; Mahfouz, Rami A; Bitar, Nizar M A; Ayoubi, Hanadi R El; Zaatari, Ghazi S; Mahon, Francois-Xavier; De Thé, Hugues B; Bazarbachi, Ali A; Nasr, Rihab R

    2014-02-15

    Imatinib is the standard of care in chronic meloid leukemia (CML) therapy. However, imatinib is not curative since most patients who discontinue therapy relapse indicating that leukemia initiating cells (LIC) are resistant. Interferon alpha (IFN) induces hematologic and cytogenetic remissions and interestingly, improved outcome was reported with the combination of interferon and imatinib. Arsenic trioxide was suggested to decrease CML LIC. We investigated the effects of arsenic and IFN on human CML cell lines or primary cells and the bone marrow retroviral transduction/transplantation murine CML model. In vitro, the combination of arsenic and IFN inhibited proliferation and activated apoptosis. Importantly, arsenic and IFN synergistically reduced the clonogenic activity of primary bone marrow cells derived from CML patients. Finally, in vivo, combined interferon and arsenic treatment, but not single agents, prolonged the survival of primary CML mice. Importantly, the combination severely impaired engraftment into untreated secondary recipients, with some recipients never developing the disease, demonstrating a dramatic decrease in CML LIC activity. Arsenic/IFN effect on CML LIC activity was significantly superior to that of imatinib. These results support further exploration of this combination, alone or with imatinib aiming at achieving CML eradication rather than long-term disease control. PMID:23934954

  9. Microbial degradation of high impact polystyrene (HIPS), an e-plastic with decabromodiphenyl oxide and antimony trioxide.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, Vini C; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan; Mohan, Arya J; Nair, Nimisha R; Bhaskar, Thallada; Pandey, Ashok

    2016-11-15

    Accumulation of electronic waste has increased catastrophically and out of that various plastic resins constitute one of the leading thrown out materials in the electronic machinery. Enrichment medium, containing high impact polystyrene (HIPS) with decabromodiphenyl oxide and antimony trioxide as sole carbon source, was used to isolate microbial cultures. The viability of these cultures in the e-plastic containing mineral medium was further confirmed by triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) reduction test. Four cultures were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing as Enterobacter sp., Citrobacter sedlakii, Alcaligenes sp. and Brevundimonas diminuta. Biodegradation experiments were carried out in flask level and gelatin supplementation (0.1% w/v) along with HIPS had increased the degradation rate to a maximum of 12.4% (w/w) within 30days. This is the first report for this kind of material. The comparison of FTIR, NMR, and TGA analysis of original and degraded e-plastic films revealed structural changes under microbial treatment. Polystyrene degradation intermediates in the culture supernatant were also detected using HPLC analysis. The gravity of biodegradation was validated by morphological changes under scanning electron microscope. All isolates displayed depolymerase activity to substantiate enzymatic degradation of e-plastic. PMID:27434738

  10. Cytotoxicity of arsenic trioxide is enhanced by (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate via suppression of ferritin in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Te-Chang; Cheng, I-Cheng; Shue, Jun-Jie; Wang, T.C.

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) treatment is a useful therapy against human acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), however, it concomitantly brings potential adverse consequences including serious side effect, human carcinogenicity and possible development of resistance. This investigation revealed that those problems might be relaxed by simultaneous application with (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), one of the major components from green tea. EGCG significantly lowered down the ATO concentration required for an effective control of APL cells, HL-60. The simultaneous treatment of ATO with EGCG induced a mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in HL-60 cells significantly, which accounted for more than 70% of the cell death in the treatment. The mechanism of apoptosis induction was elucidated. EGCG in HL-60 cells acted as a pro-oxidant enhancing intracellular hydrogen peroxide significantly. ATO, on the other hand, induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) to catalyze heme degradation, thereby provided ferrous iron for EGCG-induced hydrogen peroxide to precede Fenton reaction, which in turn generated deleterious reactive oxygen species to damage cell. In addition, EGCG inhibited expression of ferritin, which supposedly to sequester harmful ferrous iron, thereby augmented the occurrence of Fenton reaction. This investigation also provided evidence that ATO, since mainly acted to induce HO-1 in simultaneous treatment with EGCG, could be replaced by other HO-1 inducer with much less human toxicity. Furthermore, several of our preliminary investigations revealed that the enhanced cytotoxicity induced by combining heme degradation and Fenton reaction is selectively toxic to malignant but not non-malignant cells.

  11. A facile route to core-shell nanoparticulate formation of arsenic trioxide for effective solid tumor treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zongjun; Liu, Hanyu; Zhou, Hualu; Zhu, Xianglong; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Chi, Xiaoqin; Shan, Hong; Gao, Jinhao

    2016-02-21

    Arsenic trioxide has achieved great clinical success in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). However, it is difficult to replicate the success in other cancers, such as solid tumors, in part because of the rapid renal clearance and dose-limiting toxicity. Nanotechnology is expected to overcome these disadvantages through altering its pharmacokinetics and concentrating the drug at the desired sites. Herein, we report a "one-pot" method to develop arsenic-based nanodrugs by in situ coating the as-prepared arsenic nanocomplexes with porous silica shells. This process can be easily reproduced and scaled up because no complicated synthesis and purification steps are involved. This core-shell embedding method endows nanodrugs with high loading capacity (57.9 wt%) and a prolonged pH-responsive releasing profile, which is crucial to increase the drug concentration at tumor sites and improve the drug efficacy. Based on these unique features, the nanodrugs significantly inhibit the growth of solid tumors without adverse side effects. Therefore, we anticipate that the arsenic-based nanodrugs generated by this facile synthetic route may be a powerful and alternative strategy for solid tumor therapy.

  12. X-ray Diffraction Analysis of ProRoot Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Hydrated at Different pH Values

    PubMed Central

    Akhavan, Hengameh; Mohebbi, Pooneh; Firouzi, Amir; Noroozi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the chemical compounds of white ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) hydrated at different pH environments. Methods and Materials: Mixed samples of WMTA were kept in acidic (pH=5.4), neutral (pH=7.4) and alkaline (pH=9.4) environments for 48 h. Then, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was performed for both hydrated and powder forms of WMTA. Portlandite crystalline structures of environments were compared from three aspects: intensity (height of the peak, corresponding to the concentration), crystallinity (peak area/total area) and crystal size (full-width at half-maximum of the peak). Results: After matching the peaks of each sample with those of the International Center for Diffraction Data (ICDD) database, the main constituent of all set cements and powder form was found to be bismuth oxide. Acidic environment exhibited lower intensity and crystallinity of portlandite in comparison with neutral environment. Conclusion: The highest concentration and crystallinity of portlandite were observed in WMTA samples hydrated at neutral pH and the highest crystal size was detected after hydration in alkaline pH. PMID:27141218

  13. Reparative Dentinogenesis Induced by Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: A Review from the Biological and Physicochemical Points of View

    PubMed Central

    Okiji, Takashi; Yoshiba, Kunihiko

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to review the biological and physicochemical properties of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) with respect to its ability to induce reparative dentinogenesis, which involves complex cellular and molecular events leading to hard-tissue repair by newly differentiated odontoblast-like cells. Compared with that of calcium hydroxide-based materials, MTA is more efficient at inducing reparative dentinogenesis in vivo. The available literature suggests that the action of MTA is attributable to the natural wound healing process of exposed pulps, although MTA can stimulate hard-tissue-forming cells to induce matrix formation and mineralization in vitro. Physicochemical analyses have revealed that MTA not only acts as a “calcium hydroxide-releasing” material, but also interacts with phosphate-containing fluids to form apatite precipitates. MTA also shows better sealing ability and structural stability, but less potent antimicrobial activity compared with that of calcium hydroxide. The clinical outcome of direct pulp capping and pulpotomy with MTA appears quite favorable, although the number of controled prospective studies is still limited. Attempts are being conducted to improve the properties of MTA by the addition of setting accelerators and the development of new calcium silicate-based materials. PMID:20339574

  14. Arsenic trioxide inhibits accelerated allograft rejection mediated by alloreactive CD8(+) memory T cells and prolongs allograft survival time.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun; Guan, Tianjun; Gao, Chang; Lin, Yingying; Yan, Guoliang; Zhu, Maoshu; Lv, Chongshan; Xia, Junjie; Qi, Zhongquan

    2015-09-01

    CD8(+) memory T (Tm) cells are a significant barrier to transplant tolerance induction in alloantigen-primed recipients, and are insensitive to existing clinical immunosuppressants. Here, we studied the inhibition of CD8(+) Tm cells by arsenic trioxide (As2O3) for the first time. Alloantigen-primed CD8(+) Tm cells were transferred to T cell immunodeficient nude mice. The mice were subjected to heart allotransplantation, and treated with As2O3. The transplant survival time was determined, and the inhibitory effects of As2O3 on CD8(+) Tm cell-mediated immune rejection were assessed through serological studies and inspection of the transplanted heart and lymphoid organs. We found that As2O3 treatment prolonged the mean survival time of the graft and reduced the number of CD8(+) Tm cells in the spleen and lymph nodes. The expression of the genes encoding interleukin (IL)-2, and IFN-γ was reduced, while expression of IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β was increased in the transplant. Our findings show that As2O3 treatment inhibits allograft rejection mediated by alloreactive CD8(+) Tm cells in the mouse heart transplantation model.

  15. Comparing Gray and White Mineral Trioxide Aggregate as a Repair Material for Furcation Perforation: An in Vitro Dye Extraction Study

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kiran; Baba, Suheel Manzoor; Jaiswal, Shikha; Venkataraghavan, Karthik; Jani, Mehul

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Furcation perforation can have a negative impact on the prognosis of the affected tooth by compromising the attached apparatus. Hence these perforations require immediate repair. A variety of materials have been suggested for repair, of that MTA is the most promising material. The purpose of this study was to compare the ability of Gray and White MTA to seal furcation perforations using a dye extraction method under spectrophotometer. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 permanent mandibular molars were randomly divided into four experimental groups of 15 samples each as follows: Group A: Perforation repaired with White MTA. Group B: Perforation repaired with Gray MTA. Group C: Perforation left unsealed (positive). Group D: without perforation (negative). Dye extraction was performed using full concentration nitric acid. Dye absorbance was measured at 550 nm using spectrophotometer. The data analyzed using one-way-Anova Ratio and Unpaired t-test showing statistically significance difference among the groups. Result: It was seen that Group D samples without perforation showed least absorbance followed by Group A (perforation repaired with White MTA) and Group B (perforation repaired with Gray MTA). Group C (perforation left unsealed) showed highest absorbance. Conclusion: The White and Gray Mineral Trioxide Aggregate performed similarly as a furcation perforation repair material. There was no significant difference between the Gray MTA and White MTA. PMID:25478452

  16. In Vitro Evaluation of Different Solvents for Retrieval of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Calcium-Enriched Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Shojaee, Nooshin Sadat; Adl, Alireza; Sobhnamayan, Fereshte; Khademi, Azam; Hamedi, Mina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different solvents; carbonic acid (H2CO3), hydrochloric acid (HCl), chlorhexidine (CHX) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) on the surface hardness of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement. Methods and Materials: Plexiglass molds were prepared and filled with Angelus MTA or CEM cement and then exposed to 2% carbonic acid, 37% hydrochloric acid, 2% chlorhexidine, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite and normal saline at intervals of 1 and 21 days, respectively (n=4). Surface microhardness of all specimens was analyzed by a universal testing machine and an electron microscope for some selected samples. Data were analyzed using the three-way ANOVA. Subgroup analysis was performed by Student’s t-test, One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s tests. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: On the first day, all solvents and on 21st day HCl, and H2CO3 were more effective in reducing the microhardness of MTA compared to CEM cement (P<0.05). Conclusion: The two experimental cements were differently affected by the solvents at specific time intervals. The solvents were more effective on MTA. PMID:27471536

  17. Treatment of experimental furcation perforations with mineral trioxide aggregate, platelet rich plasma or platelet rich fibrin in dogs' teeth.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Hosam E; Abu-Seida, Ashraf M; Hashem, Ahmed A; El-Khawlani, Mohammed M

    2016-06-01

    This work evaluates the effect of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), platelet rich plasma (PRP) or platelet rich fibrin (PRF) on healing of non-contaminated and contaminated furcation perforations. A total of 192 teeth of 12 dogs was divided into three equal groups according to evaluation period. Each group was further subdivided into MTA, PRP, PRF, negative and positive control subgroups. Each experimental subgroup was further subdivided according to perforation status into non-contaminated and contaminated subdivisions. Root canal therapy was carried out and furcation perforation was made in all teeth except in negative control subgroup. The furcation perforation was repaired immediately in subdivision (1) and after 4 weeks in subdivision (2). The change in vertical bone loss was measured by radiography. Inflammatory cell count, cemental deposition, new bone formation, bone resorption and epithelial proliferation were assessed. Both PRP and PRF demonstrated statistically significant reduction in vertical bone loss and inflammatory cell count than MTA. No significant difference was found between MTA, PRP and PRF in cemental deposition, new bone formation, bone resorption and epithelial proliferation. The non-contaminated teeth demonstrated better treatment outcomes than the contaminated teeth. In conclusion, PRP and PRF are successful treatment options for repairing of furcation perforation in both non-contaminated and contaminated teeth in dogs with superior outcomes in non contaminated teeth. PMID:27033179

  18. Bacterial Leakage of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate, Calcium-Enriched Mixture and Biodentine as Furcation Perforation Repair Materials in Primary Molars

    PubMed Central

    Ramazani, Nahid; Sadeghi, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adequate seal of iatrogenically perforated area within the root canal system can improve the long term treatment prognosis. This in vitro study evaluated the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement and Biodentine in repair of furcation perforation in primary molars. Methods and Materials: A total of 61 freshly extracted primary mandibular second molars were randomly divided into three groups (n=17) and 10 teeth were put in negative (without perforation, n=5) and positive (perforated without repair, n=5) control groups. Turbidity was used as the criteria of bacterial leakage, when detected in the model of dual-chamber leakage. Data were analyzed using the Chi-Square and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis in SPSS software. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: All positive samples showed turbidity, whereas none of the negative samples allowed bacterial leakage. There was no significant difference between the number of turbidity samples in repaired teeth with all test materials (P=0.13). No significant difference was also detected in the mean survival time (P>0.05). Conclusion: CEM cement and Biodentine showed promising results as perforation repair materials and can be recommended as suitable alternatives of MTA for repair of furcation perforation of primary molars. PMID:27471534

  19. The Effect of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Mixed with Chlorhexidine as Direct Pulp Capping Agent in Dogs Teeth: A Histologic Study

    PubMed Central

    Manochehrifar, Hamed; Parirokh, Masoud; Kakooei, Sina; Oloomi, Mohammad Mehdi; Asgary, Saeed; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Mashhadi Abbas, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the present investigation was to compare the efficacy of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and 0.2% chlorhexidine (CHX) mixture to pure MTA, as a pulp capping material. Methods and Materials: The pulp of 24 lateral incisors and canines from four dogs were exposed and capped either with MTA or MTA+0.2% CHX. After 2 months the animals were sacrificed and the teeth were prepared for histological evaluation in terms of calcified bridge formation, the degree of inflammation and presence of necrosis. The Fisher’s exact test was used for data analysis. Results: The results showed that formation of complete calcified bridge in MTA specimens was significantly more than MTA+CHX (P<0.05). No significant difference was found in the degree of inflammation and necrosis between MTA and MTA+CHX groups (P>0.05). Conclusion: Mixing MTA with CHX as pulp capping agent had a significant negative impact on formation of calcified bridge on directly capped dog’s teeth. PMID:27790263

  20. Microbial degradation of high impact polystyrene (HIPS), an e-plastic with decabromodiphenyl oxide and antimony trioxide.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, Vini C; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan; Mohan, Arya J; Nair, Nimisha R; Bhaskar, Thallada; Pandey, Ashok

    2016-11-15

    Accumulation of electronic waste has increased catastrophically and out of that various plastic resins constitute one of the leading thrown out materials in the electronic machinery. Enrichment medium, containing high impact polystyrene (HIPS) with decabromodiphenyl oxide and antimony trioxide as sole carbon source, was used to isolate microbial cultures. The viability of these cultures in the e-plastic containing mineral medium was further confirmed by triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) reduction test. Four cultures were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing as Enterobacter sp., Citrobacter sedlakii, Alcaligenes sp. and Brevundimonas diminuta. Biodegradation experiments were carried out in flask level and gelatin supplementation (0.1% w/v) along with HIPS had increased the degradation rate to a maximum of 12.4% (w/w) within 30days. This is the first report for this kind of material. The comparison of FTIR, NMR, and TGA analysis of original and degraded e-plastic films revealed structural changes under microbial treatment. Polystyrene degradation intermediates in the culture supernatant were also detected using HPLC analysis. The gravity of biodegradation was validated by morphological changes under scanning electron microscope. All isolates displayed depolymerase activity to substantiate enzymatic degradation of e-plastic.

  1. Evaluation of pulpal response of deciduous teeth after direct pulp capping with bioactive glass and mineral trioxide aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Haghgoo, Roza; Ahmadvand, Motahare

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the pulpal response of primary teeth after direct pulp capping (DPC) with two biocompatible materials namely mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and bioactive glass (BAG). Settings and Design: This study was a randomized clinical trial. Materials and Methods: A total of 22 healthy primary canine teeth scheduled for extraction for orthodontic reasons were selected. The teeth were divided into two groups of 11 and underwent DPC. The exposure sites were randomly capped with MTA or BAG in the two groups. After 2 months, the teeth were extracted and prepared for histopathologic evaluation. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed using Fisher's exact test. Results: In the BAG group, inflammation was seen in three patients; internal resorption and abscess were not seen at all. In the MTA group, inflammation was seen in one patient and internal resorption and abscess were not seen in any patient. Fisher's exact test showed no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). Dentinal bridge formation was noted in five patients in the BAG group and six patients in the MTA group. No significant difference was observed between the BAG and MTA groups using Chi-square analysis (P = 0.67). Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, MTA and BAG can be used for DPC of primary teeth.

  2. Mechanism for doping induced p type C60 using thermally evaporated molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) as a dopant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin-Peng; Wang, Wen-Qing; Cheng, Li-Wen; Li, Yan-Qing; Tang, Jian-Xin; Kera, Satoshi; Ueno, Nobuo; Zeng, Xiang-hua

    2016-05-01

    Thermally evaporated molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) doped C60 films, which could change n type features of pristine C60 to form a p type mixed C60 layer, are investigated by x-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. It is found that C60 HOMO progressively shifts closer to the Fermi level after increased MoO3 doping concentration, and final onset of C60 HOMO is pinned at binding energy of 0.20 eV, indicating the formation of p type C60 films. It is proposed that in charge transfer induced p type C60 formation, due to large electron affinity of MoO3 (6.37 eV), electrons from HOMO of C60 could easily transfer to MoO3 to form cations and therefore increase hole concentration, which could gradually push C60 HOMO to the Fermi level and finally form p type C60 films. Moreover, clear different types of C60 species have been confirmed from UPS spectra in highly doped films.

