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Sample records for sumoylated nuclear receptor

  1. Impaired SUMOylation of nuclear receptor LRH-1 promotes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Stein, Sokrates; Lemos, Vera; Xu, Pan; Demagny, Hadrien; Wang, Xu; Ryu, Dongryeol; Jimenez, Veronica; Bosch, Fatima; Lüscher, Thomas F; Oosterveer, Maaike H; Schoonjans, Kristina

    2017-02-01

    Hepatic steatosis is caused by metabolic imbalances that could be explained in part by an increase in de novo lipogenesis that results from increased sterol element binding protein 1 (SREBP-1) activity. The nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog 1 (LRH-1) is an important regulator of intermediary metabolism in the liver, but its role in regulating lipogenesis is not well understood. Here, we have assessed the contribution of LRH-1 SUMOylation to the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Mice expressing a SUMOylation-defective mutant of LRH-1 (LRH-1 K289R mice) developed NAFLD and early signs of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) when challenged with a lipogenic, high-fat, high-sucrose diet. Moreover, we observed that the LRH-1 K289R mutation induced the expression of oxysterol binding protein-like 3 (OSBPL3), enhanced SREBP-1 processing, and promoted de novo lipogenesis. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that ectopic expression of OSBPL3 facilitates SREBP-1 processing in WT mice, while silencing hepatic Osbpl3 reverses the lipogenic phenotype of LRH-1 K289R mice. These findings suggest that compromised SUMOylation of LRH-1 promotes the development of NAFLD under lipogenic conditions through regulation of OSBPL3.

  2. Impaired SUMOylation of nuclear receptor LRH-1 promotes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Vera; Xu, Pan; Jimenez, Veronica; Bosch, Fatima; Lüscher, Thomas F.; Oosterveer, Maaike H.

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is caused by metabolic imbalances that could be explained in part by an increase in de novo lipogenesis that results from increased sterol element binding protein 1 (SREBP-1) activity. The nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog 1 (LRH-1) is an important regulator of intermediary metabolism in the liver, but its role in regulating lipogenesis is not well understood. Here, we have assessed the contribution of LRH-1 SUMOylation to the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Mice expressing a SUMOylation-defective mutant of LRH-1 (LRH-1 K289R mice) developed NAFLD and early signs of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) when challenged with a lipogenic, high-fat, high-sucrose diet. Moreover, we observed that the LRH-1 K289R mutation induced the expression of oxysterol binding protein-like 3 (OSBPL3), enhanced SREBP-1 processing, and promoted de novo lipogenesis. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that ectopic expression of OSBPL3 facilitates SREBP-1 processing in WT mice, while silencing hepatic Osbpl3 reverses the lipogenic phenotype of LRH-1 K289R mice. These findings suggest that compromised SUMOylation of LRH-1 promotes the development of NAFLD under lipogenic conditions through regulation of OSBPL3. PMID:28094767

  3. Sumoylation regulates nuclear accumulation and signaling activity of the soluble intracellular domain of the erbb4 receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Knittle, Anna Maria; Helkkula, Maria; Johnson, Mark S; Sundvall, Maria; Elenius, Klaus

    2017-10-03

    Erb-B2 receptor tyrosine kinase 4 (ErbB4) is a kinase that can signal via a proteolytically released intracellular domain (ICD) in addition to classical receptor tyrosine kinase-activated signaling cascades. Previously, we have demonstrated that ErbB4 ICD is posttranslationally modified by the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) and functionally interacts with the PIAS3 SUMO E3 ligase. However, direct evidence of SUMO modification in ErbB4 signaling has remained elusive. Here, we report that the conserved lysine residue 714 in the ErbB4 ICD undergoes SUMO modification, which was reversed by sentrin-specific proteases (SENPs) 1, 2 and 5. Although ErbB4 kinase activity was not necessary for the SUMOylation, the SUMOylated ErbB4 ICD was tyrosine phosphorylated to a higher extent than unmodified ErbB4 ICD. Mutation of the SUMOylation site neither compromised ErbB4-induced phosphorylation of the canonical signaling pathway effectors Erk1/2, Akt, or STAT5 nor ErbB4 stability. In contrast, SUMOylation was required for nuclear accumulation of the ErbB4 ICD. We also found that Lys-714 was located within a leucine-rich stretch, which resembles a nuclear export signal, and could be inactivated by site-directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, SUMOylation modulated the interaction of ErbB4 with chromosomal region maintenance 1 (CRM1), the major nuclear export receptor for proteins. Finally, the SUMO acceptor lysine was functionally required for ErbB4 ICD-mediated inhibition of mammary epithelial cell differentiation in a three-dimensional cell culture model. Our findings indicate that a SUMOylation-mediated mechanism regulates nuclear localization and function of the ICD of ErbB4 receptor tyrosine kinase. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  4. p53 SUMOylation promotes its nuclear export by facilitating its release from the nuclear export receptor CRM1.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Aleixo; Li, Dawei; Zhao, Lisa Y; Godsey, Adam; Liao, Daiqing

    2013-09-01

    Chromosomal region maintenance 1 (CRM1) mediates p53 nuclear export. Although p53 SUMOylation promotes its nuclear export, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we show that tethering of a small, ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) moiety to p53 markedly increases its cytoplasmic localization. SUMO attachment to p53 does not affect its oligomerization, suggesting that subunit dissociation required for exposing p53's nuclear export signal (NES) is unnecessary for p53 nuclear export. Surprisingly, SUMO-mediated p53 nuclear export depends on the SUMO-interacting motif (SIM)-binding pocket of SUMO-1. The CRM1 C-terminal domain lacking the NES-binding groove interacts with tetrameric p53, and the proper folding of the p53 core domain, rather than the presence of the N- or C-terminal tails, appears to be important for p53-CRM1 interaction. The CRM1 Huntington, EF3, a subunit of PP2A, and TOR1 9 (HEAT9) loop, which regulates GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran binding and cargo release, contains a prototypical SIM. Remarkably, disruption of this SIM in conjunction with a mutated SIM-binding groove of SUMO-1 markedly enhances the binding of CRM1 to p53-SUMO-1 and their accumulation in the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), as well as their persistent association in the cytoplasm. We propose that SUMOylation of a CRM1 cargo such as p53 at the NPCs unlocks the HEAT9 loop of CRM1 to facilitate the disassembly of the transporting complex and cargo release to the cytoplasm.

  5. Sumoylation regulates nuclear localization of repressor DREAM.

    PubMed

    Palczewska, Malgorzata; Casafont, Iñigo; Ghimire, Kedar; Rojas, Ana M; Valencia, Alfonso; Lafarga, Miguel; Mellström, Britt; Naranjo, Jose R

    2011-05-01

    DREAM is a Ca(2+)-binding protein with specific functions in different cell compartments. In the nucleus, DREAM acts as a transcriptional repressor, although the mechanism that controls its nuclear localization is unknown. Yeast two-hybrid assay revealed the interaction between DREAM and the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 and bioinformatic analysis identified four sumoylation-susceptible sites in the DREAM sequence. Single K-to-R mutations at positions K26 and K90 prevented in vitro sumoylation of recombinant DREAM. DREAM sumoylation mutants retained the ability to bind to the DRE sequence but showed reduced nuclear localization and failed to regulate DRE-dependent transcription. In PC12 cells, sumoylated DREAM is present exclusively in the nucleus and neuronal differentiation induced nuclear accumulation of sumoylated DREAM. In fully differentiated trigeminal neurons, DREAM and SUMO-1 colocalized in nuclear domains associated with transcription. Our results show that sumoylation regulates the nuclear localization of DREAM in differentiated neurons. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 11th European Symposium on Calcium. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Sumoylation and transcription regulation at nuclear pores.

    PubMed

    Texari, Lorane; Stutz, Françoise

    2015-03-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that besides promoters, enhancers, and epigenetic modifications, nuclear organization is another parameter contributing to optimal control of gene expression. Although differences between species exist, the influence of gene positioning on expression seems to be a conserved feature from yeast to Drosophila and mammals. The nuclear periphery is one of the nuclear compartments implicated in gene regulation. It consists of the nuclear envelope (NE) and the nuclear pore complexes (NPC), which have distinct roles in the control of gene expression. The NPC has recently been shown to tether proteins involved in the sumoylation pathway. Here, we will focus on the importance of gene positioning and NPC-linked sumoylation/desumoylation in transcription regulation. We will mainly discuss observations made in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model system and highlight potential parallels in metazoan species.

  7. Sumoylation of SAE2 C terminus regulates SAE nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Truong, Khue; Lee, Terry D; Li, Baozong; Chen, Yuan

    2012-12-14

    SUMOylation occurs predominantly in the nucleus, but non-nuclear proteins can also be SUMOylated. It is unclear how intracellular trafficking of the SUMOylation enzymes is regulated to catalyze SUMOylation in different cellular compartments. Here we report that the SAE2 subunit of human SUMO activation enzyme (SAE) underwent rapid nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and its nuclear accumulation depended on SUMO modification at the C terminus. The SUMOylation sites included three Lys residues on the bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and two Lys residues outside of but adjacent to the NLS, and their SUMOylation was catalyzed by Ubc9. Because SAE2 forms a tight heterodimer with SAE1 and it controls the trafficking of the heterodimer, this study has identified the mechanism used to localize SAE to the nucleus. Similar mechanisms are likely to exist for other proteins that depend on SUMOylation for nuclear localization.

  8. RSUME Enhances Glucocorticoid Receptor SUMOylation and Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Druker, Jimena; Liberman, Ana C.; Antunica-Noguerol, María; Gerez, Juan; Paez-Pereda, Marcelo; Rein, Theo; Iñiguez-Lluhí, Jorge A.; Holsboer, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity is modulated by posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and SUMOylation. The GR has three SUMOylation sites: lysine 297 (K297) and K313 in the N-terminal domain (NTD) and K721 within the ligand-binding domain. SUMOylation of the NTD sites mediates the negative effect of the synergy control motifs of GR on promoters with closely spaced GR binding sites. There is scarce evidence on the role of SUMO conjugation to K721 and its impact on GR transcriptional activity. We have previously shown that RSUME (RWD-containing SUMOylation enhancer) increases protein SUMOylation. We now demonstrate that RSUME interacts with the GR and increases its SUMOylation. RSUME regulates GR transcriptional activity and the expression of its endogenous target genes, FKBP51 and S100P. RSUME uncovers a positive role for the third SUMOylation site, K721, on GR-mediated transcription, demonstrating that GR SUMOylation acts positively in the presence of a SUMOylation enhancer. Both mutation of K721 and small interfering RNA-mediated RSUME knockdown diminish GRIP1 coactivator activity. RSUME, whose expression is induced under stress conditions, is a key factor in heat shock-induced GR SUMOylation. These results show that inhibitory and stimulatory SUMO sites are present in the GR and at higher SUMOylation levels the stimulatory one becomes dominant. PMID:23508108

  9. Dynamic SUMOylation is linked to the activity cycles of androgen receptor in the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Rytinki, Miia; Kaikkonen, Sanna; Sutinen, Päivi; Paakinaho, Ville; Rahkama, Vesa; Palvimo, Jorma J

    2012-10-01

    Despite of the progress in the molecular etiology of prostate cancer, the androgen receptor (AR) remains the major druggable target for the advanced disease. In addition to hormonal ligands, AR activity is regulated by posttranslational modifications. Here, we show that androgen induces SUMO-2 and SUMO-3 (SUMO-2/3) modification (SUMOylation) of the endogenous AR in prostate cancer cells, which is also reflected in the chromatin-bound receptor. Although only a small percentage of AR is SUMOylated at the steady state, AR SUMOylation sites have an impact on the receptor's stability, intranuclear mobility, and chromatin interactions and on expression of its target genes. Interestingly, short-term proteotoxic and cell stress, such as hyperthermia, that detaches the AR from the chromatin triggers accumulation of the SUMO-2/3-modified AR pool which concentrates into the nuclear matrix compartment. Alleviation of the stress allows rapid reversal of the SUMO-2/3 modifications and the AR to return to the chromatin. In sum, these results suggest that the androgen-induced SUMOylation is linked to the activity cycles of the holo-AR in the nucleus and chromatin binding, whereas the stress-induced SUMO-2/3 modifications sustain the solubility of the AR and protect it from proteotoxic insults in the nucleus.

  10. SUMOylation of ROR{alpha} potentiates transcriptional activation function

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Eun Ju; Lee, Ji Min; Jeong, Jiyeong; Park, Joo Hyeon; Yang, Young; Lim, Jong-Seok; Kim, Jung Hwa; Baek, Sung Hee; Kim, Keun Il

    2009-01-16

    SUMOylation regulates a variety of cellular processes, including control of transcriptional activities of nuclear receptors. Here, we present SUMOylation of orphan nuclear receptor, ROR{alpha} by both SUMO-1 and SUMO-2. SUMOylation of ROR{alpha} occurred on the 240th lysine residue at the hinge region of human protein. PIAS family members, PIASx{alpha}, PIAS3, and PIASy, increased SUMOylation of ROR{alpha}, whereas SENP2 specifically removed SUMO from ROR{alpha}. SUMOylation-defective mutant form of ROR{alpha} exhibited decreased transcriptional activity on ROR{alpha}-responsive promoters indicating that SUMOylation may positively regulate transcriptional function of ROR{alpha}.

  11. PML nuclear bodies: Assembly and oxidative stress-sensitive sumoylation

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Umut; de Thé, Hugues; Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    PML Nuclear Bodies (NBs) have fascinated cell biologists due to their exquisitely dynamic nature and their involvement in human diseases, notably acute promyelocytic leukemia. NBs, as well as their master organizer - the PML protein - exhibit multiple connections with stress responses. Initially viewed as a tumor suppressor, PML recently re-emerged as a multifaceted protein, capable of controlling numerous aspects of cellular homeostasis. NBs recruit many functionally diverse proteins and function as stress-regulated sumoylation factories. SUMO-initiated partner retention can subsequently facilitate a variety of other post-translational modifications, as well as partner degradation. With this newly elucidated central role of stress-enhanced sumoylation, it should now be possible to build a working model for the different NB-regulated cellular activities. Moreover, pharmacological manipulation of NB formation by interferons or oxidants holds the promise of clearing many undesirable proteins for clinical management of malignant, viral or neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25482067

  12. SUMOylation of the Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) Regulates the Expression of FXR Target Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramaniyan, Natarajan; Luo, Yuhuan; Sun, An-Qiang; Suchy, Frederick J.

    2013-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) belongs to a family of ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate many aspects of metabolism including bile acid homeostasis. Here we show that FXR is covalently modified by the small ubiquitin-like modifier (Sumo1), an important regulator of cell signaling and transcription. Well conserved consensus sites at lysine 122 and 275 in the AF-1 and ligand binding domains, respectively, of FXR were subject to SUMOylation in vitro and in vivo. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis showed that Sumo1 was recruited to the bile salt export pump (BSEP), the small heterodimer partner (SHP), and the OSTα-OSTβ organic solute transporter loci in a ligand-dependent fashion. Sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-ReChIP) verified the concurrent binding of FXR and Sumo1 to the BSEP and SHP promoters. Overexpression of Sumo1 markedly decreased binding and/or recruitment of FXR to the BSEP and SHP promoters on ChIP-ReChIP. SUMOylation did not have an apparent effect on nuclear localization of FXR. Expression of Sumo1 markedly inhibited the ligand-dependent, transactivation of BSEP and SHP promoters by FXR/retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) in HepG2 cells. In contrast, mutations that abolished SUMOylation of FXR or siRNA knockdown of Sumo1 expression augmented the transactivation of BSEP and SHP promoters by FXR. Pathways for SUMOylation were significantly altered during obstructive cholestasis with differential Sumo1 recruitment to the promoters of FXR target genes. In conclusion, FXR is subject to SUMOylation that regulates its capacity to transactivate its target genes in normal liver and during obstructive cholestasis. PMID:23546875

  13. Kainate receptor activation induces glycine receptor endocytosis through PKC deSUMOylation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hao; Lu, Li; Zuo, Yong; Wang, Yan; Jiao, Yingfu; Zeng, Wei-Zheng; Huang, Chao; Zhu, Michael X.; Zamponi, Gerald W.; Zhou, Tong; Xu, Tian-Le; Cheng, Jinke; Li, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Surface expression and regulated endocytosis of glycine receptors (GlyRs) play a critical function in balancing neuronal excitability. SUMOylation (SUMO modification) is of critical importance for maintaining neuronal function in the central nervous system. Here we show that activation of kainate receptors (KARs) causes GlyR endocytosis in a calcium- and protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent manner, leading to reduced GlyR-mediated synaptic activity in cultured spinal cord neurons and the superficial dorsal horn of rat spinal cord slices. This effect requires SUMO1/sentrin-specific peptidase 1 (SENP1)-mediated deSUMOylation of PKC, indicating that the crosstalk between KARs and GlyRs relies on the SUMOylation status of PKC. SENP1-mediated deSUMOylation of PKC is involved in the kainate-induced GlyR endocytosis and thus plays an important role in the anti-homeostatic regulation between excitatory and inhibitory ligand-gated ion channels. Altogether, we have identified a SUMOylation-dependent regulatory pathway for GlyR endocytosis, which may have important physiological implications for proper neuronal excitability. PMID:25236484

  14. Sumoylation of TCF21 downregulates the transcriptional activity of estrogen receptor-alpha

    PubMed Central

    Ao, Xiang; Li, Shujing; Xu, Zhaowei; Yang, Yangyang; Chen, Min; Jiang, Xiao; Wu, Huijian

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant estrogen receptor-α (ERα) signaling is recognized as a major contributor to the development of breast cancer. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of ERα in breast cancer is still inconclusive. In this study, we showed that the transcription factor 21 (TCF21) interacted with ERα, and repressed its transcriptional activity in a HDACs-dependent manner. We also showed that TCF21 could be sumoylated by the small ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO1, and this modification could be reversed by SENP1. Sumoylation of TCF21 occurred at lysine residue 24 (K24). Substitution of K24 with arginine resulted in complete abolishment of sumoylation. Sumoylation stabilized TCF21, but did not affect its subcellular localization. Sumoylation of TCF21 also enhanced its interaction with HDAC1/2 without affecting its interaction with ERα. Moreover, sumoylation of TCF21 promoted its repression of ERα transcriptional activity, and increased the recruitment of HDAC1/2 to the pS2 promoter. Consistent with these observations, sumoylation of TCF21 could inhibit the growth of ERα-positive breast cancer cells and decreased the proportion of S-phase cells in the cell cycle. These findings suggested that TCF21 might act as a negative regulator of ERα, and its sumoylation inhibited the transcriptional activity of ERα through promoting the recruitment of HDAC1/2. PMID:27028856

  15. Oxidative stress–induced assembly of PML nuclear bodies controls sumoylation of partner proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Umut; Ferhi, Omar; Jeanne, Marion; Benhenda, Shirine; Berthier, Caroline; Jollivet, Florence; Niwa-Kawakita, Michiko; Faklaris, Orestis; Setterblad, Niclas; Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein organizes PML nuclear bodies (NBs), which are stress-responsive domains where many partner proteins accumulate. Here, we clarify the basis for NB formation and identify stress-induced partner sumoylation as the primary NB function. NB nucleation does not rely primarily on intermolecular interactions between the PML SUMO-interacting motif (SIM) and SUMO, but instead results from oxidation-mediated PML multimerization. Oxidized PML spherical meshes recruit UBC9, which enhances PML sumoylation, allow partner recruitment through SIM interactions, and ultimately enhance partner sumoylation. Intermolecular SUMO–SIM interactions then enforce partner sequestration within the NB inner core. Accordingly, oxidative stress enhances NB formation and global sumoylation in vivo. Some NB-associated sumoylated partners also become polyubiquitinated by RNF4, precipitating their proteasomal degradation. As several partners are protein-modifying enzymes, NBs could act as sensors that facilitate and confer oxidative stress sensitivity not only to sumoylation but also to other post-translational modifications, thereby explaining alterations of stress response upon PML or NB loss. PMID:24637324

  16. Nuclear localization of Rad52 is pre-requisite for its sumoylation

    SciTech Connect

    Ohuchi, Takashi; Seki, Masayuki Enomoto, Takemi

    2008-07-18

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rad52 plays major roles in several types of homologous recombination. Here, we found that rad52-K200R mutation greatly reduced sumoylation of Rad52. The rad52-K200R mutant exhibited defects in various types of recombination, such as intrachromosomal recombination and mating-type switching. The K200 residue of Rad52 is part of the nuclear localization signal (NLS), which is important for transport into the nucleus. Indeed, the addition of a SV40 NLS to Rad52-K200R suppressed the sumoylation defect of Rad52-K200R. These findings indicate that nuclear localization of Rad52 is pre-requisite for its sumoylation.

  17. DNA Damage-induced Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein K SUMOylation Regulates p53 Transcriptional Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Pelisch, Federico; Pozzi, Berta; Risso, Guillermo; Muñoz, Manuel Javier; Srebrow, Anabella

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that is a key player in the p53-triggered DNA damage response, acting as a cofactor for p53 in response to DNA damage. hnRNP K is a substrate of the ubiquitin E3 ligase MDM2 and, upon DNA damage, is de-ubiquitylated. In sharp contrast with the role and consequences of the other post-translational modifications, nothing is known about the role of SUMO conjugation to hnRNP K in p53 transcriptional co-activation. In the present work, we show that hnRNP K is modified by SUMO in lysine 422 within its KH3 domain, and sumoylation is regulated by the E3 ligase Pc2/CBX4. Most interestingly, DNA damage stimulates hnRNP K sumoylation through Pc2 E3 activity, and this modification is required for p53 transcriptional activation. Abrogation of hnRNP K sumoylation leads to an aberrant regulation of the p53 target gene p21. Our findings link the DNA damage-induced Pc2 activation to the p53 transcriptional co-activation through hnRNP K sumoylation. PMID:22825850

  18. In situ SUMOylation analysis reveals a modulatory role of RanBP2 in the nuclear rim and PML bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, Noriko . E-mail: hisa@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Uchimura, Yasuhiro; Tachibana, Taro; Sugahara, Satoko; Saitoh, Hisato; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi . E-mail: mnakao@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp

    2006-05-01

    SUMO modification plays a critical role in a number of cellular functions including nucleocytoplasmic transport, gene expression, cell cycle and formation of subnuclear structures such as promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies. In order to identify the sites where SUMOylation takes place in the cell, we developed an in situ SUMOylation assay using a semi-intact cell system and subsequently combined it with siRNA-based knockdown of nucleoporin RanBP2, also known as Nup358, which is one of the known SUMO E3 proteins. With the in situ SUMOylation assay, we found that both nuclear rim and PML bodies, besides mitotic apparatuses, are major targets for active SUMOylation. The ability to analyze possible SUMO conjugation sites would be a valuable tool to investigate where SUMO E3-like activities and/or SUMO substrates exist in the cell. Specific knockdown of RanBP2 completely abolished SUMOylation along the nuclear rim and dislocated RanGAP1 from the nuclear pore complexes. Interestingly, the loss of RanBP2 markedly reduced the number of PML bodies, in contrast to other, normal-appearing nuclear compartments including the nuclear lamina, nucleolus and chromatin, suggesting a novel link between RanBP2 and PML bodies. SUMOylation facilitated by RanBP2 at the nuclear rim may be a key step for the formation of a particular subnuclear organization. Our data imply that SUMO E3 proteins like RanBP2 facilitate spatio-temporal SUMOylation for certain nuclear structure and function.

  19. Phosphorylated and sumoylation-deficient progesterone receptors drive proliferative gene signatures during breast cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Progesterone receptors (PR) are emerging as important breast cancer drivers. Phosphorylation events common to breast cancer cells impact PR transcriptional activity, in part by direct phosphorylation. PR-B but not PR-A isoforms are phosphorylated on Ser294 by mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). Phospho-Ser294 PRs are resistant to ligand-dependent Lys388 SUMOylation (that is, a repressive modification). Antagonism of PR small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)ylation by mitogenic protein kinases suggests a mechanism for derepression (that is, transcriptional activation) of target genes. As a broad range of PR protein expression is observed clinically, a PR gene signature would provide a valuable marker of PR contribution to early breast cancer progression. Methods Global gene expression patterns were measured in T47D and MCF-7 breast cancer cells expressing either wild-type (SUMOylation-capable) or K388R (SUMOylation-deficient) PRs and subjected to pathway analysis. Gene sets were validated by RT-qPCR. Recruitment of coregulators and histone methylation levels were determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Changes in cell proliferation and survival were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays and western blotting. Finally, human breast tumor cohort datasets were probed to identify PR-associated gene signatures; metagene analysis was employed to define survival rates in patients whose tumors express a PR gene signature. Results 'SUMO-sensitive' PR target genes primarily include genes required for proliferative and pro-survival signaling. DeSUMOylated K388R receptors are preferentially recruited to enhancer regions of derepressed genes (that is, MSX2, RGS2, MAP1A, and PDK4) with the steroid receptor coactivator, CREB-(cAMP-response element-binding protein)-binding protein (CBP), and mixed lineage leukemia 2 (MLL2), a histone methyltransferase mediator of nucleosome

  20. Nuclear import of glucokinase in pancreatic beta-cells is mediated by a nuclear localization signal and modulated by SUMOylation.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Bente Berg; Fjeld, Karianne; Solheim, Marie Holm; Shirakawa, Jun; Zhang, Enming; Keindl, Magdalena; Hu, Jiang; Lindqvist, Andreas; Døskeland, Anne; Mellgren, Gunnar; Flatmark, Torgeir; Njølstad, Pål Rasmus; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Wierup, Nils; Aukrust, Ingvild; Bjørkhaug, Lise

    2017-10-15

    The localization of glucokinase in pancreatic beta-cell nuclei is a controversial issue. Although previous reports suggest such a localization, the mechanism for its import has so far not been identified. Using immunofluorescence, subcellular fractionation and mass spectrometry, we present evidence in support of glucokinase localization in beta-cell nuclei of human and mouse pancreatic sections, as well as in human and mouse isolated islets, and murine MIN6 cells. We have identified a conserved, seven-residue nuclear localization signal ((30)LKKVMRR(36)) in the human enzyme. Substituting the residues KK(31,32) and RR(35,36) with AA led to a loss of its nuclear localization in transfected cells. Furthermore, our data indicates that SUMOylation of glucokinase modulates its nuclear import, while high glucose concentrations do not significantly alter the enzyme nuclear/cytosolic ratio. Thus, for the first time, we provide data in support of a nuclear import of glucokinase mediated by a redundant mechanism, involving a nuclear localization signal, and which is modulated by its SUMOylation. These findings add new knowledge to the functional role of glucokinase in the pancreatic beta-cell. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. SUMOylation regulates nuclear localization and stability of TRAIP/RNF206

    SciTech Connect

    Park, I. Seul; Han, Ye gi; Chung, Hee Jin; Jung, Yong Woo; Kim, Yonghwan; Kim, Hongtae

    2016-02-19

    TRAIP/RNF206 plays diverse roles in cell cycle progression, DNA damage response, and DNA repair pathways. Physiological importance of TRAIP is highlighted by the identification of pathogenic mutations of TRAIP gene in patients diagnosed with primordial dwarfism. Although the diverse functions of TRAIP in the nucleus have been well characterized, molecular mechanism of TRAIP retention in the nucleus has not been determined. Here, we discovered that TRAIP is post-translationally modified by the small ubiquitin-like protein (SUMO). In addition, we identified five SUMOylation sites in TRAIP, and successfully generated SUMOylation deficient mutant of TRAIP. In an attempt to define the functional roles of TRAIP SUMOylation, we discovered that SUMOylation deficient TRAIP is not retained in the nucleus. In addition, protein stability of SUMOylation deficient TRAIP is lower than wild type TRAIP, demonstrating that SUMOylation is critical for both proper subcellular localization and protein stability of TRAIP. Taken together, these findings improve the understanding clinical implication of TRAIP in various diseases including primordial dwarfism and cancers. - Highlights: • TRAIP is post-translationally modified by SUMO. • SUMOylation affects subcellular localization of TRAIP. • SUMOylation regulates protein stability of TRAIP.

  2. Sumoylation of Smad3 stimulates its nuclear export during PIASy-mediated suppression of TGF-{beta} signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Imoto, Seiyu; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Ikeda, Osamu; Kamitani, Shinya; Muromoto, Ryuta; Sekine, Yuichi; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2008-05-30

    Sma- and MAD-related protein 3 (Smad3) plays crucial roles in the transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta})-mediated signaling pathway, which produce a variety of cellular responses, including cell proliferation and differentiation. In our previous study, we demonstrated that protein inhibitor of activated STATy (PIASy) suppresses TGF-{beta} signaling by interacting with and sumoylating Smad3. In the present study, we examined the molecular mechanisms of Smad3 sumoylation during PIASy-mediated suppression of TGF-{beta} signaling. We found that small-interfering RNA-mediated reduction of endogenous PIASy expression enhanced TGF-{beta}-induced gene expression. Importantly, coexpression of Smad3 with PIASy and SUMO1 affected the DNA-binding activity of Smad3. Furthermore, coexpression of Smad3 with PIASy and SUMO1 stimulated the nuclear export of Smad3. Finally, fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses revealed that Smad3 interacted with SUMO1 in the cytoplasm. These results suggest that PIASy regulates TGF-{beta}/Smad3-mediated signaling by stimulating sumoylation and nuclear export of Smad3.

  3. SUMOylation regulates the nuclear mobility of CREB binding protein and its association with nuclear bodies in live cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Colm M.; Kindle, Karin B.; Collins, Hilary M.; Heery, David M.

    2010-01-01

    The lysine acetyltransferase CREB binding protein (CBP) is required for chromatin modification and transcription at many gene promoters. In fixed cells, a large proportion of CBP colocalises to PML or nuclear bodies. Using live cell imaging, we show here that YFP-tagged CBP expressed in HEK293 cells undergoes gradual accumulation in nuclear bodies, some of which are mobile and migrate towards the nuclear envelope. Deletion of a short lysine-rich domain that contains the major SUMO acceptor sites of CBP abrogated its ability to be SUMO modified, and prevented its association with endogenous SUMO-1/PML speckles in vivo. This SUMO-defective CBP showed enhanced ability to co-activate AML1-mediated transcription. Deletion mapping revealed that the SUMO-modified region was not sufficient for targeting CBP to PML bodies, as C-terminally truncated mutants containing this domain showed a strong reduction in accumulation at PML bodies. Fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP) experiments revealed that YFP-CBP{Delta}998-1087 had a retarded recovery time in the nucleus, as compared to YFP-CBP. These results indicate that SUMOylation regulates CBP function by influencing its shuttling between nuclear bodies and chromatin microenvironments.

  4. The Human Cytomegalovirus IE1 Protein Antagonizes PML Nuclear Body-Mediated Intrinsic Immunity via the Inhibition of PML De Novo SUMOylation.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Eva-Maria; Scherer, Myriam; Reuter, Nina; Schweininger, Johannes; Muller, Yves A; Stamminger, Thomas

    2017-02-15

    PML nuclear bodies (NBs) are accumulations of cellular proteins embedded in a scaffold-like structure built by SUMO-modified PML/TRIM19. PML and other NB proteins act as cellular restriction factors against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV); however, this intrinsic defense is counteracted by the immediate early protein 1 (IE1) of HCMV. IE1 directly interacts with the PML coiled-coil domain via its globular core region and disrupts NB foci by inducing a loss of PML SUMOylation. Here, we demonstrate that IE1 acts via abrogating the de novo SUMOylation of PML. In order to overcome reversible SUMOylation dynamics, we made use of a cell-based assay that combines inducible IE1 expression with a SUMO mutant resistant to SUMO proteases. Interestingly, we observed that IE1 expression did not affect preSUMOylated PML; however, it clearly prevented de novo SUMO conjugation. Consistent results were obtained by in vitro SUMOylation assays, demonstrating that IE1 alone is sufficient for this effect. Furthermore, IE1 acts in a selective manner, since K160 was identified as the main target lysine. This is strengthened by the fact that IE1 also prevents As2O3-mediated hyperSUMOylation of K160, thereby blocking PML degradation. Since IE1 did not interfere with coiled-coil-mediated PML dimerization, we propose that IE1 affects PML autoSUMOylation either by directly abrogating PML E3 ligase function or by preventing access to SUMO sites. Thus, our data suggest a novel mechanism for how a viral protein counteracts a cellular restriction factor by selectively preventing the de novo SUMOylation at specific lysine residues without affecting global protein SUMOylation. The human cytomegalovirus IE1 protein acts as an important antagonist of a cellular restriction mechanism that is mediated by subnuclear structures termed PML nuclear bodies. This function of IE1 is required for efficient viral replication and thus constitutes a potential target for antiviral strategies. In this paper, we further

  5. Human Regulatory Protein Ki-1/57 Is a Target of SUMOylation and Affects PML Nuclear Body Formation.

    PubMed

    Saito, Ângela; Souza, Edmarcia E; Costa, Fernanda C; Meirelles, Gabriela V; Gonçalves, Kaliandra A; Santos, Marcos T; Bressan, Gustavo C; McComb, Mark E; Costello, Catherine E; Whelan, Stephen A; Kobarg, Jörg

    2017-09-01

    Ki-1/57 is a nuclear and cytoplasmic regulatory protein first identified in malignant cells from Hodgkin's lymphoma. It is involved in gene expression regulation on both transcriptional and mRNA metabolism levels. Ki-1/57 belongs to the family of intrinsically unstructured proteins and undergoes phosphorylation by PKC and methylation by PRMT1. Previous characterization of its protein interaction profile by yeast two-hybrid screening showed that Ki-1/57 interacts with proteins of the SUMOylation machinery, the SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme UBC9 and the SUMO E3 ligase PIAS3, which suggested that Ki-1/57 could be involved with this process. Here we identified seven potential SUMO target sites (lysine residues) on Ki-1/57 sequence and observed that Ki-1/57 is modified by SUMO proteins in vitro and in vivo. We showed that SUMOylation of Ki-1/57 occurred on lysines 213, 276, and 336. In transfected cells expressing FLAG-Ki-1/57 wild-type, its paralog FLAG-CGI-55 wild-type, or their non-SUMOylated triple mutants, the number of PML-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) is reduced compared with the control cells not expressing the constructs. More interestingly, after treating cells with arsenic trioxide (As2O3), the number of PML-NBs is no longer reduced when the non-SUMOylated triple mutant Ki-1/57 is expressed, suggesting that the SUMOylation of Ki-1/57 has a role in the control of As2O3-induced PML-NB formation. A proteome-wide analysis of Ki-1/57 partners in the presence of either SUMO-1 or SUMO-2 suggests that the involvement of Ki-1/57 with the regulation of gene expression is independent of the presence of either SUMO-1 or SUMO-2; however, the presence of SUMO-1 strongly influences the interaction of Ki-1/57 with proteins associated with cellular metabolism, maintenance, and cell cycle.

  6. Co-repressor activity of scaffold attachment factor B1 requires sumoylation

    SciTech Connect

    Garee, Jason P.; Meyer, Rene; Oesterreich, Steffi

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} SAFB1 is sumoylated to two lysine residues K231 and K294. {yields} SAFB1 sumoylation is regulated by PIAS1 and SENP1. {yields} Sumoylation of SAFB1 regulates its transcriptional repressor activity. {yields} Mutation of sumoylation sites leads to decreased SAFB1 binding to HDAC3. -- Abstract: Sumoylation is an emerging modification associated with a variety of cellular processes including the regulation of transcriptional activities of nuclear receptors and their coregulators. As SUMO modifications are often associated with transcriptional repression, we examined if sumoylation was involved in modulation of the transcriptional repressive activity of scaffold attachment factor B1. Here we show that SAFB1 is modified by both the SUMO1 and SUMO2/3 family of proteins, on lysine's K231 and K294. Further, we demonstrate that SAFB1 can interact with PIAS1, a SUMO E3 ligase which mediates SAFB1 sumoylation. Additionally, SENP1 was identified as the enzyme desumoylating SAFB1. Mutation of the SAFB1 sumoylation sites lead to a loss of transcriptional repression, at least in part due to decreased interaction with HDAC3, a known transcriptional repressor and SAFB1 binding partner. In summary, the transcriptional repressor SAFB1 is modified by both SUMO1 and SUMO2/3, and this modification is necessary for its full repressive activity.

  7. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3) protein promotes SUMOylation and nuclear sequestration of the intracellular domain of ErbB4 protein.

    PubMed

    Sundvall, Maria; Korhonen, Anna; Vaparanta, Katri; Anckar, Julius; Halkilahti, Kalle; Salah, Zaidoun; Aqeilan, Rami I; Palvimo, Jorma J; Sistonen, Lea; Elenius, Klaus

    2012-06-29

    ErbB4 is a receptor tyrosine kinase implicated in the development and homeostasis of the heart, central nervous system, and mammary gland. Cleavable isoforms of ErbB4 release a soluble intracellular domain (ICD) that can translocate to the nucleus and function as a transcriptional coregulator. In search of regulatory mechanisms of ErbB4 ICD function, we identified PIAS3 as a novel interaction partner of ErbB4 ICD. In keeping with the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) E3 ligase function of protein inhibitor of activated STAT (PIAS) proteins, we showed that the ErbB4 ICD is modified by SUMO, and that PIAS3 stimulates the SUMOylation. Upon overexpression of PIAS3, the ErbB4 ICD generated from the full-length receptor accumulated into the nucleus in a manner that was dependent on the functional nuclear localization signal of ErbB4. In the nucleus, ErbB4 colocalized with PIAS3 and SUMO-1 in promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies, nuclear domains involved in regulation of transcription. Accordingly, PIAS3 overexpression had an effect on the transcriptional coregulatory activity of ErbB4, repressing its ability to coactivate transcription with Yes-associated protein. Finally, knockdown of PIAS3 with siRNA partially rescued the inhibitory effect of the ErbB4 ICD on differentiation of MDA-MB-468 breast cancer and HC11 mammary epithelial cells. Our findings illustrate that PIAS3 is a novel regulator of ErbB4 receptor tyrosine kinase, controlling its nuclear sequestration and function.

  8. Protein Inhibitor of Activated STAT3 (PIAS3) Protein Promotes SUMOylation and Nuclear Sequestration of the Intracellular Domain of ErbB4 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Sundvall, Maria; Korhonen, Anna; Vaparanta, Katri; Anckar, Julius; Halkilahti, Kalle; Salah, Zaidoun; Aqeilan, Rami I.; Palvimo, Jorma J.; Sistonen, Lea; Elenius, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    ErbB4 is a receptor tyrosine kinase implicated in the development and homeostasis of the heart, central nervous system, and mammary gland. Cleavable isoforms of ErbB4 release a soluble intracellular domain (ICD) that can translocate to the nucleus and function as a transcriptional coregulator. In search of regulatory mechanisms of ErbB4 ICD function, we identified PIAS3 as a novel interaction partner of ErbB4 ICD. In keeping with the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) E3 ligase function of protein inhibitor of activated STAT (PIAS) proteins, we showed that the ErbB4 ICD is modified by SUMO, and that PIAS3 stimulates the SUMOylation. Upon overexpression of PIAS3, the ErbB4 ICD generated from the full-length receptor accumulated into the nucleus in a manner that was dependent on the functional nuclear localization signal of ErbB4. In the nucleus, ErbB4 colocalized with PIAS3 and SUMO-1 in promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies, nuclear domains involved in regulation of transcription. Accordingly, PIAS3 overexpression had an effect on the transcriptional coregulatory activity of ErbB4, repressing its ability to coactivate transcription with Yes-associated protein. Finally, knockdown of PIAS3 with siRNA partially rescued the inhibitory effect of the ErbB4 ICD on differentiation of MDA-MB-468 breast cancer and HC11 mammary epithelial cells. Our findings illustrate that PIAS3 is a novel regulator of ErbB4 receptor tyrosine kinase, controlling its nuclear sequestration and function. PMID:22584572

  9. PolySUMOylation by Siz2 and Mms21 triggers relocation of DNA breaks to nuclear pores through the Slx5/Slx8 STUbL.

    PubMed

    Horigome, Chihiro; Bustard, Denise E; Marcomini, Isabella; Delgoshaie, Neda; Tsai-Pflugfelder, Monika; Cobb, Jennifer A; Gasser, Susan M

    2016-04-15

    High-resolution imaging shows that persistent DNA damage in budding yeast localizes in distinct perinuclear foci for repair. The signals that trigger DNA double-strand break (DSB) relocation or determine their destination are unknown. We show here that DSB relocation to the nuclear envelope depends on SUMOylation mediated by the E3 ligases Siz2 and Mms21. In G1, a polySUMOylation signal deposited coordinately by Mms21 and Siz2 recruits the SUMO targeted ubiquitin ligase Slx5/Slx8 to persistent breaks. Both Slx5 and Slx8 are necessary for damage relocation to nuclear pores. When targeted to an undamaged locus, however, Slx5 alone can mediate relocation in G1-phase cells, bypassing the requirement for polySUMOylation. In contrast, in S-phase cells, monoSUMOylation mediated by the Rtt107-stabilized SMC5/6-Mms21 E3 complex drives DSBs to the SUN domain protein Mps3 in a manner independent of Slx5. Slx5/Slx8 and binding to pores favor repair by ectopic break-induced replication and imprecise end-joining.

  10. PolySUMOylation by Siz2 and Mms21 triggers relocation of DNA breaks to nuclear pores through the Slx5/Slx8 STUbL

    PubMed Central

    Horigome, Chihiro; Bustard, Denise E.; Marcomini, Isabella; Delgoshaie, Neda; Tsai-Pflugfelder, Monika; Cobb, Jennifer A.; Gasser, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution imaging shows that persistent DNA damage in budding yeast localizes in distinct perinuclear foci for repair. The signals that trigger DNA double-strand break (DSB) relocation or determine their destination are unknown. We show here that DSB relocation to the nuclear envelope depends on SUMOylation mediated by the E3 ligases Siz2 and Mms21. In G1, a polySUMOylation signal deposited coordinately by Mms21 and Siz2 recruits the SUMO targeted ubiquitin ligase Slx5/Slx8 to persistent breaks. Both Slx5 and Slx8 are necessary for damage relocation to nuclear pores. When targeted to an undamaged locus, however, Slx5 alone can mediate relocation in G1-phase cells, bypassing the requirement for polySUMOylation. In contrast, in S-phase cells, monoSUMOylation mediated by the Rtt107-stabilized SMC5/6–Mms21 E3 complex drives DSBs to the SUN domain protein Mps3 in a manner independent of Slx5. Slx5/Slx8 and binding to pores favor repair by ectopic break-induced replication and imprecise end-joining. PMID:27056668

  11. A role for protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 (PIAS1) in lipogenic regulation through SUMOylation-independent suppression of liver X receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongliang; Gan, Zhenji; Huang, Ping; Zhou, Luting; Mao, Ting; Shao, Mengle; Jiang, Xiaomeng; Chen, Yan; Ying, Hao; Cao, Meina; Li, Jingya; Li, Jia; Zhang, Weiping J; Yang, Liu; Liu, Yong

    2012-11-02

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) are nuclear receptors that function to modulate lipid metabolism as well as immune and inflammatory responses. Upon activation by their ligands, LXRs up-regulate a spectrum of gene transcription programs involved in cholesterol and fatty acid homeostasis. However, the mechanisms by which LXR-mediated transcriptional activation is regulated remain incompletely understood. Here, we show that PIAS1, a member of the protein inhibitor of the activated STAT family of proteins with small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) E3 ligase activity, acts to suppress LXR ligand-dependent transcriptional activation of the lipogenic program in hepatocytes. We found that liver mRNA expression levels of Pias1 and Pias3 were inversely associated with those of genes involved in lipogenesis in mouse models with diet-induced or genetic obesity. Overexpression of PIAS1 in primary hepatocytes resulted in a reduction of LXR ligand-induced fatty acid synthesis and suppression of the expression of lipogenic genes, including Srebp1c and Fas. Moreover, PIAS1 was able to interact with LXRβ and repress its transcriptional activity upon ligand stimulation, which did not require PIAS1-promoted SUMO modification of LXRβ. In addition, PIAS1 could also interact with PGC-1β and attenuate its association with LXRβ, blunting the ability of PGC-1β to co-activate LXRβ. Importantly, PIAS1 impaired LXRβ binding to its target DNA sequence. Taken together, our results suggest that PIAS1 may serve as a lipogenic regulator by negatively modulating LXRs in a SUMOylation-independent manner.

  12. The Transition of the 37-Kda Laminin Receptor (Rpsa) to Higher Molecular Weight Species: Sumoylation or Artifact?

    PubMed

    Digiacomo, Vincent; Gando, Ivan A; Venticinque, Lisa; Hurtado, Alicia; Meruelo, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    The 37-kDa laminin receptor (37LRP or RPSA) is a remarkable, multifaceted protein that functions in processes ranging from matrix adhesion to ribosome biogenesis. Its ability to engage extracellular laminin is further thought to contribute to cellular migration and invasion. Most commonly associated with metastatic cancer, RPSA is also increasingly found to be important in other pathologies, including microbial infection, neurodegenerative disease and developmental malformations. Importantly, it is thought to have higher molecular weight forms, including a 67-kDa species (67LR), the expression of which is linked to strong laminin binding and metastatic behavior. The composition of these larger forms has remained elusive and controversial. Homo- and heterodimerization have been proposed as events capable of building the larger species from the monomeric 37-kDa precursor, but solid evidence is lacking. Here, we present data suggesting that higher molecular weight species require SUMOylation to form. We also comment on the difficulty of isolating larger RPSA species for unambiguous identification and demonstrate that cell lines stably expressing tagged RPSA for long periods of time fail to produce tagged higher molecular weight RPSA. It is possible that higher molecular weight species like 67LR are not derived from RPSA.

  13. THE TRANSITION OF THE 37-kDa LAMININ RECEPTOR (RPSA) TO HIGHER MOLECULAR WEIGHT SPECIES: SUMOylation OR ARTIFACT?

    PubMed Central

    DIGIACOMO, VINCENT; GANDO, IVAN A.; VENTICINQUE, LISA; HURTADO, ALICIA; MERUELO, DANIEL

    2017-01-01

    The 37-kDa laminin receptor (37LRP or RPSA) is a remarkable, multifaceted protein that functions in processes ranging from matrix adhesion to ribosome biogenesis. Its ability to engage extracellular laminin is further thought to contribute to cellular migration and invasion. Most commonly associated with metastatic cancer, RPSA is also increasingly found to be important in other pathologies, including microbial infection, neurodegenerative disease and developmental malformations. Importantly, it is thought to have higher molecular weight forms, including a 67-kDa species (67LR), the expression of which is linked to strong laminin binding and metastatic behavior. The composition of these larger forms has remained elusive and controversial. Homo- and heterodimerization have been proposed as events capable of building the larger species from the monomeric 37-kDa precursor, but solid evidence is lacking. Here, we present data suggesting that higher molecular weight species require SUMOylation to form. We also comment on the difficulty of isolating larger RPSA species for unambiguous identification and demonstrate that cell lines stably expressing tagged RPSA for long periods of time fail to produce tagged higher molecular weight RPSA. It is possible that higher molecular weight species like 67LR are not derived from RPSA. PMID:26146125

  14. Role of SUMOylation in Full Antiestrogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Hilmi, Khalid; Hussein, Nader; Mendoza-Sanchez, Rodrigo; El-Ezzy, Mohamed; Ismail, Houssam; Durette, Chantal; Bail, Martine; Rozendaal, Maria Johanna; Bouvier, Michel; Thibault, Pierre; Gleason, James L.

    2012-01-01

    The selective estrogen receptor downregulator (SERD) fulvestrant can be used as second-line treatment for patients relapsing after treatment with tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM). Unlike tamoxifen, SERDs are devoid of partial agonist activity. While the full antiestrogenicity of SERDs may result in part from their capacity to downregulate levels of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) through proteasome-mediated degradation, SERDs are also fully antiestrogenic in the absence of increased receptor turnover in HepG2 cells. Here we report that SERDs induce the rapid and strong SUMOylation of ERα in ERα-positive and -negative cell lines, including HepG2 cells. Four sites of SUMOylation were identified by mass spectrometry analysis. In derivatives of the SERD ICI164,384, SUMOylation was dependent on the length of the side chain and correlated with full antiestrogenicity. Preventing SUMOylation by the overexpression of a SUMO-specific protease (SENP) deSUMOylase partially derepressed transcription in the presence of full antiestrogens in HepG2 cells without a corresponding increase in activity in the presence of agonists or of the SERM tamoxifen. Mutations increasing transcriptional activity in the presence of full antiestrogens reduced SUMOylation levels and suppressed stimulation by SENP1. Our results indicate that ERα SUMOylation contributes to full antiestrogenicity in the absence of accelerated receptor turnover. PMID:22826433

  15. Sumoylated NHR-25/NR5A Regulates Cell Fate during C. elegans Vulval Development

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Teresita; Ashrafi, Kaveh; Asahina, Masako; Yamamoto, Keith R.

    2013-01-01

    Individual metazoan transcription factors (TFs) regulate distinct sets of genes depending on cell type and developmental or physiological context. The precise mechanisms by which regulatory information from ligands, genomic sequence elements, co-factors, and post-translational modifications are integrated by TFs remain challenging questions. Here, we examine how a single regulatory input, sumoylation, differentially modulates the activity of a conserved C. elegans nuclear hormone receptor, NHR-25, in different cell types. Through a combination of yeast two-hybrid analysis and in vitro biochemistry we identified the single C. elegans SUMO (SMO-1) as an NHR-25 interacting protein, and showed that NHR-25 is sumoylated on at least four lysines. Some of the sumoylation acceptor sites are in common with those of the NHR-25 mammalian orthologs SF-1 and LRH-1, demonstrating that sumoylation has been strongly conserved within the NR5A family. We showed that NHR-25 bound canonical SF-1 binding sequences to regulate transcription, and that NHR-25 activity was enhanced in vivo upon loss of sumoylation. Knockdown of smo-1 mimicked NHR-25 overexpression with respect to maintenance of the 3° cell fate in vulval precursor cells (VPCs) during development. Importantly, however, overexpression of unsumoylatable alleles of NHR-25 revealed that NHR-25 sumoylation is critical for maintaining 3° cell fate. Moreover, SUMO also conferred formation of a developmental time-dependent NHR-25 concentration gradient across the VPCs. That is, accumulation of GFP-tagged NHR-25 was uniform across VPCs at the beginning of development, but as cells began dividing, a smo-1-dependent NHR-25 gradient formed with highest levels in 1° fated VPCs, intermediate levels in 2° fated VPCs, and low levels in 3° fated VPCs. We conclude that sumoylation operates at multiple levels to affect NHR-25 activity in a highly coordinated spatial and temporal manner. PMID:24348269

  16. Neuronal SUMOylation: Mechanisms, Physiology, and Roles in Neuronal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Henley, Jeremy M.; Craig, Tim J.; Wilkinson, Kevin A.

    2014-01-01

    Protein SUMOylation is a critically important posttranslational protein modification that participates in nearly all aspects of cellular physiology. In the nearly 20 years since its discovery, SUMOylation has emerged as a major regulator of nuclear function, and more recently, it has become clear that SUMOylation has key roles in the regulation of protein trafficking and function outside of the nucleus. In neurons, SUMOylation participates in cellular processes ranging from neuronal differentiation and control of synapse formation to regulation of synaptic transmission and cell survival. It is a highly dynamic and usually transient modification that enhances or hinders interactions between proteins, and its consequences are extremely diverse. Hundreds of different proteins are SUMO substrates, and dysfunction of protein SUMOylation is implicated in a many different diseases. Here we briefly outline core aspects of the SUMO system and provide a detailed overview of the current understanding of the roles of SUMOylation in healthy and diseased neurons. PMID:25287864

  17. The in vivo role of androgen receptor SUMOylation as revealed by androgen insensitivity syndrome and prostate cancer mutations targeting the proline/glycine residues of synergy control motifs.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sarmistha; Cruz-Rodríguez, Osvaldo; Bolton, Eric; Iñiguez-Lluhí, Jorge A

    2012-09-07

    The androgen receptor (AR) mediates the effects of male sexual hormones on development and physiology. Alterations in AR function are central to reproductive disorders, prostate cancer, and Kennedy disease. AR activity is influenced by post-translational modifications, but their role in AR-based diseases is poorly understood. Conjugation by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteins at two synergy control (SC) motifs in AR exerts a promoter context-dependent inhibitory role. SC motifs are composed of a four-amino acid core that is often preceded and/or followed by nearby proline or glycine residues. The function of these flanking residues, however, has not been examined directly. Remarkably, several AR mutations associated with oligospermia and androgen insensitivity syndrome map to Pro-390, the conserved proline downstream of the first SC motif in AR. Similarly, mutations at Gly-524, downstream of the second SC motif, were recovered in recurrent prostate cancer samples. We now provide evidence that these clinically isolated substitutions lead to a partial loss of SC motif function and AR SUMOylation that affects multiple endogenous genes. Consistent with a structural role as terminators of secondary structure elements, substitution of Pro-390 by Gly fully supports both SC motif function and SUMOylation. As predicted from the functional properties of SC motifs, the clinically isolated mutations preferentially enhance transcription driven by genomic regions harboring multiple AR binding sites. The data support the view that alterations in AR SUMOylation play significant roles in AR-based diseases and offer novel SUMO-based therapeutic opportunities.

  18. Historical overview of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Jan-Ake

    2016-03-01

    This review summarizes the birth of the field of nuclear receptors, from Jensen's discovery of estrogen receptor alpha, Gustafsson's discovery of the three-domain structure of the glucocorticoid receptor, the discovery of the glucocorticoid response element and the first partial cloning of the glucocorticoid receptor. Furthermore the discovery of the novel receptors called orphan receptors is described. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nuclear Receptors in Skeletal Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Hao; Wan, Yihong

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are a family of transcription factors that can be activated by lipophilic ligands. They are fundamental regulators of development, reproduction, and energy metabolism. In bone, nuclear receptors enable bone cells, including osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes, to sense their dynamic microenvironment and maintain normal bone development and remodeling. Our views of the molecular mechanisms in this process have advanced greatly in the past decade. Drugs targeting nuclear receptors are widely used in the clinic for treating patients with bone disorders such as osteoporosis by modulating bone formation and resorption rates. Deficiency in the natural ligands of certain nuclear receptors can cause bone loss; for example, estrogen loss in postmenopausal women leads to osteoporosis and increases bone fracture risk. In contrast, excessive ligands of other nuclear receptors, such as glucocorticoids, can also be detrimental to bone health. Nonetheless, the ligand-induced osteoprotective effects of many other nuclear receptors, e.g., vitamin D receptor, are still in debate and require further characterizations. This review summarizes previous studies on the roles of nuclear receptors in bone homeostasis and incorporates the most recent findings. The advancement of our understanding in this field will help researchers improve the applications of agonists, antagonists, and selective modulators of nuclear receptors for therapeutic purposes; in particular, determining optimal pharmacological drug doses, preventing side effects, and designing new drugs that are more potent and specific. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A gene-expression screen identifies a non-toxic sumoylation inhibitor that mimics SUMO-less human LRH-1 in liver

    PubMed Central

    Suzawa, Miyuki; Miranda, Diego A; Ramos, Karmela A; Ang, Kenny K-H; Faivre, Emily J; Wilson, Christopher G; Caboni, Laura; Arkin, Michelle R; Kim, Yeong-Sang; Fletterick, Robert J; Diaz, Aaron; Schneekloth, John S; Ingraham, Holly A

    2015-01-01

    SUMO-modification of nuclear proteins has profound effects on gene expression. However, non-toxic chemical tools that modulate sumoylation in cells are lacking. Here, to identify small molecule sumoylation inhibitors we developed a cell-based screen that focused on the well-sumoylated substrate, human Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (hLRH-1, NR5A2). Our primary gene-expression screen assayed two SUMO-sensitive transcripts, APOC3 and MUC1, that are upregulated by SUMO-less hLRH-1 or by siUBC9 knockdown, respectively. A polyphenol, tannic acid (TA) emerged as a potent sumoylation inhibitor in vitro (IC50 = 12.8 µM) and in cells. TA also increased hLRH-1 occupancy on SUMO-sensitive transcripts. Most significantly, when tested in humanized mouse primary hepatocytes, TA inhibits hLRH-1 sumoylation and induces SUMO-sensitive genes, thereby recapitulating the effects of expressing SUMO-less hLRH-1 in mouse liver. Our findings underscore the benefits of phenotypic screening for targeting post-translational modifications, and illustrate the potential utility of TA for probing the cellular consequences of sumoylation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09003.001 PMID:26653140

  1. Adenovirus Early Proteins and Host Sumoylation

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sook-Young

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human adenovirus genome is transported into the nucleus, where viral gene transcription, viral DNA replication, and virion assembly take place. Posttranslational modifications by small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) are implicated in the regulation of diverse cellular processes, particularly nuclear events. It is not surprising, therefore, that adenovirus modulates and utilizes the host sumoylation system. Adenovirus early proteins play an important role in establishing optimal host environments for virus replication within infected cells by stimulating the cell cycle and counteracting host antiviral defenses. Here, we review findings on the mechanisms and functional consequences of the interplay between human adenovirus early proteins and the host sumoylation system. PMID:27651358

  2. Nuclear hormone receptors in podocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are a family of ligand-activated, DNA sequence-specific transcription factors that regulate various aspects of animal development, cell proliferation, differentiation, and homeostasis. The physiological roles of nuclear receptors and their ligands have been intensively studied in cancer and metabolic syndrome. However, their role in kidney diseases is still evolving, despite their ligands being used clinically to treat renal diseases for decades. This review will discuss the progress of our understanding of the role of nuclear receptors and their ligands in kidney physiology with emphasis on their roles in treating glomerular disorders and podocyte injury repair responses. PMID:22995171

  3. The story so far: post-translational regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors by ubiquitination and SUMOylation

    PubMed Central

    Wadosky, Kristine M.

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have implicated the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) family of nuclear receptor transcription factors in regulating cardiac substrate metabolism and ATP generation. Recently, evidence from a variety of cell culture and organ systems has implicated ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) conjugation as post-translational modifications that regulate the activity of PPAR transcription factors and their coreceptors/coactivators. Here we introduce the ubiquitin and SUMO conjugation systems and extensively review how they have been shown to regulate all three PPAR isoforms (PPARα, PPARβ/δ, and PPARγ) in addition to the retinoid X receptor and PPARγ coactivator-1α subunits of the larger PPAR transcription factor complex. We then present how the specific ubiquitin (E3) ligases have been implicated and review emerging evidence that post-translational modifications of PPARs with ubiquitin and/or SUMO may play a role in cardiac disease. Because PPAR activity is perturbed in a variety of forms of heart disease and specific proteins regulate this process (E3 ligases), this may be a fruitful area of investigation with respect to finding new therapeutic targets. PMID:22037188

  4. The story so far: post-translational regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors by ubiquitination and SUMOylation.

    PubMed

    Wadosky, Kristine M; Willis, Monte S

    2012-02-01

    Many studies have implicated the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) family of nuclear receptor transcription factors in regulating cardiac substrate metabolism and ATP generation. Recently, evidence from a variety of cell culture and organ systems has implicated ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) conjugation as post-translational modifications that regulate the activity of PPAR transcription factors and their coreceptors/coactivators. Here we introduce the ubiquitin and SUMO conjugation systems and extensively review how they have been shown to regulate all three PPAR isoforms (PPARα, PPARβ/δ, and PPARγ) in addition to the retinoid X receptor and PPARγ coactivator-1α subunits of the larger PPAR transcription factor complex. We then present how the specific ubiquitin (E3) ligases have been implicated and review emerging evidence that post-translational modifications of PPARs with ubiquitin and/or SUMO may play a role in cardiac disease. Because PPAR activity is perturbed in a variety of forms of heart disease and specific proteins regulate this process (E3 ligases), this may be a fruitful area of investigation with respect to finding new therapeutic targets.

  5. Steroid receptor coupling becomes nuclear.

    PubMed

    Galigniana, Mario D

    2012-06-22

    In this issue of Chemistry & Biology, Grossman et al. report a study on aldosterone-dependent nuclear translocation of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). They analyze the dependency of MR retrotransport, DNA-binding, and transcriptional activity on Hsp90 and demonstrate that MR dimerization is a nuclear event. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Coordination of Cellular Localization-Dependent Effects of Sumoylation in Regulating Cardiovascular and Neurological Diseases.

    PubMed

    Abe, Jun-Ichi; Sandhu, Uday G; Hoang, Nguyet Minh; Thangam, Manoj; Quintana-Quezada, Raymundo A; Fujiwara, Keigi; Le, Nhat Tu

    2017-01-01

    Sumoylation, a reversible post-transcriptional modification process, of proteins are involved in cellular differentiation, growth, and even motility by regulating various protein functions. Sumoylation is not limited to cytosolic proteins as recent evidence shows that nuclear proteins, those associated with membranes, and mitochondrial proteins are also sumoylated. Moreover, it is now known that sumoylation plays an important role in the process of major human ailments such as malignant, cardiovascular and neurological diseases. In this chapter, we will highlight and discuss how the localization of SUMO protease and SUMO E3 ligase in different compartments within a cell regulates biological processes that depend on sumoylation. First, we will discuss the key role of sumoylation in the nucleus, which leads to the development of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis . We will then discuss how sumoylation of plasma membrane potassium channel proteins are involved in epilepsy and arrhythmia. Mitochondrial proteins are known to be also sumoylated, and the importance of dynamic-related protein 1 (DRP1) sumoylation on mitochondrial function will be discussed. As we will emphasize throughout this review, sumoylation plays crucial roles in different cellular compartments, which is coordinately regulated by the translocation of various SUMO proteases and SUMO E3 ligase. Comprehensive approach will be necessary to understand the molecular mechanism for efficiently moving around various enzymes that regulate sumoylation within cells.

  7. [Extranuclear functions of protein sumoylation in the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Martin, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    Post-translational protein modifications play essential roles in many aspects of cellular functions and therefore in the maintenance of cell integrity. These protein modifications are involved at all stages of neuronal communication within the central nervous system. Sumoylation is a reversible post-translational protein modification that consists in the covalent labelling of a small protein called SUMO to lysine residues of selected target proteins. Sumoylation is a well characterized regulator of nuclear functions and has recently emerged as a key factor for numerous extranuclear processes. Furthermore, sumoylation has recently been shown to modulate synaptic transmission and is also implicated in a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Uncovering the SUMOylation and ubiquitylation crosstalk in human cells using sequential peptide immunopurification

    PubMed Central

    Lamoliatte, Frédéric; McManus, Francis P.; Maarifi, Ghizlane; Chelbi-Alix, Mounira K.; Thibault, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Crosstalk between the SUMO and ubiquitin pathways has recently been reported. However, no approach currently exists to determine the interrelationship between these modifications. Here, we report an optimized immunoaffinity method that permits the study of both protein ubiquitylation and SUMOylation from a single sample. This method enables the unprecedented identification of 10,388 SUMO sites in HEK293 cells. The sequential use of SUMO and ubiquitin remnant immunoaffinity purification facilitates the dynamic profiling of SUMOylated and ubiquitylated proteins in HEK293 cells treated with the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Quantitative proteomic analyses reveals crosstalk between substrates that control protein degradation, and highlights co-regulation of SUMOylation and ubiquitylation levels on deubiquitinase enzymes and the SUMOylation of proteasome subunits. The SUMOylation of the proteasome affects its recruitment to promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) nuclear bodies, and PML lacking the SUMO interacting motif fails to colocalize with SUMOylated proteasome further demonstrating that this motif is required for PML catabolism. PMID:28098164

  9. The estrogen receptor alpha nuclear localization sequence is critical for fulvestrant-induced degradation of the receptor.

    PubMed

    Casa, Angelo J; Hochbaum, Daniel; Sreekumar, Sreeja; Oesterreich, Steffi; Lee, Adrian V

    2015-11-05

    Fulvestrant, a selective estrogen receptor down-regulator (SERD) is a pure competitive antagonist of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). Fulvestrant binds ERα and reduces the receptor's half-life by increasing protein turnover, however, its mechanism of action is not fully understood. In this study, we show that removal of the ERα nuclear localization sequence (ERΔNLS) resulted in a predominantly cytoplasmic ERα that was degraded in response to 17-β-estradiol (E2) but was resistant to degradation by fulvestrant. ERΔNLS bound the ligands and exhibited receptor interaction similar to ERα, indicating that the lack of degradation was not due to disruption of these processes. Forcing ERΔNLS into the nucleus with a heterologous SV40-NLS did not restore degradation, suggesting that the NLS domain itself, and not merely receptor localization, is critical for fulvestrant-induced ERα degradation. Indeed, cloning of the endogenous ERα NLS onto the N-terminus of ERΔNLS significantly restored both its nuclear localization and turnover in response to fulvestrant. Moreover, mutation of the sumoylation targets K266 and K268 within the NLS impaired fulvestrant-induced ERα degradation. In conclusion, our study provides evidence for the unique role of the ERα NLS in fulvestrant-induced degradation of the receptor.

  10. PML, SUMOylation, and Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Ivanschitz, Lisa; De Thé, Hugues; Le Bras, Morgane

    2013-01-01

    Since its discovery, 25 years ago, promyelocytic leukemia (PML) has been an enigma. Implicated in the oncogenic PML/RARA fusion, forming elusive intranuclear domains, triggering cell death or senescence, controlled by and perhaps controlling SUMOylation… there are multiple PML-related issues. Here we review the reciprocal interactions between PML, senescence, and SUMOylation, notably in the context of cellular transformation. PMID:23847762

  11. Targeting nuclear receptors with marine natural products.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunyan; Li, Qianrong; Li, Yong

    2014-01-27

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are important pharmaceutical targets because they are key regulators of many metabolic and inflammatory diseases, including diabetes, dyslipidemia, cirrhosis, and fibrosis. As ligands play a pivotal role in modulating nuclear receptor activity, the discovery of novel ligands for nuclear receptors represents an interesting and promising therapeutic approach. The search for novel NR agonists and antagonists with enhanced selectivities prompted the exploration of the extraordinary chemical diversity associated with natural products. Recent studies involving nuclear receptors have disclosed a number of natural products as nuclear receptor ligands, serving to re-emphasize the translational possibilities of natural products in drug discovery. In this review, the natural ligands of nuclear receptors will be described with an emphasis on their mechanisms of action and their therapeutic potentials, as well as on strategies to determine potential marine natural products as nuclear receptor modulators.

  12. Targeting Nuclear Receptors with Marine Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunyan; Li, Qianrong; Li, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are important pharmaceutical targets because they are key regulators of many metabolic and inflammatory diseases, including diabetes, dyslipidemia, cirrhosis, and fibrosis. As ligands play a pivotal role in modulating nuclear receptor activity, the discovery of novel ligands for nuclear receptors represents an interesting and promising therapeutic approach. The search for novel NR agonists and antagonists with enhanced selectivities prompted the exploration of the extraordinary chemical diversity associated with natural products. Recent studies involving nuclear receptors have disclosed a number of natural products as nuclear receptor ligands, serving to re-emphasize the translational possibilities of natural products in drug discovery. In this review, the natural ligands of nuclear receptors will be described with an emphasis on their mechanisms of action and their therapeutic potentials, as well as on strategies to determine potential marine natural products as nuclear receptor modulators. PMID:24473166

  13. Preparation of sumoylated substrates for biochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Knipscheer, Puck; Klug, Helene; Sixma, Titia K; Pichler, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Covalent modification of proteins with SUMO (small ubiquitin related modifier) affects many cellular processes like transcription, nuclear transport, DNA repair and cell cycle progression. Although hundreds of SUMO targets have been identified, for several of them the function remains obscure. In the majority of cases sumoylation is investigated via "loss of modification" analysis by mutating the relevant target lysine. However, in other cases this approach is not successful since mapping of the modification site is problematic or mutation does not cause an obvious phenotype. These latter cases ask for different approaches to investigate the target modification. One possibility is to choose the opposite approach, a "gain in modification" analysis by producing both SUMO modified and unmodified protein in vitro and comparing them in functional assays. Here, we describe the purification of the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme E2-25K, its in vitro sumoylation with recombinant enzymes and the subsequent separation and purification of the modified and the unmodified forms.

