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Sample records for superconducting energy gaps

  1. Abrupt onset of a second energy gap at the superconducting transition of underdoped Bi2212

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Zahid; Lee, W.S.; Vishik, I.M.; Tanaka, K.; Lu, D.H.; Sasagawa, T.; Nagaosa, N.; Devereaux, T.P.; Hussain, Z.; Shen, Z.-X.

    2007-05-26

    he superconducting gap--an energy scale tied to the superconducting phenomena--opens on the Fermi surface at the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) in conventional BCS superconductors. In underdoped high-Tc superconducting copper oxides, a pseudogap (whose relation to the superconducting gap remains a mystery) develops well above Tc (refs 1, 2). Whether the pseudogap is a distinct phenomenon or the incoherent continuation of the superconducting gap above Tc is one of the central questions in high-Tc research3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. Although some experimental evidence suggests that the two gaps are distinct9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, this issue is still under intense debate. A crucial piece of evidence to firmly establish this two-gap picture is still missing: a direct and unambiguous observation of a single-particle gap tied to the superconducting transition as function of temperature. Here we report the discovery of such an energy gap in underdoped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+delta in the momentum space region overlooked in previous measurements. Near the diagonal of Cu?O bond direction (nodal direction), we found a gap that opens at Tc and has a canonical (BCS-like) temperature dependence accompanied by the appearance of the so-called Bogoliubov quasi-particles, a classical signature of superconductivity. This is in sharp contrast to the pseudogap near the Cu?O bond direction (antinodal region) measured in earlier experiments19, 20, 21.

  2. Direct Observation of the Superconducting Energy Gap in the Conductivity Spectra of Thin Niobium Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronin, A. V.; Dressel, M.; Pimenov, A.; Loidl, A.; Roshchin, I. V.; Greene, L. H.

    1998-03-01

    High-quality niobium thin films are grown by planar magnetron sputter deposition on sapphire substrates. The electrodynamic response of Nb in the frequency range above and below the energy gap 2Δ is studied in both the normal and superconducting states. The amplitude and the phase of the transmission through the Nb film measured in the 5-30cm-1 frequency range using a coherent source interferometer allowed direct determination of both components of the complex conductivity. Below the superconducting transition temperature (T_c=8.3K for a 150Åthick film) the superconducting energy gap is observed to increase when the temperature is decreased. The temperature dependence of the conductivity spectra is described by BCS formalism with finite scattering. The gap is estimated to be 2Δ(0)=24cm-1 (3 meV) at T=0, therefore 2Δ(0)=4.1 k_bT_c. [1] ^Present Address: General Phys. Inst., RAS, Russia. Support: ^#BMBF (EKM 13N6917), Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, Russian Foundation for Basic Research; ^*DoE through MRL (DEFG02-91ER45439). [1] A.V. Pronin et al., Phys.Rev.B (submitted).

  3. Direct Local Measurement of the Superconducting Energy Gap of Nb doped SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Jeonghoon; Khalsa, Guru; Natterer, Fabian; Baek, Hongwoo; Cullen, William G.; Kuk, Young; Stroscio, Joseph A.

    Strontium titanate (STO) is a perovskite metal oxide insulator that can be electron doped by substitution of Ti or Sr sites with Nb or La, respectively, or by oxygen vacancies. When doped to high electron densities with concentration in the range of 5x1019 cm- 3 to 2x1020 cm-3, STO becomes superconducting with a transition temperature below 400 mK, at a value highly dependent on the doping concentration. Previous observations were made on bulk crystals or films of doped STO by measuring the transitions in resistivity, magnetic susceptibility or thermal conductivity as a function of temperature or magnetic field. In this work, we use an ultra-low temperature scanning tunneling microscope(STM) to investigate the local electronic structure of the surface of Nb doped STO. The tunneling spectra taken at a sample temperature of ~10 mK reveal a BCS energy gap of Δ = 40 ueV. Temperature and magnetic field dependent tunneling measurements show a critical temperature of ~250 mK and upper critical field of ~0.07 T. This is the first report of direct measurement of superconducting STO using an STM.

  4. Model Evidence of a Superconducting State with a Full Energy Gap in Small Cuprate Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black-Schaffer, Annica M.; Golubev, Dmitri S.; Bauch, Thilo; Lombardi, Floriana; Fogelström, Mikael

    2013-05-01

    We investigate subdominant order parameters stabilizing at low temperatures in nanoscale high-Tc cuprate islands, motivated by the recent observation of a fully gapped state in nanosized YBa2Cu3O7-δ [D. Gustafsson et al., Nature Nanotech. 8, 25 (2013)]. Using complementary quasiclassical and tight-binding Bogoliubov-de Gennes methods, we show on distinctly different properties dependent on the symmetry being dx2-y2+is or dx2-y2+idxy. We find that a surface-induced dx2-y2+is phase creates a global spectroscopic gap which increases with an applied magnetic field, consistent with experimental observation.

  5. Superconducting gap structure of FeSe.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Lin; Huang, Chien-Lung; Rößler, Sahana; Koz, Cevriye; Rößler, Ulrich K; Schwarz, Ulrich; Wirth, Steffen

    2017-03-07

    The microscopic mechanism governing the zero-resistance flow of current in some iron-based, high-temperature superconducting materials is not well understood up to now. A central issue concerning the investigation of these materials is their superconducting gap symmetry and structure. Here we present a combined study of low-temperature specific heat and scanning tunnelling microscopy measurements on single crystalline FeSe. The results reveal the existence of at least two superconducting gaps which can be represented by a phenomenological two-band model. The analysis of the specific heat suggests significant anisotropy in the gap magnitude with deep gap minima. The tunneling spectra display an overall "U"-shaped gap close to the Fermi level away as well as on top of twin boundaries. These results are compatible with the anisotropic nodeless models describing superconductivity in FeSe.

  6. Superconducting gap structure of FeSe

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Lin; Huang, Chien-Lung; Rößler, Sahana; Koz, Cevriye; Rößler, Ulrich K.; Schwarz, Ulrich; Wirth, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    The microscopic mechanism governing the zero-resistance flow of current in some iron-based, high-temperature superconducting materials is not well understood up to now. A central issue concerning the investigation of these materials is their superconducting gap symmetry and structure. Here we present a combined study of low-temperature specific heat and scanning tunnelling microscopy measurements on single crystalline FeSe. The results reveal the existence of at least two superconducting gaps which can be represented by a phenomenological two-band model. The analysis of the specific heat suggests significant anisotropy in the gap magnitude with deep gap minima. The tunneling spectra display an overall “U”-shaped gap close to the Fermi level away as well as on top of twin boundaries. These results are compatible with the anisotropic nodeless models describing superconductivity in FeSe. PMID:28266654

  7. Superconducting gap structure of FeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Lin; Huang, Chien-Lung; Rößler, Sahana; Koz, Cevriye; Rößler, Ulrich K.; Schwarz, Ulrich; Wirth, Steffen

    2017-03-01

    The microscopic mechanism governing the zero-resistance flow of current in some iron-based, high-temperature superconducting materials is not well understood up to now. A central issue concerning the investigation of these materials is their superconducting gap symmetry and structure. Here we present a combined study of low-temperature specific heat and scanning tunnelling microscopy measurements on single crystalline FeSe. The results reveal the existence of at least two superconducting gaps which can be represented by a phenomenological two-band model. The analysis of the specific heat suggests significant anisotropy in the gap magnitude with deep gap minima. The tunneling spectra display an overall “U”-shaped gap close to the Fermi level away as well as on top of twin boundaries. These results are compatible with the anisotropic nodeless models describing superconductivity in FeSe.

  8. Enhancement of superconducting transition temperature by pointlike disorder and anisotropic energy gap in FeSe single crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Teknowijoyo, S.; Cho, K.; Tanatar, M. A.; ...

    2016-08-29

    A highly anisotropic superconducting gap is found in single crystals of FeSe by studying the London penetration depth Δλ measured down to 50 mK in samples before and after 2.5 MeV electron irradiation. The gap minimum increases with introduced pointlike disorder, indicating the absence of symmetry-imposed nodes. Surprisingly, the superconducting transition temperature Tc increases by 0.4 K from Tc0 ≈ 8.8 K while the structural transition temperature Ts decreases by 0.9 K from Ts0 ≈ 91.2 K after electron irradiation. Finally, we discuss several explanations for the Tc enhancement and propose that local strengthening of the pair interaction by irradiation-inducedmore » Frenkel defects most likely explains the phenomenon.« less

  9. Phonon-induced enhancements of the energy gap and critical current in superconducting aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Seligson, D.

    1983-05-01

    8 to 10 GHz phonons were generated by piezoelectric transduction of a microwave and by means of a quartz delay line, were allowed to enter the aluminum only after the microwaves had long since disappeared. The maximum enhancements detected were (deltaT/T/sub c/) = -0.07, for i/sub c/ and (deltaT/T/sub c/) = -0.03 for ..delta... The power- and temperature-dependence (0.82 less than or equal to T/T/sub c/ less than or equal to 0.994) of the enhancements were compared with the prediction of a theory given by Eliashberg. The gap-enhancement was in good agreement with the theory only for low input lower. The critical current measurements are predicted to be in rough agreement with the ..delta.. measurements but this was not observed. The magnitude of the critical current enhancements was typically more than twice the observed gap enhancements. The measured critical current enhancement was relatively independent of temperature whereas the gap enhancement decreased rapidly as the temperature was lowered.

  10. Energy gap evolution across the superconductivity dome in single crystals of (Ba1-xKx)Fe2As2

    DOE PAGES

    Cho, Kyuil; Konczykowski, Marcin; Teknowijoyo, Serafim; ...

    2016-09-30

    The mechanism of unconventional superconductivity in iron-based superconductors (IBSs) is one of the most intriguing questions in current materials research. Among non-oxide IBSs, (Ba1$-$xKx)Fe2As2 has been intensively studied because of its high superconducting transition temperature and fascinating evolution of the superconducting gap structure from being fully isotropic at optimal doping (x ≈ 0.4) to becoming nodal at x > 0.8. Although this marked evolution was identified in several independent experiments, there are no details of the gap evolution to date because of the lack of high-quality single crystals covering the entire K-doping range of the superconducting dome. In this work,more » we conducted a systematic study of the London penetration depth, λ(T), across the full phase diagram for different concentrations of point-like defects introduced by 2.5-MeV electron irradiation. Fitting the low-temperature variation with the power law, Δλ ~ Tn, we find that the exponent n is the highest and the Tc suppression rate with disorder is the smallest at optimal doping, and they evolve with doping being away from optimal, which is consistent with increasing gap anisotropy, including an abrupt change around x ≃ 0.8, indicating the onset of nodal behavior. Our analysis using a self-consistent t-matrix approach suggests the ubiquitous and robust nature of s± pairing in IBSs and argues against a previously suggested transition to a d-wave state near x = 1 in this system.« less

  11. Superconducting energy recovery linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2016-10-01

    High-average-power and high-brightness electron beams from a combination of laser photocathode electron guns and a superconducting energy recovery linac (ERL) is an emerging accelerator science with applications in ERL light sources, high repetition rate free electron lasers , electron cooling, electron ion colliders and more. This paper reviews the accelerator physics issues of superconducting ERLs, discusses major subsystems and provides a few examples of superconducting ERLs.

  12. Superconducting Gap Anisotropy in Monolayer FeSe Thin Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Lee, J. J.; Moore, R. G.; Li, W.; Yi, M.; Hashimoto, M.; Lu, D. H.; Devereaux, T. P.; Lee, D.-H.; Shen, Z.-X.

    2016-09-01

    Superconductivity originates from pairing of electrons near the Fermi energy. The Fermi surface topology and pairing symmetry are thus two pivotal characteristics of a superconductor. Superconductivity in one monolayer (1 ML) FeSe thin film has attracted great interest recently due to its intriguing interfacial properties and possibly high superconducting transition temperature over 65 K. Here, we report high-resolution measurements of the Fermi surface and superconducting gaps in 1 ML FeSe using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Two ellipselike electron pockets are clearly resolved overlapping with each other at the Brillouin zone corner. The superconducting gap is nodeless but moderately anisotropic, which puts strong constraint on determining the pairing symmetry. The gap maxima locate on the dx y bands along the major axis of the ellipse and four gap minima are observed at the intersections of electron pockets. The gap maximum location combined with the Fermi surface geometry deviate from a single d -wave, extended s -wave or s± gap function, suggesting an important role of the multiorbital nature of Fermi surface and orbital-dependent pairing in 1 ML FeSe. The gap minima location may be explained by a sign change on the electron pockets, or a competition between intra- and interorbital pairing.

  13. Development of Tunneling Spectroscopy Apparatus for Kelvin and Sub-Kelvin Measurements of Superconducting Energy Gaps by Multi-disciplinary students at a Liberal Arts University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckhardt, Matt

    2014-03-01

    Tunneling spectroscopy is an important technique used to measure the superconducting energy gap, a feature that is at the heart of the nature of superconductivity in various materials. In this presentation, we report the progress and results in developing high-resolution tunneling spectroscopy experimental platforms in a helium three cryostat, a 3 Kelvin cryocooler and a helium dip-tester. The experimental team working in a liberal arts university is a multi-disciplinary group consisting of one physics major, chemisty majors and a biology major. Students including non-physics majors learned and implemented current-voltage measurement techniques, vacuum system engineering, built electronic boxes and amplifier circuits from scratch, built custom multi-conductor cables for thermometry and current-voltage measurements, and performed conductance measurements. We report preliminary results. Acknowledgments: We acknowledge support from National Science Foundation Grant # DMR-1206561.

  14. Single-gap superconductivity in β -B i2Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kačmarčík, J.; Pribulová, Z.; Samuely, T.; Szabó, P.; Cambel, V.; Šoltýs, J.; Herrera, E.; Suderow, H.; Correa-Orellana, A.; Prabhakaran, D.; Samuely, P.

    2016-04-01

    The β -B i2Pd compound has been proposed as another example of a multigap superconductor [Imai et al., J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 81, 113708 (2012), 10.1143/JPSJ.81.113708]. Here, we report on measurements of several important physical quantities capable of showing a presence of multiple energy gaps on our superconducting single crystals of β -B i2Pd with the critical temperature Tc close to 5 K. The calorimetric study via a sensitive ac technique shows a sharp anomaly at the superconducting transition, however only a single energy gap is detected. Also other characteristics inferred from calorimetric measurements as the field dependence of the Sommerfeld coefficient and the temperature and angular dependence of the upper critical magnetic field point unequivocally to standard single s -wave gap superconductivity. The Hall-probe magnetometry provides the same result from the analysis of the temperature dependence of the lower critical field. A single-gapped BCS density of states is detected by the scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements. Then, the bulk as well as the surface sensitive probes evidence a standard conventional superconductivity in this system where the topologically protected surface states have been recently detected by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy [Sakano et al., Nat. Commun. 6, 8595 (2015)., 10.1038/ncomms9595].

  15. Superconducting Gap and Pseudogap in Heavily Underdoped Bi2212

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Cheng; Zhao, Lin; He, Shaolong; Liu, Guodong; Yu, Li; Chen, Chuangtian; Xu, Zuyan; Gu, Genda; Zhou, Xingjiang

    The relationship between the pseudogap and superconducting gap in high temperature cuprate superconductors remains an outstanding issue. In this talk, we will present laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy results on underdoped Bi2Sr2(Ca,Dy)Cu2O8 high temperature superconductor. The latest generation of ARPES system equipped with the narrow-bandwidth VUV laser and the time-of-flight (TOF) electron energy analyzer is utilized here, which enables us to have super-high energy resolution, high momentum resolution, and simultaneous coverage of two-dimensional momentum space. From detailed temperature dependence near the nodal and antinodal regions, we will discuss the relationship between the pseudogap and superconducting gap in the underdoped cuprate superconductors.

  16. Superconducting magnetic energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W.

    1988-08-01

    Recent programmatic developments in Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) have prompted renewed and widespread interest in this field. In mid 1987 the Defense Nuclear Agency, acting for the Strategic Defense Initiative Office, issued a request for proposals for the design and construction of SMES Engineering Test Model (ETM). Two teams, one led by Bechtel and the other by Ebasco, are now engaged in the first phase of the development of a 10 to 20 MWhr ETM. This report presents the rationale for energy storage on utility systems, describes the general technology of SMES, and explains the chronological development of the technology. The present ETM program is outlined; details of the two projects for ETM development are described in other papers in these proceedings. The impact of high T/sub c/ materials on SMES is discussed. 69 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Superconducting energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Giese, R.F.

    1993-10-01

    This report describes the status of energy storage involving superconductors and assesses what impact the recently discovered ceramic superconductors may have on the design of these devices. Our description is intended for R&D managers in government, electric utilities, firms, and national laboratories who wish an overview of what has been done and what remains to be done. It is assumed that the reader is acquainted with superconductivity, but not an expert on the topics discussed here. Indeed, it is the author`s aim to enable the reader to better understand the experts who may ask for the reader`s attention, support, or funding. This report may also inform scientists and engineers who, though expert in related areas, wish to have an introduction to our topic.

  18. Induced gap in topological materials from the superconducting proximity effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Ching-Kai; Cole, William

    Topological superconductivity has been of considerable interest lately, with several proposed experimental realizations in solid state systems. A heterostructure of s-wave superconductor and 3D topological insulator is one of the more promising platforms, with topological superconductivity realized on the ''naked'' surface of the topological insulator through the superconducting proximity effect. We theoretically study the induced superconducting gap on the naked surface. Adjusting the Fermi level above the bulk gap (which is the case in experiments), our results for the induced superconducting gap are in agreement with that probed in thin topological insulators (<10nm) in the experiments (Nat. Phys. 10, 943-950 (2014) and Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 217001 (2014)). We further predict the gap in thick topological insulators (>10nm). This work is supported by LPS-MPO-CMTC, Microsoft Q, and JQI-NSF-PFC.

  19. Energy gap evolution across the superconductivity dome in single crystals of (Ba1−xKx)Fe2As2

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyuil; Kończykowski, Marcin; Teknowijoyo, Serafim; Tanatar, Makariy A.; Liu, Yong; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Straszheim, Warren E.; Mishra, Vivek; Maiti, Saurabh; Hirschfeld, Peter J.; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of unconventional superconductivity in iron-based superconductors (IBSs) is one of the most intriguing questions in current materials research. Among non-oxide IBSs, (Ba1−xKx)Fe2As2 has been intensively studied because of its high superconducting transition temperature and fascinating evolution of the superconducting gap structure from being fully isotropic at optimal doping (x ≈ 0.4) to becoming nodal at x > 0.8. Although this marked evolution was identified in several independent experiments, there are no details of the gap evolution to date because of the lack of high-quality single crystals covering the entire K-doping range of the superconducting dome. We conducted a systematic study of the London penetration depth, λ(T), across the full phase diagram for different concentrations of point-like defects introduced by 2.5-MeV electron irradiation. Fitting the low-temperature variation with the power law, Δλ ~ Tn, we find that the exponent n is the highest and the Tc suppression rate with disorder is the smallest at optimal doping, and they evolve with doping being away from optimal, which is consistent with increasing gap anisotropy, including an abrupt change around x ≃ 0.8, indicating the onset of nodal behavior. Our analysis using a self-consistent t-matrix approach suggests the ubiquitous and robust nature of s± pairing in IBSs and argues against a previously suggested transition to a d-wave state near x = 1 in this system. PMID:27704046

  20. Heat Transport as a Probe of Superconducting Gap Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, C.; Shakeripour, H.; Taillefer, L.

    2009-05-29

    The structure of the superconducting gap provides important clues on the symmetry of the order parameter and the pairing mechanism. The presence of nodes in the gap function imposed by symmetry implies an unconventional order parameter, other than s-wave. Here we show how measurements of the thermal conductivity at very low temperature can be used to determine whether such nodes are present in a particular superconductor, and shed light on their nature and location. We focus on the residual linear term at T {yields} 0. A finite value in zero magnetic field is strong evidence for symmetry-imposed nodes, and the dependence on impurity scattering can distinguish between a line of nodes or point nodes. Application of a magnetic field probes the low-energy quasiparticle excitations, whether associated with nodes or with a small value of the gap on some part of the Fermi surface, as in a multi-band superconductor. We frame our discussion around archetypal materials: Nb for s-wave, Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}CuO{sub 6+{delta}} for d-wave, Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} for p-wave, and NbSe{sub 2} for multi-band superconductivity. In that framework, we discuss three heavy-fermion superconductors: CeIrIn{sub 5}, CeCoIn{sub 5} and UPt{sub 3}.

  1. Optical investigations of the superconducting energy gap in b00-(BEDT-TTF)2SF5CH2CF2SO3

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, S.; Yasin, S.; Drichko, N.; Dressel, M.; Room, T.; Huvonen, D.; Nagel, U.; Gard, G. L.; Schlueter, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    The organic salt {beta}''-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} is a two-dimensional metal with a quarter-filled conduction band. In the metallic state the optical conductivity evidences interaction of the charge carriers with charge-order fluctuations that become stronger as temperature decreases. In the superconducting phase below T{sub c} {approx} 5K, indications of the superconducting gap with 2{Delta} {approx} 12 cm{sup -1} are observed in the optical spectrum, corresponding to 2{Delta}/k{sub B}T{sub c} {approx} 3.3. Its temperature and magnetic field dependences are also consistent with predictions by the BCS theory of a weakly coupled superconductor. The conductivity ratio {sigma}{sub 1}(T = 1.75 K)/{sigma}{sub 1}(10 K) indicates the opening of the superconducting gap in {beta}''-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3}.

  2. Superconducting energy storage magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boom, Roger W. (Inventor); Eyssa, Yehia M. (Inventor); Abdelsalam, Mostafa K. (Inventor); Huang, Xianrui (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A superconducting magnet is formed having composite conductors arrayed in coils having turns which lie on a surface defining substantially a frustum of a cone. The conical angle with respect to the central axis is preferably selected such that the magnetic pressure on the coil at the widest portion of the cone is substantially zero. The magnet structure is adapted for use as an energy storage magnet mounted in an earthen trench or tunnel where the strength the surrounding soil is lower at the top of the trench or tunnel than at the bottom. The composite conductor may be formed having a ripple shape to minimize stresses during charge up and discharge and has a shape for each ripple selected such that the conductor undergoes a minimum amount of bending during the charge and discharge cycle. By minimizing bending, the working of the normal conductor in the composite conductor is minimized, thereby reducing the increase in resistance of the normal conductor that occurs over time as the conductor undergoes bending during numerous charge and discharge cycles.

  3. Induced spectral gap and pairing correlations from superconducting proximity effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Ching-Kai; Cole, William S.; Das Sarma, S.

    2016-09-01

    We theoretically consider superconducting proximity effect, using the Bogoliubov-de Gennes (BdG) theory, in heterostructure sandwich-type geometries involving a normal s -wave superconductor and a nonsuperconducting material with the proximity effect being driven by Cooper pairs tunneling from the superconducting slab to the nonsuperconducting slab. Applications of the superconducting proximity effect may rely on an induced spectral gap or induced pairing correlations without any spectral gap. We clarify that in a nonsuperconducting material the induced spectral gap and pairing correlations are independent physical quantities arising from the proximity effect. This is a crucial issue in proposals to create topological superconductivity through the proximity effect. Heterostructures of three-dimensional topological insulator (TI) slabs on conventional s -wave superconductor (SC) substrates provide a platform, with proximity-induced topological superconductivity expected to be observed on the "naked" top surface of a thin TI slab. We theoretically study the induced superconducting gap on this naked surface. In addition, we compare against the induced spectral gap in heterostructures of SC with a normal metal or a semiconductor with strong spin-orbit coupling and a Zeeman splitting potential (another promising platform for topological superconductivity). We find that for any model for the non-SC metal (including metallic TI) the induced spectral gap on the naked surface decays as L-3 as the thickness (L ) of the non-SC slab is increased in contrast to the slower 1 /L decay of the pairing correlations. Our distinction between proximity-induced spectral gap (with its faster spatial decay) and pairing correlation (with its slower spatial decay) has important implications for the currently active search for topological superconductivity and Majorana fermions in various superconducting heterostructures.

  4. Noise and Bandwidth Measurements of Diffusion-Cooled Nb Hot-Electron Bolometer Mixers at Frequencies Above the Superconductive Energy Gap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyss, R. A.; Karasik, B. S.; McGrath, W. R.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H.

    1999-01-01

    Diffusion-cooled Nb hot-electron bolometer (HEB) mixers have the potential to simultaneously achieve high intermediate frequency (IF) bandwidths and low mixer noise temperatures for operation at THz frequencies (above the superconductive gap energy). We have measured the IF signal bandwidth at 630 GHz of Nb devices with lengths L = 0.3, 0.2, and 0.1 micrometer in a quasioptical mixer configuration employing twin-slot antennas. The 3-dB EF bandwidth increased from 1.2 GHz for the 0.3 gm long device to 9.2 GHz for the 0.1 gm long device. These results demonstrate the expected 1/L squared dependence of the IF bandwidth at submillimeter wave frequencies for the first time, as well as the largest EF bandwidth obtained to date. For the 0.1 gm device, which had the largest bandwidth, the double sideband (DSB) noise temperature of the receiver was 320-470 K at 630 GHz with an absorbed LO power of 35 nW, estimated using the isothermal method. A version of this mixer with the antenna length scaled for operation at 2.5 THz has also been tested. A DSB receiver noise temperature of 1800 plus or minus 100 K was achieved, which is about 1,000 K lower than our previously reported results. These results demonstrate that large EF bandwidth and low-noise operation of a diffusion-cooled HEB mixer is possible at THz frequencies with the same device geometry.

  5. Hard Superconducting Gap in InSb Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Gül, Önder; Zhang, Hao; de Vries, Folkert K; van Veen, Jasper; Zuo, Kun; Mourik, Vincent; Conesa-Boj, Sonia; Nowak, Michał P; van Woerkom, David J; Quintero-Pérez, Marina; Cassidy, Maja C; Geresdi, Attila; Koelling, Sebastian; Car, Diana; Plissard, Sébastien R; Bakkers, Erik P A M; Kouwenhoven, Leo P

    2017-04-12

    Topological superconductivity is a state of matter that can host Majorana modes, the building blocks of a topological quantum computer. Many experimental platforms predicted to show such a topological state rely on proximity-induced superconductivity. However, accessing the topological properties requires an induced hard superconducting gap, which is challenging to achieve for most material systems. We have systematically studied how the interface between an InSb semiconductor nanowire and a NbTiN superconductor affects the induced superconducting properties. Step by step, we improve the homogeneity of the interface while ensuring a barrier-free electrical contact to the superconductor and obtain a hard gap in the InSb nanowire. The magnetic field stability of NbTiN allows the InSb nanowire to maintain a hard gap and a supercurrent in the presence of magnetic fields (∼0.5 T), a requirement for topological superconductivity in one-dimensional systems. Our study provides a guideline to induce superconductivity in various experimental platforms such as semiconductor nanowires, two-dimensional electron gases, and topological insulators and holds relevance for topological superconductivity and quantum computation.

  6. Nodal to nodeless superconducting energy-gap structure change concomitant with Fermi-surface reconstruction in the heavy-fermion compound CeCoIn5

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Hyunsoo; Tanatar, M. A.; Flint, R.; ...

    2015-01-15

    The London penetration depth λ(T) was measured in single crystals of Ce1–xRxCoIn₅, R=La, Nd, and Yb down to Tmin ≈ 50 mK (Tc/Tmin ~50) using a tunnel-diode resonator. In the cleanest samples Δλ(T) is best described by the power law, Δλ(T) ∝ Tn, with n ~ 1, consistent with line nodes. Substitutions of Ce with La, Nd, and Yb lead to similar monotonic suppressions of Tc, however, the effects on Δλ(T) differ. While La and Nd dopings lead to increase of the exponent n and saturation at n ~ 2, as expected for a dirty nodal superconductor, Yb doping leadsmore » to n > 3, suggesting a change from nodal to nodeless superconductivity. As a result, this superconducting gap structure change happens in the same doping range where changes of the Fermi surface topology were reported, implying that the nodal structure and Fermi surface topology are closely linked.« less

  7. Momentum dependence of the superconducting gap and in-gap states in MgB2 multiband superconductor

    DOE PAGES

    Mou, Daixiang; Jiang, Rui; Taufour, Valentin; ...

    2015-06-29

    We use tunable laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the electronic structure of the multiband superconductor MgB2. These results form the baseline for detailed studies of superconductivity in multiband systems. We find that the magnitude of the superconducting gap on both σ bands follows a BCS-like variation with temperature with Δ0 ~ 7meV. Furthermore, the value of the gap is isotropic within experimental uncertainty and in agreement with a pure s-wave pairing symmetry. We observe in-gap states confined to kF of the σ band that occur at some locations of the sample surface. As a result, the energy of thismore » excitation, ~ 3 meV, was found to be somewhat larger than the previously reported gap on π Fermi sheet and therefore we cannot exclude the possibility of interband scattering as its origin.« less

  8. Intermediate superconductive magnetic energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, M.; Fujino, H.; Iwamoto, M.; Murakomi, M.; Shintomi, T.; Veda, K.

    1983-05-01

    In the past decade, the superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) for application to peak shaving in utility has been investigated in a manner to construct the huge superconducting coil in bed rock. To confine the strong electromagnetic forces accompanied with the high magnetic field, megaton structures, no matter how they will be constructed in a liquid helium temperature, are needed. To meet such a requirement, the revolutionary idea was proposed that the superconducting coil would be constructed on the underground bed rock. Here presented is a 10 MWh unit as an intermediate SMES that is a milestone along the distant way of RandD of SMES against 1,000 - 10,000 MWh unit which advocate the replacement of the hydro-pumped station. Therefore, even if the 10 MWh unit would not function as a storage in the utility network, its design should also consider the same situation.

  9. Energy-gap spectroscopy of superconductors using a tunneling microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Duc, H. G.; Kaiser, W. J.; Stern, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    A unique scanning tunneling microscope (STM) system has been developed for spectroscopy of the superconducting energy gap. High-resolution control of tunnel current and voltage allows for measurement of superconducting properties at tunnel resistance levels 100-1000 greater than that achieved in prior work. The previously used STM methods for superconductor spectroscopy are compared to those developed for the work reported here. Superconducting energy-gap spectra are reported for three superconductors, Pb, PbBi, and NbN, over a range of tunnel resistance. The measured spectra are compared directly to theory.

  10. Dome – like variation of the superconducting gap anisotropy in Fe-based superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Prozorov, R.; Cho, K.; Kim, H.; Tanatar, M. A.

    2013-07-17

    Experiments performed on different iron-based superconductors suggest a variety of possible structures of the superconducting energy gap, both nodeless and nodal. To understand the pairing mechanisms, it is important to identify common features in the behavior of different materials. Measurements of the temperature - dependent London penetration depth provide important information on the structure of the superconducting gap. We show that despite significant differences between different iron - based superconductors, there is a universal trend: the gap is least anisotropic at the optimal doping and its anisotropy increases upon the departure towards underdoped and overdoped ends of the ''superconducting dome''. As a result, this trend is not related to the presence of the long-range magnetic order in the underdoped state.

  11. Dome – like variation of the superconducting gap anisotropy in Fe-based superconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Prozorov, R.; Cho, K.; Kim, H.; ...

    2013-07-17

    Experiments performed on different iron-based superconductors suggest a variety of possible structures of the superconducting energy gap, both nodeless and nodal. To understand the pairing mechanisms, it is important to identify common features in the behavior of different materials. Measurements of the temperature - dependent London penetration depth provide important information on the structure of the superconducting gap. We show that despite significant differences between different iron - based superconductors, there is a universal trend: the gap is least anisotropic at the optimal doping and its anisotropy increases upon the departure towards underdoped and overdoped ends of the ''superconducting dome''.more » As a result, this trend is not related to the presence of the long-range magnetic order in the underdoped state.« less

  12. On the superconducting gap structure of high-temperature superconductors by STM/STS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, K.; Sugawara, H.; Hasegawa, T.

    1996-05-01

    The tunneling spectra observed by STM on the HTSC's have been converging in terms of the superconducting gap energy values: 2 Δ/ kBTc=6 to 9. There are, however, still disagreements between the details of various results. Both d- and s-wave-like features have been claimed for the superconducting gap structure. Furthermore, both flat and V-shaped structures have been observed in the background conductance curve outside the superconducting gap. The major differences among various reports seem to be attributable to the difference in the top layer and in the carrier density of the sample. It is noted that those who observe on the BiO topmost plane in a Bi2212 crystal or on the CuO-chain plane of YBCO seem to be claiming the d-wave, and those who observe on different top planes the s-wave symmetry.

  13. Tunable sub-gap radiation detection with superconducting resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupré, O.; Benoît, A.; Calvo, M.; Catalano, A.; Goupy, J.; Hoarau, C.; Klein, T.; Le Calvez, K.; Sacépé, B.; Monfardini, A.; Levy-Bertrand, F.

    2017-04-01

    We have fabricated planar amorphous indium oxide superconducting resonators ({T}{{c}}∼ 2.8 K) that are sensitive to frequency-selective radiation in the range of 7–10 GHz. Those values lay far below twice the superconducting gap that is worth about 200 GHz. The photon detection consists in a shift of the fundamental resonance frequency. We show that the detected frequency can be adjusted by modulating the total length of the superconducting resonator. We attribute those observations to the excitation of higher-order resonance modes. The coupling between the fundamental lumped and the higher order distributed resonance is due to the kinetic inductance nonlinearity with current. These devices, that we have called sub-gap kinetic inductance detectors, are to be distinguished from the standard kinetic inductance detectors in which quasi-particles are generated when incident light breaks down Cooper pairs.

  14. Temperature dependence of superconducting gap and penetration depth for MgB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakaya, Seniye; Ozbas, Omer

    2012-09-01

    In this study, we have investigated both the temperature dependence of magnetic penetration depth and superconducting energy gap for magnesium diboride (MgB2) by considering several models such as Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS), two fluids and two band Eliashberg model. These models are compared with each others and available literature results. Several studies reported that MgB2 has two different superconducting gaps. That is, the multi-band superconductor MgB2 exhibits two dimensional (2D) σ-band and three-dimensional (3D) π-band superconductivity and have the remarkably high critical temperature (Tc= 39K) all of the metallic superconductors. So, recently it has attracted great attention. The superconductivity in MgB2 has been analyzed by using two band Eliashberg model. We also have calculated the temperature dependence of the superconducting gaps (Δσ and Δπ) and compared them with the available experimental data and the other theoretical predictions.

  15. Energy gap structure of layered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.H.; Klemm, R.A.

    1993-11-01

    We report the energy gap structure and density-of-states (DOS) of a model layered superconductor with one superconducting layer and one normal layer in a unit cell along the c-axis. In the physically interesting parameter range where the interlayer hopping strengths of the quasiparticles are comparable to the critical temperature, the peaks in the DOS curve do not correspond to the order parameter (OP) of the superconducting layer, but depend on the OP and the band dispersion in the c-direction in a complex manner. In contrast to a BCS superconductor, the DOS of layered systems have logarithmic singularities. Our simulated tunneling characteristics bear close resemblance to experimental results.

  16. Superconducting transistor

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting transistor is formed by disposing three thin films of superconducting material in a planar parallel arrangement and insulating the films from each other by layers of insulating oxides to form two tunnel junctions. One junction is biased above twice the superconducting energy gap and the other is biased at less than twice the superconducting energy gap. Injection of quasiparticles into the center film by one junction provides a current gain in the second junction.

  17. Passive energy dump for superconducting coil protection

    DOEpatents

    Luton, J.N. Jr.

    1973-01-16

    The patent describes a passive resistance type energy dump for the protection of the coils of a superconducting magnet. Insertion heaters are immersed in a rigid container filled with a fusible alloy. The energy dump is connected across the coils of the superconducting magnet wherein individual heater elements are connected singly to the windings or otherwise according to the energy dumping requirements upon transition of the magnet to a normal state.