  3. Evaluation of pulpal response of deciduous teeth after direct pulp capping with bioactive glass and mineral trioxide aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Haghgoo, Roza; Ahmadvand, Motahare

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the pulpal response of primary teeth after direct pulp capping (DPC) with two biocompatible materials namely mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and bioactive glass (BAG). Settings and Design: This study was a randomized clinical trial. Materials and Methods: A total of 22 healthy primary canine teeth scheduled for extraction for orthodontic reasons were selected. The teeth were divided into two groups of 11 and underwent DPC. The exposure sites were randomly capped with MTA or BAG in the two groups. After 2 months, the teeth were extracted and prepared for histopathologic evaluation. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed using Fisher's exact test. Results: In the BAG group, inflammation was seen in three patients; internal resorption and abscess were not seen at all. In the MTA group, inflammation was seen in one patient and internal resorption and abscess were not seen in any patient. Fisher's exact test showed no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). Dentinal bridge formation was noted in five patients in the BAG group and six patients in the MTA group. No significant difference was observed between the BAG and MTA groups using Chi-square analysis (P = 0.67). Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, MTA and BAG can be used for DPC of primary teeth. PMID:27630497

  4. Clinical and radiographical evaluation of mineral trioxide aggregate, biodentine and propolis as pulpotomy medicaments in primary teeth

    PubMed Central

    Rakesh, Kumar; Richa, Khanna

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), Biodentine and Propolis as pulpotomy medicaments in primary dentition, both clinically and radiographically. Materials and Methods A total of 75 healthy 3 to 10 yr old children each having at least one carious primary molar tooth were selected. Random assignment of the pulpotomy medicaments was done as follows: Group I, MTA; Group II, Biodentine; Group III, Propolis. All the pulpotomized teeth were evaluated at 3, 6, and 9 mon clinically and radiographically, based on the scoring criteria system. Results The clinical success rates were found to be similar among the three groups at 3 and 6 mon where as a significant decrease in success rate was observed in Group III (84%) compared to both Group I (100%) and Group II (100%) at 9 mon. Radiographic success rates over a period of 9 mon in Groups I, II, and III were 92, 80, and 72%, respectively. Conclusions Teeth treated with MTA and Biodentine showed more favorable clinical and radiographic success as compared to Propolis at 9 mon follow-up. PMID:26587413

  5. Arsenic trioxide-based therapy of relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia: registry results from the European LeukemiaNet.

    PubMed

    Lengfelder, E; Lo-Coco, F; Ades, L; Montesinos, P; Grimwade, D; Kishore, B; Ramadan, S M; Pagoni, M; Breccia, M; Huerta, A J G; Nloga, A M; González-Sanmiguel, J D; Schmidt, A; Lambert, J-F; Lehmann, S; Di Bona, E; Cassinat, B; Hofmann, W-K; Görlich, D; Sauerland, M-C; Fenaux, P; Sanz, M

    2015-05-01

    In 2008, a European registry of relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia was established by the European LeukemiaNet. Outcome data were available for 155 patients treated with arsenic trioxide in first relapse. In hematological relapse (n=104), 91% of the patients entered complete hematological remission (CR), 7% had induction death and 2% resistance, 27% developed differentiation syndrome and 39% leukocytosis, whereas no death or side effects occurred in patients treated in molecular relapse (n=40). The rate of molecular (m)CR was 74% in hematological and 62% in molecular relapse (P=0.3). All patients with extramedullary relapse (n=11) entered clinical and mCR. After 3.2 years median follow-up, the 3-year overall survival (OS) and cumulative incidence of second relapse were 68% and 41% in hematological relapse, 66% and 48% in molecular relapse and 90 and 11% in extramedullary relapse, respectively. After allogeneic or autologous transplantation in second CR (n=93), the 3-year OS was 80% compared with 59% without transplantation (n=55) (P=0.03). Multivariable analysis demonstrated the favorable prognostic impact of first remission duration ⩾1.5 years, achievement of mCR and allogeneic or autologous transplantation on OS of patients alive after induction (P=0.03, P=0.01, P=0.01) and on leukemia-free survival (P=0.006, P<0.0001, P=0.003), respectively. PMID:25627637

  6. Melatonin enhances arsenic trioxide-induced cell death via sustained upregulation of Redd1 expression in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sun-Mi; Woo, Sang Hyeok; Oh, Sang Taek; Hong, Sung-Eun; Choe, Tae-Boo; Ye, Sang-Kyu; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Seong, Min Ki; Kim, Hyun-A; Noh, Woo Chul; Lee, Jin Kyung; Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Lee, Yun-Han; Park, In-Chul

    2016-02-15

    Melatonin is implicated in various physiological functions, including anticancer activity. However, the mechanism(s) of its anticancer activity is not well understood. In the present study, we investigated the combined effects of melatonin and arsenic trioxide (ATO) on cell death in human breast cancer cells. Melatonin enhanced the ATO-induced apoptotic cell death via changes in the protein levels of Survivin, Bcl-2, and Bax, thus affecting cytochrome c release from the mitochondria to the cytosol. Interestingly, we found that the cell death induced by co-treatment with melatonin and ATO was mediated by sustained upregulation of Redd1, which was associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Combined treatment with melatonin and ATO induced the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAP kinase downstream from Redd1 expression. Rapamycin and S6K1 siRNA enhanced, while activation of mTORC1 by transfection with TSC2 siRNA suppressed the cell death induced by melatonin and ATO treatment. Taken together, our findings suggest that melatonin enhances ATO-induced apoptotic cell death via sustained upregulation of Redd1 expression and inhibition of mTORC1 upstream of the activation of the p38/JNK pathways in human breast cancer cells. PMID:26607805

  7. Partial Pulpotomy of Immature Teeth with Apical Periodontitis using Bioceramics and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: A Report of Three Cases.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Cheng Fei

    2016-06-01

    Pulpal necrosis of an immature permanent tooth with an open apex poses a challenge for the clinician. The conventional apexification technique using calcium hydroxide has yielded short-term success, but this technique has inevitable shortcomings. Hence, this case series aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of using bioceramics (iRoot BP) or mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) for partial pulpotomies. Three boys aged 9 to 11 years old presented with partial pulp necrosis and symptomatic apical periodontitis of the mandibular right and left second premolar. The involved teeth were treated with a partial pulpotomy using either iRoot BP (case 1 and 2) or MTA (case 3). At the 8-month follow-up, no abnormal clinical signs or symptoms were observed. Periapical radiographs revealed a significant reduction in periapical radiolucency, a marked increase in the root canal wall thickness and ongoing closure of the apical opening. The bioceramic material (iRoot BP) and MTA both produced successful outcomes in the partial pulpotomy of immature teeth with partial pulp necrosis and apical periodontitis. However, iRoot BP was superior in terms of ease of clinical application, and would therefore be a better treatment alternative than MTA. PMID:27379350

  8. The Coadministration of N-Acetylcysteine Ameliorates the Effects of Arsenic Trioxide on the Male Mouse Genital System.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Raquel Frenedoso; Borges, Cibele dos Santos; Villela E Silva, Patrícia; Missassi, Gabriela; Kiguti, Luiz Ricardo Almeida; Pupo, André Sampaio; Barbosa Junior, Fernando; Anselmo-Franci, Janete Aparecida; Kempinas, Wilma De Grava

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has shown effectiveness in treatment of leukemia but is also associated with reproductive toxicity. Since remediation with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) may mitigate the adverse effects caused by exposure, we assessed the effects of As2O3 and its potential reversibility after exposure cessation or coadministration of NAC. Animals received 0.3 or 3.0 mg/Kg/day of As2O3 subcutaneously and 40 mM of NAC in tap water. As2O3 treatment impaired spermatogenesis and sperm motility and decreased seminal vesicle weight and testosterone serum levels; after suspension of treatment, these parameters remained altered. When NAC was administered, animals showed improvement in sperm parameters and seminal vesicle weight. In vitro epididymal contractility was increased in As2O3-treated animals. We concluded that As2O3 is toxic to the male mouse genital system by compromising sperm quality and quantity; these effects persisted even after suspension of the treatment. However, the coadministration of NAC ameliorates the harmful effects of the drug on the male genital system. PMID:26839632

  9. Effective targeting of chronic myeloid leukemia initiating activity with the combination of arsenic trioxide and interferon alpha.

    PubMed

    El Eit, Rabab M; Iskandarani, Ahmad N; Saliba, Jessica L; Jabbour, Mark N; Mahfouz, Rami A; Bitar, Nizar M A; Ayoubi, Hanadi R El; Zaatari, Ghazi S; Mahon, Francois-Xavier; De Thé, Hugues B; Bazarbachi, Ali A; Nasr, Rihab R

    2014-02-15

    Imatinib is the standard of care in chronic meloid leukemia (CML) therapy. However, imatinib is not curative since most patients who discontinue therapy relapse indicating that leukemia initiating cells (LIC) are resistant. Interferon alpha (IFN) induces hematologic and cytogenetic remissions and interestingly, improved outcome was reported with the combination of interferon and imatinib. Arsenic trioxide was suggested to decrease CML LIC. We investigated the effects of arsenic and IFN on human CML cell lines or primary cells and the bone marrow retroviral transduction/transplantation murine CML model. In vitro, the combination of arsenic and IFN inhibited proliferation and activated apoptosis. Importantly, arsenic and IFN synergistically reduced the clonogenic activity of primary bone marrow cells derived from CML patients. Finally, in vivo, combined interferon and arsenic treatment, but not single agents, prolonged the survival of primary CML mice. Importantly, the combination severely impaired engraftment into untreated secondary recipients, with some recipients never developing the disease, demonstrating a dramatic decrease in CML LIC activity. Arsenic/IFN effect on CML LIC activity was significantly superior to that of imatinib. These results support further exploration of this combination, alone or with imatinib aiming at achieving CML eradication rather than long-term disease control.

  10. Treatment of experimental furcation perforations with mineral trioxide aggregate, platelet rich plasma or platelet rich fibrin in dogs' teeth.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Hosam E; Abu-Seida, Ashraf M; Hashem, Ahmed A; El-Khawlani, Mohammed M

    2016-06-01

    This work evaluates the effect of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), platelet rich plasma (PRP) or platelet rich fibrin (PRF) on healing of non-contaminated and contaminated furcation perforations. A total of 192 teeth of 12 dogs was divided into three equal groups according to evaluation period. Each group was further subdivided into MTA, PRP, PRF, negative and positive control subgroups. Each experimental subgroup was further subdivided according to perforation status into non-contaminated and contaminated subdivisions. Root canal therapy was carried out and furcation perforation was made in all teeth except in negative control subgroup. The furcation perforation was repaired immediately in subdivision (1) and after 4 weeks in subdivision (2). The change in vertical bone loss was measured by radiography. Inflammatory cell count, cemental deposition, new bone formation, bone resorption and epithelial proliferation were assessed. Both PRP and PRF demonstrated statistically significant reduction in vertical bone loss and inflammatory cell count than MTA. No significant difference was found between MTA, PRP and PRF in cemental deposition, new bone formation, bone resorption and epithelial proliferation. The non-contaminated teeth demonstrated better treatment outcomes than the contaminated teeth. In conclusion, PRP and PRF are successful treatment options for repairing of furcation perforation in both non-contaminated and contaminated teeth in dogs with superior outcomes in non contaminated teeth.

  11. Comparison of the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement used as root-end filling materials.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Shahriar; Yavari, Hamid R; Rahimi, Saeed; Eskandarinezhad, Mahsa; Shakouei, Sahar; Unchi, Mahsa

    2011-12-01

    Inadequate apical seal is the major cause of surgical endodontic failure. The root-end filling material used should prevent egress of potential contaminants into periapical tissue. The purpose of this study was to compare the sealing ability of four root-end filling materials: white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), gray MTA, white Portland cement (PC) and gray PC by dye leakage test. Ninety-six human single-rooted teeth were instrumented, and obturated with gutta-percha. After resecting the apex, an apical cavity was prepared. The teeth were randomly divided into four experimental groups (A: white MTA, B: gray MTA, C: white PC and D: gray PC; n = 20) and two control groups (positive and negative control groups; n = 8). Root-end cavities in the experimental groups were filled with the experimental materials. The teeth were exposed to Indian ink for 72 hours. The extent of dye penetration was measured with a stereomicroscope at 16× magnification. The negative controls showed no dye penetration and dye penetration was seen in the entire root-end cavity of positive controls. However, there was no statistically significant difference among the four experimental groups (P > 0.05). All retrograde filling materials tested in this study showed the same microleakage in vitro. Given the low cost and apparently similar sealing ability of PC, PC could be considered as a substitute for MTA as a root-end filling material.

  12. The Coadministration of N-Acetylcysteine Ameliorates the Effects of Arsenic Trioxide on the Male Mouse Genital System

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Raquel Frenedoso; Borges, Cibele dos Santos; Villela e Silva, Patrícia; Kiguti, Luiz Ricardo Almeida; Pupo, André Sampaio; Barbosa Junior, Fernando; Anselmo-Franci, Janete Aparecida; Kempinas, Wilma De Grava

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has shown effectiveness in treatment of leukemia but is also associated with reproductive toxicity. Since remediation with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) may mitigate the adverse effects caused by exposure, we assessed the effects of As2O3 and its potential reversibility after exposure cessation or coadministration of NAC. Animals received 0.3 or 3.0 mg/Kg/day of As2O3 subcutaneously and 40 mM of NAC in tap water. As2O3 treatment impaired spermatogenesis and sperm motility and decreased seminal vesicle weight and testosterone serum levels; after suspension of treatment, these parameters remained altered. When NAC was administered, animals showed improvement in sperm parameters and seminal vesicle weight. In vitro epididymal contractility was increased in As2O3-treated animals. We concluded that As2O3 is toxic to the male mouse genital system by compromising sperm quality and quantity; these effects persisted even after suspension of the treatment. However, the coadministration of NAC ameliorates the harmful effects of the drug on the male genital system. PMID:26839632

  13. Comparative evaluation of intracanal sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate and glass ionomer cement: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Gauri; Bogra, Poonam; Singh, Simranjeet; Samra, Rupandeep K

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of this study was to compare the sealing ability of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) and Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) when used over gutta-percha as intracanal sealing materials. The study also evaluated the sealing ability of Zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE) cement and Acroseal sealer. Materials and Methods: Teeth were obturated with gutta-percha using sealer ZOE (group A, C, D) and Acroseal (group B). The groups were further divided into 2 subgroups (15 premolars each) on the basis of intracanal sealing material used: GIC subgroups (A1, B1) and MTA in subgroups (A2, B2). The clearing technique was used in this study for leakage evaluation. Seventy mandibular premolars were prepared using step-back technique and divided into experimental groups A and B (30 premolars each) and the positive and negative control groups C and D (5 premolars each). Statistical analysis used: Coronal microleakage was determined under stereomicroscope using 15X magnification. Data was statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by Post-Hoc Multiple comparison (Bonferroni). Results: MTA group leaked significantly less than GIC group (P < 0.05). Acroseal exhibited better sealing ability than ZOE sealer. Teeth with no intracanal barrier showed almost complete leakage. Conclusions: MTA may be preferred over GIC as an intracanal barrier. PMID:24347890

  14. Process for removing sulfur dioxide from gas

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, W.R.

    1980-06-03

    There is disclosed a process for obtaining purer sodium sulfate from a mixture of solids containing sodium sulfate and sodium sulfite. The process involves contacting an aqueous slurry of the sulfate-sulfite mixture with a sulfur dioxide-containing gas under conditions which solubilize a significant amount of the sulfite as sodium bisulfite dissolved in the liquid aqueous phase. The remaining solid phase contains sodium sulfate of greater purity than in the mixture treated with sulfur dioxide. The mixture of sodium sulfate and sodium sulfite which is purified by the process may be obtained advantageously as a purge material from a process for removing sulfur dioxide from a gas stream.

  15. Equity, efficiency, and sulfur emission reductions

    SciTech Connect

    Pechman, C.

    1985-05-16

    The author describes how historic legislation and regulations have led to the current sulfur emission patterns. He evaluates possible sulfur emission policy options from the perspective of equity and efficiency, the latter in terms of its allocative and productive aspects, and concludes that relying upon direct controls of emissions to meet air quality objectives is an inefficient use of resources. Regulations to protect public health create an incentive to disperse rather than reduce sulfur emissions. Reliance on market forces, including emission taxes or auctions, is efficient at a minimum cost. 23 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  16. Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Liu, W.

    1995-01-24

    A catalytic reduction process is described for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(FO[sub 2])[sub 1[minus]n](RO)[sub n

  17. A Carbon-Sulfur Hybrid with Pomegranate-like Structure for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yanting; Lv, Wei; Niu, Shuzhang; He, Yanbing; Zhou, Guangmin; Chen, Guohua; Li, Baohua; Yang, Quan-Hong; Kang, Feiyu

    2016-05-01

    A carbon-sulfur hybrid with pomegranate-like core-shell structure, which demonstrates a high rate performance and relatively high cyclic stability, is obtained through carbonization of a carbon precursor in the presence of a sulfur precursor (FeS2 ) and a following oxidation of FeS2 to sulfur by HNO3 . Such a structure effectively protects the sulfur and leaves enough buffer space after Fe(3+) removal and, at the same time, has an interconnected conductive network. The capacity of the obtained hybrid is 450 mA h g(-1) under the current density of 5 C. This work provides a simple strategy to design and prepare various high-performance carbon-sulfur hybrids for lithium-sulfur batteries.

  18. Amylopectin wrapped graphene oxide/sulfur for improved cyclability of lithium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weidong; Chen, Hao; Yu, Yingchao; Wang, Deli; Cui, Zhiming; Disalvo, Francis J; Abruña, Héctor D

    2013-10-22

    An amylopectin wrapped graphene oxide-sulfur composite was prepared to construct a 3-dimensionally cross-linked structure through the interaction between amylopectin and graphene oxide, for stabilizing lithium sulfur batteries. With the help of this cross-linked structure, the sulfur particles could be confined much better among the layers of graphene oxide and exhibited significantly improved cyclability, compared with the unwrapped graphene oxide-sulfur composite. The effect of the electrode mass loading on electrochemical performance was investigated as well. In the lower sulfur mass loading cells, such as 2 mg cm(-2), both the capacity and the efficiency were obviously better than those of the higher sulfur mass loading cells, such as 6 mg cm(-2).

  19. Cyclic process for the removal of sulfur dioxide and the recovery of sulfur from gases

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, C.L.

    1991-11-19

    This patent describes a process for the removal of sulfur dioxide from a gas containing sulfur dioxide. It comprises contacting a gas containing sulfur dioxide with an aqueous solution comprising water, ferric chloride and a salt selected from the group consisting of barium chloride and calcium chloride to form ferrous chloride, hydrochloric acid and a precipitate selected from the group consisting of barium sulfate and calcium sulfate; and treating the aqueous solution with an oxidizing agent to convert ferrous chloride to ferric chloride.

