Science.gov

Sample records for sumoylated nuclear receptor

  1. Impaired SUMOylation of nuclear receptor LRH-1 promotes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Stein, Sokrates; Lemos, Vera; Xu, Pan; Demagny, Hadrien; Wang, Xu; Ryu, Dongryeol; Jimenez, Veronica; Bosch, Fatima; Lüscher, Thomas F; Oosterveer, Maaike H; Schoonjans, Kristina

    2017-02-01

    Hepatic steatosis is caused by metabolic imbalances that could be explained in part by an increase in de novo lipogenesis that results from increased sterol element binding protein 1 (SREBP-1) activity. The nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog 1 (LRH-1) is an important regulator of intermediary metabolism in the liver, but its role in regulating lipogenesis is not well understood. Here, we have assessed the contribution of LRH-1 SUMOylation to the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Mice expressing a SUMOylation-defective mutant of LRH-1 (LRH-1 K289R mice) developed NAFLD and early signs of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) when challenged with a lipogenic, high-fat, high-sucrose diet. Moreover, we observed that the LRH-1 K289R mutation induced the expression of oxysterol binding protein-like 3 (OSBPL3), enhanced SREBP-1 processing, and promoted de novo lipogenesis. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that ectopic expression of OSBPL3 facilitates SREBP-1 processing in WT mice, while silencing hepatic Osbpl3 reverses the lipogenic phenotype of LRH-1 K289R mice. These findings suggest that compromised SUMOylation of LRH-1 promotes the development of NAFLD under lipogenic conditions through regulation of OSBPL3.

  2. p53 SUMOylation promotes its nuclear export by facilitating its release from the nuclear export receptor CRM1.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Aleixo; Li, Dawei; Zhao, Lisa Y; Godsey, Adam; Liao, Daiqing

    2013-09-01

    Chromosomal region maintenance 1 (CRM1) mediates p53 nuclear export. Although p53 SUMOylation promotes its nuclear export, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we show that tethering of a small, ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) moiety to p53 markedly increases its cytoplasmic localization. SUMO attachment to p53 does not affect its oligomerization, suggesting that subunit dissociation required for exposing p53's nuclear export signal (NES) is unnecessary for p53 nuclear export. Surprisingly, SUMO-mediated p53 nuclear export depends on the SUMO-interacting motif (SIM)-binding pocket of SUMO-1. The CRM1 C-terminal domain lacking the NES-binding groove interacts with tetrameric p53, and the proper folding of the p53 core domain, rather than the presence of the N- or C-terminal tails, appears to be important for p53-CRM1 interaction. The CRM1 Huntington, EF3, a subunit of PP2A, and TOR1 9 (HEAT9) loop, which regulates GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran binding and cargo release, contains a prototypical SIM. Remarkably, disruption of this SIM in conjunction with a mutated SIM-binding groove of SUMO-1 markedly enhances the binding of CRM1 to p53-SUMO-1 and their accumulation in the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), as well as their persistent association in the cytoplasm. We propose that SUMOylation of a CRM1 cargo such as p53 at the NPCs unlocks the HEAT9 loop of CRM1 to facilitate the disassembly of the transporting complex and cargo release to the cytoplasm.

  3. Sumoylation and transcription regulation at nuclear pores.

    PubMed

    Texari, Lorane; Stutz, Françoise

    2015-03-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that besides promoters, enhancers, and epigenetic modifications, nuclear organization is another parameter contributing to optimal control of gene expression. Although differences between species exist, the influence of gene positioning on expression seems to be a conserved feature from yeast to Drosophila and mammals. The nuclear periphery is one of the nuclear compartments implicated in gene regulation. It consists of the nuclear envelope (NE) and the nuclear pore complexes (NPC), which have distinct roles in the control of gene expression. The NPC has recently been shown to tether proteins involved in the sumoylation pathway. Here, we will focus on the importance of gene positioning and NPC-linked sumoylation/desumoylation in transcription regulation. We will mainly discuss observations made in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model system and highlight potential parallels in metazoan species.

  4. Sumoylation of SAE2 C terminus regulates SAE nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Truong, Khue; Lee, Terry D; Li, Baozong; Chen, Yuan

    2012-12-14

    SUMOylation occurs predominantly in the nucleus, but non-nuclear proteins can also be SUMOylated. It is unclear how intracellular trafficking of the SUMOylation enzymes is regulated to catalyze SUMOylation in different cellular compartments. Here we report that the SAE2 subunit of human SUMO activation enzyme (SAE) underwent rapid nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and its nuclear accumulation depended on SUMO modification at the C terminus. The SUMOylation sites included three Lys residues on the bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and two Lys residues outside of but adjacent to the NLS, and their SUMOylation was catalyzed by Ubc9. Because SAE2 forms a tight heterodimer with SAE1 and it controls the trafficking of the heterodimer, this study has identified the mechanism used to localize SAE to the nucleus. Similar mechanisms are likely to exist for other proteins that depend on SUMOylation for nuclear localization.

  5. RSUME Enhances Glucocorticoid Receptor SUMOylation and Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Druker, Jimena; Liberman, Ana C.; Antunica-Noguerol, María; Gerez, Juan; Paez-Pereda, Marcelo; Rein, Theo; Iñiguez-Lluhí, Jorge A.; Holsboer, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity is modulated by posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and SUMOylation. The GR has three SUMOylation sites: lysine 297 (K297) and K313 in the N-terminal domain (NTD) and K721 within the ligand-binding domain. SUMOylation of the NTD sites mediates the negative effect of the synergy control motifs of GR on promoters with closely spaced GR binding sites. There is scarce evidence on the role of SUMO conjugation to K721 and its impact on GR transcriptional activity. We have previously shown that RSUME (RWD-containing SUMOylation enhancer) increases protein SUMOylation. We now demonstrate that RSUME interacts with the GR and increases its SUMOylation. RSUME regulates GR transcriptional activity and the expression of its endogenous target genes, FKBP51 and S100P. RSUME uncovers a positive role for the third SUMOylation site, K721, on GR-mediated transcription, demonstrating that GR SUMOylation acts positively in the presence of a SUMOylation enhancer. Both mutation of K721 and small interfering RNA-mediated RSUME knockdown diminish GRIP1 coactivator activity. RSUME, whose expression is induced under stress conditions, is a key factor in heat shock-induced GR SUMOylation. These results show that inhibitory and stimulatory SUMO sites are present in the GR and at higher SUMOylation levels the stimulatory one becomes dominant. PMID:23508108

  6. Dynamic SUMOylation is linked to the activity cycles of androgen receptor in the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Rytinki, Miia; Kaikkonen, Sanna; Sutinen, Päivi; Paakinaho, Ville; Rahkama, Vesa; Palvimo, Jorma J

    2012-10-01

    Despite of the progress in the molecular etiology of prostate cancer, the androgen receptor (AR) remains the major druggable target for the advanced disease. In addition to hormonal ligands, AR activity is regulated by posttranslational modifications. Here, we show that androgen induces SUMO-2 and SUMO-3 (SUMO-2/3) modification (SUMOylation) of the endogenous AR in prostate cancer cells, which is also reflected in the chromatin-bound receptor. Although only a small percentage of AR is SUMOylated at the steady state, AR SUMOylation sites have an impact on the receptor's stability, intranuclear mobility, and chromatin interactions and on expression of its target genes. Interestingly, short-term proteotoxic and cell stress, such as hyperthermia, that detaches the AR from the chromatin triggers accumulation of the SUMO-2/3-modified AR pool which concentrates into the nuclear matrix compartment. Alleviation of the stress allows rapid reversal of the SUMO-2/3 modifications and the AR to return to the chromatin. In sum, these results suggest that the androgen-induced SUMOylation is linked to the activity cycles of the holo-AR in the nucleus and chromatin binding, whereas the stress-induced SUMO-2/3 modifications sustain the solubility of the AR and protect it from proteotoxic insults in the nucleus.

  7. SUMOylation of ROR{alpha} potentiates transcriptional activation function

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Eun Ju; Lee, Ji Min; Jeong, Jiyeong; Park, Joo Hyeon; Yang, Young; Lim, Jong-Seok; Kim, Jung Hwa; Baek, Sung Hee; Kim, Keun Il

    2009-01-16

    SUMOylation regulates a variety of cellular processes, including control of transcriptional activities of nuclear receptors. Here, we present SUMOylation of orphan nuclear receptor, ROR{alpha} by both SUMO-1 and SUMO-2. SUMOylation of ROR{alpha} occurred on the 240th lysine residue at the hinge region of human protein. PIAS family members, PIASx{alpha}, PIAS3, and PIASy, increased SUMOylation of ROR{alpha}, whereas SENP2 specifically removed SUMO from ROR{alpha}. SUMOylation-defective mutant form of ROR{alpha} exhibited decreased transcriptional activity on ROR{alpha}-responsive promoters indicating that SUMOylation may positively regulate transcriptional function of ROR{alpha}.

  8. SUMOylation of the Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) Regulates the Expression of FXR Target Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramaniyan, Natarajan; Luo, Yuhuan; Sun, An-Qiang; Suchy, Frederick J.

    2013-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) belongs to a family of ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate many aspects of metabolism including bile acid homeostasis. Here we show that FXR is covalently modified by the small ubiquitin-like modifier (Sumo1), an important regulator of cell signaling and transcription. Well conserved consensus sites at lysine 122 and 275 in the AF-1 and ligand binding domains, respectively, of FXR were subject to SUMOylation in vitro and in vivo. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis showed that Sumo1 was recruited to the bile salt export pump (BSEP), the small heterodimer partner (SHP), and the OSTα-OSTβ organic solute transporter loci in a ligand-dependent fashion. Sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-ReChIP) verified the concurrent binding of FXR and Sumo1 to the BSEP and SHP promoters. Overexpression of Sumo1 markedly decreased binding and/or recruitment of FXR to the BSEP and SHP promoters on ChIP-ReChIP. SUMOylation did not have an apparent effect on nuclear localization of FXR. Expression of Sumo1 markedly inhibited the ligand-dependent, transactivation of BSEP and SHP promoters by FXR/retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) in HepG2 cells. In contrast, mutations that abolished SUMOylation of FXR or siRNA knockdown of Sumo1 expression augmented the transactivation of BSEP and SHP promoters by FXR. Pathways for SUMOylation were significantly altered during obstructive cholestasis with differential Sumo1 recruitment to the promoters of FXR target genes. In conclusion, FXR is subject to SUMOylation that regulates its capacity to transactivate its target genes in normal liver and during obstructive cholestasis. PMID:23546875

  9. Kainate receptor activation induces glycine receptor endocytosis through PKC deSUMOylation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hao; Lu, Li; Zuo, Yong; Wang, Yan; Jiao, Yingfu; Zeng, Wei-Zheng; Huang, Chao; Zhu, Michael X.; Zamponi, Gerald W.; Zhou, Tong; Xu, Tian-Le; Cheng, Jinke; Li, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Surface expression and regulated endocytosis of glycine receptors (GlyRs) play a critical function in balancing neuronal excitability. SUMOylation (SUMO modification) is of critical importance for maintaining neuronal function in the central nervous system. Here we show that activation of kainate receptors (KARs) causes GlyR endocytosis in a calcium- and protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent manner, leading to reduced GlyR-mediated synaptic activity in cultured spinal cord neurons and the superficial dorsal horn of rat spinal cord slices. This effect requires SUMO1/sentrin-specific peptidase 1 (SENP1)-mediated deSUMOylation of PKC, indicating that the crosstalk between KARs and GlyRs relies on the SUMOylation status of PKC. SENP1-mediated deSUMOylation of PKC is involved in the kainate-induced GlyR endocytosis and thus plays an important role in the anti-homeostatic regulation between excitatory and inhibitory ligand-gated ion channels. Altogether, we have identified a SUMOylation-dependent regulatory pathway for GlyR endocytosis, which may have important physiological implications for proper neuronal excitability. PMID:25236484

  10. Sumoylation of TCF21 downregulates the transcriptional activity of estrogen receptor-alpha

    PubMed Central

    Ao, Xiang; Li, Shujing; Xu, Zhaowei; Yang, Yangyang; Chen, Min; Jiang, Xiao; Wu, Huijian

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant estrogen receptor-α (ERα) signaling is recognized as a major contributor to the development of breast cancer. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of ERα in breast cancer is still inconclusive. In this study, we showed that the transcription factor 21 (TCF21) interacted with ERα, and repressed its transcriptional activity in a HDACs-dependent manner. We also showed that TCF21 could be sumoylated by the small ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO1, and this modification could be reversed by SENP1. Sumoylation of TCF21 occurred at lysine residue 24 (K24). Substitution of K24 with arginine resulted in complete abolishment of sumoylation. Sumoylation stabilized TCF21, but did not affect its subcellular localization. Sumoylation of TCF21 also enhanced its interaction with HDAC1/2 without affecting its interaction with ERα. Moreover, sumoylation of TCF21 promoted its repression of ERα transcriptional activity, and increased the recruitment of HDAC1/2 to the pS2 promoter. Consistent with these observations, sumoylation of TCF21 could inhibit the growth of ERα-positive breast cancer cells and decreased the proportion of S-phase cells in the cell cycle. These findings suggested that TCF21 might act as a negative regulator of ERα, and its sumoylation inhibited the transcriptional activity of ERα through promoting the recruitment of HDAC1/2. PMID:27028856

  11. Oxidative stress–induced assembly of PML nuclear bodies controls sumoylation of partner proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Umut; Ferhi, Omar; Jeanne, Marion; Benhenda, Shirine; Berthier, Caroline; Jollivet, Florence; Niwa-Kawakita, Michiko; Faklaris, Orestis; Setterblad, Niclas; Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein organizes PML nuclear bodies (NBs), which are stress-responsive domains where many partner proteins accumulate. Here, we clarify the basis for NB formation and identify stress-induced partner sumoylation as the primary NB function. NB nucleation does not rely primarily on intermolecular interactions between the PML SUMO-interacting motif (SIM) and SUMO, but instead results from oxidation-mediated PML multimerization. Oxidized PML spherical meshes recruit UBC9, which enhances PML sumoylation, allow partner recruitment through SIM interactions, and ultimately enhance partner sumoylation. Intermolecular SUMO–SIM interactions then enforce partner sequestration within the NB inner core. Accordingly, oxidative stress enhances NB formation and global sumoylation in vivo. Some NB-associated sumoylated partners also become polyubiquitinated by RNF4, precipitating their proteasomal degradation. As several partners are protein-modifying enzymes, NBs could act as sensors that facilitate and confer oxidative stress sensitivity not only to sumoylation but also to other post-translational modifications, thereby explaining alterations of stress response upon PML or NB loss. PMID:24637324

  12. Nuclear localization of Rad52 is pre-requisite for its sumoylation

    SciTech Connect

    Ohuchi, Takashi; Seki, Masayuki Enomoto, Takemi

    2008-07-18

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rad52 plays major roles in several types of homologous recombination. Here, we found that rad52-K200R mutation greatly reduced sumoylation of Rad52. The rad52-K200R mutant exhibited defects in various types of recombination, such as intrachromosomal recombination and mating-type switching. The K200 residue of Rad52 is part of the nuclear localization signal (NLS), which is important for transport into the nucleus. Indeed, the addition of a SV40 NLS to Rad52-K200R suppressed the sumoylation defect of Rad52-K200R. These findings indicate that nuclear localization of Rad52 is pre-requisite for its sumoylation.

  13. DNA Damage-induced Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein K SUMOylation Regulates p53 Transcriptional Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Pelisch, Federico; Pozzi, Berta; Risso, Guillermo; Muñoz, Manuel Javier; Srebrow, Anabella

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that is a key player in the p53-triggered DNA damage response, acting as a cofactor for p53 in response to DNA damage. hnRNP K is a substrate of the ubiquitin E3 ligase MDM2 and, upon DNA damage, is de-ubiquitylated. In sharp contrast with the role and consequences of the other post-translational modifications, nothing is known about the role of SUMO conjugation to hnRNP K in p53 transcriptional co-activation. In the present work, we show that hnRNP K is modified by SUMO in lysine 422 within its KH3 domain, and sumoylation is regulated by the E3 ligase Pc2/CBX4. Most interestingly, DNA damage stimulates hnRNP K sumoylation through Pc2 E3 activity, and this modification is required for p53 transcriptional activation. Abrogation of hnRNP K sumoylation leads to an aberrant regulation of the p53 target gene p21. Our findings link the DNA damage-induced Pc2 activation to the p53 transcriptional co-activation through hnRNP K sumoylation. PMID:22825850

  14. In situ SUMOylation analysis reveals a modulatory role of RanBP2 in the nuclear rim and PML bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, Noriko . E-mail: hisa@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Uchimura, Yasuhiro; Tachibana, Taro; Sugahara, Satoko; Saitoh, Hisato; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi . E-mail: mnakao@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp

    2006-05-01

    SUMO modification plays a critical role in a number of cellular functions including nucleocytoplasmic transport, gene expression, cell cycle and formation of subnuclear structures such as promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies. In order to identify the sites where SUMOylation takes place in the cell, we developed an in situ SUMOylation assay using a semi-intact cell system and subsequently combined it with siRNA-based knockdown of nucleoporin RanBP2, also known as Nup358, which is one of the known SUMO E3 proteins. With the in situ SUMOylation assay, we found that both nuclear rim and PML bodies, besides mitotic apparatuses, are major targets for active SUMOylation. The ability to analyze possible SUMO conjugation sites would be a valuable tool to investigate where SUMO E3-like activities and/or SUMO substrates exist in the cell. Specific knockdown of RanBP2 completely abolished SUMOylation along the nuclear rim and dislocated RanGAP1 from the nuclear pore complexes. Interestingly, the loss of RanBP2 markedly reduced the number of PML bodies, in contrast to other, normal-appearing nuclear compartments including the nuclear lamina, nucleolus and chromatin, suggesting a novel link between RanBP2 and PML bodies. SUMOylation facilitated by RanBP2 at the nuclear rim may be a key step for the formation of a particular subnuclear organization. Our data imply that SUMO E3 proteins like RanBP2 facilitate spatio-temporal SUMOylation for certain nuclear structure and function.

  15. Sumoylation of Smad3 stimulates its nuclear export during PIASy-mediated suppression of TGF-{beta} signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Imoto, Seiyu; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Ikeda, Osamu; Kamitani, Shinya; Muromoto, Ryuta; Sekine, Yuichi; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2008-05-30

    Sma- and MAD-related protein 3 (Smad3) plays crucial roles in the transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta})-mediated signaling pathway, which produce a variety of cellular responses, including cell proliferation and differentiation. In our previous study, we demonstrated that protein inhibitor of activated STATy (PIASy) suppresses TGF-{beta} signaling by interacting with and sumoylating Smad3. In the present study, we examined the molecular mechanisms of Smad3 sumoylation during PIASy-mediated suppression of TGF-{beta} signaling. We found that small-interfering RNA-mediated reduction of endogenous PIASy expression enhanced TGF-{beta}-induced gene expression. Importantly, coexpression of Smad3 with PIASy and SUMO1 affected the DNA-binding activity of Smad3. Furthermore, coexpression of Smad3 with PIASy and SUMO1 stimulated the nuclear export of Smad3. Finally, fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses revealed that Smad3 interacted with SUMO1 in the cytoplasm. These results suggest that PIASy regulates TGF-{beta}/Smad3-mediated signaling by stimulating sumoylation and nuclear export of Smad3.

  16. SUMOylation regulates the nuclear mobility of CREB binding protein and its association with nuclear bodies in live cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Colm M.; Kindle, Karin B.; Collins, Hilary M.; Heery, David M.

    2010-01-01

    The lysine acetyltransferase CREB binding protein (CBP) is required for chromatin modification and transcription at many gene promoters. In fixed cells, a large proportion of CBP colocalises to PML or nuclear bodies. Using live cell imaging, we show here that YFP-tagged CBP expressed in HEK293 cells undergoes gradual accumulation in nuclear bodies, some of which are mobile and migrate towards the nuclear envelope. Deletion of a short lysine-rich domain that contains the major SUMO acceptor sites of CBP abrogated its ability to be SUMO modified, and prevented its association with endogenous SUMO-1/PML speckles in vivo. This SUMO-defective CBP showed enhanced ability to co-activate AML1-mediated transcription. Deletion mapping revealed that the SUMO-modified region was not sufficient for targeting CBP to PML bodies, as C-terminally truncated mutants containing this domain showed a strong reduction in accumulation at PML bodies. Fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP) experiments revealed that YFP-CBP{Delta}998-1087 had a retarded recovery time in the nucleus, as compared to YFP-CBP. These results indicate that SUMOylation regulates CBP function by influencing its shuttling between nuclear bodies and chromatin microenvironments.

  17. Co-repressor activity of scaffold attachment factor B1 requires sumoylation

    SciTech Connect

    Garee, Jason P.; Meyer, Rene; Oesterreich, Steffi

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} SAFB1 is sumoylated to two lysine residues K231 and K294. {yields} SAFB1 sumoylation is regulated by PIAS1 and SENP1. {yields} Sumoylation of SAFB1 regulates its transcriptional repressor activity. {yields} Mutation of sumoylation sites leads to decreased SAFB1 binding to HDAC3. -- Abstract: Sumoylation is an emerging modification associated with a variety of cellular processes including the regulation of transcriptional activities of nuclear receptors and their coregulators. As SUMO modifications are often associated with transcriptional repression, we examined if sumoylation was involved in modulation of the transcriptional repressive activity of scaffold attachment factor B1. Here we show that SAFB1 is modified by both the SUMO1 and SUMO2/3 family of proteins, on lysine's K231 and K294. Further, we demonstrate that SAFB1 can interact with PIAS1, a SUMO E3 ligase which mediates SAFB1 sumoylation. Additionally, SENP1 was identified as the enzyme desumoylating SAFB1. Mutation of the SAFB1 sumoylation sites lead to a loss of transcriptional repression, at least in part due to decreased interaction with HDAC3, a known transcriptional repressor and SAFB1 binding partner. In summary, the transcriptional repressor SAFB1 is modified by both SUMO1 and SUMO2/3, and this modification is necessary for its full repressive activity.

  18. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3) protein promotes SUMOylation and nuclear sequestration of the intracellular domain of ErbB4 protein.

    PubMed

    Sundvall, Maria; Korhonen, Anna; Vaparanta, Katri; Anckar, Julius; Halkilahti, Kalle; Salah, Zaidoun; Aqeilan, Rami I; Palvimo, Jorma J; Sistonen, Lea; Elenius, Klaus

    2012-06-29

    ErbB4 is a receptor tyrosine kinase implicated in the development and homeostasis of the heart, central nervous system, and mammary gland. Cleavable isoforms of ErbB4 release a soluble intracellular domain (ICD) that can translocate to the nucleus and function as a transcriptional coregulator. In search of regulatory mechanisms of ErbB4 ICD function, we identified PIAS3 as a novel interaction partner of ErbB4 ICD. In keeping with the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) E3 ligase function of protein inhibitor of activated STAT (PIAS) proteins, we showed that the ErbB4 ICD is modified by SUMO, and that PIAS3 stimulates the SUMOylation. Upon overexpression of PIAS3, the ErbB4 ICD generated from the full-length receptor accumulated into the nucleus in a manner that was dependent on the functional nuclear localization signal of ErbB4. In the nucleus, ErbB4 colocalized with PIAS3 and SUMO-1 in promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies, nuclear domains involved in regulation of transcription. Accordingly, PIAS3 overexpression had an effect on the transcriptional coregulatory activity of ErbB4, repressing its ability to coactivate transcription with Yes-associated protein. Finally, knockdown of PIAS3 with siRNA partially rescued the inhibitory effect of the ErbB4 ICD on differentiation of MDA-MB-468 breast cancer and HC11 mammary epithelial cells. Our findings illustrate that PIAS3 is a novel regulator of ErbB4 receptor tyrosine kinase, controlling its nuclear sequestration and function.

  19. Protein Inhibitor of Activated STAT3 (PIAS3) Protein Promotes SUMOylation and Nuclear Sequestration of the Intracellular Domain of ErbB4 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Sundvall, Maria; Korhonen, Anna; Vaparanta, Katri; Anckar, Julius; Halkilahti, Kalle; Salah, Zaidoun; Aqeilan, Rami I.; Palvimo, Jorma J.; Sistonen, Lea; Elenius, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    ErbB4 is a receptor tyrosine kinase implicated in the development and homeostasis of the heart, central nervous system, and mammary gland. Cleavable isoforms of ErbB4 release a soluble intracellular domain (ICD) that can translocate to the nucleus and function as a transcriptional coregulator. In search of regulatory mechanisms of ErbB4 ICD function, we identified PIAS3 as a novel interaction partner of ErbB4 ICD. In keeping with the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) E3 ligase function of protein inhibitor of activated STAT (PIAS) proteins, we showed that the ErbB4 ICD is modified by SUMO, and that PIAS3 stimulates the SUMOylation. Upon overexpression of PIAS3, the ErbB4 ICD generated from the full-length receptor accumulated into the nucleus in a manner that was dependent on the functional nuclear localization signal of ErbB4. In the nucleus, ErbB4 colocalized with PIAS3 and SUMO-1 in promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies, nuclear domains involved in regulation of transcription. Accordingly, PIAS3 overexpression had an effect on the transcriptional coregulatory activity of ErbB4, repressing its ability to coactivate transcription with Yes-associated protein. Finally, knockdown of PIAS3 with siRNA partially rescued the inhibitory effect of the ErbB4 ICD on differentiation of MDA-MB-468 breast cancer and HC11 mammary epithelial cells. Our findings illustrate that PIAS3 is a novel regulator of ErbB4 receptor tyrosine kinase, controlling its nuclear sequestration and function. PMID:22584572

  20. PolySUMOylation by Siz2 and Mms21 triggers relocation of DNA breaks to nuclear pores through the Slx5/Slx8 STUbL.

    PubMed

    Horigome, Chihiro; Bustard, Denise E; Marcomini, Isabella; Delgoshaie, Neda; Tsai-Pflugfelder, Monika; Cobb, Jennifer A; Gasser, Susan M

    2016-04-15

    High-resolution imaging shows that persistent DNA damage in budding yeast localizes in distinct perinuclear foci for repair. The signals that trigger DNA double-strand break (DSB) relocation or determine their destination are unknown. We show here that DSB relocation to the nuclear envelope depends on SUMOylation mediated by the E3 ligases Siz2 and Mms21. In G1, a polySUMOylation signal deposited coordinately by Mms21 and Siz2 recruits the SUMO targeted ubiquitin ligase Slx5/Slx8 to persistent breaks. Both Slx5 and Slx8 are necessary for damage relocation to nuclear pores. When targeted to an undamaged locus, however, Slx5 alone can mediate relocation in G1-phase cells, bypassing the requirement for polySUMOylation. In contrast, in S-phase cells, monoSUMOylation mediated by the Rtt107-stabilized SMC5/6-Mms21 E3 complex drives DSBs to the SUN domain protein Mps3 in a manner independent of Slx5. Slx5/Slx8 and binding to pores favor repair by ectopic break-induced replication and imprecise end-joining.

  1. PolySUMOylation by Siz2 and Mms21 triggers relocation of DNA breaks to nuclear pores through the Slx5/Slx8 STUbL

    PubMed Central

    Horigome, Chihiro; Bustard, Denise E.; Marcomini, Isabella; Delgoshaie, Neda; Tsai-Pflugfelder, Monika; Cobb, Jennifer A.; Gasser, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution imaging shows that persistent DNA damage in budding yeast localizes in distinct perinuclear foci for repair. The signals that trigger DNA double-strand break (DSB) relocation or determine their destination are unknown. We show here that DSB relocation to the nuclear envelope depends on SUMOylation mediated by the E3 ligases Siz2 and Mms21. In G1, a polySUMOylation signal deposited coordinately by Mms21 and Siz2 recruits the SUMO targeted ubiquitin ligase Slx5/Slx8 to persistent breaks. Both Slx5 and Slx8 are necessary for damage relocation to nuclear pores. When targeted to an undamaged locus, however, Slx5 alone can mediate relocation in G1-phase cells, bypassing the requirement for polySUMOylation. In contrast, in S-phase cells, monoSUMOylation mediated by the Rtt107-stabilized SMC5/6–Mms21 E3 complex drives DSBs to the SUN domain protein Mps3 in a manner independent of Slx5. Slx5/Slx8 and binding to pores favor repair by ectopic break-induced replication and imprecise end-joining. PMID:27056668

  2. THE TRANSITION OF THE 37-kDa LAMININ RECEPTOR (RPSA) TO HIGHER MOLECULAR WEIGHT SPECIES: SUMOylation OR ARTIFACT?

    PubMed Central

    DIGIACOMO, VINCENT; GANDO, IVAN A.; VENTICINQUE, LISA; HURTADO, ALICIA; MERUELO, DANIEL

    2017-01-01

    The 37-kDa laminin receptor (37LRP or RPSA) is a remarkable, multifaceted protein that functions in processes ranging from matrix adhesion to ribosome biogenesis. Its ability to engage extracellular laminin is further thought to contribute to cellular migration and invasion. Most commonly associated with metastatic cancer, RPSA is also increasingly found to be important in other pathologies, including microbial infection, neurodegenerative disease and developmental malformations. Importantly, it is thought to have higher molecular weight forms, including a 67-kDa species (67LR), the expression of which is linked to strong laminin binding and metastatic behavior. The composition of these larger forms has remained elusive and controversial. Homo- and heterodimerization have been proposed as events capable of building the larger species from the monomeric 37-kDa precursor, but solid evidence is lacking. Here, we present data suggesting that higher molecular weight species require SUMOylation to form. We also comment on the difficulty of isolating larger RPSA species for unambiguous identification and demonstrate that cell lines stably expressing tagged RPSA for long periods of time fail to produce tagged higher molecular weight RPSA. It is possible that higher molecular weight species like 67LR are not derived from RPSA. PMID:26146125

  3. Sumoylated NHR-25/NR5A Regulates Cell Fate during C. elegans Vulval Development

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Teresita; Ashrafi, Kaveh; Asahina, Masako; Yamamoto, Keith R.

    2013-01-01

    Individual metazoan transcription factors (TFs) regulate distinct sets of genes depending on cell type and developmental or physiological context. The precise mechanisms by which regulatory information from ligands, genomic sequence elements, co-factors, and post-translational modifications are integrated by TFs remain challenging questions. Here, we examine how a single regulatory input, sumoylation, differentially modulates the activity of a conserved C. elegans nuclear hormone receptor, NHR-25, in different cell types. Through a combination of yeast two-hybrid analysis and in vitro biochemistry we identified the single C. elegans SUMO (SMO-1) as an NHR-25 interacting protein, and showed that NHR-25 is sumoylated on at least four lysines. Some of the sumoylation acceptor sites are in common with those of the NHR-25 mammalian orthologs SF-1 and LRH-1, demonstrating that sumoylation has been strongly conserved within the NR5A family. We showed that NHR-25 bound canonical SF-1 binding sequences to regulate transcription, and that NHR-25 activity was enhanced in vivo upon loss of sumoylation. Knockdown of smo-1 mimicked NHR-25 overexpression with respect to maintenance of the 3° cell fate in vulval precursor cells (VPCs) during development. Importantly, however, overexpression of unsumoylatable alleles of NHR-25 revealed that NHR-25 sumoylation is critical for maintaining 3° cell fate. Moreover, SUMO also conferred formation of a developmental time-dependent NHR-25 concentration gradient across the VPCs. That is, accumulation of GFP-tagged NHR-25 was uniform across VPCs at the beginning of development, but as cells began dividing, a smo-1-dependent NHR-25 gradient formed with highest levels in 1° fated VPCs, intermediate levels in 2° fated VPCs, and low levels in 3° fated VPCs. We conclude that sumoylation operates at multiple levels to affect NHR-25 activity in a highly coordinated spatial and temporal manner. PMID:24348269

  4. Uncovering Global SUMOylation Signaling Networks in a Site-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Hendriks, Ivo A.; D’Souza, Rochelle C.J.; Yang, Bing; Verlaan-de Vries, Matty; Mann, Matthias; Vertegaal, Alfred C.O.

    2014-01-01

    SUMOylation is a reversible post-translational modification essential for genome stability. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry, we have studied global SUMOylation in human cells and in a site-specific manner, identifying a total of over 4,300 SUMOylation sites in over 1,600 proteins. Moreover, for the first time in excess of 1,000 SUMOylation sites were identified under standard growth conditions. SUMOylation dynamics were quantitatively studied in response to SUMO protease inhibition, proteasome inhibition and heat shock. A considerable amount of SUMOylated lysines have previously been reported to be ubiquitylated, acetylated or methylated, indicating crosstalk between SUMO and other post-translational modifications. We identified 70 phosphorylation and 4 acetylation events in close proximity to SUMOylation sites, and provide evidence for acetylation-dependent SUMOylation of endogenous histone H3. SUMOylation regulates target proteins involved in all nuclear processes including transcription, DNA repair, chromatin remodeling, pre-mRNA splicing and ribosome assembly. PMID:25218447

  5. Historical overview of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Jan-Ake

    2016-03-01

    This review summarizes the birth of the field of nuclear receptors, from Jensen's discovery of estrogen receptor alpha, Gustafsson's discovery of the three-domain structure of the glucocorticoid receptor, the discovery of the glucocorticoid response element and the first partial cloning of the glucocorticoid receptor. Furthermore the discovery of the novel receptors called orphan receptors is described.

  6. Neuronal SUMOylation: Mechanisms, Physiology, and Roles in Neuronal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Henley, Jeremy M.; Craig, Tim J.; Wilkinson, Kevin A.

    2014-01-01

    Protein SUMOylation is a critically important posttranslational protein modification that participates in nearly all aspects of cellular physiology. In the nearly 20 years since its discovery, SUMOylation has emerged as a major regulator of nuclear function, and more recently, it has become clear that SUMOylation has key roles in the regulation of protein trafficking and function outside of the nucleus. In neurons, SUMOylation participates in cellular processes ranging from neuronal differentiation and control of synapse formation to regulation of synaptic transmission and cell survival. It is a highly dynamic and usually transient modification that enhances or hinders interactions between proteins, and its consequences are extremely diverse. Hundreds of different proteins are SUMO substrates, and dysfunction of protein SUMOylation is implicated in a many different diseases. Here we briefly outline core aspects of the SUMO system and provide a detailed overview of the current understanding of the roles of SUMOylation in healthy and diseased neurons. PMID:25287864

  7. The in vivo role of androgen receptor SUMOylation as revealed by androgen insensitivity syndrome and prostate cancer mutations targeting the proline/glycine residues of synergy control motifs.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sarmistha; Cruz-Rodríguez, Osvaldo; Bolton, Eric; Iñiguez-Lluhí, Jorge A

    2012-09-07

    The androgen receptor (AR) mediates the effects of male sexual hormones on development and physiology. Alterations in AR function are central to reproductive disorders, prostate cancer, and Kennedy disease. AR activity is influenced by post-translational modifications, but their role in AR-based diseases is poorly understood. Conjugation by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteins at two synergy control (SC) motifs in AR exerts a promoter context-dependent inhibitory role. SC motifs are composed of a four-amino acid core that is often preceded and/or followed by nearby proline or glycine residues. The function of these flanking residues, however, has not been examined directly. Remarkably, several AR mutations associated with oligospermia and androgen insensitivity syndrome map to Pro-390, the conserved proline downstream of the first SC motif in AR. Similarly, mutations at Gly-524, downstream of the second SC motif, were recovered in recurrent prostate cancer samples. We now provide evidence that these clinically isolated substitutions lead to a partial loss of SC motif function and AR SUMOylation that affects multiple endogenous genes. Consistent with a structural role as terminators of secondary structure elements, substitution of Pro-390 by Gly fully supports both SC motif function and SUMOylation. As predicted from the functional properties of SC motifs, the clinically isolated mutations preferentially enhance transcription driven by genomic regions harboring multiple AR binding sites. The data support the view that alterations in AR SUMOylation play significant roles in AR-based diseases and offer novel SUMO-based therapeutic opportunities.

  8. A gene-expression screen identifies a non-toxic sumoylation inhibitor that mimics SUMO-less human LRH-1 in liver

    PubMed Central

    Suzawa, Miyuki; Miranda, Diego A; Ramos, Karmela A; Ang, Kenny K-H; Faivre, Emily J; Wilson, Christopher G; Caboni, Laura; Arkin, Michelle R; Kim, Yeong-Sang; Fletterick, Robert J; Diaz, Aaron; Schneekloth, John S; Ingraham, Holly A

    2015-01-01

    SUMO-modification of nuclear proteins has profound effects on gene expression. However, non-toxic chemical tools that modulate sumoylation in cells are lacking. Here, to identify small molecule sumoylation inhibitors we developed a cell-based screen that focused on the well-sumoylated substrate, human Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (hLRH-1, NR5A2). Our primary gene-expression screen assayed two SUMO-sensitive transcripts, APOC3 and MUC1, that are upregulated by SUMO-less hLRH-1 or by siUBC9 knockdown, respectively. A polyphenol, tannic acid (TA) emerged as a potent sumoylation inhibitor in vitro (IC50 = 12.8 µM) and in cells. TA also increased hLRH-1 occupancy on SUMO-sensitive transcripts. Most significantly, when tested in humanized mouse primary hepatocytes, TA inhibits hLRH-1 sumoylation and induces SUMO-sensitive genes, thereby recapitulating the effects of expressing SUMO-less hLRH-1 in mouse liver. Our findings underscore the benefits of phenotypic screening for targeting post-translational modifications, and illustrate the potential utility of TA for probing the cellular consequences of sumoylation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09003.001 PMID:26653140

  9. Adenovirus Early Proteins and Host Sumoylation

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sook-Young

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human adenovirus genome is transported into the nucleus, where viral gene transcription, viral DNA replication, and virion assembly take place. Posttranslational modifications by small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) are implicated in the regulation of diverse cellular processes, particularly nuclear events. It is not surprising, therefore, that adenovirus modulates and utilizes the host sumoylation system. Adenovirus early proteins play an important role in establishing optimal host environments for virus replication within infected cells by stimulating the cell cycle and counteracting host antiviral defenses. Here, we review findings on the mechanisms and functional consequences of the interplay between human adenovirus early proteins and the host sumoylation system. PMID:27651358

  10. Nuclear hormone receptors in podocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are a family of ligand-activated, DNA sequence-specific transcription factors that regulate various aspects of animal development, cell proliferation, differentiation, and homeostasis. The physiological roles of nuclear receptors and their ligands have been intensively studied in cancer and metabolic syndrome. However, their role in kidney diseases is still evolving, despite their ligands being used clinically to treat renal diseases for decades. This review will discuss the progress of our understanding of the role of nuclear receptors and their ligands in kidney physiology with emphasis on their roles in treating glomerular disorders and podocyte injury repair responses. PMID:22995171

  11. [Extranuclear functions of protein sumoylation in the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Martin, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    Post-translational protein modifications play essential roles in many aspects of cellular functions and therefore in the maintenance of cell integrity. These protein modifications are involved at all stages of neuronal communication within the central nervous system. Sumoylation is a reversible post-translational protein modification that consists in the covalent labelling of a small protein called SUMO to lysine residues of selected target proteins. Sumoylation is a well characterized regulator of nuclear functions and has recently emerged as a key factor for numerous extranuclear processes. Furthermore, sumoylation has recently been shown to modulate synaptic transmission and is also implicated in a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Nuclear hormone receptors in chordates.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Stéphanie; Belgacem, Mohamed R; Escriva, Hector

    2011-03-01

    In order to understand evolution of the endocrine systems in chordates, study of the evolution of the nuclear receptors (NRs), which mediate the cellular responses to several key hormones, is of major interest. Thanks to the sequencing of several complete genomes of different species in the three chordate phyla, we now have a global view of the evolution of the nuclear receptors gene content in this lineage. The challenge is now to understand how the function of the different receptors evolved during the invertebrate-chordate to vertebrate transition by studying the functional properties of the NRs using comparative approaches in different species. The best available model system to answer this question is the cephalochordate amphioxus which has a NR gene complement close to that of the chordate ancestor. Here we review the available data concerning the function of the amphioxus NRs, and we discuss some evolutionary scenarios that can be drawn from these results.

  13. Uncovering the SUMOylation and ubiquitylation crosstalk in human cells using sequential peptide immunopurification

    PubMed Central

    Lamoliatte, Frédéric; McManus, Francis P.; Maarifi, Ghizlane; Chelbi-Alix, Mounira K.; Thibault, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Crosstalk between the SUMO and ubiquitin pathways has recently been reported. However, no approach currently exists to determine the interrelationship between these modifications. Here, we report an optimized immunoaffinity method that permits the study of both protein ubiquitylation and SUMOylation from a single sample. This method enables the unprecedented identification of 10,388 SUMO sites in HEK293 cells. The sequential use of SUMO and ubiquitin remnant immunoaffinity purification facilitates the dynamic profiling of SUMOylated and ubiquitylated proteins in HEK293 cells treated with the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Quantitative proteomic analyses reveals crosstalk between substrates that control protein degradation, and highlights co-regulation of SUMOylation and ubiquitylation levels on deubiquitinase enzymes and the SUMOylation of proteasome subunits. The SUMOylation of the proteasome affects its recruitment to promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) nuclear bodies, and PML lacking the SUMO interacting motif fails to colocalize with SUMOylated proteasome further demonstrating that this motif is required for PML catabolism. PMID:28098164

  14. The estrogen receptor alpha nuclear localization sequence is critical for fulvestrant-induced degradation of the receptor.

    PubMed

    Casa, Angelo J; Hochbaum, Daniel; Sreekumar, Sreeja; Oesterreich, Steffi; Lee, Adrian V

    2015-11-05

    Fulvestrant, a selective estrogen receptor down-regulator (SERD) is a pure competitive antagonist of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). Fulvestrant binds ERα and reduces the receptor's half-life by increasing protein turnover, however, its mechanism of action is not fully understood. In this study, we show that removal of the ERα nuclear localization sequence (ERΔNLS) resulted in a predominantly cytoplasmic ERα that was degraded in response to 17-β-estradiol (E2) but was resistant to degradation by fulvestrant. ERΔNLS bound the ligands and exhibited receptor interaction similar to ERα, indicating that the lack of degradation was not due to disruption of these processes. Forcing ERΔNLS into the nucleus with a heterologous SV40-NLS did not restore degradation, suggesting that the NLS domain itself, and not merely receptor localization, is critical for fulvestrant-induced ERα degradation. Indeed, cloning of the endogenous ERα NLS onto the N-terminus of ERΔNLS significantly restored both its nuclear localization and turnover in response to fulvestrant. Moreover, mutation of the sumoylation targets K266 and K268 within the NLS impaired fulvestrant-induced ERα degradation. In conclusion, our study provides evidence for the unique role of the ERα NLS in fulvestrant-induced degradation of the receptor.

  15. Targeting nuclear receptors with marine natural products.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunyan; Li, Qianrong; Li, Yong

    2014-01-27

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are important pharmaceutical targets because they are key regulators of many metabolic and inflammatory diseases, including diabetes, dyslipidemia, cirrhosis, and fibrosis. As ligands play a pivotal role in modulating nuclear receptor activity, the discovery of novel ligands for nuclear receptors represents an interesting and promising therapeutic approach. The search for novel NR agonists and antagonists with enhanced selectivities prompted the exploration of the extraordinary chemical diversity associated with natural products. Recent studies involving nuclear receptors have disclosed a number of natural products as nuclear receptor ligands, serving to re-emphasize the translational possibilities of natural products in drug discovery. In this review, the natural ligands of nuclear receptors will be described with an emphasis on their mechanisms of action and their therapeutic potentials, as well as on strategies to determine potential marine natural products as nuclear receptor modulators.

  16. Nuclear Receptors, RXR, and the Big Bang.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ronald M; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2014-03-27

    Isolation of genes encoding the receptors for steroids, retinoids, vitamin D, and thyroid hormone and their structural and functional analysis revealed an evolutionarily conserved template for nuclear hormone receptors. This discovery sparked identification of numerous genes encoding related proteins, termed orphan receptors. Characterization of these orphan receptors and, in particular, of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) positioned nuclear receptors at the epicenter of the "Big Bang" of molecular endocrinology. This Review provides a personal perspective on nuclear receptors and explores their integrated and coordinated signaling networks that are essential for multicellular life, highlighting the RXR heterodimer and its associated ligands and transcriptional mechanism.

  17. Nuclear Receptors, RXR & the Big Bang

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Ronald M.; Mangelsdorf, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Isolation of genes encoding the receptors for steroids, retinoids, vitamin D and thyroid hormone, and their structural and functional analysis revealed an evolutionarily conserved template for nuclear hormone receptors. This discovery sparked identification of numerous genes encoding related proteins, termed orphan receptors. Characterization of these orphan receptors, and in particular of the retinoid X receptor (RXR), positioned nuclear receptors at the epicenter of the “Big Bang” of molecular endocrinology. This review provides a personal perspective on nuclear receptors and explores their integrated and coordinated signaling networks that are essential for multi-cellular life, highlighting the RXR heterodimer and its associated ligands and transcriptional mechanism. PMID:24679540

  18. Nuclear receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Cave, Matthew C; Clair, Heather B; Hardesty, Josiah E; Falkner, K Cameron; Feng, Wenke; Clark, Barbara J; Sidey, Jennifer; Shi, Hongxue; Aqel, Bashar A; McClain, Craig J; Prough, Russell A

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors which sense changing environmental or hormonal signals and effect transcriptional changes to regulate core life functions including growth, development, and reproduction. To support this function, following ligand-activation by xenobiotics, members of subfamily 1 nuclear receptors (NR1s) may heterodimerize with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) to regulate transcription of genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism and inflammation. Several of these receptors including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), the pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR), the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the liver X receptor (LXR) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are key regulators of the gut:liver:adipose axis and serve to coordinate metabolic responses across organ systems between the fed and fasting states. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease and may progress to cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is associated with inappropriate nuclear receptor function and perturbations along the gut:liver:adipose axis including obesity, increased intestinal permeability with systemic inflammation, abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance. Environmental chemicals may compound the problem by directly interacting with nuclear receptors leading to metabolic confusion and the inability to differentiate fed from fasting conditions. This review focuses on the impact of nuclear receptors in the pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. Clinical trials including PIVENS and FLINT demonstrate that nuclear receptor targeted therapies may lead to the paradoxical dissociation of steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity. Novel strategies currently under development (including tissue-specific ligands and dual receptor agonists) may be required to separate the beneficial effects of nuclear receptor activation from unwanted metabolic

  19. What are Nuclear Receptor Ligands?

    PubMed Central

    Sladek, Frances M.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a family of highly conserved transcription factors that regulate transcription in response to small lipophilic compounds. They play a role in every aspect of development, physiology and disease in humans. They are also ubiquitous in and unique to the animal kingdom suggesting that they may have played an important role in their evolution. In contrast to the classical endocrine receptors that originally defined the family, recent studies suggest that the first NRs might have been sensors of their environment, binding ligands that were external to the host organism. The purpose of this review is to provide a broad perspective on NR ligands and address the issue of exactly what constitutes a NR ligand from historical, biological and evolutionary perspectives. This discussion will lay the foundation for subsequent reviews in this issue as well as pose new questions for future investigation. PMID:20615454

  20. SUMOylation regulates the transcriptional repression activity of FOG-2 and its association with GATA-4.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, José; Jiang, Xing-Mai; Carter, Daniel R; Khachigian, Levon M; Chong, Beng H

    2012-01-01

    Friend of GATA 2 (FOG-2), a co-factor of several GATA transcription factors (GATA-4, -5 and 6), is a critical regulator of coronary vessel formation and heart morphogenesis. Here we demonstrate that FOG-2 is SUMOylated and that this modification modulates its transcriptional activity. FOG-2 SUMOylation occurs at four lysine residues (K324, 471, 915, 955) [corrected]. Three of these residues are part of the characteristic SUMO consensus site (ψKXE), while K955 is found in the less frequent TKXE motif. Absence of SUMOylation did not affect FOG-2's nuclear localization. However, mutation of the FOG-2 SUMOylation sites, or de-SUMOylation, with SENP-1 or SENP-8 resulted in stronger transcriptional repression activity in both heterologous cells and cardiomyocytes. Conversely, increased FOG-2 SUMOylation by overexpression of SUMO-1 or expression of a SUMO-1-FOG-2 fusion protein rendered FOG-2 incapable of repressing GATA-4-mediated activation of the B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) promoter. Moreover, we demonstrate both increased interaction between a FOG-2 SUMO mutant and GATA-4 and enhanced SUMOylation of wild-type FOG-2 by co-expression of GATA-4. These data suggest a new dynamics in which GATA-4 may alter the activity of FOG-2 by influencing its SUMOylation status.

  1. Chemical Approaches to Nuclear Receptors in Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Ronald N.; Moore, David D.; Willson, Timothy M.; Guy, R. Kip

    2017-01-01

    The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) sponsored a workshop, “Chemical Approaches to Nuclear Receptors and Metabolism,” in April 2009 to explore how chemical and molecular biology and physiology can be exploited to further our understanding of nuclear receptor structure, function, and role in disease. Signaling cascades involving nuclear receptors are more complex and interrelated than once thought. Nuclear receptors continue to be attractive targets for drug discovery. The overall goal of this workshop was to identify gaps in our understanding of the complexity of ligand activities and begin to address them by (i) increasing the collaboration of investigators from different disciplines, (ii) developing a better understanding of chemical modulation of nuclear receptor action, and (iii) identifying opportunities and roadblocks in the path of translating basic research to discovery of new therapeutics. PMID:19654413

  2. Over-accumulation of nuclear IGF-1 receptor in tumor cells requires elevated expression of the receptor and the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Hua; Lin, Yingbo; Badin, Margherita; Vasilcanu, Daiana; Stroemberg, Thomas; Jernberg-Wiklund, Helena; Sehat, Bita; Larsson, Olle

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} SUMOylation mediates nuclear translocation of IGF-1R which activates transcription. {yields} Here we show that nuclear IGF-1R over-accumulates in tumor cells. {yields} This requires overexpression of the receptor that is a common feature in tumor cells. {yields} An increased expression of the SUMO ligase Ubc9 seems to be an involved mechanism too. -- Abstract: The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) plays crucial roles in tumor cell growth and is overexpressed in many cancers. IGF-1R's trans-membrane kinase signaling pathways have been well characterized. Very recently, we showed that SUMOylation mediates nuclear translocation of the IGF-1R, and that nuclear IGF-1R (nIGF-1R) binds to enhancer regions and activates transcription. We identified three lysine residues in the {beta}-subunit of the receptor and that mutation of these blocks nuclear translocation and gene activation. Furthermore, accumulation of nIGF-1R was proven strongly dependent on the specific SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9. Here we show that nIGF-1R originates solely from the cell membrane and that phosphorylation of the core tyrosine residues of the receptor kinase is crucial for nuclear accumulation. We also compared the levels of nIGF-1R, measured as nuclear/membrane ratios, in tumor and normal cells. We found that the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 has 13-fold higher amounts of nIGF-1R than breast epithelial cells (IME) which showed only a small amount of nIGF-1R. In comparison, the total expression of IGF-1R was only 3.7- higher in MCF-7. Comparison of several other tumor and normal cell lines showed similar tumor cell over-accumulation of nIGF-1R, exceeding the total receptor expression substantially. Ectopic overexpression (>10-fold) of the receptor increased nIGF-1R in IME cells but not to that high level as in wild type MCF-7. The levels of Ubc9 were higher in all tumor cell lines, compared to the normal cells, and this probably contributes to over

  3. Genetic disorders of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Achermann, John C; Schwabe, John; Fairall, Louise; Chatterjee, Krishna

    2017-04-03

    Following the first isolation of nuclear receptor (NR) genes, genetic disorders caused by NR gene mutations were initially discovered by a candidate gene approach based on their known roles in endocrine pathways and physiologic processes. Subsequently, the identification of disorders has been informed by phenotypes associated with gene disruption in animal models or by genetic linkage studies. More recently, whole exome sequencing has associated pathogenic genetic variants with unexpected, often multisystem, human phenotypes. To date, defects in 20 of 48 human NR genes have been associated with human disorders, with different mutations mediating phenotypes of varying severity or several distinct conditions being associated with different changes in the same gene. Studies of individuals with deleterious genetic variants can elucidate novel roles of human NRs, validating them as targets for drug development or providing new insights into structure-function relationships. Importantly, human genetic discoveries enable definitive disease diagnosis and can provide opportunities to therapeutically manage affected individuals. Here we review germline changes in human NR genes associated with "monogenic" conditions, including a discussion of the structural basis of mutations that cause distinctive changes in NR function and the molecular mechanisms mediating pathogenesis.

  4. Nuclear receptors in transgenerational epigenetic inheritance.

    PubMed

    Ozgyin, Lilla; Erdős, Edina; Bojcsuk, Dóra; Balint, Balint L

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear Receptors are ligand-activated transcription factors that translate information about the lipid environment into specific genetic programs, a property that renders them good candidates to be mediators of rapid adaptation changes of a species. Lipid-based morphogens, endocrine hormones, fatty acids and xenobiotics might act through this class of transcription factors making them regulators able to fine-tune physiological processes. Here we review the basic concepts and current knowledge on the process whereby small molecules act through nuclear receptors and contribute to transgenerational changes. Several molecules shown to cause transgenerational changes like phthalates, BPA, nicotine, tributylin bind and activate nuclear receptors like ERs, androgen receptors, glucocorticoid receptors or PPARγ. A specific subset of observations involving nuclear receptors has focused on the effects of environmental stress or maternal behaviour on the development of transgenerational traits. While these effects do not involve environmental ligands, they change the expression levels of Estrogen and glucocorticoid receptors of the second generation and consequently initiate an altered genetic program in the second generation. In this review we summarize the available literature about the role of nuclear receptors in transgenerational inheritance.

  5. SUMOylation regulates the intracellular fate of ZO-2.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Franziska; Mittag, Sonnhild; Cano-Cortina, Misael; Wagner, Tobias; Krämer, Oliver H; Niedenthal, Rainer; Gonzalez-Mariscal, Lorenza; Huber, Otmar

    2017-01-01

    The zonula occludens (ZO)-2 protein links tight junctional transmembrane proteins to the actin cytoskeleton and associates with splicing and transcription factors in the nucleus. Multiple posttranslational modifications control the intracellular distribution of ZO-2. Here, we report that ZO-2 is a target of the SUMOylation machinery and provide evidence on how this modification may affect its cellular distribution and function. We show that ZO-2 associates with the E2 SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 and with SUMO-deconjugating proteases SENP1 and SENP3. In line with this, modification of ZO-2 by endogenous SUMO1 was detectable. Ubc9 fusion-directed SUMOylation confirmed SUMOylation of ZO-2 and was inhibited in the presence of SENP1 but not by an enzymatic-dead SENP1 protein. Moreover, lysine 730 in human ZO-2 was identified as a potential modification site. Mutation of this site to arginine resulted in prolonged nuclear localization of ZO-2 in nuclear recruitment assays. In contrast, a construct mimicking constitutive SUMOylation of ZO-2 (SUMO1ΔGG-ZO-2) was preferentially localized in the cytoplasm. Based on previous findings the differential localization of these ZO-2 constructs may affect glycogen-synthase-kinase-3β (GSK3β) activity and β-catenin/TCF-4-mediated transcription. In this context we observed that ZO-2 directly binds to GSK3β and SUMO1ΔGG-ZO-2 modulates its kinase activity. Moreover, we show that ZO-2 forms a complex with β-catenin. Wild-type ZO-2 and ZO-2-K730R inhibited transcriptional activity in reporter gene assays, whereas the cytosolic SUMO1ΔGG-ZO-2 did not. From these data we conclude that SUMOylation affects the intracellular localization of ZO-2 and its regulatory role on GSK3β and β-catenin signaling activity.

  6. CD2AP Regulates SUMOylation of CIN85 in Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Niedenthal, Rainer; Klaus, Malte; Teng, Beina; Worthmann, Kirstin; King, Benjamin L.; Peterson, Kevin J.; Haller, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    Podocytes are highly differentiated and polarized epithelial cells located on the visceral side of the glomerulus. They form an indispensable component of the glomerular filter, the slit diaphragm, formed by several transmembrane proteins and adaptor molecules. Disruption of the slit diaphragm can lead to massive proteinuria and nephrotic syndrome in mice and humans. CD2AP is an adaptor protein that is important for the maintenance of the slit diaphragm. Together with its paralogue, CIN85, CD2AP belongs to a family of adaptor proteins that are primarily described as being involved in endocytosis and downregulation of receptor tyrosine kinase activity. We have shown that full-length CIN85 is upregulated in podocytes in the absence of CD2AP, whereas in wild-type cells, full-length CIN85 is not detectable. In this study, we show that full-length CIN85 is postranslationally modified by SUMOylation in wild-type podocytes. We can demonstrate that CIN85 is SUMOylated by SUMO-1, -2, and -3 and that SUMOylation is enhanced in the presence of CD2AP. Conversion of lysine 598 to arginine completely abolishes SUMOylation and leads to increased binding of CIN85 to nephrin. Our results indicate a novel role for CD2AP in regulating posttranslational modification of CIN85. PMID:22203040

  7. Proteins of the PIAS family enhance the sumoylation of the papillomavirus E1 protein*

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Acosta, Germán; Wilson, Van G.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The E1 protein, a papillomavirus (PV)-encoded origin-binding helicase essential for PV DNA replication, is post-translationally modified by sumoylation. As this modification is essential for the nuclear accumulation of the bovine PV E1 (BPV E1), factors modulating the sumoylation of E1 could ultimately alter the outcome of a papillomavirus infection. Therefore, we systematically tested the known sumoylation enhancing factors (E3 SUMO ligases), namely RanBP2 and PIAS family proteins, to determine their ability to bind to E1 and stimulate its sumoylation, using in vitro assays. We found that RanBP2 bound to BPV E1 but failed to bind to the E1 from a human PV (HPV11 E1), and lacked any sumoylation enhancing activity for both BPV E1 and HPV11 E1. In contrast, proteins of the PIAS family (except for PIASy) bound to both BPV E1 and HPV11 E1 and stimulated their sumoylation, with PIASxβ (Miz1) exerting the largest stimulatory effect. The structural integrity of the RING finger domain of the PIAS proteins was required for their E3 SUMO ligase activity on PV E1 sumoylation, but was dispensable for their PV E1 binding activity. Furthermore, the sumoylation enhancing activity exerted by the PIAS proteins on BPV E1 was more pronounced than on HPV11 E1, and appeared to favor SUMO1 versus SUMO2 as the SUMO modifier. Altogether, this study identifies PIAS proteins as possible modulators of PV E1 sumoylation during papillomavirus infections. PMID:15582666

  8. Nur77 suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma via switching glucose metabolism toward gluconeogenesis through attenuating phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase sumoylation.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xue-Li; Chen, Hang-Zi; Yang, Peng-Bo; Li, Ying-Ping; Zhang, Fen-Na; Zhang, Jia-Yuan; Wang, Wei-Jia; Zhao, Wen-Xiu; Zhang, Sheng; Chen, Qi-Tao; Zheng, Yu; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Min; Chien, Kun-Yi; Wu, Qiao

    2017-02-27

    Gluconeogenesis, an essential metabolic process for hepatocytes, is downregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here we show that the nuclear receptor Nur77 is a tumour suppressor for HCC that regulates gluconeogenesis. Low Nur77 expression in clinical HCC samples correlates with poor prognosis, and a Nur77 deficiency in mice promotes HCC development. Nur77 interacts with phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK1), the rate-limiting enzyme in gluconeogenesis, to increase gluconeogenesis and suppress glycolysis, resulting in ATP depletion and cell growth arrest. However, PEPCK1 becomes labile after sumoylation and is degraded via ubiquitination, which is augmented by the p300 acetylation of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (Ubc9). Although Nur77 attenuates sumoylation and stabilizes PEPCK1 via impairing p300 activity and preventing the Ubc9-PEPCK1 interaction, Nur77 is silenced in HCC samples due to Snail-mediated DNA methylation of the Nur77 promoter. Our study reveals a unique mechanism to suppress HCC by switching from glycolysis to gluconeogenesis through Nur77 antagonism of PEPCK1 degradation.

  9. Nur77 suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma via switching glucose metabolism toward gluconeogenesis through attenuating phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase sumoylation

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Xue-li; Chen, Hang-zi; Yang, Peng-bo; Li, Ying-ping; Zhang, Fen-na; Zhang, Jia-yuan; Wang, Wei-jia; Zhao, Wen-xiu; Zhang, Sheng; Chen, Qi-tao; Zheng, Yu; Sun, Xiao-yu; Wang, Xiao-min; Chien, Kun-Yi; Wu, Qiao

    2017-01-01

    Gluconeogenesis, an essential metabolic process for hepatocytes, is downregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here we show that the nuclear receptor Nur77 is a tumour suppressor for HCC that regulates gluconeogenesis. Low Nur77 expression in clinical HCC samples correlates with poor prognosis, and a Nur77 deficiency in mice promotes HCC development. Nur77 interacts with phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK1), the rate-limiting enzyme in gluconeogenesis, to increase gluconeogenesis and suppress glycolysis, resulting in ATP depletion and cell growth arrest. However, PEPCK1 becomes labile after sumoylation and is degraded via ubiquitination, which is augmented by the p300 acetylation of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (Ubc9). Although Nur77 attenuates sumoylation and stabilizes PEPCK1 via impairing p300 activity and preventing the Ubc9-PEPCK1 interaction, Nur77 is silenced in HCC samples due to Snail-mediated DNA methylation of the Nur77 promoter. Our study reveals a unique mechanism to suppress HCC by switching from glycolysis to gluconeogenesis through Nur77 antagonism of PEPCK1 degradation. PMID:28240261

  10. Critical role of RanBP2-mediated SUMOylation of Small Heterodimer Partner in maintaining bile acid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kwon, Sanghoon; Byun, Sangwon; Xiao, Zhen; Park, Sean; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Kemper, Byron; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are recently recognized signalling molecules that profoundly affect metabolism. Because of detergent-like toxicity, BA levels must be tightly regulated. An orphan nuclear receptor, Small Heterodimer Partner (SHP), plays a key role in this regulation, but how SHP senses the BA signal for feedback transcriptional responses is not clearly understood. We show an unexpected function of a nucleoporin, RanBP2, in maintaining BA homoeostasis through SUMOylation of SHP. Upon BA signalling, RanBP2 co-localizes with SHP at the nuclear envelope region and mediates SUMO2 modification at K68, which facilitates nuclear transport of SHP and its interaction with repressive histone modifiers to inhibit BA synthetic genes. Mice expressing a SUMO-defective K68R SHP mutant have increased liver BA levels, and upon BA- or drug-induced biliary insults, these mice exhibit exacerbated cholestatic pathologies. These results demonstrate a function of RanBP2-mediated SUMOylation of SHP in maintaining BA homoeostasis and protecting from the BA hepatotoxicity. PMID:27412403

  11. Critical role of RanBP2-mediated SUMOylation of Small Heterodimer Partner in maintaining bile acid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kwon, Sanghoon; Byun, Sangwon; Xiao, Zhen; Park, Sean; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Kemper, Byron; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2016-07-14

    Bile acids (BAs) are recently recognized signalling molecules that profoundly affect metabolism. Because of detergent-like toxicity, BA levels must be tightly regulated. An orphan nuclear receptor, Small Heterodimer Partner (SHP), plays a key role in this regulation, but how SHP senses the BA signal for feedback transcriptional responses is not clearly understood. We show an unexpected function of a nucleoporin, RanBP2, in maintaining BA homoeostasis through SUMOylation of SHP. Upon BA signalling, RanBP2 co-localizes with SHP at the nuclear envelope region and mediates SUMO2 modification at K68, which facilitates nuclear transport of SHP and its interaction with repressive histone modifiers to inhibit BA synthetic genes. Mice expressing a SUMO-defective K68R SHP mutant have increased liver BA levels, and upon BA- or drug-induced biliary insults, these mice exhibit exacerbated cholestatic pathologies. These results demonstrate a function of RanBP2-mediated SUMOylation of SHP in maintaining BA homoeostasis and protecting from the BA hepatotoxicity.

  12. Using Nuclear Receptor Activity to Stratify Hepatocarcinogens

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NR) are a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that control a range of cellular processes. Persistent stimulation of some NR is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. Here we report on a systematic an...

  13. Developmental control of sumoylation pathway proteins in mouse male germ cells.

    PubMed

    La Salle, Sophie; Sun, Fengyun; Zhang, Xiang-Dong; Matunis, Michael J; Handel, Mary Ann

    2008-09-01

    Protein sumoylation regulates a variety of nuclear functions and has been postulated to be involved in meiotic chromosome dynamics as well as other processes of spermatogenesis. Here, the expression and distribution of sumoylation pathway genes and proteins were determined in mouse male germ cells, with a particular emphasis on prophase I of meiosis. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that SUMO1, SUMO2/3 and UBE2I (also known as UBC9) were localized to the XY body in pachytene and diplotene spermatocytes, while only SUMO2/3 and UBE2I were detected near centromeres in metaphase I spermatocytes. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting were used to examine the expression of sumoylation pathway genes and proteins in enriched preparations of leptotene/zygotene spermatocytes, prepubertal and adult pachytene spermatocytes, as well as round spermatids. Two general expression profiles emerged from these data. The first profile, where expression was more prominent during meiosis, identified sumoylation pathway participants that could be involved in meiotic chromosome dynamics. The second profile, elevated expression in post-meiotic spermatids, suggested proteins that could be involved in spermiogenesis-related sumoylation events. In addition to revealing differential expression of protein sumoylation mediators, which suggests differential functioning, these data demonstrate the dynamic nature of SUMO metabolism during spermatogenesis.

  14. Nuclear receptors and pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Polvani, Simone; Tarocchi, Mirko; Tempesti, Sara; Galli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a devastating disease with a median overall survival time of 5 mo and the five years survival less than 5%, a rate essentially unchanged over the course of the years. A well defined progression model of accumulation of genetic alterations ranging from single point mutations to gross chromosomal abnormalities has been introduced to describe the origin of this disease. However, due to the its subtle nature and concurring events PDAC cure remains elusive. Nuclear receptors (NR) are members of a large superfamily of evolutionarily conserved ligand-regulated DNA-binding transcription factors functionally involved in important cellular functions ranging from regulation of metabolism, to growth and development. Given the nature of their ligands, NR are very tempting drug targets and their pharmacological modulation has been widely exploited for the treatment of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. There are now clear evidences that both classical ligand-activated and orphan NR are involved in the pathogenesis of PDAC from its very early stages; nonetheless many aspects of their role are not fully understood. The purpose of this review is to highlight the striking connections that link peroxisome proliferator activated receptors, retinoic acid receptors, retinoid X receptor, androgen receptor, estrogen receptors and the orphan NR Nur, chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II and the liver receptor homologue-1 receptor to PDAC development, connections that could lead to the identification of novel therapies for this disease. PMID:25232244

  15. [Structure and Function of the Nuclear Receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor].

    PubMed

    Inouye, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Animal defense mechanisms against both endogenous and exogenous toxic compounds function mainly through receptor-type transcription factors, including the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). Following xenobiotic stimulation, CAR translocates into the nucleus and transactivates its target genes including oxygenic and conjugative enzymes and transporters in hepatocytes. We identified subcellular localization signals in the rat CAR: two nuclear localization signals (NLS1 and 2); two nuclear export signals (NES1 and 2); and a cytoplasmic retention region. The nuclear import of CAR is regulated by the importin-Ran system and microtubule network. Five splice variants (SV1-5) were identified in rat liver in addition to wild-type CAR. When expressed in immortalized cells, their artificial transcripts were inactive as transcription factors. A CAR mutant with three consecutive alanine residues inserted into the ligand-binding domain of CAR showed ligand-dependent activation of target genes in immortalized cells, which is in marked contrast to the constitutive transactivating nature of wild-type CAR. Using this assay system, androstenol and clotrimazole, both of which are inverse agonists of CAR, were classified as an antagonist and weak agonist, respectively. A member of the DEAD box DNA/RNA helicase family (DP97) and protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) were found to be gene (or promotor)-specific coactivators of CAR. The expression of the CAR gene might be under the control of clock genes mediated by the nuclear receptor Rev-erb-α.

  16. SUMOylation of p53 mediates interferon activities

    PubMed Central

    Marcos-Villar, Laura; Pérez-Girón, José V; Vilas, Jéssica M; Soto, Atenea; de la Cruz-Hererra, Carlos F; Lang, Valerie; Collado, Manuel; Vidal, Anxo; Rodríguez, Manuel S; Muñoz-Fontela, César; Rivas, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence that many host proteins involved in innate and intrinsic immunity are regulated by SUMOylation, and that SUMO contributes to the regulatory process that governs the initiation of the type I interferon (IFN) response. The tumor suppressor p53 is a modulator of the IFN response that plays a role in virus-induced apoptosis and in IFN-induced senescence. Here we demonstrate that IFN treatment increases the levels of SUMOylated p53 and induces cellular senescence through a process that is partially dependent upon SUMOylation of p53. Similarly, we show that vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection induces p53 SUMOylation, and that this modification favors the control of VSV replication. Thus, our study provides evidence that IFN signaling induces p53 SUMOylation, which results in the activation of a cellular senescence program and contributes to the antiviral functions of interferon. PMID:23966171

  17. Corepressors of agonist-bound nuclear receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, Igor; Aneskievich, Brian J.

    2007-09-15

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) rely on coregulator proteins to modulate transcription of target genes. NR coregulators can be broadly subdivided into coactivators which potentiate transcription and corepressors which silence gene expression. The prevailing view of coregulator action holds that in the absence of agonist the receptor interacts with a corepressor via the corepressor nuclear receptor (CoRNR, 'corner') box motifs within the corepressor. Upon agonist binding, a conformational change in the receptor causes the shedding of corepressor and the binding of a coactivator which interacts with the receptor via NR boxes within the coregulator. This view was challenged with the discovery of RIP140 which acts as a NR corepressor in the presence of agonist and utilizes NR boxes. Since then a number of other corepressors of agonist-bound NRs have been discovered. Among them are LCoR, PRAME, REA, MTA1, NSD1, and COPR1 Although they exhibit a great diversity of structure, mechanism of repression and pathophysiological function, these corepressors frequently have one or more NR boxes and often recruit histone deacetylases to exert their repressive effects. This review highlights these more recently discovered corepressors and addresses their potential functions in transcription regulation, disease pharmacologic responses and xenobiotic metabolism.

  18. SUMOylation-mediated regulation of cell cycle progression and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eifler, Karolin; Vertegaal, Alfred C.O.