  18. First High power test results for 2.1 GHz superconducting photonic band gap accelerator cavities.

    PubMed

    Simakov, Evgenya I; Haynes, W Brian; Madrid, Michael A; Romero, Frank P; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Tuzel, Walter M; Boulware, Chase H; Grimm, Terry L

    2012-10-19

    We report the results of the recent high power testing of superconducting radio frequency photonic band gap (PBG) accelerator cells. Tests of the two single-cell 2.1 GHz cavities were performed at both 4 and 2 K. An accelerating gradient of 15 MV/m and an unloaded quality factor Q(0) of 4×10(9) were achieved. It has been long realized that PBG structures have great potential in reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. A PBG structure confines the fundamental TM(01)-like accelerating mode, but does not support higher order modes. Employing PBG cavities to filter out higher order modes in superconducting particle accelerators will allow suppression of dangerous beam instabilities caused by wakefields and thus operation at higher frequencies and significantly higher beam luminosities. This may lead towards a completely new generation of colliders for high energy physics and energy recovery linacs for the free-electron lasers.

  19. Design Tool for Liquid-Nitrogen Gaps in Superconducting Apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, Marshall O; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Tuncer, Enis; Polyzos, Georgios

    2011-01-01

    For designers of high temperature superconducting equipment with liquid nitrogen as a dielectric, an expedient universal curve is sought that provides breakdown strength for a specified class of electrode shapes, with any practical sizes of electrodes and gap; thus the universal curve fills in missing experimental data. Universal breakdown strength curves at pressures of or slightly above 100 kPa, are being developed for AC, DC or impulse stress for the class with sphere-sphere, plane-plane and sphere-plane gaps, with three independent parameters: the size of each electrode and gap. A user can normalize his parameters and find the corresponding breakdown strength, even though no data were available for his exact dimensions. For AC and DC stresses the geometrical effects of stressed area/volume are incorporated from most published AC and DC experimental data of the last 50 years, by plotting breakdown field versus new geometrical quantities, such that all data fall approximately on or near one normalized universal curve. This avoids the usual difficult task of calculating stressed area and volume effects on the breakdown values for the graph ordinate. For impulse stress a more traditional plot suffices to produce a universal curve. This suggests that area/volume effects might not be so important with impulse stress. If the method proves reliable, it may be possible to determine design parameters for a broad range of geometries, help unify seemingly disparate breakdown data in the literature, and provide easily used, practical guidance for designers.

  20. Energy gap evolution across the superconductivity dome in single crystals of (Ba1-xKx)Fe2As2

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Kyuil; Konczykowski, Marcin; Teknowijoyo, Serafim; Tanatar, Makariy A.; Liu, Yong; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Straszheim, Warren E.; Mishra, Vivek; Maiti, Saurabh; Hirschfeld, Peter J.; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2016-09-30

    The mechanism of unconventional superconductivity in iron-based superconductors (IBSs) is one of the most intriguing questions in current materials research. Among non-oxide IBSs, (Ba1$-$xKx)Fe2As2 has been intensively studied because of its high superconducting transition temperature and fascinating evolution of the superconducting gap structure from being fully isotropic at optimal doping (x ≈ 0.4) to becoming nodal at x > 0.8. Although this marked evolution was identified in several independent experiments, there are no details of the gap evolution to date because of the lack of high-quality single crystals covering the entire K-doping range of the superconducting dome. In this work, we conducted a systematic study of the London penetration depth, λ(T), across the full phase diagram for different concentrations of point-like defects introduced by 2.5-MeV electron irradiation. Fitting the low-temperature variation with the power law, Δλ ~ Tn, we find that the exponent n is the highest and the Tc suppression rate with disorder is the smallest at optimal doping, and they evolve with doping being away from optimal, which is consistent with increasing gap anisotropy, including an abrupt change around x ≃ 0.8, indicating the onset of nodal behavior. Our analysis using a self-consistent t-matrix approach suggests the ubiquitous and robust nature of s± pairing in IBSs and argues against a previously suggested transition to a d-wave state near x = 1 in this system.

  1. Anisotropic superconducting gaps in YNi2B2C : A first-principles investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Mitsuaki; Akashi, Ryosuke; Tsuneyuki, Shinji

    2017-02-01

    We calculate superconducting gaps and quasiparticle density of states of YNi2B2C in the framework of the density functional theory for superconductors to investigate the origin of highly anisotropic superconducting gaps in this material. Calculated phonon frequencies, the quasiparticle density of states, and the transition temperature show good agreement with experimental results. From our calculation of superconducting gaps and orbital character analysis, we establish that the orbital character variation of the Fermi surface is the key factor of the anisotropic gap. Since the electronic states that consist of mainly Ni 3 d orbitals couple weakly with phonons, the superconducting gap function is suppressed for the corresponding states, which results in the anisotropy observed in the experiments. These results are hints to increase the transition temperature of materials in the borocarbide family.

  2. Andreev spectroscopy of FeSe: Evidence for two-gap superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ponomarev, Ya. G.; Kuzmichev, S. A.; Mikheev, M. G.; Sudakova, M. V.; Tchesnokov, S. N.; Shanygina, T. E.; Volkova, O. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Wolf, Th.

    2011-09-15

    Current-voltage characteristics (CVCs) of Andreev superconductor-constriction-superconductor (ScS) contacts in polycrystalline samples of FeSe with the critical temperature T{sub C} = (12 {+-} 1) K have been measured using the break-junction technique. In Sharvin-type nanocontacts, two sets of subharmonic gap structures were detected due to multiple Andreev reflections, indicating the existence of two nodeless superconducting gaps {Delta}{sub L} = (2.75 {+-} 0.3) meV and {Delta}{sub S} = (0.8 {+-} 0.2) meV. Well-shaped CVCs for stacks of Andreev contacts with up to five contacts were observed due to the layered structure of FeSe (the intrinsic multiple Andreev reflections effect). An additional fine structure in the CVCs of Andreev ScS nanocontacts is attributed to the existence of a Leggett mode. A linear relation between the superconducting gap {Delta}{sub L} and the magnetic resonance energy E{sub magres} Almost-Equal-To 2{Delta}{sub L} is found to be valid for layered iron pnictides.

  3. Kinetics-Driven Superconducting Gap in Underdoped Cuprate Superconductors Within the Strong-Coupling Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Wei; Yildirim, Yucel

    2012-02-01

    A generic theory [1] of the quasiparticle superconducting gap in underdoped cuprates is derived in the strong-coupling limit, and found to describe the experimental ``second gap'' in absolute scale. In drastic contrast to the standard pairing gap associated with Bogoliubov quasiparticle excitations, the quasiparticle gap is shown to originate from anomalous kinetic (scattering) processes, with a size unrelated to the pairing strength. Consequently, the k dependence of the gap deviates significantly from the pure dx^2-y^2 wave of the order parameter. Our study reveals a new paradigm for the nature of the superconducting gap, and is expected to reconcile numerous apparent contradictions among existing experiments and point toward a more coherent understanding of high-temperature superconductivity. [4pt] [1] Y. Yildirim and Wei Ku, PRX 1, 011011 (2011).

  4. High temperature superconducting magnetic energy storage for future NASA missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faymon, Karl A.; Rudnick, Stanley J.

    1988-01-01

    Several NASA sponsored studies based on 'conventional' liquid helium temperature level superconductivity technology have concluded that superconducting magnetic energy storage has considerable potential for space applications. The advent of high temperature superconductivity (HTSC) may provide additional benefits over conventional superconductivity technology, making magnetic energy storage even more attractive. The proposed NASA space station is a possible candidate for the application of HTSC energy storage. Alternative energy storage technologies for this and other low Earth orbit missions are compared.

  5. Superconductivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    SUPERCONDUCTIVITY HIGH-POWER APPLICATIONS Electric power generation/transmission Energy storage Acoustic projectors Weapon launchers Catapult Ship propulsion • • • Stabilized...temperature superconductive shields could be substantially enhanced by use of high-Tc materials. 27 28 NRAC SUPERCONDUCTIVITY SHIP PROPULSION APPLICATIONS...motor shown in the photograph. As a next step in the evolution of electric-drive ship propulsion technology, DTRC has proposed to scale up the design

  6. Cosmological constraints on superconducting dark energy models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keresztes, Zoltán; Gergely, László Á.; Harko, Tiberiu; Liang, Shi-Dong

    2015-12-01

    We consider cosmological tests of a scalar-vector-tensor gravitational model, in which the dark energy is included in the total action through a gauge-invariant, electromagnetic type contribution. The ground state of dark energy, corresponding to a constant potential V , is a Bose-Einstein type condensate with spontaneously broken U(1) symmetry. In other words, dark energy appears as a massive vector field emerging from a superposition of a massless vector and a scalar field, the latter corresponding to the Goldstone boson. Two particular cosmological models, corresponding to pure electric and pure magnetic type potentials, respectively, are confronted with type IA supernovae and Hubble parameter data. In the electric case, a good fit is obtained along a narrow inclined stripe in the Ωm-ΩV parameter plane, which includes the Λ cold dark matter limit as the best fit. The other points on this admissible region represent superconducting dark energy as a sum of a cosmological constant and a time-evolving contribution. In the magnetic case the cosmological test selects either (i) parameter ranges of the superconducting dark energy allowing for the standard baryonic sector plus dark matter or (ii) a unified superconducting dark matter and dark energy model, additionally including only the baryonic sector.

  7. Closing the gap in the Andreev spectrum in a three-terminal superconducting junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padurariu, Ciprian; Melin, Régis; Jonckheere, Thibaut; Rech, Jérôme; Martin, Thierry; Feinberg, Denis; Douçot, Benoît; Nazarov, Yuli

    2015-03-01

    Quasiclassical circuit theory is used to investigate transport in a mesoscopic junction with three superconducting terminals. Our study reveals the closing of the gap in the Andreev spectrum for a wide range of phase-biases and transparencies, in agreement with previous work. In this regime a superconducting current flows in the junction, while the proximity mini-gap is closed. The corresponding parameter region is studied systematically, both analytically in the low transparency limit and numerically. We provide a microscopic explanation for the closing of the gap in terms of multiple pair processes that correlate the superconducting currents flowing between different pairs of terminals. We show that multi-terminal superconducting junctions provide unique opportunities for applications in quantum devices based on Josephson and/or Majorana physics.

  8. Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Yung K.

    Many potential high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) military applications have been demonstrated by low-temperature superconductivity systems; they encompass high efficiency electric drives for naval vessels, airborne electric generators, energy storage systems for directed-energy weapons, electromechanical launchers, magnetic and electromagnetic shields, and cavity resonators for microwave and mm-wave generation. Further HST applications in militarily relevant fields include EM sensors, IR focal plane arrays, SQUIDs, magnetic gradiometers, high-power sonar sources, and superconducting antennas and inertial navigation systems. The development of SQUID sensors will furnish novel magnetic anomaly detection methods for ASW.

  9. Observation of a Spin Gap in the Normal State of Superconducting Mo3Sb7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Vinh Hung; Miiller, Wojciech; Bukowski, Zbigniew

    2008-04-01

    Magnetization, specific heat, and electrical resistivity measurements have been performed on the superconductor Mo3Sb7. Two kinds of transitions are observed at 2.3 and 50 K, respectively. The former is superconducting transition, while the latter is attributed to spin-gap formation. From the analysis of the experimental data, excitation gap, intra- and interdimer interactions are estimated as Δ/kb˜120K, J0/kB˜150K, and J1/kB˜55K. The electronic structure calculations using the LSDA approximation show nesting property in the Fermi surface, favoring the superconductivity.

  10. Energy gaps in α-graphdiyne nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, X. N.; Yang, D. Z.; Si, M. S. Xue, D. S.

    2014-04-14

    α-graphdiyne is a novel predicted Dirac cone material, which is similar to graphene. But the absence of a band gap significantly limits its practical applications. In order to extend this limitation, an opening of energy gap is needed. To this end, we resort to the nanoribbon structure of α-graphdiyne. This is a conventional proposal to open up the energy gaps in nanomaterials. The results show that both the armchair and the zigzag α-graphdiyne nanoribbons do generate energy gaps, which are width-dependent. In addition, the underlying mechanism of this opening is explored. The former is ascribed to the combination of quantum confinement and edges' effect, while the latter arises from the edge magnetic ordering. These novel nanoribbons with opening energy gaps would be potentially used in electronic devices.

  11. Closing the superconducting gap in small Pb nanoislands with high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolf-Pissarczyk, Steffen; Burgess, Jacob A. J.; Yan, Shichao; Loth, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    Superconducting properties change in confined geometries. Here we study the effects of strong confinement in nanosized Pb islands on Si(111) 7 ×7 . Small hexagonal islands with diameters less than 50 nm and a uniform height of seven atomic layers are formed by depositing Pb at low temperature and annealing at 300 K. We measure the tunneling spectra of individual Pb nanoislands using a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope operated at 0.6 K and follow the narrowing of the superconducting gap as a function of magnetic field. We find the critical magnetic field, at which the superconducting gap vanishes, reaches several Tesla, which represents a greater than 50-fold enhancement compared to the bulk value. By independently measuring the size of the superconducting gap, and the critical magnetic field that quenches superconductivity for a range of nanoislands, we can correlate these two fundamental parameters and estimate the maximal achievable critical field for 7 ML Pb nanoislands to be 7 T.

  12. Research for superconducting energy storage patterns and its practical countermeasures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, D. H.; Cui, D. J.; Li, B.; Teng, Y.; Zheng, G. L.; Wang, X. Q.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we attempt to introduce briefly the significance, the present status, as well as the working principle of the primary patterns of the superconducting energy storage system, first of all. According to the defect on the lower energy storage density of existed superconducting energy storage device, we proposed some new ideas and strategies about how to improve the energy storage density, in which, a brand-new but a tentative proposal regarding the concept of energy compression was emphasized. This investigation has a certain reference value towards the practical application of the superconducting energy storage.

  13. Superconducting magnetic energy storage for asynchronous electrical systems

    DOEpatents

    Boenig, H.J.

    1984-05-16

    It is an object of the present invention to provide superconducting magnetic energy storage for a plurality of asynchronous electrical systems. It is a further object of the present invention to provide load leveling and stability improvement in a plurality of independent ac systems using a single superconducting magnetic energy storage coil.

  14. Observation of multiple superconducting gaps in Fe1+yTe1-xSex via a nanoscale approach to point-contact spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Haibing; De, Debtanu; Wu, Zheng; Diaz-Pinto, Carlos

    2012-11-01

    We report a novel experimental approach to point-contact Andreev reflection spectroscopy with diagnostic capability via a unique design for nanoscale normal metal/superconductor devices with excellent thermomechanical stability, and have employed this method to unveil the existence of two superconducting energy gaps in iron chalcogenide Fe1+yTe1-xSex, which is crucial for understanding its pairing mechanism. This work opens up new opportunities to study gap structures in superconductors and elemental excitations in solids.

  15. Fully gapped superconductivity in In-doped topological crystalline insulator Pb0.5Sn0.5Te

    DOE PAGES

    Du, Guan; Gu, G. D.; Du, Zengyi; ...

    2015-07-27

    In this study, superconductors derived from topological insulators and topological crystalline insulators by chemical doping have long been considered to be candidates as topological superconductors. Pb0.5Sn0.5Te is a topological crystalline insulator with mirror symmetry protected surface states on (001)-, (011)-, and (111)-oriented surfaces. The superconductor (Pb0.5Sn0.5)0.7In0.3Te is produced by In doping in Pb0.5Sn0.5Te, and is thought to be a topological superconductor. Here we report scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements of the superconducting state as well as the superconducting energy gap in (Pb0.5Sn0.5)0.7In0.3Te on a (001)-oriented surface. The spectrum can be well fitted by an anisotropic s-wave gap function of Δ =more » 0.72 + 0.18cos4θ meV using Dynes model. The results show that the superconductor seems to be a fully gapped one without any in-gap states, in contradiction with the expectation of a topological superconductor.« less

  16. Fully gapped superconductivity in In-doped topological crystalline insulator Pb0.5Sn0.5Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Guan; Du, Zengyi; Fang, Delong; Yang, Huan; Zhong, R. D.; Schneeloch, J.; Gu, G. D.; Wen, Hai-Hu

    2015-07-01

    Superconductors derived from topological insulators and topological crystalline insulators by chemical doping have long been considered to be candidates as topological superconductors. Pb0.5Sn0.5Te is a topological crystalline insulator with mirror symmetry protected surface states on (001)-, (011)-, and (111)-oriented surfaces. The superconductor (Pb0.5Sn0.5 )0.7In0.3Te is produced by In doping in Pb0.5Sn0.5Te , and is thought to be a topological superconductor. Here we report scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements of the superconducting state as well as the superconducting energy gap in (Pb0.5Sn0.5 )0.7In0.3Te on a (001)-oriented surface. The spectrum can be well fitted by an anisotropic s -wave gap function of Δ (θ )=0.72 +0.18 cos4 θ meV using Dynes model. The results show that the superconductor seems to be a fully gapped one without any in-gap states, in contradiction with the expectation of a topological superconductor.

  17. Low-energy phonons and superconductivity in Sn0.8In0.2Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhijun; Schneeloch, J. A.; Zhong, R. D.; Rodriguez-Rivera, J. A.; Harriger, L. W.; Birgeneau, R. J.; Gu, G. D.; Tranquada, J. M.; Xu, Guangyong

    2015-02-01

    We present neutron scattering measurements on low-energy phonons from a superconducting (Tc=2.7 K ) Sn0.8In0.2Te single-crystal sample. The longitudinal acoustic phonon mode and one transverse acoustic branch have been mapped out around the (002) Bragg peak for temperatures of 1.7 and 4.2 K. We observe a substantial energy width of the transverse phonons at energies comparable to twice the superconducting gap; however, there is no change in this width between the superconducting and normal states, and the precise origin of this energy width anomaly is not entirely clear. We also confirm that the compound is well ordered, with no indications of structural instability.

  18. Determination of gap solution and critical temperature in doped graphene superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chenmei; Yang, Yisong

    2017-04-01

    It is shown that the gap solution and critical transition temperature are significantly enhanced by doping in a recently developed BCS formalism for graphene superconductivity in such a way that positive gap and transition temperature both occur in arbitrary pairing coupling as far as doping is present. The analytic construction of the BCS gap and transition temperature offers highly effective globally convergent iterative methods for the computation of these quantities. A series of numerical examples are presented as illustrations which are in agreement with the theoretical and experimental results obtained in the physics literature and consolidate the analytic understanding achieved.

  19. Superconducting Gap Spectroscopy Using the Nonlinear Magnetic Moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žutić, Igor; Valls, Oriol T.

    1997-03-01

    We present results for the nonlinear current response of High Temperature Superconductors in an applied magnetic field. We examine the angular dependence of the nonlinear magnetic moment in the Meissner regime, and show that this quantity can serve as a high quality bulk probe to determine in detail the position of the nodes of the pairing state. The specific angular dependences of the magnetic moment for several of the proposed pairing states will be presented. Effects of the a-b plane anisotropy in the penetration depth and the sample shape ( I. Žutić, O. T. Valls Phys. Rev. B 54, 15500 (1996)) are included. In addition to the applied static magnetic field, we also consider an harmonically varying magnetic field. In the latter case the nonlinear superconducting response produces harmonics with higher frequency. We will compare our predictions with the most recent experimental data.

  20. Flywheel energy storage using superconducting magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abboud, R. G.; Uherka, K.; Hull, J.; Mulcahy, T.

    Storage of electrical energy on a utility scale is currently not practicable for most utilities, preventing the full utilization of existing base-load capacity. A potential solution to this problem is Flywheel Energy Storage (FES), made possible by technological developments in high-temperature superconducting materials. Commonwealth Research Corporation (CRC), the research arm of Commonwealth Edison Company, and Argonne National Laboratory are implementing a demonstration project to advance the state of the art in high temperature superconductor (HTS) bearing performance and the overall demonstration of efficient Flywheel Energy Storage. Currently, electricity must be used simultaneously with its generation as electrical energy storage is not available for most utilities. Existing storage methods either are dependent on special geography, are too expensive, or are too inefficient. Without energy storage, electric utilities, such as Commonwealth Edison Company, are forced to cycle base load power plants to meet load swings in hourly customer demand. Demand can change by as much as 30% over a 12-hour period and result in significant costs to utilities as power plant output is adjusted to meet these changes. HTS FES systems can reduce demand-based power plant cycling by storing unused nighttime capacity until it is needed to meet daytime demand.

  1. Flywheel energy storage using superconducting magnetic bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Abboud, R.G.; Uherka, K.; Hull, J.; Mulcahy, T.

    1994-04-01

    Storage of electrical energy on a utility scale is currently not practicable for most utilities, preventing the full utilization of existing base-load capacity. A potential solution to this problem is Flywheel Energy Storage (FES), made possible by technological developments in high-temperature superconducting materials. Commonwealth Research Corporation (CRC), the research arm of Commonwealth Edison Company, and Argonne National Laboratory are implementing a demonstration project to advance the state of the art in high temperature superconductor (HTS) bearing performance and the overall demonstration of efficient Flywheel Energy Storage. Currently, electricity must be used simultaneously with its generation as electrical energy storage is not available for most utilities. Existing storage methods either are dependent on special geography, are too expensive, or are too inefficient. Without energy storage, electric utilities, such as Commonwealth Edison Company, are forced to cycle base load power plants to meet load swings in hourly customer demand. Demand can change by as much as 30% over a 12-hour period and result in significant costs to utilities as power plant output is adjusted to meet these changes. HTS FES systems can reduce demand-based power plant cycling by storing unused nighttime capacity until it is needed to meet daytime demand.

  2. Non-Fermi liquid behavior and non-universal superconducting gap structure in Fe-pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Yuji

    2010-03-01

    The discovery of Fe-pnictide superconductors with Tc exceeding 55 K raises fundamental questions about origin of high-Tc superconductivity. Here we report the systematic studies of the normal-state charge transport, Fermi surface structure and superconducting gap structure in high-quality single crystals of BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 (0 <=x <=0.71), ranging from the SDW state to overdoped Fermi liquid state. Near the SDW boundary, the transport coefficients, including resistivity, Hall coefficient and magnetoresistance, exhibit striking deviations from the Fermi liquid properties [1]. The Fermi surface structure determined by the dHvA effect shows that in the superconducting dome the volume of the electron and hole sheets shrink linearly and the effective masses become strongly enhanced with decreasing x [2]. It is likely that these trends originate from the many-body interaction which gives rise to superconductivity. The penetration depth, thermal conductivity and NMR data for BaFe2(As0.67P0.33)2 (Tc=30 K) provide unambiguous evidence for line nodes in the superconducting gap function [3], in sharp contrast to the other Fe-based compounds with fully gapped structure. This indicates that the gap structure of Fe-based high-Tc superconductors is not universal.[1] S. Kasahara et al., arXiv:0905.4427 [2] H. Shishido et al., arXiv:0910.3634 [3] K. Hashimoto et al., arXiv:0907.4399 [4] K. Hashimoto et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 017002 (2009), ibid 102, 207001 (2009).

  3. Momentum dependence of the superconducting gap and in-gap states in MgB2 multiband superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Mou, Daixiang; Jiang, Rui; Taufour, Valentin; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Kaminski, Adam

    2015-06-29

    We use tunable laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the electronic structure of the multiband superconductor MgB2. These results form the baseline for detailed studies of superconductivity in multiband systems. We find that the magnitude of the superconducting gap on both σ bands follows a BCS-like variation with temperature with Δ0 ~ 7meV. Furthermore, the value of the gap is isotropic within experimental uncertainty and in agreement with a pure s-wave pairing symmetry. We observe in-gap states confined to kF of the σ band that occur at some locations of the sample surface. As a result, the energy of this excitation, ~ 3 meV, was found to be somewhat larger than the previously reported gap on π Fermi sheet and therefore we cannot exclude the possibility of interband scattering as its origin.

  4. Dominant Majorana bound energy and critical current enhancement in ferromagnetic-superconducting topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khezerlou, Maryam; Goudarzi, Hadi; Asgarifar, Samin

    2017-03-01

    Among the potential applications of topological insulators, we theoretically study the coexistence of proximity-induced ferromagnetic and superconducting orders in the surface states of a 3-dimensional topological insulator. The superconducting electron-hole excitations can be significantly affected by the magnetic order induced by a ferromagnet. In one hand, the surface state of the topological insulator, protected by the time-reversal symmetry, creates a spin-triplet and, on the other hand, magnetic order causes to renormalize the effective superconducting gap. We find Majorana mode energy along the ferromagnet/superconductor interface to sensitively depend on the magnitude of magnetization mzfs from superconductor region, and its slope around perpendicular incidence is steep with very low dependency on mzfs. The superconducting effective gap is renormalized by a factor η(mzfs), and Andreev bound state in ferromagnet-superconductor/ferromagnet/ferromagnet-superconductor (FS/F/FS) Josephson junction is more sensitive to the magnitude of magnetizations of FS and F regions. In particular, we show that the presence of mzfs has a noticeable impact on the gap opening in Andreev bound state, which occurs in finite angle of incidence. This directly results in zero-energy Andreev state being dominant. By introducing the proper form of corresponding Dirac spinors for FS electron-hole states, we find that via the inclusion of mzfs, the Josephson supercurrent is enhanced and exhibits almost abrupt crossover curve, featuring the dominant zero-energy Majorana bound states.

  5. Fully gapped superconducting state in Au2Pb: A natural candidate for topological superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y. J.; Xu, Y.; Xing, Y.; Zhang, J.; Ying, T. P.; Hong, X. C.; Wang, M. X.; Zhang, X.; Jia, S.; Wang, J.; Li, S. Y.

    2016-12-01

    We measured the ultra-low-temperature specific heat and thermal conductivity of the Au2Pb single crystal, a possible three-dimensional Dirac semimetal with a superconducting transition temperature Tc ≈ 1.05 \\text{K} . The electronic specific heat can be fitted by a two-band s-wave model, which gives the gap amplitudes Δ1(0)/k B T c = 1.41 and Δ2(0)/k B T c = 5.25. From the thermal conductivity measurements, a negligible residual linear term κ_0/T in zero field and a slow field dependence of κ_0/T at low field are obtained. These results suggest that Au2Pb has a fully gapped superconducting state in the bulk, which is a necessary condition for topological superconductors if Au2Pb is indeed one.

  6. Neutron scattering studies of spin-phonon hybridization and superconducting spin gaps in the high temperature superconductor La2-x(Sr;Ba)xCuO4

    DOE PAGES

    Wagman, J. J.; Carlo, Jeremy P.; Gaudet, J.; ...

    2016-03-14

    We present time-of-flight neutron-scattering measurements on single crystals of La2-xBaxCuO4 (LBCO) with 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.095 and La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) with x = 0.08 and 0.11. This range of dopings spans much of the phase diagram relevant to high temperature cuprate superconductivity, ranging from insulating, three dimensional commensurate long range antiferromagnetic order for x ≤ 0.02 to two dimensional (2D) incommensurate antiferromagnetism co-existing with superconductivity for x ≥ 0.05. Previous work on lightly doped LBCO with x = 0.035 showed a clear resonant enhancement of the inelastic scattering coincident with the low energy crossings of the highly dispersive spin excitationsmore » and quasi-2D optic phonons. The present work extends these measurements across the phase diagram and shows this enhancement to be a common feature to this family of layered quantum magnets. Furthermore we show that the low temperature, low energy magnetic spectral weight is substantially larger for samples with non-superconducting ground states relative to any of the samples with superconducting ground states. Lastly spin gaps, suppression of low energy magnetic spectral weight, are observed in both superconducting LBCO and LSCO samples, consistent with previous observations for superconducting LSCO« less

  7. Development of superconducting magnetic bearing with superconducting coil and bulk superconductor for flywheel energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Y.; Seino, H.; Yoshizawa, K.; Nagashima, K.

    2013-11-01

    We have been developing superconducting magnetic bearing for flywheel energy storage system to be applied to the railway system. The bearing consists of a superconducting coil as a stator and bulk superconductors as a rotor. A flywheel disk connected to the bulk superconductors is suspended contactless by superconducting magnetic bearings (SMBs). We have manufactured a small scale device equipped with the SMB. The flywheel was rotated contactless over 2000 rpm which was a frequency between its rigid body mode and elastic mode. The feasibility of this SMB structure was demonstrated.

  8. Molecular pairing and fully gapped superconductivity in Yb-doped CeCoIn(5).

    PubMed

    Erten, Onur; Flint, Rebecca; Coleman, Piers

    2015-01-16

    The recent observation of fully gapped superconductivity in Yb doped CeCoIn_{5} poses a paradox, for the disappearance of nodes suggests that they are accidental, yet d-wave symmetry with protected nodes is well established by experiment. Here, we show that composite pairing provides a natural resolution: in this scenario, Yb doping drives a Lifshitz transition of the nodal Fermi surface, forming a fully gapped d-wave molecular superfluid of composite pairs. The T^{4} dependence of the penetration depth associated with the sound mode of this condensate is in accordance with observation.

  9. Molecular Pairing and Fully Gapped Superconductivity in Yb-doped CeCoIn5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erten, Onur; Flint, Rebecca; Coleman, Piers

    2015-01-01

    The recent observation of fully gapped superconductivity in Yb doped CeCoIn5 poses a paradox, for the disappearance of nodes suggests that they are accidental, yet d -wave symmetry with protected nodes is well established by experiment. Here, we show that composite pairing provides a natural resolution: in this scenario, Yb doping drives a Lifshitz transition of the nodal Fermi surface, forming a fully gapped d -wave molecular superfluid of composite pairs. The T4 dependence of the penetration depth associated with the sound mode of this condensate is in accordance with observation.

  10. STM/STS study of the superconducting gap in SmFeAsO1-xFx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Yuki; Ichimura, Koichi; Katono, Kazuhiro; Kurosawa, Tohru; Oda, Migaku; Tanda, Satoshi; Kamihara, Yoichi; Hosono, Hideo

    2015-02-01

    We report an electron tunneling study of SmFeAsO1-xFx in the low doping region (x=0, 0.045, 0.046, 0.069) by low temperature UHV-STM/STS. Superconducting gaps are observed for each superconducting sample x=0.045 (Tc=12.9 K), x=0.046 (Tc=32.9 K) and x=0.069 (Tc=46.9 K). We obtained corresponding superconducting gap size of ΔSC = 9.5 ± 0.5 meV, 9.75±0.25 meV and 11±1 meV. While Tc increases, ΔSC is kept the same. This suggests that the effective attractive interaction is the same and that there is some mechanism that suppresses the superconductivity in the low doping region. On the other hand, similar gap structures were found in a non-superconducting sample with x=0 at 7.8 K. The obtained gap size was ΔN = 8.5 ± 1.5 meV, which is almost the same as the superconducting gap in the superconducting samples (x=0.045, 0.046, 0.069).

  11. Evolution of superconducting gap and metallic ground state in cuprates from transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taillefer, Louis

    2006-03-01

    We report on fundamental characteristics of the ground state of cuprates in the limit of T=0, for both normal and superconducting states, obtained from transport measurements on high-quality single crystals of YBCO and Tl-2201, as a function of hole concentration. The superconducting gap is extracted from thermal conductivity; it is found to scale with the superconducting transition temperature throughout the overdoped regime, with a gap-to-Tc ratio of 5 [1]. The normal state is accessed by suppressing superconductivity with magnetic fields up to 60 T and is characterized by the limiting behavior of its electrical resistivity; while carrier localization is observed in YBCO at low temperature for carrier concentrations p below 0.1 hole/planar Cu, at p=0.1 and above the material remains highly metallic down to T=0 [2]. This shows that the non-superconducting state of underdoped cuprates, deep in the pseudogap phase, is remarkably similar to that of strongly overdoped cuprates, e.g. at p=0.3. We compare these results with similar measurements on other cuprates and discuss their implication for our understanding of the cuprate phase diagram. [1] In collaboration with: D.G. Hawthorn, S.Y. Li, M. Sutherland, E. Boaknin, R.W. Hill, C. Proust, F. Ronning, M. Tanatar, J. Paglione, D. Peets, R. Liang, D.A. Bonn, W.N. Hardy, and N.N. Kolesnikov. [2] In collaboration with: C. Proust, M. Sutherland, N. Doiron- Leyraud, S.Y. Li, R. Liang, D.A. Bonn, W.N. Hardy, N.E. Hussey, S. Adachi, S. Tajima, J. Levallois, and M. Narbone.

  12. Closing the energy gap through passive energy expenditure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of obesity is a gradual process occurring when daily energy intake persistently exceeds energy expenditure (EE). Typical daily weight gain is attributed to an energy gap or excess of stored energy of 15 to 50 kcal/day. Sedentary jobs likely promote weight gain. Standing may be a passive ...

  13. Features of Superconducting Gaps Revealed by STM/STS in Iron Based Superconductors With and Without Hole Pockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Hai-Hu; Hai-Hu Wen Team

    The pairing mechanism and gap structure in iron based superconductors (IBS) remains unresolved. We have conducted extensive STM/STS study on the Na(Fe1-xTx) As (T =Co, Cu, Mn), Ba1-xKxFe2As2KFe2As2, and Li1-xFexOHFeSe single crystals. We found the clear evidence of the in-gap quasi-particle states induced by the non-magnetic Cu impurities in Na(Fe0.97- x Co0.03Cux) As, giving strong evidence of the S+/- pairing. Furthermore, we show the presence of the bosonic mode with the energy identical to that of the neutron resonance and a simple linear relation Ω/kBTc ~ 4.3, being explained a consequence of the S+/-pairing. The STS spectrum in Li1-x FexOHFeSe clearly indicates the presence of double superconducting gaps with Δ1 ~ 14.3 meV and Δ2 ~ 8.6 meV. Further analysis based on QPI allows us to assign the larger (smaller) gap to the outer (inner) hybridized electron pockets. The huge value 2Δ1/kBTc = 8.7 discovered here undoubtedly proves the strong coupling mechanism. This work was supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology of China, National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  14. Toroidal constant-tension superconducting magnetic energy storage units

    DOEpatents

    Herring, J. Stephen

    1992-01-01

    A superconducting magnetic energy storage unit is provided in which the magnet is wound in a toroidal fashion such that the magnetic field produced is contained only within the bore of the magnet, and thus producing a very low external field. The superconducting magnet includes a coolant channel disposed through the wire. The bore of the magnet comprises a storage volume in which cryogenic coolant is stored, and this volume supplies the coolant to be delivered to the coolant channel in the magnet.

  15. Order, disorder, and tunable gaps in the spectrum of Andreev bound states in a multiterminal superconducting device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Tomohiro; Reutlinger, Johannes; Belzig, Wolfgang; Nazarov, Yuli V.