  20. Mass-independent sulfur of inclusions in diamond and sulfur recycling on early Earth.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, J; Wing, B A; McKeegan, K D; Harris, J W; Cartigny, P; Thiemens, M H

    2002-12-20

    Populations of sulfide inclusions in diamonds from the Orapa kimberlite pipe in the Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe craton, Botswana, preserve mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionations. The data indicate that material was transferred from the atmosphere to the mantle in the Archean. The data also imply that sulfur is not well mixed in the diamond source regions, allowing for reconstruction of the Archean sulfur cycle and possibly offering insight into the nature of mantle convection through time.

  1. Process for the separation of sulfur oxides from a gaseous mixture containing sulfur oxides and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Derosset, A.J.; Ginger, E.A.

    1980-12-23

    An improved process for the separation of sulfur oxides from a gaseous mixture containing sulfur oxides and oxygen is disclosed. The gaseous mixture is contacted with a solid sulfur oxide acceptor comprising copper, copper oxide, or a mixture thereof dispersed on a carrier material in combination with a platinum group metal component and a component selected from the group consisting of rhenium, germanium and tin.

  2. Mass-independent sulfur of inclusions in diamond and sulfur recycling on early Earth.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, J; Wing, B A; McKeegan, K D; Harris, J W; Cartigny, P; Thiemens, M H

    2002-12-20

    Populations of sulfide inclusions in diamonds from the Orapa kimberlite pipe in the Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe craton, Botswana, preserve mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionations. The data indicate that material was transferred from the atmosphere to the mantle in the Archean. The data also imply that sulfur is not well mixed in the diamond source regions, allowing for reconstruction of the Archean sulfur cycle and possibly offering insight into the nature of mantle convection through time. PMID:12493909

  3. Environmental behavior and analysis of agricultural sulfur.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Corey M; Woodrow, James E; Seiber, James N

    2015-11-01

    Sulfur has been widely used for centuries as a staple for pest and disease management in agriculture. Presently, it is the largest-volume pesticide in use worldwide. This review describes the sources and recovery methods for sulfur, its allotropic forms and properties and its agricultural uses, including development and potential advantages of nanosulfur as a fungicide. Chemical and microbial reactivity, interactions in soil and water and analytical methods for determination in environmental samples and foodstuffs, including inexpensive analytical methods for sulfur residues in wine, beer and other food/beverage substrates, will be reviewed. The toxicology of sulfur towards humans and agriculturally important fungi is included, with some restrictions on use to promote safety. The review concludes with areas for which more research is warranted.

  4. Sulfur isotopic composition of cenozoic seawater sulfate

    PubMed

    Paytan; Kastner; Campbell; Thiemens

    1998-11-20

    A continuous seawater sulfate sulfur isotope curve for the Cenozoic with a resolution of approximately 1 million years was generated using marine barite. The sulfur isotopic composition decreased from 19 to 17 per mil between 65 and 55 million years ago, increased abruptly from 17 to 22 per mil between 55 and 45 million years ago, remained nearly constant from 35 to approximately 2 million years ago, and has decreased by 0.8 per mil during the past 2 million years. A comparison between seawater sulfate and marine carbonate carbon isotope records reveals no clear systematic coupling between the sulfur and carbon cycles over one to several millions of years, indicating that changes in the burial rate of pyrite sulfur and organic carbon did not singularly control the atmospheric oxygen content over short time intervals in the Cenozoic. This finding has implications for the modeling of controls on atmospheric oxygen concentration.

  5. Environmental behavior and analysis of agricultural sulfur.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Corey M; Woodrow, James E; Seiber, James N

    2015-11-01

    Sulfur has been widely used for centuries as a staple for pest and disease management in agriculture. Presently, it is the largest-volume pesticide in use worldwide. This review describes the sources and recovery methods for sulfur, its allotropic forms and properties and its agricultural uses, including development and potential advantages of nanosulfur as a fungicide. Chemical and microbial reactivity, interactions in soil and water and analytical methods for determination in environmental samples and foodstuffs, including inexpensive analytical methods for sulfur residues in wine, beer and other food/beverage substrates, will be reviewed. The toxicology of sulfur towards humans and agriculturally important fungi is included, with some restrictions on use to promote safety. The review concludes with areas for which more research is warranted. PMID:26108794

  6. Sulfur Dioxide variability in the Venus Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandaele, A. C.; Korablev, O.; Mahieux, A.; Wilquet, V.; Chamberlain, S.; Belayev, D.; Encrenaz, Th.; Esposito, L.; Jessup, K. L.; Lefèvre, F.; Limaye, S.; Marcq, E.; Mils, F.; Parkinson, C.; Sandor, B.; Stolzenbach, A.; Wilson, C.

    2015-10-01

    Recent observations of sulfur oxides (SO2, SO, OCS, and H2 SO4) in Venus' mesosphere have generated controversy and great interest in the scientific community. These observations revealed u nexpected spatial patterns and spatial/temporal variability that have not been satisfactorily explained by models. Particularly intriguing are the layer of enhanced gas-phase SO2 and SO in the upper mesosphere, and variability in the maximum observed SO2 a bundance and the equator -to-pole SO2 abundance gradient, seemingly on multi-year cycles, that is not uniquely linked to local time variations. Sulfur oxide chemistry on Venus is closely linked to the global-scale cloud and haze layers, which are composed primarily of concentrated sulfuric acid. Consequently, sulfur oxide observations provide important insight into the ongoing chemical evolution of Venus' atmosphere, atmospheric dynamics, and possible volcanism.

  7. Cathodic polarization of sulfur in molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, A.I.; Dukhanin, G.P.; Morachevskii, A.G.; Simikov, I.A.

    1985-12-01

    As a continuation of studies on the electrochemical behavior of sulfur in molten salts, this paper reports work on the determination of lithium and potassium ion discharge potentials at a sulfur electrode during cathodic polarization in molten LiNO/sub 3/-LiNO/sub 2/-LiOH and LiNO/sub 3/-KNO/sub 3/ at 423/sup 0/K as well as in molten LiF-LiCl-LiI and LiC1-KC1 ay 650/sup 0/K. The studies were carried out by taking polarization curves in a pulsed galvanostatic mode using a three-electrode electrochemical cell. The sulfur electrode floating on the molten salt electrolyte contacted a 5-mm-diameter graphite rod that also touched the molten salt. The same patterns were observed for the cathodic polarization of sulfur in both halide and nitrate melts.

  8. Atmospheric influence of Earth's earliest sulfur cycle

    PubMed

    Farquhar; Bao; Thiemens

    2000-08-01

    Mass-independent isotopic signatures for delta(33)S, delta(34)S, and delta(36)S from sulfide and sulfate in Precambrian rocks indicate that a change occurred in the sulfur cycle between 2090 and 2450 million years ago (Ma). Before 2450 Ma, the cycle was influenced by gas-phase atmospheric reactions. These atmospheric reactions also played a role in determining the oxidation state of sulfur, implying that atmospheric oxygen partial pressures were low and that the roles of oxidative weathering and of microbial oxidation and reduction of sulfur were minimal. Atmospheric fractionation processes should be considered in the use of sulfur isotopes to study the onset and consequences of microbial fractionation processes in Earth's early history.

  9. Ceres: Sulfur deposits and graphitized carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, Amanda R.; Vilas, Faith; Li, Jian-Yang

    2016-09-01

    We report new results from observations of the dwarf planet Ceres using the Hubble Space Telescope in the spectral range 1160-5700 Å. Comparisons between Ceres' UV-visible spectra and laboratory measurements indicate that both sulfur species and graphitized carbon are important on Ceres' surface. We find a latitudinal gradient in UV absorption, with northern latitudes being more UV absorbing than southern latitudes, a trend that can be explained by increasing abundances of sulfur and SO2 toward northern latitudes. The presence of graphitized carbon is consistent with the surface of this airless body being carbonized in response to processes such as charged particle bombardment. The presence of volatile sulfur species is consistent with the idea that Ceres exhibits geothermal activity. Spectral differences with previous UV observations are likely due to the changing sulfurous and carbonaceous surface of Ceres.

  10. Protected Sulfur Cathode with Mixed Conductive Coating Layer for Lithium Sulfur Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jun; Wen, Zhaoyin; Wang, Qingsong; Gu, Sui; Huang, Xiao; Chen, Chunhua

    2016-08-01

    A mixed conductive coating layer composed of lithium ion conductive ceramic powder, carbon and binder was introduced on the surface of a sulfur electrode. This coating layer is designed to suppress the migration of lithium polysulfides from the sulfur electrode, and improve the cycling capacity of a lithium sulfur battery. The protected sulfur cathode with a mixed conductive coating layer delivered an initial specific capacity of 1236 mAh g-1 at 0.5C and maintained a capacity of 842 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles. In particular, a soft package battery with protected cathode exhibits improved cycling capacity and excellent rate performance.

  11. Definition of Non-Conventional Sulfur Utilization in Western Kazakhstan for Sulfur Concrete (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Kalb, Paul

    2007-05-31

    Battelle received a contract from Agip-KCO, on behalf a consortium of international oil and gas companies with exploration rights in the North Caspian Sea, Kazakhstan. The objective of the work was to identify and help develop new techniques for sulfur concrete products from waste, by-product sulfur that will be generated in large quantitites as drilling operations begin in the near future. BNL has significant expertise in the development and use of sulfur concrete products and has direct experience collaborating with the Russian and Kazakh partners that participated. Feasibility testing was successfully conducted for a new process to produce cost-effective sulfur polymer cement that has broad commerical applications.

  12. Sulfur and nitrogen uptake by loblolly pine seedlings as influenced by nitrogen and sulfur addition

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.M.; Johnson, D.W.

    1982-12-01

    The influence of increasing levels of nitrogen addition at several levels of sulfur input on nitrogen and sulfur uptake by loblolly pine seedlings was evaluated in a greenhouse study. All possible combinations on nitrogen and sulfur were incorporated into soil collected from the A horizon of a southeastern forest soil at rates of 0, 200, 500, and 1,000 ..mu..g/g of N, and 0, 14, 35, and 70 ..mu..g/g of S. Soil samples collected at the end of the study indicated that a similar amount of soil SO/sub 4/-S had been mineralized in all treatment combinations, compared to a general pattern of increasing soil nitrogen mineralization with increasing nitrogen input. Most mineralized sulfate appeared to come from nonprotein organic compounds as there was not a significant concomitant release of nitrogen. Both shoot and root biomass responded significantly to nitrogen addition, but there was no sulfur or nitrogen-sulfur interaction response. Nitrogen treatment generally increased shoot nitrogen concentration compared to a general decrease in shoot total-, sulfate-, and organically bound-sulfur. Organically bound-sulfur concentrations were 26 to 60 percent below sulfur values calculated from an S/N ratio of 0.03 on a gram atom basis. The results show that increased nitrogen addition affected both growth and sulfur status of loblolly pine seedlings, but not entirely in the manner predicted by theoretical considerations.

  13. Sulfur and nitrogen uptake by loblolly pine seedlings as influenced by nitrogen and sulfur addition

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.M.; Johnson, D.W.

    1982-12-01

    The influence of increasing levels of nitrogen addition at several levels of sulfur input on nitrogen and sulfur uptake by loblolly pine seedlings was evaluated in a greenhouse study. All possible combinations of nitrogen and sulfur were incorporated into soil collected from the A horizon of a southeastern forest soil at rates of 0, 200, 500, and 1,000 ..mu..g/g of N, and 0, 14, 35, and 70 ..mu..g/g of S. Soil samples collected at the end of the study indicated that a similar amount of soil SO/sub 4/-S had been mineralized in all treatment combinations, compared to a general pattern of increasing soil nitrogen mineralization with increasing nitrogen input. Most mineralized sulfate appeared to come from nonprotein organic compounds as there was not a significant concomitant release of nitrogen. Both shoot and root biomass responded significantly to nitrogen addition, but there was no sulfur or nitrogen-sulfur interaction response. Nitrogen treatment generally increased shoot nitrogen concentration compared to a general decrease in shoot total-, sulfate-, and organically bound-sulfur. Organically bound-sulfur concentrations were 26 to 60 percent below sulfur values calculated from an S/N ratio of 0.03 on a gram atom basis. The results show that increased nitrogen addition affected both growth and sulfur status of loblolly pine seedlings, but not entirely in the manner predicted by theoretical considerations.

  14. Protected Sulfur Cathode with Mixed Conductive Coating Layer for Lithium Sulfur Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jun; Wen, Zhaoyin; Wang, Qingsong; Gu, Sui; Huang, Xiao; Chen, Chunhua

    2016-10-01

    A mixed conductive coating layer composed of lithium ion conductive ceramic powder, carbon and binder was introduced on the surface of a sulfur electrode. This coating layer is designed to suppress the migration of lithium polysulfides from the sulfur electrode, and improve the cycling capacity of a lithium sulfur battery. The protected sulfur cathode with a mixed conductive coating layer delivered an initial specific capacity of 1236 mAh g-1 at 0.5C and maintained a capacity of 842 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles. In particular, a soft package battery with protected cathode exhibits improved cycling capacity and excellent rate performance.

  15. Method for reducing the sulfur content of a sulfur-containing hydrocarbon stream

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder

    2004-12-28

    The sulfur content of a liquid hydrocarbon stream is reduced under mild conditions by contracting a sulfur-containing liquid hydrocarbon stream with transition metal particles containing the transition metal in a zero oxidation state under conditions sufficient to provide a hydrocarbon product having a reduced sulfur content and metal sulfide particles. The transition metal particles can be produced in situ by adding a transition metal precursor, e.g., a transition metal carbonyl compound, to the sulfur-containing liquid feed stream and sonicating the feed steam/transition metal precursor combination under conditions sufficient to produce the transition metal particles.

  16. Effects of variation of dietary sulfur on movement of sulfur in sheep rumen

    SciTech Connect

    Kandylis, K.; Bray, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    Effects of variations in dietary sulfur on rumen sulfur dynamics were studied under steady state conditions. In the first experimental period, three sheep were given 33.3 g of a pelleted diet hourly containing 1.59 g sulfur/kg (low) and in the second period the sulfur content was increased to 3.21 g/kg (high) by the addition of sodium sulfate. The daily sulfur intake was 1.158 g on the low sulfur diet and .545 g of this passed from the rumen in protein, .614 g was calculated to be absorbed from the rumen as sulfide, and .052 g was estimated to be recycled to the rumen. For sheep with daily intakes of 2.317 g sulfur, 1.212 g passed from the rumen in protein, 1.078 g was absorbed from the rumen, and .093 g was estimated to be recycled. It was estimated that 127 and 165 g microbial protein were synthesized/kg organic matter truly digested in the rumen for low and high sulfur diets, respectively. A simple model using simultaneous equations was proposed to describe rumen sulfur metabolism.

  17. The Biogeochemistry of Sulfur in Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte, Mitchell; Rogers, K. L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The incorporation of sulfur into many biomolecules likely dates back to the development of the earliest metabolic strategies. Sulfur is common in enzymes and co-enzymes and is an indispensable structural component in many peptides and proteins. Early metabolism may have been heavily influenced by the abundance of sulfide minerals in hydrothermal systems. The incorporation of sulfur into many biomolecules likely dates back to the development of the earliest metabolic strategies. Sulfur is common in enzymes and co-enzymes and is an indispensable structural component in many peptides and proteins. Early metabolism may have been heavily influenced by the abundance of sulfide minerals in hydrothermal systems. Understanding how sulfur became prevalent in biochemical processes and many biomolecules requires knowledge of the reaction properties of sulfur-bearing compounds. We have previously estimated thermodynamic data for thiols, the simplest organic sulfur compounds, at elevated temperatures and pressures. If life began in hydrothermal environments, it is especially important to understand reactions at elevated temperatures among sulfur-bearing compounds and other organic molecules essential for the origin and persistence of life. Here we examine reactions that may have formed amino acids with thiols as reaction intermediates in hypothetical early Earth hydrothermal environments. (There are two amino acids, cysteine and methionine, that contain sulfur.) Our calculations suggest that significant amounts of some amino acids were produced in early Earth hydrothermal fluids, given reasonable concentrations H2, NH3, H2S and CO. For example, preliminary results indicate that glycine activities as high as 1 mmol can be reached in these systems at 100 C. Alanine formation from propanethiol is also a favorable reaction. On the other hand, the calculated equilibrium log activities of cysteine and serine from propanethiol are -21 and -19, respectively, at 100 C. These results

  18. Antioxidants countermeasures against sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, M

    2012-07-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a vesicant chemical warfare agent that persists as a serious menace from the viewpoint of acute and chronic toxicity, simple synthesis and no effective treatment currently being available. The two most deleterious basic molecular mechanisms in SM poisoning are: inflammation and over-activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and the resulting DNA alkylation. Oxidative stress is the common consequence of these pathway activations. In the present review, the significance of oxidative stress in SM poisoning is discussed along with research on antioxidant therapy as a suitable antidote. The temporal dynamics of the redox imbalance, the antioxidant depletion and impact this has on tissues are described as the pathologies induced by SM. Special attention is paid to ameliorating the damage using low molecular weight antioxidants. Melatonin, epigallocatechin gallate and flavone derivatives, in particular, have been studied in recent experiments. The suitability of these antioxidants for therapy purposes is considered in a separate chapter. The review concludes with a view to the future and the studies needed on antioxidant therapy as a countermeasure to SM poisoning.

  19. Recovery of elemental sulfur from sour gas

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.L.

    1984-07-31

    Excess heat generated in a thermal reaction zone of a Claus sulfur recovery plant is used, by means of a high boiling point heat transfer medium, to reheat the Claus plant process stream prior to high temperature Claus catalytic conversion, and/or to regenerate Claus catalyst on which sulfur is deposited, or for other functions. In another aspect, low temperature Claus catalytic converters are operated at equivalent pressures during a cycle comprising an adsorption phase, a regeneration phase, and a cooling phase.

  20. Attachment of Thiobacillus thiooxidans to sulfur crystals.

    PubMed

    SCHAEFFER, W I; HOLBERT, P E; UMBREIT, W W

    1963-01-01

    Schaeffer, W. I. (Rutgers, The State University, New Brunswick, N.J.), P. E. Holbert, and W. W. Umbreit. Attachment of Thiobacillus thiooxidans to sulfur crystals. J. Bacteriol. 85:137-140. 1963.-Electron micrographs of replicas of sulfur crystals before and after attack by Thiobacillus thiooxidans show that the microorganisms erode the crystal in the area immediately adjacent to the cell. When there are many cells, the entire crystal surface appears eroded.

  1. Process for removing sulfur from coal

    DOEpatents

    Aida, Tetsuo; Squires, Thomas G.; Venier, Clifford G.