  14. Nuclear Receptors, RXR, and the Big Bang.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ronald M; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2014-03-27

    Isolation of genes encoding the receptors for steroids, retinoids, vitamin D, and thyroid hormone and their structural and functional analysis revealed an evolutionarily conserved template for nuclear hormone receptors. This discovery sparked identification of numerous genes encoding related proteins, termed orphan receptors. Characterization of these orphan receptors and, in particular, of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) positioned nuclear receptors at the epicenter of the "Big Bang" of molecular endocrinology. This Review provides a personal perspective on nuclear receptors and explores their integrated and coordinated signaling networks that are essential for multicellular life, highlighting the RXR heterodimer and its associated ligands and transcriptional mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nuclear Receptors, RXR & the Big Bang

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Ronald M.; Mangelsdorf, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Isolation of genes encoding the receptors for steroids, retinoids, vitamin D and thyroid hormone, and their structural and functional analysis revealed an evolutionarily conserved template for nuclear hormone receptors. This discovery sparked identification of numerous genes encoding related proteins, termed orphan receptors. Characterization of these orphan receptors, and in particular of the retinoid X receptor (RXR), positioned nuclear receptors at the epicenter of the “Big Bang” of molecular endocrinology. This review provides a personal perspective on nuclear receptors and explores their integrated and coordinated signaling networks that are essential for multi-cellular life, highlighting the RXR heterodimer and its associated ligands and transcriptional mechanism. PMID:24679540

  16. Nuclear hormone receptors in chordates.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Stéphanie; Belgacem, Mohamed R; Escriva, Hector

    2011-03-01

    In order to understand evolution of the endocrine systems in chordates, study of the evolution of the nuclear receptors (NRs), which mediate the cellular responses to several key hormones, is of major interest. Thanks to the sequencing of several complete genomes of different species in the three chordate phyla, we now have a global view of the evolution of the nuclear receptors gene content in this lineage. The challenge is now to understand how the function of the different receptors evolved during the invertebrate-chordate to vertebrate transition by studying the functional properties of the NRs using comparative approaches in different species. The best available model system to answer this question is the cephalochordate amphioxus which has a NR gene complement close to that of the chordate ancestor. Here we review the available data concerning the function of the amphioxus NRs, and we discuss some evolutionary scenarios that can be drawn from these results. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nuclear receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Cave, Matthew C; Clair, Heather B; Hardesty, Josiah E; Falkner, K Cameron; Feng, Wenke; Clark, Barbara J; Sidey, Jennifer; Shi, Hongxue; Aqel, Bashar A; McClain, Craig J; Prough, Russell A

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors which sense changing environmental or hormonal signals and effect transcriptional changes to regulate core life functions including growth, development, and reproduction. To support this function, following ligand-activation by xenobiotics, members of subfamily 1 nuclear receptors (NR1s) may heterodimerize with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) to regulate transcription of genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism and inflammation. Several of these receptors including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), the pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR), the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the liver X receptor (LXR) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are key regulators of the gut:liver:adipose axis and serve to coordinate metabolic responses across organ systems between the fed and fasting states. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease and may progress to cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is associated with inappropriate nuclear receptor function and perturbations along the gut:liver:adipose axis including obesity, increased intestinal permeability with systemic inflammation, abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance. Environmental chemicals may compound the problem by directly interacting with nuclear receptors leading to metabolic confusion and the inability to differentiate fed from fasting conditions. This review focuses on the impact of nuclear receptors in the pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. Clinical trials including PIVENS and FLINT demonstrate that nuclear receptor targeted therapies may lead to the paradoxical dissociation of steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity. Novel strategies currently under development (including tissue-specific ligands and dual receptor agonists) may be required to separate the beneficial effects of nuclear receptor activation from unwanted metabolic

  18. What are Nuclear Receptor Ligands?

    PubMed Central

    Sladek, Frances M.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a family of highly conserved transcription factors that regulate transcription in response to small lipophilic compounds. They play a role in every aspect of development, physiology and disease in humans. They are also ubiquitous in and unique to the animal kingdom suggesting that they may have played an important role in their evolution. In contrast to the classical endocrine receptors that originally defined the family, recent studies suggest that the first NRs might have been sensors of their environment, binding ligands that were external to the host organism. The purpose of this review is to provide a broad perspective on NR ligands and address the issue of exactly what constitutes a NR ligand from historical, biological and evolutionary perspectives. This discussion will lay the foundation for subsequent reviews in this issue as well as pose new questions for future investigation. PMID:20615454

  19. Nuclear Receptors: Decoding Metabolic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sonoda, Junichiro; Pei, Liming; Evans, Ronald M.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NR) are a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate development, reproduction, and metabolism of lipids, drugs and energy. The importance of this family of proteins in metabolic disease is exemplified by NR ligands used in the clinic or under exploratory development for the treatment of diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, hypercholesterolemia, or other metabolic abnormalities. Genetic studies in humans and rodents support the notion that NRs control a wide variety of metabolic processes by regulating the expression of genes encoding key enzymes, transporters and other proteins involved in metabolic homeostasis. Current knowledge of complex NR metabolic networks is summarized here. PMID:18023286

  20. Localization and identification of sumoylated proteins in human sperm: excessive sumoylation is a marker of defective spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Vigodner, Margarita; Shrivastava, Vibha; Gutstein, Leah Elisheva; Schneider, Jordana; Nieves, Edward; Goldstein, Marc; Feliciano, Miriam; Callaway, Myrasol

    2013-01-01

    Sumoylation is a type of post-translational modification that is implicated in the regulation of numerous cellular events. However, its role in the function of human sperm has not yet been characterized. In this study, both immunofluorescence and electron microscopy revealed that small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMO) SUMO1 and SUMO2/3 were highly enriched in the neck area of human sperm that is associated with the redundant nuclear envelope and were also detectable in the flagella and some head regions. Similar localization patterns of SUMO were also observed in mouse and fly sperm. Nonmotile, two-tailed, curled tailed, misshapen, microcephalic (small head) and aciphalic (no head) sperm exhibited abnormally high levels of sumoylation in their neck and tail regions relative to normal sperm. Numerous sumoylated proteins, ranging from 20 to 260 kDa, were detected via western blotting and identified by mass spectrometry, and 55 SUMO targets that were present specifically in human sperm, and not in the control fraction, corresponded to flagella proteins, proteins involved in the maturation and differentiation of sperm, heat shock proteins and important glycolytic and mitochondrial enzymes. The targets that were identified included proteins with specific functions in germ cells and sperm, such as heat shock-related 70-kDa protein 2, outer dense fiber protein 3, A-kinase anchor proteins 3 and 4, L-lactate dehydrogenase C, sperm protein associated with the nucleus on the X chromosome B/F, valosin-containing protein, seminogelins, histone H4 and ubiquitin. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments confirmed the sumoylation of semenogelin and indicated that some sperm proteins are modified by sumoylation and ubiquitination simultaneously. Numerous proteins are modified by sumoylation in human sperm; excessive sumoylation is a marker of defective spermatozoa.

  1. SUMOylation regulates the transcriptional repression activity of FOG-2 and its association with GATA-4.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, José; Jiang, Xing-Mai; Carter, Daniel R; Khachigian, Levon M; Chong, Beng H

    2012-01-01

    Friend of GATA 2 (FOG-2), a co-factor of several GATA transcription factors (GATA-4, -5 and 6), is a critical regulator of coronary vessel formation and heart morphogenesis. Here we demonstrate that FOG-2 is SUMOylated and that this modification modulates its transcriptional activity. FOG-2 SUMOylation occurs at four lysine residues (K324, 471, 915, 955) [corrected]. Three of these residues are part of the characteristic SUMO consensus site (ψKXE), while K955 is found in the less frequent TKXE motif. Absence of SUMOylation did not affect FOG-2's nuclear localization. However, mutation of the FOG-2 SUMOylation sites, or de-SUMOylation, with SENP-1 or SENP-8 resulted in stronger transcriptional repression activity in both heterologous cells and cardiomyocytes. Conversely, increased FOG-2 SUMOylation by overexpression of SUMO-1 or expression of a SUMO-1-FOG-2 fusion protein rendered FOG-2 incapable of repressing GATA-4-mediated activation of the B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) promoter. Moreover, we demonstrate both increased interaction between a FOG-2 SUMO mutant and GATA-4 and enhanced SUMOylation of wild-type FOG-2 by co-expression of GATA-4. These data suggest a new dynamics in which GATA-4 may alter the activity of FOG-2 by influencing its SUMOylation status.

  2. Chemical Approaches to Nuclear Receptors in Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Ronald N.; Moore, David D.; Willson, Timothy M.; Guy, R. Kip

    2017-01-01

    The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) sponsored a workshop, “Chemical Approaches to Nuclear Receptors and Metabolism,” in April 2009 to explore how chemical and molecular biology and physiology can be exploited to further our understanding of nuclear receptor structure, function, and role in disease. Signaling cascades involving nuclear receptors are more complex and interrelated than once thought. Nuclear receptors continue to be attractive targets for drug discovery. The overall goal of this workshop was to identify gaps in our understanding of the complexity of ligand activities and begin to address them by (i) increasing the collaboration of investigators from different disciplines, (ii) developing a better understanding of chemical modulation of nuclear receptor action, and (iii) identifying opportunities and roadblocks in the path of translating basic research to discovery of new therapeutics. PMID:19654413

  3. Over-accumulation of nuclear IGF-1 receptor in tumor cells requires elevated expression of the receptor and the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Hua; Lin, Yingbo; Badin, Margherita; Vasilcanu, Daiana; Stroemberg, Thomas; Jernberg-Wiklund, Helena; Sehat, Bita; Larsson, Olle

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} SUMOylation mediates nuclear translocation of IGF-1R which activates transcription. {yields} Here we show that nuclear IGF-1R over-accumulates in tumor cells. {yields} This requires overexpression of the receptor that is a common feature in tumor cells. {yields} An increased expression of the SUMO ligase Ubc9 seems to be an involved mechanism too. -- Abstract: The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) plays crucial roles in tumor cell growth and is overexpressed in many cancers. IGF-1R's trans-membrane kinase signaling pathways have been well characterized. Very recently, we showed that SUMOylation mediates nuclear translocation of the IGF-1R, and that nuclear IGF-1R (nIGF-1R) binds to enhancer regions and activates transcription. We identified three lysine residues in the {beta}-subunit of the receptor and that mutation of these blocks nuclear translocation and gene activation. Furthermore, accumulation of nIGF-1R was proven strongly dependent on the specific SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9. Here we show that nIGF-1R originates solely from the cell membrane and that phosphorylation of the core tyrosine residues of the receptor kinase is crucial for nuclear accumulation. We also compared the levels of nIGF-1R, measured as nuclear/membrane ratios, in tumor and normal cells. We found that the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 has 13-fold higher amounts of nIGF-1R than breast epithelial cells (IME) which showed only a small amount of nIGF-1R. In comparison, the total expression of IGF-1R was only 3.7- higher in MCF-7. Comparison of several other tumor and normal cell lines showed similar tumor cell over-accumulation of nIGF-1R, exceeding the total receptor expression substantially. Ectopic overexpression (>10-fold) of the receptor increased nIGF-1R in IME cells but not to that high level as in wild type MCF-7. The levels of Ubc9 were higher in all tumor cell lines, compared to the normal cells, and this probably contributes to over

  4. Analysis of Global Sumoylation Changes Occurring during Keratinocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Phillip R.; Santos, Andres; Rosas-Acosta, Germán; Wilson, Van G.

    2012-01-01

    Sumoylation is a highly dynamic process that plays a role in a multitude of processes ranging from cell cycle progression to mRNA processing and cancer. A previous study from our lab demonstrated that SUMO plays an important role in keratinocyte differentiation. Here we present a new method of tracking the sumoylation state of proteins by creating a stably transfected HaCaT keratinocyte cell line expressing an inducible SNAP-SUMO3 protein. The SNAP-tag allows covalent fluorescent labeling that is denaturation resistant. When combined with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, the SNAP-tag technology provides direct visualization of sumoylated targets and can be used to follow temporal changes in the global cohort of sumoylated proteins during dynamic processes such as differentiation. HaCaT keratinocyte cells expressing SNAP-SUMO3 displayed normal morphological and biochemical features that are consistent with typical keratinocyte differentiation. SNAP-SUMO3 also localized normally in these cells with a predominantly nuclear signal and some minor cytoplasmic staining, consistent with previous reports for untagged SUMO2/3. During keratinocyte differentiation the total number of proteins modified by SNAP-SUMO3 was highest in basal cells, decreased abruptly after induction of differentiation, and slowly rebounded beginning between 48 and 72 hours as differentiation progressed. However, within this overall trend the pattern of change for individual sumoylated proteins was highly variable with both increases and decreases in amount over time. From these results we conclude that sumoylation of proteins during keratinocyte differentiation is a complex process which likely reflects and contributes to the biochemical changes that drive differentiation. PMID:22291911

  5. Genetic disorders of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Achermann, John C; Schwabe, John; Fairall, Louise; Chatterjee, Krishna

    2017-04-03

    Following the first isolation of nuclear receptor (NR) genes, genetic disorders caused by NR gene mutations were initially discovered by a candidate gene approach based on their known roles in endocrine pathways and physiologic processes. Subsequently, the identification of disorders has been informed by phenotypes associated with gene disruption in animal models or by genetic linkage studies. More recently, whole exome sequencing has associated pathogenic genetic variants with unexpected, often multisystem, human phenotypes. To date, defects in 20 of 48 human NR genes have been associated with human disorders, with different mutations mediating phenotypes of varying severity or several distinct conditions being associated with different changes in the same gene. Studies of individuals with deleterious genetic variants can elucidate novel roles of human NRs, validating them as targets for drug development or providing new insights into structure-function relationships. Importantly, human genetic discoveries enable definitive disease diagnosis and can provide opportunities to therapeutically manage affected individuals. Here we review germline changes in human NR genes associated with "monogenic" conditions, including a discussion of the structural basis of mutations that cause distinctive changes in NR function and the molecular mechanisms mediating pathogenesis.

  6. Nuclear receptors in transgenerational epigenetic inheritance.

    PubMed

    Ozgyin, Lilla; Erdős, Edina; Bojcsuk, Dóra; Balint, Balint L

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear Receptors are ligand-activated transcription factors that translate information about the lipid environment into specific genetic programs, a property that renders them good candidates to be mediators of rapid adaptation changes of a species. Lipid-based morphogens, endocrine hormones, fatty acids and xenobiotics might act through this class of transcription factors making them regulators able to fine-tune physiological processes. Here we review the basic concepts and current knowledge on the process whereby small molecules act through nuclear receptors and contribute to transgenerational changes. Several molecules shown to cause transgenerational changes like phthalates, BPA, nicotine, tributylin bind and activate nuclear receptors like ERs, androgen receptors, glucocorticoid receptors or PPARγ. A specific subset of observations involving nuclear receptors has focused on the effects of environmental stress or maternal behaviour on the development of transgenerational traits. While these effects do not involve environmental ligands, they change the expression levels of Estrogen and glucocorticoid receptors of the second generation and consequently initiate an altered genetic program in the second generation. In this review we summarize the available literature about the role of nuclear receptors in transgenerational inheritance.

  7. Brain nuclear receptors and body weight regulation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Neural pathways, especially those in the hypothalamus, integrate multiple nutritional, hormonal, and neural signals, resulting in the coordinated control of body weight balance and glucose homeostasis. Nuclear receptors (NRs) sense changing levels of nutrients and hormones, and therefore play essent...

  8. Phenobarbital Meets Phosphorylation of Nuclear Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Phenobarbital was the first therapeutic drug to be characterized for its induction of hepatic drug metabolism. Essentially at the same time, cytochrome P450, an enzyme that metabolizes drugs, was discovered. After nearly 50 years of investigation, the molecular target of phenobarbital induction has now been delineated to phosphorylation at threonine 38 of the constitutive androstane receptor (NR1I3), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Determining this mechanism has provided us with the molecular basis to understand drug induction of drug metabolism and disposition. Threonine 38 is conserved as a phosphorylation motif in the majority of both mouse and human nuclear receptors, providing us with an opportunity to integrate diverse functions of nuclear receptors. Here, I review the works and accomplishments of my laboratory at the National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and the future research directions of where our study of the constitutive androstane receptor might take us. PMID:28356313

  9. SUMOylation regulates the intracellular fate of ZO-2.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Franziska; Mittag, Sonnhild; Cano-Cortina, Misael; Wagner, Tobias; Krämer, Oliver H; Niedenthal, Rainer; Gonzalez-Mariscal, Lorenza; Huber, Otmar

    2017-01-01

    The zonula occludens (ZO)-2 protein links tight junctional transmembrane proteins to the actin cytoskeleton and associates with splicing and transcription factors in the nucleus. Multiple posttranslational modifications control the intracellular distribution of ZO-2. Here, we report that ZO-2 is a target of the SUMOylation machinery and provide evidence on how this modification may affect its cellular distribution and function. We show that ZO-2 associates with the E2 SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 and with SUMO-deconjugating proteases SENP1 and SENP3. In line with this, modification of ZO-2 by endogenous SUMO1 was detectable. Ubc9 fusion-directed SUMOylation confirmed SUMOylation of ZO-2 and was inhibited in the presence of SENP1 but not by an enzymatic-dead SENP1 protein. Moreover, lysine 730 in human ZO-2 was identified as a potential modification site. Mutation of this site to arginine resulted in prolonged nuclear localization of ZO-2 in nuclear recruitment assays. In contrast, a construct mimicking constitutive SUMOylation of ZO-2 (SUMO1ΔGG-ZO-2) was preferentially localized in the cytoplasm. Based on previous findings the differential localization of these ZO-2 constructs may affect glycogen-synthase-kinase-3β (GSK3β) activity and β-catenin/TCF-4-mediated transcription. In this context we observed that ZO-2 directly binds to GSK3β and SUMO1ΔGG-ZO-2 modulates its kinase activity. Moreover, we show that ZO-2 forms a complex with β-catenin. Wild-type ZO-2 and ZO-2-K730R inhibited transcriptional activity in reporter gene assays, whereas the cytosolic SUMO1ΔGG-ZO-2 did not. From these data we conclude that SUMOylation affects the intracellular localization of ZO-2 and its regulatory role on GSK3β and β-catenin signaling activity.

  10. CD2AP Regulates SUMOylation of CIN85 in Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Niedenthal, Rainer; Klaus, Malte; Teng, Beina; Worthmann, Kirstin; King, Benjamin L.; Peterson, Kevin J.; Haller, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    Podocytes are highly differentiated and polarized epithelial cells located on the visceral side of the glomerulus. They form an indispensable component of the glomerular filter, the slit diaphragm, formed by several transmembrane proteins and adaptor molecules. Disruption of the slit diaphragm can lead to massive proteinuria and nephrotic syndrome in mice and humans. CD2AP is an adaptor protein that is important for the maintenance of the slit diaphragm. Together with its paralogue, CIN85, CD2AP belongs to a family of adaptor proteins that are primarily described as being involved in endocytosis and downregulation of receptor tyrosine kinase activity. We have shown that full-length CIN85 is upregulated in podocytes in the absence of CD2AP, whereas in wild-type cells, full-length CIN85 is not detectable. In this study, we show that full-length CIN85 is postranslationally modified by SUMOylation in wild-type podocytes. We can demonstrate that CIN85 is SUMOylated by SUMO-1, -2, and -3 and that SUMOylation is enhanced in the presence of CD2AP. Conversion of lysine 598 to arginine completely abolishes SUMOylation and leads to increased binding of CIN85 to nephrin. Our results indicate a novel role for CD2AP in regulating posttranslational modification of CIN85. PMID:22203040

  11. Nur77 suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma via switching glucose metabolism toward gluconeogenesis through attenuating phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase sumoylation

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Xue-li; Chen, Hang-zi; Yang, Peng-bo; Li, Ying-ping; Zhang, Fen-na; Zhang, Jia-yuan; Wang, Wei-jia; Zhao, Wen-xiu; Zhang, Sheng; Chen, Qi-tao; Zheng, Yu; Sun, Xiao-yu; Wang, Xiao-min; Chien, Kun-Yi; Wu, Qiao

    2017-01-01

    Gluconeogenesis, an essential metabolic process for hepatocytes, is downregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here we show that the nuclear receptor Nur77 is a tumour suppressor for HCC that regulates gluconeogenesis. Low Nur77 expression in clinical HCC samples correlates with poor prognosis, and a Nur77 deficiency in mice promotes HCC development. Nur77 interacts with phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK1), the rate-limiting enzyme in gluconeogenesis, to increase gluconeogenesis and suppress glycolysis, resulting in ATP depletion and cell growth arrest. However, PEPCK1 becomes labile after sumoylation and is degraded via ubiquitination, which is augmented by the p300 acetylation of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (Ubc9). Although Nur77 attenuates sumoylation and stabilizes PEPCK1 via impairing p300 activity and preventing the Ubc9-PEPCK1 interaction, Nur77 is silenced in HCC samples due to Snail-mediated DNA methylation of the Nur77 promoter. Our study reveals a unique mechanism to suppress HCC by switching from glycolysis to gluconeogenesis through Nur77 antagonism of PEPCK1 degradation. PMID:28240261

  12. Nur77 suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma via switching glucose metabolism toward gluconeogenesis through attenuating phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase sumoylation.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xue-Li; Chen, Hang-Zi; Yang, Peng-Bo; Li, Ying-Ping; Zhang, Fen-Na; Zhang, Jia-Yuan; Wang, Wei-Jia; Zhao, Wen-Xiu; Zhang, Sheng; Chen, Qi-Tao; Zheng, Yu; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Min; Chien, Kun-Yi; Wu, Qiao

    2017-02-27

    Gluconeogenesis, an essential metabolic process for hepatocytes, is downregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here we show that the nuclear receptor Nur77 is a tumour suppressor for HCC that regulates gluconeogenesis. Low Nur77 expression in clinical HCC samples correlates with poor prognosis, and a Nur77 deficiency in mice promotes HCC development. Nur77 interacts with phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK1), the rate-limiting enzyme in gluconeogenesis, to increase gluconeogenesis and suppress glycolysis, resulting in ATP depletion and cell growth arrest. However, PEPCK1 becomes labile after sumoylation and is degraded via ubiquitination, which is augmented by the p300 acetylation of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (Ubc9). Although Nur77 attenuates sumoylation and stabilizes PEPCK1 via impairing p300 activity and preventing the Ubc9-PEPCK1 interaction, Nur77 is silenced in HCC samples due to Snail-mediated DNA methylation of the Nur77 promoter. Our study reveals a unique mechanism to suppress HCC by switching from glycolysis to gluconeogenesis through Nur77 antagonism of PEPCK1 degradation.

  13. Sumoylation Modulates the Activity of Spalt-like Proteins during Wing Development in Drosophila*

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Jonatan; Talamillo, Ana; Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Pérez, Coralia; Hjerpe, Roland; Sutherland, James D.; Herboso, Leire; Rodríguez, Manuel S.; Barrio, Rosa

    2010-01-01

    The Spalt-like family of zinc finger transcription factors is conserved throughout evolution and is involved in fundamental processes during development and during embryonic stem cell maintenance. Although human SALL1 is modified by SUMO-1 in vitro, it is not known whether this post-translational modification plays a role in regulating the activity of this family of transcription factors. Here, we show that the Drosophila Spalt transcription factors are modified by sumoylation. This modification influences their nuclear localization and capacity to induce vein formation through the regulation of target genes during wing development. Furthermore, spalt genes interact genetically with the sumoylation machinery to repress vein formation in intervein regions and to attain the wing final size. Our results suggest a new level of regulation of Sall activity in vivo during animal development through post-translational modification by sumoylation. The evolutionary conservation of this family of transcription factors suggests a functional role for sumoylation in vertebrate Sall members. PMID:20562097

  14. Critical role of RanBP2-mediated SUMOylation of Small Heterodimer Partner in maintaining bile acid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kwon, Sanghoon; Byun, Sangwon; Xiao, Zhen; Park, Sean; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Kemper, Byron; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are recently recognized signalling molecules that profoundly affect metabolism. Because of detergent-like toxicity, BA levels must be tightly regulated. An orphan nuclear receptor, Small Heterodimer Partner (SHP), plays a key role in this regulation, but how SHP senses the BA signal for feedback transcriptional responses is not clearly understood. We show an unexpected function of a nucleoporin, RanBP2, in maintaining BA homoeostasis through SUMOylation of SHP. Upon BA signalling, RanBP2 co-localizes with SHP at the nuclear envelope region and mediates SUMO2 modification at K68, which facilitates nuclear transport of SHP and its interaction with repressive histone modifiers to inhibit BA synthetic genes. Mice expressing a SUMO-defective K68R SHP mutant have increased liver BA levels, and upon BA- or drug-induced biliary insults, these mice exhibit exacerbated cholestatic pathologies. These results demonstrate a function of RanBP2-mediated SUMOylation of SHP in maintaining BA homoeostasis and protecting from the BA hepatotoxicity. PMID:27412403

  15. Critical role of RanBP2-mediated SUMOylation of Small Heterodimer Partner in maintaining bile acid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kwon, Sanghoon; Byun, Sangwon; Xiao, Zhen; Park, Sean; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Kemper, Byron; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2016-07-14

    Bile acids (BAs) are recently recognized signalling molecules that profoundly affect metabolism. Because of detergent-like toxicity, BA levels must be tightly regulated. An orphan nuclear receptor, Small Heterodimer Partner (SHP), plays a key role in this regulation, but how SHP senses the BA signal for feedback transcriptional responses is not clearly understood. We show an unexpected function of a nucleoporin, RanBP2, in maintaining BA homoeostasis through SUMOylation of SHP. Upon BA signalling, RanBP2 co-localizes with SHP at the nuclear envelope region and mediates SUMO2 modification at K68, which facilitates nuclear transport of SHP and its interaction with repressive histone modifiers to inhibit BA synthetic genes. Mice expressing a SUMO-defective K68R SHP mutant have increased liver BA levels, and upon BA- or drug-induced biliary insults, these mice exhibit exacerbated cholestatic pathologies. These results demonstrate a function of RanBP2-mediated SUMOylation of SHP in maintaining BA homoeostasis and protecting from the BA hepatotoxicity.

  16. Nuclear hormone receptor assays for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Jon; Marschke, Keith; Rungta, Deepa

    2003-03-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a superfamily of ligand-dependent transcription factors that control diverse aspects of growth, development and homeostasis, making them exciting and important targets for drug discovery. In this review, some of the recent advances in our understanding of NRs, and their application to the discovery of new ligands, will be discussed.

  17. Using Nuclear Receptor Activity to Stratify Hepatocarcinogens

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NR) are a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that control a range of cellular processes. Persistent stimulation of some NR is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. Here we report on a systematic an...

  18. Using Nuclear Receptor Activity to Stratify Hepatocarcinogens

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NR) are a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that control a range of cellular processes. Persistent stimulation of some NR is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. Here we report on a systematic an...

  19. Developmental control of sumoylation pathway proteins in mouse male germ cells.

    PubMed

    La Salle, Sophie; Sun, Fengyun; Zhang, Xiang-Dong; Matunis, Michael J; Handel, Mary Ann

    2008-09-01

    Protein sumoylation regulates a variety of nuclear functions and has been postulated to be involved in meiotic chromosome dynamics as well as other processes of spermatogenesis. Here, the expression and distribution of sumoylation pathway genes and proteins were determined in mouse male germ cells, with a particular emphasis on prophase I of meiosis. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that SUMO1, SUMO2/3 and UBE2I (also known as UBC9) were localized to the XY body in pachytene and diplotene spermatocytes, while only SUMO2/3 and UBE2I were detected near centromeres in metaphase I spermatocytes. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting were used to examine the expression of sumoylation pathway genes and proteins in enriched preparations of leptotene/zygotene spermatocytes, prepubertal and adult pachytene spermatocytes, as well as round spermatids. Two general expression profiles emerged from these data. The first profile, where expression was more prominent during meiosis, identified sumoylation pathway participants that could be involved in meiotic chromosome dynamics. The second profile, elevated expression in post-meiotic spermatids, suggested proteins that could be involved in spermiogenesis-related sumoylation events. In addition to revealing differential expression of protein sumoylation mediators, which suggests differential functioning, these data demonstrate the dynamic nature of SUMO metabolism during spermatogenesis.

  20. Phenobarbital Meets Phosphorylation of Nuclear Receptors.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Masahiko

    2017-05-01

    Phenobarbital was the first therapeutic drug to be characterized for its induction of hepatic drug metabolism. Essentially at the same time, cytochrome P450, an enzyme that metabolizes drugs, was discovered. After nearly 50 years of investigation, the molecular target of phenobarbital induction has now been delineated to phosphorylation at threonine 38 of the constitutive androstane receptor (NR1I3), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Determining this mechanism has provided us with the molecular basis to understand drug induction of drug metabolism and disposition. Threonine 38 is conserved as a phosphorylation motif in the majority of both mouse and human nuclear receptors, providing us with an opportunity to integrate diverse functions of nuclear receptors. Here, I review the works and accomplishments of my laboratory at the National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and the future research directions of where our study of the constitutive androstane receptor might take us. U.S. Government work not protected by U.S. copyright.

  1. Nuclear receptors and pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Polvani, Simone; Tarocchi, Mirko; Tempesti, Sara; Galli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a devastating disease with a median overall survival time of 5 mo and the five years survival less than 5%, a rate essentially unchanged over the course of the years. A well defined progression model of accumulation of genetic alterations ranging from single point mutations to gross chromosomal abnormalities has been introduced to describe the origin of this disease. However, due to the its subtle nature and concurring events PDAC cure remains elusive. Nuclear receptors (NR) are members of a large superfamily of evolutionarily conserved ligand-regulated DNA-binding transcription factors functionally involved in important cellular functions ranging from regulation of metabolism, to growth and development. Given the nature of their ligands, NR are very tempting drug targets and their pharmacological modulation has been widely exploited for the treatment of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. There are now clear evidences that both classical ligand-activated and orphan NR are involved in the pathogenesis of PDAC from its very early stages; nonetheless many aspects of their role are not fully understood. The purpose of this review is to highlight the striking connections that link peroxisome proliferator activated receptors, retinoic acid receptors, retinoid X receptor, androgen receptor, estrogen receptors and the orphan NR Nur, chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II and the liver receptor homologue-1 receptor to PDAC development, connections that could lead to the identification of novel therapies for this disease. PMID:25232244

  2. Structural and functional insights into nuclear receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lihua; Li, Yong

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are important transcriptional factors that share high sequence identity and conserved domains, including a DNA-binding domain (DBD) and a ligand-binding domain (LBD). The LBD plays a crucial role in ligand-mediated nuclear receptor activity. Hundreds of different crystal structures of nuclear receptors have revealed a general mechanism for the molecular basis of ligand binding and ligand-mediated regulation of nuclear receptors. Despite the conserved fold of nuclear receptor LBDs, the ligand-binding pocket is the least conserved region among different nuclear receptor LBDs. Structural comparison and analysis show that several features of the pocket, like the size and also the shape, have contributed to the ligand binding affinity and specificity. In addition, the plastic nature of the ligand-binding pockets in many nuclear receptors provides greater flexibility to further accommodate specific ligands with a variety of conformations. Nuclear receptor coactivators usually contain multiple LXXLL motifs that are used to interact with nuclear receptors. The nuclear receptors respond differently to distinct ligands and readily exchange their ligands in different environments. The conformational flexibility of the AF-2 helix allows the nuclear receptor to sense the presence of the bound ligands, either an agonist or an antagonist, and to recruit the coactivators or corepressors that ultimately determine the transcriptional activation or repression of nuclear receptors. PMID:20723571

  3. Calreticulin Is a Receptor for Nuclear Export

    PubMed Central

    Holaska, James M.; Black, Ben E.; Love, Dona C.; Hanover, John A.; Leszyk, John; Paschal, Bryce M.

    2001-01-01

    In previous work, we used a permeabilized cell assay that reconstitutes nuclear export of protein kinase inhibitor (PKI) to show that cytosol contains an export activity that is distinct from Crm1 (Holaska, J.M., and B.M. Paschal. 1995. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 95: 14739–14744). Here, we describe the purification and characterization of the activity as calreticulin (CRT), a protein previously ascribed to functions in the lumen of the ER. We show that cells contain both ER and cytosolic pools of CRT. The mechanism of CRT-dependent export of PKI requires a functional nuclear export signal (NES) in PKI and involves formation of an export complex that contains RanGTP. Previous studies linking CRT to downregulation of steroid hormone receptor function led us to examine its potential role in nuclear export of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). We found that CRT mediates nuclear export of GR in permeabilized cell, microinjection, and transfection assays. GR export is insensitive to the Crm1 inhibitor leptomycin B in vivo, and it does not rely on a leucine-rich NES. Rather, GR export is facilitated by its DNA-binding domain, which is shown to function as an NES when transplanted to a green fluorescent protein reporter. CRT defines a new export pathway that may regulate the transcriptional activity of steroid hormone receptors. PMID:11149926

  4. [Structure and Function of the Nuclear Receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor].

    PubMed

    Inouye, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Animal defense mechanisms against both endogenous and exogenous toxic compounds function mainly through receptor-type transcription factors, including the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). Following xenobiotic stimulation, CAR translocates into the nucleus and transactivates its target genes including oxygenic and conjugative enzymes and transporters in hepatocytes. We identified subcellular localization signals in the rat CAR: two nuclear localization signals (NLS1 and 2); two nuclear export signals (NES1 and 2); and a cytoplasmic retention region. The nuclear import of CAR is regulated by the importin-Ran system and microtubule network. Five splice variants (SV1-5) were identified in rat liver in addition to wild-type CAR. When expressed in immortalized cells, their artificial transcripts were inactive as transcription factors. A CAR mutant with three consecutive alanine residues inserted into the ligand-binding domain of CAR showed ligand-dependent activation of target genes in immortalized cells, which is in marked contrast to the constitutive transactivating nature of wild-type CAR. Using this assay system, androstenol and clotrimazole, both of which are inverse agonists of CAR, were classified as an antagonist and weak agonist, respectively. A member of the DEAD box DNA/RNA helicase family (DP97) and protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) were found to be gene (or promotor)-specific coactivators of CAR. The expression of the CAR gene might be under the control of clock genes mediated by the nuclear receptor Rev-erb-α.

  5. SUMOylation of p53 mediates interferon activities

    PubMed Central

    Marcos-Villar, Laura; Pérez-Girón, José V; Vilas, Jéssica M; Soto, Atenea; de la Cruz-Hererra, Carlos F; Lang, Valerie; Collado, Manuel; Vidal, Anxo; Rodríguez, Manuel S; Muñoz-Fontela, César; Rivas, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence that many host proteins involved in innate and intrinsic immunity are regulated by SUMOylation, and that SUMO contributes to the regulatory process that governs the initiation of the type I interferon (IFN) response. The tumor suppressor p53 is a modulator of the IFN response that plays a role in virus-induced apoptosis and in IFN-induced senescence. Here we demonstrate that IFN treatment increases the levels of SUMOylated p53 and induces cellular senescence through a process that is partially dependent upon SUMOylation of p53. Similarly, we show that vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection induces p53 SUMOylation, and that this modification favors the control of VSV replication. Thus, our study provides evidence that IFN signaling induces p53 SUMOylation, which results in the activation of a cellular senescence program and contributes to the antiviral functions of interferon. PMID:23966171

  6. SUMOylation Negatively Regulates Angiogenesis by Targeting Endothelial NOTCH Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Ding, Sha; Qiu, Cong; Shi, Yanna; Song, Lin; Wang, Yueyue; Wang, Yuewen; Li, Jinying; Wang, Yiran; Sun, Yi; Qin, Lingfeng; Chen, Jun; Simons, Michael; Min, Wang; Yu, Luyang

    2017-09-01

    The highly conserved NOTCH (neurogenic locus notch homolog protein) signaling pathway functions as a key cell-cell interaction mechanism controlling cell fate and tissue patterning, whereas its dysregulation is implicated in a variety of developmental disorders and cancers. The pivotal role of endothelial NOTCH in regulation of angiogenesis is widely appreciated; however, little is known about what controls its signal transduction. Our previous study indicated the potential role of post-translational SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) modification (SUMOylation) in vascular disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of SUMOylation in endothelial NOTCH signaling and angiogenesis. Endothelial SENP1 (sentrin-specific protease 1) deletion, in newly generated endothelial SENP1 (the major protease of the SUMO system)-deficient mice, significantly delayed retinal vascularization by maintaining prolonged NOTCH1 signaling, as confirmed in cultured endothelial cells. An in vitro SUMOylation assay and immunoprecipitation revealed that when SENP1 associated with N1ICD (NOTCH1 intracellular domain), it functions as a deSUMOylase of N1ICD SUMOylation on conserved lysines. Immunoblot and immunoprecipitation analyses and dual-luciferase assays of natural and SUMO-conjugated/nonconjugated NOTCH1 forms demonstrated that SUMO conjugation facilitated NOTCH1 cleavage. This released N1ICD from the membrane and stabilized it for translocation to the nucleus where it functions as a cotranscriptional factor. Functionally, SENP1-mediated NOTCH1 deSUMOylation was required for NOTCH signal activation in response to DLL4 (Delta-like 4) stimulation. This in turn suppressed VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) receptor signaling and angiogenesis, as evidenced by immunoblotted signaling molecules and in vitro angiogenesis assays. These results establish reversible NOTCH1 SUMOylation as a regulatory mechanism in coordinating endothelial angiogenic signaling; SENP1 acts as a

  7. Corepressors of agonist-bound nuclear receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, Igor; Aneskievich, Brian J.

    2007-09-15

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) rely on coregulator proteins to modulate transcription of target genes. NR coregulators can be broadly subdivided into coactivators which potentiate transcription and corepressors which silence gene expression. The prevailing view of coregulator action holds that in the absence of agonist the receptor interacts with a corepressor via the corepressor nuclear receptor (CoRNR, 'corner') box motifs within the corepressor. Upon agonist binding, a conformational change in the receptor causes the shedding of corepressor and the binding of a coactivator which interacts with the receptor via NR boxes within the coregulator. This view was challenged with the discovery of RIP140 which acts as a NR corepressor in the presence of agonist and utilizes NR boxes. Since then a number of other corepressors of agonist-bound NRs have been discovered. Among them are LCoR, PRAME, REA, MTA1, NSD1, and COPR1 Although they exhibit a great diversity of structure, mechanism of repression and pathophysiological function, these corepressors frequently have one or more NR boxes and often recruit histone deacetylases to exert their repressive effects. This review highlights these more recently discovered corepressors and addresses their potential functions in transcription regulation, disease pharmacologic responses and xenobiotic metabolism.

  8. Minireview: Conversing With Chromatin: The Language of Nuclear Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors that are activated by physiological stimuli to bind DNA in the context of chromatin and regulate complex biological pathways. Major advances in nuclear receptor biology have been aided by genome scale examinations of receptor interactions with chromatin. In this review, we summarize the roles of the chromatin landscape in regulating nuclear receptor function. Chromatin acts as a central integrator in the nuclear receptor-signaling axis, operating in distinct temporal modalities. Chromatin effects nuclear receptor action by specifying its genomic localization and interactions with regulatory elements. On receptor binding, changes in chromatin operate as an effector of receptor signaling to modulate transcriptional events. Chromatin is therefore an integral component of the pathways that guide nuclear receptor action in cell-type-specific and cell state-dependent manners. PMID:24196351

  9. SUMOylation-mediated regulation of cell cycle progression and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eifler, Karolin; Vertegaal, Alfred C.O.

    2016-01-01

    SUMOylation plays critical roles during cell cycle progression. Many important cell cycle regulators, including many oncogenes and tumor suppressors, are functionally regulated via SUMOylation. The dynamic SUMOylation pattern observed throughout the cell cycle is ensured via distinct spatial and temporal regulation of the SUMO machinery. Additionally, SUMOylation cooperates with other post-translational modifications to mediate cell cycle progression. Deregulation of these SUMOylation and deSUMOylation enzymes causes severe defects in cell proliferation and genome stability. Different types of cancers were recently shown to be dependent on a functioning SUMOylation system, a finding that could potentially be exploited in anti-cancer therapies. PMID:26601932

  10. Using Nuclear Receptor Activity to Stratify Hepatocarcinogens

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Imran; Houck, Keith; Judson, Richard S.; Kavlock, Robert J.; Martin, Matthew T.; Reif, David M.; Wambaugh, John; Dix, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nuclear receptors (NR) are a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that control a range of cellular processes. Persistent stimulation of some NR is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. Here we report on a systematic analysis of new in vitro human NR activity data on 309 environmental chemicals in relationship to their liver cancer-related chronic outcomes in rodents. Results The effects of 309 environmental chemicals on human constitutive androstane receptors (CAR/NR1I3), pregnane X receptor (PXR/NR1I2), aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR/NR1C), liver X receptors (LXR/NR1H), retinoic X receptors (RXR/NR2B) and steroid receptors (SR/NR3) were determined using in vitro data. Hepatic histopathology, observed in rodents after two years of chronic treatment for 171 of the 309 chemicals, was summarized by a cancer lesion progression grade. Chemicals that caused proliferative liver lesions in both rat and mouse were generally more active for the human receptors, relative to the compounds that only affected one rodent species, and these changes were significant for PPAR (p0.001), PXR (p0.01) and CAR (p0.05). Though most chemicals exhibited receptor promiscuity, multivariate analysis clustered them into relatively few NR activity combinations. The human NR activity pattern of chemicals weakly associated with the severity of rodent liver cancer lesion progression (p0.05). Conclusions The rodent carcinogens had higher in vitro potency for human NR relative to non-carcinogens. Structurally diverse chemicals with similar NR promiscuity patterns weakly associated with the severity of rodent liver cancer progression. While these results do not prove the role of NR activation in human liver cancer, they do have implications for nuclear receptor chemical biology and provide insights into putative toxicity pathways. More importantly, these findings suggest the

  11. Sumoylation of Turnip mosaic virus RNA polymerase promotes viral infection by counteracting the host NPR1-mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaofei; Xiong, Ruyi; Li, Yinzi; Li, Fangfang; Zhou, Xueping; Wang, Aiming

    2017-02-21

    Sumoylation is a transient, reversible dynamic posttranslational modification that regulates diverse cellular processes including plant-pathogen interactions. Sumoylation of NPR1, a master regulator of basal and systemic acquired resistance to a broad spectrum of plant pathogens, activates the defense response. Here, we report that NIb, the only RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) that targets the nucleus upon translation, interacts exclusively with and is sumoylated by SUMO3 (SMALL UBIQUITIN-LIKE MODIFIER3), but not the three other Arabidopsis thaliana SUMO paralogs. TuMV infection upregulates SUMO3 expression, and the sumoylation of NIb by SUMO3 regulates the nuclear-cytoplasmic partitioning of NIb. We identified the SUMO-interacting motif in NIb that is essential for its sumoylation and found that knockout or overexpression of SUMO3 suppresses TuMV replication and attenuates viral symptoms, suggesting that SUMO3 plays dual roles as a host factor of TuMV and as an antiviral defender. Sumoylation of NIb by SUMO3 is crucial for its role in suppressing the host immune response. Taken together, our findings reveal that sumoylation of NIb promotes TuMV infection by retargeting NIb from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where viral replication takes place and by suppressing host antiviral responses through counteracting the TuMV infection-induced, SUMO3-activated, NPR1-mediated resistance pathway.

  12. SUMOylation of the KRAB zinc-finger transcription factor PARIS/ZNF746 regulates its transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Tamotsu Yamada, Yoshiji

    2016-05-13

    Parkin-interacting substrate (PARIS), a member of the family of Krüppel-associated box (KRAB)-containing zinc-finger transcription factors, is a substrate of the ubiquitin E3 ligase parkin. PARIS represses the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), although the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that PARIS can be SUMOylated, and its SUMOylation plays a role in the repression of PGC-1a promoter activity. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT y (PIASy) was identified as an interacting protein of PARIS and shown to enhance its SUMOylation. PIASy repressed PGC-1a promoter activity, and this effect was attenuated by PARIS in a manner dependent on its SUMOylation status. Co-expression of SUMO-1 with PIASy completely repressed PGC-1a promoter activity independently of PARIS expression. PARIS-mediated PGC-1a promoter repression depended on the activity of histone deacetylases (HDAC), whereas PIASy repressed the PGC-1a promoter in an HDAC-independent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that PARIS and PIASy modulate PGC-1a gene transcription through distinct molecular mechanisms. -- Highlights: •PARIS can be SUMOylated in vivo and in vitro. •SUMOylation of PARIS functions in the repression of PGC-1a promoter activity. •PIASy interacts with PARIS and enhances its SUMOylation. •PIASy influences PARIS-mediated repression of PGC-1a promoter activity.

  13. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor TR4 Is a Vitamin A-activated Nuclear Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X. Edward; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Xu, Yong; Chan, Cee-Wah; Tanabe, Osamu; Kruse, Schoen W.; Reynolds, Ross; Engel, James Douglas; Xu, H. Eric

    2015-11-30

    Testicular receptors 2 and 4 (TR2/4) constitute a subgroup of orphan nuclear receptors that play important roles in spermatogenesis, lipid and lipoprotein regulation, and the development of the central nervous system. Currently, little is known about the structural features and the ligand regulation of these receptors. Here we report the crystal structure of the ligand-free TR4 ligand binding domain, which reveals an autorepressed conformation. The ligand binding pocket of TR4 is filled by the C-terminal half of helix 10, and the cofactor binding site is occupied by the AF-2 helix, thus preventing ligand-independent activation of the receptor. However, TR4 exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity on multiple promoters, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, or ligand binding substantially reduce the transcriptional activity of this receptor. Importantly, both retinol and retinoic acid are able to promote TR4 to recruit coactivators and to activate a TR4-regulated reporter. These findings demonstrate that TR4 is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor and suggest that retinoids might have a much wider regulatory role via activation of orphan receptors such as TR4.

  14. Nuclear receptors in acute and chronic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Sanchez, Ester; Firrincieli, Delphine; Housset, Chantal; Chignard, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) form a family of 48 members. NRs control hepatic processes such as bile acid homeostasis, lipid metabolism and mechanisms involved in fibrosis and inflammation. Due to their central role in the regulation of hepatoprotective mechanisms, NRs are promising therapeutic targets in cholestatic disorders. NRs can be classified into five different physiological clusters. NRs from the 'bile acids and xenobiotic metabolism' and from the 'lipid metabolism and energy homeostasis' clusters are strongly expressed in the liver. Furthermore, NRs from these clusters, such as farnesoid X receptor α (FXRα), pregnane X receptor (PXR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), have been associated with the pathogenesis and the progression of cholestasis. The latter observation is also true for vitamin D receptor (VDR), which is barely detectable in the whole liver, but has been linked to cholestatic diseases. Involvement of VDR in cholestasis is ascribed to a strong expression in nonparenchymal liver cells, such as biliary epithelial cells, Kupffer cells and hepatic stellate cells. Likewise, NRs from other physiological clusters with low hepatic expression, such as estrogen receptor α (ERα) or reverse-Erb α/β (REV-ERB α/β), may also control pathophysiological processes in cholestasis. In this review, we will describe the impact of individual NRs on cholestasis. We will then discuss the potential role of these transcription factors as therapeutic targets. 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Nuclear Receptors in Bone Physiology and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Min-Young; Inoue, Kazuki; Takada, Ichiro; Kouzmenko, Alexander; Kato, Shigeaki

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade, our view on the skeleton as a mere solid physical support structure has been transformed, as bone emerged as a dynamic, constantly remodeling tissue with systemic regulatory functions including those of an endocrine organ. Reflecting this remarkable functional complexity, distinct classes of humoral and intracellular regulatory factors have been shown to control vital processes in the bone. Among these regulators, nuclear receptors (NRs) play fundamental roles in bone development, growth, and maintenance. NRs are DNA-binding transcription factors that act as intracellular transducers of the respective ligand signaling pathways through modulation of expression of specific sets of cognate target genes. Aberrant NR signaling caused by receptor or ligand deficiency may profoundly affect bone health and compromise skeletal functions. Ligand dependency of NR action underlies a major strategy of therapeutic intervention to correct aberrant NR signaling, and significant efforts have been made to design novel synthetic NR ligands with enhanced beneficial properties and reduced potential negative side effects. As an example, estrogen deficiency causes bone loss and leads to development of osteoporosis, the most prevalent skeletal disorder in postmenopausal women. Since administration of natural estrogens for the treatment of osteoporosis often associates with undesirable side effects, several synthetic estrogen receptor ligands have been developed with higher therapeutic efficacy and specificity. This review presents current progress in our understanding of the roles of various nuclear receptor-mediated signaling pathways in bone physiology and disease, and in development of advanced NR ligands for treatment of common skeletal disorders. PMID:23589826

  16. SIRT1 stabilizes PML promoting its sumoylation

    PubMed Central

    Campagna, M; Herranz, D; Garcia, M A; Marcos-Villar, L; González-Santamaría, J; Gallego, P; Gutierrez, S; Collado, M; Serrano, M; Esteban, M; Rivas, C

    2011-01-01

    SIRT1, the closest mammalian homolog of yeast Sir2, is an NAD+-dependent deacetylase with relevant functions in cancer, aging, and metabolism among other processes. SIRT1 has a diffuse nuclear localization but is recruited to the PML nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) after PML upregulation. However, the functions of SIRT1 in the PML-NBs are unknown. In this study we show that primary mouse embryo fibroblasts lacking SIRT1 contain reduced PML protein levels that are increased after reintroduction of SIRT1. In addition, overexpression of SIRT1 in HEK-293 cells increases the amount of PML protein whereas knockdown of SIRT1 reduces the size and number of PML-NBs and the levels of PML protein in HeLa cells. SIRT1 stimulates PML sumoylation in vitro and in vivo in a deacetylase-independent manner. Importantly, the absence of SIRT1 reduces the apoptotic response of vesicular stomatitis virus-infected cells and favors the extent of this PML-sensitive virus replication. These results show a novel function of SIRT1 in the control of PML and PML-NBs. PMID:20577263

  17. Nuclear Receptor Signaling: a home for nuclear receptor and coregulator signaling research.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Neil J; Evans, Ronald M; O'Malley, Bert W

    2014-01-01

    The field of nuclear receptor and coregulator signaling has grown into one of the most active and interdisciplinary in eukaryotic biology. Papers in this field are spread widely across a vast number of journals, which complicates the task of investigators in keeping current with the literature in the field. In 2003, we launched Nuclear Receptor Signaling as an Open Access reviews, perspectives and methods journal for the nuclear receptor signaling field. Building on its success and impact on the community, we have added primary research and dataset articles to this list of article categories, and we now announce the re-launch of the journal this month. Here we will summarize the rationale that informed the creation and expansion of the journal, and discuss the possibilities for its future development.

  18. Nuclear receptors, nuclear-receptor factors, and nuclear-receptor-like orphans form a large paralog cluster in Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Vallvé, S; Palau, J

    1998-06-01

    We studied a human protein paralog cluster formed by 38 nonredundant sequences taken from the Swiss-Prot database and its supplement, TrEMBL. These sequences include nuclear receptors, nuclear-receptor factors and nuclear-receptor-like orphans. Working separately with both the central cysteine-rich DNA-binding domain and the carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain, we performed multialignment analyses that included drawings of paralog trees. Our results show that the cluster is highly multibranched, with considerable differences in the amino acid sequence in the ligand-binding domain (LBD), and 17 proximal subbranches which are identifiable and fully coincident when independent trees from both domains are compared. We identified the six recently proposed subfamilies as groups of neighboring clusters in the LBD paralog tree. We found similarities of 80%-100% for the N-terminal transactivation domain among mammalian ortholog receptors, as well as some paralog resemblances within diverse subbranches. Our studies suggest that during the evolutionary process, the three domains were assembled in a modular fashion with a nonshuffled modular fusion of the LBD. We used the EMBL server PredictProtein to make secondary-structure predictions for all 38 LBD subsequences. Amino acid residues in the multialigned homologous domains--taking the beginning of helix H3 of the human retinoic acid receptor-gamma as the initial point of reference--were substituted with H or E, which identify residues predicted to be helical or extended, respectively. The result was a secondary structure multialignment with the surprising feature that the prediction follows a canonical pattern of alignable alpha-helices with some short extended elements in between, despite the fact that a number of subsequences resemble each other by less than 25% in terms of the similarity index. We also identified the presence of a binary patterning in all of the predicted helices that were conserved throughout the 38

  19. Nuclear receptor signaling and cardiac energetics.

    PubMed

    Huss, Janice M; Kelly, Daniel P

    2004-09-17

    The heart has a tremendous capacity for ATP generation, allowing it to function as an efficient pump throughout the life of the organism. The adult myocardium uses either fatty acid or glucose oxidation as its main energy source. Under normal conditions, the adult heart derives most of its energy through oxidation of fatty acids in mitochondria. However, the myocardium has a remarkable ability to switch between carbohydrate and fat fuel sources so that ATP production is maintained at a constant rate in diverse physiological and dietary conditions. This fuel selection flexibility is important for normal cardiac function. Although cardiac energy conversion capacity and metabolic flux is modulated at many levels, an important mechanism of regulation occurs at the level of gene expression. The expression of genes involved in multiple energy transduction pathways is dynamically regulated in response to developmental, physiological, and pathophysiological cues. This review is focused on gene transcription pathways involved in short- and long-term regulation of myocardial energy metabolism. Much of our knowledge about cardiac metabolic regulation comes from studies focused on mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. The genes involved in this key energy metabolic pathway are transcriptionally regulated by members of the nuclear receptor superfamily, specifically the fatty acid-activated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and the nuclear receptor coactivator, PPARgamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha). The dynamic regulation of the cardiac PPAR/PGC-1 complex in accordance with physiological and pathophysiological states will be described.

  20. Nuclear receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease1

    PubMed Central

    Cave, Matthew C.; Clair, Heather B.; Hardesty, Josiah E.; Falkner, K. Cameron; Feng, Wenke; Clark, Barbara J.; Sidey, Jennifer; Shi, Hongxue; Aqel, Bashar A.; McClain, Craig J.; Prough, Russell A.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors which sense changing environmental or hormonal signals and effect transcriptional changes to regulate core life functions including growth, development, and reproduction. To support this function, following ligand-activation by xenobiotics, members of subfamily 1 nuclear receptors (NR1s) may heterodimerize with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) to regulate transcription of genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism and inflammation. Several of these receptors including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), the pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR), the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the liver X receptor (LXR) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are key regulators of the gut:liver:adipose axis and serve to coordinate metabolic responses across organ systems between the fed and fasting states. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease and may progress to cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is associated with inappropriate nuclear receptor function and perturbations along the gut:liver:adipose axis including obesity, increased intestinal permeability with systemic inflammation, abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance. Environmental chemicals may compound the problem by directly interacting with nuclear receptors leading to metabolic confusion and the inability to differentiate fed from fasting conditions. This review focuses on the impact of nuclear receptors in the pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. Clinical trials including PIVENS and FLINT demonstrate that nuclear receptor targeted therapies may lead to the paradoxical dissociation of steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity. Novel strategies currently under development (including tissue-specific ligands and dual receptor agonists) may be required to separate the beneficial effects of nuclear receptor activation from unwanted metabolic

  1. Glucocorticoid-induced tethered transrepression requires SUMOylation of GR and formation of a SUMO-SMRT/NCoR1-HDAC3 repressing complex.

    PubMed

    Hua, Guoqiang; Ganti, Krishna Priya; Chambon, Pierre

    2016-02-02

    Upon binding of a glucocorticoid (GC), the GC receptor (GR) can exert one of three transcriptional regulatory functions. We recently reported that SUMOylation of the GR at position K293 in humans (K310 in mice) within the N-terminal domain is indispensable for GC-induced evolutionary conserved inverted repeated negative GC response element (IR nGRE)-mediated direct transrepression. We now demonstrate that the integrity of this GR SUMOylation site is mandatory for the formation of a GR-small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs)-SMRT/NCoR1-HDAC3 repressing complex, which is indispensable for NF-κB/AP1-mediated GC-induced tethered indirect transrepression in vitro. Using GR K310R mutant mice or mice containing the N-terminal truncated GR isoform GRα-D3 lacking the K310 SUMOylation site, revealed a more severe skin inflammation than in WT mice. Importantly, cotreatment with dexamethasone (Dex) could not efficiently suppress a 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced skin inflammation in these mutant mice, whereas it was clearly decreased in WT mice. In addition, in mice selectively ablated in skin keratinocytes for either nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCoR1)/silencing mediator for retinoid or thyroid-hormone receptors (SMRT) corepressors or histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), Dex-induced tethered transrepression and the formation of a repressing complex on DNA-bound NF-κB/AP1 were impaired. We previously suggested that GR ligands that would lack both (+)GRE-mediated transactivation and IR nGRE-mediated direct transrepression activities of GCs may preferentially exert the therapeutically beneficial GC antiinflammatory properties. Interestingly, we now identified a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory selective GR agonist (SEGRA) that selectively lacks both Dex-induced (+)GRE-mediated transactivation and IR nGRE-mediated direct transrepression functions, while still exerting a tethered indirect transrepression activity and could therefore be clinically lesser

  2. Non-canonical modulators of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Tice, Colin M; Zheng, Ya-Jun

    2016-09-01

    Like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and protein kinases, nuclear receptors (NRs) are a rich source of pharmaceutical targets. Over 80 NR-targeting drugs have been approved for 18 NRs. The focus of drug discovery in NRs has hitherto been on identifying ligands that bind to the canonical ligand binding pockets of the C-terminal ligand binding domains (LBDs). Due to the development of drug resistance and selectivity concerns, there has been considerable interest in exploring other, non-canonical ligand binding sites. Unfortunately, the potencies of compounds binding at other sites have generally not been sufficient for clinical development. However, the situation has changed dramatically over the last 3years, as compounds with sufficient potency have been reported for several NR targets. Here we review recent developments in this area from a medicinal chemistry point of view in the hope of stimulating further interest in this area of research.

  3. Nuclear hormone receptors in parasitic helminths

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenjie; LoVerde, Philip T

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) belong to a large protein superfamily that are important transcriptional modulators in metazoans. Parasitic helminths include parasitic worms from the Lophotrochozoa (Platyhelminths) and Ecdysozoa (Nematoda). NRs in parasitic helminths diverged into two different evolutionary lineages. NRs in parasitic Platyhelminths have orthologues in Deuterostomes, in arthropods or both with a feature of extensive gene loss and gene duplication within different gene groups. NRs in parasitic Nematoda follow the nematode evolutionary lineage with a feature of multiple duplication of SupNRs and gene loss. PMID:20600585

  4. Maturing of the nuclear receptor family.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Mitchell A

    2017-04-03

    Members of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of ligand-regulated transcription factors play important roles in reproduction, development, and physiology. In humans, genetic mutations in NRs are causes of rare diseases, while hormones and drugs that target NRs are in widespread therapeutic use. The present issue of the JCI includes a series of Review articles focused on specific NRs and their wide range of biological functions. Here I reflect on the past, present, and potential future highlights of research on the NR superfamily.

  5. Regulation of cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes by nuclear receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Honkakoski, P; Negishi, M

    2000-01-01

    Members of the nuclear-receptor superfamily mediate crucial physiological functions by regulating the synthesis of their target genes. Nuclear receptors are usually activated by ligand binding. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms often catalyse both formation and degradation of these ligands. CYPs also metabolize many exogenous compounds, some of which may act as activators of nuclear receptors and disruptors of endocrine and cellular homoeostasis. This review summarizes recent findings that indicate that major classes of CYP genes are selectively regulated by certain ligand-activated nuclear receptors, thus creating tightly controlled networks. PMID:10749660

  6. Nuclear receptors rock around the clock

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuan; Cho, Han; Yu, Ruth T; Atkins, Annette R; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms characterize almost every aspect of human physiology, endocrinology, xenobiotic detoxification, cell growth, and behavior. Modern lifestyles that disrupt our normal circadian rhythms are increasingly thought to contribute to various disease conditions ranging from depression and metabolic disorders to cancer. This self-sustained time-keeping system is generated and maintained by an endogenous molecular machine, the circadian clock, which is a transcriptional mechanism composed of the transcription factors CLOCK and BMAL and their co-repressors, PER and CRY. Nuclear receptors (NRs) represent a large family of hormone-sensitive transcriptional regulators involved in a myriad of biological processes such as development, energy metabolism, reproduction, inflammation, and tissue homeostasis. Recent studies point not only to NR regulation by the clock, but also to NR regulation of the clock itself. Here, we discuss recent studies that functionally and mechanistically implicate NRs as key components of both the universal and adaptive circadian clock mechanisms. As proven pharmacological targets, nuclear receptors are promising targets for therapeutic control of many pathological conditions associated with the disruption of circadian rhythm. PMID:24737872

  7. Nuclear hormone receptors put immunity on sterols

    PubMed Central

    Santori, Fabio R.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) are transcription factors regulated by small molecules. The functions of NHRs range from development of primary and secondary lymphoid organs, to regulation of differentiation and function of DCs, macrophages and T cells. The human genome has 48 classic (hormone and vitamin receptors) and non-classic (all others) NHRs; 17 non-classic receptors are orphans, meaning that the endogenous ligand is unknown. Understanding the function of orphan NHRs requires the identification of their natural ligands. The mevalonate pathway, including its sterol and non-sterol intermediates and derivatives, is a source of ligands for many classic and non-classic NHRs. For example, cholesterol biosynthetic intermediates (CBIs) are natural ligands for RORγ/γt. CBIs are universal endogenous metabolites in mammalian cells, and to study NHRs that bind CBIs requires ligand-free reporters system in sterol auxotroph cells. Furthermore, RORγ/γt shows broad specificity to sterol lipids, suggesting that RORγ/γt is either a general sterol sensor or specificity is defined by an abundant endogenous ligand. Unlike other NHRs, which regulate specific metabolic pathways, there is no connection between the genetic programs induced by RORγ/γt and ligand biosynthesis. In this review we summarize the roles of non-classic NHRs and their potential ligands in the immune system. PMID:26222181

  8. Dynamics of nuclear receptor gene expression during Pacific oyster development.

    PubMed

    Vogeler, Susanne; Bean, Tim P; Lyons, Brett P; Galloway, Tamara S

    2016-09-29

    Nuclear receptors are a highly conserved set of ligand binding transcription factors, with essential roles regulating aspects of vertebrate and invertebrate biology alike. Current understanding of nuclear receptor regulated gene expression in invertebrates remains sparse, limiting our ability to elucidate gene function and the conservation of developmental processes across phyla. Here, we studied nuclear receptor expression in the early life stages of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, to identify at which specific key stages nuclear receptors are expressed RESULTS: We used quantitative RT-PCR to determine the expression profiles of 34 nuclear receptors, revealing three developmental key stages, during which nuclear receptor expression is dynamically regulated: embryogenesis, mid development from gastrulation to trochophore larva, and late larval development prior to metamorphosis. Clustering of nuclear receptor expression patterns demonstrated that transcriptional regulation was not directly related to gene phylogeny, suggesting closely related genes may have distinct functions. Expression of gene homologs of vertebrate retinoid receptors suggests participation in organogenesis and shell-formation, as they are highly expressed at the gastrulation and trochophore larval initial shell formation stages. The ecdysone receptor homolog showed high expression just before larval settlement, suggesting a potential role in metamorphosis. Throughout early oyster development nuclear receptors exhibited highly dynamic expression profiles, which were not confined by gene phylogeny. These results provide fundamental information on the presence of nuclear receptors during key developmental stages, which aids elucidation of their function in the developmental process. This understanding is essential as ligand sensing nuclear receptors can be disrupted by xenobiotics, a mode of action through which anthropogenic environmental pollutants have been found to mediate effects.

  9. ISN Forefronts Symposium 2015: Nuclear Receptors and Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Bo; Chen, Lei; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the major reason for end stage renal disease in the western world. Patients with DN developed more severe cardiovascular complications with worse prognosis. In spite of tight blood pressure and glucose control through applying angiotensin II receptor antagonism, angiotensin receptor inhibitors and even direct renin inhibitors, the progression and development of DN has continued to accelerate. Nuclear receptors are, with few exceptions, ligand-depended transcription factors some of which modulate genes involved in the transportation and metabolism of carbohydrate or lipid, and inflammation. Considering the diverse biological functions of nuclear receptors, efforts have been made to explore their contributions to the pathogenesis of DN and potential therapeutic strategies. This review is mainly focused on the association between various nuclear receptors and the pathogenesis of DN, the potential beneficial effects of targeting these receptors for preventing the progress of DN, and the important role that nuclear receptors may play in future therapeutic strategies for DN. PMID:28932823

  10. Sumoylation of the Tumor Suppressor Promyelocytic Leukemia Protein Regulates Arsenic Trioxide-Induced Collagen Synthesis in Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-Xiao; Liu, Sheng-Zhi; Wu, Di; Qiao, Guo-Fen; Yan, Jinglong

    2015-01-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein is a tumor suppressor that fuses with retinoic acid receptor-α (PML-RARα) to contribute to the initiation of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Arsenic trioxide (ATO) upregulates expression of TGF-β1, promoting collagen synthesis in osteoblasts, and ATO binds directly to PML to induce oligomerization, sumoylation, and ubiquitination. However, how ATO upregulates TGF-β1 expression is uncertain. Thus, we suggested that PML sumoylation is responsible for regulation of TGF-β1 protein expression. Kunming mice were treated with ATO, and osteoblasts were counted under scanning electron microscopy. Masson's staining was used to quantify collagen content. hFOB1.19 cells were transfected with siRNA against UBC9 or RNF4, and then treated with ATO or FBS. TGF-β1, PML expression, and sumoylation were quantified with Western blot, and collagen quantified via immunocytochemistry. ATO enhanced osteoblast accumulation, collagen synthesis, and PML-NB formation in vivo. Knocking down UBC9 in hFOB1.19 cells inhibited ATO- and FBS-induced PML sumoylation, TGF-β1 expression, and collagen synthesis. Conversely, knocking down RNF4 enhanced ATO- and FBS-induced PML sumoylation, TGF-β1 expression, and collagen synthesis. These data suggest that PML sumoylation is required for ATO-induced collagen synthesis in osteoblasts. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Brain nuclear receptors and body weight regulation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong; O'Malley, Bert W; Elmquist, Joel K

    2017-04-03

    Neural pathways, especially those in the hypothalamus, integrate multiple nutritional, hormonal, and neural signals, resulting in the coordinated control of body weight balance and glucose homeostasis. Nuclear receptors (NRs) sense changing levels of nutrients and hormones, and therefore play essential roles in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Understanding the role and the underlying mechanisms of NRs in the context of energy balance control may facilitate the identification of novel targets to treat obesity. Notably, NRs are abundantly expressed in the brain, and emerging evidence indicates that a number of these brain NRs regulate multiple aspects of energy balance, including feeding, energy expenditure and physical activity. In this Review we summarize some of the recent literature regarding effects of brain NRs on body weight regulation and discuss mechanisms underlying these effects.

  12. Minireview: Nuclear Receptors, Hematopoiesis, and Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chute, John P.; Ross, Joel R.; McDonnell, Donald P.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) regulate a panoply of biological processes, including the function and development of cells within the hematopoietic and immune system, such as erythrocytes, monocytes, and lymphocytes. Significantly less is known regarding the function of NRs in regulating the fate of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), the self-renewing, pluripotent cells that give rise to the entirety of the blood and immune systems throughout the lifetime of an individual. Several recent studies suggest, either directly or indirectly, a role for members of the NR family in regulating the differentiation and self-renewal of HSCs, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. Herein, we review in detail the function of specific NRs in controlling HSC and other stem cell fate and propose a framework through which these observations can be translated into therapeutic amplification of HSCs for clinical purposes. PMID:19934345

  13. Research Resources for Nuclear Receptor Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Neil J

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear receptor (NR) signaling pathways impact cellular function in a broad variety of tissues in both normal physiology and disease states. The complex tissue-specific biology of these pathways is an enduring impediment to the development of clinical NR small-molecule modulators that combine therapeutically desirable effects in specific target tissues with suppression of off-target effects in other tissues. Supporting the important primary research in this area is a variety of web-based resources that assist researchers in gaining an appreciation of the molecular determinants of the pharmacology of a NR pathway in a given tissue. In this study, selected representative examples of these tools are reviewed, along with discussions on how current and future generations of tools might optimally adapt to the future of NR signaling research. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  14. Research Resources for Nuclear Receptor Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptor (NR) signaling pathways impact cellular function in a broad variety of tissues in both normal physiology and disease states. The complex tissue-specific biology of these pathways is an enduring impediment to the development of clinical NR small-molecule modulators that combine therapeutically desirable effects in specific target tissues with suppression of off-target effects in other tissues. Supporting the important primary research in this area is a variety of web-based resources that assist researchers in gaining an appreciation of the molecular determinants of the pharmacology of a NR pathway in a given tissue. In this study, selected representative examples of these tools are reviewed, along with discussions on how current and future generations of tools might optimally adapt to the future of NR signaling research. PMID:27216565

  15. A nuclear-receptor-dependent phosphatidylcholine pathway with antidiabetic effects

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nuclear hormone receptors regulate diverse metabolic pathways and the orphan nuclear receptor LRH-1 (also known as NR5A2) regulates bile acid biosynthesis. Structural studies have identified phospholipids as potential LRH-1 ligands, but their functional relevance is unclear. Here we show that an unu...