    2017-01-01

    We consider the spectrum of Andreev bound states (ABSs) in an exemplary four-terminal superconducting structure where four chaotic cavities are connected by quantum point contacts to the terminals and to each other forming a ring. We nickname the resulting device 4T-ring. Such a tunable device can be realized in a 2D electron gas-superconductor or a graphene-based hybrid structure. We concentrate on the limit of a short structure and large conductance of the point contacts where there are many ABS in the device forming a quasicontinuous spectrum. The energies of the ABS can be tuned by changing the superconducting phases of the terminals. We observe the opening and closing of gaps in the spectrum upon changing the phases. This concerns the usual proximity gap that separates the levels from zero energy as well as less usual "smile" gaps that split the levels of the quasicontinuous spectrum. We demonstrate a remarkable crossover in the overall spectrum that occurs upon changing the ratio of conductances of the inner and outer point contacts. At big values of the ratio (closed limit), the levels exhibit a generic behavior expected for the spectrum of a disordered system manifesting level repulsion and Brownian "motion" upon changing the phases. At small values of the ratio (open limit), the levels are squeezed into narrow bunches separated by wide smile gaps. Each bunch consists of almost degenerate ABS formed by Andreev reflection between two adjacent terminals. We study in detail the properties of the spectrum in the limit of a small ratio, paying special attention to the crossings of bunches. We distinguish two types of crossings: (i) with a regular phase dependence of the levels and (ii) crossings where the Brownian motion of the levels leads to an apparently irregular phase dependence. We work out a perturbation theory that explains the observations both at a detailed level of random scattering in the device and at a phenomenological level of positively defined

  16. Time-Resolved Photoexcitation of the Superconducting Two-Gap State in MgB2 Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Khafizov, M.; Satrapinsky, L.; Kúš, P.; Plecenik, A.; Sobolewski, Roman

    2003-11-01

    Femtosecond pump-probe studies show that carrier dynamics in MgB2 films is governed by the sub-ps electron-phonon (e-ph) relaxation present at all temperatures, the few-ps e-ph process well pronounced below 70K, and the sub-ns superconducting relaxation below Tc. The amplitude of the superconducting component versus temperature follows the superposition of the isotropic dirty gap and the three-dimensional π gap dependences, closing at two different Tc values. The time constant of the few-ps relaxation exhibits a double divergence at temperatures corresponding to the Tc's of the two gaps.

  17. Energy gaps measured by scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; Giambattista, B.; Slough, C. G.; Coleman, R. V.; Subramanian, M. A.

    1990-11-01

    A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) has been used to measure energy gaps in the charge-density-wave (CDW) phases of the layer-structure dichalcogenides and in the high-temperature superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8. Measured values of ΔCDW at 4.2 K for 2H-TaSe2, 2H-TaS2, and 2H-NbSe2 are 80, 50, and 34 meV giving values of 2ΔCDW/kBTc equal to 15.2, 15.4, and 23.9, indicating strong coupling in these CDW systems. Measured values of ΔCDW at 4.2 K in 1T-TaSe2 and 1T-TaS2 are ~150 meV for both materials giving 2ΔCDW/kBTc~=5.8. STM scans of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 at 4.2 K resolve atoms on the BiOx layer and show possible variations in electronic structure. The energy gap determined from I versus V and dI/dV versus V curves is in the range 30-35 meV giving values of 2Δ/kBTc~=8. Spectroscopy measurements with the STM can exhibit large zero-bias anomalies which complicate the analysis of the energy-gap structure, but adequate separation has been accomplished.

  18. Magnetic Excitations and the Exchange Energy Available for Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahm, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    We have made detailed comparisons of theoretical calculations and experimental neutron scattering results in absolute units in order to determine the temperature change of the nearest neighbor spin correlations in optimally doped YBCO as one goes from the normal to the superconducting state [1]. This allows us to estimate the magnetic exchange energy change that becomes available for superconducting condensation. Our results show that the available magnetic energy change is about 10-15 times larger than the energy necessary for superconducting condensation [1]. We discuss the issue of the spin sum rule and implications for a spin fluctuation driven pairing interaction as well as implications for low energy excitations in angular photoemission spectroscopy [2]. [1] H. Woo et al, Nature Physics 2, 600 (2006). [2] T. Dahm et al, Phys. Rev. B 72, 214512 (2005).

  19. Superfluid density and superconducting gaps of RbFe2As2 as a function of hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shermadini, Z.; Luetkens, H.; Maisuradze, A.; Khasanov, R.; Bukowski, Z.; Klauss, H.-H.; Amato, A.

    2012-11-01

    The superfluid density and superconducting gaps of superconducting RbFe2As2 have been determined as a function of temperature, magnetic field, and hydrostatic pressure by susceptibility and muon-spin spectroscopy measurements. From the data, fundamental microscopic parameters of the superconducting state like the London penetration depth λ, the gap values Δ, the upper critical field Bc2, and the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ have been obtained. In accordance with earlier measurements the ratio of the superfluid density ns∝λ-2 to the superconducting transition temperature Tc=2.52(2) K at ambient pressure is found to be much higher in the strongly hole-overdoped RbFe2As2 than in high-Tc Fe-based and other unconventional superconductors. As a function of pressure, Tc strongly decreases, at the rate of Tc/dp=-1.32 K GPa-1, i.e., it is reduced by 52% at p=1 GPa. The temperature dependence of ns is best described by a two-gap s-wave model, with both superconducting gaps being decreased by hydrostatic pressure until the smaller gap completely disappears at p=1 GPa.

  20. Analysis of Photonic Band Gaps in a Two-Dimensional Triangular Lattice with Superconducting Hollow Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Valencia, B. F.; Calero, J. M.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we use the plane wave expansion method to calculate photonic band structures in two-dimensional photonic crystals which consist of high-temperature superconducting hollow rods arranged in a triangular lattice. The variation of the photonic band structure with respect to both, the inner radius and the system temperature, is studied, taking into account temperatures below the critical temperature of the superconductor in the low frequencies regime and assuming E polarization of the incident light. Permittivity contrast and nontrivial geometry of the hollow rods lead to the appearance of new band gaps as compared with the case of solid cylinders. Such band gaps can be modulated by means of the inner radius and system temperature.

  1. Higher order mode damping in a five-cell superconducting rf cavity with a photonic band gap coupler cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Temkin, Richard J.; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.; Simakov, Evgenya I.; Boulware, Chase H.; Grimm, Terry L.; Rogacki, Adam R.

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of higher order mode (HOM) damping in the first multicell superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity with a photonic band gap (PBG) coupler cell. Achieving higher average beam currents is particularly desirable for future light sources and particle colliders based on SRF energy-recovery linacs (ERLs). Beam current in ERLs is limited by the beam breakup instability, caused by parasitic HOMs interacting with the beam in accelerating cavities. A PBG cell incorporated in an accelerating cavity can reduce the negative effect of HOMs by providing a frequency selective damping mechanism, thus allowing significantly higher beam currents. The five-cell cavity with a PBG cell was designed and optimized for HOM damping. Monopole and dipole HOMs were simulated. The SRF cavity was fabricated and tuned. External quality factors for some HOMs were measured in a cold test. The measurements agreed well with the simulations.

  2. A superconducting high-speed flywheel energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Andrade, R.; Ferreira, A. C.; Sotelo, G. G.; Suemitsu, W. I.; Rolim, L. G. B.; Silva Neto, J. L.; Neves, M. A.; dos Santos, V. A.; da Costa, G. C.; Rosario, M.; Stephan, R.; Nicolsky, R.

    2004-08-01

    High-speed flywheel systems have been studied as compensators of voltage sags and momentary interruptions of energy. Besides the complexity of these systems, the main concerns are bearing losses. This work is part of the development of a superconducting high-speed flywheel energy storage prototype. In order to minimize the bearing losses, this system uses a superconducting axial thrust magnetic bearing in a vacuum chamber, which guarantees low friction losses, and a switched reluctance motor-generator to drive the flywheel system. Dynamic simulations made for this prototype, connected to the electric power network, show the viability of use it as a compensator.

  3. NMR study of the superconducting gap variation near the Mott transition in Cs₃C₆₀.

    PubMed

    Wzietek, P; Mito, T; Alloul, H; Pontiroli, D; Aramini, M; Riccò, M

    2014-02-14

    Former extensive studies of superconductivity in the A3C60 compounds, where A is an alkali metal, have led one to consider that Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer electron-phonon pairing prevails in those compounds, though the incidence of electronic Coulomb repulsion has been highly debated. The discovery of two isomeric fulleride compounds Cs3C60 which exhibit a transition with pressure from a Mott insulator (MI) to a superconducting (SC) state clearly reopens that question. Using pressure (p) as a single control parameter of the C60 balls lattice spacing, one can now study the progressive evolution of the SC properties when the electronic correlations are increased towards the critical pressure p(c) of the Mott transition. We have used 13C and 133Cs NMR measurements on the cubic phase A15-Cs3C60 just above p(c)=5.0(3) kbar, where the SC transition temperature Tc displays a dome shape with decreasing cell volume. From the T dependence below T(c) of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rate (T1)(-1) we determine the electronic excitations in the SC state, that is 2Δ, the gap value. The latter is found to be largely enhanced with respect to the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer value established in the case of dense A3C60 compounds. It even increases slightly with decreasing p towards p(c), where T(c) decreases on the SC dome, so that 2Δ/k(B)T(c) increases regularly upon approaching the Mott transition. These results bring clear evidence that the increasing correlations near the Mott transition are not significantly detrimental to superconductivity. They rather suggest that repulsive electron interactions might even reinforce elecron-phonon superconductivity, being then partly responsible for the large T(c) values, as proposed by theoretical models taking the electronic correlations as a key ingredient.

  4. NMR Study of the Superconducting Gap Variation near the Mott Transition in Cs3C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wzietek, P.; Mito, T.; Alloul, H.; Pontiroli, D.; Aramini, M.; Riccò, M.

    2014-02-01

    Former extensive studies of superconductivity in the A3C60 compounds, where A is an alkali metal, have led one to consider that Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer electron-phonon pairing prevails in those compounds, though the incidence of electronic Coulomb repulsion has been highly debated. The discovery of two isomeric fulleride compounds Cs3C60 which exhibit a transition with pressure from a Mott insulator (MI) to a superconducting (SC) state clearly reopens that question. Using pressure (p) as a single control parameter of the C60 balls lattice spacing, one can now study the progressive evolution of the SC properties when the electronic correlations are increased towards the critical pressure pc of the Mott transition. We have used C13 and Cs133 NMR measurements on the cubic phase A15-Cs3C60 just above pc=5.0(3) kbar, where the SC transition temperature Tc displays a dome shape with decreasing cell volume. From the T dependence below Tc of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rate (T1)-1 we determine the electronic excitations in the SC state, that is 2Δ, the gap value. The latter is found to be largely enhanced with respect to the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer value established in the case of dense A3C60 compounds. It even increases slightly with decreasing p towards pc, where Tc decreases on the SC dome, so that 2Δ /kBTc increases regularly upon approaching the Mott transition. These results bring clear evidence that the increasing correlations near the Mott transition are not significantly detrimental to superconductivity. They rather suggest that repulsive electron interactions might even reinforce elecron-phonon superconductivity, being then partly responsible for the large Tc values, as proposed by theoretical models taking the electronic correlations as a key ingredient.

  5. Battery energy storage and superconducting magnetic energy storage for utility applications: A qualitative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Akhil, A.A.; Butler, P.; Bickel, T.C.

    1993-11-01

    This report was prepared at the request of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management for an objective comparison of the merits of battery energy storage with superconducting magnetic energy storage technology for utility applications. Conclusions are drawn regarding the best match of each technology with these utility application requirements. Staff from the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program and the superconductivity Programs at Sandia National contributed to this effort.

  6. Direct evidence for a pressure-induced nodal superconducting gap in the Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2 superconductor

    DOE PAGES

    Guguchia, Z.; Amato, A.; Kang, J.; ...

    2015-11-09

    The superconducting gap structure in iron-based high-temperature superconductors (Fe-HTSs) is non-universal. Contrasting with other unconventional superconductors, in the Fe-HTSs both d-wave and extended s-wave pairing symmetries are close in energy. Probing the proximity between these very different superconducting states and identifying experimental parameters that can tune them is of central interest. Here we report high-pressure muon spin rotation experiments on the temperature-dependent magnetic penetration depth in the optimally doped nodeless s-wave Fe-HTS Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2. Upon pressure, a strong decrease of the penetration depth in the zero-temperature limit is observed, while the superconducting transition temperature remains nearly constant. More importantly, the low-temperaturemore » behaviour of the inverse-squared magnetic penetration depth, which is a direct measure of the superfluid density, changes qualitatively from an exponential saturation at zero pressure to a linear-in-temperature behaviour at higher pressures, indicating that hydrostatic pressure promotes the appearance of nodes in the superconducting gap.« less

  7. Direct evidence for a pressure-induced nodal superconducting gap in the Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2 superconductor

    PubMed Central

    Guguchia, Z.; Amato, A.; Kang, J.; Luetkens, H.; Biswas, P. K.; Prando, G.; von Rohr, F.; Bukowski, Z.; Shengelaya, A.; Keller, H.; Morenzoni, E.; Fernandes, Rafael M.; Khasanov, R.

    2015-01-01

    The superconducting gap structure in iron-based high-temperature superconductors (Fe-HTSs) is non-universal. In contrast to other unconventional superconductors, in the Fe-HTSs both d-wave and extended s-wave pairing symmetries are close in energy. Probing the proximity between these very different superconducting states and identifying experimental parameters that can tune them is of central interest. Here we report high-pressure muon spin rotation experiments on the temperature-dependent magnetic penetration depth in the optimally doped nodeless s-wave Fe-HTS Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2. Upon pressure, a strong decrease of the penetration depth in the zero-temperature limit is observed, while the superconducting transition temperature remains nearly constant. More importantly, the low-temperature behaviour of the inverse-squared magnetic penetration depth, which is a direct measure of the superfluid density, changes qualitatively from an exponential saturation at zero pressure to a linear-in-temperature behaviour at higher pressures, indicating that hydrostatic pressure promotes the appearance of nodes in the superconducting gap. PMID:26548650

  8. Direct evidence for a pressure-induced nodal superconducting gap in the Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2 superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guguchia, Z.; Amato, A.; Kang, J.; Luetkens, H.; Biswas, P. K.; Prando, G.; von Rohr, F.; Bukowski, Z.; Shengelaya, A.; Keller, H.; Morenzoni, E.; Fernandes, Rafael M.; Khasanov, R.

    2015-11-01

    The superconducting gap structure in iron-based high-temperature superconductors (Fe-HTSs) is non-universal. In contrast to other unconventional superconductors, in the Fe-HTSs both d-wave and extended s-wave pairing symmetries are close in energy. Probing the proximity between these very different superconducting states and identifying experimental parameters that can tune them is of central interest. Here we report high-pressure muon spin rotation experiments on the temperature-dependent magnetic penetration depth in the optimally doped nodeless s-wave Fe-HTS Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2. Upon pressure, a strong decrease of the penetration depth in the zero-temperature limit is observed, while the superconducting transition temperature remains nearly constant. More importantly, the low-temperature behaviour of the inverse-squared magnetic penetration depth, which is a direct measure of the superfluid density, changes qualitatively from an exponential saturation at zero pressure to a linear-in-temperature behaviour at higher pressures, indicating that hydrostatic pressure promotes the appearance of nodes in the superconducting gap.

  9. Competition between superconductivity and magnetic/nematic order as a source of anisotropic superconducting gap in underdoped Ba1-xKxFe2As2

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H; Tanatar, M A; Straszheim, W E; Cho, K; Murphy, J; Spyrison, N; Reid, J -Ph; Shen, Bing; Wen, Hai-Hu; Fernandes, R M; Prozorov, R

    2014-07-01

    The in-plane London penetration depth Δλ(T) was measured using a tunnel diode resonator technique in single crystals of Ba1-xKxFe2As2 with doping levels x ranging from heavily underdoped, x=0.16 (Tc=7K), to nearly optimally doped, x=0.34 (Tc=39K). Exponential saturation of Δλ(T) in the T→0 limit is found in optimally doped samples, with the superfluid density ρs(T)≡[λ(0)/λ(T)]2 quantitatively described by a self-consistent γ model with two nodeless isotropic superconducting gaps. As the doping level is decreased towards the extreme end of the superconducting dome at x=0.16, the low-temperature behavior of Δλ(T) becomes nonexponential and is best described by the power law Δλ(T)∝T2, characteristic of strongly anisotropic gaps. The change between the two regimes happens within the range of coexisting magnetic/nematic order and superconductivity, x<0.25, and is accompanied by a rapid rise in the absolute value of Δλ(T) with underdoping. This effect, characteristic of the competition between superconductivity and other ordered states, is very similar to but of significantly smaller magnitude than what is observed in the electron-doped Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 compounds. Our study suggests that the competition between superconductivity and magnetic/nematic order in hole-doped compounds is weaker than in electron-doped compounds, and that the anisotropy of the superconducting state in the underdoped iron pnictides is a consequence of the anisotropic changes in the pairing interaction and in the gap function promoted by both magnetic and nematic long-range orders.

  10. Toroidal constant-tension superconducting magnetic energy storage units

    DOEpatents

    Herring, J.S.

    1992-11-03

    A superconducting magnetic energy storage unit is provided in which the magnet is wound in a toroidal fashion such that the magnetic field produced is contained only within the bore of the magnet, and thus producing a very low external field. The superconducting magnet includes a coolant channel disposed through the wire. The bore of the magnet comprises a storage volume in which cryogenic coolant is stored, and this volume supplies the coolant to be delivered to the coolant channel in the magnet. 6 figs.

  11. Vertical Line Nodes in the Superconducting Gap Structure of Sr2 RuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassinger, E.; Bourgeois-Hope, P.; Taniguchi, H.; René de Cotret, S.; Grissonnanche, G.; Anwar, M. S.; Maeno, Y.; Doiron-Leyraud, N.; Taillefer, Louis

    2017-01-01

    There is strong experimental evidence that the superconductor Sr2 RuO4 has a chiral p -wave order parameter. This symmetry does not require that the associated gap has nodes, yet specific heat, ultrasound, and thermal conductivity measurements indicate the presence of nodes in the superconducting gap structure of Sr2 RuO4 . Theoretical scenarios have been proposed to account for the existence of deep minima or accidental nodes (minima tuned to zero or below by material parameters) within a p -wave state. Other scenarios propose chiral d -wave and f -wave states, with horizontal and vertical line nodes, respectively. To elucidate the nodal structure of the gap, it is essential to know whether the lines of nodes (or minima) are vertical (parallel to the tetragonal c axis) or horizontal (perpendicular to the c axis). Here, we report thermal conductivity measurements on single crystals of Sr2 RuO4 down to 50 mK for currents parallel and perpendicular to the c axis. We find that there is substantial quasiparticle transport in the T =0 limit for both current directions. A magnetic field H immediately excites quasiparticles with velocities both in the basal plane and in the c direction. Our data down to Tc/30 and down to Hc 2/100 show no evidence that the nodes are in fact deep minima. Relative to the normal state, the thermal conductivity of the superconducting state is found to be very similar for the two current directions, from H =0 to H =Hc 2. These findings show that the gap structure of Sr2 RuO4 consists of vertical line nodes. This rules out a chiral d -wave state. Given that the c -axis dispersion (warping) of the Fermi surface in Sr2 RuO4 varies strongly from sheet to sheet, the small a -c anisotropy suggests that the line nodes are present on all three sheets of the Fermi surface. If imposed by symmetry, vertical line nodes would be inconsistent with a p -wave order parameter for Sr2 RuO4 . To reconcile the gap structure revealed by our data with a p -wave

  12. Test equipment for a flywheel energy storage system using a magnetic bearing composed of superconducting coils and superconducting bulks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, M.; Matsue, H.; Yamashita, T.; Hasegawa, H.; Nagashima, K.; Maeda, T.; Matsuoka, T.; Mukoyama, S.; Shimizu, H.; Horiuchi, S.

    2016-05-01

    Energy storage systems are necessary for renewable energy sources such as solar power in order to stabilize their output power, which fluctuates widely depending on the weather. Since ‘flywheel energy storage systems’ (FWSSs) do not use chemical reactions, they do not deteriorate due to charge or discharge. This is an advantage of FWSSs in applications for renewable energy plants. A conventional FWSS has capacity limitation because of the mechanical bearings used to support the flywheel. Therefore, we have designed a superconducting magnetic bearing composed of a superconducting coil stator and a superconducting bulk rotor in order to solve this problem, and have experimentally manufactured a large scale FWSS with a capacity of 100 kWh and an output power of 300 kW. The superconducting magnetic bearing can levitate 4 tons and enables the flywheel to rotate smoothly. A performance confirmation test will be started soon. An overview of the superconducting FWSS is presented in this paper.

  13. Development of superconducting magnetic bearing for flywheel energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Yoshiki; Mizuno, Katsutoshi; Yamashita, Tomohisa; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi; Nagashima, Ken; Mukoyama, Shinichi; Matsuoka, Taro; Nakao, Kengo; Horiuch, Shinichi; Maeda, Tadakazu; Shimizu, Hideki

    2016-12-01

    We have been developing a superconducting magnetic bearing (SMB) that has high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils and bulks for a flywheel energy storage system (FESS) that have an output capability of 300 kW and a storage capacity of 100 kW h (Nagashima et al., 2008, Hasegawa et al., 2015) [1,2]. The world largest-class FESS with a SMB has been completed and test operation has started. A CFRP flywheel rotor that had a diameter of 2 m and weight of 4000 kg had a capability to be rotated at a maximum speed of 6000 min-1. The SMB using superconducting material both for its rotor and stator is capable of supporting the flywheel that had the heavy weight and the high seed rotation mentioned above. This paper describes the design of the SMB and results of the cooling test of the SMB.

  14. Multiband superconductivity in Ta4Pd3Te16 with anisotropic gap structure.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Wen-He; Liu, Yi; Li, Yu-Ke; Xu, Xiao-Feng; Bao, Jin-Ke; Feng, Chun-Mu; Li, S Y; Xu, Zhu-An; Cao, Guang-Han

    2015-08-19

    We carried out measurements of the magnetoresistance, magnetic susceptibility and specific heat on crystals of the low-dimensional transition metal telluride Ta4Pd3Te16. Our results indicate that Ta4Pd3Te16 is an anisotropic type-II superconductor in the clean limit with the extracted Ginzburg-Landau parameter KGL = 84. The upper critical field Hc2(T) shows an anomalous temperature dependence at low temperatures and the anisotropy of Hc2(T) is strongly T-dependent, both of which indicate a multiband scenario. The electronic specific heat Cel(T) can be consistently described by a two-gap (s   +   d waves) model from the base temperature T/Tc ~ 0.12 up to Tc. Our results suggest nodal and multiband superconductivity in Ta4Pd3Te16.

  15. Pushing the Gradient Limitations of Superconducting Photonic Band Gap Structure Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Haynes, William B.; Kurennoy, Sergey S.; Shchegolkov, Dmitry; O'Hara, James F.; Olivas, Eric R.

    2012-06-07

    Superconducting photonic band gap resonators present us with unique means to place higher order mode couples in an accelerating cavity and efficiently extract HOMs. An SRF PBG resonator with round rods was successfully tested at LANL demonstrating operation at 15 MV/m. Gradient in the SRF PBG resonator was limited by magnetic quench. To increase the quench threshold in PBG resonators one must design the new geometry with lower surface magnetic fields and preserve the resonator's effectiveness for HOM suppression. The main objective of this research is to push the limits for the high-gradient operation of SRF PBG cavities. A NCRF PBG cavity technology is established. The proof-of-principle operation of SRF PBG cavities is demonstrated. SRF PBG resonators are effective for outcoupling HOMs. PBG technology can significantly reduce the size of SRF accelerators and increase brightness for future FELs.

  16. Method for making mirrored surfaces comprising superconducting material

    DOEpatents

    Early, James T.; Hargrove, R. Steven

    1989-01-01

    Superconducting mirror surfaces are provided by forming a mirror surface from a material which is superconductive at a temperature above about 40.degree. K. and adjusting the temperature of the surface to that temperature at which the material is superconducting. The mirror surfaces are essentially perfect reflectors for electromagnetic radiation with photon energy less than the superconducting band gap.

  17. Method for making mirrored surfaces comprising superconducting material

    DOEpatents

    Early, J.T.; Hargrove, R.S.

    1989-12-12

    Superconducting mirror surfaces are provided by forming a mirror surface from a material which is superconductive at a temperature above about 40 K and adjusting the temperature of the surface to that temperature at which the material is superconducting. The mirror surfaces are essentially perfect reflectors for electromagnetic radiation with photon energy less than the superconducting band gap.

  18. Numerical analysis of magnetic field in superconducting magnetic energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamaru, Y. ); Amemiya, Y. )

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports that the superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is more useful than the other systems of electric energy storage because of larger stored energy and higher efficiency. The other systems are the battery, the flywheel, the pumped-storage power station. Some models of solenoid type SMES are designed in U.S.A. and Japan. But a high magnetic field happens by the large scale SMES in the living environment, and makes the erroneous operations of the computer display, the pacemaker of the heart and the electronic equipments. We study some fit designs of magnetic shielding of the solenoidal type SMES for reduction of the magnetic field in living environment. When some superconducting shielding coils are over the main storage coil, magnetic field reduces remarkably than the case of non shielding coil. The calculated results of the magnetic field are obtained y the finite element method.

  19. Fully gapped superconductivity in In-doped topological crystalline insulator Pb0.5Sn0.5Te

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Guan; Gu, G. D.; Du, Zengyi; Fang, Delong; Yang, Huan; Zhong, R. D.; Schneeloch, J.; Wen, Hai -Hu

    2015-07-27

    In this study, superconductors derived from topological insulators and topological crystalline insulators by chemical doping have long been considered to be candidates as topological superconductors. Pb0.5Sn0.5Te is a topological crystalline insulator with mirror symmetry protected surface states on (001)-, (011)-, and (111)-oriented surfaces. The superconductor (Pb0.5Sn0.5)0.7In0.3Te is produced by In doping in Pb0.5Sn0.5Te, and is thought to be a topological superconductor. Here we report scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements of the superconducting state as well as the superconducting energy gap in (Pb0.5Sn0.5)0.7In0.3Te on a (001)-oriented surface. The spectrum can be well fitted by an anisotropic s-wave gap function of Δ = 0.72 + 0.18cos4θ meV using Dynes model. The results show that the superconductor seems to be a fully gapped one without any in-gap states, in contradiction with the expectation of a topological superconductor.

  20. Disorder induced evolution of two energy gaps in MgB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Jihn

    2007-03-01

    We study disorder effect on MgB2 superconductivity using the two band model by Suhl, Matthias, and Walker. We stress the importance of the Cooper pair size effect in the response of the BCS superconductor to the perturbation: the bounded Cooper pairs see the impurities within the range of the coherence length. This effect will undermine the initial decrease of the Tc and the big energy gap due to disorder, until the resistance ratio reaches about ˜3. For the resistance ratio less than 3, weak localization starts to decouple electrons and phonons, leading to the significant decrease of both the Tc and the big gap. In particular, we trace the evolution of two energy gaps of MgB2 as a function of disorder. Estimating the inter-band scattering rate from the experimental data, we compare our calculations with experiments. We also calculate the transition temperature, Tc as a function of the resistance ratio.

  1. Power applications of high-temperature superconductivity: Variable speed motors, current switches, and energy storage for end use

    SciTech Connect

    Hawsey, R.A.; Banerjee, B.B.; Grant, P.M.

    1996-08-01

    The objective of this project is to conduct joint research and development activities related to certain electric power applications of high-temperature superconductivity (HTS). The new superconductors may allow development of an energy-efficient switch to control current to variable speed motors, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems, and other power conversion equipment. Motor types that were considered include induction, permanent magnet, and superconducting ac motors. Because it is impractical to experimentally alter certain key design elements in radial-gap motors, experiments were conducted on an axial field superconducting motor prototype using 4 NbTi magnets. Superconducting magnetic energy storage technology with 0.25--5 kWh stored energy was studied as a viable solution to short duration voltage sag problems on the customer side of the electric meter. The technical performance characteristics of the device wee assembled, along with competing technologies such as active power line conditioners with storage, battery-based uninterruptible power supplies, and supercapacitors, and the market potential for SMES was defined. Four reports were prepared summarizing the results of the project.

  2. Superconducting magnetic energy storage apparatus structural support system

    DOEpatents

    Withers, Gregory J.; Meier, Stephen W.; Walter, Robert J.; Child, Michael D.; DeGraaf, Douglas W.

    1992-01-01

    A superconducting magnetic energy storage apparatus comprising a cylindrical superconducting coil; a cylindrical coil containment vessel enclosing the coil and adapted to hold a liquid, such as liquefied helium; and a cylindrical vacuum vessel enclosing the coil containment vessel and located in a restraining structure having inner and outer circumferential walls and a floor; the apparatus being provided with horizontal compression members between (1) the coil and the coil containment vessel and (2) between the coil containment vessel and the vacuum vessel, compression bearing members between the vacuum vessel and the restraining structure inner and outer walls, vertical support members (1) between the coil bottom and the coil containment vessel bottom and (2) between the coil containment vessel bottom and the vacuum vessel bottom, and external supports between the vacuum vessel bottom and the restraining structure floor, whereby the loads developed by thermal and magnetic energy changes in the apparatus can be accommodated and the structural integrity of the apparatus be maintained.

  3. New power-conditioning systems for superconducting magnetic energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Byung Moon

    1992-06-01

    This dissertation presents the development of new power-conditioning systems for superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES), which can regulate fast and independently the active and reactive powers demanded in the ac network. Three new power-conditioning systems were developed through a systematic approach to match the requirements of the superconducting coil and the ac power network. Each of these new systems is composed of ten 100-MW modules connected in parallel to handle the large current through the superconducting coil. The first system, which was published in the IEEE Transactions on Energy Conversion, consists of line-commutated 24-pulse converter, a thyristor-switched tap-changing transformer, and a thyristor-switched capacitor bank. The second system, which was accepted for publication in the IEEE Transactions on Energy Conversion, consists of a 12-pulse GTO (gate turn-off thyristor) converter and a thyristor-switched tap-changing transformer. The third system, which was submitted to the International Journal of Energy System, consists of a dc chopper and a voltage-source PWM (pulse width modulation) converter. The operational concept of each new system is verified through mathematical analyses and computer simulations. The dynamic interaction of each new system with the ac network and the superconducting coil is analyzed using a simulation model with EMTP (electro-magnetic transients program). The analysis results prove that each new system is feasible and realizable. Each system can regulate the active and reactive powers of the utility network rapidly and independently, and each offer a significant reduction of the system rating by reducing the reactive power demand in the converter. Feasible design for each new system was introduced using a modular design approach based on the 1000 MW/5000 MWH plant, incorporating commercially available components and proven technologies.

  4. The role of engineered materials in superconducting tunnel junction X-ray detectors - Suppression of quasiparticle recombination losses via a phononic band gap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippert, Edward D.; Ketterson, John B.; Chen, Jun; Song, Shenian; Lomatch, Susanne; Maglic, Stevan R.; Thomas, Christopher; Cheida, M. A.; Ulmer, Melville P.

    1992-01-01

    An engineered structure is proposed that can alleviate quasi-particle recombination losses via the existence of a phononic band gap that overlaps the 2-Delta energy of phonons produced during recombination of quasi-particles. Attention is given to a 1D Kronig-Penny model for phonons normally incident to the layers of a multilayered superconducting tunnel junction as an idealized example. A device with a high density of Bragg resonances is identified as desirable; both Nb/Si and NbN/SiN superlattices have been produced, with the latter having generally superior performance.

  5. Enhancement of the Superconducting Gap by Nesting in CaKFe4As4 : A New High Temperature Superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Daixiang; Kong, Tai; Meier, William R.; Lochner, Felix; Wang, Lin-Lin; Lin, Qisheng; Wu, Yun; Bud'ko, S. L.; Eremin, Ilya; Johnson, D. D.; Canfield, P. C.; Kaminski, Adam

    2016-12-01

    We use high resolution angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory with measured crystal structure parameters to study the electronic properties of CaKFe4 As4 . In contrast to the related CaFe2 As2 compounds, CaKFe4 As4 has a high Tc of 35 K at stochiometric composition. This presents a unique opportunity to study the properties of high temperature superconductivity in the iron arsenides in the absence of doping or substitution. The Fermi surface consists of several hole and electron pockets that have a range of diameters. We find that the values of the superconducting gap are nearly isotropic (within the explored portions of the Brillouin zone), but are significantly different for each of the Fermi surface (FS) sheets. Most importantly, we find that the momentum dependence of the gap magnitude plotted across the entire Brillouin zone displays a strong deviation from the simple cos (kx)cos (ky) functional form of the gap function, proposed by the scenario of Cooper pairing driven by a short range antiferromagnetic exchange interaction. Instead, the maximum value of the gap is observed on FS sheets that are closest to the ideal nesting condition, in contrast to previous observations in other ferropnictides. These results provide strong support for the multiband character of superconductivity in CaKFe4 As4 , in which Cooper pairing forms on the electron and the hole bands interacting via a dominant interband repulsive interaction, enhanced by band nesting.

  6. Design optimization of superconducting magnetic energy storage coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunia, Uttam; Saha, Subimal; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2014-05-01

    An optimization formulation has been developed for a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) solenoid-type coil with niobium titanium (Nb-Ti) based Rutherford-type cable that minimizes the cryogenic refrigeration load into the cryostat. Minimization of refrigeration load reduces the operating cost and opens up the possibility to adopt helium re-condensing system using cryo-cooler especially for small-scale SMES system. Dynamic refrigeration load during charging or discharging operational mode of the coil dominates over steady state load. The paper outlines design optimization with practical design constraints like actual critical characteristics of the superconducting cable, maximum allowable hoop stress on winding, etc., with the objective to minimize refrigeration load into the SMES cryostat. Effect of design parameters on refrigeration load is also investigated.

  7. First model of the shielded pulsed superconducting energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Shintomi, T.; Masuda, M.; Eyssa, Y.M.; Boom, R.W.

    1981-09-01

    The model was designed and constructed to test the effectiveness, the construction problems, and the scaling problems. The stored energy is 200 kJ, and its available energy is designed as 50 kJ at the transfer time less than 50 ms. The shield coil is distributed around the superconductive coil in a simple form for easy construction. The measurement of the leakage field showed that the simplified distribution of the shield coil was available. The dewar was constructed to have a wall as thin as possible with small heat leak by using GFRP supports. The design value of heat leak agreed with measurement. 4 refs.

  8. A feasibility demonstration program for superconducting magnetic energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Filios, P.G. )

    1988-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Agency, as the agent of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) Office, has begun a program to build an engineering test model (ETM) of a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system. The ETM will serve to demonstrate the feasibility of using SMES technology to meet both SDI and public utility requirements for electric energy storage. SMES technology characteristics are reviewed and related to SDI and electric utility requirements. Program structure and schedule are related to specific objectives, and critical issues are defined.

  9. Thermal conductivity of the pyrochlore superconductor KOs2O6: strong electron correlations and fully gapped superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Y; Shimono, Y; Shibauchi, T; Matsuda, Y; Yonezawa, S; Muraoka, Y; Hiroi, Z

    2006-06-23

    To elucidate the nature of the superconducting ground state of the geometrically frustrated pyrochlore KOs2O6 (Tc=9.6 K), the thermal conductivity was measured down to low temperatures (approximately Tc/100). We found that the quasiparticle mean free path is strikingly enhanced below a transition at Tp=7.8 K, indicating enormous electron inelastic scattering in the normal state. In magnetic fields, the conduction at T-->0 K is nearly constant up to approximately 0.4Hc2, in contrast with the rapid growth expected for superconductors with an anisotropic gap. This unambiguously indicates a fully gapped superconductivity, in contrast with previous studies. These results highlight that KOs2O6 is unique among superconductors with strong electron correlations.

  10. Neutron scattering studies of spin-phonon hybridization and superconducting spin gaps in the high temperature superconductor La2-x(Sr;Ba)xCuO4

    SciTech Connect

    Wagman, J. J.; Carlo, Jeremy P.; Gaudet, J.; Van Gastel, G. J.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Stone, Matthew B.; Granroth, Garrett E.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Savici, Andrei T.; Kim, Young -June; Zhang, H.; Ellis, D.; Zhao, Yang; Clark, L.; Kallin, A. B.; Mazurek, E.; Dabkowska, H. A.; Gaulin, Bruce D.