    1985-02-05

    A process for the removal of divalent organic and inorganic sulfur compounds from coal and other carbonaceous material. A slurry of pulverized carbonaceous material is contacted with an electrophilic oxidant which selectively oxidizes the divalent organic and inorganic compounds to trivalent and tetravalent compounds. The carbonaceous material is then contacted with a molten caustic which dissolves the oxidized sulfur compounds away from the hydrocarbon matrix.

  2. Process for removing sulfur from coal

    DOEpatents

    Aida, T.; Squires, T.G.; Venier, C.G.

    1983-08-11

    A process is disclosed for the removal of divalent organic and inorganic sulfur compounds from coal and other carbonaceous material. A slurry of pulverized carbonaceous material is contacted with an electrophilic oxidant which selectively oxidizes the divalent organic and inorganic compounds to trivalent and tetravalent compounds. The carbonaceous material is then contacted with a molten caustic which dissolves the oxidized sulfur compounds away from the hydrocarbon matrix.

  3. A Cable-Shaped Lithium Sulfur Battery.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xin; Weng, Wei; Ren, Jing; Peng, Huisheng

    2016-01-20

    A carbon nanostructured hybrid fiber is developed by integrating mesoporous carbon and graphene oxide into aligned carbon nanotubes. This hybrid fiber is used as a 1D cathode to fabricate a new cable-shaped lithium-sulfur battery. The fiber cathode exhibits a decent specific capacity and lifespan, which makes the cable-shaped lithium-sulfur battery rank far ahead of other fiber-shaped batteries.

  4. Copper mercaptides as sulfur dioxide indicators

    DOEpatents

    Eller, Phillip G.; Kubas, Gregory J.

    1979-01-01

    Organophosphine copper(I) mercaptide complexes are useful as convenient and semiquantitative visual sulfur dioxide gas indicators. The air-stable complexes form 1:1 adducts in the presence of low concentrations of sulfur dioxide gas, with an associated color change from nearly colorless to yellow-orange. The mercaptides are made by mixing stoichiometric amounts of the appropriate copper(I) mercaptide and phosphine in an inert organic solvent.

  5. World copper smelter sulfur balance-1988

    SciTech Connect

    Towle, S.W. )

    1993-01-01

    In 1989, the US Bureau of Mines initiated a contract to gather engineering, operating, and environmental cost data for 1988 for 30 major foreign primary copper smelters in market economy countries. Data were collected for 29 of the designated smelters together with information on applicable environmental regulations. Materials balance data obtained were used with available data for the eight US smelters to determine the approximate extent of copper smelter sulfur emission control in 1988. A broad characterization of the status of sulfur emission control regulation was made. The 37 US and foreign smelters represented roughly 73.2% of world and 89.3% of market economy primary copper production in 1988. The 29 non-US smelters attained 55.3% control of their input sulfur in 1988. Combined with the 90.4% control of US smelters, an aggregate 63.4% sulfur control existed. Roughly 1,951,100 mt of sulfur was emitted from the 37 market economy smelters in 1988. Identifiable SO[sub 2] control regulations covered 72.4% of the 29 foreign smelters, representing 65.5% of smelting capacity. Including US smelters, 78.4% of the major market economy smelters were regulated, representing 73.1% of smelting capacity. Significant changes since 1988 that may increase sulfur emission control are noted.

  6. Sulfur "Concrete" for Lunar Applications - Sublimation Concerns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Toutanji, Houssam

    2006-01-01

    Melting sulfur and mixing it with an aggregate to form "concrete" is commercially well established and constitutes a material that is particularly well-suited for use in corrosive environments. Discovery of the mineral troilite (FeS) on the moon poses the question of extracting the sulfur for use as a lunar construction material. This would be an attractive alternative to conventional concrete as it does not require water. However, the viability of sulfur concrete in a lunar environment, which is characterized by lack of an atmosphere and extreme temperatures, is not well understood. Here it is assumed that the lunar ore can be mined, refined, and the raw sulfur melded with appropriate lunar regolith to form, for example, bricks. This study evaluates pure sulfur and two sets of small sulfur concrete samples that have been prepared using JSC-1 lunar stimulant and SiO2 powder as aggregate additions. Each set was subjected to extended periods in a vacuum environment to evaluate sublimation issues. Results from these experiments are presented and discussed within the context of the lunar environment.

  7. Improved Chromatographic Techniques for Sulfur Pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, C. H.

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes several improvements in instrumental techniques for the analysis of low ppb concentrations of sulfur gases using gas chromatography (G.C.). This work has focused on the analytical problem of ambient air monitoring of the two main sulfur gas pollutants, hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide. The most significant technical improvement that will be reported here is the newly developed silica gel column for ppb concentrations of the light sulfur gases (COS, H2S, CS2, SO2, CH3SH). A simplified inlet system will be described which improves reliability of the GC system. The flame photometric detector is used as the means of selectively and sensitively detecting the low concentrations of sulfur gases. Improvements will be described which have yielded better performance than previously reported for this application of the detector. Also included in this paper will be a report of field monitoring using this improved GC system. Reliability and repeatability of performance at the low ppb concentrations of sulfur gases will be demonstrated.

  8. Theoretical studies of the marine sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Kasting, James B.; Liu, May S.

    1985-01-01

    Several reduced sulfur compounds are produced by marine organisms and then enter the atmosphere, where they are oxidized and ultimately returned to the ocean or the land. The oceanic dimethyl sulfide (DMS) flux, in particular, represents a significant fraction of the annual global sulfur input to the atmosphere. In the atmosphere, this gas is converted to sulfur dioxide (SO2), methane sulfonic acid, and other organic acids which are relatively stable and about which little is known. SO2 is a short lived gas which, in turn, is converted to sulfuric acid and other sulfate compounds which contribute significantly to acid rain. Because of the complexity of the sulfur system, it is not well understood even in the unperturbed atmosphere. However, a number of new observations and experiments have led to a significant increase in the understanding of this system. A number of one dimensional model experiments were conducted on the gas phase part of the marine sulfur cycle. The results indicate the measured concentration of DMS and the amplitude of its diurnal cycle are in agreement with estimates of its global flux. It was also found that DMS can make a large contribution to the background SO2 concentration in the free troposphere. Estimates of CS2 concentrations in the atmosphere are inconsistent with estimated fluxes; however, measured reaction rates are consistent with the observed steep tropospheric gradient in CS2. Observations of CS2 are extremely sparse. Further study is planned.

  9. “Evaluation of shear bond strength of a composite resin to white mineral trioxide aggregate with three different bonding systems”-An in vitro analysis

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Anand C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a biomaterial that has been investigated for endodontic applications. With the increased use of MTA in pulp capping, pulpotomy, perforation repair, apexification and obturation, the material that would be placed over MTA as a final restoration is an important matter. As composite resins are one of the most widely used final restorative materials, this study was conducted to evaluate the shear bond strength of a composite resin to white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) using three different bonding systems namely the two-step etch and rinse adhesive, the self-etching primer and the All-in-one system. Material and Methods Forty five specimens of white MTA (Angelus) were prepared and randomly divided into three groups of 15 specimens each depending on the bonding systems used respectively. In Group A, a Two-step etch and rinse adhesive or ‘total-etch adhesive’, Adper Single Bond 2 (3M/ESPE) and Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN) were placed over WMTA. In group B, a Two-step self-etching primer system, Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray, Medical Inc) and Filtek Z350 were used. In Group C, an All-in-one system, G Bond (GC corporation, Tokyo, Japan) and Filtek Z350 were used. The shear bond strength was measured for all the specimens. The data obtained was subjected to One way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe’s post hoc test. Results The results suggested that the Two-step etch and rinse adhesive when used to bond a composite resin to white MTA gave better bond strength values and the All-in-one exhibited the least bond strength values. Conclusions The placement of composite used with a Two-step etch and rinse adhesive over WMTA as a final restoration may be appropriate. Key words:Composite resins, dentin bonding agents, mineral trioxide aggregate, shear bond strength. PMID:27398177

  10. Generation of Sulfur-rich, Sulfur-undersaturated Basaltic Melts in Oxidized Arc Sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jugo, P. J.; Luth, R. W.; Richards, J. P.

    2003-12-01

    Although sulfur is a minor element in the Earth, it has a disproportionate impact because it commonly occurs as sulfide. Sulfides largely control the behavior of chalcophile (e.g., Cu, Ni) and highly siderophile elements (Ru, Rh, Pd, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, and Au) that are of interest because either they are economically important or because they provide valuable information about geochemical processes. Island arc basalts are more oxidized than basalts from other tectonic settings and therefore, in these settings, sulfur maybe present not as sulfide but as sulfate. In addition to the impact on the behavior of chalcophile and siderophile elements, sulfur speciation as sulfate may have a role on the occurrence of sulfur-rich explosive volcanism, which has been linked to significant short-term variations in global climate. However, little is known about the range in oxygen fugacity for the transition from solubility as sulfide to solubility as sulfate. We used experimental data on the solubility of sulfur in basaltic melts saturated with either sulfide or sulfate at different oxygen fugacities to model this transition. Our model shows that the ten-fold increase in the solubility of sulfur (from 0.14 wt.% to 1.5 wt.%) observed experimentally occurs at oxygen fugacities between ˜FMQ+1 and ˜FMQ+2, conditions under which many arc magmas are thought to be generated. The increase in the solubility of sulfur with increasing oxygen fugacity implies that in oxidized arc sources very low degrees of partial melting are sufficient to generate basaltic melts that are simultaneously sulfur-rich and sulfur-undersaturated. In the absence of sulfides, oxides and metallic alloys may influence the behavior of some (but not all) the highly siderophile elements whereas the chalcophile and some siderophile elements become incompatible. As a consequence, melting of oxidized sources in which sulfides are not stable would favor incorporation of metals such as Cu, Ni, Au and Pd in the melts and

  11. Repair of bone defect by nano-modified white mineral trioxide aggregates in rabbit: A histopathological study

    PubMed Central

    Saghiri, Mohammad-Ali; Tanideh, Nader; Asatourian, Armen; Janghorban, Kamal; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Sheibani, Nader

    2015-01-01

    Background Many researchers have tried to enhance materials functions in different aspects of science using nano-modification method, and in many cases the results have been encouraging. To evaluate the histopathological responses of the micro-/nano-size cement-type biomaterials derived from calcium silicate-based composition with addition of nano tricalcium aluminate (3CaO.Al2O3) on bone healing response. Material and Methods Ninety mature male rabbits were anesthetized and a bone defect was created in the right mandible. The rabbits were divided into three groups, which were in turn subdivided into five subgroups with six animals each based on the defect filled by: white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA), Nano-WMTA, WMTA without 3CaO.Al2O3, Nano-WMTA with 2% Nano-3CaO.Al2O3, and empty as control. Twenty, forty and sixty days postoperatively the animals were sacrificed and the right mandibles were removed for histopathological evaluations. Kruskal-Wallis test with post-hoc comparisons based on the LSMeans procedure was used for data analysis. Results All the experimental materials provoked a moderate to severe inflammatory reaction, which significantly differed from the control group (p< 0.05). Statistical analysis of bone formation and bone regeneration data showed significant differences between groups at 40- and 60- day intervals in all groups. Absence of 3CaO.Al2O3 leads to more inflammation and foreign body reaction than other groups in all time intervals. Conclusions Both powder nano-modification and addition of 2% Nano-3CaO.Al2O3 to calcium silicate-based cement enhanced the favorable tissue response and osteogenesis properties of WMTA based materials. Key words:Bone regeneration, cement, endodontics, histopathology, nano-wmta, tricalcium aluminate. PMID:26034924

  12. Arsenic trioxide induces oxidative stress, DNA damage, and mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis in human leukemia (HL-60) cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which accounts for approximately 10% of all acute myloid leukemia cases. It is a blood cancer that is formed by chromosomal mutation. Each year in the United States, APL affects about 1,500 patients of all age groups and causes approximately 1.2% of cancer deaths. Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been used successfully for treatment of APL patients, and both induction and consolidated therapy have resulted in complete remission. Recently published studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that ATO pharmacology as an anti-leukemic drug is associated with cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in leukemia cells. Methods In the present study, we further investigated the detailed molecular mechanism of ATO-mediated intrinsic pathway of apoptosis; using HL-60 cells as a test model. Oxidative stress was assessed by spectrophotometric measurements of MDA and GSH levels while genotoxicity was determined by single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay). Apoptosis pathway was analyzed by Western blot analysis of Bax, Bcl2 and caspase 3 expression, as well as immunocytochemistry and confocal imaging of Bax and Cyt c translocation and mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization. Results ATO significantly (p < 0.05) induces oxidative stress, DNA damage, and caspase 3 activityin HL-60 cells in a dose-dependent manner. It also activated the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis by significantly modulating (p < 0.05) the expression and translocation of apoptotic molecules and decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential in leukemia cells. Conclusion Taken together, our research demonstrated that ATO induces mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis in HL-60 cells. This apoptotic signaling is modulated via oxidative stress, DNA damage, and change in mitochondrial membrane potential, translocation and upregulation of apoptotic proteins leading programmed cell death. PMID:24887205

  13. In Vitro Spectrophotometry of Tooth Discoloration Induced by Tooth-Colored Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Calcium-Enriched Mixture Cement

    PubMed Central

    Arman, Marjan; Khalilak, Zohreh; Rajabi, Moones; Esnaashari, Ehsan; Saati, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: There are numerous factors that can lead to tooth discoloration after endodontic treatment, such as penetration of endodontic materials into the dentinal tubules during root canal treatment. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare discoloration induced by tooth colored mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement in extracted human teeth. Methods and Materials: Thirty two dentin-enamel cuboid blocks (7×7×2 mm) were prepared from extracted maxillary central incisors. Standardized cavities were prepared in the middle of each cube, leaving 1 mm of enamel and dentin on the labial surface. The specimens were randomly divided into two study groups (n=12) and two positive and negative control groups (n=4). In either study groups the cavities were filled with MTA or CEM cement. The positive and negative control groups were filled with blood or left empty, respectively. The cavities were sealed with composite resin and stored in normal saline. Color measurement was carried out by spectrophotometry at different time intervals including before (T0), and 1 week (T1), 1 month (T2) and 6 months (T3) after placement of materials. Repeated-measures ANOVA was used to compare the discoloration between the groups; the material type was considered as the inter-subject factor. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: No significant differences were detected between the groups in all time intervals (P>0.05). Conclusion: Tooth discoloration was similarly detectable with both of the two experimental materials. PMID:26576163

  14. The Effects of Alkaline pH on Microleakage of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Calcium Enriched Mixture Apical Plugs

    PubMed Central

    Mirhadi, Hossein; Moazzami, Fariborz; Rangani Jahromi, Saeed; Safarzade, Sareh

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Alkaline pH can affect the physical and chemical properties and sealing ability of apical plug material. Calcium hydroxide is used as an intracanal medication to complete disinfection of root canals. It raises the pH of environment to alkaline value. Purpose The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effect of alkaline pH on the sealing ability of calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) apical plugs. Materials and Method Seventy single-rooted human maxillary anterior teeth were randomly divided to two experimental groups for Angelus MTA and CEM cement (n=30) and two control groups (n=5). Each group was divided into two subgroups of 15 for neutral and alkaline pH, and 1 negative and 1 positive control groups of 5. The root canals were cleaned and shaped by using ProTaper rotary system (Dentsply Maillefer; Ballaigues, Switzerland) and the terminal 3mm of the roots were resected. Then, MTA and CEM cement were condensed in apical region with 3mm thickness. The samples were exposed to two environments with different pH values of 13 and 7.4. The leakage was assessed by using the fluid filtration technique at 1, 7, 14, 30 days intervals. Data were analyzed by the repeated measures MANOVA. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of microleakage between neutral and alkaline pH of CEM cement and MTA (p> 0.05). The sealing ability of MTA in an alkaline pH of 13 was significantly less than CEM cement in this pH (p< 0.05). Conclusion An environment with alkaline pH had no adverse effect on the sealing ability of MTA and CEM cement used as apical plugs. CEM cement had better sealing ability in alkaline pH. PMID:26966703

  15. Coronal Discoloration Induced by Calcium-Enriched Mixture, Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Calcium Hydroxide: A Spectrophotometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeili, Behnaz; Alaghehmand, Homayoun; Kordafshari, Tavoos; Daryakenari, Ghazaleh; Ehsani, Maryam; Bijani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the discoloration potential of calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement, white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) and calcium hydroxide (CH), after placement in pulp chamber. Methods and Materials: Access cavities were prepared in 40 intact maxillary central incisors. Then, a 2×2 mm box was prepared on the middle third of the inner surface on the buccal wall of the access cavity. The specimens were randomly assigned into four groups; the boxes in the control group were left empty, in groups 1 to 3, the boxes were filled with CH, WMTA and CEM cement, respectively. The access cavities and the apical openings were sealed using resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI). The color measurement was performed with a spectrophotometer at the following intervals: before (T0), immediately after placement of the filling material (T1), one week (T2), 1 month (T3), 3 months (T4) and 5 months (T5) after filling of the box and finally immediately after removing the material from the boxes (T6). Color change (ΔE) values were calculated using the sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test to determine the normal distribution of data, followed by ANOVA, repeated measured ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey’s tests. Results: All materials led to clinically perceptible crown discoloration after 1 week. The highest ΔE value belonged to WMTA group. Discoloration induced by CEM cement was not significantly different from CH or the control group (P>0.05). Conclusion: CEM cement may be the material of choice in the esthetic region, specifically pertaining to its lower color changing potential compared to WMTA. PMID:26843873

  16. Microhardness Properties of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Calcium-enriched Mixture Cement Plugs at Different Setting Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizizadeh, Mehdi; Dabbagh, Mohammad Mahdi; Badrian, Hamid; Davoudi, Amin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Providing an apical stop in open apex roots is one of the endodontic challenges. The aim of present study was to compare the surface hardness of both mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement at different setting situations. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 freshly extracted human teeth with a single root and normal apex and no obvious caries or curvatures were selected. The teeth were sectioned horizontally from the cement enamel junction and 2 mm above the apex. Standard technique was administered for cleaning and shaping of the canals. Open apex root canal was prepared by using Peso reamer. The prepared teeth were randomly divided into four groups in which two groups were filled by MTA and the other groups were filled by CEM. White MTA and CEM cement plugs were prepared and condensed up to the apical end. In two groups, moistened paper point was placed in the canals and in the other group dried paper points was used. Vickers test was done to evaluate the microhardness and the collected data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and three-way ANOVA tests using SPSS software version 18 at a significant level of 0.05. Results: The highest and lowest surface hardness was observed in CEM group at dried condition with 4 mm thickness indentation (145.10 ± 7.60 kg/mm2) and moist MTA group indented at 8 mm thickness (111.25 ± 5.37 kg/mm2). However, no significant difference was noticed (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Humidity condition might not influence the microhardness properties of both MTA and CEM cement apical plugs at different tested indentation thickness. PMID:26435614

  17. Enhanced suppression of tumor growth by concomitant treatment of human lung cancer cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and arsenic trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Chia-Wen; Yao, Ju-Hsien; Chang, Shih-Yu; Lee, Pei-Chih; Lee, Te-Chang

    2011-11-15

    The efficacy of arsenic trioxide (ATO) against acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and relapsed APL has been well documented. ATO may cause DNA damage by generating reactive oxygen intermediates. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, modulates gene and protein expression via histone-dependent or -independent pathways that may result in chromatin decondensation, cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis. We investigated whether ATO and SAHA act synergistically to enhance the death of cancer cells. Our current findings showed that combined treatment with ATO and SAHA resulted in enhanced suppression of non-small-cell lung carcinoma in vitro in H1299 cells and in vivo in a xenograft mouse model. Flow cytometric analysis of annexin V+ cells showed that apoptotic cell death was significantly enhanced after combined treatment with ATO and SAHA. At the doses used, ATO did not interfere with cell cycle progression, but SAHA induced p21 expression and led to G1 arrest. A Comet assay demonstrated that ATO, but not SAHA, induced DNA strand breaks in H1299 cells; however, co-treatment with SAHA significantly increased ATO-induced DNA damage. Moreover, SAHA enhanced acetylation of histone H3 and sensitized genomic DNA to DNase I digestion. Our results suggest that SAHA may cause chromatin relaxation and increase cellular susceptibility to ATO-induced DNA damage. Combined administration of SAHA and ATO may be an effective approach to the treatment of lung cancer. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATO and SAHA are therapeutic agents with different action modes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination of ATO and SAHA synergistically inhibits tumor cell growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SAHA loosens chromatin structure resulting in increased sensitivity to DNase I. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATO-induced DNA damage and apoptosis are enhanced by co-treatment with SAHA.