  16. Identification of Modulators of the Nuclear Receptor ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The nuclear receptor family member peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is activated by therapeutic hypolipidemic drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals to regulate genes involved in lipid transport and catabolism. Chronic activation of PPARα in rodents increases in liver cancer incidence, whereas suppression of PPARα activity can lead to hepatocellular steatosis. Analytical approaches were developed to identify biosets (i.e., gene expression differences between two conditions) in a genomic database in which PPARα activity was altered. A gene expression signature of 131 PPARα-dependent genes was built using profiles from the livers of wild-type and PPARα-null mice after exposure to three structurally diverse PPARα activators (WY-14,643, fenofibrate and perfluorohexane sulfonate). A rank-based test (Running Fisher’s test (p-value ≤ 10-4)) was used to evaluate the similarity between the PPARα signature and a test set of 48 and 31 biosets positive or negative, respectively for PPARα activation; the test resulted in a balanced accuracy of 98%. The signature was used to identify factors that activate or suppress PPARα in an annotated mouse liver/primary hepatocyte gene expression database of ~1850 biosets. In addition to the expected activation of PPARα by fibrate drugs, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, and perfluorinated compounds, PPARα was activated by benzofuran, galactosamine and TCDD and suppressed by hepatotoxins acetami

  17. Targeting nuclear receptors for the treatment of fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naoki; Aoyama, Toshifumi; Kimura, Shioko; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2017-05-23

    Ligand-activated nuclear receptors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), pregnane X receptor, and constitutive androstane receptor, were first identified as key regulators of the responses against chemical toxicants. However, numerous studies using mouse disease models and human samples have revealed critical roles for these receptors and others, such as PPARβ/δ, PPARγ, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), and liver X receptor (LXR), in maintaining nutrient/energy homeostasis in part through modulation of the gut-liver-adipose axis. Recently, disorders associated with disrupted nutrient/energy homeostasis, e.g., obesity, metabolic syndrome, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), are increasing worldwide. Notably, in NAFLD, a progressive subtype exists, designated as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) that is characterized by typical histological features resembling alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH), and NASH/ASH are recognized as major causes of hepatitis virus-unrelated liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Since hepatic steatosis is basically caused by an imbalance between fat/energy influx and utilization, abnormal signaling of these nuclear receptors contribute to the pathogenesis of fatty liver disease. Standard therapeutic interventions have not been fully established for fatty liver disease, but some new agents that activate or inhibit nuclear receptor signaling have shown promise as possible therapeutic targets. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the roles of nuclear receptors in fatty liver disease and discuss future perspectives to develop promising pharmacological strategies targeting nuclear receptors for NAFLD/NASH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Disrupting SUMOylation enhances transcriptional function and ameliorates polyglutamine androgen receptor–mediated disease

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Jason P.; Reddy, Satya L.; Yu, Zhigang; Giorgetti, Elisa; Montie, Heather L.; Mukherjee, Sarmistha; Higgins, Jake; McEachin, Richard C.; Robins, Diane M.; Merry, Diane E.; Iñiguez-Lluhí, Jorge A.; Lieberman, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Expansion of the polyglutamine (polyQ) tract within the androgen receptor (AR) causes neuromuscular degeneration in individuals with spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). PolyQ AR has diminished transcriptional function and exhibits ligand-dependent proteotoxicity, features that have both been implicated in SBMA; however, the extent to which altered AR transcriptional function contributes to pathogenesis remains controversial. Here, we sought to dissociate effects of diminished AR function from polyQ-mediated proteotoxicity by enhancing the transcriptional activity of polyQ AR. To accomplish this, we bypassed the inhibitory effect of AR SUMOylation (where SUMO indicates small ubiquitin-like modifier) by mutating conserved lysines in the polyQ AR that are sites of SUMOylation. We determined that replacement of these residues by arginine enhances polyQ AR activity as a hormone-dependent transcriptional regulator. In a murine model, disruption of polyQ AR SUMOylation rescued exercise endurance and type I muscle fiber atrophy; it also prolonged survival. These changes occurred without overt alterations in polyQ AR expression or aggregation, revealing the favorable trophic support exerted by the ligand-activated receptor. Our findings demonstrate beneficial effects of enhancing the transcriptional function of the ligand-activated polyQ AR and indicate that the SUMOylation pathway may be a potential target for therapeutic intervention in SBMA. PMID:25607844

  19. PIAS3 induction of PRB sumoylation represses PRB transactivation by destabilizing its retention in the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Man, Jiang-Hong; Li, Hui-Yan; Zhang, Pei-Jing; Zhou, Tao; He, Kun; Pan, Xin; Liang, Bing; Li, Ai-Ling; Zhao, Jie; Gong, Wei-Li; Jin, Bao-Feng; Xia, Qing; Yu, Ming; Shen, Bei-Fen; Zhang, Xue-Min

    2006-01-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) plays a critical role in cell proliferation and differentiation, and its transcriptional activity is known to be modulated by cofactor proteins. In the present study, we demonstrated that in the presence of progesterone, protein inhibitor of activated STAT-3 (PIAS3) significantly inhibited the PR transcriptional activity and the expression of progesterone-responsive genes. Reduction of endogenous PIAS3 by PIAS3 small-interfering RNA enhanced PR transactivation in a ligand-dependent manner. PIAS3 interacted with PR both in vitro and in vivo and the interaction was enhanced by progesterone. Furthermore, our findings suggested that PIAS3 strongly induced PRB sumoylation at three sites, Lys-7, Lys-388 and Lys-531. In addition, novel roles in PRB nuclear retention and transactivation were identified for these sites. Our data also suggested that PIAS3 was recruited in a largely hormone-dependent manner in response to a progesterone-responsive promoter. Finally, we demonstrated that PIAS3 inhibited the DNA-binding activity of PR and influenced its nuclear export as well as PR transactivation. Taken together, these data strongly suggested that PIAS3 played an important physiological role in PR function. PMID:17020914

  20. Looking at nuclear receptors from a new angle.

    PubMed

    Helsen, Christine; Claessens, Frank

    2014-01-25

    While the structures of the DNA- and ligand-binding domains of many nuclear receptors have been determined in great detail; the mechanisms by which these domains interact and possibly 'communicate' is still under debate. The first crystal structures of receptor dimers bound to ligand, DNA and coactivator peptides provided new insights in this matter. The observed binding modes revealed exciting new interaction surfaces between the different nuclear receptor domains. Such interfaces are proposed to be the route through which allosteric signals from the DNA are passed on to the ligand-binding domain and the activating functions of the receptor. The structural determinations of DNA-bound receptor dimers in solution, however, revealed an extended structure of the receptors. Here, we discuss these apparent contradictory structural data and their possible implications for the functioning of nuclear receptors.

  1. Sumoylation in Synaptic Function and Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Schorova, Lenka; Martin, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Sumoylation has recently emerged as a key post-translational modification involved in many, if not all, biological processes. Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) polypeptides are covalently attached to specific lysine residues of target proteins through a dedicated enzymatic pathway. Disruption of the SUMO enzymatic pathway in the developing brain leads to lethality indicating that this process exerts a central role during embryonic and post-natal development. However, little is still known regarding how this highly dynamic protein modification is regulated in the mammalian brain despite an increasing number of data implicating sumoylated substrates in synapse formation, synaptic communication and plasticity. The aim of this review is therefore to briefly describe the enzymatic SUMO pathway and to give an overview of our current knowledge on the function and dysfunction of protein sumoylation at the mammalian synapse.

  2. SUMOylation of Myc-Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sabò, Arianna; Doni, Mirko; Amati, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Myc-family proteins are key controllers of the metabolic and proliferative status of the cell, and are subjected to a complex network of regulatory events that guarantee their efficient and fast modulation by extracellular stimuli. Hence, unbalances in regulatory mechanisms leading to altered Myc levels or activities are often reported in cancer cells. Here we show that c- and N-Myc are conjugated to SUMO proteins at conserved lysines in their C-terminal domain. No obvious effects of SUMOylation were detected on bulk N-Myc stability or activities, including the regulation of transcription, proliferation or apoptosis. N-Myc SUMOylation could be induced by cellular stresses, such as heat shock and proteasome inhibition, and in all instances concerned a small fraction of the N-Myc protein. We surmise that, as shown for other substrates, SUMOylation may be part of a quality-control mechanism acting on misfolded Myc proteins. PMID:24608896

  3. Sumoylation in Synaptic Function and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Schorova, Lenka; Martin, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Sumoylation has recently emerged as a key post-translational modification involved in many, if not all, biological processes. Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) polypeptides are covalently attached to specific lysine residues of target proteins through a dedicated enzymatic pathway. Disruption of the SUMO enzymatic pathway in the developing brain leads to lethality indicating that this process exerts a central role during embryonic and post-natal development. However, little is still known regarding how this highly dynamic protein modification is regulated in the mammalian brain despite an increasing number of data implicating sumoylated substrates in synapse formation, synaptic communication and plasticity. The aim of this review is therefore to briefly describe the enzymatic SUMO pathway and to give an overview of our current knowledge on the function and dysfunction of protein sumoylation at the mammalian synapse. PMID:27199730

  4. Deficient Sumoylation of Yeast 2-Micron Plasmid Proteins Rep1 and Rep2 Associated with Their Loss from the Plasmid-Partitioning Locus and Impaired Plasmid Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Pinder, Jordan B.; McQuaid, Mary E.; Dobson, Melanie J.

    2013-01-01

    The 2-micron plasmid of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes copy-number amplification and partitioning systems that enable the plasmid to persist despite conferring no advantage to its host. Plasmid partitioning requires interaction of the plasmid Rep1 and Rep2 proteins with each other and with the plasmid-partitioning locus STB. Here we demonstrate that Rep1 stability is reduced in the absence of Rep2, and that both Rep proteins are sumoylated. Lysine-to-arginine substitutions in Rep1 and Rep2 that inhibited their sumoylation perturbed plasmid inheritance without affecting Rep protein stability or two-hybrid interaction between Rep1 and Rep2. One-hybrid and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that Rep1 was required for efficient retention of Rep2 at STB and that sumoylation-deficient mutants of Rep1 and Rep2 were impaired for association with STB. The normal co-localization of both Rep proteins with the punctate nuclear plasmid foci was also lost when Rep1 was sumoylation-deficient. The correlation of Rep protein sumoylation status with plasmid-partitioning locus association suggests a theme common to eukaryotic chromosome segregation proteins, sumoylated forms of which are found enriched at centromeres, and between the yeast 2-micron plasmid and viral episomes that depend on sumoylation of their maintenance proteins for persistence in their hosts. PMID:23555963

  5. SUMOylation-Mediated Regulation of Cell Cycle Progression and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Eifler, Karolin; Vertegaal, Alfred C O

    2015-12-01

    Protein conjugation with Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMOylation) has critical roles during cell cycle progression. Many important cell cycle regulators, including many oncogenes and tumor suppressors, are functionally regulated via SUMOylation. The dynamic SUMOylation pattern observed throughout the cell cycle is ensured via distinct spatial and temporal regulation of the SUMO machinery. Additionally, SUMOylation cooperates with other post-translational modifications to mediate cell cycle progression. Deregulation of these SUMOylation and deSUMOylation enzymes causes severe defects in cell proliferation and genome stability. Different types of cancer were recently shown to be dependent on a functioning SUMOylation system, a finding that could be exploited in anticancer therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Nuclear receptors PPAR as a drug target in metabolic disorders].

    PubMed

    Stolarczyk, Marta; Gutman, Wojciech; Derlacz, Rafał A

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear receptors regulate many basic cellular processes and their malfunction can lead to serious consequences including metabolic disorders, obesity and type 2 diabetes. Among many nuclear receptor families, the best known for their therapeutic use are the PPARs. These are key transcription factors determining, proper cellular metabolism of glucose and lipids, tissue sensitivity to insulin, appropriate immune responses including inflammatory processes and finally cell division and differentiation. Currently two types of PPAR activators are in medical use: in the therapy of type 2 diabetes--thiazolidinediones (TZDs), which act via PPARgamma receptors and in the treatment of dyslipidemia-fibrates, which act via PPARalpha receptors. The search for new drugs acting through PPAR mechanism consists in the design of new molecules with tissue specific proprieties, which would selectively bind and modulate the activity of appropriate receptors, thus reducing the number of adverse events typically observed with the use of full agonists. These molecules have been named selective nuclear receptor modulators (SNuRMs).

  7. Nuclear receptors: emerging drug targets for parasitic diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu; Schaffer, Nathaniel E; Kliewer, Steven A; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2017-02-06

    Parasitic worms infect billions of people worldwide. Current treatments rely on a small group of drugs that have been used for decades. A shortcoming of these drugs is their inability to target the intractable infectious stage of the parasite. As well-known therapeutic targets in mammals, nuclear receptors have begun to be studied in parasitic worms, where they are widely distributed and play key roles in governing metabolic and developmental transcriptional networks. One such nuclear receptor is DAF-12, which is required for normal nematode development, including the all-important infectious stage. Here we review the emerging literature that implicates DAF-12 and potentially other nuclear receptors as novel anthelmintic targets.

  8. Is Transthyretin a Regulator of Ubc9 SUMOylation?

    PubMed Central

    Kędracka–Krok, Sylwia; Sołtys, Katarzyna; Jankowska, Urszula; Hołubowicz, Rafał; Seliga, Justyna; Ożyhar, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Ageing and mutations of transthyretin (TTR), the thyroid hormones and retinol transporting protein lead to amyloidosis by destabilizing the structure of TTR. Because protein structure is regulated through posttranslational modifications, we investigated the Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO)ylation of TTR. We chose the widely used Ubc9 fusion-directed SUMOylation system, which is based on a fusion of the SUMOylation substrate of interest with Ubc9, a sole SUMO conjugating enzyme. Surprisingly, despite our presumptions, we found that Ubc9 fused to TTR was SUMOylated at a unique set of lysine residues. Three unknown SUMOylation sites of Ubc9—K154, K18 and K65—were revealed by mass spectrometry (MS). The previously reported SUMOylation at K49 of Ubc9 was also observed. SUMOylation of the lysine residues of TTR fused to Ubc9 was hardly detectable. However, non-fused TTR was SUMOylated via trans-SUMOylation by Ubc9 fused to TTR. Interestingly, mutating the catalytic residue of Ubc9 fused to TTR did not result in complete loss of the SUMOylation signal, suggesting that Ubc9 linked to TTR is directly cross-SUMOylated by the SUMO-activating enzyme E1. Ubc9, TTR or fusion proteins composed of TTR and Ubc9 specifically affected the global SUMOylation of cellular proteins. TTR or Ubc9 alone increased global SUMOylation, whereas concomitant presence of TTR and Ubc9 did not further increase the amount of high-molecular weight (HMW) SUMO conjugates. Our data suggest that TTR may influence the SUMOylation of Ubc9, thereby altering signalling pathways in the cell. PMID:27501389

  9. Medea SUMOylation restricts the signaling range of the Dpp morphogen in the Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed

    Miles, Wayne O; Jaffray, Ellis; Campbell, Susan G; Takeda, Shugaku; Bayston, Laura J; Basu, Sanjay P; Li, Mingfa; Raftery, Laurel A; Ashe, Mark P; Hay, Ronald T; Ashe, Hilary L

    2008-09-15

    Morphogens are secreted signaling molecules that form concentration gradients and control cell fate in developing tissues. During development, it is essential that morphogen range is strictly regulated in order for correct cell type specification to occur. One of the best characterized morphogens is Drosophila Decapentaplegic (Dpp), a BMP signaling molecule that patterns the dorsal ectoderm of the embryo by activating the Mad and Medea (Med) transcription factors. We demonstrate that there is a spatial and temporal expansion of the expression patterns of Dpp target genes in SUMO pathway mutant embryos. We identify Med as the primary SUMOylation target in the Dpp pathway, and show that failure to SUMOylate Med leads to the increased Dpp signaling range observed in the SUMO pathway mutant embryos. Med is SUMO modified in the nucleus, and we provide evidence that SUMOylation triggers Med nuclear export. Hence, Med SUMOylation provides a mechanism by which nuclei can continue to monitor the presence of extracellular Dpp signal to activate target gene expression for an appropriate duration. Overall, our results identify an unusual strategy for regulating morphogen range that, rather than impacting on the morphogen itself, targets an intracellular transducer.

  10. The CacyBP/SIP protein is sumoylated in neuroblastoma NB2a cells.

    PubMed

    Wasik, Urszula; Filipek, Anna

    2013-11-01

    The Calcyclin binding protein and Siah-1 interacting protein (CacyBP/SIP) protein is highly expressed in mammalian brain as well as in neuroblastoma NB2a cells and pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. This protein interacts with several targets such as cytoskeletal proteins or ERK1/2 kinase and seems to be involved in many cellular processes. In this work we examined a post-translational modification of CacyBP/SIP which might have an effect on its function. Since theoretical analysis of the amino acid sequence of CacyBP/SIP indicated several lysine residues which could potentially be sumoylated we checked experimentally whether this protein might be modified by SUMO attachment. We have shown that indeed CacyBP/SIP bound the E2 SUMO ligase, Ubc9, in neuroblastoma NB2a cell extract and was sumoylated in these cells. By fractionation of NB2a cell extract we have found that, contrary to the majority of SUMO-modified proteins, sumoylated CacyBP/SIP is present in the cytoplasmic and not in the nuclear fraction. We have also established that lysine 16 is the residue which undergoes sumoylation in the CacyBP/SIP protein.

  11. Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas: Opening Access to the Biology of Nuclear Receptor Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Becnel, Lauren B.; Darlington, Yolanda F.; Ochsner, Scott A.; Easton-Marks, Jeremy R.; Watkins, Christopher M.; McOwiti, Apollo; Kankanamge, Wasula H.; Wise, Michael W.; DeHart, Michael; Margolis, Ronald N.; McKenna, Neil J.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling pathways involving nuclear receptors (NRs), their ligands and coregulators, regulate tissue-specific transcriptomes in diverse processes, including development, metabolism, reproduction, the immune response and neuronal function, as well as in their associated pathologies. The Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA) is a Consortium focused around a Hub website (www.nursa.org) that annotates and integrates diverse ‘omics datasets originating from the published literature and NURSA-funded Data Source Projects (NDSPs). These datasets are then exposed to the scientific community on an Open Access basis through user-friendly data browsing and search interfaces. Here, we describe the redesign of the Hub, version 3.0, to deploy “Web 2.0” technologies and add richer, more diverse content. The Molecule Pages, which aggregate information relevant to NR signaling pathways from myriad external databases, have been enhanced to include resources for basic scientists, such as post-translational modification sites and targeting miRNAs, and for clinicians, such as clinical trials. A portal to NURSA’s Open Access, PubMed-indexed journal Nuclear Receptor Signaling has been added to facilitate manuscript submissions. Datasets and information on reagents generated by NDSPs are available, as is information concerning periodic new NDSP funding solicitations. Finally, the new website integrates the Transcriptomine analysis tool, which allows for mining of millions of richly annotated public transcriptomic data points in the field, providing an environment for dataset re-use and citation, bench data validation and hypothesis generation. We anticipate that this new release of the NURSA database will have tangible, long term benefits for both basic and clinical research in this field. PMID:26325041

  12. Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas: Opening Access to the Biology of Nuclear Receptor Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Becnel, Lauren B; Darlington, Yolanda F; Ochsner, Scott A; Easton-Marks, Jeremy R; Watkins, Christopher M; McOwiti, Apollo; Kankanamge, Wasula H; Wise, Michael W; DeHart, Michael; Margolis, Ronald N; McKenna, Neil J

    2015-01-01

    Signaling pathways involving nuclear receptors (NRs), their ligands and coregulators, regulate tissue-specific transcriptomes in diverse processes, including development, metabolism, reproduction, the immune response and neuronal function, as well as in their associated pathologies. The Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA) is a Consortium focused around a Hub website (www.nursa.org) that annotates and integrates diverse 'omics datasets originating from the published literature and NURSA-funded Data Source Projects (NDSPs). These datasets are then exposed to the scientific community on an Open Access basis through user-friendly data browsing and search interfaces. Here, we describe the redesign of the Hub, version 3.0, to deploy "Web 2.0" technologies and add richer, more diverse content. The Molecule Pages, which aggregate information relevant to NR signaling pathways from myriad external databases, have been enhanced to include resources for basic scientists, such as post-translational modification sites and targeting miRNAs, and for clinicians, such as clinical trials. A portal to NURSA's Open Access, PubMed-indexed journal Nuclear Receptor Signaling has been added to facilitate manuscript submissions. Datasets and information on reagents generated by NDSPs are available, as is information concerning periodic new NDSP funding solicitations. Finally, the new website integrates the Transcriptomine analysis tool, which allows for mining of millions of richly annotated public transcriptomic data points in the field, providing an environment for dataset re-use and citation, bench data validation and hypothesis generation. We anticipate that this new release of the NURSA database will have tangible, long term benefits for both basic and clinical research in this field.

  13. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor SHP Inhibits Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 and Retinoid X Receptor Transactivation: Two Mechanisms for Repression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon-Kwang; Dell, Helen; Dowhan, Dennis H.; Hadzopoulou-Cladaras, Margarita; Moore, David D.

    2000-01-01

    The orphan nuclear hormone receptor SHP interacts with a number of other nuclear hormone receptors and inhibits their transcriptional activity. Several mechanisms have been suggested to account for this inhibition. Here we show that SHP inhibits transactivation by the orphan receptor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF-4) and the retinoid X receptor (RXR) by at least two mechanisms. SHP interacts with the same HNF-4 surface recognized by transcriptional coactivators and competes with them for binding in vivo. The minimal SHP sequences previously found to be required for interaction with other receptors are sufficient for interaction with HNF-4, although deletion results indicate that additional C-terminal sequences are necessary for full binding and coactivator competition. These additional sequences include those associated with direct transcriptional repressor activity of SHP. SHP also competes with coactivators for binding to ligand-activated RXR, and based on the ligand-dependent interaction with other nuclear receptors, it is likely that coactivator competition is a general feature of SHP-mediated repression. The minimal receptor interaction domain of SHP is sufficient for full interaction with RXR, as previously described. This domain is also sufficient for full coactivator competition. Functionally, however, full inhibition of RXR transactivation requires the presence of the C-terminal repressor domain, with only weak inhibition associated with this receptor interaction domain. Overall, these results suggest that SHP represses nuclear hormone receptor-mediated transactivation via two separate steps: first by competition with coactivators and then by direct effects of its transcriptional repressor function. PMID:10594021

  14. SUMOylation by the E3 ligase TbSIZ1/PIAS1 positively regulates VSG expression in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    López-Farfán, Diana; Bart, Jean-Mathieu; Rojas-Barros, Domingo I; Navarro, Miguel

    2014-12-01

    Bloodstream form trypanosomes avoid the host immune response by switching the expression of their surface proteins between Variant Surface Glycoproteins (VSG), only one of which is expressed at any given time. Monoallelic transcription of the telomeric VSG Expression Site (ES) by RNA polymerase I (RNA pol I) localizes to a unique nuclear body named the ESB. Most work has focused on silencing mechanisms of inactive VSG-ESs, but the mechanisms involved in transcriptional activation of a single VSG-ES remain largely unknown. Here, we identify a highly SUMOylated focus (HSF) in the nucleus of the bloodstream form that partially colocalizes with the ESB and the active VSG-ES locus. SUMOylation of chromatin-associated proteins was enriched along the active VSG-ES transcriptional unit, in contrast to silent VSG-ES or rDNA, suggesting that it is a distinct feature of VSG-ES monoallelic expression. In addition, sequences upstream of the active VSG-ES promoter were highly enriched in SUMOylated proteins. We identified TbSIZ1/PIAS1 as the SUMO E3 ligase responsible for SUMOylation in the active VSG-ES chromatin. Reduction of SUMO-conjugated proteins by TbSIZ1 knockdown decreased the recruitment of RNA pol I to the VSG-ES and the VSG-ES-derived transcripts. Furthermore, cells depleted of SUMO conjugated proteins by TbUBC9 and TbSUMO knockdown confirmed the positive function of SUMO for VSG-ES expression. In addition, the largest subunit of RNA pol I TbRPA1 was SUMOylated in a TbSIZ-dependent manner. Our results show a positive mechanism associated with active VSG-ES expression via post-translational modification, and indicate that chromatin SUMOylation plays an important role in the regulation of VSG-ES. Thus, protein SUMOylation is linked to active gene expression in this protozoan parasite that diverged early in evolution.

  15. Studying Nuclear Receptor Complexes in the Cellular Environment.

    PubMed

    Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    The ligand-regulated structure and biochemistry of nuclear receptor complexes are commonly determined by in vitro studies of isolated receptors, cofactors, and their fragments. However, in the living cell, the complexes that form are governed not just by the relative affinities of isolated cofactors for the receptor but also by the cell-specific sequestration or concentration of subsets of competing or cooperating cofactors, receptors, and other effectors into distinct subcellular domains and/or their temporary diversion into other cellular activities. Most methods developed to understand nuclear receptor function in the cellular environment involve the direct tagging of the nuclear receptor or its cofactors with fluorescent proteins (FPs) and the tracking of those FP-tagged factors by fluorescence microscopy. One of those approaches, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy, quantifies the transfer of energy from a higher energy "donor" FP to a lower energy "acceptor" FP attached to a single protein or to interacting proteins. The amount of FRET is influenced by the ligand-induced changes in the proximities and orientations of the FPs within the tagged nuclear receptor complexes, which is an indicator of the structure of the complexes, and by the kinetics of the interaction between FP-tagged factors. Here, we provide a guide for parsing information about the structure and biochemistry of nuclear receptor complexes from FRET measurements in living cells.

  16. Hairless is a nuclear receptor corepressor essential for skin function

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    The activity of nuclear receptors is modulated by numerous coregulatory factors. Corepressors can either mediate the ability of nuclear receptors to repress transcription, or can inhibit transactivation by nuclear receptors. As we learn more about the mechanisms of transcriptional repression, the importance of repression by nuclear receptors in development and disease has become clear. The protein encoded by the mammalian Hairless (Hr) gene was shown to be a corepressor by virtue of its functional similarity to the well-established corepressors N-CoR and SMRT. Mutation of the Hr gene results in congenital hair loss in both mice and men. Investigation of Hairless function both in vitro and in mouse models in vivo has revealed a critical role in maintaining skin and hair by regulating the differentiation of epithelial stem cells, as well as a putative role in regulating gene expression via chromatin remodeling. PMID:20087431

  17. The association between nuclear receptors and ocular diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ke; Zou, Chang; Qin, Bo

    2017-02-07

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) are one of the most abundant transcription factors in the human cells. They regulate expression of genes via interactions with corresponding ligands, co-activators, and co-repressors. These molecular pathways play important roles in the development, cell differentiation, and physiologic and metabolic processes. Increasingly, targeting nuclear receptors is becoming a promising strategy for new drug development. The aim of this review is to discuss the association between nuclear receptors and eye development, and expand their role in various ocular diseases such as keratitis, cataract, glaucoma, uveitis, retinopathy, and ophthalmic tumors. Recent studies in this area are highlighted as well as future research directions and potential clinical applications. Finally, various strategies will be elucidated to inspire more targeted therapies for ocular diseases through the use of nuclear receptors.

  18. Identification of Gene Markers for Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Pregnane X Receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many environmentally-relevant chemicals and drugs activate the nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR). Activation of PXR in the mouse liver can lead to increases in liver weight in part through increased hepatocyte replication similar to chemicals that activate other nuclear ...

  19. Identification of Gene Markers for Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Pregnane X Receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many environmentally-relevant chemicals and drugs activate the nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR). Activation of PXR in the mouse liver can lead to increases in liver weight in part through increased hepatocyte replication similar to chemicals that activate other nuclear ...

  20. Intrinsic disorder in nuclear hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Krasowski, Matthew D; Reschly, Erica J; Ekins, Sean

    2008-10-01

    Many proteins possess intrinsic disorder (ID) and lack a rigid three-dimensional structure in at least part of their sequence. ID has been hypothesized to influence protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions. We calculated ID for nearly 400 vertebrate and invertebrate members of the biomedically important nuclear hormone receptor (NHR) superfamily, including all 48 known human NHRs. The predictions correctly identified regions in 20 of the 23 NHRs suggested as disordered based on published X-ray and NMR structures. Of the four major NHR domains (N-terminal domain, DNA-binding domain, D-domain, and ligand-binding domain), we found ID to be highest in the D-domain, a region of NHRs critical in DNA recognition and heterodimerization, coactivator/corepressor interactions and protein-protein interactions. ID in the D-domain and LBD was significantly higher in "hub" human NHRs that have 10 or more downstream proteins in their interaction networks compared to "non-hub" NHRs that interact with fewer than 10 downstream proteins. ID in the D-domain and LBD was also higher in classic, ligand-activated NHRs than in orphan, ligand-independent NHRs in human. The correlation between ID in human and mouse NHRs was high. Less correlation was found for ID between mammalian and non-mammalian vertebrate NHRs. For some invertebrate species, particularly sea squirts ( Ciona), marked differences were observed in ID between invertebrate NHRs and their vertebrate orthologs. Our results indicate that variability of ID within NHRs, particularly in the D-domain and LBD, is likely an important evolutionary force in shaping protein-protein interactions and NHR function. This information enables further understanding of these therapeutic targets.

  1. INTRINSIC DISORDER IN NUCLEAR HORMONE RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Krasowski, Matthew D.; Reschly, Erica J.; Ekins, Sean

    2009-01-01

    Many proteins possess intrinsic disorder (ID) and lack a rigid three-dimensional structure in at least part of their sequence. ID has been hypothesized to influence protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions. We calculated ID for nearly 400 vertebrate and invertebrate members of the biomedically important nuclear hormone receptor (NHR) superfamily, including all 48 known human NHRs. The predictions correctly identified regions in 20 of the 23 NHRs suggested as disordered based on published X-ray and NMR structures. Of the four major NHR domains (N-terminal domain, DNA-binding domain, D-domain, and ligand-binding domain), we found ID to be highest in the D-domain, a region of NHRs critical in DNA recognition and heterodimerization, coactivator/corepressor interactions and protein-protein interactions. ID in the D-domain and LBD was significantly higher in “hub” human NHRs that have 10 or more downstream proteins in their interaction networks compared to “non-hub” NHRs that interact with fewer than 10 downstream proteins. ID in the D-domain and LBD was also higher in classic, ligand-activated NHRs than in orphan, ligand-independent NHRs in human. The correlation between ID in human and mouse NHRs was high. Less correlation was found for ID between mammalian and non-mammalian vertebrate NHRs. For some invertebrate species, particularly sea squirts (Ciona), marked differences were observed in ID between invertebrate NHRs and their vertebrate orthologs. Our results indicate that variability of ID within NHRs, particularly in the D-domain and LBD, is likely an important evolutionary force in shaping protein-protein interactions and NHR function. This information enables further understanding of these therapeutic targets. PMID:18651760

  2. The Orphan Nuclear Receptors at Their 25th Year Reunion

    PubMed Central

    Mullican, Shannon E.; DiSpirito, Joanna R.; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2013-01-01

    The Nuclear Receptor superfamily includes many receptors identified based on their similarity to steroid hormone receptors but without a known ligand. The study of how these receptors are diversely regulated to interact with genomic regions to control a plethora of biological processes has provided critical insight into development, physiology and the molecular pathology of disease. Here we provide a compendium of these so-called Orphan Receptors, and focus on what has been learned about their modes of action, physiological functions, and therapeutic promise. PMID:24096517

  3. Alteration of FXR phosphorylation and sumoylation in liver in the development of adult catch-up growth.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiang; Zhang, Qiao; Zheng, Juan; Kong, Wen; Zhang, Hao-Hao; Zeng, Tian-Shu; Zhang, Jiao-Yue; Min, Jie; Wu, Chaodong; Chen, Lu-Lu

    2017-02-01

    Catch-up growth in adult, is increasingly recognized as an important causative factor for the extremely prevalent insulin resistance-related diseases especially in developing countries/territories. We aimed to investigate the alteration of bile acids level, phosphorylation and sumoylation of its interacting protein, bile acid receptor/farnesoid X receptor and their downstream signaling pathway, as well as insulin sensitivity and lipid profile in catch-up growth in adult rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated into four groups for two sampling points: caloric restriction group, catch-up growth in adult refed with normal chow and their normal chow controls for four or eight weeks (N4, N8 individually).We found that total serum bile acids and farnesoid X receptor phosphorylation increased without significant changes in farnesoid X receptor sumoylation and its downstream small heterodimer partner expression at the end of caloric restriction stage, while the visceral fat decreased and insulin resistance never occurred in these animals; After refeeding, total serum bile acids, farnesoid X receptor phosphorylation and sumoylation, as well as Cyp7a1, SREBP-1c mRNA levels were higher with significant decrease in small heterodimer partner expression, which is associated fat accumulation, and drastic insulin resistance in whole body and skeletal muscle. Our findings demonstrated that the fat accumulation and insulin resistance are associated with increases of bile acids, alteration of farnesoid X receptor phosphorylation, and sumoylation and its downstream signaling pathway. These changes of bile acids, farnesoid X receptor phosphorylation and sumoylation, as well as their downstream signaling might be of importance in the etiology of fat accumulation and insulin resistance in catch-up growth in adult.

  4. Identification of cell-specific targets of sumoylation during mouse spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yuxuan; Pollack, Daniel; Andrusier, Miriam; Levy, Avi; Callaway, Myrasol; Nieves, Edward; Reddi, Prabhakara; Vigodner, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings suggest diverse and potentially multiple roles of SUMO in testicular function and spermatogenesis. However, SUMO targets remain uncharacterized in the testis due to the complex multicellular nature of testicular tissue, the inability to maintain and manipulate spermatogenesis in vitro, and the technical challenges involved in identifying low-abundance endogenous SUMO targets. In this study, we performed cell-specific identification of sumoylated proteins using concentrated cell lysates prepared with de-sumoylation inhibitors from freshly purified spermatocytes and spermatids. One-hundred and twenty proteins were uniquely identified in the spermatocyte and/or spermatid fractions. The identified proteins are involved in the regulation of transcription, stress response, microRNA biogenesis, regulation of major enzymatic pathways, nuclear-cytoplasmic transport, cell cycle control, acrosome biogenesis, and other processes. Several proteins with important roles during spermatogenesis were chosen for further characterization by co-immunoprecipitation, co-localization and in-vitro sumoylation studies. GPS-SUMO software was used to identify consensus and non-consensus sumoylation sites within the amino acid sequences of the proteins. The analyses confirmed the cell-specific sumoylation and/or SUMO interaction of several novel, previously uncharacterized SUMO targets such as CDK1, RNAP II, CDC5, MILI, DDX4, TDP-43 and STK31. Furthermore, several proteins that were previously identified as SUMO targets in somatic cells (e.g., KAP1, MDC1) were identified as SUMO targets in germ cells. Many of these proteins have a unique role in spermatogenesis and during meiotic progression. This research opens a novel avenue for further studies of SUMO at the level of individual targets. PMID:26701181

  5. Identification of cell-specific targets of sumoylation during mouse spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuxuan; Pollack, Daniel; Andrusier, Miriam; Levy, Avi; Callaway, Myrasol; Nieves, Edward; Reddi, Prabhakara; Vigodner, Margarita

    2016-02-01

    Recent findings suggest diverse and potentially multiple roles of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) in testicular function and spermatogenesis. However, SUMO targets remain uncharacterized in the testis due to the complex multicellular nature of testicular tissue, the inability to maintain and manipulate spermatogenesis in vitro, and the technical challenges involved in identifying low-abundance endogenous SUMO targets. In this study, we performed cell-specific identification of sumoylated proteins using concentrated cell lysates prepared with de-sumoylation inhibitors from freshly purified spermatocytes and spermatids. One-hundred and twenty proteins were uniquely identified in the spermatocyte and/or spermatid fractions. The identified proteins are involved in the regulation of transcription, stress response, microRNA biogenesis, regulation of major enzymatic pathways, nuclear-cytoplasmic transport, cell-cycle control, acrosome biogenesis, and other processes. Several proteins with important roles during spermatogenesis were chosen for further characterization by co-immunoprecipitation, co-localization, and in vitro sumoylation studies. GPS-SUMO Software was used to identify consensus and non-consensus sumoylation sites within the amino acid sequences of the proteins. The analyses confirmed the cell-specific sumoylation and/or SUMO interaction of several novel, previously uncharacterized SUMO targets such as CDK1, RNAP II, CDC5, MILI, DDX4, TDP-43, and STK31. Furthermore, several proteins that were previously identified as SUMO targets in somatic cells (KAP1 and MDC1) were identified as SUMO targets in germ cells. Many of these proteins have a unique role in spermatogenesis and during meiotic progression. This research opens a novel avenue for further studies of SUMO at the level of individual targets.

  6. Dynamic regulation of Drosophila nuclear receptor activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Palanker, Laura; Necakov, Aleksandar S.; Sampson, Heidi M.; Ni, Ruoyu; Hu, Chun; Thummel, Carl S.; Krause, Henry M.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are a large family of transcription factors that play major roles in development, metamorphosis, metabolism and disease. To determine how, where and when nuclear receptors are regulated by small chemical ligands and/or protein partners, we have used a ‘ligand sensor’ system to visualize spatial activity patterns for each of the 18 Drosophila nuclear receptors in live developing animals. Transgenic lines were established that express the ligand binding domain of each nuclear receptor fused to the DNA-binding domain of yeast GAL4. When combined with a GAL4-responsive reporter gene, the fusion proteins show tissue- and stage-specific patterns of activation. We show that these responses accurately reflect the presence of endogenous and exogenously added hormone, and that they can be modulated by nuclear receptor partner proteins. The amnioserosa, yolk, midgut and fat body, which play major roles in lipid storage, metabolism and developmental timing, were identified as frequent sites of nuclear receptor activity. We also see dynamic changes in activation that are indicative of sweeping changes in ligand and/or co-factor production. The screening of a small compound library using this system identified the angular psoralen angelicin and the insect growth regulator fenoxycarb as activators of the Ultraspiracle (USP) ligand-binding domain. These results demonstrate the utility of this system for the functional dissection of nuclear receptor pathways and for the development of new receptor agonists and antagonists that can be used to modulate metabolism and disease and to develop more effective means of insect control. PMID:16914501

  7. IRTKS negatively regulates antiviral immunity through PCBP2 sumoylation-mediated MAVS degradation

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Pengyan; Wang, Shuo; Xiong, Zhen; Ye, Buqing; Huang, Li-Yu; Han, Ze-Guang; Fan, Zusen

    2015-01-01

    RNA virus infection is recognized by the RIG-I family of receptors that activate the mitochondrial adaptor MAVS, leading to the clearance of viruses. Antiviral signalling activation requires strict modulation to avoid damage to the host from exacerbated inflammation. Insulin receptor tyrosine kinase substrate (IRTKS) participates in actin bundling and insulin signalling and its deficiency causes insulin resistance. However, whether IRTKS is involved in the regulation of innate immunity remains elusive. Here we show that IRTKS deficiency causes enhanced innate immune responses against RNA viruses. IRTKS-mediated suppression of antiviral responses depends on the RIG-I-MAVS signalling pathway. IRTKS recruits the E2 ligase Ubc9 to sumoylate PCBP2 in the nucleus, which causes its cytoplasmic translocation during viral infection. The sumoylated PCBP2 associates with MAVS to initiate its degradation, leading to downregulation of antiviral responses. Thus, IRTKS functions as a negative modulator of excessive inflammation. PMID:26348439

  8. Affinity labeling of rat liver thyroid hormone nuclear receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Nikodem, V M; Cheng, S Y; Rall, J E

    1980-01-01

    The thyroid hormone receptor from rat liver nuclei has been covalently labeled with the N-bromoacetyl derivatives of L-thyroxine (T4) and 3,3',5-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3). Displacement binding studies showed that, in the presence of 100-fold molar excess of unlabeled N-bromoacetyl-T3 or T4, binding of [125I]T3 or [125I]T4 was nearly totally inhibited. Heat inactivation of the receptor (55 degrees C for 15 min) resulted in parallel losses in the binding of T3 (95%) and N-bromoacetyl-T3 (93%). These results indicated that T3 and T4 and their bromoacetyl derivatives compete for the same binding site. The nuclear receptor showed identical behavior in high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) whether bound to T3 or T4 or covalently labeled with their bromoacetyl derivatives. HPLC provided a single-step 100-fold purification of the nuclear receptor. Na-DodSO4 gel electrophoresis of the nuclear receptor labeled with N-bromoacetyl derivatives of [125I]T3 or [125I]T4 showed one major radioactive component with a molecular weight of 56,000. Furthermore, in the absence of denaturant, the nuclear receptor either bound to [125I]T3 or covalently labeled with N-bromoacetyl-[125I]T3 showed identical mobility. These results suggested that the nuclear receptor is a single polypeptide chain and binds either T3 or T4. Nuclear receptors covalently linked with N-bromoacetyl derivatives of [125I]T3 or [125I]T4 may be useful as a marker for the preparative purification of receptor. PMID:6261237

  9. [Mechanism for subcellular localization of nuclear receptor CAR].

    PubMed

    Kanno, Yuichiro; Inouye, Yoshio

    2011-03-01

    Animals including human beings have defense mechanisms against the toxicity of xenobiotics such as medicinal compounds and environmental pollutants. Receptor-type transcriptional factors, such as aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR), play important roles in the defense against xenobiotic toxicities. In the absence of stimuli, these receptors are distributed predominantly in the cytoplasmic compartment. Following xenobiotic stimuli, receptors translocate into the nucleus and transactivate its target genes. However, the exogenously expressed CAR translocates spontaneously into the nucleus in immortal cells. Previously, we identified subcellular localization signals in rat CAR: nuclear localization signal (NLS), nuclear export signal (NES) and cytoplasmic retention region (CRR). Lack of CRR function might be responsible for the spontaneous nuclear accumulation of CAR in immortal cells. Further, the nuclear import of CAR is regulated by the importin-Ran system, which is required for maintaining an intact microtubule network. Clarifying the mechanisms underlying the nuclear translocation of CAR would be useful for the establishment of novel assay systems for the screening of ligands and activators of CAR using immortal cells without sacrificing animals.

  10. In Vivo Imaging of Nuclear Receptor Transcriptional Activity.

    PubMed

    Dart, D Alwyn; Bevan, Charlotte L

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptors drive key processes during development, reproduction, metabolism, and disease. In order to understand and analyze, as well as manipulate, their actions it is imperative that we are able to study them in whole animals and in a spatiotemporal manner. The increasing repertoire of transgenic animals, expressing reporter genes driven by a specific nuclear receptor, enables us to do this. Use of luciferase reporter genes is the method of choice of many researchers as it is well tolerated, relatively easy to use, and robust. Further, luciferase lends itself to the process as it can penetrate tissue and can be manipulated to degrade rapidly thus allowing a dynamic response. However, limited resolution, lack of quantitation, and the largely two-dimensional images acquired make it desirable to support results using ex vivo imaging and enzymatic and/or immunohistochemical analysis of dissected tissue. As well as enabling the visualization of nuclear receptor signaling in wild-type animals, crossing these mouse models with models of disease will provide invaluable information on how such signaling is dysregulated during disease progression, and how we may manipulate nuclear receptor signaling in therapy. The use of in vivo imaging therefore provides the power to determine where and when in development, aging, and disease nuclear receptors are active and how ligands or receptor modulators affect this.

  11. Rational discovery of novel nuclear hormone receptor antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schapira, Matthieu; Raaka, Bruce M.; Samuels, Herbert H.; Abagyan, Ruben

    2000-02-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) are potential targets for therapeutic approaches to many clinical conditions, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological diseases. The crystal structure of the ligand binding domain of agonist-bound NRs enables the design of compounds with agonist activity. However, with the exception of the human estrogen receptor-, the lack of antagonist-bound "inactive" receptor structures hinders the rational design of receptor antagonists. In this study, we present a strategy for designing such antagonists. We constructed a model of the inactive conformation of human retinoic acid receptor- by using information derived from antagonist-bound estrogen receptor-α and applied a computer-based virtual screening algorithm to identify retinoic acid receptor antagonists. Thus, the currently available crystal structures of NRs may be used for the rational design of antagonists, which could lead to the development of novel drugs for a variety of diseases.

  12. Regulation of germ cell function by SUMOylation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Amanda; Pangas, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Oogenesis and spermatogenesis are tightly regulated complex processes that are critical for fertility function. Germ cells undergo meiosis to generate haploid cells necessary for reproduction. Errors in meiosis, including the generation of chromosomal abnormalities, can result in reproductive defects and infertility. Meiotic proteins are regulated by post-translational modifications including SUMOylation, the covalent attachment of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteins. Here, we review the role of SUMO proteins in controlling germ cell development and maturation based on recent findings from mouse models. Several studies have characterized the localization of SUMO proteins in male and female germ cells. However, a deeper understanding of how SUMOylation regulates proteins with essential roles in oogenesis and spermatogenesis will provide useful insight into the underlying mechanisms of germ cell development and fertility. PMID:26374733

  13. Pan-cancer analyses of the nuclear receptor superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Long, Mark D.; Campbell, Moray J.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NR) act as an integrated conduit for environmental and hormonal signals to govern genomic responses, which relate to cell fate decisions. We review how their integrated actions with each other, shared co-factors and other transcription factors are disrupted in cancer. Steroid hormone nuclear receptors are oncogenic drivers in breast and prostate cancer and blockade of signaling is a major therapeutic goal. By contrast to blockade of receptors, in other cancers enhanced receptor function is attractive, as illustrated initially with targeting of retinoic acid receptors in leukemia. In the post-genomic era large consortia, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas, have developed a remarkable volume of genomic data with which to examine multiple aspects of nuclear receptor status in a pan-cancer manner. Therefore to extend the review of NR function we have also undertaken bioinformatics analyses of NR expression in over 3000 tumors, spread across six different tumor types (bladder, breast, colon, head and neck, liver and prostate). Specifically, to ask how the NR expression was distorted (altered expression, mutation and CNV) we have applied bootstrapping approaches to simulate data for comparison, and also compared these NR findings to 12 other transcription factor families. Nuclear receptors were uniquely and uniformly downregulated across all six tumor types, more than predicted by chance. These approaches also revealed that each tumor type had a specific NR expression profile but these were most similar between breast and prostate cancer. Some NRs were down-regulated in at least five tumor types (e.g. NR3C2/MR and NR5A2/LRH-1)) whereas others were uniquely down-regulated in one tumor (e.g. NR1B3/RARG). The downregulation was not driven by copy number variation or mutation and epigenetic mechanisms maybe responsible for the altered nuclear receptor expression. PMID:27200367

  14. Importance of the regulation of nuclear receptor degradation.

    PubMed

    Dennis, A P; Haq, R U; Nawaz, Z

    2001-08-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) represent a superfamily of structurally related ligand-activated transcription factors, which regulate diverse biological activities like growth, development, and homeostasis. Recently, it has been demonstrated that certain members of the NHR superfamily are degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in a ligand-dependent manner. Though the signal for the down-regulation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is not yet known, phosphorylation at specific amino acid residues or coactivator binding to receptors could lead to their degradation by the 26S proteasome. Activation and degradation seems to be an engineered cyclic mechanism, which provides tight control over diverse cellular processes. The degradation process involves extensive loss of proteins and requires expenditure of cellular ATP. That seems to be inevitable for a more important aim, that is efficient and appropriate regulation of transcription. Down-regulation of receptors would lead to an attenuated transcriptional response because the number of receptor molecules available to activate transcription would decrease over time. One of the obvious reasons for down-regulating NHRs thus seems to be to prevent the cell from overstimulation by the hormones or other activating signals. Nuclear receptor turnover may also reset the transcriptional apparatus in preparation for a subsequent response. Since inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome degradation pathway disturbs the transcriptional activitity of some of the nuclear receptors such as estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptors, it is also possible that the degradation of NHRs may enable recycling of components of receptor-cofactor complexes and general transcriptional machinary. Understanding the mechanism of nuclear hormone receptor degradation and its relation to transcription may lead to novel insights of therapuetic intervention.

  15. SUMOylation-disrupting WAS mutation converts WASp from a transcriptional activator to a repressor of NF-κB response genes in T cells.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Koustav; Sadhukhan, Sanjoy; Han, Seong-Su; Vyas, Yatin M

    2015-10-01

    In Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), immunodeficiency and autoimmunity often comanifest, yet how WAS mutations misregulate chromatin-signaling in Thelper (TH) cells favoring development of auto-inflammation over protective immunity is unclear. Previously, we identified an essential promoter-specific, coactivator role of nuclear-WASp in TH1 gene transcription. Here we identify small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO)ylation as a novel posttranslational modification of WASp, impairment of which converts nuclear-WASp from a transcriptional coactivator to a corepressor of nuclear factor (NF)-κB response genes in human (TH)1-differentiating cells. V75M, one of many disease-causing mutations occurring in SUMO*motif (72-ψψψψKDxxxxSY-83) of WASp, compromises WASp-SUMOylation, associates with COMMD1 to attenuate NF-κB signaling, and recruits histone deacetylases-6 (HDAC6) to p300-marked promoters of NF-κB response genes that pattern immunity but not inflammation. Consequently, proteins mediating adaptive immunity (IFNG, STAT1, TLR1) are deficient, whereas those mediating auto-inflammation (GM-CSF, TNFAIP2, IL-1β) are paradoxically increased in TH1 cells expressing SUMOylation-deficient WASp. Moreover, SUMOylation-deficient WASp favors ectopic development of the TH17-like phenotype (↑IL17A, IL21, IL22, IL23R, RORC, and CSF2) under TH1-skewing conditions, suggesting a role for WASp in modulating TH1/TH17 plasticity. Notably, pan-histone deacetylase inhibitors lift promoter-specific repression imposed by SUMOylation-deficient WASp and restore misregulated gene expression. Our findings uncovering a SUMOylation-based mechanism controlling WASp's dichotomous roles in transcription may have implications for personalized therapy for patients carrying mutations that perturb WASp-SUMOylation.

  16. SUMOylation-disrupting WAS mutation converts WASp from a transcriptional activator to a repressor of NF-κB response genes in T cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Koustav; Sadhukhan, Sanjoy; Han, Seong-Su

    2015-01-01

    In Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), immunodeficiency and autoimmunity often comanifest, yet how WAS mutations misregulate chromatin-signaling in Thelper (TH) cells favoring development of auto-inflammation over protective immunity is unclear. Previously, we identified an essential promoter-specific, coactivator role of nuclear-WASp in TH1 gene transcription. Here we identify small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO)ylation as a novel posttranslational modification of WASp, impairment of which converts nuclear-WASp from a transcriptional coactivator to a corepressor of nuclear factor (NF)-κB response genes in human (TH)1-differentiating cells. V75M, one of many disease-causing mutations occurring in SUMO*motif (72-ψψψψKDxxxxSY-83) of WASp, compromises WASp-SUMOylation, associates with COMMD1 to attenuate NF-κB signaling, and recruits histone deacetylases-6 (HDAC6) to p300-marked promoters of NF-κB response genes that pattern immunity but not inflammation. Consequently, proteins mediating adaptive immunity (IFNG, STAT1, TLR1) are deficient, whereas those mediating auto-inflammation (GM-CSF, TNFAIP2, IL-1β) are paradoxically increased in TH1 cells expressing SUMOylation-deficient WASp. Moreover, SUMOylation-deficient WASp favors ectopic development of the TH17-like phenotype (↑IL17A, IL21, IL22, IL23R, RORC, and CSF2) under TH1-skewing conditions, suggesting a role for WASp in modulating TH1/TH17 plasticity. Notably, pan-histone deacetylase inhibitors lift promoter-specific repression imposed by SUMOylation-deficient WASp and restore misregulated gene expression. Our findings uncovering a SUMOylation-based mechanism controlling WASp’s dichotomous roles in transcription may have implications for personalized therapy for patients carrying mutations that perturb WASp-SUMOylation. PMID:26261240

  17. Cardiac nuclear receptors: architects of mitochondrial structure and function.

    PubMed

    Vega, Rick B; Kelly, Daniel P

    2017-04-03

    The adult heart is uniquely designed and equipped to provide a continuous supply of energy in the form of ATP to support persistent contractile function. This high-capacity energy transduction system is the result of a remarkable surge in mitochondrial biogenesis and maturation during the fetal-to-adult transition in cardiac development. Substantial evidence indicates that nuclear receptor signaling is integral to dynamic changes in the cardiac mitochondrial phenotype in response to developmental cues, in response to diverse postnatal physiologic conditions, and in disease states such as heart failure. A subset of cardiac-enriched nuclear receptors serve to match mitochondrial fuel preferences and capacity for ATP production with changing energy demands of the heart. In this Review, we describe the role of specific nuclear receptors and their coregulators in the dynamic control of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism in the normal and diseased heart.

  18. Emerging roles of sumoylation in the regulation of actin, microtubules, intermediate filaments, and septins

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Annabel; Greenlee, Matt; Matts, Jessica; Kline, Jake; Davis, Kayla J.

    2015-01-01

    Sumoylation is a powerful regulatory system that controls many of the critical processes in the cell, including DNA repair, transcriptional regulation, nuclear transport, and DNA replication. Recently, new functions for SUMO have begun to emerge. SUMO is covalently attached to components of each of the four major cytoskeletal networks, including microtubule‐associated proteins, septins, and intermediate filaments, in addition to nuclear actin and actin‐regulatory proteins. However, knowledge of the mechanisms by which this signal transduction system controls the cytoskeleton is still in its infancy. One story that is beginning to unfold is that SUMO may regulate the microtubule motor protein dynein by modification of its adaptor Lis1. In other instances, cytoskeletal elements can both bind to SUMO non‐covalently and also be conjugated by it. The molecular mechanisms for many of these new functions are not yet clear, but are under active investigation. One emerging model links the function of MAP sumoylation to protein degradation through SUMO‐targeted ubiquitin ligases, also known as STUbL enzymes. Other possible functions for cytoskeletal sumoylation are also discussed. © 2015 The Authors. Cytoskeleton Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26033929

  19. Nuclear transportation of exogenous epidermal growth factor receptor and androgen receptor via extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Read, Jolene; Ingram, Alistair; Al Saleh, Hassan A; Platko, Khrystyna; Gabriel, Kathleen; Kapoor, Anil; Pinthus, Jehonathan; Majeed, Fadwa; Qureshi, Talha; Al-Nedawi, Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays a central role in the progression of several human malignancies. Although EGFR is a membrane receptor, it undergoes nuclear translocation, where it has a distinct signalling pathway. Herein, we report a novel mechanism by which cancer cells can directly transport EGFR to the nucleus of other cells via extracellular vesicles (EVs). The transported receptor is active and stimulates the nuclear EGFR pathways. Interestingly, the translocation of EGFR via EVs occurs independently of the nuclear localisation sequence that is required for nuclear translocation of endogenous EGFR. Also, we found that the mutant receptor EGFRvIII could be transported to the nucleus of other cells via EVs. To assess the role of EVs in the regulation of an actual nuclear receptor, we studied the regulation of androgen receptor (AR). We found that full-length AR and mutant variant ARv7 are secreted in EVs derived from prostate cancer cell lines and could be transported to the nucleus of AR-null cells. The EV-derived AR was able to bind the androgen-responsive promoter region of prostate specific antigen, and recruit RNA Pol II, an indication of active transcription. The nuclear-translocated AR via EVs enhanced the proliferation of acceptor cells in the absence of androgen. Finally, we provide evidence that nuclear localisation of AR could occur in vivo via orthotopically-injected EVs in male SCID mice prostate glands. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing the nuclear translocation of nuclear receptors via EVs, which significantly extends the role of EVs as paracrine transcriptional regulators. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Emerging functional roles of nuclear receptors in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Doan, Tram B; Graham, J Dinny; Clarke, Christine L

    2017-04-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) have been targets of intensive drug development for decades due to their roles as key regulators of multiple developmental, physiological and disease processes. In breast cancer, expression of the estrogen and progesterone receptor remains clinically important in predicting prognosis and determining therapeutic strategies. More recently, there is growing evidence supporting the involvement of multiple nuclear receptors other than the estrogen and progesterone receptors, in the regulation of various processes important to the initiation and progression of breast cancer. We review new insights into the mechanisms of action of NRs made possible by recent advances in genomic technologies and focus on the emerging functional roles of NRs in breast cancer biology, including their involvement in circadian regulation, metabolic reprogramming and breast cancer migration and metastasis.

  1. Elevated copper impairs hepatic nuclear receptor function in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wooton-Kee, Clavia Ruth; Jain, Ajay K; Wagner, Martin; Grusak, Michael A; Finegold, Milton J; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Moore, David D

    2015-09-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in accumulation of copper in the liver as a consequence of mutations in the gene encoding the copper-transporting P-type ATPase (ATP7B). WD is a chronic liver disorder, and individuals with the disease present with a variety of complications, including steatosis, cholestasis, cirrhosis, and liver failure. Similar to patients with WD, Atp7b⁻/⁻ mice have markedly elevated levels of hepatic copper and liver pathology. Previous studies have demonstrated that replacement of zinc in the DNA-binding domain of the estrogen receptor (ER) with copper disrupts specific binding to DNA response elements. Here, we found decreased binding of the nuclear receptors FXR, RXR, HNF4α, and LRH-1 to promoter response elements and decreased mRNA expression of nuclear receptor target genes in Atp7b⁻/⁻ mice, as well as in adult and pediatric WD patients. Excessive hepatic copper has been described in progressive familial cholestasis (PFIC), and we found that similar to individuals with WD, patients with PFIC2 or PFIC3 who have clinically elevated hepatic copper levels exhibit impaired nuclear receptor activity. Together, these data demonstrate that copper-mediated nuclear receptor dysfunction disrupts liver function in WD and potentially in other disorders associated with increased hepatic copper levels.

  2. Nuclear tristetraprolin acts as a corepressor of multiple steroid nuclear receptors in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Barrios-García, Tonatiuh; Gómez-Romero, Vania; Tecalco-Cruz, Ángeles; Valadéz-Graham, Viviana; León-Del-Río, Alfonso

    2016-06-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is a 34-kDa, zinc finger-containing factor that in mammalian cells acts as a tumor suppressor protein through two different mechanisms. In the cytoplasm TTP promotes the decay of hundreds of mRNAs encoding cell factors involved in inflammation, tissue invasion, and metastasis. In the cell nucleus TTP has been identified as a transcriptional corepressor of the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), which has been associated to the development and progression of the majority of breast cancer tumors. In this work we report that nuclear TTP modulates the transactivation activity of progesterone receptor (PR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and androgen receptor (AR). In recent years these steroid nuclear receptors have been shown to be of clinical and therapeutical relevance in breast cancer. The functional association between TTP and steroid nuclear receptors is supported by the finding that TTP physically interacts with ERα, PR, GR and AR in vivo. We also show that TTP overexpression attenuates the transactivation of all the steroid nuclear receptors tested. In contrast, siRNA-mediated reduction of endogenous TTP expression in MCF-7 cells produced an increase in the transcriptional activities of ERα, PR, GR and AR. Taken together, these results suggest that the function of nuclear TTP in breast cancer cells is to act as a corepressor of ERα, PR, GR and AR. We propose that the reduction of TTP expression observed in different types of breast cancer tumors may contribute to the development of this disease by producing a dysregulation of the transactivation activity of multiple steroid nuclear receptors.

  3. Glucocorticoid-induced tethered transrepression requires SUMOylation of GR and formation of a SUMO-SMRT/NCoR1-HDAC3 repressing complex

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Guoqiang; Ganti, Krishna Priya; Chambon, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Upon binding of a glucocorticoid (GC), the GC receptor (GR) can exert one of three transcriptional regulatory functions. We recently reported that SUMOylation of the GR at position K293 in humans (K310 in mice) within the N-terminal domain is indispensable for GC-induced evolutionary conserved inverted repeated negative GC response element (IR nGRE)-mediated direct transrepression. We now demonstrate that the integrity of this GR SUMOylation site is mandatory for the formation of a GR-small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs)-SMRT/NCoR1-HDAC3 repressing complex, which is indispensable for NF-κB/AP1-mediated GC-induced tethered indirect transrepression in vitro. Using GR K310R mutant mice or mice containing the N-terminal truncated GR isoform GRα-D3 lacking the K310 SUMOylation site, revealed a more severe skin inflammation than in WT mice. Importantly, cotreatment with dexamethasone (Dex) could not efficiently suppress a 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)–induced skin inflammation in these mutant mice, whereas it was clearly decreased in WT mice. In addition, in mice selectively ablated in skin keratinocytes for either nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCoR1)/silencing mediator for retinoid or thyroid-hormone receptors (SMRT) corepressors or histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), Dex-induced tethered transrepression and the formation of a repressing complex on DNA-bound NF-κB/AP1 were impaired. We previously suggested that GR ligands that would lack both (+)GRE-mediated transactivation and IR nGRE-mediated direct transrepression activities of GCs may preferentially exert the therapeutically beneficial GC antiinflammatory properties. Interestingly, we now identified a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory selective GR agonist (SEGRA) that selectively lacks both Dex-induced (+)GRE-mediated transactivation and IR nGRE-mediated direct transrepression functions, while still exerting a tethered indirect transrepression activity and could therefore be clinically lesser

  4. SUMOylated IRF-1 shows oncogenic potential by mimicking IRF-2

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sun-Mi; Chae, Myounghee; Kim, Bo-Kyoung; Seo, Taegun; Jang, Ik-Soon; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kim, Il-Chul; Lee, Je-Ho; Park, Junsoo

    2010-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) is an interferon-induced transcriptional activator that suppresses tumors by impeding cell proliferation. Recently, we demonstrated that the level of SUMOylated IRF-1 is elevated in tumor cells, and that SUMOylation of IRF-1 attenuates its tumor-suppressive function. Here we report that SUMOylated IRF-1 mimics IRF-2, an antagonistic repressor, and shows oncogenic potential. To demonstrate the role of SUMOylated IRF-1 in tumorigenesis, we used SUMO-IRF-1 recombinant protein. Stable expression of SUMO-IRF-1 in NIH3T3 cells resulted in focus formation and anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. Inoculation of SUMO-IRF-1-transfected cells into athymic nude mice resulted in tumor formation and infiltration of adipose tissues. Finally, we demonstrated that SUMO-IRF-1 transforms NIH3T3 cells in a dose-dependent manner suggesting that SUMOylated IRF-1 may act as an oncogenic protein in tumor cells.

  5. Detection of Protein SUMOylation In Situ by Proximity Ligation Assays.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Umut; Jollivet, Florence; Berthier, Caroline; de Thé, Hugues; Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Sumoylation is a posttranslational process essential for life and concerns a growing number of crucial proteins. Understanding the influence of this phenomenon on individual proteins or on cellular pathways in which they function has become an intense area of research. A critical step in studying protein sumoylation is to detect sumoylated forms of a particular protein. This has proven to be a challenging task for a number of reasons, especially in the case of endogenous proteins and in vivo studies or when studying rare cells such as stem cells. Proximity ligation assays that allow detection of closely interacting protein partners can be adapted for initial detection of endogenous sumoylation or ubiquitination in a rapid, ultrasensitive, and cheap manner. In addition, modified forms of a given protein can be detected in situ in various cellular compartments. Finally, the flexibility of this technique may allow rapid screening of drugs and stress signals that may modulate protein sumoylation.

  6. Orphan Nuclear Receptors as Targets for Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Subhajit

    2012-01-01

    Orphan nuclear receptors regulate diverse biological processes. These important molecules are ligand-activated transcription factors that act as natural sensors for a wide range of steroid hormones and xenobiotic ligands. Because of their importance in regulating various novel signaling pathways, recent research has focused on identifying xenobiotics targeting these receptors for the treatment of multiple human diseases. In this review, we will highlight these receptors in several physiologic and pathophysiologic actions and demonstrate how their functions can be exploited for the successful development of newer drugs. PMID:20372994

  7. Review: Receptor Targeted Nuclear Imaging of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dalm, Simone U.; Verzijlbergen, John Fred; De Jong, Marion

    2017-01-01

    Receptor targeted nuclear imaging directed against molecular markers overexpressed on breast cancer (BC) cells offers a sensitive and specific method for BC imaging. Currently, a few targets such as estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), somatostatin receptor (SSTR), and the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) are being investigated for this purpose. Expression of these targets is BC subtype dependent and information that can be gained from lesion visualization is dependent on the target; ER-targeting radiotracers, e.g., can be used to monitor response to anti-estrogen treatment. Here we give an overview of the studies currently under investigation for receptor targeted nuclear imaging of BC. Main findings of imaging studies are summarized and (potential) purposes of lesion visualization by targeting these molecular markers are discussed. Since BC is a very heterogeneous disease and molecular target expression can vary per subtype, but also during disease progression or under influence of treatment, radiotracers for selected imaging purposes should be chosen carefully. PMID:28134770

  8. Understanding nuclear receptor form and function using structural biology.

    PubMed

    Rastinejad, Fraydoon; Huang, Pengxiang; Chandra, Vikas; Khorasanizadeh, Sepideh

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a major transcription factor family whose members selectively bind small-molecule lipophilic ligands and transduce those signals into specific changes in gene programs. For over two decades, structural biology efforts were focused exclusively on the individual ligand-binding domains (LBDs) or DNA-binding domains of NRs. These analyses revealed the basis for both ligand and DNA binding and also revealed receptor conformations representing both the activated and repressed states. Additionally, crystallographic studies explained how NR LBD surfaces recognize discrete portions of transcriptional coregulators. The many structural snapshots of LBDs have also guided the development of synthetic ligands with therapeutic potential. Yet, the exclusive structural focus on isolated NR domains has made it difficult to conceptualize how all the NR polypeptide segments are coordinated physically and functionally in the context of receptor quaternary architectures. Newly emerged crystal structures of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ-retinoid X receptor α (PPARγ-RXRα) heterodimer and hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4α homodimer have recently revealed the higher order organizations of these receptor complexes on DNA, as well as the complexity and uniqueness of their domain-domain interfaces. These emerging structural advances promise to better explain how signals in one domain can be allosterically transmitted to distal receptor domains, also providing much better frameworks for guiding future drug discovery efforts.

  9. Review: Receptor Targeted Nuclear Imaging of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dalm, Simone U; Verzijlbergen, John Fred; De Jong, Marion

    2017-01-26

    Receptor targeted nuclear imaging directed against molecular markers overexpressed on breast cancer (BC) cells offers a sensitive and specific method for BC imaging. Currently, a few targets such as estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), somatostatin receptor (SSTR), and the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) are being investigated for this purpose. Expression of these targets is BC subtype dependent and information that can be gained from lesion visualization is dependent on the target; ER-targeting radiotracers, e.g., can be used to monitor response to anti-estrogen treatment. Here we give an overview of the studies currently under investigation for receptor targeted nuclear imaging of BC. Main findings of imaging studies are summarized and (potential) purposes of lesion visualization by targeting these molecular markers are discussed. Since BC is a very heterogeneous disease and molecular target expression can vary per subtype, but also during disease progression or under influence of treatment, radiotracers for selected imaging purposes should be chosen carefully.

  10. Structures and regulation of non-X orphan nuclear receptors: A retinoid hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Xiaoyong; Zhou, X Edward; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear receptors are defined as a family of ligand regulated transcription factors [1-6]. While this definition reflects that ligand binding is a key property of nuclear receptors, it is still a heated subject of debate if all the nuclear receptors (48 human members) can bind ligands (ligands referred here to both physiological and synthetic ligands). Recent studies in nuclear receptor structure biology and pharmacology have undoubtedly increased our knowledge of nuclear receptor functions and their regulation. As a result, they point to new avenues for the discovery and development of nuclear receptor regulators, including nuclear receptor ligands. Here we review the recent literature on orphan nuclear receptor structural analysis and ligand identification, particularly on the orphan nuclear receptors that do not heterodimerize with retinoid X receptors, which we term as non-X orphan receptors. We also propose a speculative "retinoid hypothesis" for a subset of non-X orphan nuclear receptors, which we hope to help shed light on orphan nuclear receptor biology and drug discovery. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Orphan Nuclear Receptors'.

  11. Nuclear Receptor Activity and Liver Cancer Lesion Progression

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that control diverse cellular processes. Chronic stimulation of some NRs is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. We explored this question using human CAR, PXR, PPARα,...

  12. Autoinduction of nuclear hormone receptors during metamorphosis and its significance.

    PubMed

    Tata, J R

    2000-01-01

    Metamorphosis is a most dramatic example of hormonally regulated genetic reprogramming during postembryonic development. The initiation and sustenance of the process are under the control of ecdysteroids in invertebrates and thyroid hormone, 3,3', 5-triiodothyronine, in oviparous vertebrates. Their actions are inhibited or potentiated by other endogenous or exogenous hormones - juvenile hormone in invertebrates and prolactin and glucocorticoids in vertebrates. The nuclear receptors for ecdysteroids and thyroid hormone are the most closely related members of the steroid/retinoid/thyroid hormone receptor supergene family. In many pre-metamorphic amphibia and insects, the onset of natural metamorphosis and the administration of the exogenous hormones to the early larvae are characterized by a substantial and rapid autoinduction of the respective nuclear receptors. This review will largely deal with the phenomenon of receptor autoinduction during amphibian metamorphosis, although many of its features resemble those in insect metamorphosis. In the frog Xenopus, thyroid hormone receptor autoinduction has been shown to be brought about by the direct interaction between the receptor protein and the thyroid-responsive elements in the promoter of its own gene. Three lines of evidence point towards the involvement of receptor autoinduction in the process of initiation of amphibian metamorphosis: (1) a close association between the extent of inhibition or potentiation by prolactin and glucocorticoid, respectively, and metamorphic response in whole tadpoles and in organ and cell cultures; (2) thyroid hormone fails to upregulate the expression of its own receptor in obligatorily neotenic amphibia but does so in facultatively neotenic amphibia; and (3) dominant-negative receptors known to block hormonal response prevent the autoinduction of wild-type Xenopus receptors in vivo and in cell lines. Autoinduction is not restricted to insect and amphibian metamorphic hormones but is

  13. Limited proteolysis for assaying ligand binding affinities of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Benkoussa, M; Nominé, B; Mouchon, A; Lefebvre, B; Bernardon, J M; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1997-01-01

    The binding of natural or synthetic ligands to nuclear receptors is the triggering event leading to gene transcription activation or repression. Ligand binding to the ligand binding domain of these receptors induces conformational changes that are evidenced by an increased resistance of this domain to proteases. In vitro labeled receptors were incubated with various synthetic or natural agonists or antagonists and submitted to trypsin digestion. Proteolysis products were separated by SDS-PAGE and quantified. The amount of trypsin-resistant fragments was proportional to receptor occupancy by the ligand, and allowed the determination of dissociation constants (kDa). Using the wild-type or mutated human retinoic acid receptor alpha as a model, kDa values determined by classical competition binding assays using tritiated ligands are in agreement with those measured by the proteolytic assay. This method was successfully extended to human retinoic X receptor alpha, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, thus providing a basis for a new, faster assay to determine simultaneously the affinity and conformation of receptors when bound to a given ligand.