    2016-03-14

    We present time-of-flight neutron-scattering measurements on single crystals of La2-xBaxCuO4 (LBCO) with 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.095 and La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) with x = 0.08 and 0.11. This range of dopings spans much of the phase diagram relevant to high temperature cuprate superconductivity, ranging from insulating, three dimensional commensurate long range antiferromagnetic order for x ≤ 0.02 to two dimensional (2D) incommensurate antiferromagnetism co-existing with superconductivity for x ≥ 0.05. Previous work on lightly doped LBCO with x = 0.035 showed a clear resonant enhancement of the inelastic scattering coincident with the low energy crossings of the highly dispersive spin excitations and quasi-2D optic phonons. The present work extends these measurements across the phase diagram and shows this enhancement to be a common feature to this family of layered quantum magnets. Furthermore we show that the low temperature, low energy magnetic spectral weight is substantially larger for samples with non-superconducting ground states relative to any of the samples with superconducting ground states. Lastly spin gaps, suppression of low energy magnetic spectral weight, are observed in both superconducting LBCO and LSCO samples, consistent with previous observations for superconducting LSCO

  11. Underdoped superconducting cuprates as topological superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yuan-Ming; Xiang, Tao; Lee, Dung-Hai

    2014-09-01

    Superconductivity in copper oxide (cuprate) high-transition-temperature superconductors follows from the chemical doping of an antiferromagnetic insulating state. The consensus that the wavefunction of the superconducting carrier, the Cooper pair, has dx2-y2 symmetry has long been reached. This pairing symmetry implies the existence of nodes in the superconducting energy gap. Recently, a series of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments have revealed that deeply underdoped cuprates exhibit a particle-hole symmetric superconducting-like energy gap at the momentum-space locations where the dx2-y2 gap nodes are expected. Here we discuss the possibility that this phenomenon is caused by a fully gapped topological superconducting state that coexists with the antiferromagnetic order. If experimentally confirmed, this result will completely change our view of how exactly the high-temperature superconductivity state evolves from the insulating antiferromagnet.

  12. Neutron Scattering Study of Low Energy Magnetic Excitation in superconducting Te-vapor annealed under-doped FeTeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhijun; Yi, Ming; Xu, Guangyong; Shneeloch, J. A.; Matsuda, Masaaki; Chi, Songxue; Gu, Genda; Tranquada, J. M.; Birgeneau, R. J.

    To study the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity, we have performed neutron scattering and magnetization measurements on a Te vapor annealed single crystal Fe1 +yTe0.8Se0.2 (Tc~13K) sample. Te vapor annealed process is found to reduce/remove the excess Fe in the as-grown sample and make the under-doped originally non-superconducting sample become good superconducting sample. Our neutron scattering studies show both spin gap and spin resonance found in the Te vapor annealed superconducting sample. Comparing to commensurate spin resonance in as-grown optimal-doped sample, the spin resonance of Te annealed sample only shows up at the clearly incommensurate positions. The temperature and energy dependence of low energy magnetic excitations are also measured in the sample. This work is supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DOE.

  13. Scrutinizing the double superconducting gaps and strong coupling pairing in (Li1−xFex)OHFeSe

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zengyi; Yang, Xiong; Lin, Hai; Fang, Delong; Du, Guan; Xing, Jie; Yang, Huan; Zhu, Xiyu; Wen, Hai-Hu

    2016-01-01

    In the field of iron-based superconductors, one of the frontier studies is about the pairing mechanism. The recently discovered (Li1−xFex)OHFeSe superconductor with the transition temperature of about 40 K provides a good platform to check the origin of double superconducting gaps and high transition temperature in the monolayer FeSe thin film. Here we report a scanning tunnelling spectroscopy study on the (Li1−xFex)OHFeSe single crystals. The tunnelling spectrum mimics that of the monolayer FeSe thin film and shows double gaps at about 14.3 and 8.6 meV. Further analysis based on the quasiparticle interference allows us to rule out the d-wave gap, and for the first time assign the larger (smaller) gap to the outer (inner) Fermi pockets (after folding) associating with the dxy (dxz/dyz) orbitals, respectively. The gap ratio amounts to 8.7, which demonstrates the strong coupling mechanism in the present superconducting system. PMID:26822281

  14. ORNL Superconducting Technology Program for Electric Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hawsey, R.A.

    1993-02-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconducting Technology Program is conducted as part of a national effort by the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy to develop the technology base needed by US industry for commercial development of electric power applications of high-temperature superconductivity. The two major elements of this program are wire development and systems development. This document describes the major research and development activities for this program together with related accomplishments. The technical progress reported was summarized from information prepared for the FY 1992 Peer Review of Projects, conducted by DOE's Office of Program Analysis, Office of Energy Research. This ORNL program is highly leveraged by the staff and other resources of US industry and universities. Interlaboratory teams are also in place on a number of industry-driven projects. Patent disclosures, working group meetings, staff exchanges, and joint publications and presentations ensure that there is technology transfer to US industry. Working together, the collaborative teams are making tremendous progress in solving the scientific and technical issues necessary for the commercialization of long lengths of practical high-temperature superconductor wire and wire products.

  15. Anisotropic evolution of energy gap in Bi2212 superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durajski, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    We present a systematic analysis of the energy gap in underdoped Bi2212 superconductor as a function of temperature and hole doping level. Within the framework of the theoretical model containing the electron-phonon and electron-electron-phonon pairing mechanism, we reproduced the measurement results of modern ARPES experiments with very high accuracy. We showed that the energy-gap amplitude is very weakly dependent on the temperature but clearly dependent on the level of doping. The evidence for a non-zero energy gap above the critical temperature, referred to as a pseudogap, was also obtained.

  16. Anisotropic Superconducting Gap Revealed by Angle Resolved Specific Heat, Point Contact Tunneling and Scanning Tunneling Microscope in Iron Pnictide Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Hai-Hu

    2011-03-01

    Angle resolved specific heat was measured in FeSe 0.55 Te 0.45 single crystals. A four-fold oscillation of C/T, with the minimum locating at the Fe-Fe bond direction, was observed when the sample was rotated at 9 T, which can be understood as due to the gap modulation on the electron pocket within the scheme of S +/- pairing. Accordingly, by measuring the point contact Andreev reflection spectrum on the BaFe 2-x Ni x As 2 single crystals in wide doping regimes, we found a crossover from nodeless to nodal feature of the superconducting gap. In K-doped BaFe 2 As 2 single crystals, we performed the low temperature STM measurements and observed a well ordered vortex lattice in local region. In addition, the statistics on over 3000 dI/dV spectra illustrate clear evidence of two gaps with magnitude of 7.6 meV and 3.3 meV, respectively. Detailed fitting to the tunneling spectrum shows an isotropic superconducting gap. Work collaborated with B. Zeng, C. Ren, L. Shan, Y. L. Wang, B. Shen, G. Mu, H. Q. Luo, T. Xiang, H. Yang, I. I. Mazin and P. C. Dai. This work was supported by the Natural Science Foundation of China, the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (2011CB605900, No. 2006CB921802), and Chinese Academy of Sciences. IIM was supported by the Office of the Naval Research.

  17. Superconductivity:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacchetti, N.

    In this paper a short historical account of the discovery of superconductivity and of its gradual development is given. The physical interpretation of its various aspects took about forty years (from 1911 to 1957) to reach a successful description of this phenomenon in terms of a microscopic theory At the very end it seemed that more or less everything could be reasonably interpreted even if modifications and refinements of the original theory were necessary. In 1986 the situation changed abruptly when a cautious but revolutionary paper appeared showing that superconductivity was found in certain ceramic oxides at temperatures above those up to then known. A rush of frantic experimental activity started world-wide and in less than one year it was shown that superconductivity is a much more widespread phenomenon than deemed before and can be found at temperatures well above the liquid air boiling point. The complexity and the number of the substances (mainly ceramic oxides) involved call for a sort of modern alchemy if compounds with the best superconducting properties are to be manufactured. We don't use the word alchemy in a deprecatory sense but just to emphasise that till now nobody can say why these compounds are what they are: superconductors.

  18. Nodal to nodeless superconducting energy-gap structure change concomitant with Fermi-surface reconstruction in the heavy-fermion compound CeCoIn5

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyunsoo; Tanatar, M. A.; Flint, R.; Petrovic, C.; Hu, Rongwei; White, B. D.; Lum, I. K.; Maple, M. B.; Prozorov, R.

    2015-01-15

    The London penetration depth λ(T) was measured in single crystals of Ce1–xRxCoIn₅, R=La, Nd, and Yb down to Tmin ≈ 50 mK (Tc/Tmin ~50) using a tunnel-diode resonator. In the cleanest samples Δλ(T) is best described by the power law, Δλ(T) ∝ Tn, with n ~ 1, consistent with line nodes. Substitutions of Ce with La, Nd, and Yb lead to similar monotonic suppressions of Tc, however, the effects on Δλ(T) differ. While La and Nd dopings lead to increase of the exponent n and saturation at n ~ 2, as expected for a dirty nodal superconductor, Yb doping leads to n > 3, suggesting a change from nodal to nodeless superconductivity. As a result, this superconducting gap structure change happens in the same doping range where changes of the Fermi surface topology were reported, implying that the nodal structure and Fermi surface topology are closely linked.

  19. Enhancement of the superconducting gap by nesting in CaKFe4As4: A new high temperature superconductor

    DOE PAGES

    Mou, Daixiang; Kong, Tai; Meier, William R.; ...

    2016-12-28

    We use high resolution angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory with measured crystal structure parameters to study the electronic properties of CaKFe4As4. In contrast to the related CaFe2As2 compounds, CaKFe4As4 has a high Tc of 35 K at stochiometric composition. This presents a unique opportunity to study the properties of high temperature superconductivity in the iron arsenides in the absence of doping or substitution. The Fermi surface consists of several hole and electron pockets that have a range of diameters. We find that the values of the superconducting gap are nearly isotropic (within the explored portions of themore » Brillouin zone), but are significantly different for each of the Fermi surface (FS) sheets. Most importantly, we find that the momentum dependence of the gap magnitude plotted across the entire Brillouin zone displays a strong deviation from the simple cos(kx)cos(ky) functional form of the gap function, proposed by the scenario of Cooper pairing driven by a short range antiferromagnetic exchange interaction. Instead, the maximum value of the gap is observed on FS sheets that are closest to the ideal nesting condition, in contrast to previous observations in other ferropnictides. Finally, these results provide strong support for the multiband character of superconductivity in CaKFe4As4, in which Cooper pairing forms on the electron and the hole bands interacting via a dominant interband repulsive interaction, enhanced by band nesting.« less

  20. Temperature Evolution of the Pseudogap and Superconducting Gap in Bi2 Sr2 CaCu2 O8 Superconductor Studied by High Resolution Time-of-Flight Laser-ARPES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuxiao; Zhou, Xingjiang

    2015-03-01

    The relationship between the pseudogap and superconducting gap in high temperature cuprate superconductors remains an outstanding issue. In this talk, we will present our high resolution laser-ARPES measurement on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 superconductor. We will use the latest generation of ARPES system equipped with the VUV laser and the time-of-flight (TOF) electron energy analyzer. This enables us to have super-high energy resolution, high momentum resolution, simultaneous coverage of two-dimensional momentum space, high data acquisition efficiency and much reduced nonlinearity effect. From detailed temperature dependence near the nodal and antinodal regions, we will discuss on the relationship between the pseudogap and superconducting gap in the cuprate superconductors.

  1. The role of gap analyses in energy assurance planning.

    PubMed

    Shea, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Energy-related emergencies, such as power outages or interruptions to other energy supplies, can arise from a number of factors. Common causes include severe weather events--such as snowstorms, hurricanes, or summer storms with strong winds--as well as energy infrastructure that is overburdened, aging, or in need of repair. As past experience indicates, jurisdictions will continue to experience severe weather events, as well as confront infrastructure issues that make future power outages likely. As a result, state and local governments have turned to energy assurance planning, an energy-specific form of planning that helps jurisdictions prepare for and recover from energy emergencies. Energy assurance recognizes that power loss/disruption cannot be eradicated completely, but jurisdictions can mitigate the impact of power loss through effective planning. This article discusses the role of energy assurance planning and provides a description of what energy assurance means and why developing such plans at the state and local levels is important. In addition, this article discusses the role of statutory gap analyses in energy assurance planning and discusses how a gap analysis can be used by planners to identify trends and gaps in energy assurance. To provide context, a recently conducted statutory gap analysis analyzing national emergency backup power trends is provided as a case study. A summary of this project and key findings is included. Finally, this article briefly touches on legislation as an alternative to energy assurance planning, and provides summaries of recent legislative proposals introduced in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.

  2. Superconducting gap evolution in overdoped BaFe₂(As1-xPx)₂ single crystals through nanocalorimetry

    DOE PAGES

    Campanini, D.; Diao, Z.; Fang, L.; ...

    2015-06-18

    We report on specific heat measurements on clean overdoped BaFe₂(As1-xPx)₂ single crystals performed with a high resolution membrane-based nanocalorimeter. A nonzero residual electronic specific heat coefficient at zero temperature γr=C/T|T→0 is seen for all doping compositions, indicating a considerable fraction of the Fermi surface ungapped or having very deep minima. The remaining superconducting electronic specific heat is analyzed through a two-band s-wave α model in order to investigate the gap structure. Close to optimal doping we detect a single zero-temperature gap of Δ₀~5.3 me V, corresponding to Δ₀/kBTc ~ 2.2. Increasing the phosphorus concentration x, the main gap reduces tillmore » a value of Δ₀ ~ 1.9 meV for x = 0.55 and a second weaker gap becomes evident. From the magnetic field effect on γr, all samples however show similar behavior [γr(H) - γr (H = 0)∝ Hn, with n between 0.6 and 0.7]. This indicates that, despite a considerable redistribution of the gap weights, the total degree of gap anisotropy does not change drastically with doping.« less

  3. Survey of domestic research on superconducting magnetic energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Dresner, L.

    1991-09-01

    This report documents the results of a survey of domestic research on superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) undertaken with the support of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconductivity Pilot Center. Each survey entry includes the following: Name, address, and other telephone and facsimile numbers of the principal investigator and other staff members; funding for fiscal year 1991, 1992, 1993; brief descriptions of the program, the technical progress to date, and the expected technical progress; a note on any other collaboration. Included with the survey are recommendations intended to help DOE decide how best to support SMES research and development (R D). To summarize, I would say that important elements of a well-rounded SMES research program for DOE are as follows. (1) Construction of a large ETM. (2) Development of SMES as an enabling technology for solar and wind generation, especially in conjunction with the ETM program, if possible. (3) Development of small SMES units for electric networks, for rapid transit, and as noninterruptible power supplies (uses (2), (3), and (4) above). In this connection, lightweight, fiber-reinforced polymer structures, which would be especially advantageous for space and transportation applications, should be developed. (4) Continued study of the potential impacts of high-temperature superconductors on SMES, with construction as soon as feasible of small SMES units using high-temperature superconductors (HTSs).

  4. Department of Energy`s Wire Development Workshop - Superconductivity program for electric systems

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The 1996 High-Temperature Superconducting Wire Development Workshop was held on January 31--February 1 at the Crown Plaza Tampa Westshore in Tampa, Florida. The meeting was hosted by Tampa Electric Company and sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Program for Electric Systems. The meeting focused on recent high-temperature superconducting wire development activities in the Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Systems program. Tampa Electric`s Greg Ramon began the meeting by giving a perspective on the changes now occurring in the utility sector. Major program wire development accomplishments during the past year were then highlighted, particularly the world record achievements at Los Alamos and Oak Ridge National Laboratories. The meeting then focussed on three priority technical issues: thallium conductors; AC losses in HTS conductors; and coated conductors on textured substrates. Following in-depth presentations, working groups were formed in each technology area to discuss and critique the most important current research and development issues. The working groups identified research areas that have the potential for greatly enhancing the wire development effort. These areas are discussed in the summary reports from each of the working groups. This document is a compilation of the workshop proceedings including all general session presentations and summary reports from the working groups.

  5. Which Way to the Energy Gap?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loftas, Tony

    1973-01-01

    The higher cost of energy in the future might well dampen the current ardour for industrialization. Cheap sources are the ones most likely to disappear, pointing to a further disparity between industrialized and nonindustrialized societies. (BL)

  6. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of branched gap plasmon resonators

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Søren; Esfandyarpour, Majid; Koh, Ai Leen; Mortensen, N. Asger; Brongersma, Mark L.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-01-01

    The miniaturization of integrated optical circuits below the diffraction limit for high-speed manipulation of information is one of the cornerstones in plasmonics research. By coupling to surface plasmons supported on nanostructured metallic surfaces, light can be confined to the nanoscale, enabling the potential interface to electronic circuits. In particular, gap surface plasmons propagating in an air gap sandwiched between metal layers have shown extraordinary mode confinement with significant propagation length. In this work, we unveil the optical properties of gap surface plasmons in silver nanoslot structures with widths of only 25 nm. We fabricate linear, branched and cross-shaped nanoslot waveguide components, which all support resonances due to interference of counter-propagating gap plasmons. By exploiting the superior spatial resolution of a scanning transmission electron microscope combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we experimentally show the propagation, bending and splitting of slot gap plasmons. PMID:27982030

  7. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of branched gap plasmon resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Søren; Esfandyarpour, Majid; Koh, Ai Leen; Mortensen, N. Asger; Brongersma, Mark L.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-12-01

    The miniaturization of integrated optical circuits below the diffraction limit for high-speed manipulation of information is one of the cornerstones in plasmonics research. By coupling to surface plasmons supported on nanostructured metallic surfaces, light can be confined to the nanoscale, enabling the potential interface to electronic circuits. In particular, gap surface plasmons propagating in an air gap sandwiched between metal layers have shown extraordinary mode confinement with significant propagation length. In this work, we unveil the optical properties of gap surface plasmons in silver nanoslot structures with widths of only 25 nm. We fabricate linear, branched and cross-shaped nanoslot waveguide components, which all support resonances due to interference of counter-propagating gap plasmons. By exploiting the superior spatial resolution of a scanning transmission electron microscope combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we experimentally show the propagation, bending and splitting of slot gap plasmons.

  8. Design of a 4.5 MJ/1 MW sectored toroidal superconducting energy storage magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunia, Uttam; Akhter, Javed; Nandi, Chinmay; Pal, Gautam; Saha, Subimal

    2014-09-01

    A 4.5 MJ/1 MW superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system is being developed at VECC centre, Kolkata. The magnet system consists of the cryostat and coil assembly comprising eight superconducting solenoid coils made of custom-made NbTi based Rutherford-type cable and arranged in toroidal fashion with finite inter-sector gap. Since the strong electromagnetic force distributed to the coil is asymmetric and non-uniform in nature, a precise 3-D finite element analysis (FEA) has been carried out to design a mechanically stable coil and support structure under various operational scenarios. The results reveal that maximum stress developed on coil and its support structure is below allowable stress limit. Extensive transient analysis has also been carried out to evaluate transient loss and assess the feasibility of using helium re-condensation technology with commercially available cryo-refrigerators. Finally, quench protection scenario has also been discussed suitable for this toroidal-type SMES system. The article investigates the design concept of the cryostat and coil assembly.

  9. Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) program, January 1-December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.D.

    1982-02-01

    Work reported is on the development of a 30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit for use by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to stabilize power oscillations on their Pacific AC Intertie. The 30 MJ superconducting coil manufacture was completed. Design of the seismic mounting of the coil to the nonconducting dewar lid and a concrete foundation is complete. The superconducting application VAR (SAVAR) control study indicated a low economic advantage and the SAVAR program was terminated. An economic and technological evaluation of superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) was completed and the results are reported.

  10. Minding the Gap: Synthetic Strategies for Tuning the Energy Gap in Conjugated Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Dana; Cohn, Pamela G.

    2016-01-01

    While structure-property relationships are commonly developed in applications of physical organic chemistry to real-world problems at the graduate level, they have not been generally emphasized in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum. For instance, the ability to modify the energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the…

  11. Direct evidence for a pressure-induced nodal superconducting gap in the Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2 superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Guguchia, Z.; Amato, A.; Kang, J.; Luetkens, H.; Biswas, P. K.; Prando, G.; von Rohr, F.; Bukowski, Z.; Shengelaya, A.; Keller, H.; Morenzoni, E.; Fernandes, Rafael M.; Khasanov, R.

    2015-11-09

    The superconducting gap structure in iron-based high-temperature superconductors (Fe-HTSs) is non-universal. Contrasting with other unconventional superconductors, in the Fe-HTSs both d-wave and extended s-wave pairing symmetries are close in energy. Probing the proximity between these very different superconducting states and identifying experimental parameters that can tune them is of central interest. Here we report high-pressure muon spin rotation experiments on the temperature-dependent magnetic penetration depth in the optimally doped nodeless s-wave Fe-HTS Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2. Upon pressure, a strong decrease of the penetration depth in the zero-temperature limit is observed, while the superconducting transition temperature remains nearly constant. More importantly, the low-temperature behaviour of the inverse-squared magnetic penetration depth, which is a direct measure of the superfluid density, changes qualitatively from an exponential saturation at zero pressure to a linear-in-temperature behaviour at higher pressures, indicating that hydrostatic pressure promotes the appearance of nodes in the superconducting gap.

  12. The calculation of band gap energy in zinc oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, Ali; Belahssen, Okba; Gareh, Salim; Benramache, Said

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the optical properties of undoped zinc oxide thin films as the n-type semiconductor; the thin films were deposited at different precursor molarities by ultrasonic spray and spray pyrolysis techniques. The thin films were deposited at different substrate temperatures ranging between 200 and 500 °C. In this paper, we present a new approach to control the optical gap energy of ZnO thin films by concentration of the ZnO solution and substrate temperatures from experimental data, which were published in international journals. The model proposed to calculate the band gap energy with the Urbach energy was investigated. The relation between the experimental data and theoretical calculation suggests that the band gap energies are predominantly estimated by the Urbach energies, film transparency, and concentration of the ZnO solution and substrate temperatures. The measurements by these proposal models are in qualitative agreements with the experimental data; the correlation coefficient values were varied in the range 0.96-0.99999, indicating high quality representation of data based on Equation (2), so that the relative errors of all calculation are smaller than 4%. Thus, one can suppose that the undoped ZnO thin films are chemically purer and have many fewer defects and less disorder owing to an almost complete chemical decomposition and contained higher optical band gap energy.

  13. Analytical design of a superconducting magnetic energy storage for pulsed power peak

    SciTech Connect

    Netter, D.; Leveque, J.; Rezzoug, A.; Caron, J.P.; Sargos, F.M.

    1996-09-01

    A Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage can be used to produce very high pulsed power peak. A superconducting coil is magnetically coupled with another coil linked to the load. During the storage phase, the current is constant. In order to transfer the energy to the load, the authors cause the quench of the superconducting coil. It is very important to know the efficiency of the transfer and how much energy is discharged in the Helium vessel. In this paper, they propose an analytical method which enables to calculate very quickly the electrical parameters of such a device.

  14. Stripes and superconductivity in cuprate superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranquada, J. M.

    2005-08-01

    One type of order that has been observed to compete with superconductivity in cuprates involves alternating charge and antiferromagnetic stripes. Recent neutron scattering studies indicate that the magnetic excitation spectrum of a stripe-ordered sample is very similar to that observed in superconducting samples. In fact, it now appears that there may be a universal magnetic spectrum for the cuprates. One likely implication of this universal spectrum is that stripes of a dynamic form are present in the superconducting samples. On cooling through the superconducting transition temperature, a gap opens in the magnetic spectrum, and the weight lost at low energy piles up above the gap; the transition temperature is correlated with the size of the spin gap. Depending on the magnitude of the spin gap with respect to the magnetic spectrum, the enhanced magnetic scattering at low temperature can be either commensurate or incommensurate. Connections between stripe correlations and superconductivity are discussed.

  15. STRIPES AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY IN CUPRATE SUPERCONDUCTORS

    SciTech Connect

    TRANQUADA, J.M.

    2005-08-22

    One type of order that has been observed to compete with superconductivity in cuprates involves alternating charge and antiferromagnetic stripes. Recent neutron scattering studies indicate that the magnetic excitation spectrum of a stripe-ordered sample is very similar to that observed in superconducting samples. In fact, it now appears that there may be a universal magnetic spectrum for the cuprates. One likely implication of this universal spectrum is that stripes of a dynamic form are present in the superconducting samples. On cooling through the superconducting transition temperature, a gap opens in the magnetic spectrum, and the weight lost at low energy piles up above the gap; the transition temperature is correlated with the size of the spin gap. Depending on the magnitude of the spin gap with respect to the magnetic spectrum, the enhanced magnetic scattering at low temperature can be either commensurate or incommensurate. Connections between stripe correlations and superconductivity are discussed.

  16. Development of Low Energy Gap and Fully Regioregular Polythienylenevinylene Derivative

    DOE PAGES

    David, Tanya M. S.; Zhang, Cheng; Sun, Sam-Shajing

    2014-01-01

    Low energy gap and fully regioregular conjugated polymers find its wide use in solar energy conversion applications. This paper will first briefly review this type of polymers and also report synthesis and characterization of a specific example new polymer, a low energy gap, fully regioregular, terminal functionalized, and processable conjugated polymer poly-(3-dodecyloxy-2,5-thienylene vinylene) or PDDTV. The polymer exhibited an optical energy gap of 1.46 eV based on the UV-vis-NIR absorption spectrum. The electrochemically measured highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level is −4.79 eV, resulting in the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of −3.33 eV based on optical energy gap. The polymer wasmore » synthesized via Horner-Emmons condensation and is fairly soluble in common organic solvents such as tetrahydrofuran and chloroform with gentle heating. DSC showed two endothermic peaks at 67°C and 227°C that can be attributed to transitions between crystalline and liquid states. The polymer is thermally stable up to about 300°C. This polymer appears very promising for cost-effective solar cell applications.« less

  17. Fractal superconductivity near localization threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Feigel'man, M.V.; Ioffe, L.B.; Kravtsov, V.E.; Cuevas, E.

    2010-07-15

    We develop a semi-quantitative theory of electron pairing and resulting superconductivity in bulk 'poor conductors' in which Fermi energy E{sub F} is located in the region of localized states not so far from the Anderson mobility edge E{sub c}. We assume attractive interaction between electrons near the Fermi surface. We review the existing theories and experimental data and argue that a large class of disordered films is described by this model. Our theoretical analysis is based on analytical treatment of pairing correlations, described in the basis of the exact single-particle eigenstates of the 3D Anderson model, which we combine with numerical data on eigenfunction correlations. Fractal nature of critical wavefunction's correlations is shown to be crucial for the physics of these systems. We identify three distinct phases: 'critical' superconductive state formed at E{sub F} = E{sub c}, superconducting state with a strong pseudo-gap, realized due to pairing of weakly localized electrons and insulating state realized at E{sub F} still deeper inside a localized band. The 'critical' superconducting phase is characterized by the enhancement of the transition temperature with respect to BCS result, by the inhomogeneous spatial distribution of superconductive order parameter and local density of states. The major new feature of the pseudo-gapped state is the presence of two independent energy scales: superconducting gap {Delta}, that is due to many-body correlations and a new 'pseudo-gap' energy scale {Delta}{sub P} which characterizes typical binding energy of localized electron pairs and leads to the insulating behavior of the resistivity as a function of temperature above superconductive T{sub c}. Two gap nature of the pseudo-gapped superconductor is shown to lead to specific features seen in scanning tunneling spectroscopy and point-contact Andreev spectroscopy. We predict that pseudo-gapped superconducting state demonstrates anomalous behavior of the optical

  18. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; ...

    2015-02-26

    This study examines the field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds which has a history dating back to the 1960s. This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC₆ and YbC₆ in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how this relates to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic statesmore » and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.« less

  19. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; Dean, Mark P. M.; Rahnejat, Kaveh C.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Ellerby, Mark

    2015-02-26

    This study examines the field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds which has a history dating back to the 1960s. This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC₆ and YbC₆ in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how this relates to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.

  20. Energy Gaps in the Failed High-Tc Superconductor La1.875Ba0.125CuO4

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-08-11

    A central issue in high-T{sub c} superconductivity is the nature of the normal-state gap (pseudogap) in the underdoped regime and its relationship with superconductivity. Despite persistent efforts, theoretical ideas for the pseudogap evolve around fluctuating superconductivity, competing order, and spectral weight suppression due to many-body effects. Recently, although some experiments in the superconducting state indicate a distinction between the superconducting gap and pseudogap, others in the normal state, either by extrapolation from high-temperature data or directly from La{sub 1.875)Ba{sub 0.125}CuO{sub 4} (LBCO-1/8) at low temperature, suggest the ground-state pseudogap is a single gap of d-wave form. Here, we report angle-resolved photoemission data from LBCO-1/8, collected with improved experimental conditions, that reveal the ground-state pseudogap has a pronounced deviation from the simple d-wave form. It contains two distinct components: a d-waev component within an extended region around the node and the other abruptly enhanced close to the antinode, pointing to a dual nature of the pseudogap in this failed high-T{sub c} superconductor that involves a possible precursor-pairing energy scale around the node and another of different but unknown origin near the antinode.

  1. Identical superconducting gap on different Fermi surfaces of Ca(Al0.5Si0.5)2 with the AlB2 structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, S.; Yokoya, T.; Shin, S.; Imai, M.; Hase, I.

    2004-03-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of Ca(Al0.5Si0.5)2 (CaAlSi), which is a superconductor (transition temperature is 7.7 K) with the AlB2 structure, revealed that superconducting gaps on two Fermi surfaces (FSs) with three-dimensional character around Γ(A) and M(L) in the Brillouin zone provide essentially the same superconducting gap value (˜1.2 meV±0.2 meV). This is in contrast to the case of MgB2, in which different FSs exhibit different gap values. The reduced gap value 2Δ(0)/kBTc of ˜4.2±0.2 classifies CaAlSi as a moderately strong-coupling superconductor.

  2. Superconducting gamma and fast-neutron spectrometers with high energy resolution

    DOEpatents

    Friedrich, Stephan; , Niedermayr, Thomas R.; Labov, Simon E.

    2008-11-04

    Superconducting Gamma-ray and fast-neutron spectrometers with very high energy resolution operated at very low temperatures are provided. The sensor consists of a bulk absorber and a superconducting thermometer weakly coupled to a cold reservoir, and determines the energy of the incident particle from the rise in temperature upon absorption. A superconducting film operated at the transition between its superconducting and its normal state is used as the thermometer, and sensor operation at reservoir temperatures around 0.1 K reduces thermal fluctuations and thus enables very high energy resolution. Depending on the choice of absorber material, the spectrometer can be configured either as a Gamma-spectrometer or as a fast-neutron spectrometer.

  3. ESR spectrometer with a loop-gap resonator for cw and time resolved studies in a superconducting magnet.

    PubMed

    Simon, Ferenc; Murányi, Ferenc

    2005-04-01

    The design and performance of an electron spin resonance spectrometer operating at 3 and 9 GHz microwave frequencies combined with a 9-T superconducting magnet are described. The probehead contains a compact two-loop, one gap resonator, and is inside the variable temperature insert of the magnet enabling measurements in the 0-9T magnetic field and 1.5-400 K temperature range. The spectrometer allows studies on systems where resonance occurs at fields far above the g approximately 2 paramagnetic condition such as in antiferromagnets. The low quality factor of the resonator allows time resolved experiments such as, e.g., longitudinally detected ESR. We demonstrate the performance of the spectrometer on the NaNiO2 antiferromagnet, the MgB2 superconductor, and the RbC60 conducting alkaline fulleride polymer.

  4. Anisotropic rectifying characteristics induced by the superconducting gap of YBa2Cu3O7-δ/Nb-doped SrTiO3 heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M. J.; Hao, F. X.; Zhang, C.; Liu, X.; Li, X. G.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigated the anisotropic rectifying characteristics of a YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO)/Nb-doped SrTiO3 heterojunction in magnetic fields of up to 9 T by rotating the junction from H//c to H//ab of the YBCO film. From the temperature and field dependencies of the diffusion potential Vd, we found that the angle-resolved reductions of Vd from its original value, δVd, were induced by the anisotropic superconducting gap Δ of the YBCO. The anisotropic parameter obtained from Δ was close to that obtained from the angular-dependent upper critical fields of the YBCO. This heterojunction is helpful both in investigating the superconducting gap and in designing sensitive superconducting devices.

  5. Energy Gap of Neutral Excitations Implies Vanishing Charge Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Haruki

    2017-03-01

    In quantum many-body systems with a U(1) symmetry, such as particle number conservation and axial spin conservation, there are two distinct types of excitations: charge-neutral excitations and charged excitations. The energy gaps of these excitations may be independent from each other in strongly correlated systems. The static susceptibility of the U(1) charge vanishes when the charged excitations are all gapped, but its relation to the neutral excitations is not obvious. Here we show that a finite excitation gap of the neutral excitations is, in fact, sufficient to prove that the charge susceptibility vanishes (i.e., the system is incompressible). This result gives a partial explanation for why the celebrated quantization condition n (S -mz)∈Z at magnetization plateaus works even in spatial dimensions greater than one.

  6. Optical and electrical properties of thin superconducting films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covington, Billy C.; Jing, Feng Chen

    1990-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopic techniques can provide a vital probe of the superconducting energy gap which is one of the most fundamental physical properties of superconductors. Currently, the central questions regarding the optical properties of superconductors are how the energy gap can be measured by infrared techniques and at which frequency the gap exists. An effective infrared spectroscopic method to investigate the superconducting energy gap, Eg, was developed by using the Bomem DA 3.01 Fourier Transformation Spectrophotometer. The reflectivity of a superconducting thin film of YBaCuO deposited on SrTiO3 was measured. A shoulder was observed in the superconducting state reflectance R(sub S) at 480/cm. This gives a value of Eg/kT(sub c) = 7.83, where k is the Boltzmann constant and T(sub c) is the superconducting transition temperature, from which, it is suggested that YBaCuO is a very strong coupling superconductor.

  7. Spatial variation of the two-fold anisotropic superconducting gap in a monolayer of FeS e0.5T e0.5 on a topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamlapure, A.; Manna, S.; Cornils, L.; Hänke, T.; Bremholm, M.; Hofmann, Ph.; Wiebe, J.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2017-03-01

    We present a low temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) study of the superconducting properties of monolayers of FeS e0.5T e0.5 grown on the three-dimensional (3D) topological insulator B i2S e1.2T e1.8 . While the morphology and the overall transition temperature resembles those of similarly doped bulk crystals, we find a two-fold anisotropic s -wave gap function. The two-fold nature of the gap symmetry is evident from the Bogoliubov quasiparticle interference (QPI) pattern, which shows distinct C2 symmetric scattering intensities. Spatially resolved spectroscopic data shows a strong inhomogeneity in the size and anisotropy strength of the energy gaps, which cannot be correlated merely to the local chemical disorder. Instead, we argue that the gap inhomogeneity emerges with a similar mechanism as in disordered superconductors. Our sample system provides an ideal platform to study unconventional superconductivity in close proximity to a topological insulator.

  8. Superconductivity of the Sr2Ca12Cu24O41 spin-ladder system: are the superconducting pairing and the spin-gap formation of the same origin?

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Naoki; Môri, Nobuo; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Matsumoto, Takehiko; Motoyama, Naoki; Uchida, Shinichi

    2003-04-04

    Pressure-induced superconductivity in a spin-ladder cuprate Sr2Ca12Cu24O41 has not been studied on a microscopic level thus far although the superconductivity was already discovered in 1996. We have improved the high-pressure technique using a large high-quality crystal, and succeeded in studying the superconductivity using 63Cu nuclear magnetic resonance. We found that the anomalous metallic state reflecting the spin-ladder structure is realized and the superconductivity possesses an s-wave-like character in the meaning that a finite gap exists in the quasiparticle excitation: At a pressure of 3.5 GPa, we observed two excitation modes in the normal state from the relaxation rate T-11. One gives rise to an activation-type component in T-11, and the other T-linear component linking directly with the superconductivity. This gapless mode likely arises from free motion of holon-spinon bound states appearing by hole doping, and the pairing of them likely causes the superconductivity.