  18. Comparison of Newly Diagnosed and Relapsed Patients with Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Treated with Arsenic Trioxide: Insight into Mechanisms of Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chendamarai, Ezhilarasi; Ganesan, Saravanan; Alex, Ansu Abu; Kamath, Vandana; Nair, Sukesh C.; Nellickal, Arun Jose; Janet, Nancy Beryl; Srivastava, Vivi; Lakshmi, Kavitha M.; Viswabandya, Auro; Abraham, Aby; Aiyaz, Mohammed; Mullapudi, Nandita; Mugasimangalam, Raja; Padua, Rose Ann; Chomienne, Christine; Chandy, Mammen; Srivastava, Alok; George, Biju; Balasubramanian, Poonkuzhali; Mathews, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    There is limited data on the clinical, cellular and molecular changes in relapsed acute promyeloytic leukemia (RAPL) in comparison with newly diagnosed cases (NAPL). We undertook a prospective study to compare NAPL and RAPL patients treated with arsenic trioxide (ATO) based regimens. 98 NAPL and 28 RAPL were enrolled in this study. RAPL patients had a significantly lower WBC count and higher platelet count at diagnosis. IC bleeds was significantly lower in RAPL cases (P=0.022). The ability of malignant promyelocytes to concentrate ATO intracellularly and their in-vitro IC50 to ATO was not significantly different between the two groups. Targeted NGS revealed PML B2 domain mutations in 4 (15.38%) of the RAPL subset and none were associated with secondary resistance to ATO. A microarray GEP revealed 1744 genes were 2 fold and above differentially expressed between the two groups. The most prominent differentially regulated pathways were cell adhesion (n=92), cell survival (n=50), immune regulation (n=74) and stem cell regulation (n=51). Consistent with the GEP data, immunophenotyping revealed significantly increased CD34 expression (P=0.001) in RAPL cases and there was in-vitro evidence of significant microenvironment mediated innate resistance (EM-DR) to ATO. Resistance and relapse following treatment with ATO is probably multi-factorial, mutations in PML B2 domain while seen only in RAPL may not be the major clinically relevant cause of subsequent relapses. In RAPL additional factors such as expansion of the leukemia initiating compartment along with EM-DR may contribute significantly to relapse following treatment with ATO based regimens. PMID:25822503

  19. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cancer stem-like cells via down-regulation of Gli1 in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ke-Jie; Yang, Meng-Hang; Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Li, Bing; Nie, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for the tumorigenesis and recurrence, so targeting CSCs is a potential effective method to cure cancers. Activated Hedgehog signaling pathway has been proved to be implicated in the maintenance of self-renewal of CSCs, and arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has been reported to inhibit Gli1, a key transcription factor of Hedgehog pathway. In this study, we evaluated whether As2O3 has inhibitory effects on cancer stem-like cells (CSLCs) in lung cancer and further explored the possible mechanism. CCK8 assay and colony formation assay were performed to demonstrate the ability of As2O3 to inhibit the growth of NCI-H460 and NCI-H446 cells, which represented non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC), respectively. Tumor sphere formation assay was carried out to evaluate the effects of As2O3 on stem cell-like subpopulations. The expression of stem cell biomarkers CD133 and stem cell transcription factors such as Sox2 and Oct4 were detected. Moreover, the effects of As2O3 on expression of Gli1 and its target genes were observed. We found that As2O3 inhibited the cell proliferation and reduced the colony formation ability. Importantly, As2O3 decreased the formation of tumor spheres. The expression of stem cell biomarker CD133 and stem cell transcription factors such as Sox2 and Oct4 were markedly reduced by As2O3 treatment. Furthermore, As2O3 decreased the expression of Gli1, N-myc and GAS1. Our results suggested that As2O3 is a promising agent to inhibit CSLCs in lung cancer. In addition, the mechanism of CSLCs inhibition might involve Gli1 down-regulation. PMID:27158399

  20. Photo-controllable thermoelectric properties with reversibility and photo-thermoelectric effects of tungsten trioxide accompanied by its photochromic phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Chiori; Kawano, Takuto; Kakemoto, Hirofumi; Irie, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    The addition of photo-controllable properties to tungsten trioxide (WO3) is of interest for developing practical applications of WO3 as well as for interpreting such phenomena from scientific viewpoints. Here, a sputtered crystalline WO3 thin film generated thermoelectric power due to ultraviolet (UV) light-induced band-gap excitation and was accompanied by a photochromic reaction resulting from generating W5+ ions. The thermoelectric properties (electrical conductivity (σ) and Seebeck coefficient (S)) and coloration of WO3 could be reversibly switched by alternating the external stimulus between UV light irradiation and dark storage. After irradiating the film with UV light, σ increased, whereas the absolute value of S decreased, and the photochromic (coloration) reaction was detected. Notably, the opposite behavior was exhibited by WO3 after dark storage, and this reversible cycle could be repeated at least three times. Moreover, photo-thermoelectric effects (photo-conductive effect (photo-conductivity, σphoto) and photo-Seebeck effect (photo-Seebeck coefficient, Sphoto)) were also detected in response to visible-light irradiation of the colored WO3 thin films. Under visible-light irradiation, σphoto and the absolute value of Sphoto increased and decreased, respectively. These effects are likely attributable to the excitation of electrons from the mid-gap visible light absorption band (W5+ state) to the conduction band of WO3. Our findings demonstrate that the simultaneous, reversible switching of multiple properties of WO3 thin film is achieved by the application of an external stimulus and that this material exhibits photo-thermoelectric effects when irradiated with visible-light.

  1. Apical Sealing Ability of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate, Intermediate Restorative Material and Calcium Enriched Mixture Cement: A Bacterial Leakage Study

    PubMed Central

    Shahriari, Shahriar; Faramarzi, Farhad; Alikhani, Mohammad-Yousef; Farhadian, Maryam; Hendi, Seyedeh Sareh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This in vitro study compared the apical sealing ability of three common root end filling materials namely mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), intermediate restorative material (IRM) and calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement using a bacterial leakage model. Methods and Materials: The study was conducted on 83 single-rooted human teeth. Tooth crowns were cut and root canals were prepared using the step-back technique. Apical 3 mm of the roots were cut and a three-mm-deep cavity was prepared using an ultrasonic instrument. The samples were divided into three groups (n=25) according to the root-end filling material including MTA, IRM and CEM cement. The roots were inserted into cut-end microtubes. After sterilization with ethylene oxide, microtubes were placed in sterile vials containing 10 mL of Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) broth and incubated at 37°C and 0.1 mL of Enterococcus faecalis suspension compatible with 0.5 McFarland standard (1.5×108 cell/ ml), which was refreshed daily. This procedure was continued for 70 days. The data were analyzed using the chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis and log rank tests. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: No significant difference was found in bacterial microleakage among three groups; MTA showed slightly (but not significantly) less microleakage than IRM and CEM. However, the difference in the mean time of microleakage was significant among the groups (P<0.04) and in MTA samples leakage occurred in a longer time than CEM (P<0.012). Conclusion: The three tested root end filling materials had equal sealing efficacy for preventing bacterial leakage. PMID:27790267

  2. Immunolocalization of fibronectin during reparative dentinogenesis in rat molor teeth after pulp capping with mineral trioxide aggregate or calcium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Bal, Cenkhan; Oztas, Nurhan; Cincik, Mehmet; Baris, Emre

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunolocalization of fibronectin during reparative dentinogenesis in rat teeth after pulp capping with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) or calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2). The pulps of 72 upper and lower first molar teeth from 18 male Wistar rats were experimentally exposed. The pulps were capped with MTA or (Ca(OH)2); final restoration followed with zinc oxide and eugenol cement. The animals were euthanized at, respectively, one, three, seven and fourteen days postoperatively. At day one, all groups showed varying degrees of inflammation, from mild to severe. There was no positive reaction for fibronectin at day one. After three days, a partial acute pulpitis was observed in the Ca(OH)2 group. There was less inflammation in the MTA group (p<0.05), and a layer of fibrin barrier was observed along the pulp walls of the MTA material. The layer of fibrodentin formation showed positive reaction for fibronectin. At seven days, the Ca(OH)2 group showed mild inflammation and demonstrated more immunostaining for fibronectin than the Ca(OH)2 group (p<0.05) at three days. Pulps capped with MTA at seven days showed thicker fibrin barrier formation than the MTA group at three days and more immunostaining for fibronectin in whole groups (p<0.05). At fourteen days, there was no positive reaction for fibronectin in either the MTA or Ca(OH)2 group. It seems MTA showed better biocompability properties with the dental pulp tissue, inducing the expression of reparative molecule fibronectin compared with Ca(OH)2. Therefore, MTA may be a better choice for pulp capping procedures. PMID:22338817

  3. Biodentine versus Mineral Trioxide Aggregate versus Intermediate Restorative Material for Retrograde Root End Filling: An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Soundappan, Saravanapriyan; Sundaramurthy, Jothi Latha; Raghu, Sandhya; Natanasabapathy, Velmurugan

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the marginal adaptation of Biodentine in comparison with Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) and Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM), as a root end filling material, using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Thirty permanent maxillary central incisors were chemo-mechanically prepared and obturated. Three millimetres of the root end were resected and 3mm retro cavity preparation was done using ultrasonic retrotips. The samples were randomly divided into three groups (n=10) and were restored with root end filling materials: Group I – MTA, Group II – Biodentine, Group III – IRM. The root ends were sectioned transversely at 1mm and 2mm levels and evaluated for marginal adaptation using SEM. The gap between dentin and retro filling material was measured at four quadrants. The mean gap at 1mm level and 2mm level from the resected root tip and combined mean were calculated. The data were statistically analyzed, using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD post hoc test for intergroup analysis and paired t-test for intragroup analysis. Results: The overall results showed no statistically significant difference between MTA and IRM but both were superior when compared to Biodentine. At 1mm level there was no statistically significant difference among any of the tested materials. At 2mm level MTA was superior to both IRM and Biodentine. Conclusion: In overall comparison, MTA and IRM were significantly superior when compared to Biodentine in terms of marginal adaptation, when used as retrograde filling material. PMID:24910689

  4. A drug from poison: how the therapeutic effect of arsenic trioxide on acute promyelocytic leukemia was discovered.

    PubMed

    Rao, Yi; Li, Runhong; Zhang, Daqing

    2013-06-01

    It is surprising that, while arsenic trioxide (ATO) is now considered as "the single most active agent in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL)", the most important discoverer remains obscure and his original papers have not been cited by a single English paper. The discovery was made during the Cultural Revolution when most Chinese scientists and doctors struggled to survive. Beginning with recipes from a countryside practitioner that were vague in applicable diseases, Zhang TingDong and colleagues proposed in the 1970s that a single chemical in the recipe is most effective and that its target is APL. More than 20 years of work by Zhang and colleagues eliminated the confusions about whether and how ATO can be used effectively. Other researchers, first in China and then in the West, followed his lead. Retrospective analysis of data from his own group proved that APL was indeed the most sensitive target. Removal of a trace amount of mercury chloride from the recipe by another group in his hospital proved that only ATO was required. Publication of Western replication in 1998 made the therapy widely accepted, though neither Western, nor Chinese authors of English papers on ATO cited Zhang's papers in the 1970s. This article focuses on the early papers of Zhang, but also suggests it worth further work to validate Chinese reports of ATO treatment of other cancers, and infers that some findings published in Chinese journals are of considerable value to patients and that doctors from other countries can benefit from the clinical experience of Chinese doctors with the largest population of patients.

  5. Carnosic Acid-combined Arsenic Trioxide Antileukaemia Cells in the Establishment of NB4/SCID Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Hao, Li; Ran, Wang; Xiang-Xin, Li; Lu-Qun, Wang; Xiao-Ning, Yu

    2016-09-01

    Despite great improvement in the treatment outcome of APL, treatment failure still sometimes occurs due to the toxicity of arsenic trioxide (ATO). Damage to the heart and liver often occurs even when the dose is lower than the therapeutic dose. Based on the results of cell experiments in vitro in this study, we investigated the synergistic activity of carnosic acid (CA) combined with ATO in the SCID mouse model of human promyelocytic leukaemia in vivo. A NB4/SCID mouse model was established in this study. The NB4/SCID mice were randomly divided into three treatment groups (CA alone, ATO alone and CA combined with ATO) and a control group based on factorial design. The evaluation indicators of the curative effect of the drugs included expressions of cleaved caspase-3, PTEN, p27 gene mRNA and proteins by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry and Western blot analysis. The survival time was compared between the four groups. The results indicated that verification of the NB4/SCID mouse model was confirmed by histopathological examination. Compared with mice treated by CA or ATO alone, the mice in the combination of CA and ATO group had a higher rate of apoptosis, which was linked with expressions of cleaved caspase-3, PTEN, p27 gene mRNA and proteins. Also, the mice with the longest survival time were those treated with the combination of CA and ATO. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that CA and ATO in combination have strong synergistic antileukaemic effects on cell activity.

  6. Determination of the Apical Sealing Abilities of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate, Portland Cement, and Bioaggregate After Irrigation with Different Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Bayram, H Melike; Saklar, Feridun; Bayram, Emre; Orucoglu, Hasan; Bozkurt, Alperen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the sealing ability of root-end filling materials such as mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), Portland cement, and bioaggregate (BA) after irrigation with different solutions. Materials and Methods: We examined 130 human maxillar central teeth. After cutting the teeth at the cementoenamel junction, the root canals were expanded using nickel-titanium rotary instruments. Root canals were filled with AH-plus and gutta-percha. Then, the roots were cut apically, and 3 mm deep retrograde cavities were prepared. The roots were divided 12 experimental groups, consisting 10 teeth each; the positive and negative control groups contained five teeth each. The retrograde cavities were rinsed using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), chlorhexidine (CHX), BioPure™ mixture of a tetracycline isomer, an acid, and a detergent (MTAD), or distilled water. Next, groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were sealed with MTA; groups 5, 6, 7, and 8 were sealed with Portland cement; and groups 9, 10, 11, and 12 were sealed with BA. Then, apical microleakage was evaluated by using a computerized fluid filtration method. The results of the leakage test were statistically evaluated by the post-hoc Tukey’s test. Results: MTA, Portland cement, and BA root-end filling materials showed the least leakage in the CHX and distilled water groups. The highest leakage was observed in the EDTA and MTAD groups. Conclusions: The sealing ability of BA was as good as that of MTA. EDTA and MTAD increased the apical leakage and CHX and distilled water decreased the leakage of the root-end filling materials examined in this study. PMID:26124593

  7. A drug from poison: how the therapeutic effect of arsenic trioxide on acute promyelocytic leukemia was discovered.

    PubMed

    Rao, Yi; Li, Runhong; Zhang, Daqing

    2013-06-01

    It is surprising that, while arsenic trioxide (ATO) is now considered as "the single most active agent in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL)", the most important discoverer remains obscure and his original papers have not been cited by a single English paper. The discovery was made during the Cultural Revolution when most Chinese scientists and doctors struggled to survive. Beginning with recipes from a countryside practitioner that were vague in applicable diseases, Zhang TingDong and colleagues proposed in the 1970s that a single chemical in the recipe is most effective and that its target is APL. More than 20 years of work by Zhang and colleagues eliminated the confusions about whether and how ATO can be used effectively. Other researchers, first in China and then in the West, followed his lead. Retrospective analysis of data from his own group proved that APL was indeed the most sensitive target. Removal of a trace amount of mercury chloride from the recipe by another group in his hospital proved that only ATO was required. Publication of Western replication in 1998 made the therapy widely accepted, though neither Western, nor Chinese authors of English papers on ATO cited Zhang's papers in the 1970s. This article focuses on the early papers of Zhang, but also suggests it worth further work to validate Chinese reports of ATO treatment of other cancers, and infers that some findings published in Chinese journals are of considerable value to patients and that doctors from other countries can benefit from the clinical experience of Chinese doctors with the largest population of patients. PMID:23645104

  8. Sealing Ability of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Calcium-Enriched Mixture Cement as Apical Barriers with Different Obturation Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizizade, Mahdi; Asadi, Yasin; Sooratgar, Aidin; Moradi, Saeed; Sooratgar, Hossein; Ayatollahi, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Endodontic treatment in pulpless immature teeth is challenging due to the lack of an apical stop. Insertion of an apical plug is an alternative to conventional long-term apexification with calcium hydroxide. The aim of this study was to compare the apical microleakage of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement as apical plugs with three different obturation techniques. Methods and Materials: This experimental study was conducted on 130 single rooted human teeth with one canal. Samples were randomly divided into 2 experimental groups (n=60) and two negative and positive control groups containing 5 samples each. After cleaning and shaping, an open apex configuration was prepared in all samples. MTA or CEM cement apical plugs with 5 mm thicknesses were placed. Then, each group was divided to 4 subgroups and the remaining space of root canals were filled with either lateral compaction or thermoplasticized injectable gutta-percha or was obturated by filling the entire canal with apical plug material. In one remaining subgroup the canal space was left unfilled. Microleakage was measured by the fluid filtration method and results were analyzed by means of the two-way ANOVA test. Results: There were no significant differences between microleakage of MTA and CEM cement apical plugs (P=0.92). The difference between three obturation methods was not significant, either (P=0.39). Conclusion: MTA and CEM cement have similar sealing ability as apical plugs and no significant difference was found in microleakage of the three groups. PMID:25386206

  9. Immunotoxicity and biodistribution analysis of arsenic trioxide in C57Bl/6 mice following a 2-week inhalation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Burchiel, Scott W.; Mitchell, Leah A.; Lauer, Fredine T.; Sun Xi; McDonald, Jacob D.; Hudson, Laurie G.; Liu Kejian

    2009-12-15

    In these studies the immunotoxicity of arsenic trioxide (ATO, As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was evaluated in mice following 14 days of inhalation exposures (nose only, 3 h per day) at concentrations of 50 mug/m{sup 3} and 1 mg/m{sup 3}. A biodistribution analysis performed immediately after inhalation exposures revealed highest levels of arsenic in the kidneys, bladder, liver, and lung. Spleen cell levels were comparable to those found in the blood, with the highest concentration of arsenic detected in the spleen being 150 mug/g tissue following the 1 mg/m{sup 3} exposures. No spleen cell cytotoxicity was observed at either of the two exposure levels. There were no changes in spleen cell surface marker expression for B cells, T cells, macrophages, and natural killer (NK) cells. There were also no changes detected in the B cell (LPS-stimulated) and T cell (Con A-stimulated) proliferative responses of spleen cells, and no changes were found in the NK-mediated lysis of Yac-1 target cells. The primary T-dependent antibody response was, however, found to be highly susceptible to ATO suppression. Both the 50 mug/m{sup 3} and 1 mg/m{sup 3} exposures produced greater than 70% suppression of the humoral immune response to sheep red blood cells. Thus, the primary finding of this study is that the T-dependent humoral immune response is extremely sensitive to suppression by ATO and assessment of humoral immune responses should be considered in evaluating the health effects of arsenic containing agents.