    2016-01-01

    SUMOylation plays critical roles during cell cycle progression. Many important cell cycle regulators, including many oncogenes and tumor suppressors, are functionally regulated via SUMOylation. The dynamic SUMOylation pattern observed throughout the cell cycle is ensured via distinct spatial and temporal regulation of the SUMO machinery. Additionally, SUMOylation cooperates with other post-translational modifications to mediate cell cycle progression. Deregulation of these SUMOylation and deSUMOylation enzymes causes severe defects in cell proliferation and genome stability. Different types of cancers were recently shown to be dependent on a functioning SUMOylation system, a finding that could potentially be exploited in anti-cancer therapies. PMID:26601932

  19. Using Nuclear Receptor Activity to Stratify Hepatocarcinogens

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Imran; Houck, Keith; Judson, Richard S.; Kavlock, Robert J.; Martin, Matthew T.; Reif, David M.; Wambaugh, John; Dix, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nuclear receptors (NR) are a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that control a range of cellular processes. Persistent stimulation of some NR is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. Here we report on a systematic analysis of new in vitro human NR activity data on 309 environmental chemicals in relationship to their liver cancer-related chronic outcomes in rodents. Results The effects of 309 environmental chemicals on human constitutive androstane receptors (CAR/NR1I3), pregnane X receptor (PXR/NR1I2), aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR/NR1C), liver X receptors (LXR/NR1H), retinoic X receptors (RXR/NR2B) and steroid receptors (SR/NR3) were determined using in vitro data. Hepatic histopathology, observed in rodents after two years of chronic treatment for 171 of the 309 chemicals, was summarized by a cancer lesion progression grade. Chemicals that caused proliferative liver lesions in both rat and mouse were generally more active for the human receptors, relative to the compounds that only affected one rodent species, and these changes were significant for PPAR (p0.001), PXR (p0.01) and CAR (p0.05). Though most chemicals exhibited receptor promiscuity, multivariate analysis clustered them into relatively few NR activity combinations. The human NR activity pattern of chemicals weakly associated with the severity of rodent liver cancer lesion progression (p0.05). Conclusions The rodent carcinogens had higher in vitro potency for human NR relative to non-carcinogens. Structurally diverse chemicals with similar NR promiscuity patterns weakly associated with the severity of rodent liver cancer progression. While these results do not prove the role of NR activation in human liver cancer, they do have implications for nuclear receptor chemical biology and provide insights into putative toxicity pathways. More importantly, these findings suggest the

  20. Sumoylation of Turnip mosaic virus RNA polymerase promotes viral infection by counteracting the host NPR1-mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaofei; Xiong, Ruyi; Li, Yinzi; Li, Fangfang; Zhou, Xueping; Wang, Aiming

    2017-02-21

    Sumoylation is a transient, reversible dynamic posttranslational modification that regulates diverse cellular processes including plant-pathogen interactions. Sumoylation of NPR1, a master regulator of basal and systemic acquired resistance to a broad spectrum of plant pathogens, activates the defense response. Here, we report that NIb, the only RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) that targets the nucleus upon translation, interacts exclusively with and is sumoylated by SUMO3 (SMALL UBIQUITIN-LIKE MODIFIER3), but not the three other Arabidopsis thaliana SUMO paralogs. TuMV infection upregulates SUMO3 expression, and the sumoylation of NIb by SUMO3 regulates the nuclear-cytoplasmic partitioning of NIb. We identified the SUMO-interacting motif in NIb that is essential for its sumoylation and found that knockout or overexpression of SUMO3 suppresses TuMV replication and attenuates viral symptoms, suggesting that SUMO3 plays dual roles as a host factor of TuMV and as an antiviral defender. Sumoylation of NIb by SUMO3 is crucial for its role in suppressing the host immune response. Taken together, our findings reveal that sumoylation of NIb promotes TuMV infection by retargeting NIb from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where viral replication takes place and by suppressing host antiviral responses through counteracting the TuMV infection-induced, SUMO3-activated, NPR1-mediated resistance pathway.

  1. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor TR4 Is a Vitamin A-activated Nuclear Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X. Edward; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Xu, Yong; Chan, Cee-Wah; Tanabe, Osamu; Kruse, Schoen W.; Reynolds, Ross; Engel, James Douglas; Xu, H. Eric

    2015-11-30

    Testicular receptors 2 and 4 (TR2/4) constitute a subgroup of orphan nuclear receptors that play important roles in spermatogenesis, lipid and lipoprotein regulation, and the development of the central nervous system. Currently, little is known about the structural features and the ligand regulation of these receptors. Here we report the crystal structure of the ligand-free TR4 ligand binding domain, which reveals an autorepressed conformation. The ligand binding pocket of TR4 is filled by the C-terminal half of helix 10, and the cofactor binding site is occupied by the AF-2 helix, thus preventing ligand-independent activation of the receptor. However, TR4 exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity on multiple promoters, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, or ligand binding substantially reduce the transcriptional activity of this receptor. Importantly, both retinol and retinoic acid are able to promote TR4 to recruit coactivators and to activate a TR4-regulated reporter. These findings demonstrate that TR4 is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor and suggest that retinoids might have a much wider regulatory role via activation of orphan receptors such as TR4.

  2. Nuclear Receptors in Bone Physiology and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Min-Young; Inoue, Kazuki; Takada, Ichiro; Kouzmenko, Alexander; Kato, Shigeaki

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade, our view on the skeleton as a mere solid physical support structure has been transformed, as bone emerged as a dynamic, constantly remodeling tissue with systemic regulatory functions including those of an endocrine organ. Reflecting this remarkable functional complexity, distinct classes of humoral and intracellular regulatory factors have been shown to control vital processes in the bone. Among these regulators, nuclear receptors (NRs) play fundamental roles in bone development, growth, and maintenance. NRs are DNA-binding transcription factors that act as intracellular transducers of the respective ligand signaling pathways through modulation of expression of specific sets of cognate target genes. Aberrant NR signaling caused by receptor or ligand deficiency may profoundly affect bone health and compromise skeletal functions. Ligand dependency of NR action underlies a major strategy of therapeutic intervention to correct aberrant NR signaling, and significant efforts have been made to design novel synthetic NR ligands with enhanced beneficial properties and reduced potential negative side effects. As an example, estrogen deficiency causes bone loss and leads to development of osteoporosis, the most prevalent skeletal disorder in postmenopausal women. Since administration of natural estrogens for the treatment of osteoporosis often associates with undesirable side effects, several synthetic estrogen receptor ligands have been developed with higher therapeutic efficacy and specificity. This review presents current progress in our understanding of the roles of various nuclear receptor-mediated signaling pathways in bone physiology and disease, and in development of advanced NR ligands for treatment of common skeletal disorders. PMID:23589826

  3. SIRT1 stabilizes PML promoting its sumoylation

    PubMed Central

    Campagna, M; Herranz, D; Garcia, M A; Marcos-Villar, L; González-Santamaría, J; Gallego, P; Gutierrez, S; Collado, M; Serrano, M; Esteban, M; Rivas, C

    2011-01-01

    SIRT1, the closest mammalian homolog of yeast Sir2, is an NAD+-dependent deacetylase with relevant functions in cancer, aging, and metabolism among other processes. SIRT1 has a diffuse nuclear localization but is recruited to the PML nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) after PML upregulation. However, the functions of SIRT1 in the PML-NBs are unknown. In this study we show that primary mouse embryo fibroblasts lacking SIRT1 contain reduced PML protein levels that are increased after reintroduction of SIRT1. In addition, overexpression of SIRT1 in HEK-293 cells increases the amount of PML protein whereas knockdown of SIRT1 reduces the size and number of PML-NBs and the levels of PML protein in HeLa cells. SIRT1 stimulates PML sumoylation in vitro and in vivo in a deacetylase-independent manner. Importantly, the absence of SIRT1 reduces the apoptotic response of vesicular stomatitis virus-infected cells and favors the extent of this PML-sensitive virus replication. These results show a novel function of SIRT1 in the control of PML and PML-NBs. PMID:20577263

  4. Nuclear receptors, nuclear-receptor factors, and nuclear-receptor-like orphans form a large paralog cluster in Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Vallvé, S; Palau, J

    1998-06-01

    We studied a human protein paralog cluster formed by 38 nonredundant sequences taken from the Swiss-Prot database and its supplement, TrEMBL. These sequences include nuclear receptors, nuclear-receptor factors and nuclear-receptor-like orphans. Working separately with both the central cysteine-rich DNA-binding domain and the carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain, we performed multialignment analyses that included drawings of paralog trees. Our results show that the cluster is highly multibranched, with considerable differences in the amino acid sequence in the ligand-binding domain (LBD), and 17 proximal subbranches which are identifiable and fully coincident when independent trees from both domains are compared. We identified the six recently proposed subfamilies as groups of neighboring clusters in the LBD paralog tree. We found similarities of 80%-100% for the N-terminal transactivation domain among mammalian ortholog receptors, as well as some paralog resemblances within diverse subbranches. Our studies suggest that during the evolutionary process, the three domains were assembled in a modular fashion with a nonshuffled modular fusion of the LBD. We used the EMBL server PredictProtein to make secondary-structure predictions for all 38 LBD subsequences. Amino acid residues in the multialigned homologous domains--taking the beginning of helix H3 of the human retinoic acid receptor-gamma as the initial point of reference--were substituted with H or E, which identify residues predicted to be helical or extended, respectively. The result was a secondary structure multialignment with the surprising feature that the prediction follows a canonical pattern of alignable alpha-helices with some short extended elements in between, despite the fact that a number of subsequences resemble each other by less than 25% in terms of the similarity index. We also identified the presence of a binary patterning in all of the predicted helices that were conserved throughout the 38

  5. Glucocorticoid-induced tethered transrepression requires SUMOylation of GR and formation of a SUMO-SMRT/NCoR1-HDAC3 repressing complex.

    PubMed

    Hua, Guoqiang; Ganti, Krishna Priya; Chambon, Pierre

    2016-02-02

    Upon binding of a glucocorticoid (GC), the GC receptor (GR) can exert one of three transcriptional regulatory functions. We recently reported that SUMOylation of the GR at position K293 in humans (K310 in mice) within the N-terminal domain is indispensable for GC-induced evolutionary conserved inverted repeated negative GC response element (IR nGRE)-mediated direct transrepression. We now demonstrate that the integrity of this GR SUMOylation site is mandatory for the formation of a GR-small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs)-SMRT/NCoR1-HDAC3 repressing complex, which is indispensable for NF-κB/AP1-mediated GC-induced tethered indirect transrepression in vitro. Using GR K310R mutant mice or mice containing the N-terminal truncated GR isoform GRα-D3 lacking the K310 SUMOylation site, revealed a more severe skin inflammation than in WT mice. Importantly, cotreatment with dexamethasone (Dex) could not efficiently suppress a 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced skin inflammation in these mutant mice, whereas it was clearly decreased in WT mice. In addition, in mice selectively ablated in skin keratinocytes for either nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCoR1)/silencing mediator for retinoid or thyroid-hormone receptors (SMRT) corepressors or histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), Dex-induced tethered transrepression and the formation of a repressing complex on DNA-bound NF-κB/AP1 were impaired. We previously suggested that GR ligands that would lack both (+)GRE-mediated transactivation and IR nGRE-mediated direct transrepression activities of GCs may preferentially exert the therapeutically beneficial GC antiinflammatory properties. Interestingly, we now identified a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory selective GR agonist (SEGRA) that selectively lacks both Dex-induced (+)GRE-mediated transactivation and IR nGRE-mediated direct transrepression functions, while still exerting a tethered indirect transrepression activity and could therefore be clinically lesser

  6. Non-canonical modulators of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Tice, Colin M; Zheng, Ya-Jun

    2016-09-01

    Like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and protein kinases, nuclear receptors (NRs) are a rich source of pharmaceutical targets. Over 80 NR-targeting drugs have been approved for 18 NRs. The focus of drug discovery in NRs has hitherto been on identifying ligands that bind to the canonical ligand binding pockets of the C-terminal ligand binding domains (LBDs). Due to the development of drug resistance and selectivity concerns, there has been considerable interest in exploring other, non-canonical ligand binding sites. Unfortunately, the potencies of compounds binding at other sites have generally not been sufficient for clinical development. However, the situation has changed dramatically over the last 3years, as compounds with sufficient potency have been reported for several NR targets. Here we review recent developments in this area from a medicinal chemistry point of view in the hope of stimulating further interest in this area of research.

  7. Maturing of the nuclear receptor family.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Mitchell A

    2017-04-03

    Members of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of ligand-regulated transcription factors play important roles in reproduction, development, and physiology. In humans, genetic mutations in NRs are causes of rare diseases, while hormones and drugs that target NRs are in widespread therapeutic use. The present issue of the JCI includes a series of Review articles focused on specific NRs and their wide range of biological functions. Here I reflect on the past, present, and potential future highlights of research on the NR superfamily.

  8. Regulation of cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes by nuclear receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Honkakoski, P; Negishi, M

    2000-01-01

    Members of the nuclear-receptor superfamily mediate crucial physiological functions by regulating the synthesis of their target genes. Nuclear receptors are usually activated by ligand binding. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms often catalyse both formation and degradation of these ligands. CYPs also metabolize many exogenous compounds, some of which may act as activators of nuclear receptors and disruptors of endocrine and cellular homoeostasis. This review summarizes recent findings that indicate that major classes of CYP genes are selectively regulated by certain ligand-activated nuclear receptors, thus creating tightly controlled networks. PMID:10749660

  9. Nuclear hormone receptors put immunity on sterols

    PubMed Central

    Santori, Fabio R.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) are transcription factors regulated by small molecules. The functions of NHRs range from development of primary and secondary lymphoid organs, to regulation of differentiation and function of DCs, macrophages and T cells. The human genome has 48 classic (hormone and vitamin receptors) and non-classic (all others) NHRs; 17 non-classic receptors are orphans, meaning that the endogenous ligand is unknown. Understanding the function of orphan NHRs requires the identification of their natural ligands. The mevalonate pathway, including its sterol and non-sterol intermediates and derivatives, is a source of ligands for many classic and non-classic NHRs. For example, cholesterol biosynthetic intermediates (CBIs) are natural ligands for RORγ/γt. CBIs are universal endogenous metabolites in mammalian cells, and to study NHRs that bind CBIs requires ligand-free reporters system in sterol auxotroph cells. Furthermore, RORγ/γt shows broad specificity to sterol lipids, suggesting that RORγ/γt is either a general sterol sensor or specificity is defined by an abundant endogenous ligand. Unlike other NHRs, which regulate specific metabolic pathways, there is no connection between the genetic programs induced by RORγ/γt and ligand biosynthesis. In this review we summarize the roles of non-classic NHRs and their potential ligands in the immune system. PMID:26222181

  10. Ubiquitylation of Nuclear Receptors: New Linkages and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Helzer, Kyle T.; Hooper, Christopher; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Alarid, Elaine T.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor superfamily is a group of transcriptional regulators that control multiple aspects of both physiology and pathology, and are broadly recognized as viable therapeutic targets. While receptor-modulating drugs have been successful in many cases, the discovery of new drug targets is still an active area of research, because resistance to nuclear receptor-targeting therapies remains a significant clinical challenge. Many successful targeted therapies have harnessed the control of receptor activity by targeting events within the nuclear receptor signaling pathway. In this review, we explore the role of nuclear receptor ubiquitylation and discuss how the expanding roles of ubiquitin might be leveraged to identify additional entry points to control receptor function for future therapeutic development. PMID:25943391

  11. A nuclear-receptor-dependent phosphatidylcholine pathway with antidiabetic effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nuclear hormone receptors regulate diverse metabolic pathways and the orphan nuclear receptor LRH-1 (also known as NR5A2) regulates bile acid biosynthesis. Structural studies have identified phospholipids as potential LRH-1 ligands, but their functional relevance is unclear. Here we show that an unu...

  12. Brain nuclear receptors and body weight regulation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong; O'Malley, Bert W; Elmquist, Joel K

    2017-02-20

    Neural pathways, especially those in the hypothalamus, integrate multiple nutritional, hormonal, and neural signals, resulting in the coordinated control of body weight balance and glucose homeostasis. Nuclear receptors (NRs) sense changing levels of nutrients and hormones, and therefore play essential roles in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Understanding the role and the underlying mechanisms of NRs in the context of energy balance control may facilitate the identification of novel targets to treat obesity. Notably, NRs are abundantly expressed in the brain, and emerging evidence indicates that a number of these brain NRs regulate multiple aspects of energy balance, including feeding, energy expenditure and physical activity. In this Review we summarize some of the recent literature regarding effects of brain NRs on body weight regulation and discuss mechanisms underlying these effects.

  13. Minireview: Nuclear Receptors, Hematopoiesis, and Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chute, John P.; Ross, Joel R.; McDonnell, Donald P.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) regulate a panoply of biological processes, including the function and development of cells within the hematopoietic and immune system, such as erythrocytes, monocytes, and lymphocytes. Significantly less is known regarding the function of NRs in regulating the fate of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), the self-renewing, pluripotent cells that give rise to the entirety of the blood and immune systems throughout the lifetime of an individual. Several recent studies suggest, either directly or indirectly, a role for members of the NR family in regulating the differentiation and self-renewal of HSCs, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. Herein, we review in detail the function of specific NRs in controlling HSC and other stem cell fate and propose a framework through which these observations can be translated into therapeutic amplification of HSCs for clinical purposes. PMID:19934345

  14. Disrupting SUMOylation enhances transcriptional function and ameliorates polyglutamine androgen receptor–mediated disease

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Jason P.; Reddy, Satya L.; Yu, Zhigang; Giorgetti, Elisa; Montie, Heather L.; Mukherjee, Sarmistha; Higgins, Jake; McEachin, Richard C.; Robins, Diane M.; Merry, Diane E.; Iñiguez-Lluhí, Jorge A.; Lieberman, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Expansion of the polyglutamine (polyQ) tract within the androgen receptor (AR) causes neuromuscular degeneration in individuals with spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). PolyQ AR has diminished transcriptional function and exhibits ligand-dependent proteotoxicity, features that have both been implicated in SBMA; however, the extent to which altered AR transcriptional function contributes to pathogenesis remains controversial. Here, we sought to dissociate effects of diminished AR function from polyQ-mediated proteotoxicity by enhancing the transcriptional activity of polyQ AR. To accomplish this, we bypassed the inhibitory effect of AR SUMOylation (where SUMO indicates small ubiquitin-like modifier) by mutating conserved lysines in the polyQ AR that are sites of SUMOylation. We determined that replacement of these residues by arginine enhances polyQ AR activity as a hormone-dependent transcriptional regulator. In a murine model, disruption of polyQ AR SUMOylation rescued exercise endurance and type I muscle fiber atrophy; it also prolonged survival. These changes occurred without overt alterations in polyQ AR expression or aggregation, revealing the favorable trophic support exerted by the ligand-activated receptor. Our findings demonstrate beneficial effects of enhancing the transcriptional function of the ligand-activated polyQ AR and indicate that the SUMOylation pathway may be a potential target for therapeutic intervention in SBMA. PMID:25607844

  15. Looking at nuclear receptors from a new angle.

    PubMed

    Helsen, Christine; Claessens, Frank

    2014-01-25

    While the structures of the DNA- and ligand-binding domains of many nuclear receptors have been determined in great detail; the mechanisms by which these domains interact and possibly 'communicate' is still under debate. The first crystal structures of receptor dimers bound to ligand, DNA and coactivator peptides provided new insights in this matter. The observed binding modes revealed exciting new interaction surfaces between the different nuclear receptor domains. Such interfaces are proposed to be the route through which allosteric signals from the DNA are passed on to the ligand-binding domain and the activating functions of the receptor. The structural determinations of DNA-bound receptor dimers in solution, however, revealed an extended structure of the receptors. Here, we discuss these apparent contradictory structural data and their possible implications for the functioning of nuclear receptors.

  16. PIAS3 induction of PRB sumoylation represses PRB transactivation by destabilizing its retention in the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Man, Jiang-Hong; Li, Hui-Yan; Zhang, Pei-Jing; Zhou, Tao; He, Kun; Pan, Xin; Liang, Bing; Li, Ai-Ling; Zhao, Jie; Gong, Wei-Li; Jin, Bao-Feng; Xia, Qing; Yu, Ming; Shen, Bei-Fen; Zhang, Xue-Min

    2006-01-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) plays a critical role in cell proliferation and differentiation, and its transcriptional activity is known to be modulated by cofactor proteins. In the present study, we demonstrated that in the presence of progesterone, protein inhibitor of activated STAT-3 (PIAS3) significantly inhibited the PR transcriptional activity and the expression of progesterone-responsive genes. Reduction of endogenous PIAS3 by PIAS3 small-interfering RNA enhanced PR transactivation in a ligand-dependent manner. PIAS3 interacted with PR both in vitro and in vivo and the interaction was enhanced by progesterone. Furthermore, our findings suggested that PIAS3 strongly induced PRB sumoylation at three sites, Lys-7, Lys-388 and Lys-531. In addition, novel roles in PRB nuclear retention and transactivation were identified for these sites. Our data also suggested that PIAS3 was recruited in a largely hormone-dependent manner in response to a progesterone-responsive promoter. Finally, we demonstrated that PIAS3 inhibited the DNA-binding activity of PR and influenced its nuclear export as well as PR transactivation. Taken together, these data strongly suggested that PIAS3 played an important physiological role in PR function. PMID:17020914

  17. Sumoylation in Synaptic Function and Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Schorova, Lenka; Martin, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Sumoylation has recently emerged as a key post-translational modification involved in many, if not all, biological processes. Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) polypeptides are covalently attached to specific lysine residues of target proteins through a dedicated enzymatic pathway. Disruption of the SUMO enzymatic pathway in the developing brain leads to lethality indicating that this process exerts a central role during embryonic and post-natal development. However, little is still known regarding how this highly dynamic protein modification is regulated in the mammalian brain despite an increasing number of data implicating sumoylated substrates in synapse formation, synaptic communication and plasticity. The aim of this review is therefore to briefly describe the enzymatic SUMO pathway and to give an overview of our current knowledge on the function and dysfunction of protein sumoylation at the mammalian synapse.

  18. SUMOylation of Myc-Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sabò, Arianna; Doni, Mirko; Amati, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Myc-family proteins are key controllers of the metabolic and proliferative status of the cell, and are subjected to a complex network of regulatory events that guarantee their efficient and fast modulation by extracellular stimuli. Hence, unbalances in regulatory mechanisms leading to altered Myc levels or activities are often reported in cancer cells. Here we show that c- and N-Myc are conjugated to SUMO proteins at conserved lysines in their C-terminal domain. No obvious effects of SUMOylation were detected on bulk N-Myc stability or activities, including the regulation of transcription, proliferation or apoptosis. N-Myc SUMOylation could be induced by cellular stresses, such as heat shock and proteasome inhibition, and in all instances concerned a small fraction of the N-Myc protein. We surmise that, as shown for other substrates, SUMOylation may be part of a quality-control mechanism acting on misfolded Myc proteins. PMID:24608896

  19. Sumoylation in Synaptic Function and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Schorova, Lenka; Martin, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Sumoylation has recently emerged as a key post-translational modification involved in many, if not all, biological processes. Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) polypeptides are covalently attached to specific lysine residues of target proteins through a dedicated enzymatic pathway. Disruption of the SUMO enzymatic pathway in the developing brain leads to lethality indicating that this process exerts a central role during embryonic and post-natal development. However, little is still known regarding how this highly dynamic protein modification is regulated in the mammalian brain despite an increasing number of data implicating sumoylated substrates in synapse formation, synaptic communication and plasticity. The aim of this review is therefore to briefly describe the enzymatic SUMO pathway and to give an overview of our current knowledge on the function and dysfunction of protein sumoylation at the mammalian synapse. PMID:27199730

  20. Nuclear receptors: emerging drug targets for parasitic diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu; Schaffer, Nathaniel E; Kliewer, Steven A; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2017-02-06

    Parasitic worms infect billions of people worldwide. Current treatments rely on a small group of drugs that have been used for decades. A shortcoming of these drugs is their inability to target the intractable infectious stage of the parasite. As well-known therapeutic targets in mammals, nuclear receptors have begun to be studied in parasitic worms, where they are widely distributed and play key roles in governing metabolic and developmental transcriptional networks. One such nuclear receptor is DAF-12, which is required for normal nematode development, including the all-important infectious stage. Here we review the emerging literature that implicates DAF-12 and potentially other nuclear receptors as novel anthelmintic targets.

  1. Is Transthyretin a Regulator of Ubc9 SUMOylation?

    PubMed Central

    Kędracka–Krok, Sylwia; Sołtys, Katarzyna; Jankowska, Urszula; Hołubowicz, Rafał; Seliga, Justyna; Ożyhar, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Ageing and mutations of transthyretin (TTR), the thyroid hormones and retinol transporting protein lead to amyloidosis by destabilizing the structure of TTR. Because protein structure is regulated through posttranslational modifications, we investigated the Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO)ylation of TTR. We chose the widely used Ubc9 fusion-directed SUMOylation system, which is based on a fusion of the SUMOylation substrate of interest with Ubc9, a sole SUMO conjugating enzyme. Surprisingly, despite our presumptions, we found that Ubc9 fused to TTR was SUMOylated at a unique set of lysine residues. Three unknown SUMOylation sites of Ubc9—K154, K18 and K65—were revealed by mass spectrometry (MS). The previously reported SUMOylation at K49 of Ubc9 was also observed. SUMOylation of the lysine residues of TTR fused to Ubc9 was hardly detectable. However, non-fused TTR was SUMOylated via trans-SUMOylation by Ubc9 fused to TTR. Interestingly, mutating the catalytic residue of Ubc9 fused to TTR did not result in complete loss of the SUMOylation signal, suggesting that Ubc9 linked to TTR is directly cross-SUMOylated by the SUMO-activating enzyme E1. Ubc9, TTR or fusion proteins composed of TTR and Ubc9 specifically affected the global SUMOylation of cellular proteins. TTR or Ubc9 alone increased global SUMOylation, whereas concomitant presence of TTR and Ubc9 did not further increase the amount of high-molecular weight (HMW) SUMO conjugates. Our data suggest that TTR may influence the SUMOylation of Ubc9, thereby altering signalling pathways in the cell. PMID:27501389

  2. Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas: Opening Access to the Biology of Nuclear Receptor Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Becnel, Lauren B.; Darlington, Yolanda F.; Ochsner, Scott A.; Easton-Marks, Jeremy R.; Watkins, Christopher M.; McOwiti, Apollo; Kankanamge, Wasula H.; Wise, Michael W.; DeHart, Michael; Margolis, Ronald N.; McKenna, Neil J.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling pathways involving nuclear receptors (NRs), their ligands and coregulators, regulate tissue-specific transcriptomes in diverse processes, including development, metabolism, reproduction, the immune response and neuronal function, as well as in their associated pathologies. The Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA) is a Consortium focused around a Hub website (www.nursa.org) that annotates and integrates diverse ‘omics datasets originating from the published literature and NURSA-funded Data Source Projects (NDSPs). These datasets are then exposed to the scientific community on an Open Access basis through user-friendly data browsing and search interfaces. Here, we describe the redesign of the Hub, version 3.0, to deploy “Web 2.0” technologies and add richer, more diverse content. The Molecule Pages, which aggregate information relevant to NR signaling pathways from myriad external databases, have been enhanced to include resources for basic scientists, such as post-translational modification sites and targeting miRNAs, and for clinicians, such as clinical trials. A portal to NURSA’s Open Access, PubMed-indexed journal Nuclear Receptor Signaling has been added to facilitate manuscript submissions. Datasets and information on reagents generated by NDSPs are available, as is information concerning periodic new NDSP funding solicitations. Finally, the new website integrates the Transcriptomine analysis tool, which allows for mining of millions of richly annotated public transcriptomic data points in the field, providing an environment for dataset re-use and citation, bench data validation and hypothesis generation. We anticipate that this new release of the NURSA database will have tangible, long term benefits for both basic and clinical research in this field. PMID:26325041

  3. The CacyBP/SIP protein is sumoylated in neuroblastoma NB2a cells.

    PubMed

    Wasik, Urszula; Filipek, Anna

    2013-11-01

    The Calcyclin binding protein and Siah-1 interacting protein (CacyBP/SIP) protein is highly expressed in mammalian brain as well as in neuroblastoma NB2a cells and pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. This protein interacts with several targets such as cytoskeletal proteins or ERK1/2 kinase and seems to be involved in many cellular processes. In this work we examined a post-translational modification of CacyBP/SIP which might have an effect on its function. Since theoretical analysis of the amino acid sequence of CacyBP/SIP indicated several lysine residues which could potentially be sumoylated we checked experimentally whether this protein might be modified by SUMO attachment. We have shown that indeed CacyBP/SIP bound the E2 SUMO ligase, Ubc9, in neuroblastoma NB2a cell extract and was sumoylated in these cells. By fractionation of NB2a cell extract we have found that, contrary to the majority of SUMO-modified proteins, sumoylated CacyBP/SIP is present in the cytoplasmic and not in the nuclear fraction. We have also established that lysine 16 is the residue which undergoes sumoylation in the CacyBP/SIP protein.

  4. Sumoylation of the Epstein-Barr Virus BZLF1 Protein Inhibits Its Transcriptional Activity and Is Regulated by the Virus-Encoded Protein Kinase▿

    PubMed Central

    Hagemeier, Stacy R.; Dickerson, Sarah J.; Meng, Qiao; Yu, Xianming; Mertz, Janet E.; Kenney, Shannon C.

    2010-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) immediate-early protein BZLF1 (Z) mediates the switch between latent and lytic EBV infection. Z not only activates early lytic viral gene transcription but also plays a direct role in lytic viral genome replication. Although a small fraction of Z is known to be sumoylated, the effects of this posttranslational modification on various different Z functions have not been well defined. In this report, we show that only the lysine at amino acid residue 12 is required for the sumoylation of Z, and that Z can be sumoylated by SUMO isoforms 1, 2, and 3. We also demonstrate that the sumo-defective Z mutants ZK12A and ZK12R have enhanced transcriptional activity. The sumoylated and nonsumoylated forms of Z were found to have a similar cellular location, both being localized primarily within the nuclear matrix. The Z sumo-defective mutants were, however, partially defective for disrupting promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies compared to the ability of wild-type Z. In addition, we show that lytic viral genome replication does not require the sumoylation of Z, although a Z mutant altered at both amino acids 12 and 13 is replication defective. Furthermore, we show that the sumoylation of Z is greatly increased (from less than 1 to about 11%) in lytically induced 293 cells infected with an EBV mutant virus deleted for the EBV-encoded protein kinase (EBV-PK) compared to that of 293 cells infected with wild-type EBV, and that the overexpression of EBV-PK leads to the reduced sumoylation of Z in EBV-negative cells. Our results suggest that the sumoylation of Z helps to promote viral latency, and that EBV-PK inhibits Z sumoylation during viral reactivation. PMID:20181712

  5. SUMOylation by the E3 ligase TbSIZ1/PIAS1 positively regulates VSG expression in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    López-Farfán, Diana; Bart, Jean-Mathieu; Rojas-Barros, Domingo I; Navarro, Miguel

    2014-12-01

    Bloodstream form trypanosomes avoid the host immune response by switching the expression of their surface proteins between Variant Surface Glycoproteins (VSG), only one of which is expressed at any given time. Monoallelic transcription of the telomeric VSG Expression Site (ES) by RNA polymerase I (RNA pol I) localizes to a unique nuclear body named the ESB. Most work has focused on silencing mechanisms of inactive VSG-ESs, but the mechanisms involved in transcriptional activation of a single VSG-ES remain largely unknown. Here, we identify a highly SUMOylated focus (HSF) in the nucleus of the bloodstream form that partially colocalizes with the ESB and the active VSG-ES locus. SUMOylation of chromatin-associated proteins was enriched along the active VSG-ES transcriptional unit, in contrast to silent VSG-ES or rDNA, suggesting that it is a distinct feature of VSG-ES monoallelic expression. In addition, sequences upstream of the active VSG-ES promoter were highly enriched in SUMOylated proteins. We identified TbSIZ1/PIAS1 as the SUMO E3 ligase responsible for SUMOylation in the active VSG-ES chromatin. Reduction of SUMO-conjugated proteins by TbSIZ1 knockdown decreased the recruitment of RNA pol I to the VSG-ES and the VSG-ES-derived transcripts. Furthermore, cells depleted of SUMO conjugated proteins by TbUBC9 and TbSUMO knockdown confirmed the positive function of SUMO for VSG-ES expression. In addition, the largest subunit of RNA pol I TbRPA1 was SUMOylated in a TbSIZ-dependent manner. Our results show a positive mechanism associated with active VSG-ES expression via post-translational modification, and indicate that chromatin SUMOylation plays an important role in the regulation of VSG-ES. Thus, protein SUMOylation is linked to active gene expression in this protozoan parasite that diverged early in evolution.

  6. Identification of Gene Markers for Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Pregnane X Receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many environmentally-relevant chemicals and drugs activate the nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR). Activation of PXR in the mouse liver can lead to increases in liver weight in part through increased hepatocyte replication similar to chemicals that activate other nuclear ...

  7. Hairless is a nuclear receptor corepressor essential for skin function

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    The activity of nuclear receptors is modulated by numerous coregulatory factors. Corepressors can either mediate the ability of nuclear receptors to repress transcription, or can inhibit transactivation by nuclear receptors. As we learn more about the mechanisms of transcriptional repression, the importance of repression by nuclear receptors in development and disease has become clear. The protein encoded by the mammalian Hairless (Hr) gene was shown to be a corepressor by virtue of its functional similarity to the well-established corepressors N-CoR and SMRT. Mutation of the Hr gene results in congenital hair loss in both mice and men. Investigation of Hairless function both in vitro and in mouse models in vivo has revealed a critical role in maintaining skin and hair by regulating the differentiation of epithelial stem cells, as well as a putative role in regulating gene expression via chromatin remodeling. PMID:20087431

  8. The association between nuclear receptors and ocular diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ke; Zou, Chang; Qin, Bo

    2017-02-07

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) are one of the most abundant transcription factors in the human cells. They regulate expression of genes via interactions with corresponding ligands, co-activators, and co-repressors. These molecular pathways play important roles in the development, cell differentiation, and physiologic and metabolic processes. Increasingly, targeting nuclear receptors is becoming a promising strategy for new drug development. The aim of this review is to discuss the association between nuclear receptors and eye development, and expand their role in various ocular diseases such as keratitis, cataract, glaucoma, uveitis, retinopathy, and ophthalmic tumors. Recent studies in this area are highlighted as well as future research directions and potential clinical applications. Finally, various strategies will be elucidated to inspire more targeted therapies for ocular diseases through the use of nuclear receptors.

  9. Alteration of FXR phosphorylation and sumoylation in liver in the development of adult catch-up growth.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiang; Zhang, Qiao; Zheng, Juan; Kong, Wen; Zhang, Hao-Hao; Zeng, Tian-Shu; Zhang, Jiao-Yue; Min, Jie; Wu, Chaodong; Chen, Lu-Lu

    2017-02-01

    Catch-up growth in adult, is increasingly recognized as an important causative factor for the extremely prevalent insulin resistance-related diseases especially in developing countries/territories. We aimed to investigate the alteration of bile acids level, phosphorylation and sumoylation of its interacting protein, bile acid receptor/farnesoid X receptor and their downstream signaling pathway, as well as insulin sensitivity and lipid profile in catch-up growth in adult rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated into four groups for two sampling points: caloric restriction group, catch-up growth in adult refed with normal chow and their normal chow controls for four or eight weeks (N4, N8 individually).We found that total serum bile acids and farnesoid X receptor phosphorylation increased without significant changes in farnesoid X receptor sumoylation and its downstream small heterodimer partner expression at the end of caloric restriction stage, while the visceral fat decreased and insulin resistance never occurred in these animals; After refeeding, total serum bile acids, farnesoid X receptor phosphorylation and sumoylation, as well as Cyp7a1, SREBP-1c mRNA levels were higher with significant decrease in small heterodimer partner expression, which is associated fat accumulation, and drastic insulin resistance in whole body and skeletal muscle. Our findings demonstrated that the fat accumulation and insulin resistance are associated with increases of bile acids, alteration of farnesoid X receptor phosphorylation, and sumoylation and its downstream signaling pathway. These changes of bile acids, farnesoid X receptor phosphorylation and sumoylation, as well as their downstream signaling might be of importance in the etiology of fat accumulation and insulin resistance in catch-up growth in adult.

  10. IRTKS negatively regulates antiviral immunity through PCBP2 sumoylation-mediated MAVS degradation

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Pengyan; Wang, Shuo; Xiong, Zhen; Ye, Buqing; Huang, Li-Yu; Han, Ze-Guang; Fan, Zusen

    2015-01-01

    RNA virus infection is recognized by the RIG-I family of receptors that activate the mitochondrial adaptor MAVS, leading to the clearance of viruses. Antiviral signalling activation requires strict modulation to avoid damage to the host from exacerbated inflammation. Insulin receptor tyrosine kinase substrate (IRTKS) participates in actin bundling and insulin signalling and its deficiency causes insulin resistance. However, whether IRTKS is involved in the regulation of innate immunity remains elusive. Here we show that IRTKS deficiency causes enhanced innate immune responses against RNA viruses. IRTKS-mediated suppression of antiviral responses depends on the RIG-I-MAVS signalling pathway. IRTKS recruits the E2 ligase Ubc9 to sumoylate PCBP2 in the nucleus, which causes its cytoplasmic translocation during viral infection. The sumoylated PCBP2 associates with MAVS to initiate its degradation, leading to downregulation of antiviral responses. Thus, IRTKS functions as a negative modulator of excessive inflammation. PMID:26348439

  11. Identification of cell-specific targets of sumoylation during mouse spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuxuan; Pollack, Daniel; Andrusier, Miriam; Levy, Avi; Callaway, Myrasol; Nieves, Edward; Reddi, Prabhakara; Vigodner, Margarita

    2016-02-01

    Recent findings suggest diverse and potentially multiple roles of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) in testicular function and spermatogenesis. However, SUMO targets remain uncharacterized in the testis due to the complex multicellular nature of testicular tissue, the inability to maintain and manipulate spermatogenesis in vitro, and the technical challenges involved in identifying low-abundance endogenous SUMO targets. In this study, we performed cell-specific identification of sumoylated proteins using concentrated cell lysates prepared with de-sumoylation inhibitors from freshly purified spermatocytes and spermatids. One-hundred and twenty proteins were uniquely identified in the spermatocyte and/or spermatid fractions. The identified proteins are involved in the regulation of transcription, stress response, microRNA biogenesis, regulation of major enzymatic pathways, nuclear-cytoplasmic transport, cell-cycle control, acrosome biogenesis, and other processes. Several proteins with important roles during spermatogenesis were chosen for further characterization by co-immunoprecipitation, co-localization, and in vitro sumoylation studies. GPS-SUMO Software was used to identify consensus and non-consensus sumoylation sites within the amino acid sequences of the proteins. The analyses confirmed the cell-specific sumoylation and/or SUMO interaction of several novel, previously uncharacterized SUMO targets such as CDK1, RNAP II, CDC5, MILI, DDX4, TDP-43, and STK31. Furthermore, several proteins that were previously identified as SUMO targets in somatic cells (KAP1 and MDC1) were identified as SUMO targets in germ cells. Many of these proteins have a unique role in spermatogenesis and during meiotic progression. This research opens a novel avenue for further studies of SUMO at the level of individual targets.

  12. Identification of cell-specific targets of sumoylation during mouse spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yuxuan; Pollack, Daniel; Andrusier, Miriam; Levy, Avi; Callaway, Myrasol; Nieves, Edward; Reddi, Prabhakara; Vigodner, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings suggest diverse and potentially multiple roles of SUMO in testicular function and spermatogenesis. However, SUMO targets remain uncharacterized in the testis due to the complex multicellular nature of testicular tissue, the inability to maintain and manipulate spermatogenesis in vitro, and the technical challenges involved in identifying low-abundance endogenous SUMO targets. In this study, we performed cell-specific identification of sumoylated proteins using concentrated cell lysates prepared with de-sumoylation inhibitors from freshly purified spermatocytes and spermatids. One-hundred and twenty proteins were uniquely identified in the spermatocyte and/or spermatid fractions. The identified proteins are involved in the regulation of transcription, stress response, microRNA biogenesis, regulation of major enzymatic pathways, nuclear-cytoplasmic transport, cell cycle control, acrosome biogenesis, and other processes. Several proteins with important roles during spermatogenesis were chosen for further characterization by co-immunoprecipitation, co-localization and in-vitro sumoylation studies. GPS-SUMO software was used to identify consensus and non-consensus sumoylation sites within the amino acid sequences of the proteins. The analyses confirmed the cell-specific sumoylation and/or SUMO interaction of several novel, previously uncharacterized SUMO targets such as CDK1, RNAP II, CDC5, MILI, DDX4, TDP-43 and STK31. Furthermore, several proteins that were previously identified as SUMO targets in somatic cells (e.g., KAP1, MDC1) were identified as SUMO targets in germ cells. Many of these proteins have a unique role in spermatogenesis and during meiotic progression. This research opens a novel avenue for further studies of SUMO at the level of individual targets. PMID:26701181

  13. NucleaRDB: information system for nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Vroling, Bas; Thorne, David; McDermott, Philip; Joosten, Henk-Jan; Attwood, Teresa K; Pettifer, Steve; Vriend, Gert

    2012-01-01

    The NucleaRDB is a Molecular Class-Specific Information System that collects, combines, validates and disseminates large amounts of heterogeneous data on nuclear hormone receptors. It contains both experimental and computationally derived data. The data and knowledge present in the NucleaRDB can be accessed using a number of different interactive and programmatic methods and query systems. A nuclear hormone receptor-specific PDF reader interface is available that can integrate the contents of the NucleaRDB with full-text scientific articles. The NucleaRDB is freely available at http://www.receptors.org/nucleardb.

  14. Rational discovery of novel nuclear hormone receptor antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schapira, Matthieu; Raaka, Bruce M.; Samuels, Herbert H.; Abagyan, Ruben

    2000-02-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) are potential targets for therapeutic approaches to many clinical conditions, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological diseases. The crystal structure of the ligand binding domain of agonist-bound NRs enables the design of compounds with agonist activity. However, with the exception of the human estrogen receptor-, the lack of antagonist-bound "inactive" receptor structures hinders the rational design of receptor antagonists. In this study, we present a strategy for designing such antagonists. We constructed a model of the inactive conformation of human retinoic acid receptor- by using information derived from antagonist-bound estrogen receptor-α and applied a computer-based virtual screening algorithm to identify retinoic acid receptor antagonists. Thus, the currently available crystal structures of NRs may be used for the rational design of antagonists, which could lead to the development of novel drugs for a variety of diseases.

  15. Regulation of germ cell function by SUMOylation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Amanda; Pangas, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Oogenesis and spermatogenesis are tightly regulated complex processes that are critical for fertility function. Germ cells undergo meiosis to generate haploid cells necessary for reproduction. Errors in meiosis, including the generation of chromosomal abnormalities, can result in reproductive defects and infertility. Meiotic proteins are regulated by post-translational modifications including SUMOylation, the covalent attachment of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteins. Here, we review the role of SUMO proteins in controlling germ cell development and maturation based on recent findings from mouse models. Several studies have characterized the localization of SUMO proteins in male and female germ cells. However, a deeper understanding of how SUMOylation regulates proteins with essential roles in oogenesis and spermatogenesis will provide useful insight into the underlying mechanisms of germ cell development and fertility. PMID:26374733

  16. Pan-cancer analyses of the nuclear receptor superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Long, Mark D.; Campbell, Moray J.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NR) act as an integrated conduit for environmental and hormonal signals to govern genomic responses, which relate to cell fate decisions. We review how their integrated actions with each other, shared co-factors and other transcription factors are disrupted in cancer. Steroid hormone nuclear receptors are oncogenic drivers in breast and prostate cancer and blockade of signaling is a major therapeutic goal. By contrast to blockade of receptors, in other cancers enhanced receptor function is attractive, as illustrated initially with targeting of retinoic acid receptors in leukemia. In the post-genomic era large consortia, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas, have developed a remarkable volume of genomic data with which to examine multiple aspects of nuclear receptor status in a pan-cancer manner. Therefore to extend the review of NR function we have also undertaken bioinformatics analyses of NR expression in over 3000 tumors, spread across six different tumor types (bladder, breast, colon, head and neck, liver and prostate). Specifically, to ask how the NR expression was distorted (altered expression, mutation and CNV) we have applied bootstrapping approaches to simulate data for comparison, and also compared these NR findings to 12 other transcription factor families. Nuclear receptors were uniquely and uniformly downregulated across all six tumor types, more than predicted by chance. These approaches also revealed that each tumor type had a specific NR expression profile but these were most similar between breast and prostate cancer. Some NRs were down-regulated in at least five tumor types (e.g. NR3C2/MR and NR5A2/LRH-1)) whereas others were uniquely down-regulated in one tumor (e.g. NR1B3/RARG). The downregulation was not driven by copy number variation or mutation and epigenetic mechanisms maybe responsible for the altered nuclear receptor expression. PMID:27200367

  17. Importance of the regulation of nuclear receptor degradation.

    PubMed

    Dennis, A P; Haq, R U; Nawaz, Z

    2001-08-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) represent a superfamily of structurally related ligand-activated transcription factors, which regulate diverse biological activities like growth, development, and homeostasis. Recently, it has been demonstrated that certain members of the NHR superfamily are degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in a ligand-dependent manner. Though the signal for the down-regulation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is not yet known, phosphorylation at specific amino acid residues or coactivator binding to receptors could lead to their degradation by the 26S proteasome. Activation and degradation seems to be an engineered cyclic mechanism, which provides tight control over diverse cellular processes. The degradation process involves extensive loss of proteins and requires expenditure of cellular ATP. That seems to be inevitable for a more important aim, that is efficient and appropriate regulation of transcription. Down-regulation of receptors would lead to an attenuated transcriptional response because the number of receptor molecules available to activate transcription would decrease over time. One of the obvious reasons for down-regulating NHRs thus seems to be to prevent the cell from overstimulation by the hormones or other activating signals. Nuclear receptor turnover may also reset the transcriptional apparatus in preparation for a subsequent response. Since inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome degradation pathway disturbs the transcriptional activitity of some of the nuclear receptors such as estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptors, it is also possible that the degradation of NHRs may enable recycling of components of receptor-cofactor complexes and general transcriptional machinary. Understanding the mechanism of nuclear hormone receptor degradation and its relation to transcription may lead to novel insights of therapuetic intervention.

  18. Cardiac nuclear receptors: architects of mitochondrial structure and function.

    PubMed

    Vega, Rick B; Kelly, Daniel P

    2017-04-03

    The adult heart is uniquely designed and equipped to provide a continuous supply of energy in the form of ATP to support persistent contractile function. This high-capacity energy transduction system is the result of a remarkable surge in mitochondrial biogenesis and maturation during the fetal-to-adult transition in cardiac development. Substantial evidence indicates that nuclear receptor signaling is integral to dynamic changes in the cardiac mitochondrial phenotype in response to developmental cues, in response to diverse postnatal physiologic conditions, and in disease states such as heart failure. A subset of cardiac-enriched nuclear receptors serve to match mitochondrial fuel preferences and capacity for ATP production with changing energy demands of the heart. In this Review, we describe the role of specific nuclear receptors and their coregulators in the dynamic control of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism in the normal and diseased heart.

  19. SUMOylation-disrupting WAS mutation converts WASp from a transcriptional activator to a repressor of NF-κB response genes in T cells.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Koustav; Sadhukhan, Sanjoy; Han, Seong-Su; Vyas, Yatin M

    2015-10-01

    In Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), immunodeficiency and autoimmunity often comanifest, yet how WAS mutations misregulate chromatin-signaling in Thelper (TH) cells favoring development of auto-inflammation over protective immunity is unclear. Previously, we identified an essential promoter-specific, coactivator role of nuclear-WASp in TH1 gene transcription. Here we identify small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO)ylation as a novel posttranslational modification of WASp, impairment of which converts nuclear-WASp from a transcriptional coactivator to a corepressor of nuclear factor (NF)-κB response genes in human (TH)1-differentiating cells. V75M, one of many disease-causing mutations occurring in SUMO*motif (72-ψψψψKDxxxxSY-83) of WASp, compromises WASp-SUMOylation, associates with COMMD1 to attenuate NF-κB signaling, and recruits histone deacetylases-6 (HDAC6) to p300-marked promoters of NF-κB response genes that pattern immunity but not inflammation. Consequently, proteins mediating adaptive immunity (IFNG, STAT1, TLR1) are deficient, whereas those mediating auto-inflammation (GM-CSF, TNFAIP2, IL-1β) are paradoxically increased in TH1 cells expressing SUMOylation-deficient WASp. Moreover, SUMOylation-deficient WASp favors ectopic development of the TH17-like phenotype (↑IL17A, IL21, IL22, IL23R, RORC, and CSF2) under TH1-skewing conditions, suggesting a role for WASp in modulating TH1/TH17 plasticity. Notably, pan-histone deacetylase inhibitors lift promoter-specific repression imposed by SUMOylation-deficient WASp and restore misregulated gene expression. Our findings uncovering a SUMOylation-based mechanism controlling WASp's dichotomous roles in transcription may have implications for personalized therapy for patients carrying mutations that perturb WASp-SUMOylation.

  20. SUMOylation-disrupting WAS mutation converts WASp from a transcriptional activator to a repressor of NF-κB response genes in T cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Koustav; Sadhukhan, Sanjoy; Han, Seong-Su

    2015-01-01

    In Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), immunodeficiency and autoimmunity often comanifest, yet how WAS mutations misregulate chromatin-signaling in Thelper (TH) cells favoring development of auto-inflammation over protective immunity is unclear. Previously, we identified an essential promoter-specific, coactivator role of nuclear-WASp in TH1 gene transcription. Here we identify small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO)ylation as a novel posttranslational modification of WASp, impairment of which converts nuclear-WASp from a transcriptional coactivator to a corepressor of nuclear factor (NF)-κB response genes in human (TH)1-differentiating cells. V75M, one of many disease-causing mutations occurring in SUMO*motif (72-ψψψψKDxxxxSY-83) of WASp, compromises WASp-SUMOylation, associates with COMMD1 to attenuate NF-κB signaling, and recruits histone deacetylases-6 (HDAC6) to p300-marked promoters of NF-κB response genes that pattern immunity but not inflammation. Consequently, proteins mediating adaptive immunity (IFNG, STAT1, TLR1) are deficient, whereas those mediating auto-inflammation (GM-CSF, TNFAIP2, IL-1β) are paradoxically increased in TH1 cells expressing SUMOylation-deficient WASp. Moreover, SUMOylation-deficient WASp favors ectopic development of the TH17-like phenotype (↑IL17A, IL21, IL22, IL23R, RORC, and CSF2) under TH1-skewing conditions, suggesting a role for WASp in modulating TH1/TH17 plasticity. Notably, pan-histone deacetylase inhibitors lift promoter-specific repression imposed by SUMOylation-deficient WASp and restore misregulated gene expression. Our findings uncovering a SUMOylation-based mechanism controlling WASp’s dichotomous roles in transcription may have implications for personalized therapy for patients carrying mutations that perturb WASp-SUMOylation. PMID:26261240

  1. Nuclear transportation of exogenous epidermal growth factor receptor and androgen receptor via extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Read, Jolene; Ingram, Alistair; Al Saleh, Hassan A; Platko, Khrystyna; Gabriel, Kathleen; Kapoor, Anil; Pinthus, Jehonathan; Majeed, Fadwa; Qureshi, Talha; Al-Nedawi, Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays a central role in the progression of several human malignancies. Although EGFR is a membrane receptor, it undergoes nuclear translocation, where it has a distinct signalling pathway. Herein, we report a novel mechanism by which cancer cells can directly transport EGFR to the nucleus of other cells via extracellular vesicles (EVs). The transported receptor is active and stimulates the nuclear EGFR pathways. Interestingly, the translocation of EGFR via EVs occurs independently of the nuclear localisation sequence that is required for nuclear translocation of endogenous EGFR. Also, we found that the mutant receptor EGFRvIII could be transported to the nucleus of other cells via EVs. To assess the role of EVs in the regulation of an actual nuclear receptor, we studied the regulation of androgen receptor (AR). We found that full-length AR and mutant variant ARv7 are secreted in EVs derived from prostate cancer cell lines and could be transported to the nucleus of AR-null cells. The EV-derived AR was able to bind the androgen-responsive promoter region of prostate specific antigen, and recruit RNA Pol II, an indication of active transcription. The nuclear-translocated AR via EVs enhanced the proliferation of acceptor cells in the absence of androgen. Finally, we provide evidence that nuclear localisation of AR could occur in vivo via orthotopically-injected EVs in male SCID mice prostate glands. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing the nuclear translocation of nuclear receptors via EVs, which significantly extends the role of EVs as paracrine transcriptional regulators.

  2. Emerging roles of sumoylation in the regulation of actin, microtubules, intermediate filaments, and septins

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Annabel; Greenlee, Matt; Matts, Jessica; Kline, Jake; Davis, Kayla J.

    2015-01-01

    Sumoylation is a powerful regulatory system that controls many of the critical processes in the cell, including DNA repair, transcriptional regulation, nuclear transport, and DNA replication. Recently, new functions for SUMO have begun to emerge. SUMO is covalently attached to components of each of the four major cytoskeletal networks, including microtubule‐associated proteins, septins, and intermediate filaments, in addition to nuclear actin and actin‐regulatory proteins. However, knowledge of the mechanisms by which this signal transduction system controls the cytoskeleton is still in its infancy. One story that is beginning to unfold is that SUMO may regulate the microtubule motor protein dynein by modification of its adaptor Lis1. In other instances, cytoskeletal elements can both bind to SUMO non‐covalently and also be conjugated by it. The molecular mechanisms for many of these new functions are not yet clear, but are under active investigation. One emerging model links the function of MAP sumoylation to protein degradation through SUMO‐targeted ubiquitin ligases, also known as STUbL enzymes. Other possible functions for cytoskeletal sumoylation are also discussed. © 2015 The Authors. Cytoskeleton Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26033929

  3. Emerging functional roles of nuclear receptors in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Doan, Tram B; Graham, J Dinny; Clarke, Christine L

    2017-04-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) have been targets of intensive drug development for decades due to their roles as key regulators of multiple developmental, physiological and disease processes. In breast cancer, expression of the estrogen and progesterone receptor remains clinically important in predicting prognosis and determining therapeutic strategies. More recently, there is growing evidence supporting the involvement of multiple nuclear receptors other than the estrogen and progesterone receptors, in the regulation of various processes important to the initiation and progression of breast cancer. We review new insights into the mechanisms of action of NRs made possible by recent advances in genomic technologies and focus on the emerging functional roles of NRs in breast cancer biology, including their involvement in circadian regulation, metabolic reprogramming and breast cancer migration and metastasis.

  4. Elevated copper impairs hepatic nuclear receptor function in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wooton-Kee, Clavia Ruth; Jain, Ajay K; Wagner, Martin; Grusak, Michael A; Finegold, Milton J; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Moore, David D

    2015-09-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in accumulation of copper in the liver as a consequence of mutations in the gene encoding the copper-transporting P-type ATPase (ATP7B). WD is a chronic liver disorder, and individuals with the disease present with a variety of complications, including steatosis, cholestasis, cirrhosis, and liver failure. Similar to patients with WD, Atp7b⁻/⁻ mice have markedly elevated levels of hepatic copper and liver pathology. Previous studies have demonstrated that replacement of zinc in the DNA-binding domain of the estrogen receptor (ER) with copper disrupts specific binding to DNA response elements. Here, we found decreased binding of the nuclear receptors FXR, RXR, HNF4α, and LRH-1 to promoter response elements and decreased mRNA expression of nuclear receptor target genes in Atp7b⁻/⁻ mice, as well as in adult and pediatric WD patients. Excessive hepatic copper has been described in progressive familial cholestasis (PFIC), and we found that similar to individuals with WD, patients with PFIC2 or PFIC3 who have clinically elevated hepatic copper levels exhibit impaired nuclear receptor activity. Together, these data demonstrate that copper-mediated nuclear receptor dysfunction disrupts liver function in WD and potentially in other disorders associated with increased hepatic copper levels.

  5. Nuclear tristetraprolin acts as a corepressor of multiple steroid nuclear receptors in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Barrios-García, Tonatiuh; Gómez-Romero, Vania; Tecalco-Cruz, Ángeles; Valadéz-Graham, Viviana; León-Del-Río, Alfonso

    2016-06-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is a 34-kDa, zinc finger-containing factor that in mammalian cells acts as a tumor suppressor protein through two different mechanisms. In the cytoplasm TTP promotes the decay of hundreds of mRNAs encoding cell factors involved in inflammation, tissue invasion, and metastasis. In the cell nucleus TTP has been identified as a transcriptional corepressor of the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), which has been associated to the development and progression of the majority of breast cancer tumors. In this work we report that nuclear TTP modulates the transactivation activity of progesterone receptor (PR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and androgen receptor (AR). In recent years these steroid nuclear receptors have been shown to be of clinical and therapeutical relevance in breast cancer. The functional association between TTP and steroid nuclear receptors is supported by the finding that TTP physically interacts with ERα, PR, GR and AR in vivo. We also show that TTP overexpression attenuates the transactivation of all the steroid nuclear receptors tested. In contrast, siRNA-mediated reduction of endogenous TTP expression in MCF-7 cells produced an increase in the transcriptional activities of ERα, PR, GR and AR. Taken together, these results suggest that the function of nuclear TTP in breast cancer cells is to act as a corepressor of ERα, PR, GR and AR. We propose that the reduction of TTP expression observed in different types of breast cancer tumors may contribute to the development of this disease by producing a dysregulation of the transactivation activity of multiple steroid nuclear receptors.

  6. Orphan Nuclear Receptors as Targets for Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Subhajit

    2012-01-01

    Orphan nuclear receptors regulate diverse biological processes. These important molecules are ligand-activated transcription factors that act as natural sensors for a wide range of steroid hormones and xenobiotic ligands. Because of their importance in regulating various novel signaling pathways, recent research has focused on identifying xenobiotics targeting these receptors for the treatment of multiple human diseases. In this review, we will highlight these receptors in several physiologic and pathophysiologic actions and demonstrate how their functions can be exploited for the successful development of newer drugs. PMID:20372994

  7. Detection of Protein SUMOylation In Situ by Proximity Ligation Assays.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Umut; Jollivet, Florence; Berthier, Caroline; de Thé, Hugues; Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Sumoylation is a posttranslational process essential for life and concerns a growing number of crucial proteins. Understanding the influence of this phenomenon on individual proteins or on cellular pathways in which they function has become an intense area of research. A critical step in studying protein sumoylation is to detect sumoylated forms of a particular protein. This has proven to be a challenging task for a number of reasons, especially in the case of endogenous proteins and in vivo studies or when studying rare cells such as stem cells. Proximity ligation assays that allow detection of closely interacting protein partners can be adapted for initial detection of endogenous sumoylation or ubiquitination in a rapid, ultrasensitive, and cheap manner. In addition, modified forms of a given protein can be detected in situ in various cellular compartments. Finally, the flexibility of this technique may allow rapid screening of drugs and stress signals that may modulate protein sumoylation.

  8. SUMOylated IRF-1 shows oncogenic potential by mimicking IRF-2

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sun-Mi; Chae, Myounghee; Kim, Bo-Kyoung; Seo, Taegun; Jang, Ik-Soon; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kim, Il-Chul; Lee, Je-Ho; Park, Junsoo

    2010-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) is an interferon-induced transcriptional activator that suppresses tumors by impeding cell proliferation. Recently, we demonstrated that the level of SUMOylated IRF-1 is elevated in tumor cells, and that SUMOylation of IRF-1 attenuates its tumor-suppressive function. Here we report that SUMOylated IRF-1 mimics IRF-2, an antagonistic repressor, and shows oncogenic potential. To demonstrate the role of SUMOylated IRF-1 in tumorigenesis, we used SUMO-IRF-1 recombinant protein. Stable expression of SUMO-IRF-1 in NIH3T3 cells resulted in focus formation and anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. Inoculation of SUMO-IRF-1-transfected cells into athymic nude mice resulted in tumor formation and infiltration of adipose tissues. Finally, we demonstrated that SUMO-IRF-1 transforms NIH3T3 cells in a dose-dependent manner suggesting that SUMOylated IRF-1 may act as an oncogenic protein in tumor cells.

  9. Review: Receptor Targeted Nuclear Imaging of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dalm, Simone U; Verzijlbergen, John Fred; De Jong, Marion

    2017-01-26

    Receptor targeted nuclear imaging directed against molecular markers overexpressed on breast cancer (BC) cells offers a sensitive and specific method for BC imaging. Currently, a few targets such as estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), somatostatin receptor (SSTR), and the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) are being investigated for this purpose. Expression of these targets is BC subtype dependent and information that can be gained from lesion visualization is dependent on the target; ER-targeting radiotracers, e.g., can be used to monitor response to anti-estrogen treatment. Here we give an overview of the studies currently under investigation for receptor targeted nuclear imaging of BC. Main findings of imaging studies are summarized and (potential) purposes of lesion visualization by targeting these molecular markers are discussed. Since BC is a very heterogeneous disease and molecular target expression can vary per subtype, but also during disease progression or under influence of treatment, radiotracers for selected imaging purposes should be chosen carefully.

  10. Review: Receptor Targeted Nuclear Imaging of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dalm, Simone U.; Verzijlbergen, John Fred; De Jong, Marion

    2017-01-01

    Receptor targeted nuclear imaging directed against molecular markers overexpressed on breast cancer (BC) cells offers a sensitive and specific method for BC imaging. Currently, a few targets such as estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), somatostatin receptor (SSTR), and the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) are being investigated for this purpose. Expression of these targets is BC subtype dependent and information that can be gained from lesion visualization is dependent on the target; ER-targeting radiotracers, e.g., can be used to monitor response to anti-estrogen treatment. Here we give an overview of the studies currently under investigation for receptor targeted nuclear imaging of BC. Main findings of imaging studies are summarized and (potential) purposes of lesion visualization by targeting these molecular markers are discussed. Since BC is a very heterogeneous disease and molecular target expression can vary per subtype, but also during disease progression or under influence of treatment, radiotracers for selected imaging purposes should be chosen carefully. PMID:28134770

  11. Structures and regulation of non-X orphan nuclear receptors: A retinoid hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Xiaoyong; Zhou, X Edward; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear receptors are defined as a family of ligand regulated transcription factors [1-6]. While this definition reflects that ligand binding is a key property of nuclear receptors, it is still a heated subject of debate if all the nuclear receptors (48 human members) can bind ligands (ligands referred here to both physiological and synthetic ligands). Recent studies in nuclear receptor structure biology and pharmacology have undoubtedly increased our knowledge of nuclear receptor functions and their regulation. As a result, they point to new avenues for the discovery and development of nuclear receptor regulators, including nuclear receptor ligands. Here we review the recent literature on orphan nuclear receptor structural analysis and ligand identification, particularly on the orphan nuclear receptors that do not heterodimerize with retinoid X receptors, which we term as non-X orphan receptors. We also propose a speculative "retinoid hypothesis" for a subset of non-X orphan nuclear receptors, which we hope to help shed light on orphan nuclear receptor biology and drug discovery. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Orphan Nuclear Receptors'.

  12. Autoinduction of nuclear hormone receptors during metamorphosis and its significance.

    PubMed

    Tata, J R

    2000-01-01

    Metamorphosis is a most dramatic example of hormonally regulated genetic reprogramming during postembryonic development. The initiation and sustenance of the process are under the control of ecdysteroids in invertebrates and thyroid hormone, 3,3', 5-triiodothyronine, in oviparous vertebrates. Their actions are inhibited or potentiated by other endogenous or exogenous hormones - juvenile hormone in invertebrates and prolactin and glucocorticoids in vertebrates. The nuclear receptors for ecdysteroids and thyroid hormone are the most closely related members of the steroid/retinoid/thyroid hormone receptor supergene family. In many pre-metamorphic amphibia and insects, the onset of natural metamorphosis and the administration of the exogenous hormones to the early larvae are characterized by a substantial and rapid autoinduction of the respective nuclear receptors. This review will largely deal with the phenomenon of receptor autoinduction during amphibian metamorphosis, although many of its features resemble those in insect metamorphosis. In the frog Xenopus, thyroid hormone receptor autoinduction has been shown to be brought about by the direct interaction between the receptor protein and the thyroid-responsive elements in the promoter of its own gene. Three lines of evidence point towards the involvement of receptor autoinduction in the process of initiation of amphibian metamorphosis: (1) a close association between the extent of inhibition or potentiation by prolactin and glucocorticoid, respectively, and metamorphic response in whole tadpoles and in organ and cell cultures; (2) thyroid hormone fails to upregulate the expression of its own receptor in obligatorily neotenic amphibia but does so in facultatively neotenic amphibia; and (3) dominant-negative receptors known to block hormonal response prevent the autoinduction of wild-type Xenopus receptors in vivo and in cell lines. Autoinduction is not restricted to insect and amphibian metamorphic hormones but is

  13. Limited proteolysis for assaying ligand binding affinities of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Benkoussa, M; Nominé, B; Mouchon, A; Lefebvre, B; Bernardon, J M; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1997-01-01

    The binding of natural or synthetic ligands to nuclear receptors is the triggering event leading to gene transcription activation or repression. Ligand binding to the ligand binding domain of these receptors induces conformational changes that are evidenced by an increased resistance of this domain to proteases. In vitro labeled receptors were incubated with various synthetic or natural agonists or antagonists and submitted to trypsin digestion. Proteolysis products were separated by SDS-PAGE and quantified. The amount of trypsin-resistant fragments was proportional to receptor occupancy by the ligand, and allowed the determination of dissociation constants (kDa). Using the wild-type or mutated human retinoic acid receptor alpha as a model, kDa values determined by classical competition binding assays using tritiated ligands are in agreement with those measured by the proteolytic assay. This method was successfully extended to human retinoic X receptor alpha, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, thus providing a basis for a new, faster assay to determine simultaneously the affinity and conformation of receptors when bound to a given ligand.

  14. Regulation of the cytosolic sulfotransferases by nuclear receptors

    PubMed Central

    Runge-Morris, Melissa; Kocarek, Thomas A.; Falany, Charles N.

    2013-01-01

    The cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs) are a multigene family of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a sulfonate group from the physiologic sulfate donor, 3′-phosphoadenosine-5′-phosphosulfate, to a nucleophilic substrate to generate a polar product that is more amenable to elimination from the body. As catalysts of both xenobiotic and endogenous metabolism, the SULTs are major points of contact between the external and physiological environments, and modulation of SULT-catalyzed metabolism can not only affect xenobiotic disposition, but it can also alter endogenous metabolic processes. Therefore, it is not surprising that SULT expression is regulated by numerous members of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily that function as sensors of xenobiotics as well as endogenous molecules, such as fatty acids, bile acids, and oxysterols. These NRs include the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, liver X receptors, farnesoid X receptor, retinoid-related orphan receptors, and estrogen-related receptors. This review summarizes current information about NR regulation of SULT expression. Because species differences in SULT subfamily composition and tissue-, sex-, development-, and inducer-dependent regulation are prominent, these differences will be emphasized throughout the review. In addition, because of the central role of the SULTs in cellular physiology, the effect of NR-mediated SULT regulation on physiological and pathophysiological processes will be discussed. Gaps in current knowledge that require further investigation are also highlighted. PMID:23330539

  15. Nuclear Receptor Activity and Liver Cancer Lesion Progression

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that control diverse cellular processes. Chronic stimulation of some NRs is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. We explored this question using human CAR, PXR, PPARα,...

  16. Dietary modification of metabolic pathways via nuclear hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Caiozzi, Gianella; Wong, Brian S; Ricketts, Marie-Louise

    2012-10-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs), as ligand-dependent transcription factors, have emerged as important mediators in the control of whole body metabolism. Because of the promiscuous nature of several members of this superfamily that have been found to bind ligand with lower affinity than the classical steroid NHRs, they consequently display a broader ligand selectivity. This promiscuous nature has facilitated various bioactive dietary components being able to act as agonist ligands for certain members of the NHR superfamily. By binding to these NHRs, bioactive dietary components are able to mediate changes in various metabolic pathways, including, glucose, cholesterol and triglyceride homeostasis among others. This review will provide a general overview of the nuclear hormone receptors that have been shown to be activated by dietary components. The physiological consequences of such receptor activation by these dietary components will then be discussed in more detail.

  17. Cooling-induced SUMOylation of EXOSC10 down-regulates ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Knight, John R P; Bastide, Amandine; Peretti, Diego; Roobol, Anne; Roobol, Jo; Mallucci, Giovanna R; Smales, C Mark; Willis, Anne E

    2016-04-01

    The RNA exosome is essential for 3' processing of functional RNA species and degradation of aberrant RNAs in eukaryotic cells. Recent reports have defined the substrates of the exosome catalytic domains and solved the multimeric structure of the exosome complex. However, regulation of exosome activity remains poorly characterized, especially in response to physiological stress. Following the observation that cooling of mammalian cells results in a reduction in 40S:60S ribosomal subunit ratio, we uncover regulation of the nuclear exosome as a result of reduced temperature. Using human cells and an in vivo model system allowing whole-body cooling, we observe reduced EXOSC10 (hRrp6, Pm/Scl-100) expression in the cold. In parallel, both models of cooling increase global SUMOylation, leading to the identification of specific conjugation of SUMO1 to EXOSC10, a process that is increased by cooling. Furthermore, we define the major SUMOylation sites in EXOSC10 by mutagenesis and show that overexpression of SUMO1 alone is sufficient to suppress EXOSC10 abundance. Reducing EXOSC10 expression by RNAi in human cells correlates with the 3' preribosomal RNA processing defects seen in the cold as well as reducing the 40S:60S ratio, a previously uncharacterized consequence of EXOSC10 suppression. Together, this work illustrates that EXOSC10 can be modified by SUMOylation and identifies a physiological stress where this regulation is prevalent both in vitro and in vivo.

  18. SUMOylation at K707 of DGCR8 controls direct function of primary microRNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Changhong; Chen, Cheng; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Hailong; Zhao, Xian; Deng, Rong; Dou, Jinzhuo; Jin, Hui; Chen, Ran; Xu, Ming; Chen, Qin; Wang, Yanli; Yu, Jianxiu

    2015-01-01

    DGCR8 (DiGeorge syndrome critical region gene 8) is essential for primary microRNA (pri-miRNA) processing in the cell nucleus. It specifically combines with Drosha, a nuclear RNase III enzyme, to form the Microprocessor complex (MC) that cleaves pri-miRNA to precursor miRNA (pre-miRNA), which is further processed to mature miRNA by Dicer, a cytoplasmic RNase III enzyme. Increasing evidences suggest that pri-/pre-miRNAs have direct functions in regulation of gene expression, however the underlying mechanism how it is fine-tuned remains unclear. Here we find that DGCR8 is modified by SUMO1 at the major site K707, which can be promoted by its ERK-activated phosphorylation. SUMOylation of DGCR8 enhances the protein stability by preventing the degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. More importantly, SUMOylation of DGCR8 does not alter its association with Drosha, the MC activity and miRNA biogenesis, but rather influences its affinity with pri-miRNAs. This altered affinity of DGCR8 with pri-miRNAs seems to control the direct functions of pri-miRNAs in recognition and repression of the target mRNAs, which is evidently linked to the DGCR8 function in regulation of tumorigenesis and cell migration. Collectively, our data suggest a novel mechanism that SUMOylation of DGCR8 controls direct functions of pri-miRNAs in gene silencing. PMID:26202964

  19. Cooling-induced SUMOylation of EXOSC10 down-regulates ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bastide, Amandine; Peretti, Diego; Roobol, Anne; Roobol, Jo; Mallucci, Giovanna R.; Smales, C. Mark; Willis, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    The RNA exosome is essential for 3′ processing of functional RNA species and degradation of aberrant RNAs in eukaryotic cells. Recent reports have defined the substrates of the exosome catalytic domains and solved the multimeric structure of the exosome complex. However, regulation of exosome activity remains poorly characterized, especially in response to physiological stress. Following the observation that cooling of mammalian cells results in a reduction in 40S:60S ribosomal subunit ratio, we uncover regulation of the nuclear exosome as a result of reduced temperature. Using human cells and an in vivo model system allowing whole-body cooling, we observe reduced EXOSC10 (hRrp6, Pm/Scl-100) expression in the cold. In parallel, both models of cooling increase global SUMOylation, leading to the identification of specific conjugation of SUMO1 to EXOSC10, a process that is increased by cooling. Furthermore, we define the major SUMOylation sites in EXOSC10 by mutagenesis and show that overexpression of SUMO1 alone is sufficient to suppress EXOSC10 abundance. Reducing EXOSC10 expression by RNAi in human cells correlates with the 3′ preribosomal RNA processing defects seen in the cold as well as reducing the 40S:60S ratio, a previously uncharacterized consequence of EXOSC10 suppression. Together, this work illustrates that EXOSC10 can be modified by SUMOylation and identifies a physiological stress where this regulation is prevalent both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26857222

  20. Re-adopting classical nuclear receptors by cholesterol metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Umetani, Michihisa

    2015-01-01

    Since the first cloning of the human estrogen receptor (ER) α in 1986 and the subsequent cloning of human ERβ, there has been extensive investigation of the role of estrogen/ER. Estrogens/ER play important roles not only in sexual development and reproduction but also in a variety of other functions in multiple tissues. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators (SERMs) are ER lignds that act as agonists or antagonists depending on the target genes and tissues, and until recently, only synthetic SERMs have been recognized. However, the discovery of the first endogenous SERM, 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), opened a new dimension of ER action in health and disease. In addition to the identification of 27HC as a SERM, oxysterols have been recently demonstrated as indirect modulators of ER through interaction with the nuclear receptor Liver X Receptor (LXR) β. In this review, the recent progress on these novel roles of oxysterols in ER modulation is summarized. PMID:26563834

  1. Innate immunity to RNA virus is regulated by temporal and reversible sumoylation of RIG-I and MDA5.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ming-Ming; Liao, Chen-Yang; Yang, Qing; Xie, Xue-Qin; Shu, Hong-Bing

    2017-04-03

    Sensing of viral RNA by the cytosolic receptors RIG-I and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) leads to innate antiviral response. How RIG-I and MDA5 are dynamically regulated in innate antiviral response is not well understood. Here, we show that TRIM38 positively regulates MDA5- and RIG-I-mediated induction of downstream genes and acts as a SUMO E3 ligase for their dynamic sumoylation at K43/K865 and K96/K888, respectively, before and after viral infection. The sumoylation of MDA5 and RIG-I suppresses their K48-linked polyubiquitination and degradation in uninfected or early-infected cells. Sumoylation of the caspase recruitment domains of MDA5 and RIG-I is also required for their dephosphorylation by PP1 and activation upon viral infection. At the late phase of viral infection, both MDA5 and RIG-I are desumoylated by SENP2, resulting in their K48-linked polyubiquitination and degradation. These findings suggest that dynamic sumoylation and desumoylation of MDA5 and RIG-I modulate efficient innate immunity to RNA virus and its timely termination.