  9. Public perceptions and information gaps in solar energy in Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Varun; Beck, Ariane L.

    2015-07-01

    Studying the behavioral aspects of the individual decision-making process is important in identifying and addressing barriers in the adoption of residential solar photovoltaic (PV). However, there is little systematic research focusing on these aspects of residential PV in Texas, an important, large, populous state, with a range of challenges in the electricity sector including increasing demand, shrinking reserve margins, constrained water supply, and challenging emissions reduction targets under proposed federal regulations. This paper aims to address this gap through an empirical investigation of a new survey-based dataset collected in Texas on solar energy perceptions and behavior. The results of this analysis offer insights into the perceptions and motivations influencing intentions and behavior toward solar energy in a relatively untapped market and help identify information gaps that could be targeted to alleviate key barriers to adopting solar, thereby enabling significant emissions reductions in the residential sector in Texas.

  10. Optical and electronic properties of some semiconductors from energy gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Sunil K.; Pattanaik, Anup

    2016-03-01

    II-VI and III-V tetrahedral semiconductors have significant potential for novel optoelectronic applications. In the present work, some of the optical and electronic properties of these groups of semiconductors have been studied using a recently proposed empirical relationship for refractive index from energy gap. The calculated values of these properties are also compared with those calculated from some well known relationships. From an analysis of the calculated electronic polarisability of these tetrahedral binary semiconductors from different formulations, we have proposed an empirical relation for its calculation. The predicted values of electronic polarisability of these semiconductors agree fairly well with the known values over a wide range of energy gap. The proposed empirical relation has also been used to calculate the electronic polarisability of some ternary compounds.

  11. Photonic Band Gap resonators for high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, S.; Smith, D.R.; Kroll, N. |

    1993-12-31

    We have proposed that a new type of microwave resonator, based on Photonic Band Gap (PBG) structures, may be particularly useful for high energy accelerators. We provide an explanation of the PBG concept and present data which illustrate some of the special properties associated with such structures. Further evaluation of the utility of PBG resonators requires laboratory testing of model structures at cryogenic temperatures, and at high fields. We provide a brief discussion of our test program, which is currently in progress.

  12. Free Energy Gap and Statistical Thermodynamic Fidelity of DNA Codes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    reverse-complement unless otherwise stated. For strand x, let Nx denote its complement. A (perfect) Watson - Crick duplex is the joining of complement...is possible for complementary sequences to form a non-perfectly aligned duplex, we will call any x W Nx duplex a Watson - Crick (WC) duplex. Two...DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE FREE ENERGY GAP AND STATISTICAL THERMODYNAMIC FIDELITY OF DNA CODES 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8750-07

  13. Bose gas with generalized dispersion relation plus an energy gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis, M. A.; Martinez, J. G.; Garcia, J.

    We report the critical temperature, the condensed fraction, the internal energy and the specific heat for a d-dimensional Bose gas with a generalized dispersion relation plus an energy gap, i.e., ɛ =ɛ0 for k = 0 and ɛ =ɛ0 + Δ +csks , for k > 0 , where ℏk is the particle momentum, ɛ0 the lowest particle energy, cs a constant with dimension of energy multiplied by a length to the power s > 0 . When Δ > 0 , a Bose-Einstein critical temperature Tc ≠ 0 exists for any d / s >= 0 at which the internal energy shows a peak and the specific heat shows a jump. The critical temperature and the specific heat jump increase as functions of the gap but they decrease as functions of d / s . Thermodynamic properties are ɛ0 independent since this is just a reference energy. For Δ = 0 we recover the results reported in Ref. [1]. V. C. Aguilera-Navarro, M. de Llano y M. A. Solís, Eur. J. Phys. 20, 177 (1999). We acknowledge partial support from Grants PAPIIT IN111613 and CONACyT 221030.

  14. Superconductivity, cohesive energy density, and electron-atom ratio in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Lawson, D. D.; Hrubes, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that superconductivity above 8 K occurs in alloys and metallic compounds within relatively narrow regions of cohesive energy density with a sharp peak which includes Nb3Ge, SiV3, Nb3Ga, and NbN. When cross-correlated with the electron-atom ratio, high-temperature superconductivity can be observed in only a few regions. This suggests a search for superconductors with high-transition temperatures and critical fields within these regions.

  15. 15 kA energy-evacuation switch for test bench of superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudashkin, A. V.; Sidorin, A. O.; Karpinskiy, V. N.; Savelev, A. A.; Osipenkov, A. L.; Makarov, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    A new 15-kA energy-evacuation switch based on the operational experience of the protection system of Nuclotron superconducting magnets has been developed. It is used at the test bench of superconducting magnets being produced for NICA (Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility, which is implemented at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR)) [1] and FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, Darmstadt, Germany) accelerator facilities.

  16. Two-dimensional topological insulators with large bulk energy gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z. Q.; Jia, Jin-Feng; Qian, Dong

    2016-11-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) topological insulators (TIs, or quantum spin Hall insulators) are special insulators that possess bulk 2D electronic energy gap and time-reversal symmetry protected one-dimensional (1D) edge state. Carriers in the edge state have the property of spin-momentum locking, enabling dissipation-free conduction along the 1D edge. The existence of 2D TIs was confirmed by experiments in semiconductor quantum wells. However, the 2D bulk gaps in those quantum wells are extremely small, greatly limiting potential application in future electronics and spintronics. Despite this limitation, 2D TIs with a large bulk gap attracted plenty of interest. In this paper, recent progress in searching for TIs with a large bulk gap is reviewed briefly. We start by introducing some theoretical predictions of these new materials and then discuss some recent important achievements in crystal growth and characterization. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. U1632272, 11574201, and 11521404). D. Q. acknowledges support from the Changjiang Scholars Program, China and the Program for Professor of Special Appointment (Eastern Scholar), China.

  17. Nodal Superconducting Gap Structure in the Quasi-One-Dimensional Cs2Cr3As3 Investigated Using μSR Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adroja, Devashibhai; Bhattacharyya, Amitava; Smidman, Michael; Hillier, Adrian; Feng, Yu; Pan, Bingying; Zhao, Jun; Lees, Martin R.; Strydom, Andre; Biswas, Pabitra K.

    2017-04-01

    The superconducting ground state of the newly discovered superconductor Cs2Cr3As3 [Tc ˜ 2.1(1) K] with a quasi-one-dimensional crystal structure has been investigated using magnetization and muon-spin relaxation and rotation (μSR), both zero-field (ZF) and transverse-field (TF), measurements. Our ZF μSR measurements reveal the presence of spin fluctuations below 4 K and the ZF relaxation rate (λ) shows an enhancement below Tc ˜ 2.1 K, which might indicate that the superconducting state is unconventional. This observation suggests that the electrons are paired via unconventional channels such as spin fluctuations, as proposed on the basis of theoretical models. Our analysis of the TF μSR results shows that the temperature dependence of the superfluid density is fitted better with a nodal gap structure than an isotropic s-wave model for the superconducting gap. The observation of a nodal gap in Cs2Cr3As3 is consistent with that observed in the isostructural K2Cr3As3 compound through TF μSR measurements. Furthermore, from our TF μSR study we have estimated the magnetic penetration depth of the polycrystalline sample λL(0) = 954 nm, superconducting carrier density ns = 4.98 × 1026 m-3, and carriers' effective-mass enhancement m* = 1.61me.

  18. 100 Years of Superconductivity: Perspective on Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Paul

    2011-11-01

    One hundred years ago this past April, in 1911, traces of superconductivity were first detected near 4.2 K in mercury in the Leiden laboratory of Kammerlingh Onnes, followed seventy-five years later in January, 1986, by the discovery of ``high temperature'' superconductivity above 30 K in layered copper oxide perovskites by Bednorz and Mueller at the IBM Research Laboratory in Rueschlikon. Visions of application to the electric power infrastructure followed each event, and the decades following the 1950s witnessed numerous, successful demonstrations to electricity generation, transmission and end use -- rotating machinery, cables, transformers, storage, current limiters and power conditioning, employing both low and high temperature superconductors in the USA, Japan, Europe, and more recently, China. Despite these accomplishments, there has been to date no substantial insertion of superconducting technology in the electric power infrastructure worldwide, and its eventual deployment remains problematic. We will explore the issues delaying such deployment and suggest future electric power scenarios where superconductivity will play an essential central role.

  19. Controllable generation of two-mode-entangled states in two-resonator circuit QED with a single gap-tunable superconducting qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Sheng-Li; Li, Zhen; Fang, Ai-Ping; Li, Peng-Bo; Gao, Shao-Yan; Li, Fu-Li

    2014-12-01

    We study controllable generation of two-mode-entangled states in a circuit QED setup, which consists of two spatially separated superconducting transmission line resonators and a single gap-tunable superconducting qubit. Two sharp coupling sidebands are induced when the artificial atom is suitably driven by a bichromatic microwave field. The two resonators can have squeezing-type interactions with the qubit via the coupling sidebands. If the two resonators are not degenerate, we show that the two resonators can be cooled down into the two-mode squeezed vacuum via dissipation of the qubit. The generation of the two-mode squeezed state is based on a dissipative state-engineering process, which explores the energy relaxation of the qubit as a resource. Moreover, the scheme does not need both the specific preparation of the initial state and the designed special dynamical process of the system. If the resonators are degenerate, we show that entangled coherent states of the resonators can be generated by use of the unitary dynamical evolution process of the system and the state-projection measurement. Moreover, macro entangled coherent states of the resonators with huge photons can in principle be created if the resonators and the qubit have sufficiently long lifetimes. The present scheme has two remarkable features: (1) only a single qubit is used in the generation of the two-mode squeezed state; and (2) the ultrastrong coupling condition and initializing the resonators in coherent states are not required. These make the present scheme more simple and feasible in experimental implementation.

  20. Robust measurement of superconducting gap sign changes via quasiparticle interference: an application to 111 compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, Ilya; Altenfeld, Dustin; Hirschfeld, Peter; Mazin, Igor

    While quasiparticle interference (QPI) measurements based on scanning tunneling spectroscopy are often proposed as definitive tests of gap structure, the analysis typically relies on details of the model employed. Here using the simplified two-band model system we propose, that the temperature dependence of momentum-integrated QPI data can be used to identify gap sign changes in a qualitative way, and present an illustration for s+/- and s+ + states in a system with typical Fe-pnictide Fermi surface. Using ARPES derived band structures within 10 orbital model Hamiltonian we analyze the QPI spectra in LiFeAs and Co-doped NaFeAs compounds and show that the sign-changing gap can be clearly identified using non-magnetic impurity scattering. P.J.H. was supported by NSF-DMR-1005625, and I.I.M. by the U.S. Office of Naval Research through the Naval Research Laboratory's Basic Research Program. The work of DA and IE was supported by the Focus Program 1458 Eisen-Pniktide of the DFG.

  1. Energy gap structure and tunneling characteristics of layered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.H.; Klemm, R.A.

    1993-06-01

    The authors have analyzed the energy gaps and density-of-states (DOS) of layered superconductors with two inequivalent layers in a unit cell along the c-axis. In the physically interesting parameter range where the interlayer hopping strengths of the quasiparticles are comparable to the critical temperature, the peaks in the DOS curve do not correspond to the order parameters (OP`s) of each layer, but depend on the OP`s and the interlayer hopping strengths in a complex manner. In contrast to a BCS superconductor, the DOS of layered systems have logarithmic singularities. The simulated tunneling characteristics bear close resemblance to experimental results.

  2. The energy gap of the compound FeSe0.5Te0.5 determined by specific heat and Point Contact Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, Roberto; López-Romero, Rodolfo E.

    2015-10-01

    The superconductor FeSe0.5Te0.5 was studied with Point Contact spectroscopy and specific heat in polycrystalline samples. The transition temperature determined by magnetic measurement was TC=14.5 K. The size of the energy gap measured by junctions is Δ = 1.9 meV, whereas the gap determined by the specific heat measurements was Δ = 2.3 meV. The gap evolution with temperature follows BCS, the ratio 2Δ/KBTC has values between 2.88 ≤ 2 Δ /KBTC ≤ 3.04. The compound was grown by solid state synthesis in quartz ampoules under vacuum at 950 °C. Crystal structure was characterized by X-ray diffraction. The superconducting properties were characterized by magnetization, resistivity and specific heat. This superconductor shows an isotropic energy gap as observed with the fitting of the specific heat at low temperature.

  3. Theory on Superconducting Transition from Pseudogap State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanase, Youichi; Jujo, Takanobu; Yamada, Kosaku

    2000-11-01

    The anomalous properties of High-T c cuprates are investigated both in the normal state and in the superconducting state. In particular, we pay attention to the pseudogap in the normal state and the phase transition from the pseudogap state to the superconducting state. The pseudogap phenomena observed in cuprates are naturally understood as a precursor of the strong coupling superconductivity. We have previously shown by using the self-consistent T-matrix calculation that the pseudogap is a result of the strong superconducting fluctuations which are accompanied by the strong coupling superconductivity in quasi-two dimensional systems [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 68 (1999) 2999]. We extend the scenario to the superconducting state. The close relation between the pseudogap state and the superconducting state is pointed out. Once the superconducting phase transition occurs, the superconducting order parameter rapidly grows rather than the result of BCS theory. With the rapid growth of the order parameter, the gap structure becomes sharp, while it is remarkably broad in the pseudogap state. The characteristic energy scale of the gap does not change. These results well explain the phase transition observed in the spectroscopic measurements. Further, we calculate the magnetic and transport properties which show the pseudogap phenomena. The comprehensive understanding of the NMR, the neutron scattering, the optical conductivity and the London penetration depth is obtained both in the pseudogap state and in the superconducting state.

  4. Basic Research Needs for Superconductivity. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Superconductivity, May 8-11, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrao, J.; Kwok, W-K; Bozovic, I.; Mazin, I.; Seamus, J. C.; Civale, L.; Christen, D.; Horwitz, J.; Kellogg, G.; Finnemore, D.; Crabtree, G.; Welp, U.; Ashton, C.; Herndon, B.; Shapard, L.; Nault, R. M.

    2006-05-11

    As an energy carrier, electricity has no rival with regard to its environmental cleanliness, flexibility in interfacing with multiple production sources and end uses, and efficiency of delivery. In fact, the electric power grid was named ?the greatest engineering achievement of the 20th century? by the National Academy of Engineering. This grid, a technological marvel ingeniously knitted together from local networks growing out from cities and rural centers, may be the biggest and most complex artificial system ever built. However, the growing demand for electricity will soon challenge the grid beyond its capability, compromising its reliability through voltage fluctuations that crash digital electronics, brownouts that disable industrial processes and harm electrical equipment, and power failures like the North American blackout in 2003 and subsequent blackouts in London, Scandinavia, and Italy in the same year. The North American blackout affected 50 million people and caused approximately $6 billion in economic damage over the four days of its duration. Superconductivity offers powerful new opportunities for restoring the reliability of the power grid and increasing its capacity and efficiency. Superconductors are capable of carrying current without loss, making the parts of the grid they replace dramatically more efficient. Superconducting wires carry up to five times the current carried by copper wires that have the same cross section, thereby providing ample capacity for future expansion while requiring no increase in the number of overhead access lines or underground conduits. Their use is especially attractive in urban areas, where replacing copper with superconductors in power-saturated underground conduits avoids expensive new underground construction. Superconducting transformers cut the volume, weight, and losses of conventional transformers by a factor of two and do not require the contaminating and flammable transformer oils that violate urban safety

  5. Large superconducting double-gap, a pronounced pseudogap and evidence for proximity-induced topological superconductivity in the Bi2Te3/Fe1+yTe interfacial superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, J. Y.; He, M. Q.; He, Q. L.; Law, K. T.; Sou, I. K.; Lortz, R.; Petrovic, A. P.

    We investigate directional point-contact spectroscopy on a Bi2Te3/ Fe1+yTe heterostructure, fabricated via van der Waals epitaxy, which is interfacial superconducting with an onset TC at 12K and zero resistance below 8K. A large superconducting twin-gap structure is seen down to 0.27K, together with a zero bias conductance peak. The anisotropic smaller gap (Δ1) is around 5 meV at 0.27K and closes at 8K, while the other one (Δ2), as large as 12 meV, is isotropic and eventually evolves into a pseudogap closing at 40K. Both, the two-gap BTK and Dynes models can well reproduce our data, demonstrating Δ1 should be associated with the proximity-induced superconductivity in the topological Bi2Te3 layer, while Δ2 may be attributed to an intrinsically-doped FeTe thin film at the interface. This work was supported by grants from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (603010, SEGHKUST03).

  6. Energy gap, penetration depth, and surface resistance of MgB2 thin films determined by microwave resonator measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, B. B.; Klein, N.; Kang, W. N.; Kim, Hyeong-Jin; Choi, Eun-Mi; Lee, Sung-Ik; Dahm, T.; Maki, K.

    2002-09-01

    We have measured the temperature dependence of the microwave surface impedance Zs=Rs+iωμ0λ of two c-axis oriented MgB2 films employing dielectric resonator techniques. The temperature dependence of the magnetic-field penetration depth λ determined by a sapphire dielectric resonator at 17.9 GHz can be well fitted from 5 K close to Tc by the standard BCS integral expression assuming the reduced energy gap Δ(0)/kTc to be as low as 1.13 and 1.03 for the two samples. For the penetration depth at zero temperatures, values of 102 and 107 nm were determined from the fit. Our results clearly indicate the s-wave character of the order parameter. A similar fit of the penetration depth data was obtained with an anisotropic s-wave BCS model. Within this model we had to assume a prolate order parameter, having a large gap value in the c-axis direction and a small gap within the ab plane. This is in contrast to recent fits of the anisotropic s-wave model to upper critical-field data, where an oblate order parameter had to be used, and raises interesting questions about the nature of the superconducting state in MgB2. A rutile dielectric resonator was employed to obtain the temperature dependence of Rs with high accuracy. Below about Tc/2, Rs(T)-Rs(5 K) exhibits an exponential temperature dependence with a reduced energy gap consistent with that determined from the penetration depth data. The Rs value at 4.2 K was found to be as low as 19 μΩ at 7.2 GHz, which is comparable with a high-temperature superconducting copper oxide thin film.

  7. Glide-plane symmetry and superconducting gap structure of iron-based superconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yan; Berlijn, Tom; Hirschfeld, Peter J.; ...

    2015-03-10

    We consider the effect of glide-plane symmetry of the Fe-pnictogen/chalcogen layer in Fe-based superconductors on pairing in spin fluctuation models. Recent theories propose that so-called η-pairing states with nonzero total momentum can be realized and possess such exotic properties as odd parity spin singlet symmetry and time-reversal symmetry breaking. Here we show that when there is orbital weight at the Fermi level from orbitals with even and odd mirror reflection symmetry in z, η pairing is inevitable; however, we conclude from explicit calculation that the gap function appearing in observable quantities is identical to that found in earlier pseudocrystal momentummore » calculations with 1 Fe per unit cell.« less

  8. Glide-plane symmetry and superconducting gap structure of iron-based superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yan; Berlijn, Tom; Hirschfeld, Peter J.; Scalapino, Douglas J.; Maier, Thomas A.

    2015-03-10

    We consider the effect of glide-plane symmetry of the Fe-pnictogen/chalcogen layer in Fe-based superconductors on pairing in spin fluctuation models. Recent theories propose that so-called η-pairing states with nonzero total momentum can be realized and possess such exotic properties as odd parity spin singlet symmetry and time-reversal symmetry breaking. Here we show that when there is orbital weight at the Fermi level from orbitals with even and odd mirror reflection symmetry in z, η pairing is inevitable; however, we conclude from explicit calculation that the gap function appearing in observable quantities is identical to that found in earlier pseudocrystal momentum calculations with 1 Fe per unit cell.

  9. Direct evidence for a pressure induced nodal superconducting gap in the Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2 superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guguchia, Zurab; Amato, Alex; Kang, Jian; Luetkens, Hubertus; Biswas, Pabitra K.; Prando, Giacomo; Rohr, Fabian V.; Bukowski, Zbigniew; Shengelaya, Alexander; Keller, Hugo; Morenzoni, Elvezio; Fernandes, Rafael M.; Khasanov, Rustem

    In contrast to other unconventional superconductors, in the Fe-based superconductors (Fe-HTSs) both d-wave and extended s-wave pairing symmetries are close in energy. Probing the proximity between these different superconducting (SC) states and identifying experimental parameters that can tune them is of central interest. We report high-pressure muon spin rotation experiments on the temperature-dependent magnetic penetration depth in the optimally doped nodeless s-wave Fe-HTS Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2. Upon pressure, a strong decrease of the penetration depth is observed, while the SC transition temperature remains nearly constant. More importantly, the low-temperature behavior of the inverse squared magnetic penetration depth, which is a direct measure of the superfluid density, changes qualitatively from an exponential saturation at zero pressure to a linear-in- T behavior at higher pressures, indicating that hydrostatic pressure promotes the appearance of nodes in the SC gap.

  10. Inelastic Neutron Scattering Studies of High-Energy Spin Excitations in Superconducting BaFe1.9Ni0.1As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mengshu; Abernathy, Douglas; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Chenglin; Wang, Miaoyin; Dai, Pengcheng

    2010-03-01

    Understanding how the spin fluctuations evolve with doping in iron pnictide superconductors is important because spin fluctuations may mediate electron pairing for superconductivity in these materials. Upon doping, the spin fluctuation persists long after the long-range antiferromagnetism is destroyed. More importantly, spin excitations are coupled to superconductivity in the appearance of a neutron magnetic resonance and a superconductivity-induced spin gap. However, all current neutron scattering results in iron based superconductors are confined to low energy excitations except for the ``11'' FeTe1-xSex system, which shows incommensurate excitations that are not found in other iron pnictide systems. Therefore, how the spin waves in parent compounds of the ``122'' (AFe2As2, A = Ca, Sr, Ba) system will evolve when the system becomes an optimal superconductor is still an open question. We use time-of-flight spectroscopy to determine S (Q,φ) at energy regions not accessed before. We compare spin fluctuations of iron arsenide superconductors with those of high-Tc copper oxides and discuss their role in the superconductivity of these materials.

  11. Peak power reduction and energy efficiency improvement with the superconducting flywheel energy storage in electric railway system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hansang; Jung, Seungmin; Cho, Yoonsung; Yoon, Donghee; Jang, Gilsoo

    2013-11-01

    This paper proposes an application of the 100 kWh superconducting flywheel energy storage systems to reduce the peak power of the electric railway system. The electric railway systems have high-power characteristics and large amount of regenerative energy during vehicles’ braking. The high-power characteristic makes operating cost high as the system should guarantee the secure capacity of electrical equipment and the low utilization rate of regenerative energy limits the significant energy efficiency improvement. In this paper, it had been proved that the peak power reduction and energy efficiency improvement can be achieved by using 100 kWh superconducting flywheel energy storage systems with the optimally controlled charging or discharging operations. Also, economic benefits had been assessed.

  12. Double pancake superconducting coil design for maximum magnetic energy storage in small scale SMES systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hekmati, Arsalan; Hekmati, Rasoul

    2016-12-01

    Electrical power quality and stability is an important issue nowadays and technology of Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage systems, SMES, has brought real power storage capability to power systems. Therefore, optimum SMES design to achieve maximum energy with the least length of tape has been quite a matter of concern. This paper provides an approach to design optimization of solenoid and toroid types of SMES, ensuring maximum possible energy storage. The optimization process, based on Genetic Algorithm, calculates the operating current of superconducting tapes through intersection of a load line with the surface indicating the critical current variation versus the parallel and perpendicular components of magnetic flux density. FLUX3D simulations of SMES have been utilized for energy calculations. Through numerical analysis of obtained data, formulations have been obtained for the optimum dimensions of superconductor coil and maximum stored energy for a given length and cross sectional area of superconductor tape.

  13. Thin Superconducting Film Characterization by Surface Acoustic Waves.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    NUMBER 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3 RECIPIENT’S CA ALOG NUMBER ~~AFOSR TR -0 8 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) 5 TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Thin Superconducting ...thin film superconductor surface acoustic waves I SAW electron phonon interaction superconducting energy gap electron mean free path vortex...electrical resistivity and the attenuation of surface ,e J -acoustic waves (SAW) were measured in the superconducting state of a L granular lead film

  14. Concepts of flywheels for energy storage using autostable high-T(sub c) superconducting magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bornemann, Hans J.; Zabka, R.; Boegler, P.; Urban, C.; Rietschel, H.

    1994-01-01

    A flywheel for energy storage using autostable high-T(sub c) superconducting magnetic bearings has been built. The rotating disk has a total weight of 2.8 kg. The maximum speed is 9240 rpm. A process that allows accelerated, reliable and reproducible production of melt-textured superconducting material used for the bearings has been developed. In order to define optimum configurations for radial and axial bearings, interaction forces in three dimensions and vertical and horizontal stiffness have been measured between superconductors and permanent magnets in different geometries and various shapes. Static as well as dynamic measurements have been performed. Results are being reported and compared to theoretical models.

  15. Length and energy gap dependences of thermoelectricity in nanostructured junctions.

    PubMed

    Asai, Yoshihiro

    2013-04-17

    The possibilities of an enhanced thermoelectric figure of merit value, ZT, in a nanostructured junction are examined for a wide range of parameter values in a theoretical model. Our research shows that the figure of merit can take a very large maximum, which depends both on the length and the energy gap values. The maximum of ZT is achieved when the Fermi level of the electrodes is aligned to the edge of the electronic transmission function of the junction, where both the conductance and the Seebeck constant are significantly enhanced. On the basis of our results, we conclude that nanowires and molecular junctions form a special class of systems where a large ZT can be expected in some cases.

  16. Energy Transfer with Hydrogen and Superconductivity - The Review of the First Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vysotsky, V. S.; Antyukhov, I. V.; Firsov, V. P.; Blagov, E. V.; Kostyuk, V. V.; Nosov, A. A.; Fetisov, S. S.; Zanegin, S. Yu.; Rachuk, V. S.; Katorgin, B. I.

    The transfer of massive amounts of both electrical and chemical power over long distances will present a major challenge for the global energy enterprise in future. Attraction of hydrogen is apparent as a chemical energy agent, possessing among the highest energy density content of various common fuels, whose combustive "waste" is simply water. The usage of "gratis" cold to cool a superconducting cable made of proper superconductor permits to deliver extra electrical power with the same line. This, rather old theoretical idea recently found its experimental realization. The team of Russian institutes and organizations with using Italian-produced MgB2 wire has made and successfully tested two hybrid energy transfer lines with liquid hydrogen as a chemical source of power and superconducting cable as a source of electricity. The first line has been tested in 2011. It has length ∼10 m, maximum liquid hydrogen flow ∼250 g/s and maximum current of MgB2 superconducting cable 2600 A @ 20K. This test was the first experimental proof of conception of the hybrid energy transfer line. The second line has been tested in October 2013. It has length ∼30 m. The new MgB2 cable has critical current at 21 K ∼3500 A and successfully passed high voltage DC test of 50 kV. New hydrogen cryostat has three sections with different types of thermal insulation in each section. The idea of hybrid energy transfer is formulated and details of first experiments are reviewed.

  17. Superconducting energy scales and anomalous dissipative conductivity in thin films of molybdenum nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmendinger, Julian; Pracht, Uwe S.; Daschke, Lena; Proslier, Thomas; Klug, Jeffrey A.; Dressel, Martin; Scheffler, Marc

    2016-08-01

    We report investigations of molybdenum nitride (MoN) thin films with different thickness and disorder and with superconducting transition temperature 9.89 K ≥Tc≥2.78 K . Using terahertz frequency-domain spectroscopy we explore the normal and superconducting charge carrier dynamics for frequencies covering the range from 3 to 38 cm-1 (0.1 to 1.1 THz). The superconducting energy scales, i.e., the critical temperature Tc, the pairing energy Δ , and the superfluid stiffness J , and the superfluid density ns can be well described within the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory for conventional superconductors. At the same time, we find an anomalously large dissipative conductivity, which cannot be explained by thermally excited quasiparticles, but rather by a temperature-dependent normal-conducting fraction, persisting deep into the superconducting state. Our results on this disordered system constrain the regime, where discernible effects stemming from the disorder-induced superconductor-insulator transition possibly become relevant, to MoN films with a transition temperature lower than at least 2.78 K.

  18. Superconductivity of the magnetized electron gas of a quantum cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Eminov, P. A. Sezonov, Yu. I.

    2008-10-15

    A microscopic theory of superconductivity is developed for the magnetized electron gas on a cylindrical surface. The Gibbs free energy is calculated for the superconducting system. A gap equation is derived that determines the critical temperature as a function of the quantum-cylinder dimensions and the Aharonov-Bohm parameter. It is shown that the gap not only exhibits Aharonov-Bohm oscillations, but also oscillates with varying curvature of the cylindrical surface.

  19. Canted-Cosine-Theta Superconducting Accelerator Magnets for High Energy Physics and Ion Beam Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, Lucas Nathan

    Advances in superconducting magnet technology have historically enabled the construction of new, higher energy hadron colliders. Looking forward to the needs of a potential future collider, a significant increase in magnet field and performance is required. Such a task requires an open mind to the investigation of new design concepts for high field magnets. Part I of this thesis will present an investigation of the Canted-Cosine-Theta (CCT) design for high field Nb3Sn magnets. New analytic and finite element methods for analysis of CCT magnets will be given, along with a discussion on optimization of the design for high field. The design, fabrication, and successful test of the 2.5 T NbTi dipole CCT1 will be presented as a proof-of-principle step towards a high field Nb3Sn magnet. Finally, the design and initial steps in the fabrication of the 16 T Nb3Sn dipole CCT2 will be described. Part II of this thesis will investigate the CCT concept extended to a curved magnet for use in an ion beam therapy gantry. The introduction of superconducting technology in this field shows promise to reduce the weight and cost of gantries, as well as open the door to new beam optics solutions with high energy acceptance. An analytic approach developed for modeling curved CCT magnets will be presented, followed by a design study of a superconducting magnet for a proton therapy gantry. Finally, a new magnet concept called the "Alternating Gradient CCT" (AG-CCT) will be introduced. This concept will be shown to be a practical magnet solution for achieving the alternating quadrupole fields desired for an achromatic gantry, allowing for the consideration of treatment with minimal field changes in the superconducting magnets. The primary motivation of this thesis is to share new developments for Canted-Cosine-Theta superconducting magnets, with the hope this design will improve technology for high energy physics and ion beam cancer therapy.

  20. Superconducting gap evolution in overdoped BaFe₂(As1-xPx)₂ single crystals through nanocalorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Campanini, D.; Diao, Z.; Fang, L.; Kwok, W.-K.; Welp, U.; Rydh, A.

    2015-06-18

    We report on specific heat measurements on clean overdoped BaFe₂(As1-xPx)₂ single crystals performed with a high resolution membrane-based nanocalorimeter. A nonzero residual electronic specific heat coefficient at zero temperature γr=C/T|T→0 is seen for all doping compositions, indicating a considerable fraction of the Fermi surface ungapped or having very deep minima. The remaining superconducting electronic specific heat is analyzed through a two-band s-wave α model in order to investigate the gap structure. Close to optimal doping we detect a single zero-temperature gap of Δ₀~5.3 me V, corresponding to Δ₀/kBTc ~ 2.2. Increasing the phosphorus concentration x, the main gap reduces till a value of Δ₀ ~ 1.9 meV for x = 0.55 and a second weaker gap becomes evident. From the magnetic field effect on γr, all samples however show similar behavior [γr(H) - γr (H = 0)∝ Hn, with n between 0.6 and 0.7]. This indicates that, despite a considerable redistribution of the gap weights, the total degree of gap anisotropy does not change drastically with doping.

  1. Study of superconducting magnetic bearing applicable to the flywheel energy storage system that consist of HTS-bulks and superconducting-coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seino, Hiroshi; Nagashima, Ken; Tanaka, Yoshichika; Nakauchi, Masahiko

    2010-06-01

    The Railway Technical Research Institute conducted a study to develop a superconducting magnetic bearing applicable to the flywheel energy-storage system for railways. In the first step of the study, the thrust rolling bearing was selected for application, and adopted liquid-nitrogen-cooled HTS-bulk as a rotor, and adopted superconducting coil as a stator for the superconducting magnetic bearing. Load capacity of superconducting magnetic bearing was verified up to 10 kN in the static load test. After that, rotation test of that approximately 5 kN thrust load added was performed with maximum rotation of 3000rpm. In the results of bearing rotation test, it was confirmed that position in levitation is able to maintain with stability during the rotation. Heat transfer properties by radiation in vacuum and conductivity by tenuous gas were basically studied by experiment by the reason of confirmation of rotor cooling method. The experimental result demonstrates that the optimal gas pressure is able to obtain without generating windage drag. In the second stage of the development, thrust load capacity of the bearing will be improved aiming at the achievement of the energy capacity of a practical scale. In the static load test of the new superconducting magnetic bearing, stable 20kN-levitation force was obtained.

  2. Universal heat conduction in Ce1-xYbxCoIn5: Evidence for robust nodal d-wave superconducting gap

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Y.; Petrovic, C.; Dong, J. K.; ...

    2016-02-01

    In the heavy-fermion superconductor Ce1-xYbxCoIn5, Yb doping was reported to cause a possible change from nodal d-wave superconductivity to a fully gapped d-wave molecular superfluid of composite pairs near x ≈ 0.07 (nominal value xnom = 0.2). Here we present systematic thermal conductivity measurements on Ce1-xYbxCoIn5 (x = 0.013, 0.084, and 0.163) single crystals. The observed finite residual linear term κ0/T is insensitive to Yb doping, verifying the universal heat conduction of the nodal d-wave superconducting gap in Ce1-xYbxCoIn5. Similar universal heat conduction is also observed in the CeCo(In1–yCdy)5 system. Furthermore, these results reveal a robust nodal d-wave gap inmore » CeCoIn5 upon Yb or Cd doping.« less

  3. Simple Experimental Verification of the Relation between the Band-Gap Energy and the Energy of Photons Emitted by LEDs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Precker, Jurgen W.

    2007-01-01

    The wavelength of the light emitted by a light-emitting diode (LED) is intimately related to the band-gap energy of the semiconductor from which the LED is made. We experimentally estimate the band-gap energies of several types of LEDs, and compare them with the energies of the emitted light, which ranges from infrared to white. In spite of…

  4. Determining the band gap and mean kinetic energy of atoms from reflection electron energy loss spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Vos, M.; Marmitt, G. G.; Finkelstein, Y.; Moreh, R.

    2015-09-14

    Reflection electron energy loss spectra from some insulating materials (CaCO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and SiO{sub 2}) taken at relatively high incoming electron energies (5–40 keV) are analyzed. Here, one is bulk sensitive and a well-defined onset of inelastic excitations is observed from which one can infer the value of the band gap. An estimate of the band gap was obtained by fitting the spectra with a procedure that includes the recoil shift and recoil broadening affecting these measurements. The width of the elastic peak is directly connected to the mean kinetic energy of the atom in the material (Doppler broadening). The experimentally obtained mean kinetic energies of the O, C, Li, Ca, and Si atoms are compared with the calculated ones, and good agreement is found, especially if the effect of multiple scattering is taken into account. It is demonstrated experimentally that the onset of the inelastic excitation is also affected by Doppler broadening. Aided by this understanding, we can obtain a good fit of the elastic peak and the onset of inelastic excitations. For SiO{sub 2}, good agreement is obtained with the well-established value of the band gap (8.9 eV) only if it is assumed that the intensity near the edge scales as (E − E{sub gap}){sup 1.5}. For CaCO{sub 3}, the band gap obtained here (7 eV) is about 1 eV larger than the previous experimental value, whereas the value for Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (7.5 eV) is the first experimental estimate.