  10. Differential binding of monomethylarsonous acid compared to arsenite and arsenic trioxide with zinc finger peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xixi; Sun, Xi; Mobarak, Charlotte; Gandolfi, A Jay; Burchiel, Scott W; Hudson, Laurie G; Liu, Ke Jian

    2014-04-21

    Arsenic is an environmental toxin that enhances the carcinogenic effect of DNA-damaging agents, such as ultraviolet radiation and benzo[a]pyrene. Interaction with zinc finger proteins has been shown to be an important molecular mechanism for arsenic toxicity and cocarcinogenesis. Arsenicals such as arsenite, arsenic trioxide (ATO), and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) have been reported to interact with cysteine residues of zinc finger domains, but little is known about potential differences in their selectivity of interaction. Herein we analyzed the interaction of arsenite, MMA(III), and ATO with C2H2, C3H1, and C4 configurations of zinc fingers using UV-vis, cobalt, fluorescence, and mass spectrometry. We observed that arsenite and ATO both selectively bound to C3H1 and C4 zinc fingers, while MMA(III) interacted with all three configurations of zinc finger peptides. Structurally and functionally, arsenite and ATO caused conformational changes and zinc loss on C3H1 and C4 zinc finger peptide and protein, respectively, whereas MMA(III) changed conformation and displaced zinc on all three types of zinc fingers. The differential selectivity was also demonstrated in zinc finger proteins isolated from cells treated with these arsenicals. Our results show that trivalent inorganic arsenic compounds, arsenite and ATO, have the same selectivity and behavior when interacting with zinc finger proteins, while methylation removes the selectivity. These findings provide insights on the molecular mechanisms underlying the differential effects of inorganic versus methylated arsenicals, as well as the role of in vivo arsenic methylation in arsenic toxicity and carcinogenesis.

  11. Evaluation of antifungal activity of white-colored mineral trioxide aggregate on different strains of Candida albicans in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Archana; Bhardwaj, Abhishek; Rao, Nageshwar

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antifungal action of various concentrations of white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) against seven different strains of Candida albicans using the tube dilution test. Materials and Methods: Fresh mix of MTA was prepared at concentrations of 100, 50, 25, and 12.5 mg/ml and added to a broth tube containing Sabouraud's liquid medium. A total of 1287 broth tubes were prepared and divided into experimental and control groups. Stock cultures of seven strains of C. albicans were obtained. Fresh inoculate of the microorganism was prepared by growing overnight cultures. Aliquots of the test C. albicans were taken and added to the test tubes. All tubes were incubated at 37°C for 1-, 24-, 72-, and 168-h time periods. At each time period, the presence of C. albicans colonies was assessed. Statistical analysis used: Differences among the groups were statistically analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U tests. Results: Results showed that one strain showed resistance even after 3 days at the lower MTA concentrations of 12.5 and 25 mg/ml. Growth reoccurred with three strains at MTA concentration of 12.5 mg/ml after 7 days. A significant difference was found between strain 3 and other strains at MTA concentrations of 12.5 and 25 mg/ml at the 3-days time period and between tubes containing 12.5 mg/ml and tubes containing higher concentrations of MTA at the 7-days time period. Conclusion: White MTA in concentrations of 100 and 50 mg/ml is effective in inhibiting the seven tested strains of C. albicans for periods up to 1 week. PMID:24944454

  12. Photo-controllable thermoelectric properties with reversibility and photo-thermoelectric effects of tungsten trioxide accompanied by its photochromic phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Azuma, Chiori; Kawano, Takuto; Kakemoto, Hirofumi; Irie, Hiroshi

    2014-11-07

    The addition of photo-controllable properties to tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) is of interest for developing practical applications of WO{sub 3} as well as for interpreting such phenomena from scientific viewpoints. Here, a sputtered crystalline WO{sub 3} thin film generated thermoelectric power due to ultraviolet (UV) light-induced band-gap excitation and was accompanied by a photochromic reaction resulting from generating W{sup 5+} ions. The thermoelectric properties (electrical conductivity (σ) and Seebeck coefficient (S)) and coloration of WO{sub 3} could be reversibly switched by alternating the external stimulus between UV light irradiation and dark storage. After irradiating the film with UV light, σ increased, whereas the absolute value of S decreased, and the photochromic (coloration) reaction was detected. Notably, the opposite behavior was exhibited by WO{sub 3} after dark storage, and this reversible cycle could be repeated at least three times. Moreover, photo-thermoelectric effects (photo-conductive effect (photo-conductivity, σ{sub photo}) and photo-Seebeck effect (photo-Seebeck coefficient, S{sub photo})) were also detected in response to visible-light irradiation of the colored WO{sub 3} thin films. Under visible-light irradiation, σ{sub photo} and the absolute value of S{sub photo} increased and decreased, respectively. These effects are likely attributable to the excitation of electrons from the mid-gap visible light absorption band (W{sup 5+} state) to the conduction band of WO{sub 3}. Our findings demonstrate that the simultaneous, reversible switching of multiple properties of WO{sub 3} thin film is achieved by the application of an external stimulus and that this material exhibits photo-thermoelectric effects when irradiated with visible-light.

  13. Shear Bond Strength of Calcium Enriched Mixture Cement and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate to Composite Resin with Two Different Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Bahari, Mahmoud; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Motahhari, Paria; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Immediate restoration after vital pulp therapy is essential in order to create and maintain effective coronal seal. Purpose of Study: The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of recently used pulp capping materials: white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and calcium enriched mixture cement (CEM) to composite resin with the use of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems and compare them with the bond strength of commonly used resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) cement. Materials and Methods: Forty specimens from each test material were fabricated, measuring 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in depth. The specimens of each material were divided into 2 groups of 20 specimens according to the adhesive system (Single Bond vs. Clearfil SE Bond) used for bonding of resin composite. The shear bond strength values were measured at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min and fractured surfaces were examined. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey’s test (P<0.05). Results: Analysis of data showed a significantly higher bond strength for RMGI compared to MTA and CEM (P<0.001); however, no significant differences were observed in the bond strength values of MTA and CEM (P=0.9). Furthermore, there were no significant differences in relation to the type of the adhesive system irrespective of the type of the material used (P=0.95) All the failures were of cohesive type in RMGI, MTA and CEM. Conclusion: Bond strength of RMGI cement to composite resin was higher than that of MTA or CEM cement irrespective of the type of the adhesive system. PMID:25628696

  14. Metal-Sulfur Battery Cathodes Based on PAN-Sulfur Composites.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuya; Ma, Lin; Hendrickson, Kenville E; Tu, Zhengyuan; Archer, Lynden A

    2015-09-23

    Sulfur/polyacrylonitrile composites provide a promising route toward cathode materials that overcome multiple, stubborn technical barriers to high-energy, rechargeable lithium-sulfur (Li-S) cells. Using a facile thermal synthesis procedure in which sulfur and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) are the only reactants, we create a family of sulfur/PAN (SPAN) nanocomposites in which sulfur is maintained as S3/S2 during all stages of the redox process. By entrapping these smaller molecular sulfur species in the cathode through covalent bonding to and physical confinement in a conductive host, these materials are shown to completely eliminate polysulfide dissolution and shuttling between lithium anode and sulfur cathode. We also show that, in the absence of any of the usual salt additives required to stabilize the anode in traditional Li-S cells, Li-SPAN cells cycle trouble free and at high Coulombic efficiencies in simple carbonate electrolytes. Electrochemical and spectroscopic analysis of the SPAN cathodes at various stages of charge and discharge further show a full and reversible reduction and oxidation between elemental sulfur and Li-ions in the electrolyte to produce Li2S as the only discharge product over hundreds of cycles of charge and discharge at fixed current densities. PMID:26325146

  15. Airborne sulfur trace species intercomparison campaign: Sulfur dioxide, dimethylsulfide, hydrogen sulfide, carbon disulfide, and carbonyl sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Gerald L.; Hoell, James M., Jr.; Davis, Douglas D.

    1991-01-01

    Results from an airborne intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of sulfur trace gases are presented. The intercomparison was part of the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE) and was conducted during the summer of 1989. The intercomparisons were conducted on the Wallops Electra aircraft during flights from Wallops Island, Virginia, and Natal, Brazil. Sulfur measurements intercompared included sulfur dioxide (SO2), dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbon disulfide (CS2), and carbonyl sulfide (OCS). Measurement techniques ranged from filter collection systems with post-flight analyses to mass spectrometer and gas chromatograph systems employing various methods for measuring and identifying the sulfur gases during flight. Sampling schedules for the techniques ranged from integrated collections over periods as long as 50 minutes to one- to three-minute samples every ten or fifteen minutes. Several of the techniques provided measurements of more than one sulfur gas. Instruments employing different detection principles were involved in each of the sulfur intercomparisons. Also included in the intercomparison measurement scenario were a host of supporting measurements (i.e., ozone, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, total sulfur, aerosols, etc.) for purposes of: (1) interpreting results (i.e., correlation of any noted instrument disagreement with the chemical composition of the measurement environment); and (2) providing supporting chemical data to meet CITE-3 science objectives of studying ozone/sulfur photochemistry, diurnal cycles, etc. The results of the intercomparison study are briefly discussed.

  16. COULOMETRIC DETERMINATION OF TOTAL SULFUR AND REDUCED INORGANIC SULFUR FRACTIONS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of the solid-phase partitioning of sulfur is frequently an important analytical component of risk assessments at hazardous waste sites because minerals containing reduced-sulfur can significantly affect the transport and fate of organic and inorganic contaminants in na...

  17. 40 CFR 52.1881 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... amount of hydrogen peroxide absorbent. (ii) The test methods and procedures used for determining... 40 CFR 52.1870: (i) Rules as effective in Ohio on December 28, 1979: OAC 3745-18-04(A), (B), (C), (D... sulfuric acid by the contact process by burning elemental sulfur, alkylation acid, hydrogen...

  18. 40 CFR 52.1881 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... amount of hydrogen peroxide absorbent. (ii) The test methods and procedures used for determining... 40 CFR 52.1870: (i) Rules as effective in Ohio on December 28, 1979: OAC 3745-18-04(A), (B), (C), (D... sulfuric acid by the contact process by burning elemental sulfur, alkylation acid, hydrogen...

  19. 40 CFR 52.1881 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... amount of hydrogen peroxide absorbent. (ii) The test methods and procedures used for determining... 40 CFR 52.1870: (i) Rules as effective in Ohio on December 28, 1979: OAC 3745-18-04(A), (B), (C), (D... sulfuric acid by the contact process by burning elemental sulfur, alkylation acid, hydrogen...

  20. 40 CFR 52.1881 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... amount of hydrogen peroxide absorbent. (ii) The test methods and procedures used for determining... 40 CFR 52.1870: (i) Rules as effective in Ohio on December 28, 1979: OAC 3745-18-04(A), (B), (C), (D... sulfuric acid by the contact process by burning elemental sulfur, alkylation acid, hydrogen...

  1. Metal-Sulfur Battery Cathodes Based on PAN-Sulfur Composites.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuya; Ma, Lin; Hendrickson, Kenville E; Tu, Zhengyuan; Archer, Lynden A

    2015-09-23

    Sulfur/polyacrylonitrile composites provide a promising route toward cathode materials that overcome multiple, stubborn technical barriers to high-energy, rechargeable lithium-sulfur (Li-S) cells. Using a facile thermal synthesis procedure in which sulfur and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) are the only reactants, we create a family of sulfur/PAN (SPAN) nanocomposites in which sulfur is maintained as S3/S2 during all stages of the redox process. By entrapping these smaller molecular sulfur species in the cathode through covalent bonding to and physical confinement in a conductive host, these materials are shown to completely eliminate polysulfide dissolution and shuttling between lithium anode and sulfur cathode. We also show that, in the absence of any of the usual salt additives required to stabilize the anode in traditional Li-S cells, Li-SPAN cells cycle trouble free and at high Coulombic efficiencies in simple carbonate electrolytes. Electrochemical and spectroscopic analysis of the SPAN cathodes at various stages of charge and discharge further show a full and reversible reduction and oxidation between elemental sulfur and Li-ions in the electrolyte to produce Li2S as the only discharge product over hundreds of cycles of charge and discharge at fixed current densities.

  2. Infiltrating sulfur into a highly porous carbon sphere as cathode material for lithium–sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xiaohui; Kim, Dul-Sun; Ahn, Hyo-Jun; Kim, Ki-Won; Cho, Kwon-Koo; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A highly porous carbon (HPC) with regular spherical morphology was synthesized. • Sulfur/HPC composites were prepared by melt–diffusion method. • Sulfur/HPC composites showed improved cyclablity and long-term cycle life. - Abstract: Sulfur composite material with a highly porous carbon sphere as the conducting container was prepared. The highly porous carbon sphere was easily synthesized with resorcinol–formaldehyde precursor as the carbon source. The morphology of the carbon was observed with field emission scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope, which showed a well-defined spherical shape. Brunauer–Emmett–Teller analysis indicated that it possesses a high specific surface area of 1563 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and a total pore volume of 2.66 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1} with a bimodal pore size distribution, which allow high sulfur loading and easy transportation of lithium ions. Sulfur carbon composites with varied sulfur contents were prepared by melt–diffusion method and lithium sulfur cells with the sulfur composites showed improved cyclablity and long-term cycle life.

  3. Sulfur isotope fractionation during the reduction of elemental sulfur and thiosulfate by Dethiosulfovibrio spp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surkov, A. V.; Böttcher, M. E.; Kuever, J.

    2009-04-01

    Thiosulfate and elemental sulfur are typical by-products of the oxidation of dissolved sulfide and important sulfur intermediates in the biogeochemical sulfur cycle of natural sediments where they can be further transformed by microbial or chemical oxidation, reduction, or disproportionation. Due to the often superimposing reaction pathways of the sulfur intermediates in natural environments specific tracers are needed to better resolve the complex microbial and biogeochemical reactions. An important fingerprint for sulfur cycling is provided by the microbial fractionation of the stable sulfur isotopes S-34 and S-32. Proper interpretation of isotope signals in nature, however, is only possible by the calibration with results obtained with pure cultures under defined experimental conditions. In addition, sulfur isotope discrimination may provide informations about specific encymatic biochemical pathways within the bacterial cells. In this study, we report the results for the discrimination of stable sulfur isotopes S-32 and S-34 during reduction of thiosulfate and elemental sulfur by non-sulfate, but sulfur- and thiosulfate-reducing bacteria which are phylogenetically not related to sulfate-reducing bacteria. Experiments with were conducted at known cell-specific thiosulfate reduction rates. Stable sulfur isotope fractionation was investigated during reduction of thiosulfate and elemental sulfur at 28°C by growing batch cultures of Dethiosulfovibrio marinus WS100 (type strain DSM 12537) and Dethiosulfovibrio russensis (type strain DSM 12538) using citrate as carbon and energy source. The cell-specific reduction rates were 0.3 to 2.4 fmol cell-1 d-1 (thiosulfate) and 31 to 38 fmol cell-1 d-1 (elemental sulphur), respectively. The sulfide produced was depleted in S-34 by 12 per mil compared to total thiosulfate sulfur, close to previous results observed for sulfate-reducing bacteria, indicating that the thiosulfate-reducing mechanism of sulfate reducers is similar to

  4. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric; Pan, Huilin; Lv, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Z. D.; Liaw, Bor Y.; Yu, Xiqian; et al

    2015-01-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge processes follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials and the electrochemical characteristics of the cell, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-Smore » cell are driving each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new perspectives to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.« less

  5. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric; Pan, Huilin; Lv, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Z. D.; Liaw, Bor Y.; Yu, Xiqian; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2015-01-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge processes follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials and the electrochemical characteristics of the cell, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-S cell are driving each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new perspectives to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.

  6. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in lithium Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric D.; Pan, Huilin; Lu, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Zhiqun; Liaw, Bor Yann; Yu, Xiqian; Yang, Xiaoning; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2014-12-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge process follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-S cell are driven each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new insights to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.

  7. Sulfur oxidation activities of pure and mixed thermophiles and sulfur speciation in bioleaching of chalcopyrite.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Xia, Jin-Lan; Yang, Yi; Nie, Zhen-yuan; Zheng, Lei; Ma, Chen-yan; Zhang, Rui-yong; Peng, An-an; Tang, Lu; Qiu, Guan-zhou

    2011-02-01

    The sulfur oxidation activities of four pure thermophilic archaea Acidianus brierleyi (JCM 8954), Metallosphaera sedula (YN 23), Acidianus manzaensis (YN 25) and Sulfolobus metallicus (YN 24) and their mixture in bioleaching chalcopyrite were compared. Meanwhile, the relevant surface sulfur speciation of chalcopyrite leached with the mixed thermophilic archaea was investigated. The results showed that the mixed culture, with contributing significantly to the raising of leaching rate and accelerating the formation of leaching products, may have a higher sulfur oxidation activity than the pure cultures, and jarosite was the main passivation component hindering the dissolution of chalcopyrite, while elemental sulfur seemed to have no influence on the dissolution of chalcopyrite. In addition, the present results supported the former speculation, i.e., covellite might be converted from chalcocite during the leaching experiments, and the elemental sulfur may partially be the derivation of covellite and chalcocite. PMID:21194927

  8. Electrostatic self-assembly of graphene oxide wrapped sulfur particles for lithium–sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Haiwei; Huang, Ying Zong, Meng; Ding, Xiao; Ding, Juan; Sun, Xu

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Researched graphene oxide wrapped sulfur particles for lithium–sulfur batteries. • New approach for core–shell GO/S composites by electrostatic self-assembly method. • Both core–shell structure and the GO support help to retard the diffusion of polysulfides during the electrochemical cycling process of GO/S cathode. - Abstract: A novel graphene oxide (GO)/sulfur (S) composite is developed by electrostatic self-assembly method. Remarkably, the core–shell structure of the composite and the GO support helps to retard the diffusion of polysulfides during the electrochemical cycling process. The GO/sulfur cathode presents enhanced cycling ability. Specific discharge capacities up to 494.7 mAh g{sup −1} over 200 cycles at 0.1 C is achieved with enhanced columbic efficiency around 95%, representing a good cathode material for lithium–sulfur batteries.