  2. Proteolytic cleavage, trafficking, and functions of nuclear receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Kuang; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-10-01

    Intracellular localization has been reported for over three-quarters of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) families in response to environmental stimuli. Internalized RTK may bind to non-canonical substrates and affect various cellular processes. Many of the intracellular RTKs exist as fragmented forms that are generated by γ-secretase cleavage of the full-length receptor, shedding, alternative splicing, or alternative translation initiation. Soluble RTK fragments are stabilized and intracellularly transported into subcellular compartments, such as the nucleus, by binding to chaperone or transcription factors, while membrane-bound RTKs (full-length or truncated) are transported from the plasma membrane to the ER through the well-established Rab- or clathrin adaptor protein-coated vesicle retrograde trafficking pathways. Subsequent nuclear transport of membrane-bound RTK may occur via two pathways, INFS or INTERNET, with the former characterized by release of receptors from the ER into the cytosol and the latter characterized by release of membrane-bound receptor from the ER into the nucleoplasm through the inner nuclear membrane. Although most non-canonical intracellular RTK signaling is related to transcriptional regulation, there may be other functions that have yet to be discovered. In this review, we summarize the proteolytic processing, intracellular trafficking and nuclear functions of RTKs, and discuss how they promote cancer progression, and their clinical implications.

  3. Transmembrane helices in "classical" nuclear reproductive steroid receptors: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Morrill, Gene A; Kostellow, Adele B; Gupta, Raj K

    2015-01-01

    Steroid receptors of the nuclear receptor superfamily are proposed to be either: 1) located in the cytosol and moved to the cell nucleus upon activation, 2) tethered to the inside of the plasma membrane, or 3) retained in the nucleus until free steroid hormone enters and activates specific receptors. Using computational methods to analyze peptide receptor topology, we find that the "classical" nuclear receptors for progesterone (PRB/PGR), androgen (ARB/AR) and estrogen (ER1/ESR1) contain two transmembrane helices (TMH) within their ligand-binding domains (LBD).The MEMSAT-SVM algorithm indicates that ARB and ER2 (but not PRB or ER1) contain a pore-lining (channel-forming) region which may merge with other pore-lining regions to form a membrane channel. ER2 lacks a TMH, but contains a single pore-lining region. The MemBrain algorithm predicts that PRB, ARB and ER1 each contain one TMH plus a half TMH separated by 51 amino acids.ER2 contains two half helices. The TM-2 helices of ARB, ER1 and ER2 each contain 9-13 amino acid motifs reported to translocate the receptor to the plasma membrane, as well as cysteine palmitoylation sites. PoreWalker analysis of X-ray crystallographic data identifies a pore or channel within the LBDs of ARB and ER1 and predicts that 70 and 72 residues are pore-lining residues, respectively. The data suggest that (except for ER2), cytosolic receptors become anchored to the plasma membrane following synthesis. Half-helices and pore-lining regions in turn form functional ion channels and/or facilitate passive steroid uptake into the cell. In perspective, steroid-dependent insertion of "classical" receptors containing pore-lining regions into the plasma membrane may regulate permeability to ions such as Ca(2+), Na(+) or K(+), as well as facilitate steroid translocation into the nucleus.

  4. Heterodimeric interaction between retinoid X receptor alpha and orphan nuclear receptor OR1 reveals dimerization-induced activation as a novel mechanism of nuclear receptor activation.

    PubMed Central

    Wiebel, F F; Gustafsson, J A

    1997-01-01

    OR1 is a member of the steroid/thyroid hormone nuclear receptor superfamily which has been described to mediate transcriptional responses to retinoids and oxysterols. On a DR4 response element, an OR1 heterodimer with the nuclear receptor retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR alpha) has been described to convey transcriptional activation in both the absence and presence of the RXR ligand 9-cis retinoic acid, the mechanisms of which have remained unclear. Here, we dissect the effects of RXR alpha and OR1 ligand-binding domain interaction on transcriptional regulation and the role of the respective carboxy-terminal activation domains (AF-2s) in the absence and presence of the RXR ligand, employing chimeras of the nuclear receptors containing the heterologous GAL4 DNA-binding domain as well as natural receptors. The results show that the interaction of the RXR and OR1 ligand-binding domains unleashes a transcription activation potential that is mainly dependent on the AF-2 of OR1, indicating that interaction with RXR activates OR1. This defines dimerization-induced activation as a novel function of heterodimeric interaction and mechanism of receptor activation not previously described for nuclear receptors. Moreover, we present evidence that activation of OR1 occurs by a conformational change induced upon heterodimerization with RXR. PMID:9199332

  5. Sumoylation: a regulatory protein modification in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Flotho, Annette; Melchior, Frauke

    2013-01-01

    Posttranslational modification with small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) proteins is now established as one of the key regulatory protein modifications in eukaryotic cells. Hundreds of proteins involved in processes such as chromatin organization, transcription, DNA repair, macromolecular assembly, protein homeostasis, trafficking, and signal transduction are subject to reversible sumoylation. Hence, it is not surprising that disease links are beginning to emerge and that interference with sumoylation is being considered for intervention. Here, we summarize basic mechanisms and highlight recent developments in the physiology of sumoylation.

  6. Nuclear exclusion of the androgen receptor by melatonin.

    PubMed

    Rimler, Avi; Culig, Zoran; Lupowitz, Zippora; Zisapel, Nava

    2002-05-01

    Androgen receptors (AR) play a crucial role in androgen-mediated processes and prostate cancer progression. The pineal hormone melatonin attenuates the androgen-dependent growth of benign and cancer prostate epithelial cells in vitro and may reverse clinical resistance to androgen ablation therapy in patients progressing on gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue. Where along the AR cascade does melatonin act remains to be determined. The effects of melatonin on AR localization, level and activity were assessed using androgen-insensitive prostate carcinoma PC3 cells stably transfected with a wild-type AR-expressing vector (PC3-AR).AR was localized to the PC3-AR cell nucleus in the absence of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Melatonin caused a robust exclusion of the AR from the cell nucleus to the cytoplasm. The nuclear export inhibitor, leptomycin B prevented this process. The exclusion was selective since melatonin had no such effect on the nuclear localization of estrogen receptors alpha (ERalpha) in these cells. Melatonin also caused nuclear exclusion of the AR in the presence of DHT. In addition, it attenuated androgen induced reporter gene activity in PC3 cells co-transfected with the human AR and AR reporter plasmids. Elevated androgen concentrations counteracted melatonin's effects. Melatonin did not decrease AR level or androgen binding in the cells. The nuclear localization of the AR is a hallmark of its cellular activity. These data point to AR nuclear exclusion as a possible mechanism to attenuate androgen responses in target tissues.

  7. Retinoic Acid-mediated Nuclear Receptor Activation and Hepatocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bushue, Nathan; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Due to their well-known differentiation and apoptosis-inducing abilities, retinoic acid (RA) and its analogs have strong anti-cancer efficacy in human cancers. However, in vivo RA is a liver mitogen. While speculation has persisted that RA-mediated signaling is likely involved in hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration, direct evidence is still required. Findings in support of this proposition include observations that a release of retinyl palmitate (the precursor of RA) occurs in liver stellate cells following liver injury. Nevertheless, the biological action of this released vitamin A is virtually unknown. More likely is that the released vitamin A is converted to RA, the biological form, and then bound to a specific receptor (retinoid x receptor; RXRα), which is most abundantly expressed in the liver. Considering the mitogenic effects of RA, the RA-activated RXRα would likely then influence hepatocyte proliferation and liver tissue repair. At present, the mechanism by which RA stimulates hepatocyte proliferation is largely unknown. This review summarizes the activation of nuclear receptors (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α, pregnane x receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and farnesoid x receptor) in an RXRα dependent manner to induce hepatocyte proliferation, providing a link between RA and its proliferative role. PMID:27635169

  8. Nuclear receptors CAR and PXR: Molecular, functional, and biomedical aspects.

    PubMed

    di Masi, Alessandra; De Marinis, Elisabetta; Ascenzi, Paolo; Marino, Maria

    2009-10-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors sharing a common evolutionary history and having similar sequence features at the protein level. Selective ligand(s) for some NRs is not known, therefore these NRs have been named "orphan receptors". Whenever ligands have been recognized for any of the orphan receptor, it has been categorized and grouped as "adopted" orphan receptor. This group includes the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane X receptor (PXR). They function as sensors of toxic byproducts derived from endogenous metabolites and of exogenous chemicals, in order to enhance their elimination. This unique function of CAR and PXR sets them apart from the steroid hormone receptors. The broad response profile has established that CAR and PXR are xenobiotic sensors that coordinately regulate xenobiotic clearance in the liver and intestine via induction of genes involved in drug and xenobiotic metabolism. In the past few years, research has revealed new and mostly unsuspected roles for CAR and PXR in modulating hormone, lipid, and energy homeostasis as well as cancer and liver steatosis. The purpose of this review is to highlight the structural and molecular bases of CAR and PXR impact on human health, providing information on mechanisms through which diet, chemical exposure, and environment ultimately impact health and disease.

  9. Regulation of adiponectin receptor 1 in human hepatocytes by agonists of nuclear receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Neumeier, Markus; Weigert, Johanna; Schaeffler, Andreas; Weiss, Thomas; Kirchner, Stefan; Laberer, Sabine; Schoelmerich, Juergen; Buechler, Christa . E-mail: christa.buechler@klinik.uni-regensburg.de

    2005-09-02

    The adiponectin receptors AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 have been identified to mediate the insulin-sensitizing effects of adiponectin. Although AdipoR2 was suggested to be the main receptor for this adipokine in hepatocytes, AdipoR1 protein is highly abundant in primary human hepatocytes and hepatocytic cell lines. Nuclear receptors are main regulators of lipid metabolism and activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} and {gamma}, retinoid X receptor (RXR), and liver X receptor (LXR) by specific ligands may influence AdipoR1 abundance. AdipoR1 protein is neither altered by RXR or LXR agonists nor by pioglitazone. In contrast, fenofibric acid reduces AdipoR1 whereas hepatotoxic troglitazone upregulates AdipoR1 protein in HepG2 cells. Taken together this work shows for the first time that AdipoR1 protein is expressed in human hepatocytes but that it is not a direct target gene of nuclear receptors. Elevated AdipoR1 induced by hepatotoxic troglitazone may indicate a role of this receptor in adiponectin-mediated beneficial effects in liver damage.

  10. Transcriptional regulation of human Paraoxonase 1 by nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Ruiz, N; Murillo-González, F E; Rojas-García, A E; Mackness, Mike; Bernal-Hernández, Y Y; Barrón-Vivanco, B S; González-Arias, C A; Medina-Díaz, I M

    2017-02-20

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a calcium-dependent lactonase synthesized primarily in the liver and secreted into the plasma, where it is associates with high density lipoproteins (HDL). PON1 acts as antioxidant preventing low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation, a process considered critical in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Additionally, PON1 hydrolyzes and detoxifies some toxic metabolites of organophosphorus compounds (OPs). Thus, PON1 activity and expression levels are important for determining susceptibility to OPs intoxication and risk of developing diseases related to inflammation and oxidative stress. Increasing evidence has demonstrated the modulation of PON1 expression by many factors is due to interaction with nuclear receptors (NRs). Here, we briefly review the studies in this area and discuss the role of nuclear receptors in the regulation of PON1 expression, as well as how understanding these mechanisms may allow us to manipulate PON1 levels to improve drug efficacy and treat disease.

  11. Atypical nuclear localization of VIP receptors in glioma cell lines and patients

    SciTech Connect

    Barbarin, Alice; Séité, Paule; Godet, Julie; Bensalma, Souheyla; Muller, Jean-Marc; Chadéneau, Corinne

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • The VIP receptor VPAC1 contains a putative NLS signal. • VPAC1 is predominantly nuclear in GBM cell lines but not VPAC2. • Non-nuclear VPAC1/2 protein expression is correlated with glioma grade. • Nuclear VPAC1 is observed in 50% of stage IV glioma (GBM). - Abstract: An increasing number of G protein-coupled receptors, like receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), are found in cell nucleus. As VIP receptors are involved in the regulation of glioma cell proliferation and migration, we investigated the expression and the nuclear localization of the VIP receptors VPAC1 and VPAC2 in this cancer. First, by applying Western blot and immunofluorescence detection in three human glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines, we observed a strong nuclear staining for the VPAC1 receptor and a weak nuclear VPAC2 receptor staining. Second, immunohistochemical staining of VPAC1 and VPAC2 on tissue microarrays (TMA) showed that the two receptors were expressed in normal brain and glioma tissues. Expression in the non-nuclear compartment of the two receptors significantly increased with the grade of the tumors. Analysis of nuclear staining revealed a significant increase of VPAC1 staining with glioma grade, with up to 50% of GBM displaying strong VPAC1 nuclear staining, whereas nuclear VPAC2 staining remained marginal. The increase in VPAC receptor expression with glioma grades and the enhanced nuclear localization of the VPAC1 receptors in GBM might be of importance for glioma progression.

  12. A photoregulated ligand for the nuclear import receptor karyopherin alpha.

    PubMed

    Park, S B; Standaert, R F

    2001-12-01

    The ability to orchestrate the transport of proteins between nucleus and cytoplasm provides cells with a powerful regulatory mechanism. Selective translocation between these compartments is often used to propagate cellular signals, and it is an intimate part of the processes that control cell division, viral replication, and other cellular events. Therefore, precise experimental control over protein localization, through the agency of light, would provide a powerful tool for the study and manipulation of these events. To this end, a prototype photoregulated nuclear localization signal (NLS) was derived from a native NLS. A library of 30 mutants of the bipartite NLS from Xenopus laevis nucleoplasmin containing a novel, photoisomerizable amino acid was prepared by parallel, solid-phase synthesis and screened in vitro for binding to the nuclear import receptor karyopherin alpha, which mediates the nuclear import of cellular proteins. A single peptide was identified in which the cis and trans photoisomers bind the receptor differentially. The strategy used to obtain this peptide is systematic and empirical; therefore, it is potentially applicable to any peptide-receptor system.

  13. Identification of COUP-TFII Orphan Nuclear Receptor as a Retinoic Acid–Activated Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Schoen W; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Zhou, X. Edward; Kretschman, Jennifer E; Reynolds, Ross; Vonrhein, Clemens; Xu, Yong; Wang, Liliang; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Xu, H. Eric

    2008-01-01

    The chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factors (COUP-TFI and II) make up the most conserved subfamily of nuclear receptors that play key roles in angiogenesis, neuronal development, organogenesis, cell fate determination, and metabolic homeostasis. Although the biological functions of COUP-TFs have been studied extensively, little is known of their structural features or aspects of ligand regulation. Here we report the ligand-free 1.48 Å crystal structure of the human COUP-TFII ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals an autorepressed conformation of the receptor, where helix α10 is bent into the ligand-binding pocket and the activation function-2 helix is folded into the cofactor binding site, thus preventing the recruitment of coactivators. In contrast, in multiple cell lines, COUP-TFII exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, and ligand binding, substantially reduce the COUP-TFII transcriptional activity. Importantly, retinoid acids are able to promote COUP-TFII to recruit coactivators and activate a COUP-TF reporter construct. Although the concentration needed is higher than the physiological levels of retinoic acids, these findings demonstrate that COUP-TFII is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor, in which ligands activate the receptor by releasing it from the autorepressed conformation. PMID:18798693

  14. Identification of COUP-TFII Orphan Nuclear Receptor as a Retinoic Acid-Activated Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, Schoen W; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Zhou, X Edward; Kretschman, Jennifer E; Reynolds, Ross; Vonrhein, Clemens; Xu, Yong; Wang, Liliang; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Xu, H Eric

    2010-01-12

    The chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factors (COUP-TFI and II) make up the most conserved subfamily of nuclear receptors that play key roles in angiogenesis, neuronal development, organogenesis, cell fate determination, and metabolic homeostasis. Although the biological functions of COUP-TFs have been studied extensively, little is known of their structural features or aspects of ligand regulation. Here we report the ligand-free 1.48 {angstrom} crystal structure of the human COUP-TFII ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals an autorepressed conformation of the receptor, where helix {alpha}10 is bent into the ligand-binding pocket and the activation function-2 helix is folded into the cofactor binding site, thus preventing the recruitment of coactivators. In contrast, in multiple cell lines, COUP-TFII exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, and ligand binding, substantially reduce the COUP-TFII transcriptional activity. Importantly, retinoid acids are able to promote COUP-TFII to recruit coactivators and activate a COUP-TF reporter construct. Although the concentration needed is higher than the physiological levels of retinoic acids, these findings demonstrate that COUP-TFII is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor, in which ligands activate the receptor by releasing it from the autorepressed conformation.

  15. Understanding Nuclear Receptor Form and Function Using Structural Biology

    PubMed Central

    Rastinejad, Fraydoon; Huang, Pengxiang; Chandra, Vikas; Khorasanizadeh, Sepideh

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NR) are a major transcription factor family whose members selectively bind small molecule lipophilic ligands and transduce those signals into specific changes in gene programs. For over two decades, structural biology efforts were directed exclusively on the individual ligand binding domains (LBDs) or DNA binding domains (DBDs) of NRs. These analyses revealed the basis for both ligand and DNA binding, and also revealed receptor conformations representing both the activated and repressed states. Additionally, crystallographic studies explained how NR LBD surfaces recognize discrete portions of transcriptional coregulators. The many structural snapshots of LBDs have also guided the development of synthetic ligands with therapeutic potential. Yet, the exclusive structural focus on isolated NR domains has made it difficult to conceptualize how all the NR polypeptide segments are coordinated physically and functionally in the context of receptor quaternary architectures. Newly emerged crystal structures of the PPARγ-RXRα heterodimer and HNF-4α homodimer have recently revealed the higher order organizations of these receptor complexes on DNA, as well as the complexity and uniqueness of their domain-domain interfaces. These emerging structural advances promise to better explain how signals in one domain can be allosterically transmitted to distal receptor domains, also providing much better frameworks for guiding future drug discovery efforts. PMID:24103914

  16. Nuclear receptor TLX inhibits TGF-β signaling in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Erik; Zhai, Qiwei; Zeng, Zhao-Jun; Yoshida, Takeshi; Funa, Keiko

    2016-05-01

    TLX (also called NR2E1) is an orphan nuclear receptor that maintains stemness of neuronal stem cells. TLX is highly expressed in the most malignant form of glioma, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and is important for the proliferation and maintenance of the stem/progenitor cells of the tumor. Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) is a cytokine regulating many different cellular processes such as differentiation, migration, adhesion, cell death and proliferation. TGF-β has an important function in cancer where it can work as either a tumor suppressor or oncogene, depending on the cancer type and stage of tumor development. Since glioblastoma often have dysfunctional TGF-β signaling we wanted to find out if there is any interaction between TLX and TGF-β in glioblastoma cells. We demonstrate that knockdown of TLX enhances the canonical TGF-β signaling response in glioblastoma cell lines. TLX physically interacts with and stabilizes Smurf1, which can ubiquitinate and target TGF-β receptor II for degradation, whereas knockdown of TLX leads to stabilization of TGF-β receptor II, increased nuclear translocation of Smad2/3 and enhanced expression of TGF-β target genes. The interaction between TLX and TGF-β may play an important role in the regulation of proliferation and tumor-initiating properties of glioblastoma cells.

  17. Regulation of hepatic energy metabolism by the nuclear receptor PXR.

    PubMed

    Hakkola, Jukka; Rysä, Jaana; Hukkanen, Janne

    2016-09-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a nuclear receptor that is traditionally thought to be specialized for sensing xenobiotic exposure. In concurrence with this feature PXR was originally identified to regulate drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. During the last ten years it has become clear that PXR harbors broader functions. Evidence obtained both in experimental animals and humans indicate that ligand-activated PXR regulates hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism and affects whole body metabolic homeostasis. Currently, the consequences of PXR activation on overall metabolic health are not yet fully understood and varying results on the effect of PXR activation or knockout on metabolic disorders and weight gain have been published in mouse models. Rifampicin and St. John's wort, the prototypical human PXR agonists, impair glucose tolerance in healthy volunteers. Chronic exposure to PXR agonists could potentially represent a risk factor for diabetes and metabolic syndrome. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie.

  18. Porcine mononuclear leukocyte nuclear thyroid hormone receptors: Effects of cold exposure on receptor kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    D'Alesandro, M.; Reed, L.; Malik, M.; Quesada, M.; Hesslink, R.; Castro, S.; Homer, L.; Young, B. Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton )

    1991-03-11

    Changes in kinetic characteristics of the triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) receptor may be a mechanism involved in the thermoregulatory action of T{sub 3} at the nuclear level. To study this, the authors analyzed changes in T{sub 3} nuclear receptor kinetics in cold exposed swine and compared them with similar animals housed at thermoneutral temperature. Receptors were from isolated nuclear extracts of circulating mononuclear leukocytes (MNL). Scatchard analysis indicates the presence of a single class of binding sites. The authors were unable to detect differences in the equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) or the maximum binding capacity (MBC, fmol/up DNA) between the two groups. The Kd for T{sub 3} in the control group was 1.17 {plus minus} 0.11 nmol/L and 1.25 {plus minus} 0.19 nmol/L in the cold exposed group. The MBC was 0.43 {plus minus} 0.04 fmol/ug DNA in the control group and 0.40 {plus minus} 0.06 fmol/L in the cold exposed group. In competition studies using thyroid hormone analogues, 10{sup {minus}7} M reverse T{sub 3} and 3,5-diiodothyronine resulted in approximately 50% displacement from the porcine receptor. TRIAC and L-T{sub 4} had no effect at 10{sup {minus}7} M. The porcine values for both Kd and MBC are similar to those previously reported for human MNL. Although T{sub 3} production and serum T{sub 3} values in the cold exposed group are nearly double the control group (Reed et al., FASEB 1991), continuous short-term cold exposure had no significant effect on MNL nuclear T{sub 3} receptor kinetics.

  19. Constitutive and ligand-induced nuclear localization of oxytocin receptor.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, Conan G; Bussolati, Gianni; Bosco, Martino; Kimura, Tadashi; Pizzorno, Marie C; Chernin, Mitchell I; Cassoni, Paola; Novak, Josef F

    2007-01-01

    Oxytocin receptor (OTR) is a membrane protein known to mediate oxytocin (OT) effects, in both normal and neoplastic cells. We report here that human osteosarcoma (U2OS, MG63, OS15 and SaOS2), breast cancer (MCF7), and primary human fibroblastic cells (HFF) all exhibit OTR not only on the cell membrane, but also in the various nuclear compartments including the nucleolus. Both an OTR-GFP fusion protein and the native OTR appear to be localized to the nucleus as detected by transfection and/or confocal immunofluorescence, respectively. Treatment with oxytocin causes internalization of OTR and the resulting vesicles accumulate in the vicinity of the nucleus and some of the perinuclear OTR enters the nucleus. Western blots indicate that OTR in the nucleus and on the plasma membrane are likely to be the same biochemical and immunological entities. It appears that OTR is first visible in the nucleoli and subsequently disperses within the nucleus into 4-20 spots while some of the OTR diffuses throughout the nucleoplasm. The behaviour and kinetics of OTR-GFP and OTR are different, indicating interference by GFP in both OTR entrance into the nucleus and subsequent relocalization of OTR within the nucleus. There are important differences among the tested cells, such as the requirement of a ligand for transfer of OTR in nuclei. A constitutive internalization of OTR was found only in osteosarcoma cells, while the nuclear localization in all other tested cells was dependent on ligand binding. The amount of OTR-positive material within and in the vicinity of the nucleus increased following a treatment with oxytocin in both constitutive and ligand-dependent type of cells. The evidence of OTR compartmentalization at the cell nucleus (either ligand-dependent or constitutive) in different cell types suggests still unknown biological functions of this protein or its ligand and adds this G-protein-coupled receptor to other heptahelical receptors displaying this atypical and unexpected

  20. Allosteric Pathways in the PPARγ-RXRα nuclear receptor complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Clarisse G.; Silveira, Rodrigo L.; Rivalta, Ivan; Batista, Victor S.; Skaf, Munir S.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of allostery in DNA-nuclear receptor (NR) complexes is of fundamental importance for drug development since NRs regulate the transcription of a myriad of genes in humans and other metazoans. Here, we investigate allostery in the peroxisome proliferator-activated/retinoid X receptor heterodimer. This important NR complex is a target for antidiabetic drugs since it binds to DNA and functions as a transcription factor essential for insulin sensitization and lipid metabolism. We find evidence of interdependent motions of Ω-loops and PPARγ-DNA binding domain with contacts susceptible to conformational changes and mutations, critical for regulating transcriptional functions in response to sequence-dependent DNA dynamics. Statistical network analysis of the correlated motions, observed in molecular dynamics simulations, shows preferential allosteric pathways with convergence centers comprised of polar amino acid residues. These findings are particularly relevant for the design of allosteric modulators of ligand-dependent transcription factors.

  1. Allosteric Pathways in the PPARγ-RXRα nuclear receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Clarisse G.; Silveira, Rodrigo L.; Rivalta, Ivan; Batista, Victor S.; Skaf, Munir S.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of allostery in DNA-nuclear receptor (NR) complexes is of fundamental importance for drug development since NRs regulate the transcription of a myriad of genes in humans and other metazoans. Here, we investigate allostery in the peroxisome proliferator-activated/retinoid X receptor heterodimer. This important NR complex is a target for antidiabetic drugs since it binds to DNA and functions as a transcription factor essential for insulin sensitization and lipid metabolism. We find evidence of interdependent motions of Ω-loops and PPARγ-DNA binding domain with contacts susceptible to conformational changes and mutations, critical for regulating transcriptional functions in response to sequence-dependent DNA dynamics. Statistical network analysis of the correlated motions, observed in molecular dynamics simulations, shows preferential allosteric pathways with convergence centers comprised of polar amino acid residues. These findings are particularly relevant for the design of allosteric modulators of ligand-dependent transcription factors. PMID:26823026

  2. Functional analysis of retinoid Z receptor beta, a brain-specific nuclear orphan receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, E F; Kirfel, J; Greschik, H; Dörflinger, U; Becker, P; Mercep, A; Schüle, R

    1996-01-01

    The retinoid Z receptor beta (RZR beta), an orphan receptor, is a member of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR)/thyroid hormone receptor (TR) subfamily of nuclear receptors. RZR beta exhibits a highly restricted brain-specific expression pattern. So far, no natural RZR beta target gene has been identified and the physiological role of the receptor in transcriptional regulation remains to be elucidated. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays reveal binding of RZR beta to monomeric response elements containing the sequence AnnTAGGTCA, but RZR beta-mediated transactivation of reporter genes is only achieved with two property spaced binding sites. We present evidence that RZR beta can function as a cell-type-specific transactivator. In neuronal cells, GaI-RZR beta fusion proteins function as potent transcriptional activators, whereas no transactivation can be observed in nonneuronal cells. Mutational analyses demonstrate that the activation domain (AF-2) of RZR beta and RAR alpha are functionally interchangeable. However, in contrast to RAR and TR, the RZR beta AF-2 cannot function autonomously as a transactivation domain. Furthermore, our data define a novel repressor function for the C-terminal part of the putative ligand binding domain. We propose that the transcriptional activity of RZR beta is regulated by an interplay of different receptor domains with coactivators and corepressors. Images Fig. 5 PMID:8816759

  3. Minireview: Nuclear Receptor-Controlled Steroid Hormone Synthesis and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    He, Jinhan; Cheng, Qiuqiong; Xie, Wen

    2010-01-01

    Steroid hormones are essential in normal physiology whereas disruptions in hormonal homeostasis represent an important etiological factor for many human diseases. Steroid hormones exert most of their functions through the binding and activation of nuclear hormone receptors (NRs or NHRs), a superfamily of DNA-binding and often ligand-dependent transcription factors. In recent years, accumulating evidence has suggested that NRs can also regulate the biosynthesis and metabolism of steroid hormones. This review will focus on the recent progress in our understanding of the regulatory role of NRs in hormonal homeostasis and the implications of this regulation in physiology and diseases. PMID:19762543

  4. p150/Glued Modifies Nuclear Estrogen Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Jung; Chae, Christina; Wang, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    Estrogen modulates gene expression through interactions with estrogen receptors (ERs) that bind chromosomal target genes. Recent studies have suggested an interaction between the cytoskeletal system and estrogen signaling; these have implicated a role of cytoplasmic microtubules in scaffolding ERα and enhancing nongenomic function; in addition, other experiments demonstrate that dynein light chain 1 may chaperone ERα to the nucleus, indirectly increasing transcriptional potency. Actin/myosin and dynein light chain 1 are also required for estrogen-mediated chromosomal movement that is required for transcriptional up-regulation of ERα targets. We present evidence that the dynactin component, p150/glued, directly influences the potency of nuclear ER function. Increasing the stoichiometric ratio of p150/glued and ERα by overexpression enhances estrogen responses. ERα enhancement by p150/glued does not appear to be influenced by shifts in subcellular localization because microtubule disruption fails to increase nuclear ERα. Rather, we find that modest amounts of p150/glued reside in the nucleus of cells, suggesting that it plays a direct role in nuclear transcription. Notably, p150/glued is recruited to the pS2 promoter in the presence of hormone, and, in MCF-7 cells, knockdown of p150/glued levels reduces estrogen-dependent transcription. Our results suggest that p150/glued modulates estrogen sensitivity in cells through nuclear mechanisms. PMID:19228793

  5. Sumoylation regulates EXO1 stability and processing of DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Bologna, Serena; Altmannova, Veronika; Valtorta, Emanuele; Koenig, Christiane; Liberali, Prisca; Gentili, Christian; Anrather, Dorothea; Ammerer, Gustav; Pelkmans, Lucas; Krejci, Lumir; Ferrari, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    DNA double-strand break repair by the error-free pathway of homologous recombination (HR) requires the concerted action of several factors. Among these, EXO1 and DNA2/BLM are responsible for the extensive resection of DNA ends to produce 3′-overhangs, which are essential intermediates for downstream steps of HR. Here we show that EXO1 is a SUMO target and that sumoylation affects EXO1 ubiquitylation and protein stability. We identify an UBC9-PIAS1/PIAS4-dependent mechanism controlling human EXO1 sumoylation in vivo and demonstrate conservation of this mechanism in yeast by the Ubc9-Siz1/Siz2 using an in vitro reconstituted system. Furthermore, we show physical interaction between EXO1 and the de-sumoylating enzyme SENP6 both in vitro and in vivo, promoting EXO1 stability. Finally, we identify the major sites of sumoylation in EXO1 and show that ectopic expression of a sumoylation-deficient form of EXO1 rescues the DNA damage-induced chromosomal aberrations observed upon wt-EXO1 expression. Thus, our study identifies a novel layer of regulation of EXO1, making the pathways that regulate its function an ideal target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26083678

  6. A histone chaperone, DEK, transcriptionally coactivates a nuclear receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sawatsubashi, Shun; Murata, Takuya; Lim, Jinseon; Fujiki, Ryoji; Ito, Saya; Suzuki, Eriko; Tanabe, Masahiko; Zhao, Yue; Kimura, Shuhei; Fujiyama, Sally; Ueda, Takashi; Umetsu, Daiki; Ito, Takashi; Takeyama, Ken-ichi; Kato, Shigeaki

    2010-01-01

    Chromatin reorganization is essential for transcriptional control by sequence-specific transcription factors. However, the molecular link between transcriptional control and chromatin reconfiguration remains unclear. By colocalization of the nuclear ecdysone receptor (EcR) on the ecdysone-induced puff in the salivary gland, Drosophila DEK (dDEK) was genetically identified as a coactivator of EcR in both insect cells and intact flies. Biochemical purification and characterization of the complexes containing fly and human DEKs revealed that DEKs serve as histone chaperones via phosphorylation by forming complexes with casein kinase 2. Consistent with the preferential association of the DEK complex with histones enriched in active epigenetic marks, dDEK facilitated H3.3 assembly during puff formation. In some human myeloid leukemia patients, DEK was fused to CAN by chromosomal translocation. This mutation significantly reduced formation of the DEK complex, which is required for histone chaperone activity. Thus, the present study suggests that at least one histone chaperone can be categorized as a type of transcriptional coactivator for nuclear receptors. PMID:20040570

  7. Nuclear receptors and the Warburg effect in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thome, James L.; Campbell, Moray J.

    2016-01-01

    In 1927 Otto Warburg established that tumours derive energy primarily from the conversion of glucose to lactic acid and only partially through cellular respiration involving oxygen. In the 1950s he proposed that all causes of cancer reflected different mechanisms of disabling cellular respiration in favour of fermentation (now termed aerobic glycolysis). The role of aberrant glucose metabolism in cancer is now firmly established. The shift away from oxidative phosphorylation towards the metabolically expensive aerobic glycolysis is somewhat counter-intuitive given its wasteful nature. Multiple control processes are in place to maintain cellular efficiency and it is likely that these mechanisms are disrupted to facilitate the shift to the reliance on aerobic glycolysis. One such process of cell control is mediated by the nuclear receptor superfamily. This large family of transcription factors plays a significant role in sensing environmental cues and controlling decisions on proliferation, differentiation and cell death for example, to regulate glucose uptake and metabolism and to modulate the actions of oncogenes and tumour suppressors. In this review we highlight mechanisms by which nuclear receptors actions are altered during tumorigenic transformation and can serve to enhance the shift to aerobic glycolysis. At the simplest level, a basic alteration in NR behaviour can serve to enhance glycolytic flux thus providing a basis for enhanced survival within the tumour micro-environment. Ameliorating the enhanced NR activity in this context may help to sensitize cancer cells to Warburg targeted therapies and may provide future drug targets. PMID:24895240

  8. Role of nuclear receptors in breast cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Papi, Alessio; Orlandi, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The recapitulation of primary tumour heterogenity and the existence of a minor sub-population of cancer cells, capable of initiating tumour growth in xenografts on serial passages, led to the hypothesis that cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist. CSCs are present in many tumours, among which is breast cancer. Breast CSCs (BCSCs) are likely to sustain the growth of the primary tumour mass, as well as to be responsible for disease relapse and metastatic spreading. Consequently, BCSCs represent the most significant target for new drugs in breast cancer therapy. Both the hypoxic condition in BCSCs biology and pro-inflammatory cytokine network has gained increasing importance in the recent past. Breast stromal cells are crucial components of the tumours milieu and are a major source of inflammatory mediators. Recently, the anti-inflammatory role of some nuclear receptors ligands has emerged in several diseases, including breast cancer. Therefore, the use of nuclear receptors ligands may be a valid strategy to inhibit BCSCs viability and consequently breast cancer growth and disease relapse. PMID:27022437

  9. The role of nuclear hormone receptors in cutaneous wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Sandra; Zhao, Hengguang; Martin, Paige; Abe, Koichiro; Lisse, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    The cutaneous wound repair process involves balancing a dynamic series of events ranging from inflammation, oxidative stress, cell migration, proliferation, survival and differentiation. A complex series of secreted trophic factors, cytokines, surface and intracellular proteins are expressed in a temporospatial manner to restore skin integrity after wounding. Impaired initiation, maintenance or termination of the tissue repair processes can lead to perturbed healing, necrosis, fibrosis or even cancer. Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) in the cutaneous environment regulate tissue repair processes such as fibroplasia and angiogenesis. Defects in functional NHRs and their ligands are associated with the clinical phenotypes of chronic non-healing wounds and skin endocrine disorders. The functional relationship between NHRs and skin niche cells such as epidermal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts is pivotal for successful wound closure and permanent repair. The aim of this review is to delineate the cutaneous effects and cross-talk of various nuclear receptors upon injury towards functional tissue restoration. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25529612

  10. Solubility shift and SUMOylaltion of promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein in response to arsenic(III) and fate of the SUMOylated PML

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Seishiro; Tadano, Mihoko; Kobayashi, Yayoi; Udagawa, Osamu; Kato, Ayaka

    2015-09-15

    Promyelocytic leukemia (PML), which is a tumor suppressor protein that nevertheless plays an important role in the maintenance of leukemia initiating cells, is known to be biochemically modified by As{sup 3+}. We recently developed a simple method to evaluate the modification of PML by As{sup 3+} resulting in a change in solubility and the covalent binding of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO). Here we semi-quantitatively investigated the SUMOylation of PML using HEK293 cells which were stably transfected with PML-VI (HEK-PML). Western blot analyses indicated that PML became insoluble in cold RadioImmunoPrecipitation Assay (RIPA) lysis buffer and was SUMOylated by both SUMO2/3 and SUMO1 by As{sup 3+}. Surprisingly SUMO1 monomers were completely utilized for the SUMOylation of PML. Antimony (Sb{sup 3+}) but not bismuth (Bi{sup 3+}), Cu{sup 2+}, or Cd{sup 2+} biochemically modified PML similarly. SUMOylated PML decreased after removal of As{sup 3+} from the culture medium. However, unSUMOylated PML was still recovered in the RIPA-insoluble fraction, suggesting that SUMOylation is not requisite for changing the RIPA-soluble PML into the RIPA-insoluble form. Immunofluorescence staining of As{sup 3+}-exposed cells indicated that SUMO2/3 was co-localized with PML in the nuclear bodies. However, some PML protein was present in peri-nuclear regions without SUMO2/3. Functional Really Interesting New Gene (RING)-deleted mutant PML neither formed PML nuclear bodies nor was biochemically modified by As{sup 3+}. Conjugation with intracellular glutathione may explain the accessibility of As{sup 3+} and Sb{sup 3+} to PML in the nuclear region evading chelation and entrapping by cytoplasmic proteins such as metallothioneins. - Highlights: • As{sup 3+} is a carcinogen and also a therapeutic agent for leukemia. • PML becomes insoluble in RIPA and SUMOylated by As{sup 3+}. • Sb{sup 3+} modifies PML similar to As{sup 3+}. • Functional RING motif is necessary for As{sup 3

  11. Defining the SUMO System in Maize: SUMOylation Is Up-Regulated during Endosperm Development and Rapidly Induced by Stress1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Augustine, Robert C.; Rytz, Thérèse C.

    2016-01-01

    In response to abiotic and biotic challenges, plants rapidly attach small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) to a large collection of nuclear proteins, with studies in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) linking SUMOylation to stress tolerance via its modification of factors involved in chromatin and RNA dynamics. Despite this importance, little is known about SUMOylation in crop species. Here, we describe the plant SUMO system at the phylogenetic, biochemical, and transcriptional levels with a focus on maize (Zea mays). In addition to canonical SUMOs, land plants encode a loosely constrained noncanonical isoform and a variant containing a long extension upstream of the signature β-grasp fold, with cereals also expressing a novel diSUMO polypeptide bearing two SUMO β-grasp domains in tandem. Maize and other cereals also synthesize a unique SUMO-conjugating enzyme variant with more restricted expression patterns that is enzymatically active despite a distinct electrostatic surface. Maize SUMOylation primarily impacts nuclear substrates, is strongly induced by high temperatures, and displays a memory that suppresses subsequent conjugation. Both in-depth transcript and conjugate profiles in various maize organs point to tissue/cell-specific functions for SUMOylation, with potentially significant roles during embryo and endosperm maturation. Collectively, these studies define the organization of the maize SUMO system and imply important functions during seed development and stress defense. PMID:27208252

  12. Nanostructured sensors containing immobilized nuclear receptors for thyroid hormone detection.

    PubMed

    Bendo, Luana; Casanova, Monise; Figueira, Ana Carolina M; Polikarpov, Igor; Zucolotto, Valtencir

    2014-05-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are members of the nuclear receptors (NRs) superfamily, being encoded by two genes: TRa and TRbeta. In this paper, the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the TRbeta1 isoform was immobilized on the surface of nanostructured electrodes for TR detection. The platforms containing TRbeta1-LBD were applied to the detection of specific ligand agonists, including the natural hormones T3 (triiodothyronine) and T4 (thyroxine), and the synthetic agonists TRIAC (3,5,3'-triiodothyroacetic acid) and GC-1 [3,5-dimethyl-4-(4'-hydroxy-3'-isopropylbenzyl phenoxy) acetic acid]. Detection was performed via impedance spectroscopy. The biosensors were capable of distinguishing between the thyroid hormones T3 and T4, and/or the analogues TRIAC and GC-1 at concentrations as low as 50 nM. The detection and separation of thyroid hormones and analogue ligands by impedance techniques represents an innovative tool in the field of nanomedicine because it allows the design of inexpensive devices for the rapid and real-time detection of distinct ligand/receptor systems.

  13. Controlling Androgen receptor nuclear localization by dendrimer conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoyu

    Androgen Receptor (AR) antagonists, such as bicalutamide and flutamide have been used widely in the treatment of prostate cancer. Although initial treatment is effective, prostate cancer cells often acquire antiandrogen resistance with prolonged treatment. AR over-expression and AR mutations contribute to the development of antiandrogen resistant cancer. Second generation antiandrogens such as enzalutamide are more effective and show reduced AR nuclear localization. In this study, derivatives of PAN52, a small molecule antiandrogen previously developed in our lab, were conjugated to the surface of generation 4 and generation 6 PAMAM dendrimers to obtain antiandrogen PAMAM dendrimer conjugates (APDC). APDCs readily enter cells and associate with AR in the cytoplasm. Due to their large size and positive charge, they can not enter the nucleus, thus retaining AR in the cytoplasm. In addition, APDCs are effective in decreasing AR mediated transcription and cell proliferation. APDC is the first AR antagonists that inhibit DHT-induced nuclear localization of AR. By inhibiting AR nuclear localization, APDC represents a new class of antiandrogens that offer an alternative approach to addressing antiandrogen-resistant prostate cancer. Lysine post-translational modification of AR Nuclear Localization Sequence (NLS) has great impact on AR cellular localization. It is of interest to understand which modifications modulate AR translocation into the nucleus. In this study, we prepared dendrimer-based acetyltransferase mimetic (DATM), DATM is able to catalytically acetylate AR in CWR22Rv1 cells, which will be a useful tool for studying AR modification effect on AR cellular localization. Derivatives of DATM, which transfer other chemical groups to AR, can be prepared similarly, and with more dendrimer based AR modification tools prepared in future, we will be able to understand and control AR cellular localization through AR modification.

  14. SUMOylation regulates polo-like kinase 1-interacting checkpoint helicase (PICH) during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Vinidhra; Park, Hyewon; Ryu, Hyunju; Azuma, Yoshiaki

    2015-02-06

    Mitotic SUMOylation has an essential role in faithful chromosome segregation in eukaryotes, although its molecular consequences are not yet fully understood. In Xenopus egg extract assays, we showed that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) is modified by SUMO2/3 at mitotic centromeres and that its enzymatic activity could be regulated by SUMOylation. To determine the molecular consequence of mitotic SUMOylation, we analyzed SUMOylated PARP1-specific binding proteins. We identified Polo-like kinase 1-interacting checkpoint helicase (PICH) as an interaction partner of SUMOylated PARP1 in Xenopus egg extract. Interestingly, PICH also bound to SUMOylated topoisomerase IIα (TopoIIα), a major centromeric small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) substrate. Purified recombinant human PICH interacted with SUMOylated substrates, indicating that PICH directly interacts with SUMO, and this interaction is conserved among species. Further analysis of mitotic chromosomes revealed that PICH localized to the centromere independent of mitotic SUMOylation. Additionally, we found that PICH is modified by SUMO2/3 on mitotic chromosomes and in vitro. PICH SUMOylation is highly dependent on protein inhibitor of activated STAT, PIASy, consistent with other mitotic chromosomal SUMO substrates. Finally, the SUMOylation of PICH significantly reduced its DNA binding capability, indicating that SUMOylation might regulate its DNA-dependent ATPase activity. Collectively, our findings suggest a novel SUMO-mediated regulation of the function of PICH at mitotic centromeres.

  15. Sumoylation stabilizes RACK1B and enhance its interaction with RAP2.6 in the abscisic acid response

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rongkai; Sun, Weining

    2017-01-01

    The highly conserved eukaryotic WD40 repeat protein, Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1), is involved in the abscisic acid (ABA) response in Arabidopsis. However, the regulation of RACK1 and the proteins with which it interacts are poorly understood. Here, we show that RACK1B is sumoylated at four residues, Lys50, Lys276, Lys281 and Lys291. Sumoylation increases RACK1B stability and its tolerance to ubiquitination-mediated degradation in ABA response. As a result, sumoylation leads to enhanced interaction between RACK1B and RAP2.6, an AP2/ERF family transcription factor. RACK1B binds directly to the AP2 domain of RAP2.6, which alters the affinity of RAP2.6 for CE1 and GCC cis-acting regulatory elements. Taken together, our findings illustrate that protein stability controlled by dynamic post-transcriptional modification is a critical regulatory mechanism for RACK1B, which functions as scaffold protein for RAP2.6 in ABA signaling. PMID:28272518

  16. Requirements for heterodimerization between the orphan nuclear receptor Nurr1 and retinoid X receptors.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, Paola; Dwornik, Hélène; Formstecher, Pierre; Rachez, Christophe; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2002-09-20

    The nuclear receptor nurr1 is a transcription factor involved in the development and maintenance of neurons synthesizing the neurotransmitter dopamine. Although the lack of nurr1 expression has dramatic consequences for these cells either in terms of differentiation or survival, the mechanisms by which nurr1 controls gene transcription still remain unclear. In the intent to understand better the modalities of action of this nuclear receptor, we have undertaken a systematic analysis of the transcriptional effects and DNA binding properties of nurr1 as a monomer or when forming dimers with the different isotypes of the retinoic X receptor (RXR). Here, we show that nurr1 acts as a gene activator independently of RXR and through an AF2-independent mechanism. In addition, heterodimerization with RXR is isotype-specific, involves multiple domains in the C-terminal region of nurr1, and requires RXR binding to DNA. RXR(alpha)-nurr1 and RXRgamma-nurr1 heterodimers bind direct repeat response elements and display no specific requirements with respect to half-site spacing. However, the retinoid responsiveness of DNA-bound heterodimers requires the reiteration of at least three nurr1 binding sites, thereby limiting retinoid-induced nurr1 transcriptional activity to specific direct response elements.

  17. Bmal1 is a direct transcriptional target of the orphan nuclear receptor, NR2F1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orphan nuclear receptor NR2F1 (also known as COUP-TFI, Chicken Ovalbumin Upstream Promoter Transcription Factor I) is a highly conserved member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. NR2F1 plays a critical role during embryonic development, particularly in the central and peripheral nervous systems a...

  18. Therapeutic potential of nuclear receptor agonists in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Moutinho, Miguel; Landreth, Gary E

    2017-03-06

    The Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by an extensive accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, which triggers a set of deleterious processes including synaptic dysfunction, inflammation and neuronal injury leading to neuronal loss and cognitive impairment. A large body of evidence supports that nuclear receptor (NR) activation could be a promising therapeutic approach for AD. NRs are ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate gene expression and have a cell type-specific effects. In this review we discuss the mechanisms that underlie the beneficial effects of NRs in AD. Moreover, we summarize studies reported in the last 10-15 years and their major outcomes arising from the pharmacological targeting of NRs in AD animal models. The dissection of the pathways regulated by NRs in the context of AD is of importance in identifying novel and effective therapeutic strategies.

  19. Minireview: Nuclear Receptor Regulation of Osteoclast and Bone Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zixue; Li, Xiaoxiao

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing cells essential for skeletal remodeling and regeneration. However, excessive osteoclasts often contribute to prevalent bone degenerative diseases such as osteoporosis, arthritis, and cancer bone metastasis. Osteoclast dysregulation is also associated with rare disorders such as osteopetrosis, pycnodysostosis, Paget's disease, and Gorham-Stout syndrome. The nuclear receptor (NR) family of transcription factors functions as metabolic sensors that control a variety of physiological processes including skeletal homeostasis and serves as attractive therapeutic targets for many diseases. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the new players and the new mechanisms for how NRs regulate osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. An enhanced understanding of NR functions in osteoclastogenesis will facilitate the development of not only novel osteoprotective medicine but also prudent strategies to minimize the adverse skeletal effects of certain NR-targeting drugs for a better treatment of cancer and metabolic diseases. PMID:25549044

  20. Allosteric mechanisms of nuclear receptors: insights from computational simulations.

    PubMed

    Mackinnon, Jonathan A G; Gallastegui, Nerea; Osguthorpe, David J; Hagler, Arnold T; Estébanez-Perpiñá, Eva

    2014-08-05

    The traditional structural view of allostery defines this key regulatory mechanism as the ability of one conformational event (allosteric site) to initiate another in a separate location (active site). In recent years computational simulations conducted to understand how this phenomenon occurs in nuclear receptors (NRs) has gained significant traction. These results have yield insights into allosteric changes and communication mechanisms that underpin ligand binding, coactivator binding site formation, post-translational modifications, and oncogenic mutations. Moreover, substantial efforts have been made in understanding the dynamic processes involved in ligand binding and coregulator recruitment to different NR conformations in order to predict cell/tissue-selective pharmacological outcomes of drugs. They also have improved the accuracy of in silico screening protocols so that nowadays they are becoming part of optimisation protocols for novel therapeutics. Here we summarise the important contributions that computational simulations have made towards understanding the structure/function relationships of NRs and how these can be exploited for rational drug design.

  1. Nuclear receptor regulation of stemness and stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yangsik

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells include a diverse number of toti-, pluri-, and multi-potent cells that play important roles in cellular genesis and differentiation, tissue development, and organogenesis. Genetic regulation involving various transcription factors results in the self-renewal and differentiation properties of stem cells. The nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily is composed of 48 ligand-activated transcription factors involved in diverse physiological functions such as metabolism, development, and reproduction. Increasing evidence shows that certain NRs function in regulating stemness or differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells and tissue-specific adult stem cells. Here, we review the role of the NR superfamily in various aspects of stem cell biology, including their regulation of stemness, forward- and trans-differentiation events; reprogramming of terminally differentiated cells; and interspecies differences. These studies provide insights into the therapeutic potential of the NR superfamily in stem cell therapy and in treating stem cell-associated diseases (e.g., cancer stem cell). PMID:19696553

  2. The dynamic interacting landscape of MAPL reveals essential functions for SUMOylation in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Karine; Goyon, Vanessa; Coyaud, Etienne; Rajapakse, Sanjeeva; Raught, Brian; McBride, Heidi M

    2017-12-01

    Activation of the innate immune response triggered by dsRNA viruses occurs through the assembly of the Mitochondrial Anti-Viral Signaling (MAVS) complex. Upon recognition of viral dsRNA, the cytosolic receptor RIG-I is activated and recruited to MAVS to activate the immune signaling response. We here demonstrate a strict requirement for a mitochondrial anchored protein ligase, MAPL (also called MUL1) in the signaling events that drive the transcriptional activation of antiviral genes downstream of Sendai virus infection, both in vivo and in vitro. A biotin environment scan of MAPL interacting polypeptides identified a series of proteins specific to Sendai virus infection; including RIG-I, IFIT1, IFIT2, HERC5 and others. Upon infection, RIG-I is SUMOylated in a MAPL-dependent manner, a conjugation step that is required for its activation. Consistent with this, MAPL was not required for signaling downstream of a constitutively activated form of RIG-I. These data highlight a critical role for MAPL and mitochondrial SUMOylation in the early steps of antiviral signaling.

  3. Receptors and ionic transporters in nuclear membranes: new targets for therapeutical pharmacological interventions.

    PubMed

    Bkaily, Ghassan; Avedanian, Levon; Al-Khoury, Johny; Ahmarani, Lena; Perreault, Claudine; Jacques, Danielle

    2012-08-01

    Work from our group and other laboratories showed that the nucleus could be considered as a cell within a cell. This is based on growing evidence of the presence and role of nuclear membrane G-protein coupled receptors and ionic transporters in the nuclear membranes of many cell types, including vascular endothelial cells, endocardial endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, and hepatocytes. The nuclear membrane receptors were found to modulate the functioning of ionic transporters at the nuclear level, and thus contribute to regulation of nuclear ionic homeostasis. Nuclear membranes of the mentioned types of cells possess the same ionic transporters; however, the type of receptors is cell-type dependent. Regulation of cytosolic and nuclear ionic homeostasis was found to be dependent upon a tight crosstalk between receptors and ionic transporters of the plasma membranes and those of the nuclear membrane. This crosstalk seems to be the basis for excitation-contraction coupling, excitation-secretion coupling, and excitation - gene expression coupling. Further advancement in this field will certainly shed light on the role of nuclear membrane receptors and transporters in health and disease. This will in turn enable the successful design of a new class of drugs that specifically target such highly vital nuclear receptors and ionic transporters.

  4. Sumoylation of the THO complex regulates the biogenesis of a subset of mRNPs

    PubMed Central

    Bretes, Hugo; Rouviere, Jérôme O.; Leger, Thibaut; Oeffinger, Marlene; Devaux, Frédéric; Doye, Valérie; Palancade, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    Assembly of messenger ribonucleoparticles (mRNPs) is a pivotal step in gene expression, but only a few molecular mechanisms contributing to its regulation have been described. Here, through a comprehensive proteomic survey of mRNP assembly, we demonstrate that the SUMO pathway specifically controls the association of the THO complex with mRNPs. We further show that the THO complex, a key player in the interplay between gene expression, mRNA export and genetic stability, is sumoylated on its Hpr1 subunit and that this modification regulates its association with mRNPs. Altered recruitment of the THO complex onto mRNPs in sumoylation-defective mutants does not affect bulk mRNA export or genetic stability, but impairs the expression of acidic stress-induced genes and, consistently, compromises viability in acidic stress conditions. Importantly, inactivation of the nuclear exosome suppresses the phenotypes of the hpr1 non-sumoylatable mutant, showing that SUMO-dependent mRNP assembly is critical to allow a specific subset of mRNPs to escape degradation. This article thus provides the first example of a SUMO-dependent mRNP-assembly event allowing a refined tuning of gene expression, in particular under specific stress conditions. PMID:24500206

  5. Nuclear hormone receptor functions in keratinocyte and melanocyte homeostasis, epidermal carcinogenesis and melanomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hyter, Stephen; Indra, Arup K

    2013-01-01

    Skin homeostasis is maintained, in part, through regulation of gene expression orchestrated by type II nuclear hormone receptors in a cell and context specific manner. This group of transcriptional regulators is implicated in various cellular processes including epidermal proliferation, differentiation, permeability barrier formation, follicular cycling and inflammatory responses. Endogenous ligands for the receptors regulate actions during skin development and maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Type II nuclear receptor signaling is also important for cellular crosstalk between multiple cell types in the skin. Overall, these nuclear receptors are critical players in keratinocyte and melanocyte biology and present targets for cutaneous disease management. PMID:23395795

  6. Mode of Action and Human Relevance Analysis for Nuclear Receptor-Mediated Liver Toxicity: A Case Study with Phenobarbital as a Model Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR) Activator

    EPA Science Inventory

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are key nuclear receptors involved in the regulation of cellular responses. to exposure to many xenobiotics and various physiological processes. Phenobarbital (PB) is a non­ genotoxic i...

  7. Transcriptional coordination of hepatic autophagy by nutrient-sensing nuclear receptor PPARα and FXR

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are in general ligand-dependent transcription factors that control a variety of mammalian physiologies including development, differentiation, proliferation, and homeostasis. Recent studies have found that two nutrient-sensing nuclear receptors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α and farnesoid x receptor, responding to fasting or feeding state, respectively are able to regulate autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process involved in lysosomal degradation. In this review, we discuss the role of these nutrient-sensing nuclear receptors in an aspect of transcriptional regulation of autophagy, and how these nuclear receptor-driven transcriptional programs integrate lipophagy, a lipid autophagy with fatty acid oxidation to coordinate hepatic lipid metabolism in the fasted state of the liver. PMID:28164071

  8. Transcriptional coordination of hepatic autophagy by nutrient-sensing nuclear receptor PPARα and FXR.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Man

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear receptors are in general ligand-dependent transcription factors that control a variety of mammalian physiologies including development, differentiation, proliferation, and homeostasis. Recent studies have found that two nutrient-sensing nuclear receptors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α and farnesoid x receptor, responding to fasting or feeding state, respectively are able to regulate autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process involved in lysosomal degradation. In this review, we discuss the role of these nutrient-sensing nuclear receptors in an aspect of transcriptional regulation of autophagy, and how these nuclear receptor-driven transcriptional programs integrate lipophagy, a lipid autophagy with fatty acid oxidation to coordinate hepatic lipid metabolism in the fasted state of the liver.

  9. Functional interaction of nuclear receptor coactivator 4 with aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kollara, Alexandra; Brown, Theodore J. . E-mail: brown@mshri.on.ca

    2006-07-28

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transcriptional activity is enhanced by interaction with p160 coactivators. We demonstrate here that NcoA4, a nuclear receptor coactivator, interacts with and amplifies AhR action. NcoA4-AhR and NcoA4-ARNT interactions were demonstrated by immunoprecipitation in T47D breast cancer and COS cells and was independent of ligand. Overexpression of NcoA4 enhanced AhR transcriptional activity 3.2-fold in the presence of dioxin, whereas overexpression of a splice variant, NcoA4{beta}, as well as a variant lacking the C-terminal region enhanced AhR transcriptional activity by only 1.6-fold. Enhanced AhR signaling by NcoA4 was independent of the LXXLL and FXXLF motifs or of the activation domain. NcoA4 protein localized to cytoplasm in the absence of dioxin and in both the cytoplasm and nucleus following dioxin treatment. NcoA4-facilitation of AhR activity was abolished by overexpression of androgen receptor, suggesting a potential competition of AhR and androgen receptor for NcoA4. These findings thus demonstrate a functional interaction between NcoA4 and AhR that may alter AhR activity to affect disease development and progression.

  10. Combined therapeutic potential of nuclear receptors with receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wairagu, Peninah M.; Park, Kwang Hwa; Kim, Jihye; Choi, Jong-Whan; Kim, Hyun-Won; Yeh, Byung-Il; Jung, Soon-Hee; Yong, Suk-Joong; Jeong, Yangsik

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • The 48 NR genes and 48 biological anti-cancer targets are profiled in paired-cells. • Growth inhibition by NR ligands or TKIs is target receptor level-dependent. • T0901317 with gefitinib/PHA665752 shows additive growth inhibition in lung cells. - Abstract: Cancer heterogeneity is a big hurdle in achieving complete cancer treatment, which has led to the emergence of combinational therapy. In this study, we investigated the potential use of nuclear receptor (NR) ligands for combinational therapy with other anti-cancer drugs. We first profiled all 48 NRs and 48 biological anti-cancer targets in four pairs of lung cell lines, where each pair was obtained from the same patient. Two sets of cell lines were normal and the corresponding tumor cell lines while the other two sets consisted of primary versus metastatic tumor cell lines. Analysis of the expression profile revealed 11 NRs and 15 cancer targets from the two pairs of normal versus tumor cell lines, and 9 NRs and 9 cancer targets from the primary versus metastatic tumor cell lines had distinct expression patterns in each category. Finally, the evaluation of nuclear receptor ligand T0901317 for liver X receptor (LXR) demonstrated its combined therapeutic potential with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The combined treatment of cMET inhibitor PHA665752 or EGFR inhibitor gefitinib with T0901317 showed additive growth inhibition in both H2073 and H1993 cells. Mechanistically, the combined treatment suppressed cell cycle progression by inhibiting cyclinD1 and cyclinB expression. Taken together, this study provides insight into the potential use of NR ligands in combined therapeutics with other biological anti-cancer drugs.

  11. Shp2 SUMOylation promotes ERK activation and hepatocellular carcinoma development

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Rong; Zhao, Xian; Qu, YingYing; Chen, Cheng; Zhu, Changhong; Zhang, Hailong; Yuan, Haihua; Jin, Hui; Liu, Xin; Wang, Yanli; Chen, Qin; Huang, Jian; Yu, Jianxiu

    2015-01-01

    Shp2, an ubiquitously expressed protein tyrosine phosphatase, is essential for regulation of Ras/ERK signaling pathway and tumorigenesis. Here we report that Shp2 is modified by SUMO1 at lysine residue 590 (K590) in its C-terminus, which is reduced by SUMO1-specific protease SENP1. Analysis of wild-type Shp2 and SUMOylation-defective Shp2K590R mutant reveals that SUMOylation of Shp2 promotes EGF-stimulated ERK signaling pathway and increases anchorage-independent cell growth and xenografted tumor growth of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines. Furthermore, we find that mutant Shp2K590R reduces its binding with the scaffolding protein Gab1, and consistent with this, knockdown of SENP1 increased the interaction between Shp2 and Gab1. More surprisingly, we show that human Shp2 (hShp2) and mouse Shp2 (mShp2) have differential effects on ERK activation as a result of different SUMOylation level, which is due to the event of K590 at hShp2 substituted by R594 at mShp2. In summary, our data demonstrate that SUMOylation of Shp2 promotes ERK activation via facilitating the formation of Shp2-Gab1 complex and thereby accelerates HCC cell and tumor growth, which presents a novel regulatory mechanism underlying Shp2 in regulation of HCC development. PMID:25823821

  12. SUMOylation of Argonaute-2 regulates RNA interference activity

    PubMed Central

    Josa-Prado, Fernando; Henley, Jeremy M.; Wilkinson, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modification of substrate proteins by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) regulates a vast array of cellular processes. SUMOylation occurs through three sequential enzymatic steps termed E1, E2 and E3. Substrate selection can be determined through interactions between the target protein and the SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme Ubc9 and specificity can be enhanced by substrate interactions with E3 ligase enzymes. We used the putative substrate recognition (PINIT) domain from the SUMO E3 PIAS3 as bait to identify potential SUMO substrates. One protein identified was Argonaute-2 (Ago2), which mediates RNA-induced gene silencing through binding small RNAs and promoting degradation of complimentary target mRNAs. We show that Ago2 can be SUMOylated in mammalian cells by both SUMO1 and SUMO2. SUMOylation occurs primarily at K402, and mutation of the SUMO consensus site surrounding this lysine reduces Ago2-mediated siRNA-induced silencing in a luciferase-based reporter assay. These results identify SUMOylation as a potential regulator of Ago2 activity and open new avenues for research into the mechanisms underlying the regulation of RNA-induced gene silencing. PMID:26188511

  13. A Structural Investigation into Oct4 Regulation by Orphan Nuclear Receptors, Germ Cell Nuclear Factor (GCNF) and Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (LRH-1).

    PubMed

    Weikum, Emily R; Tuntland, Micheal L; Murphy, Michael N; Ortlund, Eric A

    2016-10-27

    Oct4 is a transcription factor required for maintaining pluripotency and self-renewal in stem cells. Prior to differentiation, Oct4 must be silenced to allow for the development of the three germ layers in the developing embryo. This fine-tuning is controlled by the nuclear receptors, liver receptor homolog-1 and germ cell nuclear factor. Liver receptor homolog-1 is responsible for driving the expression of Oct4 where germ cell nuclear factor represses its expression upon differentiation. Both receptors bind to a DR0 motif located within the Oct4 promoter. Here, we present the first structure of mouse germ cell nuclear factor DNA binding domain in complex with the Oct4 DR0. The overall structure revealed two molecules bound in a head-to-tail fashion on opposite sides of the DNA. Additionally, we solved the structure of the human liver receptor homolog-1 DNA binding domain bound to the same element. We explore the structural elements that govern Oct4 recognition by these two nuclear receptors.

  14. Nuclear Receptors in Drug Metabolism, Drug Response and Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Chandra; Zuniga, Baltazar; Song, Chung Seog; Jiang, Shoulei; Cropper, Jodie; Park, Sulgi; Chatterjee, Bandana

    2016-01-01

    Orally delivered small-molecule therapeutics are metabolized in the liver and intestine by phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), and transport proteins coordinate drug influx (phase 0) and drug/drug-metabolite efflux (phase III). Genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition are induced by xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (NRs), i.e. PXR (pregnane X receptor) and CAR (constitutive androstane receptor), and by the 1α, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR), due to transactivation of xenobiotic-response elements (XREs) present in phase 0-III genes. Additional NRs, like HNF4-α, FXR, LXR-α play important roles in drug metabolism in certain settings, such as in relation to cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. The phase I enzymes CYP3A4/A5, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2A6, CYP2J2, and CYP2E1 metabolize >90% of all prescription drugs, and phase II conjugation of hydrophilic functional groups (with/without phase I modification) facilitates drug clearance. The conjugation step is mediated by broad-specificity transferases like UGTs, SULTs, GSTs. This review delves into our current understanding of PXR/CAR/VDR-mediated regulation of DME and transporter expression, as well as effects of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and epigenome (specified by promoter methylation, histone modification, microRNAs, long non coding RNAs) on the expression of PXR/CAR/VDR and phase 0-III mediators, and their impacts on variable drug response. Therapeutic agents that target epigenetic regulation and the molecular basis and consequences (overdosing, underdosing, or beneficial outcome) of drug-drug/drug-food/drug-herb interactions are also discussed. Precision medicine requires understanding of a drug’s impact on DME and transporter activity and their NR-regulated expression in order to achieve optimal drug efficacy without adverse drug reactions. In future drug screening, new tools such as humanized mouse models and

  15. Nuclear Receptors in Drug Metabolism, Drug Response and Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Chandra; Zuniga, Baltazar; Song, Chung Seog; Jiang, Shoulei; Cropper, Jodie; Park, Sulgi; Chatterjee, Bandana

    Orally delivered small-molecule therapeutics are metabolized in the liver and intestine by phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), and transport proteins coordinate drug influx (phase 0) and drug/drug-metabolite efflux (phase III). Genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition are induced by xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (NRs), i.e. PXR (pregnane X receptor) and CAR (constitutive androstane receptor), and by the 1α, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR), due to transactivation of xenobiotic-response elements (XREs) present in phase 0-III genes. Additional NRs, like HNF4-α, FXR, LXR-α play important roles in drug metabolism in certain settings, such as in relation to cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. The phase I enzymes CYP3A4/A5, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2A6, CYP2J2, and CYP2E1 metabolize >90% of all prescription drugs, and phase II conjugation of hydrophilic functional groups (with/without phase I modification) facilitates drug clearance. The conjugation step is mediated by broad-specificity transferases like UGTs, SULTs, GSTs. This review delves into our current understanding of PXR/CAR/VDR-mediated regulation of DME and transporter expression, as well as effects of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and epigenome (specified by promoter methylation, histone modification, microRNAs, long non coding RNAs) on the expression of PXR/CAR/VDR and phase 0-III mediators, and their impacts on variable drug response. Therapeutic agents that target epigenetic regulation and the molecular basis and consequences (overdosing, underdosing, or beneficial outcome) of drug-drug/drug-food/drug-herb interactions are also discussed. Precision medicine requires understanding of a drug's impact on DME and transporter activity and their NR-regulated expression in order to achieve optimal drug efficacy without adverse drug reactions. In future drug screening, new tools such as humanized mouse models and

  16. The mammalian clock component PERIOD2 coordinates circadian output by interaction with nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Schmutz, Isabelle; Ripperger, Jürgen A; Baeriswyl-Aebischer, Stéphanie; Albrecht, Urs

    2010-02-15

    Mammalian circadian clocks provide a temporal framework to synchronize biological functions. To obtain robust rhythms with a periodicity of about a day, these clocks use molecular oscillators consisting of two interlocked feedback loops. The core loop generates rhythms by transcriptional repression via the Period (PER) and Cryptochrome (CRY) proteins, whereas the stabilizing loop establishes roughly antiphasic rhythms via nuclear receptors. Nuclear receptors also govern many pathways that affect metabolism and physiology. Here we show that the core loop component PER2 can coordinate circadian output with the circadian oscillator. PER2 interacts with nuclear receptors including PPARalpha and REV-ERBalpha and serves as a coregulator of nuclear receptor-mediated transcription. Consequently, PER2 is rhythmically bound at the promoters of nuclear receptor target genes in vivo. In this way, the circadian oscillator can modulate the expression of nuclear receptor target genes like Bmal1, Hnf1alpha, and Glucose-6-phosphatase. The concept that PER2 may propagate clock information to metabolic pathways via nuclear receptors adds an important facet to the clock-dependent regulation of biological networks.

  17. Shear stress activation of nuclear receptor PXR in endothelial detoxification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; Fang, Xi; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Zhen; Zhao, Beilei; Xiao, Lei; Liu, Ao; Li, Yi-Shuan J; Shyy, John Y-J; Guan, Youfei; Chien, Shu; Wang, Nanping

    2013-08-06

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are constantly exposed to xenobiotics and endobiotics or their metabolites, which perturb EC function, as well as to shear stress, which plays a crucial role in vascular homeostasis. Pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a nuclear receptor and a key regulator of the detoxification of xeno- and endobiotics. Here we show that laminar shear stress (LSS), the atheroprotective flow, activates PXR in ECs, whereas oscillatory shear stress, the atheroprone flow, suppresses PXR. LSS activation of PXR in cultured ECs led to the increased expression of a PXR target gene, multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1). An in vivo study using rats showed that the expression of MDR1 was significantly higher in the endothelium from the descending thoracic aorta, where flow is mostly laminar, than from the inner curvature of aortic arch, where flow is disturbed. Functionally, LSS-activated PXR protects ECs from apoptosis triggered by doxorubicin via the induction of MDR1 and other detoxification genes. PXR also suppressed the expression of proinflammatory adhesion molecules and monocyte adhesion in response to TNF-α and lipopolysaccharide. Overexpression of a constitutively active PXR in rat carotid arteries potently attenuated proinflammatory responses. In addition, cDNA microarray revealed a large number of the PXR-activated endothelial genes whose products are responsible for major steps of detoxification, including phase I and II metabolizing enzymes and transporters. These detoxification genes in ECs are induced by LSS in ECs in a PXR-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that PXR represents a flow-activated detoxification system to protect ECs against damage by xeno- and endobiotics.