  14. Regulation of the cytosolic sulfotransferases by nuclear receptors

    PubMed Central

    Runge-Morris, Melissa; Kocarek, Thomas A.; Falany, Charles N.

    2013-01-01

    The cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs) are a multigene family of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a sulfonate group from the physiologic sulfate donor, 3′-phosphoadenosine-5′-phosphosulfate, to a nucleophilic substrate to generate a polar product that is more amenable to elimination from the body. As catalysts of both xenobiotic and endogenous metabolism, the SULTs are major points of contact between the external and physiological environments, and modulation of SULT-catalyzed metabolism can not only affect xenobiotic disposition, but it can also alter endogenous metabolic processes. Therefore, it is not surprising that SULT expression is regulated by numerous members of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily that function as sensors of xenobiotics as well as endogenous molecules, such as fatty acids, bile acids, and oxysterols. These NRs include the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, liver X receptors, farnesoid X receptor, retinoid-related orphan receptors, and estrogen-related receptors. This review summarizes current information about NR regulation of SULT expression. Because species differences in SULT subfamily composition and tissue-, sex-, development-, and inducer-dependent regulation are prominent, these differences will be emphasized throughout the review. In addition, because of the central role of the SULTs in cellular physiology, the effect of NR-mediated SULT regulation on physiological and pathophysiological processes will be discussed. Gaps in current knowledge that require further investigation are also highlighted. PMID:23330539

  15. Dietary modification of metabolic pathways via nuclear hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Caiozzi, Gianella; Wong, Brian S; Ricketts, Marie-Louise

    2012-10-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs), as ligand-dependent transcription factors, have emerged as important mediators in the control of whole body metabolism. Because of the promiscuous nature of several members of this superfamily that have been found to bind ligand with lower affinity than the classical steroid NHRs, they consequently display a broader ligand selectivity. This promiscuous nature has facilitated various bioactive dietary components being able to act as agonist ligands for certain members of the NHR superfamily. By binding to these NHRs, bioactive dietary components are able to mediate changes in various metabolic pathways, including, glucose, cholesterol and triglyceride homeostasis among others. This review will provide a general overview of the nuclear hormone receptors that have been shown to be activated by dietary components. The physiological consequences of such receptor activation by these dietary components will then be discussed in more detail.

  16. SUMOylation at K707 of DGCR8 controls direct function of primary microRNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Changhong; Chen, Cheng; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Hailong; Zhao, Xian; Deng, Rong; Dou, Jinzhuo; Jin, Hui; Chen, Ran; Xu, Ming; Chen, Qin; Wang, Yanli; Yu, Jianxiu

    2015-01-01

    DGCR8 (DiGeorge syndrome critical region gene 8) is essential for primary microRNA (pri-miRNA) processing in the cell nucleus. It specifically combines with Drosha, a nuclear RNase III enzyme, to form the Microprocessor complex (MC) that cleaves pri-miRNA to precursor miRNA (pre-miRNA), which is further processed to mature miRNA by Dicer, a cytoplasmic RNase III enzyme. Increasing evidences suggest that pri-/pre-miRNAs have direct functions in regulation of gene expression, however the underlying mechanism how it is fine-tuned remains unclear. Here we find that DGCR8 is modified by SUMO1 at the major site K707, which can be promoted by its ERK-activated phosphorylation. SUMOylation of DGCR8 enhances the protein stability by preventing the degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. More importantly, SUMOylation of DGCR8 does not alter its association with Drosha, the MC activity and miRNA biogenesis, but rather influences its affinity with pri-miRNAs. This altered affinity of DGCR8 with pri-miRNAs seems to control the direct functions of pri-miRNAs in recognition and repression of the target mRNAs, which is evidently linked to the DGCR8 function in regulation of tumorigenesis and cell migration. Collectively, our data suggest a novel mechanism that SUMOylation of DGCR8 controls direct functions of pri-miRNAs in gene silencing. PMID:26202964

  17. Cooling-induced SUMOylation of EXOSC10 down-regulates ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bastide, Amandine; Peretti, Diego; Roobol, Anne; Roobol, Jo; Mallucci, Giovanna R.; Smales, C. Mark; Willis, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    The RNA exosome is essential for 3′ processing of functional RNA species and degradation of aberrant RNAs in eukaryotic cells. Recent reports have defined the substrates of the exosome catalytic domains and solved the multimeric structure of the exosome complex. However, regulation of exosome activity remains poorly characterized, especially in response to physiological stress. Following the observation that cooling of mammalian cells results in a reduction in 40S:60S ribosomal subunit ratio, we uncover regulation of the nuclear exosome as a result of reduced temperature. Using human cells and an in vivo model system allowing whole-body cooling, we observe reduced EXOSC10 (hRrp6, Pm/Scl-100) expression in the cold. In parallel, both models of cooling increase global SUMOylation, leading to the identification of specific conjugation of SUMO1 to EXOSC10, a process that is increased by cooling. Furthermore, we define the major SUMOylation sites in EXOSC10 by mutagenesis and show that overexpression of SUMO1 alone is sufficient to suppress EXOSC10 abundance. Reducing EXOSC10 expression by RNAi in human cells correlates with the 3′ preribosomal RNA processing defects seen in the cold as well as reducing the 40S:60S ratio, a previously uncharacterized consequence of EXOSC10 suppression. Together, this work illustrates that EXOSC10 can be modified by SUMOylation and identifies a physiological stress where this regulation is prevalent both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26857222

  18. A high-throughput ligand competition binding assay for the androgen receptor and other nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Féau, Clémentine; Arnold, Leggy A; Kosinski, Aaron; Guy, R Kiplin

    2009-01-01

    Standardized, automated ligand-binding assays facilitate evaluation of endocrine activities of environmental chemicals and identification of antagonists of nuclear receptor ligands. Many current assays rely on fluorescently labeled ligands that are significantly different from the native ligands. The authors describe a radiolabeled ligand competition scintillation proximity assay (SPA) for the androgen receptor (AR) using Ni-coated 384-well FlashPlates and liganded AR-LBD protein. This highly reproducible, low-cost assay is well suited for automated high-throughput screening. In addition, the authors show that this assay can be adapted to measure ligand affinities for other nuclear receptors (peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor gamma, thyroid receptors alpha and beta).

  19. Exclusive nuclear location of estrogen receptors in Squalus testis.

    PubMed Central

    Callard, G V; Mak, P

    1985-01-01

    An estrogen (E)-binding molecule having both occupied and unoccupied sites is restricted to nuclear subfractions in the testis of the spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias). We investigated the hypothesis that a species characterized by high body-fluid osmolarity (1010 mosM) has an estrogen receptor (ER) that binds to chromatin with high affinity and consequently resists redistribution during tissue processing. Although the steroid binding and sedimentation properties of the Squalus nuclear ER conformed to those of classical ER, its elution maximum from DNA-cellulose was unusually high (0.55 M NaCl). A tendency to adhere tightly to cell nuclei was reflected in the high salt concentration (0.43 M KCl) required to extract 50% of the receptors from the nuclear compartment during homogenization and in the stability of the nuclear ER population in the presence of high concentrations of a nonionic solute (urea) or increased buffer volume. Mixing and redistribution experiments showed that nuclear ER could be quantitatively and qualitatively measured in cytosolic extracts, ruling out the possibility that soluble receptors were being masked. Although Squalus oviduct ER was similar to that of testis, ER in the testis and liver of a related elasmobranch (Potamotrygon) that maintains osmotic equilibrium at 300 mosM more closely resembled mammalian ER in its elution maximum from DNA-cellulose (0.22 M NaCl) and cytosolic/nuclear ratios in low-salt buffers. We conclude that Squalus testis has a single ER pool located exclusively in the nuclear compartment. These observations support a revised concept of steroid action and further indicate that the chromatin affinity of the hormone-ER complex is an important factor in determining subfractional distribution during tissue processing. PMID:3856265

  20. SXR, a novel steroid and xenobioticsensing nuclear receptor

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, Bruce; Sabbagh, Walid; Juguilon, Henry; Bolado, Jack; van Meter, Casey M.; Ong, Estelita S.; Evans, Ronald M.

    1998-01-01

    An important requirement for physiologic homeostasis is the detoxification and removal of endogenous hormones and xenobiotic compounds with biological activity. Much of the detoxification is performed by cytochrome P-450 enzymes, many of which have broad substrate specificity and are inducible by hundreds of different compounds, including steroids. The ingestion of dietary steroids and lipids induces the same enzymes; therefore, they would appear to be integrated into a coordinated metabolic pathway. Instead of possessing hundreds of receptors, one for each inducing compound, we propose the existence of a few broad specificity, low-affinity sensing receptors that would monitor aggregate levels of inducers to trigger production of metabolizing enzymes. In support of this model, we have isolated a novel nuclear receptor, termed the steroid and xenobiotic receptor (SXR), which activates transcription in response to a diversity of natural and synthetic compounds. SXR forms a heterodimer with RXR that can bind to and induce transcription from response elements present in steroid-inducible cytochrome P-450 genes and is expressed in tissues in which these catabolic enzymes are expressed. These results strongly support the steroid sensor hypothesis and suggest that broad specificity sensing receptors may represent a novel branch of the nuclear receptor superfamily. PMID:9784494

  1. SUMOylation Regulates Insulin Exocytosis Downstream of Secretory Granule Docking in Rodents and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiao-Qing; Plummer, Greg; Casimir, Marina; Kang, Youhou; Hajmrle, Catherine; Gaisano, Herbert Y.; Manning Fox, Jocelyn E.; MacDonald, Patrick E.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The reversible attachment of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteins controls target localization and function. We examined an acute role for the SUMOylation pathway in downstream events mediating insulin secretion. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied islets and β-cells from mice and human donors, as well as INS-1 832/13 cells. Insulin secretion, intracellular Ca2+, and β-cell exocytosis were monitored after manipulation of the SUMOylation machinery. Granule localization was imaged by total internal reflection fluorescence and electron microscopy; immunoprecipitation and Western blotting were used to examine the soluble NSF attachment receptor (SNARE) complex formation and SUMO1 interaction with synaptotagmin VII. RESULTS SUMO1 impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by blunting the β-cell exocytotic response to Ca2+. The effect of SUMO1 to impair insulin secretion and β-cell exocytosis is rapid and does not require altered gene expression or insulin content, is downstream of granule docking at the plasma membrane, and is dependent on SUMO-conjugation because the deSUMOylating enzyme, sentrin/SUMO-specific protease (SENP)-1, rescues exocytosis. SUMO1 coimmunoprecipitates with the Ca2+ sensor synaptotagmin VII, and this is transiently lost upon glucose stimulation. SENP1 overexpression also disrupts the association of SUMO1 with synaptotagmin VII and mimics the effect of glucose to enhance exocytosis. Conversely, SENP1 knockdown impairs exocytosis at stimulatory glucose levels and blunts glucose-dependent insulin secretion from mouse and human islets. CONCLUSIONS SUMOylation acutely regulates insulin secretion by the direct and reversible inhibition of β-cell exocytosis in response to intracellular Ca2+ elevation. The SUMO protease, SENP1, is required for glucose-dependent insulin secretion. PMID:21266332

  2. Solubility shift and SUMOylaltion of promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein in response to arsenic(III) and fate of the SUMOylated PML.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Seishiro; Tadano, Mihoko; Kobayashi, Yayoi; Udagawa, Osamu; Kato, Ayaka

    2015-09-15

    Promyelocytic leukemia (PML), which is a tumor suppressor protein that nevertheless plays an important role in the maintenance of leukemia initiating cells, is known to be biochemically modified by As(3+). We recently developed a simple method to evaluate the modification of PML by As(3+) resulting in a change in solubility and the covalent binding of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO). Here we semi-quantitatively investigated the SUMOylation of PML using HEK293 cells which were stably transfected with PML-VI (HEK-PML). Western blot analyses indicated that PML became insoluble in cold RadioImmunoPrecipitation Assay (RIPA) lysis buffer and was SUMOylated by both SUMO2/3 and SUMO1 by As(3+). Surprisingly SUMO1 monomers were completely utilized for the SUMOylation of PML. Antimony (Sb(3+)) but not bismuth (Bi(3+)), Cu(2+), or Cd(2+) biochemically modified PML similarly. SUMOylated PML decreased after removal of As(3+) from the culture medium. However, unSUMOylated PML was still recovered in the RIPA-insoluble fraction, suggesting that SUMOylation is not requisite for changing the RIPA-soluble PML into the RIPA-insoluble form. Immunofluorescence staining of As(3+)-exposed cells indicated that SUMO2/3 was co-localized with PML in the nuclear bodies. However, some PML protein was present in peri-nuclear regions without SUMO2/3. Functional Really Interesting New Gene (RING)-deleted mutant PML neither formed PML nuclear bodies nor was biochemically modified by As(3+). Conjugation with intracellular glutathione may explain the accessibility of As(3+) and Sb(3+) to PML in the nuclear region evading chelation and entrapping by cytoplasmic proteins such as metallothioneins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Endothelial nuclear lamina is not required for glucocorticoid receptor nuclear import but does affect receptor-mediated transcription activation.

    PubMed

    Nayebosadri, Arman; Ji, Julie Y

    2013-08-01

    The lamina serves to maintain the nuclear structure and stiffness while acting as a scaffold for heterochromatin and many transcriptional proteins. Its role in endothelial mechanotransduction, specifically how nuclear mechanics impact gene regulation under shear stress, is not fully understood. In this study, we successfully silenced lamin A/C in bovine aortic endothelial cells to determine its role in both glucocorticoid receptor (GR) nuclear translocation and glucocorticoid response element (GRE) transcriptional activation in response to dexamethasone and shear stress. Nuclear translocation of GR, an anti-inflammatory nuclear receptor, in response to dexamethasone or shear stress (5, 10, and 25 dyn/cm(2)) was observed via time-lapse cell imaging and quantified using a Bayesian image analysis algorithm. Transcriptional activity of the GRE promoter was assessed using a dual-luciferase reporter plasmid. We found no dependence on nuclear lamina for GR translocation from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. However, the absence of lamin A/C led to significantly increased expression of luciferase under dexamethasone and shear stress induction as well as changes in histone protein function. PCR results for NF-κB inhibitor alpha (NF-κBIA) and dual specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1) genes further supported our luciferase data with increased expression in the absence of lamin. Our results suggest that absence of lamin A/C does not hinder passage of GR into the nucleus, but nuclear lamina is important to properly regulate GRE transcription. Nuclear lamina, rather than histone deacetylase (HDAC), is a more significant mediator of shear stress-induced transcriptional activity, while dexamethasone-initiated transcription is more HDAC dependent. Our findings provide more insights into the molecular pathways involved in nuclear mechanotransduction.

  4. Endothelial nuclear lamina is not required for glucocorticoid receptor nuclear import but does affect receptor-mediated transcription activation

    PubMed Central

    Nayebosadri, Arman

    2013-01-01

    The lamina serves to maintain the nuclear structure and stiffness while acting as a scaffold for heterochromatin and many transcriptional proteins. Its role in endothelial mechanotransduction, specifically how nuclear mechanics impact gene regulation under shear stress, is not fully understood. In this study, we successfully silenced lamin A/C in bovine aortic endothelial cells to determine its role in both glucocorticoid receptor (GR) nuclear translocation and glucocorticoid response element (GRE) transcriptional activation in response to dexamethasone and shear stress. Nuclear translocation of GR, an anti-inflammatory nuclear receptor, in response to dexamethasone or shear stress (5, 10, and 25 dyn/cm2) was observed via time-lapse cell imaging and quantified using a Bayesian image analysis algorithm. Transcriptional activity of the GRE promoter was assessed using a dual-luciferase reporter plasmid. We found no dependence on nuclear lamina for GR translocation from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. However, the absence of lamin A/C led to significantly increased expression of luciferase under dexamethasone and shear stress induction as well as changes in histone protein function. PCR results for NF-κB inhibitor alpha (NF-κBIA) and dual specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1) genes further supported our luciferase data with increased expression in the absence of lamin. Our results suggest that absence of lamin A/C does not hinder passage of GR into the nucleus, but nuclear lamina is important to properly regulate GRE transcription. Nuclear lamina, rather than histone deacetylase (HDAC), is a more significant mediator of shear stress-induced transcriptional activity, while dexamethasone-initiated transcription is more HDAC dependent. Our findings provide more insights into the molecular pathways involved in nuclear mechanotransduction. PMID:23703529

  5. Proteolytic cleavage, trafficking, and functions of nuclear receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Kuang; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-10-01

    Intracellular localization has been reported for over three-quarters of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) families in response to environmental stimuli. Internalized RTK may bind to non-canonical substrates and affect various cellular processes. Many of the intracellular RTKs exist as fragmented forms that are generated by γ-secretase cleavage of the full-length receptor, shedding, alternative splicing, or alternative translation initiation. Soluble RTK fragments are stabilized and intracellularly transported into subcellular compartments, such as the nucleus, by binding to chaperone or transcription factors, while membrane-bound RTKs (full-length or truncated) are transported from the plasma membrane to the ER through the well-established Rab- or clathrin adaptor protein-coated vesicle retrograde trafficking pathways. Subsequent nuclear transport of membrane-bound RTK may occur via two pathways, INFS or INTERNET, with the former characterized by release of receptors from the ER into the cytosol and the latter characterized by release of membrane-bound receptor from the ER into the nucleoplasm through the inner nuclear membrane. Although most non-canonical intracellular RTK signaling is related to transcriptional regulation, there may be other functions that have yet to be discovered. In this review, we summarize the proteolytic processing, intracellular trafficking and nuclear functions of RTKs, and discuss how they promote cancer progression, and their clinical implications. © 2015 FEBS.

  6. Re-adopting classical nuclear receptors by cholesterol metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Umetani, Michihisa

    2015-01-01

    Since the first cloning of the human estrogen receptor (ER) α in 1986 and the subsequent cloning of human ERβ, there has been extensive investigation of the role of estrogen/ER. Estrogens/ER play important roles not only in sexual development and reproduction but also in a variety of other functions in multiple tissues. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators (SERMs) are ER lignds that act as agonists or antagonists depending on the target genes and tissues, and until recently, only synthetic SERMs have been recognized. However, the discovery of the first endogenous SERM, 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), opened a new dimension of ER action in health and disease. In addition to the identification of 27HC as a SERM, oxysterols have been recently demonstrated as indirect modulators of ER through interaction with the nuclear receptor Liver X Receptor (LXR) β. In this review, the recent progress on these novel roles of oxysterols in ER modulation is summarized. PMID:26563834

  7. Innate immunity to RNA virus is regulated by temporal and reversible sumoylation of RIG-I and MDA5.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ming-Ming; Liao, Chen-Yang; Yang, Qing; Xie, Xue-Qin; Shu, Hong-Bing

    2017-04-03

    Sensing of viral RNA by the cytosolic receptors RIG-I and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) leads to innate antiviral response. How RIG-I and MDA5 are dynamically regulated in innate antiviral response is not well understood. Here, we show that TRIM38 positively regulates MDA5- and RIG-I-mediated induction of downstream genes and acts as a SUMO E3 ligase for their dynamic sumoylation at K43/K865 and K96/K888, respectively, before and after viral infection. The sumoylation of MDA5 and RIG-I suppresses their K48-linked polyubiquitination and degradation in uninfected or early-infected cells. Sumoylation of the caspase recruitment domains of MDA5 and RIG-I is also required for their dephosphorylation by PP1 and activation upon viral infection. At the late phase of viral infection, both MDA5 and RIG-I are desumoylated by SENP2, resulting in their K48-linked polyubiquitination and degradation. These findings suggest that dynamic sumoylation and desumoylation of MDA5 and RIG-I modulate efficient innate immunity to RNA virus and its timely termination.

  8. Transmembrane helices in "classical" nuclear reproductive steroid receptors: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Morrill, Gene A; Kostellow, Adele B; Gupta, Raj K

    2015-01-01

    Steroid receptors of the nuclear receptor superfamily are proposed to be either: 1) located in the cytosol and moved to the cell nucleus upon activation, 2) tethered to the inside of the plasma membrane, or 3) retained in the nucleus until free steroid hormone enters and activates specific receptors. Using computational methods to analyze peptide receptor topology, we find that the "classical" nuclear receptors for progesterone (PRB/PGR), androgen (ARB/AR) and estrogen (ER1/ESR1) contain two transmembrane helices (TMH) within their ligand-binding domains (LBD).The MEMSAT-SVM algorithm indicates that ARB and ER2 (but not PRB or ER1) contain a pore-lining (channel-forming) region which may merge with other pore-lining regions to form a membrane channel. ER2 lacks a TMH, but contains a single pore-lining region. The MemBrain algorithm predicts that PRB, ARB and ER1 each contain one TMH plus a half TMH separated by 51 amino acids.ER2 contains two half helices. The TM-2 helices of ARB, ER1 and ER2 each contain 9-13 amino acid motifs reported to translocate the receptor to the plasma membrane, as well as cysteine palmitoylation sites. PoreWalker analysis of X-ray crystallographic data identifies a pore or channel within the LBDs of ARB and ER1 and predicts that 70 and 72 residues are pore-lining residues, respectively. The data suggest that (except for ER2), cytosolic receptors become anchored to the plasma membrane following synthesis. Half-helices and pore-lining regions in turn form functional ion channels and/or facilitate passive steroid uptake into the cell. In perspective, steroid-dependent insertion of "classical" receptors containing pore-lining regions into the plasma membrane may regulate permeability to ions such as Ca(2+), Na(+) or K(+), as well as facilitate steroid translocation into the nucleus.

  9. Nuclear exclusion of the androgen receptor by melatonin.

    PubMed

    Rimler, Avi; Culig, Zoran; Lupowitz, Zippora; Zisapel, Nava

    2002-05-01

    Androgen receptors (AR) play a crucial role in androgen-mediated processes and prostate cancer progression. The pineal hormone melatonin attenuates the androgen-dependent growth of benign and cancer prostate epithelial cells in vitro and may reverse clinical resistance to androgen ablation therapy in patients progressing on gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue. Where along the AR cascade does melatonin act remains to be determined. The effects of melatonin on AR localization, level and activity were assessed using androgen-insensitive prostate carcinoma PC3 cells stably transfected with a wild-type AR-expressing vector (PC3-AR).AR was localized to the PC3-AR cell nucleus in the absence of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Melatonin caused a robust exclusion of the AR from the cell nucleus to the cytoplasm. The nuclear export inhibitor, leptomycin B prevented this process. The exclusion was selective since melatonin had no such effect on the nuclear localization of estrogen receptors alpha (ERalpha) in these cells. Melatonin also caused nuclear exclusion of the AR in the presence of DHT. In addition, it attenuated androgen induced reporter gene activity in PC3 cells co-transfected with the human AR and AR reporter plasmids. Elevated androgen concentrations counteracted melatonin's effects. Melatonin did not decrease AR level or androgen binding in the cells. The nuclear localization of the AR is a hallmark of its cellular activity. These data point to AR nuclear exclusion as a possible mechanism to attenuate androgen responses in target tissues.

  10. Heterodimeric interaction between retinoid X receptor alpha and orphan nuclear receptor OR1 reveals dimerization-induced activation as a novel mechanism of nuclear receptor activation.

    PubMed Central

    Wiebel, F F; Gustafsson, J A

    1997-01-01

    OR1 is a member of the steroid/thyroid hormone nuclear receptor superfamily which has been described to mediate transcriptional responses to retinoids and oxysterols. On a DR4 response element, an OR1 heterodimer with the nuclear receptor retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR alpha) has been described to convey transcriptional activation in both the absence and presence of the RXR ligand 9-cis retinoic acid, the mechanisms of which have remained unclear. Here, we dissect the effects of RXR alpha and OR1 ligand-binding domain interaction on transcriptional regulation and the role of the respective carboxy-terminal activation domains (AF-2s) in the absence and presence of the RXR ligand, employing chimeras of the nuclear receptors containing the heterologous GAL4 DNA-binding domain as well as natural receptors. The results show that the interaction of the RXR and OR1 ligand-binding domains unleashes a transcription activation potential that is mainly dependent on the AF-2 of OR1, indicating that interaction with RXR activates OR1. This defines dimerization-induced activation as a novel function of heterodimeric interaction and mechanism of receptor activation not previously described for nuclear receptors. Moreover, we present evidence that activation of OR1 occurs by a conformational change induced upon heterodimerization with RXR. PMID:9199332

  11. Sumoylation: a regulatory protein modification in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Flotho, Annette; Melchior, Frauke

    2013-01-01

    Posttranslational modification with small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) proteins is now established as one of the key regulatory protein modifications in eukaryotic cells. Hundreds of proteins involved in processes such as chromatin organization, transcription, DNA repair, macromolecular assembly, protein homeostasis, trafficking, and signal transduction are subject to reversible sumoylation. Hence, it is not surprising that disease links are beginning to emerge and that interference with sumoylation is being considered for intervention. Here, we summarize basic mechanisms and highlight recent developments in the physiology of sumoylation.

  12. Dose-response approaches for nuclear receptor-mediated ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A public workshop, organized by a Steering Committee of scientists from government, industry, universities, and research organizations, was held at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) in September, 2010. The workshop explored the dose-response implications of toxicant modes of action (MOA) mediated by nuclear receptors. The dominant paradigm in human health risk assessment has been linear extrapolation without a threshold for cancer, and estimation of sub-threshold doses for non-cancer and (in appropriate cases) cancer endpoints. However, recent publications question the application of dose-response modeling approaches with a threshold. The growing body of molecular toxicology information and computational toxicology tools has allowed for exploration of the presence or absence of subthreshold doses for a number of receptor-mediated MOPs. The workshop explored the development of dose-response approaches for nuclear receptor-mediated liver cancer, within a MOA Human Relevance framework (HRF). Case studies addressed activation of the AHR; the CAR/PXR, and the PPARa. This paper describes the workshop process, key issues discussed, and conclusions. The value of an interactive workshop approach to apply current MOA/HRF frameworks was demonstrated. The results may help direct research on the MOA and dose-response of receptor-based toxicity, since there are commonalities for many receptors in the basic pathways involved for late steps in the

  13. Dose-response approaches for nuclear receptor-mediated ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A public workshop, organized by a Steering Committee of scientists from government, industry, universities, and research organizations, was held at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) in September, 2010. The workshop explored the dose-response implications of toxicant modes of action (MOA) mediated by nuclear receptors. The dominant paradigm in human health risk assessment has been linear extrapolation without a threshold for cancer, and estimation of sub-threshold doses for non-cancer and (in appropriate cases) cancer endpoints. However, recent publications question the application of dose-response modeling approaches with a threshold. The growing body of molecular toxicology information and computational toxicology tools has allowed for exploration of the presence or absence of subthreshold doses for a number of receptor-mediated MOPs. The workshop explored the development of dose-response approaches for nuclear receptor-mediated liver cancer, within a MOA Human Relevance framework (HRF). Case studies addressed activation of the AHR; the CAR/PXR, and the PPARa. This paper describes the workshop process, key issues discussed, and conclusions. The value of an interactive workshop approach to apply current MOA/HRF frameworks was demonstrated. The results may help direct research on the MOA and dose-response of receptor-based toxicity, since there are commonalities for many receptors in the basic pathways involved for late steps in the

  14. Functional domains in nuclear import factor p97 for binding the nuclear localization sequence receptor and the nuclear pore.

    PubMed Central

    Chi, N C; Adam, S A

    1997-01-01

    The interaction of the nuclear protein import factor p97 with the nuclear localization sequence (NLS) receptor, the nuclear pore complex, and Ran/TC4 is important for coordinating the events of protein import to the nucleus. We have mapped the binding domains on p97 for the NLS receptor and the nuclear pore. The NLS receptor-binding domain of p97 maps to the C-terminal 60% of the protein between residues 356 and 876. The pore complex-binding domain of p97 maps to residues 152-352. The pore complex-binding domain overlaps the Ran-GTP- and Ran-GDP-binding domains on p97, but only Ran-GTP competes for docking in permeabilized cells. The N-ethylmaleimide sensitivity of the p97 for docking was investigated and found to be due to inhibition of p97 binding to the pore complex and to the NLS receptor. Site-directed mutagenesis of conserved cysteine residues in the pore- and receptor-binding domains identified two cysteines, C223 and C228, that were required for p97 to bind the nuclear pore. Inhibition studies on docking and accumulation of a NLS protein provided additional evidence that the domains identified biochemically are the functional domains involved in protein import. Together, these results suggest that Ran-GTP dissociates the receptor complex and prevents p97 binding to the pore by inducing a conformational change in the structure of p97 rather than simple competition for binding sites. Images PMID:9201707

  15. Retinoic Acid-mediated Nuclear Receptor Activation and Hepatocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bushue, Nathan; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Due to their well-known differentiation and apoptosis-inducing abilities, retinoic acid (RA) and its analogs have strong anti-cancer efficacy in human cancers. However, in vivo RA is a liver mitogen. While speculation has persisted that RA-mediated signaling is likely involved in hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration, direct evidence is still required. Findings in support of this proposition include observations that a release of retinyl palmitate (the precursor of RA) occurs in liver stellate cells following liver injury. Nevertheless, the biological action of this released vitamin A is virtually unknown. More likely is that the released vitamin A is converted to RA, the biological form, and then bound to a specific receptor (retinoid x receptor; RXRα), which is most abundantly expressed in the liver. Considering the mitogenic effects of RA, the RA-activated RXRα would likely then influence hepatocyte proliferation and liver tissue repair. At present, the mechanism by which RA stimulates hepatocyte proliferation is largely unknown. This review summarizes the activation of nuclear receptors (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α, pregnane x receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and farnesoid x receptor) in an RXRα dependent manner to induce hepatocyte proliferation, providing a link between RA and its proliferative role. PMID:27635169

  16. Nuclear receptors CAR and PXR: Molecular, functional, and biomedical aspects.

    PubMed

    di Masi, Alessandra; De Marinis, Elisabetta; Ascenzi, Paolo; Marino, Maria

    2009-10-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors sharing a common evolutionary history and having similar sequence features at the protein level. Selective ligand(s) for some NRs is not known, therefore these NRs have been named "orphan receptors". Whenever ligands have been recognized for any of the orphan receptor, it has been categorized and grouped as "adopted" orphan receptor. This group includes the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane X receptor (PXR). They function as sensors of toxic byproducts derived from endogenous metabolites and of exogenous chemicals, in order to enhance their elimination. This unique function of CAR and PXR sets them apart from the steroid hormone receptors. The broad response profile has established that CAR and PXR are xenobiotic sensors that coordinately regulate xenobiotic clearance in the liver and intestine via induction of genes involved in drug and xenobiotic metabolism. In the past few years, research has revealed new and mostly unsuspected roles for CAR and PXR in modulating hormone, lipid, and energy homeostasis as well as cancer and liver steatosis. The purpose of this review is to highlight the structural and molecular bases of CAR and PXR impact on human health, providing information on mechanisms through which diet, chemical exposure, and environment ultimately impact health and disease.

  17. The dynamics of nuclear receptors and nuclear receptor coregulators in the pathogenesis of endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang Jun; O'Malley, Bert W.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Endometriosis is defined as the colonization and growth of endometrial tissue at anatomic sites outside the uterine cavity. Up to 15% of reproductive-aged women in the USA suffer from painful symptoms of endometriosis, such as infertility, pelvic pain, menstrual cycle abnormalities and increased risk of certain cancers. However, many of the current clinical treatments for endometriosis are not sufficiently effective and yield unacceptable side effects. There is clearly an urgent need to identify new molecular mechanisms that critically underpin the initiation and progression of endometriosis in order to develop more specific and effective therapeutics which lack the side effects of current therapies. The aim of this review is to discuss how nuclear receptors (NRs) and their coregulators promote the progression of endometriosis. Understanding the pathogenic molecular mechanisms for the genesis and maintenance of endometriosis as modulated by NRs and coregulators can reveal new therapeutic targets for alternative endometriosis treatments. METHODS This review was prepared using published gene expression microarray data sets obtained from patients with endometriosis and published literature on NRs and their coregulators that deal with endometriosis progression. Using the above observations, our current understanding of how NRs and NR coregulators are involved in the progression of endometriosis is summarized. RESULTS Aberrant levels of NRs and NR coregulators in ectopic endometriosis lesions are associated with the progression of endometriosis. As an example, endometriotic cell-specific alterations in gene expression are correlated with a differential methylation status of the genome compared with the normal endometrium. These differential epigenetic regulations can generate favorable cell-specific NR and coregulator milieus for endometriosis progression. Genetic alterations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms and insertion/deletion polymorphisms of NR

  18. Transcriptional regulation of human Paraoxonase 1 by nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Ruiz, N; Murillo-González, F E; Rojas-García, A E; Mackness, Mike; Bernal-Hernández, Y Y; Barrón-Vivanco, B S; González-Arias, C A; Medina-Díaz, I M

    2017-02-20

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a calcium-dependent lactonase synthesized primarily in the liver and secreted into the plasma, where it is associates with high density lipoproteins (HDL). PON1 acts as antioxidant preventing low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation, a process considered critical in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Additionally, PON1 hydrolyzes and detoxifies some toxic metabolites of organophosphorus compounds (OPs). Thus, PON1 activity and expression levels are important for determining susceptibility to OPs intoxication and risk of developing diseases related to inflammation and oxidative stress. Increasing evidence has demonstrated the modulation of PON1 expression by many factors is due to interaction with nuclear receptors (NRs). Here, we briefly review the studies in this area and discuss the role of nuclear receptors in the regulation of PON1 expression, as well as how understanding these mechanisms may allow us to manipulate PON1 levels to improve drug efficacy and treat disease.

  19. General molecular biology and architecture of nuclear receptors

    PubMed Central

    Pawlak, Michal; Lefebvre, Philippe; Staels, Bart

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) regulate and coordinate multiple processes by integrating internal and external signals, thereby maintaining homeostasis in front of nutritional, behavioral and environment challenges. NRs exhibit strong similarities in their structure and mode of action: by selective transcriptional activation or repression of cognate target genes, which can either be controlled through a direct, DNA binding-dependent mechanism or through crosstalk with other transcriptional regulators, NRs modulate the expression of gene clusters thus achieving coordinated tissue responses. Additionally, non genomic effects of NR ligands appear mediated by ill-defined mechanisms at the plasma membrane. These effects mediate potential therapeutic effects as small lipophilic molecule targets, and many efforts have been put in elucidating their precise mechanism of action and pathophysiological roles. Currently, numerous nuclear receptor ligand analogs are used in therapy or are tested in clinical trials against various diseases such as hypertriglyceridemia, atherosclerosis, diabetes, allergies and cancer and others. PMID:22242852

  20. Regulation of adiponectin receptor 1 in human hepatocytes by agonists of nuclear receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Neumeier, Markus; Weigert, Johanna; Schaeffler, Andreas; Weiss, Thomas; Kirchner, Stefan; Laberer, Sabine; Schoelmerich, Juergen; Buechler, Christa . E-mail: christa.buechler@klinik.uni-regensburg.de

    2005-09-02

    The adiponectin receptors AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 have been identified to mediate the insulin-sensitizing effects of adiponectin. Although AdipoR2 was suggested to be the main receptor for this adipokine in hepatocytes, AdipoR1 protein is highly abundant in primary human hepatocytes and hepatocytic cell lines. Nuclear receptors are main regulators of lipid metabolism and activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} and {gamma}, retinoid X receptor (RXR), and liver X receptor (LXR) by specific ligands may influence AdipoR1 abundance. AdipoR1 protein is neither altered by RXR or LXR agonists nor by pioglitazone. In contrast, fenofibric acid reduces AdipoR1 whereas hepatotoxic troglitazone upregulates AdipoR1 protein in HepG2 cells. Taken together this work shows for the first time that AdipoR1 protein is expressed in human hepatocytes but that it is not a direct target gene of nuclear receptors. Elevated AdipoR1 induced by hepatotoxic troglitazone may indicate a role of this receptor in adiponectin-mediated beneficial effects in liver damage.

  1. Atypical nuclear localization of VIP receptors in glioma cell lines and patients

    SciTech Connect

    Barbarin, Alice; Séité, Paule; Godet, Julie; Bensalma, Souheyla; Muller, Jean-Marc; Chadéneau, Corinne

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • The VIP receptor VPAC1 contains a putative NLS signal. • VPAC1 is predominantly nuclear in GBM cell lines but not VPAC2. • Non-nuclear VPAC1/2 protein expression is correlated with glioma grade. • Nuclear VPAC1 is observed in 50% of stage IV glioma (GBM). - Abstract: An increasing number of G protein-coupled receptors, like receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), are found in cell nucleus. As VIP receptors are involved in the regulation of glioma cell proliferation and migration, we investigated the expression and the nuclear localization of the VIP receptors VPAC1 and VPAC2 in this cancer. First, by applying Western blot and immunofluorescence detection in three human glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines, we observed a strong nuclear staining for the VPAC1 receptor and a weak nuclear VPAC2 receptor staining. Second, immunohistochemical staining of VPAC1 and VPAC2 on tissue microarrays (TMA) showed that the two receptors were expressed in normal brain and glioma tissues. Expression in the non-nuclear compartment of the two receptors significantly increased with the grade of the tumors. Analysis of nuclear staining revealed a significant increase of VPAC1 staining with glioma grade, with up to 50% of GBM displaying strong VPAC1 nuclear staining, whereas nuclear VPAC2 staining remained marginal. The increase in VPAC receptor expression with glioma grades and the enhanced nuclear localization of the VPAC1 receptors in GBM might be of importance for glioma progression.

  2. Minireview: Nuclear Receptors as Modulators of the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Mara H.; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past several decades of cancer research, the inherent complexity of tumors has become increasingly appreciated. In addition to acquired cell-intrinsic properties, tumor growth is supported by an abundance of parenchymal, inflammatory and stromal cell types, which infiltrate and surround the tumor. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that numerous components of this supportive milieu, referred to collectively as the tumor microenvironment, are indeed critical during the process of multistep tumorigenesis. These findings highlight the important interplay between cancer cells and tumor-associated cell types, and suggest that cancer therapy should target both neoplastic cells and supportive stromal cells to effectively attenuate tumor growth. The nuclear receptor superfamily encompasses a druggable class of molecules expressed in numerous stromal and parenchymal cell types, whose established physiologic roles suggest therapeutic potential in the context of the reactive tumor microenvironment. In this minireview, we discuss recent evidence that tumor-associated inflammation, angiogenesis, and fibrosis can be modulated at the transcriptional level by nuclear receptors and their ligands. As these processes have been widely implicated in cancer initiation, progression, and resistance to current therapy, nuclear receptors ligands targeting the tumor microenvironment may be potent antitumor agents in combination with chemotherapy. PMID:22135047

  3. Motor neuron impairment mediated by a sumoylated fragment of the glial glutamate transporter EAAT2

    PubMed Central

    Foran, Emily; Bogush, Alex; Goffredo, Michael; Roncaglia, Paola; Gustincich, Stefano; Pasinelli, Piera; Trotti, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Dysregulation of glutamate handling ensuing downregulation of expression and activity levels of the astroglial glutamate transporter EAAT2 is implicated in excitotoxic degeneration of motor neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We previously reported that EAAT2 (a.k.a. GLT-1) is cleaved by caspase-3 at its cytosolic carboxy-terminus domain. This cleavage results in impaired glutamate transport activity and generates a proteolytic fragment (CTE) that we found to be post-translationally conjugated by SUMO1. We show here that this sumoylated CTE fragment accumulates in the nucleus of spinal cord astrocytes of the SOD1-G93A mouse model of ALS at symptomatic stages of disease. Astrocytic expression of CTE, artificially tagged with SUMO1 (CTE-SUMO1) to mimic the native sumoylated fragment, recapitulates the nuclear accumulation pattern of the endogenous EAAT2-derived proteolytic fragment. Moreover, in a co-culture binary system, expression of CTE-SUMO1 in spinal cord astrocytes initiates extrinsic toxicity by inducing caspase-3 activation in motor neuron-derived NSC-34 cells or axonal growth impairment in primary motor neurons. Interestingly, prolonged nuclear accumulation of CTE-SUMO1 is intrinsically toxic to spinal cord astrocytes, although this gliotoxic effect of CTE-SUMO1 occurs later than the indirect, non-cell autonomous toxic effect on motor neurons. As more evidence on the implication of SUMO substrates in neurodegenerative diseases emerges, our observations strongly suggest that the nuclear accumulation in spinal cord astrocytes of a sumoylated proteolytic fragment of the astroglial glutamate transporter EAAT2 could participate to the pathogenesis of ALS and suggest a novel, unconventional role for EAAT2 in motor neuron degeneration. PMID:21769946

  4. Sumoylation of HDAC2 promotes NF-κB-dependent gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Tobias; Kiweler, Nicole; Wolff, Katharina; Knauer, Shirley K.; Brandl, André; Hemmerich, Peter; Dannenberg, Jan-Hermen; Heinzel, Thorsten; Schneider, Günter; Krämer, Oliver H.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is crucial for the maintenance of homeostasis. It is incompletely understood how nuclear NF-κB and the crosstalk of NF-κB with other transcription factors are controlled. Here, we demonstrate that the epigenetic regulator histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) activates NF-κB in transformed and primary cells. This function depends on both, the catalytic activity and an intact HDAC2 sumoylation motif. Several mechanisms account for the induction of NF-κB through HDAC2. The expression of wild-type HDAC2 can increase the nuclear presence of NF-κB. In addition, the ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (RSK1) and the tumor suppressor p53 contribute to the regulation of NF-κB by HDAC2. Moreover, TP53 mRNA expression is positively regulated by wild-type HDAC2 but not by sumoylation-deficient HDAC2. Thus, sumoylation of HDAC2 integrates NF-κB signaling involving p53 and RSK1. Since HDAC2-dependent NF-κB activity protects colon cancer cells from genotoxic stress, our data also suggest that high HDAC2 levels, which are frequently found in tumors, are linked to chemoresistance. Accordingly, inhibitors of NF-κB and of the NF-κB/p53-regulated anti-apoptotic protein survivin significantly sensitize colon carcinoma cells expressing wild-type HDAC2 to apoptosis induced by the genotoxin doxorubicin. Hence, the HDAC2-dependent signaling node we describe here may offer an interesting therapeutic option. PMID:25704882

  5. Sumoylation activates the transcriptional activity of Pax-6, an important transcription factor for eye and brain development.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qin; Gong, Lili; Deng, Mi; Zhang, Lan; Sun, Shuming; Liu, Jiao; Ma, Haili; Yuan, Dan; Chen, Pei-Chao; Hu, Xiaohui; Liu, Jinping; Qin, Jichao; Xiao, Ling; Huang, Xiao-Qin; Zhang, Jian; Li, David Wan-Cheng

    2010-12-07

    Pax-6 is an evolutionarily conserved transcription factor regulating brain and eye development. Four Pax-6 isoforms have been reported previously. Although the longer Pax-6 isoforms (p46 and p48) bear two DNA-binding domains, the paired domain (PD) and the homeodomain (HD), the shorter Pax-6 isoform p32 contains only the HD for DNA binding. Although a third domain, the proline-, serine- and threonine-enriched activation (PST) domain, in the C termini of all Pax-6 isoforms mediates their transcriptional modulation via phosphorylation, how p32 Pax-6 could regulate target genes remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we show that sumoylation at K91 is required for p32 Pax-6 to bind to a HD-specific site and regulate expression of target genes. First, in vitro-synthesized p32 Pax-6 alone cannot bind the P3 sequence, which contains the HD recognition site, unless it is preincubated with nuclear extracts precleared by anti-Pax-6 but not by anti-small ubiquitin-related modifier 1 (anti-SUMO1) antibody. Second, in vitro-synthesized p32 Pax-6 can be sumoylated by SUMO1, and the sumoylated p32 Pax-6 then can bind to the P3 sequence. Third, Pax-6 and SUMO1 are colocalized in the embryonic optic and lens vesicles and can be coimmunoprecipitated. Finally, SUMO1-conjugated p32 Pax-6 exists in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, and sumoylation significantly enhances the DNA-binding ability of p32 Pax-6 and positively regulates gene expression. Together, our results demonstrate that sumoylation activates p32 Pax-6 in both DNA-binding and transcriptional activities. In addition, our studies demonstrate that p32 and p46 Pax-6 possess differential DNA-binding and regulatory activities.

  6. Sumoylation activates the transcriptional activity of Pax-6, an important transcription factor for eye and brain development

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qin; Gong, Lili; Deng, Mi; Zhang, Lan; Sun, Shuming; Liu, Jiao; Ma, Haili; Yuan, Dan; Chen, Pei-Chao; Hu, Xiaohui; Liu, Jinping; Qin, Jichao; Xiao, Ling; Huang, Xiao-Qin; Zhang, Jian; Wan-Cheng Li, David

    2010-01-01

    Pax-6 is an evolutionarily conserved transcription factor regulating brain and eye development. Four Pax-6 isoforms have been reported previously. Although the longer Pax-6 isoforms (p46 and p48) bear two DNA-binding domains, the paired domain (PD) and the homeodomain (HD), the shorter Pax-6 isoform p32 contains only the HD for DNA binding. Although a third domain, the proline-, serine- and threonine-enriched activation (PST) domain, in the C termini of all Pax-6 isoforms mediates their transcriptional modulation via phosphorylation, how p32 Pax-6 could regulate target genes remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we show that sumoylation at K91 is required for p32 Pax-6 to bind to a HD-specific site and regulate expression of target genes. First, in vitro-synthesized p32 Pax-6 alone cannot bind the P3 sequence, which contains the HD recognition site, unless it is preincubated with nuclear extracts precleared by anti–Pax-6 but not by anti-small ubiquitin-related modifier 1 (anti-SUMO1) antibody. Second, in vitro-synthesized p32 Pax-6 can be sumoylated by SUMO1, and the sumoylated p32 Pax-6 then can bind to the P3 sequence. Third, Pax-6 and SUMO1 are colocalized in the embryonic optic and lens vesicles and can be coimmunoprecipitated. Finally, SUMO1-conjugated p32 Pax-6 exists in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, and sumoylation significantly enhances the DNA-binding ability of p32 Pax-6 and positively regulates gene expression. Together, our results demonstrate that sumoylation activates p32 Pax-6 in both DNA-binding and transcriptional activities. In addition, our studies demonstrate that p32 and p46 Pax-6 possess differential DNA-binding and regulatory activities. PMID:21084637

  7. Distinct nuclear receptor expression in stroma adjacent to breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Knower, Kevin C; Chand, Ashwini L; Eriksson, Natalie; Takagi, Kiyoshi; Miki, Yasuhiro; Sasano, Hironobu; Visvader, Jane E; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Funder, John W; Fuller, Peter J; Simpson, Evan R; Tilley, Wayne D; Leedman, Peter J; Graham, J Dinny; Muscat, George E O; Clarke, Christine L; Clyne, Colin D

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between breast tumor epithelial and stromal cells is vital for initial and recurrent tumor growth. While breast cancer-associated stromal cells provide a favorable environment for proliferation and metastasis, the molecular mechanisms contributing to this process are not fully understood. Nuclear receptors (NRs) are intracellular transcription factors that directly regulate gene expression. Little is known about the status of NRs in cancer-associated stroma. Nuclear Receptor Low-Density Taqman Arrays were used to compare the gene expression profiles of all 48 NR family members in a collection of primary cultured cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) obtained from estrogen receptor (ER)α positive breast cancers (n = 9) and normal breast adipose fibroblasts (NAFs) (n = 7). Thirty-three of 48 NRs were expressed in both the groups, while 11 NRs were not detected in either. Three NRs (dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region, on chromosome X, gene 1 (DAX-1); estrogen-related receptor beta (ERR-β); and RAR-related orphan receptor beta (ROR-β)) were only detected in NAFs, while one NR (liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1)) was unique to CAFs. Of the NRs co-expressed, four were significantly down-regulated in CAFs compared with NAFs (RAR-related orphan receptor-α (ROR-α); Thyroid hormone receptor-β (TR-β); vitamin D receptor (VDR); and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ)). Quantitative immunohistochemistry for LRH-1, TR-β, and PPAR-γ proteins in stromal fibroblasts from an independent panel of breast cancers (ER-positive (n = 15), ER-negative (n = 15), normal (n = 14)) positively correlated with mRNA expression profiles. The differentially expressed NRs identified in tumor stroma are key mediators in aromatase regulation and subsequent estrogen production. Our findings reveal a distinct pattern of NR expression that therefore fits with a sustained and increased local estrogen microenvironment in ER

  8. Sumoylation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α is implicated in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell development through regulating runx1 in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hao; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Xiaohui; Deng, Min; Zhang, Wenqing; Wen, Zilong; Chen, Saijuan; Chen, Zhu; de The, Hugues; Zhou, Jun; Zhu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) participates in various cellular processes, including maintenance of genome integrity, nuclear transport, transcription and signal transduction. However, the biological function of sumoylation in hematopoiesis has not been fully explored. We show here that definitive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) are depleted in SUMO-deficient zebrafish embryos. Impairment of sumoylation attenuates HSPC generation and proliferation. The hyposumoylation triggered HSPC defects are CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/ebpα) dependent. Critically, a SUMO-C/ebpα fusion rescues the defective hematopoiesis in SUMO-deficient embryos, at least in part through restored runx1 expression. While C/ebpα-dependent transcription is involved in myeloid differentiation, our studies here reveal that C/ebpα sumoylation is essential for HSPC development during definitive hematopoiesis. PMID:25757417

  9. SUMOylation inhibits FOXM1 activity and delays mitotic transition

    PubMed Central

    Myatt, S S; Kongsema, M; Man, C W-Y; Kelly, D J; Gomes, A R; Khongkow, P; Karunarathna, U; Zona, S; Langer, J K; Dunsby, C W; Coombes, R C; French, P M; Brosens, J J; Lam, E W-F

    2014-01-01

    The forkhead box transcription factor FOXM1 is an essential effector of G2/M-phase transition, mitosis and the DNA damage response. As such, it is frequently deregulated during tumorigenesis. Here we report that FOXM1 is dynamically modified by SUMO1 but not by SUMO2/3 at multiple sites. We show that FOXM1 SUMOylation is enhanced in MCF-7 breast cancer cells in response to treatment with epirubicin and mitotic inhibitors. Mutation of five consensus conjugation motifs yielded a SUMOylation-deficient mutant FOXM1. Conversely, fusion of the E2 ligase Ubc9 to FOXM1 generated an auto-SUMOylating mutant (FOXM1-Ubc9). Analysis of wild-type FOXM1 and mutants revealed that SUMOylation inhibits FOXM1 activity, promotes translocation to the cytoplasm and enhances APC/Cdh1-mediated ubiquitination and degradation. Further, expression of the SUMOylation-deficient mutant enhanced cell proliferation compared with wild-type FOXM1, whereas the FOXM1-Ubc9 fusion protein resulted in persistent cyclin B1 expression and slowed the time from mitotic entry to exit. In summary, our findings suggest that SUMOylation attenuates FOXM1 activity and causes mitotic delay in cytotoxic drug response. PMID:24362530

  10. Identification of COUP-TFII Orphan Nuclear Receptor as a Retinoic Acid–Activated Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Schoen W; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Zhou, X. Edward; Kretschman, Jennifer E; Reynolds, Ross; Vonrhein, Clemens; Xu, Yong; Wang, Liliang; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Xu, H. Eric

    2008-01-01

    The chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factors (COUP-TFI and II) make up the most conserved subfamily of nuclear receptors that play key roles in angiogenesis, neuronal development, organogenesis, cell fate determination, and metabolic homeostasis. Although the biological functions of COUP-TFs have been studied extensively, little is known of their structural features or aspects of ligand regulation. Here we report the ligand-free 1.48 Å crystal structure of the human COUP-TFII ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals an autorepressed conformation of the receptor, where helix α10 is bent into the ligand-binding pocket and the activation function-2 helix is folded into the cofactor binding site, thus preventing the recruitment of coactivators. In contrast, in multiple cell lines, COUP-TFII exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, and ligand binding, substantially reduce the COUP-TFII transcriptional activity. Importantly, retinoid acids are able to promote COUP-TFII to recruit coactivators and activate a COUP-TF reporter construct. Although the concentration needed is higher than the physiological levels of retinoic acids, these findings demonstrate that COUP-TFII is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor, in which ligands activate the receptor by releasing it from the autorepressed conformation. PMID:18798693

  11. Identification of COUP-TFII Orphan Nuclear Receptor as a Retinoic Acid-Activated Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, Schoen W; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Zhou, X Edward; Kretschman, Jennifer E; Reynolds, Ross; Vonrhein, Clemens; Xu, Yong; Wang, Liliang; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Xu, H Eric

    2010-01-12

    The chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factors (COUP-TFI and II) make up the most conserved subfamily of nuclear receptors that play key roles in angiogenesis, neuronal development, organogenesis, cell fate determination, and metabolic homeostasis. Although the biological functions of COUP-TFs have been studied extensively, little is known of their structural features or aspects of ligand regulation. Here we report the ligand-free 1.48 {angstrom} crystal structure of the human COUP-TFII ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals an autorepressed conformation of the receptor, where helix {alpha}10 is bent into the ligand-binding pocket and the activation function-2 helix is folded into the cofactor binding site, thus preventing the recruitment of coactivators. In contrast, in multiple cell lines, COUP-TFII exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, and ligand binding, substantially reduce the COUP-TFII transcriptional activity. Importantly, retinoid acids are able to promote COUP-TFII to recruit coactivators and activate a COUP-TF reporter construct. Although the concentration needed is higher than the physiological levels of retinoic acids, these findings demonstrate that COUP-TFII is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor, in which ligands activate the receptor by releasing it from the autorepressed conformation.

  12. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor: A family of nuclear receptors role in various diseases.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Sandeep; Gupta, Paras; Saini, Arminder Singh; Kaushal, Chaitnya; Sharma, Saurabh

    2011-10-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors of nuclear hormone receptor superfamily comprising of the following three subtypes: PPARα, PPARγ, and PPARβ/δ. Activation of PPAR-α reduces triglyceride level and is involved in regulation of energy homeostasis. Activation of PPAR-γ causes insulin sensitization and enhances glucose metabolism, whereas activation of PPAR-β/δ enhances fatty acids metabolism. Thus, PPAR family of nuclear receptors plays a major regulatory role in energy homeostasis and metabolic function. The present review critically analyzes the protective and detrimental effect of PPAR agonists in dyslipidemia, diabetes, adipocyte differentiation, inflammation, cancer, lung diseases, neurodegenerative disorders, fertility or reproduction, pain, and obesity.

  13. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor: A family of nuclear receptors role in various diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Sandeep; Gupta, Paras; Saini, Arminder Singh; Kaushal, Chaitnya; Sharma, Saurabh

    2011-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors of nuclear hormone receptor superfamily comprising of the following three subtypes: PPARα, PPARγ, and PPARβ/δ. Activation of PPAR-α reduces triglyceride level and is involved in regulation of energy homeostasis. Activation of PPAR-γ causes insulin sensitization and enhances glucose metabolism, whereas activation of PPAR-β/δ enhances fatty acids metabolism. Thus, PPAR family of nuclear receptors plays a major regulatory role in energy homeostasis and metabolic function. The present review critically analyzes the protective and detrimental effect of PPAR agonists in dyslipidemia, diabetes, adipocyte differentiation, inflammation, cancer, lung diseases, neurodegenerative disorders, fertility or reproduction, pain, and obesity. PMID:22247890

  14. Understanding Nuclear Receptor Form and Function Using Structural Biology

    PubMed Central

    Rastinejad, Fraydoon; Huang, Pengxiang; Chandra, Vikas; Khorasanizadeh, Sepideh

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NR) are a major transcription factor family whose members selectively bind small molecule lipophilic ligands and transduce those signals into specific changes in gene programs. For over two decades, structural biology efforts were directed exclusively on the individual ligand binding domains (LBDs) or DNA binding domains (DBDs) of NRs. These analyses revealed the basis for both ligand and DNA binding, and also revealed receptor conformations representing both the activated and repressed states. Additionally, crystallographic studies explained how NR LBD surfaces recognize discrete portions of transcriptional coregulators. The many structural snapshots of LBDs have also guided the development of synthetic ligands with therapeutic potential. Yet, the exclusive structural focus on isolated NR domains has made it difficult to conceptualize how all the NR polypeptide segments are coordinated physically and functionally in the context of receptor quaternary architectures. Newly emerged crystal structures of the PPARγ-RXRα heterodimer and HNF-4α homodimer have recently revealed the higher order organizations of these receptor complexes on DNA, as well as the complexity and uniqueness of their domain-domain interfaces. These emerging structural advances promise to better explain how signals in one domain can be allosterically transmitted to distal receptor domains, also providing much better frameworks for guiding future drug discovery efforts. PMID:24103914

  15. Modulators of the nuclear receptor retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor-γ (RORγ or RORc).

    PubMed

    Fauber, Benjamin P; Magnuson, Steven

    2014-07-24

    As the biology surrounding the nuclear receptor retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor-gamma (RORγ or RORc) continues to evolve, significant effort has been invested in discovering modulators of this potentially important target for the treatment of metabolic and immunological diseases. Several major pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies have disclosed RORc inhibitors or partnered with other players in the field. In this perspective, we discuss both the biology and the underlying structural biology of RORc, and summarize the RORc modulators disclosed in the scientific and patent literature.

  16. Regulation of hepatic energy metabolism by the nuclear receptor PXR.

    PubMed

    Hakkola, Jukka; Rysä, Jaana; Hukkanen, Janne

    2016-09-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a nuclear receptor that is traditionally thought to be specialized for sensing xenobiotic exposure. In concurrence with this feature PXR was originally identified to regulate drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. During the last ten years it has become clear that PXR harbors broader functions. Evidence obtained both in experimental animals and humans indicate that ligand-activated PXR regulates hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism and affects whole body metabolic homeostasis. Currently, the consequences of PXR activation on overall metabolic health are not yet fully understood and varying results on the effect of PXR activation or knockout on metabolic disorders and weight gain have been published in mouse models. Rifampicin and St. John's wort, the prototypical human PXR agonists, impair glucose tolerance in healthy volunteers. Chronic exposure to PXR agonists could potentially represent a risk factor for diabetes and metabolic syndrome. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie.

  17. Nuclear receptor conformation, coregulators, and tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Graham, J D; Bain, D L; Richer, J K; Jackson, T A; Tung, L; Horwitz, K B

    2000-01-01

    The development of tamoxifen resistance and consequent disease progression are common occurrences in breast cancers, often despite the continuing expression of estrogen receptors (ER). Tamoxifen is a mixed antagonist, having both agonist and antagonist properties. We have suggested that the development of tamoxifen resistance is associated with an increase in its agonist-like properties, resulting in loss of antagonist effects or even inappropriate tumor stimulation. Nuclear receptor function is influenced by a family of transcriptional coregulators, that either enhance or suppress transcriptional activity. Using a mixed antagonist-biased two-hybrid screening strategy, we identified two such proteins: the human homolog of the nuclear receptor corepressor, N-CoR, and a novel coactivator, L7/SPA (Switch Protein for Antagonists). In transcriptional studies, N-CoR suppressed the agonist properties of tamoxifen and RU486, and L7/SPA increased agonist effects. We speculated that the relative levels of these coactivators and corepressors may determine the balance of agonist and antagonist properties of mixed antagonists, such as tamoxifen. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we, therefore, measured the levels of transcripts encoding these coregulators, as well as the corepressor SMRT, and the coactivator SRC-1, in a small cohort of tamoxifen-resistant and sensitive breast tumors. The results suggest that tumor sensitivity to mixed antagonists may be governed by a complex set of transcription factors, which we are only now beginning to understand.

  18. Nuclear receptor TLX inhibits TGF-β signaling in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Erik; Zhai, Qiwei; Zeng, Zhao-Jun; Yoshida, Takeshi; Funa, Keiko

    2016-05-01

    TLX (also called NR2E1) is an orphan nuclear receptor that maintains stemness of neuronal stem cells. TLX is highly expressed in the most malignant form of glioma, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and is important for the proliferation and maintenance of the stem/progenitor cells of the tumor. Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) is a cytokine regulating many different cellular processes such as differentiation, migration, adhesion, cell death and proliferation. TGF-β has an important function in cancer where it can work as either a tumor suppressor or oncogene, depending on the cancer type and stage of tumor development. Since glioblastoma often have dysfunctional TGF-β signaling we wanted to find out if there is any interaction between TLX and TGF-β in glioblastoma cells. We demonstrate that knockdown of TLX enhances the canonical TGF-β signaling response in glioblastoma cell lines. TLX physically interacts with and stabilizes Smurf1, which can ubiquitinate and target TGF-β receptor II for degradation, whereas knockdown of TLX leads to stabilization of TGF-β receptor II, increased nuclear translocation of Smad2/3 and enhanced expression of TGF-β target genes. The interaction between TLX and TGF-β may play an important role in the regulation of proliferation and tumor-initiating properties of glioblastoma cells. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Constitutive and ligand-induced nuclear localization of oxytocin receptor.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, Conan G; Bussolati, Gianni; Bosco, Martino; Kimura, Tadashi; Pizzorno, Marie C; Chernin, Mitchell I; Cassoni, Paola; Novak, Josef F

    2007-01-01

    Oxytocin receptor (OTR) is a membrane protein known to mediate oxytocin (OT) effects, in both normal and neoplastic cells. We report here that human osteosarcoma (U2OS, MG63, OS15 and SaOS2), breast cancer (MCF7), and primary human fibroblastic cells (HFF) all exhibit OTR not only on the cell membrane, but also in the various nuclear compartments including the nucleolus. Both an OTR-GFP fusion protein and the native OTR appear to be localized to the nucleus as detected by transfection and/or confocal immunofluorescence, respectively. Treatment with oxytocin causes internalization of OTR and the resulting vesicles accumulate in the vicinity of the nucleus and some of the perinuclear OTR enters the nucleus. Western blots indicate that OTR in the nucleus and on the plasma membrane are likely to be the same biochemical and immunological entities. It appears that OTR is first visible in the nucleoli and subsequently disperses within the nucleus into 4-20 spots while some of the OTR diffuses throughout the nucleoplasm. The behaviour and kinetics of OTR-GFP and OTR are different, indicating interference by GFP in both OTR entrance into the nucleus and subsequent relocalization of OTR within the nucleus. There are important differences among the tested cells, such as the requirement of a ligand for transfer of OTR in nuclei. A constitutive internalization of OTR was found only in osteosarcoma cells, while the nuclear localization in all other tested cells was dependent on ligand binding. The amount of OTR-positive material within and in the vicinity of the nucleus increased following a treatment with oxytocin in both constitutive and ligand-dependent type of cells. The evidence of OTR compartmentalization at the cell nucleus (either ligand-dependent or constitutive) in different cell types suggests still unknown biological functions of this protein or its ligand and adds this G-protein-coupled receptor to other heptahelical receptors displaying this atypical and unexpected

  20. p150/Glued Modifies Nuclear Estrogen Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Jung; Chae, Christina; Wang, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    Estrogen modulates gene expression through interactions with estrogen receptors (ERs) that bind chromosomal target genes. Recent studies have suggested an interaction between the cytoskeletal system and estrogen signaling; these have implicated a role of cytoplasmic microtubules in scaffolding ERα and enhancing nongenomic function; in addition, other experiments demonstrate that dynein light chain 1 may chaperone ERα to the nucleus, indirectly increasing transcriptional potency. Actin/myosin and dynein light chain 1 are also required for estrogen-mediated chromosomal movement that is required for transcriptional up-regulation of ERα targets. We present evidence that the dynactin component, p150/glued, directly influences the potency of nuclear ER function. Increasing the stoichiometric ratio of p150/glued and ERα by overexpression enhances estrogen responses. ERα enhancement by p150/glued does not appear to be influenced by shifts in subcellular localization because microtubule disruption fails to increase nuclear ERα. Rather, we find that modest amounts of p150/glued reside in the nucleus of cells, suggesting that it plays a direct role in nuclear transcription. Notably, p150/glued is recruited to the pS2 promoter in the presence of hormone, and, in MCF-7 cells, knockdown of p150/glued levels reduces estrogen-dependent transcription. Our results suggest that p150/glued modulates estrogen sensitivity in cells through nuclear mechanisms. PMID:19228793

  1. Porcine mononuclear leukocyte nuclear thyroid hormone receptors: Effects of cold exposure on receptor kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    D'Alesandro, M.; Reed, L.; Malik, M.; Quesada, M.; Hesslink, R.; Castro, S.; Homer, L.; Young, B. Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton )

    1991-03-11

    Changes in kinetic characteristics of the triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) receptor may be a mechanism involved in the thermoregulatory action of T{sub 3} at the nuclear level. To study this, the authors analyzed changes in T{sub 3} nuclear receptor kinetics in cold exposed swine and compared them with similar animals housed at thermoneutral temperature. Receptors were from isolated nuclear extracts of circulating mononuclear leukocytes (MNL). Scatchard analysis indicates the presence of a single class of binding sites. The authors were unable to detect differences in the equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) or the maximum binding capacity (MBC, fmol/up DNA) between the two groups. The Kd for T{sub 3} in the control group was 1.17 {plus minus} 0.11 nmol/L and 1.25 {plus minus} 0.19 nmol/L in the cold exposed group. The MBC was 0.43 {plus minus} 0.04 fmol/ug DNA in the control group and 0.40 {plus minus} 0.06 fmol/L in the cold exposed group. In competition studies using thyroid hormone analogues, 10{sup {minus}7} M reverse T{sub 3} and 3,5-diiodothyronine resulted in approximately 50% displacement from the porcine receptor. TRIAC and L-T{sub 4} had no effect at 10{sup {minus}7} M. The porcine values for both Kd and MBC are similar to those previously reported for human MNL. Although T{sub 3} production and serum T{sub 3} values in the cold exposed group are nearly double the control group (Reed et al., FASEB 1991), continuous short-term cold exposure had no significant effect on MNL nuclear T{sub 3} receptor kinetics.

  2. Allosteric Pathways in the PPARγ-RXRα nuclear receptor complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Clarisse G.; Silveira, Rodrigo L.; Rivalta, Ivan; Batista, Victor S.; Skaf, Munir S.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of allostery in DNA-nuclear receptor (NR) complexes is of fundamental importance for drug development since NRs regulate the transcription of a myriad of genes in humans and other metazoans. Here, we investigate allostery in the peroxisome proliferator-activated/retinoid X receptor heterodimer. This important NR complex is a target for antidiabetic drugs since it binds to DNA and functions as a transcription factor essential for insulin sensitization and lipid metabolism. We find evidence of interdependent motions of Ω-loops and PPARγ-DNA binding domain with contacts susceptible to conformational changes and mutations, critical for regulating transcriptional functions in response to sequence-dependent DNA dynamics. Statistical network analysis of the correlated motions, observed in molecular dynamics simulations, shows preferential allosteric pathways with convergence centers comprised of polar amino acid residues. These findings are particularly relevant for the design of allosteric modulators of ligand-dependent transcription factors.

  3. Allosteric Pathways in the PPARγ-RXRα nuclear receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Clarisse G.; Silveira, Rodrigo L.; Rivalta, Ivan; Batista, Victor S.; Skaf, Munir S.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of allostery in DNA-nuclear receptor (NR) complexes is of fundamental importance for drug development since NRs regulate the transcription of a myriad of genes in humans and other metazoans. Here, we investigate allostery in the peroxisome proliferator-activated/retinoid X receptor heterodimer. This important NR complex is a target for antidiabetic drugs since it binds to DNA and functions as a transcription factor essential for insulin sensitization and lipid metabolism. We find evidence of interdependent motions of Ω-loops and PPARγ-DNA binding domain with contacts susceptible to conformational changes and mutations, critical for regulating transcriptional functions in response to sequence-dependent DNA dynamics. Statistical network analysis of the correlated motions, observed in molecular dynamics simulations, shows preferential allosteric pathways with convergence centers comprised of polar amino acid residues. These findings are particularly relevant for the design of allosteric modulators of ligand-dependent transcription factors. PMID:26823026

  4. Human Xenobiotic Nuclear Receptor PXR Augments Mycobacterium tuberculosis Survival.

    PubMed

    Bhagyaraj, Ella; Nanduri, Ravikanth; Saini, Ankita; Dkhar, Hedwin Kitdorlang; Ahuja, Nancy; Chandra, Vemika; Mahajan, Sahil; Kalra, Rashi; Tiwari, Drishti; Sharma, Charu; Janmeja, Ashok Kumar; Gupta, Pawan

    2016-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis can evade host defense processes, thereby ensuring its survival and pathogenesis. In this study, we investigated the role of nuclear receptor, pregnane X receptor (PXR), in M. tuberculosis infection in human monocyte-derived macrophages. In this study, we demonstrate that PXR augments M. tuberculosis survival inside the host macrophages by promoting the foamy macrophage formation and abrogating phagolysosomal fusion, inflammation, and apoptosis. Additionally, M. tuberculosis cell wall lipids, particularly mycolic acids, crosstalk with human PXR (hPXR) by interacting with its promiscuous ligand binding domain. To confirm our in vitro findings and to avoid the reported species barrier in PXR function, we adopted an in vivo mouse model expressing hPXR, wherein expression of hPXR in mice promotes M. tuberculosis survival. Therefore, pharmacological intervention and designing antagonists to hPXR may prove to be a promising adjunct therapy for tuberculosis. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. Bile acid nuclear receptor FXR and digestive system diseases.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lili; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao; Huang, Wendong

    2015-03-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are not only digestive surfactants but also important cell signaling molecules, which stimulate several signaling pathways to regulate some important biological processes. The bile-acid-activated nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), plays a pivotal role in regulating bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis as well as in regulating the inflammatory responses, barrier function and prevention of bacterial translocation in the intestinal tract. As expected, FXR is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide range of diseases of gastrointestinal tract, including inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the roles of FXR in physiology of the digestive system and the related diseases. Better understanding of the roles of FXR in digestive system will accelerate the development of FXR ligands/modulators for the treatment of digestive system diseases.