  9. Effect of sulfur content in a sulfur-activated carbon composite on the electrochemical properties of a lithium/sulfur battery

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin-Woo; Kim, Changhyeon; Ryu, Ho-Suk; Cho, Gyu-Bong; Cho, Kwon-Koo; Kim, Ki-Won; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon; Wang, Guoxiu; Ahn, Jae-Pyeung; Ahn, Hyo-Jun

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The content of sulfur in activated carbon was controlled by solution process. • The sulfur electrode with low sulfur content shows the best performance. • The Li/S battery has capacity of 1360 mAh/g at 1 C and 702 mAh/g at 10 C. - Abstract: The content of sulfur in sulfur/activated carbon composite is controlled from 32.37 wt.% to 55.33 wt.% by a one-step solution-based process. When the sulfur content is limited to 41.21 wt.%, it can be loaded into the pores of an activated carbon matrix in a highly dispersed state. On the contrary, when the sulfur content is 55.33 wt.%, crystalline sulfur can be detected on the surface of the activated carbon matrix. The best electrochemical performance can be obtained for a sulfur electrode with the lowest sulfur content. The sulfur/activated carbon composite with 32.37 wt.% sulfur afforded the highest first discharge capacity of 1360 mAh g{sup −1} at 1 C rate and a large reversible capacity of 702 mAh g{sup −1} at 10 C (16.75 A/g)

  10. A primer on sulfur for the planetary geologist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theilig, E.

    1982-01-01

    Sulfur has been proposed as the dominant composition for the volcanic material on Io. Sulfur is a complex element which forms many intramolecular and intermolecular allotropes exhibiting a variety of physical properties. Cyclo-S8 sulfur is the most abundant and stable molecular form. The important molecular species within liquid sulfur change in concentration with temperature. Concentrations of the allotropes control the physical properties of the melt. Discontinuities in density, viscosity, and thermal properties reflect the polymerization process within liquid sulfur. Variations in the melting point are related to autodissociation of the liquid. Many solids forms of sulfur have been identified but only orthorhombic alpha and monoclinic beta sulfur, both composed of cyclo-S8 sulfur, are stable under terrestrial conditions. Physical properties of solid sulfur are dependent on the allotrope and, in some cases, the thermal history. Three natural terrestrial sulfur flows are described: (1) Siretoko-Iosan, Japan; (2) Volcan Azufre, Galapagos Islands; and (3) Mauna Loa, Hawaii. All of the flows are associated with fumarolic areas and are considered to have formed by the melting and mobilization of sulfur deposits. Surface textures of the flows indicate a behavior of molten sulfur similar to that of silicate lava. Channels, rivulets, and lobate edges were described for the flows. The solidification of man-made sulfur flows formed as part of the Frasch mining process by which sulfur is removed from the subsurface in a liquid state is described.

  11. Sulfur vesicles from Thermococcales: A possible role in sulfur detoxifying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gorlas, A.; Marguet, E.; Gill, S.; Geslin, C.; Guigner, J.-M.; Guyot, F.; Forterre, P.

    2015-01-01

    The euryarchaeon Thermococcus prieurii inhabits deep-sea hydrothermal vents, one of the most extreme environments on Earth, which is reduced and enriched with heavy metals. Transmission electron microscopy and cryo-electron microscopy imaging of T. prieurii revealed the production of a plethora of diverse membrane vesicles (MVs) (from 50 nm to 400 nm), as is the case for other Thermococcales. T. prieurii also produces particularly long nanopods/nanotubes, some of them containing more than 35 vesicles encased in a S-layer coat. Notably, cryo-electron microscopy of T. prieurii cells revealed the presence of numerous intracellular dark vesicles that bud from the host cells via interaction with the cytoplasmic membrane. These dark vesicles are exclusively found in conjunction with T. prieurii cells and never observed in the purified membrane vesicles preparations. Energy-Dispersive-X-Ray analyses revealed that these dark vesicles are filled with sulfur. Furthermore, the presence of these sulfur vesicles (SVs) is exclusively observed when elemental sulfur was added into the growth medium. In this report, we suggest that these atypical vesicles sequester the excess sulfur not used for growth, thus preventing the accumulation of toxic levels of sulfur in the host's cytoplasm. These SVs transport elemental sulfur out of the cell where they are rapidly degraded. Intriguingly, closely related archaeal species, Thermococcus nautili and Thermococcus kodakaraensis, show some differences about the production of sulfur vesicles. Whereas T. kodakaraensis produces less sulfur vesicles than T. prieurii, T. nautili does not produce such sulfur vesicles, suggesting that Thermococcales species exhibit significant differences in their sulfur metabolic pathways. PMID:26234734

  12. Sulfur vesicles from Thermococcales: A possible role in sulfur detoxifying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gorlas, A; Marguet, E; Gill, S; Geslin, C; Guigner, J-M; Guyot, F; Forterre, P

    2015-11-01

    The euryarchaeon Thermococcus prieurii inhabits deep-sea hydrothermal vents, one of the most extreme environments on Earth, which is reduced and enriched with heavy metals. Transmission electron microscopy and cryo-electron microscopy imaging of T. prieurii revealed the production of a plethora of diverse membrane vesicles (MVs) (from 50 nm to 400 nm), as is the case for other Thermococcales. T. prieurii also produces particularly long nanopods/nanotubes, some of them containing more than 35 vesicles encased in a S-layer coat. Notably, cryo-electron microscopy of T. prieurii cells revealed the presence of numerous intracellular dark vesicles that bud from the host cells via interaction with the cytoplasmic membrane. These dark vesicles are exclusively found in conjunction with T. prieurii cells and never observed in the purified membrane vesicles preparations. Energy-Dispersive-X-Ray analyses revealed that these dark vesicles are filled with sulfur. Furthermore, the presence of these sulfur vesicles (SVs) is exclusively observed when elemental sulfur was added into the growth medium. In this report, we suggest that these atypical vesicles sequester the excess sulfur not used for growth, thus preventing the accumulation of toxic levels of sulfur in the host's cytoplasm. These SVs transport elemental sulfur out of the cell where they are rapidly degraded. Intriguingly, closely related archaeal species, Thermococcus nautili and Thermococcus kodakaraensis, show some differences about the production of sulfur vesicles. Whereas T. kodakaraensis produces less sulfur vesicles than T. prieurii, T. nautili does not produce such sulfur vesicles, suggesting that Thermococcales species exhibit significant differences in their sulfur metabolic pathways.

  13. Elemental sulfur from regenerable FGD processes

    SciTech Connect

    Little, R.C.; Nelson, S.G.

    1995-12-31

    Sorbent Technologies Corporation (Sorbtech) engineers recently discovered a new catalyst that effectively reduces sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) in concentrated SO{sub 2} streams directly to elemental sulfur as a one-step process. The discovery was made during Sorbtech`s development work with the Magsorbent Process, a new regenerable Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) process. In laboratory studies, the catalyst demonstrated good SO{sub 2}-to-elemental sulfur yields. Yields of 95% or more were observed. The process, which is carried out at atmospheric pressure, employs reformed methane and the catalyst, which is heated, to reduce SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur. The new catalyst process should be of interest to anyone who currently has an SO{sub 2} stream containing high concentrations of SO{sub 2}, and wishes to convert it into a useful product. The process is expected to be a low-cost alternative to a modified Claus plant. This paper describes laboratory tests that were conducted to examine the effects of gas composition, sulfur dioxide concentration, and long-term use on the performance of the catalyst. It also describes the scale up of the new technology to a size suitable for treating the total SO{sub 2}-rich regenerator off-gas stream at DOE`s new Copper Oxide Process flue-gas desulfurization pilot facility, located at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center.

  14. Emissions of sulfur gases from wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    Data on the emissions of sulfur gases from marine and freshwater wetlands are summarized with respect to wetland vegetation type and possible formation mechanisms. The current data base is largest for salt marshes inhabited by Spartina alterniflora. Both dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) dominate emissions from salt marshes, with lesser quantities of methyl mercaptan (MeSH), carbonyl sulfide (COS), carbon disulfide (CS2) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) being emitted. High emission rates of DMS are associated with vegetation that produces the DMS precursor dimethylsulfonionpropionate (DMSP). Although large quantities of H2S are produced in marshes, only a small percentage escapes to the atmosphere. High latitude marshes emit less sulfur gases than temperate ones, but DMS still dominates. Mangrove-inhabited wetlands also emit less sulfur than temperate S. alterniflora marshes. Few data are available on sulfur gas emissions from freshwater wetlands. In most instances, sulfur emissions from temperate freshwater sites are low. However, some temperate and subtropical freshwater sites are similar in magnitude to those from marine wetlands which do not contain vegetation that produces DMSP. Emissions are low in Alaskan tundra but may be considerably higher in some bogs and fens.

  15. Sulfur 'Concrete' for Lunar Applications - Environmental Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.

    2008-01-01

    Commercial use of sulfur concrete on Earth is well established, particularly in corrosive, e.g., acid and salt, environments. Having found troilite (FeS) on the Moon raises the question of using extracted sulfur as a lunar construction material, an attractive alternative to conventional concrete as it does not require water. For the purpose of this Technical Memorandum, it is assumed that lunar ore is mined, refined, and the raw sulfur processed with appropriate lunar regolith to form, for example, bricks. With this stipulation, it is then noted that the viability of sulfur concrete in a lunar environment, which is characterized by lack of an atmosphere and extreme temperatures, is not well understood. The work presented here evaluates two sets of small sulfur concrete samples that have been prepared using JSC-1 lunar simulant as an aggregate addition. One set was subjected to extended periods in high vacuum to evaluate sublimation issues, and the other was cycled between room and liquid nitrogen temperatures to investigate their subsequent mechanical integrity. Results are presented from both investigations, discussed, and put into the context of the lunar environment.

  16. Sulfuric acid in the Venus clouds.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sill, G. T.

    1972-01-01

    The extremely dry nature of the Venus upper atmosphere appears to demand the presence of an efficient desiccating agent as the chief constituent of the clouds of Venus. On the basis of polarization measures it is to be expected that this substance is present as spherical droplets, 1 to 2 microns in diameter, with a refractive index n of 1.46 plus or minus 0.02 at 3500A in the observed region of the atmosphere, with T about equal to 235 K. This substance must have ultraviolet, visible, and infrared reflection properties not inconsistent with the observed spectrum of Venus. Sulfuric acid, of about 86% by weight composition, roughly fulfills the first of these properties. The visible and ultraviolet transmission features of a thin layer of elemental bromine and hydrobromic acid dissolved in sulfuric acid somewhat resemble the Venus spectrum, up to 14 microns. The chemical process postulated for forming sulfuric acid involves the oxidation of sulfur and its compounds to sulfuric acid through the agency of elemental bromine produced by the photolytic decomposition of hydrogen bromide.

  17. Metabolic Reactions among Organic Sulfur Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte, M.; Rogers, K.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfur is central to the metabolisms of many organisms that inhabit extreme environments. Numerous authors have addressed the energy available from a variety of inorganic sulfur redox pairs. Less attention has been paid, however, to the energy required or gained from metabolic reactions among organic sulfur compounds. Work in this area has focused on the oxidation of alkyl sulfide or disulfide to thiol and formaldehyde, e.g. (CH3)2S + H2O yields CH3SH + HCHO + H2, eventually resulting in the formation of CO2 and SO4(-2). It is also found that reactions among thiols and disulfides may help control redox disequilibria between the cytoplasm and the periplasm. Building on our earlier efforts for thiols, we have compiled and estimated thermodynamic properties for alkyl sulfides. We are investigating metabolic reactions among various sulfur compounds in a variety of extreme environments, ranging from sea floor hydrothermal systems to organic-rich sludge. Using thermodynamic data and the revised HKF equation of state, along with constraints imposed by the geochemical environments sulfur-metabolizing organisms inhabit, we are able to calculate the amount of energy available to these organisms.

  18. Sulfur Reduction in Acid Rock Drainage Environments.

    PubMed

    Florentino, Anna P; Weijma, Jan; Stams, Alfons J M; Sánchez-Andrea, Irene

    2015-10-01

    Microbiological suitability of acidophilic sulfur reduction for metal recovery was explored by enriching sulfur reducers from acidic sediments at low pH (from 2 to 5) with hydrogen, glycerol, methanol and acetate as electron donors at 30 °C. The highest levels of sulfide in the enrichments were detected at pH 3 with hydrogen and pH 4 with acetate. Cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene showed dominance of the deltaproteobacterial sulfur-reducing genus Desulfurella in all the enrichments and subsequently an acidophilic strain (TR1) was isolated. Strain TR1 grew at a broad range of pH (3-7) and temperature (20-50 °C) and showed good metal tolerance (Pb(2+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+)), especially for Ni(2+) and Pb(2+), with maximal tolerated concentrations of 0.09 and 0.03 mM, respectively. Different sources of sulfur were tested in the enrichments, from which biosulfur showed fastest growth (doubling time of 1.9 days), followed by colloidal, chemical and sublimated sulfur (doubling times of 2.2, 2.5, and 3.6 days, respectively). Strain TR1's physiological traits make it a good candidate to cope with low pH and high metal concentration in biotechnological processes for treatment of metal-laden acidic streams at low and moderately high temperature.

  19. Development of enhanced sulfur rejection processes

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.; Adel, G.; Richardson, P.E.

    1993-03-23

    Research at Virginia Tech led to two complementary concepts for improving the removal of inorganic sulfur from much of the Eastern US coals. One controls the surface properties of coal pyrite (FeS[sub 2]) by electrochemical-.potential control, referred to as the Electrochemically Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (EESR) Process: The second controls the flotation of middlings, i.e., particles composed of pyrite with coal inclusions by using polymeric reagents to react with pyrite and convert the middlings to hydrophilic particles, and is termed the Polymer Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (PESR) Process. These new concepts are based on recent research establishing the two main reasons why flotation fails to remove more than about 50% of the pyritic sulfur from coal: superficial oxidization of liberated pyrite to form polysulfide oxidation products so that a part of the liberated pyrite floats with the coal; and hydrophobic coal inclusions in the middlings dominating their flotation so that the middlings also float with the coal. These new pyritic-sulfur rejection processes do not require significant modifications of existing coal preparation facilities, enhancing their adoptability by the coal industry. It is believed that they can be used simultaneously to achieve both free pyrite and locked pyrite rejection.

  20. Sulfur copolymers for infrared optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namnabat, S.; Gabriel, J. J.; Pyun, J.; Norwood, R. A.; Dereniak, E. L.; van der Laan, J.

    2014-06-01

    The development of organic polymers with low infrared absorption has been investigated as a possible alternative to inorganic metal oxide, semiconductor, or chalcogenide-based materials for a variety of optical devices and components, such as lenses, goggles, thermal imaging cameras and optical fibers. In principle, organic-based polymers are attractive for these applications because of their low weight, ease of processing, mechanical toughness, and facile chemical variation using commercially available precursors. Herein we report on the optical characterization of a new class of sulfur copolymers that are readily moldable, transparent above 500 nm, possess high refractive index (n > 1.8) and take advantage of the low infrared absorption of S-S bonds for potential use in the mid-infrared at 3-5 microns. These materials are largely made from elemental sulfur by an inverse vulcanization process; in the current study we focus on the properties of a chemically stable, branched copolymer of poly(sulfur-random-1,3-diisopropenylbenzene) (poly(S-r- DIB). Copolymers with elemental sulfur content ranging from 50% to 80% by weight were studied by UV-VIS spectroscopy, FTIR, and prism coupling for refractive index measurement. Clear correlation between material composition and the optical properties was established, confirming that the high polarizability of the sulfur atom leads to high refractive index while also maintaining low optical loss in the infrared.

  1. Neutralization and biodegradation of sulfur mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, S.P.; Beaudry, W.T.; Szafraniec, L.L.

    1995-12-31

    One technology recommended for consideration for the disposal of the U.S. Chemical Stockpile is chemical neutralization followed by biodegradation. In the case of sulfur mustard ({open_quotes}mustard gas{close_quotes}, 2,2{prime}-dichlorodiethyl sulfide), alkaline hydrolysis yields a detoxified and biodegradable product. The hydrolysis reaction was studied with respect to the effects of temperature and sulfur mustard concentration on the rate and products of the reaction. A 28-fold overall rate enhancement was observed at 70{degrees}C vs. 30{degrees}C corresponding to an enthalpy of activation value of 17.9 Kcal/mole. Material balance studies conducted by {sup 1}H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance analysis showed that the products of the reaction consisted of thiodiglycol was relatively greater at lower sulfur mustard concentrations and higher temperatures. As temperatures were decreased or sulfur mustard concentrations was increased, the proportion of ether-type compounds increased accordingly. Conditions of 1% (vol//vol) sulfur mustard, 5% stoichiometric excess of NaOH and 90{degrees}C were selected for generation of the hydrolyzed bioreactor influent material. The bioreactor was seeded with activated sludge and was initially operated as 5 liter sequencing batch reactor with a hydraulic residence time of approximately days. Early results show total organic carbon removal of greater than 90%.

  2. Combined chemical and microbiological removal of organic sulfur from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Raphaelian, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate techniques for chemically converting the sulfur containing organic compounds in coal to compounds that can be treated microbiologically to remove the organically bound sulfur. The goal is to achieve an economically feasible mild chemical oxidation of the organic sulfur in a representative Illinois Basin coal by converting the sulfur to sulfoxides and sulfones; the carbon sulfur bond in the sulfoxides and sulfones would then be broken microbiologically and the sulfur removed from the coal as sulfate.

  3. Permeability and corrosion resistance of reinforced sulfur concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Wrzesinski, W.R.; McBee, W.C.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the findings form a 1-yr Bureau of Mines program in which sulfur concrete reinforcing materials were tested and evaluated to determine their resistance to corrosion. It also summarizes the permeation characteristics of sulfur concrete and the exemplary of precast, reinforced sulfur concrete structures in various industrial environments. The Bureau is furthering the development of sulfur concrete technology as part of a larger effort to find uses for the Nation's plentiful sulfur resources in construction materials. Sulfur concrete is a corrosion-resistant material that can be used in acid and salt environments where conventional materials fail.