  18. Shear stress activation of nuclear receptor PXR in endothelial detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohong; Fang, Xi; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Zhen; Zhao, Beilei; Xiao, Lei; Liu, Ao; Li, Yi-Shuan J.; Shyy, John Y.-J.; Guan, Youfei; Chien, Shu; Wang, Nanping

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are constantly exposed to xenobiotics and endobiotics or their metabolites, which perturb EC function, as well as to shear stress, which plays a crucial role in vascular homeostasis. Pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a nuclear receptor and a key regulator of the detoxification of xeno- and endobiotics. Here we show that laminar shear stress (LSS), the atheroprotective flow, activates PXR in ECs, whereas oscillatory shear stress, the atheroprone flow, suppresses PXR. LSS activation of PXR in cultured ECs led to the increased expression of a PXR target gene, multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1). An in vivo study using rats showed that the expression of MDR1 was significantly higher in the endothelium from the descending thoracic aorta, where flow is mostly laminar, than from the inner curvature of aortic arch, where flow is disturbed. Functionally, LSS-activated PXR protects ECs from apoptosis triggered by doxorubicin via the induction of MDR1 and other detoxification genes. PXR also suppressed the expression of proinflammatory adhesion molecules and monocyte adhesion in response to TNF-α and lipopolysaccharide. Overexpression of a constitutively active PXR in rat carotid arteries potently attenuated proinflammatory responses. In addition, cDNA microarray revealed a large number of the PXR-activated endothelial genes whose products are responsible for major steps of detoxification, including phase I and II metabolizing enzymes and transporters. These detoxification genes in ECs are induced by LSS in ECs in a PXR-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that PXR represents a flow-activated detoxification system to protect ECs against damage by xeno- and endobiotics. PMID:23878263

  19. ERRα metabolic nuclear receptor controls growth of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bernatchez, Gérald; Giroux, Véronique; Lassalle, Thomas; Carpentier, André C; Rivard, Nathalie; Carrier, Julie C

    2013-10-01

    The estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) is a nuclear receptor that acts primarily as a regulator of metabolic processes, particularly in tissues subjected to high-energy demand. In addition to its control of energy metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis, ERRα has recently been associated with cancer progression. Notably, increased expression of ERRα has been shown in several cancerous tissues, including breast, ovary and colon. However, additional studies are required to gain insight into the action of ERRα in cancer biology, particularly in non-endocrine-related cancers. Therefore, using a short hairpin RNA-mediated approach, we investigated whether ERRα is required for the rapid growth of colon cancer cells and to maintain their neoplastic metabolic state. Results show that silencing ERRα significantly impaired colon cancer cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro as well as their in vivo tumorigenic capacity. A pronounced delay in G1-to-S cell cycle phase transition was observed in ERRα-depleted cells in association with reduced cyclin-dependent kinase 2 activity and hyperphosphorylated state of the retinoblastoma protein along with disturbed expression of several cell cycle regulators, including p15 and p27. Interestingly, ERRα-depleted HCT116 cells also displayed significant reduction in expression of a large set of key genes to glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle and lipid synthesis. Furthermore, using (14)C isotope tracer analysis, ERRα depletion in colon cancer cells resulted in reduced glucose incorporation and glucose-mediated lipogenesis in these cells. These findings suggest that ERRα coordinates colon cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenic capacity with energy metabolism. Thus, ERRα could represent a promising therapeutic target in colon cancer.

  20. High glucose induces activation of NF-κB inflammatory signaling through IκBα sumoylation in rat mesangial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wei; Xu, Ling; Zhou, Xueqin; Gao, Chenlin; Yang, Maojun; Chen, Guo; Zhu, Jianhua; Jiang, Lan; Gan, Huakui; Gou, Fang; Feng, Hong; Peng, Juan; Xu, Yong

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •The expression of SUMO1, SUMO2/3 under high glucose was obviously enhanced. •High glucose induced degradation of IκBα and activation of NF-κB pathway. •Sumoylation of IκBα in high glucose were significantly decreased. •The proteasome inhibitor MG132 could partially revert the degradation of IκBα. -- Abstract: The posttranslational modification of proteins by small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) has emerged as an important regulatory mechanism for the alteration of protein activity, stability, and cellular localization. The latest research demonstrates that sumoylation is extensively involved in the regulation of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway, which plays a critical role in the regulation of inflammation and contributes to fibrosis in diabetic nephropathy (DN). However, the role of sumoylation in the regulation of NF-κB signaling in DN is still unclear. In the present study, we cultured rat glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs) stimulated by high glucose and divided GMCs into six groups: normal glucose group (5.6 mmol/L), high glucose groups (10, 20, and 30 mmol/L), mannitol group (i.e., osmotic control group), and MG132 intervention group (30 mmol/L glucose with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor). The expression of SUMO1, SUMO2/3, IκBα, NF-κBp65, and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) was measured by Western blot, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and indirect immunofluorescence laser scanning confocal microscopy. The interaction between SUMO1, SUMO2/3, and IκBα was observed by co-immunoprecipitation. The results showed that the expression of SUMO1 and SUMO2/3 was dose- and time-dependently enhanced by high glucose (p < 0.05). However, the expression of IκBα sumoylation in high glucose was significantly decreased compared with the normal glucose group (p < 0.05). The expression of IκBα was dose- and time-dependently decreased, and NF-κBp65 and MCP-1 were increased under high glucose conditions, which

  1. Elevated NCOR1 disrupts a network of dietary-sensing nuclear receptors in bladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Abedin, S. Asad; Thorne, James L.; Battaglia, Sebastiano; Maguire, Orla; Hornung, Laura B.; Doherty, Alan P.; Mills, Ian G.; Campbell, Moray J.

    2009-01-01

    Increasingly invasive bladder cancer cells lines displayed insensitivity toward a panel of dietary-derived ligands for members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Insensitivity was defined through altered gene regulatory actions and cell proliferation and reflected both reduced receptor expression and elevated nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCOR1) expression. Stable overexpression of NCOR1 in sensitive cells (RT4) resulted in a panel of clones that recapitulated the resistant phenotype in terms of gene regulatory actions and proliferative responses toward ligand. Similarly, silencing RNA approaches to NCOR1 in resistant cells (EJ28) enhanced ligand gene regulatory and proliferation responses, including those mediated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ and vitamin D receptor (VDR) receptors. Elevated NCOR1 levels generate an epigenetic lesion to target in resistant cells using the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat, in combination with nuclear receptor ligands. Such treatments revealed strong-additive interactions toward the PPARγ, VDR and Farnesoid X-activated receptors. Genome-wide microarray and microfluidic quantitative real-time, reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction approaches, following the targeting of NCOR1 activity and expression, revealed the selective capacity of this corepressor to govern common transcriptional events of underlying networks. Combined these findings suggest that NCOR1 is a selective regulator of nuclear receptors, notably PPARγ and VDR, and contributes to their loss of sensitivity. Combinations of epigenetic therapies that target NCOR1 may prove effective, even when receptor expression is reduced. PMID:19126649

  2. Road to exercise mimetics: targeting nuclear receptors in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Fan, Weiwei; Atkins, Annette R; Yu, Ruth T; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M

    2013-12-01

    Skeletal muscle is the largest organ in the human body and is the major site for energy expenditure. It exhibits remarkable plasticity in response to physiological stimuli such as exercise. Physical exercise remodels skeletal muscle and enhances its capability to burn calories, which has been shown to be beneficial for many clinical conditions including the metabolic syndrome and cancer. Nuclear receptors (NRs) comprise a class of transcription factors found only in metazoans that regulate major biological processes such as reproduction, development, and metabolism. Recent studies have demonstrated crucial roles for NRs and their co-regulators in the regulation of skeletal muscle energy metabolism and exercise-induced muscle remodeling. While nothing can fully replace exercise, development of exercise mimetics that enhance or even substitute for the beneficial effects of physical exercise would be of great benefit. The unique property of NRs that allows modulation by endogenous or synthetic ligands makes them bona fide therapeutic targets. In this review, we present an overview of the current understanding of the role of NRs and their co-regulators in skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism and summarize recent progress in the development of exercise mimetics that target NRs and their co-regulators.

  3. Nuclear receptor coregulators: modulators of pathology and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Lonard, David M.; O’Malley, Bert W.

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear receptor superfamily includes transcription factors that transduce steroid, thyroid and retinoid hormones and other ligands in conjunction with coregulators. To date, over 350 coregulators have been reported in the literature, and advances in proteomic analyses of coregulator protein complexes have revealed that a far greater number of coregulator-interacting proteins also exist. Coregulator dysfunction has been implicated in diverse pathological states, genetic syndromes and cancer. A hallmark of disease related to the disruption of normal coregulator function is the pleiotropic effect on animal physiology, which is frequently manifested as the dysregulation of metabolic and neurological systems. Coregulators have broad physiological and pathological functions that make them promising new drug targets for diseases such as hormone-dependent cancers. Advances in proteomics, genomics and transcriptomics have provided novel insights into the biology of coregulators at a system-wide level and will lead the way to a new understanding of how coregulators can be evaluated in the context of complex and multifaceted genetic factors, hormones, diet, the environment and stress. Ultimately, better knowledge of the associations that exist between coregulator function and human diseases is expected to expand the indications for the use of future coregulator-targeted drugs. PMID:22733267

  4. Transcriptional integration of metabolism by the nuclear sterol-activated receptors LXR and FXR.

    PubMed

    Calkin, Anna C; Tontonoz, Peter

    2012-03-14

    Nuclear receptors are integrators of hormonal and nutritional signals, mediating changes to metabolic pathways within the body. Given that modulation of lipid and glucose metabolism has been linked to diseases including type 2 diabetes, obesity and atherosclerosis, a greater understanding of pathways that regulate metabolism in physiology and disease is crucial. The liver X receptors (LXRs) and the farnesoid X receptors (FXRs) are activated by oxysterols and bile acids, respectively. Mounting evidence indicates that these nuclear receptors have essential roles, not only in the regulation of cholesterol and bile acid metabolism but also in the integration of sterol, fatty acid and glucose metabolism.

  5. Transcriptional integration of metabolism by the nuclear sterol-activated receptors LXR and FXR

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are integrators of hormonal and nutritional signals, mediating changes to metabolic pathways within the body. Given that modulation of lipid and glucose metabolism has been linked to diseases including type 2 diabetes, obesity and atherosclerosis, a greater understanding of pathways that regulate metabolism in physiology and disease is crucial. The liver X receptors (LXRs) and the farnesoid X receptors (FXRs) are activated by oxysterols and bile acids, respectively. Mounting evidence indicates that these nuclear receptors have essential roles, not only in the regulation of cholesterol and bile acid metabolism but also in the integration of sterol, fatty acid and glucose metabolism. PMID:22414897

  6. SENP1-modulated sumoylation regulates retinoblastoma protein (RB) and Lamin A/C interaction and stabilization.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P; Kuehn, M R

    2016-12-15

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB) plays a critical role in cell proliferation and differentiation and its inactivation is a frequent underlying factor in tumorigenesis. While the regulation of RB function by phosphorylation is well studied, proteasome-mediated RB protein degradation is emerging as an important regulatory mechanism. Although our understanding of RB turnover is currently limited, there is evidence that the nuclear lamina filament protein Lamin A/C protects RB from proteasomal degradation. Here we show that SUMO1 conjugation of RB and Lamin A/C is modulated by the SUMO protease SENP1 and that sumoylation of both proteins is required for their interaction. Importantly, this SUMO1-dependent complex protects both RB and Lamin A/C from proteasomal turnover.

  7. PPARs: Nuclear Receptors Controlled by, and Controlling, Nutrient Handling through Nuclear and Cytosolic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Maria; Lombardi, Assunta; Silvestri, Elena; Senese, Rosalba; Cioffi, Federica; Goglia, Fernando; Lanni, Antonia; de Lange, Pieter

    2010-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), which are known to regulate lipid homeostasis, are tightly controlled by nutrient availability, and they control nutrient handling. In this paper, we focus on how nutrients control the expression and action of PPARs and how cellular signaling events regulate the action of PPARs in metabolically active tissues (e.g., liver, skeletal muscle, heart, and white adipose tissue). We address the structure and function of the PPARs, and their interaction with other nuclear receptors, including PPAR cross-talk. We further discuss the roles played by different kinase pathways, including the extracellular signal-regulated kinases/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK MAPK), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), Akt/protein kinase B (Akt/PKB), and the NAD+-regulated protein deacetylase SIRT1, serving to control the activity of the PPARs themselves as well as that of a key nutrient-related PPAR coactivator, PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α). We also highlight how currently applied nutrigenomic strategies will increase our understanding on how nutrients regulate metabolic homeostasis through PPAR signaling. PMID:20814433

  8. Nuclear export receptor CRM1 recognizes diverse conformations in nuclear export signals.

    PubMed

    Fung, Ho Yee Joyce; Fu, Szu-Chin; Chook, Yuh Min

    2017-03-10

    Nuclear export receptor CRM1 binds highly variable nuclear export signals (NESs) in hundreds of different cargoes. Previously we have shown that CRM1 binds NESs in both polypeptide orientations (Fung et al., 2015). Here, we show crystal structures of CRM1 bound to eight additional NESs which reveal diverse conformations that range from loop-like to all-helix, which occupy different extents of the invariant NES-binding groove. Analysis of all NES structures show 5-6 distinct backbone conformations where the only conserved secondary structural element is one turn of helix that binds the central portion of the CRM1 groove. All NESs also participate in main chain hydrogen bonding with human CRM1 Lys568 side chain, which acts as a specificity filter that prevents binding of non-NES peptides. The large conformational range of NES backbones explains the lack of a fixed pattern for its 3-5 hydrophobic anchor residues, which in turn explains the large array of peptide sequences that can function as NESs.

  9. Nuclear export receptor CRM1 recognizes diverse conformations in nuclear export signals

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Ho Yee Joyce; Fu, Szu-Chin; Chook, Yuh Min

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear export receptor CRM1 binds highly variable nuclear export signals (NESs) in hundreds of different cargoes. Previously we have shown that CRM1 binds NESs in both polypeptide orientations (Fung et al., 2015). Here, we show crystal structures of CRM1 bound to eight additional NESs which reveal diverse conformations that range from loop-like to all-helix, which occupy different extents of the invariant NES-binding groove. Analysis of all NES structures show 5-6 distinct backbone conformations where the only conserved secondary structural element is one turn of helix that binds the central portion of the CRM1 groove. All NESs also participate in main chain hydrogen bonding with human CRM1 Lys568 side chain, which acts as a specificity filter that prevents binding of non-NES peptides. The large conformational range of NES backbones explains the lack of a fixed pattern for its 3-5 hydrophobic anchor residues, which in turn explains the large array of peptide sequences that can function as NESs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23961.001 PMID:28282025

  10. Nuclear Receptors: Small Molecule Sensors that Coordinate Growth, Metabolism and Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Pardee, Keith; Necakov, Aleksandar S; Krause, Henry

    2011-01-01

    One of the largest groups of metazoan transcription factors (TFs), the Nuclear Receptor superfamily, regulates genes required for virtually all aspects of development, reproduction and metabolism. Together, these master regulators can be thought of as a fundamental operating system for metazoan life. Their most distinguishing feature is a structurally conserved domain that acts as a switch, powered by the presence of small diffusible ligands. This ligand-responsive regulation has allowed the Nuclear Receptors to help their hosts adapt to a wide variety of physiological niches and roles, making them one of the most evolutionarily successful TF families. Originally discovered as receptors for steroid hormones, the Nuclear Receptor field has grown to encompass much more than traditional endocrinology. For example, recent work has highlighted the role of Nuclear Receptors as major regulators of metabolism and biological clocks. By monitoring endogenous metabolites and absorbed xenobiotics, these receptors also coordinate rapid, system-wide responses to changing metabolic and environmental states. While many new Nuclear Receptor ligands have been discovered in the past couple of decades, approximately half of the 48 human receptors are still orphans, with a significantly higher percentage of orphans in other organisms. The discovery of new ligands has led to the elucidation of new regulatory mechanisms, target genes, pathways and functions. This review will highlight both the common as well as newly emerging traits and functions that characterize this particularly unique and important TF family.

  11. Jun Dimerization Protein 2 Activates Mc2r Transcriptional Activity: Role of Phosphorylation and SUMOylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chiung-Min; Wang, Raymond X.; Liu, Runhua; Yang, Wei-Hsiung

    2017-01-01

    Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2), a basic leucine zipper transcription factor, is involved in numerous biological and cellular processes such as cancer development and regulation, cell-cycle regulation, skeletal muscle and osteoclast differentiation, progesterone receptor signaling, and antibacterial immunity. Though JDP2 is widely expressed in mammalian tissues, its function in gonads and adrenals (such as regulation of steroidogenesis and adrenal development) is largely unknown. Herein, we find that JDP2 mRNA and proteins are expressed in mouse adrenal gland tissues. Moreover, overexpression of JDP2 in Y1 mouse adrenocortical cancer cells increases the level of melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R) protein. Notably, Mc2r promoter activity is activated by JDP2 in a dose-dependent manner. Next, by mapping the Mc2r promoter, we show that cAMP response elements (between −1320 and −720-bp) are mainly required for Mc2r activation by JDP2 and demonstrate that −830-bp is the major JDP2 binding site by real-time chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis. Mutations of cAMP response elements on Mc2r promoter disrupts JDP2 effect. Furthermore, we demonstrate that removal of phosphorylation of JDP2 results in attenuated transcriptional activity of Mc2r. Finally, we show that JDP2 is a candidate for SUMOylation and SUMOylation affects JDP2-mediated Mc2r transcriptional activity. Taken together, JDP2 acts as a novel transcriptional activator of the mouse Mc2r gene, suggesting that JDP2 may have physiological functions as a novel player in MC2R-mediated steroidogenesis as well as cell signaling in adrenal glands. PMID:28146118

  12. Xenobiotic-sensing nuclear receptors involved in drug metabolism: a structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Bret D; Redinbo, Matthew R

    2013-02-01

    Xenobiotic compounds undergo a critical range of biotransformations performed by the phase I, II, and III drug-metabolizing enzymes. The oxidation, conjugation, and transportation of potentially harmful xenobiotic and endobiotic compounds achieved by these catalytic systems are significantly regulated, at the gene expression level, by members of the nuclear receptor (NR) family of ligand-modulated transcription factors. Activation of NRs by a variety of endo- and exogenous chemicals are elemental to induction and repression of drug-metabolism pathways. The master xenobiotic sensing NRs, the promiscuous pregnane X receptor and less-promiscuous constitutive androstane receptor are crucial to initial ligand recognition, jump-starting the metabolic process. Other receptors, including farnesoid X receptor, vitamin D receptor, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, liver X receptor, and RAR-related orphan receptor, are not directly linked to promiscuous xenobiotic binding, but clearly play important roles in the modulation of metabolic gene expression. Crystallographic studies of the ligand-binding domains of nine NRs involved in drug metabolism provide key insights into ligand-based and constitutive activity, coregulator recruitment, and gene regulation. Structures of other, noncanonical transcription factors also shed light on secondary, but important, pathways of control. Pharmacological targeting of some of these nuclear and atypical receptors has been instituted as a means to treat metabolic and developmental disorders and provides a future avenue to be explored for other members of the xenobiotic-sensing NRs.

  13. The Nuclear Receptor HIZR-1 Uses Zinc as a Ligand to Mediate Homeostasis in Response to High Zinc

    PubMed Central

    Warnhoff, Kurt; Roh, Hyun C.; Kocsisova, Zuzana; Tan, Chieh-Hsiang; Morrison, Andrew; Croswell, Damari; Schneider, Daniel L.; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear receptors were originally defined as endocrine sensors in humans, leading to the identification of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Despite intensive efforts, most nuclear receptors have no known ligand, suggesting new ligand classes remain to be discovered. Furthermore, nuclear receptors are encoded in the genomes of primitive organisms that lack endocrine signaling, suggesting the primordial function may have been environmental sensing. Here we describe a novel Caenorhabditis elegans nuclear receptor, HIZR-1, that is a high zinc sensor in an animal and the master regulator of high zinc homeostasis. The essential micronutrient zinc acts as a HIZR-1 ligand, and activated HIZR-1 increases transcription of genes that promote zinc efflux and storage. The results identify zinc as the first inorganic molecule to function as a physiological ligand for a nuclear receptor and direct environmental sensing as a novel function of nuclear receptors. PMID:28095401

  14. Nuclear receptors and transcription factors in the development of fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Vluggens, Aurore; Reddy, Janardan K

    2012-12-01

    Liver regulates certain key aspects of lipid metabolism including de novo lipogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, and lipoprotein uptake and secretion. Disturbances in these hepatic functions can contribute to the development of fatty liver disease. An understanding of the regulatory mechanisms influencing hepatic lipid homeostasis and systemic energy balance is therefore of paramount importance in gaining insights that might be useful in the management of fatty liver disease. In this regard, emerging evidence indicates that certain members of the nuclear receptor superfamily and some key transcription coactivators function as intracellular sensors to orchestrate hepatic lipid metabolism. Dysregulation of nuclear receptor-mediated transcriptional signaling and perturbations in the levels of their cognate endogenous ligands play a prominent role in the development of fatty liver disease. The potential of nuclear receptors, transcription coactivators as well as enzymes that participate in the synthesis and degradation of endogenous nuclear receptor ligands, as effective therapeutic targets for fatty liver disease needs evaluation.

  15. A Boolean Network Model of Nuclear Receptor Mediated Cell Cycle Progression

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate a broad range of cellular processes. Hormones, lipids and xenobiotics have been shown to activate NRs with a range of consequences on development, metabolism, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and prolif...

  16. A Boolean Network Model of Nuclear Receptor Mediated Cell Cycle Progression (S)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate a broad range of cellular processes. Hormones, lipids and xenobiotics have been shown to activate NRs with a range of consequences on development, metabolism, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and prolif...

  17. Evidence for triclosan-induced activation of human and rodent xenobiotic nuclear receptors

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bacteriostat triclosan (2,4,40-trichloro-20-hydroxydiphenylether) (TCS) decreases rat serum thyroxine via putative nuclear receptor (NR) interaction(s) and subsequent transcriptional up-regulation of hepatic catabolism and clearance. However, due to the evolutionary divergenc...

  18. LASSO-ing Potential Nuclear Receptor Agonists and Antagonists: A New Computational Method for Database Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are important biological macromolecular transcription factors that are implicated in multiple biological pathways and may interact with other xenobiotics that are endocrine disruptors present in the environment. Examples of important NRs include the androg...

  19. The Key Regulator for Language and Speech Development, FOXP2, is a Novel Substrate for SUMOylation.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Leslie J; Wang, Chiung-Min; Nascimento, Leticia; Liu, Runhua; Wang, Lizhong; Yang, Wei-Hsiung

    2016-02-01

    Transcription factor forkhead box protein P2 (FOXP2) plays an essential role in the development of language and speech. However, the transcriptional activity of FOXP2 regulated by the post-translational modifications remains unknown. Here, we demonstrated that FOXP2 is clearly defined as a SUMO target protein at the cellular levels as FOXP2 is covalently modified by both SUMO1 and SUMO3. Furthermore, SUMOylation of FOXP2 was significantly decreased by SENP2 (a specific SUMOylation protease). We further showed that FOXP2 is selectively SUMOylated in vivo on a phylogenetically conserved lysine 674 but the SUMOylation does not alter subcellular localization and stability of FOXP2. Interestingly, we observed that human etiological FOXP2 R553H mutation robustly reduces its SUMOylation potential as compared to wild-type FOXP2. In addition, the acidic residues downstream the core SUMO motif on FOXP2 are required for its full SUMOylation capacity. Finally, our functional analysis using reporter gene assays showed that SUMOylation may modulate transcriptional activity of FOXP2 in regulating downstream target genes (DISC1, SRPX2, and MiR200c). Altogether, we provide the first evidence that FOXP2 is a substrate for SUMOylation and SUMOylation of FOXP2 plays a functional role in regulating its transcriptional activity.

  20. Nuclear Receptors and Endocrine Disruptors in Fetal and Neonatal Testes: A Gapped Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Rouiller-Fabre, Virginie; Guerquin, Marie Justine; N’Tumba-Byn, Thierry; Muczynski, Vincent; Moison, Delphine; Tourpin, Sophie; Messiaen, Sébastien; Habert, René; Livera, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    During the last decades, many studies reported that male reproductive disorders are increasing among humans. It is currently acknowledged that these abnormalities can result from fetal exposure to environmental chemicals that are progressively becoming more concentrated and widespread in our environment. Among the chemicals present in the environment (air, water, food, and many consumer products), several can act as endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), thus interfering with the endocrine system. Phthalates, bisphenol A (BPA), and diethylstilbestrol (DES) have been largely incriminated, particularly during the fetal and neonatal period, due to their estrogenic and/or anti-androgenic properties. Indeed, many epidemiological and experimental studies have highlighted their deleterious impact on fetal and neonatal testis development. As EDCs can affect many different genomic and non-genomic pathways, the mechanisms underlying the adverse effects of EDC exposure are difficult to elucidate. Using literature data and results from our laboratory, in the present review, we discuss the role of classical nuclear receptors (genomic pathway) in the fetal and neonatal testis response to EDC exposure, particularly to phthalates, BPA, and DES. Among the nuclear receptors, we focused on some of the most likely candidates, such as peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor (PPAR), androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptors (ERα and β), liver X receptors (LXR), and small heterodimer partner (SHP). First, we describe the expression and potential functions (based on data from studies using receptor agonists and mouse knockout models) of these nuclear receptors in the developing testis. Then, for each EDC studied, we summarize the main evidences indicating that the reprotoxic effect of each EDC under study is mediated through a specific nuclear receptor(s). We also point-out the involvement of other receptors and nuclear receptor-independent pathways. PMID:25999913

  1. Plant nuclear hormone receptors: a role for small molecules in protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Lumba, Shelley; Cutler, Sean; McCourt, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Plant hormones are a group of chemically diverse small molecules that direct processes ranging from growth and development to biotic and abiotic stress responses. Surprisingly, genome analyses suggest that classic animal nuclear hormone receptor homologs do not exist in plants. It now appears that plants have co-opted several protein families to perceive hormones within the nucleus. In one solution to the problem, the hormones auxin and jasmonate (JA) act as “molecular glue” that promotes protein-protein interactions between receptor F-boxes and downstream corepressor targets. In another solution, gibberellins (GAs) bind and elicit a conformational change in a novel soluble receptor family related to hormone-sensitive lipases. Abscisic acid (ABA), like GA, also acts through an allosteric mechanism involving a START-domain protein. The molecular identification of plant nuclear hormone receptors will allow comparisons with animal nuclear receptors and testing of fundamental questions about hormone function in plant development and evolution.

  2. Nuclear receptors of the honey bee: annotation and expression in the adult brain.

    PubMed

    Velarde, Rodrigo A; Robinson, Gene E; Fahrbach, Susan E

    2006-10-01

    The Drosophila genome encodes 18 canonical nuclear receptors. All of the Drosophila nuclear receptors are here shown to be present in the genome of the honey bee (Apis mellifera). Given that the time since divergence of the Drosophila and Apis lineages is measured in hundreds of millions of years, the identification of matched orthologous nuclear receptors in the two genomes reveals the fundamental set of nuclear receptors required to 'make' an endopterygote insect. The single novelty is the presence in the A. mellifera genome of a third insect gene similar to vertebrate photoreceptor-specific nuclear receptor (PNR). Phylogenetic analysis indicates that this novel gene, which we have named AmPNR-like, is a new member of the NR2 subfamily not found in the Drosophila or human genomes. This gene is expressed in the developing compound eye of the honey bee. Like their vertebrate counterparts, arthropod nuclear receptors play key roles in embryonic and postembryonic development. Studies in Drosophila have focused primarily on the role of these transcription factors in embryogenesis and metamorphosis. Examination of an expressed sequence tag library developed from the adult bee brain and analysis of transcript expression in brain using in situ hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR revealed that several members of the nuclear receptor family (AmSVP, AmUSP, AmERR, AmHr46, AmFtz-F1, and AmHnf-4) are expressed in the brain of the adult bee. Further analysis of the expression of AmUSP and AmSVP in the mushroom bodies, the major insect brain centre for learning and memory, revealed changes in transcript abundance and, in the case of AmUSP, changes in transcript localization, during the development of foraging behaviour in the adult. Study of the honey bee therefore provides a model for understanding nuclear receptor function in the adult brain.

  3. Transcriptional Corepressor SMILE Recruits SIRT1 to Inhibit Nuclear Receptor Estrogen Receptor-related Receptor γ Transactivation*

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuan-Bin; Park, Jeong-Hoh; Kim, Don-Kyu; Hwang, Jung Hwan; Oh, Sangmi; Park, Seung Bum; Shong, Minho; Lee, In-Kyu; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2009-01-01

    SMILE (small heterodimer partner interacting leucine zipper protein) has been identified as a corepressor of the glucocorticoid receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α. Here we show that SMILE also represses estrogen receptor-related receptor γ (ERRγ) transactivation. Knockdown of SMILE gene expression increases ERRγ activity. SMILE directly interacts with ERRγ in vitro and in vivo. Domain mapping analysis showed that SMILE binds to the AF2 domain of ERRγ. SMILE represses ERRγ transactivation partially through competition with coactivators PGC-1α, PGC-1β, and GRIP1. Interestingly, the repression of SMILE on ERRγ is released by SIRT1 inhibitors, a catalytically inactive SIRT1 mutant, and SIRT1 small interfering RNA but not by histone protein deacetylase inhibitor. In vivo glutathione S-transferase pulldown and coimmunoprecipitation assays validated that SMILE physically interacts with SIRT1. Furthermore, the ERRγ inverse agonist GSK5182 enhances the interaction of SMILE with ERRγ and SMILE-mediated repression. Knockdown of SMILE or SIRT1 blocks the repressive effect of GSK5182. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that GSK5182 augments the association of SMILE and SIRT1 on the promoter of the ERRγ target PDK4. GSK5182 and adenoviral overexpression of SMILE cooperate to repress ERRγ-induced PDK4 gene expression, and this repression is released by overexpression of a catalytically defective SIRT1 mutant. Finally, we demonstrated that ERRγ regulates SMILE gene expression, which in turn inhibits ERRγ. Overall, these findings implicate SMILE as a novel corepressor of ERRγ and recruitment of SIRT1 as a novel repressive mechanism for SMILE and ERRγ inverse agonist. PMID:19690166

  4. Nuclear Receptor Corepressor Recruitment by Unliganded Thyroid Hormone Receptor in Gene Repression during Xenopus laevis Development

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, Laurent M.; Jones, Peter L.; Havis, Emmanuelle; Rouse, Nicole; Demeneix, Barbara A.; Shi, Yun-Bo

    2002-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TR) act as activators of transcription in the presence of the thyroid hormone (T3) and as repressors in its absence. While many in vitro approaches have been used to study the molecular mechanisms of TR action, their physiological relevance has not been addressed. Here we investigate how TR regulates gene expression during vertebrate postembryonic development by using T3-dependent amphibian metamorphosis as a model. Earlier studies suggest that TR acts as a repressor during premetamorphosis when T3 is absent. We hypothesize that corepressor complexes containing the nuclear receptor corepressor (N-CoR) are key factors in this TR-dependent gene repression, which is important for premetamorphic tadpole growth. To test this hypothesis, we isolated Xenopus laevis N-CoR (xN-CoR) and showed that it was present in pre- and metamorphic tadpoles. Using a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we demonstrated that xN-CoR was recruited to the promoters of T3 response genes during premetamorphosis and released upon T3 treatment, accompanied by a local increase in histone acetylation. Furthermore, overexpression of a dominant-negative N-CoR in tadpole tail muscle led to increased transcription from a T3-dependent promoter. Our data indicate that N-CoR is recruited by unliganded TR to repress target gene expression during premetamorphic animal growth, an important process that prepares the tadpole for metamorphosis. PMID:12446772

  5. Bile Acid Nuclear Receptor Farnesoid X Receptor: Therapeutic Target for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Gi; Kim, Byung-Kwon; Kim, Kyumin

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the causes of fatty liver, occurring when fat is accumulated in the liver without alcohol consumption. NAFLD is the most common liver disorder in advanced countries. NAFLD is a spectrum of pathology involving hepatic steatosis with/without inflammation and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis with accumulation of hepatocyte damage and hepatic fibrosis. Recent studies have revealed that NAFLD results in the progression of cryptogenic cirrhosis that leads to hepatocarcinoma and cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure. The main causes of NAFLD have not been revealed yet, metabolic syndromes including obesity and insulin resistance are widely accepted for the critical risk factors for the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Nuclear receptors (NRs) are transcriptional factors that sense environmental or hormonal signals and regulate expression of genes, involved in cellular growth, development, and metabolism. Several NRs have been reported to regulate genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism and inflammation. Among various NRs, farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is abundantly expressed in the liver and a key regulator to control various metabolic processes in the liver. Recent studies have shown that NAFLD is associated with inappropriate function of FXR. The impact of FXR transcriptional activity in NAFLD is likely to be potential therapeutic strategy, but still requires to elucidate underlying potent therapeutic mechanisms of FXR for the treatment of NAFLD. This article will focus the physiological roles of FXR and establish the correlation between FXR transcriptional activity and the pathogenesis of NAFLD. PMID:28029021

  6. Crystal Structures of the Nuclear Receptor, Liver Receptor Homolog 1, Bound to Synthetic Agonists.

    PubMed

    Mays, Suzanne G; Okafor, C Denise; Whitby, Richard J; Goswami, Devrishi; Stec, Józef; Flynn, Autumn R; Dugan, Michael C; Jui, Nathan T; Griffin, Patrick R; Ortlund, Eric A

    2016-12-02

    Liver receptor homolog 1 (NR5A2, LRH-1) is an orphan nuclear hormone receptor that regulates diverse biological processes, including metabolism, proliferation, and the resolution of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Although preclinical and cellular studies demonstrate that LRH-1 has great potential as a therapeutic target for metabolic diseases and cancer, development of LRH-1 modulators has been difficult. Recently, systematic modifications to one of the few known chemical scaffolds capable of activating LRH-1 failed to improve efficacy substantially. Moreover, mechanisms through which LRH-1 is activated by synthetic ligands are entirely unknown. Here, we use x-ray crystallography and other structural methods to explore conformational changes and receptor-ligand interactions associated with LRH-1 activation by a set of related agonists. Unlike phospholipid LRH-1 ligands, these agonists bind deep in the pocket and do not interact with residues near the mouth nor do they expand the pocket like phospholipids. Unexpectedly, two closely related agonists with similar efficacies (GSK8470 and RJW100) exhibit completely different binding modes. The dramatic repositioning is influenced by a differential ability to establish stable face-to-face π-π-stacking with the LRH-1 residue His-390, as well as by a novel polar interaction mediated by the RJW100 hydroxyl group. The differing binding modes result in distinct mechanisms of action for the two agonists. Finally, we identify a network of conserved water molecules near the ligand-binding site that are important for activation by both agonists. This work reveals a previously unappreciated complexity associated with LRH-1 agonist development and offers insights into rational design strategies.

  7. In silico modelling of prostacyclin and other lipid mediators to nuclear receptors reveal novel thyroid hormone receptor antagonist properties.

    PubMed

    Perez Diaz, Noelia; Zloh, Mire; Patel, Pryank; Mackenzie, Louise S

    2016-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) is a key mediator involved in cardiovascular homeostasis, acting predominantly on two receptor types; cell surface IP receptor and cytosolic peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) β/δ. Having a very short half-life, direct methods to determine its long term effects on cells is difficult, and little is known of its interactions with nuclear receptors. Here we used computational chemistry methods to investigate the potential for PGI2, beraprost (IP receptor agonist), and GW0742 (PPARβ/δ agonist), to bind to nuclear receptors, confirmed with pharmacological methods. In silico screening predicted that PGI2, beraprost, and GW0742 have the potential to bind to different nuclear receptors, in particular thyroid hormone β receptor (TRβ) and thyroid hormone α receptor (TRα). Docking analysis predicts a binding profile to residues thought to have allosteric control on the TR ligand binding site. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed that beraprost and GW0742 display TRβ and TRα antagonistic properties; beraprost IC50 6.3 × 10(-5)mol/L and GW0742 IC50 4.9 × 10(-6) mol/L. Changes to triiodothyronine (T3) induced vasodilation of rat mesenteric arteries measured on the wire myograph were measured in the presence of the TR antagonist MLS000389544 (10(-5) mol/L), beraprost (10(-5) mol/L) and GW0742 (10(-5) mol/L); all significantly inhibited T3 induced vasodilation compared to controls. We have shown that both beraprost and GW0742 exhibit TRβ and TRα antagonist behaviour, and suggests that PGI2 has the ability to affect the long term function of cells through binding to and inactivating thyroid hormone receptors.

  8. Breast cancer prognosis predicted by nuclear receptor-coregulator networks.

    PubMed

    Doan, Tram B; Eriksson, Natalie A; Graham, Dinny; Funder, John W; Simpson, Evan R; Kuczek, Elizabeth S; Clyne, Colin; Leedman, Peter J; Tilley, Wayne D; Fuller, Peter J; Muscat, George E O; Clarke, Christine L

    2014-07-01

    Although molecular signatures based on transcript expression in breast cancer samples have provided new insights into breast cancer classification and prognosis, there are acknowledged limitations in current signatures. To provide rational, pathway-based signatures of disrupted physiology in cancer tissues that may be relevant to prognosis, this study has directly quantitated changed gene expression, between normal breast and cancer tissue, as a basis for signature development. The nuclear receptor (NR) family of transcription factors, and their coregulators, are fundamental regulators of every aspect of metazoan life, and were rigorously quantified in normal breast tissues and ERα positive and ERα negative breast cancers. Coregulator expression was highly correlated with that of selected NR in normal breast, particularly from postmenopausal women. These associations were markedly decreased in breast cancer, and the expression of the majority of coregulators was down-regulated in cancer tissues compared with normal. While in cancer the loss of NR-coregulator associations observed in normal breast was common, a small number of NR (Rev-ERBβ, GR, NOR1, LRH-1 and PGR) acquired new associations with coregulators in cancer tissues. Elevated expression of these NR in cancers was associated with poorer outcome in large clinical cohorts, as well as suggesting the activation of ERα -related, but ERα-independent, pathways in ERα negative cancers. In addition, the combined expression of small numbers of NR and coregulators in breast cancer was identified as a signature predicting outcome in ERα negative breast cancer patients, not linked to proliferation and with predictive power superior to existing signatures containing many more genes. These findings highlight the power of predictive signatures derived from the quantitative determination of altered gene expression between normal breast and breast cancers. Taken together, the findings of this study identify networks

  9. Role of Nuclear Receptor SHP in Metabolism and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuxia; Hagedorn, Curt H.; Wang, Li

    2010-01-01

    Small heterodimer partner (SHP, NR0B2) is a unique member of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily that contains the dimerization and ligand-binding domain found in other family members, but lacks the conserved DNA binding domain. The ability of SHP to bind directly to multiple NRs is crucial for its physiological function as a transcriptional inhibitor of gene expression. A wide variety of interacting partners for SHP have been identified, indicating the potential for SHP to regulate an array of genes in different biological pathways. In this review, we summarize studies concerning the structure and target genes of SHP and discuss recent progress in understanding the function of SHP in bile acid, cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, and drug metabolism. In addition, we review the regulatory role of SHP in microRNA (miRNA) regulation, liver fibrosis and cancer progression. The fact that SHP controls a complex set of genes in multiple metabolic pathways suggests the intriguing possibility of developing new therapeutics for metabolic diseases, including fatty liver, dyslipidemia and obesity, by regulating SHP with small molecules. To achieve this goal, more progress regarding SHP ligands and protein structure will be required. Besides its metabolic regulatory function, studies by us and other groups provide strong evidence that SHP plays a critical role in the development of cancer, particularly liver and breast cancer. An increased understanding of the fundamental mechanisms by which SHP regulates the development of cancers will be critical in applying knowledge of SHP in diagnostic, therapeutic or preventive strategies for specific cancers. PMID:20970497

  10. Natural compounds regulate energy metabolism by the modulating the activity of lipid-sensing nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Obesity causes excess fat accumulation in various tissues, most notoriously in the adipose tissue, along with other insulin-responsive organs such as skeletal muscle and the liver, which predisposes an individual to the development of metabolic abnormalities. The molecular mechanisms underlying obesity-induced metabolic abnormalities have not been completely elucidated; however, in recent years, the search for therapies to prevent the development of obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders has increased. It is known that several nuclear receptors, when activated by specific ligands, regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism at the transcriptional level. The expression of lipid metabolism-related enzymes is directly regulated by the activity of various nuclear receptors via their interaction with specific response elements in promoters of those genes. Many natural compounds act as ligands of nuclear receptors and regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism by regulating the activities of these nuclear receptors. In this review, we describe our current knowledge of obesity, the role of lipid-sensing nuclear receptors in energy metabolism, and several examples of food factors that act as agonists or antagonists of nuclear receptors, which may be useful for the management of obesity and the accompanying energy metabolism abnormalities.

  11. Nuclear hormone receptor signals as new therapeutic targets for urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, H; Zheng, Y; Izumi, K

    2012-01-01

    Unlike prostate and breast cancers, urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder is not yet considered as an endocrine-related neoplasm, and hormonal therapy for bladder cancer remains experimental. Nonetheless, there is increasing evidence indicating that nuclear hormone receptor signals are implicated in the development and progression of bladder cancer. Androgen-mediated androgen receptor (AR) signals have been convincingly shown to induce bladder tumorigenesis. Androgens also promote the growth of AR-positive bladder cancer cells, although it is controversial whether AR plays a dominant role in bladder cancer progression. Both stimulatory and inhibitory functions of estrogen receptor signals in bladder cancer have been reported. Various studies have also demonstrated the involvement of other nuclear receptors, including progesterone receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, vitamin D receptor, and retinoid receptors, as well as some orphan receptors, in bladder cancer. This review summarizes and discusses available data suggesting the modulation of bladder carcinogenesis and cancer progression via nuclear hormone receptor signaling pathways. These pathways have the potential to be an extremely important area of bladder cancer research, leading to the development of effective chemopreventive/therapeutic approaches, using hormonal manipulation. Considerable uncertainty remains regarding the selection of patients who are likely to benefit from hormonal therapy and optimal options for the treatment.

  12. Nuclear receptors license phagocytosis by trem2+ myeloid cells in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Savage, Julie C; Jay, Taylor; Goduni, Elanda; Quigley, Caitlin; Mariani, Monica M; Malm, Tarja; Ransohoff, Richard M; Lamb, Bruce T; Landreth, Gary E

    2015-04-22

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by a robust inflammatory response elicited by the accumulation and subsequent deposition of amyloid (Aβ) within the brain. The brain's immune cells migrate to and invest their processes within Aβ plaques but are unable to efficiently phagocytose and clear plaques from the brain. Previous studies have shown that treatment of myeloid cells with nuclear receptor agonists increases expression of phagocytosis-related genes. In this study, we elucidate a novel mechanism by which nuclear receptors act to enhance phagocytosis in the AD brain. Treatment of murine models of AD with agonists of the nuclear receptors PPARγ, PPARδ, LXR, and RXR stimulated microglial phagocytosis in vitro and rapidly induced the expression of the phagocytic receptors Axl and MerTK. In murine models of AD, we found that plaque-associated macrophages expressed Axl and MerTK and treatment of the cells with an RXR agonist further induced their expression, coincident with the rapid reduction in plaque burden. Further characterization of MerTK(+)/Axl(+) macrophages revealed that they also expressed the phagocytic receptor TREM2 and high levels of CD45, consistent with a peripheral origin of these cells. Importantly, in an ex vivo slice assay, nuclear receptor agonist treatment reversed the AD-related suppression of phagocytosis through a MerTK-dependent mechanism. Thus, nuclear receptor agonists increase MerTK and Axl expression on plaque-associated immune cells, consequently licensing their phagocytic activity and promoting plaque clearance.

  13. Minireview: Pathophysiological Roles of the TR4 Nuclear Receptor: Lessons Learned From Mice Lacking TR4

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shin-Jen; Zhang, Yanqing; Liu, Ning-Chun; Yang, Dong-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Testicular nuclear receptor 4 (TR4), also known as NR2C2, belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily and shares high homology with the testicular nuclear receptor 2. The natural ligands of TR4 remained unclear until the recent discoveries of several energy/lipid sensors including the polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolites, 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, and their synthetic ligands, thiazolidinediones, used for treatment of diabetes. TR4 is widely expressed throughout the body and particularly concentrated in the testis, prostate, cerebellum, and hippocampus. It has been shown to play important roles in cerebellar development, forebrain myelination, folliculogenesis, gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, muscle development, bone development, and prostate cancer progression. Here we provide a comprehensive summary of TR4 signaling including its upstream ligands/activators/suppressors, transcriptional coactivators/repressors, downstream targets, and their in vivo functions with potential impacts on TR4-related diseases. Importantly, TR4 shares similar ligands/activators with another key nuclear receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, which raised several interesting questions about how these 2 nuclear receptors may collaborate with or counteract each other's function in their related diseases. Clear dissection of such molecular mechanisms and their differential roles in various diseases may help researchers to design new potential drugs with better efficacy and fewer side effects to battle TR4 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ involved diseases. PMID:24702179

  14. Analysis of PTEN ubiquitylation and SUMOylation using molecular traps.

    PubMed

    Lang, Valérie; Aillet, Fabienne; Da Silva-Ferrada, Elisa; Xolalpa, Wendy; Zabaleta, Lorea; Rivas, Carmen; Rodriguez, Manuel S

    2015-05-01

    The function of the tumour suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is tightly controlled by post-translational modifications (PTMs) including ubiquitin or Small Ubiquitin-related MOdifiers (SUMO). It is known that SUMOylation by SUMO-1, SUMO-2/-3, mono- or polyubiquitylation have a distinct impact on PTEN activity, localisation and/or stability, however the molecular mechanisms governing these processes are still unclear. Studying PTM regulated events has always been a difficult task due to their labile nature. Here, we propose an update on the role of these PTMs on PTEN function, as well as a methodological overview on the use of molecular traps named SUMO Binding Entities (SUBEs) or Tandem Ubiquitin Binding Entities (TUBEs) to capture SUMOylated or Ubiquitylated forms of PTEN respectively. When combined with in vitro SUMOylation or Ubiquitylation assays, the use of molecular traps facilitate the detection of modified forms of PTEN. SUMO and ubiquitin-traps are also suitable to capture endogenously modified forms of PTEN after expression of E3 ligases or treatment with chemical inhibitors. This versatile approach represents an interesting alternative to explore PTEN regulation by SUMO and ubiquitin under physiological or pathological conditions.

  15. SMRT isoforms mediate repression and anti-repression of nuclear receptor heterodimers.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J D; Umesono, K; Evans, R M

    1996-01-01

    Transcriptional repression represents an important component in the regulation of cell differentiation and oncogenesis mediated by nuclear hormone receptors. Hormones act to relieve repression, thus allowing receptors to function as transcriptional activators. The transcriptional corepressor SMRT was identified as a silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors. SMRT is highly related to another corepressor, N-CoR, suggesting the existence of a new family of receptor-interacting proteins. We demonstrate that SMRT is a ubiquitous nuclear protein that interacts with unliganded receptor heterodimers in mammalian cells. Furthermore, expression of the receptor-interacting domain of SMRT acts as an antirepressor, suggesting the potential importance of splicing variants as modulators of thyroid hormone and retinoic acid signaling. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8755515

  16. Multiple Novel Signals Mediate Thyroid Hormone Receptor Nuclear Import and Export*

    PubMed Central

    Mavinakere, Manohara S.; Powers, Jeremy M.; Subramanian, Kelly S.; Roggero, Vincent R.; Allison, Lizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptor (TR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that shuttles between the cytosol and nucleus. The fine balance between nuclear import and export of TR has emerged as a critical control point for modulating thyroid hormone-responsive gene expression; however, sequence motifs of TR that mediate shuttling are not fully defined. Here, we characterized multiple signals that direct TR shuttling. Along with the known nuclear localization signal in the hinge domain, we identified a novel nuclear localization signal in the A/B domain of thyroid hormone receptor α1 that is absent in thyroid hormone receptor β1 and inactive in the oncoprotein v-ErbA. Our prior studies showed that thyroid hormone receptor α1 exits the nucleus through two pathways, one dependent on the export factor CRM1 and the other CRM1-independent. Here, we identified three novel CRM1-independent nuclear export signal (NES) motifs in the ligand-binding domain as follows: a highly conserved NES in helix 12 (NES-H12) and two additional NES sequences spanning helix 3 and helix 6, respectively. Mutations predicted to disrupt the α-helical structure resulted in a significant decrease in NES-H12 activity. The high degree of conservation of helix 12 suggests that this region may function as a key NES in other nuclear receptors. Furthermore, our mutagenesis studies on NES-H12 suggest that altered shuttling of thyroid hormone receptor β1 may be a contributing factor in resistance to thyroid hormone syndrome. Taken together, our findings provide a detailed mechanistic understanding of the multiple signals that work together to regulate TR shuttling and transcriptional activity, and they provide important insights into nuclear receptor function in general. PMID:22815488

  17. Identification of Modulators of the Nuclear Receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α (PPARα) in a Mouse Liver Gene Expression Compendium

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nuclear receptor family member peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is activated by therapeutic hypolipidemic drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals to regulate genes involved in lipid transport and catabolism. Chronic activation of PPARα in rodents inc...

  18. Analysis of the Heat Shock Response in Mouse Liver Reveals Transcriptional Dependence on the Nuclear Receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor alpha (PPARα)

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) regulates responses to chemical or physical stress in part by altering expression of genes involved in proteome maintenance. Many of these genes are also transcriptionally regulated by h...

  19. AF-2 activity and recruitment of steroid receptor coactivator 1 to the estrogen receptor depend on a lysine residue conserved in nuclear receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Henttu, P M; Kalkhoven, E; Parker, M G

    1997-01-01

    Hormone-dependent transcriptional activation by nuclear receptors depends on the presence of a conserved C-terminal amphipathic alpha-helix (helix 12) in the ligand-binding domain. Here we show that a lysine residue, which is conserved in most nuclear receptors in the predicted helix 3, is also required for estrogen-dependent transactivation. The replacement of lysine 366 with alanine appreciably reduced activation function 2 (AF-2) activity without affecting steroid- or DNA-binding activity in the mouse estrogen receptor. The mutation dramatically reduced the ability of the receptor to bind steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC-1) but had no effect on receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP-140) binding, indicating that while their sites of interaction overlap, they are not entirely consistent and in keeping with the proposal that the recruitment of coactivators, such as SRC-1, is required for AF-2 activity. Although the function of RIP-140 remains to be established, RIP-140 appears to be capable of recruiting the basal transcription machinery, since overexpression of the protein markedly increased the transcriptional activity of the mutant receptor. Since the lysine residue is conserved, we propose that it is required, together with residues in helix 12, to form the surface by which members of the nuclear receptor family interact with coactivators. PMID:9121431

  20. The structure of corepressor Dax-1 bound to its target nuclear receptor LRH-1

    PubMed Central

    Sablin, Elena P.; Woods, April; Krylova, Irina N.; Hwang, Peter; Ingraham, Holly A.; Fletterick, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    The Dax-1 protein is an enigmatic nuclear receptor that lacks an expected DNA binding domain, yet functions as a potent corepressor of nuclear receptors. Here we report the structure of Dax-1 bound to one of its targets, liver receptor homolog 1 (LRH-1). Unexpectedly, Dax-1 binds to LRH-1 using a new module, a repressor helix built from a family conserved sequence motif, PCFXXLP. Mutations in this repressor helix that are linked with human endocrine disorders dissociate the complex and attenuate Dax-1 function. The structure of the Dax-1:LRH-1 complex provides the molecular mechanism for the function of Dax-1 as a potent transcriptional repressor. PMID:19015525

  1. Dietary regulation of adiponectin by direct and indirect lipid activators of nuclear hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Rühl, R; Landrier, J F

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipokine mainly secreted by adipocytes that presents antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherogenic functions. Therefore, modulation of adiponectin expression represents a promising target for prevention or treatment of several diseases including insulin resistance and type II diabetes. Pharmacological agents such as the nuclear hormone receptor synthetic agonists like peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ agonists are of particular interest in therapeutic strategies due to their ability to increase the plasma adiponectin concentration. Nutritional approaches are also of particular interest, especially in primary prevention, since some active compounds of our diet (notably vitamins, carotenoids, or other essential nutrients) are direct or indirect lipid-activators of nuclear hormone receptors and are modifiers of adiponectin expression and secretion. The aim of the present review is to summarize current knowledge about the nutritional regulation of adiponectin by derivatives of active compounds naturally present in the diet acting as indirect or direct activators of nuclear hormone receptors.

  2. Nuclear export of the glucocorticoid receptor is accelerated by cell fusion-dependent release of calreticulin.

    PubMed

    Walther, Rhian F; Lamprecht, Claudia; Ridsdale, Andrew; Groulx, Isabelle; Lee, Stephen; Lefebvre, Yvonne A; Haché, Robert J G

    2003-09-26

    Nucleocytoplasmic exchange of nuclear hormone receptors is hypothesized to allow for rapid and direct interactions with cytoplasmic signaling factors. In addition to recycling between a naïve, chaperone-associated cytoplasmic complex and a liganded chaperone-free nuclear form, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) has been observed to shuttle between nucleus and cytoplasm. Nuclear export of GR and other nuclear receptors has been proposed to depend on direct interactions with calreticulin, which is predominantly localized to the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. We show that rapid calreticulin-mediated nuclear export of GR is a specific response to transient disruption of the endoplasmic reticulum that occurs during polyethylene glycol-mediated cell fusion. Using live and digitonin-permeabilized cells we demonstrate that, in the absence of cell fusion, GR nuclear export occurs slowly over a period of many hours independent of direct interaction with calreticulin. Our findings temper expectations that nuclear receptors respond rapidly and directly to cytoplasmic signals in the absence of additional regulatory control. These results highlight the importance of verifying findings of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking using techniques in addition to heterokaryon cell fusion.

  3. Comparison of solubilized and purified plasma membrane and nuclear insulin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K.Y.; Hawley, D.; Vigneri, R.; Goldfine, I.D.

    1988-01-12

    Prior studies have detected biochemical and immunological differences between insulin receptors in plasma membranes and isolated nuclei. To further investigate these receptors, they were solubilized in Triton X-100 partially purified by wheat germ agglutinin-agarose chromatography. In these preparations, the nuclear and plasma membrane receptors had very similar pH optima (pH 8.0) and reactivities to a group of polyclonal antireceptor antibodies. Further, both membrane preparations had identical binding activities when labeled insulin was competed for by unlabeled insulin (50% inhibition at 800 pM). Next, nuclear and plasma membranes were solubilized and purified to homogeneity by wheat germ agglutinin-agarose and insulin-agarose chromatography. In both receptors, labeled insulin was covalently cross-linked to a protein of 130 kilodaltons representing the insulin receptor ..cap alpha.. subunit. When preparations of both receptors were incubated with insulin and then adenosine 5'-(..gamma..-/sup 32/P)triphosphate, a protein of 95 kilodaltons representing the insulin receptor ..beta.. subunit was phosphorylated in a dose-dependent manner. These studies indicate, therefore, that solubilized plasma membrane and nuclear insulin receptors have similar structures and biochemical properties, and they suggest that they are the same (or very similar) proteins.

  4. Regulation of nuclear pore complex conformation by IP(3) receptor activation.

    PubMed Central

    Moore-Nichols, David; Arnott, Anne; Dunn, Robert C

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, both the molecular architecture and functional dynamics of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) have been revealed with increasing detail. These large, supramolecular assemblages of proteins form channels that span the nuclear envelope of cells, acting as crucial regulators of nuclear import and export. From the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear envelope, nuclear pore complexes exhibit an eightfold symmetric ring structure encompassing a central lumen. The lumen often appears occupied by an additional structure alternatively referred to as the central granule, nuclear transport complex, or nuclear plug. Previous studies have suggested that the central granule may play a role in mediating calcium-dependent regulation of diffusion across the nuclear envelope for intermediate sized molecules (10-40 kDa). Using atomic force microscopy to measure the surface topography of chemically fixed Xenopus laevis oocyte nuclear envelopes, we present measurements of the relative position of the central granule within the NPC lumen under a variety of conditions known to modify nuclear Ca(2+) stores. These measurements reveal a large, approximately 9-nm displacement of the central granule toward the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear envelope under calcium depleting conditions. Additionally, activation of nuclear inositol triphosphate (IP(3)) receptors by the specific agonist, adenophostin A, results in a concentration-dependent displacement of central granule position with an EC(50) of ~1.2 nM. The displacement of the central granule within the NPC is observed on both the cytoplasmic and nucleoplasmic faces of the nuclear envelope. The displacement is blocked upon treatment with xestospongin C, a specific inhibitor of IP(3) receptor activation. These results extend previous models of NPC conformational dynamics linking central granule position to depletion of IP(3) sensitive nuclear envelope calcium stores. PMID:12202368

  5. Identification and characterization of a novel nuclear protein complex involved in nuclear hormone receptor-mediated gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Garapaty, Shivani; Xu, Chong-Feng; Trojer, Patrick; Mahajan, Muktar A; Neubert, Thomas A; Samuels, Herbert H

    2009-03-20

    NRC/NCoA6 plays an important role in mediating the effects of ligand-bound nuclear hormone receptors as well as other transcription factors. NRC interacting factor 1 (NIF-1) was cloned as a novel factor that interacts in vivo with NRC. Although NIF-1 does not directly interact with nuclear hormone receptors, it enhances activation by nuclear hormone receptors presumably through its interaction with NRC. To further understand the cellular and biological function of NIF-1, we identified NIF-1-associated proteins by in-solution proteolysis followed by mass spectrometry. The identified components revealed factors involved in histone methylation and cell cycle control and include Ash2L, RbBP5, WDR5, HCF-1, DBC-1, and EMSY. Although the NIF-1 complex contains Ash2L, RbBP5, and WDR5, suggesting that the complex might methylate histone H3-Lys-4, we found that the complex contains a H3 methyltransferase activity that modifies a residue other than H3-Lys-4. The identified components form at least two distinctly sized NIF-1 complexes. DBC-1 and EMSY were identified as integral components of an NIF-1 complex of approximately 1.5 MDa and were found to play an important role in the regulation of nuclear receptor-mediated transcription. Stimulation of the Sox9 and HoxA1 genes by retinoic acid receptor-alpha was found to require both DBC-1 and EMSY in addition to NIF-1 for maximal transcriptional activation. Interestingly, NRC was not identified as a component of the NIF-1 complex, suggesting that NIF-1 and NRC do not exist as stable in vitro purified complexes, although the separate NIF-1 and NRC complexes appear to functionally interact in the cell.

  6. Nuclear localization of Formyl-Peptide Receptor 2 in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Fabio; Parisi, Melania; Fioretti, Tiziana; Sarnataro, Daniela; Esposito, Gabriella; Ammendola, Rosario

    2016-08-01

    Current models of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signaling describe binding of external agonists to cell surface receptors which, in turn, trigger several biological responses. New paradigms indicate that GPCRs localize to and signal at the nucleus, thus regulating distinct signaling cascades. The formyl-peptide receptor FPR2 belongs to the GPCR super-family and is coupled to PTX-sensitive Gi proteins. We show by western blot analysis, immunofluorescence experiments and radioligand binding assays that FPR2 is expressed at nuclear level in CaLu-6 and AGS cells. Nuclear FPR2 is a functional receptor, since it participates in intra-nuclear signaling, as assessed by decreased G protein-FPR2 association and enhanced ERK2, c-Jun and c-Myc phosphorylation upon stimulation of intact nuclei with the FPR2 agonist, WKYMVm. We analyzed FPR2 sequence for the search of a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and we found a stretch of basic aminoacids (227-KIHKK-231) in the third cytoplasmic loop of the receptor. We performed single (K230A) and multiple (H229A/K230A/K231A) mutagenesis of NLS. The constructs were individually overexpressed in HEK293 cells and immunofluorescence and western blot analysis showed that nuclear localization or translocation of FPR2 depends on the integrity of the H(229) and K(231) residues within the NLS.

  7. GR SUMOylation and formation of an SUMO-SMRT/NCoR1-HDAC3 repressing complex is mandatory for GC-induced IR nGRE-mediated transrepression.

    PubMed

    Hua, Guoqiang; Paulen, Laetitia; Chambon, Pierre

    2016-02-02

    Unique among the nuclear receptor superfamily, the glucocorticoid (GC) receptor (GR) can exert three distinct transcriptional regulatory functions on binding of a single natural (cortisol in human and corticosterone in mice) and synthetic [e.g., dexamethasone (Dex)] hormone. The molecular mechanisms underlying GC-induced positive GC response element [(+)GRE]-mediated activation of transcription are partially understood. In contrast, these mechanisms remain elusive for GC-induced evolutionary conserved inverted repeated negative GC response element (IR nGRE)-mediated direct transrepression and for tethered indirect transrepression that is mediated by DNA-bound NF-κB/activator protein 1 (AP1)/STAT3 activators and instrumental in GC-induced anti-inflammatory activity. We demonstrate here that SUMOylation of lysine K293 (mouse K310) located within an evolutionary conserved sequence in the human GR N-terminal domain allows the formation of a GR-small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs)-NCoR1/SMRT-HDAC3 repressing complex mandatory for GC-induced IR nGRE-mediated direct repression in vitro, but does not affect transactivation. Importantly, these results were validated in vivo: in K310R mutant mice and in mice ablated selectively for nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCoR1)/silencing mediator for retinoid or thyroid-hormone receptors (SMRT) corepressors in skin keratinocytes, Dex-induced direct repression and the formation of repressing complexes on IR nGREs were impaired, whereas transactivation was unaffected. In mice selectively ablated for histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) in skin keratinocytes, GC-induced direct repression, but not bindings of GR and of corepressors NCoR1/SMRT, was abolished, indicating that HDAC3 is instrumental in IR nGRE-mediated repression. Moreover, we demonstrate that the binding of HDAC3 to IR nGREs in vivo is mediated through interaction with SMRT/NCoR1. We also show that the GR ligand binding domain (LBD) is not required for SMRT

  8. Fate of the inner nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor and nuclear lamins in herpes simplex virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Scott, E S; O'Hare, P

    2001-09-01

    During herpesvirus egress, capsids bud through the inner nuclear membrane. Underlying this membrane is the nuclear lamina, a meshwork of intermediate filaments with which it is tightly associated. Details of alterations to the lamina and the inner nuclear membrane during infection and the mechanisms involved in capsid transport across these structures remain unclear. Here we describe the fate of key protein components of the nuclear envelope and lamina during herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. We followed the distribution of the inner nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor (LBR) and lamins A and B(2) tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) in live infected cells. Together with additional results from indirect immunofluorescence, our studies reveal major morphologic distortion of nuclear-rim LBR and lamins A/C, B(1), and B(2). By 8 h p.i., we also observed a significant redistribution of LBR-GFP to the endoplasmic reticulum, where it colocalized with a subpopulation of cytoplasmic glycoprotein B by immunofluorescence. In addition, analysis by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching reveals that LBR-GFP exhibited increased diffusional mobility within the nuclear membrane of infected cells. This is consistent with the disruption of interactions between LBR and the underlying lamina. In addition to studying stably expressed GFP-lamins by fluorescence microscopy, we studied endogenous A- and B-type lamins in infected cells by Western blotting. Both approaches reveal a loss of lamins associated with virus infection. These data indicate major disruption of the nuclear envelope and lamina of HSV-1-infected cells and are consistent with a virus-induced dismantling of the nuclear lamina, possibly in order to gain access to the inner nuclear membrane.

  9. Role of Nuclear Receptors in Lipid Dysfunction and Obesity-Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Taira; Xie, Wen; Renga, Barbara; Zampella, Angela; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano; Kong, Bo; Thomas, Ann M.; Guo, Grace L.; Narayanan, Ramesh; Yepuru, Muralimohan; Dalton, James T.; Chiang, John Y. L.

    2013-01-01

    This article is a report on a symposium sponsored by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics and held at the Experimental Biology 12 meeting in San Diego, CA. The presentations discussed the roles of a number of nuclear receptors in regulating glucose and lipid homeostasis, the pathophysiology of obesity-related disease states, and the promise associated with targeting their activities to treat these diseases. While many of these receptors (in particular, constitutive androstane receptor and pregnane X receptor) and their target enzymes have been thought of as regulators of drug and xenobiotic metabolism, this symposium highlighted the advances made in our understanding of the endogenous functions of these receptors. Similarly, as we gain a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying bile acid signaling pathways in the regulation of body weight and glucose homeostasis, we see the importance of using complementary approaches to elucidate this fascinating network of pathways. The observation that some receptors, like the farnesoid X receptor, can function in a tissue-specific manner via well defined mechanisms has important clinical implications, particularly in the treatment of liver diseases. Finally, the novel findings that agents that selectively activate estrogen receptor β can effectively inhibit weight gain in a high-fat diet model of obesity identifies a new role for this member of the steroid superfamily. Taken together, the significant findings reported during this symposium illustrate the promise associated with targeting a number of nuclear receptors for the development of new therapies to treat obesity and other metabolic disorders. PMID:23043185

  10. Nuclear progesterone receptor isoforms and their functions in the female reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Rekawiecki, R; Kowalik, M K; Kotwica, J

    2011-01-01

    Progesterone (P4), which is produced by the corpus luteum (CL), creates proper conditions for the embryo implantation, its development, and ensures proper conditions for the duration of pregnancy. Besides the non-genomic activity of P4 on target cells, its main physiological effect is caused through genomic action by the progesterone nuclear receptor (PGR). This nuclear progesterone receptor occurs in two specific isoforms, PGRA and PGRB. PGRA isoform acts as an inhibitor of transcriptional action of PGRB. The inactive receptor is connected with chaperone proteins and attachment of P4 causes disconnection of chaperones and unveiling of DNA binding domain (DBD). After receptor dimerization in the cells' nucleus and interaction with hormone response element (HRE), the receptor coactivators are connected and transcription is initiated. The ratio of these isoforms changes during the estrous cycle and reflects the different levels of P4 effect on the reproductive system. Both isoforms, PGRA and PGRB, also show a different response to the P4 receptor antagonist activity. Connection of the antagonist to PGRA can block PGRB, but acting through the PGRB isoform, P4 receptor antagonist may undergo conversion to a strongly receptor agonist. A third isoform, PGRC, has also been revealed. This isoform is the shortest and does not have transcriptional activity. Alternative splicing and insertion of additional exons may lead to the formation of different PGR isoforms. This paper summarizes the available data on the progesterone receptor isoforms and its regulatory action within the female reproductive system.

  11. Defective nuclear accumulation of androgen receptors in disorders of sexual differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Gyorki, S; Warne, G L; Khalid, B A; Funder, J W

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear transfer of androgen receptors (AR) and glucocorticoid receptors (GR) was determined in cultured genital skin fibroblasts from 10 normal controls and eight patients with abnormalities of the external genitalia. In whole cell studies, cultures were incubated for 20 min at 37 degrees C with [3H]methyltrienolone (3H-R1881) or tritiated dexamethasone, and specific binding was determined in whole cell, cytoplasmic, and crude nuclear fractions. Between normal and affected fibroblasts no difference was seen in cellular levels of GR, or in cytoplasmic and nuclear distribution of GR. In normal fibroblasts, cytoplasmic binding of 3H-R1881 represented 56%, and crude nuclear binding 44%, of total binding; in fibroblasts from five of the eight patients similar values (cytoplasmic 55% and nuclear 44%) were seen for 3H-R1881 binding. In fibroblasts from the other three patients no decrease in total cellular levels of AR were seen; nuclear compartmentalization, however, was much lower (approximately 20%) than in other cultures. In vitro reconstitution studies, combining 3H-R1881-loaded cytosol with naive nuclei, lead us to suggest that the defect in nuclear compartmentalization lies at the level of the nuclear acceptor site rather than the cytoplasmic binder in affected cells. We interpret the data to suggest that defective nuclear binding of AR complexes may be involved in a proportion of cases of abnormal development of the external genitalia. PMID:6684127

  12. Optimization of stress response through the nuclear receptor-mediated cortisol signalling network

    PubMed Central

    Kolodkin, Alexey; Sahin, Nilgun; Phillips, Anna; Hood, Steve R.; Bruggeman, Frank J.; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Plant, Nick

    2013-01-01

    It is an accepted paradigm that extended stress predisposes an individual to pathophysiology. However, the biological adaptations to minimize this risk are poorly understood. Using a computational model based upon realistic kinetic parameters we are able to reproduce the interaction of the stress hormone cortisol with its two nuclear receptors, the high-affinity glucocorticoid receptor and the low-affinity pregnane X-receptor. We demonstrate that regulatory signals between these two nuclear receptors are necessary to optimize the body’s response to stress episodes, attenuating both the magnitude and duration of the biological response. In addition, we predict that the activation of pregnane X-receptor by multiple, low-affinity endobiotic ligands is necessary for the significant pregnane X-receptor-mediated transcriptional response observed following stress episodes. This integration allows responses mediated through both the high and low-affinity nuclear receptors, which we predict is an important strategy to minimize the risk of disease from chronic stress. PMID:23653204

  13. Impact of circadian nuclear receptor REV-ERBα on midbrain dopamine production and mood regulation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sooyoung; Lee, Eun Jeong; Yun, Seongsik; Choe, Han Kyoung; Park, Seong-Beom; Son, Hyo Jin; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Dluzen, Dean E; Lee, Inah; Hwang, Onyou; Son, Gi Hoon; Kim, Kyungjin

    2014-05-08

    The circadian nature of mood and its dysfunction in affective disorders is well recognized, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are still unclear. Here, we show that the circadian nuclear receptor REV-ERBα, which is associated with bipolar disorder, impacts midbrain dopamine production and mood-related behavior in mice. Genetic deletion of the Rev-erbα gene or pharmacological inhibition of REV-ERBα activity in the ventral midbrain induced mania-like behavior in association with a central hyperdopaminergic state. Also, REV-ERBα repressed tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene transcription via competition with nuclear receptor-related 1 protein (NURR1), another nuclear receptor crucial for dopaminergic neuronal function, thereby driving circadian TH expression through a target-dependent antagonistic mechanism. In conclusion, we identified a molecular connection between the circadian timing system and mood regulation, suggesting that REV-ERBα could be targeting in the treatment of circadian rhythm-related affective disorders.

  14. Kinetic Analysis of BCL11B Multisite Phosphorylation–Dephosphorylation and Coupled Sumoylation in Primary Thymocytes by Multiple Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors with multiple post-translational modifications (PTMs) are not uncommon, but comprehensive information on site-specific dynamics and interdependence is comparatively rare. Assessing dynamic changes in the extent of PTMs has the potential to link multiple sites both to each other and to biological effects observable on the same time scale. The transcription factor and tumor suppressor BCL11B is critical to three checkpoints in T-cell development and is a target of a T-cell receptor-mediated MAP kinase signaling. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectroscopy was used to assess changes in relative phosphorylation on 18 of 23 serine and threonine residues and sumoylation on one of two lysine resides in BCL11B. We have resolved the composite phosphorylation–dephosphorylation and sumoylation changes of BCL11B in response to MAP kinase activation into a complex pattern of site-specific PTM changes in primary mouse thymocytes. The site-specific resolution afforded by MRM analyses revealed four kinetic patterns of phosphorylation and one of sumoylation, including both rapid simultaneous site-specific increases and decreases at putative MAP kinase proline-directed phosphorylation sites, following stimulation. These data additionally revealed a novel spatiotemporal bisphosphorylation motif consisting of two kinetically divergent proline-directed phosphorylation sites spaced five residues apart. PMID:25423098

  15. Sulfotransferase genes: Regulation by nuclear receptors in response to xeno/endo-biotics

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Susumu; Negishi, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    Pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR), members of the nuclear receptor superfamily, are two major xeno-sensing transcription factors. They can be activated by a broad range of lipophilic xenobiotics including therapeutics drugs. In addition to xenobiotics, endogenous compounds such as steroid hormones and bile acids can also activate PXR and/or CAR. These nuclear receptors regulate genes that encode enzymes and transporters that metabolize and excrete both xenobiotics and endobiotics. Sulfotransferases (SULTs) are a group of these enzymes and sulfate xenobiotics for detoxification. In general, inactivation by sulfation constitutes the mechanism to maintain homeostasis of endobiotics. Thus, deciphering the molecular mechanism by which PXR and CAR regulate SULT genes is critical for understanding the roles of SULTs in the alterations of physiological and pathophysiological processes caused by drug treatment or environmental exposures. PMID:24025090

  16. Nuclear Receptors Resolve Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress to Improve Hepatic Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Chronic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress culminating in proteotoxicity contributes to the development of insulin resistance and progression to type 2 diabetes mellitus. Pharmacologic interventions targeting several different nuclear receptors have emerged as potential treatments for insulin resistance. The mechanistic basis for these antidiabetic effects has primarily been attributed to multiple metabolic and inflammatory functions. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the association of ER stress with insulin resistance and the role of nuclear receptors in promoting ER stress resolution and improving insulin resistance in the liver. PMID:28236381

  17. Nuclear receptor/microRNA circuitry links muscle fiber type to energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gan, Zhenji; Rumsey, John; Hazen, Bethany C; Lai, Ling; Leone, Teresa C; Vega, Rick B; Xie, Hui; Conley, Kevin E; Auwerx, Johan; Smith, Steven R; Olson, Eric N; Kralli, Anastasia; Kelly, Daniel P

    2013-06-01

    The mechanisms involved in the coordinate regulation of the metabolic and structural programs controlling muscle fitness and endurance are unknown. Recently, the nuclear receptor PPARβ/δ was shown to activate muscle endurance programs in transgenic mice. In contrast, muscle-specific transgenic overexpression of the related nuclear receptor, PPARα, results in reduced capacity for endurance exercise. We took advantage of the divergent actions of PPARβ/δ and PPARα to explore the downstream regulatory circuitry that orchestrates the programs linking muscle fiber type with energy metabolism. Our results indicate that, in addition to the well-established role in transcriptional control of muscle metabolic genes, PPARβ/δ and PPARα participate in programs that exert opposing actions upon the type I fiber program through a distinct muscle microRNA (miRNA) network, dependent on the actions of another nuclear receptor, estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ). Gain-of-function and loss-of-function strategies in mice, together with assessment of muscle biopsies from humans, demonstrated that type I muscle fiber proportion is increased via the stimulatory actions of ERRγ on the expression of miR-499 and miR-208b. This nuclear receptor/miRNA regulatory circuit shows promise for the identification of therapeutic targets aimed at maintaining muscle fitness in a variety of chronic disease states, such as obesity, skeletal myopathies, and heart failure.