  6. Minireview: Nuclear Receptor-Controlled Steroid Hormone Synthesis and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    He, Jinhan; Cheng, Qiuqiong; Xie, Wen

    2010-01-01

    Steroid hormones are essential in normal physiology whereas disruptions in hormonal homeostasis represent an important etiological factor for many human diseases. Steroid hormones exert most of their functions through the binding and activation of nuclear hormone receptors (NRs or NHRs), a superfamily of DNA-binding and often ligand-dependent transcription factors. In recent years, accumulating evidence has suggested that NRs can also regulate the biosynthesis and metabolism of steroid hormones. This review will focus on the recent progress in our understanding of the regulatory role of NRs in hormonal homeostasis and the implications of this regulation in physiology and diseases. PMID:19762543

  7. Melatonin inhibits glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation in mouse thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Presman, Diego M; Hoijman, Esteban; Ceballos, Nora R; Galigniana, Mario D; Pecci, Adali

    2006-11-01

    The antiapoptotic effect of melatonin (MEL) has been described in several systems. In particular, MEL inhibits glucocorticoid-mediated apoptosis. Our group previously demonstrated that in the thymus, MEL inhibits the release of Cytochrome C from mitochondria and the dexamethasone-dependent increase of bax mRNA levels. In this study we analyzed the ability of MEL to regulate the activation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in mouse thymocytes. We found that even though the methoxyindole does not affect the ligand binding capacity of the receptor, it impairs the steroid-dependent nuclear translocation of the GR and also prevents transformation by blocking the dissociation of the 90-kDa heat shock protein. Coincubation of the methoxyindole with dexamethasone did not affect the expression of a reporter gene in GR-transfected Cos-7 cells or HC11 and L929 mouse cell lines that express Mel-1a and retinoid-related orphan receptor-alpha (RORalpha) receptors. Therefore, the antagonistic effect of MEL seems to be specific for thymocytes, in a Mel 1a- and RORalpha-independent manner. In summary, the present results suggest a novel mechanism for the antagonistic action of MEL on GR-mediated effects, which involves the inhibition of 90-kDa heat shock protein dissociation and the cytoplasmic retention of the GR.

  8. Pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor and hepatocyte nuclear factors as emerging players in cancer precision medicine.

    PubMed

    De Mattia, Elena; Cecchin, Erika; Roncato, Rossana; Toffoli, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Great research effort has been focused on elucidating the contribution of host genetic variability on pharmacological outcomes in cancer. Nuclear receptors have emerged as mediators between environmental stimuli and drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor and hepatocyte nuclear factors have been reported to regulate transcription of genes that encode drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Altered nuclear receptor expression has been shown to affect the metabolism and pharmacological profile of traditional chemotherapeutics and targeted agents. Accordingly, polymorphic variants in these genes have been studied as pharmacogenetic markers of outcome variability. This review summarizes the state of knowledge about the roles played by pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor and hepatocyte nuclear factor expression and genetics as predictive markers of anticancer drug toxicity and efficacy, which can improve cancer precision medicine.

  9. Functional analysis of retinoid Z receptor beta, a brain-specific nuclear orphan receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, E F; Kirfel, J; Greschik, H; Dörflinger, U; Becker, P; Mercep, A; Schüle, R

    1996-01-01

    The retinoid Z receptor beta (RZR beta), an orphan receptor, is a member of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR)/thyroid hormone receptor (TR) subfamily of nuclear receptors. RZR beta exhibits a highly restricted brain-specific expression pattern. So far, no natural RZR beta target gene has been identified and the physiological role of the receptor in transcriptional regulation remains to be elucidated. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays reveal binding of RZR beta to monomeric response elements containing the sequence AnnTAGGTCA, but RZR beta-mediated transactivation of reporter genes is only achieved with two property spaced binding sites. We present evidence that RZR beta can function as a cell-type-specific transactivator. In neuronal cells, GaI-RZR beta fusion proteins function as potent transcriptional activators, whereas no transactivation can be observed in nonneuronal cells. Mutational analyses demonstrate that the activation domain (AF-2) of RZR beta and RAR alpha are functionally interchangeable. However, in contrast to RAR and TR, the RZR beta AF-2 cannot function autonomously as a transactivation domain. Furthermore, our data define a novel repressor function for the C-terminal part of the putative ligand binding domain. We propose that the transcriptional activity of RZR beta is regulated by an interplay of different receptor domains with coactivators and corepressors. Images Fig. 5 PMID:8816759

  10. System-wide Analysis of SUMOylation Dynamics in Response to Replication Stress Reveals Novel Small Ubiquitin-like Modified Target Proteins and Acceptor Lysines Relevant for Genome Stability*

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhenyu; Chang, Jer-Gung; Hendriks, Ivo A.; Sigurðsson, Jón Otti; Olsen, Jesper V.; Vertegaal, Alfred C.O.

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxic agents can cause replication fork stalling in dividing cells because of DNA lesions, eventually leading to replication fork collapse when the damage is not repaired. Small Ubiquitin-like Modifiers (SUMOs) are known to counteract replication stress, nevertheless, only a small number of relevant SUMO target proteins are known. To address this, we have purified and identified SUMO-2 target proteins regulated by replication stress in human cells. The developed methodology enabled single step purification of His10-SUMO-2 conjugates under denaturing conditions with high yield and high purity. Following statistical analysis on five biological replicates, a total of 566 SUMO-2 targets were identified. After 2 h of hydroxyurea treatment, 10 proteins were up-regulated for SUMOylation and two proteins were down-regulated for SUMOylation, whereas after 24 h, 35 proteins were up-regulated for SUMOylation, and 13 proteins were down-regulated for SUMOylation. A site-specific approach was used to map over 1000 SUMO-2 acceptor lysines in target proteins. The methodology is generic and is widely applicable in the ubiquitin field. A large subset of these identified proteins function in one network that consists of interacting replication factors, transcriptional regulators, DNA damage response factors including MDC1, ATR-interacting protein ATRIP, the Bloom syndrome protein and the BLM-binding partner RMI1, the crossover junction endonuclease EME1, BRCA1, and CHAF1A. Furthermore, centromeric proteins and signal transducers were dynamically regulated by SUMOylation upon replication stress. Our results uncover a comprehensive network of SUMO target proteins dealing with replication damage and provide a framework for detailed understanding of the role of SUMOylation to counteract replication stress. Ultimately, our study reveals how a post-translational modification is able to orchestrate a large variety of different proteins to integrate different nuclear processes with the

  11. Determination of posttranslational modifications of photoreceptor differentiation factor NRL: focus on SUMOylation.

    PubMed

    Roger, Jerome E; Nellissery, Jacob; Swaroop, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Conjugation of SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier 1) is a critical posttranslational modification, with significant impact on protein function/activity. Here, we describe direct SUMOylation of GST (glutathione S-transferase)-fusion protein and immunoprecipitation assays for investigating SUMOylation of any protein of interest. We have employed these methods to examine SUMOylation of the basic-motif leucine zipper transcription factor NRL.

  12. Farnesyl pyrophosphate is a novel transcriptional activator for a subset of nuclear hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Das, Sharmistha; Schapira, Matthieu; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Goyanka, Ritu; Cardozo, Timothy; Samuels, Herbert H

    2007-11-01

    In silico docking of a chemical library with the ligand-binding domain of thyroid hormone nuclear receptor-beta (TRbeta) suggested that farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP), a key intermediate in cholesterol synthesis and protein farnesylation, might function as an agonist. Surprisingly, addition of FPP to cells activated TR as well as the classical steroid hormone receptors but not peroxisome proliferative-activating receptors, farnesoid X receptor, liver X receptor, or several orphan nuclear receptors the ligands of which are unknown. FPP enhanced receptor-coactivator binding in vitro and in vivo, and elevation of FPP levels in cells by squalene synthetase or farnesyl transferase inhibitors leads to activation. The FPP effect was blocked by selective receptor antagonists, and in silico docking with 143 nuclear receptor ligand-binding domain structures revealed that FPP only docked with the agonist conformation of those receptors activated by FPP. Our results suggest that certain nuclear receptors maintain a common structural feature that may reflect an action of FPP on an ancient nuclear receptor or that FPP could function as a ligand for one of the many orphan nuclear receptors the ligands of which have not yet been identified. This finding also has potential interesting implications that may, in part, explain the pleotropic effects of statins as well as certain actions of farnesylation inhibitors in cells.

  13. Sumoylation regulates EXO1 stability and processing of DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Bologna, Serena; Altmannova, Veronika; Valtorta, Emanuele; Koenig, Christiane; Liberali, Prisca; Gentili, Christian; Anrather, Dorothea; Ammerer, Gustav; Pelkmans, Lucas; Krejci, Lumir; Ferrari, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    DNA double-strand break repair by the error-free pathway of homologous recombination (HR) requires the concerted action of several factors. Among these, EXO1 and DNA2/BLM are responsible for the extensive resection of DNA ends to produce 3′-overhangs, which are essential intermediates for downstream steps of HR. Here we show that EXO1 is a SUMO target and that sumoylation affects EXO1 ubiquitylation and protein stability. We identify an UBC9-PIAS1/PIAS4-dependent mechanism controlling human EXO1 sumoylation in vivo and demonstrate conservation of this mechanism in yeast by the Ubc9-Siz1/Siz2 using an in vitro reconstituted system. Furthermore, we show physical interaction between EXO1 and the de-sumoylating enzyme SENP6 both in vitro and in vivo, promoting EXO1 stability. Finally, we identify the major sites of sumoylation in EXO1 and show that ectopic expression of a sumoylation-deficient form of EXO1 rescues the DNA damage-induced chromosomal aberrations observed upon wt-EXO1 expression. Thus, our study identifies a novel layer of regulation of EXO1, making the pathways that regulate its function an ideal target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26083678

  14. Solubility shift and SUMOylaltion of promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein in response to arsenic(III) and fate of the SUMOylated PML

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Seishiro; Tadano, Mihoko; Kobayashi, Yayoi; Udagawa, Osamu; Kato, Ayaka

    2015-09-15

    Promyelocytic leukemia (PML), which is a tumor suppressor protein that nevertheless plays an important role in the maintenance of leukemia initiating cells, is known to be biochemically modified by As{sup 3+}. We recently developed a simple method to evaluate the modification of PML by As{sup 3+} resulting in a change in solubility and the covalent binding of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO). Here we semi-quantitatively investigated the SUMOylation of PML using HEK293 cells which were stably transfected with PML-VI (HEK-PML). Western blot analyses indicated that PML became insoluble in cold RadioImmunoPrecipitation Assay (RIPA) lysis buffer and was SUMOylated by both SUMO2/3 and SUMO1 by As{sup 3+}. Surprisingly SUMO1 monomers were completely utilized for the SUMOylation of PML. Antimony (Sb{sup 3+}) but not bismuth (Bi{sup 3+}), Cu{sup 2+}, or Cd{sup 2+} biochemically modified PML similarly. SUMOylated PML decreased after removal of As{sup 3+} from the culture medium. However, unSUMOylated PML was still recovered in the RIPA-insoluble fraction, suggesting that SUMOylation is not requisite for changing the RIPA-soluble PML into the RIPA-insoluble form. Immunofluorescence staining of As{sup 3+}-exposed cells indicated that SUMO2/3 was co-localized with PML in the nuclear bodies. However, some PML protein was present in peri-nuclear regions without SUMO2/3. Functional Really Interesting New Gene (RING)-deleted mutant PML neither formed PML nuclear bodies nor was biochemically modified by As{sup 3+}. Conjugation with intracellular glutathione may explain the accessibility of As{sup 3+} and Sb{sup 3+} to PML in the nuclear region evading chelation and entrapping by cytoplasmic proteins such as metallothioneins. - Highlights: • As{sup 3+} is a carcinogen and also a therapeutic agent for leukemia. • PML becomes insoluble in RIPA and SUMOylated by As{sup 3+}. • Sb{sup 3+} modifies PML similar to As{sup 3+}. • Functional RING motif is necessary for As{sup 3

  15. Sumoylation in p27kip1 via RanBP2 promotes cancer cell growth in cholangiocarcinoma cell line QBC939.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Liu, Yan; Wang, Bing; Lan, Hongzhen; Liu, Ying; Chen, Fei; Zhang, Ju; Luo, Jian

    2017-09-07

    Cholangiocarcinoma is one of the deadly disease with poor 5-year survival and poor response to conventional therapies. Previously, we found that p27kip1 nuclear-cytoplasmic translocation confers proliferation potential to cholangiocarcinoma cell line QBC939 and this process is mediated by crm-1. However, no other post-transcriptional regulation was found in this process including sumoylation in cholangiocarcinoma. In this study, we explored the role of sumoylation in the nuclear-cytoplasmic translocation of p27kip1 and its involvement of QBC939 cells' proliferation. First, we identified K73 as the sumoylation site in p27kip1. By utilizing plasmid flag-p27kip1, HA-RanBP2, GST-RanBP2 and His-p27kip1 and immunoprecipitation assay, we validated that p27kip1 can serve as the sumoylation target of RanBP2 in QBC939. Furthermore, we confirmed crm-1's role in promoting nuclear-cytoplasmic translocation of p27kip1 and found that RanBP2's function relies on crm-1. However, K73R mutated p27kip1 can't be identified by crm-1 or RanBP2 in p27kip1 translocation process, suggesting sumoylation of p27kip1 via K73 site is necessary in this process by RanBP2 and crm-1. Phenotypically, the overexpression of either RanBP2 or crm-1 can partially rescue the anti-proliferative effect brought by p27kip1 overexpression in both the MTS and EdU assay. For the first time, we identified and validated the K73 sumoylation site in p27kip1, which is critical to RanBP2 and crm-1 in p27kip1 nuclear-cytoplasmic translocation process. Taken together, targeted inhibition of sumoylation of p27kip1 may serve as a potentially potent therapeutic target in the eradication of cholangiocarcinoma development and relapses.

  16. Role of nuclear receptors in breast cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Papi, Alessio; Orlandi, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The recapitulation of primary tumour heterogenity and the existence of a minor sub-population of cancer cells, capable of initiating tumour growth in xenografts on serial passages, led to the hypothesis that cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist. CSCs are present in many tumours, among which is breast cancer. Breast CSCs (BCSCs) are likely to sustain the growth of the primary tumour mass, as well as to be responsible for disease relapse and metastatic spreading. Consequently, BCSCs represent the most significant target for new drugs in breast cancer therapy. Both the hypoxic condition in BCSCs biology and pro-inflammatory cytokine network has gained increasing importance in the recent past. Breast stromal cells are crucial components of the tumours milieu and are a major source of inflammatory mediators. Recently, the anti-inflammatory role of some nuclear receptors ligands has emerged in several diseases, including breast cancer. Therefore, the use of nuclear receptors ligands may be a valid strategy to inhibit BCSCs viability and consequently breast cancer growth and disease relapse. PMID:27022437

  17. Nuclear receptors and the Warburg effect in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thome, James L.; Campbell, Moray J.

    2016-01-01

    In 1927 Otto Warburg established that tumours derive energy primarily from the conversion of glucose to lactic acid and only partially through cellular respiration involving oxygen. In the 1950s he proposed that all causes of cancer reflected different mechanisms of disabling cellular respiration in favour of fermentation (now termed aerobic glycolysis). The role of aberrant glucose metabolism in cancer is now firmly established. The shift away from oxidative phosphorylation towards the metabolically expensive aerobic glycolysis is somewhat counter-intuitive given its wasteful nature. Multiple control processes are in place to maintain cellular efficiency and it is likely that these mechanisms are disrupted to facilitate the shift to the reliance on aerobic glycolysis. One such process of cell control is mediated by the nuclear receptor superfamily. This large family of transcription factors plays a significant role in sensing environmental cues and controlling decisions on proliferation, differentiation and cell death for example, to regulate glucose uptake and metabolism and to modulate the actions of oncogenes and tumour suppressors. In this review we highlight mechanisms by which nuclear receptors actions are altered during tumorigenic transformation and can serve to enhance the shift to aerobic glycolysis. At the simplest level, a basic alteration in NR behaviour can serve to enhance glycolytic flux thus providing a basis for enhanced survival within the tumour micro-environment. Ameliorating the enhanced NR activity in this context may help to sensitize cancer cells to Warburg targeted therapies and may provide future drug targets. PMID:24895240

  18. A histone chaperone, DEK, transcriptionally coactivates a nuclear receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sawatsubashi, Shun; Murata, Takuya; Lim, Jinseon; Fujiki, Ryoji; Ito, Saya; Suzuki, Eriko; Tanabe, Masahiko; Zhao, Yue; Kimura, Shuhei; Fujiyama, Sally; Ueda, Takashi; Umetsu, Daiki; Ito, Takashi; Takeyama, Ken-ichi; Kato, Shigeaki

    2010-01-01

    Chromatin reorganization is essential for transcriptional control by sequence-specific transcription factors. However, the molecular link between transcriptional control and chromatin reconfiguration remains unclear. By colocalization of the nuclear ecdysone receptor (EcR) on the ecdysone-induced puff in the salivary gland, Drosophila DEK (dDEK) was genetically identified as a coactivator of EcR in both insect cells and intact flies. Biochemical purification and characterization of the complexes containing fly and human DEKs revealed that DEKs serve as histone chaperones via phosphorylation by forming complexes with casein kinase 2. Consistent with the preferential association of the DEK complex with histones enriched in active epigenetic marks, dDEK facilitated H3.3 assembly during puff formation. In some human myeloid leukemia patients, DEK was fused to CAN by chromosomal translocation. This mutation significantly reduced formation of the DEK complex, which is required for histone chaperone activity. Thus, the present study suggests that at least one histone chaperone can be categorized as a type of transcriptional coactivator for nuclear receptors. PMID:20040570

  19. The role of nuclear hormone receptors in cutaneous wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Sandra; Zhao, Hengguang; Martin, Paige; Abe, Koichiro; Lisse, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    The cutaneous wound repair process involves balancing a dynamic series of events ranging from inflammation, oxidative stress, cell migration, proliferation, survival and differentiation. A complex series of secreted trophic factors, cytokines, surface and intracellular proteins are expressed in a temporospatial manner to restore skin integrity after wounding. Impaired initiation, maintenance or termination of the tissue repair processes can lead to perturbed healing, necrosis, fibrosis or even cancer. Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) in the cutaneous environment regulate tissue repair processes such as fibroplasia and angiogenesis. Defects in functional NHRs and their ligands are associated with the clinical phenotypes of chronic non-healing wounds and skin endocrine disorders. The functional relationship between NHRs and skin niche cells such as epidermal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts is pivotal for successful wound closure and permanent repair. The aim of this review is to delineate the cutaneous effects and cross-talk of various nuclear receptors upon injury towards functional tissue restoration. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25529612

  20. Defining the SUMO System in Maize: SUMOylation Is Up-Regulated during Endosperm Development and Rapidly Induced by Stress1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Augustine, Robert C.; Rytz, Thérèse C.

    2016-01-01

    In response to abiotic and biotic challenges, plants rapidly attach small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) to a large collection of nuclear proteins, with studies in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) linking SUMOylation to stress tolerance via its modification of factors involved in chromatin and RNA dynamics. Despite this importance, little is known about SUMOylation in crop species. Here, we describe the plant SUMO system at the phylogenetic, biochemical, and transcriptional levels with a focus on maize (Zea mays). In addition to canonical SUMOs, land plants encode a loosely constrained noncanonical isoform and a variant containing a long extension upstream of the signature β-grasp fold, with cereals also expressing a novel diSUMO polypeptide bearing two SUMO β-grasp domains in tandem. Maize and other cereals also synthesize a unique SUMO-conjugating enzyme variant with more restricted expression patterns that is enzymatically active despite a distinct electrostatic surface. Maize SUMOylation primarily impacts nuclear substrates, is strongly induced by high temperatures, and displays a memory that suppresses subsequent conjugation. Both in-depth transcript and conjugate profiles in various maize organs point to tissue/cell-specific functions for SUMOylation, with potentially significant roles during embryo and endosperm maturation. Collectively, these studies define the organization of the maize SUMO system and imply important functions during seed development and stress defense. PMID:27208252

  1. Cooling-induced SUMOylation of EXOSC10 down-regulates ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Knight, John R P; Bastide, Amandine; Peretti, Diego; Roobol, Anne; Roobol, Jo; Mallucci, Giovanna R; Smales, C Mark; Willis, Anne E

    2016-04-01

    The RNA exosome is essential for 3' processing of functional RNA species and degradation of aberrant RNAs in eukaryotic cells. Recent reports have defined the substrates of the exosome catalytic domains and solved the multimeric structure of the exosome complex. However, regulation of exosome activity remains poorly characterized, especially in response to physiological stress. Following the observation that cooling of mammalian cells results in a reduction in 40S:60S ribosomal subunit ratio, we uncover regulation of the nuclear exosome as a result of reduced temperature. Using human cells and an in vivo model system allowing whole-body cooling, we observe reduced EXOSC10 (hRrp6, Pm/Scl-100) expression in the cold. In parallel, both models of cooling increase global SUMOylation, leading to the identification of specific conjugation of SUMO1 to EXOSC10, a process that is increased by cooling. Furthermore, we define the major SUMOylation sites in EXOSC10 by mutagenesis and show that overexpression of SUMO1 alone is sufficient to suppress EXOSC10 abundance. Reducing EXOSC10 expression by RNAi in human cells correlates with the 3' preribosomal RNA processing defects seen in the cold as well as reducing the 40S:60S ratio, a previously uncharacterized consequence of EXOSC10 suppression. Together, this work illustrates that EXOSC10 can be modified by SUMOylation and identifies a physiological stress where this regulation is prevalent both in vitro and in vivo. © 2016 Knight et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  2. Nanostructured sensors containing immobilized nuclear receptors for thyroid hormone detection.

    PubMed

    Bendo, Luana; Casanova, Monise; Figueira, Ana Carolina M; Polikarpov, Igor; Zucolotto, Valtencir

    2014-05-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are members of the nuclear receptors (NRs) superfamily, being encoded by two genes: TRa and TRbeta. In this paper, the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the TRbeta1 isoform was immobilized on the surface of nanostructured electrodes for TR detection. The platforms containing TRbeta1-LBD were applied to the detection of specific ligand agonists, including the natural hormones T3 (triiodothyronine) and T4 (thyroxine), and the synthetic agonists TRIAC (3,5,3'-triiodothyroacetic acid) and GC-1 [3,5-dimethyl-4-(4'-hydroxy-3'-isopropylbenzyl phenoxy) acetic acid]. Detection was performed via impedance spectroscopy. The biosensors were capable of distinguishing between the thyroid hormones T3 and T4, and/or the analogues TRIAC and GC-1 at concentrations as low as 50 nM. The detection and separation of thyroid hormones and analogue ligands by impedance techniques represents an innovative tool in the field of nanomedicine because it allows the design of inexpensive devices for the rapid and real-time detection of distinct ligand/receptor systems.

  3. Nuclear Receptor PXR, transcriptional circuits and metabolic relevance

    PubMed Central

    Ihunnah, Chibueze A.; Jiang, Mengxi; Xie, Wen

    2011-01-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2) is a ligand activated transcription factor that belongs to the nuclear hormone receptor (NR) superfamily. PXR is highly expressed in the liver and intestine, but low levels of expression have also been found in many other tissues. PXR plays an integral role in xenobiotic and endobiotic metabolism by regulating the expression of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters, as well as genes implicated in the metabolism of endobiotics. PXR exerts its transcriptional regulation by binding to its DNA response elements as a heterodimer with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) and recruitment of a host of coactivators. The biological and physiological implications of PXR activation are broad, ranging from drug metabolism and drug-drug interactions to the homeostasis of numerous endobiotics, such as glucose, lipids, steroids, bile acids, bilirubin, retinoic acid, and bone minerals. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview on the transcriptional circuits and metabolic relevance controlled by PXR. PMID:21295138

  4. Identification of c-MYC SUMOylation by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kalkat, Manpreet; Chan, Pak-Kei; Wasylishen, Amanda R.; Srikumar, Tharan; Kim, Sam S.; Ponzielli, Romina; Bazett-Jones, David P.; Raught, Brian; Penn, Linda Z.

    2014-01-01

    The c-MYC transcription factor is a master regulator of many cellular processes and deregulation of this oncogene has been linked to more than 50% of all cancers. This deregulation can take many forms, including altered post-translational regulation. Here, using immunoprecipitation combined with mass spectrometry, we identified a MYC SUMOylation site (K326). Abrogation of signaling through this residue by substitution with arginine (K326R) has no obvious effects on MYC half-life, intracellular localization, transcriptional targets, nor on the biological effects of MYC overexpression in two different cell systems assessed for soft agar colony formation, proliferation, and apoptosis. While we have definitively demonstrated that MYC SUMOylation can occur on K326, future work will be needed to elucidate the mechanisms and biological significance of MYC regulation by SUMOylation. PMID:25522242

  5. Controlling Androgen receptor nuclear localization by dendrimer conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoyu

    Androgen Receptor (AR) antagonists, such as bicalutamide and flutamide have been used widely in the treatment of prostate cancer. Although initial treatment is effective, prostate cancer cells often acquire antiandrogen resistance with prolonged treatment. AR over-expression and AR mutations contribute to the development of antiandrogen resistant cancer. Second generation antiandrogens such as enzalutamide are more effective and show reduced AR nuclear localization. In this study, derivatives of PAN52, a small molecule antiandrogen previously developed in our lab, were conjugated to the surface of generation 4 and generation 6 PAMAM dendrimers to obtain antiandrogen PAMAM dendrimer conjugates (APDC). APDCs readily enter cells and associate with AR in the cytoplasm. Due to their large size and positive charge, they can not enter the nucleus, thus retaining AR in the cytoplasm. In addition, APDCs are effective in decreasing AR mediated transcription and cell proliferation. APDC is the first AR antagonists that inhibit DHT-induced nuclear localization of AR. By inhibiting AR nuclear localization, APDC represents a new class of antiandrogens that offer an alternative approach to addressing antiandrogen-resistant prostate cancer. Lysine post-translational modification of AR Nuclear Localization Sequence (NLS) has great impact on AR cellular localization. It is of interest to understand which modifications modulate AR translocation into the nucleus. In this study, we prepared dendrimer-based acetyltransferase mimetic (DATM), DATM is able to catalytically acetylate AR in CWR22Rv1 cells, which will be a useful tool for studying AR modification effect on AR cellular localization. Derivatives of DATM, which transfer other chemical groups to AR, can be prepared similarly, and with more dendrimer based AR modification tools prepared in future, we will be able to understand and control AR cellular localization through AR modification.

  6. Nuclear receptor atlas of female mouse liver parenchymal, endothelial, and Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaosha; Kruijt, J Kar; van der Sluis, Ronald J; Van Berkel, Theo J C; Hoekstra, Menno

    2013-04-01

    The liver consists of different cell types that together synchronize crucial roles in liver homeostasis. Since nuclear receptors constitute an important class of drug targets that are involved in a wide variety of physiological processes, we have composed the hepatic cell type-specific expression profile of nuclear receptors to uncover the pharmacological potential of liver-enriched nuclear receptors. Parenchymal liver cells (hepatocytes) and liver endothelial and Kupffer cells were isolated from virgin female C57BL/6 wild-type mice using collagenase perfusion and counterflow centrifugal elutriation. The hepatic expression pattern of 49 nuclear receptors was generated by real-time quantitative PCR using the NUclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA) program resources. Thirty-six nuclear receptors were expressed in total liver. FXR-α, EAR2, LXR-α, HNF4-α, and CAR were the most abundantly expressed nuclear receptors in liver parenchymal cells. In contrast, NUR77, COUP-TFII, LXR-α/β, FXR-α, and EAR2 were the most highly expressed nuclear receptors in endothelial and Kupffer cells. Interestingly, members of orphan receptor COUP-TF family showed a distinct expression pattern. EAR2 was highly and exclusively expressed in parenchymal cells, while COUP-TFII was moderately and exclusively expressed in endothelial and Kupffer cells. Of interest, the orphan receptor TR4 showed a similar expression pattern as the established lipid sensor PPAR-γ. In conclusion, our study provides the most complete quantitative assessment of the nuclear receptor distribution in liver reported to date. Our gene expression catalog suggests that orphan nuclear receptors such as COUP-TFII, EAR2, and TR4 may be of significant importance as novel targets for pharmaceutical interventions in liver.

  7. A glucocorticoid/retinoic acid receptor chimera that displays cytoplasmic/nuclear translocation in response to retinoic acid. A real time sensing assay for nuclear receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Mackem, S; Baumann, C T; Hager, G L

    2001-12-07

    Members of the nuclear receptor superfamily play key roles in a host of physiologic and pathologic processes from embryogenesis to cancer. Some members, including the retinoic acid receptor (RAR), are activated by ligand binding but are unaffected in their subcellular distribution, which is predominantly nuclear. In contrast, several members of the steroid receptor family, including the glucocorticoid receptor, are cytoplasmic and only translocate to the nucleus after ligand binding. We have constructed chimeras between RAR and glucocorticoid receptor that selectively respond to RAR agonists but display cytoplasmic localization in the absence of ligand. These chimeric receptors manifest both nuclear translocation and gene activation functions in response to physiological concentrations of RAR ligands. The ability to achieve regulated subcellular trafficking with a heterologous ligand binding domain has implications both for current models of receptor translocation and for structural-functional conservation of ligand binding domains broadly across the receptor superfamily. When coupled to the green fluorescent protein, chimeric receptors offer a powerful new tool to 1) study mechanisms of steroid receptor translocation, 2) detect dynamic and graded distributions of ligands in complex microenvironments such as embryos, and 3) screen for novel ligands of "orphan" receptors in vivo.

  8. Molecular adaptation and resilience of the insect's nuclear receptor USP.

    PubMed

    Chaumot, Arnaud; Da Lage, Jean-Luc; Maestro, Oscar; Martin, David; Iwema, Thomas; Brunet, Frederic; Belles, Xavier; Laudet, Vincent; Bonneton, François

    2012-10-05

    The maintenance of biological systems requires plasticity and robustness. The function of the ecdysone receptor, a heterodimer composed of the nuclear receptors ECR (NR1H1) and USP (NR2B4), was maintained in insects despite a dramatic divergence that occurred during the emergence of Mecopterida. This receptor is therefore a good model to study the evolution of plasticity. We tested the hypothesis that selection has shaped the Ligand-Binding Domain (LBD) of USP during evolution of Mecopterida. We isolated usp and cox1 in several species of Drosophilidae, Tenebrionidae and Blattaria and estimated non-synonymous/synonymous rate ratios using maximum-likelihood methods and codon-based substitution models. Although the usp sequences were mainly under negative selection, we detected relaxation at residues located on the surface of the LBD within Mecopterida families. Using branch-site models, we also detected changes in selective constraints along three successive branches of the Mecopterida evolution. Residues located at the bottom of the ligand-binding pocket (LBP) underwent strong positive selection during the emergence of Mecopterida. This change is correlated with the acquisition of a large LBP filled by phospholipids that probably allowed the stabilisation of the new Mecopterida structure. Later, when the two subgroups of Mecopterida (Amphiesmenoptera: Lepidoptera, Trichoptera; Antliophora: Diptera, Mecoptera, Siphonaptera) diverged, the same positions became under purifying selection. Similarly, several positions of the heterodimerisation interface experienced positive selection during the emergence of Mecopterida, rapidly followed by a phase of constrained evolution. An enlargement of the heterodimerisation surface is specific for Mecopterida and was associated with a reinforcement of the obligatory partnership between ECR and USP, at the expense of homodimerisation. In order to explain the episodic mode of evolution of USP, we propose a model in which the

  9. SUMOylation regulates polo-like kinase 1-interacting checkpoint helicase (PICH) during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Vinidhra; Park, Hyewon; Ryu, Hyunju; Azuma, Yoshiaki

    2015-02-06

    Mitotic SUMOylation has an essential role in faithful chromosome segregation in eukaryotes, although its molecular consequences are not yet fully understood. In Xenopus egg extract assays, we showed that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) is modified by SUMO2/3 at mitotic centromeres and that its enzymatic activity could be regulated by SUMOylation. To determine the molecular consequence of mitotic SUMOylation, we analyzed SUMOylated PARP1-specific binding proteins. We identified Polo-like kinase 1-interacting checkpoint helicase (PICH) as an interaction partner of SUMOylated PARP1 in Xenopus egg extract. Interestingly, PICH also bound to SUMOylated topoisomerase IIα (TopoIIα), a major centromeric small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) substrate. Purified recombinant human PICH interacted with SUMOylated substrates, indicating that PICH directly interacts with SUMO, and this interaction is conserved among species. Further analysis of mitotic chromosomes revealed that PICH localized to the centromere independent of mitotic SUMOylation. Additionally, we found that PICH is modified by SUMO2/3 on mitotic chromosomes and in vitro. PICH SUMOylation is highly dependent on protein inhibitor of activated STAT, PIASy, consistent with other mitotic chromosomal SUMO substrates. Finally, the SUMOylation of PICH significantly reduced its DNA binding capability, indicating that SUMOylation might regulate its DNA-dependent ATPase activity. Collectively, our findings suggest a novel SUMO-mediated regulation of the function of PICH at mitotic centromeres.

  10. SUMOylation Regulates Polo-like Kinase 1-interacting Checkpoint Helicase (PICH) during Mitosis*

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Vinidhra; Park, Hyewon; Ryu, Hyunju; Azuma, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic SUMOylation has an essential role in faithful chromosome segregation in eukaryotes, although its molecular consequences are not yet fully understood. In Xenopus egg extract assays, we showed that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) is modified by SUMO2/3 at mitotic centromeres and that its enzymatic activity could be regulated by SUMOylation. To determine the molecular consequence of mitotic SUMOylation, we analyzed SUMOylated PARP1-specific binding proteins. We identified Polo-like kinase 1-interacting checkpoint helicase (PICH) as an interaction partner of SUMOylated PARP1 in Xenopus egg extract. Interestingly, PICH also bound to SUMOylated topoisomerase IIα (TopoIIα), a major centromeric small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) substrate. Purified recombinant human PICH interacted with SUMOylated substrates, indicating that PICH directly interacts with SUMO, and this interaction is conserved among species. Further analysis of mitotic chromosomes revealed that PICH localized to the centromere independent of mitotic SUMOylation. Additionally, we found that PICH is modified by SUMO2/3 on mitotic chromosomes and in vitro. PICH SUMOylation is highly dependent on protein inhibitor of activated STAT, PIASy, consistent with other mitotic chromosomal SUMO substrates. Finally, the SUMOylation of PICH significantly reduced its DNA binding capability, indicating that SUMOylation might regulate its DNA-dependent ATPase activity. Collectively, our findings suggest a novel SUMO-mediated regulation of the function of PICH at mitotic centromeres. PMID:25564610

  11. Sumoylation stabilizes RACK1B and enhance its interaction with RAP2.6 in the abscisic acid response

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rongkai; Sun, Weining

    2017-01-01

    The highly conserved eukaryotic WD40 repeat protein, Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1), is involved in the abscisic acid (ABA) response in Arabidopsis. However, the regulation of RACK1 and the proteins with which it interacts are poorly understood. Here, we show that RACK1B is sumoylated at four residues, Lys50, Lys276, Lys281 and Lys291. Sumoylation increases RACK1B stability and its tolerance to ubiquitination-mediated degradation in ABA response. As a result, sumoylation leads to enhanced interaction between RACK1B and RAP2.6, an AP2/ERF family transcription factor. RACK1B binds directly to the AP2 domain of RAP2.6, which alters the affinity of RAP2.6 for CE1 and GCC cis-acting regulatory elements. Taken together, our findings illustrate that protein stability controlled by dynamic post-transcriptional modification is a critical regulatory mechanism for RACK1B, which functions as scaffold protein for RAP2.6 in ABA signaling. PMID:28272518

  12. A structural view of nuclear hormone receptor: endocrine disruptor interactions.

    PubMed

    le Maire, Albane; Bourguet, William; Balaguer, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) represent a broad class of exogenous substances that cause adverse effects in the endocrine system by interfering with hormone biosynthesis, metabolism, or action. The molecular mechanisms of EDCs involve different pathways including interactions with nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) which are primary targets of a large variety of environmental contaminants. Here, based on the crystal structures currently available in the Protein Data Bank, we review recent studies showing the many ways in which EDCs interact with NHRs and impact their signaling pathways. Like the estrogenic chemical diethylstilbestrol, some EDCs mimic the natural hormones through conserved protein-ligand contacts, while others, such as organotins, employ radically different binding mechanisms. Such structure-based knowledge, in addition to providing a better understanding of EDC activities, can be used to predict the endocrine-disrupting potential of environmental pollutants and may have applications in drug discovery.

  13. Nuclear receptor regulation of stemness and stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yangsik

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells include a diverse number of toti-, pluri-, and multi-potent cells that play important roles in cellular genesis and differentiation, tissue development, and organogenesis. Genetic regulation involving various transcription factors results in the self-renewal and differentiation properties of stem cells. The nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily is composed of 48 ligand-activated transcription factors involved in diverse physiological functions such as metabolism, development, and reproduction. Increasing evidence shows that certain NRs function in regulating stemness or differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells and tissue-specific adult stem cells. Here, we review the role of the NR superfamily in various aspects of stem cell biology, including their regulation of stemness, forward- and trans-differentiation events; reprogramming of terminally differentiated cells; and interspecies differences. These studies provide insights into the therapeutic potential of the NR superfamily in stem cell therapy and in treating stem cell-associated diseases (e.g., cancer stem cell). PMID:19696553

  14. Allosteric mechanisms of nuclear receptors: insights from computational simulations.

    PubMed

    Mackinnon, Jonathan A G; Gallastegui, Nerea; Osguthorpe, David J; Hagler, Arnold T; Estébanez-Perpiñá, Eva

    2014-08-05

    The traditional structural view of allostery defines this key regulatory mechanism as the ability of one conformational event (allosteric site) to initiate another in a separate location (active site). In recent years computational simulations conducted to understand how this phenomenon occurs in nuclear receptors (NRs) has gained significant traction. These results have yield insights into allosteric changes and communication mechanisms that underpin ligand binding, coactivator binding site formation, post-translational modifications, and oncogenic mutations. Moreover, substantial efforts have been made in understanding the dynamic processes involved in ligand binding and coregulator recruitment to different NR conformations in order to predict cell/tissue-selective pharmacological outcomes of drugs. They also have improved the accuracy of in silico screening protocols so that nowadays they are becoming part of optimisation protocols for novel therapeutics. Here we summarise the important contributions that computational simulations have made towards understanding the structure/function relationships of NRs and how these can be exploited for rational drug design.

  15. Nuclear hormone receptor co-repressors: Structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Peter J.; Fairall, Louise; Schwabe, John W.R.

    2012-01-01

    Co-repressor proteins, such as SMRT and NCoR, mediate the repressive activity of unliganded nuclear receptors and other transcription factors. They appear to act as intrinsically disordered “hub proteins” that integrate the activities of a range of transcription factors with a number of histone modifying enzymes. Although these co-repressor proteins are challenging targets for structural studies due to their largely unstructured character, a number of structures have recently been determined of co-repressor interaction regions in complex with their interacting partners. These have yielded considerable insight into the mechanism of assembly of these complexes, the structural basis for the specificity of the interactions and also open opportunities for targeting these interactions therapeutically. PMID:21925568

  16. Minireview: Nuclear Receptor Regulation of Osteoclast and Bone Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zixue; Li, Xiaoxiao

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing cells essential for skeletal remodeling and regeneration. However, excessive osteoclasts often contribute to prevalent bone degenerative diseases such as osteoporosis, arthritis, and cancer bone metastasis. Osteoclast dysregulation is also associated with rare disorders such as osteopetrosis, pycnodysostosis, Paget's disease, and Gorham-Stout syndrome. The nuclear receptor (NR) family of transcription factors functions as metabolic sensors that control a variety of physiological processes including skeletal homeostasis and serves as attractive therapeutic targets for many diseases. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the new players and the new mechanisms for how NRs regulate osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. An enhanced understanding of NR functions in osteoclastogenesis will facilitate the development of not only novel osteoprotective medicine but also prudent strategies to minimize the adverse skeletal effects of certain NR-targeting drugs for a better treatment of cancer and metabolic diseases. PMID:25549044

  17. Therapeutic potential of nuclear receptor agonists in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Moutinho, Miguel; Landreth, Gary E

    2017-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by an extensive accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, which triggers a set of deleterious processes, including synaptic dysfunction, inflammation, and neuronal injury, leading to neuronal loss and cognitive impairment. A large body of evidence supports that nuclear receptor (NR) activation could be a promising therapeutic approach for AD. NRs are ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate gene expression and have cell type-specific effects. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms that underlie the beneficial effects of NRs in AD. Moreover, we summarize studies reported in the last 10-15 years and their major outcomes arising from the pharmacological targeting of NRs in AD animal models. The dissection of the pathways regulated by NRs in the context of AD is of importance in identifying novel and effective therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Bmal1 is a direct transcriptional target of the orphan nuclear receptor, NR2F1

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Orphan nuclear receptor NR2F1 (also known as COUP-TFI, Chicken Ovalbumin Upstream Promoter Transcription Factor I) is a highly conserved member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. NR2F1 plays a critical role during embryonic development, particularly in the central and peripheral nervous systems a...

  19. Sumoylation of the THO complex regulates the biogenesis of a subset of mRNPs

    PubMed Central

    Bretes, Hugo; Rouviere, Jérôme O.; Leger, Thibaut; Oeffinger, Marlene; Devaux, Frédéric; Doye, Valérie; Palancade, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    Assembly of messenger ribonucleoparticles (mRNPs) is a pivotal step in gene expression, but only a few molecular mechanisms contributing to its regulation have been described. Here, through a comprehensive proteomic survey of mRNP assembly, we demonstrate that the SUMO pathway specifically controls the association of the THO complex with mRNPs. We further show that the THO complex, a key player in the interplay between gene expression, mRNA export and genetic stability, is sumoylated on its Hpr1 subunit and that this modification regulates its association with mRNPs. Altered recruitment of the THO complex onto mRNPs in sumoylation-defective mutants does not affect bulk mRNA export or genetic stability, but impairs the expression of acidic stress-induced genes and, consistently, compromises viability in acidic stress conditions. Importantly, inactivation of the nuclear exosome suppresses the phenotypes of the hpr1 non-sumoylatable mutant, showing that SUMO-dependent mRNP assembly is critical to allow a specific subset of mRNPs to escape degradation. This article thus provides the first example of a SUMO-dependent mRNP-assembly event allowing a refined tuning of gene expression, in particular under specific stress conditions. PMID:24500206

  20. Receptors and ionic transporters in nuclear membranes: new targets for therapeutical pharmacological interventions.

    PubMed

    Bkaily, Ghassan; Avedanian, Levon; Al-Khoury, Johny; Ahmarani, Lena; Perreault, Claudine; Jacques, Danielle

    2012-08-01

    Work from our group and other laboratories showed that the nucleus could be considered as a cell within a cell. This is based on growing evidence of the presence and role of nuclear membrane G-protein coupled receptors and ionic transporters in the nuclear membranes of many cell types, including vascular endothelial cells, endocardial endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, and hepatocytes. The nuclear membrane receptors were found to modulate the functioning of ionic transporters at the nuclear level, and thus contribute to regulation of nuclear ionic homeostasis. Nuclear membranes of the mentioned types of cells possess the same ionic transporters; however, the type of receptors is cell-type dependent. Regulation of cytosolic and nuclear ionic homeostasis was found to be dependent upon a tight crosstalk between receptors and ionic transporters of the plasma membranes and those of the nuclear membrane. This crosstalk seems to be the basis for excitation-contraction coupling, excitation-secretion coupling, and excitation - gene expression coupling. Further advancement in this field will certainly shed light on the role of nuclear membrane receptors and transporters in health and disease. This will in turn enable the successful design of a new class of drugs that specifically target such highly vital nuclear receptors and ionic transporters.

  1. Requirements for heterodimerization between the orphan nuclear receptor Nurr1 and retinoid X receptors.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, Paola; Dwornik, Hélène; Formstecher, Pierre; Rachez, Christophe; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2002-09-20

    The nuclear receptor nurr1 is a transcription factor involved in the development and maintenance of neurons synthesizing the neurotransmitter dopamine. Although the lack of nurr1 expression has dramatic consequences for these cells either in terms of differentiation or survival, the mechanisms by which nurr1 controls gene transcription still remain unclear. In the intent to understand better the modalities of action of this nuclear receptor, we have undertaken a systematic analysis of the transcriptional effects and DNA binding properties of nurr1 as a monomer or when forming dimers with the different isotypes of the retinoic X receptor (RXR). Here, we show that nurr1 acts as a gene activator independently of RXR and through an AF2-independent mechanism. In addition, heterodimerization with RXR is isotype-specific, involves multiple domains in the C-terminal region of nurr1, and requires RXR binding to DNA. RXR(alpha)-nurr1 and RXRgamma-nurr1 heterodimers bind direct repeat response elements and display no specific requirements with respect to half-site spacing. However, the retinoid responsiveness of DNA-bound heterodimers requires the reiteration of at least three nurr1 binding sites, thereby limiting retinoid-induced nurr1 transcriptional activity to specific direct response elements.

  2. The dynamic interacting landscape of MAPL reveals essential functions for SUMOylation in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Karine; Goyon, Vanessa; Coyaud, Etienne; Rajapakse, Sanjeeva; Raught, Brian; McBride, Heidi M

    2017-12-01

    Activation of the innate immune response triggered by dsRNA viruses occurs through the assembly of the Mitochondrial Anti-Viral Signaling (MAVS) complex. Upon recognition of viral dsRNA, the cytosolic receptor RIG-I is activated and recruited to MAVS to activate the immune signaling response. We here demonstrate a strict requirement for a mitochondrial anchored protein ligase, MAPL (also called MUL1) in the signaling events that drive the transcriptional activation of antiviral genes downstream of Sendai virus infection, both in vivo and in vitro. A biotin environment scan of MAPL interacting polypeptides identified a series of proteins specific to Sendai virus infection; including RIG-I, IFIT1, IFIT2, HERC5 and others. Upon infection, RIG-I is SUMOylated in a MAPL-dependent manner, a conjugation step that is required for its activation. Consistent with this, MAPL was not required for signaling downstream of a constitutively activated form of RIG-I. These data highlight a critical role for MAPL and mitochondrial SUMOylation in the early steps of antiviral signaling.

  3. Regulation of Oligodendrocyte Differentiation and Myelination by Nuclear Receptors: Role in Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Hernández, Adrián; Contreras, María José; Jaramillo, Jenny; Arboleda, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    During development and through adulthood, differentiation of diverse cell types is controlled by specific genetic and molecular programs for which transcription factors are master regulators of gene expression. Here, we present an overview of the role of nuclear receptors and their selective pharmacological modulators in oligodendrocytes linage, their role in myelination and remyelination and their potential use as a therapeutic strategy for demyelinating diseases. We discuss several aspects of nuclear receptors including: (1) the biochemistry of nuclear receptors superfamily; (2) their role on stem cells physiology, focusing in differentiation and cell removal; (3) the role of nuclear receptor in the oligodendrocytes cell linage, from oligodendrocyte progenitors cells to mature myelinating cells; and (4) the therapeutics opportunities of nuclear receptors for specific demyelinating diseases.

  4. Nuclear hormone receptor functions in keratinocyte and melanocyte homeostasis, epidermal carcinogenesis and melanomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hyter, Stephen; Indra, Arup K

    2013-01-01

    Skin homeostasis is maintained, in part, through regulation of gene expression orchestrated by type II nuclear hormone receptors in a cell and context specific manner. This group of transcriptional regulators is implicated in various cellular processes including epidermal proliferation, differentiation, permeability barrier formation, follicular cycling and inflammatory responses. Endogenous ligands for the receptors regulate actions during skin development and maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Type II nuclear receptor signaling is also important for cellular crosstalk between multiple cell types in the skin. Overall, these nuclear receptors are critical players in keratinocyte and melanocyte biology and present targets for cutaneous disease management. PMID:23395795

  5. Phenobarbital and Insulin Reciprocate Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor through the Insulin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yasujima, Tomoya; Saito, Kosuke; Moore, Rick

    2016-01-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) antagonized insulin to inactivate the insulin receptor and attenuated the insulin receptor downstream protein kinase B (AKT)–forkhead box protein O1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signals in mouse primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. Hepatic AKT began dephosphorylation in an early stage of PB treatment, and blood glucose levels transiently increased in both wild-type and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) knockout (KO) mice. On the other hand, blood glucose levels increased in wild-type mice, but not KO mice, in later stages of PB treatment. As a result, PB, acting as an insulin receptor antagonist, elicited CAR-independent increases and CAR-dependent decreases of blood glucose levels at these different stages of treatment, respectively. Reciprocally, insulin activation of the insulin receptor repressed CAR activation and induction of its target CYP2B6 gene in HepG2 cells. Thus, PB and insulin cross-talk through the insulin receptor to regulate glucose and drug metabolism reciprocally. PMID:26994072

  6. Phenobarbital and Insulin Reciprocate Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor through the Insulin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Yasujima, Tomoya; Saito, Kosuke; Moore, Rick; Negishi, Masahiko

    2016-05-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) antagonized insulin to inactivate the insulin receptor and attenuated the insulin receptor downstream protein kinase B (AKT)-forkhead box protein O1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signals in mouse primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. Hepatic AKT began dephosphorylation in an early stage of PB treatment, and blood glucose levels transiently increased in both wild-type and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) knockout (KO) mice. On the other hand, blood glucose levels increased in wild-type mice, but not KO mice, in later stages of PB treatment. As a result, PB, acting as an insulin receptor antagonist, elicited CAR-independent increases and CAR-dependent decreases of blood glucose levels at these different stages of treatment, respectively. Reciprocally, insulin activation of the insulin receptor repressed CAR activation and induction of its target CYP2B6 gene in HepG2 cells. Thus, PB and insulin cross-talk through the insulin receptor to regulate glucose and drug metabolism reciprocally. Copyright © 2016 by U.S. Government work not protected by U.S. copyright.

  7. The nuclear receptor CAR modulates alcohol-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaosong; Meng, Zhipeng; Wang, Xiaoqiong; Zeng, Samuel; Huang, Wendong

    2011-08-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and a sensor and detoxifier of both xenobiotics and endobiotics. Recent studies also show that CAR participates in metabolism of glucose and lipid, and has an important role in fatty liver disease and diabetes. In this study, we investigate the roles of CAR in chronic and acute alcohol-induced liver injuries. The results showed that absence of CAR in rodents led to significantly increased susceptibility to chronic alcohol-induced liver injury, which was accompanied with elevated hepatocyte apoptosis and fat accumulation. However, pre-activation of CAR by a CAR agonist, TCPOBOP, strongly enhanced the hepatic toxicity by both chronic and acute alcohol infusion in wild-type, but not in CAR(-/-) mice. Gene expression analyses indicated that CAR pre-activation and alcohol infusion synergistically decreased the expression of enzymes that metabolize the alcohol in liver. These results support a role of CAR in modulating alcoholic liver injury and imply a risk of synergistic liver toxicity induced by alcohol and CAR activation.

  8. Sumoylation of the major immediate-early IE2 protein of human cytomegalovirus Towne strain is not required for virus growth in cultured human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Ra; Ahn, Jin-Hyun

    2004-08-01

    Sumoylation of the major immediate-early IE2 protein of human cytomegalovirus has been shown to increase transactivation activity in target reporter gene assays. This study examined the role of IE2 sumoylation in viral infection. A Towne strain-based bacterial artificial chromosome clone was generated encoding a mutated form of the IE2 protein with Lys-->Arg substitutions at positions 175 and 180, the two major sumoylation sites. When human fibroblast (HF) cells were infected with the reconstituted mutant virus, (i) viral growth kinetics, (ii) the accumulation of IE1 (UL123), IE2 (UL122), p52 (UL44) and pp65 (UL83) proteins and (iii) the relocalization of the cellular small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-1, p53 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen proteins into viral DNA replication compartments were comparable with those of the wild-type and the revertant virus. The data demonstrate that sumoylation of IE2 is not essential for virus growth in cultured HF cells.

  9. Transcriptional coordination of hepatic autophagy by nutrient-sensing nuclear receptor PPARα and FXR

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are in general ligand-dependent transcription factors that control a variety of mammalian physiologies including development, differentiation, proliferation, and homeostasis. Recent studies have found that two nutrient-sensing nuclear receptors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α and farnesoid x receptor, responding to fasting or feeding state, respectively are able to regulate autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process involved in lysosomal degradation. In this review, we discuss the role of these nutrient-sensing nuclear receptors in an aspect of transcriptional regulation of autophagy, and how these nuclear receptor-driven transcriptional programs integrate lipophagy, a lipid autophagy with fatty acid oxidation to coordinate hepatic lipid metabolism in the fasted state of the liver. PMID:28164071

  10. Transcriptional coordination of hepatic autophagy by nutrient-sensing nuclear receptor PPARα and FXR.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Man

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear receptors are in general ligand-dependent transcription factors that control a variety of mammalian physiologies including development, differentiation, proliferation, and homeostasis. Recent studies have found that two nutrient-sensing nuclear receptors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α and farnesoid x receptor, responding to fasting or feeding state, respectively are able to regulate autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process involved in lysosomal degradation. In this review, we discuss the role of these nutrient-sensing nuclear receptors in an aspect of transcriptional regulation of autophagy, and how these nuclear receptor-driven transcriptional programs integrate lipophagy, a lipid autophagy with fatty acid oxidation to coordinate hepatic lipid metabolism in the fasted state of the liver.

  11. Characterization of nuclear localization signals and cytoplasmic retention region in the nuclear receptor CAR.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Motoyoshi; Nakahama, Takayuki; Inouye, Yoshio

    2005-09-10

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a ligand/activator-dependent transactivation factor that resides in the cytoplasm and forms part of an as yet unidentified protein complex. Upon stimulation, CAR translocates into the nucleus where it modulates the transactivation of target genes. However, CAR exogenously expressed in rat liver RL-34 cells is located in the nucleus even in the absence of activators. By transiently transfecting RL-34 cells with various mutated rat CAR segments, we identified two nuclear localization signals: a basic amino acid-rich sequence (RRARQARRR) between amino acids 100 and 108; and an assembly of noncontiguous residues widely spread over amino acid residues 111 to 320 within the ligand binding domain. A C-terminal leucine-rich segment corresponding to a previously reported murine xenochemical response signal was not found to exhibit nuclear import activity in cultured cells. Using rat primary hepatocytes transfected with various CAR segments, we identified the region required for the cytoplasmic retention of CAR. Based on these results, the intracellular localization of CAR would be determined by the combined effects of nuclear localization signals, the xenochemical response signal, and the cytoplasmic retention region.

  12. Mode of Action and Human Relevance Analysis for Nuclear Receptor-Mediated Liver Toxicity: A Case Study with Phenobarbital as a Model Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR) Activator

    EPA Science Inventory

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are key nuclear receptors involved in the regulation of cellular responses. to exposure to many xenobiotics and various physiological processes. Phenobarbital (PB) is a non­ genotoxic i...

  13. Mode of Action and Human Relevance Analysis for Nuclear Receptor-Mediated Liver Toxicity: A Case Study with Phenobarbital as a Model Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR) Activator

    EPA Science Inventory

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are key nuclear receptors involved in the regulation of cellular responses. to exposure to many xenobiotics and various physiological processes. Phenobarbital (PB) is a non­ genotoxic i...

  14. Shp2 SUMOylation promotes ERK activation and hepatocellular carcinoma development

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Rong; Zhao, Xian; Qu, YingYing; Chen, Cheng; Zhu, Changhong; Zhang, Hailong; Yuan, Haihua; Jin, Hui; Liu, Xin; Wang, Yanli; Chen, Qin; Huang, Jian; Yu, Jianxiu

    2015-01-01

    Shp2, an ubiquitously expressed protein tyrosine phosphatase, is essential for regulation of Ras/ERK signaling pathway and tumorigenesis. Here we report that Shp2 is modified by SUMO1 at lysine residue 590 (K590) in its C-terminus, which is reduced by SUMO1-specific protease SENP1. Analysis of wild-type Shp2 and SUMOylation-defective Shp2K590R mutant reveals that SUMOylation of Shp2 promotes EGF-stimulated ERK signaling pathway and increases anchorage-independent cell growth and xenografted tumor growth of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines. Furthermore, we find that mutant Shp2K590R reduces its binding with the scaffolding protein Gab1, and consistent with this, knockdown of SENP1 increased the interaction between Shp2 and Gab1. More surprisingly, we show that human Shp2 (hShp2) and mouse Shp2 (mShp2) have differential effects on ERK activation as a result of different SUMOylation level, which is due to the event of K590 at hShp2 substituted by R594 at mShp2. In summary, our data demonstrate that SUMOylation of Shp2 promotes ERK activation via facilitating the formation of Shp2-Gab1 complex and thereby accelerates HCC cell and tumor growth, which presents a novel regulatory mechanism underlying Shp2 in regulation of HCC development. PMID:25823821

  15. SUMOylation of Argonaute-2 regulates RNA interference activity

    PubMed Central

    Josa-Prado, Fernando; Henley, Jeremy M.; Wilkinson, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modification of substrate proteins by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) regulates a vast array of cellular processes. SUMOylation occurs through three sequential enzymatic steps termed E1, E2 and E3. Substrate selection can be determined through interactions between the target protein and the SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme Ubc9 and specificity can be enhanced by substrate interactions with E3 ligase enzymes. We used the putative substrate recognition (PINIT) domain from the SUMO E3 PIAS3 as bait to identify potential SUMO substrates. One protein identified was Argonaute-2 (Ago2), which mediates RNA-induced gene silencing through binding small RNAs and promoting degradation of complimentary target mRNAs. We show that Ago2 can be SUMOylated in mammalian cells by both SUMO1 and SUMO2. SUMOylation occurs primarily at K402, and mutation of the SUMO consensus site surrounding this lysine reduces Ago2-mediated siRNA-induced silencing in a luciferase-based reporter assay. These results identify SUMOylation as a potential regulator of Ago2 activity and open new avenues for research into the mechanisms underlying the regulation of RNA-induced gene silencing. PMID:26188511

  16. Functional interaction of nuclear receptor coactivator 4 with aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kollara, Alexandra; Brown, Theodore J. . E-mail: brown@mshri.on.ca

    2006-07-28

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transcriptional activity is enhanced by interaction with p160 coactivators. We demonstrate here that NcoA4, a nuclear receptor coactivator, interacts with and amplifies AhR action. NcoA4-AhR and NcoA4-ARNT interactions were demonstrated by immunoprecipitation in T47D breast cancer and COS cells and was independent of ligand. Overexpression of NcoA4 enhanced AhR transcriptional activity 3.2-fold in the presence of dioxin, whereas overexpression of a splice variant, NcoA4{beta}, as well as a variant lacking the C-terminal region enhanced AhR transcriptional activity by only 1.6-fold. Enhanced AhR signaling by NcoA4 was independent of the LXXLL and FXXLF motifs or of the activation domain. NcoA4 protein localized to cytoplasm in the absence of dioxin and in both the cytoplasm and nucleus following dioxin treatment. NcoA4-facilitation of AhR activity was abolished by overexpression of androgen receptor, suggesting a potential competition of AhR and androgen receptor for NcoA4. These findings thus demonstrate a functional interaction between NcoA4 and AhR that may alter AhR activity to affect disease development and progression.

  17. Combined therapeutic potential of nuclear receptors with receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wairagu, Peninah M.; Park, Kwang Hwa; Kim, Jihye; Choi, Jong-Whan; Kim, Hyun-Won; Yeh, Byung-Il; Jung, Soon-Hee; Yong, Suk-Joong; Jeong, Yangsik

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • The 48 NR genes and 48 biological anti-cancer targets are profiled in paired-cells. • Growth inhibition by NR ligands or TKIs is target receptor level-dependent. • T0901317 with gefitinib/PHA665752 shows additive growth inhibition in lung cells. - Abstract: Cancer heterogeneity is a big hurdle in achieving complete cancer treatment, which has led to the emergence of combinational therapy. In this study, we investigated the potential use of nuclear receptor (NR) ligands for combinational therapy with other anti-cancer drugs. We first profiled all 48 NRs and 48 biological anti-cancer targets in four pairs of lung cell lines, where each pair was obtained from the same patient. Two sets of cell lines were normal and the corresponding tumor cell lines while the other two sets consisted of primary versus metastatic tumor cell lines. Analysis of the expression profile revealed 11 NRs and 15 cancer targets from the two pairs of normal versus tumor cell lines, and 9 NRs and 9 cancer targets from the primary versus metastatic tumor cell lines had distinct expression patterns in each category. Finally, the evaluation of nuclear receptor ligand T0901317 for liver X receptor (LXR) demonstrated its combined therapeutic potential with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The combined treatment of cMET inhibitor PHA665752 or EGFR inhibitor gefitinib with T0901317 showed additive growth inhibition in both H2073 and H1993 cells. Mechanistically, the combined treatment suppressed cell cycle progression by inhibiting cyclinD1 and cyclinB expression. Taken together, this study provides insight into the potential use of NR ligands in combined therapeutics with other biological anti-cancer drugs.

  18. Nuclear Receptors in Drug Metabolism, Drug Response and Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Chandra; Zuniga, Baltazar; Song, Chung Seog; Jiang, Shoulei; Cropper, Jodie; Park, Sulgi; Chatterjee, Bandana

    2016-01-01

    Orally delivered small-molecule therapeutics are metabolized in the liver and intestine by phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), and transport proteins coordinate drug influx (phase 0) and drug/drug-metabolite efflux (phase III). Genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition are induced by xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (NRs), i.e. PXR (pregnane X receptor) and CAR (constitutive androstane receptor), and by the 1α, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR), due to transactivation of xenobiotic-response elements (XREs) present in phase 0-III genes. Additional NRs, like HNF4-α, FXR, LXR-α play important roles in drug metabolism in certain settings, such as in relation to cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. The phase I enzymes CYP3A4/A5, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2A6, CYP2J2, and CYP2E1 metabolize >90% of all prescription drugs, and phase II conjugation of hydrophilic functional groups (with/without phase I modification) facilitates drug clearance. The conjugation step is mediated by broad-specificity transferases like UGTs, SULTs, GSTs. This review delves into our current understanding of PXR/CAR/VDR-mediated regulation of DME and transporter expression, as well as effects of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and epigenome (specified by promoter methylation, histone modification, microRNAs, long non coding RNAs) on the expression of PXR/CAR/VDR and phase 0-III mediators, and their impacts on variable drug response. Therapeutic agents that target epigenetic regulation and the molecular basis and consequences (overdosing, underdosing, or beneficial outcome) of drug-drug/drug-food/drug-herb interactions are also discussed. Precision medicine requires understanding of a drug’s impact on DME and transporter activity and their NR-regulated expression in order to achieve optimal drug efficacy without adverse drug reactions. In future drug screening, new tools such as humanized mouse models and

  19. Nuclear Receptors in Drug Metabolism, Drug Response and Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Chandra; Zuniga, Baltazar; Song, Chung Seog; Jiang, Shoulei; Cropper, Jodie; Park, Sulgi; Chatterjee, Bandana

    Orally delivered small-molecule therapeutics are metabolized in the liver and intestine by phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), and transport proteins coordinate drug influx (phase 0) and drug/drug-metabolite efflux (phase III). Genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition are induced by xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (NRs), i.e. PXR (pregnane X receptor) and CAR (constitutive androstane receptor), and by the 1α, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR), due to transactivation of xenobiotic-response elements (XREs) present in phase 0-III genes. Additional NRs, like HNF4-α, FXR, LXR-α play important roles in drug metabolism in certain settings, such as in relation to cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. The phase I enzymes CYP3A4/A5, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2A6, CYP2J2, and CYP2E1 metabolize >90% of all prescription drugs, and phase II conjugation of hydrophilic functional groups (with/without phase I modification) facilitates drug clearance. The conjugation step is mediated by broad-specificity transferases like UGTs, SULTs, GSTs. This review delves into our current understanding of PXR/CAR/VDR-mediated regulation of DME and transporter expression, as well as effects of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and epigenome (specified by promoter methylation, histone modification, microRNAs, long non coding RNAs) on the expression of PXR/CAR/VDR and phase 0-III mediators, and their impacts on variable drug response. Therapeutic agents that target epigenetic regulation and the molecular basis and consequences (overdosing, underdosing, or beneficial outcome) of drug-drug/drug-food/drug-herb interactions are also discussed. Precision medicine requires understanding of a drug's impact on DME and transporter activity and their NR-regulated expression in order to achieve optimal drug efficacy without adverse drug reactions. In future drug screening, new tools such as humanized mouse models and

  20. The nuclear receptor gene family in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, contains a novel subfamily group.

    PubMed

    Vogeler, Susanne; Galloway, Tamara S; Lyons, Brett P; Bean, Tim P

    2014-05-15

    Nuclear receptors are a superfamily of transcription factors important in key biological, developmental and reproductive processes. Several of these receptors are ligand- activated and through their ability to bind endogenous and exogenous ligands, are potentially vulnerable to xenobiotics. Molluscs are key ecological species in defining aquatic and terrestrial habitats and are sensitive to xenobiotic compounds in the environment. However, the understanding of nuclear receptor presence, function and xenobiotic disruption in the phylum Mollusca is limited. Here, forty-three nuclear receptor sequences were mined from the genome of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. They include members of NR0-NR5 subfamilies, notably lacking any NR6 members. Phylogenetic analyses of the oyster nuclear receptors have been conducted showing the presence of a large novel subfamily group not previously reported, which is named NR1P. Homologues to all previous identified nuclear receptors in other mollusc species have also been determined including the putative heterodimer partner retinoid X receptor, estrogen receptor and estrogen related receptor. C. gigas contains a highly diverse set of nuclear receptors including a novel NR1 group, which provides important information on presence and evolution of this transcription factor superfamily in invertebrates. The Pacific oyster possesses two members of NR3, the sex steroid hormone receptor analogues, of which there are 9 in humans. This provides increasing evidence that steroid ligand specific expansion of this family is deuterostome specific. This new knowledge on divergence and emergence of nuclear receptors in C. gigas provides essential information for studying regulation of molluscan gene expression and the potential effects of xenobiotics.

  1. PPAR δ agonist GW0742 interacts weakly with multiple nuclear receptors including the vitamin D receptor

    PubMed Central

    Nandhikonda, Premchendar; Yasgar, Adam; Baranowski, Athena M.; Sidhu, Preetpal S.; McCallum, Megan M.; Pawlak, Alan J.; Teske, Kelly; Feleke, Belaynesh; Yuan, Nina Y.; Kevin, Chinedum; Bikle, Daniel D.; Ayers, Steven D.; Webb, Paul; Rai, Ganesha; Simeonov, Anton; Jadhav, Ajit; Maloney, David; Arnold, Leggy A.

    2013-01-01

    A high throughput screening campaign was conducted to identify small molecules with the ability to inhibit the interaction between the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and steroid receptor coactivator 2. These inhibitors represent novel molecular probes to modulate gene regulation mediated by VDR. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ) agonist GW0742 was among the identified VDR-coactivator inhibitors and has been characterized herein as a pan nuclear receptor antagonist at concentrations higher than 12.1 µM. The highest antagonist activity for GW0742 was found for VDR and the androgen receptor (AR). Surprisingly, GW0742 behaved as PPAR agonist/antagonist activating transcription at lower concentration and inhibiting this effect at higher concentrations. A unique spectroscopic property of GW0742 was identified as well. In the presence of rhodamine-derived molecules, GW0742+ increased fluorescence intensity and fluorescence polarization at an excitation wavelength of 595 nm and emission wavelength of 615 nm in a dose dependent manner. The GW0742-inhibited NR-coactivator binding resulted in a reduced expression of five different NR target genes in LNCaP cells in the presence of agonist. Especially VDR target genes CYP24A1, IGFBP-3 and TRPV6 were negatively regulated by GW0742. GW0742 is the first VDR ligand inhibitor lacking the secosteroid structure of VDR ligand antagonists. Nevertheless, the VDR-meditated downstream process of cell differentiation was antagonized by GW0742 in HL-60 cells that were pretreated with the endogenous VDR agonist 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. PMID:23713684

  2. The mammalian clock component PERIOD2 coordinates circadian output by interaction with nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Schmutz, Isabelle; Ripperger, Jürgen A; Baeriswyl-Aebischer, Stéphanie; Albrecht, Urs

    2010-02-15

    Mammalian circadian clocks provide a temporal framework to synchronize biological functions. To obtain robust rhythms with a periodicity of about a day, these clocks use molecular oscillators consisting of two interlocked feedback loops. The core loop generates rhythms by transcriptional repression via the Period (PER) and Cryptochrome (CRY) proteins, whereas the stabilizing loop establishes roughly antiphasic rhythms via nuclear receptors. Nuclear receptors also govern many pathways that affect metabolism and physiology. Here we show that the core loop component PER2 can coordinate circadian output with the circadian oscillator. PER2 interacts with nuclear receptors including PPARalpha and REV-ERBalpha and serves as a coregulator of nuclear receptor-mediated transcription. Consequently, PER2 is rhythmically bound at the promoters of nuclear receptor target genes in vivo. In this way, the circadian oscillator can modulate the expression of nuclear receptor target genes like Bmal1, Hnf1alpha, and Glucose-6-phosphatase. The concept that PER2 may propagate clock information to metabolic pathways via nuclear receptors adds an important facet to the clock-dependent regulation of biological networks.