  4. Comparison of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Diluted Formocresol in Pulpotomized Human Primary Molars: 42-month Follow-up and Survival Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mettlach, Sarah E.; Zealand, Cameron M.; Botero, Tatiana M.; Boynton, James R.; Majewski, Robert F.; Hu, Jan ChingChun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that there is no significant difference in the clinical and radiographic outcomes of diluted formocresol (DFC) compared to gray mineral trioxide aggregate (GMTA) pulpotomy in human primary molars. Methods A total of 152 children with 252 primary molars met selection criteria. Of those, 119 and 133 teeth were randomly assigned to the GMTA and DFC groups, respectively. Periapical radiographs, taken pre- and/or postoperatively and at each 6-month follow-up, were digitized and evaluated by three blinded and calibrated examiners. Results Over a 42-month period, a total of 865 clinical and radiographic evaluations were conducted. There was no significant difference in clinical success, with the cumulative proportion of GMTA-treated teeth surviving at 0.98 vs DFC-treated teeth at 0.95 (P>.05). Radiographic success, however, was significantly greater for GMTA vs DFC, with the cumulative proportion of GMTA-treated teeth surviving at 0.90 vs DFC-treated teeth at 0.47 (P<.001). Overall, DFC-treated teeth were 5.1 times more likely to fail than GMTA-treated teeth. Radiographic pathologies were observed more frequently in the DFC-treated teeth (P<.05). Conclusion Gray mineral trioxide aggregate can be considered an acceptable replacement for diluted formocresol when used as a medicament for primary molar pulpotomies. PMID:23756301

  5. New tungsten trioxide hydrate, WO/sub 3/. 1/3 H/sub 2/O: preparation, characterization, and crystallographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Gerand, B.; Nowogrocki, G.; Figlarz, M.

    1981-07-15

    A new hydrate of tungsten trioxide, WO/sub 3/.1/3 H/sub 2/O has been obtained by hydrothermal treatment at 120/sup 0/C of an aqueous suspension of either tungstic acid gel or crystallized dihydrate. This hydrate has been characterized by different methods. A crystallograhic study was carried out from x-ray powder diffraction. The hydrate crystallizes in the orthorhombic system: a = 7.359(3) A, b = 12.513(6) A, c = 7.704(5) A, Z = 12. The existence of structural relationships between the hydrate, WO/sub 3/.1/3 H/sub 2/O, and the product of dehydration, hexagonal WO/sub 3/, has permitted us to propose a structural model in agreement with the experimental data. WO/sub 3/.1/3 H/sub 2/O must be regarded as an interesting compound because its dehydration leads to a new anhydrous tungsten trioxide, hexagonal WO/sub 3/.

  6. Effects of pH and mixing agents on the temporal setting of tooth-colored and gray mineral trioxide aggregate.

    PubMed

    Watts, J Dustin; Holt, Dennis M; Beeson, Thomas J; Kirkpatrick, Timothy C; Rutledge, Richard E

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the compressive strength of white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) and gray mineral trioxide aggregate (GMTA) when mixed with sterile water or local anesthetic and exposed to an acidic environment. A total of 248 samples of WMTA and GMTA were mixed and placed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), at pH 5.0 or 7.4, for a period of 7 or 28 days. When WMTA and GMTA were mixed with local anesthetic, the following were observed: 1) pH 5.0 caused a significant decrease in compressive strength (p<0.0001); 2) WMTA was significantly stronger than GMTA (p<0.0001); and 3) more time in PBS (total 28 days) caused a significant decrease in compressive strength (p<0.001). There were no consistent differences in compressive strength for WMTA or GMTA when mixed with sterile water. Variability of results suggests both types of MTA be mixed with sterile water in acidic and neutral environments.

  7. Anthropogenic Sulfur Dioxide Emissions: 1850-2005

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven J.; van Aardenne, John; Klimont, Z.; Andres, Robert; Volke, April C.; Delgado Arias, Sabrina

    2011-01-02

    Sulfur aerosols impact human health, ecosystems, agriculture, and global and regional climate. A new annual estimate of anthropogenic global and regional sulfur dioxide emissions has been constructed spanning the period 1850 - 2005. A combination of mass balance and best available inventory data was used in order to achieve the most accurate estimate possible. Global emissions peaked in the early 1970s and decreased until 2000, with an increase in recent years due to increased emissions in China, international shipping, and developing countries in general. An uncertainty analysis was conducted including both random and systemic uncertainties. The overall global uncertainty in sulfur dioxide emissions is relatively small, but regional uncertainties of up to 30% were found. The largest contributors to uncertainty at present are emissions from China and international shipping.

  8. Sodium sulfur batteries for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degruson, James A.

    1992-01-01

    In 1986, Eagle-Picher Industries was selected by the Air Force to develop sodium sulfur cells for satellite applications. Specifically, the development program was geared toward low earth orbit goals requiring high charge and/or discharge rates. A number of improvements have been made on the cell level and a transition to a complete space battery was initiated at Eagle-Picher. The results of six months of testing a 250 watt/hour sodium sulfur space battery look very promising. With over 1000 LEO cycles conducted on this first battery, the next generation battery is being designed. This next design will focus on achieving greater energy densities associated with the sodium sulfur chemistry.

  9. Adsorption of sulfur on Ag(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Selena M.; Shen, Mingmin; Liu, Da-Jiang; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2010-12-17

    We have used scanning tunneling microscopy and density Functional theory to investigate the structures formed by sulfur on Ag(100). As indicated by previous low-energy electron diffraction studies, the main phases have unit cells of p(2 x 2) and ({radical}17 x {radical}17)R14{sup o}. We show that the latter is a reconstruction. The favored structural model is one in which 5 Ag atoms are missing from the (100) surface plane per unit cell. The ejected Ag atoms combine with sulfur to form islands of the reconstructed phase on the terraces. The ({radical}17 x {radical}17)R14{sup o} phase coexists with the p(2 x 2), at sulfur coverages slightly above 0.25 monolayers. In addition, chain-like structures are observed in STM, both at room temperature (where they are dynamic) and below (where they are not). These results are compared with relevant literature for copper surfaces.

  10. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in environmental technology.

    PubMed

    Pokorna, Dana; Zabranska, Jana

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is widely known as the most undesirable component of biogas that caused not only serious sensoric and toxic problems, but also corrosion of concrete and steel structures. Many agricultural and industrial waste used in biogas production, may contain a large amount of substances that serve as direct precursors to the formation of sulfide sulfur-sources of hydrogen sulfide in the biogas. Biological desulfurization methods are currently promoted to abiotic methods because they are less expensive and do not produce undesirable materials which must be disposed of. The final products of oxidation of sulfides are no longer hazardous. Biological removal of sulfide from a liquid or gaseous phase is based on the activity of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. They need an oxidizing agent such as an acceptor of electrons released during the oxidation of sulfides-atmospheric oxygen or oxidized forms of nitrogen. Different genera of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and their technological application are discussed. PMID:25701621

  11. Anticancer Mechanism of Sulfur-Containing Compounds.

    PubMed

    De Gianni, Elena; Fimognari, Carmela

    2015-01-01

    Fruit and vegetables have traditionally represented a main source for the discovery of many biologically active substances with therapeutic values. Among the many bioactive compounds identified over the years, sulfur-containing compounds, which are present especially in the genera Allium and Brassica, have been showing a protective effect against different types of cancer. Many in vitro and in vivo studies reported that apoptosis is crucial for the anticancer effects of sulfur-containing compounds. Garlic and onion compounds and isothiocyanates contained in Brassica vegetables are able to modulate apoptosis by a wide range of mechanisms. This chapter will give an overview on the induction of apoptosis by sulfur-containing compounds in cancer cells and their different molecular mechanisms. Finally, the potential clinical implications of their proapoptotic effects will be discussed. PMID:26298460

  12. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in environmental technology.

    PubMed

    Pokorna, Dana; Zabranska, Jana

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is widely known as the most undesirable component of biogas that caused not only serious sensoric and toxic problems, but also corrosion of concrete and steel structures. Many agricultural and industrial waste used in biogas production, may contain a large amount of substances that serve as direct precursors to the formation of sulfide sulfur-sources of hydrogen sulfide in the biogas. Biological desulfurization methods are currently promoted to abiotic methods because they are less expensive and do not produce undesirable materials which must be disposed of. The final products of oxidation of sulfides are no longer hazardous. Biological removal of sulfide from a liquid or gaseous phase is based on the activity of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. They need an oxidizing agent such as an acceptor of electrons released during the oxidation of sulfides-atmospheric oxygen or oxidized forms of nitrogen. Different genera of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and their technological application are discussed.

  13. Anthropogenic sulfur dioxide emissions: 1850-2005

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S. J.; Van Aardenne, J.; Klimont, Z.; Andres, Robert Joseph; Volke, A.; Delgado Arias, S

    2011-01-01

    Sulfur aerosols impact human health, ecosystems, agriculture, and global and regional climate. A new annual estimate of anthropogenic global and regional sulfur dioxide emissions has been constructed spanning the period 1850 2005 using a bottom-up mass balance method, calibrated to country-level inventory data. Global emissions peaked in the early 1970s and decreased until 2000, with an increase in recent years due to increased emissions in China, international shipping, and developing countries in general. An uncertainty analysis was conducted including both random and systemic uncertainties. The overall global uncertainty in sulfur dioxide emissions is relatively small, but regional uncertainties ranged up to 30%. The largest contributors to uncertainty at present are emissions from China and international shipping. Emissions were distributed on a 0.5 grid by sector for use in coordinated climate model experiments.

  14. Production of Lunar Concrete Using Molten Sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, Husam A.

    1993-01-01

    The United States has made a commitment to go back to the moon to stay in the early part of the next century. In order to achieve this objective it became evident to NASA that a Lunar Outpost will be needed to house scientists and astronauts who will be living on the moon for extended periods of time. A study has been undertaken by the authors and supported by NASA to study the feasibility of using lunar regolith with different binders such as molten sulfur, epoxy or hydraulic cement as a construction material for different lunar structures. The basic premise of this study is that it will be more logical and cost effective to manufacture lunar construction materials utilizing indigenous resources rather than transporting needed materials from earth. Lunar concrete (made from Hydraulic Cement and lunar soil) has been studied and suggested as the construction material of choice for some of the lunar projects. Unfortunately, its hydration requires water which is going to be a precious commodity on the moon. Therefore this study explores the feasibility of using binders other than hydraulic cement such as sulfur or epoxy with lunar regolith as a construction material. This report describes findings of this study which deals specifically with using molten sulfur as a binder for Lunar concrete. It describes laboratory experiments in which the sulfur to lunar soil simulant ratios by weight were varied to study the minimum amount of sulfur required to produce a particular strength. The compressive and tensile strengths of these mixes were evaluated. Metal and fiber glass fibers were added to some of the mixes to study their effects on the compressive and tensile strengths. This report also describes experiments where the sulfur is melted and mixed with the lunar regolith in a specially designed vacuum chamber. The properties of the produced concrete were compared to those of concrete produced under normal pressure.

  15. Sulfur isotope homogeneity of lunar mare basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, Boswell A.; Farquhar, James

    2015-12-01

    We present a new set of high precision measurements of relative 33S/32S, 34S/32S, and 36S/32S values in lunar mare basalts. The measurements are referenced to the Vienna-Canyon Diablo Troilite (V-CDT) scale, on which the international reference material, IAEA-S-1, is characterized by δ33S = -0.061‰, δ34S ≡ -0.3‰ and δ36S = -1.27‰. The present dataset confirms that lunar mare basalts are characterized by a remarkable degree of sulfur isotopic homogeneity, with most new and published SF6-based sulfur isotope measurements consistent with a single mass-dependent mean isotopic composition of δ34S = 0.58 ± 0.05‰, Δ33S = 0.008 ± 0.006‰, and Δ36S = 0.2 ± 0.2‰, relative to V-CDT, where the uncertainties are quoted as 99% confidence intervals on the mean. This homogeneity allows identification of a single sample (12022, 281) with an apparent 33S enrichment, possibly reflecting cosmic-ray-induced spallation reactions. It also reveals that some mare basalts have slightly lower δ34S values than the population mean, which is consistent with sulfur loss from a reduced basaltic melt prior to eruption at the lunar surface. Both the sulfur isotope homogeneity of the lunar mare basalts and the predicted sensitivity of sulfur isotopes to vaporization-driven fractionation suggest that less than ≈1-10% of lunar sulfur was lost after a potential moon-forming impact event.

  16. Reinforced Conductive Confinement of Sulfur for Robust and High-Performance Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chao; Wu, Zhenzhen; Gu, Xingxing; Wang, Chao; Xi, Kai; Kumar, R Vasant; Zhang, Shanqing

    2015-11-01

    Sulfur is an attractive cathode material in energy storage devices due to its high theoretical capacity of 1672 mAh g(-1). However, practical application of lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries can be achieved only when the major barriers, including the shuttling effect of polysulfides (Li2Sx, x = 3-8), significant volume change (∼80%), and the resultant rapid deterioration of electrodes, are tackled. Here, we propose an "inside-out" synthesis strategy by mimicking the structure of the pomegranate fruit to achieve conductive confinement of sulfur to address these issues. In the proposed pomegranate-like structure, sulfur and carbon nanotubes composite is encapsulated by the in situ formed amorphous carbon network, which allows the regeneration of electroactive material sulfur and the confinement of the sulfur as well as the lithium polysulfide within the electrical conductive carbon network. Consequently, a highly robust sulfur cathode is obtained, delivering remarkable performance in a Li-S battery. The obtained composite cathode shows a reversible capacity of 691 mAh g(-1) after 200 cycles with impressive cycle stability at the current density of 1600 mA g(-1). PMID:26470838

  17. Impact of the preparation conditions in the sulfur distribution of a new sulfurized porous adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Guijarro, M.I.; Mendioroz, S. . Inst. Catalisis y Petroleoquimica); Munoz, V. . Dept. de Quimica Inorganica y Quimica Tecnica)

    1994-02-01

    Fibrous natural silicates (sepiolite), instead of more conventional active carbon, have been sulfurized to be used as remover agents of mercury vapors from contaminated industrial waste gases. The Claus reaction, 2nH[sub 2]S + nSO[sub 2] [r arrow] (3n/x)S[sub x] + 2nH[sub 2]O, at low temperature (<400 K) and reactant concentration (2--3% molar) has been used as the sulfur source, thus being an additional way of eliminating SO[sub 2] from metallurgical processes and urban areas. The process has been carried out in a fluidized bed reactor of the semicontinuous type, and various homogeneous materials with sulfur contents in the range 3--40% S were generated. Sulfur condensation results in catalyst deactivation but, prior to its stabilization as monoclinic sulfur, also acts as cocatalyst of the reaction contributing to its overall kinetics. A study of the operating conditions, temperature, reactant concentration, and textural properties of the solid on the yield of sulfur deposited has been made. Different pore-plugging mechanisms have been applied, and from them, the influence of temperature in sulfur distribution has been concluded. In this paper, TA, N[sub 2] adsorption at 77 K, and mercury-intrusion porosimetry were used to characterize the resulting adsorbents.

  18. Conductive framework of inverse opal structure for sulfur cathode in lithium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lu; Huang, Xiaopeng; Zeng, Guobo; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    As a promising cathode inheritor for lithium-ion batteries, the sulfur cathode exhibits very high theoretical volumetric capacity and energy density. In its practical applications, one has to solve the insulating properties of sulfur and the shuttle effect that deteriorates cycling stability. The state-of-the-art approaches are to confine sulfur in a conductive matrix. In this work, we utilize monodisperse polystyrene nanoparticles as sacrificial templates to build polypyrrole (PPy) framework of an inverse opal structure to accommodate (encapsulate) sulfur through a combined in situ polymerization and melting infiltration approach. In the design, the interconnected conductive PPy provides open channels for sulfur infiltration, improves electrical and ionic conductivity of the embedded sulfur, and reduces polysulfide dissolution in the electrolyte through physical and chemical adsorption. The flexibility of PPy and partial filling of the inverse opal structure endure possible expansion and deformation during long-term cycling. It is found that the long cycling stability of the cells using the prepared material as the cathode can be substantially improved. The result demonstrates the possibility of constructing a pure conductive polymer framework to accommodate insulate sulfur in ion battery applications. PMID:27600885

  19. Sulfur contents and sulfur-isotope compositions of thiotrophic symbioses in bivalve molluscs and vestimentiferan worms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vetter, R.D.; Fry, B.

    1998-01-01

    Total sulfur (S(TOT)), elemental sulfur (S??) and sulfur-isotope compositions (??34S) of marine animals were analyzed to determine whether these chemical characteristics could help distinguish animals with a sulfur-based, thiotrophic nutrition from animals whose nutrition is based on methanotrophy or on more normal consumption of phytoplankton-derived organic matter. The presence of S??was almost entirely confined to the symbiont-containing tissues of thiotrophs, but was sometimes undetectable in thiotrophic species where sulfide availability was probably low. When S??contents were subtracted, the remaining tissue-sulfur concentrations were similar for all nutritional groups. ??34S values were typically lower for thiotrophs than for other groups, although there was overlap in methanotroph and thiotroph values at some sites. Field evidence supported the existence of small to moderate (1 to 10???)34S fractionations in the uptake of sulfides and metabolism of thiosulfate. In general, a total sulfur content of >3% dry weight, the presence of elemental sulfur, and ??34S values less than + 5??? can be used to infer a thiotrophic mode of nutrition.

  20. Conductive framework of inverse opal structure for sulfur cathode in lithium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lu; Huang, Xiaopeng; Zeng, Guobo; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-09-07

    As a promising cathode inheritor for lithium-ion batteries, the sulfur cathode exhibits very high theoretical volumetric capacity and energy density. In its practical applications, one has to solve the insulating properties of sulfur and the shuttle effect that deteriorates cycling stability. The state-of-the-art approaches are to confine sulfur in a conductive matrix. In this work, we utilize monodisperse polystyrene nanoparticles as sacrificial templates to build polypyrrole (PPy) framework of an inverse opal structure to accommodate (encapsulate) sulfur through a combined in situ polymerization and melting infiltration approach. In the design, the interconnected conductive PPy provides open channels for sulfur infiltration, improves electrical and ionic conductivity of the embedded sulfur, and reduces polysulfide dissolution in the electrolyte through physical and chemical adsorption. The flexibility of PPy and partial filling of the inverse opal structure endure possible expansion and deformation during long-term cycling. It is found that the long cycling stability of the cells using the prepared material as the cathode can be substantially improved. The result demonstrates the possibility of constructing a pure conductive polymer framework to accommodate insulate sulfur in ion battery applications.