  18. Elevated copper impairs hepatic nuclear receptor function in Wilson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Wooton-Kee, Clavia Ruth; Jain, Ajay K.; Wagner, Martin; Grusak, Michael A.; Finegold, Milton J.; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Moore, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Wilson’s disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in accumulation of copper in the liver as a consequence of mutations in the gene encoding the copper-transporting P-type ATPase (ATP7B). WD is a chronic liver disorder, and individuals with the disease present with a variety of complications, including steatosis, cholestasis, cirrhosis, and liver failure. Similar to patients with WD, Atp7b–/– mice have markedly elevated levels of hepatic copper and liver pathology. Previous studies have demonstrated that replacement of zinc in the DNA-binding domain of the estrogen receptor (ER) with copper disrupts specific binding to DNA response elements. Here, we found decreased binding of the nuclear receptors FXR, RXR, HNF4α, and LRH-1 to promoter response elements and decreased mRNA expression of nuclear receptor target genes in Atp7b–/– mice, as well as in adult and pediatric WD patients. Excessive hepatic copper has been described in progressive familial cholestasis (PFIC), and we found that similar to individuals with WD, patients with PFIC2 or PFIC3 who have clinically elevated hepatic copper levels exhibit impaired nuclear receptor activity. Together, these data demonstrate that copper-mediated nuclear receptor dysfunction disrupts liver function in WD and potentially in other disorders associated with increased hepatic copper levels. PMID:26241054

  19. Importin {beta}-type nuclear transport receptors have distinct binding affinities for Ran-GTP

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Silvia; Schlenstedt, Gabriel

    2011-03-18

    Highlights: {yields} Determination of binding properties of nuclear transport receptor/Ran-GTP complexes. {yields} Biosensor measurements provide constants for dissociation, on-rates, and off-rates. {yields} The affinity of receptors for Ran-GTP is widely divergent. {yields} Dissociation constants differ for three orders of magnitude. {yields} The cellular concentration of yeast Ran is not limiting. -- Abstract: Cargos destined to enter or leave the cell nucleus are typically transported by receptors of the importin {beta} family to pass the nuclear pore complex. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae comprises 14 members of this protein family, which can be divided in importins and exportins. The Ran GTPase regulates the association and dissociation of receptors and cargos as well as the transport direction through the nuclear pore. All receptors bind to Ran exclusively in its GTP-bound state and this event is restricted to the nuclear compartment. We determined the Ran-GTP binding properties of all yeast transport receptors by biosensor measurements and observed that the affinity of importins for Ran-GTP differs significantly. The dissociation constants range from 230 pM to 270 nM, which is mostly based on a variability of the off-rate constants. The divergent affinity of importins for Ran-GTP suggests the existence of a novel mode of nucleocytoplasmic transport regulation. Furthermore, the cellular concentration of {beta}-receptors and of other Ran-binding proteins was determined. We found that the number of {beta}-receptors altogether about equals the amounts of yeast Ran, but Ran-GTP is not limiting in the nucleus. The implications of our results for nucleocytoplasmic transport mechanisms are discussed.

  20. SUMOylation of EHD3 Modulates Tubulation of the Endocytic Recycling Compartment.

    PubMed

    Cabasso, Or; Pekar, Olga; Horowitz, Mia

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis defines the entry of molecules or macromolecules through the plasma membrane as well as membrane trafficking in the cell. It depends on a large number of proteins that undergo protein-protein and protein-phospholipid interactions. EH Domain containing (EHDs) proteins formulate a family, whose members participate in different stages of endocytosis. Of the four mammalian EHDs (EHD1-EHD4) EHD1 and EHD3 control traffic to the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC) and from the ERC to the plasma membrane, while EHD2 modulates internalization. Recently, we have shown that EHD2 undergoes SUMOylation, which facilitates its exit from the nucleus, where it serves as a co-repressor. In the present study, we tested whether EHD3 undergoes SUMOylation and what is its role in endocytic recycling. We show, both in-vitro and in cell culture, that EHD3 undergoes SUMOylation. Localization of EHD3 to the tubular structures of the ERC depends on its SUMOylation on lysines 315 and 511. Absence of SUMOylation of EHD3 has no effect on its dimerization, an important factor in membrane localization of EHD3, but has a dominant negative effect on its appearance in tubular ERC structures. Non-SUMOylated EHD3 delays transferrin recycling from the ERC to the cell surface. Our findings indicate that SUMOylation of EHD3 is involved in tubulation of the ERC membranes, which is important for efficient recycling.

  1. Computational identification of post-translational modification-based nuclear import regulations by characterizing nuclear localization signal-import receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jhih-Rong; Liu, Zhonghao; Hu, Jianjun

    2014-10-01

    The binding affinity between a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and its import receptor is closely related to corresponding nuclear import activity. PTM-based modulation of the NLS binding affinity to the import receptor is one of the most understood mechanisms to regulate nuclear import of proteins. However, identification of such regulation mechanisms is challenging due to the difficulty of assessing the impact of PTM on corresponding nuclear import activities. In this study we proposed NIpredict, an effective algorithm to predict nuclear import activity given its NLS, in which molecular interaction energy components (MIECs) were used to characterize the NLS-import receptor interaction, and the support vector regression machine (SVR) was used to learn the relationship between the characterized NLS-import receptor interaction and the corresponding nuclear import activity. Our experiments showed that nuclear import activity change due to NLS change could be accurately predicted by the NIpredict algorithm. Based on NIpredict, we developed a systematic framework to identify potential PTM-based nuclear import regulations for human and yeast nuclear proteins. Application of this approach has identified the potential nuclear import regulation mechanisms by phosphorylation of two nuclear proteins including SF1 and ORC6.

  2. Nuclear Receptors and Clearance of Apoptotic Cells: Stimulating the Macrophage’s Appetite

    PubMed Central

    A-Gonzalez, Noelia; Hidalgo, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Clearance of apoptotic cells by macrophages occurs as a coordinated process to ensure tissue homeostasis. Macrophages play a dual role in this process; first, a rapid and efficient phagocytosis of the dying cells is needed to eliminate uncleared corpses that can promote inflammation. Second, after engulfment, macrophages exhibit an anti-inflammatory phenotype, to avoid unwanted immune reactions against cell components. Several nuclear receptors, including liver X receptor and proliferator-activated receptor, have been linked to these two important features of macrophages during apoptotic cell clearance. This review outlines the emerging implications of nuclear receptors in the response of macrophages to cell clearance. These include activation of genes implicated in metabolism, to process the additional cellular content provided by the engulfed cells, as well as inflammatory genes, to maintain apoptotic cell clearance as an “immunologically silent” process. Remarkably, genes encoding receptors for the so-called “eat-me” signals are also regulated by activated nuclear receptors after phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, thus enhancing the efficiency of macrophages to clear dead cells. PMID:24860573

  3. CREB SUMOylation by the E3 ligase PIAS1 enhances spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Chu; Hsu, Wei-Lun; Ma, Yun-Li; Tai, Derek J C; Lee, Eminy H Y

    2014-07-16

    cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and signaling plays an important role in long-term memory formation, but other posttranslational modifications of CREB are less known. Here, we found that CREB1Δ, the short isoform of CREB, could be sumoylated by the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) E3 ligase protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 (PIAS1) at Lys271 and Lys290 and PIAS1 SUMOylation of CREB1Δ increased the expression level of CREB1Δ. CREB1Δ could also be sumoylated by other PIAS family proteins, but not by the E3 ligases RanBP2 and Pc2 or by the E2 ligase Ubc9. Furthermore, water maze training increased the level of endogenous CREB SUMOylation in rat CA1 neurons determined by in vitro SUMOylation assay, but this effect was not observed in other brain areas. Moreover, transduction of Lenti-CREBWT to rat CA1 area facilitated, whereas transduction of Lenti-CREB double sumo-mutant (CREBK271RK290R) impaired, spatial learning and memory performance. Transduction of Lenti-CREBWT-SUMO1 fusion vector to rat CA1 area showed a more significant effect in enhancing spatial learning and memory and CREB SUMOylation. Lenti-CREBWT transduction increased, whereas Lenti-CREBK271RK290R transduction decreased, CREB DNA binding to the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf) promoter and decreased bdnf mRNA expression. Knock-down of PIAS1 expression in CA1 area by PIAS1 siRNA transfection impaired spatial learning and memory and decreased endogenous CREB SUMOylation. In addition, CREB SUMOylation was CREB phosphorylation dependent and lasted longer. Therefore, CREB phosphorylation may be responsible for signal transduction during the early phase of long-term memory formation, whereas CREB SUMOylation sustains long-term memory.

  4. Orphan Nuclear Receptor DAX-1 Acts as a Novel Corepressor of Liver X Receptor α and Inhibits Hepatic Lipogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Nedumaran, Balachandar; Kim, Gwang Sik; Hong, Sungpyo; Yoon, Young-Sil; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lee, Young Chul; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2010-01-01

    DAX-1 (dosage-sensitive sex reversal adrenal hypoplasia congenital critical region on X chromosome, gene 1) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that can repress diverse nuclear receptors and has a key role in adreno-gonadal development. Our previous report has demonstrated that DAX-1 can inhibit hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α transactivity and negatively regulate gluconeogenic gene expression (Nedumaran, B., Hong, S., Xie, Y. B., Kim, Y. H., Seo, W. Y., Lee, M. W., Lee, C. H., Koo, S. H., and Choi, H. S. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 27511–27523). Here, we further expand the role of DAX-1 in hepatic energy metabolism. Transfection assays have demonstrated that DAX-1 can inhibit the transcriptional activity of nuclear receptor liver X receptor α (LXRα). Physical interaction between DAX-1 and LXRα was confirmed Immunofluorescent staining in mouse liver shows that LXRα and DAX-1 are colocalized in the nucleus. Domain mapping analysis shows that the entire region of DAX-1 is involved in the interaction with the ligand binding domain region of LXRα. Competition analyses demonstrate that DAX-1 competes with the coactivator SRC-1 for repressing LXRα transactivity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that endogenous DAX-1 recruitment on the SREBP-1c gene promoter was decreased in the presence of LXRα agonist. Overexpression of DAX-1 inhibits T7-induced LXRα target gene expression, whereas knockdown of endogenous DAX-1 significantly increases T7-induced LXRα target gene expression in HepG2 cells. Finally, overexpression of DAX-1 in mouse liver decreases T7-induced LXRα target gene expression, liver triglyceride level, and lipid accumulation. Overall, this study suggests that DAX-1, a novel corepressor of LXRα, functions as a negative regulator of lipogenic enzyme gene expression in liver. PMID:20080977

  5. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen is a novel inhibitory ligand for the natural cytotoxicity receptor NKp44.

    PubMed

    Rosental, Benyamin; Brusilovsky, Michael; Hadad, Uzi; Oz, Dafna; Appel, Michael Y; Afergan, Fabian; Yossef, Rami; Rosenberg, Lior Ann; Aharoni, Amir; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Campbell, Kerry S; Braiman, Alex; Porgador, Angel

    2011-12-01

    NK cells play an important role in the early immune response to cancer. The NKp44 activating receptor is the only natural cytotoxicity receptor that is expressed exclusively by primate NK cells, yet its cellular ligands remain largely unknown. Proliferating cell nuclear Ag (PCNA) is overexpressed in cancer cells. In this study, we show that the NKp44 receptor recognizes PCNA. Their interaction inhibits NK cell function through NKp44/ITIM. The physical interaction of NKp44 and PCNA is enabled by recruitment of target cell PCNA to the NK immunological synapse. We demonstrate that PCNA promotes cancer survival by immune evasion through inhibition of NKp44-mediated NK cell attack.

  6. SUMOylation silences heterodimeric TASK potassium channels containing K2P1 subunits in cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Plant, Leigh D; Zuniga, Leandro; Araki, Dan; Marks, Jeremy D; Goldstein, Steve A N

    2012-11-20

    The standing outward K(+) current (IKso) governs the response of cerebellar granule neurons to natural and medicinal stimuli including volatile anesthetics. We showed that SUMOylation silenced half of IKso at the surface of cerebellar granule neurons because the underlying channels were heterodimeric assemblies of K2P1, a subunit subject to SUMOylation, and the TASK (two-P domain, acid-sensitive K(+)) channel subunits K2P3 or K2P9. The heterodimeric channels comprised the acid-sensitive portion of IKso and mediated its response to halothane. We anticipate that SUMOylation also influences sensation and homeostatic mechanisms in mammals through TASK channels formed with K2P1.

  7. OR-1, a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that interacts with the 9-cis-retinoic acid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Teboul, M; Enmark, E; Li, Q; Wikström, A C; Pelto-Huikko, M; Gustafsson, J A

    1995-01-01

    We have cloned a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. The cDNA was isolated from a rat liver library and encodes a protein of 446 aa with a predicted mass of 50 kDa. This clone (OR-1) shows no striking homology to any known member of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily. The most related receptor is the ecdysone receptor and the highest homologies represent < 10% in the amino-terminal domain, between 15-37% in the carboxyl-terminal domain and 50-62% in the DNA binding domain. The expression of OR-1 appears to be widespread in both fetal and adult rat tissues. Potential DNA response elements composed of a direct repeat of the hexameric motif AGGTCA spaced by 0-6 nt were tested in gel shift experiments. OR-1 was shown to interact with the 9-cis-retinoic acid receptor (retinoid X receptor, RXR) and the OR-1/RXR complex to bind to a direct repeat spaced by 4 nt (DR4). In transfection experiments, OR-1 appears to activate RXR-mediated function through the DR4. Therefore OR-1 might modulate 9-cis-retinoic acid signaling by interacting with RXR. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7892230

  8. Nuclear hormone receptor coregulator: role in hormone action, metabolism, growth, and development.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Muktar A; Samuels, Herbert H

    2005-06-01

    Nuclear hormone receptor coregulator (NRC) (also referred to as activating signal cointegrator-2, thyroid hormone receptor-binding protein, peroxisome proliferator activating receptor-interacting protein, and 250-kDa receptor associated protein) belongs to a growing class of nuclear cofactors widely known as coregulators or coactivators that are necessary for transcriptional activation of target genes. The NRC gene is also amplified and overexpressed in breast, colon, and lung cancers. NRC is a 2063-amino acid protein that harbors a potent N-terminal activation domain (AD1) and a second more centrally located activation domain (AD2) that is rich in Glu and Pro. Near AD2 is a receptor-interacting domain containing an LxxLL motif (LxxLL-1), which interacts with a wide variety of ligand-bound nuclear hormone receptors with high affinity. A second LxxLL motif (LxxLL-2) located in the C-terminal region of NRC is more restricted in its nuclear hormone receptor specificity. The intrinsic activation potential of NRC is regulated by a C-terminal serine, threonine, leucine-regulatory domain. The potential role of NRC as a cointegrator is suggested by its ability to enhance transcriptional activation of a wide variety of transcription factors and from its in vivo association with a number of known transcriptional regulators including CBP/p300. Recent studies in mice indicate that deletion of both NRC alleles leads to embryonic lethality resulting from general growth retardation coupled with developmental defects in the heart, liver, brain, and placenta. NRC(-/-) mouse embryo fibroblasts spontaneously undergo apoptosis, indicating the importance of NRC as a prosurvival and antiapoptotic gene. Studies with 129S6 NRC(+/-) mice indicate that NRC is a pleiotropic regulator that is involved in growth, development, reproduction, metabolism, and wound healing.

  9. Orphan nuclear receptor NGFI-B forms dimers with nonclassical interface

    PubMed Central

    Calgaro, Marcos R.; Neto, Mario de Oliveira; Figueira, Ana Carolina M.; Santos, Maria A.M.; Portugal, Rodrigo V.; Guzzi, Carolina A.; Saidemberg, Daniel M.; Bleicher, Lucas; Vernal, Javier; Fernandez, Pablo; Terenzi, Hernán; Palma, Mario Sergio; Polikarpov, Igor

    2007-01-01

    The orphan receptor nerve growth factor-induced B (NGFI-B) is a member of the nuclear receptor's subfamily 4A (Nr4a). NGFI-B was shown to be capable of binding both as a monomer to an extended half-site containing a single AAAGGTCA motif and also as a homodimer to a widely separated everted repeat, as opposed to a large number of nuclear receptors that recognize and bind specific DNA sequences predominantly as homo- and/or heterodimers. To unveil the structural organization of NGFI-B in solution, we determined the quaternary structure of the NGFI-B LBD by a combination of ab initio procedures from small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data and hydrogen–deuterium exchange followed by mass spectrometry. Here we report that the protein forms dimers in solution with a radius of gyration of 2.9 nm and maximum dimension of 9.0 nm. We also show that the NGFI-B LBD dimer is V-shaped, with the opening angle significantly larger than that of classical dimer's exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) or retinoid X receptor (RXR). Surprisingly, NGFI-B dimers formation does not occur via the classical nuclear receptor dimerization interface exemplified by ER and RXR, but instead, involves an extended surface area composed of the loop between helices 3 and 4 and C-terminal fraction of the helix 3. Remarkably, the NGFI-B dimer interface is similar to the dimerization interface earlier revealed for glucocorticoid nuclear receptor (GR), which might be relevant to the recognition of cognate DNA response elements by NGFI-B and to antagonism of NGFI-B–dependent transcription exercised by GR in cells. PMID:17600153

  10. The Nuclear Receptors of Biomphalaria glabrata and Lottia gigantea: Implications for Developing New Model Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Satwant; Jobling, Susan; Jones, Catherine S.; Noble, Leslie R.; Routledge, Edwin J.; Lockyer, Anne E.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are transcription regulators involved in an array of diverse physiological functions including key roles in endocrine and metabolic function. The aim of this study was to identify nuclear receptors in the fully sequenced genome of the gastropod snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni and compare these to known vertebrate NRs, with a view to assessing the snail's potential as a invertebrate model organism for endocrine function, both as a prospective new test organism and to elucidate the fundamental genetic and mechanistic causes of disease. For comparative purposes, the genome of a second gastropod, the owl limpet, Lottia gigantea was also investigated for nuclear receptors. Thirty-nine and thirty-three putative NRs were identified from the B. glabrata and L. gigantea genomes respectively, based on the presence of a conserved DNA-binding domain and/or ligand-binding domain. Nuclear receptor transcript expression was confirmed and sequences were subjected to a comparative phylogenetic analysis, which demonstrated that these molluscs have representatives of all the major NR subfamilies (1-6). Many of the identified NRs are conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates, however differences exist, most notably, the absence of receptors of Group 3C, which includes some of the vertebrate endocrine hormone targets. The mollusc genomes also contain NR homologues that are present in insects and nematodes but not in vertebrates, such as Group 1J (HR48/DAF12/HR96). The identification of many shared receptors between humans and molluscs indicates the potential for molluscs as model organisms; however the absence of several steroid hormone receptors indicates snail endocrine systems are fundamentally different. PMID:25849443

  11. Retinoids induce integrin-independent lymphocyte adhesion through RAR-α nuclear receptor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, Jarrett T.; Wang, Lei; Chen, Jianming; Metts, Meagan E.; Nasser, Taj A.; McGoldrick, Liam J.; Bridges, Lance C.

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Transcription and translation are required for retinoid-induced lymphocyte adhesion. • RAR activation is sufficient to induced lymphocyte cell adhesion. • Vitamin D derivatives inhibit RAR-prompted lymphocyte adhesion. • Adhesion occurs through a novel binding site within ADAM disintegrin domains. • RARα is a key nuclear receptor for retinoid-dependent lymphocyte cell adhesion. - Abstract: Oxidative metabolites of vitamin A, in particular all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA), have emerged as key factors in immunity by specifying the localization of immune cells to the gut. Although it is appreciated that isomers of retinoic acid activate the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR) family of nuclear receptors to elicit cellular changes, the molecular details of retinoic acid action remain poorly defined in immune processes. Here we employ a battery of agonists and antagonists to delineate the specific nuclear receptors utilized by retinoids to evoke lymphocyte cell adhesion to ADAM (adisintegrin and metalloprotease) protein family members. We report that RAR agonism is sufficient to promote immune cell adhesion in both immortal and primary immune cells. Interestingly, adhesion occurs independent of integrin function, and mutant studies demonstrate that atRA-induced adhesion to ADAM members required a distinct binding interface(s) as compared to integrin recognition. Anti-inflammatory corticosteroids as well as 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}, a vitamin D metabolite that prompts immune cell trafficking to the skin, potently inhibited the observed adhesion. Finally, our data establish that induced adhesion was specifically attributable to the RAR-α receptor isotype. The current study provides novel molecular resolution as to which nuclear receptors transduce retinoid exposure into immune cell adhesion.

  12. Effects of primary metabolites of organophosphate flame retardants on transcriptional activity via human nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Shinji; Van den Eede, Nele; Covaci, Adrian

    2016-03-14

    Organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) have been used in a wide variety of applications and detected in several environmental matrices, including indoor air and dust. Continuous human exposure to these chemicals is of growing concern. In this study, the agonistic and/or antagonistic activities of 12 primary OPFR-metabolites against ten human nuclear receptors were examined using cell-based transcriptional assays, and compared to those of their parent compounds. As a result, 3-hydroxylphenyl diphenyl phosphate and 4-hydroxylphenyl diphenyl phosphate showed more potent estrogen receptor α (ERα) and ERβ agonistic activity than did their parent, triphenyl phosphate (TPHP). In addition, these hydroxylated TPHP-metabolites also showed ERβ antagonistic activity at higher concentrations and exhibited pregnane X receptor (PXR) agonistic activity as well as androgen receptor (AR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonistic activities at similar levels to those of TPHP. Bis(2-butoxyethyl) 3'-hydroxy-2-butoxyethyl phosphate and 2-hydroxyethyl bis(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate act as PXR agonists at similar levels to their parent, tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate. On the other hand, seven diester OPFR-metabolites and 1-hydroxy-2-propyl bis(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate did not show any receptor activity. Taken together, these results suggest that hydroxylated TPHP-metabolites show increased estrogenicity compared to the parent compound, whereas the diester OPFR-metabolites may have limited nuclear receptor activity compared to their parent triester OPFRs.

  13. Application of an in silico liver model to determine nuclear receptor mediated pathways in liver cancer

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that control diverse cellular processes. Chronic stimulation of some NRs in rodents can result in increased incidence of liver tumors. These are generally thought to develop through a non-genotoxic mechanism with...

  14. REV-ERBα influences the stability and nuclear localization of the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Takashi; Chavan, Rohit; Fonseca Costa, Sara S; Brenna, Andrea; Ripperger, Jürgen A; Albrecht, Urs

    2016-11-01

    REV-ERBα (encoded by Nr1d1) is a nuclear receptor that is part of the circadian clock mechanism and regulates metabolism and inflammatory processes. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR, encoded by Nr3c1) influences similar processes, but is not part of the circadian clock, although glucocorticoid signaling affects resetting of the circadian clock in peripheral tissues. Because of their similar impact on physiological processes, we studied the interplay between these two nuclear receptors. We found that REV-ERBα binds to the C-terminal portion and GR to the N-terminal portion of HSP90α and HSP90β, a chaperone responsible for the activation of proteins to ensure survival of a cell. The presence of REV-ERBα influences the stability and nuclear localization of GR by an unknown mechanism, thereby affecting expression of GR target genes, such as IκBα (Nfkbia) and alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1). Our findings highlight an important interplay between two nuclear receptors that influence the transcriptional potential of each other. This indicates that the transcriptional landscape is strongly dependent on dynamic processes at the protein level.

  15. REV-ERBα influences the stability and nuclear localization of the glucocorticoid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Okabe, Takashi; Chavan, Rohit; Fonseca Costa, Sara S.; Brenna, Andrea; Ripperger, Jürgen A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT REV-ERBα (encoded by Nr1d1) is a nuclear receptor that is part of the circadian clock mechanism and regulates metabolism and inflammatory processes. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR, encoded by Nr3c1) influences similar processes, but is not part of the circadian clock, although glucocorticoid signaling affects resetting of the circadian clock in peripheral tissues. Because of their similar impact on physiological processes, we studied the interplay between these two nuclear receptors. We found that REV-ERBα binds to the C-terminal portion and GR to the N-terminal portion of HSP90α and HSP90β, a chaperone responsible for the activation of proteins to ensure survival of a cell. The presence of REV-ERBα influences the stability and nuclear localization of GR by an unknown mechanism, thereby affecting expression of GR target genes, such as IκBα (Nfkbia) and alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1). Our findings highlight an important interplay between two nuclear receptors that influence the transcriptional potential of each other. This indicates that the transcriptional landscape is strongly dependent on dynamic processes at the protein level. PMID:27686098

  16. SUMOylation of the C-terminal domain of DNA topoisomerase IIα regulates the centromeric localization of Claspin

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hyunju; Yoshida, Makoto M; Sridharan, Vinidhra; Kumagai, Akiko; Dunphy, William G; Dasso, Mary; Azuma, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase II (TopoII) regulates DNA topology by its strand passaging reaction, which is required for genome maintenance by resolving tangled genomic DNA. In addition, TopoII contributes to the structural integrity of mitotic chromosomes and to the activation of cell cycle checkpoints in mitosis. Post-translational modification of TopoII is one of the key mechanisms by which its broad functions are regulated during mitosis. SUMOylation of TopoII is conserved in eukaryotes and plays a critical role in chromosome segregation. Using Xenopus laevis egg extract, we demonstrated previously that TopoIIα is modified by SUMO on mitotic chromosomes and that its activity is modulated via SUMOylation of its lysine at 660. However, both biochemical and genetic analyses indicated that TopoII has multiple SUMOylation sites in addition to Lys660, and the functions of the other SUMOylation sites were not clearly determined. In this study, we identified the SUMOylation sites on the C-terminal domain (CTD) of TopoIIα. CTD SUMOylation did not affect TopoIIα activity, indicating that its function is distinct from that of Lys660 SUMOylation. We found that CTD SUMOylation promotes protein binding and that Claspin, a well-established cell cycle checkpoint mediator, is one of the SUMOylation-dependent binding proteins. Claspin harbors 2 SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs), and its robust association to mitotic chromosomes requires both the SIMs and TopoIIα-CTD SUMOylation. Claspin localizes to the mitotic centromeres depending on mitotic SUMOylation, suggesting that TopoIIα-CTD SUMOylation regulates the centromeric localization of Claspin. Our findings provide a novel mechanistic insight regarding how TopoIIα-CTD SUMOylation contributes to mitotic centromere activity. PMID:26131587

  17. Protein kinase A is part of a mechanism that regulates nuclear reimport of the nuclear tRNA export receptors Los1p and Msn5p.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Jacqueline B; van der Merwe, George; Mangroo, Dev

    2014-02-01

    The two main signal transduction mechanisms that allow eukaryotes to sense and respond to changes in glucose availability in the environment are the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/Snf1 kinase-dependent pathways. Previous studies have shown that the nuclear tRNA export process is inhibited in Saccharomyces cerevisiae deprived of glucose. However, the signal transduction pathway involved and the mechanism by which glucose availability regulates nuclear-cytoplasmic tRNA trafficking are not understood. Here, we show that inhibition of nuclear tRNA export is caused by a block in nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors during glucose deprivation. Cytoplasmic accumulation of the tRNA export receptors during glucose deprivation is not caused by activation of Snf1p. Evidence obtained suggests that PKA is part of the mechanism that regulates nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors in response to glucose availability. This mechanism does not appear to involve phosphorylation of the nuclear tRNA export receptors by PKA. The block in nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors appears to be caused by activation of an unidentified mechanism when PKA is turned off during glucose deprivation. Taken together, the data suggest that PKA facilitates return of the tRNA export receptors to the nucleus by inhibiting an unidentified activity that facilitates cytoplasmic accumulation of the tRNA export receptors when glucose in the environment is limiting. A PKA-independent mechanism was also found to regulate nuclear tRNA export in response to glucose availability. This mechanism, however, does not regulate nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors.

  18. Dose-dependent difference of nuclear receptors involved in murine liver hypertrophy by piperonyl butoxide.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Yohei; Yoshida, Midori; Tamura, Kei; Takahashi, Miwa; Kodama, Yukio; Inoue, Kaoru

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear receptors play important roles in chemically induced liver hypertrophy in rodents. To clarify the involvement of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and other nuclear receptors in mouse liver hypertrophy induced by different doses of piperonyl butoxide (PBO), wild-type and CAR-knockout mice were administered PBO (200, 1,000, or 5,000 ppm) in the basal diet for 1 week. Increased liver weight and diffuse hepatocellular hypertrophy were observed at 5,000 ppm for both genotypes, accompanied by increased Cyp3a11 mRNA and CYP3A protein expression, suggesting that CAR-independent pathway, possibly pregnane X receptor (PXR), plays a major role in the induction of hypertrophy. Moreover, wild-type mice at 5,000 ppm showed enhanced hepatocellular hypertrophy and strong positive staining for CYP2B in the centrilobular area, suggesting the localized contribution of CAR. At 1,000 ppm, only wild-type mice showed liver weight increase and centrilobular hepatocellular hypertrophy concurrent with elevated Cyp2b10 mRNA expression and strong CYP2B staining, indicating that CAR was essential at 1,000 ppm. We concluded that high-dose PBO induced hypertrophy via CAR and another pathway, while lower dose of PBO induced a pathway mediated predominantly by CAR. The dose-responsiveness on liver hypertrophy is important for understanding the involvement of nuclear receptors.

  19. Membrane and nuclear estrogen receptor α collaborate to suppress adipogenesis but not triglyceride content

    PubMed Central

    Pedram, Ali; Razandi, Mahnaz; Blumberg, Bruce; Levin, Ellis Robert

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen and estrogen receptor (ER)-α suppress visceral fat development through actions in several organs via unclear mechanisms that we sought to identify. Using mice that express only nuclear ER-α [nuclear-only ER-α (NOER) mice] or plasma membrane ER-α [membrane-only ER-α (MOER) mice], we found that 10-wk-old mice that lacked either receptor pool showed extensive abdominal visceral fat deposition and weight gain compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Differentiation of cultured bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) into the adipocyte lineage was suppressed by 17-β-estradiol (E2) in WT female mice but not in NOER or MOER mice. This finding correlated with E2 inhibition of prominent differentiation genes in WT BMSCs. In contrast, triglyceride content in differentiated BMSCs or 3T3-L1 cells was suppressed as a result of membrane ER-α signaling through several kinases to inhibit carbohydrate response element–binding protein-α and -β. We concluded that extranuclear and nuclear ER-α collaborate to suppress adipocyte development, but inhibition of lipid synthesis in mature cells does not involve nuclear ER-α.—Pedram, A., Razandi, M., Blumberg, B., Levin, E. R. Membrane and nuclear estrogen receptor α collaborate to suppress adipogenesis but not triglyceride content. PMID:26373802

  20. Nuclear Membranes ETB Receptors Mediate ET-1-induced Increase of Nuclear Calcium in Human Left Ventricular Endocardial Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Jules, Farah; Avedanian, Levon; Al-Khoury, Johny; Keita, Ramatoulaye; Normand, Alexandre; Bkaily, Ghassan; Jacques, Danielle

    2015-07-01

    In fetal human left ventricular endocardial endothelial cells (EECLs), both plasma membrane (PM) ET(A)R and ET(B)R were reported to mediate ET-1-induced increase of intracellular calcium [Ca](i); however, this effect was mediated by ET(A)R in right EECs (EECRs). In this study, we verified whether, as for the PM, nuclear membranes (NMs) ET-1 receptors activation in EECLs and EECRs induce an increase of nuclear calcium ([Ca](n)) and if this effect is mediated through the same receptor type as in PM. Using a plasmalemma-perforated technique and 3D confocal microscopy, our results showed that, as in PM intact cells, superfusion of nuclei of both cell types with cytosolic ET-1 induced a concentration-dependent sustained increase of [Ca](n). In EECRs, the ET(A)R antagonist prevented the effect of ET-1 on [Ca](n) without affecting EECLs. However, in both cell types, the effect of cytosolic ET-1 on [Ca](n) was prevented by the ETBR antagonist. In conclusion, both NMs' ET(A)R and ET(B)R mediated the effect of cytosolic ET-1 on [Ca](n) in EECRs. In contrast, only NMs' ET(B)R activation mediated the effect of cytosolic ET-1 in EECLs. Hence, the type of NMs' receptors mediating the effect of ET-1 on [Ca](n) are different from those of PM mediating the increase in [Ca](i).

  1. Androgen receptor regulates nuclear trafficking and nuclear domain residency of corepressor HDAC7 in a ligand-dependent fashion

    SciTech Connect

    Karvonen, Ulla; Jaenne, Olli A.; Palvimo, Jorma J. . E-mail: jorma.palvimo@uku.fi

    2006-10-01

    In addition to chromosomal proteins, histone deacetylases (HDACs) target transcription factors in transcriptional repression. Here, we show that the class II HDAC family member HDAC7 is an efficient corepressor of the androgen receptor (AR). HDAC7 resided in the cytoplasm in the absence of AR or a cognate ligand, but hormone-occupancy of AR induced nuclear transfer of HDAC7. Nuclear colocalization pattern of AR and HDAC7 was dependent on the nature of the ligand. In the presence of testosterone, a portion of HDAC7 localized to pearl-like nuclear domains, whereas AR occupied with antagonistic ligands cyproterone acetate- or casodex (bicalutamide) recruited HDAC7 from these domains to colocalize with the receptor in speckles and nucleoplasm in a more complete fashion. Ectopic expression of PML-3 relieved the repressive effect of HDAC7 on AR function by sequestering HDAC7 to PML-3 domains. AR acetylation at Lys630/632/633 was not the target of HDAC7 repression, since repression of AR function was independent of these acetylation sites. Moreover, the deacetylase activity of HDAC7 was in part dispensable in the repression of AR function. In sum, our results identify HDAC7 as a novel AR corepressor whose subcellular and subnuclear compartmentalization can be regulated in an androgen-selective manner.

  2. Role of Nuclear Receptors in Central Nervous System Development and Associated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, Ana Maria; Moreno-Ramos, Oscar Andrés; Haider, Neena B.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear hormone receptor (NHR) superfamily is composed of a wide range of receptors involved in a myriad of important biological processes, including development, growth, metabolism, and maintenance. Regulation of such wide variety of functions requires a complex system of gene regulation that includes interaction with transcription factors, chromatin-modifying complex, and the proper recognition of ligands. NHRs are able to coordinate the expression of genes in numerous pathways simultaneously. This review focuses on the role of nuclear receptors in the central nervous system and, in particular, their role in regulating the proper development and function of the brain and the eye. In addition, the review highlights the impact of mutations in NHRs on a spectrum of human diseases from autism to retinal degeneration. PMID:27168725

  3. G-protein coupling and nuclear translocation of the human abscisic acid receptor LANCL2

    PubMed Central

    Fresia, Chiara; Vigliarolo, Tiziana; Guida, Lucrezia; Booz, Valeria; Bruzzone, Santina; Sturla, Laura; Di Bona, Melody; Pesce, Mattia; Usai, Cesare; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a long known phytohormone, has been recently demonstrated to be present also in humans, where it targets cells of the innate immune response, mesenchymal and hemopoietic stem cells and cells involved in the regulation of systemic glucose homeostasis. LANCL2, a peripheral membrane protein, is the mammalian ABA receptor. We show that N-terminal glycine myristoylation causes LANCL2 localization to the plasmamembrane and to cytoplasmic membrane vesicles, where it interacts with the α subunit of a Gi protein and starts the ABA signaling pathway via activation of adenylate cyclase. Demyristoylation of LANCL2 by chemical or genetic means triggers its nuclear translocation. Nuclear enrichment of native LANCL2 is also induced by ABA treatment. Therefore human LANCL2 is a non-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor susceptible to hormone-induced nuclear translocation. PMID:27222287

  4. Activated nuclear metabotropic glutamate receptor mGlu5 couples to nuclear Gq/11 proteins to generate inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-mediated nuclear Ca2+ release.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vikas; Jong, Yuh-Jiin I; O'Malley, Karen L

    2008-05-16

    Recently we have shown that the metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5) receptor can be expressed on nuclear membranes of heterologous cells or endogenously on striatal neurons where it can mediate nuclear Ca2+ changes. Here, pharmacological, optical, and genetic techniques were used to show that upon activation, nuclear mGlu5 receptors generate nuclear inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) in situ. Specifically, expression of an mGlu5 F767S mutant in HEK293 cells that blocks Gq/11 coupling or introduction of a dominant negative Galphaq construct in striatal neurons prevented nuclear Ca2+ changes following receptor activation. These data indicate that nuclear mGlu5 receptors couple to Gq/11 to mobilize nuclear Ca2+. Nuclear mGlu5-mediated Ca2+ responses could also be blocked by the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, U73122, the phosphatidylinositol (PI) PLC inhibitor 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine (ET-18-OCH3), or by using small interfering RNA targeted against PLCbeta1 demonstrating that PI-PLC is involved. Direct assessment of inositol phosphate production using a PIP2/IP3 "biosensor" revealed for the first time that IP3 can be generated in the nucleus following activation of nuclear mGlu5 receptors. Finally, both IP3 and ryanodine receptor blockers prevented nuclear mGlu5-mediated increases in intranuclear Ca2+. Collectively, this study shows that like plasma membrane receptors, activated nuclear mGlu5 receptors couple to Gq/11 and PLC to generate IP3-mediated release of Ca2+ from Ca2+-release channels in the nucleus. Thus the nucleus can function as an autonomous organelle independent of signals originating in the cytoplasm, and nuclear mGlu5 receptors play a dynamic role in mobilizing Ca2+ in a specific, localized fashion.

  5. Featured Article: Nuclear export of opioid growth factor receptor is CRM1 dependent.

    PubMed

    Kren, Nancy P; Zagon, Ian S; McLaughlin, Patricia J

    2016-02-01

    Opioid growth factor receptor (OGFr) facilitates growth inhibition in the presence of its specific ligand opioid growth factor (OGF), chemically termed [Met(5)]-enkephalin. The function of the OGF-OGFr axis requires the receptor to translocate to the nucleus. However, the mechanism of nuclear export of OGFr is unknown. In this study, endogenous OGFr, as well as exogenously expressed OGFr-EGFP, demonstrated significant nuclear accumulation in response to leptomycin B (LMB), an inhibitor of CRM1-dependent nuclear export, suggesting that OGFr is exported in a CRM1-dependent manner. One consensus sequence for a nuclear export signal (NES) was identified. Mutation of the associated leucines, L217 L220 L223 and L225, to alanine resulted in decreased nuclear accumulation. NES-EGFP responded to LMB, indicating that this sequence is capable of functioning as an export signal in isolation. To determine why the sequence functions differently in isolation than as a full length protein, the localization of subNES was evaluated in the presence and absence of MG132, a potent inhibitor of proteosomal degradation. MG132 had no effect of subNES localization. The role of tandem repeats located at the C-terminus of OGFr was examined for their role in nuclear trafficking. Six of seven tandem repeats were removed to form deltaTR. DeltaTR localized exclusively to the nucleus indicating that the tandem repeats may contribute to the localization of the receptor. Similar to the loss of cellular proliferation activity (i.e. inhibition) recorded with subNES, deltaTR also demonstrated a significant loss of inhibitory activity indicating that the repeats may be integral to receptor function. These experiments reveal that OGFr contains one functional NES, L217 L220 L223 and L225 and can be exported from the nucleus in a CRM1-dependent manner.

  6. Impairment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Integrase SUMOylation Correlates with an Early Replication Defect*

    PubMed Central

    Zamborlini, Alessia; Coiffic, Audrey; Beauclair, Guillaume; Delelis, Olivier; Paris, Joris; Koh, Yashuiro; Magne, Fabian; Giron, Marie-Lou; Tobaly-Tapiero, Joelle; Deprez, Eric; Emiliani, Stephane; Engelman, Alan; de Thé, Hugues; Saïb, Ali

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) orchestrates the integration of the reverse transcribed viral cDNA into the host cell genome and participates also in other steps of HIV-1 replication. Cellular and viral factors assist IN in performing its multiple functions, and post-translational modifications contribute to modulate its activities. Here, we show that HIV-1 IN is modified by SUMO proteins and that phylogenetically conserved SUMOylation consensus motifs represent major SUMO acceptor sites. Viruses harboring SUMOylation site IN mutants displayed a replication defect that was mapped during the early stages of infection, before integration but after reverse transcription. Because SUMOylation-defective IN mutants retained WT catalytic activity, we hypothesize that SUMOylation might regulate the affinity of IN for co-factors, contributing to efficient HIV-1 replication. PMID:21454548

  7. The roles of nuclear receptors CAR and PXR in hepatic energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Konno, Yoshihiro; Negishi, Masahiko; Kodama, Susumu

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear receptors constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) were originally characterized as transcription factors regulating the hepatic genes that encode drug metabolizing enzymes. Recent works have now revealed that these nuclear receptors also play the critical roles in modulating hepatic energy metabolism. While CAR and PXR directly bind to their response sequences phenobarbital-responsive enhancer module (PBREM) and xenobiotic responsive enhancer module (XREM) in the promoter of target genes to increase drug metabolism, the receptors also cross talk with various hormone responsive transcription factors such as forkhead box O1 (FoxO1), forkhead box A2 (FoxA2), cAMP-response element binding protein, and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC 1alpha) to decrease energy metabolism through down-regulating gluconeogenesis, fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis and up-regulating lipogenesis. In addition, CAR modulates thyroid hormone activity by regulating type 1 deiodinase in the regenerating liver. Thus, CAR and PXR are now placed at the crossroad where both xenobiotics and endogenous stimuli co-regulate liver function.

  8. Photoaffinity labelling of the rat liver nuclear thyroid hormone receptor with (/sup 125/I)triiodothyronine

    SciTech Connect

    David-Inouye, Y.; Somack, R.; Nordeen, S.K.; Apriletti, J.W.; Baxter, J.D.; Eberhardt, N.L.

    1982-11-01

    (/sup 125/I)Triiodothyronine (T3) was used as a photoreactive probe for the thyroid hormone nuclear receptor in photoaffinity labelling experiments. Autoradiograms of photolysis products electrophoresed on either one or two-dimensional gels showed that (/sup 125/I)T3 covalently, but nonspecifically, labelled many proteins in the partially purified receptor preparations used. However, one of these proteins with an estimated molecular weight of 47,000 and an isoelectric point of approximately 6.2 +/- 0.5 pH units appears to be the thyroid hormone receptor, since, in contrast to the other proteins, its photoinduced labelling was blocked by concentrations of T3 and thyroxine (T4) similar to those that inhibit binding of (/sup 125/I)T3 by the receptor in equilibrium binding assays. In addition, the isoelectric point of the photolabelled protein agrees with that determined in separate equilibrium isoelectric focusing studies. These results indicate that (/sup 125/)T3 can serve as a photoreactive probe for the thyroid hormone nuclear receptor, and they suggest that this receptor is a single polypeptide chain of molecular weight 47,000 with an isoelectric point of 6.2 +/- 0.5 pH units.

  9. Photoaffinity labelling of the rat liver nuclear thyroid hormone receptor with (/sup 125/I)triiodothyronine

    SciTech Connect

    David-Inouye, Y.; Somack, R; Nordeen, S.K.; Apriletti, J.W.; Baxter, J.D.; Eberhardt, N.L.

    1982-11-01

    (/sup 125/I)Triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) was used as a photoreactive probe for the thyroid hormone nuclear receptor in photoaffinity labelling experiments. Autoradiograms of photolysis products electrophoresed on either one or two-dimensional gels showed that (/sup 125/I)T/sub 3/ covalently, but nonspecifically, labelled many proteins in the partially purified receptor preparations used. However, one of these proteins with an estimated molecular weight of 47,000 and an isoelectric point of approximately 6.2 +/- 0.5 pH units appears to be the thyroid hormone receptor, since, in contrast to the other proteins, its photoinduced labelling was blocked by concentrations of T/sub 3/ and thyroxine (T/sub 4/) similar to those that inhibit binding of (/sup 125/I)T/sub 3/ by the receptor in equilibrium binding assays. In addition, the isoelectric point of the photolabelled protein agrees with that determined in separate equilibrium isoelectric focusing studies. These results indicate that (/sup 125/I)T/sub 3/ can serve as a photoreactive probe for the thyroid hormone nuclear receptor, and they suggest that this receptor is a single polypeptide chain of molecular weight 47,000 with an isoelectric point of 6.2 +/- 0.5 pH units.

  10. Ryanodine receptors are involved in nuclear calcium oscillation in primary pancreatic {beta}-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Ji; Chen, Zheng; Yin, Wenxuan; Miao, Lin; Zhou, Zhansong; Ji, Guangju

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that RyRs are expressed on the nuclear envelope in single primary pancreatic {beta}-cells and isolated nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed that the pattern of glucose-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in the nucleus and cytosol was similar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results demonstrate that ryanodine-sensitive Ca{sup 2+} stores exist and have function in the pancreatic {beta}-cell nucleus. -- Abstract: Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are mainly located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and play an important role in regulating glucose-induced cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in pancreatic {beta}-cells. However, subcellular locations and functions of RyRs on other cell organelles such as nuclear envelope are not well understood. In order to investigate the role of RyRs in nuclear Ca{sup 2+} oscillation we designed and conducted experiments in intact primary pancreatic {beta}-cells. Immunocytochemistry was used to examine the expression of RYRs on the nuclear envelope. Confocal microscopy was used to evaluate the function of RYRs on the nuclear envelope. We found that RyRs are expressed on the nuclear envelope in single primary pancreatic {beta}-cells and isolated nuclei. Laser scanning confocal microscopy studies indicated that application of glucose to the cells co-incubated with Ca{sup 2+} indicator Fluo-4 AM and cell-permeable nuclear indicator Hoechst 33342 resulted in nuclear Ca{sup 2+} oscillation. The pattern of glucose-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in the nucleus and cytosol was similar. The reduction of Ca{sup 2+} oscillation amplitude by ryanodine was much greater in the nucleus though both the cytosol and the nucleus Ca{sup 2+} amplitude decreased by ryanodine. Our results suggest that functional ryanodine receptors not only exist in endoplasmic reticulum but are also expressed in nuclear envelope of pancreatic {beta}-cells.

  11. HTLV-2B Tax oncoprotein is modified by ubiquitination and sumoylation and displays intracellular localization similar to its homologue HTLV-1 Tax

    SciTech Connect

    Turci, Marco; Lodewick, Julie; Righi, Paola; Polania, Angela; Romanelli, Maria Grazia; Bex, Francoise; Bertazzoni, Umberto

    2009-03-30

    HTLV-1 is more pathogenic than HTLV-2B. The difference is generally attributed to the properties of their individual transactivating Tax proteins. By using internal Flag-6His tagged Tax-1 and Tax-2B, which display transcriptional activities comparable to the untagged proteins and can be recognized by a single anti-Flag antibody, we demonstrate that Tax-2B is modified by ubiquitination and sumoylation. In addition, Tax2B is distributed in punctuate nuclear structures that include the RelA subunit of NF-{kappa}B, as has been previously demonstrated for Tax-1.

  12. Novel protective role of the circadian nuclear receptor retinoic acid-related orphan receptor-α in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yichao; Xu, Longwei; Ding, Song; Lin, Nan; Ji, Qingqi; Gao, Lingchen; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Ben; Pu, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a major complication that significantly contributes to morbidity and mortality in diabetics with few therapies. Moreover, antidiabetic drugs reported inconsistent or even adverse cardiovascular effects, suggesting that it is important to exploit novel therapeutic targets against diabetic cardiomyopathy. Here, we observed that the nuclear melatonin receptor, the retinoic acid-related orphan receptor-α (RORα), was downregulated in diabetic hearts. By utilizing a mouse line with RORα disruption, we demonstrated that RORα deficiency led to significantly augmented diastolic dysfunction and cardiac remodeling induced by diabetes. Microscopic and molecular analyses further indicated that the detrimental effects of RORα deficiency were associated with aggravated myocardial apoptosis, autophagy dysfunction, and oxidative stress by disrupting antioxidant gene expression. By contrast, restoration of cardiac RORα levels in transgenic mice significantly improved cardiac functional and structural parameters at 8 weeks after diabetes induction. Consistent with genetic manipulation, pharmacological activation of RORα by melatonin and SR1078 (a synthetic agonist) showed beneficial effects against diabetic cardiomyopathy, while the RORα inhibitor SR3335 significantly exacerbated cardiac impairments in diabetic mice. Collectively, these findings suggest that cardiac-targeted manipulation of nuclear melatonin receptor RORα may hold promise for delaying diabetic cardiomyopathy development.

  13. The Nuclear Hormone Receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor β/δ Potentiates Cell Chemotactism, Polarization, and Migration▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Nguan Soon; Icre, Guillaume; Montagner, Alexandra; Heggeler, Béatrice Bordier-ten; Wahli, Walter; Michalik, Liliane

    2007-01-01

    After an injury, keratinocytes acquire the plasticity necessary for the reepithelialization of the wound. Here, we identify a novel pathway by which a nuclear hormone receptor, until now better known for its metabolic functions, potentiates cell migration. We show that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) enhances two phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent pathways, namely, the Akt and the Rho-GTPase pathways. This PPARβ/δ activity amplifies the response of keratinocytes to a chemotactic signal, promotes integrin recycling and remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, and thereby favors cell migration. Using three-dimensional wound reconstructions, we demonstrate that these defects have a strong impact on in vivo skin healing, since PPARβ/δ−/− mice show an unexpected and rare epithelialization phenotype. Our findings demonstrate that nuclear hormone receptors not only regulate intercellular communication at the organism level but also participate in cell responses to a chemotactic signal. The implications of our findings may be far-reaching, considering that the mechanisms described here are important in many physiological and pathological situations. PMID:17682064

  14. Dynamic Sumoylation of a Conserved Transcription Corepressor Prevents Persistent Inclusion Formation during Hyperosmotic Stress.

    PubMed

    Oeser, Michelle L; Amen, Triana; Nadel, Cory M; Bradley, Amanda I; Reed, Benjamin J; Jones, Ramon D; Gopalan, Janani; Kaganovich, Daniel; Gardner, Richard G

    2016-01-01

    Cells are often exposed to physical or chemical stresses that can damage the structures of essential biomolecules. Stress-induced cellular damage can become deleterious if not managed appropriately. Rapid and adaptive responses to stresses are therefore crucial for cell survival. In eukaryotic cells, different stresses trigger post-translational modification of proteins with the small ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO. However, the specific regulatory roles of sumoylation in each stress response are not well understood. Here, we examined the sumoylation events that occur in budding yeast after exposure to hyperosmotic stress. We discovered by proteomic and biochemical analyses that hyperosmotic stress incurs the rapid and transient sumoylation of Cyc8 and Tup1, which together form a conserved transcription corepressor complex that regulates hundreds of genes. Gene expression and cell biological analyses revealed that sumoylation of each protein directs distinct outcomes. In particular, we discovered that Cyc8 sumoylation prevents the persistence of hyperosmotic stress-induced Cyc8-Tup1 inclusions, which involves a glutamine-rich prion domain in Cyc8. We propose that sumoylation protects against persistent inclusion formation during hyperosmotic stress, allowing optimal transcriptional function of the Cyc8-Tup1 complex.

  15. The serine/arginine-rich protein SF2/ASF regulates protein sumoylation

    PubMed Central

    Pelisch, Federico; Gerez, Juan; Druker, Jimena; Schor, Ignacio E.; Muñoz, Manuel J.; Risso, Guillermo; Petrillo, Ezequiel; Westman, Belinda J.; Lamond, Angus I.; Arzt, Eduardo; Srebrow, Anabella

    2010-01-01

    Protein modification by conjugation of small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) is involved in diverse biological functions, such as transcription regulation, subcellular partitioning, stress response, DNA damage repair, and chromatin remodeling. Here, we show that the serine/arginine-rich protein SF2/ASF, a factor involved in splicing regulation and other RNA metabolism-related processes, is a regulator of the sumoylation pathway. The overexpression of this protein stimulates, but its knockdown inhibits SUMO conjugation. SF2/ASF interacts with Ubc9 and enhances sumoylation of specific substrates, sharing characteristics with already described SUMO E3 ligases. In addition, SF2/ASF interacts with the SUMO E3 ligase PIAS1 (protein inhibitor of activated STAT-1), regulating PIAS1-induced overall protein sumoylation. The RNA recognition motif 2 of SF2/ASF is necessary and sufficient for sumoylation enhancement. Moreover, SF2/ASF has a role in heat shock-induced sumoylation and promotes SUMO conjugation to RNA processing factors. These results add a component to the sumoylation pathway and a previously unexplored role for the multifunctional SR protein SF2/ASF. PMID:20805487

  16. Sumoylation of eIF4A2 affects stress granule formation

    PubMed Central

    Jongjitwimol, Jirapas; Baldock, Robert A.; Morley, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Regulation of protein synthesis is crucial for cells to maintain viability and to prevent unscheduled proliferation that could lead to tumorigenesis. Exposure to stress results in stalling of translation, with many translation initiation factors, ribosomal subunits and mRNAs being sequestered into stress granules or P bodies. This allows the re-programming of the translation machinery. Many aspects of translation are regulated by post-translational modification. Several proteomic screens have identified translation initiation factors as targets for sumoylation, although in many cases the role of this modification has not been determined. We show here that eIF4A2 is modified by SUMO, with sumoylation occurring on a single residue (K226). We demonstrate that sumoylation of eIF4A2 is modestly increased in response to arsenite and ionising radiation, but decreases in response to heat shock or hippuristanol. In arsenite-treated cells, but not in hippuristanol-treated cells, eIF4A2 is recruited to stress granules, suggesting sumoylation of eIF4A2 correlates with its recruitment to stress granules. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the inability to sumoylate eIF4A2 results in impaired stress granule formation, indicating a new role for sumoylation in the stress response. PMID:27160682

  17. Sumoylation Influences DNA Break Repair Partly by Increasing the Solubility of a Conserved End Resection Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Prabha; Steinacher, Roland; Altmannova, Veronika; Fu, Qiong; Paull, Tanya T.; Krejci, Lumir; Whitby, Matthew C.; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2015-01-01

    Protein modifications regulate both DNA repair levels and pathway choice. How each modification achieves regulatory effects and how different modifications collaborate with each other are important questions to be answered. Here, we show that sumoylation regulates double-strand break repair partly by modifying the end resection factor Sae2. This modification is conserved from yeast to humans, and is induced by DNA damage. We mapped the sumoylation site of Sae2 to a single lysine in its self-association domain. Abolishing Sae2 sumoylation by mutating this lysine to arginine impaired Sae2 function in the processing and repair of multiple types of DNA breaks. We found that Sae2 sumoylation occurs independently of its phosphorylation, and the two modifications act in synergy to increase soluble forms of Sae2. We also provide evidence that sumoylation of the Sae2-binding nuclease, the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex, further increases end resection. These findings reveal a novel role for sumoylation in DNA repair by regulating the solubility of an end resection factor. They also show that collaboration between different modifications and among multiple substrates leads to a stronger biological effect. PMID:25569253

  18. Dynamic Sumoylation of a Conserved Transcription Corepressor Prevents Persistent Inclusion Formation during Hyperosmotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Oeser, Michelle L.; Amen, Triana; Nadel, Cory M.; Bradley, Amanda I.; Reed, Benjamin J.; Jones, Ramon D.; Gopalan, Janani; Kaganovich, Daniel; Gardner, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Cells are often exposed to physical or chemical stresses that can damage the structures of essential biomolecules. Stress-induced cellular damage can become deleterious if not managed appropriately. Rapid and adaptive responses to stresses are therefore crucial for cell survival. In eukaryotic cells, different stresses trigger post-translational modification of proteins with the small ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO. However, the specific regulatory roles of sumoylation in each stress response are not well understood. Here, we examined the sumoylation events that occur in budding yeast after exposure to hyperosmotic stress. We discovered by proteomic and biochemical analyses that hyperosmotic stress incurs the rapid and transient sumoylation of Cyc8 and Tup1, which together form a conserved transcription corepressor complex that regulates hundreds of genes. Gene expression and cell biological analyses revealed that sumoylation of each protein directs distinct outcomes. In particular, we discovered that Cyc8 sumoylation prevents the persistence of hyperosmotic stress-induced Cyc8-Tup1 inclusions, which involves a glutamine-rich prion domain in Cyc8. We propose that sumoylation protects against persistent inclusion formation during hyperosmotic stress, allowing optimal transcriptional function of the Cyc8-Tup1 complex. PMID:26800527

  19. The nuclear xenobiotic receptor CAR: structural determinants of constitutive activation and heterodimerization.

    PubMed

    Suino, Kelly; Peng, Li; Reynolds, Ross; Li, Yong; Cha, Ji-Young; Repa, Joyce J; Kliewer, Steven A; Xu, H Eric

    2004-12-22

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) induces xenobiotic, bilirubin, and thyroid hormone metabolism as a heterodimer with the retinoid X receptor (RXR). Unlike ligand-dependent nuclear receptors, CAR is constitutively active. Here, we report the heterodimeric structure of the CAR and RXR ligand binding domains (LBDs), which reveals an unusually large dimerization interface and a small CAR ligand binding pocket. Constitutive CAR activity appears to be mediated by the compact nature of the CAR LBD that displays several unique features including a shortened AF2 helix and helix H10, which are linked by a two-turn helix that normally adopts an extended loop in other receptors, and an extended helix H2 that stabilizes the canonical LBD fold by packing tightly against helix H3. These structural observations provide a molecular framework for understanding the atypical transcriptional activation properties of CAR.

  20. Membrane-bound trafficking regulates nuclear transport of integral epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and ErbB-2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Nai; Lee, Heng-Huan; Lee, Hong-Jen; Du, Yi; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2012-05-11

    Nuclear localization of multiple receptor-tyrosine kinases (RTKs), such as EGF receptor (EGFR), ErbB-2, FGF receptor (FGFR), and many others, has been reported by several groups. We previously showed that cell surface EGFR is trafficked to the nucleus through a retrograde pathway from the Golgi to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and that EGFR is then translocated to the inner nuclear membrane (INM) through the INTERNET (integral trafficking from the ER to the nuclear envelope transport) pathway. However, the nuclear trafficking mechanisms of other membrane RTKs, apart from EGFR, remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare the nuclear transport of EGFR family proteins with that of FGFR-1. Interestingly, we found that digitonin permeabilization, which selectively releases soluble nuclear transporters from the cytoplasm and has been shown to inhibit nuclear transport of FGFR-1, had no effects on EGFR nuclear transport, raising the possibility that EGFR and FGFR-1 use different pathways to be translocated into the nucleus. Using the subnuclear fractionation assay, we further demonstrated that biotinylated cell surface ErbB-2, but not FGFR-1, is targeted to the INM, associating with Sec61β in the INM, similar to the nuclear trafficking of EGFR. Thus, ErbB-2, but not FGFR-1, shows a similar trafficking pathway to EGFR for translocation to the nucleus, indicating that at least two different pathways of nuclear transport exist for cell surface receptors. This finding provides a new direction for investigating the trafficking mechanisms of various nuclear RTKs.

  1. Structural insights into gene repression by the orphan nuclear receptor SHP

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Xiaoyong; Zhou, X. Edward; He, Yuanzheng; Zechner, Christoph; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Kliewer, Steven A.; Melcher, Karsten; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Xu, H. Eric

    2014-01-01

    Small heterodimer partner (SHP) is an orphan nuclear receptor that functions as a transcriptional repressor to regulate bile acid and cholesterol homeostasis. Although the precise mechanism whereby SHP represses transcription is not known, E1A-like inhibitor of differentiation (EID1) was isolated as a SHP-interacting protein and implicated in SHP repression. Here we present the crystal structure of SHP in complex with EID1, which reveals an unexpected EID1-binding site on SHP. Unlike the classical cofactor-binding site near the C-terminal helix H12, the EID1-binding site is located at the N terminus of the receptor, where EID1 mimics helix H1 of the nuclear receptor ligand-binding domain. The residues composing the SHP–EID1 interface are highly conserved. Their mutation diminishes SHP–EID1 interactions and affects SHP repressor activity. Together, these results provide important structural insights into SHP cofactor recruitment and repressor function and reveal a conserved protein interface that is likely to have broad implications for transcriptional repression by orphan nuclear receptors. PMID:24379397

  2. Structural insights into gene repression by the orphan nuclear receptor SHP.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Xiaoyong; Zhou, X Edward; He, Yuanzheng; Zechner, Christoph; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Kliewer, Steven A; Melcher, Karsten; Mangelsdorf, David J; Xu, H Eric

    2014-01-14

    Small heterodimer partner (SHP) is an orphan nuclear receptor that functions as a transcriptional repressor to regulate bile acid and cholesterol homeostasis. Although the precise mechanism whereby SHP represses transcription is not known, E1A-like inhibitor of differentiation (EID1) was isolated as a SHP-interacting protein and implicated in SHP repression. Here we present the crystal structure of SHP in complex with EID1, which reveals an unexpected EID1-binding site on SHP. Unlike the classical cofactor-binding site near the C-terminal helix H12, the EID1-binding site is located at the N terminus of the receptor, where EID1 mimics helix H1 of the nuclear receptor ligand-binding domain. The residues composing the SHP-EID1 interface are highly conserved. Their mutation diminishes SHP-EID1 interactions and affects SHP repressor activity. Together, these results provide important structural insights into SHP cofactor recruitment and repressor function and reveal a conserved protein interface that is likely to have broad implications for transcriptional repression by orphan nuclear receptors.

  3. Biliary Phospholipids Sustain Enterocyte Proliferation and Intestinal Tumor Progression via Nuclear Receptor Lrh1 in mice

    PubMed Central

    Petruzzelli, Michele; Piccinin, Elena; Pinto, Claudio; Peres, Claudia; Bellafante, Elena; Moschetta, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The proliferative-crypt compartment of the intestinal epithelium is enriched in phospholipids and accumulation of phospholipids has been described in colorectal tumors. Here we hypothesize that biliary phospholipid flow could directly contribute to the proliferative power of normal and dysplastic enterocytes. We used Abcb4−/− mice which lack biliary phospholipid secretion. We first show that Abcb4−/− mice are protected against intestinal tumorigenesis. At the molecular level, the transcriptional activity of the nuclear receptor Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (Lrh1) is reduced in Abcb4−/− mice and its re-activation re-establishes a tumor burden comparable to control mice. Feeding Abcb4−/− mice a diet supplemented with phospholipids completely overcomes the intestinal tumor protective phenotype, thus corroborating the hypothesis that the absence of biliary phospholipids and not lack of Abcb4 gene per se is responsible for the protection. In turn, phospholipids cannot re-establish intestinal tumorigenesis in Abcb4−/− mice crossed with mice with intestinal specific ablation of Lrh1, a nuclear hormone receptor that is activates by phospholipids. Our data identify the key role of biliary phospholipids in sustaining intestinal mucosa proliferation and tumor progression through the activation of nuclear receptor Lrh1. PMID:27995969

  4. The Drosophila NR4A Nuclear Receptor DHR38 Regulates Carbohydrate Metabolism and Glycogen Storage

    PubMed Central

    Ruaud, Anne-Françoise; Lam, Geanette; Thummel, Carl S.

    2011-01-01

    Animals balance nutrient storage and mobilization to maintain metabolic homeostasis, a process that is disrupted in metabolic diseases like obesity and diabetes. Here, we show that DHR38, the single fly ortholog of the mammalian nuclear receptor 4A family of nuclear receptors, regulates glycogen storage during the larval stages of Drosophila melanogaster. DHR38 is expressed and active in the gut and body wall of larvae, and its expression levels change in response to nutritional status. DHR38 null mutants have normal levels of glucose, trehalose (the major circulating form of sugar), and triacylglycerol but display reduced levels of glycogen in the body wall muscles, which constitute the primary storage site for carbohydrates. Microarray analysis reveals that many metabolic genes are mis-regulated in DHR38 mutants. These include phosphoglucomutase, which is required for glycogen synthesis, and the two genes that encode the digestive enzyme amylase, accounting for the reduced amylase enzyme activity seen in DHR38 mutant larvae. These studies demonstrate that a critical role of nuclear receptor 4A receptors in carbohydrate metabolism has been conserved through evolution and that nutritional regulation of DHR38 expression maintains the proper uptake and storage of glycogen during the growing larval stage of development. PMID:21084378

  5. 0610009K11Rik, a testis-specific and germ cell nuclear receptor-interacting protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Heng; Denhard, Leslie A.; Zhou Huaxin; Liu Lanhsin; Lan Zijian

    2008-02-22

    Using an in silico approach, a putative nuclear receptor-interacting protein 0610009K11Rik was identified in mouse testis. We named this gene testis-specific nuclear receptor-interacting protein-1 (Tnrip-1). Tnrip-1 was predominantly expressed in the testis of adult mouse tissues. Expression of Tnrip-1 in the testis was regulated during postnatal development, with robust expression in 14-day-old or older testes. In situ hybridization analyses showed that Tnrip-1 is highly expressed in pachytene spermatocytes and spermatids. Consistent with its mRNA expression, Tnrip-1 protein was detected in adult mouse testes. Immunohistochemical studies showed that Tnrip-1 is a nuclear protein and mainly expressed in pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation analyses showed that endogenous Tnrip-1 protein can interact with germ cell nuclear receptor (GCNF) in adult mouse testes. Our results suggest that Tnrip-1 is a testis-specific and GCNF-interacting protein which may be involved in the modulation of GCNF-mediated gene transcription in spermatogenic cells within the testis.

  6. Urban renewal in the nucleus: is protein turnover by proteasomes absolutely required for nuclear receptor-regulated transcription?

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Zafar; O'Malley, Bert W

    2004-03-01

    The importance of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway in higher eukaryotes has been well established in cell cycle regulation, signal transduction, and cell differentiation, but has only recently been linked to nuclear hormone receptor-regulated gene transcription. Characterization of a number of ubiquitin proteasome pathway enzymes as coactivators and observations that several nuclear receptors are ubiquitinated and degraded in the course of their nuclear activities provide evidence that ubiquitin proteasome-mediated protein degradation plays an integral role in eukaryotic transcription. In addition to receptors, studies have revealed that coactivators are ubiquitinated and degraded via the proteasome. The notion that the ubiquitin proteasome pathway is involved in gene transcription is further strengthened by the fact that ubiquitin proteasome pathway enzymes are recruited to the promoters of target genes and that proteasome-dependent degradation of nuclear receptors is required for efficient transcriptional activity. These findings suggest that protein degradation is coupled with nuclear receptor coactivation activity. It is possible that the ubiquitin proteasome pathway modulates transcription by promoting remodeling and turnover of the nuclear receptor-transcription complex. In this review, we discus the possible role of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway in nuclear hormone receptor-regulated gene transcription.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of action of the soy isoflavones includes activation of promiscuous nuclear receptors. A review.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, Marie-Louise; Moore, David D; Banz, William J; Mezei, Orsolya; Shay, Neil F

    2005-06-01

    Consumption of soy has been demonstrated to reduce circulating cholesterol levels, most notably reducing low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels in hypercholesterolemic individuals. The component or components that might be responsible for this effect is still a matter of debate or controversy among many researchers. Candidate agents include an activity of soy protein itself, bioactive peptides produced during the digestive process, or the soy isoflavones. Although soy intake may provide other health benefits including preventative or remediative effects on cancer, osteoporosis and symptoms of menopause, this review will focus on isoflavones as agents affecting lipid metabolism. Isoflavones were first discovered as a bioactive agent disrupting estrogen action in female sheep, thereby earning the often-used term 'phytoestrogens'. Subsequent work confirmed the ability of isoflavones to bind to estrogen receptors. Along with the cholesterol-lowering effect of soy intake, research that is more recent has pointed to a beneficial antidiabetic effect of soy intake, perhaps mediated by soy isoflavones. The two common categories of antidiabetic drugs acting on nuclear receptors known as peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) are the fibrates and glitazones. We and others have recently asked the research question 'do the soy isoflavones have activities as either "phytofibrates" or "phytoglitazones"?' Such an activity should be able to be confirmed both in vivo and in vitro. In both the in vivo and in vitro cases, this action has indeed been confirmed. Further work suggests a possible action of isoflavones similar to the nonestrogenic ligands that bind the estrogen-related receptors (ERRs). Recently, these receptors have been demonstrated to contribute to lipolytic processes. Finally, evaluation of receptor activation studies suggests that thyroid receptor activation may provide additional clues explaining the metabolic action of isoflavones. The recent

  8. Role of nuclear progesterone receptor isoforms in uterine pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Bansari; Elguero, Sonia; Thakore, Suruchi; Dahoud, Wissam; Bedaiwy, Mohamed; Mesiano, Sam

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Progesterone is a key hormonal regulator of the female reproductive system. It plays a major role to prepare the uterus for implantation and in the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. Actions of progesterone on the uterine tissues (endometrium, myometrium and cervix) are mediated by the combined effects of two progesterone receptor (PR) isoforms, designated PR-A and PR-B. Both receptors function primarily as ligand-activated transcription factors. Progesterone action on the uterine tissues is qualitatively and quantitatively determined by the relative levels and transcriptional activities of PR-A and PR-B. The transcriptional activity of the PR isoforms is affected by specific transcriptional coregulators and by PR post-translational modifications that affect gene promoter targeting. In this context, appropriate temporal and cell-specific expression and function of PR-A and PR-B are critical for normal uterine function. METHODS Relevant studies describing the role of PRs in uterine physiology and pathology (endometriosis, uterine leiomyoma, endometrial cancer, cervical cancer and recurrent pregnancy loss) were comprehensively searched using PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and Google Scholar and critically reviewed. RESULTS Progesterone, acting through PR-A and PR-B, regulates the development and function of the endometrium and induces changes in cells essential for implantation and the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. During pregnancy, progesterone via the PRs promotes myometrial relaxation and cervical closure. Withdrawal of PR-mediated progesterone signaling triggers menstruation and parturition. PR-mediated progesterone signaling is anti-mitogenic in endometrial epithelial cells, and as such, mitigates the tropic effects of estrogen on eutopic normal endometrium, and on ectopic implants in endometriosis. Similarly, ligand-activated PRs function as tumor suppressors in endometrial cancer cells through inhibition of key

  9. Regulation of CYP3A4 by pregnane X receptor: The role of nuclear receptors competing for response element binding

    SciTech Connect

    Istrate, Monica A.; Nussler, Andreas K.; Eichelbaum, Michel; Burk, Oliver

    2010-03-19

    Induction of the major drug metabolizing enzyme CYP3A4 by xenobiotics contributes to the pronounced interindividual variability of its expression and often results in clinically relevant drug-drug interactions. It is mainly mediated by PXR, which regulates CYP3A4 expression by binding to several specific elements in the 5' upstream regulatory region of the gene. Induction itself shows a marked interindividual variability, whose underlying determinants are only partly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of nuclear receptor binding to PXR response elements in CYP3A4, as a potential non-genetic mechanism contributing to interindividual variability of induction. By in vitro DNA binding experiments, we showed that several nuclear receptors bind efficiently to the proximal promoter ER6 and distal xenobiotic-responsive enhancer module DR3 motifs. TR{alpha}1, TR{beta}1, COUP-TFI, and COUP-TFII further demonstrated dose-dependent repression of PXR-mediated CYP3A4 enhancer/promoter reporter activity in transient transfection in the presence and absence of the PXR inducer rifampin, while VDR showed this effect only in the absence of treatment. By combining functional in vitro characterization with hepatic expression analysis, we predict that TR{alpha}1, TR{beta}1, COUP-TFI, and COUP-TFII show a strong potential for the repression of PXR-mediated activation of CYP3A4 in vivo. In summary, our results demonstrate that nuclear receptor binding to PXR response elements interferes with PXR-mediated expression and induction of CYP3A4 and thereby contributes to the interindividual variability of induction.