  3. Structure-activity relationship of nuclear receptor-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Greschik, Holger; Moras, Dino

    2003-01-01

    Small molecules such as retinoids, steroid hormones, fatty acids, cholesterol metabolites, or xenobiotics are involved in the regulation of numerous physiological and patho-physiological processes by binding to and controlling the activity of members of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors. In addition to natural ligands, synthetic agonists or antagonists have been identified that in some cases specifically target NR isotypes, or elicit tissue-, signaling pathway-, or promoter-selective transcriptional responses. For these ligands the term "selective NR modulators" (SNRMs) has been introduced. Structure determination of apo- and holo-NR ligand-binding domains (LBDs)--some of them complexed to small coactivator or corepressor fragments--revealed the major principles of ligand-dependent NR action and determinants of (isotype-) selective ligand binding. These studies also stimulated the interpretation of tissue-specific effects of SNRMs on wild-type or mutant receptors. In contrast to the increasing knowledge on the structure-activity relationship of NRs with known SNRMs, rather basic questions remain about the regulation of orphan NRs (for which no ligands are known) or "adopted" orphan NRs (for which only recently ligands were identified). Several crystal structures of orphan NR LBDs uncovered unexpected properties, contributed to the understanding of orphan NR function, and may in the future permit the identification or design of ligands. This review will (i) focus on the current understanding of the structure-activity relationship of NR-ligand interactions, (ii) discuss recent advances in the field of "orphan" NR crystallography, and (iii) outline future challenges in NR structural biology.

  4. Shear stress activation of nuclear receptor PXR in endothelial detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohong; Fang, Xi; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Zhen; Zhao, Beilei; Xiao, Lei; Liu, Ao; Li, Yi-Shuan J.; Shyy, John Y.-J.; Guan, Youfei; Chien, Shu; Wang, Nanping

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are constantly exposed to xenobiotics and endobiotics or their metabolites, which perturb EC function, as well as to shear stress, which plays a crucial role in vascular homeostasis. Pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a nuclear receptor and a key regulator of the detoxification of xeno- and endobiotics. Here we show that laminar shear stress (LSS), the atheroprotective flow, activates PXR in ECs, whereas oscillatory shear stress, the atheroprone flow, suppresses PXR. LSS activation of PXR in cultured ECs led to the increased expression of a PXR target gene, multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1). An in vivo study using rats showed that the expression of MDR1 was significantly higher in the endothelium from the descending thoracic aorta, where flow is mostly laminar, than from the inner curvature of aortic arch, where flow is disturbed. Functionally, LSS-activated PXR protects ECs from apoptosis triggered by doxorubicin via the induction of MDR1 and other detoxification genes. PXR also suppressed the expression of proinflammatory adhesion molecules and monocyte adhesion in response to TNF-α and lipopolysaccharide. Overexpression of a constitutively active PXR in rat carotid arteries potently attenuated proinflammatory responses. In addition, cDNA microarray revealed a large number of the PXR-activated endothelial genes whose products are responsible for major steps of detoxification, including phase I and II metabolizing enzymes and transporters. These detoxification genes in ECs are induced by LSS in ECs in a PXR-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that PXR represents a flow-activated detoxification system to protect ECs against damage by xeno- and endobiotics. PMID:23878263

  5. ERRα metabolic nuclear receptor controls growth of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bernatchez, Gérald; Giroux, Véronique; Lassalle, Thomas; Carpentier, André C; Rivard, Nathalie; Carrier, Julie C

    2013-10-01

    The estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) is a nuclear receptor that acts primarily as a regulator of metabolic processes, particularly in tissues subjected to high-energy demand. In addition to its control of energy metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis, ERRα has recently been associated with cancer progression. Notably, increased expression of ERRα has been shown in several cancerous tissues, including breast, ovary and colon. However, additional studies are required to gain insight into the action of ERRα in cancer biology, particularly in non-endocrine-related cancers. Therefore, using a short hairpin RNA-mediated approach, we investigated whether ERRα is required for the rapid growth of colon cancer cells and to maintain their neoplastic metabolic state. Results show that silencing ERRα significantly impaired colon cancer cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro as well as their in vivo tumorigenic capacity. A pronounced delay in G1-to-S cell cycle phase transition was observed in ERRα-depleted cells in association with reduced cyclin-dependent kinase 2 activity and hyperphosphorylated state of the retinoblastoma protein along with disturbed expression of several cell cycle regulators, including p15 and p27. Interestingly, ERRα-depleted HCT116 cells also displayed significant reduction in expression of a large set of key genes to glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle and lipid synthesis. Furthermore, using (14)C isotope tracer analysis, ERRα depletion in colon cancer cells resulted in reduced glucose incorporation and glucose-mediated lipogenesis in these cells. These findings suggest that ERRα coordinates colon cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenic capacity with energy metabolism. Thus, ERRα could represent a promising therapeutic target in colon cancer.

  6. Nuclear receptor coactivators function in estrogen receptor- and progestin receptor-dependent aspects of sexual behavior in female rats.

    PubMed

    Molenda-Figueira, Heather A; Williams, Casey A; Griffin, Andreana L; Rutledge, Eric M; Blaustein, Jeffrey D; Tetel, Marc J

    2006-09-01

    The ovarian hormones, estradiol (E) and progesterone (P) facilitate the expression of sexual behavior in female rats. E and P mediate many of these behavioral effects by binding to their respective intracellular receptors in specific brain regions. Nuclear receptor coactivators, including Steroid Receptor Coactivator-1 (SRC-1) and CREB Binding Protein (CBP), dramatically enhance ligand-dependent steroid receptor transcriptional activity in vitro. Previously, our lab has shown that SRC-1 and CBP modulate estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated induction of progestin receptor (PR) gene expression in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMN) and hormone-dependent sexual receptivity in female rats. Female sexual behaviors can be activated by high doses of E alone in ovariectomized rats, and thus are believed to be ER-dependent. However, the full repertoire of female sexual behavior, in particular, proceptive behaviors such as hopping, darting and ear wiggling, are considered to be PR-dependent. In the present experiments, the function of SRC-1 and CBP in distinct ER- (Exp. 1) and PR- (Exp. 2) dependent aspects of female sexual behavior was investigated. In Exp. 1, infusion of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides to SRC-1 and CBP mRNA into the VMN decreased lordosis intensity in rats treated with E alone, suggesting that these coactivators modulate ER-mediated female sexual behavior. In Exp. 2, antisense to SRC-1 and CBP mRNA around the time of P administration reduced PR-dependent ear wiggling and hopping and darting. Taken together, these data suggest that SRC-1 and CBP modulate ER and PR action in brain and influence distinct aspects of hormone-dependent sexual behaviors. These findings support our previous studies and provide further evidence that SRC-1 and CBP function together to regulate ovarian hormone action in behaviorally-relevant brain regions.

  7. Regulation of Liver Energy Balance by the Nuclear Receptors Farnesoid X Receptor and Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor α.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang Ho; Moore, David D

    2017-01-01

    The liver undergoes major changes in substrate utilization and metabolic output over the daily feeding and fasting cycle. These changes occur acutely in response to hormones such as insulin and glucagon, with rapid changes in signaling pathways mediated by protein phosphorylation and other post-translational modifications. They are also reflected in chronic alterations in gene expression in response to nutrient-sensitive transcription factors. Among these, the nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) provide an intriguing, coordinated response to maintain energy balance in the liver. FXR is activated in the fed state by bile acids returning to the liver, while PPARα is activated in the fasted state in response to the free fatty acids produced by adipocyte lipolysis or possibly other signals. Key Messages: Previous studies indicate that FXR and PPARα have opposing effects on each other's primary targets in key metabolic pathways including gluconeogenesis. Our more recent work shows that these 2 nuclear receptors coordinately regulate autophagy: FXR suppresses this pathway of nutrient and energy recovery, while PPARα activates it. Another recent study indicates that FXR activates the complement and coagulation pathway, while earlier studies identify this as a negative target of PPARα. Since secretion is a very energy- and nutrient-intensive process for hepatocytes, it is possible that FXR licenses it in the nutrient-rich fed state, while PPARα represses it to spare resources in the fasted state. Energy balance is a potential connection linking FXR and PPARα regulation of autophagy and secretion, 2 seemingly unrelated aspects of hepatocyte function. FXR and PPARα act coordinately to promote energy balance and homeostasis in the liver by regulating autophagy and potentially protein secretion. It is quite likely that their impact extends to additional pathways relevant to hepatic energy balance, and

  8. Paralogous Vitamin D Receptors in Teleosts: Transition of Nuclear Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, Deanna L.; Law, Sheran H. W.; Barnes, Benjamin; Hall, Julie M.; Hinton, David E.; Moore, Linda; Maglich, Jodi M.; Moore, John T.; Kullman, Seth W.

    2008-01-01

    The availability of multiple teleost (bony fish) genomes is providing unprecedented opportunities to understand the diversity and function of gene duplication events using comparative genomics. Here we describe the cloning and functional characterization of two novel vitamin D receptor (VDR) paralogs from the freshwater teleost medaka (Oryzias latipes). VDR sequences were identified through mining of the medaka genome database in which gene organization and structure was determined. Two distinct VDR genes were identified in the medaka genome and mapped to defined loci. Each VDR sequence exhibits unique intronic organization and dissimilar 5′ untranslated regions, suggesting they are not isoforms of the same gene locus. Phylogenetic comparison with additional teleosts and mammalian VDR sequences illustrate that two distinct clusters are formed separating aquatic and terrestrial species. Nested within the teleost cluster are two separate clades for VDRα and VDRβ. The topology of teleost VDR sequences is consistent with the notion of paralogous genes arising from a whole genome duplication event prior to teleost radiation. Functional characterization was conducted through the development of VDR expression vectors including Gal4 chimeras containing the yeast Gal4 DNA binding domain fused to the medaka VDR ligand binding domain and full-length protein. The common VDR ligand 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1α,25(OH)2D3] resulted in significant transactivation activity with both the Gal4 and full-length constructs of medaka (m) VDRβ. Comparatively, transactivation of mVDRα with 1α,25(OH)2D3 was highly attenuated, suggesting a functional divergence between these two nuclear receptor paralogs. We additionally demonstrate through coactivator studies that mVDRα is still functional; however, it exhibits a different sensitivity to 1α,25(OH)2D3, compared with VDRβ. These results suggest that in mVDRα and VDRβ have undergone a functional divergence through a process of

  9. High glucose induces activation of NF-κB inflammatory signaling through IκBα sumoylation in rat mesangial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wei; Xu, Ling; Zhou, Xueqin; Gao, Chenlin; Yang, Maojun; Chen, Guo; Zhu, Jianhua; Jiang, Lan; Gan, Huakui; Gou, Fang; Feng, Hong; Peng, Juan; Xu, Yong

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •The expression of SUMO1, SUMO2/3 under high glucose was obviously enhanced. •High glucose induced degradation of IκBα and activation of NF-κB pathway. •Sumoylation of IκBα in high glucose were significantly decreased. •The proteasome inhibitor MG132 could partially revert the degradation of IκBα. -- Abstract: The posttranslational modification of proteins by small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) has emerged as an important regulatory mechanism for the alteration of protein activity, stability, and cellular localization. The latest research demonstrates that sumoylation is extensively involved in the regulation of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway, which plays a critical role in the regulation of inflammation and contributes to fibrosis in diabetic nephropathy (DN). However, the role of sumoylation in the regulation of NF-κB signaling in DN is still unclear. In the present study, we cultured rat glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs) stimulated by high glucose and divided GMCs into six groups: normal glucose group (5.6 mmol/L), high glucose groups (10, 20, and 30 mmol/L), mannitol group (i.e., osmotic control group), and MG132 intervention group (30 mmol/L glucose with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor). The expression of SUMO1, SUMO2/3, IκBα, NF-κBp65, and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) was measured by Western blot, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and indirect immunofluorescence laser scanning confocal microscopy. The interaction between SUMO1, SUMO2/3, and IκBα was observed by co-immunoprecipitation. The results showed that the expression of SUMO1 and SUMO2/3 was dose- and time-dependently enhanced by high glucose (p < 0.05). However, the expression of IκBα sumoylation in high glucose was significantly decreased compared with the normal glucose group (p < 0.05). The expression of IκBα was dose- and time-dependently decreased, and NF-κBp65 and MCP-1 were increased under high glucose conditions, which

  10. Computational Characterization of Modes of Transcriptional Regulation of Nuclear Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Yogita; Chilamakuri, Chandra Sekhar Reddy; Bakke, Marit; Lenhard, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Background Nuclear receptors are a large structural class of transcription factors that act with their co-regulators and repressors to maintain a variety of biological and physiological processes such as metabolism, development and reproduction. They are activated through the binding of small ligands, which can be replaced by drug molecules, making nuclear receptors promising drug targets. Transcriptional regulation of the genes that encode them is central to gaining a deeper understanding of the diversity of their biochemical and biophysical roles and their role in disease and therapy. Even though they share evolutionary history, nuclear receptor genes have fundamentally different expression patterns, ranging from ubiquitously expressed to tissue-specific and spatiotemporally complex. However, current understanding of regulation in nuclear receptor gene family is still nascent. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we investigate the relationship between long-range regulation of nuclear receptor family and their known functionality. Towards this goal, we identify the nuclear receptor genes that are potential targets based on counts of highly conserved non-coding elements. We validate our results using publicly available expression (RNA-seq) and histone modification (ChIP-seq) data from the ENCODE project. We find that nuclear receptor genes involved in developmental roles show strong evidence of long-range mechanism of transcription regulation with distinct cis-regulatory content they feature clusters of highly conserved non-coding elements distributed in regions spanning several Megabases, long and multiple CpG islands, bivalent promoter marks and statistically significant higher enrichment of enhancer mark around their gene loci. On the other hand nuclear receptor genes that are involved in tissue-specific roles lack these features, having simple transcriptional controls and a greater variety of mechanisms for producing paralogs. We further examine the

  11. Computational characterization of modes of transcriptional regulation of nuclear receptor genes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Yogita; Chilamakuri, Chandra Sekhar Reddy; Bakke, Marit; Lenhard, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are a large structural class of transcription factors that act with their co-regulators and repressors to maintain a variety of biological and physiological processes such as metabolism, development and reproduction. They are activated through the binding of small ligands, which can be replaced by drug molecules, making nuclear receptors promising drug targets. Transcriptional regulation of the genes that encode them is central to gaining a deeper understanding of the diversity of their biochemical and biophysical roles and their role in disease and therapy. Even though they share evolutionary history, nuclear receptor genes have fundamentally different expression patterns, ranging from ubiquitously expressed to tissue-specific and spatiotemporally complex. However, current understanding of regulation in nuclear receptor gene family is still nascent. In this study, we investigate the relationship between long-range regulation of nuclear receptor family and their known functionality. Towards this goal, we identify the nuclear receptor genes that are potential targets based on counts of highly conserved non-coding elements. We validate our results using publicly available expression (RNA-seq) and histone modification (ChIP-seq) data from the ENCODE project. We find that nuclear receptor genes involved in developmental roles show strong evidence of long-range mechanism of transcription regulation with distinct cis-regulatory content they feature clusters of highly conserved non-coding elements distributed in regions spanning several Megabases, long and multiple CpG islands, bivalent promoter marks and statistically significant higher enrichment of enhancer mark around their gene loci. On the other hand nuclear receptor genes that are involved in tissue-specific roles lack these features, having simple transcriptional controls and a greater variety of mechanisms for producing paralogs. We further examine the combinatorial patterns of histone maps

  12. Nuclear export receptor CRM1 recognizes diverse conformations in nuclear export signals.

    PubMed

    Fung, Ho Yee Joyce; Fu, Szu-Chin; Chook, Yuh Min

    2017-03-10

    Nuclear export receptor CRM1 binds highly variable nuclear export signals (NESs) in hundreds of different cargoes. Previously we have shown that CRM1 binds NESs in both polypeptide orientations (Fung et al., 2015). Here, we show crystal structures of CRM1 bound to eight additional NESs which reveal diverse conformations that range from loop-like to all-helix, which occupy different extents of the invariant NES-binding groove. Analysis of all NES structures show 5-6 distinct backbone conformations where the only conserved secondary structural element is one turn of helix that binds the central portion of the CRM1 groove. All NESs also participate in main chain hydrogen bonding with human CRM1 Lys568 side chain, which acts as a specificity filter that prevents binding of non-NES peptides. The large conformational range of NES backbones explains the lack of a fixed pattern for its 3-5 hydrophobic anchor residues, which in turn explains the large array of peptide sequences that can function as NESs.

  13. Nuclear export receptor CRM1 recognizes diverse conformations in nuclear export signals

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Ho Yee Joyce; Fu, Szu-Chin; Chook, Yuh Min

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear export receptor CRM1 binds highly variable nuclear export signals (NESs) in hundreds of different cargoes. Previously we have shown that CRM1 binds NESs in both polypeptide orientations (Fung et al., 2015). Here, we show crystal structures of CRM1 bound to eight additional NESs which reveal diverse conformations that range from loop-like to all-helix, which occupy different extents of the invariant NES-binding groove. Analysis of all NES structures show 5-6 distinct backbone conformations where the only conserved secondary structural element is one turn of helix that binds the central portion of the CRM1 groove. All NESs also participate in main chain hydrogen bonding with human CRM1 Lys568 side chain, which acts as a specificity filter that prevents binding of non-NES peptides. The large conformational range of NES backbones explains the lack of a fixed pattern for its 3-5 hydrophobic anchor residues, which in turn explains the large array of peptide sequences that can function as NESs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23961.001 PMID:28282025

  14. PPARs: Nuclear Receptors Controlled by, and Controlling, Nutrient Handling through Nuclear and Cytosolic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Maria; Lombardi, Assunta; Silvestri, Elena; Senese, Rosalba; Cioffi, Federica; Goglia, Fernando; Lanni, Antonia; de Lange, Pieter

    2010-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), which are known to regulate lipid homeostasis, are tightly controlled by nutrient availability, and they control nutrient handling. In this paper, we focus on how nutrients control the expression and action of PPARs and how cellular signaling events regulate the action of PPARs in metabolically active tissues (e.g., liver, skeletal muscle, heart, and white adipose tissue). We address the structure and function of the PPARs, and their interaction with other nuclear receptors, including PPAR cross-talk. We further discuss the roles played by different kinase pathways, including the extracellular signal-regulated kinases/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK MAPK), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), Akt/protein kinase B (Akt/PKB), and the NAD+-regulated protein deacetylase SIRT1, serving to control the activity of the PPARs themselves as well as that of a key nutrient-related PPAR coactivator, PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α). We also highlight how currently applied nutrigenomic strategies will increase our understanding on how nutrients regulate metabolic homeostasis through PPAR signaling. PMID:20814433

  15. Road to exercise mimetics: targeting nuclear receptors in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Fan, Weiwei; Atkins, Annette R; Yu, Ruth T; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M

    2013-12-01

    Skeletal muscle is the largest organ in the human body and is the major site for energy expenditure. It exhibits remarkable plasticity in response to physiological stimuli such as exercise. Physical exercise remodels skeletal muscle and enhances its capability to burn calories, which has been shown to be beneficial for many clinical conditions including the metabolic syndrome and cancer. Nuclear receptors (NRs) comprise a class of transcription factors found only in metazoans that regulate major biological processes such as reproduction, development, and metabolism. Recent studies have demonstrated crucial roles for NRs and their co-regulators in the regulation of skeletal muscle energy metabolism and exercise-induced muscle remodeling. While nothing can fully replace exercise, development of exercise mimetics that enhance or even substitute for the beneficial effects of physical exercise would be of great benefit. The unique property of NRs that allows modulation by endogenous or synthetic ligands makes them bona fide therapeutic targets. In this review, we present an overview of the current understanding of the role of NRs and their co-regulators in skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism and summarize recent progress in the development of exercise mimetics that target NRs and their co-regulators.

  16. Nuclear receptor coregulators: modulators of pathology and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Lonard, David M.; O’Malley, Bert W.

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear receptor superfamily includes transcription factors that transduce steroid, thyroid and retinoid hormones and other ligands in conjunction with coregulators. To date, over 350 coregulators have been reported in the literature, and advances in proteomic analyses of coregulator protein complexes have revealed that a far greater number of coregulator-interacting proteins also exist. Coregulator dysfunction has been implicated in diverse pathological states, genetic syndromes and cancer. A hallmark of disease related to the disruption of normal coregulator function is the pleiotropic effect on animal physiology, which is frequently manifested as the dysregulation of metabolic and neurological systems. Coregulators have broad physiological and pathological functions that make them promising new drug targets for diseases such as hormone-dependent cancers. Advances in proteomics, genomics and transcriptomics have provided novel insights into the biology of coregulators at a system-wide level and will lead the way to a new understanding of how coregulators can be evaluated in the context of complex and multifaceted genetic factors, hormones, diet, the environment and stress. Ultimately, better knowledge of the associations that exist between coregulator function and human diseases is expected to expand the indications for the use of future coregulator-targeted drugs. PMID:22733267

  17. SENP1-modulated sumoylation regulates retinoblastoma protein (RB) and Lamin A/C interaction and stabilization.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P; Kuehn, M R

    2016-12-15

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB) plays a critical role in cell proliferation and differentiation and its inactivation is a frequent underlying factor in tumorigenesis. While the regulation of RB function by phosphorylation is well studied, proteasome-mediated RB protein degradation is emerging as an important regulatory mechanism. Although our understanding of RB turnover is currently limited, there is evidence that the nuclear lamina filament protein Lamin A/C protects RB from proteasomal degradation. Here we show that SUMO1 conjugation of RB and Lamin A/C is modulated by the SUMO protease SENP1 and that sumoylation of both proteins is required for their interaction. Importantly, this SUMO1-dependent complex protects both RB and Lamin A/C from proteasomal turnover.

  18. Elevated NCOR1 disrupts a network of dietary-sensing nuclear receptors in bladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Abedin, S. Asad; Thorne, James L.; Battaglia, Sebastiano; Maguire, Orla; Hornung, Laura B.; Doherty, Alan P.; Mills, Ian G.; Campbell, Moray J.

    2009-01-01

    Increasingly invasive bladder cancer cells lines displayed insensitivity toward a panel of dietary-derived ligands for members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Insensitivity was defined through altered gene regulatory actions and cell proliferation and reflected both reduced receptor expression and elevated nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCOR1) expression. Stable overexpression of NCOR1 in sensitive cells (RT4) resulted in a panel of clones that recapitulated the resistant phenotype in terms of gene regulatory actions and proliferative responses toward ligand. Similarly, silencing RNA approaches to NCOR1 in resistant cells (EJ28) enhanced ligand gene regulatory and proliferation responses, including those mediated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ and vitamin D receptor (VDR) receptors. Elevated NCOR1 levels generate an epigenetic lesion to target in resistant cells using the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat, in combination with nuclear receptor ligands. Such treatments revealed strong-additive interactions toward the PPARγ, VDR and Farnesoid X-activated receptors. Genome-wide microarray and microfluidic quantitative real-time, reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction approaches, following the targeting of NCOR1 activity and expression, revealed the selective capacity of this corepressor to govern common transcriptional events of underlying networks. Combined these findings suggest that NCOR1 is a selective regulator of nuclear receptors, notably PPARγ and VDR, and contributes to their loss of sensitivity. Combinations of epigenetic therapies that target NCOR1 may prove effective, even when receptor expression is reduced. PMID:19126649

  19. Transcriptional integration of metabolism by the nuclear sterol-activated receptors LXR and FXR.

    PubMed

    Calkin, Anna C; Tontonoz, Peter

    2012-03-14

    Nuclear receptors are integrators of hormonal and nutritional signals, mediating changes to metabolic pathways within the body. Given that modulation of lipid and glucose metabolism has been linked to diseases including type 2 diabetes, obesity and atherosclerosis, a greater understanding of pathways that regulate metabolism in physiology and disease is crucial. The liver X receptors (LXRs) and the farnesoid X receptors (FXRs) are activated by oxysterols and bile acids, respectively. Mounting evidence indicates that these nuclear receptors have essential roles, not only in the regulation of cholesterol and bile acid metabolism but also in the integration of sterol, fatty acid and glucose metabolism.

  20. Transcriptional integration of metabolism by the nuclear sterol-activated receptors LXR and FXR

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are integrators of hormonal and nutritional signals, mediating changes to metabolic pathways within the body. Given that modulation of lipid and glucose metabolism has been linked to diseases including type 2 diabetes, obesity and atherosclerosis, a greater understanding of pathways that regulate metabolism in physiology and disease is crucial. The liver X receptors (LXRs) and the farnesoid X receptors (FXRs) are activated by oxysterols and bile acids, respectively. Mounting evidence indicates that these nuclear receptors have essential roles, not only in the regulation of cholesterol and bile acid metabolism but also in the integration of sterol, fatty acid and glucose metabolism. PMID:22414897

  1. Research resource: Comparative nuclear receptor atlas: basal and activated peritoneal B-1 and B-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Cody J; Barish, Grant D; Downes, Michael; Chou, Meng-Yun; Heinz, Sven; Glass, Christopher K; Evans, Ronald M; Witztum, Joseph L

    2011-03-01

    Naïve murine B cells are typically divided into three subsets based on functional and phenotypic characteristics: innate-like B-1 and marginal zone B cells vs. adaptive B-2 cells, also known as follicular or conventional B cells. B-1 cells, the innate-immune-like component of the B cell lineage are the primary source of natural antibodies and have been shown to modulate autoimmune diseases, human B-cell leukemias, and inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis. On the other hand, B-2 cells are the principal mediators of the adaptive humoral immune response and represent an important pharmacological target for various conditions including rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, and lymphomas. Using the resources of the Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas program, we used quantitative real-time PCR to assess the complement of the 49 murine nuclear receptor superfamily expressed in quiescent and toll-like receptor (TLR)-stimulated peritoneal B-1 and B-2 cells. We report the expression of 24 nuclear receptors in basal B-1 cells and 25 nuclear receptors in basal B-2 cells, with, in some cases, dramatic changes in response to TLR 4 or TLR 2/1 stimulation. Comparative nuclear receptor profiling between B-1 and peritoneal B-2 cells reveals a highly concordant expression pattern, albeit at quantitatively dissimilar levels. We also found that splenic B cells express 23 nuclear receptors. This catalog of nuclear receptor expression in B-1 and B-2 cells provides data to be used to better understand the specific roles of nuclear receptors in B cell function, chronic inflammation, and autoimmune disease.

  2. Research Resource: Comparative Nuclear Receptor Atlas: Basal and Activated Peritoneal B-1 and B-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, Cody J.; Barish, Grant D.; Downes, Michael; Chou, Meng-Yun; Heinz, Sven; Glass, Christopher K.; Evans, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    Naïve murine B cells are typically divided into three subsets based on functional and phenotypic characteristics: innate-like B-1 and marginal zone B cells vs. adaptive B-2 cells, also known as follicular or conventional B cells. B-1 cells, the innate-immune-like component of the B cell lineage are the primary source of natural antibodies and have been shown to modulate autoimmune diseases, human B-cell leukemias, and inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis. On the other hand, B-2 cells are the principal mediators of the adaptive humoral immune response and represent an important pharmacological target for various conditions including rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, and lymphomas. Using the resources of the Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas program, we used quantitative real-time PCR to assess the complement of the 49 murine nuclear receptor superfamily expressed in quiescent and toll-like receptor (TLR)-stimulated peritoneal B-1 and B-2 cells. We report the expression of 24 nuclear receptors in basal B-1 cells and 25 nuclear receptors in basal B-2 cells, with, in some cases, dramatic changes in response to TLR 4 or TLR 2/1 stimulation. Comparative nuclear receptor profiling between B-1 and peritoneal B-2 cells reveals a highly concordant expression pattern, albeit at quantitatively dissimilar levels. We also found that splenic B cells express 23 nuclear receptors. This catalog of nuclear receptor expression in B-1 and B-2 cells provides data to be used to better understand the specific roles of nuclear receptors in B cell function, chronic inflammation, and autoimmune disease. PMID:21273443

  3. Molecular pathways: the role of NR4A orphan nuclear receptors in cancer.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Helen M; Aherne, Carol M; Rogers, Ailin C; Baird, Alan W; Winter, Des C; Murphy, Evelyn P

    2012-06-15

    Nuclear receptors are of integral importance in carcinogenesis. Manipulation of classic ligand-activated nuclear receptors, such as estrogen receptor blockade in breast cancer, is an important established cancer therapy. Orphan nuclear receptors, such as nuclear family 4 subgroup A (NR4A) receptors, have no known natural ligand(s). These elusive receptors are increasingly recognized as molecular switches in cell survival and a molecular link between inflammation and cancer. NR4A receptors act as transcription factors, altering expression of downstream genes in apoptosis (Fas-ligand, TRAIL), proliferation, DNA repair, metabolism, cell migration, inflammation (interleukin-8), and angiogenesis (VEGF). NR4A receptors are modulated by multiple cell-signaling pathways, including protein kinase A/CREB, NF-κB, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT, c-jun-NH(2)-kinase, Wnt, and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. NR4A receptor effects are context and tissue specific, influenced by their levels of expression, posttranslational modification, and interaction with other transcription factors (RXR, PPAR-Υ). The subcellular location of NR4A "nuclear receptors" is also important functionally; novel roles have been described in the cytoplasm where NR4A proteins act both indirectly and directly on the mitochondria to promote apoptosis via Bcl-2. NR4A receptors are implicated in a wide variety of malignancies, including breast, lung, colon, bladder, and prostate cancer; glioblastoma multiforme; sarcoma; and acute and/or chronic myeloid leukemia. NR4A receptors modulate response to conventional chemotherapy and represent an exciting frontier for chemotherapeutic intervention, as novel agents targeting NR4A receptors have now been developed. This review provides a concise clinical overview of current knowledge of NR4A signaling in cancer and the potential for therapeutic manipulation. ©2012 AACR.

  4. SUMOylation Is Developmentally Regulated and Required for Cell Pairing during Conjugation in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Amjad M.; Yang, Qianyi

    2014-01-01

    The covalent attachment of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) to target proteins regulates numerous nuclear events in eukaryotes, including transcription, mitosis and meiosis, and DNA repair. Despite extensive interest in nuclear pathways within the field of ciliate molecular biology, there have been no investigations of the SUMO pathway in Tetrahymena. The developmental program of sexual reproduction of this organism includes cell pairing, micronuclear meiosis, and the formation of a new somatic macronucleus. We identified the Tetrahymena thermophila SMT3 (SUMO) and UBA2 (SUMO-activating enzyme) genes and demonstrated that the corresponding green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged gene products are found predominantly in the somatic macronucleus during vegetative growth. Use of an anti-Smt3p antibody to perform immunoblot assays with whole-cell lysates during conjugation revealed a large increase in SUMOylation that peaked during formation of the new macronucleus. Immunofluorescence using the same antibody showed that the increase was localized primarily within the new macronucleus. To initiate functional analysis of the SUMO pathway, we created germ line knockout cell lines for both the SMT3 and UBA2 genes and found both are essential for cell viability. Conditional Smt3p and Uba2p cell lines were constructed by incorporation of the cadmium-inducible metallothionein promoter. Withdrawal of cadmium resulted in reduced cell growth and increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Interestingly, Smt3p and Uba2p conditional cell lines were unable to pair during sexual reproduction in the absence of cadmium, consistent with a function early in conjugation. Our studies are consistent with multiple roles for SUMOylation in Tetrahymena, including a dynamic regulation associated with the sexual life cycle. PMID:25527524

  5. Nuclear Receptors: Small Molecule Sensors that Coordinate Growth, Metabolism and Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Pardee, Keith; Necakov, Aleksandar S; Krause, Henry

    2011-01-01

    One of the largest groups of metazoan transcription factors (TFs), the Nuclear Receptor superfamily, regulates genes required for virtually all aspects of development, reproduction and metabolism. Together, these master regulators can be thought of as a fundamental operating system for metazoan life. Their most distinguishing feature is a structurally conserved domain that acts as a switch, powered by the presence of small diffusible ligands. This ligand-responsive regulation has allowed the Nuclear Receptors to help their hosts adapt to a wide variety of physiological niches and roles, making them one of the most evolutionarily successful TF families. Originally discovered as receptors for steroid hormones, the Nuclear Receptor field has grown to encompass much more than traditional endocrinology. For example, recent work has highlighted the role of Nuclear Receptors as major regulators of metabolism and biological clocks. By monitoring endogenous metabolites and absorbed xenobiotics, these receptors also coordinate rapid, system-wide responses to changing metabolic and environmental states. While many new Nuclear Receptor ligands have been discovered in the past couple of decades, approximately half of the 48 human receptors are still orphans, with a significantly higher percentage of orphans in other organisms. The discovery of new ligands has led to the elucidation of new regulatory mechanisms, target genes, pathways and functions. This review will highlight both the common as well as newly emerging traits and functions that characterize this particularly unique and important TF family.

  6. Jun Dimerization Protein 2 Activates Mc2r Transcriptional Activity: Role of Phosphorylation and SUMOylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chiung-Min; Wang, Raymond X.; Liu, Runhua; Yang, Wei-Hsiung

    2017-01-01

    Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2), a basic leucine zipper transcription factor, is involved in numerous biological and cellular processes such as cancer development and regulation, cell-cycle regulation, skeletal muscle and osteoclast differentiation, progesterone receptor signaling, and antibacterial immunity. Though JDP2 is widely expressed in mammalian tissues, its function in gonads and adrenals (such as regulation of steroidogenesis and adrenal development) is largely unknown. Herein, we find that JDP2 mRNA and proteins are expressed in mouse adrenal gland tissues. Moreover, overexpression of JDP2 in Y1 mouse adrenocortical cancer cells increases the level of melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R) protein. Notably, Mc2r promoter activity is activated by JDP2 in a dose-dependent manner. Next, by mapping the Mc2r promoter, we show that cAMP response elements (between −1320 and −720-bp) are mainly required for Mc2r activation by JDP2 and demonstrate that −830-bp is the major JDP2 binding site by real-time chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis. Mutations of cAMP response elements on Mc2r promoter disrupts JDP2 effect. Furthermore, we demonstrate that removal of phosphorylation of JDP2 results in attenuated transcriptional activity of Mc2r. Finally, we show that JDP2 is a candidate for SUMOylation and SUMOylation affects JDP2-mediated Mc2r transcriptional activity. Taken together, JDP2 acts as a novel transcriptional activator of the mouse Mc2r gene, suggesting that JDP2 may have physiological functions as a novel player in MC2R-mediated steroidogenesis as well as cell signaling in adrenal glands. PMID:28146118

  7. The Nuclear Receptor HIZR-1 Uses Zinc as a Ligand to Mediate Homeostasis in Response to High Zinc

    PubMed Central

    Warnhoff, Kurt; Roh, Hyun C.; Kocsisova, Zuzana; Tan, Chieh-Hsiang; Morrison, Andrew; Croswell, Damari; Schneider, Daniel L.; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear receptors were originally defined as endocrine sensors in humans, leading to the identification of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Despite intensive efforts, most nuclear receptors have no known ligand, suggesting new ligand classes remain to be discovered. Furthermore, nuclear receptors are encoded in the genomes of primitive organisms that lack endocrine signaling, suggesting the primordial function may have been environmental sensing. Here we describe a novel Caenorhabditis elegans nuclear receptor, HIZR-1, that is a high zinc sensor in an animal and the master regulator of high zinc homeostasis. The essential micronutrient zinc acts as a HIZR-1 ligand, and activated HIZR-1 increases transcription of genes that promote zinc efflux and storage. The results identify zinc as the first inorganic molecule to function as a physiological ligand for a nuclear receptor and direct environmental sensing as a novel function of nuclear receptors. PMID:28095401

  8. The Nuclear Receptor HIZR-1 Uses Zinc as a Ligand to Mediate Homeostasis in Response to High Zinc.

    PubMed

    Warnhoff, Kurt; Roh, Hyun C; Kocsisova, Zuzana; Tan, Chieh-Hsiang; Morrison, Andrew; Croswell, Damari; Schneider, Daniel L; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear receptors were originally defined as endocrine sensors in humans, leading to the identification of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Despite intensive efforts, most nuclear receptors have no known ligand, suggesting new ligand classes remain to be discovered. Furthermore, nuclear receptors are encoded in the genomes of primitive organisms that lack endocrine signaling, suggesting the primordial function may have been environmental sensing. Here we describe a novel Caenorhabditis elegans nuclear receptor, HIZR-1, that is a high zinc sensor in an animal and the master regulator of high zinc homeostasis. The essential micronutrient zinc acts as a HIZR-1 ligand, and activated HIZR-1 increases transcription of genes that promote zinc efflux and storage. The results identify zinc as the first inorganic molecule to function as a physiological ligand for a nuclear receptor and direct environmental sensing as a novel function of nuclear receptors.

  9. Xenobiotic-sensing nuclear receptors involved in drug metabolism: a structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Bret D; Redinbo, Matthew R

    2013-02-01

    Xenobiotic compounds undergo a critical range of biotransformations performed by the phase I, II, and III drug-metabolizing enzymes. The oxidation, conjugation, and transportation of potentially harmful xenobiotic and endobiotic compounds achieved by these catalytic systems are significantly regulated, at the gene expression level, by members of the nuclear receptor (NR) family of ligand-modulated transcription factors. Activation of NRs by a variety of endo- and exogenous chemicals are elemental to induction and repression of drug-metabolism pathways. The master xenobiotic sensing NRs, the promiscuous pregnane X receptor and less-promiscuous constitutive androstane receptor are crucial to initial ligand recognition, jump-starting the metabolic process. Other receptors, including farnesoid X receptor, vitamin D receptor, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, liver X receptor, and RAR-related orphan receptor, are not directly linked to promiscuous xenobiotic binding, but clearly play important roles in the modulation of metabolic gene expression. Crystallographic studies of the ligand-binding domains of nine NRs involved in drug metabolism provide key insights into ligand-based and constitutive activity, coregulator recruitment, and gene regulation. Structures of other, noncanonical transcription factors also shed light on secondary, but important, pathways of control. Pharmacological targeting of some of these nuclear and atypical receptors has been instituted as a means to treat metabolic and developmental disorders and provides a future avenue to be explored for other members of the xenobiotic-sensing NRs.

  10. Xenobiotic-sensing nuclear receptors involved in drug metabolism: a structural perspective

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Bret D.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    Xenobiotic compounds undergo a critical range of biotransformations performed by the phase I, II, and III drug-metabolizing enzymes. The oxidation, conjugation, and transportation of potentially harmful xenobiotic and endobiotic compounds achieved by these catalytic systems are significantly regulated, at the gene expression level, by members of the nuclear receptor (NR) family of ligand-modulated transcription factors. Activation of NRs by a variety of endo- and exogenous chemicals are elemental to induction and repression of drug-metabolism pathways. The master xenobiotic sensing NRs, the promiscuous pregnane X receptor and less-promiscuous constitutive androstane receptor are crucial to initial ligand recognition, jump-starting the metabolic process. Other receptors, including farnesoid X receptor, vitamin D receptor, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, liver X receptor, and RAR-related orphan receptor, are not directly linked to promiscuous xenobiotic binding, but clearly play important roles in the modulation of metabolic gene expression. Crystallographic studies of the ligand-binding domains of nine NRs involved in drug metabolism provide key insights into ligand-based and constitutive activity, coregulator recruitment, and gene regulation. Structures of other, noncanonical transcription factors also shed light on secondary, but important, pathways of control. Pharmacological targeting of some of these nuclear and atypical receptors has been instituted as a means to treat metabolic and developmental disorders and provides a future avenue to be explored for other members of the xenobiotic-sensing NRs. PMID:23210723

  11. The Key Regulator for Language and Speech Development, FOXP2, is a Novel Substrate for SUMOylation.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Leslie J; Wang, Chiung-Min; Nascimento, Leticia; Liu, Runhua; Wang, Lizhong; Yang, Wei-Hsiung

    2016-02-01

    Transcription factor forkhead box protein P2 (FOXP2) plays an essential role in the development of language and speech. However, the transcriptional activity of FOXP2 regulated by the post-translational modifications remains unknown. Here, we demonstrated that FOXP2 is clearly defined as a SUMO target protein at the cellular levels as FOXP2 is covalently modified by both SUMO1 and SUMO3. Furthermore, SUMOylation of FOXP2 was significantly decreased by SENP2 (a specific SUMOylation protease). We further showed that FOXP2 is selectively SUMOylated in vivo on a phylogenetically conserved lysine 674 but the SUMOylation does not alter subcellular localization and stability of FOXP2. Interestingly, we observed that human etiological FOXP2 R553H mutation robustly reduces its SUMOylation potential as compared to wild-type FOXP2. In addition, the acidic residues downstream the core SUMO motif on FOXP2 are required for its full SUMOylation capacity. Finally, our functional analysis using reporter gene assays showed that SUMOylation may modulate transcriptional activity of FOXP2 in regulating downstream target genes (DISC1, SRPX2, and MiR200c). Altogether, we provide the first evidence that FOXP2 is a substrate for SUMOylation and SUMOylation of FOXP2 plays a functional role in regulating its transcriptional activity.

  12. Nuclear receptors and transcription factors in the development of fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Vluggens, Aurore; Reddy, Janardan K

    2012-12-01

    Liver regulates certain key aspects of lipid metabolism including de novo lipogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, and lipoprotein uptake and secretion. Disturbances in these hepatic functions can contribute to the development of fatty liver disease. An understanding of the regulatory mechanisms influencing hepatic lipid homeostasis and systemic energy balance is therefore of paramount importance in gaining insights that might be useful in the management of fatty liver disease. In this regard, emerging evidence indicates that certain members of the nuclear receptor superfamily and some key transcription coactivators function as intracellular sensors to orchestrate hepatic lipid metabolism. Dysregulation of nuclear receptor-mediated transcriptional signaling and perturbations in the levels of their cognate endogenous ligands play a prominent role in the development of fatty liver disease. The potential of nuclear receptors, transcription coactivators as well as enzymes that participate in the synthesis and degradation of endogenous nuclear receptor ligands, as effective therapeutic targets for fatty liver disease needs evaluation.

  13. Identification of a High Affinity Nuclear Acceptor Site for Estrogen Receptor of Calf Uterus

    PubMed Central

    Puca, Giovanni Alfredo; Sica, Vincenzo; Nola, Ernesto

    1974-01-01

    By means of affinity chromatography, specific nuclear acceptor sites for estradiol receptors are identified in a fraction that can be solubilized from purified nuclei with 2 M NaCl. Interaction between these acceptor sites and crude or partially purified estradiol receptor shows a high association constant (over 109 M). Receptor-acceptor interaction is dependent on physiological concentrations of 17β-estradiol; it is disrupted by high ionic strength. The nuclear acceptor sites appear to be protein in nature and exist in 5- to 10-fold excess over the estrogen binding sites present in the cytosol. Single- or double-stranded DNA does not bind estrogen-receptor complexes. Acceptor sites appear to be associated with basic nuclear proteins as judged by hydroxyapatite chromatography. The nuclear acceptor sites probably represent less than 0.1% of the purified basic proteins from the nucleus. PMID:4362642

  14. Evidence for triclosan-induced activation of human and rodent xenobiotic nuclear receptors

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bacteriostat triclosan (2,4,40-trichloro-20-hydroxydiphenylether) (TCS) decreases rat serum thyroxine via putative nuclear receptor (NR) interaction(s) and subsequent transcriptional up-regulation of hepatic catabolism and clearance. However, due to the evolutionary divergenc...

  15. A Boolean Network Model of Nuclear Receptor Mediated Cell Cycle Progression

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate a broad range of cellular processes. Hormones, lipids and xenobiotics have been shown to activate NRs with a range of consequences on development, metabolism, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and prolif...

  16. A Boolean Network Model of Nuclear Receptor Mediated Cell Cycle Progression (S)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate a broad range of cellular processes. Hormones, lipids and xenobiotics have been shown to activate NRs with a range of consequences on development, metabolism, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and prolif...

  17. A Boolean Network Model of Nuclear Receptor Mediated Cell Cycle Progression

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate a broad range of cellular processes. Hormones, lipids and xenobiotics have been shown to activate NRs with a range of consequences on development, metabolism, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and prolif...

  18. A Boolean Network Model of Nuclear Receptor Mediated Cell Cycle Progression (S)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate a broad range of cellular processes. Hormones, lipids and xenobiotics have been shown to activate NRs with a range of consequences on development, metabolism, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and prolif...

  19. LASSO-ing Potential Nuclear Receptor Agonists and Antagonists: A New Computational Method for Database Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are important biological macromolecular transcription factors that are implicated in multiple biological pathways and may interact with other xenobiotics that are endocrine disruptors present in the environment. Examples of important NRs include the androg...

  20. Evidence for triclosan-induced activation of human and rodent xenobiotic nuclear receptors

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bacteriostat triclosan (2,4,40-trichloro-20-hydroxydiphenylether) (TCS) decreases rat serum thyroxine via putative nuclear receptor (NR) interaction(s) and subsequent transcriptional up-regulation of hepatic catabolism and clearance. However, due to the evolutionary divergenc...

  1. LASSO-ing Potential Nuclear Receptor Agonists and Antagonists: A New Computational Method for Database Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are important biological macromolecular transcription factors that are implicated in multiple biological pathways and may interact with other xenobiotics that are endocrine disruptors present in the environment. Examples of important NRs include the androg...

  2. Nuclear Receptors and Endocrine Disruptors in Fetal and Neonatal Testes: A Gapped Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Rouiller-Fabre, Virginie; Guerquin, Marie Justine; N’Tumba-Byn, Thierry; Muczynski, Vincent; Moison, Delphine; Tourpin, Sophie; Messiaen, Sébastien; Habert, René; Livera, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    During the last decades, many studies reported that male reproductive disorders are increasing among humans. It is currently acknowledged that these abnormalities can result from fetal exposure to environmental chemicals that are progressively becoming more concentrated and widespread in our environment. Among the chemicals present in the environment (air, water, food, and many consumer products), several can act as endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), thus interfering with the endocrine system. Phthalates, bisphenol A (BPA), and diethylstilbestrol (DES) have been largely incriminated, particularly during the fetal and neonatal period, due to their estrogenic and/or anti-androgenic properties. Indeed, many epidemiological and experimental studies have highlighted their deleterious impact on fetal and neonatal testis development. As EDCs can affect many different genomic and non-genomic pathways, the mechanisms underlying the adverse effects of EDC exposure are difficult to elucidate. Using literature data and results from our laboratory, in the present review, we discuss the role of classical nuclear receptors (genomic pathway) in the fetal and neonatal testis response to EDC exposure, particularly to phthalates, BPA, and DES. Among the nuclear receptors, we focused on some of the most likely candidates, such as peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor (PPAR), androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptors (ERα and β), liver X receptors (LXR), and small heterodimer partner (SHP). First, we describe the expression and potential functions (based on data from studies using receptor agonists and mouse knockout models) of these nuclear receptors in the developing testis. Then, for each EDC studied, we summarize the main evidences indicating that the reprotoxic effect of each EDC under study is mediated through a specific nuclear receptor(s). We also point-out the involvement of other receptors and nuclear receptor-independent pathways. PMID:25999913

  3. Nuclear receptors of the honey bee: annotation and expression in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Velarde, Rodrigo A; Robinson, Gene E; Fahrbach, Susan E

    2006-01-01

    The Drosophila genome encodes 18 canonical nuclear receptors. All of the Drosophila nuclear receptors are here shown to be present in the genome of the honey bee (Apis mellifera). Given that the time since divergence of the Drosophila and Apis lineages is measured in hundreds of millions of years, the identification of matched orthologous nuclear receptors in the two genomes reveals the fundamental set of nuclear receptors required to ‘make’ an endopterygote insect. The single novelty is the presence in the A. mellifera genome of a third insect gene similar to vertebrate photoreceptor-specific nuclear receptor (PNR). Phylogenetic analysis indicates that this novel gene, which we have named AmPNR-like, is a new member of the NR2 subfamily not found in the Drosophila or human genomes. This gene is expressed in the developing compound eye of the honey bee. Like their vertebrate counterparts, arthropod nuclear receptors play key roles in embryonic and postembryonic development. Studies in Drosophila have focused primarily on the role of these transcription factors in embryogenesis and metamorphosis. Examination of an expressed sequence tag library developed from the adult bee brain and analysis of transcript expression in brain using in situ hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR revealed that several members of the nuclear receptor family (AmSVP, AmUSP, AmERR, AmHr46, AmFtz-F1, and AmHnf-4) are expressed in the brain of the adult bee. Further analysis of the expression of AmUSP and AmSVP in the mushroom bodies, the major insect brain centre for learning and memory, revealed changes in transcript abundance and, in the case of AmUSP, changes in transcript localization, during the development of foraging behaviour in the adult. Study of the honey bee therefore provides a model for understanding nuclear receptor function in the adult brain. PMID:17069634

  4. Nuclear receptors of the honey bee: annotation and expression in the adult brain.

    PubMed

    Velarde, Rodrigo A; Robinson, Gene E; Fahrbach, Susan E

    2006-10-01

    The Drosophila genome encodes 18 canonical nuclear receptors. All of the Drosophila nuclear receptors are here shown to be present in the genome of the honey bee (Apis mellifera). Given that the time since divergence of the Drosophila and Apis lineages is measured in hundreds of millions of years, the identification of matched orthologous nuclear receptors in the two genomes reveals the fundamental set of nuclear receptors required to 'make' an endopterygote insect. The single novelty is the presence in the A. mellifera genome of a third insect gene similar to vertebrate photoreceptor-specific nuclear receptor (PNR). Phylogenetic analysis indicates that this novel gene, which we have named AmPNR-like, is a new member of the NR2 subfamily not found in the Drosophila or human genomes. This gene is expressed in the developing compound eye of the honey bee. Like their vertebrate counterparts, arthropod nuclear receptors play key roles in embryonic and postembryonic development. Studies in Drosophila have focused primarily on the role of these transcription factors in embryogenesis and metamorphosis. Examination of an expressed sequence tag library developed from the adult bee brain and analysis of transcript expression in brain using in situ hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR revealed that several members of the nuclear receptor family (AmSVP, AmUSP, AmERR, AmHr46, AmFtz-F1, and AmHnf-4) are expressed in the brain of the adult bee. Further analysis of the expression of AmUSP and AmSVP in the mushroom bodies, the major insect brain centre for learning and memory, revealed changes in transcript abundance and, in the case of AmUSP, changes in transcript localization, during the development of foraging behaviour in the adult. Study of the honey bee therefore provides a model for understanding nuclear receptor function in the adult brain.

  5. Mapping the Dynamics of the Glucocorticoid Receptor within the Nuclear Landscape.

    PubMed

    Stortz, Martin; Presman, Diego M; Bruno, Luciana; Annibale, Paolo; Dansey, Maria V; Burton, Gerardo; Gratton, Enrico; Pecci, Adali; Levi, Valeria

    2017-07-24

    The distribution of the transcription machinery among different sub-nuclear domains raises the question on how the architecture of the nucleus modulates the transcriptional response. Here, we used fluorescence fluctuation analyses to quantitatively explore the organization of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in the interphase nucleus of living cells. We found that this ligand-activated transcription factor diffuses within the nucleus and dynamically interacts with bodies enriched in the coregulator NCoA-2, DNA-dependent foci and chromatin targets. The distribution of the receptor among the nuclear compartments depends on NCoA-2 and the conformation of the receptor as assessed with synthetic ligands and GR mutants with impaired transcriptional abilities. Our results suggest that the partition of the receptor in different nuclear reservoirs ultimately regulates the concentration of receptor available for the interaction with specific targets, and thus has an impact on transcription regulation.

  6. Plant nuclear hormone receptors: a role for small molecules in protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Lumba, Shelley; Cutler, Sean; McCourt, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Plant hormones are a group of chemically diverse small molecules that direct processes ranging from growth and development to biotic and abiotic stress responses. Surprisingly, genome analyses suggest that classic animal nuclear hormone receptor homologs do not exist in plants. It now appears that plants have co-opted several protein families to perceive hormones within the nucleus. In one solution to the problem, the hormones auxin and jasmonate (JA) act as “molecular glue” that promotes protein-protein interactions between receptor F-boxes and downstream corepressor targets. In another solution, gibberellins (GAs) bind and elicit a conformational change in a novel soluble receptor family related to hormone-sensitive lipases. Abscisic acid (ABA), like GA, also acts through an allosteric mechanism involving a START-domain protein. The molecular identification of plant nuclear hormone receptors will allow comparisons with animal nuclear receptors and testing of fundamental questions about hormone function in plant development and evolution.

  7. Role of Nuclear Receptor SHP in Metabolism and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuxia; Hagedorn, Curt H.; Wang, Li

    2010-01-01

    Small heterodimer partner (SHP, NR0B2) is a unique member of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily that contains the dimerization and ligand-binding domain found in other family members, but lacks the conserved DNA binding domain. The ability of SHP to bind directly to multiple NRs is crucial for its physiological function as a transcriptional inhibitor of gene expression. A wide variety of interacting partners for SHP have been identified, indicating the potential for SHP to regulate an array of genes in different biological pathways. In this review, we summarize studies concerning the structure and target genes of SHP and discuss recent progress in understanding the function of SHP in bile acid, cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, and drug metabolism. In addition, we review the regulatory role of SHP in microRNA (miRNA) regulation, liver fibrosis and cancer progression. The fact that SHP controls a complex set of genes in multiple metabolic pathways suggests the intriguing possibility of developing new therapeutics for metabolic diseases, including fatty liver, dyslipidemia and obesity, by regulating SHP with small molecules. To achieve this goal, more progress regarding SHP ligands and protein structure will be required. Besides its metabolic regulatory function, studies by us and other groups provide strong evidence that SHP plays a critical role in the development of cancer, particularly liver and breast cancer. An increased understanding of the fundamental mechanisms by which SHP regulates the development of cancers will be critical in applying knowledge of SHP in diagnostic, therapeutic or preventive strategies for specific cancers. PMID:20970497

  8. Breast cancer prognosis predicted by nuclear receptor-coregulator networks.

    PubMed

    Doan, Tram B; Eriksson, Natalie A; Graham, Dinny; Funder, John W; Simpson, Evan R; Kuczek, Elizabeth S; Clyne, Colin; Leedman, Peter J; Tilley, Wayne D; Fuller, Peter J; Muscat, George E O; Clarke, Christine L

    2014-07-01

    Although molecular signatures based on transcript expression in breast cancer samples have provided new insights into breast cancer classification and prognosis, there are acknowledged limitations in current signatures. To provide rational, pathway-based signatures of disrupted physiology in cancer tissues that may be relevant to prognosis, this study has directly quantitated changed gene expression, between normal breast and cancer tissue, as a basis for signature development. The nuclear receptor (NR) family of transcription factors, and their coregulators, are fundamental regulators of every aspect of metazoan life, and were rigorously quantified in normal breast tissues and ERα positive and ERα negative breast cancers. Coregulator expression was highly correlated with that of selected NR in normal breast, particularly from postmenopausal women. These associations were markedly decreased in breast cancer, and the expression of the majority of coregulators was down-regulated in cancer tissues compared with normal. While in cancer the loss of NR-coregulator associations observed in normal breast was common, a small number of NR (Rev-ERBβ, GR, NOR1, LRH-1 and PGR) acquired new associations with coregulators in cancer tissues. Elevated expression of these NR in cancers was associated with poorer outcome in large clinical cohorts, as well as suggesting the activation of ERα -related, but ERα-independent, pathways in ERα negative cancers. In addition, the combined expression of small numbers of NR and coregulators in breast cancer was identified as a signature predicting outcome in ERα negative breast cancer patients, not linked to proliferation and with predictive power superior to existing signatures containing many more genes. These findings highlight the power of predictive signatures derived from the quantitative determination of altered gene expression between normal breast and breast cancers. Taken together, the findings of this study identify networks

  9. Natural compounds regulate energy metabolism by the modulating the activity of lipid-sensing nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Obesity causes excess fat accumulation in various tissues, most notoriously in the adipose tissue, along with other insulin-responsive organs such as skeletal muscle and the liver, which predisposes an individual to the development of metabolic abnormalities. The molecular mechanisms underlying obesity-induced metabolic abnormalities have not been completely elucidated; however, in recent years, the search for therapies to prevent the development of obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders has increased. It is known that several nuclear receptors, when activated by specific ligands, regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism at the transcriptional level. The expression of lipid metabolism-related enzymes is directly regulated by the activity of various nuclear receptors via their interaction with specific response elements in promoters of those genes. Many natural compounds act as ligands of nuclear receptors and regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism by regulating the activities of these nuclear receptors. In this review, we describe our current knowledge of obesity, the role of lipid-sensing nuclear receptors in energy metabolism, and several examples of food factors that act as agonists or antagonists of nuclear receptors, which may be useful for the management of obesity and the accompanying energy metabolism abnormalities.

  10. NR4A nuclear receptors support memory enhancement by histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hawk, Joshua D.; Bookout, Angie L.; Poplawski, Shane G.; Bridi, Morgan; Rao, Allison J.; Sulewski, Michael E.; Kroener, Brian T.; Manglesdorf, David J.; Abel, Ted

    2012-01-01

    The formation of a long-lasting memory requires a transcription-dependent consolidation period that converts a short-term memory into a long-term memory. Nuclear receptors compose a class of transcription factors that regulate diverse biological processes, and several nuclear receptors have been implicated in memory formation. Here, we examined the potential contribution of nuclear receptors to memory consolidation by measuring the expression of all 49 murine nuclear receptors after learning. We identified 13 nuclear receptors with increased expression after learning, including all 3 members of the Nr4a subfamily. These CREB-regulated Nr4a genes encode ligand-independent “orphan” nuclear receptors. We found that blocking NR4A activity in memory-supporting brain regions impaired long-term memory but did not impact short-term memory in mice. Further, expression of Nr4a genes increased following the memory-enhancing effects of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Blocking NR4A signaling interfered with the ability of HDAC inhibitors to enhance memory. These results demonstrate that the Nr4a gene family contributes to memory formation and is a promising target for improving cognitive function. PMID:22996661

  11. Bile Acid Nuclear Receptor Farnesoid X Receptor: Therapeutic Target for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Gi; Kim, Byung-Kwon; Kim, Kyumin

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the causes of fatty liver, occurring when fat is accumulated in the liver without alcohol consumption. NAFLD is the most common liver disorder in advanced countries. NAFLD is a spectrum of pathology involving hepatic steatosis with/without inflammation and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis with accumulation of hepatocyte damage and hepatic fibrosis. Recent studies have revealed that NAFLD results in the progression of cryptogenic cirrhosis that leads to hepatocarcinoma and cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure. The main causes of NAFLD have not been revealed yet, metabolic syndromes including obesity and insulin resistance are widely accepted for the critical risk factors for the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Nuclear receptors (NRs) are transcriptional factors that sense environmental or hormonal signals and regulate expression of genes, involved in cellular growth, development, and metabolism. Several NRs have been reported to regulate genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism and inflammation. Among various NRs, farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is abundantly expressed in the liver and a key regulator to control various metabolic processes in the liver. Recent studies have shown that NAFLD is associated with inappropriate function of FXR. The impact of FXR transcriptional activity in NAFLD is likely to be potential therapeutic strategy, but still requires to elucidate underlying potent therapeutic mechanisms of FXR for the treatment of NAFLD. This article will focus the physiological roles of FXR and establish the correlation between FXR transcriptional activity and the pathogenesis of NAFLD. PMID:28029021

  12. Nuclear Receptor Corepressor Recruitment by Unliganded Thyroid Hormone Receptor in Gene Repression during Xenopus laevis Development

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, Laurent M.; Jones, Peter L.; Havis, Emmanuelle; Rouse, Nicole; Demeneix, Barbara A.; Shi, Yun-Bo

    2002-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TR) act as activators of transcription in the presence of the thyroid hormone (T3) and as repressors in its absence. While many in vitro approaches have been used to study the molecular mechanisms of TR action, their physiological relevance has not been addressed. Here we investigate how TR regulates gene expression during vertebrate postembryonic development by using T3-dependent amphibian metamorphosis as a model. Earlier studies suggest that TR acts as a repressor during premetamorphosis when T3 is absent. We hypothesize that corepressor complexes containing the nuclear receptor corepressor (N-CoR) are key factors in this TR-dependent gene repression, which is important for premetamorphic tadpole growth. To test this hypothesis, we isolated Xenopus laevis N-CoR (xN-CoR) and showed that it was present in pre- and metamorphic tadpoles. Using a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we demonstrated that xN-CoR was recruited to the promoters of T3 response genes during premetamorphosis and released upon T3 treatment, accompanied by a local increase in histone acetylation. Furthermore, overexpression of a dominant-negative N-CoR in tadpole tail muscle led to increased transcription from a T3-dependent promoter. Our data indicate that N-CoR is recruited by unliganded TR to repress target gene expression during premetamorphic animal growth, an important process that prepares the tadpole for metamorphosis. PMID:12446772

  13. Orphan Nuclear Receptor Estrogen-Related Receptor γ (ERRγ) Is Key Regulator of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Don-Kyu; Ryu, Dongryeol; Koh, Minseob; Lee, Min-Woo; Lim, Donghyun; Kim, Min-Jung; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Cho, Won-Jea; Lee, Chul-Ho; Park, Seung Bum; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2012-01-01

    Glucose homeostasis is tightly controlled by hormonal regulation of hepatic glucose production. Dysregulation of this system is often associated with insulin resistance and diabetes, resulting in hyperglycemia in mammals. Here, we show that the orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) is a novel downstream mediator of glucagon action in hepatic gluconeogenesis and demonstrate a beneficial impact of the inverse agonist GSK5182. Hepatic ERRγ expression was increased by fasting-dependent activation of the cAMP-response element-binding protein-CRTC2 pathway. Overexpression of ERRγ induced Pck1 and G6PC gene expression and glucose production in primary hepatocytes, whereas abolition of ERRγ gene expression attenuated forskolin-mediated induction of gluconeogenic gene expression. Deletion and mutation analyses of the Pck1 promoter showed that ERRγ directly regulates the Pck1 gene transcription via ERR response elements of the Pck1 promoter as confirmed by ChIP assay and in vivo imaging analysis. We also demonstrate that GSK5182, an inverse agonist of ERRγ, specifically inhibits the transcriptional activity of ERRγ in a PGC-1α dependent manner. Finally, the ERRγ inverse agonist ameliorated hyperglycemia through inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis in db/db mice. Control of hepatic glucose production by an ERRγ-specific inverse agonist is a new potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:22549789

  14. Computer-assisted generation of a protein-interaction database for nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Albert, Sylvie; Gaudan, Sylvain; Knigge, Heidrun; Raetsch, Andreas; Delgado, Asuncion; Huhse, Bettina; Kirsch, Harald; Albers, Michael; Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich; Koegl, Manfred

    2003-08-01

    With the increasing amount of biological data available, automated methods for information retrieval become necessary. We employed computer-assisted text mining to retrieve all protein-protein interactions for nuclear receptors from MEDLINE in a systematic way. A dictionary of protein names and of terms denoting interactions was generated, and trioccurrences of two protein names and one interaction term in one sentence were retrieved. Abstracts containing at least one such trioccurrence were manually checked by biologists to select the relevant interactions out of the automatically extracted data. In total, 4360 abstracts were retrieved containing data on protein interactions for nuclear receptors. The resulting database contains all reported protein interactions involving nuclear receptors from 1966 to September 2001. Remarkably, the annual increase in number of reported interactors for nuclear receptors has been following an exponential growth curve in the years 1991 to 2001. Apparent in the data set is the high complexity of protein interactions for nuclear receptors. The number of interactions correlates with the number of published papers for a given receptor, suggesting that the number of reported interactors is a reflection of the intensity of research dedicated to a given receptor. Indeed, comparison of the retrieved data to a systematic yeast two-hybrid-based interaction analysis suggests that most NRs are similar with respect to the number of interacting proteins. The data set obtained serves as a source for information on NR interactions, as well as a reference data set for the improvement of advanced text-mining methods.

  15. Nuclear receptors license phagocytosis by trem2+ myeloid cells in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Savage, Julie C; Jay, Taylor; Goduni, Elanda; Quigley, Caitlin; Mariani, Monica M; Malm, Tarja; Ransohoff, Richard M; Lamb, Bruce T; Landreth, Gary E

    2015-04-22

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by a robust inflammatory response elicited by the accumulation and subsequent deposition of amyloid (Aβ) within the brain. The brain's immune cells migrate to and invest their processes within Aβ plaques but are unable to efficiently phagocytose and clear plaques from the brain. Previous studies have shown that treatment of myeloid cells with nuclear receptor agonists increases expression of phagocytosis-related genes. In this study, we elucidate a novel mechanism by which nuclear receptors act to enhance phagocytosis in the AD brain. Treatment of murine models of AD with agonists of the nuclear receptors PPARγ, PPARδ, LXR, and RXR stimulated microglial phagocytosis in vitro and rapidly induced the expression of the phagocytic receptors Axl and MerTK. In murine models of AD, we found that plaque-associated macrophages expressed Axl and MerTK and treatment of the cells with an RXR agonist further induced their expression, coincident with the rapid reduction in plaque burden. Further characterization of MerTK(+)/Axl(+) macrophages revealed that they also expressed the phagocytic receptor TREM2 and high levels of CD45, consistent with a peripheral origin of these cells. Importantly, in an ex vivo slice assay, nuclear receptor agonist treatment reversed the AD-related suppression of phagocytosis through a MerTK-dependent mechanism. Thus, nuclear receptor agonists increase MerTK and Axl expression on plaque-associated immune cells, consequently licensing their phagocytic activity and promoting plaque clearance.

  16. Minireview: Pathophysiological Roles of the TR4 Nuclear Receptor: Lessons Learned From Mice Lacking TR4

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shin-Jen; Zhang, Yanqing; Liu, Ning-Chun; Yang, Dong-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Testicular nuclear receptor 4 (TR4), also known as NR2C2, belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily and shares high homology with the testicular nuclear receptor 2. The natural ligands of TR4 remained unclear until the recent discoveries of several energy/lipid sensors including the polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolites, 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, and their synthetic ligands, thiazolidinediones, used for treatment of diabetes. TR4 is widely expressed throughout the body and particularly concentrated in the testis, prostate, cerebellum, and hippocampus. It has been shown to play important roles in cerebellar development, forebrain myelination, folliculogenesis, gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, muscle development, bone development, and prostate cancer progression. Here we provide a comprehensive summary of TR4 signaling including its upstream ligands/activators/suppressors, transcriptional coactivators/repressors, downstream targets, and their in vivo functions with potential impacts on TR4-related diseases. Importantly, TR4 shares similar ligands/activators with another key nuclear receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, which raised several interesting questions about how these 2 nuclear receptors may collaborate with or counteract each other's function in their related diseases. Clear dissection of such molecular mechanisms and their differential roles in various diseases may help researchers to design new potential drugs with better efficacy and fewer side effects to battle TR4 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ involved diseases. PMID:24702179

  17. Nuclear hormone receptor signals as new therapeutic targets for urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, H; Zheng, Y; Izumi, K

    2012-01-01

    Unlike prostate and breast cancers, urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder is not yet considered as an endocrine-related neoplasm, and hormonal therapy for bladder cancer remains experimental. Nonetheless, there is increasing evidence indicating that nuclear hormone receptor signals are implicated in the development and progression of bladder cancer. Androgen-mediated androgen receptor (AR) signals have been convincingly shown to induce bladder tumorigenesis. Androgens also promote the growth of AR-positive bladder cancer cells, although it is controversial whether AR plays a dominant role in bladder cancer progression. Both stimulatory and inhibitory functions of estrogen receptor signals in bladder cancer have been reported. Various studies have also demonstrated the involvement of other nuclear receptors, including progesterone receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, vitamin D receptor, and retinoid receptors, as well as some orphan receptors, in bladder cancer. This review summarizes and discusses available data suggesting the modulation of bladder carcinogenesis and cancer progression via nuclear hormone receptor signaling pathways. These pathways have the potential to be an extremely important area of bladder cancer research, leading to the development of effective chemopreventive/therapeutic approaches, using hormonal manipulation. Considerable uncertainty remains regarding the selection of patients who are likely to benefit from hormonal therapy and optimal options for the treatment.