  5. Effects of out-of-plane disorder on the nodal quasiparticle and superconducting gap in single-layer Bi2Sr1.6L0.4CuO6+δ (L=La,Nd,Gd)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, M.; Yoshida, T.; Fujimori, A.; Lu, D. H.; Shen, Z.-X.; Kubota, M.; Ono, K.; Ishikado, M.; Fujita, K.; Uchida, S.

    2009-04-01

    How out-of-plane disorder affects the electronic structure has been investigated for the single-layer cuprates Bi2Sr1.6L0.4CuO6+δ ( L=La , Nd, and Gd) by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We have observed that, with increasing disorder, while the Fermi-surface shape and band dispersions are not affected, the quasiparticle width increases, the antinodal gap is enhanced and the superconducting gap in the nodal region is depressed. The results indicate that the superconductivity is significantly depressed by out-of-plane disorder through the enhancement of the antinodal gap and the depression of the superconducting gap in the nodal region.

  6. Effects of Out-of-Plane Disorder on the Nodal Quasiparticle and Superconducting Gap in Single-Layer Bi_2Sr_1.6Ln_0.4CuO_6 delta (Ln = La, Nd, Gd)

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, M.

    2011-01-04

    How out-of-plane disorder affects the electronic structure has been investigated for the single-layer cuprates Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 1.6}Ln{sub 0.4}CuO{sub 6+{delta}} (Ln = La, Nd, Gd) by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We have observed that, with increasing disorder, while the Fermi surface shape and band dispersions are not affected, the quasi-particle width increases, the anti-nodal gap is enhanced and the superconducting gap in the nodal region is depressed. The results indicate that the superconductivity is significantly depressed by out-of-plane disorder through the enhancement of the anti-nodal gap and the depression of the superconducting gap in the nodal region.

  7. Superconducting resonator used as a phase and energy detector for linac setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, Nikolai R.

    2016-07-01

    Booster linacs for tandem accelerators and positive ion superconducting injectors have matured into standard features of many accelerator laboratories. Both types of linac are formed as an array of independently-phased resonators operating at room temperature or in a superconducting state. Each accelerating resonator needs to be individually set in phase and amplitude for optimum acceleration efficiency. The modularity of the linac allows the velocity profile along the structure to be tailored to accommodate a wide range charge to mass ratio. The linac setup procedure, described in this paper, utilizes a superconducting resonator operating in a beam bunch phase detection mode. The main objective was to derive the full set of phase distributions for quick and efficient tuning of the entire accelerator. The phase detector was operated in overcoupling mode in order to minimize de-tuning effects of microphonic background. A mathematical expression was derived to set a limit on resonator maximum accelerating field during the crossover search to enable extracting unambiguous beam phase data. A set of equations was obtained to calculate the values of beam phase advance and energy gain produced by accelerating resonators. An extensive range of linac setting up configurations was conducted to validate experimental procedures and analytical models. The main application of a superconducting phase detector is for fast tuning for beams of ultralow intensities, in particular in the straight section of linac facilities.

  8. Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) program. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.D.

    1981-03-01

    Work is reported on the development of two superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) units. One is a 30-MJ unit for use by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to stabilize power oscillations on their Pacific AC Intertie, and the second is a 1- to 10-GWh unit for use as a diurnal load leveling device. Emphasis has been on the stabilizing system. The manufacturing phase of the 30-MJ superconducting coil was initiated and the coil fabrication has advanced rapidly. The two converter power transformers were manufactured, successfully factory tested, and shipped. One transformer reached the Tacoma Substation in good condition; the other was dropped enroute and has been returned to the factory for rebuilding. Insulation of the 30-MJ coil has been examined for high voltage effects apt to be caused by transients such as inductive voltage spikes from the protective dump circuit. The stabilizing system converter and protective energy dump system were completed, factory tested, and delivered.

  9. Determination of a Magnetic Component to the Superconducting Condensation Energy for Fe1+δSexTe1-x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiner, Jonathan; Thampy, Vivek; Lumsden, Mark; Christianson, Andrew; Abernathy, Douglas; Sales, Brian; Sefat, Athena; Mao, Zhiqiang; Hu, Jin; Bao, Wei; Broholm, Collin

    2014-03-01

    A quantitative method to extract a magnetic component of the superconducting condensation energy from inelastic neutron scattering data is described and applied to Fe1+δSe0.4Te0.6. Based on the first moment sum-rule for the dynamic correlation function, the method is sensitive to changes in the inter-site magnetic correlation energy, ΔEij , associated with superconductivity. We find the length scale over which ΔEij is appreciable coincides with the superconducting coherence length as determined by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy. The overall change in inter-site magnetic correlation energy is compared to the superconducting condensation energy determined through specific heat measurements. Supported by ORNL LDRD funding.

  10. Free energy surfaces in the superconducting mixed state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finnemore, D. K.; Fang, M. M.; Bansal, N. P.; Farrell, D. E.

    1989-01-01

    The free energy surface for Tl2Ba2Ca2Cu3O1O has been measured as a function of temperature and magnetic field to determine the fundamental thermodynamic properties of the mixed state. The change in free energy, G(H)-G(O), is found to be linear in temperature over a wide range indicating that the specific heat is independent of field.

  11. Doping Evolution of the Superconducting Gap Structure in Heavily Hole-Doped Ba1-xKxFe2As2: a Heat Transport Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xiao-Chen; Wang, Ai-Feng; Zhang, Zhen; Pan, Jian; He, Lan-Po; Luo, Xi-Gang; Chen, Xian-Hui; Li, Shi-Yan

    2015-12-01

    We performed systematic thermal conductivity measurements on heavily hole-doped Ba$_{1-x}$K$_x$Fe$_2$As$_2$ single crystals with 0.747 $\\leq x \\leq$ 0.974. At $x$ = 0.747, the $\\kappa_0/T$ is negligible, indicating nodeless superconducting gap. A small residual linear term $\\kappa_0/T$ ($\\approx$ 0.035 mW/K$^2$ cm) appears at $x$ = 0.826, and it increases slowly up to $x$ = 0.974, followed by a drastic increase of more than 20 times to the pure KFe$_2$As$_2$ ($x$ = 1.0). This doping dependence of $\\kappa_0/T$ clearly shows that the nodal gap appears near $x = 0.8$, likely associated with the change of Fermi surface topology. The small values of $\\kappa_0/T$ from $x$ = 0.826 to 0.974 support a "$\\curlyvee$"-shaped nodal $s$-wave gap recently revealed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments at $x$ = 0.9. Furthermore, the drastic increase of $\\kappa_0/T$ from $x$ = 0.974 to 1.0 is inconsistent with a symmetry-imposed $d$-wave gap in KFe$_2$As$_2$, and the possible nodal gap structure in KFe$_2$As$_2$ is discussed.

  12. Revisiting orbital-fluctuation-mediated superconductivity in LiFeAs: Nontrivial spin-orbit interaction effects on the band structure and superconducting gap function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Tetsuro; Yamakawa, Youichi; Onari, Seiichiro; Kontani, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    The precise gap structure in LiFeAs (Tc=18 K) given by ARPES studies offers significant information that helps us understand the pairing mechanism in iron-based superconductors. The most remarkable characteristic in the LiFeAs gap structure would be that "the largest gap emerges on the tiny hole-pockets around the Z point." This result has been naturally explained in terms of the orbital-fluctuation scenario [T. Saito et al., Phys. Rev. B 90, 035104 (2014)], 10.1103/PhysRevB.90.035104, whereas the opposite result is obtained by the spin-fluctuation scenario. In this paper, we study the gap structure in LiFeAs by taking the spin-orbit interaction (SOI) into account, motivated by the recent ARPES studies that revealed a significant SOI-induced modification of the Fermi surface topology. For this purpose, we construct two possible tight-binding models with finite SOI by referring the band structures given by different ARPES groups. In addition, we extend the gap equation for multiorbital systems with finite SOI, and calculate the gap functions by applying the orbital-spin fluctuation theory. On the basis of both SOI-induced band structures, the main characteristics of the gap structure in LiFeAs are naturally reproduced only in the presence of strong interorbital interactions between (dx z /y z-dx y) orbitals. Thus the experimental gap structure in LiFeAs is a strong evidence for the orbital-fluctuation pairing mechanism.

  13. Determining the band gap and mean kinetic energy of atoms from reflection electron energy loss spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, M.; Marmitt, G. G.; Finkelstein, Y.; Moreh, R.

    2015-09-01

    Reflection electron energy loss spectra from some insulating materials (CaCO3, Li2CO3, and SiO2) taken at relatively high incoming electron energies (5-40 keV) are analyzed. Here, one is bulk sensitive and a well-defined onset of inelastic excitations is observed from which one can infer the value of the band gap. An estimate of the band gap was obtained by fitting the spectra with a procedure that includes the recoil shift and recoil broadening affecting these measurements. The width of the elastic peak is directly connected to the mean kinetic energy of the atom in the material (Doppler broadening). The experimentally obtained mean kinetic energies of the O, C, Li, Ca, and Si atoms are compared with the calculated ones, and good agreement is found, especially if the effect of multiple scattering is taken into account. It is demonstrated experimentally that the onset of the inelastic excitation is also affected by Doppler broadening. Aided by this understanding, we can obtain a good fit of the elastic peak and the onset of inelastic excitations. For SiO2, good agreement is obtained with the well-established value of the band gap (8.9 eV) only if it is assumed that the intensity near the edge scales as (E - Egap)1.5. For CaCO3, the band gap obtained here (7 eV) is about 1 eV larger than the previous experimental value, whereas the value for Li2CO3 (7.5 eV) is the first experimental estimate.

  14. FLYWHEEL ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS WITH SUPERCONDUCTING BEARINGS FOR UTILITY APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Michael Strasik; Mr. Arthur Day; Mr. Philip Johnson; Dr. John Hull

    2007-10-26

    This project’s mission was to achieve significant advances in the practical application of bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS) materials to energy-storage systems. The ultimate product was planned as an operational prototype of a flywheel system on an HTS suspension. While the final prototype flywheel did not complete the final offsite demonstration phase of the program, invaluable lessons learned were captured on the laboratory demonstration units that will lead to the successful deployment of a future HTS-stabilized, composite-flywheel energy-storage system (FESS).

  15. Superconducting Magnet Technology for Future High Energy Proton Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourlay, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Interest in high field dipoles has been given a boost by new proposals to build a high-energy proton-proton collider to follow the LHC and programs around the world are taking on the task to answer the need. Studies aiming toward future high-energy proton-proton colliders at the 100 TeV scale are now being organized. The LHC and current cost models are based on technology close to four decades old and point to a broad optimum of operation using dipoles with fields between 5 and 12T when site constraints, either geographical or political, are not a factor. Site geography constraints that limit the ring circumference can drive the required dipole field up to 20T, which is more than a factor of two beyond state-of-the-art. After a brief review of current progress, the talk will describe the challenges facing future development and present a roadmap for moving high field accelerator magnet technology forward. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, High Energy Physics, US Department of Energy, under contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  16. Superconducting High Energy Resolution Gamma-ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, D T

    2002-02-22

    We have demonstrated that a bulk absorber coupled to a TES can serve as a good gamma-ray spectrometer. Our measured energy resolution of 70 eV at 60 keV is among the best measurements in this field. We have also shown excellent agreement between the noise predictions and measured noise. Despite this good result, we noted that our detector design has shortcomings with a low count rate and vulnerabilities with the linearity of energy response. We addressed these issues by implementation of an active negative feedback bias. We demonstrated the effects of active bias such as additional pulse shortening, reduction of TES change in temperature during a pulse, and linearization of energy response at low energy. Linearization at higher energy is possible with optimized heat capacities and thermal conductivities of the microcalorimeter. However, the current fabrication process has low control and repeatability over the thermal properties. Thus, optimization of the detector performance is difficult until the fabrication process is improved. Currently, several efforts are underway to better control the fabrication of our gamma-ray spectrometers. We are developing a full-wafer process to produce TES films. We are investigating the thermal conductivity and surface roughness of thicker SiN membranes. We are exploring alternative methods to couple the absorber to the TES film for reproducibility. We are also optimizing the thermal conductivities within the detector to minimize two-element phonon noise. We are experimenting with different absorber materials to optimize absorption efficiency and heat capacity. We are also working on minimizing Johnson noise from the E S shunt and SQUID amplifier noise. We have shown that our performance, noise, and active bias models agree very well with measured data from several microcalorimeters. Once the fabrication improvements have been implemented, we have no doubt that our gamma-ray spectrometer will achieve even more spectacular results.

  17. Technical Barriers, Gaps,and Opportunities Related to Home Energy Upgrade Market Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, Marcus V.A.

    2011-11-01

    This report outlines the technical barriers, gaps, and opportunities that arise in executing home energy upgrade market delivery approaches, as identified through research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program.

  18. Coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity in Ni/Bi bilayers.

    PubMed

    LeClair, P; Moodera, J S; Philip, J; Heiman, D

    2005-01-28

    In spite of a lack of superconductivity in bulk crystalline Bi, thin film Bi deposited on thin Ni underlayers are strong-coupled superconductors below approximately 4 K. We unambiguously demonstrate that by tuning the Ni thickness the competition between ferromagnetism and superconductivity in the Ni/Bi can be tailored. For a narrow range of Ni thicknesses, the coexistence of both a superconducting energy gap and conduction electron spin polarization are visible within the Ni side of the Ni/Bi bilayers, independent of any particular theoretical model. We believe that this represents one of the clearest observations of superconductivity and ferromagnetism coexisting.

  19. Superconductivity in 4 angstrom single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Z K; Zhang, L; Wang, N; Zhang, X X; Wen, G H; Li, G D; Wang, J N; Chan, C T; Sheng, P

    2001-06-29

    Investigation of the magnetic and transport properties of single-walled small-diameter carbon nanotubes embedded in a zeolite matrix revealed that at temperatures below 20 kelvin, 4 angstrom tubes exhibit superconducting behavior manifest as an anisotropic Meissner effect, with a superconducting gap and fluctuation supercurrent. The measured superconducting characteristics display smooth temperature variations owing to one-dimensional fluctuations, with a mean-field superconducting transition temperature of 15 kelvin. Statistical mechanic calculations based on the Ginzburg-Landau free-energy functional yield predictions that are in excellent agreement with the experiments.

  20. Strain energy minimization in SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) magnet winding

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.M.

    1990-09-24

    Differential geometry provides a natural family of coordinate systems, the Frenet frame, in which to specify the geometric properties of magnet winding. By a modification of the Euler-Bernoulli thin rod model, the strain energy is defined with respect to this frame. Then it is minimized by a direct method from the calculus of variations. The mathematics, its implementation in a computer program, and some analysis of an SSC dipole by the program will be described. 16 refs.

  1. Performance of Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre superconducting cyclotron liquid nitrogen distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Gautam; Nandi, Chinmay; Bhattacharyya, Tamal Kumar; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2014-01-01

    The liquid nitrogen distribution at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata, India K500 superconducting cyclotron uses parallel branches to cool the thermal shield of helium vessel housing the superconducting coil and the cryopanels. Liquid nitrogen is supplied to the thermal shields from a pressurised liquid nitrogen dewar. Direct measurement of flow is quite difficult and seldom used in an operational cryogenic system. The total flow and heat load of the liquid nitrogen system was estimated indirectly by continuous measurement of level in the liquid nitrogen tanks. A mathematical model was developed to evaluate liquid nitrogen flow in the parallel branches. The model was used to generate flow distribution for different settings and the total flow was compared with measured data.

  2. Superconducting tunneling-junction detectors of X-ray radiation. Issues concerning the energy resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianov, V. A. Gor'kov, V. P. Koshelets, V. P. Filippenko, L. V.

    2007-02-15

    The effect of the recombination-and edge-related losses of nonequilibrium quasiparticles on the energy resolution of superconducting tunneling detectors is studied. The dependence of the signal on the energy of X-ray photons is measured and the shape of instrument-related lines is studied for the Ti/Nb/Al/AlO{sub x}/Al/Nb/NbN detectors with the Ti/Nb passive electrode. Experimental data are analyzed using the diffusion-based model of tunneling detectors.

  3. Simulating chemical energies to high precision with fully-scalable quantum algorithms on superconducting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, Peter; Babbush, Ryan; Kivlichan, Ian; Romero, Jhonathan; McClean, Jarrod; Tranter, Andrew; Barends, Rami; Kelly, Julian; Chen, Yu; Chen, Zijun; Jeffrey, Evan; Fowler, Austin; Megrant, Anthony; Mutus, Josh; Neill, Charles; Quintana, Christopher; Roushan, Pedram; Sank, Daniel; Vainsencher, Amit; Wenner, James; White, Theodore; Love, Peter; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan; Neven, Hartmut; Martinis, John

    Quantum simulations of molecules have the potential to calculate industrially-important chemical parameters beyond the reach of classical methods with relatively modest quantum resources. Recent years have seen dramatic progress both superconducting qubits and quantum chemistry algorithms. Here, we present experimental demonstrations of two fully-scalable algorithms for finding the dissociation energy of hydrogen: the variational quantum eigensolver and iterative phase estimation. This represents the first calculation of a dissociation energy to chemical accuracy with a non-precompiled algorithm. These results show the promise of chemistry as the ``killer app'' for quantum computers, even before the advent of full error-correction.

  4. Preparation of Nb3Al by high-energy ball milling and superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongliang; Liu, Zhao; Li, Pingyuan; Zhang, Xiaolan; Yang, Suhua; Yang, Dawei; Du, Lupeng; Cui, Yajing; Pan, Xifeng; Yan, Guo; Zhao, Yong

    2014-05-01

    The A15 phase superconductor Nb3Al has been considered as an alternative to Nb3Sn for high field and large scale applications. However, to prepare a stoichiometric Nb3Al with fine grain structures is very difficult. High-energy ball milling is a solid state powder processing technique and is a very useful for preparing Nb-Al alloys (Nb3Al). The effects of ball milling time and annealing temperature on the formation of Nb3Al superconducting phase have been studied. Pure Nb and Al powders with stoichiometric ratio of Nb3Al were mixed and milled, and the charging and milling were performed in an inert atmosphere. Phase formation and structural evolution during high-energy ball milling have been examined by X-ray diffraction. Al disappeared and Nb peaks broadened after about one hour of milling. With increasing milling time, the peaks of Nb became considerably broader and intensities decreased, the Nb-Al solid solution phase was extensive when milled about 3 hours. In order to obtain Nb3Al superconducting phase, a subsequent anneal was required. We have annealed the as-milled powders at 800-900°C for different times to prepared Nb3Al superconducting alloy. The results indicated that Nb3Al with small amount of impurity phase can be obtained on annealing the Nb-Al solid solution phase and the superconducting transition temperature was about 15K, but it is difficult to obtain a homogeneous Nb3Al phase by annealing the amorphous powder.

  5. Sensing with Superconducting Point Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Nurbawono, Argo; Zhang, Chun

    2012-01-01

    Superconducting point contacts have been used for measuring magnetic polarizations, identifying magnetic impurities, electronic structures, and even the vibrational modes of small molecules. Due to intrinsically small energy scale in the subgap structures of the supercurrent determined by the size of the superconducting energy gap, superconductors provide ultrahigh sensitivities for high resolution spectroscopies. The so-called Andreev reflection process between normal metal and superconductor carries complex and rich information which can be utilized as powerful sensor when fully exploited. In this review, we would discuss recent experimental and theoretical developments in the supercurrent transport through superconducting point contacts and their relevance to sensing applications, and we would highlight their current issues and potentials. A true utilization of the method based on Andreev reflection analysis opens up possibilities for a new class of ultrasensitive sensors. PMID:22778630

  6. Sensing with superconducting point contacts.

    PubMed

    Nurbawono, Argo; Zhang, Chun

    2012-01-01

    Superconducting point contacts have been used for measuring magnetic polarizations, identifying magnetic impurities, electronic structures, and even the vibrational modes of small molecules. Due to intrinsically small energy scale in the subgap structures of the supercurrent determined by the size of the superconducting energy gap, superconductors provide ultrahigh sensitivities for high resolution spectroscopies. The so-called Andreev reflection process between normal metal and superconductor carries complex and rich information which can be utilized as powerful sensor when fully exploited. In this review, we would discuss recent experimental and theoretical developments in the supercurrent transport through superconducting point contacts and their relevance to sensing applications, and we would highlight their current issues and potentials. A true utilization of the method based on Andreev reflection analysis opens up possibilities for a new class of ultrasensitive sensors.

  7. Energy band gaps in graphene nanoribbons with corners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczȩśniak, Dominik; Durajski, Artur P.; Khater, Antoine; Ghader, Doried

    2016-05-01

    In the present paper, we study the relation between the band gap size and the corner-corner length in representative chevron-shaped graphene nanoribbons (CGNRs) with 120° and 150° corner edges. The direct physical insight into the electronic properties of CGNRs is provided within the tight-binding model with phenomenological edge parameters, developed against recent first-principle results. We show that the analyzed CGNRs exhibit inverse relation between their band gaps and corner-corner lengths, and that they do not present a metal-insulator transition when the chemical edge modifications are introduced. Our results also suggest that the band gap width for the CGNRs is predominantly governed by the armchair edge effects, and is tunable through edge modifications with foreign atoms dressing.

  8. Enhancing the design of a superconducting coil for magnetic energy storage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indira, Gomathinayagam; UmaMaheswaraRao, Theru; Chandramohan, Sankaralingam

    2015-01-01

    Study and analysis of a coil for Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) system is presented in this paper. Generally, high magnetic flux density is adapted in the design of superconducting coil of SMES to reduce the size of the coil and to increase its energy density. With high magnetic flux density, critical current density of the coil is degraded and so the coil is wound with High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) made of different materials. A comparative study is made to emphasize the relationship between the energy storage and length of the coil wound by Bi2223, SF12100, SCS12100 and YBCO tapes. Recently for the construction of HTS magnets, YBCO tapes have been used. Simulation models for various designs have been developed to analyze the magnetic field distribution for the optimum design of energy storage. The design which gives the maximum stored energy in the coil has been used with a certain length of second-generation HTS. The performance analysis and the results of comparative study are done.

  9. ORNL Superconducting Technology Program for Electric Energy Systems. Annual report for FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hawsey, R.A.

    1993-02-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconducting Technology Program is conducted as part of a national effort by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy to develop the technology base needed by US industry for commercial development of electric power applications of high-temperature superconductivity. The two major elements of this program are wire development and systems development. This document describes the major research and development activities for this program together with related accomplishments. The technical progress reported was summarized from information prepared for the FY 1992 Peer Review of Projects, conducted by DOE`s Office of Program Analysis, Office of Energy Research. This ORNL program is highly leveraged by the staff and other resources of US industry and universities. Interlaboratory teams are also in place on a number of industry-driven projects. Patent disclosures, working group meetings, staff exchanges, and joint publications and presentations ensure that there is technology transfer to US industry. Working together, the collaborative teams are making tremendous progress in solving the scientific and technical issues necessary for the commercialization of long lengths of practical high-temperature superconductor wire and wire products.

  10. Space applications of superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, D. B.; Vorreiter, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Some potential applications of superconductivity in space are summarized, e.g., the use of high field magnets for cosmic ray analysis or energy storage and generation, space applications of digital superconducting devices, such as the Josephson switch and, in the future, a superconducting computer. Other superconducting instrumentation which could be used in space includes: low frequency superconducting sensors, microwave and infrared detectors, instruments for gravitational studies, and high-Q cavities for use as stabilizing elements in clocks and oscillators.

  11. Hybrid superconducting magnetic bearing and its frictional energy loss and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Z.; Ma, K.B.; Chen, Q.Y.; Cooley, R.R.

    1995-12-31

    A hybrid superconducting magnetic bearing (SMB) has been designed and tested. A flywheel energy storage (FES) prototype has been constructed for testing bearing friction loss and characterizing the dynamics of the rotor. The hybrid SMB design uses magnetic forces from permanent magnets for levitation and high temperature superconductor YBCO in between the magnets for stabilization. A 42 lb. flywheel currently can rotate up to 6,000 RPM with kinetic energy of 8 Wh stored. The result from the recent rotor spin-down experiment indicates an average frictional energy loss <2% per hour in a vacuum of 10 {sup {minus}5} torr, with imperfect system alignment and balance of rotor. The system dynamics has been conducted to improve upon the energy loss and rotor-bearing modeling.

  12. Generation of full polarization in ferromagnetic graphene with spin energy gap

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Qing-Ping; Liu, Zheng-Fang E-mail: aixichen@ecjtu.edu.cn; Liu, Zhi-Min; Chen, Ai-Xi E-mail: aixichen@ecjtu.edu.cn; Xiao, Xian-Bo

    2014-12-22

    We propose a workable scheme for the generation of full spin polarization in ferromagnetic graphene system with strain or Rashba spin-orbit interaction. A spin energy gap can be opened in ferromagnetic graphene system in the presence of strain or Rashba spin-orbit interaction, leading to the full polarization in the spin energy gap. In addition, under the combined modulation of strain and Rashba spin-orbit interaction, the ferromagnetic graphene system can generate significantly large spin-polarized current with a full polarization in the spin energy gap. It is anticipated to apply such a phenomenon to design the electron spin devices based on the graphene.

  13. Dirac-Hartree-Bogoliubov calculation for spherical and deformed hot nuclei: Temperature dependence of the pairing energy and gaps, nuclear deformation, nuclear radii, excitation energy, and entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisboa, R.; Malheiro, M.; Carlson, B. V.

    2016-02-01

    Background: Unbound single-particle states become important in determining the properties of a hot nucleus as its temperature increases. We present relativistic mean field (RMF) for hot nuclei considering not only the self-consistent temperature and density dependence of the self-consistent relativistic mean fields but also the vapor phase that takes into account the unbound nucleon states. Purpose: The temperature dependence of the pairing gaps, nuclear deformation, radii, binding energies, entropy, and caloric curves of spherical and deformed nuclei are obtained in self-consistent RMF calculations up to the limit of existence of the nucleus. Method: We perform Dirac-Hartree-Bogoliubov (DHB) calculations for hot nuclei using a zero-range approximation to the relativistic pairing interaction to calculate proton-proton and neutron-neutron pairing energies and gaps. A vapor subtraction procedure is used to account for unbound states and to remove long range Coulomb repulsion between the hot nucleus and the gas as well as the contribution of the external nucleon gas. Results: We show that p -p and n -n pairing gaps in the S10 channel vanish for low critical temperatures in the range Tcp≈0.6 -1.1 MeV for spherical nuclei such as 90Zr, 124Sn, and 140Ce and for both deformed nuclei 150Sm and 168Er. We found that superconducting phase transition occurs at Tcp=1.03 Δp p(0 ) for 90Zr, Tcp=1.16 Δp p(0 ) for 140Ce, Tcp=0.92 Δp p(0 ) for 150Sm, and Tcp=0.97 Δp p(0 ) for 168Er. The superfluidity phase transition occurs at Tcp=0.72 Δn n(0 ) for 124Sn, Tcp=1.22 Δn n(0 ) for 150Sm, and Tcp=1.13 Δn n(0 ) for 168Er. Thus, the nuclear superfluidity phase—at least for this channel—can only survive at very low nuclear temperatures and this phase transition (when the neutron gap vanishes) always occurs before the superconducting one, where the proton gap is zero. For deformed nuclei the nuclear deformation disappear at temperatures of about Tcs=2.0 -4.0 MeV , well above the

  14. Graphene field effect transistor without an energy gap

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Min Seok; Kim, Hyungjun; Son, Young-Woo; Atwater, Harry A.; Goddard, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Graphene is a room temperature ballistic electron conductor and also a very good thermal conductor. Thus, it has been regarded as an ideal material for postsilicon electronic applications. A major complication is that the relativistic massless electrons in pristine graphene exhibit unimpeded Klein tunneling penetration through gate potential barriers. Thus, previous efforts to realize a field effect transistor for logic applications have assumed that introduction of a band gap in graphene is a prerequisite. Unfortunately, extrinsic treatments designed to open a band gap seriously degrade device quality, yielding very low mobility and uncontrolled on/off current ratios. To solve this dilemma, we propose a gating mechanism that leads to a hundredfold enhancement in on/off transmittance ratio for normally incident electrons without any band gap engineering. Thus, our saw-shaped geometry gate potential (in place of the conventional bar-shaped geometry) leads to switching to an off state while retaining the ultrahigh electron mobility in the on state. In particular, we report that an on/off transmittance ratio of 130 is achievable for a sawtooth gate with a gate length of 80 nm. Our switching mechanism demonstrates that intrinsic graphene can be used in designing logic devices without serious alteration of the conventional field effect transistor architecture. This suggests a new variable for the optimization of the graphene-based device—geometry of the gate electrode. PMID:23671093

  15. Graphene field effect transistor without an energy gap.

    PubMed

    Jang, Min Seok; Kim, Hyungjun; Son, Young-Woo; Atwater, Harry A; Goddard, William A

    2013-05-28

    Graphene is a room temperature ballistic electron conductor and also a very good thermal conductor. Thus, it has been regarded as an ideal material for postsilicon electronic applications. A major complication is that the relativistic massless electrons in pristine graphene exhibit unimpeded Klein tunneling penetration through gate potential barriers. Thus, previous efforts to realize a field effect transistor for logic applications have assumed that introduction of a band gap in graphene is a prerequisite. Unfortunately, extrinsic treatments designed to open a band gap seriously degrade device quality, yielding very low mobility and uncontrolled on/off current ratios. To solve this dilemma, we propose a gating mechanism that leads to a hundredfold enhancement in on/off transmittance ratio for normally incident electrons without any band gap engineering. Thus, our saw-shaped geometry gate potential (in place of the conventional bar-shaped geometry) leads to switching to an off state while retaining the ultrahigh electron mobility in the on state. In particular, we report that an on/off transmittance ratio of 130 is achievable for a sawtooth gate with a gate length of 80 nm. Our switching mechanism demonstrates that intrinsic graphene can be used in designing logic devices without serious alteration of the conventional field effect transistor architecture. This suggests a new variable for the optimization of the graphene-based device--geometry of the gate electrode.

  16. The energy trilogy: An integrated sustainability model to bridge wastewater treatment plant energy and emissions gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Talibi, A. Adhim

    An estimated 4% of national energy consumption is used for drinking water and wastewater services. Despite the awareness and optimization initiatives for energy conservation, energy consumption is on the rise owing to population and urbanization expansion and to commercial and industrial business advancement. The principal concern is since energy consumption grows, the higher will be the energy production demand, leading to an increase in CO2 footprints and the contribution to global warming potential. This research is in the area of energy-water nexus, focusing on wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) energy trilogy -- the group of three related entities, which includes processes: (1) consuming energy, (2) producing energy, and (3) the resulting -- CO2 equivalents. Detailed and measurable energy information is not readily obtained for wastewater facilities, specifically during facility preliminary design phases. These limitations call for data-intensive research approach on GHG emissions quantification, plant efficiencies and source reduction techniques. To achieve these goals, this research introduced a model integrating all plant processes and their pertinent energy sources. In a comprehensive and "Energy Source-to-Effluent Discharge" pattern, this model is capable of bridging the gaps of WWTP energy, facilitating plant designers' decision-making for meeting energy assessment, sustainability and the environmental regulatory compliance. Protocols for estimating common emissions sources are available such as for fuels, whereas, site-specific emissions for other sources have to be developed and are captured in this research. The dissertation objectives were met through an extensive study of the relevant literature, models and tools, originating comprehensive lists of processes and energy sources for WWTPs, locating estimation formulas for each source, identifying site specific emissions factors, and linking the sources in a mathematical model for site specific CO2 e

  17. Eddy Current Analysis and Optimization for Superconducting Magnetic Bearing of Flywheel Energy Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Yuuki; Yamashita, Tomohisa; Hasegawa, Hitoshi; Matsuoka, Taro; Kaimori, Hiroyuki; Ishihara, Terumasa

    Levitation and guidance force is electromagnetic generated between a superconducting coil and zero field cooled bulk superconductors used in our flywheel energy storage system (FESS). Because the magnetic field depends on the configuration of the coil and the bulks, the eccentricity and the vibration of a rotor cause fluctuation in the magnetic field which induces eddy current and consequent Joule heat on electric conductors such as cooling plates. Heat generation in the cryogenic region critically reduces the efficiency of the FESS. In this paper, we will report the result of the electromagnetic analysis of the SMB and propose an optimal divided cooling plate for reducing the eddy current and Joule heat.

  18. 30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage stabilizing coil. Final report for construction

    SciTech Connect

    1983-03-01

    This report covers Phase II, Fabrication and Delivery of the 30 MJ Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Stabilizing Coil. A history of the manufacturing and assembly phase of the magnet is presented. Major problems and solutions are summarized, and illustrations of the major operations are provided. The Quality Assurance program is described with a listing of all nonconformance reports. Design documentation is provided, including a Design Document Index, monthly progress reports, and a list of papers given on the project. Appendices to the report contain copies of released and revised design calculations, test reports, assembly procedure, and nonconformance reports and engineering dispositions.

  19. Evolution of superconducting gaps in Th-substituted Sm1 -xThxOFeAs studied by multiple Andreev reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmicheva, T. E.; Kuzmichev, S. A.; Pervakov, K. S.; Pudalov, V. M.; Zhigadlo, N. D.

    2017-03-01

    Using intrinsic multiple Andreev reflections effect spectroscopy, we studied SnS contacts in the layered oxypnictide superconductors Sm1 -xThxOFeAs with various thorium doping and critical temperatures TC=21 -54 K. We observe a scaling between both superconducting gaps and TC. The determined BCS ratio for the large gap 2 ΔL/kBTC=5.0 -5.7 and its eigen-BCS ratio (in a hypothetical case of zero interband coupling) 2 ΔL/kBTCL=4.1 -4.6 both exceeding the weak-coupling limit 3.52, and for the small gap 2 ΔS/kBTC=1.2 -1.6 , remain nearly constant within all the TC range studied. The temperature dependences ΔL ,S(T ) agree well with a two-band BCS-like Moskalenko and Suhl model. We prove intraband coupling to be stronger than interband coupling, whereas Coulomb repulsion constants μ* are finite in Sm-based oxypnictides.

  20. Tunneling spectra and superconducting gaps observed by scanning tunneling microscopy near the grain boundaries of FeSe0.3Te0.7 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, K. C.; Li, Y. S.; Shen, Y. T.; Wu, M. K.; Chi, C. C.

    2013-12-01

    We used scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to study the tunneling spectra of FeSe0.3Te0.7 films with two orientations of the ab-planes and a connection ramp between them. We discovered that by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method, the a- and b-axis of the FeSe0.3Te0.7 film deposited on an Ar-ion-milled magnesium oxide (MgO) substrate were rotated 45° with respect to those of MgO, whereas the a- and b-axis of the film grown on a pristine MgO substrate were parallel to those of MgO. With photolithography and this technique, we can prepare FeSe0.3Te0.7 films with two orientations on the same MgO substrate so that the connection between them forms a ramp at an angle of about 25° to the substrate plane. In the planar region, for either the 0° or 45° orientation, we observed tunneling spectra with a superconducting gap of about 5 meV and 1.78 meV, respectively. However, a much larger gap at about 18 meV was observed in the ramp region. Furthermore, we observed a small zero-bias conductance peak (ZBCP) inside the large gap at T = 4.3 K. The ZBCP becomes smaller with increasing temperature and disappeared at temperature above 7 K.