  10. Nuclear estrogen receptor molecular heterogeneity in the mouse uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Golding, T.S.; Korach, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    Holomeric estrogen receptor (ER) prepared from ovariectomized mouse uteri displays heterogeneous electrophoretic mobility when analyzed by NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE. ER derived from nuclei (ER/sub n/) appears as a closely spaced doublet having apparent molecular masses of 66.4 and 65 kDa, while ER from the cytosolic compartment (ER/sub c/) has a single band of 65 kDa. Both partially purified ER/sub c/ and the 8S form of unactivated ER/sub c/ show only the 65-kDa band. The appearance of the ER/sub n/ doublet is hormonally inducible, and the relative proportions of the two doublet bands are influenced by the type of hormone treatment, with weakly estrogenic compounds yielding the lower band as predominant while potent estrogens increase the proportion of the upper band. Steroid binding of the ER/sub n/ doublet was determined by (/sup 3/H)tamoxifen aziridine affinity labeling of both the 66.4- and the 65-kDa peptides; binding to the 65-kDa peptide was predominant. The ER/sub n/ doublet displays a time dependency after estrogen administration with maximal amounts occurring in a bimodal fashion at 1 and 8 hr.

  11. The NR4A nuclear receptors as potential targets for anti-aging interventions.

    PubMed

    Paillasse, Michael R; de Medina, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    The development of innovative anti-aging strategy is urgently needed to promote healthy aging and overcome the occurrence of age-related diseases such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Genomic instability, deregulated nutrient sensing and mitochondrial dysfunction are established hallmark of aging. Interestingly, the orphan nuclear receptors NR4A subfamily (NR4A1, NR4A2 and NR4A3) are nutrient sensors that trigger mitochondria biogenesis and improve intrinsic mitochondrial function. In addition, NR4A receptors are components of DNA repair machinery and promote DNA repair. Members of the NR4A subfamily should also be involved in anti-aging properties of hormesis since these receptors are induced by various form of cellular stress and stimulate protective cells response such as anti-oxidative activity and DNA repair. Previous studies reported that NR4A nuclear receptors subfamily is potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of age related disorders (e.g. metabolic syndromes, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases). Consequently, we propose that targeting NR4A receptors might constitute a new approach to delay aging and the onset of diseases affecting our aging population.

  12. The putative roles of nuclear and membrane-bound progesterone receptors in the female reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Kowalik, Magdalena K; Rekawiecki, Robert; Kotwica, Jan

    2013-12-01

    Progesterone produced by the corpus luteum (CL) is a key regulator of normal cyclical reproductive functions in the females of mammalian species. The physiological effects of progesterone are mediated by the canonical genomic pathway after binding of progesterone to its specific nuclear progesterone receptor (PGR), which acts as a ligand-activated transcription factor and has two main isoforms, PGRA and PGRB. These PGR isoforms play different roles in the cell; PGRB acts as an activator of progesterone-responsive genes, while PGRA can inhibit the activity of PGRB. The ratio of these isoforms changes during the estrous cycle and pregnancy, and it corresponds to the different levels of progesterone signaling occurring in the reproductive tract. Progesterone exerts its effects on cells also by a non-genomic mechanism by the interaction with the progesterone-binding membrane proteins including the progesterone membrane component (PGRMC) 1 and 2, and the membrane progestin receptors (mPRs). These receptors rapidly activate the appropriate intracellular signal transduction pathways, and subsequently they can initiate specific cell responses or modulate genomic cell responses. The diversity of progesterone receptors and their cellular actions enhances the role of progesterone as a factor regulating the function of the reproductive system and other organs. This paper deals with the possible involvement of nuclear and membrane-bound progesterone receptors in the function of target cells within the female reproductive tract.

  13. Structural and functional analysis of Hikeshi, a new nuclear transport receptor of Hsp70s.

    PubMed

    Song, Jinsue; Kose, Shingo; Watanabe, Ai; Son, Se Young; Choi, Saehae; Hong, Hyerim; Yamashita, Eiki; Park, Il Yeong; Imamoto, Naoko; Lee, Soo Jae

    2015-03-01

    Hikeshi is a nuclear transport receptor required for cell survival after stress. It mediates heat-shock-induced nuclear import of 70 kDa heat-shock proteins (Hsp70s) through interactions with FG-nucleoporins (FG-Nups), which are proteins in nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Here, the crystal structure of human Hikeshi is presented at 1.8 Å resolution. Hikeshi forms an asymmetric homodimer that is responsible for the interaction with Hsp70s. The asymmetry of Hikeshi arises from the distinct conformation of the C-terminal domain (CTD) and the flexibility of the linker regions of each monomer. Structure-guided mutational analyses showed that both the flexible linker region and the CTD are important for nuclear import of Hsp70. Pull-down assays revealed that only full-length Hsp70s can interact with Hikeshi. The N-terminal domain (NTD) consists of a jelly-roll/β-sandwich fold structure which contains hydrophobic pockets involved in FG-Nup recognition. A unique extended loop (E-loop) in the NTD is likely to regulate the interactions of Hikeshi with FG-Nups. The crystal structure of Hikeshi explains how Hikeshi participates in the regulation of nuclear import through the recognition of FG-Nups and which part of Hikeshi affects its binding to Hsp70. This study is the first to yield structural insight into this highly unique import receptor.

  14. CTCF modulates Estrogen Receptor function through specific chromatin and nuclear matrix interactions

    PubMed Central

    Fiorito, Elisa; Sharma, Yogita; Gilfillan, Siv; Wang, Shixiong; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Satheesh, Somisetty V.; Katika, Madhumohan R.; Urbanucci, Alfonso; Thiede, Bernd; Mills, Ian G.; Hurtado, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Enhancer regions and transcription start sites of estrogen-target regulated genes are connected by means of Estrogen Receptor long-range chromatin interactions. Yet, the complete molecular mechanisms controlling the transcriptional output of engaged enhancers and subsequent activation of coding genes remain elusive. Here, we report that CTCF binding to enhancer RNAs is enriched when breast cancer cells are stimulated with estrogen. CTCF binding to enhancer regions results in modulation of estrogen-induced gene transcription by preventing Estrogen Receptor chromatin binding and by hindering the formation of additional enhancer-promoter ER looping. Furthermore, the depletion of CTCF facilitates the expression of target genes associated with cell division and increases the rate of breast cancer cell proliferation. We have also uncovered a genomic network connecting loci enriched in cell cycle regulator genes to nuclear lamina that mediates the CTCF function. The nuclear lamina and chromatin interactions are regulated by estrogen-ER. We have observed that the chromatin loops formed when cells are treated with estrogen establish contacts with the nuclear lamina. Once there, the portion of CTCF associated with the nuclear lamina interacts with enhancer regions, limiting the formation of ER loops and the induction of genes present in the loop. Collectively, our results reveal an important, unanticipated interplay between CTCF and nuclear lamina to control the transcription of ER target genes, which has great implications in the rate of growth of breast cancer cells. PMID:27638884

  15. Clustering Nuclear Receptors in Liver Regeneration Identifies Candidate Modulators of Hepatocyte Proliferation and Hepatocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Giusi; D'Orazio, Andria; Cariello, Marica; Massafra, Vittoria; Salvatore, Lorena; Martelli, Nicola; Murzilli, Stefania; Sasso, Giuseppe Lo; Mariani-Costantini, Renato; Moschetta, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Liver regeneration (LR) is a valuable model for studying mechanisms modulating hepatocyte proliferation. Nuclear receptors (NRs) are key players in the control of cellular functions, being ideal modulators of hepatic proliferation and carcinogenesis. Methods & Results We used a previously validated RT-qPCR platform to profile modifications in the expression of all 49 members of the NR superfamily in mouse liver during LR. Twenty-nine NR transcripts were significantly modified in their expression during LR, including fatty acid (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, PPARs) and oxysterol (liver X receptors, Lxrs) sensors, circadian masters RevErbα and RevErbβ, glucocorticoid receptor (Gr) and constitutive androxane receptor (Car). In order to detect the NRs that better characterize proliferative status vs. proliferating liver, we used the novel Random Forest (RF) analysis to selected a trio of down-regulated NRs (thyroid receptor alpha, Trα; farsenoid X receptor beta, Fxrβ; Pparδ) as best discriminators of the proliferating status. To validate our approach, we further studied PPARδ role in modulating hepatic proliferation. We first confirmed the suppression of PPARδ both in LR and human hepatocellular carcinoma at protein level, and then demonstrated that PPARδ agonist GW501516 reduces the proliferative potential of hepatoma cells. Conclusions Our data suggest that NR transcriptome is modulated in proliferating liver and is a source of biomarkers and bona fide pharmacological targets for the management of liver disease affecting hepatocyte proliferation. PMID:25116592

  16. Surface localization of the nuclear receptor CAR in influenza A virus-infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Tadanobu; Moriyama, Yusuke; Ikari, Akira; Sugatani, Junko; Suzuki, Takashi; Miwa, Masao

    2008-04-11

    Constitutive active/androstane receptor CAR is a member of the nuclear receptors which regulate transcription of xenobiotic metabolism enzymes. CAR is usually localized in the cytosol and nucleus. Here, we found that CAR was localized at the cell surface of influenza A virus (IAV)-infected cells. Additionally, we demonstrated that expression of a viral envelope glycoprotein, either hemagglutinin (HA) or neuraminidase (NA), but not viral nucleoprotein (NP), was responsible for this localization. This report is the first demonstration of CAR at the surface of tissue culture cells, and suggests that CAR may exert the IAV infection mechanism.

  17. Finerenone Impedes Aldosterone-dependent Nuclear Import of the Mineralocorticoid Receptor and Prevents Genomic Recruitment of Steroid Receptor Coactivator-1*

    PubMed Central

    Amazit, Larbi; Le Billan, Florian; Kolkhof, Peter; Lamribet, Khadija; Viengchareun, Say; Fay, Michel R.; Khan, Junaid A.; Hillisch, Alexander; Lombès, Marc; Rafestin-Oblin, Marie-Edith; Fagart, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Aldosterone regulates sodium homeostasis by activating the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Hyperaldosteronism leads todeleterious effects on the kidney, blood vessels, and heart. Although steroidal antagonists such as spironolactone and eplerenone are clinically useful for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, they are associated with several side effects. Finerenone, a novel nonsteroidal MR antagonist, is presently being evaluated in two clinical phase IIb trials. Here, we characterized the molecular mechanisms of action of finerenone and spironolactone at several key steps of the MR signaling pathway. Molecular modeling and mutagenesis approaches allowed identification of Ser-810 and Ala-773 as key residues for the high MR selectivity of finerenone. Moreover, we showed that, in contrast to spironolactone, which activates the S810L mutant MR responsible for a severe form of early onset hypertension, finerenone displays strict antagonistic properties. Aldosterone-dependent phosphorylation and degradation of MR are inhibited by both finerenone and spironolactone. However, automated quantification of MR subcellular distribution demonstrated that finerenone delays aldosterone-induced nuclear accumulation of MR more efficiently than spironolactone. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that, as opposed to spironolactone, finerenone inhibits MR, steroid receptor coactivator-1, and RNA polymerase II binding at the regulatory sequence of the SCNN1A gene and also remarkably reduces basal MR and steroid receptor coactivator-1 recruitment, unraveling a specific and unrecognized inactivating mechanism on MR signaling. Overall, our data demonstrate that the highly potent and selective MR antagonist finerenone specifically impairs several critical steps of the MR signaling pathway and therefore represents a promising new generation MR antagonist. PMID:26203193

  18. The orphan nuclear receptor DAX-1 functions as a potent corepressor of the constitutive androstane receptor (NR1I3).

    PubMed

    Laurenzana, Elizabeth M; Chen, Tao; Kannuswamy, Malavika; Sell, Brian E; Strom, Stephen C; Li, Yong; Omiecinski, Curtis J

    2012-11-01

    Regulation of gene transcription is controlled in part by nuclear receptors that function coordinately with coregulator proteins. The human constitutive androstane receptor (CAR; NR1I3) is expressed primarily in liver and regulates the expression of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism as well as hormone, energy, and lipid homeostasis. In this report, DAX-1, a nuclear receptor family member with corepressor properties, was identified as a potent CAR regulator. Results of transaction and mutational studies demonstrated that both DAX-1's downstream LXXLL and its PCFQVLP motifs were critical contributors to DAX-1's corepression activities, although two other LXXM/LL motifs located nearer the N terminus had no impact on the CAR functional interaction. Deletion of DAX-1's C-terminal transcription silencing domain restored CAR1 transactivation activity in reporter assays to approximately 90% of control, demonstrating its critical function in mediating the CAR repression activities. Furthermore, results obtained from mammalian two-hybrid experiments assessing various domain configurations of the respective receptors showed that full-length DAX-1 inhibited the CAR-SRC1 interaction by approximately 50%, whereas the same interaction was restored to 90% of control when the DAX-1 transcription silencing domain was deleted. Direct interaction between CAR and DAX-1 was demonstrated with both alpha-screen and coimmunoprecipitation experiments, and this interaction was enhanced in the presence of the CAR activator 6-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole-5-carbaldehyde O-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)oxime (CITCO). Results obtained in primary human hepatocytes further demonstrated DAX-1 inhibition of CAR-mediated CITCO induction of the CYP2B6 target gene. The results of this investigation identify DAX-1 as a novel and potent CAR corepressor and suggest that DAX-1 functions as a coordinate hepatic regulator of CAR's biological function.

  19. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor DAX-1 Functions as a Potent Corepressor of the Constitutive Androstane Receptor (NR1I3)

    PubMed Central

    Laurenzana, Elizabeth M.; Chen, Tao; Kannuswamy, Malavika; Sell, Brian E.; Strom, Stephen C.; Li, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of gene transcription is controlled in part by nuclear receptors that function coordinately with coregulator proteins. The human constitutive androstane receptor (CAR; NR1I3) is expressed primarily in liver and regulates the expression of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism as well as hormone, energy, and lipid homeostasis. In this report, DAX-1, a nuclear receptor family member with corepressor properties, was identified as a potent CAR regulator. Results of transaction and mutational studies demonstrated that both DAX-1's downstream LXXLL and its PCFQVLP motifs were critical contributors to DAX-1's corepression activities, although two other LXXM/LL motifs located nearer the N terminus had no impact on the CAR functional interaction. Deletion of DAX-1's C-terminal transcription silencing domain restored CAR1 transactivation activity in reporter assays to approximately 90% of control, demonstrating its critical function in mediating the CAR repression activities. Furthermore, results obtained from mammalian two-hybrid experiments assessing various domain configurations of the respective receptors showed that full-length DAX-1 inhibited the CAR-SRC1 interaction by approximately 50%, whereas the same interaction was restored to 90% of control when the DAX-1 transcription silencing domain was deleted. Direct interaction between CAR and DAX-1 was demonstrated with both alpha-screen and coimmunoprecipitation experiments, and this interaction was enhanced in the presence of the CAR activator 6-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole-5-carbaldehyde O-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)oxime (CITCO). Results obtained in primary human hepatocytes further demonstrated DAX-1 inhibition of CAR-mediated CITCO induction of the CYP2B6 target gene. The results of this investigation identify DAX-1 as a novel and potent CAR corepressor and suggest that DAX-1 functions as a coordinate hepatic regulator of CAR's biological function. PMID:22896671

  20. Model inspired by nuclear pore complex suggests possible roles for nuclear transport receptors in determining its structure.

    PubMed

    Osmanović, Dino; Ford, Ian J; Hoogenboom, Bart W

    2013-12-17

    Nuclear transport receptors (NTRs) mediate nucleocytoplasmic transport via their affinity for unstructured proteins (polymers) in the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Here, we have modeled the effect of NTRs on polymeric structure in the nanopore confinement of the NPC central conduit. The model explicitly takes into account inter- and intramolecular interactions, as well as the finite size of the NTRs (∼20% of the NPC channel diameter). It reproduces various proposed scenarios for the channel structure, ranging from a central polymer condensate (selective phase) to brushlike polymer arrangements localized at the channel wall (virtual gate, reduction of dimensionality), with the transport receptors lining the polymer surface. In addition, it predicts a new structure in which NTRs become an integral part of the transport barrier by forming a cross-linked network with the unstructured proteins stretching across the pore. The model provides specific and distinctive predictions for the equilibrium spatial distributions of NTRs for these different scenarios that can be experimentally verified by, e.g., superresolution fluorescence microscopy. Moreover, it suggests mechanisms by which globular macromolecules (colloidal particles) can cause polymer-coated nanopores to switch between open and closed configurations, a possible explanation of the biological function of the NPC, and suggests potential technological applications for filtration and single-molecule sensing.

  1. Altered activity profile of a tertiary silanol analog of multi-targeting nuclear receptor modulator T0901317.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Hirozumi; Sato, Shoko; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Komai, Michio; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Fujii, Shinya

    2016-04-01

    We report the design, synthesis, and physicochemical/biological evaluation of novel silanol derivative 6 (sila-T) as a silanol analog of multi-target nuclear receptor modulator T0901317 (5). Compound 6 showed intermediate hydrophobicity between the corresponding alcohol 13 and perfluoroalcohol 5. While 5 exhibited potent activities toward liver X receptor α and β, farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor (PXR) and retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor (ROR)γ, silanol 6 exhibited activity only toward PXR and RORs. Incorporation of silanol instead of perfluoroalcohol is a promising option for developing novel target-selective, biologically active compounds.

  2. The Nuclear Receptor LXRα controls the functional specialization of splenic macrophages

    PubMed Central

    A-Gonzalez, Noelia; Guillen, Jose A.; Gallardo, Germán; Diaz, Mercedes; de la Rosa, Juan V.; Hernandez, Irene H.; Casanova-Acebes, Maria; Lopez, Felix; Tabraue, Carlos; Beceiro, Susana; Hong, Cynthia; Lara, Pedro C.; Andujar, Miguel; Arai, Satoko; Miyazaki, Toru; Li, Senlin; Corbi, Angel L.; Tontonoz, Peter; Hidalgo, Andres; Castrillo, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages are professional phagocytic cells that orchestrate innate immune responses and display remarkable phenotypic diversity at different anatomical locations. However, the mechanisms that control the heterogeneity of tissue macrophages are not well characterized. Here, we report that the nuclear receptor LXRα is essential for the differentiation of macrophages in the marginal zone (MZ) of the spleen. LXR deficient mice are defective in the generation of MZ and metallophilic macrophages, resulting in abnormal responses to blood-borne antigens. Myeloid specific expression of LXRα or adoptive transfer of wild-type monocytes rescues the MZ microenvironment in LXRα deficient mice. These results demonstrate that LXRα signaling in myeloid cells is crucial for the generation of splenic MZ macrophages and reveal an unprecedented role for a nuclear receptor in the generation of specialized macrophage subsets. PMID:23770640

  3. Emerging roles for nuclear receptors in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Goldis; Lad, Eleonora M.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly in the Western world. Over the last 30 years, our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease has grown exponentially thanks to the results of countless epidemiology, genetic, histo-logical, and biochemical studies. This information, in turn, has led to the identification of multiple biologic pathways potentially involved in development and progression of AMD, including but not limited to inflammation, lipid and extracellular matrix dysregulation, and angiogenesis. Nuclear receptors are a superfamily of transcription factors that have been shown to regulate many of the pathogenic pathways linked with AMD and as such they are emerging as promising targets for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we will present the fundamental phenotypic features of AMD and discuss our current understanding of the pathobiological disease mechanisms. We will introduce the nuclear receptor superfamily and discuss the current literature on their effects on AMD-related pathophysiology. PMID:25156067

  4. Role of nuclear receptors in the regulation of drug transporters in the brain.

    PubMed

    Chan, Gary N Y; Hoque, Md Tozammel; Bendayan, Reina

    2013-07-01

    ATP-binding cassette membrane-associated drug efflux transporters and solute carrier influx transporters, expressed at the blood-brain barrier, blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, and in brain parenchyma, are important determinants of drug disposition in the central nervous system. Targeting the regulatory pathways that govern the expression of these transporters could provide novel approaches to selectively alter drug permeability into the brain. Nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcription factors which regulate the gene expression of several metabolic enzymes and drug efflux/influx transporters. Although efforts have primarily been focused on investigating these regulatory pathways in peripheral organs (i.e., liver and intestine), recent findings demonstrate their significance in the brain. This review addresses the role of nuclear receptors in the regulation of drug transporter functional expression in the brain. An in-depth understanding of these pathways could guide the development of novel pharmacotherapy with either enhanced efficacy in the central nervous system or minimal associated neurotoxicity.

  5. Nuclear receptors regulate lipid metabolism and oxidative stress markers in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ratneswaran, Anusha; Sun, Margaret Man-Ger; Dupuis, Holly; Sawyez, Cynthia; Borradaile, Nica; Beier, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Joint homeostasis failure can result in osteoarthritis (OA). Currently, there are no treatments to alter disease progression in OA, but targeting early changes in cellular behavior has great potential. Recent data show that nuclear receptors contribute to the pathogenesis of OA and could be viable therapeutic targets, but their molecular mechanisms in cartilage are incompletely understood. This study examines global changes in gene expression after treatment with agonists for four nuclear receptor implicated in OA (LXR, PPARδ, PPARγ, and RXR). Murine articular chondrocytes were treated with agonists for LXR, PPARδ, PPARγ, or RXR and underwent microarray, qPCR, and cellular lipid analyses to evaluate changes in gene expression and lipid profile. Immunohistochemistry was conducted to compare two differentially expressed targets (Txnip, Gsta4) in control and cartilage-specific PPARδ knockout mice subjected to surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM). Nuclear receptor agonists induced different gene expression profiles with many responses affecting lipid metabolism. LXR activation downregulated gene expression of proteases involved in OA, whereas RXR agonism decreased expression of ECM components and increased expression of Mmp13. Functional assays indicate increases in cell triglyceride accumulation after PPARγ, LXR, and RXR agonism but a decrease after PPARδ agonism. PPARδ and RXR downregulate the antioxidant Gsta4, and PPARδ upregulates Txnip. Wild-type, but not PPARδ-deficient mice, display increased staining for Txnip after DMM. Collectively, these data demonstrate that nuclear receptor activation in chondrocytes primarily affects lipid metabolism. In the case of PPARδ, this change might lead to increased oxidative stress, possibly contributing to OA-associated changes.

  6. Cold exposure rapidly induces virtual saturation of brown adipose tissue nuclear T sub 3 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, A.C.; Silva, J.E. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA )

    1988-10-01

    Cold exposure induces a rapid increase in uncoupling protein (UCP) concentration in the brown adipose tissue (BAT) of euthyroid, but not hypothyroid, rats. To normalize this response with exogenous 3,5,3{prime}-triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}), it is necessary to cause systemic hyperthyroidism. In contrast, the same result can be obtained with just replacement doses of thyroxine (T{sub 4}) and, in euthyroid rats, the normal response of UCP to cold occurs without hyperthyroid plasma T{sub 3} levels. Consequently, the authors explored the possibility that the cold-induced activation of the type II 5{prime}-deiodinase resulted in high levels of nuclear T{sub 3} receptor occupancy in euthyroid rats. Studies were performed with pulse injections of tracer T{sub 3} or T{sub 4} in rats exposed to 4{degree}C for different lengths of time (1 h-3 wk). Within 4 h of cold exposure, they observed a significant increase in the nuclear ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3} derived from the tracer ({sup 125}I)T{sub 4} injections (T{sub 3}(T{sub 4})) and a significant reduction in the nuclear ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3} derived from ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3} injections (T{sub 3}(T{sub 3})). The number of BAT nuclear T{sub 3} receptors did not increase for up to 3 wk of observation at 4{degree}C. The mass of nuclear-bound T{sub 3} was calculated from the nuclear tracer ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3}(T{sub 3}) and ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3}(T{sub 4}) at equilibrium and the specific activity of serum T{sub 3} and T{sub 4}, respectively. By 4 h after the initiation of the cold exposure, the receptors were >95% occupied and remained so for the 3 weeks of observation. They conclude that the simultaneous activation of the deiodinase with adrenergic BAT stimulation serves the purpose of nearly saturating the nuclear T{sub 3} receptors. This makes possible the realization of the full thermogenic potential of the tissue without causing systemic hyperthyroidism.

  7. SUMOylation of the ING1b tumor suppressor regulates gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Satpathy, Shankha; Guérillon, Claire; Kim, Tae-Sun; Bigot, Nicolas; Thakur, Satbir; Bonni, Shirin; Riabowol, Karl; Pedeux, Rémy

    2014-01-01

    The INhibitor of Growth (ING) proteins are encoded as multiple isoforms in five ING genes (ING1 –5) and act as type II tumor suppressors. They are growth inhibitory when overexpressed and are frequently mislocalized or downregulated in several forms of cancer. ING1 and ING2 are stoichiometric members of histone deacetylase complexes, whereas ING3–5 are stoichiometric components of different histone acetyltransferase complexes. The INGs target these complexes to histone marks, thus acting as epigenetic regulators. ING proteins affect angiogenesis, apoptosis, DNA repair, metastasis and senescence, but how the proteins themselves are regulated is not yet clear. Here, we find a small ubiquitin-like modification (SUMOylation) of the ING1b protein and identify lysine 193 (K193) as the preferred ING1b SUMO acceptor site. We also show that PIAS4 is the E3 SUMO ligase responsible for ING1b SUMOylation on K193. Sequence alignment reveals that the SUMO consensus site on ING1b contains a phosphorylation-dependent SUMOylation motif (PDSM) and our data indicate that the SUMOylation on K193 is enhanced by the S199D phosphomimic mutant. Using an ING1b protein mutated at the major SUMOylation site (ING1b E195A), we further demonstrate that ING1b SUMOylation regulates the binding of ING1b to the ISG15 and DGCR8 promoters, consequently regulating ISG15 and DGCR8 transcription. These results suggest a role for ING1b SUMOylation in the regulation of gene transcription. PMID:24903338

  8. Nuclear translocation of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 and its significance in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Yao, Lu-Tian; Liang, Zhi-Yong; Zhou, Wei-Xun; You, Lei; Shao, Qian-Qian; Huang, Shuai; Guo, Jun-Chao; Zhao, Yu-Pei

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear translocation of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) was previously observed in some kinds of cancer. However, whether the phenomenon occurs in pancreatic cancer (PC), a malignancy with very dismal prognosis, remains unknown. In the present study, FGFR3 expression was firstly detected by Western blot and immunohistochemical staining in specimens of PC. Then, its correlations with clinicopathologic features and patient survival were evaluated. It was shown that FGFR3 was highly expressed in all the nuclear extracts, but in only one out of four whole tissue lysates, of tumor tissues, in contrast to those of non-tumor ones. Using immunohistochemistry, nuclear expression of FGFR3 was found to mainly locate in tumor cells, and was significantly associated with N stage. Furthermore, high FGFR3 nuclear expression was revealed to be associated with poor overall and disease-free survival in univariate analysis. For overall survival in the whole cohort and disease-free survival in patients with curative resection, high nuclear expression of FGFR3 was significant or marginally significant in multivariate analysis. However, its cytoplasmic expression was not related to clinical, pathologic variables and prognosis. These data suggest that nuclear translocation of FGFR3 is frequent and carries clinicopathologic as well as prognostic significances in PC.

  9. The N-terminal nuclear localization sequences of liver X receptors alpha and beta bind to importin alpha and are essential for both nuclear import and transactivating functions.

    PubMed

    Miller, Anna; Crumbley, Christine; Prüfer, Kirsten

    2009-04-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) alpha and beta are nuclear receptors, which form obligate heterodimers with the retinoid X receptor (RXR). The LXRs regulate both redundantly and non-redundantly the transcription of genes controlling cholesterol metabolism and transport as well as lipogenesis. Previously, we showed that mutations in putative N-terminal nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) within both LXRs inhibit nuclear import. Through in vitro studies, we show here that these NLSs bind importin alpha and are both necessary and sufficient for the nuclear import of LXRs. Imaging, transactivation, and electro-mobility shift experiments show that RXR rescues the nuclear import of the LXRalpha NLS mutant yet does not restore its transcriptional activity despite intact DNA binding. In contrast, RXR partially rescues the import of the LXRbeta NLS mutant, but has no effect on its transcriptional activity due to the loss of DNA binding. Experiments with NLS mutant RXR confirmed that RXR may dominate the nuclear import of the RXR/LXRalpha heterodimer, whereas LXRbeta dominates the nuclear import of the RXR/LXRbeta heterodimer. Intriguingly, our data indicate differences between LXRalpha and LXRbeta in their interaction with RXR and in the role their NLSs play in transactivating functions independent of nuclear import.

  10. Orphan nuclear receptor oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) plays a key role in hepatic cannabinoid receptor type 1-mediated induction of CYP7A1 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaochen; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Ji-Min; Park, Seung Bum; Jeong, Won-IL; Kim, Seong Heon; Lee, In-Kyu; Lee, Chul-Ho; Chiang, John Y.L.; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2017-01-01

    Bile acids are primarily synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and have important roles in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homoeostasis. Detailed roles of the orphan nuclear receptors regulating cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme in bile acid synthesis, have not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we report that oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) is a novel transcriptional regulator of CYP7A1 expression. Activation of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 receptor) signalling induced ERRγ-mediated transcription of the CYP7A1 gene. Overexpression of ERRγ increased CYP7A1 expression in vitro and in vivo, whereas knockdown of ERRγ attenuated CYP7A1 expression. Deletion analysis of the CYP7A1 gene promoter and a ChIP assay revealed an ERRγ -binding site on the CYP7A1 gene promoter. Small heterodimer partner (SHP) inhibited the transcriptional activity of ERRγ and thus regulated CYP7A1 expression. Overexpression of ERRγ led to increased bile acid levels, whereas an inverse agonist of ERRγ, GSK5182, reduced CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis. Finally, GSK5182 significantly reduced hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis in alcohol-treated mice. These results provide the molecular mechanism linking ERRγ and bile acid metabolism. PMID:26348907

  11. Orphan nuclear receptor oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) plays a key role in hepatic cannabinoid receptor type 1-mediated induction of CYP7A1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaochen; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Ji-Min; Park, Seung Bum; Jeong, Won-Il; Kim, Seong Heon; Lee, In-Kyu; Lee, Chul-Ho; Chiang, John Y L; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2015-09-01

    Bile acids are primarily synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and have important roles in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homoeostasis. Detailed roles of the orphan nuclear receptors regulating cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme in bile acid synthesis, have not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we report that oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) is a novel transcriptional regulator of CYP7A1 expression. Activation of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 receptor) signalling induced ERRγ-mediated transcription of the CYP7A1 gene. Overexpression of ERRγ increased CYP7A1 expression in vitro and in vivo, whereas knockdown of ERRγ attenuated CYP7A1 expression. Deletion analysis of the CYP7A1 gene promoter and a ChIP assay revealed an ERRγ-binding site on the CYP7A1 gene promoter. Small heterodimer partner (SHP) inhibited the transcriptional activity of ERRγ and thus regulated CYP7A1 expression. Overexpression of ERRγ led to increased bile acid levels, whereas an inverse agonist of ERRγ, GSK5182, reduced CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis. Finally, GSK5182 significantly reduced hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis in alcohol-treated mice. These results provide the molecular mechanism linking ERRγ and bile acid metabolism.

  12. Sumoylated α-skeletal muscle actin in the skeletal muscle of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Uda, Munehiro; Kawasaki, Hiroaki; Iizumi, Kyoichi; Shigenaga, Ayako; Baba, Takeshi; Naito, Hisashi; Yoshioka, Toshitada; Yamakura, Fumiyuki

    2015-11-01

    Skeletal muscles are composed of two major muscle fiber types: slow-twitch oxidative fibers and fast-twitch glycolytic fibers. The proteins in these muscle fibers are known to differ in their expression, relative abundance, and post-translational modifications. In this study, we report a previously unreported post-translational modification of α-skeletal muscle actin in the skeletal muscles of adult male F344 rats in vivo. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), we first examined the differences in the protein expression profiles between the soleus and plantaris muscles. We found higher intensity protein spots at approximately 60 kDa and pH 9 on 2D-PAGE for the soleus muscle compared with the plantaris muscle. These spots were identified as α-skeletal muscle actin by liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry and western blot analyses. In addition, we found that the 60 kDa α-skeletal muscle actin is modified by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) 1, using 2D-PAGE and western blot analyses. Furthermore, we found that α-skeletal muscle actin with larger molecular weight was localized in the nuclear and cytosol of the skeletal muscle, but not in the myofibrillar fraction by the combination of subcellular fractionation and western blot analyses. These results suggest that α-skeletal muscle actin is modified by SUMO-1 in the skeletal muscles, localized in nuclear and cytosolic fractions, and the extent of this modification is much higher in the slow muscles than in the fast muscles. This is the first study to show the presence of SUMOylated actin in animal tissues.

  13. Structural analysis of nuclear receptors: from isolated domains to integral proteins.

    PubMed

    Brélivet, Yann; Rochel, Natacha; Moras, Dino

    2012-01-30

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand dependent transcription factors that regulate gene expression. A number of in depth structure-function relationship studies have been performed, in particular with drug design perspectives. Recent structural results concerning integral receptors in diverse functional states, obtained using a combination of different methods, now allow a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in molecular regulation. The structural data highlight the importance of DNA sequences for binding selectivity and the role of promoter response elements in the spatial organization of the protein domains into functional complexes. The solution structures of several heterodimer complexes reveal how the DNA directs the positioning of coactivators. In the case of PPARγ-RXRα the comparison with the crystal structure reveals two different conformational states that illustrate the flexibility of the receptors. The results shed light on the dynamics of the molecular recognition process.

  14. Antidiabetic phospholipid-nuclear receptor complex reveals the mechanism for phospholipid-driven gene regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Musille, Paul M; Pathak, Manish C; Lauer, Janelle L; Hudson, William H; Griffin, Patrick R; Ortlund, Eric A

    2013-01-31

    The human nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) has an important role in controlling lipid and cholesterol homeostasis and is a potential target for the treatment of diabetes and hepatic diseases. LRH-1 is known to bind phospholipids, but the role of phospholipids in controlling LRH-1 activation remains highly debated. Here we describe the structure of both apo LRH-1 and LRH-1 in complex with the antidiabetic phospholipid dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC). Together with hydrogen-deuterium exchange MS and functional data, our studies show that DLPC binding is a dynamic process that alters co-regulator selectivity. We show that the lipid-free receptor undergoes previously unrecognized structural fluctuations, allowing it to interact with widely expressed co-repressors. These observations enhance our understanding of LRH-1 regulation and highlight its importance as a new therapeutic target for controlling diabetes.

  15. Annotation of the Daphnia magna nuclear receptors: comparison to Daphnia pulex.

    PubMed

    Litoff, Elizabeth J; Garriott, Travis E; Ginjupalli, Gautam K; Butler, LaToya; Gay, Claudy; Scott, Kiandra; Baldwin, William S

    2014-11-15

    Most nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-dependent transcription factors crucial in homeostatic physiological responses or environmental responses. We annotated the Daphnia magna NRs and compared them to Daphnia pulex and other species, primarily through phylogenetic analysis. Daphnia species contain 26 NRs spanning all seven gene subfamilies. Thirteen of the 26 receptors found in Daphnia species phylogenetically segregate into the NR1 subfamily, primarily involved in energy metabolism and resource allocation. Some of the Daphnia NRs, such as RXR, HR96, and E75 show strong conservation between D. magna and D. pulex. Other receptors, such as EcRb, THRL-11 and RARL-10 have diverged considerably and therefore may show different functions in the two species. Curiously, there is an inverse association between the number of NR splice variants and conservation of the LBD. Overall, D. pulex and D. magna possess the same NRs; however not all of the NRs demonstrate high conservation indicating the potential for a divergence of function.

  16. Nutrient-sensing nuclear receptors PPARα and FXR control liver energy balance.

    PubMed

    Preidis, Geoffrey A; Kim, Kang Ho; Moore, David D

    2017-04-03

    The nuclear receptors PPARα (encoded by NR1C1) and farnesoid X receptor (FXR, encoded by NR1H4) are activated in the liver in the fasted and fed state, respectively. PPARα activation induces fatty acid oxidation, while FXR controls bile acid homeostasis, but both nuclear receptors also regulate numerous other metabolic pathways relevant to liver energy balance. Here we review evidence that they function coordinately to control key nutrient pathways, including fatty acid oxidation and gluconeogenesis in the fasted state and lipogenesis and glycolysis in the fed state. We have also recently reported that these receptors have mutually antagonistic impacts on autophagy, which is induced by PPARα but suppressed by FXR. Secretion of multiple blood proteins is a major drain on liver energy and nutrient resources, and we present preliminary evidence that the liver secretome may be directly suppressed by PPARα, but induced by FXR. Finally, previous studies demonstrated a striking deficiency in bile acid levels in malnourished mice that is consistent with results in malnourished children. We present evidence that hepatic targets of PPARα and FXR are dysregulated in chronic undernutrition. We conclude that PPARα and FXR function coordinately to integrate liver energy balance.

  17. Evolution of the bile salt nuclear receptor FXR in vertebrates*s⃞

    PubMed Central

    Reschly, Erica J.; Ai, Ni; Ekins, Sean; Welsh, William J.; Hagey, Lee R.; Hofmann, Alan F.; Krasowski, Matthew D.

    2008-01-01

    Bile salts, the major end metabolites of cholesterol, vary significantly in structure across vertebrate species, suggesting that nuclear receptors binding these molecules may show adaptive evolutionary changes. We compared across species the bile salt specificity of the major transcriptional regulator of bile salt synthesis, the farnesoid X receptor (FXR). We found that FXRs have changed specificity for primary bile salts across species by altering the shape and size of the ligand binding pocket. In particular, the ligand binding pockets of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) FXRs, as predicted by homology models, are flat and ideal for binding planar, evolutionarily early bile alcohols. In contrast, human FXR has a curved binding pocket best suited for the bent steroid ring configuration typical of evolutionarily more recent bile acids. We also found that the putative FXR from the sea squirt Ciona intestinalis, a chordate invertebrate, was completely insensitive to activation by bile salts but was activated by sulfated pregnane steroids, suggesting that the endogenous ligands of this receptor may be steroidal in nature. Our observations present an integrated picture of the coevolution of bile salt structure and of the binding pocket of their target nuclear receptor FXR. PMID:18362391

  18. A lophotrochozoan-specific nuclear hormone receptor is required for reproductive system development in the planarian

    PubMed Central

    Tharp, Marla E.; Collins, James J.; Newmark, Phillip A.

    2014-01-01

    Germ cells of sexually reproducing organisms receive an array of cues from somatic tissues that instruct developmental processes. Although the nature of these signals differs amongst organisms, the importance of germline-soma interactions is a common theme. Recently, peptide hormones from the nervous system have been shown to regulate germ cell development in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea; thus, we sought to investigate a second class of hormones with a conserved role in reproduction, the lipophilic hormones. In order to study these signals, we identified a set of putative lipophilic hormone receptors, known as nuclear hormone receptors, and analyzed their functions in reproductive development. We found one gene, nhr-1, belonging to a small class of functionally uncharacterized lophotrochozoan-specific receptors, to be essential for the development of differentiated germ cells. Upon nhr-1 knockdown, germ cells in the testes and ovaries fail to mature, and remain as undifferentiated germline stem cells. Further analysis revealed that nhr-1 mRNA is expressed in the accessory reproductive organs and is required for their development, suggesting that this transcription factor functions cell non-autonomously in regulating germ cell development. Our studies identify a role for nuclear hormone receptors in planarian reproductive maturation and reinforce the significance of germline-soma interactions in sexual reproduction across metazoans. PMID:25278423

  19. The antidepressant fluoxetine normalizes the nuclear glucocorticoid receptor evoked by psychosocial stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitić, M.; Simić, I.; Djordjević, J.; Radojčić, M. B.; Adžić, M.

    2011-12-01

    Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression and stress disorders. Glucocorticoids, key regulators of the stress response, exert diverse effects on cellular processes in the hippocampus. Beside non-genomic pathways, glucocorticoid effects are mediated through activation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a ligand activated transcriptional factor that belongs to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. We analysed the GR protein levels both in the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments of the hippocampus of Wistar rats exposed to chronic psychosocial isolation stress upon chronic fluoxetine (FLU) treatment. Under chronic stress, corticosterone levels (CORT) were decreased compared to the control, and treatment with FLU did not change its level in the stressed rats. At the molecular level, FLU normalized the level of nuclear GR protein in the hippocampus of the stressed rats. Discrepancy between normalization of nuclear GR in the hippocampus and lack of normalization of HPA axis activity judged by CORT, suggests that other brain structures such as the amygdale and prefrontal cortex that also regulate HPA axis activity, seem not to be normalized by the FLU treatment used in our study.

  20. Nuclear localization of platelet-activating factor receptor controls retinal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    K Bhosle, Vikrant; Rivera, José Carlos; Zhou, Tianwei (Ellen); Omri, Samy; Sanchez, Melanie; Hamel, David; Zhu, Tang; Rouget, Raphael; Rabea, Areej Al; Hou, Xin; Lahaie, Isabelle; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Chemtob, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a pleiotropic phospholipid with proinflammatory, procoagulant and angiogenic actions on the vasculature. We and others have reported the presence of PAF receptor (Ptafr) at intracellular sites such as the nucleus. However, mechanisms of localization and physiologic functions of intracellular Ptafr remain poorly understood. We hereby identify the importance of C-terminal motif of the receptor and uncover novel roles of Rab11a GTPase and importin-5 in nuclear translocation of Ptafr in primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells. Nuclear localization of Ptafr is independent of exogenous PAF stimulation as well as intracellular PAF biosynthesis. Moreover, nuclear Ptafr is responsible for the upregulation of unique set of growth factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor, in vitro and ex vivo. We further corroborate the intracrine PAF signaling, resulting in angiogenesis in vivo, using Ptafr antagonists with distinct plasma membrane permeability. Collectively, our findings show that nuclear Ptafr translocates in an agonist-independent manner, and distinctive functions of Ptafr based on its cellular localization point to another dimension needed for pharmacologic selectivity of drugs. PMID:27462464

  1. Med1 subunit of the mediator complex in nuclear receptor-regulated energy metabolism, liver regeneration, and hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yuzhi; Viswakarma, Navin; Reddy, Janardan K

    2014-01-01

    Several nuclear receptors regulate diverse metabolic functions that impact on critical biological processes, such as development, differentiation, cellular regeneration, and neoplastic conversion. In the liver, some members of the nuclear receptor family, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), liver X receptor (LXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and others, regulate energy homeostasis, the formation and excretion of bile acids, and detoxification of xenobiotics. Excess energy burning resulting from increases in fatty acid oxidation systems in liver generates reactive oxygen species, and the resulting oxidative damage influences liver regeneration and liver tumor development. These nuclear receptors are important sensors of exogenous activators as well as receptor-specific endogenous ligands. In this regard, gene knockout mouse models revealed that some lipid-metabolizing enzymes generate PPARα-activating ligands, while others such as ACOX1 (fatty acyl-CoA oxidase1) inactivate these endogenous PPARα activators. In the absence of ACOX1, the unmetabolized ACOX1 substrates cause sustained activation of PPARα, and the resulting increase in energy burning leads to hepatocarcinogenesis. Ligand-activated nuclear receptors recruit the multisubunit Mediator complex for RNA polymerase II-dependent gene transcription. Evidence indicates that the Med1 subunit of the Mediator is essential for PPARα, PPARγ, CAR, and GR signaling in liver. Med1 null hepatocytes fail to respond to PPARα activators in that these cells do not show induction of peroxisome proliferation and increases in fatty acid oxidation enzymes. Med1-deficient hepatocytes show no increase in cell proliferation and do not give rise to liver tumors. Identification of nuclear receptor-specific coactivators and Mediator subunits should further our understanding of the complexities of metabolic

  2. Med1 Subunit of the Mediator Complex in Nuclear Receptor-Regulated Energy Metabolism, Liver Regeneration, and Hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yuzhi; Viswakarma, Navin; Reddy, Janardan K.

    2014-01-01

    Several nuclear receptors regulate diverse metabolic functions that impact on critical biological processes, such as development, differentiation, cellular regeneration, and neoplastic conversion. In the liver, some members of the nuclear receptor family, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), liver X receptor (LXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and others, regulate energy homeostasis, the formation and excretion of bile acids, and detoxification of xenobiotics. Excess energy burning resulting from increases in fatty acid oxidation systems in liver generates reactive oxygen species, and the resulting oxidative damage influences liver regeneration and liver tumor development. These nuclear receptors are important sensors of exogenous activators as well as receptor-specific endogenous ligands. In this regard, gene knockout mouse models revealed that some lipid-metabolizing enzymes generate PPARα-activating ligands, while others such as ACOX1 (fatty acyl-CoA oxidase1) inactivate these endogenous PPARα activators. In the absence of ACOX1, the unmetabolized ACOX1 substrates cause sustained activation of PPARα, and the resulting increase in energy burning leads to hepatocarcinogenesis. Ligand-activated nuclear receptors recruit the multisubunit Mediator complex for RNA polymerase II-dependent gene transcription. Evidence indicates that the Med1 subunit of the Mediator is essential for PPARα, PPARγ, CAR, and GR signaling in liver. Med1 null hepatocytes fail to respond to PPARα activators in that these cells do not show induction of peroxisome proliferation and increases in fatty acid oxidation enzymes. Med1-deficient hepatocytes show no increase in cell proliferation and do not give rise to liver tumors. Identification of nuclear receptor-specific coactivators and Mediator subunits should further our understanding of the complexities of metabolic

  3. The expression of nuclear and membrane estrogen receptors in the European eel throughout spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Morini, Marina; Peñaranda, David S; Vílchez, M Carmen; Tveiten, Helge; Lafont, Anne-Gaëlle; Dufour, Sylvie; Pérez, Luz; Asturiano, Juan F

    2017-01-01

    Estradiol (E2) can bind to nuclear estrogen receptors (ESR) or membrane estrogen receptors (GPER). While mammals possess two nuclear ESRs and one membrane GPER, the European eel, like most other teleosts, has three nuclear ESRs and two membrane GPERs, as the result of a teleost specific genome duplication. In the current study, the expression of the three nuclear ESRs (ESR1, ESR2a and ESR2b) and the two membrane GPERs (GPERa and GPERb) in the brain-pituitary-gonad (BPG) axis of the European eel was measured, throughout spermatogenesis. The eels were first transferred from freshwater (FW) to seawater (SW), inducing parallel increases in E2 plasma levels and the expression of ESRs. This indicates that salinity has a stimulatory effect on the E2 signalling pathway along the BPG axis. Stimulation of sexual maturation by weekly injections of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) induced a progressive decrease in E2 plasma levels, and different patterns of expression of ESRs and GPERs in the BPG axis. The expression of nuclear ESRs increased in some parts of the brain, suggesting a possible upregulation due to a local production of E2. In the testis, the highest expression levels of the nuclear ESRs were observed at the beginning of spermatogenesis, possibly mediating the role of E2 as spermatogonia renewal factor, followed by a sharply decrease in the expression of ESRs. Conversely, there was a marked increase observed in the expression of both membrane GPERs throughout spermatogenesis, suggesting they play a major role in the final stages of spermatogenesis.

  4. Biosynthesis of SUMOylated Proteins in Bacteria Using the Trypanosoma brucei Enzymatic System.

    PubMed

    Iribarren, Paula Ana; Berazategui, María Agustina; Cazzulo, Juan José; Alvarez, Vanina Eder

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modification with the Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) is conserved in eukaryotic organisms and plays important regulatory roles in proteins affecting diverse cellular processes. In Trypanosoma brucei, member of one of the earliest branches in eukaryotic evolution, SUMO is essential for normal cell cycle progression and is likely to be involved in the epigenetic control of genes crucial for parasite survival, such as those encoding the variant surface glycoproteins. Molecular pathways modulated by SUMO have started to be discovered by proteomic studies; however, characterization of functional consequences is limited to a reduced number of targets. Here we present a bacterial strain engineered to produce SUMOylated proteins, by transferring SUMO from T. brucei together with the enzymes essential for its activation and conjugation. Due to the lack of background in E. coli, this system is useful to express and identify SUMOylated proteins directly in cell lysates by immunoblotting, and SUMOylated targets can be eventually purified for biochemical or structural studies. We applied this strategy to describe the ability of TbSUMO to form chains in vitro and to detect SUMOylation of a model substrate, PCNA both from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and from T. brucei. To further validate targets, we applied an in vitro deconjugation assay using the T. brucei SUMO-specific protease capable to revert the pattern of modification. This system represents a valuable tool for target validation, mutant generation and functional studies of SUMOylated proteins in trypanosomatids.

  5. Sumoylation of critical proteins in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: emerging pathways of pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Foran, Emily; Rosenblum, Lauren; Bogush, Alexey I.; Trotti, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Emerging lines of evidence suggest a relationship between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and protein sumoylation. Multiple studies have demonstrated that several of the proteins involved in the pathogenesis of ALS, including superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), fused in liposarcoma (FUS), and TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP43), are substrates for sumoylation. Additionally, recent studies in cellular and animal models of ALS revealed that sumoylation of these proteins impact their localization, longevity and how they functionally perform in disease, providing novel areas for mechanistic investigations and therapeutics. In this article, we summarize the current literature examining the impact of sumoylation of critical proteins involved in ALS and discuss the potential impact for the pathogenesis of the disease. In addition, we report and discuss the implications of new evidence demonstrating that sumoylation of a fragment derived from the proteolytic cleavage of the astroglial glutamate transporter, EAAT2, plays a direct role in downregulating the expression levels of full length EAAT2 by binding to a regulatory region of its promoter. PMID:24062161

  6. Overexpression of SKI oncoprotein leads to p53 degradation through regulation of MDM2 protein sumoylation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Boxiao; Sun, Yin; Huang, Jiaoti

    2012-04-27

    Protooncogene Ski was identified based on its ability to transform avian fibroblasts in vitro. In support of its oncogenic activity, SKI was found to be overexpressed in a variety of human cancers, although the exact molecular mechanism(s) responsible for its oncogenic activity is not fully understood. We found that SKI can negatively regulate p53 by decreasing its level through up-regulation of MDM2 activity, which is mediated by the ability of SKI to enhance sumoylation of MDM2. This stimulation of MDM2 sumoylation is accomplished through a direct interaction of SKI with SUMO-conjugating enzyme E2, Ubc9, resulting in enhanced thioester bond formation and mono-sumoylation of Ubc9. A mutant SKI defective in transformation fails to increase p53 ubiquitination and is unable to increase MDM2 levels and to increase mono-sumoylation of Ubc9, suggesting that the ability of SKI to enhance Ubc9 activity is essential for its transforming function. These results established a detailed molecular mechanism that underlies the ability of SKI to cause cellular transformation while unraveling a novel connection between sumoylation and tumorigenesis, providing potential new therapeutic targets for cancer.

  7. Localization of SUMOylation factors and Osterix in odontoblast lineage cells during dentin formation and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Akihiro; Yukita, Akira; Ninomiya, Tadashi; Hiraga, Toru; Yoshiba, Kunihiko; Yoshiba, Nagako; Kasahara, Etsuo; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2013-08-01

    Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) conjugation (SUMOylation) is a post-translational modification involved in various cellular processes including the regulation of transcription factors. In this study, to analyze the involvement of SUMOylation in odontoblast differentiation, we examined the immunohistochemical localization of SUMO-1, SUMO-2/3, and Osterix during rat tooth development. At the bud and cap stages, localization of SUMOs and Osterix was hardly detected in the dental mesenchyme. At the bell stage, odontoblasts just beginning dentin matrix secretion and preodontoblasts near these odontoblasts showed intense immunoreactivity for these molecules. However, after the root-formation stage, these immunoreactivities in the odontoblasts decreased in intensity. Next, to examine whether the SUMOylation participates in dentin regeneration, we evaluated the distribution of SUMOs and Osterix in the dental pulp after cavity preparation. In the coronal pulp chamber of an untreated rat molar, odontoblasts and pulp cells showed no immunoreactivity. At 4 days after cavity preparation, positive cells for SUMOs and Osterix appeared on the surface of the dentin beneath the cavity. Odontoblast-like cells forming reparative dentin were immunopositive for SUMOs and Osterix at 1 week, whereas these immunoreactivities disappeared after 8 weeks. Additionally, we further analyzed the capacity of SUMO-1 to bind Osterix by performing an immunoprecipitation assay using C2C12 cells, and showed that Osterix could undergo SUMOylation. These results suggest that SUMOylation might regulate the transcriptional activity of Osterix in odontoblast lineage cells, and thus play important roles in odontoblast differentiation and regeneration.

  8. RUNX family members are covalently modified and regulated by PIAS1-mediated sumoylation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J-H; Jang, J-W; Lee, Y-S; Lee, J-W; Chi, X-Z; Li, Y-H; Kim, M-K; Kim, D-M; Choi, B-S; Kim, J; Kim, H-M; van Wijnen, A; Park, IlY; Bae, S-C

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors of the RUNX family (RUNXs), which play pivotal roles in normal development and neoplasia, are regulated by various post-translational modifications. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of RUNXs, we performed a large-scale functional genetic screen of a fly mutant library. The screen identified dPias (the fly ortholog of mammalian PIASs), an E3 ligase for the SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) modification, as a novel genetic modifier of lz (the fly ortholog of mammalian RUNX3). Molecular biological analysis revealed that lz/RUNXs are sumoylated by dPias/PIAS1 at an evolutionarily conserved lysine residue (K372 of lz, K144 of RUNX1, K181 of RUNX2 and K148 of RUNX3). PIAS1-mediated sumoylation inhibited RUNX3 transactivation activity, and this modification was promoted by the AKT1 kinase. Importantly, PIAS1 failed to sumoylate some RUNX1 mutants associated with breast cancer. In nude mice, tumorigenicity was promoted by RUNX3 bearing a mutation in the sumoylation site, but suppressed by wild-type RUNX3. Our results suggest that RUNXs are sumoylated by PIAS1, and that this modification could play a critical role in the regulation of the tumor-suppressive activity of these proteins. PMID:24777122

  9. SUMOylation of synapsin Ia maintains synaptic vesicle availability and is reduced in an autism mutation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Leo T. -H.; Craig, Tim J.; Henley, Jeremy M.

    2015-01-01

    Synapsins are key components of the presynaptic neurotransmitter release machinery. Their main role is to cluster synaptic vesicles (SVs) to each other and anchor them to the actin cytoskeleton to establish the reserve vesicle pool, and then release them in response to appropriate membrane depolarization. Here we demonstrate that SUMOylation of synapsin Ia (SynIa) at K687 is necessary for SynIa function. Replacement of endogenous SynIa with a non-SUMOylatable mutant decreases the size of the releasable vesicle pool and impairs stimulated SV exocytosis. SUMOylation enhances SynIa association with SVs to promote the efficient reclustering of SynIa following neuronal stimulation and maintain its presynaptic localization. The A548T mutation in SynIa is strongly associated with autism and epilepsy and we show that it leads to defective SynIa SUMOylation. These results identify SUMOylation as a fundamental regulator of SynIa function and reveal a novel link between reduced SUMOylation of SynIa and neurological disorders. PMID:26173895

  10. SUMOylation Blocks the Ubiquitin-Mediated Degradation of the Nephronophthisis Gene Product Glis2/NPHP7

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Haribaskar; Herfurth, Konstantin; Grosschedl, Rudolf; Schäfer, Tobias; Walz, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Glis2/NPHP7 is a transcriptional regulator mutated in type 7 nephronophthisis, an autosomal recessive ciliopathy associated with cystic and fibrotic kidney disease as well as characteristic extrarenal manifestations. While most ciliopathy-associated molecules are found in the cilium, Glis2/NPHP7 presumably localizes to the nucleus. However, the detection of endogenous Glis2/NPHP7 has remained unsuccessful, potentially due to its ubiquitylation-dependent rapid degradation. We report now that Glis2/NPHP7 is also SUMOylated, preferentially by PIAS4, which conjugates Glis2/NPHP7 to SUMO3. SUMOylation interferes with ubiquitylation and degradation of Glis2/NPHP7, suggesting that Glis2/NPHP7 protein levels are regulated by competing ubiquitylation/ SUMOylation. SUMOylation also alters the transcriptional activity of Glis2/NPHP7. While Glis2/NPHP7 activates the mouse insulin-2-promotor (mIns2), SUMOylated Glis2/NPHP7 lacks this property, and seems to act as a repressor. Taken together, our data reveal that Glis2/NPHP7 is extensively modified by post-translational modifications, suggesting that a tight control of this transcriptional regulator is required for normal development and tissue homeostasis. PMID:26083374

  11. Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Inhibition Enhances Memory Acquisition through Activation of PPAR-alpha Nuclear Receptors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzola, Carmen; Medalie, Julie; Scherma, Maria; Panlilio, Leigh V.; Solinas, Marcello; Tanda, Gianluigi; Drago, Filippo; Cadet, Jean Lud; Goldberg, Steven R.; Yasar, Sevil

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) increase endogenous levels of anandamide (a cannabinoid CB[subscript 1]-receptor ligand) and oleoylethanolamide and palmitoylethanolamide (OEA and PEA, ligands for alpha-type peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptors, PPAR-alpha) when and where they are naturally released in the brain.…

  12. Nuclear Receptor 4A (NR4A) Family – Orphans No More

    PubMed Central

    Safe, Stephen; Jin, Un-Ho; Morpurgo, Benjamin; Abdayyeh, Ala; Singh, Mandip; Tjalkens, Ronald B.

    2015-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptors NR4A1, NR4A2 and NR4A3 are immediate early genes induced by multiple stressors, and the NR4A1 receptors play an important role in maintaining cellular homeostasis and disease. There is increasing evidence for the role of these receptors in metabolic, cardiovascular and neurological functions and also in inflammation and inflammatory diseases and in immune functions and cancer. Despite the similarities of NR4A1, NR4A2 and NR4A3 and their interactions with common cis-genomic elements, they exhibit unique activities and cell-/tissue-specific functions. Although endogenous ligands for NR4A receptors have not been identified, there is increasing evidence that structurally-diverse synthetic molecules can directly interact with the ligand binding domain of NR4A1 and act as agonists or antagonists, and ligands for NR4A2 and NR4A3 have also been identified. Since NR4A receptors are key factors in multiple diseases, there are opportunities for the future development of NR4A ligands for clinical applications in treating multiple health problems including metabolic, neurologic and cardiovascular diseases, other inflammatory conditions, and cancer. PMID:25917081

  13. Reciprocal activation of Xenobiotic response genes by nuclear receptors SXR/PXR and CAR

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wen; Barwick, Joyce L.; Simon, Cynthia M.; Pierce, Alexis M.; Safe, Stephen; Blumberg, Bruce; Guzelian, Philip S.; Evans, Ronald M.

    2000-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) gene products such as CYP3A and CYP2B are essential for the metabolism of steroid hormones and xenochemicals including prescription drugs. Nuclear receptor SXR/PXR (steroid and xenobiotic receptor/pregnenolone X receptor) has been shown both biochemically and genetically to activate CYP3A genes, while similar studies have established constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) as a CYP2B regulator. The response elements in these genes are also distinct, furthering the concept of independent regulation. Unexpectedly, we found that SXR can regulate CYP2B, both in cultured cells and in transgenic mice via adaptive recognition of the phenobarbital response element (PBRE). In a type of functional symmetry, orphan receptor CAR was also found to activate CYP3A through previously defined SXR/PXR response elements. These observations not only provide a rational explanation for the activation of multiple CYP gene classes by certain xenobiotics, but also reveal the existence of a metabolic safety net that confers a second layer of protection to the harmful effects of toxic compounds and at the same time increases the propensity for drug–drug interactions. PMID:11114890

  14. The Concise Guide to Pharmacology 2013/14: Nuclear Hormone Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Stephen PH; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Spedding, Michael; Peters, John A; Harmar, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 2000 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.12444/full. Nuclear hormone receptors are one of the seven major pharmacological targets into which the Guide is divided, with the others being G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, ion channels, catalytic receptors, transporters and enzymes. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. A new landscape format has easy to use tables comparing related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2013, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in previous Guides to Receptors and Channels. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and the Guide to Receptors and Channels, providing a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:24528240

  15. Physical and functional interactions of human papillomavirus E2 protein with nuclear receptor coactivators

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, M.-H.; Huang, C.-J.; Liu, S.-T.; Liu, P.-Y.; Ho, C.-L. . E-mail: shihming@ndmctsgh.edu.tw

    2007-05-11

    In addition to the human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced immortalization of epithelial cells, which usually requires integration of the viral DNA into the host cell genome, steroid hormone-activated nuclear receptors (NRs) are thought to bind to specific DNA sequences within transcriptional regulatory regions on the long control region to either increase or suppress transcription of dependent genes. In this study, our data suggest that the NR coactivator function of HPV E2 proteins might be mediated through physical and functional interactions with not only NRs but also the NR coactivators GRIP1 (glucocorticoid receptor-interacting protein 1) and Zac1 (zinc-finger protein which regulates apoptosis and cell cycle arrest 1), reciprocally regulating their transactivation activities. GRIP1 and Zac1 both were able to act synergistically with HPV E2 proteins on the E2-, androgen receptor-, and estrogen receptor-dependent transcriptional activation systems. GRIP1 and Zac1 might selectively function with HPV E2 proteins on thyroid receptor- and p53-dependent transcriptional activation, respectively. Hence, the transcriptional function of E2 might be mediated through NRs and NR coactivators to regulate E2-, NR-, and p53-dependent transcriptional activations.

  16. The export receptor Crm1 forms a dimer to promote nuclear export of HIV RNA.

    PubMed

    Booth, David S; Cheng, Yifan; Frankel, Alan D

    2014-12-08

    The HIV Rev protein routes viral RNAs containing the Rev Response Element (RRE) through the Crm1 nuclear export pathway to the cytoplasm where viral proteins are expressed and genomic RNA is delivered to assembling virions. The RRE assembles a Rev oligomer that displays nuclear export sequences (NESs) for recognition by the Crm1-Ran(GTP) nuclear receptor complex. Here we provide the first view of an assembled HIV-host nuclear export complex using single-particle electron microscopy. Unexpectedly, Crm1 forms a dimer with an extensive interface that enhances association with Rev-RRE and poises NES binding sites to interact with a Rev oligomer. The interface between Crm1 monomers explains differences between Crm1 orthologs that alter nuclear export and determine cellular tropism for viral replication. The arrangement of the export complex identifies a novel binding surface to possibly target an HIV inhibitor and may point to a broader role for Crm1 dimerization in regulating host gene expression.

  17. Regulation of nuclear TDP-43 by NR2A-containing NMDA receptors and PTEN

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Mei; Liao, Mingxia; Cui, Tianyuan; Tian, Honglin; Fan, Dong-Sheng; Wan, Qi

    2012-01-01

    The dysfunction of TAR DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43) is implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. However, the function of TDP-43 is not fully elucidated. Here we show that the protein level of endogenous TDP-43 in the nucleus is increased in mouse cortical neurons in the early stages, but return to basal level in the later stages after glutamate accumulation-induced injury. The elevation of TDP-43 results from a downregulation of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). We further demonstrate that activation of NR2A-containing NMDA receptors (NR2ARs) leads to PTEN downregulation and subsequent reduction of PTEN import from the cytoplasm to the nucleus after glutamate accumulation. The decrease of PTEN in the nucleus contributes to its reduced association with TDP-43, and thereby mediates the elevation of nuclear TDP-43. We provide evidence that the elevation of nuclear TDP-43, mediated by NR2AR activation and PTEN downregulation, confers protection against cortical neuronal death in the late stages after glutamate accumulation. Thus, this study reveals a NR2AR–PTEN–TDP-43 signaling pathway by which nuclear TDP-43 promotes neuronal survival. These results suggest that upregulation of nuclear TDP-43 represents a self-protection mechanism to delay neurodegeneration in the early stages after glutamate accumulation and that prolonging the upregulation process of nuclear TDP-43 might have therapeutic significance. PMID:22526419

  18. Widespread nuclear and cytoplasmic accumulation of mutant androgen receptor in SBMA patients.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Hiroaki; Katsuno, Masahisa; Minamiyama, Makoto; Waza, Masahiro; Sang, Chen; Nakagomi, Yuji; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Doyu, Manabu; Inukai, Akira; Yoshida, Mari; Hashizume, Yoshio; Sobue, Gen

    2005-03-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an inherited adult onset motor neuron disease caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ) tract within the androgen receptor (AR), affecting only males. The characteristic pathological finding is nuclear inclusions (NIs) consisting of mutant AR with an expanded polyQ in residual motor neurons, and in certain visceral organs. We immunohistochemically examined 11 SBMA patients at autopsy with 1C2, an antibody that specifically recognizes expanded polyQ. Our study demonstrated that diffuse nuclear accumulation of mutant AR was far more frequent and extensive than NIs being distributed in a wide array of CNS nuclei, and in more visceral organs than thus far believed. Mutant AR accumulation was also present in the cytoplasm, particularly in the Golgi apparatus; nuclear or cytoplasmic predominance of accumulation was tissue specific. Furthermore, the extent of diffuse nuclear accumulation of mutant AR in motor and sensory neurons of the spinal cord was closely related to CAG repeat length. Thus, diffuse nuclear accumulation of mutant AR apparently is a cardinal pathogenetic process underlying neurological manifestations, as in SBMA transgenic mice, while cytoplasmic accumulation may also contribute to SBMA pathophysiology.

  19. SIRT1 modulates aggregation and toxicity through deacetylation of the androgen receptor in cell models of SBMA.

    PubMed

    Montie, Heather L; Pestell, Richard G; Merry, Diane E

    2011-11-30

    Posttranslational protein modifications can play a major role in disease pathogenesis; phosphorylation, sumoylation, and acetylation modulate the toxicity of a variety of proteotoxic proteins. The androgen receptor (AR) is substantially modified, in response to hormone binding, by phosphorylation, sumoylation, and acetylation; these modifications might thus contribute to DHT-dependent polyglutamine (polyQ)-expanded AR proteotoxicity in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). SIRT1, a nuclear protein and deacetylase of the AR, is neuroprotective in many neurodegenerative disease models. Our studies reveal that SIRT1 also offers protection against polyQ-expanded AR by deacetylating the AR at lysines 630/632/633. This finding suggested that nuclear AR acetylation plays a role in the aberrant metabolism and toxicity of polyQ-expanded AR. Subsequent studies revealed that the polyQ-expanded AR is hyperacetylated and that pharmacologic reduction of acetylation reduces mutant AR aggregation. Moreover, genetic mutation to inhibit polyQ-expanded AR acetylation of lysines 630/632/633 substantially decreased its aggregation and completely abrogated its toxicity in cell lines and motor neurons. Our studies also reveal one means by which the AR acetylation state likely modifies polyQ-expanded AR metabolism and toxicity, through its effect on DHT-dependent AR stabilization. Overall, our findings reveal a neuroprotective function of SIRT1 that operates through its deacetylation of polyQ-expanded AR and highlight the potential of both SIRT1 and AR acetylation as powerful therapeutic targets in SBMA.

  20. RAPID SEMISYNTHESIS OF ACETYLATED AND SUMOYLATED HISTONE ANALOGS

    PubMed Central

    Dhall, Abhinav; Weller, Caroline E.

    2016-01-01

    The density and diversity of post-translational modifications (PTMs) observed in histone proteins typically limits their purification to homogeneity from biological sources. Access to quantities of uniformly modified histones is, however, critical for investigating the downstream effects of histone PTMs on chromatin-templated processes. Therefore, a number of semisynthetic methodologies have been developed to generate histones bearing precisely defined PTMs or close analogs thereof. In this chapter, we present two optimized and rapid strategies for generating functional analogs of site-specifically acetylated and sumoylated histones. First, we describe a convergent strategy to site-specifically attach the small ubiquitin-like modifier-3 (SUMO-3) protein to the site of Lys12 in histone H4 by means of a disulfide linkage. We then describe the generation of thialysine analogs of histone H3 acetylated at Lys 14 or Lys 56, using thiol-ene coupling chemistry. Both strategies afford multi-milligram quantities of uniformly modified histones that are easily incorporated into mononucleosomes and nucleosome arrays for biophysical and biochemical investigations. These methods are readily extendable to any desired sites in the four core nucleosomal histones and their variant forms. PMID:27423861

  1. Direct modification and regulation of a nuclear receptor-PIP2 complex by the nuclear inositol-lipid kinase IPMK

    PubMed Central

    Blind, Raymond D.; Suzawa, Miyuki; Ingraham, Holly A.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP2) is best known as a plasma membrane-bound regulatory lipid. While PIP2 and phosphoinositide-modifying enzymes coexist in the nucleus, their roles in the nucleus remain unclear. Here we show that the nuclear inositol polyphosphate multikinase (IPMK), which functions both as an inositol- and a PI3-kinase, interacts with the nuclear receptor SF-1 (NR5A1) and phosphorylates its bound ligand, PIP2. IPMK failed to recognize SF-1/PIP2 after blocking or displacing PIP2 from SF-1’s large hydrophobic pocket. In contrast to IPMK, p110 catalytic subunits of type 1 PI3-kinases were inactive on SF-1/PIP2. These and other in vitro analyses demonstrated specificity of IPMK for the SF-1/PIP2 protein/lipid complex. Once generated, SF-1/PIP3 is readily dephosphorylated by the lipid phosphatase PTEN. Importantly, decreasing IPMK or increasing PTEN expression greatly reduced SF-1 transcriptional activity. This ability of lipid kinases and phosphatases to alter the activity and directly remodel a non-membrane protein/lipid complex such SF-1/PIP2, establishes a new pathway for promoting lipid-mediated signaling in the nucleus. PMID:22715467

  2. An active nuclear retention signal in the glucocorticoid receptor functions as a strong inducer of transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Carrigan, Amanda; Walther, Rhian F; Salem, Houssein Abdou; Wu, Dongmei; Atlas, Ella; Lefebvre, Yvonne A; Haché, Robert J G

    2007-04-13

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) cycles between a naive chaperone-complexed form in the cytoplasm and a transcriptionally active steroid-bound nuclear form. Nuclear import of GR occurs rapidly and is mediated through the importin alpha/beta karyopherin import pathway. By contrast, nuclear export of GR occurs only slowly under most conditions, despite a dependence on active signaling. In this study we have defined a nuclear retention signal (NRS) in the hinge region of GR that actively opposes the nuclear export of GR as well as the nuclear export mediated through an ectopic CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal (NES). The GR NRS overlaps closely with the basic NL1 nuclear localization signal (NLS) but can be distinguished from NL1 by targeted mutagenesis. Substitution of the classical NLS from SV40 T antigen for the GR NL1 results in a receptor in which nuclear export is accelerated. Remarkably, although the SV40-modified GR remains predominantly nuclear in the presence of steroid and is recruited to transcriptional regulatory regions indistinguishably from wild-type GR, the substitution dramatically weakens the ability of GR to activate transcription of a mouse mammary tumor virus reporter gene. These results suggest that active nuclear retention of GR plays an integral role in glucocorticoid signaling.