  18. Transcriptional Corepressor SMILE Recruits SIRT1 to Inhibit Nuclear Receptor Estrogen Receptor-related Receptor γ Transactivation*

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuan-Bin; Park, Jeong-Hoh; Kim, Don-Kyu; Hwang, Jung Hwan; Oh, Sangmi; Park, Seung Bum; Shong, Minho; Lee, In-Kyu; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2009-01-01

    SMILE (small heterodimer partner interacting leucine zipper protein) has been identified as a corepressor of the glucocorticoid receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α. Here we show that SMILE also represses estrogen receptor-related receptor γ (ERRγ) transactivation. Knockdown of SMILE gene expression increases ERRγ activity. SMILE directly interacts with ERRγ in vitro and in vivo. Domain mapping analysis showed that SMILE binds to the AF2 domain of ERRγ. SMILE represses ERRγ transactivation partially through competition with coactivators PGC-1α, PGC-1β, and GRIP1. Interestingly, the repression of SMILE on ERRγ is released by SIRT1 inhibitors, a catalytically inactive SIRT1 mutant, and SIRT1 small interfering RNA but not by histone protein deacetylase inhibitor. In vivo glutathione S-transferase pulldown and coimmunoprecipitation assays validated that SMILE physically interacts with SIRT1. Furthermore, the ERRγ inverse agonist GSK5182 enhances the interaction of SMILE with ERRγ and SMILE-mediated repression. Knockdown of SMILE or SIRT1 blocks the repressive effect of GSK5182. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that GSK5182 augments the association of SMILE and SIRT1 on the promoter of the ERRγ target PDK4. GSK5182 and adenoviral overexpression of SMILE cooperate to repress ERRγ-induced PDK4 gene expression, and this repression is released by overexpression of a catalytically defective SIRT1 mutant. Finally, we demonstrated that ERRγ regulates SMILE gene expression, which in turn inhibits ERRγ. Overall, these findings implicate SMILE as a novel corepressor of ERRγ and recruitment of SIRT1 as a novel repressive mechanism for SMILE and ERRγ inverse agonist. PMID:19690166

  19. Analysis of PTEN ubiquitylation and SUMOylation using molecular traps.

    PubMed

    Lang, Valérie; Aillet, Fabienne; Da Silva-Ferrada, Elisa; Xolalpa, Wendy; Zabaleta, Lorea; Rivas, Carmen; Rodriguez, Manuel S

    2015-05-01

    The function of the tumour suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is tightly controlled by post-translational modifications (PTMs) including ubiquitin or Small Ubiquitin-related MOdifiers (SUMO). It is known that SUMOylation by SUMO-1, SUMO-2/-3, mono- or polyubiquitylation have a distinct impact on PTEN activity, localisation and/or stability, however the molecular mechanisms governing these processes are still unclear. Studying PTM regulated events has always been a difficult task due to their labile nature. Here, we propose an update on the role of these PTMs on PTEN function, as well as a methodological overview on the use of molecular traps named SUMO Binding Entities (SUBEs) or Tandem Ubiquitin Binding Entities (TUBEs) to capture SUMOylated or Ubiquitylated forms of PTEN respectively. When combined with in vitro SUMOylation or Ubiquitylation assays, the use of molecular traps facilitate the detection of modified forms of PTEN. SUMO and ubiquitin-traps are also suitable to capture endogenously modified forms of PTEN after expression of E3 ligases or treatment with chemical inhibitors. This versatile approach represents an interesting alternative to explore PTEN regulation by SUMO and ubiquitin under physiological or pathological conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Crystal Structures of the Nuclear Receptor, Liver Receptor Homolog 1, Bound to Synthetic Agonists.

    PubMed

    Mays, Suzanne G; Okafor, C Denise; Whitby, Richard J; Goswami, Devrishi; Stec, Józef; Flynn, Autumn R; Dugan, Michael C; Jui, Nathan T; Griffin, Patrick R; Ortlund, Eric A

    2016-12-02

    Liver receptor homolog 1 (NR5A2, LRH-1) is an orphan nuclear hormone receptor that regulates diverse biological processes, including metabolism, proliferation, and the resolution of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Although preclinical and cellular studies demonstrate that LRH-1 has great potential as a therapeutic target for metabolic diseases and cancer, development of LRH-1 modulators has been difficult. Recently, systematic modifications to one of the few known chemical scaffolds capable of activating LRH-1 failed to improve efficacy substantially. Moreover, mechanisms through which LRH-1 is activated by synthetic ligands are entirely unknown. Here, we use x-ray crystallography and other structural methods to explore conformational changes and receptor-ligand interactions associated with LRH-1 activation by a set of related agonists. Unlike phospholipid LRH-1 ligands, these agonists bind deep in the pocket and do not interact with residues near the mouth nor do they expand the pocket like phospholipids. Unexpectedly, two closely related agonists with similar efficacies (GSK8470 and RJW100) exhibit completely different binding modes. The dramatic repositioning is influenced by a differential ability to establish stable face-to-face π-π-stacking with the LRH-1 residue His-390, as well as by a novel polar interaction mediated by the RJW100 hydroxyl group. The differing binding modes result in distinct mechanisms of action for the two agonists. Finally, we identify a network of conserved water molecules near the ligand-binding site that are important for activation by both agonists. This work reveals a previously unappreciated complexity associated with LRH-1 agonist development and offers insights into rational design strategies. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. In silico modelling of prostacyclin and other lipid mediators to nuclear receptors reveal novel thyroid hormone receptor antagonist properties.

    PubMed

    Perez Diaz, Noelia; Zloh, Mire; Patel, Pryank; Mackenzie, Louise S

    2016-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) is a key mediator involved in cardiovascular homeostasis, acting predominantly on two receptor types; cell surface IP receptor and cytosolic peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) β/δ. Having a very short half-life, direct methods to determine its long term effects on cells is difficult, and little is known of its interactions with nuclear receptors. Here we used computational chemistry methods to investigate the potential for PGI2, beraprost (IP receptor agonist), and GW0742 (PPARβ/δ agonist), to bind to nuclear receptors, confirmed with pharmacological methods. In silico screening predicted that PGI2, beraprost, and GW0742 have the potential to bind to different nuclear receptors, in particular thyroid hormone β receptor (TRβ) and thyroid hormone α receptor (TRα). Docking analysis predicts a binding profile to residues thought to have allosteric control on the TR ligand binding site. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed that beraprost and GW0742 display TRβ and TRα antagonistic properties; beraprost IC50 6.3 × 10(-5)mol/L and GW0742 IC50 4.9 × 10(-6) mol/L. Changes to triiodothyronine (T3) induced vasodilation of rat mesenteric arteries measured on the wire myograph were measured in the presence of the TR antagonist MLS000389544 (10(-5) mol/L), beraprost (10(-5) mol/L) and GW0742 (10(-5) mol/L); all significantly inhibited T3 induced vasodilation compared to controls. We have shown that both beraprost and GW0742 exhibit TRβ and TRα antagonist behaviour, and suggests that PGI2 has the ability to affect the long term function of cells through binding to and inactivating thyroid hormone receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. SMRT isoforms mediate repression and anti-repression of nuclear receptor heterodimers.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J D; Umesono, K; Evans, R M

    1996-01-01

    Transcriptional repression represents an important component in the regulation of cell differentiation and oncogenesis mediated by nuclear hormone receptors. Hormones act to relieve repression, thus allowing receptors to function as transcriptional activators. The transcriptional corepressor SMRT was identified as a silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors. SMRT is highly related to another corepressor, N-CoR, suggesting the existence of a new family of receptor-interacting proteins. We demonstrate that SMRT is a ubiquitous nuclear protein that interacts with unliganded receptor heterodimers in mammalian cells. Furthermore, expression of the receptor-interacting domain of SMRT acts as an antirepressor, suggesting the potential importance of splicing variants as modulators of thyroid hormone and retinoic acid signaling. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8755515

  3. The xenobiotic-sensing nuclear receptors pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and orphan nuclear receptor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha in the regulation of human steroid-/bile acid-sulfotransferase.

    PubMed

    Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Song, Chung S; Oh, Taesung; Ahmed, Mohamed; De La Cruz, Isidro John; Chatterjee, Bandana

    2007-09-01

    The nuclear receptors pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) are the primary transcription factors coordinating induced expression of the enzymes and proteins directing oxidative, conjugative, and transport phases of endobiotic and xenobiotic metabolism, whereas hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF4alpha), a regulator of hepatic lipid homeostasis, can modify the PXR/CAR response. Steroid- and bile acid-sulfotransferase (SULT2A1) promotes phase II metabolism through its sulfonating action on certain endobiotics, including steroids and bile acids, and on diverse xenobiotics, including therapeutic drugs. This study describes characterization of a PXR- and CAR-inducible composite element in the human SULT2A1 promoter and its synergistic interaction with HNF4alpha. Inverted and direct repeats of AG(G/T)TCA (IR2 and DR4), both binding to PXR and CAR, define the composite element. Differential recognition of the composite element by PXR and CAR is evident because single-site mutation at either IR2 or DR4 in the natural gene abolished the PXR response, whereas mutations at both repeats were necessary to abrogate completely the CAR response. The composite element conferred xenobiotic response to a heterologous promoter, and the cognate ligands induced PXR and CAR recruitment to the chromatin-associated response region. An HNF4alpha element adjacent to the -30 position enhanced basal promoter activity. Although functioning as a synergizer, the HNF4alpha element was not essential for the PXR/CAR response. An emerging role of SULT2A1 in lipid and caloric homeostasis suggests that illumination on the regulatory interactions driving human SULT2A1 expression may reveal new avenues to control certain metabolic disorders.

  4. Multiple Novel Signals Mediate Thyroid Hormone Receptor Nuclear Import and Export*

    PubMed Central

    Mavinakere, Manohara S.; Powers, Jeremy M.; Subramanian, Kelly S.; Roggero, Vincent R.; Allison, Lizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptor (TR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that shuttles between the cytosol and nucleus. The fine balance between nuclear import and export of TR has emerged as a critical control point for modulating thyroid hormone-responsive gene expression; however, sequence motifs of TR that mediate shuttling are not fully defined. Here, we characterized multiple signals that direct TR shuttling. Along with the known nuclear localization signal in the hinge domain, we identified a novel nuclear localization signal in the A/B domain of thyroid hormone receptor α1 that is absent in thyroid hormone receptor β1 and inactive in the oncoprotein v-ErbA. Our prior studies showed that thyroid hormone receptor α1 exits the nucleus through two pathways, one dependent on the export factor CRM1 and the other CRM1-independent. Here, we identified three novel CRM1-independent nuclear export signal (NES) motifs in the ligand-binding domain as follows: a highly conserved NES in helix 12 (NES-H12) and two additional NES sequences spanning helix 3 and helix 6, respectively. Mutations predicted to disrupt the α-helical structure resulted in a significant decrease in NES-H12 activity. The high degree of conservation of helix 12 suggests that this region may function as a key NES in other nuclear receptors. Furthermore, our mutagenesis studies on NES-H12 suggest that altered shuttling of thyroid hormone receptor β1 may be a contributing factor in resistance to thyroid hormone syndrome. Taken together, our findings provide a detailed mechanistic understanding of the multiple signals that work together to regulate TR shuttling and transcriptional activity, and they provide important insights into nuclear receptor function in general. PMID:22815488

  5. The HR97 (NR1L) Group of Nuclear Receptors: A New Group up of Nuclear Receptors Discovered in Daphnia species

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yangchun; Ginjupalli, Gautam K.; Baldwin, William S.

    2014-01-01

    The recently sequenced Daphnia pulex genome revealed the NR1L nuclear receptor group consisting of three novel receptors. Phylogenetic studies show that this group is related to the NR1I group (CAR/PXR/VDR) and the NR1J group (HR96), and were subsequently named HR97a/b/g. Each of the HR97 paralogs from Daphnia magna, a commonly used crustacean in toxicity testing, was cloned, sequenced, and partially characterized. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the HR97 receptors are present in primitive arthropods such as the chelicerates but lost in insects. qPCR and immunohistochemistry demonstrate that each of the receptors is expressed near or at reproductive maturity, and that HR97g, the most ancient of the HR97 receptors, is primarily expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, mandibular region, and ovaries, consistent with a role in reproduction. Transactivation assays using an HR97a/b/g-GAL4 chimera indicate that unlike Daphnia HR96 that is promiscuous with respect to ligand recognition, the HR97 receptors do not respond to many of the ligands that activate CAR/PXR/HR96 nuclear receptors. Only three putative ligands of HR97 receptors were identified in this study: pyriproxyfen, methyl farnesoate, and arachidonic acid. Only arachidonic acid, which acts as an inverse agonist, alters HR97g activity at concentrations that would be considered within physiologically relevant ranges. Overall, this study demonstrates that, although closely related to the promiscuous receptors in the NR1I and NR1J groups, the HR97 receptors are mostly likely not multi-xenobiotic sensors, but rather may perform physiological functions, potentially in reproduction, unique to crustaceans and other non-insect arthropod groups. PMID:25092536

  6. Sumoylation is tumor-suppressive and confers proliferative quiescence to hematopoietic progenitors in Drosophila melanogaster larvae.

    PubMed

    Kalamarz, Marta E; Paddibhatla, Indira; Nadar, Christina; Govind, Shubha

    2012-03-15

    How cell-intrinsic regulation of the cell cycle and the extrinsic influence of the niche converge to provide proliferative quiescence, safeguard tissue integrity, and provide avenues to stop stem cells from giving rise to tumors is a major challenge in gene therapy and tissue engineering. We explore this question in sumoylation-deficient mutants of Drosophila. In wild type third instar larval lymph glands, a group of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells acquires quiescence; a multicellular niche supports their undifferentiated state. However, how proliferative quiescence is instilled in this population is not understood. We show that Ubc9 protein is nuclear in this population. Loss of the SUMO-activating E1 enzyme, Aos1/Uba2, the conjugating E2 enzyme, Ubc9, or the E3 SUMO ligase, PIAS, results in a failure of progenitors to quiesce; progenitors become hyperplastic, misdifferentiate, and develop into microtumors that eventually detach from the dorsal vessel. Significantly, dysplasia and lethality of Ubc9 mutants are rescued when Ubc9(wt) is provided specifically in the progenitor populations, but not when it is provided in the niche or in the differentiated cortex. While normal progenitors express high levels of the Drosophila cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 homolog, Dacapo, the corresponding overgrown mutant population exhibits a marked reduction in Dacapo. Forced expression of either Dacapo or human p21 in progenitors shrinks this population. The selective expression of either protein in mutant progenitor cells, but not in other hematopoietic populations, limits overgrowth, blocks tumorogenesis, and restores organ integrity. We discuss an essential and complex role for sumoylation in preserving the hematopoietic progenitor states for stress response and in the context of normal development of the fly.

  7. Sumoylation is tumor-suppressive and confers proliferative quiescence to hematopoietic progenitors in Drosophila melanogaster larvae

    PubMed Central

    Kalamarz, Marta E.; Paddibhatla, Indira; Nadar, Christina; Govind, Shubha

    2012-01-01

    Summary How cell-intrinsic regulation of the cell cycle and the extrinsic influence of the niche converge to provide proliferative quiescence, safeguard tissue integrity, and provide avenues to stop stem cells from giving rise to tumors is a major challenge in gene therapy and tissue engineering. We explore this question in sumoylation-deficient mutants of Drosophila. In wild type third instar larval lymph glands, a group of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells acquires quiescence; a multicellular niche supports their undifferentiated state. However, how proliferative quiescence is instilled in this population is not understood. We show that Ubc9 protein is nuclear in this population. Loss of the SUMO-activating E1 enzyme, Aos1/Uba2, the conjugating E2 enzyme, Ubc9, or the E3 SUMO ligase, PIAS, results in a failure of progenitors to quiesce; progenitors become hyperplastic, misdifferentiate, and develop into microtumors that eventually detach from the dorsal vessel. Significantly, dysplasia and lethality of Ubc9 mutants are rescued when Ubc9wt is provided specifically in the progenitor populations, but not when it is provided in the niche or in the differentiated cortex. While normal progenitors express high levels of the Drosophila cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 homolog, Dacapo, the corresponding overgrown mutant population exhibits a marked reduction in Dacapo. Forced expression of either Dacapo or human p21 in progenitors shrinks this population. The selective expression of either protein in mutant progenitor cells, but not in other hematopoietic populations, limits overgrowth, blocks tumorogenesis, and restores organ integrity. We discuss an essential and complex role for sumoylation in preserving the hematopoietic progenitor states for stress response and in the context of normal development of the fly. PMID:23213407

  8. The structure of corepressor Dax-1 bound to its target nuclear receptor LRH-1

    PubMed Central

    Sablin, Elena P.; Woods, April; Krylova, Irina N.; Hwang, Peter; Ingraham, Holly A.; Fletterick, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    The Dax-1 protein is an enigmatic nuclear receptor that lacks an expected DNA binding domain, yet functions as a potent corepressor of nuclear receptors. Here we report the structure of Dax-1 bound to one of its targets, liver receptor homolog 1 (LRH-1). Unexpectedly, Dax-1 binds to LRH-1 using a new module, a repressor helix built from a family conserved sequence motif, PCFXXLP. Mutations in this repressor helix that are linked with human endocrine disorders dissociate the complex and attenuate Dax-1 function. The structure of the Dax-1:LRH-1 complex provides the molecular mechanism for the function of Dax-1 as a potent transcriptional repressor. PMID:19015525

  9. Analysis of the Heat Shock Response in Mouse Liver Reveals Transcriptional Dependence on the Nuclear Receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor alpha (PPARα)

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) regulates responses to chemical or physical stress in part by altering expression of genes involved in proteome maintenance. Many of these genes are also transcriptionally regulated by h...

  10. Analysis of the Heat Shock Response in Mouse Liver Reveals Transcriptional Dependence on the Nuclear Receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor alpha (PPARα)

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) regulates responses to chemical or physical stress in part by altering expression of genes involved in proteome maintenance. Many of these genes are also transcriptionally regulated by h...

  11. Identification of Modulators of the Nuclear Receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α (PPARα) in a Mouse Liver Gene Expression Compendium

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nuclear receptor family member peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is activated by therapeutic hypolipidemic drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals to regulate genes involved in lipid transport and catabolism. Chronic activation of PPARα in rodents inc...

  12. Identification of Modulators of the Nuclear Receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α (PPARα) in a Mouse Liver Gene Expression Compendium

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nuclear receptor family member peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is activated by therapeutic hypolipidemic drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals to regulate genes involved in lipid transport and catabolism. Chronic activation of PPARα in rodents inc...

  13. AF-2 activity and recruitment of steroid receptor coactivator 1 to the estrogen receptor depend on a lysine residue conserved in nuclear receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Henttu, P M; Kalkhoven, E; Parker, M G

    1997-01-01

    Hormone-dependent transcriptional activation by nuclear receptors depends on the presence of a conserved C-terminal amphipathic alpha-helix (helix 12) in the ligand-binding domain. Here we show that a lysine residue, which is conserved in most nuclear receptors in the predicted helix 3, is also required for estrogen-dependent transactivation. The replacement of lysine 366 with alanine appreciably reduced activation function 2 (AF-2) activity without affecting steroid- or DNA-binding activity in the mouse estrogen receptor. The mutation dramatically reduced the ability of the receptor to bind steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC-1) but had no effect on receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP-140) binding, indicating that while their sites of interaction overlap, they are not entirely consistent and in keeping with the proposal that the recruitment of coactivators, such as SRC-1, is required for AF-2 activity. Although the function of RIP-140 remains to be established, RIP-140 appears to be capable of recruiting the basal transcription machinery, since overexpression of the protein markedly increased the transcriptional activity of the mutant receptor. Since the lysine residue is conserved, we propose that it is required, together with residues in helix 12, to form the surface by which members of the nuclear receptor family interact with coactivators. PMID:9121431

  14. Nuclear export of the glucocorticoid receptor is accelerated by cell fusion-dependent release of calreticulin.

    PubMed

    Walther, Rhian F; Lamprecht, Claudia; Ridsdale, Andrew; Groulx, Isabelle; Lee, Stephen; Lefebvre, Yvonne A; Haché, Robert J G

    2003-09-26

    Nucleocytoplasmic exchange of nuclear hormone receptors is hypothesized to allow for rapid and direct interactions with cytoplasmic signaling factors. In addition to recycling between a naïve, chaperone-associated cytoplasmic complex and a liganded chaperone-free nuclear form, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) has been observed to shuttle between nucleus and cytoplasm. Nuclear export of GR and other nuclear receptors has been proposed to depend on direct interactions with calreticulin, which is predominantly localized to the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. We show that rapid calreticulin-mediated nuclear export of GR is a specific response to transient disruption of the endoplasmic reticulum that occurs during polyethylene glycol-mediated cell fusion. Using live and digitonin-permeabilized cells we demonstrate that, in the absence of cell fusion, GR nuclear export occurs slowly over a period of many hours independent of direct interaction with calreticulin. Our findings temper expectations that nuclear receptors respond rapidly and directly to cytoplasmic signals in the absence of additional regulatory control. These results highlight the importance of verifying findings of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking using techniques in addition to heterokaryon cell fusion.

  15. Dietary regulation of adiponectin by direct and indirect lipid activators of nuclear hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Rühl, R; Landrier, J F

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipokine mainly secreted by adipocytes that presents antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherogenic functions. Therefore, modulation of adiponectin expression represents a promising target for prevention or treatment of several diseases including insulin resistance and type II diabetes. Pharmacological agents such as the nuclear hormone receptor synthetic agonists like peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ agonists are of particular interest in therapeutic strategies due to their ability to increase the plasma adiponectin concentration. Nutritional approaches are also of particular interest, especially in primary prevention, since some active compounds of our diet (notably vitamins, carotenoids, or other essential nutrients) are direct or indirect lipid-activators of nuclear hormone receptors and are modifiers of adiponectin expression and secretion. The aim of the present review is to summarize current knowledge about the nutritional regulation of adiponectin by derivatives of active compounds naturally present in the diet acting as indirect or direct activators of nuclear hormone receptors.

  16. Minireview: The Role of Nuclear Receptors in Photoreceptor Differentiation and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Swaroop, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Rod and cone photoreceptors are specialized sensory cells that mediate vision. Transcriptional controls are critical for the development and long-term survival of photoreceptors; when these controls become ineffective, retinal dysfunction or degenerative disease may result. This review discusses the role of nuclear receptors, a class of ligand-regulated transcription factors, at key stages of photoreceptor life in the mammalian retina. Nuclear receptors with known ligands, such as retinoids or thyroid hormone, together with several orphan receptors without identified physiological ligands, complement other classes of transcription factors in directing the differentiation and functional maintenance of photoreceptors. The potential of nuclear receptors to respond to ligands introduces versatility into the control of photoreceptor development and function and may suggest new opportunities for treatments of photoreceptor disease. PMID:22556342

  17. Regulation of nuclear pore complex conformation by IP(3) receptor activation.

    PubMed Central

    Moore-Nichols, David; Arnott, Anne; Dunn, Robert C

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, both the molecular architecture and functional dynamics of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) have been revealed with increasing detail. These large, supramolecular assemblages of proteins form channels that span the nuclear envelope of cells, acting as crucial regulators of nuclear import and export. From the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear envelope, nuclear pore complexes exhibit an eightfold symmetric ring structure encompassing a central lumen. The lumen often appears occupied by an additional structure alternatively referred to as the central granule, nuclear transport complex, or nuclear plug. Previous studies have suggested that the central granule may play a role in mediating calcium-dependent regulation of diffusion across the nuclear envelope for intermediate sized molecules (10-40 kDa). Using atomic force microscopy to measure the surface topography of chemically fixed Xenopus laevis oocyte nuclear envelopes, we present measurements of the relative position of the central granule within the NPC lumen under a variety of conditions known to modify nuclear Ca(2+) stores. These measurements reveal a large, approximately 9-nm displacement of the central granule toward the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear envelope under calcium depleting conditions. Additionally, activation of nuclear inositol triphosphate (IP(3)) receptors by the specific agonist, adenophostin A, results in a concentration-dependent displacement of central granule position with an EC(50) of ~1.2 nM. The displacement of the central granule within the NPC is observed on both the cytoplasmic and nucleoplasmic faces of the nuclear envelope. The displacement is blocked upon treatment with xestospongin C, a specific inhibitor of IP(3) receptor activation. These results extend previous models of NPC conformational dynamics linking central granule position to depletion of IP(3) sensitive nuclear envelope calcium stores. PMID:12202368

  18. Design of selective nuclear receptor modulators: RAR and RXR as a case study.

    PubMed

    de Lera, Angel R; Bourguet, William; Altucci, Lucia; Gronemeyer, Hinrich

    2007-10-01

    Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily whose effects on cell growth and survival can be modulated therapeutically by small-molecule ligands. Although compounds that target these receptors are powerful anticancer drugs, their use is limited by toxicity. An improved understanding of the structural biology of RXRs and RARs and recent advances in the chemical synthesis of modified retinoid and rexinoid ligands should enable the rational design of more selective agents that might overcome such problems. Here, we review structural data for RXRs and RARs, discuss strategies in the design of selective RXR and RAR modulators, and consider lessons that can be learned for the design of selective nuclear-receptor modulators in general.

  19. Comparison of solubilized and purified plasma membrane and nuclear insulin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K.Y.; Hawley, D.; Vigneri, R.; Goldfine, I.D.

    1988-01-12

    Prior studies have detected biochemical and immunological differences between insulin receptors in plasma membranes and isolated nuclei. To further investigate these receptors, they were solubilized in Triton X-100 partially purified by wheat germ agglutinin-agarose chromatography. In these preparations, the nuclear and plasma membrane receptors had very similar pH optima (pH 8.0) and reactivities to a group of polyclonal antireceptor antibodies. Further, both membrane preparations had identical binding activities when labeled insulin was competed for by unlabeled insulin (50% inhibition at 800 pM). Next, nuclear and plasma membranes were solubilized and purified to homogeneity by wheat germ agglutinin-agarose and insulin-agarose chromatography. In both receptors, labeled insulin was covalently cross-linked to a protein of 130 kilodaltons representing the insulin receptor ..cap alpha.. subunit. When preparations of both receptors were incubated with insulin and then adenosine 5'-(..gamma..-/sup 32/P)triphosphate, a protein of 95 kilodaltons representing the insulin receptor ..beta.. subunit was phosphorylated in a dose-dependent manner. These studies indicate, therefore, that solubilized plasma membrane and nuclear insulin receptors have similar structures and biochemical properties, and they suggest that they are the same (or very similar) proteins.

  20. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Nuclear Protein Complex Involved in Nuclear Hormone Receptor-mediated Gene Regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Garapaty, Shivani; Xu, Chong-Feng; Trojer, Patrick; Mahajan, Muktar A.; Neubert, Thomas A.; Samuels, Herbert H.

    2009-01-01

    NRC/NCoA6 plays an important role in mediating the effects of ligand-bound nuclear hormone receptors as well as other transcription factors. NRC interacting factor 1 (NIF-1) was cloned as a novel factor that interacts in vivo with NRC. Although NIF-1 does not directly interact with nuclear hormone receptors, it enhances activation by nuclear hormone receptors presumably through its interaction with NRC. To further understand the cellular and biological function of NIF-1, we identified NIF-1-associated proteins by in-solution proteolysis followed by mass spectrometry. The identified components revealed factors involved in histone methylation and cell cycle control and include Ash2L, RbBP5, WDR5, HCF-1, DBC-1, and EMSY. Although the NIF-1 complex contains Ash2L, RbBP5, and WDR5, suggesting that the complex might methylate histone H3-Lys-4, we found that the complex contains a H3 methyltransferase activity that modifies a residue other than H3-Lys-4. The identified components form at least two distinctly sized NIF-1 complexes. DBC-1 and EMSY were identified as integral components of an NIF-1 complex of ∼1.5 MDa and were found to play an important role in the regulation of nuclear receptor-mediated transcription. Stimulation of the Sox9 and HoxA1 genes by retinoic acid receptor-α was found to require both DBC-1 and EMSY in addition to NIF-1 for maximal transcriptional activation. Interestingly, NRC was not identified as a component of the NIF-1 complex, suggesting that NIF-1 and NRC do not exist as stable in vitro purified complexes, although the separate NIF-1 and NRC complexes appear to functionally interact in the cell. PMID:19131338

  1. Identification and characterization of a novel nuclear protein complex involved in nuclear hormone receptor-mediated gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Garapaty, Shivani; Xu, Chong-Feng; Trojer, Patrick; Mahajan, Muktar A; Neubert, Thomas A; Samuels, Herbert H

    2009-03-20

    NRC/NCoA6 plays an important role in mediating the effects of ligand-bound nuclear hormone receptors as well as other transcription factors. NRC interacting factor 1 (NIF-1) was cloned as a novel factor that interacts in vivo with NRC. Although NIF-1 does not directly interact with nuclear hormone receptors, it enhances activation by nuclear hormone receptors presumably through its interaction with NRC. To further understand the cellular and biological function of NIF-1, we identified NIF-1-associated proteins by in-solution proteolysis followed by mass spectrometry. The identified components revealed factors involved in histone methylation and cell cycle control and include Ash2L, RbBP5, WDR5, HCF-1, DBC-1, and EMSY. Although the NIF-1 complex contains Ash2L, RbBP5, and WDR5, suggesting that the complex might methylate histone H3-Lys-4, we found that the complex contains a H3 methyltransferase activity that modifies a residue other than H3-Lys-4. The identified components form at least two distinctly sized NIF-1 complexes. DBC-1 and EMSY were identified as integral components of an NIF-1 complex of approximately 1.5 MDa and were found to play an important role in the regulation of nuclear receptor-mediated transcription. Stimulation of the Sox9 and HoxA1 genes by retinoic acid receptor-alpha was found to require both DBC-1 and EMSY in addition to NIF-1 for maximal transcriptional activation. Interestingly, NRC was not identified as a component of the NIF-1 complex, suggesting that NIF-1 and NRC do not exist as stable in vitro purified complexes, although the separate NIF-1 and NRC complexes appear to functionally interact in the cell.

  2. [Nuclear export signal of androgen receptor regulated of androgen receptor stability in prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Gong, Y Q; Zhang, C J; He, S M; Li, X S; Zhou, L Q; Guo, Y L

    2017-08-18

    To investigate the mechanisms of nuclear export signal of androgen receptor (NES(AR)) in the regulation of androgen receptor (AR) protein expression and stability in prostate cancer. The green fluorescent protein fusion protein expression vectors pEGFP-AR(1-918aa), pEGFP-NES(AR) (743-817aa), pEGFP-NAR (1-665aa) and pEGFP-NAR-NES(AR), and lysine mutants of NES(AR) pEGFP-NES(AR) K776R, pEGFP-NES(AR) K807R and pEGFP-NES(AR) K776R/K807R, were transiently transfected into prostate cancer cell line PC3. Fluorescence microscopy, Western blot and immunoprecipitation were used to detect NES(AR) regulation of androgen receptor stability. Under the fluorescence microscope, NES(AR)-containing fusion proteins were cytoplasmic localization, and their fluorescence intensities were much weaker than those without NES(AR). The expression levels of NES(AR)-containing fusion proteins were significantly lower than those without NES(AR). The half-lives of GFP-NES(AR) and GFP-NAR-NES(AR) were less than 6 h, while the expression of GFP and GFP-NAR was relatively stable and the half-life was more than 24 h in the presence of cycloheximide. The expression levels of GFP-NES(AR) were significantly increased by proteasome inhibitor MG132 treatment in a dose-dependent manner; in contrast, MG132 did not show any significant effect on the protein levels of GFP. When new protein synthesis was blocked, MG132 could also prevent the degradation of GFP-NES(AR) in the transfected cells in the presence of cycloheximide, while it had no significant effect on GFP protein stability in the parallel experiment. GFP immunoprecipitation showed that the ubiquitination level of GFP-NES(AR) fusion protein was significantly higher than that of the GFP control. The mutations of lysine sites K776 and K807 in NES(AR) significantly reduced the level of ubiquitination, and showed increased protein stability, indicating that they were the key amino acid residues of NES(AR) ubiquitination. NES(AR) was unstable and

  3. Fate of the inner nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor and nuclear lamins in herpes simplex virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Scott, E S; O'Hare, P

    2001-09-01

    During herpesvirus egress, capsids bud through the inner nuclear membrane. Underlying this membrane is the nuclear lamina, a meshwork of intermediate filaments with which it is tightly associated. Details of alterations to the lamina and the inner nuclear membrane during infection and the mechanisms involved in capsid transport across these structures remain unclear. Here we describe the fate of key protein components of the nuclear envelope and lamina during herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. We followed the distribution of the inner nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor (LBR) and lamins A and B(2) tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) in live infected cells. Together with additional results from indirect immunofluorescence, our studies reveal major morphologic distortion of nuclear-rim LBR and lamins A/C, B(1), and B(2). By 8 h p.i., we also observed a significant redistribution of LBR-GFP to the endoplasmic reticulum, where it colocalized with a subpopulation of cytoplasmic glycoprotein B by immunofluorescence. In addition, analysis by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching reveals that LBR-GFP exhibited increased diffusional mobility within the nuclear membrane of infected cells. This is consistent with the disruption of interactions between LBR and the underlying lamina. In addition to studying stably expressed GFP-lamins by fluorescence microscopy, we studied endogenous A- and B-type lamins in infected cells by Western blotting. Both approaches reveal a loss of lamins associated with virus infection. These data indicate major disruption of the nuclear envelope and lamina of HSV-1-infected cells and are consistent with a virus-induced dismantling of the nuclear lamina, possibly in order to gain access to the inner nuclear membrane.

  4. Nuclear localization of Formyl-Peptide Receptor 2 in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Fabio; Parisi, Melania; Fioretti, Tiziana; Sarnataro, Daniela; Esposito, Gabriella; Ammendola, Rosario

    2016-08-01

    Current models of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signaling describe binding of external agonists to cell surface receptors which, in turn, trigger several biological responses. New paradigms indicate that GPCRs localize to and signal at the nucleus, thus regulating distinct signaling cascades. The formyl-peptide receptor FPR2 belongs to the GPCR super-family and is coupled to PTX-sensitive Gi proteins. We show by western blot analysis, immunofluorescence experiments and radioligand binding assays that FPR2 is expressed at nuclear level in CaLu-6 and AGS cells. Nuclear FPR2 is a functional receptor, since it participates in intra-nuclear signaling, as assessed by decreased G protein-FPR2 association and enhanced ERK2, c-Jun and c-Myc phosphorylation upon stimulation of intact nuclei with the FPR2 agonist, WKYMVm. We analyzed FPR2 sequence for the search of a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and we found a stretch of basic aminoacids (227-KIHKK-231) in the third cytoplasmic loop of the receptor. We performed single (K230A) and multiple (H229A/K230A/K231A) mutagenesis of NLS. The constructs were individually overexpressed in HEK293 cells and immunofluorescence and western blot analysis showed that nuclear localization or translocation of FPR2 depends on the integrity of the H(229) and K(231) residues within the NLS.

  5. Discovering relationships between nuclear receptor signaling pathways, genes, and tissues in Transcriptomine.

    PubMed

    Becnel, Lauren B; Ochsner, Scott A; Darlington, Yolanda F; McOwiti, Apollo; Kankanamge, Wasula H; Dehart, Michael; Naumov, Alexey; McKenna, Neil J

    2017-04-25

    We previously developed a web tool, Transcriptomine, to explore expression profiling data sets involving small-molecule or genetic manipulations of nuclear receptor signaling pathways. We describe advances in biocuration, query interface design, and data visualization that enhance the discovery of uncharacterized biology in these pathways using this tool. Transcriptomine currently contains about 45 million data points encompassing more than 2000 experiments in a reference library of nearly 550 data sets retrieved from public archives and systematically curated. To make the underlying data points more accessible to bench biologists, we classified experimental small molecules and gene manipulations into signaling pathways and experimental tissues and cell lines into physiological systems and organs. Incorporation of these mappings into Transcriptomine enables the user to readily evaluate tissue-specific regulation of gene expression by nuclear receptor signaling pathways. Data points from animal and cell model experiments and from clinical data sets elucidate the roles of nuclear receptor pathways in gene expression events accompanying various normal and pathological cellular processes. In addition, data sets targeting non-nuclear receptor signaling pathways highlight transcriptional cross-talk between nuclear receptors and other signaling pathways. We demonstrate with specific examples how data points that exist in isolation in individual data sets validate each other when connected and made accessible to the user in a single interface. In summary, Transcriptomine allows bench biologists to routinely develop research hypotheses, validate experimental data, or model relationships between signaling pathways, genes, and tissues. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Specific regulation of thermosensitive lipid droplet fusion by a nuclear hormone receptor pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Shiwei; Li, Qi; Kong, Yuanyuan; Wu, Shuang; Cui, Qingpo; Zhang, Mingming; Zhang, Shaobing O

    2017-08-15

    Nuclear receptors play important roles in regulating fat metabolism and energy production in humans. The regulatory functions and endogenous ligands of many nuclear receptors are still unidentified, however. Here, we report that CYP-37A1 (ortholog of human cytochrome P450 CYP4V2), EMB-8 (ortholog of human P450 oxidoreductase POR), and DAF-12 (homolog of human nuclear receptors VDR/LXR) constitute a hormone synthesis and nuclear receptor pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans This pathway specifically regulates the thermosensitive fusion of fat-storing lipid droplets. CYP-37A1, together with EMB-8, synthesizes a lipophilic hormone not identical to Δ7-dafachronic acid, which represses the fusion-promoting function of DAF-12. CYP-37A1 also negatively regulates thermotolerance and lifespan at high temperature in a DAF-12-dependent manner. Human CYP4V2 can substitute for CYP-37A1 in C. elegans This finding suggests the existence of a conserved CYP4V2-POR-nuclear receptor pathway that functions in converting multilocular lipid droplets to unilocular ones in human cells; misregulation of this pathway may lead to pathogenic fat storage.

  7. The nuclear import of the constitutive androstane receptor by importin/Ran-GTP systems.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Yuichiro; Miyazaki, Yukari; Inouye, Yoshio

    2010-08-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. The CAR is normally located in the cytoplasmic compartment of untreated liver cells and translocates to the nucleus after exposure to phenobarbital (PB) or PB-like chemicals. Previously, we identified two nuclear localization signals (NLS) in the rat constitutive androstane/active receptor (CAR), NLS1, which is located in the hinge region, and NLS2, which overlaps with the ligand-binding domain. However, the nuclear import mechanism of CAR is unclear. In this study, we show that nuclear import of CAR is regulated by importin/Ran-GTP systems. The regulation of CAR nuclear import by a Ran-GTP concentration gradient was confirmed using the dominant negative, GTPase-deficient form of Ran (RanQ69L), suggesting the involvement of transport receptors of the importinbeta family. IPO13 was shown to be involved in the PB-mediated nuclear translocation of CAR, which was found to be susceptible to inhibition by a dominant negative mutant of IPO13 in primary hepatocytes. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Genome-wide identification of nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily genes in the copepod Tigriopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Dae-Sik; Lee, Bo-Young; Kim, Hui-Su; Lee, Min Chul; Kyung, Do-Hyun; Om, Ae-Son; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2014-11-18

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a large superfamily of proteins defined by a DNA-binding domain (DBD) and a ligand-binding domain (LBD). They function as transcriptional regulators to control expression of genes involved in development, homeostasis, and metabolism. The number of NRs differs from species to species, because of gene duplications and/or lineage-specific gene losses during metazoan evolution. Many NRs in arthropods interact with the ecdysteroid hormone and are involved in ecdysone-mediated signaling in arthropods. The nuclear receptor superfamily complement has been reported in several arthropods, including crustaceans, but not in copepods. We identified the entire NR repertoire of the copepod Tigriopus japonicus, which is an important marine model species for ecotoxicology and environmental genomics. Using whole genome and transcriptome sequences, we identified a total of 31 nuclear receptors in the genome of T. japonicus. Nomenclature of the nuclear receptors was determined based on the sequence similarities of the DNA-binding domain (DBD) and ligand-binding domain (LBD). The 7 subfamilies of NRs separate into five major clades (subfamilies NR1, NR2, NR3, NR4, and NR5/6). Although the repertoire of NR members in, T. japonicus was similar to that reported for other arthropods, there was an expansion of the NR1 subfamily in Tigriopus japonicus. The twelve unique nuclear receptors identified in T. japonicus are members of NR1L. This expansion may be a unique lineage-specific feature of crustaceans. Interestingly, E78 and HR83, which are present in other arthropods, were absent from the genomes of T. japonicus and two congeneric copepod species (T. japonicus and Tigriopus californicus), suggesting copepod lineage-specific gene loss. We identified all NR receptors present in the copepod, T. japonicus. Knowledge of the copepod nuclear receptor repertoire will contribute to a better understanding of copepod- and crustacean-specific NR evolution.

  9. Defective nuclear accumulation of androgen receptors in disorders of sexual differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Gyorki, S; Warne, G L; Khalid, B A; Funder, J W

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear transfer of androgen receptors (AR) and glucocorticoid receptors (GR) was determined in cultured genital skin fibroblasts from 10 normal controls and eight patients with abnormalities of the external genitalia. In whole cell studies, cultures were incubated for 20 min at 37 degrees C with [3H]methyltrienolone (3H-R1881) or tritiated dexamethasone, and specific binding was determined in whole cell, cytoplasmic, and crude nuclear fractions. Between normal and affected fibroblasts no difference was seen in cellular levels of GR, or in cytoplasmic and nuclear distribution of GR. In normal fibroblasts, cytoplasmic binding of 3H-R1881 represented 56%, and crude nuclear binding 44%, of total binding; in fibroblasts from five of the eight patients similar values (cytoplasmic 55% and nuclear 44%) were seen for 3H-R1881 binding. In fibroblasts from the other three patients no decrease in total cellular levels of AR were seen; nuclear compartmentalization, however, was much lower (approximately 20%) than in other cultures. In vitro reconstitution studies, combining 3H-R1881-loaded cytosol with naive nuclei, lead us to suggest that the defect in nuclear compartmentalization lies at the level of the nuclear acceptor site rather than the cytoplasmic binder in affected cells. We interpret the data to suggest that defective nuclear binding of AR complexes may be involved in a proportion of cases of abnormal development of the external genitalia. PMID:6684127

  10. PPP1R16A, the membrane subunit of protein phosphatase 1beta, signals nuclear translocation of the nuclear receptor constitutive active/androstane receptor.

    PubMed

    Sueyoshi, Tatsuya; Moore, Rick; Sugatani, Junko; Matsumura, Yonehiro; Negishi, Masahiko

    2008-04-01

    Constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR), a member of the nuclear steroid/thyroid hormone receptor family, activates transcription of numerous hepatic genes upon exposure to therapeutic drugs and environmental pollutants. Sequestered in the cytoplasm, this receptor signals xenobiotic exposure, such as phenobarbital (PB), by translocating into the nucleus. Unlike other hormone receptors, translocation can be triggered indirectly without binding to xenobiotics. We have now identified a membrane-associated subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PPP1R16A, or abbreviated as R16A) as a novel CAR-binding protein. When CAR and R16A are coexpressed in mouse liver, CAR translocates into the nucleus. Close association of R16A and CAR molecule on liver membrane was shown by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis using expressed yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-CAR and CFP-R16A fusion proteins. R16A can form dimer through its middle region, where protein kinase A phosphorylation sites are recently identified. Translocation of CAR by R16A correlates with the ability of R16A to form an intermolecular interaction via the middle region. Moreover, this interaction is enhanced by PB treatment in mouse liver. R16A specifically interacted with PP1beta in HepG2 cells despite the highly conserved structure of PP1 family molecules. PP1beta activity was inhibited by R16A in vitro and coexpression of PP1beta in liver can prevent YFP-CAR translocation into mouse liver. Taken together, R16A at the membrane may mediate the PB signal to initiate CAR nuclear translocation, through a mechanism including its dimerization and inhibition of PP1beta activity, providing a novel model for the translocation of nuclear receptors in which direct interaction of ligands and the receptors may not be crucial.

  11. GR SUMOylation and formation of an SUMO-SMRT/NCoR1-HDAC3 repressing complex is mandatory for GC-induced IR nGRE-mediated transrepression.

    PubMed

    Hua, Guoqiang; Paulen, Laetitia; Chambon, Pierre

    2016-02-02

    Unique among the nuclear receptor superfamily, the glucocorticoid (GC) receptor (GR) can exert three distinct transcriptional regulatory functions on binding of a single natural (cortisol in human and corticosterone in mice) and synthetic [e.g., dexamethasone (Dex)] hormone. The molecular mechanisms underlying GC-induced positive GC response element [(+)GRE]-mediated activation of transcription are partially understood. In contrast, these mechanisms remain elusive for GC-induced evolutionary conserved inverted repeated negative GC response element (IR nGRE)-mediated direct transrepression and for tethered indirect transrepression that is mediated by DNA-bound NF-κB/activator protein 1 (AP1)/STAT3 activators and instrumental in GC-induced anti-inflammatory activity. We demonstrate here that SUMOylation of lysine K293 (mouse K310) located within an evolutionary conserved sequence in the human GR N-terminal domain allows the formation of a GR-small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs)-NCoR1/SMRT-HDAC3 repressing complex mandatory for GC-induced IR nGRE-mediated direct repression in vitro, but does not affect transactivation. Importantly, these results were validated in vivo: in K310R mutant mice and in mice ablated selectively for nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCoR1)/silencing mediator for retinoid or thyroid-hormone receptors (SMRT) corepressors in skin keratinocytes, Dex-induced direct repression and the formation of repressing complexes on IR nGREs were impaired, whereas transactivation was unaffected. In mice selectively ablated for histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) in skin keratinocytes, GC-induced direct repression, but not bindings of GR and of corepressors NCoR1/SMRT, was abolished, indicating that HDAC3 is instrumental in IR nGRE-mediated repression. Moreover, we demonstrate that the binding of HDAC3 to IR nGREs in vivo is mediated through interaction with SMRT/NCoR1. We also show that the GR ligand binding domain (LBD) is not required for SMRT

  12. Nuclear progesterone receptor isoforms and their functions in the female reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Rekawiecki, R; Kowalik, M K; Kotwica, J

    2011-01-01

    Progesterone (P4), which is produced by the corpus luteum (CL), creates proper conditions for the embryo implantation, its development, and ensures proper conditions for the duration of pregnancy. Besides the non-genomic activity of P4 on target cells, its main physiological effect is caused through genomic action by the progesterone nuclear receptor (PGR). This nuclear progesterone receptor occurs in two specific isoforms, PGRA and PGRB. PGRA isoform acts as an inhibitor of transcriptional action of PGRB. The inactive receptor is connected with chaperone proteins and attachment of P4 causes disconnection of chaperones and unveiling of DNA binding domain (DBD). After receptor dimerization in the cells' nucleus and interaction with hormone response element (HRE), the receptor coactivators are connected and transcription is initiated. The ratio of these isoforms changes during the estrous cycle and reflects the different levels of P4 effect on the reproductive system. Both isoforms, PGRA and PGRB, also show a different response to the P4 receptor antagonist activity. Connection of the antagonist to PGRA can block PGRB, but acting through the PGRB isoform, P4 receptor antagonist may undergo conversion to a strongly receptor agonist. A third isoform, PGRC, has also been revealed. This isoform is the shortest and does not have transcriptional activity. Alternative splicing and insertion of additional exons may lead to the formation of different PGR isoforms. This paper summarizes the available data on the progesterone receptor isoforms and its regulatory action within the female reproductive system.

  13. Role of Nuclear Receptors in Lipid Dysfunction and Obesity-Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Taira; Xie, Wen; Renga, Barbara; Zampella, Angela; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano; Kong, Bo; Thomas, Ann M.; Guo, Grace L.; Narayanan, Ramesh; Yepuru, Muralimohan; Dalton, James T.; Chiang, John Y. L.

    2013-01-01

    This article is a report on a symposium sponsored by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics and held at the Experimental Biology 12 meeting in San Diego, CA. The presentations discussed the roles of a number of nuclear receptors in regulating glucose and lipid homeostasis, the pathophysiology of obesity-related disease states, and the promise associated with targeting their activities to treat these diseases. While many of these receptors (in particular, constitutive androstane receptor and pregnane X receptor) and their target enzymes have been thought of as regulators of drug and xenobiotic metabolism, this symposium highlighted the advances made in our understanding of the endogenous functions of these receptors. Similarly, as we gain a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying bile acid signaling pathways in the regulation of body weight and glucose homeostasis, we see the importance of using complementary approaches to elucidate this fascinating network of pathways. The observation that some receptors, like the farnesoid X receptor, can function in a tissue-specific manner via well defined mechanisms has important clinical implications, particularly in the treatment of liver diseases. Finally, the novel findings that agents that selectively activate estrogen receptor β can effectively inhibit weight gain in a high-fat diet model of obesity identifies a new role for this member of the steroid superfamily. Taken together, the significant findings reported during this symposium illustrate the promise associated with targeting a number of nuclear receptors for the development of new therapies to treat obesity and other metabolic disorders. PMID:23043185

  14. Optimization of stress response through the nuclear receptor-mediated cortisol signalling network

    PubMed Central

    Kolodkin, Alexey; Sahin, Nilgun; Phillips, Anna; Hood, Steve R.; Bruggeman, Frank J.; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Plant, Nick

    2013-01-01

    It is an accepted paradigm that extended stress predisposes an individual to pathophysiology. However, the biological adaptations to minimize this risk are poorly understood. Using a computational model based upon realistic kinetic parameters we are able to reproduce the interaction of the stress hormone cortisol with its two nuclear receptors, the high-affinity glucocorticoid receptor and the low-affinity pregnane X-receptor. We demonstrate that regulatory signals between these two nuclear receptors are necessary to optimize the body’s response to stress episodes, attenuating both the magnitude and duration of the biological response. In addition, we predict that the activation of pregnane X-receptor by multiple, low-affinity endobiotic ligands is necessary for the significant pregnane X-receptor-mediated transcriptional response observed following stress episodes. This integration allows responses mediated through both the high and low-affinity nuclear receptors, which we predict is an important strategy to minimize the risk of disease from chronic stress. PMID:23653204

  15. Nuclear Compartmentalization of α1-Adrenergic Receptor Signaling in Adult Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Although convention dictates that G protein-coupled receptors localize to and signal at the plasma membrane, accumulating evidence suggests that G protein-coupled receptors localize to and signal at intracellular membranes, most notably the nucleus. In fact, there is now significant evidence indicating that endogenous alpha-1 adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs) localize to and signal at the nuclei in adult cardiac myocytes. Cumulatively, the data suggest that α1-ARs localize to the inner nuclear membrane, activate intranuclear signaling, and regulate physiologic function in adult cardiac myocytes. Although α1-ARs signal through Gαq, unlike other Gq-coupled receptors, α1-ARs mediate important cardioprotective functions including adaptive/physiologic hypertrophy, protection from cell death (survival signaling), positive inotropy, and preconditioning. Also unlike other Gq-coupled receptors, most, if not all, functional α1-ARs localize to the nuclei in adult cardiac myocytes, as opposed to the sarcolemma. Together, α1-AR nuclear localization and cardioprotection might suggest a novel model for compartmentalization of Gq-coupled receptor signaling in which nuclear Gq-coupled receptor signaling is cardioprotective. PMID:25264754

  16. Impact of circadian nuclear receptor REV-ERBα on midbrain dopamine production and mood regulation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sooyoung; Lee, Eun Jeong; Yun, Seongsik; Choe, Han Kyoung; Park, Seong-Beom; Son, Hyo Jin; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Dluzen, Dean E; Lee, Inah; Hwang, Onyou; Son, Gi Hoon; Kim, Kyungjin

    2014-05-08

    The circadian nature of mood and its dysfunction in affective disorders is well recognized, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are still unclear. Here, we show that the circadian nuclear receptor REV-ERBα, which is associated with bipolar disorder, impacts midbrain dopamine production and mood-related behavior in mice. Genetic deletion of the Rev-erbα gene or pharmacological inhibition of REV-ERBα activity in the ventral midbrain induced mania-like behavior in association with a central hyperdopaminergic state. Also, REV-ERBα repressed tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene transcription via competition with nuclear receptor-related 1 protein (NURR1), another nuclear receptor crucial for dopaminergic neuronal function, thereby driving circadian TH expression through a target-dependent antagonistic mechanism. In conclusion, we identified a molecular connection between the circadian timing system and mood regulation, suggesting that REV-ERBα could be targeting in the treatment of circadian rhythm-related affective disorders.

  17. Nuclear receptor function in skin health and disease: therapeutic opportunities in the orphan and adopted receptor classes.

    PubMed

    Yin, Kelvin; Smith, Aaron G

    2016-10-01

    The skin forms a vital barrier between an organism's external environment, providing protection from pathogens and numerous physical and chemical threats. Moreover, the intact barrier is essential to prevent water and electrolyte loss without which terrestrial life could not be maintained. Accordingly, acute disruption of the skin through physical or chemical trauma needs to be repaired timely and efficiently as sustained skin pathologies ranging from mild irritations and inflammation through to malignancy impact considerably on morbidity and mortality. The Nuclear Hormone Receptor Family of transcriptional regulators has proven to be highly valuable targets for addressing a range of pathologies, including metabolic syndrome and cancer. Indeed members of the classic endocrine sub-group, such as the glucocorticoid, retinoid, and Vitamin D receptors, represent mainstay treatment strategies for numerous inflammatory skin disorders, though side effects from prolonged use are common. Emerging evidence has now highlighted important functional roles for nuclear receptors belonging to the adopted and orphan subgroups in skin physiology and patho-physiology. This review will focus on these subgroups and explore the current evidence that suggests these nuclear receptor hold great promise as future stand-alone or complementary drug targets in treating common skin diseases and maintaining skin homeostasis.

  18. Kinetic Analysis of BCL11B Multisite Phosphorylation–Dephosphorylation and Coupled Sumoylation in Primary Thymocytes by Multiple Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors with multiple post-translational modifications (PTMs) are not uncommon, but comprehensive information on site-specific dynamics and interdependence is comparatively rare. Assessing dynamic changes in the extent of PTMs has the potential to link multiple sites both to each other and to biological effects observable on the same time scale. The transcription factor and tumor suppressor BCL11B is critical to three checkpoints in T-cell development and is a target of a T-cell receptor-mediated MAP kinase signaling. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectroscopy was used to assess changes in relative phosphorylation on 18 of 23 serine and threonine residues and sumoylation on one of two lysine resides in BCL11B. We have resolved the composite phosphorylation–dephosphorylation and sumoylation changes of BCL11B in response to MAP kinase activation into a complex pattern of site-specific PTM changes in primary mouse thymocytes. The site-specific resolution afforded by MRM analyses revealed four kinetic patterns of phosphorylation and one of sumoylation, including both rapid simultaneous site-specific increases and decreases at putative MAP kinase proline-directed phosphorylation sites, following stimulation. These data additionally revealed a novel spatiotemporal bisphosphorylation motif consisting of two kinetically divergent proline-directed phosphorylation sites spaced five residues apart. PMID:25423098

  19. Sumoylation of IkB attenuates NF-kB-induced nitrosative stress at rostral ventrolateral medulla and cardiovascular depression in experimental brain death.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ching-Yi; Li, Faith C H; Wu, Carol H Y; Chang, Alice Y W; Chan, Samuel H H

    2016-09-22

    Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) is a group of proteins that participates in post-translational modifications. One known SUMO target is the transcription factor nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) that plays a pivotal role in many disease processes; sumoylation inactivates NF-kB by conjugation with inhibitors of NF-kB (IkB). Our laboratory demonstrated previously that transcriptional upregulation of nitric oxide synthase II (NOS II) by NF-kB, leading to nitrosative stress by the formation of peroxynitrite in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), underpins the defunct brain stem cardiovascular regulation that precedes brain death. Based on an experimental endotoxemia model, this study evaluated the hypothesis that sumoylation plays a pro-life role in brain death by interacting with the NF-kB/NOS II/peroxynitrite signaling pathway in the RVLM. In Sprague-Dawley rats, intravenous administration of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 10 mg kg(-1)) elicited an augmentation of SUMO-1 and ubiquitin-conjugase 9 (Ubc9) mRNA or protein levels, alongside SUMO-1-conjugated proteins in the RVLM. Immunoneutralization of SUMO-1 or Ubc9 in the RVLM significantly potentiated the already diminished sumoylation of IkBα and intensified NF-kB activation and NOS II/peroxynitrite expression in this brain stem substrate, together with exacerbated fatality, cardiovascular depression and reduction of an experimental index of a life-and-death signal detected from arterial pressure that disappears in comatose patients signifying failure of brain stem cardiovascular regulation before brain death. We conclude that sumoylation of IkB in the RVLM ameliorates the defunct brain stem cardiovascular regulation that underpins brain death in our experimental endotoxemia modal by reducing nitrosative stress via inhibition of IkB degradation that diminishes the induction of the NF-kB/NOS II/peroxynitrite signaling cascade.

  20. The adenovirus E4-ORF3 protein functions as a SUMO E3 ligase for TIF-1γ sumoylation and poly-SUMO chain elongation

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sook-Young; Hearing, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The adenovirus (Ad) early region 4 (E4)-ORF3 protein regulates diverse cellular processes to optimize the host environment for the establishment of Ad replication. E4-ORF3 self-assembles into multimers to form a nuclear scaffold in infected cells and creates distinct binding interfaces for different cellular target proteins. Previous studies have shown that the Ad5 E4-ORF3 protein induces sumoylation of multiple cellular proteins and subsequent proteasomal degradation of some of them, but the detailed mechanism of E4-ORF3 function remained unknown. Here, we investigate the role of E4-ORF3 in the sumoylation process by using transcription intermediary factor (TIF)-1γ as a substrate. Remarkably, we discovered that purified E4-ORF3 protein stimulates TIF-1γ sumoylation in vitro, demonstrating that E4-ORF3 acts as a small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) E3 ligase. Furthermore, E4-ORF3 significantly increases poly-SUMO3 chain formation in vitro in the absence of substrate, showing that E4-ORF3 has SUMO E4 elongase activity. An E4-ORF3 mutant, which is defective in protein multimerization, exhibited severely decreased activity, demonstrating that E4-ORF3 self-assembly is required for these activities. Using a SUMO3 mutant, K11R, we found that E4-ORF3 facilitates the initial acceptor SUMO3 conjugation to TIF-1γ as well as poly-SUMO chain elongation. The E4-ORF3 protein displays no SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase activity in our assay system. These studies reveal the mechanism by which E4-ORF3 targets specific cellular proteins for sumoylation and proteasomal degradation and provide significant insight into how a small viral protein can play a role as a SUMO E3 ligase and E4-like SUMO elongase to impact a variety of cellular responses. PMID:27247387

  1. Alterations of ubiquitylation and sumoylation in conventional renal cell carcinomas after the Chernobyl accident: a comparison with Spanish cases.

    PubMed

    Morell-Quadreny, Luisa; Romanenko, Alina; Lopez-Guerrero, Jose Antonio; Calabuig, Silvia; Vozianov, Alexander; Llombart-Bosch, Antonio

    2011-09-01

    We determined whether ubiquitylation and sumoylation processes are involved in conventional renal cell carcinogenesis associated with chronic, long-term, persistent low doses of ionizing radiation (IR) in patients living for more than 20 years in cesium-137 ((137)Cs)-contaminated areas after the Chernobyl accident in Ukraine. To this end, we assessed the immunohistochemical expression of ubiquitin (Ub), SUMO1, SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme Ubc9, and the cell cycle regulators p53, mdm2, and p14(ARF) in 38 conventional renal cell carcinomas from Ukrainian patients with different degrees of radiation exposure after the Chernobyl accident. As control cases, 18 conventional renal carcinoma (cRCC) tissues from a Spanish cohort were analyzed. No significant differences between the Ukrainian and Spanish groups were found regarding Ub overexpression, although being higher in the Ukrainian cases. Furthermore, this expression was inversely associated with SUMO1 and Ubc9, with no correlation with tumor nuclear grade. There was also a direct relationship between Ubc9 and inflammatory response. These findings do not allow us to consider the immunohistochemical expression of ubiquitylation and sumoylation as valuable markers for discriminating the effects of long-term, low-dose IR exposure in cRCC carcinogenesis.

  2. Sulfotransferase genes: Regulation by nuclear receptors in response to xeno/endo-biotics

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Susumu; Negishi, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    Pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR), members of the nuclear receptor superfamily, are two major xeno-sensing transcription factors. They can be activated by a broad range of lipophilic xenobiotics including therapeutics drugs. In addition to xenobiotics, endogenous compounds such as steroid hormones and bile acids can also activate PXR and/or CAR. These nuclear receptors regulate genes that encode enzymes and transporters that metabolize and excrete both xenobiotics and endobiotics. Sulfotransferases (SULTs) are a group of these enzymes and sulfate xenobiotics for detoxification. In general, inactivation by sulfation constitutes the mechanism to maintain homeostasis of endobiotics. Thus, deciphering the molecular mechanism by which PXR and CAR regulate SULT genes is critical for understanding the roles of SULTs in the alterations of physiological and pathophysiological processes caused by drug treatment or environmental exposures. PMID:24025090

  3. Computational identification of post-translational modification-based nuclear import regulations by characterizing nuclear localization signal-import receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jhih-Rong; Liu, Zhonghao; Hu, Jianjun

    2014-10-01

    The binding affinity between a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and its import receptor is closely related to corresponding nuclear import activity. PTM-based modulation of the NLS binding affinity to the import receptor is one of the most understood mechanisms to regulate nuclear import of proteins. However, identification of such regulation mechanisms is challenging due to the difficulty of assessing the impact of PTM on corresponding nuclear import activities. In this study we proposed NIpredict, an effective algorithm to predict nuclear import activity given its NLS, in which molecular interaction energy components (MIECs) were used to characterize the NLS-import receptor interaction, and the support vector regression machine (SVR) was used to learn the relationship between the characterized NLS-import receptor interaction and the corresponding nuclear import activity. Our experiments showed that nuclear import activity change due to NLS change could be accurately predicted by the NIpredict algorithm. Based on NIpredict, we developed a systematic framework to identify potential PTM-based nuclear import regulations for human and yeast nuclear proteins. Application of this approach has identified the potential nuclear import regulation mechanisms by phosphorylation of two nuclear proteins including SF1 and ORC6.

  4. Allosteric controls of nuclear receptor function in the regulation of transcription.

    PubMed

    Billas, Isabelle; Moras, Dino

    2013-07-10

    Nuclear receptors control a large number of physiological events through the regulation of gene transcription. Their activation function involves and is controlled by ligands and multiple cofactors (repressors, activators and bridging proteins). Further post-translational modifications resulting from the crosstalk between different signaling pathways provide additional regulations. The numerous players involved allow the sophisticated fine-tuning of transcriptional regulation. The present review describes how allosteric mechanisms are used in the control of the sequential and ordered binding of nuclear receptors and the various protein effectors to target DNA.

  5. Nuclear Receptors Resolve Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress to Improve Hepatic Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Chronic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress culminating in proteotoxicity contributes to the development of insulin resistance and progression to type 2 diabetes mellitus. Pharmacologic interventions targeting several different nuclear receptors have emerged as potential treatments for insulin resistance. The mechanistic basis for these antidiabetic effects has primarily been attributed to multiple metabolic and inflammatory functions. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the association of ER stress with insulin resistance and the role of nuclear receptors in promoting ER stress resolution and improving insulin resistance in the liver. PMID:28236381

  6. Molecular cloning and characterization of a nuclear androgen receptor activated by 11-ketotestosterone

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Per-Erik; Berg, A Håkan; von Hofsten, Jonas; Grahn, Birgitta; Hellqvist, Anna; Larsson, Anders; Karlsson, Johnny; Modig, Carina; Borg, Bertil; Thomas, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Although 11-ketotestosterone is a potent androgen and induces male secondary sex characteristics in many teleosts, androgen receptors with high binding affinity for 11-ketotestosterone or preferential activation by 11-ketotestosterone have not been identified. So, the mechanism by which 11-ketotestosterone exhibits such high potency remains unclear. Recently we cloned the cDNA of an 11-ketotestosterone regulated protein, spiggin, from three-spined stickleback renal tissue. As spiggin is the only identified gene product regulated by 11-ketotestosterone, the stickleback kidney is ideal for determination of the mechanism of 11-ketotestosterone gene regulation. A single androgen receptor gene with two splicing variants, belonging to the androgen receptor-β subfamily was cloned from stickleback kidney. A high affinity, saturable, single class of androgen specific binding sites, with the characteristics of an androgen receptor, was identified in renal cytosolic and nuclear fractions. Measurement of ligand binding moieties in the cytosolic and nuclear fractions as well as to the recombinant receptor revealed lower affinity for 11-ketotestosterone than for dihydrotestosterone. Treatment with different androgens did not up-regulate androgen receptor mRNA level or increase receptor abundance, suggesting that auto-regulation is not involved in differential ligand activation. However, comparison of the trans-activation potential of the stickleback androgen receptor with the human androgen receptor, in both human HepG2 cells and zebrafish ZFL cells, revealed preferential activation by 11-ketotestosterone of the stickleback receptor, but not of the human receptor. These findings demonstrate the presence of a receptor preferentially activated by 11-ketotestosterone in the three-spined stickleback, so far the only one known in any animal. PMID:16107211

  7. Elevated copper impairs hepatic nuclear receptor function in Wilson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Wooton-Kee, Clavia Ruth; Jain, Ajay K.; Wagner, Martin; Grusak, Michael A.; Finegold, Milton J.; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Moore, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Wilson’s disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in accumulation of copper in the liver as a consequence of mutations in the gene encoding the copper-transporting P-type ATPase (ATP7B). WD is a chronic liver disorder, and individuals with the disease present with a variety of complications, including steatosis, cholestasis, cirrhosis, and liver failure. Similar to patients with WD, Atp7b–/– mice have markedly elevated levels of hepatic copper and liver pathology. Previous studies have demonstrated that replacement of zinc in the DNA-binding domain of the estrogen receptor (ER) with copper disrupts specific binding to DNA response elements. Here, we found decreased binding of the nuclear receptors FXR, RXR, HNF4α, and LRH-1 to promoter response elements and decreased mRNA expression of nuclear receptor target genes in Atp7b–/– mice, as well as in adult and pediatric WD patients. Excessive hepatic copper has been described in progressive familial cholestasis (PFIC), and we found that similar to individuals with WD, patients with PFIC2 or PFIC3 who have clinically elevated hepatic copper levels exhibit impaired nuclear receptor activity. Together, these data demonstrate that copper-mediated nuclear receptor dysfunction disrupts liver function in WD and potentially in other disorders associated with increased hepatic copper levels. PMID:26241054

  8. Nuclear receptor/microRNA circuitry links muscle fiber type to energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gan, Zhenji; Rumsey, John; Hazen, Bethany C; Lai, Ling; Leone, Teresa C; Vega, Rick B; Xie, Hui; Conley, Kevin E; Auwerx, Johan; Smith, Steven R; Olson, Eric N; Kralli, Anastasia; Kelly, Daniel P

    2013-06-01

    The mechanisms involved in the coordinate regulation of the metabolic and structural programs controlling muscle fitness and endurance are unknown. Recently, the nuclear receptor PPARβ/δ was shown to activate muscle endurance programs in transgenic mice. In contrast, muscle-specific transgenic overexpression of the related nuclear receptor, PPARα, results in reduced capacity for endurance exercise. We took advantage of the divergent actions of PPARβ/δ and PPARα to explore the downstream regulatory circuitry that orchestrates the programs linking muscle fiber type with energy metabolism. Our results indicate that, in addition to the well-established role in transcriptional control of muscle metabolic genes, PPARβ/δ and PPARα participate in programs that exert opposing actions upon the type I fiber program through a distinct muscle microRNA (miRNA) network, dependent on the actions of another nuclear receptor, estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ). Gain-of-function and loss-of-function strategies in mice, together with assessment of muscle biopsies from humans, demonstrated that type I muscle fiber proportion is increased via the stimulatory actions of ERRγ on the expression of miR-499 and miR-208b. This nuclear receptor/miRNA regulatory circuit shows promise for the identification of therapeutic targets aimed at maintaining muscle fitness in a variety of chronic disease states, such as obesity, skeletal myopathies, and heart failure.