  1. Optimized use of superconducting magnetic energy storage for electromagnetic rail launcher powering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badel, Arnaud; Tixador, Pascal; Arniet, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Electromagnetic rail launchers (EMRLs) require very high currents, from hundreds of kA to several MA. They are usually powered by capacitors. The use of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) in the supply chain of an EMRL is investigated, as an energy buffer and as direct powering source. Simulations of direct powering are conducted to quantify the benefits of this method in terms of required primary energy. In order to enhance further the benefits of SMES powering, a novel integration concept is proposed, the superconducting self-supplied electromagnetic launcher (S3EL). In the S3EL, the SMES is used as a power supply for the EMRL but its coil serves also as an additional source of magnetic flux density, in order to increase the thrust (or reduce the required current for a given thrust). Optimization principles for this new concept are presented. Simulations based on the characteristics of an existing launcher demonstrate that the required current could be reduced by a factor of seven. Realizing such devices with HTS cables should be possible in the near future, especially if the S3EL concept is used in combination with the XRAM principle, allowing current multiplication.

  2. Localization of Metal-Induced Gap States at the Metal-Insulator Interface: Origin of Flux Noise in SQUIDs and Superconducting Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sangkook; Lee, Dung-Hai; Louie, Steven G.; Clarke, John

    2010-03-01

    The origin of magnetic flux noise in dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) with a power spectrum scaling as 1/f (f is frequency) has been a puzzle for over 25 years. This noise limits both the low frequency performance of SQUIDs and the decoherence time of flux-sensitive superconducting qubits, making scaling-up for quantum computing problematic. Recent calculations and experiments indicate that the noise is generated by electrons that randomly reverse their spin directions. Their areal density of ˜ 5 x 10^17 m-2 is relatively insensitive to the nature of the superconductor and substrate. Here, we propose that the local magnetic moments originate in metal-induced gap states (MIGSs) localized by potential disorder at the metal-insulator interface. MIGSs are particularly sensitive to such disorder, so that the localized states have a Coulomb repulsion sufficiently large to make them singly occupied. Our calculations demonstrate that a modest level of disorder generates the required areal density of localized moments. This result suggests that magnetic flux noise could be reduced by fabricating superconductor-insulator interfaces with less disorder. Support: NSF DMR07-05941, US DOE De-AC02-05CH11231, Samsung Foundation, Teragrid, NERSC.

  3. Experimental and analytical study of the DC breakdown characteristics of polypropylene laminated paper with a butt gap condition considering the insulation design of superconducting cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, In-jin; Choi, Won; Seong, Jae-gyu; Lee, Bang-wook; Koo, Ja-yoon

    2014-08-01

    It has been reported that the insulation design under DC stress is considered as one of the critical factors in determining the performance of high-voltage direct current (HVDC) superconducting cable. Therefore, it is fundamentally necessary to investigate the DC breakdown characteristics of the composite insulation system consisting of liquid nitrogen (LN2)/polypropylene-laminated-paper (PPLP). In particular, the insulation characteristics under DC polarity reversal condition should be verified to understand the polarity effect of the DC voltage considering the unexpected incidents taking place at line-commutated-converters (LCC) under service at a DC power grid. In this study, to examine the variation of DC electric field strength, the step voltage and polarity reversal breakdown tests are performed under DC stress. Also, we investigate the electric field distributions in a butt gap of the LN2/PPLP condition considering the DC polarity reversal by using simulation software.

  4. Origin of the variety of superconducting gap structure in iron-based superconductors: competition between orbital and spin fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onari, Seiichiro; Saito, Tetsuro; Kontani, Hiroshi

    2012-02-01

    To understand the pairing mechanism in iron-based superconductors, we study the three-dimensional gap structure based on the orbital fluctuation theory. We focus on the fully-gapped state in (i) heavily electron-doped KFe2Se2 [1], nodal gap structure in (ii) isovalent-doped BaFe2(As,P)2, and strongly band-dependent gap structure in (iii) hole-doped (Ba,K)Fe2As2. Based on the three-dimensional ten orbital model for (i), we obtain orbital-fluctuation-mediated fully-gapped s++ wave state without sign reversal. For (ii), we reproduce the loop-shaped nodal structure on the electron-Fermi surface, due to the competition between orbital and spin fluctuations. For (iii), we obtain a drastic change in the gap structure by hole-doping, reflecting the variation of orbital fluctuations due to the topological change of electron-pockets. These results indicate the significant role of orbital fluctuations in iron-based superconductors. [1] Saito et al., PRB 83, 140512(R) (2011)

  5. Bulk evidence for single-Gap s-wave superconductivity in the intercalated graphite superconductor C6Yb.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Mike; Doiron-Leyraud, Nicolas; Taillefer, Louis; Weller, Thomas; Ellerby, Mark; Saxena, S S

    2007-02-09

    We report measurements of the in-plane electrical resistivity rho and thermal conductivity kappa of the intercalated graphite superconductor C6Yb down to temperatures as low as Tc/100. When a field is applied along the c axis, the residual electronic linear term kappa0/T evolves in an exponential manner for Hc1superconductivity.

  6. Summary of Gaps and Barriers for Implementing Residential Building Energy Efficiency Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    This report presents the key gaps and barriers to implementing residential energy efficiency strategies in the U.S. market, as identified in sessions at the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America 2010 Residential Energy Efficiency Meeting held in Denver, Colorado, on July 20-22, 2010.

  7. Roles of superconducting magnetic bearings and active magnetic bearings in attitude control and energy storage flywheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jiqiang; Fang, Jiancheng; Ge, Shuzhi Sam

    2012-12-01

    Compared with conventional energy storage flywheel, the rotor of attitude control and energy storage flywheel (ACESF) used in space not only has high speed, but also is required to have precise and stable direction. For the presented superconducting magnetic bearing (SMB) and active magnetic bearing (AMB) suspended ACESF, the rotor model including gyroscopic couples is established originally by taking the properties of SMB and AMB into account, the forces of SMB and AMB are simplified by linearization within their own neighbors of equilibrium points. For the high-speed rigid discal rotor with large inertia, the negative effect of gyroscopic effect of rotor is prominent, the radial translation and tilting movement of rotor suspended by only SMB, SMB with equivalent PMB, or SMB together with PD controlled AMB are researched individually. These analysis results proved originally that SMB together with AMB can make the rotor be stable and make the radial amplitude of the vibration of rotor be small while the translation of rotor suspended by only SMB or SMB and PM is not stable and the amplitude of this vibration is large. For the stability of the high-speed rotor in superconducting ACESF, the AMB can suppress the nutation and precession of rotor effectively by cross-feedback control based on the separated PD type control or by other modern control methods.

  8. Energy Factors in Commercial Mortgages: Gaps and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Paul; Coleman, Philip; Wallace, Nancy; Issler, Paulo; Kolstad, Lenny; Sahadi, Robert

    2016-09-01

    The commercial real estate mortgage market is enormous, with almost half a trillion dollars in deals originated in 2015. Relative to other energy efficiency financing mechanisms, very little attention has been paid to the potential of commercial mortgages as a channel for promoting energy efficiency investments. The valuation and underwriting elements of the business are largely driven by the “net operating income” (NOI) metric – essentially, rents minus expenses. While NOI ostensibly includes all expenses, energy factors are in several ways given short shrift in the underwriting process. This is particularly interesting when juxtaposed upon a not insignificant body of research revealing that there are in fact tangible benefits (such as higher valuations and lower vacancy and default rates) for energy-efficient and “green” commercial buildings. This scoping report characterizes the current status and potential interventions to promote greater inclusion of energy factors in the commercial mortgage process.

  9. COMMERCIALIZATION DEMONSTRATION OF MID-SIZED SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE TECHNOLOGY FOR ELECTRIC UTILITYAPPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    CHARLES M. WEBER

    2008-06-24

    As an outgrowth of the Technology Reinvestment Program of the 1990’s, an Agreement was formed between BWXT and the DOE to promote the commercialization of Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) technology. Business and marketing studies showed that the performance of electric transmission lines could be improved with this SMES technology by stabilizing the line thereby allowing the reserved stability margin to be used. One main benefit sought was to double the capacity and the amount of energy flow on an existing transmission line by enabling the use of the reserved stability margin, thereby doubling revenue. Also, electrical disturbances, power swings, oscillations, cascading disturbances and brown/black-outs could be mitigated and rendered innocuous; thereby improving power quality and reliability. Additionally, construction of new transmission lines needed for increased capacity could be delayed or perhaps avoided (with significant savings) by enabling the use of the reserved stability margin of the existing lines. Two crucial technical aspects were required; first, a large, powerful, dynamic, economic and reliable superconducting magnet, capable of oscillating power flow was needed; and second, an electrical power interface and control to a transmission line for testing, demonstrating and verifying the benefits and features of the SMES system was needed. A project was formed with the goals of commercializing the technology by demonstrating SMES technology for utility applications and to establish a domestic capability for manufacturing large superconducting magnets for both commercial and defense applications. The magnet had very low AC losses to support the dynamic and oscillating nature of the stabilizing power flow. Moreover, to economically interface to the transmission line, the magnet had the largest operating voltage ever made. The manufacturing of that design was achieved by establishing a factory with newly designed and acquired equipment

  10. Superconducting parity effect across the Anderson limit

    PubMed Central

    Vlaic, Sergio; Pons, Stéphane; Zhang, Tianzhen; Assouline, Alexandre; Zimmers, Alexandre; David, Christophe; Rodary, Guillemin; Girard, Jean-Christophe; Roditchev, Dimitri; Aubin, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    How small can superconductors be? For isolated nanoparticles subject to quantum size effects, P.W. Anderson in 1959 conjectured that superconductivity could only exist when the electronic level spacing δ is smaller than the superconducting gap energy Δ. Here we report a scanning tunnelling spectroscopy study of superconducting lead (Pb) nanocrystals grown on the (110) surface of InAs. We find that for nanocrystals of lateral size smaller than the Fermi wavelength of the 2D electron gas at the surface of InAs, the electronic transmission of the interface is weak; this leads to Coulomb blockade and enables the extraction of electron addition energy of the nanocrystals. For large nanocrystals, the addition energy displays superconducting parity effect, a direct consequence of Cooper pairing. Studying this parity effect as a function of nanocrystal volume, we find the suppression of Cooper pairing when the mean electronic level spacing overcomes the superconducting gap energy, thus demonstrating unambiguously the validity of the Anderson criterion. PMID:28240294

  11. Tunable coupling in circuit quantum electrodynamics using a superconducting charge qubit with a V-shaped energy level diagram.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, S J; Hoffman, A J; Gambetta, J M; Houck, A A

    2011-02-25

    We introduce a new type of superconducting charge qubit that has a V-shaped energy spectrum and uses quantum interference to provide independently tunable qubit energy and coherent coupling to a superconducting cavity. Dynamic access to the strong coupling regime is demonstrated by tuning the coupling strength from less than 200 kHz to greater than 40 MHz. This tunable coupling can be used to protect the qubit from cavity-induced relaxation and avoid unwanted qubit-qubit interactions in a multiqubit system.

  12. Energy band gap and optical transition of metal ion modified double crossover DNA lattices.

    PubMed

    Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Ha, Taewoo; Gnapareddy, Bramaramba; Choi, Kyujin; Lee, Junwye; Kim, Byeonghoon; Kim, Jae Hoon; Park, Sung Ha

    2014-10-22

    We report on the energy band gap and optical transition of a series of divalent metal ion (Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Zn(2+), and Co(2+)) modified DNA (M-DNA) double crossover (DX) lattices fabricated on fused silica by the substrate-assisted growth (SAG) method. We demonstrate how the degree of coverage of the DX lattices is influenced by the DX monomer concentration and also analyze the band gaps of the M-DNA lattices. The energy band gap of the M-DNA, between the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), ranges from 4.67 to 4.98 eV as judged by optical transitions. Relative to the band gap of a pristine DNA molecule (4.69 eV), the band gap of the M-DNA lattices increases with metal ion doping up to a critical concentration and then decreases with further doping. Interestingly, except for the case of Ni(2+), the onset of the second absorption band shifts to a lower energy until a critical concentration and then shifts to a higher energy with further increasing the metal ion concentration, which is consistent with the evolution of electrical transport characteristics. Our results show that controllable metal ion doping is an effective method to tune the band gap energy of DNA-based nanostructures.

  13. Energy Flow for a Variable-Gap Capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Nathaniel R.

    2005-09-01

    When capacitor plates are separated, the capacitor's electrostatic energy either increases or decreases, depending upon whether the charge or the voltage is held constant. For the constant-voltage case, an interesting puzzle can be posed to students: How is it possible that an external agent does positive work on the capacitor while at the same time the capacitor's stored energy decreases? An energy flow diagram, as suggested by Art Hobson's TPT article, helps to visualize the movements of energy among different parts of the system. What Richard Feynman calls a "surprising factor of one-half" in the expression for the force between capacitor plates confronts students with an additional puzzle to decipher.2

  14. Calculation of Energy Diagram of Asymmetric Graded-Band-Gap Semiconductor Superlattices.

    PubMed

    Monastyrskii, Liubomyr S; Sokolovskii, Bogdan S; Alekseichyk, Mariya P

    2017-12-01

    The paper theoretically investigates the peculiarities of energy diagram of asymmetric graded-band-gap superlattices with linear coordinate dependences of band gap and electron affinity. For calculating the energy diagram of asymmetric graded-band-gap superlattices, linearized Poisson's equation has been solved for the two layers forming a period of the superlattice. The obtained coordinate dependences of edges of the conduction and valence bands demonstrate substantial transformation of the shape of the energy diagram at changing the period of the lattice and the ratio of width of the adjacent layers. The most marked changes in the energy diagram take place when the period of lattice is comparable with the Debye screening length. In the case when the lattice period is much smaller that the Debye screening length, the energy diagram has the shape of a sawtooth-like pattern.

  15. Accurate Zero Parameter Correlation Energy Functional Obtained from the Homogeneous Electron Gas with an Energy Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, J. B.; Chen, Jiqiang; Iafrate, G. J.; Savin, A.

    1998-03-01

    We have obtained an analytic approximation to E_c(r_g, ζ,G) where G is an energy gap separating the occupied and unoccupied states of a homogeneous electron gas for ζ=3D0 and ξ=3D1. When G=3D0, E_c(r_g, ζ) reduces to the usual LSD result. This functional is employed in calculating correlation energies for unpolarized atoms and ions for Z <= 18 by taking G[n]=3D1/8|nabla ln n|^2, which reduces to the ionization energy in the large r limit in an exact Kohn-Sham (KS) theory. The resulting functional is self-interaction-corrected employing a method which is invariant under a unitary transformation. We find that the application of this approach to the calculation of the Ec functional reduces the error in the LSD result by more than 95%. When the value of G is approximately corrected to include the effect of higher lying unoccupied localized states, the resulting values of Ec are within a few percent of the exact results.

  16. Omnidirectional Measurements of Angle-Resolved Heat Capacity for Complete Detection of Superconducting Gap Structure in the Heavy-Fermion Antiferromagnet UPd_{2}Al_{3}.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yusei; Kittaka, Shunichiro; Sakakibara, Toshiro; Tsutsumi, Yasumasa; Nomoto, Takuya; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Machida, Kazushige; Homma, Yoshiya; Aoki, Dai

    2016-07-15

    Quasiparticle excitations in UPd_{2}Al_{3} were studied by means of heat-capacity (C) measurements under rotating magnetic fields using a high-quality single crystal. The field dependence shows C(H)∝H^{1/2}-like behavior at low temperatures for both two hexagonal crystal axes, i.e., H∥[0001] (c axis) and H∥[112[over ¯]0] (a axis), suggesting the presence of nodal quasiparticle excitations from heavy bands. At low temperatures, the polar-angle (θ) dependence of C exhibits a maximum along H∥[0001] with a twofold symmetric oscillation below 0.5 T, and an unusual shoulder or hump anomaly has been found around 30°-60° from the c axis in C(θ) at intermediate fields (1≲μ_{0}H≲2  T). These behaviors in UPd_{2}Al_{3} purely come from the superconducting nodal quasiparticle excitations, and can be successfully reproduced by theoretical calculations assuming the gap symmetry with a horizontal linear line node. We demonstrate the whole angle-resolved heat-capacity measurements done here as a novel spectroscopic method for nodal gap determination, which can be applied to other exotic superconductors.

  17. Ni-impurity effects on the superconducting gap of La2-xSrxCuO4 studied from the magnetic field and temperature dependence of the electronic specific heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosawa, T.; Momono, N.; Oda, M.; Ido, M.

    2012-04-01

    The magnetic field and temperature dependence of the electronic specific heat Cel have been systematically investigated in La2-xSrxCu1-yNiyO4 (LSCNO) in order to study Ni-impurity effects on the superconducting (SC) gap. In LSCNO with x = 0.15 and y = 0.015, the value of γ (≡Cel/T) at T = 0 K, γ0, is enhanced under the magnetic field H applied along the c axis. The increment of γ0, Δγ0, follows the Volovik relation Δγ0 = AH, characteristic of the SC gap with line nodes, with prefactor A similar to that of a pure sample. The Cel/T versus T curve under H = 0 shows a d-wave-like SC anomaly with an abrupt increase at Tc and T-linear dependence at T ≪ Tc, although the γ0-value in the Cel/T versus T curve increases with increasing Ni concentrations. Interestingly, as the SC part of Cel/T, Cel/T - γ0 ≡ γs, decreases in LSCNO, Tc is reduced in proportion to the decrease of γs. These findings can be explained phenomenologically by a simple model in which Ni impurities bring about strong pair breaking at the edges of the coherent nodal part of the Fermi surface but in the vicinity of the nodes of the SC gap. The reduction of the SC condensation energy U0 in LSCNO, evaluated from Cel at T≲Tc, is also understood by the same model.

  18. Topological superconductivity in bilayer Rashba system.

    PubMed

    Nakosai, Sho; Tanaka, Yukio; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2012-04-06

    We theoretically study a possible topological superconductivity in the interacting two layers of Rashba systems, which can be fabricated by the heterostructures of semiconductors and oxides. The hybridization, which induces the gap in the single particle dispersion, and the electron-electron interaction between the two layers leads to the novel phase diagram of the superconductivity. It is found that the topological superconductivity without breaking time-reversal symmetry is realized when (i) the Fermi energy is within the hybridization gap, and (ii) the interlayer interaction is repulsive, both of which can be satisfied in realistic systems. Edge channels are studied in a tight-binding model numerically, and the several predictions on experiments are also given.

  19. Development of an abort gap monitor for high-energy proton rings

    SciTech Connect

    Beche, Jean-Francois; Byrd, John; De Santis, Stefano; Denes, Peter; Placidi, Massimo; Turner, William; Zolotorev, Max

    2004-05-03

    The fill pattern in proton synchrotrons usually features an empty gap, longer than the abort kicker raise time, for machine protection. This gap is referred to as the ''abort gap'' and any particles, which may accumulate in it due to injection errors and diffusion between RF buckets, would be lost inside the ring, rather than in the beam dump, during the kicker firing. In large proton rings, due to the high energies involved, it is vital to monitor the build up of charges in the abort gap with a high sensitivity. We present a study of an abort gap monitor based on a photomultiplier with a gated microchannel plate, which would allow for detecting low charge densities by monitoring the synchrotron radiation emitted. We show results of beam test experiments at the Advanced Light Source using a Hamamatsu 5916U MCP-PMT and compare them to the specifications for the Large Hadron Collider

  20. Energy calibration of superconducting transition edge sensors for x-ray detection using pulse analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerith, C.; Simmnacher, B.; Weiland, R.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Isaila, C.; Jochum, J.; Potzel, W.; Hoehne, J.; Phelan, K.; Wernicke, D.; May, T.

    2006-05-15

    Transition edge sensors (TESs) have been developed to be used as high-resolution x-ray detectors. They show excellent energy resolution and can be used in many applications. TESs are a special kind of calorimeters that can determine small temperature changes after x-ray absorption. Such a temperature change causes a strong resistance change (superconducting to normal-conducting phase transition) that can be measured. The energy calibration of a TES based spectrometer is problematic due to the nonlinear behavior of the detector response. In this article, a method is introduced to calibrate the energy scale of TES spectra. This is accomplished by calculating the energy dependence of the response of the detector operated in electrothermal feedback mode. Using this method a calibration accuracy of a few eV for an x-ray energy of 6 keV can be achieved. Examples of energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) measurements demonstrate the high quality of this method for everyday use of TES EDS detectors in material analysis. However, because the method relies only on a few very general assumptions, it should also be useful for other kinds of TES detectors.

  1. Superconducting transport in single and parallel double InAs quantum dot Josephson junctions with Nb-based superconducting electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Shoji Sailer, Juergen; Deacon, Russell S.; Oiwa, Akira; Shibata, Kenji; Hirakawa, Kazuhiko; Tarucha, Seigo

    2015-11-30

    We report conductance and supercurrent measurements for InAs single and parallel double quantum dot Josephson junctions contacted with Nb or NbTiN superconducting electrodes. Large superconducting gap energy, high critical field, and large switching current are observed, all reflecting the features of Nb-based electrodes. For the parallel double dots, we observe an enhanced supercurrent when both dots are on resonance, which may reflect split Cooper pair tunneling.

  2. Point contact spectroscopy in oriented La[sub 2-x]Sr[sub x]CuO[sub 4] superconductors; energy gap and Fermi velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, N. ); Deutscher, G. ); Revcolevschi, A.; Dhalenne, G. )

    1994-08-01

    Point contact measurements in oriented La[sub 2-x]Sr[sub x]CuO[sub 4] samples were performed using metal tips. The current-voltage curves measured along the CuO plane direction (ab) are characteristic of the Andreev reflection phenomenon. The superconducting energy gap in the ab plane is determined, [Delta][sub ab] = 6 [+-] 1 meV, with a possibility for the existence of a lower subgap in the plane. A lower limit for the Fermi velocity in the CuO planes is also set by the measurements; V[sub F] [ge] 6 [times] 10[sup 7] cm/sec, which is significantly higher than the average velocity obtained by band calculations. The results are discussed in the context of different models for superconductivity in the layered oxides. In particular, the authors raise the possibility of an anisotropic gap parameter which may indicate a nonstandard s-wave pairing in La[sub 2-x]Sr[sub x]CuO[sub 4]. A comparison with previous results obtained on YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7-[delta

  3. Possible Nodeless Superconducting Gaps in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and YBa2Cu3O7-x Revealed by Cross-Sectional Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Ming-Qiang; Yan, Ya-Jun; Zhang, Tong; Feng, Dong-Lai

    2016-12-01

    Pairing in the cuprate high-temperature superconductors and its origin remain among the most enduring mysteries in condensed matter physics. With cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy/ spectroscopy, we clearly reveal the spatial-dependence or inhomogeneity of the superconducting gap structure of Bi$_2$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_{8+\\delta}$ (Bi2212) and YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{7-x}$ (YBCO) along their $c$-axes on a scale shorter than the interlayer spacing. By tunneling into the (100) plane of a Bi2212 single crystal and a YBCO film, we observe both U-shaped tunneling spectra with extended flat zero-conductance bottoms, and V-shaped gap structures, in different regions of each sample. On the YBCO film, tunneling into a (110) surface only reveals a U-shaped gap without any zero-bias peak. Our analysis suggests that the U-shaped gap is likely a nodeless superconducting gap. The V-shaped gap has a very small amplitude, and is likely proximity-induced by regions having the larger U-shaped gap.

  4. Effect of temperature, energy gap, and distortion of potential surfaces on photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Islampour, R.; Alden, R.G.; Wu, G.Y.C.; Lin, S.H. )

    1993-07-01

    We report the quantitative examination of the effect of distortion of potential energy surfaces and the temperature effect on photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer (PIET) as a function of electronic energy gap. The results demonstrate the importance of distorted oscillators in determining the dependence of the rate of PIET on the energy gap. This phenomenon may in some cases lead to misinterpretations of experimental data, when undistorted oscillators are assumed to be involved in the PIET process. The condition for observing the linear (rather than parabolic) dependence of the ET rate will be determined using the multimode model. The inclusion of multivibrational modes in the nuclear factors results in energy gap behavior, which is markedly different from the single mode case. Finally, a comparison between PIET and internal conversion is discussed. 25 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Progress with high-field superconducting magnets for high-energy colliders

    DOE PAGES

    Apollinari, Giorgio; Prestemon, Soren; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2015-10-01

    One of the possible next steps for high-energy physics research relies on a high-energy hadron or muon collider. The energy of a circular collider is limited by the strength of bending dipoles, and its maximum luminosity is determined by the strength of final focus quadrupoles. For this reason, the high-energy physics and accelerator communities have shown much interest in higher-field and higher-gradient superconducting accelerator magnets. The maximum field of NbTi magnets used in all present high-energy machines, including the LHC, is limited to ~10 T at 1.9 K. Fields above 10 T became possible with the use of Nbmore » $$_3$$Sn superconductors. Nb$$_3$$Sn accelerator magnets can provide operating fields up to ~15 T and can significantly increase the coil temperature margin. Accelerator magnets with operating fields above 15 T require high-temperature superconductors. Furthermore, this review discusses the status and main results of Nb$$_3$$Sn accelerator magnet research and development and work toward 20-T magnets.« less

  6. Progress with high-field superconducting magnets for high-energy colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Apollinari, Giorgio; Prestemon, Soren; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2015-10-01

    One of the possible next steps for high-energy physics research relies on a high-energy hadron or muon collider. The energy of a circular collider is limited by the strength of bending dipoles, and its maximum luminosity is determined by the strength of final focus quadrupoles. For this reason, the high-energy physics and accelerator communities have shown much interest in higher-field and higher-gradient superconducting accelerator magnets. The maximum field of NbTi magnets used in all present high-energy machines, including the LHC, is limited to ~10 T at 1.9 K. Fields above 10 T became possible with the use of Nb$_3$Sn superconductors. Nb$_3$Sn accelerator magnets can provide operating fields up to ~15 T and can significantly increase the coil temperature margin. Accelerator magnets with operating fields above 15 T require high-temperature superconductors. Furthermore, this review discusses the status and main results of Nb$_3$Sn accelerator magnet research and development and work toward 20-T magnets.

  7. Anomalous behavior of the energy gap in the one-dimensional quantum XY model.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Manaka; Yamanaka, Yuuki; Nishimori, Hidetoshi; Rams, Marek M

    2015-11-01

    We reexamine the well-studied one-dimensional spin-1/2 XY model to reveal its nontrivial energy spectrum, in particular the energy gap between the ground state and the first excited state. In the case of the isotropic XY model, the XX model, the gap behaves very irregularly as a function of the system size at a second order transition point. This is in stark contrast to the usual power-law decay of the gap and is reminiscent of the similar behavior at the first order phase transition in the infinite-range quantum XY model. The gap also shows nontrivial oscillatory behavior for the phase transitions in the anisotropic model in the incommensurate phase. We observe a close relation between this anomalous behavior of the gap and the correlation functions. These results, those for the isotropic case in particular, are important from the viewpoint of quantum annealing where the efficiency of computation is strongly affected by the size dependence of the energy gap.

  8. Tensile-strain effect of inducing the indirect-to-direct band-gap transition and reducing the band-gap energy of Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Inaoka, Takeshi Furukawa, Takuro; Toma, Ryo; Yanagisawa, Susumu

    2015-09-14

    By means of a hybrid density-functional method, we investigate the tensile-strain effect of inducing the indirect-to-direct band-gap transition and reducing the band-gap energy of Ge. We consider [001], [111], and [110] uniaxial tensility and (001), (111), and (110) biaxial tensility. Under the condition of no normal stress, we determine both normal compression and internal strain, namely, relative displacement of two atoms in the primitive unit cell, by minimizing the total energy. We identify those strain types which can induce the band-gap transition, and evaluate the critical strain coefficient where the gap transition occurs. Either normal compression or internal strain operates unfavorably to induce the gap transition, which raises the critical strain coefficient or even blocks the transition. We also examine how each type of tensile strain decreases the band-gap energy, depending on its orientation. Our analysis clearly shows that synergistic operation of strain orientation and band anisotropy has a great influence on the gap transition and the gap energy.

  9. Superconducting qubit in a nonstationary transmission line cavity: Parametric excitation, periodic pumping, and energy dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, A. A.; Shapiro, D. S.; Remizov, S. V.; Pogosov, W. V.; Lozovik, Yu. E.

    2017-02-01

    We consider a superconducting qubit coupled to the nonstationary transmission line cavity with modulated frequency taking into account energy dissipation. Previously, it was demonstrated that in the case of a single nonadiabatical modulation of a cavity frequency there are two channels of a two-level system excitation which are due to the absorption of Casimir photons and due to the counterrotating wave processes responsible for the dynamical Lamb effect. We show that the parametric periodical modulation of the resonator frequency can increase dramatically the excitation probability. Remarkably, counterrotating wave processes under such a modulation start to play an important role even in the resonant regime. Our predictions can be used to control qubit-resonator quantum states as well as to study experimentally different channels of a parametric qubit excitation.

  10. A promising way to open an energy gap in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jialei; Huang, Chengxi; Wu, Haiping; Qiu, Yuhao; Gao, Qian; Hu, Zhenpeng; Kan, Erjun; Zhang, Lixin

    2015-10-01

    There has been huge research interest in the energy gap problem of monolayer and bilayer graphene due to their great potential in practical applications. Herein, based on first-principles calculations, we report a promising way to open a large band gap in bilayer graphene (BLG) by sandwiching it between two substrates, although this is not usually expected to occur due to the weak interlayer interactions dominated by van der Waals forces. Taking surface-functionalized boron-nitrides as substrates, we predict from first-principles calculations that BLG can have energy gaps ranging from 0.35 eV to 0.55 eV, depending on the substrates and stacking order. Compared to other methods of band-gap manipulation in BLG, the structural integrity of BLG is well-preserved in our study, and the predicted energy gap is suitable for electric devices. Since the proposed method is easily realized in experiments, our results will hopefully accelerate the application of graphene in semiconductor devices and promote the development of graphene technology.There has been huge research interest in the energy gap problem of monolayer and bilayer graphene due to their great potential in practical applications. Herein, based on first-principles calculations, we report a promising way to open a large band gap in bilayer graphene (BLG) by sandwiching it between two substrates, although this is not usually expected to occur due to the weak interlayer interactions dominated by van der Waals forces. Taking surface-functionalized boron-nitrides as substrates, we predict from first-principles calculations that BLG can have energy gaps ranging from 0.35 eV to 0.55 eV, depending on the substrates and stacking order. Compared to other methods of band-gap manipulation in BLG, the structural integrity of BLG is well-preserved in our study, and the predicted energy gap is suitable for electric devices. Since the proposed method is easily realized in experiments, our results will hopefully accelerate the

  11. Unusual nodal behaviors of the superconducting gap in the iron-based superconductor Ba (F e0.65R u0.35)2A s2 : Effects of spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Okazaki, K.; Yoshida, T.; Suzuki, H.; Horio, M.; Ambolode, L. C. C.; Xu, J.; Ideta, S.; Hashimoto, M.; Lu, D. H.; Shen, Z.-X.; Ota, Y.; Shin, S.; Nakajima, M.; Ishida, S.; Kihou, K.; Lee, C. H.; Iyo, A.; Eisaki, H.; Mikami, T.; Kakeshita, T.; Yamakawa, Y.; Kontani, H.; Uchida, S.; Fujimori, A.

    2017-03-01

    We have investigated the superconducting (SC) gap on hole Fermi surfaces (FSs) of optimally substituted Ba (F e0.65R u0.35)2A s2 by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (APRES) using bulk-sensitive 7 eV laser and synchrotron radiation. It was found that, whereas the gap is isotropic in the kx-ky plane, the gap magnitudes of two resolved hole FSs show similar kz dependences and decrease as kz approaches ˜2 π /c (i.e., around the Z point), unlike the other Fe-based superconductors reported so far, where the SC gap of only one hole FS shows a strong kz dependence. This unique gap structure can be understood in the scenario that the dz2 orbital character is mixed into both hole FSs due to finite spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and is reproduced by calculation within the random phase approximation including the SOC.

  12. Pressure dependence of the band-gap energy in BiTeI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güler-Kılıç, Sümeyra; Kılıç, ćetin

    2016-10-01

    The evolution of the electronic structure of BiTeI, a layered semiconductor with a van der Waals gap, under compression is studied by employing semilocal and dispersion-corrected density-functional calculations. Comparative analysis of the results of these calculations shows that the band-gap energy of BiTeI decreases till it attains a minimum value of zero at a critical pressure, after which it increases again. The critical pressure corresponding to the closure of the band gap is calculated, at which BiTeI becomes a topological insulator. Comparison of the critical pressure to the pressure at which BiTeI undergoes a structural phase transition indicates that the closure of the band gap would not be hindered by a structural transformation. Moreover, the band-gap pressure coefficients of BiTeI are computed, and an expression of the critical pressure is devised in terms of these coefficients. Our findings indicate that the semilocal and dispersion-corrected approaches are in conflict about the compressibility of BiTeI, which result in overestimation and underestimation, respectively. Nevertheless, the effect of pressure on the atomic structure of BiTeI is found to be manifested primarily as the reduction of the width of the van der Waals gap according to both approaches, which also yield consistent predictions concerning the interlayer metallic bonding in BiTeI under compression. It is consequently shown that the calculated band-gap energies follow qualitatively and quantitatively the same trend within the two approximations employed here, and the transition to the zero-gap state occurs at the same critical width of the van der Waals gap.

  13. Phase diagram and superconducting gap structure of the iron-pnictide superconductor (Ba,K) Fe 2 As 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xigang

    2011-03-01

    Measurements of the Nernst and Seebeck coefficients were used to delineate the T-x phase diagram of the iron-pnictide superconductor Ba 1-x Kx Fe 2 As 2 . The sensitivity of these two coefficients to the reconstruction of the Fermi surface caused by the onset of antiferromagnetic order below a temperature TN allowed us to track TN precisely as a function of concentration x, even when the electrical resistivity, for example, shows no anomaly at the magnetic transition. In the region of concentrations where superconductivity appears out of an antiferromagnetic normal state (T T N) , weinvestigatetheevolutionofthesuperconductinggapstructureofBa 1-x K x Fe 2 As 2 bymeasuringthethermalconductivityintheT = 0 limit . Thisisasensitiveanddirectionalprobeofnodalquasiparticles . Astheconcentrationxisreduced , wefindasuddenchangeinthegapstructurefromafullgapwithoutnodestoagapwithnodes . Weascribethischangetotheonsetofantiferromagnetismbelowacriticaldopingx N insidethesuperconductingphase , whoseeffectismostlikelytoalterboththeFermisurfaceandtheangulardependenceofthegap . WecomparetheseresultswithourearlierstudyonBa (Fe 1-x Co x)2 As 2 [1,2]. This work was performed in collaboration with H. Shakeripour, J. Chang, F. Laliberte, J.-Ph. Reid, N. Doiron-Leyraud, L. Taillefer, M.A. Tanatar, R. Prozorov, H. Q. Luo, Z. S. Wang, H.-H. Wen.

  14. Energy gap of extended states in SiC-doped graphene nanoribbon: Ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoshi; Wu, Yong; Li, Zhongyao; Gao, Yong

    2017-04-01

    The energy gap of extended states in zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) was examined on the basis of density-functional theory. In isolated ZGNRs, the energy gap is inversely proportional to the width of ribbon. It agrees well with the results from the Dirac equation in spin-unpolarized ZGNRs, although the considered ZGNRs have spin-polarized edges. However, the energy gap in SiC-doped ZGNRs cannot be modeled by effective width approximation. The doping also lifts the spin-degenerate of edge states and results in a metallic-like band structure near the Fermi level in SiC-doped ZGNRs. Our calculations may be helpful for understanding the origin of the reported single-channel ballistic transport in epitaxial graphene nanoribbons.