  3. Structural basis for corepressor assembly by the orphan nuclear receptor TLX.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Xiaoyong; Zhou, X Edward; He, Yuanzheng; Searose-Xu, Kelvin; Zhang, Chun-Li; Tsai, Chih-Cheng; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2015-02-15

    The orphan nuclear receptor TLX regulates neural stem cell self-renewal in the adult brain and functions primarily as a transcription repressor through recruitment of Atrophin corepressors, which bind to TLX via a conserved peptide motif termed the Atro box. Here we report crystal structures of the human and insect TLX ligand-binding domain in complex with Atro box peptides. In these structures, TLX adopts an autorepressed conformation in which its helix H12 occupies the coactivator-binding groove. Unexpectedly, H12 in this autorepressed conformation forms a novel binding pocket with residues from helix H3 that accommodates a short helix formed by the conserved ALXXLXXY motif of the Atro box. Mutations that weaken the TLX-Atrophin interaction compromise the repressive activity of TLX, demonstrating that this interaction is required for Atrophin to confer repressor activity to TLX. Moreover, the autorepressed conformation is conserved in the repressor class of orphan nuclear receptors, and mutations of corresponding residues in other members of this class of receptors diminish their repressor activities. Together, our results establish the functional conservation of the autorepressed conformation and define a key sequence motif in the Atro box that is essential for TLX-mediated repression.

  4. Abnormal XPD-induced nuclear receptor transactivation in DNA repair disorders: trichothiodystrophy and xeroderma pigmentosum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolong; Khan, Sikandar G; Tamura, Deborah; Ueda, Takahiro; Boyle, Jennifer; Compe, Emmanuel; Egly, Jean-Marc; DiGiovanna, John J; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2013-08-01

    XPD (ERCC2) is a DNA helicase involved in nucleotide excision repair and in transcription as a structural bridge tying the transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) core with the cdk-activating kinase complex, which phosphorylates nuclear receptors. Mutations in XPD are associated with several different phenotypes, including trichothiodystrophy (TTD), with sulfur-deficient brittle hair, bone defects, and developmental abnormalities without skin cancer, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), with pigmentary abnormalities and increased skin cancer, or XP/TTD with combined features, including skin cancer. We describe the varied clinical features and mutations in nine patients examined at the National Institutes of Health who were compound heterozygotes for XPD mutations but had different clinical phenotypes: four TTD, three XP, and two combined XP/TTD. We studied TFIIH-dependent transactivation by nuclear receptor for vitamin D (VDR) and thyroid in cells from these patients. The vitamin D stimulation ratio of CYP24 and osteopontin was associated with specific pairs of mutations (reduced in 5, elevated in 1) but not correlated with distinct clinical phenotypes. Thyroid receptor stimulation ratio for KLF9 was not significantly different from normal. XPD mutations frequently were associated with abnormal VDR stimulation in compound heterozygote patients with TTD, XP, or XP/TTD.

  5. IDENTIFICATION OF VDR ANTAGONISTS AMONG NUCLEAR RECEPTOR LIGANDS USING VIRTUAL SCREENING

    PubMed Central

    Teske, Kelly; Nandhikonda, Premchendar; Bogart, Jonathan W.; Feleke, Belaynesh; Sidhu, Preetpal; Yuan, Nina; Preston, Joshua; Goy, Robin; Han, Lanlan; Silvaggi, Nicholas R; Singh, Rakesh K.; Bikle, Daniel D.; Cook, James M.; Arnold, Leggy A.

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we described the development of two virtual screens to identify new vitamin D receptor (VDR) antagonists among nuclear receptor (NR) ligands. Therefore, a database of 14330 nuclear receptor ligands and their NR affinities was assembled using the online available “Binding Database”. Two different virtual screens were carried out in conjunction with a reported VDR crystal structure applying a stringent and less stringent pharmacophore model to filter docked NR ligand conformations. The pharmacophore models were based on the spatial orientation of the hydroxyl functionalities of VDR’s natural ligands 1,25(OH2)D3 and 25(OH2)D3. The first virtual screen identified 32 NR ligands with a calculate free energy of VDR binding of more than −6.0 kJ/mol. All but nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) are VDR ligands, which inhibited the interaction between VDR and coactivator peptide SRC2-3 with an IC50 value of 15.8 µM. The second screen identified 162 NR ligands with a calculate free energy of VDR binding of more than −6.0 kJ/mol. More than half of these ligands were developed to bind VDR followed by ERα/β ligands (26%), TRα/β ligands (7%) and LxRα/β ligands (7%). The binding between VDR and ERα ligand H6036 as well as TRα/β ligand triiodothyronine and a homoserine analog thereof was confirmed by fluorescence polarization. PMID:25419525

  6. Regulation of miR-200c by Nuclear Receptors PPARα, LRH-1 and SHP

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuxia; Yang, Zhihong; Whitby, Richard; Wang, Li

    2011-01-01

    We investigated regulation of miR-200c expression by nuclear receptors. Ectopic expression of miR-200c inhibited MHCC97H cell migration, which was abrogated by the synergistic effects of PPARα and LRH-1 siRNAs. The expression of miR-200c was decreased by PPARα/LRH-1 siRNAs and increased by SHP siRNAs, and overexpression of the receptors reversed the effects of their respective siRNAs. SHP siRNAs also drastically enhanced the ability of the LRH-1 agonist RJW100 to induce miR-200c and downregulate ZEB1 and ZEB2 proteins. Co-expression of PPARα and LRH-1 moderately transactivated the miR-200c promoter, which was repressed by SHP co-expression. RJW100 caused strong activation of the miR-200c promoter. This is the first report to demonstrate that miR-200c expression is controlled by nuclear receptors. PMID:22100809

  7. [Current Topics on Vitamin D. Mechanism of molecular action of vitamin D via its nuclear receptor].

    PubMed

    Kato, Shigeaki; Morita, Tomohiro

    2015-03-01

    Most of vitamin D actions mediate expression of target genes regulated by nuclear vitamin D receptor (VDR). Regulation of chromatin environment has emerged to underlie gene regulation by liganded VDR. Active state of chromatin is defined by specific combination of post-translational modification of histone proteins, and chromatin remodelers as nuclear complexes conduct dynamic shift of chromatin sate. Among histone modifications, methylations of specific lysine residues located in the N-terminal tails of histone H3 are known to play pivotal roles in directing chromatin state, and the methylated lysine 4 and 9 in the histone H3 (H3K4me and H3K9me) are widely used as indicators of chromatin state. The histone modifying enzymes and chromatin remodelers are thus regulators for chromatin environment, and overtly co-regulate transcriptional regulations of a particular set of target genes by nuclear receptors including VDR. In this review, the molecular mechanism of regulated chromatin configuration is described by illustrating modifications of histone proteins and rearrangements of nucleosome array and their regulators.

  8. Sumoylation Silences Heterodimeric TASK Potassium Channels Containing K2P1 Subunits in Cerebellar Granule Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Plant, Leigh D.; Zuniga, Leandro; Araki, Dan; Marks, Jeremy D.; Goldstein, Steve A. N.

    2013-01-01

    The standing outward K+ current (IKso) governs the response of cerebellar granule neurons to natural and medicinal stimuli including volatile anesthetics. In this study, we showed that sumoylation silenced half of IKso at the surface of cerebellar granule neurons because the underlying channels were heterodimeric assemblies of K2P1, a subunit subject to sumoylation, and the two P domain, acid-sensitive K+ (TASK) channel subunits, K2P3 or K2P9. The heteromeric channels comprised the acid-sensitive portion of IKso and mediated its response to halothane. We anticipate that sumoylation also influences sensation and homeostatic mechanisms in mammals through TASK channels formed with K2P1. PMID:23169818

  9. FSCB phosphorylation regulates mouse spermatozoa capacitation through suppressing SUMOylation of ROPN1/ROPN1L

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinqi; Chen, Mingrui; Yu, Renyi; Liu, Benli; Tian, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shunli

    2016-01-01

    Fibrous sheath CABYR binding protein (FSCB) is regulated by protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation in the spermatozoa capacitation. Recently, we showed that FSCB phosphorylation activated spermatozoa motility. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. Here, we showed that FSCB phosphorylation inhibited SUMOylation of two crucial proteins ROPN1/ROPN1L that are associated with PKA/A kinase activity and spermatozoa motility. Suppression of SUMOylation of ROPN1/ROPN1L mimicked the effects of FSCB phosphorylation on spermatozoa motility. Immunoprecipitation assay showed that phosphorylated FSCB had a significantly higher affinity to ROPN1/ROPN1L than non-phosphorylated FSCB. Together, our data suggest that FSCB phosphorylation may regulate mouse spermatozoa capacitation through suppressing SUMOylation of ROPN1/ROPN1L, which sheds new light on creating a therapeutic strategy targeting FSCB phosphorylation in the study of infertility. PMID:27398160

  10. SUMOylation is essential for sex-specific assembly and function of the Caenorhabditis elegans dosage compensation complex on X chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Pferdehirt, Rebecca R.; Meyer, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    The essential process of dosage compensation equalizes X-chromosome gene expression between Caenorhabditis elegans XO males and XX hermaphrodites through a dosage compensation complex (DCC) that is homologous to condensin. The DCC binds to both X chromosomes of hermaphrodites to repress transcription by half. Here, we show that posttranslational modification by the SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) conjugation pathway is essential for sex-specific assembly and function of the DCC on X. Depletion of SUMO in vivo severely disrupts binding of particular DCC subunits and causes changes in X-linked gene expression similar to those caused by deleting genes encoding DCC subunits. Three DCC subunits are SUMOylated, and SUMO depletion preferentially reduces their binding to X, suggesting that SUMOylation of DCC subunits is essential for robust association with X. DCC SUMOylation is triggered by the signal that initiates DCC assembly onto X. The initial step of assembly—binding of X-targeting factors to recruitment sites on X—is independent of SUMOylation, but robust binding of the complete complex requires SUMOylation. SUMOylated DCC subunits are enriched at recruitment sites, and SUMOylation likely enhances interactions between X-targeting factors and condensin subunits that facilitate DCC binding beyond the low level achieved without SUMOylation. DCC subunits also participate in condensin complexes essential for chromosome segregation, but their SUMOylation occurs only in the context of the DCC. Our results reinforce a newly emerging theme in which multiple proteins of a complex are collectively SUMOylated in response to a specific stimulus, leading to accelerated complex formation and enhanced function. PMID:24043781

  11. Lipid-sensors, enigmatic-orphan and orphan nuclear receptors as therapeutic targets in breast-cancer.

    PubMed

    Garattini, Enrico; Bolis, Marco; Gianni', Maurizio; Paroni, Gabriela; Fratelli, Maddalena; Terao, Mineko

    2016-07-05

    Breast-cancer is heterogeneous and consists of various groups with different biological characteristics. Innovative pharmacological approaches accounting for this heterogeneity are needed. The forty eight human Nuclear-Hormone-Receptors are ligand-dependent transcription-factors and are classified into Endocrine-Receptors, Adopted-Orphan-Receptors (Lipid-sensors and Enigmatic-Orphans) and Orphan-receptors. Nuclear-Receptors represent ideal targets for the design/synthesis of pharmacological ligands. We provide an overview of the literature available on the expression and potential role played by Lipid-sensors, Enigmatic-Orphans and Orphan-Receptors in breast-cancer. The data are complemented by an analysis of the expression levels of each selected Nuclear-Receptor in the PAM50 breast-cancer groups, following re-elaboration of the data publicly available. The major aim is to support the idea that some of the Nuclear-Receptors represent largely unexploited therapeutic-targets in breast-cancer treatment/chemo-prevention. On the basis of our analysis, we conclude that the Lipid-Sensors, NR1C3, NR1H2 and NR1H3 are likely to be onco-suppressors in breast-cancer. The Enigmatic-Orphans, NR1F1 NR2A1 and NR3B3 as well as the Orphan-Receptors, NR0B1, NR0B2, NR1D1, NR2F1, NR2F2 and NR4A3 exert a similar action. These Nuclear-Receptors represent candidates for the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at increasing their expression or activating them in tumor cells. The group of Nuclear-Receptors endowed with potential oncogenic properties consists of the Lipid-Sensors, NR1C2 and NR1I2, the Enigmatic-Orphans, NR1F3, NR3B1 and NR5A2, as well as the Orphan-Receptors, NR2E1, NR2E3 and NR6A1. These oncogenic Nuclear-Receptors should be targeted with selective antagonists, reverse-agonists or agents/strategies capable of reducing their expression in breast-cancer cells.

  12. Lipid-sensors, enigmatic-orphan and orphan nuclear receptors as therapeutic targets in breast-cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garattini, Enrico; Bolis, Marco; Gianni', Maurizio; Paroni, Gabriela; Fratelli, Maddalena; Terao, Mineko

    2016-01-01

    Breast-cancer is heterogeneous and consists of various groups with different biological characteristics. Innovative pharmacological approaches accounting for this heterogeneity are needed. The forty eight human Nuclear-Hormone-Receptors are ligand-dependent transcription-factors and are classified into Endocrine-Receptors, Adopted-Orphan-Receptors (Lipid-sensors and Enigmatic-Orphans) and Orphan-receptors. Nuclear-Receptors represent ideal targets for the design/synthesis of pharmacological ligands. We provide an overview of the literature available on the expression and potential role played by Lipid-sensors, Enigmatic-Orphans and Orphan-Receptors in breast-cancer. The data are complemented by an analysis of the expression levels of each selected Nuclear-Receptor in the PAM50 breast-cancer groups, following re-elaboration of the data publicly available. The major aim is to support the idea that some of the Nuclear-Receptors represent largely unexploited therapeutic-targets in breast-cancer treatment/chemo-prevention. On the basis of our analysis, we conclude that the Lipid-Sensors, NR1C3, NR1H2 and NR1H3 are likely to be onco-suppressors in breast-cancer. The Enigmatic-Orphans, NR1F1 NR2A1 and NR3B3 as well as the Orphan-Receptors, NR0B1, NR0B2, NR1D1, NR2F1, NR2F2 and NR4A3 exert a similar action. These Nuclear-Receptors represent candidates for the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at increasing their expression or activating them in tumor cells. The group of Nuclear-Receptors endowed with potential oncogenic properties consists of the Lipid-Sensors, NR1C2 and NR1I2, the Enigmatic-Orphans, NR1F3, NR3B1 and NR5A2, as well as the Orphan-Receptors, NR2E1, NR2E3 and NR6A1. These oncogenic Nuclear-Receptors should be targeted with selective antagonists, reverse-agonists or agents/strategies capable of reducing their expression in breast-cancer cells. PMID:26894976

  13. Frienemies of infection: A chronic case of host nuclear receptors acting as cohorts or combatants of infection.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Sahil; Saini, Ankita; Kalra, Rashi; Gupta, Pawan

    2016-08-01

    Macrophages and dendritic cells provide critical effector functions to efficiently resist and promptly eliminate infection. Pattern recognition receptors signaling operative in these cell types is imperative for their innate properties. However, it is now emerging that besides these conventional signaling pathways, nuclear receptors coupled gene regulation and transrepression pathways assemble immune regulatory networks. A couple of these networks associated with members of nuclear receptor superfamily decide heterogeneity in macrophages and dendritic cells population and thereby play decisive role in determining protective immunity against bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa and helminths. Pathogens also direct shift in the expression of nuclear receptors and their target genes and this is proclaimed to be a sui generis mechanism whereby microbes disconnect the genomic component from the peripheral immune response. Many endogenous and synthetic nuclear receptor ligands have been tested in various in vitro and in vivo infection models to study their effect on pathogen burden. Here, we discuss current advances in our understanding of the composite interactions between nuclear receptor and pathogens and their implications on the causatum infectious diseases.

  14. Emerging evidence of the importance of rapid, non-nuclear estrogen receptor signaling in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Kazutaka; Karas, Richard H

    2013-06-01

    Estrogen receptors are classically known as ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate gene transcription in cells in response to hormone binding. In addition to this "genomic" signaling pathway, a "rapid, non-nuclear" signaling pathway mediated by cell membrane-associated estrogen receptors also has been recognized. Although for many years there was little evidence to support any physiological relevance of rapid-signaling, very recently evidence has been accumulating supporting the importance of the rapid, non-nuclear signaling as potentially critical for the protective effects of estrogen in the cardiovascular system. Better understanding of the rapid, non-nuclear signaling potentially provides an opportunity to design "pathway-specific" selective estrogen receptor modulators capable of differentially regulating non-nuclear vs. genomic effects that may prove useful ultimately as specific therapies for cardiovascular diseases.

  15. SUMOylation of phytochrome-B negatively regulates light-induced signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Sadanandom, Ari; Ádám, Éva; Orosa, Beatriz; Viczián, András; Klose, Cornelia; Zhang, Cunjin; Josse, Eve-Marie; Kozma-Bognár, László; Nagy, Ferenc

    2015-01-01

    The red/far red light absorbing photoreceptor phytochrome-B (phyB) cycles between the biologically inactive (Pr, λmax, 660 nm) and active (Pfr; λmax, 730 nm) forms and functions as a light quality and quantity controlled switch to regulate photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis. At the molecular level, phyB interacts in a conformation-dependent fashion with a battery of downstream regulatory proteins, including PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR transcription factors, and by modulating their activity/abundance, it alters expression patterns of genes underlying photomorphogenesis. Here we report that the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is conjugated (SUMOylation) to the C terminus of phyB; the accumulation of SUMOylated phyB is enhanced by red light and displays a diurnal pattern in plants grown under light/dark cycles. Our data demonstrate that (i) transgenic plants expressing the mutant phyBLys996Arg-YFP photoreceptor are hypersensitive to red light, (ii) light-induced SUMOylation of the mutant phyB is drastically decreased compared with phyB-YFP, and (iii) SUMOylation of phyB inhibits binding of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 5 to phyB Pfr. In addition, we show that OVERLY TOLERANT TO SALT 1 (OTS1) de-SUMOylates phyB in vitro, it interacts with phyB in vivo, and the ots1/ots2 mutant is hyposensitive to red light. Taken together, we conclude that SUMOylation of phyB negatively regulates light signaling and it is mediated, at least partly, by the action of OTS SUMO proteases. PMID:26283376

  16. Structure-based discovery of antagonists of nuclear receptor LRH-1.

    PubMed

    Benod, Cindy; Carlsson, Jens; Uthayaruban, Rubatharshini; Hwang, Peter; Irwin, John J; Doak, Allison K; Shoichet, Brian K; Sablin, Elena P; Fletterick, Robert J

    2013-07-05

    Liver receptor homolog 1 (nuclear receptor LRH-1, NR5A2) is an essential regulator of gene transcription, critical for maintenance of cell pluripotency in early development and imperative for the proper functions of the liver, pancreas, and intestines during the adult life. Although physiological hormones of LRH-1 have not yet been identified, crystallographic and biochemical studies demonstrated that LRH-1 could bind regulatory ligands and suggested phosphatidylinositols as potential hormone candidates for this receptor. No synthetic antagonists of LRH-1 are known to date. Here, we identify the first small molecule antagonists of LRH-1 activity. Our search for LRH-1 modulators was empowered by screening of 5.2 million commercially available compounds via molecular docking followed by verification of the top-ranked molecules using in vitro direct binding and transcriptional assays. Experimental evaluation of the predicted ligands identified two compounds that inhibit the transcriptional activity of LRH-1 and diminish the expression of the receptor's target genes. Among the affected transcriptional targets are co-repressor SHP (small heterodimer partner) as well as cyclin E1 (CCNE1) and G0S2 genes that are known to regulate cell growth and proliferation. Treatments of human pancreatic (AsPC-1), colon (HT29), and breast adenocarcinoma cells T47D and MDA-MB-468 with the LRH-1 antagonists resulted in the receptor-mediated inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Our data suggest that specific antagonists of LRH-1 could be used as specific molecular probes for elucidating the roles of the receptor in different types of malignancies.

  17. Reporter Cell Lines for the Characterization of the Interactions between Human Nuclear Receptors and Endocrine Disruptors

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, Marina; Boulahtouf, Abdelhay; Delfosse, Vanessa; Thouennon, Erwan; Bourguet, William; Balaguer, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are exogenous substances interfering with hormone biosynthesis, metabolism, or action, and consequently causing disturbances in the endocrine system. Various pathways are activated by EDCs, including interactions with nuclear receptors (NRs), which are primary targets of numerous environmental contaminants. The main NRs targeted by environmental contaminants are the estrogen (ER α, β) and the androgen (AR) receptors. ERs and AR have pleiotropic regulatory roles in a diverse range of tissues, notably in the mammary gland, the uterus, and the prostate. Thus, dysfunctional ERs and AR signaling due to inappropriate exposure to environmental pollutants may lead to hormonal cancers and infertility. The pregnane X receptor (PXR) is also recognized by many environmental molecules. PXR has a protective role of the body through its ability to regulate proteins involved in the metabolism, the conjugation, and the transport of many exogenous and endogenous compounds. However, the permanent activation of this receptor by xenobiotics may lead to premature drug metabolism, the formation, and accumulation of toxic metabolites and defects in hormones homeostasis. The activity of other NRs can also be affected by environmental molecules. Compounds capable of inhibiting or activating the estrogen related (ERRγ), the thyroid hormone (TRα, β), the retinoid X receptors (RXRα, β, γ), and peroxisome proliferator-activated (PPAR α, γ) receptors have been identified and are highly suspected to promote developmental, reproductive, neurological, or metabolic diseases in humans and wildlife. In this review, we provide an overview of reporter cell lines established to characterize the human NR activities of a large panel of EDCs including natural as well as industrial compounds such as pesticides, plasticizers, surfactants, flame retardants, and cosmetics. PMID:26029163

  18. Mutations in the nuclear bile acid receptor FXR cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Potter, Carol J.; Xiao, Rui; Manickam, Kandamurugu; Kim, Mi-Sun; Kim, Kang Ho; Shneider, Benjamin L.; Picarsic, Jennifer L.; Jacobson, Theodora A.; Zhang, Jing; He, Weimin; Liu, Pengfei; Knisely, A. S.; Finegold, Milton J.; Muzny, Donna M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Lupski, James R.; Plon, Sharon E.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Eng, Christine M.; Yang, Yaping; Washington, Gabriel C.; Porteus, Matthew H.; Berquist, William E.; Kambham, Neeraja; Singh, Ravinder J.; Xia, Fan; Enns, Gregory M.; Moore, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal cholestasis is a potentially life-threatening condition requiring prompt diagnosis. Mutations in several different genes can cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis, but known genes cannot account for all familial cases. Here we report four individuals from two unrelated families with neonatal cholestasis and mutations in NR1H4, which encodes the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a bile acid-activated nuclear hormone receptor that regulates bile acid metabolism. Clinical features of severe, persistent NR1H4-related cholestasis include neonatal onset with rapid progression to end-stage liver disease, vitamin K-independent coagulopathy, low-to-normal serum gamma-glutamyl transferase activity, elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein and undetectable liver bile salt export pump (ABCB11) expression. Our findings demonstrate a pivotal function for FXR in bile acid homeostasis and liver protection. PMID:26888176

  19. LXRα and LXRβ Nuclear Receptors Evolved in the Common Ancestor of Gnathostomes

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Elza; Ruivo, Raquel; Lopes-Marques, Mónica; Zhang, Huixian; Santos, Miguel M.; Venkatesh, Byrappa

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) regulate numerous aspects of the endocrine system. They mediate endogenous and exogenous cues, ensuring a homeostatic control of development and metabolism. Gene duplication, loss and mutation have shaped the repertoire and function of NRs in metazoans. Here, we examine the evolution of a pivotal orchestrator of cholesterol metabolism in vertebrates, the liver X receptors (LXRs). Previous studies suggested that LXRα and LXRβ genes emerged in the mammalian ancestor. However, we show through genome analysis and functional assay that bona fide LXRα and LXRβ orthologues are present in reptiles, coelacanth and chondrichthyans but not in cyclostomes. These findings show that LXR duplicated before gnathostome radiation, followed by asymmetric paralogue loss in some lineages. We suggest that a tighter control of cholesterol levels in vertebrates was achieved through the exploitation of a wider range of oxysterols, an ability contingent on ligand-binding pocket remodeling. PMID:28057729

  20. Identification of a 120-kDa protein associated with aromatic hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator.

    PubMed

    Hossain, A; Kikuchi, H; Ikawa, S; Sagami, I; Watanabe, M

    1995-07-06

    The aromatic hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) is a basic helix-loop-helix-PAS protein which forms a heterodimer with aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), this heterodimer mediating the signal transduction in response to the various xenobiotics such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and directly interacting with target genes by binding to xenobiotic responsive elements. An anti-ARNT antibody was raised in rabbits against the bacterially expressed ARNT of amino acids 21-328 from the N-terminal. Using this antibody, besides ARNT itself, we detected at least one protein, 120 kDa, in the immunoprecipitate of anti-ARNT antibodies in HepG2 cells as well as in Hepa-1 cells. However, this protein is not present in the immunoprecipitate of the anti-AHR antisera nor in that of the preimmune sera of the rabbits used for the immunization.

  1. Regulation of antibacterial defense in the small intestine by the nuclear bile acid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Takeshi; Moschetta, Antonio; Lee, Youn-Kyoung; Peng, Li; Zhao, Guixiang; Downes, Michael; Yu, Ruth T.; Shelton, John M.; Richardson, James A.; Repa, Joyce J.; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Kliewer, Steven A.

    2006-01-01

    Obstruction of bile flow results in bacterial proliferation and mucosal injury in the small intestine that can lead to the translocation of bacteria across the epithelial barrier and systemic infection. These adverse effects of biliary obstruction can be inhibited by administration of bile acids. Here we show that the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor for bile acids, induces genes involved in enteroprotection and inhibits bacterial overgrowth and mucosal injury in ileum caused by bile duct ligation. Mice lacking FXR have increased ileal levels of bacteria and a compromised epithelial barrier. These findings reveal a central role for FXR in protecting the distal small intestine from bacterial invasion and suggest that FXR agonists may prevent epithelial deterioration and bacterial translocation in patients with impaired bile flow. PMID:16473946

  2. Regulation of skeletal muscle mitochondrial function by nuclear receptors: implications for health and disease.

    PubMed

    Perez-Schindler, Joaquin; Philp, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Skeletal muscle metabolism is highly dependent on mitochondrial function, with impaired mitochondrial biogenesis associated with the development of metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Mitochondria display substantial plasticity in skeletal muscle, and are highly sensitive to levels of physical activity. It is thought that physical activity promotes mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle through increased expression of genes encoded in both the nuclear and the mitochondrial genome; however, how this process is co-ordinated at the cellular level is poorly understood. Nuclear receptors (NRs) are key signalling proteins capable of integrating environmental factors and mitochondrial function, thereby providing a potential link between exercise and mitochondrial biogenesis. The aim of this review is to highlight the function of NRs in skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and discuss the therapeutic potential of NRs for the management and treatment of chronic metabolic disease.

  3. Structure of the intact PPAR-Υ-RXR-α nuclear receptor complex on DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Vikas; Huang, Pengxiang; Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Raghuram, Srilatha; Wang, Yongjun; Burris, Thomas P; Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2009-01-09

    Nuclear receptors are multi-domain transcription factors that bind to DNA elements from which they regulate gene expression. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) form heterodimers with the retinoid X receptor (RXR), and PPAR-{gamma} has been intensively studied as a drug target because of its link to insulin sensitization. Previous structural studies have focused on isolated DNA or ligand-binding segments, with no demonstration of how multiple domains cooperate to modulate receptor properties. Here we present structures of intact PPAR-{gamma} and RXR-{alpha} as a heterodimer bound to DNA, ligands and coactivator peptides. PPAR-{gamma} and RXR-{alpha} form a non-symmetric complex, allowing the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of PPAR-{gamma} to contact multiple domains in both proteins. Three interfaces link PPAR-{gamma} and RXR-{alpha}, including some that are DNA dependent. The PPAR-{gamma} LBD cooperates with both DNA-binding domains (DBDs) to enhance response-element binding. The A/B segments are highly dynamic, lacking folded substructures despite their gene-activation properties.

  4. Insights into Orphan Nuclear Receptors as Prognostic Markers and Novel Therapeutic Targets for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aesoy, Reidun; Clyne, Colin D.; Chand, Ashwini L.

    2015-01-01

    There is emerging evidence asserting the importance of orphan nuclear receptors (ONRs) in cancer initiation and progression. In breast cancer, there is a lot unknown about ONRs in terms of their expression profile and their transcriptional targets in the various stages of tumor progression. With the classification of breast tumors into distinct molecular subtypes, we assess ONR expression in the different breast cancer subtypes and with patient outcomes. Complementing this, we review evidence implicating ONR-dependent molecular pathways in breast cancer progression to identify candidate ONRs as potential prognostic markers and/or as therapeutic targets. PMID:26300846

  5. Targeting of the Nuclear Receptor Coactivator Isoform DELTA3AIB1 in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    lab showed that the downregulation of overall levels of AIB1 plus ∆3AIB1, using a regulatable AIB1 directed ribozyme , resulted in reduced tumor...overall levels of AIB1 plus ∆3AIB1, using a regulatable AIB1 directed ribozyme , resulted in reduced tumor growth in vivo. Overall, these data indicate a...Reiter R, Powers C, Wellstein A, Riegel AT. Ribozyme targeting shows that the nuclear receptor coactivator AIB1 is a rate-limiting factor for estrogen

  6. Transcriptional activation of NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT1 by nuclear receptor TLX

    SciTech Connect

    Iwahara, Naotoshi; Hisahara, Shin; Hayashi, Takashi; Horio, Yoshiyuki

    2009-09-04

    An orphan nuclear receptor TLX is a transcriptional repressor that promotes the proliferation and self-renewal of neural precursor cells (NPCs). SIRT1, an NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylase, is highly expressed in the NPCs and participates in neurogenesis. Here, we found that TLX colocalized with SIRT1 and knockdown of TLX by small interfering RNAs decreased SIRT1 levels in NPCs. TLX increased the SIRT1 expression by binding to the newly identified TLX-activating element in the SIRT1 gene promoter in HEK293 cells. Thus, TLX is an inducer of SIRT1 and may contribute to neurogenesis both as a transactivator and as a repressor.

  7. Glucocorticoid receptor-interacting protein 1 mediates ligand-independent nuclear translocation and activation of constitutive androstane receptor in vivo.

    PubMed

    Min, Gyesik; Kemper, J Kim; Kemper, Byron

    2002-07-19

    Phenobarbital (PB) induction of CYP2B genes is mediated by translocation of the constitutively active androstane receptor (CAR) to the nucleus. Interaction of CAR with p160 coactivators and enhancement of CAR transactivation by the coactivators have been shown in cultured cells. In the present studies, the interaction of CAR with the p160 coactivator glucocorticoid receptor-interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) was examined in vitro and in vivo. Binding of GRIP1 to CAR was shown by glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down and affinity DNA binding. N- or C-terminal fragments of GRIP1 that contained the central receptor-interacting domain bound to GST-CAR, but the presence of ligand increased the binding to GST-CAR of only the fragments containing the C-terminal region. In gel shift analysis, binding to CAR was observed only with GRIP1 fragments containing the C-terminal region, and the binding was increased by a CAR agonist and decreased by a CAR antagonist. Expression of GRIP1 enhanced CAR-mediated transactivation in cultured hepatic-derived cells 2-3-fold. In hepatocytes transfected in vivo, expression of exogenous GRIP1 alone induced transactivation of the CYP2B1 PB-dependent enhancer 15-fold, whereas CAR expression alone resulted in only a 3-fold enhancement in untreated mice. Remarkably, CAR and GRIP1 together synergistically transactivated the enhancer about 150-fold, which is approximately equal to activation by PB treatment. In PB-treated mice, expression of exogenous CAR alone had little effect, expression of GRIP1 increased transactivation about 2-fold, and with CAR and GRIP, a 4-fold activation was observed. In untreated mice, expression of GRIP resulted in nuclear translocation of green fluorescent protein-CAR. These results strongly suggest that a p160 coactivator functions in CAR-mediated transactivation in vivo in response to PB treatment and that the synergistic activation of CAR by GRIP in untreated animals results from both nuclear translocation and

  8. Challenges Predicting Ligand-Receptor Interactions of Promiscuous Proteins: The Nuclear Receptor PXR

    PubMed Central

    Ekins, Sean; Kortagere, Sandhya; Iyer, Manisha; Reschly, Erica J.; Lill, Markus A.; Redinbo, Matthew R.; Krasowski, Matthew D.

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of some genes involved in xenobiotic detoxification and apoptosis is performed via the human pregnane X receptor (PXR) which in turn is activated by structurally diverse agonists including steroid hormones. Activation of PXR has the potential to initiate adverse effects, altering drug pharmacokinetics or perturbing physiological processes. Reliable computational prediction of PXR agonists would be valuable for pharmaceutical and toxicological research. There has been limited success with structure-based modeling approaches to predict human PXR activators. Slightly better success has been achieved with ligand-based modeling methods including quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis, pharmacophore modeling and machine learning. In this study, we present a comprehensive analysis focused on prediction of 115 steroids for ligand binding activity towards human PXR. Six crystal structures were used as templates for docking and ligand-based modeling approaches (two-, three-, four- and five-dimensional analyses). The best success at external prediction was achieved with 5D-QSAR. Bayesian models with FCFP_6 descriptors were validated after leaving a large percentage of the dataset out and using an external test set. Docking of ligands to the PXR structure co-crystallized with hyperforin had the best statistics for this method. Sulfated steroids (which are activators) were consistently predicted as non-activators while, poorly predicted steroids were docked in a reverse mode compared to 5α-androstan-3β-ol. Modeling of human PXR represents a complex challenge by virtue of the large, flexible ligand-binding cavity. This study emphasizes this aspect, illustrating modest success using the largest quantitative data set to date and multiple modeling approaches. PMID:20011107

  9. Sumoylation differentially regulates Sp1 to control cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lili; Ji, Wei-Ke; Hu, Xiao-Hui; Hu, Wen-Feng; Tang, Xiang-Cheng; Huang, Zhao-Xia; Li, Ling; Liu, Mugen; Xiang, Shi-Hua; Wu, Erxi; Woodward, Zachary; Liu, Yi-Zhi; Nguyen, Quan Dong; Li, David Wan-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) are actively involved in regulating differentiation of different cell types. However, the functional differences between SUMO isoforms and their mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. Using the ocular lens as a model system, we demonstrate that different SUMOs display distinct functions in regulating differentiation of epithelial cells into fiber cells. During lens differentiation, SUMO1 and SUMO2/3 displayed different expression, localization, and targets, suggesting differential functions. Indeed, overexpression of SUMO2/3, but not SUMO1, inhibited basic (b) FGF-induced cell differentiation. In contrast, knockdown of SUMO1, but not SUMO2/3, also inhibited bFGF action. Mechanistically, specificity protein 1 (Sp1), a major transcription factor that controls expression of lens-specific genes such as β-crystallins, was positively regulated by SUMO1 but negatively regulated by SUMO2. SUMO2 was found to inhibit Sp1 functions through several mechanisms: sumoylating it at K683 to attenuate DNA binding, and at K16 to increase its turnover. SUMO2 also interfered with the interaction between Sp1 and the coactivator, p300, and recruited a repressor, Sp3 to β-crystallin gene promoters, to negatively regulate their expression. Thus, stable SUMO1, but diminishing SUMO2/3, during lens development is necessary for normal lens differentiation. In support of this conclusion, SUMO1 and Sp1 formed complexes during early and later stages of lens development. In contrast, an interaction between SUMO2/3 and Sp1 was detected only during the initial lens vesicle stage. Together, our results establish distinct roles of different SUMO isoforms and demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that Sp1 acts as a major transcription factor target for SUMO control of cell differentiation. PMID:24706897

  10. Control of energy balance by hypothalamic gene circuitry involving two nuclear receptors, neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 and glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Gyun; Lee, Bora; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Kim, Juhee; Lee, Seunghee; Lee, Soo-Kyung; Lee, Jae W

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) regulate diverse physiological processes, including the central nervous system control of energy balance. However, the molecular mechanisms for the central actions of NRs in energy balance remain relatively poorly defined. Here we report a hypothalamic gene network involving two NRs, neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 (NOR1) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which directs the regulated expression of orexigenic neuropeptides agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in response to peripheral signals. Our results suggest that the anorexigenic signal leptin induces NOR1 expression likely via the transcription factor cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), while the orexigenic signal glucocorticoid mobilizes GR to inhibit NOR1 expression by antagonizing the action of CREB. Also, NOR1 suppresses glucocorticoid-dependent expression of AgRP and NPY. Consistently, relative to wild-type mice, NOR1-null mice showed significantly higher levels of AgRP and NPY and were less responsive to leptin in decreasing the expression of AgRP and NPY. These results identify mutual antagonism between NOR1 and GR to be a key rheostat for peripheral metabolic signals to centrally control energy balance.

  11. Polo-like kinase 2 gene expression is regulated by the orphan nuclear receptor estrogen receptor-related receptor gamma (ERR{gamma})

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yun-Yong; Kim, Seok-Ho; Kim, Yong Joo; Kim, Sun Yee; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Lee, In-Kyu; Park, Seung Bum; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2007-10-12

    Estrogen receptor-related receptor gamma (ERR{gamma}) is a member of the nuclear receptor family of transcriptional activators. To date, the target genes and physiological functions of ERR{gamma} are not well understood. In the current study, we identify that Plk2 is a novel target of ERR{gamma}. Northern blot analysis showed that overexpression of ERR{gamma} induced Plk2 expression in cancer cell lines. ERR{gamma} activated the Plk2 gene promoter, and deletion and mutational analysis of the Plk2 promoter revealed that the ERR{gamma}-response region is located between nucleotides (nt) -2327 and -2229 and -441 and -432 (relative to the transcriptional start site at +1). Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis demonstrated that ERR{gamma} binds directly to the Plk2 promoter. Overexpression of ERR{gamma} in the presence of the mitotic inhibitor nocodazole significantly decreased apoptosis, and induced S-phase cell cycle progression through the induction of Plk2 expression. Taken together, these results demonstrated that Plk2 is a novel target of ERR{gamma}, and suggest that this interaction is crucial for cancer cell proliferation.

  12. SUMOylation of the Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channel 2 Increases Surface Expression and the Maximal Conductance of the Hyperpolarization-Activated Current

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Anna R.; Welch, Meghyn A.; Forster, Lori A.; Tasneem, Sarah M.; Dubhashi, Janhavi A.; Baro, Deborah J.

    2017-01-01

    Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) is a ∼10 kDa peptide that can be post-translationally added to a lysine (K) on a target protein to facilitate protein–protein interactions. Recent studies have found that SUMOylation can be regulated in an activity-dependent manner and that ion channel SUMOylation can alter the biophysical properties and surface expression of the channel. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel surface expression can be regulated in an activity-dependent manner through unknown processes. We hypothesized that SUMOylation might influence the surface expression of HCN2 channels. In this manuscript, we show that HCN2 channels are SUMOylated in the mouse brain. Baseline levels of SUMOylation were also observed for a GFP-tagged HCN2 channel stably expressed in Human embryonic kidney (Hek) cells. Elevating GFP-HCN2 channel SUMOylation above baseline in Hek cells led to an increase in surface expression that augmented the hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) mediated by these channels. Increased SUMOylation did not alter Ih voltage-dependence or kinetics of activation. There are five predicted intracellular SUMOylation sites on HCN2. Site-directed mutagenesis indicated that more than one K on the GFP-HCN2 channel was SUMOylated. Enhancing SUMOylation at one of the five predicted sites, K669, led to the increase in surface expression and Ih Gmax. The role of SUMOylation at additional sites is currently unknown. The SUMOylation site at K669 is also conserved in HCN1 channels. Aberrant SUMOylation has been linked to neurological diseases that also display alterations in HCN1 and HCN2 channel expression, such as seizures and Parkinson’s disease. This work is the first report that HCN channels can be SUMOylated and that this can regulate surface expression and Ih. PMID:28127275

  13. A muscle-specific knockout implicates nuclear receptor coactivator MED1 in the regulation of glucose and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoting; Birsoy, Kivanc; Roeder, Robert G

    2010-06-01

    As conventional transcriptional factors that are activated in diverse signaling pathways, nuclear receptors play important roles in many physiological processes that include energy homeostasis. The MED1 subunit of the Mediator coactivator complex plays a broad role in nuclear receptor-mediated transcription by anchoring the Mediator complex to diverse promoter-bound nuclear receptors. Given the significant role of skeletal muscle, in part through the action of nuclear receptors, in glucose and fatty acid metabolism, we generated skeletal muscle-specific Med1 knockout mice. Importantly, these mice show enhanced insulin sensitivity and improved glucose tolerance as well as resistance to high-fat diet-induced obesity. Furthermore, the white muscle of these mice exhibits increased mitochondrial density and expression of genes specific to type I and type IIA fibers, indicating a fast-to-slow fiber switch, as well as markedly increased expression of the brown adipose tissue-specific UCP-1 and Cidea genes that are involved in respiratory uncoupling. These dramatic results implicate MED1 as a powerful suppressor in skeletal muscle of genetic programs implicated in energy expenditure and raise the significant possibility of therapeutical approaches for metabolic syndromes and muscle diseases through modulation of MED1-nuclear receptor interactions.

  14. Yes and Lyn play a role in nuclear translocation of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Iida, M; Brand, T M; Campbell, D A; Li, C; Wheeler, D L

    2013-02-07

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a central regulator of tumor progression in human cancers. Cetuximab is an anti-EGFR antibody that has been approved for use in oncology. Previously we investigated mechanisms of resistance to cetuximab using a model derived from the non-small cell lung cancer line NCI-H226. We demonstrated that cetuximab-resistant clones (Ctx(R)) had increased nuclear localization of the EGFR. This process was mediated by Src family kinases (SFKs), and nuclear EGFR had a role in resistance to cetuximab. To better understand SFK-mediated nuclear translocation of EGFR, we investigated which SFK member(s) controlled this process as well as the EGFR tyrosine residues that are involved. Analyses of mRNA and protein expression indicated upregulation of the SFK members Yes (v-Yes-1 yamaguchi sarcoma viral oncogene) and Lyn (v-yes-1 Yamaguchi sarcoma viral-related oncogene homolog) in all Ctx(R) clones. Further, immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that EGFR interacts with Yes and Lyn in Ctx(R) clones, but not in cetuximab-sensitive (Ctx(S)) parental cells. Using RNAi interference, we found that knockdown of either Yes or Lyn led to loss of EGFR translocation to the nucleus. Conversely, overexpression of Yes or Lyn in low nuclear EGFR-expressing Ctx(S) parental cells led to increased nuclear EGFR. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed nuclear EGFR complexes associated with the promoter of the known EGFR target genes B-Myb and iNOS. Further, all Ctx(R) clones exhibited upregulation of B-Myb and iNOS at the mRNA and protein levels. siRNAs directed at Yes or Lyn led to decreased binding of EGFR complexes to the B-Myb and iNOS promoters based on ChIP analyses. SFKs have been shown to phosphorylate EGFR on tyrosines 845 and 1101 (Y845 and Y1101), and mutation of Y1101, but not Y845, impaired nuclear entry of the EGFR. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that Yes and Lyn phosphorylate EGFR at Y1101, which influences EGFR

  15. SENP3-mediated deSUMOylation of Drp1 facilitates interaction with Mff to promote cell death

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chun; Wilkinson, Kevin A.; Evans, Ashley J.; Rubin, Philip P.; Henley, Jeremy M.

    2017-01-01

    The GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) is essential for physiological and pathophysiological mitochondrial fission. DeSUMOylation of Drp1 by the enzyme SENP3 promotes cell death during reperfusion after ischaemia by enhancing Drp1 partitioning to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM), which causes cytochrome c release and apoptosis. However, how deSUMOylation recruits Drp1 to the MOM is unknown. Here we show that deSUMOylation selectively promotes Drp1 binding to the MOM resident adaptor protein mitochondrial fission factor (Mff). Consistent with this, preventing Drp1 SUMOylation by mutating the SUMO acceptor sites enhances binding to Mff. Conversely, increasing Drp1 SUMOylation by knocking down SENP3 reduces both Drp1 binding to Mff and stress-induced cytochrome c release. Directly tethering Drp1 to the MOM bypasses the need for Mff to evoke cytochrome c release, and occludes the effect of SENP3 overexpression. Thus, Drp1 deSUMOylation promotes cell death by enhancing Mff-mediated mitochondrial recruitment. These data provide a mechanistic explanation for how the SUMOylation status of Drp1 acts as a key switch in cell death/survival decisions following extreme cell stress. PMID:28262828

  16. SENP3-mediated deSUMOylation of Drp1 facilitates interaction with Mff to promote cell death.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chun; Wilkinson, Kevin A; Evans, Ashley J; Rubin, Philip P; Henley, Jeremy M

    2017-03-06

    The GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) is essential for physiological and pathophysiological mitochondrial fission. DeSUMOylation of Drp1 by the enzyme SENP3 promotes cell death during reperfusion after ischaemia by enhancing Drp1 partitioning to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM), which causes cytochrome c release and apoptosis. However, how deSUMOylation recruits Drp1 to the MOM is unknown. Here we show that deSUMOylation selectively promotes Drp1 binding to the MOM resident adaptor protein mitochondrial fission factor (Mff). Consistent with this, preventing Drp1 SUMOylation by mutating the SUMO acceptor sites enhances binding to Mff. Conversely, increasing Drp1 SUMOylation by knocking down SENP3 reduces both Drp1 binding to Mff and stress-induced cytochrome c release. Directly tethering Drp1 to the MOM bypasses the need for Mff to evoke cytochrome c release, and occludes the effect of SENP3 overexpression. Thus, Drp1 deSUMOylation promotes cell death by enhancing Mff-mediated mitochondrial recruitment. These data provide a mechanistic explanation for how the SUMOylation status of Drp1 acts as a key switch in cell death/survival decisions following extreme cell stress.

  17. Mimetics of caloric restriction include agonists of lipid-activated nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Corton, J Christopher; Apte, Udayan; Anderson, Steven P; Limaye, Pallavi; Yoon, Lawrence; Latendresse, John; Dunn, Corrie; Everitt, Jeffrey I; Voss, Kenneth A; Swanson, Cynthia; Kimbrough, Carie; Wong, Jean S; Gill, Sarjeet S; Chandraratna, Roshantha A S; Kwak, Mi-Kyoung; Kensler, Thomas W; Stulnig, Thomas M; Steffensen, Knut R; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Mehendale, Harihara M

    2004-10-29

    The obesity epidemic in industrialized countries is associated with increases in cardiovascular disease (CVD) and certain types of cancer. In animal models, caloric restriction (CR) suppresses these diseases as well as chemical-induced tissue damage. These beneficial effects of CR overlap with those altered by agonists of nuclear receptors (NR) under control of the fasting-responsive transcriptional co-activator, peroxisome proliferator-activated co-activator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha). In a screen for compounds that mimic CR effects in the liver, we found statistically significant overlaps between the CR transcript profile in wild-type mice and the profiles altered by agonists of lipid-activated NR, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha), liver X receptor, and their obligate heterodimer partner, retinoid X receptor. The overlapping genes included those involved in CVD (lipid metabolism and inflammation) and cancer (cell fate). Based on this overlap, we hypothesized that some effects of CR are mediated by PPARalpha. As determined by transcript profiling, 19% of all gene expression changes in wild-type mice were dependent on PPARalpha, including Cyp4a10 and Cyp4a14, involved in fatty acid omega-oxidation, acute phase response genes, and epidermal growth factor receptor but not increases in PGC-1alpha. CR protected the livers of wild-type mice from damage induced by thioacetamide, a liver toxicant and hepatocarcinogen. CR protection was lost in PPARalpha-null mice due to inadequate tissue repair. These results demonstrate that PPARalpha mediates some of the effects of CR and indicate that a pharmacological approach to mimicking many of the beneficial effects of CR may be possible.

  18. Thyroid hormone receptor alpha1 follows a cooperative CRM1/calreticulin-mediated nuclear export pathway.

    PubMed

    Grespin, Matthew E; Bonamy, Ghislain M C; Roggero, Vincent R; Cameron, Nicole G; Adam, Lindsay E; Atchison, Andrew P; Fratto, Victoria M; Allison, Lizabeth A

    2008-09-12

    The thyroid hormone receptor alpha1 (TRalpha) exhibits a dual role as an activator or repressor of its target genes in response to thyroid hormone (T(3)). Previously, we have shown that TRalpha, formerly thought to reside solely in the nucleus bound to DNA, actually shuttles rapidly between the nucleus and cytoplasm. An important aspect of the shuttling activity of TRalpha is its ability to exit the nucleus through the nuclear pore complex. TRalpha export is not sensitive to treatment with the CRM1-specific inhibitor leptomycin B (LMB) in heterokaryon assays, suggesting a role for an export receptor other than CRM1. Here, we have used a combined approach of in vivo fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments, in vitro permeabilized cell nuclear export assays, and glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays to investigate the export pathway used by TRalpha. We show that, in addition to shuttling in heterokaryons, TRalpha shuttles rapidly in an unfused monokaryon system as well. Furthermore, our data show that TRalpha directly interacts with calreticulin, and point to the intriguing possibility that TRalpha follows a cooperative export pathway in which both calreticulin and CRM1 play a role in facilitating efficient translocation of TRalpha from the nucleus to cytoplasm.

  19. Thyroid Hormone Receptor α1 Follows a Cooperative CRM1/Calreticulin-mediated Nuclear Export Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Grespin, Matthew E.; Bonamy, Ghislain M. C.; Roggero, Vincent R.; Cameron, Nicole G.; Adam, Lindsay E.; Atchison, Andrew P.; Fratto, Victoria M.; Allison, Lizabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    The thyroid hormone receptor α1 (TRα) exhibits a dual role as an activator or repressor of its target genes in response to thyroid hormone (T3). Previously, we have shown that TRα, formerly thought to reside solely in the nucleus bound to DNA, actually shuttles rapidly between the nucleus and cytoplasm. An important aspect of the shuttling activity of TRα is its ability to exit the nucleus through the nuclear pore complex. TRα export is not sensitive to treatment with the CRM1-specific inhibitor leptomycin B (LMB) in heterokaryon assays, suggesting a role for an export receptor other than CRM1. Here, we have used a combined approach of in vivo fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments, in vitro permeabilized cell nuclear export assays, and glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays to investigate the export pathway used by TRα. We show that, in addition to shuttling in heterokaryons, TRα shuttles rapidly in an unfused monokaryon system as well. Furthermore, our data show that TRα directly interacts with calreticulin, and point to the intriguing possibility that TRα follows a cooperative export pathway in which both calreticulin and CRM1 play a role in facilitating efficient translocation of TRα from the nucleus to cytoplasm. PMID:18641393

  20. CREB controls hepatic lipid metabolism through nuclear hormone receptor PPAR-gamma.

    PubMed

    Herzig, Stephan; Hedrick, Susan; Morantte, Ianessa; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Galimi, Francesco; Montminy, Marc

    2003-11-13

    Fasting triggers a series of hormonal cues that promote energy balance by inducing glucose output and lipid breakdown in the liver. In response to pancreatic glucagon and adrenal cortisol, the cAMP-responsive transcription factor CREB activates gluconeogenic and fatty acid oxidation programmes by stimulating expression of the nuclear hormone receptor coactivator PGC-1 (refs 2-5). In parallel, fasting also suppresses lipid storage and synthesis (lipogenic) pathways, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here we show that mice deficient in CREB activity have a fatty liver phenotype and display elevated expression of the nuclear hormone receptor PPAR-gamma, a key regulator of lipogenic genes. CREB inhibits hepatic PPAR-gamma expression in the fasted state by stimulating the expression of the Hairy Enhancer of Split (HES-1) gene, a transcriptional repressor that is shown here to be a mediator of fasting lipid metabolism in vivo. The coordinate induction of PGC-1 and repression of PPAR-gamma by CREB during fasting provides a molecular rationale for the antagonism between insulin and counter-regulatory hormones, and indicates a potential role for CREB antagonists as therapeutic agents in enhancing insulin sensitivity in the liver.

  1. Dietary Restriction Induced Longevity Is Mediated by Nuclear Receptor NHR-62 in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Heestand, Bree N.; Shen, Yidong; Liu, Wei; Magner, Daniel B.; Storm, Nadia; Meharg, Caroline; Habermann, Bianca; Antebi, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) extends lifespan in a wide variety of species, yet the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans HNF4α-related nuclear hormone receptor NHR-62 is required for metabolic and physiologic responses associated with DR-induced longevity. nhr-62 mediates the longevity of eat-2 mutants, a genetic mimetic of dietary restriction, and blunts the longevity response of DR induced by bacterial food dilution at low nutrient levels. Metabolic changes associated with DR, including decreased Oil Red O staining, decreased triglyceride levels, and increased autophagy are partly reversed by mutation of nhr-62. Additionally, the DR fatty acid profile is altered in nhr-62 mutants. Expression profiles reveal that several hundred genes induced by DR depend on the activity of NHR-62, including a putative lipase required for the DR response. This study provides critical evidence of nuclear hormone receptor regulation of the DR longevity response, suggesting hormonal and metabolic control of life span. PMID:23935515

  2. Hepatic nuclear receptor PPARalpha in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus): cloning and molecular characterisation.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Suong Ngoc Thi; McKinnon, Ross Allan; Stupans, Ieva

    2007-09-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) is a member of the nuclear/steroid receptor gene superfamily that plays an essential role in fatty acid metabolism. PPARalpha modulates the expression of genes encoding peroxisomal fatty acid beta-oxidation enzymes and microsomal fatty acid hydroxylases CYP4As. We have previously reported that the obligate Eucalyptus feeder koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) exhibits a higher hepatic CYP4A activity and an absence of peroxisomal palmitoyl-CoA oxidation as compared to non-Eucalyptus feeders human, rat or wallaby. Here we describe the cloning, expression and molecular characterisation of koala hepatic PPARalpha. A full-length PPARalpha cDNA of size 1515 bp was cloned by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The koala PPARalpha cDNA encodes a protein of 468 amino acids. Transfection of the koala PPARalpha cDNA into Cos-7 cells resulted in the expression of a protein recognised by a rabbit anti-human PPARalpha polyclonal antibody. PPARalpha immunoreactive bands of the same molecular mass were detected in nuclear extracts of koala livers. The results of this study demonstrate the presence of koala hepatic PPARalpha which shares several common features with other published PPARalphas; however, it exhibits important differences in both the DNA and ligand binding domains.

  3. Nuclear Receptor-Induced Chromosomal Proximity and DNA Breaks Underlie Specific Translocations in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chunru; Yang, Liuqing; Tanasa, Bogdan; Hutt, Kasey; Ju, Bong-gun; Ohgi, Kenny; Zhang, Jie; Rose, Dave; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Glass, Christopher K.; Rosenfeld, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Chromosomal translocations are a hallmark of leukemia/lymphoma and also appear in solid tumors, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. By establishing a cellular model that mimics the relative frequency of authentic translocation events without proliferation selection, we report mechanisms of nuclear receptor-dependent tumor translocations. Intronic binding of liganded-AR first juxtaposes translocation loci by triggering intra- and interchromosomal interactions. AR then promotes site-specific DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) at translocation loci by recruiting two types of enzymatic machinery induced by genotoxic stress and liganded-AR, including Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID) and the LINE-1 repeat-encoded ORF2 endonuclease. These enzymatic machineries synergistically generate site-selective DSBs at juxtaposed translocation loci that are ligated by Non-Homologous Ending Joining (NHEJ) pathway for specific translocations. Our data suggest that the confluence of two parallel pathways initiated by liganded-nuclear receptor and genotoxic stress underlie non-random tumor translocations, which may function in many types of tumors and pathological processes. PMID:19962179

  4. Nuclear receptors in nematode development: Natural experiments made by a phylum.

    PubMed

    Kostrouchova, Marta; Kostrouch, Zdenek

    2015-02-01

    The development of complex multicellular organisms is dependent on regulatory decisions that are necessary for the establishment of specific differentiation and metabolic cellular states. Nuclear receptors (NRs) form a large family of transcription factors that play critical roles in the regulation of development and metabolism of Metazoa. Based on their DNA binding and ligand binding domains, NRs are divided into eight NR subfamilies from which representatives of six subfamilies are present in both deuterostomes and protostomes indicating their early evolutionary origin. In some nematode species, especially in Caenorhabditis, the family of NRs expanded to a large number of genes strikingly exceeding the number of NR genes in vertebrates or insects. Nematode NRs, including the multiplied Caenorhabditis genes, show clear relation to vertebrate and insect homologues belonging to six of the eight main NR subfamilies. This review summarizes advances in research of nematode NRs and their developmental functions. Nematode NRs can reveal evolutionarily conserved mechanisms that regulate specific developmental and metabolic processes as well as new regulatory adaptations. They represent the results of a large number of natural experiments with structural and functional potential of NRs for the evolution of the phylum. The conserved and divergent character of nematode NRs adds a new dimension to our understanding of the general biology of regulation by NRs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear receptors in animal development.

  5. The Nuclear Orphan Receptor NR2F6 Is a Central Checkpoint for Cancer Immune Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Hermann-Kleiter, Natascha; Klepsch, Victoria; Wallner, Stephanie; Siegmund, Kerstin; Klepsch, Sebastian; Tuzlak, Selma; Villunger, Andreas; Kaminski, Sandra; Pfeifhofer-Obermair, Christa; Gruber, Thomas; Wolf, Dominik; Baier, Gottfried

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nuclear receptor subfamily 2, group F, member 6 (NR2F6) is an orphan member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Here, we show that genetic ablation of Nr2f6 significantly improves survival in the murine transgenic TRAMP prostate cancer model. Furthermore, Nr2f6−/− mice spontaneously reject implanted tumors and develop host-protective immunological memory against tumor rechallenge. This is paralleled by increased frequencies of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and higher expression levels of interleukin 2 and interferon γ at the tumor site. Mechanistically, CD4+ and CD8+ T cell-intrinsic NR2F6 acts as a direct repressor of the NFAT/AP-1 complex on both the interleukin 2 and the interferon γ cytokine promoters, attenuating their transcriptional thresholds. Adoptive transfer of Nr2f6-deficient T cells into tumor-bearing immunocompetent mice is sufficient to delay tumor outgrowth. Altogether, this defines NR2F6 as an intracellular immune checkpoint in effector T cells, governing the amplitude of anti-cancer immunity. PMID:26387951

  6. A nuclear receptor-like pathway regulating multidrug resistance in fungi.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Jitendra K; Arthanari, Haribabu; Yang, Fajun; Pan, Shih-Jung; Fan, Xiaochun; Breger, Julia; Frueh, Dominique P; Gulshan, Kailash; Li, Darrick K; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Struhl, Kevin; Moye-Rowley, W Scott; Cormack, Brendan P; Wagner, Gerhard; Näär, Anders M

    2008-04-03

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a serious complication during treatment of opportunistic fungal infections that frequently afflict immunocompromised individuals, such as transplant recipients and cancer patients undergoing cytotoxic chemotherapy. Improved knowledge of the molecular pathways controlling MDR in pathogenic fungi should facilitate the development of novel therapies to combat these intransigent infections. MDR is often caused by upregulation of drug efflux pumps by members of the fungal zinc-cluster transcription-factor family (for example Pdr1p orthologues). However, the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we show that Pdr1p family members in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the human pathogen Candida glabrata directly bind to structurally diverse drugs and xenobiotics, resulting in stimulated expression of drug efflux pumps and induction of MDR. Notably, this is mechanistically similar to regulation of MDR in vertebrates by the PXR nuclear receptor, revealing an unexpected functional analogy of fungal and metazoan regulators of MDR. We have also uncovered a critical and specific role of the Gal11p/MED15 subunit of the Mediator co-activator and its activator-targeted KIX domain in antifungal/xenobiotic-dependent regulation of MDR. This detailed mechanistic understanding of a fungal nuclear receptor-like gene regulatory pathway provides novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of multidrug-resistant fungal infections.

  7. Orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 participates in human apolipoprotein A5 gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Kwang-Hoon

    2010-01-29

    The orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 (NR4A1) has been reported to play a crucial role in the modulation of diverse metabolic processes in liver. Here, we reported the identification of human apolipoprotein A5 (ApoA5), which implicated in lowering plasma triglyceride levels, as a novel target gene of Nur77. Nur77 induced the human ApoA5 promoter activity. Using 5'-deletion and mutagenesis of human ApoA5 promoter analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, it was shown that Nur77 directly regulated human ApoA5 gene expression by binding to a Nur77 response element (AAAGGTCA) located in the proximal human ApoA5 promoter region. In addition, we demonstrated that blocking of Nur77 transcriptional activity via overexpression of dominant negative Nur77 suppressed human ApoA5 promoter activity and mRNA expression in human hepatoma cells, HepG2. Taken together, our results demonstrated that Nur77 is a novel regulator of human ApoA5 gene expression and provide a new insight into the role of this orphan nuclear receptor in lipoprotein metabolism and triglyceride homeostasis.

  8. The human gonadotropin releasing hormone type I receptor is a functional intracellular GPCR expressed on the nuclear membrane.

    PubMed

    Re, Michelle; Pampillo, Macarena; Savard, Martin; Dubuc, Céléna; McArdle, Craig A; Millar, Robert P; Conn, P Michael; Gobeil, Fernand; Bhattacharya, Moshmi; Babwah, Andy V

    2010-07-08

    The mammalian type I gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R) is a structurally unique G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that lacks cytoplasmic tail sequences and displays inefficient plasma membrane expression (PME). Compared to its murine counterparts, the primate type I receptor is inefficiently folded and retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) leading to a further reduction in PME. The decrease in PME and concomitant increase in intracellular localization of the mammalian GnRH-RI led us to characterize the spatial distribution of the human and mouse GnRH receptors in two human cell lines, HEK 293 and HTR-8/SVneo. In both human cell lines we found the receptors were expressed in the cytoplasm and were associated with the ER and nuclear membrane. A molecular analysis of the receptor protein sequence led us to identify a putative monopartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in the first intracellular loop of GnRH-RI. Surprisingly, however, neither the deletion of the NLS nor the addition of the Xenopus GnRH-R cytoplasmic tail sequences to the human receptor altered its spatial distribution. Finally, we demonstrate that GnRH treatment of nuclei isolated from HEK 293 cells expressing exogenous GnRH-RI triggers a significant increase in the acetylation and phosphorylation of histone H3, thereby revealing that the nuclear-localized receptor is functional. Based on our findings, we conclude that the mammalian GnRH-RI is an intracellular GPCR that is expressed on the nuclear membrane. This major and novel discovery causes us to reassess the signaling potential of this physiologically and clinically important receptor.

  9. Nuclear tropomyosin and troponin in striated muscle: new roles in a new locale?

    PubMed

    Chase, P Bryant; Szczypinski, Mark P; Soto, Elliott P

    2013-08-01

    Tropomyosin and troponin have well known Ca(2+)-regulatory functions in the striated muscle sarcomere. In this review, we summarize experimental evidence that tropomyosin and troponin are localized, with as yet unidentified functional roles, in the striated muscle cell nucleus. We also apply bioinformatics approaches that predict localization of some tropomyosin and troponin to the nucleus, and that SUMOylation could be a covalent modification that modulates their nuclear localization and function. Further, we provide examples of cardiomyopathy mutations that alter the predicted likelihood of nuclear localization and SUMOylation of tropomyosin. These observations suggest novel mechanisms by which cardiomyopathy mutations in tropomyosin and troponin might alter not only cardiac contractility but also nuclear function.

  10. The nuclear melatonin receptor RORα is a novel endogenous defender against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    He, Ben; Zhao, Yichao; Xu, Longwei; Gao, Lingchen; Su, Yuanyuan; Lin, Nan; Pu, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Circadian rhythm disruption or decrease in levels of circadian hormones such as melatonin increases ischemic heart disease risk. The nuclear melatonin receptors RORs are pivotally involved in circadian rhythm regulation and melatonin effects mediation. However, the functional roles of RORs in the heart have never been investigated and were therefore the subject of this study on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R) injury pathogenesis. RORα and RORγ subtypes were detected in the adult mouse heart, and RORα but not RORγ was downregulated after MI/R. To determine the pathological consequence of MI/R-induced reduction of RORα, we subjected RORα-deficient staggerer mice and wild-type (WT) littermates to MI/R injury, resulting in significantly increased myocardial infarct size, myocardial apoptosis and exacerbated contractile dysfunction in the former. Mechanistically, RORα deficiency promoted MI/R-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial impairments, and autophagy dysfunction. Moreover, RORα deficiency augmented MI/R-induced oxidative/nitrative stress. Given the emerging evidence of RORα as an essential melatonin effects mediator, we further investigated the RORα roles in melatonin-exerted cardioprotection, in particular against MI/R injury, which was significantly attenuated in RORα-deficient mice, but negligibly affected by cardiac-specific silencing of RORγ. Finally, to determine cell type-specific effects of RORα, we generated mice with cardiomyocyte-specific RORα overexpression and they were less vulnerable to MI/R injury. In summary, our study provides the first direct evidence that the nuclear melatonin receptor RORα is a novel endogenous protective receptor against MI/R injury and an important mediator of melatonin-exerted cardioprotection; melatonin-RORα axis signaling thus appears important in protection against ischemic heart injury.

  11. Classical Nuclear Hormone Receptor Activity as a Mediator of Complex Concentration Response Relationships for Endocrine Active Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Cookman, Clifford J.; Belcher, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Nonmonotonic concentration response relationships are frequently observed for endocrine active ligands that act via nuclear receptors. The curve of best fit for nonmonotonic concentration response relationships are often inverted U-shaped with effects at intermediate concentrations that are different from effects at higher or lower concentrations. Cytotoxicity is a major mode of action responsible for inverted U-shaped concentration response relationships. However, evidence suggests that ligand selectivity, activation of multiple molecular targets, concerted regulation of multiple opposing endpoints, and multiple ligand binding sites within nuclear receptors also contribute to nonmonotonic concentration response relationships of endocrine active ligands. This review reports the current understanding of mechanisms involved in classical nuclear receptor mediated nonmonotonic concentration response relationships with a focus on studies published between 2012 and 2014. PMID:25299165

  12. The Slx5-Slx8 complex affects sumoylation of DNA repair proteins and negatively regulates recombination.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Rahman, Sadia; Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2007-09-01

    Recombination is important for repairing DNA lesions, yet it can also lead to genomic rearrangements. This process must be regulated, and recently, sumoylation-mediated mechanisms were found to inhibit Rad51-dependent recombination. Here, we report that the absence of the Slx5-Slx8 complex, a newly identified player in the SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) pathway, led to increased Rad51-dependent and Rad51-independent recombination. The increases were most striking during S phase, suggesting an accumulation of DNA lesions during replication. Consistent with this view, Slx8 protein localized to replication centers. In addition, like SUMO E2 mutants, slx8Delta mutants exhibited clonal lethality, which was due to the overamplification of 2 microm, an extrachromosomal plasmid. Interestingly, in both SUMO E2 and slx8Delta mutants, clonal lethality was rescued by deleting genes required for Rad51-independent recombination but not those involved in Rad51-dependent events. These results suggest that sumoylation negatively regulates Rad51-independent recombination, and indeed, the Slx5-Slx8 complex affected the sumoylation of several enzymes involved in early steps of Rad51-independent recombination. We propose that, during replication, the Slx5-Slx8 complex helps prevent DNA lesions that are acted upon by recombination. In addition, the complex inhibits Rad51-independent recombination via modulating the sumoylation of DNA repair proteins.

  13. TORC1-dependent sumoylation of Rpc82 promotes RNA polymerase III assembly and activity

    PubMed Central

    Chymkowitch, Pierre; Nguéa P, Aurélie; Aanes, Håvard; Robertson, Joseph; Klungland, Arne; Enserink, Jorrit M.

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining cellular homeostasis under changing nutrient conditions is essential for the growth and development of all organisms. The mechanisms that maintain homeostasis upon loss of nutrient supply are not well understood. By mapping the SUMO proteome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we discovered a specific set of differentially sumoylated proteins mainly involved in transcription. RNA polymerase III (RNAPIII) components, including Rpc53, Rpc82, and Ret1, are particularly prominent nutrient-dependent SUMO targets. Nitrogen starvation, as well as direct inhibition of the master nutrient response regulator target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1), results in rapid desumoylation of these proteins, which is reflected by loss of SUMO at tRNA genes. TORC1-dependent sumoylation of Rpc82 in particular is required for robust tRNA transcription. Mechanistically, sumoylation of Rpc82 is important for assembly of the RNAPIII holoenzyme and recruitment of Rpc82 to tRNA genes. In conclusion, our data show that TORC1-dependent sumoylation of Rpc82 bolsters the transcriptional capacity of RNAPIII under optimal growth conditions. PMID:28096404

  14. The PI3K/Akt signal hyperactivates Eya1 via the SUMOylation pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ye; Kaneko, Satoshi; Li, Xiaokun; Li, Xue

    2014-01-01

    Eya1 is a conserved critical regulator of organ-specific stem cells. Ectopic Eya1 activities, however, promote transformation of mammary epithelial cells. Signals that instigate Eya1 oncogenic activities remain to be determined. Here, we show that Akt1 kinase physically interacts with Eya1 and phosphorylates a conserved consensus site of the Akt kinase. PI3K/Akt signaling enhances Eya1 transcription activity, which largely attributes to the phosphorylation-induced reduction of Eya1 SUMOylation. Indeed, SUMOylation inhibits Eya1 transcription activity; and pharmacologic and genetic activation of PI3K/Akt robustly reduces Eya1 SUMOylation. Wild type but not Akt phosphorylation site mutant Eya1 variant rescues the cell migratory phenotype of EYA1-silenced breast cancer cells, highlighting the importance of Eya1 phosphorylation. Furthermore, knockdown EYA1 sensitizes breast cancer cells to the PI3K/Akt1 inhibitor and irradiation treatments. Thus, the PI3K/Akt signal pathway activates Eya1. These findings further suggest that regulation of SUMOylation by PI3K/Akt signaling is likely an important aspect of tumorigenesis. PMID:24954506

  15. SUMOylation of Rb enhances its binding with CDK2 and phosphorylation at early G1 phase.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fengxi; Qian, Jiang; Yue, Han; Li, Xiaofeng; Xue, Kang

    2016-07-02

    Retinoblastoma protein (Rb) is a prototypical tumor suppressor that is vital to the negative regulation of the cell cycle and tumor progression. Hypo-phosphorylated Rb is associated with G0/G1 arrest by suppressing E2F transcription factor activity, whereas Rb hyper-phosphorylation allows E2F release and cell cycle progression from G0/G1 to S phase. However, the factors that regulate cyclin-dependent protein kinase (CDK)-dependent hyper-phosphorylation of Rb during the cell cycle remain obscure. In this study, we show that throughout the cell cycle, Rb is specifically small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)ylated at early G1 phase. SUMOylation of Rb stimulates its phosphorylation level by recruiting a SUMO-interaction motif (SIM)-containing kinase CDK2, leading to Rb hyper-phosphorylation and E2F-1 release. In contrast, a SUMO-deficient Rb mutant results in reduced SUMOylation and phosphorylation, weakened CDK2 binding, and attenuated E2F-1 sequestration. Furthermore, we reveal that Rb SUMOylation is required for cell proliferation. Therefore, our study describes a novel mechanism that regulates Rb phosphorylation during cell cycle progression.