  9. Time-Resolved Expression Profiling of the Nuclear Receptor Superfamily in Human Adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lahnalampi, Mari; Heinäniemi, Merja; Sinkkonen, Lasse; Wabitsch, Martin; Carlberg, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    Background The differentiation of fibroblast-like pre-adipocytes to lipid-loaded adipocytes is regulated by a network of transcription factors, the most prominent one being the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ. However, many of the other 47 members of the nuclear receptor superfamily have an impact on adipogenesis, which in human cells has not been investigated in detail. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed by quantitative PCR all human nuclear receptors at multiple time points during differentiation of SGBS pre-adipocytes. The earliest effect was the down-regulation of the genes RARG, PPARD, REV-ERBA, REV-ERBB, VDR and GR followed by the up-regulation of PPARG, LXRA and AR. These observations are supported with data from 3T3-L1 mouse pre-adipocytes and primary human adipocytes. Investigation of the effects of the individual differentiation mix components in short-term treatments and of their omission from the full mix showed that the expression levels of the early-regulated nuclear receptor genes were most affected by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) ligand cortisol and the phosophodiesterase inhibitor IBMX. Interestingly, the effects of both compounds converged to repress the genes PPARD, REV-ERBA, REV-ERBB, VDR and GR, whereas cortisol and IBMX showed antagonistic interaction for PPARG, LXRA and AR causing a time lag in their up-regulation. We hypothesize that the well-known auto-repression of GR fine-tunes the detected early responses. Consistently, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments showed that GR association increased on the transcription start sites of the genes RARG, REV-ERBB, VDR and GR. Conclusions/Significance Adipocyte differentiation is a process, in which many members of the nuclear receptor superfamily change their mRNA expression. The actions of cortisol and IBMX converged to repress several nuclear receptors early in differentiation, while up-regulation of other nuclear receptor genes showed a time

  10. Nuclear Receptor Modulation for the Treatment of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Claudia D; Traussnigg, Stefan A; Trauner, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcriptional regulators of several key metabolic processes including hepatic lipid and glucose metabolism, bile acid homeostasis, and energy expenditure as well as inflammation, fibrosis, and cellular proliferation in the liver. Dysregulation of these processes contributes to the pathogenesis and progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This places NRs at the forefront of novel therapeutic approaches for NAFLD. Some NRs are already pharmacologically targeted in metabolic disorders such as hyperlipidemia (peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor α [PPARα], fibrates) and diabetes (PPARγ, glitazones) with potential applications for NAFLD. Other NRs with potential therapeutic implications are the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and xenobiotic sensors such as constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR). Further new perspectives include combined ligands for NR isoforms such as PPARα/δ ligands. Other novel key players represent the nuclear bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR; targeted by synthetic FXR ligands such as obeticholic acid) and RAR-related orphan receptor gamma two (RORγt). In this review the authors provide an overview of the preclinical and clinical evidence of current and future treatment strategies targeting NRs in metabolism, inflammation, and fibrogenesis of NAFLD. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. Importin {beta}-type nuclear transport receptors have distinct binding affinities for Ran-GTP

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Silvia; Schlenstedt, Gabriel

    2011-03-18

    Highlights: {yields} Determination of binding properties of nuclear transport receptor/Ran-GTP complexes. {yields} Biosensor measurements provide constants for dissociation, on-rates, and off-rates. {yields} The affinity of receptors for Ran-GTP is widely divergent. {yields} Dissociation constants differ for three orders of magnitude. {yields} The cellular concentration of yeast Ran is not limiting. -- Abstract: Cargos destined to enter or leave the cell nucleus are typically transported by receptors of the importin {beta} family to pass the nuclear pore complex. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae comprises 14 members of this protein family, which can be divided in importins and exportins. The Ran GTPase regulates the association and dissociation of receptors and cargos as well as the transport direction through the nuclear pore. All receptors bind to Ran exclusively in its GTP-bound state and this event is restricted to the nuclear compartment. We determined the Ran-GTP binding properties of all yeast transport receptors by biosensor measurements and observed that the affinity of importins for Ran-GTP differs significantly. The dissociation constants range from 230 pM to 270 nM, which is mostly based on a variability of the off-rate constants. The divergent affinity of importins for Ran-GTP suggests the existence of a novel mode of nucleocytoplasmic transport regulation. Furthermore, the cellular concentration of {beta}-receptors and of other Ran-binding proteins was determined. We found that the number of {beta}-receptors altogether about equals the amounts of yeast Ran, but Ran-GTP is not limiting in the nucleus. The implications of our results for nucleocytoplasmic transport mechanisms are discussed.

  12. SUMOylation of Pax7 is Essential for Neural Crest & Muscle Development Authors and Affiliations

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Zhidong; Liu, Ying; Stuhlmiller, Timothy J.; Marquez, Jonathan; García-Castro, Martín I.

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory transcription factors of the Pax family play fundamental roles in the function of multipotent cells during vertebrate development, post-natal regeneration, and cancer. Pax7 and its homologue Pax3 are important players in neural crest and muscle development. Both genes are coexpressed in various tissues and are thought to provide similar, but not identical functions. The mechanisms that allow specific regulation of Pax7 remain largely unknown. Here we report for the first time that Pax7 is regulated by SUMOylation. We identify the interaction of Pax7 with Ubc9, the SUMO conjugating enzyme, and reveal that SUMOylation machinery is enriched in neural crest precursors and plays a critical role in NC development. We demonstrate that Pax7 becomes SUMOylated and identify an essential role for lysine 85 (K85) in Pax7-SUMOylation. Despite high conservation surrounding K85 amongst Pax genes, we were unable to identify SUMOylation of other Pax proteins tested, including Pax3. Using a non-SUMOylatable Pax7 K85 x R variant (Pax7K85R), we demonstrate that SUMOylation is essential for the function of Pax7 in neural crest development, C2C12 myogenic differentiation, and transcriptional transactivation. Our study provides new mechanistic insight into the molecular regulation of Pax7’s function by SUMOylation in neural crest and muscle development. PMID:23247248

  13. SUMOylation of EHD3 Modulates Tubulation of the Endocytic Recycling Compartment.

    PubMed

    Cabasso, Or; Pekar, Olga; Horowitz, Mia

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis defines the entry of molecules or macromolecules through the plasma membrane as well as membrane trafficking in the cell. It depends on a large number of proteins that undergo protein-protein and protein-phospholipid interactions. EH Domain containing (EHDs) proteins formulate a family, whose members participate in different stages of endocytosis. Of the four mammalian EHDs (EHD1-EHD4) EHD1 and EHD3 control traffic to the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC) and from the ERC to the plasma membrane, while EHD2 modulates internalization. Recently, we have shown that EHD2 undergoes SUMOylation, which facilitates its exit from the nucleus, where it serves as a co-repressor. In the present study, we tested whether EHD3 undergoes SUMOylation and what is its role in endocytic recycling. We show, both in-vitro and in cell culture, that EHD3 undergoes SUMOylation. Localization of EHD3 to the tubular structures of the ERC depends on its SUMOylation on lysines 315 and 511. Absence of SUMOylation of EHD3 has no effect on its dimerization, an important factor in membrane localization of EHD3, but has a dominant negative effect on its appearance in tubular ERC structures. Non-SUMOylated EHD3 delays transferrin recycling from the ERC to the cell surface. Our findings indicate that SUMOylation of EHD3 is involved in tubulation of the ERC membranes, which is important for efficient recycling.

  14. A Structural Investigation into Oct4 Regulation by Orphan Nuclear Receptors, Germ Cell Nuclear Factor (GCNF), and Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (LRH-1).

    PubMed

    Weikum, Emily R; Tuntland, Micheal L; Murphy, Michael N; Ortlund, Eric A

    2016-12-04

    Oct4 is a transcription factor required for maintaining pluripotency and self-renewal in stem cells. Prior to differentiation, Oct4 must be silenced to allow for the development of the three germ layers in the developing embryo. This fine-tuning is controlled by the nuclear receptors (NRs), liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) and germ cell nuclear factor (GCNF). Liver receptor homolog-1 is responsible for driving the expression of Oct4 where GCNF represses its expression upon differentiation. Both receptors bind to a DR0 motif located within the Oct4 promoter. Here, we present the first structure of mouse GCNF DNA-binding domain in complex with the Oct4 DR0. The overall structure revealed two molecules bound in a head-to-tail fashion on opposite sides of the DNA. Additionally, we solved the structure of the human LRH-1 DNA-binding domain bound to the same element. We explore the structural elements that govern Oct4 recognition by these two NRs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Inter-species functional interactome of nuclear steroid receptors (R1).

    PubMed

    Geronikolou, Styliani A; Pavlopoulou, Athanasia; Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina; Chrousos, George

    2018-01-01

    Steroids exert their actions by binding to the glucocorticoid, mineralocorticoid, androgen, estrogen and progesterone classes of receptors. Despite an exponential increase in our knowledge of steroid receptors, their interactions with other molecules, subcellular location and functions still need further elucidation. To unravel the mechanism(s) of action of the steroid hormones, as well as the function of their cognate nuclear receptors, an interaction network was created (henceforth referred to as "R1 Interactome")- illustrating that robust interactions have been preserved in rodents, frog, zebra fish and drosophila. The generated interactome of the retrieved orthologs across species revealed: a. interactions among surface-cytosol-nuclear receptors, and/or orphan receptors and genes, and b. nuclear corepressor 1 (NCOR1) as a major "hub", through which most steroid receptors interact. These mechanisms (i) integrate social behavior and environmental stimuli with intrinsic cellular functions, (ii) provide an explanatory mechanism of the major Public Health problem of "non-ionizing" radiation impact, surpassing the existing conflict over the "thermal"/ "non- thermal" consequences of radiation, linking all the so far proposed mechanisms, and addressing all reported effects in humans, rodents and insects, and (iii) reveal biologically or clinically important pathways and/or regulatory networks.

  16. Nuclear Receptors and Clearance of Apoptotic Cells: Stimulating the Macrophage’s Appetite

    PubMed Central

    A-Gonzalez, Noelia; Hidalgo, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Clearance of apoptotic cells by macrophages occurs as a coordinated process to ensure tissue homeostasis. Macrophages play a dual role in this process; first, a rapid and efficient phagocytosis of the dying cells is needed to eliminate uncleared corpses that can promote inflammation. Second, after engulfment, macrophages exhibit an anti-inflammatory phenotype, to avoid unwanted immune reactions against cell components. Several nuclear receptors, including liver X receptor and proliferator-activated receptor, have been linked to these two important features of macrophages during apoptotic cell clearance. This review outlines the emerging implications of nuclear receptors in the response of macrophages to cell clearance. These include activation of genes implicated in metabolism, to process the additional cellular content provided by the engulfed cells, as well as inflammatory genes, to maintain apoptotic cell clearance as an “immunologically silent” process. Remarkably, genes encoding receptors for the so-called “eat-me” signals are also regulated by activated nuclear receptors after phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, thus enhancing the efficiency of macrophages to clear dead cells. PMID:24860573

  17. CREB SUMOylation by the E3 ligase PIAS1 enhances spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Chu; Hsu, Wei-Lun; Ma, Yun-Li; Tai, Derek J C; Lee, Eminy H Y

    2014-07-16

    cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and signaling plays an important role in long-term memory formation, but other posttranslational modifications of CREB are less known. Here, we found that CREB1Δ, the short isoform of CREB, could be sumoylated by the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) E3 ligase protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 (PIAS1) at Lys271 and Lys290 and PIAS1 SUMOylation of CREB1Δ increased the expression level of CREB1Δ. CREB1Δ could also be sumoylated by other PIAS family proteins, but not by the E3 ligases RanBP2 and Pc2 or by the E2 ligase Ubc9. Furthermore, water maze training increased the level of endogenous CREB SUMOylation in rat CA1 neurons determined by in vitro SUMOylation assay, but this effect was not observed in other brain areas. Moreover, transduction of Lenti-CREBWT to rat CA1 area facilitated, whereas transduction of Lenti-CREB double sumo-mutant (CREBK271RK290R) impaired, spatial learning and memory performance. Transduction of Lenti-CREBWT-SUMO1 fusion vector to rat CA1 area showed a more significant effect in enhancing spatial learning and memory and CREB SUMOylation. Lenti-CREBWT transduction increased, whereas Lenti-CREBK271RK290R transduction decreased, CREB DNA binding to the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf) promoter and decreased bdnf mRNA expression. Knock-down of PIAS1 expression in CA1 area by PIAS1 siRNA transfection impaired spatial learning and memory and decreased endogenous CREB SUMOylation. In addition, CREB SUMOylation was CREB phosphorylation dependent and lasted longer. Therefore, CREB phosphorylation may be responsible for signal transduction during the early phase of long-term memory formation, whereas CREB SUMOylation sustains long-term memory.

  18. Daphnia HR96 is a Promiscuous Xenobiotic and Endobiotic Nuclear Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Karimullina, Elina; Li, Yangchun; Ginjupalli, Gautam; Baldwin, William S.

    2012-01-01

    Daphnia pulex is the first crustacean to have its genome sequenced. The genome project provides new insight and data into how an aquatic crustacean may respond to environmental stressors, including toxicants. We cloned Daphnia pulex HR96 (DappuHR96), a nuclear receptor orthologous to the CAR/PXR/VDR group of nuclear receptors. In Drosophila melanogaster, (hormone receptor 96) HR96 responds to phenobarbital exposure and has been hypothesized as a toxicant receptor. Therefore, we set up a transactivation assay to test whether DappuHR96 is a promiscuous receptor activated by xenobiotics and endobiotics similar to the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane X-receptor (PXR). Transactivation assays performed with a GAL4-HR96 chimera demonstrate that HR96 is a promiscuous toxicant receptor activated by a diverse set of chemicals such as pesticides, hormones, and fatty acids. Several environmental toxicants activate HR96 including estradiol, pyriproxyfen, chlorpyrifos, atrazine, and methane arsonate. We also observed repression of HR96 activity by chemicals such as triclosan, androstanol, and fluoxetine. Nearly 50% of the chemicals tested activated or inhibited HR96. Interestingly, unsaturated fatty acids were common activators or inhibitors of HR96 activity, indicating a link between diet and toxicant response. The omega-6 and omega-9 unsaturated fatty acids linoleic and oleic acid activated HR96, but the omega-3 unsaturated fatty acids alpha-linolenic acid and docosahexaenoic acid inhibited HR96, suggesting that these two distinct sets of lipids perform opposing roles in Daphnia physiology. This also provides a putative mechanism by which the ratio of dietary unsaturated fats may affect the ability of an organism to respond to a toxic insult. In summary, HR96 is a promiscuous nuclear receptor activated by numerous endo- and xenobiotics. PMID:22466357

  19. SUMOylation silences heterodimeric TASK potassium channels containing K2P1 subunits in cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Plant, Leigh D; Zuniga, Leandro; Araki, Dan; Marks, Jeremy D; Goldstein, Steve A N

    2012-11-20

    The standing outward K(+) current (IKso) governs the response of cerebellar granule neurons to natural and medicinal stimuli including volatile anesthetics. We showed that SUMOylation silenced half of IKso at the surface of cerebellar granule neurons because the underlying channels were heterodimeric assemblies of K2P1, a subunit subject to SUMOylation, and the TASK (two-P domain, acid-sensitive K(+)) channel subunits K2P3 or K2P9. The heterodimeric channels comprised the acid-sensitive portion of IKso and mediated its response to halothane. We anticipate that SUMOylation also influences sensation and homeostatic mechanisms in mammals through TASK channels formed with K2P1.

  20. Nuclear receptors expression chart in peripheral blood mononuclear cells identifies patients with Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    D'Amore, Simona; Vacca, Michele; Graziano, Giusi; D'Orazio, Andria; Cariello, Marica; Martelli, Nicola; Di Tullio, Giuseppe; Salvia, Roberto; Grandaliano, Giuseppe; Belfiore, Anna; Pellegrini, Fabio; Palasciano, Giuseppe; Moschetta, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear receptors are a class of 48 ligand-activated transcription factors identified as key players of metabolic and developmental processes. Most of these receptors are potential targets for pharmacological strategies in the Metabolic Syndrome. In the present study, we analyzed changes in the mRNA expression of nuclear receptors in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with Metabolic Syndrome, in order to identify novel biomarkers of disease and candidate targets for putative therapeutical approaches. We enrolled thirty healthy controls (14 M:16 F) and thirty naïve patients (16 M: 14 F; >3 criteria for Metabolic Syndrome upon Adult Treatment Panel III) without organ damage. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we assessed the expression patterns of nuclear receptors in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. 33/48 nuclear receptors were expressed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In patients with Metabolic Syndrome, we found a significant down-regulation of the entire PPAR, NR4A and RAR families, together with a repression of RXRα, VDR, and Rev-Erbα. Furthermore, we performed a novel statistical analysis with classification trees, which allowed us to depict a predictive core of nuclear receptor expression patterns characterizing subjects with Metabolic Syndrome. Random Forest Analysis identified NOR1 and PPARδ, which were both reduced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and specifically in CD14(+) cells (mostly monocytes), as classifiers of Metabolic Syndrome, with high specificity and sensitivity. Our results point to the use of PPAR and NR4A mRNA levels in the overall peripheral blood mononuclear cells as biomarkers of Metabolic Syndrome and bona fide putative targets of pharmacological therapy. © 2013.

  1. Orphan Nuclear Receptor DAX-1 Acts as a Novel Corepressor of Liver X Receptor α and Inhibits Hepatic Lipogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Nedumaran, Balachandar; Kim, Gwang Sik; Hong, Sungpyo; Yoon, Young-Sil; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lee, Young Chul; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2010-01-01

    DAX-1 (dosage-sensitive sex reversal adrenal hypoplasia congenital critical region on X chromosome, gene 1) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that can repress diverse nuclear receptors and has a key role in adreno-gonadal development. Our previous report has demonstrated that DAX-1 can inhibit hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α transactivity and negatively regulate gluconeogenic gene expression (Nedumaran, B., Hong, S., Xie, Y. B., Kim, Y. H., Seo, W. Y., Lee, M. W., Lee, C. H., Koo, S. H., and Choi, H. S. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 27511–27523). Here, we further expand the role of DAX-1 in hepatic energy metabolism. Transfection assays have demonstrated that DAX-1 can inhibit the transcriptional activity of nuclear receptor liver X receptor α (LXRα). Physical interaction between DAX-1 and LXRα was confirmed Immunofluorescent staining in mouse liver shows that LXRα and DAX-1 are colocalized in the nucleus. Domain mapping analysis shows that the entire region of DAX-1 is involved in the interaction with the ligand binding domain region of LXRα. Competition analyses demonstrate that DAX-1 competes with the coactivator SRC-1 for repressing LXRα transactivity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that endogenous DAX-1 recruitment on the SREBP-1c gene promoter was decreased in the presence of LXRα agonist. Overexpression of DAX-1 inhibits T7-induced LXRα target gene expression, whereas knockdown of endogenous DAX-1 significantly increases T7-induced LXRα target gene expression in HepG2 cells. Finally, overexpression of DAX-1 in mouse liver decreases T7-induced LXRα target gene expression, liver triglyceride level, and lipid accumulation. Overall, this study suggests that DAX-1, a novel corepressor of LXRα, functions as a negative regulator of lipogenic enzyme gene expression in liver. PMID:20080977

  2. Orphan nuclear receptor NGFI-B forms dimers with nonclassical interface

    PubMed Central

    Calgaro, Marcos R.; Neto, Mario de Oliveira; Figueira, Ana Carolina M.; Santos, Maria A.M.; Portugal, Rodrigo V.; Guzzi, Carolina A.; Saidemberg, Daniel M.; Bleicher, Lucas; Vernal, Javier; Fernandez, Pablo; Terenzi, Hernán; Palma, Mario Sergio; Polikarpov, Igor

    2007-01-01

    The orphan receptor nerve growth factor-induced B (NGFI-B) is a member of the nuclear receptor's subfamily 4A (Nr4a). NGFI-B was shown to be capable of binding both as a monomer to an extended half-site containing a single AAAGGTCA motif and also as a homodimer to a widely separated everted repeat, as opposed to a large number of nuclear receptors that recognize and bind specific DNA sequences predominantly as homo- and/or heterodimers. To unveil the structural organization of NGFI-B in solution, we determined the quaternary structure of the NGFI-B LBD by a combination of ab initio procedures from small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data and hydrogen–deuterium exchange followed by mass spectrometry. Here we report that the protein forms dimers in solution with a radius of gyration of 2.9 nm and maximum dimension of 9.0 nm. We also show that the NGFI-B LBD dimer is V-shaped, with the opening angle significantly larger than that of classical dimer's exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) or retinoid X receptor (RXR). Surprisingly, NGFI-B dimers formation does not occur via the classical nuclear receptor dimerization interface exemplified by ER and RXR, but instead, involves an extended surface area composed of the loop between helices 3 and 4 and C-terminal fraction of the helix 3. Remarkably, the NGFI-B dimer interface is similar to the dimerization interface earlier revealed for glucocorticoid nuclear receptor (GR), which might be relevant to the recognition of cognate DNA response elements by NGFI-B and to antagonism of NGFI-B–dependent transcription exercised by GR in cells. PMID:17600153

  3. Nuclear hormone receptor coregulator: role in hormone action, metabolism, growth, and development.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Muktar A; Samuels, Herbert H

    2005-06-01

    Nuclear hormone receptor coregulator (NRC) (also referred to as activating signal cointegrator-2, thyroid hormone receptor-binding protein, peroxisome proliferator activating receptor-interacting protein, and 250-kDa receptor associated protein) belongs to a growing class of nuclear cofactors widely known as coregulators or coactivators that are necessary for transcriptional activation of target genes. The NRC gene is also amplified and overexpressed in breast, colon, and lung cancers. NRC is a 2063-amino acid protein that harbors a potent N-terminal activation domain (AD1) and a second more centrally located activation domain (AD2) that is rich in Glu and Pro. Near AD2 is a receptor-interacting domain containing an LxxLL motif (LxxLL-1), which interacts with a wide variety of ligand-bound nuclear hormone receptors with high affinity. A second LxxLL motif (LxxLL-2) located in the C-terminal region of NRC is more restricted in its nuclear hormone receptor specificity. The intrinsic activation potential of NRC is regulated by a C-terminal serine, threonine, leucine-regulatory domain. The potential role of NRC as a cointegrator is suggested by its ability to enhance transcriptional activation of a wide variety of transcription factors and from its in vivo association with a number of known transcriptional regulators including CBP/p300. Recent studies in mice indicate that deletion of both NRC alleles leads to embryonic lethality resulting from general growth retardation coupled with developmental defects in the heart, liver, brain, and placenta. NRC(-/-) mouse embryo fibroblasts spontaneously undergo apoptosis, indicating the importance of NRC as a prosurvival and antiapoptotic gene. Studies with 129S6 NRC(+/-) mice indicate that NRC is a pleiotropic regulator that is involved in growth, development, reproduction, metabolism, and wound healing.

  4. The Nuclear Receptors of Biomphalaria glabrata and Lottia gigantea: Implications for Developing New Model Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Satwant; Jobling, Susan; Jones, Catherine S.; Noble, Leslie R.; Routledge, Edwin J.; Lockyer, Anne E.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are transcription regulators involved in an array of diverse physiological functions including key roles in endocrine and metabolic function. The aim of this study was to identify nuclear receptors in the fully sequenced genome of the gastropod snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni and compare these to known vertebrate NRs, with a view to assessing the snail's potential as a invertebrate model organism for endocrine function, both as a prospective new test organism and to elucidate the fundamental genetic and mechanistic causes of disease. For comparative purposes, the genome of a second gastropod, the owl limpet, Lottia gigantea was also investigated for nuclear receptors. Thirty-nine and thirty-three putative NRs were identified from the B. glabrata and L. gigantea genomes respectively, based on the presence of a conserved DNA-binding domain and/or ligand-binding domain. Nuclear receptor transcript expression was confirmed and sequences were subjected to a comparative phylogenetic analysis, which demonstrated that these molluscs have representatives of all the major NR subfamilies (1-6). Many of the identified NRs are conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates, however differences exist, most notably, the absence of receptors of Group 3C, which includes some of the vertebrate endocrine hormone targets. The mollusc genomes also contain NR homologues that are present in insects and nematodes but not in vertebrates, such as Group 1J (HR48/DAF12/HR96). The identification of many shared receptors between humans and molluscs indicates the potential for molluscs as model organisms; however the absence of several steroid hormone receptors indicates snail endocrine systems are fundamentally different. PMID:25849443

  5. Retinoids induce integrin-independent lymphocyte adhesion through RAR-α nuclear receptor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, Jarrett T.; Wang, Lei; Chen, Jianming; Metts, Meagan E.; Nasser, Taj A.; McGoldrick, Liam J.; Bridges, Lance C.

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Transcription and translation are required for retinoid-induced lymphocyte adhesion. • RAR activation is sufficient to induced lymphocyte cell adhesion. • Vitamin D derivatives inhibit RAR-prompted lymphocyte adhesion. • Adhesion occurs through a novel binding site within ADAM disintegrin domains. • RARα is a key nuclear receptor for retinoid-dependent lymphocyte cell adhesion. - Abstract: Oxidative metabolites of vitamin A, in particular all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA), have emerged as key factors in immunity by specifying the localization of immune cells to the gut. Although it is appreciated that isomers of retinoic acid activate the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR) family of nuclear receptors to elicit cellular changes, the molecular details of retinoic acid action remain poorly defined in immune processes. Here we employ a battery of agonists and antagonists to delineate the specific nuclear receptors utilized by retinoids to evoke lymphocyte cell adhesion to ADAM (adisintegrin and metalloprotease) protein family members. We report that RAR agonism is sufficient to promote immune cell adhesion in both immortal and primary immune cells. Interestingly, adhesion occurs independent of integrin function, and mutant studies demonstrate that atRA-induced adhesion to ADAM members required a distinct binding interface(s) as compared to integrin recognition. Anti-inflammatory corticosteroids as well as 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}, a vitamin D metabolite that prompts immune cell trafficking to the skin, potently inhibited the observed adhesion. Finally, our data establish that induced adhesion was specifically attributable to the RAR-α receptor isotype. The current study provides novel molecular resolution as to which nuclear receptors transduce retinoid exposure into immune cell adhesion.

  6. Effects of primary metabolites of organophosphate flame retardants on transcriptional activity via human nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Shinji; Van den Eede, Nele; Covaci, Adrian

    2016-03-14

    Organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) have been used in a wide variety of applications and detected in several environmental matrices, including indoor air and dust. Continuous human exposure to these chemicals is of growing concern. In this study, the agonistic and/or antagonistic activities of 12 primary OPFR-metabolites against ten human nuclear receptors were examined using cell-based transcriptional assays, and compared to those of their parent compounds. As a result, 3-hydroxylphenyl diphenyl phosphate and 4-hydroxylphenyl diphenyl phosphate showed more potent estrogen receptor α (ERα) and ERβ agonistic activity than did their parent, triphenyl phosphate (TPHP). In addition, these hydroxylated TPHP-metabolites also showed ERβ antagonistic activity at higher concentrations and exhibited pregnane X receptor (PXR) agonistic activity as well as androgen receptor (AR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonistic activities at similar levels to those of TPHP. Bis(2-butoxyethyl) 3'-hydroxy-2-butoxyethyl phosphate and 2-hydroxyethyl bis(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate act as PXR agonists at similar levels to their parent, tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate. On the other hand, seven diester OPFR-metabolites and 1-hydroxy-2-propyl bis(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate did not show any receptor activity. Taken together, these results suggest that hydroxylated TPHP-metabolites show increased estrogenicity compared to the parent compound, whereas the diester OPFR-metabolites may have limited nuclear receptor activity compared to their parent triester OPFRs.

  7. Synergistic Regulation of Coregulator/Nuclear Receptor Interaction by Ligand and DNA.

    PubMed

    de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S; Zheng, Jie; Novick, Scott; Shang, Jinsai; Hughes, Travis S; Brust, Richard; Munoz-Tello, Paola; Gardner, William J; Marciano, David P; Kong, Xiangming; Griffin, Patrick R; Kojetin, Douglas J

    2017-10-03

    Nuclear receptor (NR) transcription factors bind various coreceptors, small-molecule ligands, DNA response element sequences, and transcriptional coregulator proteins to affect gene transcription. Small-molecule ligands and DNA are known to influence receptor structure, coregulator protein interaction, and function; however, little is known on the mechanism of synergy between ligand and DNA. Using quantitative biochemical, biophysical, and solution structural methods, including (13)C-detected nuclear magnetic resonance and hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry, we show that ligand and DNA cooperatively recruit the intrinsically disordered steroid receptor coactivator-2 (SRC-2/TIF2/GRIP1/NCoA-2) receptor interaction domain to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-retinoid X receptor alpha (PPARγ-RXRα) heterodimer and reveal the binding determinants of the complex. Our data reveal a thermodynamic mechanism by which DNA binding propagates a conformational change in PPARγ-RXRα, stabilizes the receptor ligand binding domain dimer interface, and impacts ligand potency and cooperativity in NR coactivator recruitment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Nuclear receptor coactivator 6 mediates the synergistic activation of human cytochrome P-450 2C9 by the constitutive androstane receptor and hepatic nuclear factor-4alpha.

    PubMed

    Surapureddi, Sailesh; Rana, Ritu; Reddy, Janardan K; Goldstein, Joyce A

    2008-09-01

    Nuclear receptor coactivator 6 (NCOA6) also known as PRIP/RAP250/ASC-2 anchors a steady-state complex of cofactors and function as a transcriptional coactivator for certain nuclear receptors. This is the first study to identify NCOA6 as a hepatic nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF4alpha)-interacting protein. CYP2C9 is an important enzyme that metabolizes both commonly used therapeutic drugs and important endogenous compounds. We have shown previously that constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) (a xenobiotic-sensing receptor) up-regulates the CYP2C9 promoter through binding to a distal site, whereas HNF4alpha transcriptionally up-regulates CYP2C9 via proximal sites. We demonstrate ligand-enhanced synergistic cross-talk between CAR and HNF4alpha. We identify NCOA6 as crucial to the underlying mechanism of this cross-talk. NCOA6 was identified as an HNF4alpha-interacting protein in this study using a yeast two-hybrid screen and GST pull-down assays. Furthermore, we identified NCOA6, CAR, and other coactivators as part of a mega complex of cofactors associated with HNF4alpha in HepG2 cells. Although the interaction of NCOA6 with CAR is specifically through the first LXXLL motif of NCOA6, both LXXLL motifs are involved in its interaction with HNF4alpha. Silencing of NCOA6 abrogated the synergistic activation of the CYP2C9 promoter and the synergistic induction of the CYP2C9 gene by CAR-HNF4alpha. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that NCOA6 can pull down both the proximal HNF4alpha and distal CAR binding sites of the CYP2C9 promoter and provides the basis for the recruitment of other cofactors. We conclude that the coactivator NCOA6 mediates the mechanism of the synergistic activation of the CYP2C9 gene by CAR and HNF4alpha.

  9. Nuclear progesterone receptor expression in the human fetal membranes and decidua at term before and after labor.

    PubMed

    Merlino, Amy; Welsh, Toni; Erdonmez, Tan; Madsen, Gemma; Zakar, Tamas; Smith, Roger; Mercer, Brian; Mesiano, Sam

    2009-04-01

    To explore how progesterone affects human pregnancy, we identified the progesterone target cells within the fetal membranes (amnion, chorion, and decidua) at term by assessing the extent of expression and localization of the nuclear progesterone receptors, progesterone receptor-A and progesterone receptor-B. Fetal membranes (separated into amnion and chorion-decidua) were obtained after term cesarean deliveries performed before (n = 7) and after (n = 7) labor onset. Nuclear progesterone receptor expression was determined by the abundance of nuclear progesterone receptor mRNAs (by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) and proteins (by western blotting). Localization of nPRs was determined by immunohistochemistry. Progesterone receptor-A and progesterone receptor-B mRNA and protein levels were highest in the chorion-decidua and did not change in association with labor. Nuclear progesterone receptor mRNAs and proteins were barely detectable in amnion. Nuclear progesterone receptor immunostaining was detected only in the nucleus of decidual cells. These findings suggest that the decidua, and not the amnion and chorion, is a direct target for nuclear progesterone receptor-mediated progesterone actions during human pregnancy.

  10. OR-1, a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that interacts with the 9-cis-retinoic acid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Teboul, M; Enmark, E; Li, Q; Wikström, A C; Pelto-Huikko, M; Gustafsson, J A

    1995-01-01

    We have cloned a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. The cDNA was isolated from a rat liver library and encodes a protein of 446 aa with a predicted mass of 50 kDa. This clone (OR-1) shows no striking homology to any known member of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily. The most related receptor is the ecdysone receptor and the highest homologies represent < 10% in the amino-terminal domain, between 15-37% in the carboxyl-terminal domain and 50-62% in the DNA binding domain. The expression of OR-1 appears to be widespread in both fetal and adult rat tissues. Potential DNA response elements composed of a direct repeat of the hexameric motif AGGTCA spaced by 0-6 nt were tested in gel shift experiments. OR-1 was shown to interact with the 9-cis-retinoic acid receptor (retinoid X receptor, RXR) and the OR-1/RXR complex to bind to a direct repeat spaced by 4 nt (DR4). In transfection experiments, OR-1 appears to activate RXR-mediated function through the DR4. Therefore OR-1 might modulate 9-cis-retinoic acid signaling by interacting with RXR. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7892230

  11. Protein kinase A is part of a mechanism that regulates nuclear reimport of the nuclear tRNA export receptors Los1p and Msn5p.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Jacqueline B; van der Merwe, George; Mangroo, Dev

    2014-02-01

    The two main signal transduction mechanisms that allow eukaryotes to sense and respond to changes in glucose availability in the environment are the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/Snf1 kinase-dependent pathways. Previous studies have shown that the nuclear tRNA export process is inhibited in Saccharomyces cerevisiae deprived of glucose. However, the signal transduction pathway involved and the mechanism by which glucose availability regulates nuclear-cytoplasmic tRNA trafficking are not understood. Here, we show that inhibition of nuclear tRNA export is caused by a block in nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors during glucose deprivation. Cytoplasmic accumulation of the tRNA export receptors during glucose deprivation is not caused by activation of Snf1p. Evidence obtained suggests that PKA is part of the mechanism that regulates nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors in response to glucose availability. This mechanism does not appear to involve phosphorylation of the nuclear tRNA export receptors by PKA. The block in nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors appears to be caused by activation of an unidentified mechanism when PKA is turned off during glucose deprivation. Taken together, the data suggest that PKA facilitates return of the tRNA export receptors to the nucleus by inhibiting an unidentified activity that facilitates cytoplasmic accumulation of the tRNA export receptors when glucose in the environment is limiting. A PKA-independent mechanism was also found to regulate nuclear tRNA export in response to glucose availability. This mechanism, however, does not regulate nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors.

  12. Protein Kinase A Is Part of a Mechanism That Regulates Nuclear Reimport of the Nuclear tRNA Export Receptors Los1p and Msn5p

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Jacqueline B.; van der Merwe, George

    2014-01-01

    The two main signal transduction mechanisms that allow eukaryotes to sense and respond to changes in glucose availability in the environment are the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/Snf1 kinase-dependent pathways. Previous studies have shown that the nuclear tRNA export process is inhibited in Saccharomyces cerevisiae deprived of glucose. However, the signal transduction pathway involved and the mechanism by which glucose availability regulates nuclear-cytoplasmic tRNA trafficking are not understood. Here, we show that inhibition of nuclear tRNA export is caused by a block in nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors during glucose deprivation. Cytoplasmic accumulation of the tRNA export receptors during glucose deprivation is not caused by activation of Snf1p. Evidence obtained suggests that PKA is part of the mechanism that regulates nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors in response to glucose availability. This mechanism does not appear to involve phosphorylation of the nuclear tRNA export receptors by PKA. The block in nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors appears to be caused by activation of an unidentified mechanism when PKA is turned off during glucose deprivation. Taken together, the data suggest that PKA facilitates return of the tRNA export receptors to the nucleus by inhibiting an unidentified activity that facilitates cytoplasmic accumulation of the tRNA export receptors when glucose in the environment is limiting. A PKA-independent mechanism was also found to regulate nuclear tRNA export in response to glucose availability. This mechanism, however, does not regulate nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors. PMID:24297441

  13. Residue correlation networks in nuclear receptors reflect functional specialization and the formation of the nematode-specific P-box

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nuclear receptors (NRs) are transcription factors which bind small hormones, whose evolutionary history and the presence of different functional surfaces makes them an interesting target for a correlation based analysis. Results Correlation analysis of ligand binding domains shows that correlated residue subsets arise from the differences between functional sites in different nuclear receptor subfamilies. For the DNA binding domain, particularly, the analysis shows that the main source of correlation comes from residues that regulate hormone response element specificity, and one of the conserved residue sub-sets arises due to the presence of an unusual sequence for the DNA binding motif known as P-box in nematodes, suggesting the existence of different DBD-DNA specificities in nuclear receptors. Conclusions We conclude that DNA specificity and functional surface specialization has independently driven nuclear receptor evolution, and suggest possible binding modes for the class of divergent nuclear receptors in nematodes. PMID:24564869

  14. REV-ERBα influences the stability and nuclear localization of the glucocorticoid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Okabe, Takashi; Chavan, Rohit; Fonseca Costa, Sara S.; Brenna, Andrea; Ripperger, Jürgen A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT REV-ERBα (encoded by Nr1d1) is a nuclear receptor that is part of the circadian clock mechanism and regulates metabolism and inflammatory processes. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR, encoded by Nr3c1) influences similar processes, but is not part of the circadian clock, although glucocorticoid signaling affects resetting of the circadian clock in peripheral tissues. Because of their similar impact on physiological processes, we studied the interplay between these two nuclear receptors. We found that REV-ERBα binds to the C-terminal portion and GR to the N-terminal portion of HSP90α and HSP90β, a chaperone responsible for the activation of proteins to ensure survival of a cell. The presence of REV-ERBα influences the stability and nuclear localization of GR by an unknown mechanism, thereby affecting expression of GR target genes, such as IκBα (Nfkbia) and alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1). Our findings highlight an important interplay between two nuclear receptors that influence the transcriptional potential of each other. This indicates that the transcriptional landscape is strongly dependent on dynamic processes at the protein level. PMID:27686098

  15. Application of an in silico liver model to determine nuclear receptor mediated pathways in liver cancer

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that control diverse cellular processes. Chronic stimulation of some NRs in rodents can result in increased incidence of liver tumors. These are generally thought to develop through a non-genotoxic mechanism with...

  16. REV-ERBα influences the stability and nuclear localization of the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Takashi; Chavan, Rohit; Fonseca Costa, Sara S; Brenna, Andrea; Ripperger, Jürgen A; Albrecht, Urs

    2016-11-01

    REV-ERBα (encoded by Nr1d1) is a nuclear receptor that is part of the circadian clock mechanism and regulates metabolism and inflammatory processes. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR, encoded by Nr3c1) influences similar processes, but is not part of the circadian clock, although glucocorticoid signaling affects resetting of the circadian clock in peripheral tissues. Because of their similar impact on physiological processes, we studied the interplay between these two nuclear receptors. We found that REV-ERBα binds to the C-terminal portion and GR to the N-terminal portion of HSP90α and HSP90β, a chaperone responsible for the activation of proteins to ensure survival of a cell. The presence of REV-ERBα influences the stability and nuclear localization of GR by an unknown mechanism, thereby affecting expression of GR target genes, such as IκBα (Nfkbia) and alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1). Our findings highlight an important interplay between two nuclear receptors that influence the transcriptional potential of each other. This indicates that the transcriptional landscape is strongly dependent on dynamic processes at the protein level. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. SUMOylation of the C-terminal domain of DNA topoisomerase IIα regulates the centromeric localization of Claspin

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hyunju; Yoshida, Makoto M; Sridharan, Vinidhra; Kumagai, Akiko; Dunphy, William G; Dasso, Mary; Azuma, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase II (TopoII) regulates DNA topology by its strand passaging reaction, which is required for genome maintenance by resolving tangled genomic DNA. In addition, TopoII contributes to the structural integrity of mitotic chromosomes and to the activation of cell cycle checkpoints in mitosis. Post-translational modification of TopoII is one of the key mechanisms by which its broad functions are regulated during mitosis. SUMOylation of TopoII is conserved in eukaryotes and plays a critical role in chromosome segregation. Using Xenopus laevis egg extract, we demonstrated previously that TopoIIα is modified by SUMO on mitotic chromosomes and that its activity is modulated via SUMOylation of its lysine at 660. However, both biochemical and genetic analyses indicated that TopoII has multiple SUMOylation sites in addition to Lys660, and the functions of the other SUMOylation sites were not clearly determined. In this study, we identified the SUMOylation sites on the C-terminal domain (CTD) of TopoIIα. CTD SUMOylation did not affect TopoIIα activity, indicating that its function is distinct from that of Lys660 SUMOylation. We found that CTD SUMOylation promotes protein binding and that Claspin, a well-established cell cycle checkpoint mediator, is one of the SUMOylation-dependent binding proteins. Claspin harbors 2 SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs), and its robust association to mitotic chromosomes requires both the SIMs and TopoIIα-CTD SUMOylation. Claspin localizes to the mitotic centromeres depending on mitotic SUMOylation, suggesting that TopoIIα-CTD SUMOylation regulates the centromeric localization of Claspin. Our findings provide a novel mechanistic insight regarding how TopoIIα-CTD SUMOylation contributes to mitotic centromere activity. PMID:26131587

  18. Androgen receptor regulates nuclear trafficking and nuclear domain residency of corepressor HDAC7 in a ligand-dependent fashion

    SciTech Connect

    Karvonen, Ulla; Jaenne, Olli A.; Palvimo, Jorma J. . E-mail: jorma.palvimo@uku.fi

    2006-10-01

    In addition to chromosomal proteins, histone deacetylases (HDACs) target transcription factors in transcriptional repression. Here, we show that the class II HDAC family member HDAC7 is an efficient corepressor of the androgen receptor (AR). HDAC7 resided in the cytoplasm in the absence of AR or a cognate ligand, but hormone-occupancy of AR induced nuclear transfer of HDAC7. Nuclear colocalization pattern of AR and HDAC7 was dependent on the nature of the ligand. In the presence of testosterone, a portion of HDAC7 localized to pearl-like nuclear domains, whereas AR occupied with antagonistic ligands cyproterone acetate- or casodex (bicalutamide) recruited HDAC7 from these domains to colocalize with the receptor in speckles and nucleoplasm in a more complete fashion. Ectopic expression of PML-3 relieved the repressive effect of HDAC7 on AR function by sequestering HDAC7 to PML-3 domains. AR acetylation at Lys630/632/633 was not the target of HDAC7 repression, since repression of AR function was independent of these acetylation sites. Moreover, the deacetylase activity of HDAC7 was in part dispensable in the repression of AR function. In sum, our results identify HDAC7 as a novel AR corepressor whose subcellular and subnuclear compartmentalization can be regulated in an androgen-selective manner.

  19. Membrane and nuclear estrogen receptor α collaborate to suppress adipogenesis but not triglyceride content

    PubMed Central

    Pedram, Ali; Razandi, Mahnaz; Blumberg, Bruce; Levin, Ellis Robert

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen and estrogen receptor (ER)-α suppress visceral fat development through actions in several organs via unclear mechanisms that we sought to identify. Using mice that express only nuclear ER-α [nuclear-only ER-α (NOER) mice] or plasma membrane ER-α [membrane-only ER-α (MOER) mice], we found that 10-wk-old mice that lacked either receptor pool showed extensive abdominal visceral fat deposition and weight gain compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Differentiation of cultured bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) into the adipocyte lineage was suppressed by 17-β-estradiol (E2) in WT female mice but not in NOER or MOER mice. This finding correlated with E2 inhibition of prominent differentiation genes in WT BMSCs. In contrast, triglyceride content in differentiated BMSCs or 3T3-L1 cells was suppressed as a result of membrane ER-α signaling through several kinases to inhibit carbohydrate response element–binding protein-α and -β. We concluded that extranuclear and nuclear ER-α collaborate to suppress adipocyte development, but inhibition of lipid synthesis in mature cells does not involve nuclear ER-α.—Pedram, A., Razandi, M., Blumberg, B., Levin, E. R. Membrane and nuclear estrogen receptor α collaborate to suppress adipogenesis but not triglyceride content. PMID:26373802

  20. Androgen Induces a Switch from Cytoplasmic Retention to Nuclear Import of the Androgen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Li; Llewellyn, Ryan; Kesler, Cristina T.; Kelley, Joshua B.; Spencer, Adam; Snow, Chelsi J.; Shank, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) has critical functions as a transcription factor in both normal and cancer cells, but the specific mechanisms that regulate its nuclear localization are not well defined. We found that an AR mutation commonly reported in prostate cancer generates an androgen-independent gain of function for nuclear import. The substitution, Thr877Ala, is within the ligand-binding domain, but the nuclear import gain of function is mediated by the bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) spanning the DNA-binding domain (DBD) and hinge region. Bipartite NLS activity depends on the structure provided by the DBD, and protein interactions with the bipartite NLS are repressed by the hinge region. The bipartite NLS is recognized by importin 7, a nuclear import receptor for several proteins. Importin 7 binding to AR, however, inhibits import by shielding the bipartite NLS. Androgen binding relieves the inhibition by inducing a switch that promotes exchange of importin 7 for karyopherin alpha import receptors. Importin 7 contributes to the regulation of AR import by restraining import until androgen is detected in the cytoplasm. PMID:24100013

  1. Regulation of expanded polyglutamine protein aggregation and nuclear localization by the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Diamond, M I; Robinson, M R; Yamamoto, K R

    2000-01-18

    Spinobulbar muscular atrophy and Huntington's disease are caused by polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor and huntingtin, respectively, and their pathogenesis has been associated with abnormal nuclear localization and aggregation of truncated forms of these proteins. Here we show, in diverse cell types, that glucocorticoids can up- or down-modulate aggregation and nuclear localization of expanded polyglutamine polypeptides derived from the androgen receptor and huntingtin through specific regulation of gene expression. Wild-type glucocorticoid receptor (GR), as well as C-terminal deletion derivatives, suppressed the aggregation and nuclear localization of these polypeptides, whereas mutations within the DNA binding domain and N terminus of GR abolished this activity. Surprisingly, deletion of a transcriptional regulatory domain within the GR N terminus markedly increased aggregation and nuclear localization of the expanded polyglutamine proteins. Thus, aggregation and nuclear localization of expanded polyglutamine proteins are regulated cellular processes that can be modulated by a well-characterized transcriptional regulator, the GR. Our findings suggest approaches to study the molecular pathogenesis and selective neuronal degeneration of polyglutamine expansion diseases.

  2. Regulation of expanded polyglutamine protein aggregation and nuclear localization by the glucocorticoid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Marc I.; Robinson, Melissa R.; Yamamoto, Keith R.

    2000-01-01

    Spinobulbar muscular atrophy and Huntington's disease are caused by polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor and huntingtin, respectively, and their pathogenesis has been associated with abnormal nuclear localization and aggregation of truncated forms of these proteins. Here we show, in diverse cell types, that glucocorticoids can up- or down-modulate aggregation and nuclear localization of expanded polyglutamine polypeptides derived from the androgen receptor and huntingtin through specific regulation of gene expression. Wild-type glucocorticoid receptor (GR), as well as C-terminal deletion derivatives, suppressed the aggregation and nuclear localization of these polypeptides, whereas mutations within the DNA binding domain and N terminus of GR abolished this activity. Surprisingly, deletion of a transcriptional regulatory domain within the GR N terminus markedly increased aggregation and nuclear localization of the expanded polyglutamine proteins. Thus, aggregation and nuclear localization of expanded polyglutamine proteins are regulated cellular processes that can be modulated by a well-characterized transcriptional regulator, the GR. Our findings suggest approaches to study the molecular pathogenesis and selective neuronal degeneration of polyglutamine expansion diseases. PMID:10639135

  3. Nuclear Membranes ETB Receptors Mediate ET-1-induced Increase of Nuclear Calcium in Human Left Ventricular Endocardial Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Jules, Farah; Avedanian, Levon; Al-Khoury, Johny; Keita, Ramatoulaye; Normand, Alexandre; Bkaily, Ghassan; Jacques, Danielle

    2015-07-01

    In fetal human left ventricular endocardial endothelial cells (EECLs), both plasma membrane (PM) ET(A)R and ET(B)R were reported to mediate ET-1-induced increase of intracellular calcium [Ca](i); however, this effect was mediated by ET(A)R in right EECs (EECRs). In this study, we verified whether, as for the PM, nuclear membranes (NMs) ET-1 receptors activation in EECLs and EECRs induce an increase of nuclear calcium ([Ca](n)) and if this effect is mediated through the same receptor type as in PM. Using a plasmalemma-perforated technique and 3D confocal microscopy, our results showed that, as in PM intact cells, superfusion of nuclei of both cell types with cytosolic ET-1 induced a concentration-dependent sustained increase of [Ca](n). In EECRs, the ET(A)R antagonist prevented the effect of ET-1 on [Ca](n) without affecting EECLs. However, in both cell types, the effect of cytosolic ET-1 on [Ca](n) was prevented by the ETBR antagonist. In conclusion, both NMs' ET(A)R and ET(B)R mediated the effect of cytosolic ET-1 on [Ca](n) in EECRs. In contrast, only NMs' ET(B)R activation mediated the effect of cytosolic ET-1 in EECLs. Hence, the type of NMs' receptors mediating the effect of ET-1 on [Ca](n) are different from those of PM mediating the increase in [Ca](i).

  4. Activated nuclear metabotropic glutamate receptor mGlu5 couples to nuclear Gq/11 proteins to generate inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-mediated nuclear Ca2+ release.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vikas; Jong, Yuh-Jiin I; O'Malley, Karen L

    2008-05-16

    Recently we have shown that the metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5) receptor can be expressed on nuclear membranes of heterologous cells or endogenously on striatal neurons where it can mediate nuclear Ca2+ changes. Here, pharmacological, optical, and genetic techniques were used to show that upon activation, nuclear mGlu5 receptors generate nuclear inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) in situ. Specifically, expression of an mGlu5 F767S mutant in HEK293 cells that blocks Gq/11 coupling or introduction of a dominant negative Galphaq construct in striatal neurons prevented nuclear Ca2+ changes following receptor activation. These data indicate that nuclear mGlu5 receptors couple to Gq/11 to mobilize nuclear Ca2+. Nuclear mGlu5-mediated Ca2+ responses could also be blocked by the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, U73122, the phosphatidylinositol (PI) PLC inhibitor 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine (ET-18-OCH3), or by using small interfering RNA targeted against PLCbeta1 demonstrating that PI-PLC is involved. Direct assessment of inositol phosphate production using a PIP2/IP3 "biosensor" revealed for the first time that IP3 can be generated in the nucleus following activation of nuclear mGlu5 receptors. Finally, both IP3 and ryanodine receptor blockers prevented nuclear mGlu5-mediated increases in intranuclear Ca2+. Collectively, this study shows that like plasma membrane receptors, activated nuclear mGlu5 receptors couple to Gq/11 and PLC to generate IP3-mediated release of Ca2+ from Ca2+-release channels in the nucleus. Thus the nucleus can function as an autonomous organelle independent of signals originating in the cytoplasm, and nuclear mGlu5 receptors play a dynamic role in mobilizing Ca2+ in a specific, localized fashion.

  5. Human diabetes associated with defects in nuclear regulatory proteins for the insulin receptor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti, A; Brunetti, L; Foti, D; Accili, D; Goldfine, I D

    1996-01-01

    The control of gene transcription is mediated by sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins (trans-acting factors) that bind to upstream regulatory elements (cis elements). We have previously identified two DNA-binding proteins that specifically interact with two unique AT-rich sequences of the 5' regulatory region of the insulin receptor gene which have in vivo promoter activity. Herein we have investigated the expression of these DNA-binding proteins in cells from two unrelated patients with insulin resistance and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In these patients, the insulin receptor gene was normal. In EBV-transformed lymphoblasts from both patients, insulin receptor mRNA levels and insulin receptor expression were decreased. The expression of nuclear-binding proteins for the 5' regulatory region of the insulin receptor gene was markedly reduced, and this defect paralleled the decrease in insulin receptor protein expression. These studies indicate that DNA-binding proteins to the regulatory region of the insulin receptor gene are important for expression of the insulin receptor. Further, they suggest that in affected individuals, defects in the expression of these proteins may cause decreased insulin receptor expression and insulin resistance. PMID:8550844

  6. In vitro endocrine disruption potential of organophosphate flame retardants via human nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Shinji; Itoh, Toshihiro; Iida, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Yoshida, Takahiko

    2013-12-06

    Various organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) are widely used in building materials, textiles and electric appliances, and have been reported to cause indoor environmental pollution in houses and office buildings. In this study, using cell-based transactivation assays, we characterized the agonistic and/or antagonistic activities of 11 OPFRs against human nuclear receptors; estrogen receptor α (ERα), ERβ, androgen receptor (AR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), thyroid hormone receptor α1 (TRα1), TRβ1, retinoic acid receptor α (RARα), retinoid X receptor α (RXRα), pregnane X receptor (PXR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), and PPARγ. Of the 11 OPFRs tested, triphenyl phosphate (TPhP) and tricrecyl phosphate (TCP) showed ERα and/or ERβ agonistic activity. In addition, tributyl phosphate (TBP), tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP), TPhP and TCP showed AR antagonistic activity, and TBP, tris(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (TEHP), TDCPP, TPhP and TCP showed GR antagonistic activity. Furthermore, we found that seven compounds, TBP, tris(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) phosphate (TCPP), TEHP, tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBEP), TDCPP, TPhP, and TCP, display PXR agonistic activity. However, none of test compounds showed agonistic or antagonistic activity against TRα/β, or agonistic activity against RARα, RXRα or PPARα/γ. Taken together, these results suggest that several OPFRs may have potential endocrine disrupting effects via ERα, ERβ, AR, GR and PXR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dose-dependent difference of nuclear receptors involved in murine liver hypertrophy by piperonyl butoxide.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Yohei; Yoshida, Midori; Tamura, Kei; Takahashi, Miwa; Kodama, Yukio; Inoue, Kaoru

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear receptors play important roles in chemically induced liver hypertrophy in rodents. To clarify the involvement of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and other nuclear receptors in mouse liver hypertrophy induced by different doses of piperonyl butoxide (PBO), wild-type and CAR-knockout mice were administered PBO (200, 1,000, or 5,000 ppm) in the basal diet for 1 week. Increased liver weight and diffuse hepatocellular hypertrophy were observed at 5,000 ppm for both genotypes, accompanied by increased Cyp3a11 mRNA and CYP3A protein expression, suggesting that CAR-independent pathway, possibly pregnane X receptor (PXR), plays a major role in the induction of hypertrophy. Moreover, wild-type mice at 5,000 ppm showed enhanced hepatocellular hypertrophy and strong positive staining for CYP2B in the centrilobular area, suggesting the localized contribution of CAR. At 1,000 ppm, only wild-type mice showed liver weight increase and centrilobular hepatocellular hypertrophy concurrent with elevated Cyp2b10 mRNA expression and strong CYP2B staining, indicating that CAR was essential at 1,000 ppm. We concluded that high-dose PBO induced hypertrophy via CAR and another pathway, while lower dose of PBO induced a pathway mediated predominantly by CAR. The dose-responsiveness on liver hypertrophy is important for understanding the involvement of nuclear receptors.

  8. G-protein coupling and nuclear translocation of the human abscisic acid receptor LANCL2

    PubMed Central

    Fresia, Chiara; Vigliarolo, Tiziana; Guida, Lucrezia; Booz, Valeria; Bruzzone, Santina; Sturla, Laura; Di Bona, Melody; Pesce, Mattia; Usai, Cesare; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a long known phytohormone, has been recently demonstrated to be present also in humans, where it targets cells of the innate immune response, mesenchymal and hemopoietic stem cells and cells involved in the regulation of systemic glucose homeostasis. LANCL2, a peripheral membrane protein, is the mammalian ABA receptor. We show that N-terminal glycine myristoylation causes LANCL2 localization to the plasmamembrane and to cytoplasmic membrane vesicles, where it interacts with the α subunit of a Gi protein and starts the ABA signaling pathway via activation of adenylate cyclase. Demyristoylation of LANCL2 by chemical or genetic means triggers its nuclear translocation. Nuclear enrichment of native LANCL2 is also induced by ABA treatment. Therefore human LANCL2 is a non-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor susceptible to hormone-induced nuclear translocation. PMID:27222287

  9. Role of Nuclear Receptors in Central Nervous System Development and Associated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, Ana Maria; Moreno-Ramos, Oscar Andrés; Haider, Neena B.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear hormone receptor (NHR) superfamily is composed of a wide range of receptors involved in a myriad of important biological processes, including development, growth, metabolism, and maintenance. Regulation of such wide variety of functions requires a complex system of gene regulation that includes interaction with transcription factors, chromatin-modifying complex, and the proper recognition of ligands. NHRs are able to coordinate the expression of genes in numerous pathways simultaneously. This review focuses on the role of nuclear receptors in the central nervous system and, in particular, their role in regulating the proper development and function of the brain and the eye. In addition, the review highlights the impact of mutations in NHRs on a spectrum of human diseases from autism to retinal degeneration. PMID:27168725

  10. Featured Article: Nuclear export of opioid growth factor receptor is CRM1 dependent.

    PubMed

    Kren, Nancy P; Zagon, Ian S; McLaughlin, Patricia J

    2016-02-01

    Opioid growth factor receptor (OGFr) facilitates growth inhibition in the presence of its specific ligand opioid growth factor (OGF), chemically termed [Met(5)]-enkephalin. The function of the OGF-OGFr axis requires the receptor to translocate to the nucleus. However, the mechanism of nuclear export of OGFr is unknown. In this study, endogenous OGFr, as well as exogenously expressed OGFr-EGFP, demonstrated significant nuclear accumulation in response to leptomycin B (LMB), an inhibitor of CRM1-dependent nuclear export, suggesting that OGFr is exported in a CRM1-dependent manner. One consensus sequence for a nuclear export signal (NES) was identified. Mutation of the associated leucines, L217 L220 L223 and L225, to alanine resulted in decreased nuclear accumulation. NES-EGFP responded to LMB, indicating that this sequence is capable of functioning as an export signal in isolation. To determine why the sequence functions differently in isolation than as a full length protein, the localization of subNES was evaluated in the presence and absence of MG132, a potent inhibitor of proteosomal degradation. MG132 had no effect of subNES localization. The role of tandem repeats located at the C-terminus of OGFr was examined for their role in nuclear trafficking. Six of seven tandem repeats were removed to form deltaTR. DeltaTR localized exclusively to the nucleus indicating that the tandem repeats may contribute to the localization of the receptor. Similar to the loss of cellular proliferation activity (i.e. inhibition) recorded with subNES, deltaTR also demonstrated a significant loss of inhibitory activity indicating that the repeats may be integral to receptor function. These experiments reveal that OGFr contains one functional NES, L217 L220 L223 and L225 and can be exported from the nucleus in a CRM1-dependent manner. © 2015 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  11. Ryanodine receptors are involved in nuclear calcium oscillation in primary pancreatic {beta}-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Ji; Chen, Zheng; Yin, Wenxuan; Miao, Lin; Zhou, Zhansong; Ji, Guangju

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that RyRs are expressed on the nuclear envelope in single primary pancreatic {beta}-cells and isolated nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed that the pattern of glucose-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in the nucleus and cytosol was similar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results demonstrate that ryanodine-sensitive Ca{sup 2+} stores exist and have function in the pancreatic {beta}-cell nucleus. -- Abstract: Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are mainly located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and play an important role in regulating glucose-induced cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in pancreatic {beta}-cells. However, subcellular locations and functions of RyRs on other cell organelles such as nuclear envelope are not well understood. In order to investigate the role of RyRs in nuclear Ca{sup 2+} oscillation we designed and conducted experiments in intact primary pancreatic {beta}-cells. Immunocytochemistry was used to examine the expression of RYRs on the nuclear envelope. Confocal microscopy was used to evaluate the function of RYRs on the nuclear envelope. We found that RyRs are expressed on the nuclear envelope in single primary pancreatic {beta}-cells and isolated nuclei. Laser scanning confocal microscopy studies indicated that application of glucose to the cells co-incubated with Ca{sup 2+} indicator Fluo-4 AM and cell-permeable nuclear indicator Hoechst 33342 resulted in nuclear Ca{sup 2+} oscillation. The pattern of glucose-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in the nucleus and cytosol was similar. The reduction of Ca{sup 2+} oscillation amplitude by ryanodine was much greater in the nucleus though both the cytosol and the nucleus Ca{sup 2+} amplitude decreased by ryanodine. Our results suggest that functional ryanodine receptors not only exist in endoplasmic reticulum but are also expressed in nuclear envelope of pancreatic {beta}-cells.

  12. Impairment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Integrase SUMOylation Correlates with an Early Replication Defect*

    PubMed Central

    Zamborlini, Alessia; Coiffic, Audrey; Beauclair, Guillaume; Delelis, Olivier; Paris, Joris; Koh, Yashuiro; Magne, Fabian; Giron, Marie-Lou; Tobaly-Tapiero, Joelle; Deprez, Eric; Emiliani, Stephane; Engelman, Alan; de Thé, Hugues; Saïb, Ali

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) orchestrates the integration of the reverse transcribed viral cDNA into the host cell genome and participates also in other steps of HIV-1 replication. Cellular and viral factors assist IN in performing its multiple functions, and post-translational modifications contribute to modulate its activities. Here, we show that HIV-1 IN is modified by SUMO proteins and that phylogenetically conserved SUMOylation consensus motifs represent major SUMO acceptor sites. Viruses harboring SUMOylation site IN mutants displayed a replication defect that was mapped during the early stages of infection, before integration but after reverse transcription. Because SUMOylation-defective IN mutants retained WT catalytic activity, we hypothesize that SUMOylation might regulate the affinity of IN for co-factors, contributing to efficient HIV-1 replication. PMID:21454548

  13. The roles of nuclear receptors CAR and PXR in hepatic energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Konno, Yoshihiro; Negishi, Masahiko; Kodama, Susumu

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear receptors constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) were originally characterized as transcription factors regulating the hepatic genes that encode drug metabolizing enzymes. Recent works have now revealed that these nuclear receptors also play the critical roles in modulating hepatic energy metabolism. While CAR and PXR directly bind to their response sequences phenobarbital-responsive enhancer module (PBREM) and xenobiotic responsive enhancer module (XREM) in the promoter of target genes to increase drug metabolism, the receptors also cross talk with various hormone responsive transcription factors such as forkhead box O1 (FoxO1), forkhead box A2 (FoxA2), cAMP-response element binding protein, and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC 1alpha) to decrease energy metabolism through down-regulating gluconeogenesis, fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis and up-regulating lipogenesis. In addition, CAR modulates thyroid hormone activity by regulating type 1 deiodinase in the regenerating liver. Thus, CAR and PXR are now placed at the crossroad where both xenobiotics and endogenous stimuli co-regulate liver function.

  14. Photoaffinity labelling of the rat liver nuclear thyroid hormone receptor with (/sup 125/I)triiodothyronine

    SciTech Connect

    David-Inouye, Y.; Somack, R.; Nordeen, S.K.; Apriletti, J.W.; Baxter, J.D.; Eberhardt, N.L.

    1982-11-01

    (/sup 125/I)Triiodothyronine (T3) was used as a photoreactive probe for the thyroid hormone nuclear receptor in photoaffinity labelling experiments. Autoradiograms of photolysis products electrophoresed on either one or two-dimensional gels showed that (/sup 125/I)T3 covalently, but nonspecifically, labelled many proteins in the partially purified receptor preparations used. However, one of these proteins with an estimated molecular weight of 47,000 and an isoelectric point of approximately 6.2 +/- 0.5 pH units appears to be the thyroid hormone receptor, since, in contrast to the other proteins, its photoinduced labelling was blocked by concentrations of T3 and thyroxine (T4) similar to those that inhibit binding of (/sup 125/I)T3 by the receptor in equilibrium binding assays. In addition, the isoelectric point of the photolabelled protein agrees with that determined in separate equilibrium isoelectric focusing studies. These results indicate that (/sup 125/)T3 can serve as a photoreactive probe for the thyroid hormone nuclear receptor, and they suggest that this receptor is a single polypeptide chain of molecular weight 47,000 with an isoelectric point of 6.2 +/- 0.5 pH units.

  15. Photoaffinity labelling of the rat liver nuclear thyroid hormone receptor with (/sup 125/I)triiodothyronine

    SciTech Connect

    David-Inouye, Y.; Somack, R; Nordeen, S.K.; Apriletti, J.W.; Baxter, J.D.; Eberhardt, N.L.

    1982-11-01

    (/sup 125/I)Triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) was used as a photoreactive probe for the thyroid hormone nuclear receptor in photoaffinity labelling experiments. Autoradiograms of photolysis products electrophoresed on either one or two-dimensional gels showed that (/sup 125/I)T/sub 3/ covalently, but nonspecifically, labelled many proteins in the partially purified receptor preparations used. However, one of these proteins with an estimated molecular weight of 47,000 and an isoelectric point of approximately 6.2 +/- 0.5 pH units appears to be the thyroid hormone receptor, since, in contrast to the other proteins, its photoinduced labelling was blocked by concentrations of T/sub 3/ and thyroxine (T/sub 4/) similar to those that inhibit binding of (/sup 125/I)T/sub 3/ by the receptor in equilibrium binding assays. In addition, the isoelectric point of the photolabelled protein agrees with that determined in separate equilibrium isoelectric focusing studies. These results indicate that (/sup 125/I)T/sub 3/ can serve as a photoreactive probe for the thyroid hormone nuclear receptor, and they suggest that this receptor is a single polypeptide chain of molecular weight 47,000 with an isoelectric point of 6.2 +/- 0.5 pH units.

  16. SUMOylation Pathway in Trypanosoma cruzi: Functional Characterization and Proteomic Analysis of Target Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Bayona, Julio C.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Laverrière, Marc; Aguilar, Clemente; Sobreira, Tiago J. P.; Choi, Hyungwon; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.; Almeida, Igor C.; Cazzulo, Juan J.; Alvarez, Vanina E.

    2011-01-01

    SUMOylation is a relevant protein post-translational modification in eukaryotes. The C terminus of proteolytically activated small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is covalently linked to a lysine residue of the target protein by an isopeptide bond, through a mechanism that includes an E1-activating enzyme, an E2-conjugating enzyme, and transfer to the target, sometimes with the assistance of a ligase. The modification is reversed by a protease, also responsible for SUMO maturation. A number of proteins have been identified as SUMO targets, participating in the regulation of cell cycle progression, transcription, translation, ubiquitination, and DNA repair. In this study, we report that orthologous genes corresponding to the SUMOylation pathway are present in the etiological agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi. Furthermore, the SUMOylation system is functionally active in this protozoan parasite, having the requirements for SUMO maturation and conjugation. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that T. cruzi SUMO (TcSUMO) is predominantly found in the nucleus. To identify SUMOylation targets and get an insight into their physiological roles we generated transfectant T. cruzi epimastigote lines expressing a double-tagged T. cruzi SUMO, and SUMOylated proteins were enriched by tandem affinity chromatography. By two-dimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry a total of 236 proteins with diverse biological functions were identified as potential T. cruzi SUMO targets. Of these, metacaspase-3 was biochemically validated as a bona fide SUMOylation substrate. Proteomic studies in other organisms have reported that orthologs of putative T. cruzi SUMOylated proteins are similarly modified, indicating conserved functions for protein SUMOylation in this early divergent eukaryote. PMID:21832256

  17. HTLV-2B Tax oncoprotein is modified by ubiquitination and sumoylation and displays intracellular localization similar to its homologue HTLV-1 Tax

    SciTech Connect

    Turci, Marco; Lodewick, Julie; Righi, Paola; Polania, Angela; Romanelli, Maria Grazia; Bex, Francoise; Bertazzoni, Umberto

    2009-03-30

    HTLV-1 is more pathogenic than HTLV-2B. The difference is generally attributed to the properties of their individual transactivating Tax proteins. By using internal Flag-6His tagged Tax-1 and Tax-2B, which display transcriptional activities comparable to the untagged proteins and can be recognized by a single anti-Flag antibody, we demonstrate that Tax-2B is modified by ubiquitination and sumoylation. In addition, Tax2B is distributed in punctuate nuclear structures that include the RelA subunit of NF-{kappa}B, as has been previously demonstrated for Tax-1.

  18. Pharmacogenetics of the nuclear hormone receptors: the missing link between environment and drug effects?

    PubMed

    De Mattia, Elena; Dreussi, Eva; Cecchin, Erika; Toffoli, Giuseppe

    2013-12-01

    In the last decade, genetic variations in ABC/SLC transporters and phase I/II enzymes have raised pharmacogenetic markers as being predictive to the attention of researchers in the field of personalized medicine in oncology. However, it is becoming evident that the sequence variations in these genes cannot address by themselves the sharp interindividual variability in drug effects. Recently, nuclear receptors (NRs), including pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, retinoid X receptor, farnesoid X receptor, liver X receptor, vitamin D receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and HNF4A, have demonstrated key roles in regulating transporter and metabolic gene expression in response to xeno/endobiotics, as well as antineoplastic drugs. These findings attracted interest to the genetics of the NRs for their possible role in influencing the metabolism and pharmacological profiles of chemotherapeutics. In this review, we aim to summarize the most recent findings in the innovative field of NR pharmacogenetics and findings in how they could integrate with more traditional markers in order to improve drug treatment personalization.

  19. In vivo measurement of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors using nuclear imaging.

    PubMed

    Willenbrock, R; Lambert, R; Tremblay, J; Bavaria, G; Langlois, Y; Léveillé, J; Flanagan, R; Hamet, P

    1992-11-01

    We have successfully visualized atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) receptors in vivo using nuclear imaging. 123I-Labelled ANP, injected in green vervet monkeys, was rapidly bound to ANP receptors in the kidneys and lungs. That the observed uptake was receptor mediated was demonstrated with competition studies using simultaneous injection of unlabelled ANP 99-126. It was possible to distinguish between the ANP receptor subtypes by the use of selective antagonists. Thus coinjection of ANP 102-121-des[Gln, Ser, Gly, Leu, Gly] (C-ANP), an ANP analog that selectively binds to the ANP C-receptor, decreased uptake in the kidneys by 50% but increased relative uptake in the lungs and soft tissues. This method permits for the first time, the dynamic in vivo analysis of ANP receptors and their interaction with endogenous ligand. Differences and changes in local ANP receptor concentrations and occupancy could be detected. Since ANP receptor density and affinity are influenced by various physiological and pathological conditions, clinical and diagnostic applications seem possible.

  20. Research Resource: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Potential of Nuclear Receptor Expression in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yang; Lee, Woochang; Bookout, Angie L.; Girard, Luc; Raso, Gabriela; Behrens, Carmen; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Gadzar, Adi F.; Minna, John D.; Mangelsdorf, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death. Despite a number of studies that have provided prognostic biomarkers for lung cancer, a paucity of reliable markers and therapeutic targets exist to diagnose and treat this aggressive disease. In this study we investigated the potential of nuclear receptors (NRs), many of which are well-established drug targets, as therapeutic markers in lung cancer. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we analyzed the expression of the 48 members of the NR superfamily in a human panel of 55 normal and lung cancer cell lines. Unsupervised cluster analysis of the NR expression profile segregated normal from tumor cell lines and grouped lung cancers according to type (i.e. small vs. non-small cell lung cancers). Moreover, we found that