  16. SUMOylation of DRIL1 Directs Its Transcriptional Activity Towards Leukocyte Lineage-Specific Genes

    PubMed Central

    van Lohuizen, Maarten; Peeper, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    DRIL1 is an ARID family transcription factor that can immortalize primary mouse fibroblasts, bypass RASV12-induced cellular senescence and collaborate with RASV12 or MYC in mediating oncogenic transformation. It also activates immunoglobulin heavy chain transcription and engages in heterodimer formation with E2F to stimulate E2F-dependent transcription. Little, however, is known about the regulation of DRIL1 activity. Recently, DRIL1 was found to interact with the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9, but the functional relevance of this association has not been assessed. Here, we show that DRIL1 is sumoylated both in vitro and in vivo at lysine 398. Moreover, we provide evidence that PIASy functions as a specific SUMO E3-ligase for DRIL1 and promotes its sumoylation both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, consistent with the subnuclear localization of PIASy in the Matrix-Associated Region (MAR), SUMO-modified DRIL1 species are found exclusively in the MAR fraction. This post-translational modification interferes neither with the subcellular localization nor the DNA-binding activity of the protein. In contrast, DRIL1 sumoylation impairs its interaction with E2F1 in vitro and modifies its transcriptional activity in vivo, driving transcription of subset of genes regulating leukocyte fate. Taken together, these results identify sumoylation as a novel post-translational modification of DRIL1 that represents an important mechanism for targeting and modulating DRIL1 transcriptional activity. PMID:19436740

  17. SUMOylation of TARBP2 regulates miRNA/siRNA efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng; Zhu, Changhong; Huang, Jian; Zhao, Xian; Deng, Rong; Zhang, Hailong; Dou, Jinzhuo; Chen, Qin; Xu, Ming; Yuan, Haihua; Wang, Yanli; Yu, Jianxiu

    2015-01-01

    Small RNA-induced gene silencing is essential for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression; however, it remains unclear how miRNA/siRNA efficiency is regulated. Here we show that TARBP2 is SUMOylated at K52, which can be enhanced by its phosphorylation. This modification can stabilize TARBP2 via repressing its K48-linked ubiquitination. We find that TARBP2 SUMOylation does not influence the overall production of mature miRNAs, but it regulates miRNA/siRNA efficiency. SUMOylated TARBP2 recruits Ago2 to constitute the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC)-loading complex (RLC), and simultaneously promotes more pre-miRNAs to load into the RLC. Consequently, Ago2 is stabilized and miRNAs/siRNAs bound by TARBP2/Dicer is effectively transferred to Ago2. Thus, these processes lead to the formation of the effective RISC for RNA interference (RNAi). Collectively, our data suggest that SUMOylation of TARBP2 is required for regulating miRNA/siRNA efficiency, which is a general mechanism of miRNA/siRNA regulation. PMID:26582366

  18. E2-25K SUMOylation inhibits proteasome for cell death during cerebral ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Eun Il; Chung, Hae Won; Lee, Won Jea; Kim, Seo-Hyun; Kim, Hyunjoo; Choi, Seon-Guk; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) causes brain damage accompanied by ubiquitin accumulation and impairment of proteasome activity. In this study, we report that E2-25K, an E2-conjugating enzyme, is SUMOylated during oxidative stress and regulates cerebral I/R-induced damage. Knockdown of E2-25K expression protects against oxygen/glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD/R)-induced neuronal cell death, whereas ectopic expression of E2-25K stimulates it. Compared with the control mice, cerebral infarction lesions and behavioral/neurological disorders are ameliorated in E2-25K knockout mice during middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion. In particular, E2-25K is SUMOylated at Lys14 under oxidative stress, OGD/R and I/R to prompt cell death. Further, E2-25K downregulates the proteasome subunit S5a to impair proteasome complex and thus restrain proteasome activity under oxidative stress. This proteasome inhibitory activity of E2-25K is dependent on its SUMOylation. These results suggest that E2-25K has a crucial role in oxidative stress and cerebral I/R-induced damage through inhibiting proteasome via its SUMOylation. PMID:28032866

  19. Elg1, an alternative subunit of the RFC clamp loader, preferentially interacts with SUMOylated PCNA.

    PubMed

    Parnas, Oren; Zipin-Roitman, Adi; Pfander, Boris; Liefshitz, Batia; Mazor, Yuval; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Jentsch, Stefan; Kupiec, Martin

    2010-08-04

    Replication-factor C (RFC) is a protein complex that loads the processivity clamp PCNA onto DNA. Elg1 is a conserved protein with homology to the largest subunit of RFC, but its function remained enigmatic. Here, we show that yeast Elg1 interacts physically and genetically with PCNA, in a manner that depends on PCNA modification, and exhibits preferential affinity for SUMOylated PCNA. This interaction is mediated by three small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-interacting motifs and a PCNA-interacting protein box close to the N-terminus of Elg1. These motifs are important for the ability of Elg1 to maintain genomic stability. SUMOylated PCNA is known to recruit the helicase Srs2, and in the absence of Elg1, Srs2 and SUMOylated PCNA accumulate on chromatin. Strains carrying mutations in both ELG1 and SRS2 exhibit a synthetic fitness defect that depends on PCNA modification. Our results underscore the importance of Elg1, Srs2 and SUMOylated PCNA in the maintenance of genomic stability.

  20. The nuclear localization of low risk HPV11 E7 protein mediated by its zinc binding domain is independent of nuclear import receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Piccioli, Zachary; McKee, Courtney H.; Leszczynski, Anna; Onder, Zeynep; Hannah, Erin C.; Mamoor, Shahan; Crosby, Lauren; Moroianu, Junona

    2010-11-10

    We investigated the nuclear import of low risk HPV11 E7 protein using 1) transfection assays in HeLa cells with EGFP fusion plasmids containing 11E7 and its domains and 2) nuclear import assays in digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells with GST fusion proteins containing 11E7 and its domains. The EGFP-11E7 and EGFP-11cE7{sub 39-98} localized mostly to the nucleus. The GST-11E7 and GST-11cE7{sub 39-98} were imported into the nuclei in the presence of either Ran-GDP or RanG19V-GTP mutant and in the absence of nuclear import receptors. This suggests that 11E7 enters the nucleus via a Ran-dependent pathway, independent of nuclear import receptors, mediated by a nuclear localization signal located in its C-terminal domain (cNLS). This cNLS contains the zinc binding domain consisting of two copies of Cys-X-X-Cys motif. Mutagenesis of Cys residues in these motifs changed the localization of the EGFP-11cE7/-11E7 mutants to cytoplasmic, suggesting that the zinc binding domain is essential for nuclear localization of 11E7.

  1. The nuclear receptor PPARγ individually responds to serotonin- and fatty acid-metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Waku, Tsuyoshi; Shiraki, Takuma; Oyama, Takuji; Maebara, Kanako; Nakamori, Rinna; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), recognizes various synthetic and endogenous ligands by the ligand-binding domain. Fatty-acid metabolites reportedly activate PPARγ through conformational changes of the Ω loop. Here, we report that serotonin metabolites act as endogenous agonists for PPARγ to regulate macrophage function and adipogenesis by directly binding to helix H12. A cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, is a mimetic agonist of these metabolites. Crystallographic analyses revealed that an indole acetate functions as a common moiety for the recognition by the sub-pocket near helix H12. Intriguingly, a serotonin metabolite and a fatty-acid metabolite each bind to distinct sub-pockets, and the PPARγ antagonist, T0070907, blocked the fatty-acid agonism, but not that of the serotonin metabolites. Mutational analyses on receptor-mediated transcription and coactivator binding revealed that each metabolite individually uses coregulator and/or heterodimer interfaces in a ligand-type-specific manner. Furthermore, the inhibition of the serotonin metabolism reduced the expression of the endogenous PPARγ-target gene. Collectively, these results suggest a novel agonism, in which PPARγ functions as a multiple sensor in response to distinct metabolites. PMID:20717101

  2. Agonist ligands mediate the transcriptional response of nuclear receptor heterodimers through distinct stoichiometric assemblies with coactivators.

    PubMed

    Pavlin, Mark Remec; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Fernandez, Elias J

    2014-09-05

    The constitutive androstane (CAR) and retinoid X receptors (RXR) are ligand-mediated transcription factors of the nuclear receptor protein superfamily. Functional CAR:RXR heterodimers recruit coactivator proteins, such as the steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC1). Here, we show that agonist ligands can potentiate transactivation through both coactivator binding sites on CAR:RXR, which distinctly bind two SRC1 molecules. We also observe that SRC1 transitions from a structurally plastic to a compact form upon binding CAR:RXR. Using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) we show that the CAR(tcp):RXR(9c)·SRC1 complex can encompass two SRC1 molecules compared with the CAR(tcp):RXR·SRC1, which binds only a single SRC1. Moreover, sedimentation coefficients and molecular weights determined by analytical ultracentrifugation confirm the SAXS model. Cell-based transcription assays show that disrupting the SRC1 binding site on RXR alters the transactivation by CAR:RXR. These data suggest a broader role for RXR within heterodimers, whereas offering multiple strategies for the assembly of the transcription complex.

  3. Nuclear receptor ligand-binding domains: reduction of helix H12 dynamics to favour crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Nahoum, Virginie; Lipski, Alexandra; Quillard, Fabien; Guichou, Jean-François; Boublik, Yvan; Pérez, Efrèn; Germain, Pierre; Lera, Angel R. de; Bourguet, William

    2008-07-01

    Attempts have been made to crystallize the ligand-binding domain of the human retinoid X receptor in complex with a variety of newly synthesized ligands. An inverse correlation was observed between the ‘crystallizability’ and the structural dynamics of the various receptor–ligand complexes. Crystallization trials of the human retinoid X receptor α ligand-binding domain (RXRα LBD) in complex with various ligands have been carried out. Using fluorescence anisotropy, it has been found that when compared with agonists these small-molecule effectors enhance the dynamics of the RXRα LBD C-terminal helix H12. In some cases, the mobility of this helix could be dramatically reduced by the addition of a 13-residue co-activator fragment (CoA). In keeping with these observations, crystals have been obtained of the corresponding ternary RXRα LBD–ligand–CoA complexes. In contrast, attempts to crystallize complexes with a highly mobile H12 remained unsuccessful. These experimental observations substantiate the previously recognized role of co-regulator fragments in facilitating the crystallization of nuclear receptor LBDs.

  4. Phosphorylated nuclear receptor CAR forms a homodimer to repress its constitutive activity for ligand activation.

    PubMed

    Shizu, Ryota; Osabe, Makoto; Perera, Lalith; Moore, Rick; Sueyoshi, Tatsuya; Negishi, Masahiko

    2017-03-06

    Nuclear receptor CAR (NR1I3) regulates hepatic drug and energy metabolism as well as cell fate. Its activation can be a critical factor in drug-induced toxicity and disease development such as diabetes and tumors. CAR inactivates its constitutive activity by phosphorylation at threonine 38. Utilizing receptor for protein kinase 1 (RACK1) as the regulatory subunit, protein phosphatase PP2A dephosphorylates threonine 38 to activate CAR. Here we have demonstrated that CAR undergoes its homodimer-monomer conversion to regulate this dephosphorylation. By co-expressing two differently-tagged CAR proteins in Huh-7 cells, mouse primary hepatocytes and mouse livers, co-immunoprecipitation and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that CAR can form a homodimer in a configuration in which the PP2A/RACK1 binding site is buried within its dimer interface. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) was found to stimulate CAR homo-dimerization, thus constraining CAR in its inactive form. The agonistic ligand CITCO binds directly to the CAR homodimer and dissociates phosphorylated CAR into its monomer, exposing the PP2A/RACK1 binding site for dephosphorylation. Phenobarbital, which is not a CAR ligand, binds the EGF receptor, reversing the EGF signal to monomerize CAR for its indirect activation. Thus, the homodimer-monomer conversion is the underlying molecular mechanism that regulates CAR activation, by placing phosphorylated threonine 38 as the common target for both direct and in direct activation of CAR.

  5. Inactivation of the Nuclear Orphan Receptor COUP-TFII by Small Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Le Guével, Rémy; Oger, Frédérik; Martinez-Jimenez, Celia P; Bizot, Maud; Gheeraert, Céline; Firmin, François; Ploton, Maheul; Kretova, Miroslava; Palierne, Gaëlle; Staels, Bart; Barath, Peter; Talianidis, Iannis; Lefebvre, Philippe; Eeckhoute, Jérôme; Salbert, Gilles

    2017-01-13

    Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II (COUP-TFII/NR2F2) is an orphan member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors whose activities are modulated upon binding of small molecules into an hydrophobic ligand-binding pocket (LBP). Although the LBP of COUP-TFII is filled with aromatic amino-acid side chains, alternative modes of ligand binding could potentially lead to regulation of the orphan receptor. Here, we screened a synthetic and natural compound library in a yeast one-hybrid assay and identified 4-methoxynaphthol as an inhibitor of COUP-TFII. This synthetic inhibitor was able to counteract processes either positively or negatively regulated by COUP-TFII in different mammalian cell systems. Hence, we demonstrate that the true orphan receptor COUP-TFII can be targeted by small chemicals which could be used to study the physiological functions of COUP-TFII or to counteract detrimental COUP-TFII activities in various pathological conditions.

  6. Chemical regulators of epithelial plasticity reveal a nuclear receptor pathway controlling myofibroblast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Carthy, Jon M.; Stöter, Martin; Bellomo, Claudia; Vanlandewijck, Michael; Heldin, Angelos; Morén, Anita; Kardassis, Dimitris; Gahman, Timothy C.; Shiau, Andrew K.; Bickle, Marc; Zerial, Marino; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Moustakas, Aristidis

    2016-01-01

    Plasticity in epithelial tissues relates to processes of embryonic development, tissue fibrosis and cancer progression. Pharmacological modulation of epithelial transitions during disease progression may thus be clinically useful. Using human keratinocytes and a robotic high-content imaging platform, we screened for chemical compounds that reverse transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In addition to TGF-β receptor kinase inhibitors, we identified small molecule epithelial plasticity modulators including a naturally occurring hydroxysterol agonist of the liver X receptors (LXRs), members of the nuclear receptor transcription factor family. Endogenous and synthetic LXR agonists tested in diverse cell models blocked α-smooth muscle actin expression, myofibroblast differentiation and function. Agonist-dependent LXR activity or LXR overexpression in the absence of ligand counteracted TGF-β-mediated myofibroblast terminal differentiation and collagen contraction. The protective effect of LXR agonists against TGF-β-induced pro-fibrotic activity raises the possibility that anti-lipidogenic therapy may be relevant in fibrotic disorders and advanced cancer. PMID:27430378

  7. Phytol metabolites are circulating dietary factors that activate the nuclear receptor RXR.

    PubMed Central

    Kitareewan, S; Burka, L T; Tomer, K B; Parker, C E; Deterding, L J; Stevens, R D; Forman, B M; Mais, D E; Heyman, R A; McMorris, T; Weinberger, C

    1996-01-01

    RXR is a nuclear receptor that plays a central role in cell signaling by pairing with a host of other receptors. Previously, 9-cis-retinoic acid (9cRA) was defined as a potent RXR activator. Here we describe a unique RXR effector identified from organic extracts of bovine serum by following RXR-dependent transcriptional activity. Structural analyses of material in active fractions pointed to the saturated diterpenoid phytanic acid, which induced RXR-dependent transcription at concentrations between 4 and 64 microM. Although 200 times more potent than phytanic acid, 9cRA was undetectable in equivalent amounts of extract and cannot be present at a concentration that could account for the activity. Phytanic acid, another phytol metabolite, was synthesized and stimulated RXR with a potency and efficacy similar to phytanic acid. These metabolites specifically displaced [3H]-9cRA from RXR with Ki values of 4 microM, indicating that their transcriptional effects are mediated by direct receptor interactions. Phytol metabolites are compelling candidates for physiological effectors, because their RXR binding affinities and activation potencies match their micromolar circulating concentrations. Given their exclusive dietary origin, these chlorophyll metabolites may represent essential nutrients that coordinate cellular metabolism through RXR-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:8856661

  8. Phosphorylation inhibits DNA-binding of alternatively spliced aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator

    SciTech Connect

    Kewley, Robyn J. . E-mail: rkewley@csu.edu.au; Whitelaw, Murray L.

    2005-12-09

    The basic helix-loop-helix/PER-ARNT-SIM homology (bHLH/PAS) transcription factor ARNT (aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator) is a key component of various pathways which induce the transcription of cytochrome P450 and hypoxia response genes. ARNT can be alternatively spliced to express Alt ARNT, containing an additional 15 amino acids immediately N-terminal to the DNA-binding basic region. Here, we show that ARNT and Alt ARNT proteins are differentially phosphorylated by protein kinase CKII in vitro. Phosphorylation had an inhibitory effect on DNA-binding to an E-box probe by Alt ARNT, but not ARNT, homodimers. This inhibitory phosphorylation occurs through Ser77. Moreover, a point mutant, Alt ARNT S77A, shows increased activity on an E-box reporter gene, consistent with Ser77 being a regulatory site in vivo. In contrast, DNA binding by an Alt ARNT/dioxin receptor heterodimer to the xenobiotic response element is not inhibited by phosphorylation with CKII, nor does Alt ARNT S77A behave differently from wild type Alt ARNT in the context of a dioxin receptor heterodimer.

  9. Annotation of the Daphnia magna nuclear receptors: Comparison to Daphnia pulex

    PubMed Central

    Litoff, Elizabeth J; Garriott, Travis E.; Ginjupalli, Gautam K.; Butler, LaToya; Gay, Claudy; Scott, Kiandra; Baldwin, William S.

    2014-01-01

    Most Nuclear Receptors (NRs) are ligand-dependent transcription factors crucial in homeostatic physiological responses or environmental responses. We annotated the D. magna NRs and compared them to D. pulex and other species, primarily through phylogenetic analysis. Daphnia species contain 26 NRs spanning all seven gene subfamilies. Thirteen of the 26 receptors found in Daphnia species phylogenetically segregate into the NR1 subfamily, primarily involved in energy metabolism and resource allocation. Some of the Daphnia NRs, such as RXR, HR96, and E75 show strong conservation between D. magna and D. pulex. Other receptors, such as EcRb, THRL-11 and RARL-10 have diverged considerably and therefore may show different functions in the two species. Curiously, there is an inverse association between the number of NR splice variants and conservation of the LBD. Overall, D. pulex and D. magna possess the same NRs; however not all of the NRs demonstrate high conservation indicating the potential for a divergence of function. PMID:25239664

  10. Nuclear receptor engineering based on novel structure activity relationships revealed by farnesyl pyrophosphate.

    PubMed

    Goyanka, Ritu; Das, Sharmistha; Samuels, Herbert H; Cardozo, Timothy

    2010-11-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) comprise the second largest protein family targeted by currently available drugs, acting via specific ligand interactions within the ligand binding domain (LBD). Recently, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) was shown to be a unique promiscuous NR ligand, activating a subset of NR family members and inhibiting wound healing in skin. The current study aimed at visualizing the unique basis of FPP interaction with multiple receptors in order to identify general structure-activity relationships that operate across the NR family. Docking of FPP to the 3D structures of the LBDs of a diverse set of NRs consistently revealed an electrostatic FPP pyrophosphate contact with an NR arginine conserved in the NR family, a hydrophobic farnesyl contact with NR helix-12 and a ligand binding pocket volume between 300 and 430 Å(3) as the minimal requirements for FPP activation of any NR. Lack of any of these structural features appears to render a given NR resistant to FPP activation. We used these structure-activity relationships to rationally design and successfully engineer several mutant human estrogen receptors that retain responsiveness to estradiol but no longer respond to FPP.

  11. Diazepam affects the nuclear thyroid hormone receptor density and their expression levels in adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Constantinou, Caterina; Bolaris, Stamatis; Valcana, Theony; Margarity, Marigoula

    2005-07-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are involved in the occurrence of anxiety and affective disorders; however, the effects following an anxiolytic benzodiazepine treatment, such as diazepam administration, on the mechanism of action of thyroid hormones has not yet been investigated. The effect of diazepam on the in vitro nuclear T3 binding, on the relative expression of the TH receptors (TRs) and on the synaptosomal TH availability were examined in adult rat cerebral hemispheres 24 h after a single intraperitoneal dose (5 mg/kg BW) of this tranquillizer. Although, diazepam did not affect the availability of TH either in blood circulation or in the synaptosomal fraction, it decreased (33%) the nuclear T3 maximal binding density (B(max)). No differences were observed in the equilibrium dissociation constant (K(d)). The TRalpha2 variant (non-T3-binding) mRNA levels were increased by 33%, whereas no changes in the relative expression of the T3-binding isoforms of TRs (TRalpha1, TRbeta1) were observed. This study shows that a single intraperitoneal injection of diazepam affects within 24 h, the density of the nuclear TRs and their expression pattern. The latest effect occurs in an isoform-specific manner involving specifically the TRalpha2 mRNA levels in adult rat brain.

  12. Plasticity of an ultrafast interaction between nucleoporins and nuclear transport receptors.

    PubMed

    Milles, Sigrid; Mercadante, Davide; Aramburu, Iker Valle; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Banterle, Niccolò; Koehler, Christine; Tyagi, Swati; Clarke, Jane; Shammas, Sarah L; Blackledge, Martin; Gräter, Frauke; Lemke, Edward A

    2015-10-22

    The mechanisms by which intrinsically disordered proteins engage in rapid and highly selective binding is a subject of considerable interest and represents a central paradigm to nuclear pore complex (NPC) function, where nuclear transport receptors (NTRs) move through the NPC by binding disordered phenylalanine-glycine-rich nucleoporins (FG-Nups). Combining single-molecule fluorescence, molecular simulations, and nuclear magnetic resonance, we show that a rapidly fluctuating FG-Nup populates an ensemble of conformations that are prone to bind NTRs with near diffusion-limited on rates, as shown by stopped-flow kinetic measurements. This is achieved using multiple, minimalistic, low-affinity binding motifs that are in rapid exchange when engaging with the NTR, allowing the FG-Nup to maintain an unexpectedly high plasticity in its bound state. We propose that these exceptional physical characteristics enable a rapid and specific transport mechanism in the physiological context, a notion supported by single molecule in-cell assays on intact NPCs.

  13. Plasticity of an Ultrafast Interaction between Nucleoporins and Nuclear Transport Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Milles, Sigrid; Mercadante, Davide; Aramburu, Iker Valle; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Banterle, Niccolò; Koehler, Christine; Tyagi, Swati; Clarke, Jane; Shammas, Sarah L.; Blackledge, Martin; Gräter, Frauke; Lemke, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms by which intrinsically disordered proteins engage in rapid and highly selective binding is a subject of considerable interest and represents a central paradigm to nuclear pore complex (NPC) function, where nuclear transport receptors (NTRs) move through the NPC by binding disordered phenylalanine-glycine-rich nucleoporins (FG-Nups). Combining single-molecule fluorescence, molecular simulations, and nuclear magnetic resonance, we show that a rapidly fluctuating FG-Nup populates an ensemble of conformations that are prone to bind NTRs with near diffusion-limited on rates, as shown by stopped-flow kinetic measurements. This is achieved using multiple, minimalistic, low-affinity binding motifs that are in rapid exchange when engaging with the NTR, allowing the FG-Nup to maintain an unexpectedly high plasticity in its bound state. We propose that these exceptional physical characteristics enable a rapid and specific transport mechanism in the physiological context, a notion supported by single molecule in-cell assays on intact NPCs. PMID:26456112

  14. The enhancement of nuclear receptor transcriptional activation by a mouse actin-binding protein, alpha actinin 2.

    PubMed

    Huang, S M; Huang, C J; Wang, W M; Kang, J C; Hsu, W C

    2004-04-01

    The p160 coactivators, steroid receptor coactivator 1, glucocorticoid receptor interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) and the activator of thyroid and retinoic acid receptor, have two activation domains, AD1 and AD2, which transmit the activation signal from the DNA-bound nuclear receptor to the chromatin and/or transcription machinery. In screening for mammalian proteins that bind the AD2 of GRIP1, we identified a mouse actin-binding protein, alpha actinin 2 (mACTN2). mACTN2 was expressed in the heart, skeletal muscle, lung, brain and testis, but there was no expression in the spleen, liver or kidney. Interestingly, the expression level of mACTN2 in the developing embryo depended on the embryonic stage. We further demonstrated that mACTN2 could enhance two transactivation activities of GRIP1, which in turn could enhance the homodimerization of mACTN2. Importantly, mACTN2 not only served as a primary coactivator for androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and thyroid receptor activities, but also acted synergistically with GRIP1 to enhance these nuclear receptor (NR) functions. However, the NR binding motif, LXXLL, conserved in mACTN2 and other actinin family proteins, might be a dispensable domain for its coactivator roles in NRs. These findings suggested that mACTN2 might play an important role in GRIP1-induced NR coactivator functions.

  15. SUMOylation of GTF2IRD1 Regulates Protein Partner Interactions and Ubiquitin-Mediated Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Widagdo, Jocelyn; Taylor, Kylie M.; Gunning, Peter W.; Hardeman, Edna C.; Palmer, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    GTF2IRD1 is one of the genes implicated in Williams-Beuren syndrome, a disease caused by haploinsufficiency of certain dosage-sensitive genes within a hemizygous microdeletion of chromosome 7. GTF2IRD1 is a prime candidate for some of the major features of the disease, presumably caused by abnormally reduced abundance of this putative transcriptional repressor protein. GTF2IRD1 has been shown to interact with the E3 SUMO ligase PIASxβ, but the significance of this relationship is largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that GTF2IRD1 can be SUMOylated by the SUMO E2 ligase UBC9 and the level of SUMOylation is enhanced by PIASxβ. A major SUMOylation site was mapped to lysine 495 within a conserved SUMO consensus motif. SUMOylation of GTF2IRD1 alters the affinity of the protein for binding partners that contain SUMO-interacting motifs, including a novel family member of the HDAC repressor complex, ZMYM5, and PIASxβ itself. In addition, we show that GTF2IRD1 is targeted for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Cross regulation by SUMOylation modulates this process, thus potentially regulating the level of GTF2IRD1 protein in the cell. These findings, concerning post-translational control over the activity and stability of GTF2IRD1, together with previous work showing how GTF2IRD1 directly regulates its own transcription levels suggest an evolutionary requirement for fine control over GTF2IRD1 activity in the cell. PMID:23145142

  16. SUMOylation of GTF2IRD1 regulates protein partner interactions and ubiquitin-mediated degradation.

    PubMed

    Widagdo, Jocelyn; Taylor, Kylie M; Gunning, Peter W; Hardeman, Edna C; Palmer, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    GTF2IRD1 is one of the genes implicated in Williams-Beuren syndrome, a disease caused by haploinsufficiency of certain dosage-sensitive genes within a hemizygous microdeletion of chromosome 7. GTF2IRD1 is a prime candidate for some of the major features of the disease, presumably caused by abnormally reduced abundance of this putative transcriptional repressor protein. GTF2IRD1 has been shown to interact with the E3 SUMO ligase PIASxβ, but the significance of this relationship is largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that GTF2IRD1 can be SUMOylated by the SUMO E2 ligase UBC9 and the level of SUMOylation is enhanced by PIASxβ. A major SUMOylation site was mapped to lysine 495 within a conserved SUMO consensus motif. SUMOylation of GTF2IRD1 alters the affinity of the protein for binding partners that contain SUMO-interacting motifs, including a novel family member of the HDAC repressor complex, ZMYM5, and PIASxβ itself. In addition, we show that GTF2IRD1 is targeted for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Cross regulation by SUMOylation modulates this process, thus potentially regulating the level of GTF2IRD1 protein in the cell. These findings, concerning post-translational control over the activity and stability of GTF2IRD1, together with previous work showing how GTF2IRD1 directly regulates its own transcription levels suggest an evolutionary requirement for fine control over GTF2IRD1 activity in the cell.

  17. A structural perspective on nuclear receptors as targets of environmental compounds

    PubMed Central

    Delfosse, Vanessa; Maire, Albane le; Balaguer, Patrick; Bourguet, William

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are members of a large superfamily of evolutionarily related transcription factors that control a plethora of biological processes. NRs orchestrate complex events such as development, organ homeostasis, metabolism, immune function, and reproduction. Approximately one-half of the 48 human NRs have been shown to act as ligand-regulated transcription factors and respond directly to a large variety of endogenous hormones and metabolites that are generally hydrophobic and small in size (eg, retinoic acid or estradiol). The second half of the NR family comprises the so-called orphan receptors, for which regulatory ligands are still unknown or may not exist despite the presence of a C-terminal ligand-binding domain, which is the hallmark of all NRs. Several chemicals released into the environment (eg, bisphenols, phthalates, parabens, etc) share some physicochemical properties with natural ligands, allowing them to bind to NRs and activate or inhibit their action. Collectively referred to as endocrine disruptors or endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), these environmental pollutants are highly suspected to cause a wide range of developmental, reproductive, neurological, or metabolic defects in humans and wildlife. Crystallographic studies are revealing unanticipated mechanisms by which chemically diverse EDCs interact with the ligand-binding domain of NRs. These studies thereby provide a rational basis for designing novel chemicals with lower impacts on human and animal health. In this review, we provide a structural and mechanistic view of endocrine disrupting action using estrogen receptors α and β, (ERα/β), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ), and their respective environmental ligands as representative examples. PMID:25500867

  18. Molecular adaptation and resilience of the insect’s nuclear receptor USP

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The maintenance of biological systems requires plasticity and robustness. The function of the ecdysone receptor, a heterodimer composed of the nuclear receptors ECR (NR1H1) and USP (NR2B4), was maintained in insects despite a dramatic divergence that occurred during the emergence of Mecopterida. This receptor is therefore a good model to study the evolution of plasticity. We tested the hypothesis that selection has shaped the Ligand-Binding Domain (LBD) of USP during evolution of Mecopterida. Results We isolated usp and cox1 in several species of Drosophilidae, Tenebrionidae and Blattaria and estimated non-synonymous/synonymous rate ratios using maximum-likelihood methods and codon-based substitution models. Although the usp sequences were mainly under negative selection, we detected relaxation at residues located on the surface of the LBD within Mecopterida families. Using branch-site models, we also detected changes in selective constraints along three successive branches of the Mecopterida evolution. Residues located at the bottom of the ligand-binding pocket (LBP) underwent strong positive selection during the emergence of Mecopterida. This change is correlated with the acquisition of a large LBP filled by phospholipids that probably allowed the stabilisation of the new Mecopterida structure. Later, when the two subgroups of Mecopterida (Amphiesmenoptera: Lepidoptera, Trichoptera; Antliophora: Diptera, Mecoptera, Siphonaptera) diverged, the same positions became under purifying selection. Similarly, several positions of the heterodimerisation interface experienced positive selection during the emergence of Mecopterida, rapidly followed by a phase of constrained evolution. An enlargement of the heterodimerisation surface is specific for Mecopterida and was associated with a reinforcement of the obligatory partnership between ECR and USP, at the expense of homodimerisation. Conclusions In order to explain the episodic mode of evolution of USP, we

  19. Cytosolic glucocorticoid receptor interaction with nuclear factor-kappa B proteins in rat liver cells.

    PubMed

    Widén, Christina; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Wikström, Ann-Charlotte

    2003-07-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) acts as an anti-inflammatory factor. To a large extent, this activity is exerted by the interference of pro-inflammatory nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) activity. In their respective inactive forms, both GR and NF-kappa B reside in the cytoplasm and translocate to the nucleus on relevant stimulation. Previously, p65, a component of the NF-kappa B complex, and GR have been shown to interact physically in vitro, and the interaction is assumed to take place in the nucleus of cells [McKay and Cidlowski (1999) Endocrine Rev. 20, 435-459]. We have studied the interaction between GR and NF-kappa B using in vivo -like conditions. Using immunoaffinity chromatography or immunoprecipitation, combined with Western blotting, we observed that, with endogenous protein levels in cytosolic extracts of rat liver and of H4-II-E-C3 hepatoma cells and in contrast with the current belief, p65, p50 and inhibitory kappa B alpha complex interact with GR, even in the absence of glucocorticoid or an inflammatory signal. The interaction between non-liganded/non-activated GR and p65/p50 has also been verified by both p65 and p50 co-immunoprecipitations. Intracellular localization studies, using Western blotting, revealed that glucocorticoids can decrease tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha)-induced nuclear entry of p65, whereas glucocorticoid-induced GR translocation was much less affected by TNFalpha. We were also able to demonstrate a nuclear interaction of GR and p65 and p50 using in vivo -like protein concentrations. Furthermore, nuclear GR interaction with heat-shock protein 90 was enhanced distinctly by TNFalpha treatment. In conclusion, our studies suggest a strong interconnectivity between the NF-kappa B and GR-signalling pathways where also, somewhat unexpectedly, a physical interaction in the cytosol constitutes an integral part of GR-NF-kappa B cross-talk.

  20. The nuclear receptors pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor contribute to the impact of fipronil on hepatic gene expression linked to thyroid hormone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Roques, Béatrice B; Leghait, Julien; Lacroix, Marlène Z; Lasserre, Frédéric; Pineau, Thierry; Viguié, Catherine; Martin, Pascal G P

    2013-10-01

    Fipronil is described as a thyroid disruptor in rat. Based on the hypothesis that this results from a perturbation of hepatic thyroid hormone metabolism, our goal was to investigate the pathways involved in fipronil-induced liver gene expression regulations. First, we performed a microarray screening in the liver of rats treated with fipronil or vehicle. Fipronil treatment led to the upregulation of several genes involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics, including the cytochrome P450 Cyp2b1, Cyp2b2 and Cyp3a1, the carboxylesterases Ces2 and Ces6, the phase II enzymes Ugt1a1, Sult1b1 and Gsta2, and the membrane transporters Abcc2, Abcc3, Abcg5, Abcg8, Slco1a1 and Slco1a4. Based on a large overlap with the target genes of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR), we postulated that these two nuclear receptors are involved in mediating the effects of fipronil on liver gene expression in rodents. We controlled that liver gene expression changes induced by fipronil were generally reproduced in mice, and then studied the effects of fipronil in wild-type, CAR- and PXR-deficient mice. For most of the genes studied, the gene expression modulations were abolished in the liver of PXR-deficient mice and were reduced in the liver of CAR-deficient mice. However, CAR and PXR activation in mouse liver was not associated with a marked increase of thyroid hormone clearance, as observed in rat. Nevertheless, our data clearly indicate that PXR and CAR are key modulators of the hepatic gene expression profile following fipronil treatment which, in rats, may contribute to increase thyroid hormone clearance.

  1. The L-, N-, and T-type triple calcium channel blocker benidipine acts as an antagonist of mineralocorticoid receptor, a member of nuclear receptor family.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Hiromichi; Hirayama, Kazunori; Yoda, Nobuyuki; Sasaki, Katsutoshi; Kitayama, Tetsuya; Kusaka, Hideaki; Matsubara, Masahiro

    2010-06-10

    Aldosterone-induced activation of mineralocorticoid receptor, a member of the nuclear receptor family, results in increased tissue damage such as vascular inflammation and cardiac and perivascular fibrosis. Benidipine, a long-lasting dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker, is used for hypertension and angina. Benidipine exhibits pleiotropic pharmacological features such as renoprotective and cardioprotective effects through triple blockade of L-, N-, and T-type calcium channels. However, the mechanism of additional beneficial effects on end-organ damage is poorly understood. Here, we examined the effects of benidipine and other calcium channel blockers on aldosterone-induced mineralocorticoid receptor activation using luciferase reporter assay system. Benidipine showed more potent activity than efonidipine, amlodipine, or azelnidipine. Benidipine depressed the response to higher concentrations of aldosterone, whereas pretreatment of eplerenone, a steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist, did not. Binding studies using [(3)H] aldosterone indicated that benidipine and other calcium channel blockers competed for binding to mineralocorticoid receptor. Benidipine and other calcium channel blockers showed antagonistic activity on Ser810 to Leu mutant mineralocorticoid receptor, which is identified in patients with early-onset hypertension. On the other hand, eplerenone partially activated the mutant. Results of analysis using optical isomers of benidipine indicated that inhibitory effect of aldosterone-induced mineralocorticoid receptor activation was independent of its primary blockade of calcium channels. These results suggested that benidipine directly inhibits aldosterone-induced mineralocorticoid receptor activation, and the antagonistic activity might contribute to the drug's pleiotropic pharmacological features.

  2. In Silico Adoption of an Orphan Nuclear Receptor NR4A1

    PubMed Central

    Lanig, Harald; Reisen, Felix; Whitley, David; Schneider, Gisbert; Banting, Lee; Clark, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    A 4.1μs molecular dynamics simulation of the NR4A1 (hNur77) apo-protein has been undertaken and a previously undetected druggable pocket has become apparent that is located remotely from the ‘traditional’ nuclear receptor ligand-binding site. A NR4A1/bis-indole ligand complex at this novel site has been found to be stable over 1 μs of simulation and to result in an interesting conformational transmission to a remote loop that has the capacity to communicate with a NBRE within a RXR-α/NR4A1 heterodimer. Several features of the simulations undertaken indicate how NR4A1 can be affected by alternate-site modulators. PMID:26270486

  3. Feed-forward transcriptional programming by nuclear receptors: regulatory principles and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Sarah K; Gerber, Anthony N

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are widely targeted to treat a range of human diseases. Feed-forward loops are an ancient mechanism through which single cell organisms organize transcriptional programming and modulate gene expression dynamics, but they have not been systematically studied as a regulatory paradigm for NR-mediated transcriptional responses. Here, we provide an overview of the basic properties of feed-forward loops as predicted by mathematical models and validated experimentally in single cell organisms. We review existing evidence implicating feed-forward loops as important in controlling clinically relevant transcriptional responses to estrogens, progestins, and glucocorticoids, among other NR ligands. We propose that feed-forward transcriptional circuits are a major mechanism through which NRs integrate signals, exert temporal control over gene regulation, and compartmentalize client transcriptomes into discrete subunits. Implications for the design and function of novel selective NR ligands are discussed.

  4. The signaling phospholipid PIP3 creates a new interaction surface on the nuclear receptor SF-1

    DOE PAGES

    Blind, Raymond D.; Sablin, Elena P.; Kuchenbecker, Kristopher M.; ...

    2014-10-06

    We previously reported that lipids PI(4,5)P2 (PIP2) and PI(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3) bind NR5A nuclear receptors to regulate their activity. Here, the crystal structures of PIP2 and PIP3 bound to NR5A1 (SF-1) define a new interaction surface that is organized by the solvent-exposed PIPn headgroups. We find that stabilization by the PIP3 ligand propagates a signal that increases coactivator recruitment to SF-1, consistent with our earlier work showing that PIP3 increases SF-1 activity. This newly created surface harbors a cluster of human mutations that lead to endocrine disorders, thus explaining how these puzzling mutations cripple SF-1 activity. Finally, we propose that thismore » new surface acts as a PIP3-regulated interface between SF-1 and coregulatory proteins, analogous to the function of membrane-bound phosphoinositides.« less

  5. Nuclear Receptors as Therapeutic Targets in Liver Disease: Are We There Yet?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NR) are ligand-modulated transcription factors that play diverse roles in cell differentiation, development, proliferation, and metabolism and are associated with numerous liver pathologies such as cancer, steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, cholestasis, and xenobiotic/drug-induced liver injury. The network of target proteins associated with NRs is extremely complex, comprising coregulators, small noncoding microRNAs, and long noncoding RNAs. The importance of NRs as targets of liver disease is exemplified by the number of NR ligands that are currently used in the clinics or in clinical trials with promising results. Understanding the regulation by NR during pathophysiological conditions, and identifying ligands for orphan NR, points to a potential therapeutic approach for patients with liver diseases. An overview of complex NR metabolic networks and their pharmacological implications in liver disease is presented here. PMID:26738480

  6. The Nuclear Receptor DAF-12 Regulates Nutrient Metabolism and Reproductive Growth in Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhu; Stoltzfus, Jonathan; You, Young-jai; Ranjit, Najju; Tang, Hao; Xie, Yang; Lok, James B.; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Kliewer, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate nutrient response is essential for growth and reproduction. Under favorable nutrient conditions, the C. elegans nuclear receptor DAF-12 is activated by dafachronic acids, hormones that commit larvae to reproductive growth. Here, we report that in addition to its well-studied role in controlling developmental gene expression, the DAF-12 endocrine system governs expression of a gene network that stimulates the aerobic catabolism of fatty acids. Thus, activation of the DAF-12 transcriptome coordinately mobilizes energy stores to permit reproductive growth. DAF-12 regulation of this metabolic gene network is conserved in the human parasite, Strongyloides stercoralis, and inhibition of specific steps in this network blocks reproductive growth in both of the nematodes. Our study provides a molecular understanding for metabolic adaptation of nematodes to their environment, and suggests a new therapeutic strategy for treating parasitic diseases. PMID:25774872

  7. Ligand-binding domains of nuclear receptors facilitate tight control of split CRISPR activity

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Duy P.; Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Gilbert, Luke A.; Mayerl, Steven J.; Lee, Brian H.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Conklin, Bruce R.; Wells, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Cas9-based RNA-guided nuclease (RGN) has emerged to be a versatile method for genome editing due to the ease of construction of RGN reagents to target specific genomic sequences. The ability to control the activity of Cas9 with a high temporal resolution will facilitate tight regulation of genome editing processes for studying the dynamics of transcriptional regulation or epigenetic modifications in complex biological systems. Here we show that fusing ligand-binding domains of nuclear receptors to split Cas9 protein fragments can provide chemical control over split Cas9 activity. The method has allowed us to control Cas9 activity in a tunable manner with no significant background, which has been challenging for other inducible Cas9 constructs. We anticipate that our design will provide opportunities through the use of different ligand-binding domains to enable multiplexed genome regulation of endogenous genes in distinct loci through simultaneous chemical regulation of orthogonal Cas9 variants. PMID:27363581

  8. The Drosophila DHR96 nuclear receptor binds cholesterol and regulates cholesterol homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Michael A.; Pardee, Keith; Liu, Suya; King-Jones, Kirst; Lajoie, Gilles; Edwards, Aled; Krause, Henry M.; Thummel, Carl S.

    2009-01-01

    Cholesterol homeostasis is required to maintain normal cellular function and avoid the deleterious effects of hypercholesterolemia. Here we show that the Drosophila DHR96 nuclear receptor binds cholesterol and is required for the coordinate transcriptional response of genes that are regulated by cholesterol and involved in cholesterol uptake, trafficking, and storage. DHR96 mutants die when grown on low levels of cholesterol and accumulate excess cholesterol when maintained on a high-cholesterol diet. The cholesterol accumulation phenotype can be attributed to misregulation of npc1b, an ortholog of the mammalian Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 gene NPC1L1, which is essential for dietary cholesterol uptake. These studies define DHR96 as a central regulator of cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:19952106

  9. The Drosophila DHR96 nuclear receptor binds cholesterol and regulates cholesterol homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Horner, Michael A; Pardee, Keith; Liu, Suya; King-Jones, Kirst; Lajoie, Gilles; Edwards, Aled; Krause, Henry M; Thummel, Carl S

    2009-12-01

    Cholesterol homeostasis is required to maintain normal cellular function and avoid the deleterious effects of hypercholesterolemia. Here we show that the Drosophila DHR96 nuclear receptor binds cholesterol and is required for the coordinate transcriptional response of genes that are regulated by cholesterol and involved in cholesterol uptake, trafficking, and storage. DHR96 mutants die when grown on low levels of cholesterol and accumulate excess cholesterol when maintained on a high-cholesterol diet. The cholesterol accumulation phenotype can be attributed to misregulation of npc1b, an ortholog of the mammalian Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 gene NPC1L1, which is essential for dietary cholesterol uptake. These studies define DHR96 as a central regulator of cholesterol homeostasis.

  10. Activation of the nuclear receptor LXR by oxysterols defines a new hormone response pathway.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, J M; Kliewer, S A; Moore, L B; Smith-Oliver, T A; Oliver, B B; Su, J L; Sundseth, S S; Winegar, D A; Blanchard, D E; Spencer, T A; Willson, T M

    1997-02-07

    Accumulation of cholesterol causes both repression of genes controlling cholesterol biosynthesis and cellular uptake and induction of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase, which leads to the removal of cholesterol by increased metabolism to bile acids. Here, we report that LXRalpha and LXRbeta, two orphan members of the nuclear receptor superfamily, are activated by 24(S), 25-epoxycholesterol and 24(S)-hydroxycholesterol at physiologic concentrations. In addition, we have identified an LXR response element in the promoter region of the rat cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase gene. Our data provide evidence for a new hormonal signaling pathway that activates transcription in response to oxysterols and suggest that LXRs play a critical role in the regulation of cholesterol homeostasis.

  11. Emerging roles of orphan nuclear receptors in regulation of innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hyo Sun; Kim, Tae Sung; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2016-11-01

    Innate immunity constitutes the first line of defense against pathogenic and dangerous insults. However, it is a double-edged sword, as it functions in both clearance of infection and inflammatory damage. It is therefore important that innate immune responses are tightly controlled to prevent harmful excessive inflammation. Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a family of transcription factors that play critical roles in various physiological responses. Orphan NRs are a subset of NRs for which the ligands and functions are unclear. Accumulating evidence has revealed that orphan NRs play essential roles in innate immune responses to prevent pathogenic inflammatory responses and to enhance antimicrobial host defenses. In this review, we describe current knowledge on the roles and mechanisms of orphan NRs in the regulation of innate immune responses. Discovery of new functions of orphan NRs would facilitate development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies against human inflammatory diseases.

  12. Cross-talk between the NR3B and NR4A families of orphan nuclear receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Lammi, Johanna; Rajalin, Ann-Marie; Huppunen, Johanna; Aarnisalo, Piia . E-mail: piia.aarnisalo@helsinki.fi

    2007-07-27

    Estrogen-related receptors (NR3B family) and Nurr1, NGFI-B, and Nor1 (NR4A family) are orphan nuclear receptors lacking identified natural ligands. The mechanisms regulating their transcriptional activities have remained elusive. We have previously observed that the members of NR3B and NR4A families are coexpressed in certain cell types such as osteoblasts and that the ability of Nurr1 to transactivate the osteopontin promoter is repressed by ERRs. We have now studied the cross-talk between NR3B and NR4A receptors. We show that NR3B and NR4A receptors mutually repress each others' transcriptional activity. The repression involves intact DNA-binding domains and dimerization interfaces but does not result from competition for DNA binding or from heterodimerization. The activation functions of NR3B and NR4A receptors are dispensable for the cross-talk. In conclusion, we report that cross-talk between NR3B and NR4A receptors is a mechanism modulating the transcriptional activities of these orphan nuclear receptors.

  13. Nuclear and membrane progestin receptors in the European eel: Characterization and expression in vivo through spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Morini, Marina; Peñaranda, David S; Vílchez, María C; Nourizadeh-Lillabadi, Rasoul; Lafont, Anne-Gaëlle; Dufour, Sylvie; Asturiano, Juan F; Weltzien, Finn-Arne; Pérez, Luz

    2017-02-11

    Characterization of all the progestin receptor genes (PRs) found in the European eel has been performed. There were five membrane PRs (mPRs): mPRα (alpha), mPRAL1 (alpha-like1), mPRAL2 (alpha-like2), mPRγ (gamma), mPRδ (delta) and two nuclear PRs (nPRs or PGRs): pgr1 and pgr2. In silico studies showed that the C and E(F) domains of Pgr are well conserved among vertebrates whereas the A/B domain is not. Phylogeny and synteny analyses suggest that eel duplicated pgr (pgr1 and pgr2) originated from the teleost-specific third whole genome duplication (3R). mPR phylogeny placed three eel mPRs together with the mPRα clade, being termed mPRα, mPRAL1 and mPRAL2, while the other two eel mPRs clustered with mPRγ and mPRδ clades, respectively. The in vivo study showed differential expression patterns along the brain-pituitary-gonad axis. An increase in nPR transcripts was observed in brain (in pgr1) and pituitary (in pgr1 and pgr2) through the spermatogenesis, from the spermatogonia B/spermatocyte stage to the spermiation stage. In the testis, mPRγ, mPRδ and pgr2 transcripts showed the highest levels in testis with A spermatogonia as dominant germ cell, while the highest mPRα, mPRAL1 and mPRAL2 transcripts were observed in testis from spermiating males, where the dominant germ cell were spermatozoa. Further studies should elucidate the role of both nuclear and membrane progestin receptors on eel spermatogenesis.

  14. Prospects of Targeting the Gastrin Releasing Peptide Receptor and Somatostatin Receptor 2 for Nuclear Imaging and Therapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dalm, Simone U.; Schrijver, Willemijne A. M. E.; Sieuwerts, Anieta M.; Look, Maxime P.; Ziel - van der Made, Angelique C. J.; de Weerd, Vanja; Martens, John W.; van Diest, Paul J.; de Jong, Marion; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background The gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) and the somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2) are overexpressed on primary breast cancer (BC), making them ideal candidates for receptor-mediated nuclear imaging and therapy. The aim of this study was to determine whether these receptors are also suitable targets for metastatic BC. Methods mRNA expression of human BC samples were studied by in vitro autoradiography and associated with radioligand binding. Next, GRPR and SSTR2 mRNA levels of 60 paired primary BCs and metastases from different sites were measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Receptor mRNA expression levels were associated with clinico-pathological factors and expression levels of primary tumors and corresponding metastases were compared. Results Binding of GRPR and SSTR radioligands to tumor tissue correlated significantly with receptor mRNA expression. High GRPR and SSTR2 mRNA levels were associated with estrogen receptor (ESR1)-positive tumors (p<0.001 for both receptors). There was no significant difference in GRPR mRNA expression of primary tumors versus paired metastases. Regarding SSTR2 mRNA expression, there was also no significant difference in the majority of cases, apart from liver and ovarian metastases which showed a significantly lower expression compared to the corresponding primary tumors (p = 0.02 and p = 0.03, respectively). Conclusion Targeting the GRPR and SSTR2 for nuclear imaging and/or treatment has the potential to improve BC care in primary as well as metastatic disease. PMID:28107508

  15. A calreticulin-dependent nuclear export signal is involved in the regulation of liver receptor homologue-1 protein folding.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Ming; Feng, Shan-Jung; Lai, Tsai-Chun; Hu, Meng-Chun

    2015-10-15

    As an orphan member of the nuclear receptor family, liver receptor homologue-1 (LRH-1) controls a tremendous range of transcriptional programmes that are essential for metabolism and hormone synthesis. Our previous studies have shown that nuclear localization of the LRH-1 protein is mediated by two nuclear localization signals (NLSs) that are karyopherin/importin-dependent. It is unclear whether LRH-1 can be actively exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. In the present study, we describe a nuclear export domain containing two leucine-rich motifs [named nuclear export signal (NES)1 and NES2] within the ligand-binding domain (LBD). Mutation of leucine residues in NES1 or NES2 abolished nuclear export, indicating that both NES1 and NES2 motifs are essential for full nuclear export activity. This NES-mediated nuclear export was insensitive to the chromosomal region maintenance 1 (CRM1) inhibitor leptomycin B (LMB) or to CRM1 knockdown. However, knockdown of calreticulin (CRT) prevented NES-mediated nuclear export. Furthermore, our data show that CRT interacts with LRH-1 and is involved in the nuclear export of LRH-1. With full-length LRH-1, mutation of NES1 led to perinuclear accumulation of the mutant protein. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that these perinuclear aggregates were co-localized with the centrosome marker, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3), ubiquitin and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), indicating that the mutant was misfolded and sequestered into aggresome-like structures via the autophagic clearance pathway. Our study demonstrates for the first time that LRH-1 has a CRT-dependent NES which is not only required for cytoplasmic trafficking, but also essential for correct protein folding to avoid misfolding-induced aggregation.

  16. Nuclear receptor LRH-1/NR5A2 is required and targetable for liver endoplasmic reticulum stress resolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress results in toxicity that contributes to multiple human disorders. We report a stress resolution pathway initiated by the nuclear receptor LRH-1 that is independent of known unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways. Like mice lacking primary UPR components, h...

  17. The N-terminal domain of the androgen receptor drives its nuclear localization in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Javid A.; Masoodi, Khalid Z.; Eisermann, Kurtis; Isharwal, Sudhir; Ai, Junkui; Pascal, Laura E.; Nelson, Joel B.; Wang, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Androgen-independent nuclear localization is required for androgen receptor (AR) transactivation in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and should be a key step leading to castration resistance. However, mechanism(s) leading to androgen-independent AR nuclear localization are poorly understood. Since the N-terminal domain (NTD) of AR plays a role in transactivation under androgen-depleted conditions, we investigated the role of NTD in AR nuclear localization in CRPC. Deletion mutagenesis was used to identify amino acid sequences in the NTD essential for its androgen-independent nuclear localization in C4-2, a widely used CRPC cell line. Deletion mutants of AR tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) at the 5`-end were generated and their signal distribution was investigated in C4-2 cells by fluorescent microscopy. Our results showed that the region of a.a. 294–556 was required for androgen-independent AR nuclear localization whereas a.a. 1–293 mediates Hsp90 regulation of AR nuclear localization in CRPC cells. Although a.a. 294–556 does not contain a nuclear import signal, it was able to enhance DHT-induced import of the ligand binding domain (LBD). Also, transactivation of the NTD could be uncoupled from its modulation of AR nuclear localization in C4-2 cells. These observations suggest an important role of NTD in AR intracellular trafficking and androgen-independent AR nuclear localization in CRPC cells. PMID:24662325

  18. Decoding the role of the nuclear receptor SHP in regulating hepatic stellate cells and liver fibrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, Sabrina; Carino, Adriana; Masullo, Dario; Zampella, Angela; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    The small heterodimer partner (SHP) is an orphan nuclear receptor that lacks the DNA binding domain while conserves a putative ligand-binding site, thought that endogenous ligands for this receptor are unknown. Previous studies have determined that SHP activation protects against development of liver fibrosis a process driven by trans-differentiation and activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a miofibroblast like cell type, involved in extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. To dissect signals involved in this activity we generated SHP-overexpressing human and rat HSCs. Forced expression of SHP in HSC-T6 altered the expression of 574 genes. By pathway and functional enrichment analyses we detected a cluster of 46 differentially expressed genes involved in HSCs trans-differentiation. Using a isoxazole scaffold we designed and synthesized a series of SHP agonists. The most potent member of this group, ISO-COOH (EC50: 9 μM), attenuated HSCs trans-differentiation and ECM deposition in vitro, while in mice rendered cirrhotic by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) or α-naphthyl-isothiocyanate (ANIT), protected against development of liver fibrosis as measured by morphometric analysis and expression of α-SMA and α1-collagen mRNAs. In aggregate, present results identify SHP as a counter-regulatory signal for HSCs transactivation and describe a novel class of SHP agonists endowed with anti-fibrotic activity. PMID:28117422

  19. The nuclear corepressor 1 and the thyroid hormone receptor β suppress breast tumor lymphangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Iglesias, Olaia; Olmeda, David; Alonso-Merino, Elvira; Gómez-Rey, Sara; González-López, Ana M; Luengo, Enrique; Soengas, María S; Palacios, José; Regadera, Javier; Aranda, Ana

    2016-11-29

    Vascular Endotelial Growth Factors C and D (VEGF-C and VEGF-D) are crucial regulators of lymphangiogenesis, a main event in the metastatic spread of breast cancer tumors. Although inhibition of lymphangiogenic gene expression might be a useful therapeutic strategy to restrict the progression of cancer, the factors involved in the transcriptional repression of these genes are still unknown. We have previously shown that Nuclear Receptor Corepressor 1 (NCoR) and the thyroid hormone receptor β1 (TRβ) inhibit tumor invasion. Here we show that these molecules repress VEGF-C and VEGF-D gene transcription in breast cancer cells, reducing lymphatic vessel density and sentinel lymph node invasion in tumor xenografts. The clinical significance of these results is stressed by the finding that NCoR and TRβ transcripts correlate negatively with those of the lymphangiogenic genes and the lymphatic vessel marker LYVE-1 in human breast tumors. Our results point to the use of NCoR and TRβ as potential biomarkers for diagnosis or prognosis in breast cancer and suggest that further studies of these molecules as potential targets for anti-lymphangiogenic therapy are warranted.

  20. The nuclear receptor DHR3 modulates dS6 kinase-dependent growth in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Jacques; Lecerf, Caroline; Parvy, Jean-Philippe; Bennion, Janis M; Radimerski, Thomas; Ruhf, Marie-Laure; Zilbermann, Frederic; Vouilloz, Nicole; Stocker, Hugo; Hafen, Ernst; Kozma, Sara C; Thomas, George

    2010-05-06

    S6 kinases (S6Ks) act to integrate nutrient and insulin signaling pathways and, as such, function as positive effectors in cell growth and organismal development. However, they also have been shown to play a key role in limiting insulin signaling and in mediating the autophagic response. To identify novel regulators of S6K signaling, we have used a Drosophila-based, sensitized, gain-of-function genetic screen. Unexpectedly, one of the strongest enhancers to emerge from this screen was the nuclear receptor (NR), Drosophila hormone receptor 3 (DHR3), a critical constituent in the coordination of Drosophila metamorphosis. Here we demonstrate that DHR3, through dS6K, also acts to regulate cell-autonomous growth. Moreover, we show that the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of DHR3 is essential for mediating this response. Consistent with these findings, we have identified an endogenous DHR3 isoform that lacks the DBD. These results provide the first molecular link between the dS6K pathway, critical in controlling nutrient-dependent growth, and that of DHR3, a major mediator of ecdysone signaling, which, acting together, coordinate metamorphosis.

  1. Function of the nuclear receptor FTZ-F1 during the pupal stage in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Abdel-Rahman S; Oish, Yasuhiro; Ueda, Hitoshi

    2014-04-01

    The nuclear receptor βFTZ-F1 is expressed in most cells in a temporally specific manner, and its expression is induced immediately after decline in ecdysteroid levels. This factor plays important roles during embryogenesis, larval ecdysis, and early metamorphic stages. However, little is known about the expression pattern, regulation and function of this receptor during the pupal stage. We analyzed the expression pattern and regulation of ftz-f1 during the pupal period, as well as the phenotypes of RNAi knockdown or mutant animals, to elucidate its function during this stage. Western blotting revealed that βFTZ-F1 is expressed at a high level during the late pupal stage, and this expression is dependent on decreasing ecdysteroid levels. By immunohistological analysis of the late pupal stage, FTZ-F1 was detected in the nuclei of most cells, but cytoplasmic localization was observed only in the oogonia and follicle cells of the ovary. Both the ftz-f1 genetic mutant and temporally specific ftz-f1 knockdown using RNAi during the pupal stage showed defects in eclosion and in the eye, the antennal segment, the wing and the leg, including bristle color and sclerosis. These results suggest that βFTZ-F1 is expressed in most cells at the late pupal stage, under the control of ecdysteroids and plays important roles during pupal development.

  2. Identification of a binding motif specific to HNF4 by comparative analysis of multiple nuclear receptors

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Bin; Mane-Padros, Daniel; Bolotin, Eugene; Jiang, Tao; Sladek, Frances M.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) regulate gene expression by binding specific DNA sequences consisting of AG[G/T]TCA or AGAACA half site motifs in a variety of configurations. However, those motifs/configurations alone do not adequately explain the diversity of NR function in vivo. Here, a systematic examination of DNA binding specificity by protein-binding microarrays (PBMs) of three closely related human NRs—HNF4α, retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRα) and COUPTF2—reveals an HNF4-specific binding motif (H4-SBM), xxxxCAAAGTCCA, as well as a previously unrecognized polarity in the classical DR1 motif (AGGTCAxAGGTCA) for HNF4α, RXRα and COUPTF2 homodimers. ChIP-seq data indicate that the H4-SBM is uniquely bound by HNF4α but not 10 other NRs in vivo, while NRs PXR, FXRα, Rev-Erbα appear to bind adjacent to H4-SBMs. HNF4-specific DNA recognition and transactivation are mediated by residues Asp69 and Arg76 in the DNA-binding domain; this combination of amino acids is unique to HNF4 among all human NRs. Expression profiling and ChIP data predict ∼100 new human HNF4α target genes with an H4-SBM site, including several Co-enzyme A-related genes and genes with links to disease. These results provide important new insights into NR DNA binding. PMID:22383578

  3. An ecdysone-responsive nuclear receptor regulates circadian rhythms in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shailesh; Chen, Dechun; Jang, Christopher; Nall, Alexandra; Zheng, Xiangzhong; Sehgal, Amita

    2014-12-16

    Little is known about molecular links between circadian clocks and steroid hormone signalling, although both are important for normal physiology. Here we report a circadian function for a nuclear receptor, ecdysone-induced protein 75 (Eip75/E75), which we identified through a gain-of-function screen for circadian genes in Drosophila melanogaster. Overexpression or knockdown of E75 in clock neurons disrupts rest:activity rhythms and dampens molecular oscillations. E75 represses expression of the gene encoding the transcriptional activator, CLOCK (CLK), and may also affect circadian output. PER inhibits the activity of E75 on the Clk promoter, thereby providing a mechanism for a previously proposed de-repressor effect of PER on Clk transcription. The ecdysone receptor is also expressed in central clock cells and manipulations of its expression produce effects similar to those of E75 on circadian rhythms. We find that E75 protects rhythms under stressful conditions, suggesting a function for steroid signalling in the maintenance of circadian rhythms in Drosophila.

  4. Non-nuclear-initiated actions of the estrogen receptor protect cortical bone mass.

    PubMed

    Bartell, Shoshana M; Han, Li; Kim, Ha-neui; Kim, Sung Hoon; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Chambliss, Ken L; Shaul, Philip W; Roberson, Paula K; Weinstein, Robert S; Jilka, Robert L; Almeida, Maria; Manolagas, Stavros C

    2013-04-01

    Extensive evidence has suggested that at least some of the effects of estrogens on bone are mediated via extranuclear estrogen receptor α signaling. However, definitive proof for this contention and the extent to which such effects may contribute to the overall protective effects of estrogens on bone maintenance have remained elusive. Here, we investigated the ability of a 17β-estradiol (E2) dendrimer conjugate (EDC), incapable of stimulating nuclear-initiated actions of estrogen receptor α, to prevent the effects of ovariectomy (OVX) on the murine skeleton. We report that EDC was as potent as an equimolar dose of E2 in preventing bone loss in the cortical compartment that represents 80% of the entire skeleton, but was ineffective on cancellous bone. In contrast, E2 was effective in both compartments. Consistent with its effect on cortical bone mass, EDC partially prevented the loss of both vertebral and femoral strength. In addition, EDC, as did E2, prevented the OVX-induced increase in osteoclastogenesis, osteoblastogenesis, and oxidative stress. Nonetheless, the OVX-induced decrease in uterine weight was unaltered by EDC but was restored by E2. These results demonstrate that the protection of cortical bone mass by estrogens is mediated, at least in part, via a mechanism that is distinct from the classic mechanism of estrogen action on reproductive organs.

  5. Membrane and Integrative Nuclear Fibroblastic Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR) Regulation of FGF-23*

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaobin; Xiao, Zhousheng; Quarles, L. Darryl

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblastic growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) signaling pathways are implicated in the regulation of FGF-23 gene transcription, but the molecular pathways remain poorly defined. We used low molecular weight (LMW, 18 kDa) FGF-2 and high molecular weight (HMW) FGF-2 isoforms, which, respectively, activate cell surface FGF receptors and intranuclear FGFR1, to determine the roles of membrane FGFRs and integrative nuclear FGFR1 signaling (INFS) in the regulation of FGF-23 gene transcription in osteoblasts. We found that LMW-FGF-2 induced NFAT and Ets1 binding to conserved cis-elements in the proximal FGF-23 promoter and stimulated FGF-23 promoter activity through PLCγ/calcineurin/NFAT and MAPK pathways in SaOS-2 and MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. In contrast, HMW-FGF-2 stimulated FGF-23 promoter activity in osteoblasts through a cAMP-dependent binding of FGFR1 and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) to a conserved cAMP response element (CRE) contiguous with the NFAT binding site in the FGF-23 promoter. Mutagenesis of the NFAT and CRE binding sites, respectively, inhibited the effects of LMW-FGF-2 and HMW-FGF-23 to stimulate FGF-23 promoter activity. FGF-2 activation of both membrane FGFRs and INFS-dependent FGFR1 pathways may provide a means to integrate systemic and local regulation of FGF-23 transcription under diverse physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25752607

  6. A Nuclear Receptor Ligand-based Probe Enables Temporal Control of C. elegans Development

    PubMed Central

    Judkins, Joshua C.; Mahanti, Parag; Hoffman, Jacob; Yim, Isaiah; Antebi, Adam; Schroeder, Frank C.

    2014-01-01

    C. elegans development and lifespan are controlled by the nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12, an important model for vertebrate vitamin D and liver-X receptors. Similar to its mammalian homologs, DAF-12 function is regulated by bile acid-like steroidal ligands, the dafachronic acids; however, tools for investigating their biosynthesis and function in vivo are lacking. We report a flexible synthesis for DAF-12 ligands and masked ligand derivatives that enable precise temporal control of DAF-12 function. For ligand masking, we introduce photocleavable amides of 5-methoxy-N-methyl-2-nitroaniline (MMNA). MMNA-masked ligands are bioavailable and after incorporation into the worm can be used to trigger expression of DAF-12 target genes and initiate development from dauer larvae to adults by brief, innocuous UV-irradiation. In-vivo release of DAF-12 ligands and other small-molecule signals using MMNA-based probes will enable functional studies with precise spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:24453122

  7. Membrane and integrative nuclear fibroblastic growth factor receptor (FGFR) regulation of FGF-23.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaobin; Xiao, Zhousheng; Quarles, L Darryl

    2015-04-17

    Fibroblastic growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) signaling pathways are implicated in the regulation of FGF-23 gene transcription, but the molecular pathways remain poorly defined. We used low molecular weight (LMW, 18 kDa) FGF-2 and high molecular weight (HMW) FGF-2 isoforms, which, respectively, activate cell surface FGF receptors and intranuclear FGFR1, to determine the roles of membrane FGFRs and integrative nuclear FGFR1 signaling (INFS) in the regulation of FGF-23 gene transcription in osteoblasts. We found that LMW-FGF-2 induced NFAT and Ets1 binding to conserved cis-elements in the proximal FGF-23 promoter and stimulated FGF-23 promoter activity through PLCγ/calcineurin/NFAT and MAPK pathways in SaOS-2 and MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. In contrast, HMW-FGF-2 stimulated FGF-23 promoter activity in osteoblasts through a cAMP-dependent binding of FGFR1 and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) to a conserved cAMP response element (CRE) contiguous with the NFAT binding site in the FGF-23 promoter. Mutagenesis of the NFAT and CRE binding sites, respectively, inhibited the effects of LMW-FGF-2 and HMW-FGF-23 to stimulate FGF-23 promoter activity. FGF-2 activation of both membrane FGFRs and INFS-dependent FGFR1 pathways may provide a means to integrate systemic and local regulation of FGF-23 transcription under diverse physiological and pathological conditions.

  8. Influence of a critical single nucleotide polymorphism on nuclear receptor PXR-promoter function.

    PubMed

    Rana, Manjul; Coshic, Poonam; Goswami, Ravinder; Tyagi, Rakesh K

    2017-02-15

    The Pregnane and Xenobiotic Receptor (PXR; NR1I2) is a ligand-modulated transcription factor that belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily. It is expressed at higher levels primarily in liver and intestine as compared to the levels in several other organs. It is activated by a broad spectrum of xenobiotics and endobiotics. The primary function of PXR is to regulate the expression of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters and prevent the accumulation of toxic chemicals in the body, thereby maintaining body's homeostasis. In this study, we identified a C/T single nucleotide polymorphism at position -831 from the transcriptional start site of the PXR gene promoter and examined the functional significance of this variant using both the luciferase reporter gene assays and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Transient transfection experiments showed that the T-allele was associated with significantly greater transcriptional activity than the C-allele of SNP rs3814055. These results indicate that the -831C/T polymorphism has a direct effect on transcriptional regulation of PXR gene. This allelic variation may be a potential genetic marker that can help identify individuals at higher risk for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).

  9. The Nuclear Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling Network and its Role in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Toni M.; Iida, Mari; Li, Chunrong; Wheeler, Deric L.

    2012-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a member of the EGFR family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). EGFR activation via ligand binding results in signaling through various pathways ultimately resulting in cellular proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Aberrant expression or activity of EGFR has been strongly linked to the etiology of several human epithelial cancers including but not limited to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), colorectal cancer (CRC), breast cancer, pancreatic cancer and brain cancer. Thus intense efforts have been made to inhibit the activity of EGFR by designing antibodies against the ligand binding domains (cetuximab and panitumumab) or small molecules against the tyrosine kinase domains (erlotinib, gefitinib, and lapatinib). Although targeting membrane bound EGFR has shown benefit a new and emerging role for the EGFR is now being elucidated. In this review we will summarize the current knowledge of the nuclear EGFR signaling network, including how it is trafficked to the nucleus, the functions it serves in the nucleus, and how these functions impact cancer progression, survival and response to chemotherapeutics. PMID:22127113

  10. The nuclear corepressor 1 and the thyroid hormone receptor β suppress breast tumor lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Iglesias, Olaia; Olmeda, David; Alonso-Merino, Elvira; Gómez-Rey, Sara; González-López, Ana M.; Luengo, Enrique; Soengas, María S.; Palacios, José; Regadera, Javier; Aranda, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Vascular Endotelial Growth Factors C and D (VEGF-C and VEGF-D) are crucial regulators of lymphangiogenesis, a main event in the metastatic spread of breast cancer tumors. Although inhibition of lymphangiogenic gene expression might be a useful therapeutic strategy to restrict the progression of cancer, the factors involved in the transcriptional repression of these genes are still unknown. We have previously shown that Nuclear Receptor Corepressor 1 (NCoR) and the thyroid hormone receptor β1 (TRβ) inhibit tumor invasion. Here we show that these molecules repress VEGF-C and VEGF-D gene transcription in breast cancer cells, reducing lymphatic vessel density and sentinel lymph node invasion in tumor xenografts. The clinical significance of these results is stressed by the finding that NCoR and TRβ transcripts correlate negatively with those of the lymphangiogenic genes and the lymphatic vessel marker LYVE-1 in human breast tumors. Our results point to the use of NCoR and TRβ as potential biomarkers for diagnosis or prognosis in breast cancer and suggest that further studies of these molecules as potential targets for anti-lymphangiogenic therapy are warranted. PMID:27806339

  11. KPNA7, a nuclear transport receptor, promotes malignant properties of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Laurila, Eeva; Vuorinen, Elisa; Savinainen, Kimmo; Rauhala, Hanna; Kallioniemi, Anne

    2014-03-10

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy and one of the leading causes of cancer deaths. The high mortality rate is mostly due to the lack of appropriate tools for early detection of the disease and a shortage of effective therapies. We have previously shown that karyopherin alpha 7 (KPNA7), the newest member of the alpha karyopherin family of nuclear import receptors, is frequently amplified and overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. Here, we report that KPNA7 expression is absent in practically all normal human adult tissues but elevated in several pancreatic cancer cell lines. Inhibition of KPNA7 expression in AsPC-1 and Hs700T pancreatic cancer cells led to a reduction in cell growth and decreased anchorage independent growth, as well as increased autophagy. The cell growth effects were accompanied by an induction of the cell cycle regulator p21 and a G1 arrest of the cell cycle. Interestingly, the p21 induction was caused by increased mRNA synthesis and not defective nuclear transport. These data strongly demonstrate that KPNA7 silencing inhibits the malignant properties of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and thereby provide the first evidence on the functional role for KPNA7 in human cancer. - Highlights: • KPNA7 expression is elevated in several pancreatic cancer cell lines. • KPNA7 silencing in high expressing cancer cells leads to growth inhibition. • The cell growth reduction is associated with p21 induction and G1 arrest. • KPNA7 silencing is also accompanied with increased autophagy.

  12. Structural Basis of Natural Promoter Recognition by a Unique Nuclear Receptor, HNF4[alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Peng; Rha, Geun Bae; Melikishvili, Manana; Wu, Guangteng; Adkins, Brandon C.; Fried, Michael G.; Chi, Young-In

    2010-11-09

    HNF4{alpha} (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4{alpha}) plays an essential role in the development and function of vertebrate organs, including hepatocytes and pancreatic {beta}-cells by regulating expression of multiple genes involved in organ development, nutrient transport, and diverse metabolic pathways. As such, HNF4{alpha} is a culprit gene product for a monogenic and dominantly inherited form of diabetes, known as maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY). As a unique member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, HNF4{alpha} recognizes target genes containing two hexanucleotide direct repeat DNA-response elements separated by one base pair (DR1) by exclusively forming a cooperative homodimer. We describe here the 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of human HNF4{alpha} DNA binding domain in complex with a high affinity promoter element of another MODY gene, HNF1{alpha}, which reveals the molecular basis of unique target gene selection/recognition, DNA binding cooperativity, and dysfunction caused by diabetes-causing mutations. The predicted effects of MODY mutations have been tested by a set of biochemical and functional studies, which show that, in contrast to other MODY gene products, the