  15. Quantum spin Hall insulator in halogenated arsenene films with sizable energy gaps

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongchao; Chen, Li; Shi, Changmin; Wang, Xiaoli; Cui, Guangliang; Zhang, Pinhua; Chen, Yeqing

    2016-01-01

    Based on first-principles calculations, the electronic and topological properties of halogenated (F-, Cl-, Br- and I-) arsenene are investigated in detail. It is found that the halogenated arsenene sheets show Dirac type characteristic in the absence of spin-orbital coupling (SOC), whereas energy gap will be induced by SOC with the values ranging from 0.194 eV for F-arsenene to 0.255 eV for I-arsenene. Noticeably, these four newly proposed two-dimensional (2D) systems are verified to be quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulators by calculating the edge states with obvious linear cross inside bulk energy gap. It should be pointed out that the large energy gap in these 2D materials consisted of commonly used element is quite promising for practical applications of QSH insulators at room temperature. PMID:27340091

  16. The Potential United Kingdom Energy Gap and Creep Life Prediction Methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The United Kingdom faces a looming energy gap with around 20 pct of its generating capacity due for closure in the next 10 to 15 years as a result of plant age and new European legislation on environmental protection and safety at work. A number of solutions exist for this problem including the use of new materials so that new plants can operate at higher temperatures, new technologies related to carbon capture and gasification, development of renewable resources, and less obviously the use of accurate models for predicting creep life. This article reviews, with illustrations, some of the more applicable and successful creep prediction methodologies used by academics and industrialists and highlights how these techniques can help alleviate the looming energy gap. The role that these approaches can play in solving the energy gap is highlighted throughout.

  17. Phase competition in trisected superconducting dome

    PubMed Central

    Vishik, I. M.; Hashimoto, M.; He, Rui-Hua; Lee, Wei-Sheng; Schmitt, Felix; Lu, Donghui; Moore, R. G.; Zhang, C.; Meevasana, W.; Sasagawa, T.; Uchida, S.; Fujita, Kazuhiro; Ishida, S.; Ishikado, M.; Yoshida, Yoshiyuki; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Hussain, Zahid; Devereaux, Thomas P.; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2012-01-01

    A detailed phenomenology of low energy excitations is a crucial starting point for microscopic understanding of complex materials, such as the cuprate high-temperature superconductors. Because of its unique momentum-space discrimination, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) is ideally suited for this task in the cuprates, where emergent phases, particularly superconductivity and the pseudogap, have anisotropic gap structure in momentum space. We present a comprehensive doping- and temperature-dependence ARPES study of spectral gaps in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ, covering much of the superconducting portion of the phase diagram. In the ground state, abrupt changes in near-nodal gap phenomenology give spectroscopic evidence for two potential quantum critical points, p = 0.19 for the pseudogap phase and p = 0.076 for another competing phase. Temperature dependence reveals that the pseudogap is not static below Tc and exists p > 0.19 at higher temperatures. Our data imply a revised phase diagram that reconciles conflicting reports about the endpoint of the pseudogap in the literature, incorporates phase competition between the superconducting gap and pseudogap, and highlights distinct physics at the edge of the superconducting dome. PMID:23093670

  18. Energy-gap reduction in heavily doped silicon: Causes and consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Selloni, Annabella; Car, Roberto

    1985-02-01

    The authors review briefly the existing theoretical treatments of the various effects that contribute to the reduction of the energy gap in heavily doped Si, namely electron-electron and electron-impurity interactions and the effect of disorder in the impurity distribution. They then turn to the longstanding question why energy-gap reductions extracted from three different types of experiments have persistently produced values with substantial discrepancies, making it impossible to compare with theoretical values. First, they demonstrate that a meaningful comparison between theory and experiment can indeed be made if theoretical calculations are carried out for actual quantities that experiments measure, e.g. luminescence spectra, as recently done by Selloni and Pantelides. Then, they demonstrate that, independent of any theoretical calculations, the optical absorption spectra are fully consistent with the luminescence spectra and that the discrepancies in the energy-gap reductions extracted from the two sets of spectra are caused entirely by the curve-fitting procedures used in analyzing optical-absorption data. Finally, they show explicitly that, as already believed by many authors, energy-gap reductions extracted from electrical measurements on transistors do not correspond to true gap reductions. They identify two corrections that must be added to the values extracted from the electrical data in order to arrive at the true gap reductions and show that the resulting values are in good overall agreement with luminescence and absorption data. They, therefore, demonstrate that the observed reduction in emitter injection efficiency in bipolar transistors is not strictly due to a gap reduction, as generally believed, but to three very different effects.

  19. Temperature-Dependent Ellipsometry Measurements of Partial Coulomb Energy in Superconducting Cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levallois, J.; Tran, M. K.; Pouliot, D.; Presura, C. N.; Greene, L. H.; Eckstein, J. N.; Uccelli, J.; Giannini, E.; Gu, G. D.; Leggett, A. J.; van der Marel, D.

    2016-07-01

    We performed an experimental study of the temperature and doping dependence of the energy-loss function of the bilayer and trilayer bismuth cuprates family. The primary aim is to obtain information on the energy stored in the Coulomb interaction between the conduction electrons, on the temperature dependence thereof, and on the change of Coulomb interaction when Cooper pairs are formed. We performed temperature-dependent ellipsometry measurements on several Bi2 Sr2 CaCu2 O8 -x single crystals: underdoped with Tc=60 , 70, and 83 K; optimally doped with Tc=91 K ; overdoped with Tc=84 , 81, 70, and 58 K; as well as optimally doped Bi2 Sr2 Ca2 Cu3 O10 +x with Tc=110 K . Our first observation is that, as the temperature drops through Tc, the loss function in the range up to 2 eV displays a change of temperature dependence as compared to the temperature dependence in the normal state. This effect at—or close to—Tc depends strongly on doping, with a sign change for weak overdoping. The size of the observed change in Coulomb energy, using an extrapolation with reasonable assumptions about its q dependence, is about the same size as the condensation energy that has been measured in these compounds. Our results therefore lend support to the notion that the Coulomb energy is an important factor for stabilizing the superconducting phase. Because of the restriction to small momentum, our observations do not exclude a possible significant contribution to the condensation energy of the Coulomb energy associated with the region of q around (π ,π ).

  20. Controlling of optical energy gap of Co-ferrite quantum dots in poly (methyl methacrylate) matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sayed, H. M.; Agami, W. R.

    2015-07-01

    Different crystallite sizes of Co-ferrite nanoparticles were prepared and dispersed in the matrix of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) polymer. The effect of crystallite size on the structure and optical energy gap of Co-nanoferrite/PMMA composite has been studied. The optical energy gap of Co-ferrite was greatly affected by the crystallite size. This result was discussed in terms of the formation of electron-hole exciton using particle in a box model. The effective mass and the Bohr radius of the formed exciton have been calculated from the spectroscopic measurements.

  1. Rotochemical heating with a density-dependent superfluid energy gap in neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Jimenez, Nicolas; Petrovich, Cristobal; Reisenegger, Andreas

    2010-08-04

    When a rotating neutron star loses angular momentum, the reduction of the centrifugal force makes it contract. This perturbs each fluid element, raising the local pressure and originating deviations from beta equilibrium, inducing reactions that release heat (rotochemical heating). This effect has previously been studied by Fernandez and Reisenegger for neutron stars of non-superfluid matter and by Petrovich and Reisenegger for superfluid matter, finding that the system in both cases reaches a quasi-steady state, corresponding to a partial equilibration between compression, due to the loss of angular momentum, and reactions that try to restore the equilibrium. However, Petrovich and Reisenegger assumes a constant value of the superfluid energy gap, whereas theoretical models predict density-dependent gap amplitudes, and therefore gaps that depend on the location in the star. In this work, we try to discriminate between several proposed gap models, comparing predicted surface temperatures to the value measured for the nearest millisecond pulsar, J0437-4715.

  2. Energy losses in superconductive DC-electromagnets due to ferromagnetic movement

    SciTech Connect

    Ciesla, A.; Matras, A.

    1996-05-01

    A DC-current, superconductive electromagnet is a source of the magnetic field in a separator matrix. This type of separator operates in a cyclic way. Therefore, it appears as very important to ensure the electromagnet stability during operation, i.e., range of parameters` changes that could maintain the magnet winding in the superconductive state. This means selecting parameter changes representing the magnet winding in the superconductive state.

  3. Strong-Coupling Superconductivity. I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalapino, D. J.; Schrieffer, J. R.; Wilkins, J. W.

    The pairing theory of superconductivity is extended to treat systems having strong electron-phonon coupling. In this regime the Landau quasiparticle approximation is invalid. In the theory we treat phonon and Coulomb interactions on the same basis and carry out the analysis using the nonzero-temperature Green's functions of the Nambu formalism. The generalized energy-gap equation thus obtained is solved (at T = 0°K) for a model which closely represents lead and the complex energy-gap parameter Δ(ω)) is plotted as a function of energy for several choices of phonon and Coulomb interaction strengths. An expression for the single-particle tunneling density of states is derived, which, when combined with Δ(ω), gives excellent agreement with experiment, if the phonon interaction strength is chosen to give the observed energy gap Δ0 at zero temperature. The tunneling experiments therefore give a detailed justification of the phonon mechanism of superconductivity and of the validity of the strong-coupling theory. In addition, by combining theory and the tunneling experiments, much can be learned about the electron-phon interaction and the phonon density of states. The theory is accurate to terms of order the square root of the electron-ion mass ratio, 10-2-10-3.

  4. Strain-Induced Energy Band Gap Opening in Two-Dimensional Bilayered Silicon Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Z.; Zhou, R.; Lew Yan Voon, L. C.; Zhuang, Y.

    2016-10-01

    This work presents a theoretical study of the structural and electronic properties of bilayered silicon film (BiSF) under in-plane biaxial strain/stress using density functional theory (DFT). Atomic structures of the two-dimensional (2-D) silicon films are optimized by using both the local-density approximation (LDA) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA). In the absence of strain/stress, five buckled hexagonal honeycomb structures of the BiSF with triangular lattice have been obtained as local energy minima, and their structural stability has been verified. These structures present a Dirac-cone shaped energy band diagram with zero energy band gaps. Applying a tensile biaxial strain leads to a reduction of the buckling height. Atomically flat structures with zero buckling height have been observed when the AA-stacking structures are under a critical biaxial strain. Increase of the strain between 10.7% and 15.4% results in a band-gap opening with a maximum energy band gap opening of ˜0.17 eV, obtained when a 14.3% strain is applied. Energy band diagrams, electron transmission efficiency, and the charge transport property are calculated. Additionally, an asymmetric energetically favorable atomic structure of BiSF shows a non-zero band gap in the absence of strain/stress and a maximum band gap of 0.15 eV as a -1.71% compressive strain is applied. Both tensile and compressive strain/stress can lead to a band gap opening in the asymmetric structure.

  5. Energy gap in the aetiology of body weight gain and obesity: a challenging concept with a complex evaluation and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Schutz, Yves; Byrne, Nuala M; Dulloo, Abdul; Hills, Andrew P

    2014-01-01

    The concept of energy gap(s) is useful for understanding the consequence of a small daily, weekly, or monthly positive energy balance and the inconspicuous shift in weight gain ultimately leading to overweight and obesity. Energy gap is a dynamic concept: an initial positive energy gap incurred via an increase in energy intake (or a decrease in physical activity) is not constant, may fade out with time if the initial conditions are maintained, and depends on the 'efficiency' with which the readjustment of the energy imbalance gap occurs with time. The metabolic response to an energy imbalance gap and the magnitude of the energy gap(s) can be estimated by at least two methods, i.e. i) assessment by longitudinal overfeeding studies, imposing (by design) an initial positive energy imbalance gap; ii) retrospective assessment based on epidemiological surveys, whereby the accumulated endogenous energy storage per unit of time is calculated from the change in body weight and body composition. In order to illustrate the difficulty of accurately assessing an energy gap we have used, as an illustrative example, a recent epidemiological study which tracked changes in total energy intake (estimated by gross food availability) and body weight over 3 decades in the US, combined with total energy expenditure prediction from body weight using doubly labelled water data. At the population level, the study attempted to assess the cause of the energy gap purported to be entirely due to increased food intake. Based on an estimate of change in energy intake judged to be more reliable (i.e. in the same study population) and together with calculations of simple energetic indices, our analysis suggests that conclusions about the fundamental causes of obesity development in a population (excess intake vs. low physical activity or both) is clouded by a high level of uncertainty.

  6. Energy Gaps and Layer Polarization of Integer and Fractional Quantum Hall States in Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yanmeng; Lee, Yongjin; Che, Shi; Pi, Ziqi; Espiritu, Timothy; Stepanov, Petr; Smirnov, Dmitry; Lau, Chun Ning; Zhang, Fan

    2016-02-01

    Owing to the spin, valley, and orbital symmetries, the lowest Landau level in bilayer graphene exhibits multicomponent quantum Hall ferromagnetism. Using transport spectroscopy, we investigate the energy gaps of integer and fractional quantum Hall (QH) states in bilayer graphene with controlled layer polarization. The state at filling factor ν =1 has two distinct phases: a layer polarized state that has a larger energy gap and is stabilized by high electric field, and a hitherto unobserved interlayer coherent state with a smaller gap that is stabilized by large magnetic field. In contrast, the ν =2 /3 quantum Hall state and a feature at ν =1 /2 are only resolved at finite electric field and large magnetic field. These results underscore the importance of controlling layer polarization in understanding the competing symmetries in the unusual QH system of BLG.

  7. Nanoscale mapping of optical band gaps using monochromated electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhan, W; Granerød, C S; Venkatachalapathy, V; Johansen, K M H; Jensen, I J T; Kuznetsov, A Yu; Prytz, Ø

    2017-03-10

    Using monochromated electron energy loss spectroscopy in a probe-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope we demonstrate band gap mapping in ZnO/ZnCdO thin films with a spatial resolution below 10 nm and spectral precision of 20 meV.

  8. Nanoscale mapping of optical band gaps using monochromated electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, W.; Granerød, C. S.; Venkatachalapathy, V.; Johansen, K. M. H.; Jensen, I. J. T.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu; Prytz, Ø.

    2017-03-01

    Using monochromated electron energy loss spectroscopy in a probe-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope we demonstrate band gap mapping in ZnO/ZnCdO thin films with a spatial resolution below 10 nm and spectral precision of 20 meV.

  9. The optical band gap and surface free energy of polyethylene modified by electron beam irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Kader, A. M.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, investigations have been carried out on electron beam irradiated ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Polyethylene samples were irradiated with 1.5 MeV electron beam at doses ranging from 50 to 500 kGy. Modifications in optical properties and photoluminescence behavior of the polymer were evaluated by UV-vis and photoluminescence techniques. Changes of surface layer composition of UHMWPE produced by electron irradiations were studied by Rutherford back scattering spectrometry (RBS). The change in wettability and surface free energy induced by irradiations was also investigated. The optical absorption studies reveal that both optical band gap and Urbach's energy decreases with increasing electron dose. A correlation between energy gap and the number of carbon atoms in clusters is discussed. Photoluminescence spectra were reveal remarkable decrease in the integrated luminescence intensity with increasing irradiation dose. Contact angle measurements showed that wettability and surface free energy increases with increasing the irradiation dose.

  10. Technical Barriers, Gaps, and Opportunities Related to Home Energy Upgrade Market Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, M. V. A.

    2011-11-01

    This report outlines the technical barriers, gaps, and opportunities that arise in executing home energy upgrade market delivery approaches, as identified through research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program. The objective of this report is to outline the technical1 barriers, gaps, and opportunities that arise in executing home energy upgrade market delivery approaches, as identified through research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program. This information will be used to provide guidance for new research necessary to enable the success of the approaches. Investigation for this report was conducted via publications related to home energy upgrade market delivery approaches, and a series of interviews with subject matter experts (contractors, consultants, program managers, manufacturers, trade organization representatives, and real estate agents). These experts specified technical barriers and gaps, and offered suggestions for how the technical community might address them. The potential benefits of home energy upgrades are many and varied: reduced energy use and costs; improved comfort, durability, and safety; increased property value; and job creation. Nevertheless, home energy upgrades do not comprise a large part of the overall home improvement market. Residential energy efficiency is the most complex climate intervention option to deliver because the market failures are many and transaction costs are high (Climate Change Capital 2009). The key reasons that energy efficiency investment is not being delivered are: (1) The opportunity is highly fragmented; and (2) The energy efficiency assets are nonstatus, low-visibility investments that are not properly valued. There are significant barriers to mobilizing the investment in home energy upgrades, including the 'hassle factor' (the time and effort required to identify and secure improvement works), access to financing, and the opportunity cost of

  11. An overview of Boeing flywheel energy storage systems with high-temperature superconducting bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasik, M.; Hull, J. R.; Mittleider, J. A.; Gonder, J. F.; Johnson, P. E.; McCrary, K. E.; McIver, C. R.

    2010-03-01

    An overview summary of recent Boeing work on high-temperature superconducting (HTS) bearings is presented. A design is presented for a small flywheel energy storage system that is deployable in a field installation. The flywheel is suspended by a HTS bearing whose stator is conduction cooled by connection to a cryocooler. At full speed, the flywheel has 5 kW h of kinetic energy, and it can deliver 3 kW of three-phase 208 V power to an electrical load. The entire system, which includes a containment structure, is compatible with transportation by forklift or crane. Laboratory measurements of the bearing loss are combined with the parasitic loads to estimate the efficiency of the system. Improvements in structural composites are expected to enable the operation of flywheels with very high rim velocities. Small versions of such flywheels will be capable of very high rotational rates and will likely require the low loss inherent in HTS bearings to achieve these speeds. We present results of experiments with small-diameter rotors that use HTS bearings for levitation and rotate in vacuum at kHz rates. Bearing losses are presented as a function of rotor speed.

  12. Tests of the 30-MJ superconducting magnetic-energy storage unit

    SciTech Connect

    Boenig, H.J.; Dean, J.W.; Rogers, J.D.; Schermer, R.I.; Hauer, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    A 30-MJ (8.4 kWh) superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit with a 10-MW converter was installed during the later months of 1982 at the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Tacoma substation in Tacoma, Washington. The unit, which is capable of absorbing and releasing up to 10 MJ of energy at a frequency of 0.35 Hz, was designed to damp the dominant power swing mode of the Pacific AC Intertie. Extensive tests were performed with the unit during the first half of 1983. This paper will review the major components of the storage unit and describe the startup and steady state operating experience with the coil, dewar, refrigerator and converter. The unit has absorbed power up to a level of 11.8 Mw. Real power was modulated following a sinusoidal power demand with frequencies from 0.1 to 1.2 Hz and a power level up to +- 8.3 MW. The unit has performed in accordance with design expectations and no major problems have developed.

  13. Initial studies of Bremsstrahlung energy deposition in small-bore superconducting undulator structures in linac environments

    SciTech Connect

    Cremer, T.; Tatchyn, R.

    1995-12-31

    One of the more promising technologies for developing minimal-length insertion devices for linac-driven, single-pass Free Electron Lasers (FELs) operating in the x-ray range is based on the use of superconducting (SC) materials. In recent FEL simulations, for example, a bifilar helical SC device with a 2 cm period and 1.8 T field was found to require a 30 m saturation length for operation at 1.5{Angstrom} on a 15 GeV linac, more than 40% shorter than an alternative hybrid/permanent magnet (hybrid/PM) undulator. AT the same time, however, SC technology is known to present characteristic difficulties for insertion device design, both in engineering detail and in operation. Perhaps the most critical problem, as observed, e.g., by Madey and co-workers in their initial FEL experiments, was the frequent quenching induced by scattered electrons upstream of their (bifilar) device. Postulating that this quenching was precipitated by directly-scattered or bremsstrahlung-induced particle energy deposited into the SC material or into material contiguous with it, the importance of numerical and experimental characterizations of this phenomenon for linac-based, user-facility SC undulator design becomes evident. In this paper we discuss selected prior experimental results and report on initial EGS4 code studies of scattered and bremsstrahlung induced particle energy deposition into SC structures with geometries comparable to a small-bore bifilar helical undulator.

  14. Few-photon color imaging using energy-dispersive superconducting transition-edge sensor spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Kazuki; Numata, Takayuki; Hattori, Kaori; Fukuda, Daiji

    2017-04-04

    Highly sensitive spectral imaging is increasingly being demanded in bioanalysis research and industry to obtain the maximum information possible from molecules of different colors. We introduce an application of the superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) technique to highly sensitive spectral imaging. A TES is an energy-dispersive photodetector that can distinguish the wavelength of each incident photon. Its effective spectral range is from the visible to the infrared (IR), up to 2800 nm, which is beyond the capabilities of other photodetectors. TES was employed in this study in a fiber-coupled optical scanning microscopy system, and a test sample of a three-color ink pattern was observed. A red-green-blue (RGB) image and a near-IR image were successfully obtained in the few-incident-photon regime, whereas only a black and white image could be obtained using a photomultiplier tube. Spectral data were also obtained from a selected focal area out of the entire image. The results of this study show that TES is feasible for use as an energy-dispersive photon-counting detector in spectral imaging applications.

  15. Few-photon color imaging using energy-dispersive superconducting transition-edge sensor spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Kazuki; Numata, Takayuki; Hattori, Kaori; Fukuda, Daiji

    2017-01-01

    Highly sensitive spectral imaging is increasingly being demanded in bioanalysis research and industry to obtain the maximum information possible from molecules of different colors. We introduce an application of the superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) technique to highly sensitive spectral imaging. A TES is an energy-dispersive photodetector that can distinguish the wavelength of each incident photon. Its effective spectral range is from the visible to the infrared (IR), up to 2800 nm, which is beyond the capabilities of other photodetectors. TES was employed in this study in a fiber-coupled optical scanning microscopy system, and a test sample of a three-color ink pattern was observed. A red–green–blue (RGB) image and a near-IR image were successfully obtained in the few-incident-photon regime, whereas only a black and white image could be obtained using a photomultiplier tube. Spectral data were also obtained from a selected focal area out of the entire image. The results of this study show that TES is feasible for use as an energy-dispersive photon-counting detector in spectral imaging applications. PMID:28374801

  16. Multi-band Eilenberger Theory of Superconductivity: Systematic Low-Energy Projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Yuki; Nakamura, Hiroki

    2016-07-01

    We propose the general multi-band quasiclassical Eilenberger theory of superconductivity to describe quasiparticle excitations in inhomogeneous systems. With the use of low-energy projection matrix, the M-band quasiclassical Eilenberger equations are systematically obtained from N-band Gor'kov equations. Here M is the internal degrees of freedom in the bands crossing the Fermi energy and N is the degree of freedom in a model. Our framework naturally includes inter-band off-diagonal elements of Green's functions, which have usually been neglected in previous multi-band quasiclassical frameworks. The resultant multi-band Eilenberger and Andreev equations are similar to the single-band ones, except for multi-band effects. The multi-band effects can exhibit the non-locality and the anisotropy in the mapped systems. Our framework can be applied to an arbitrary Hamiltonian (e.g., a tight-binding Hamiltonian derived by the first-principle calculation). As examples, we use our framework in various kinds of systems, such as noncentrosymmetric superconductor CePt3Si, three-orbital model for Sr2RuO4, heavy fermion CeCoIn5/YbCoIn5 superlattice, a topological superconductor with the strong spin-orbit coupling CuxBi2Se3, and a surface system on a topological insulator.

  17. Illusory continuity without sufficient sound energy to fill a temporal gap: examples of crossing glide tones.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Yoshitaka; Eguchi, Shuntarou

    2012-10-01

    The gap transfer illusion is an auditory illusion where a temporal gap inserted in a longer glide tone is perceived as if it were in a crossing shorter glide tone. Psychophysical and phenomenological experiments were conducted to examine the effects of sound-pressure-level (SPL) differences between crossing glides on the occurrence of the gap transfer illusion. We found that the subjective continuity-discontinuity of the crossing glides changed as a function of the relative level of the shorter glide to the level of the longer glide. When the relative level was approximately between -9 and +2 dB, listeners perceived the longer glide as continuous and the shorter glide as discontinuous, that is, the gap transfer illusion took place. The glides were perceived veridically below this range, that is, gap transfer did not take place, whereas above this range the longer glide and the shorter glide were both perceived as continuous. The fact that the longer glide could be perceived as continuous even when the crossing shorter glide was 9 dB weaker indicates that the longer glide's subjective continuity cannot be explained within the conventional framework of auditory organization, which assumes reallocation of sound energy from the shorter to the longer glide. The implicated mechanisms are discussed in terms of the temporal configuration of onsets and terminations and the time-frequency distribution of sound energy.

  18. An outer gap model of high-energy emission from rotation-powered pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, James; Romani, Roger W.

    1994-01-01

    We describe a refined calculation of high-energy emission from rotation-powered pulsars based on the outer gap model of Cheng, Ho, & Ruderman (1986 a, b). In this calculation, vacuum gaps form in regions near the speed-of-light cylinder of the pulsar magnetosphere along the boundary between the closed and open field line zones. We have improved upon previous efforts to model the spectra from these pulsars (e.g., Cheng et al. 1986b; Ho 1989) by following the variation in particle production and radiation properties with position in the outer gap. Curvature, synchotron, and inverse-Compton scattering fluxes vary significantly over the gap, and their interactions via photon-photon pair production build up the radiating charge populations at varying rates. We have also incorporated an approximate treatment of the transport particle and photon fluxes between gap emission zones. These effects, along with improved computations of the particle and photon distribution, provide very important modifications of the model gamma-ray flux. In paticular, we attempt to make specific predictions of pulse profile shapes and spectral variations as a function of pulse phase and suggest further extensions to the model which may provide accurate computations of the observed high-energy emissions.

  19. Color superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wilczek, F.

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  20. Superconducting Memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peotta, Sebastiano; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2014-09-01

    In his original work, Josephson predicted that a phase-dependent conductance should be present in superconducting tunnel junctions, an effect difficult to detect, mainly because it is hard to single it out from the usual nondissipative Josephson current. We propose a solution for this problem that consists of using different superconducting materials to realize the two junctions of a superconducting interferometer. According to the Ambegaokar-Baratoff relation the two junctions have different conductances if the critical currents are equal, thus the Josephson current can be suppressed by fixing the magnetic flux in the loop at half of a flux quantum without canceling the phase-dependent conductance. Our proposal can be used to study the phase-dependent conductance, an effect present in principle in all superconducting weak links. From the standpoint of nonlinear circuit theory, such a device is in fact an ideal memristor with possible applications to memories and neuromorphic computing in the framework of ultrafast and low-energy-consumption superconducting digital circuits.

  1. Three energy scales in the superconducting state of hole-doped cuprates detected by electronic Raman scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Benhabib, S.; Gu, G. D.; Gallais, Y.; ...

    2015-10-06

    We explore by electronic Raman scattering the superconducting state of the Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi-2212) crystal by performing a fine-tuned doping study. We find three distinct energy scales in A1g, B1g, and B2g symmetries which show three distinct doping dependencies. Above p=0.22, the three energies merge; below p=0.12, the A1g scale is no longer detectable, while the B1g and B2g scales become constant in energy. In between, the A1g and B1g scales increase monotonically with underdoping, while the B2g one exhibits a maximum at p=0.16. The three superconducting energy scales appear to be a universal feature of hole-doped cuprates. Furthermore, we proposemore » that the nontrivial doping dependencies of the three scales originate from the Fermi-surface changes and reveal competing orders inside the superconducting dome.« less

  2. Three energy scales in the superconducting state of hole-doped cuprates detected by electronic Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Benhabib, S.; Gu, G. D.; Gallais, Y.; Cazayous, M.; Measson, M. -A.; Zhong, R. D.; Schneeloch, J.; Forget, A.; Colson, D.; Sacuto, A.

    2015-10-06

    We explore by electronic Raman scattering the superconducting state of the Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi-2212) crystal by performing a fine-tuned doping study. We find three distinct energy scales in A1g, B1g, and B2g symmetries which show three distinct doping dependencies. Above p=0.22, the three energies merge; below p=0.12, the A1g scale is no longer detectable, while the B1g and B2g scales become constant in energy. In between, the A1g and B1g scales increase monotonically with underdoping, while the B2g one exhibits a maximum at p=0.16. The three superconducting energy scales appear to be a universal feature of hole-doped cuprates. Furthermore, we propose that the nontrivial doping dependencies of the three scales originate from the Fermi-surface changes and reveal competing orders inside the superconducting dome.

  3. Improvement of superconducting properties of old Y Ba Cu O specimens by high-energy heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, I.; Balogh, A.; Peurla, M.; Laiho, R.; Mészáros, Cs.; Pintér-Csordás, A.

    2006-12-01

    Superconducting parameters of different, almost 20 years old Y-Ba-Cu-O samples, prepared in 1987-1988 are investigated. The aim of this research is to find out how a heavy ion beam can enhance the superconducting features of very old and originally not always perfect Y-based specimens. As is observed, their electrical and magnetic characteristics are very sensitive to high-energy Bi-ion irradiation, which results in significant increase of the superconducting parameters. The most important one of them is the global critical current density which is calculated with the help of a new method on the basis of experiments. It can be increased by 18-39%, depending on the original, starting conditions of the samples before the irradiation. At the same time, the average values of intragrain critical current density grows by 37-51%. A slight increase in the critical temperature of 1-2 K was also observed. The experiments on AC susceptibility demonstrate that this irradiation causes to develop faster the total diamagnetic state and decreases the loss. The reason of these effects can be found in the better orientation of crystals, enlargement of microcrystalline aggregates, higher homogenization of the material, thus, in the increase of the superconducting component of samples due to the irradiation.

  4. On the massless gap'' adjustment of detected energy for passive material in front of a calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Trost, H.J.

    1992-01-31

    I have designed a correction scheme for energy losses in passive material in front of a calorimeter based on the massless gap'' idea. I use a flexible geometry model of a calorimeter design for SDC outside of a solenoidal coil made of aluminium cylinders of adjustable thickness. The signal from the first radiation length of active calorimetry is scaled dependent on the incoming and observed energies of the shower. A reasonable recovery of the resolution of an unobstructed calorimeter is achieved using correction factors that depend only upon the total thickness of passive material. Thus a useful correction may be built into the hardware by increasing the amount of scintillator in the first radiation length of the active calorimeter. The distribution of correction factors determined event-by-event indicate that an additional dependence on the observed signal in the massless gap and total incident energy is clearly present.

  5. On the ``massless gap`` adjustment of detected energy for passive material in front of a calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Trost, H.J.

    1992-01-31

    I have designed a correction scheme for energy losses in passive material in front of a calorimeter based on the ``massless gap`` idea. I use a flexible geometry model of a calorimeter design for SDC outside of a solenoidal coil made of aluminium cylinders of adjustable thickness. The signal from the first radiation length of active calorimetry is scaled dependent on the incoming and observed energies of the shower. A reasonable recovery of the resolution of an unobstructed calorimeter is achieved using correction factors that depend only upon the total thickness of passive material. Thus a useful correction may be built into the hardware by increasing the amount of scintillator in the first radiation length of the active calorimeter. The distribution of correction factors determined event-by-event indicate that an additional dependence on the observed signal in the massless gap and total incident energy is clearly present.

  6. Compact, energy efficient superconducting asymmetric ERL for ultra-high fluxes of X-ray and THz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoplev, I. V.; Seryi, A.; Lancaster, A. J.; Metodiev, K.; Burt, G.; Ainsworth, R.

    2017-03-01

    To make the light sources compact and energy efficient, an energy recovery Superconducting RF LINAC can be used. We suggest a dual-axis, asymmetric cavity instead of conventional single axis, symmetric cavity configurations to generate average electron beam currents above 1 A, while still avoiding development of the beam breakup instability (BBU). The use of an asymmetric cavity allows one to increase the start current of HOMs participating in BBU instability development, as well as to break the positive feedback, resulting in the capability of a high average current electron beam to be driven without loss through the system. In this work, the results of experimental studies of an asymmetric cavity are presented and compared with theoretical predictions. The following steps toward design of a full-scale superconducting cavity are also discussed.

  7. Band gap energy and optical transitions in polyenes formed by thermal decomposition of polyvinyl alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulak, A. I.; Bondarava, G. V.; Shchurevich, O. A.

    2013-07-01

    The band gap of the ensemble of oligoene clusters formed by thermocatalytic decomposition of polyvinyl alcohol is parametrized using optical absorption spectra. A band gap energy of E gm =1.53 ± 0.02 eV at the end of an infinite polyene chain is found by extrapolating the energies of π → π* transitions in clusters with a number of double bonds varying from 4 to 12. This value is close to the band gap of trans-polyacetylene and the lower bound for the Tauc energy E gT =1.50 eV, which characterizes the minimum interband transition energy. E gT is essentially independent of the concentration of oligoene clusters, which is determined by the concentration of the AlCl3 thermal decomposition catalyst. The Urbach energy determined from the long wavelength edge of the spectrum falls from 2.21 to 0.66 eV as the AlCl3 concentration is raised from 11.1 to 41.7 mmol per mol of polyvinyl alcohol structural units.

  8. Superconductivity applications for infrared and microwave devices; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 19, 20, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B. (Editor); Heinen, Vernon O. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on superconductivity applications for IR and microwave devices are presented. The individual topics addressed include: pulsed laser deposition of Tl-Ca-Ba-Cu-O films, patterning of high-Tc superconducting thin films on Si substrates, IR spectra and the energy gap in thin film YBa2Cu3O(7-delta), high-temperature superconducting thin film microwave circuits, novel filter implementation utilizing HTS materials, high-temperature superconductor antenna investigations, high-Tc superconducting IR detectors, high-Tc superconducting IR detectors from Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films, Y-Ba-Cu0-O thin films as high-speed IR detectors, fabrication of a high-Tc superconducting bolometer, transition-edge microbolometer, photoresponse of YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) granular and epitaxial superconducting thin films, fast IR response of YBCO thin films, kinetic inductance effects in high-Tc microstrip circuits at microwave frequencies.

  9. Josephson effect and nonequilibrium superconductivity in superconducting tunnel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, E. M.

    2012-04-01

    Nonequilibrium superconductivity induced by tunnel current injection of quasiparticles is studied. It is found that an instability in the form of a negative voltage jump in the oscillator current-voltage characteristic (CVC), which leads to an inhomogeneous state, as well as the spatial structure of the inhomogeneous state are very sensitive to low magnetic fields. The shape of the CVC of low-resistance tunnel junctions for bias voltages V ≈ 2Δ/e depends strongly on the junction dimensions and barrier transparency. These results are interpreted in terms of Josephson vortices (fluxons) in a tunnel oscillator. Studies of the nonequilibrium phenomena, with the Josephson properties of low-resistance tunnel structures taken into account, reveal a number of new effects, such as nonequilibrium suppression of the energy gap at bias voltages V < 2Δ/e, the possible existence of an entire series of instabilities of the nonequilibrium superconducting state during tunnel injection, and inhomogeneity in the tunnel injector effect.

  10. A quantum galvanometer with high-energy resolution based on a superconducting interferometer circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtin, P.A.; Makhov, V.I.; Masalov, V.V.; Sretenskii, V.N.; Tyablikov, A.V.; Vasenkov, A.A.

    1985-07-01

    The authors make a comprehensive analysis of principles of constructing measurement systems based on the superconducting quantum interferometer (SQUID) implemented in integrated form. They note trends of promising applications for galvanometric measurement systems. They describe the two types of SQUID, one-junction and two junction. They analyze the processing and formation of superconducting ion chemical signals and structures. And they present their results in a series of charts and diagrams. They conclude that quantum galvanometry using superconducting microcircuits allows one to propose new experimental studies in microelectronics, the techniques of high-precision measurements, and equipment for metrological work.

  11. Edge multi-energy soft x-ray diagnostic in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y. L.; Xu, G. S.; Wan, B. N.; Lan, H.; Liu, Y. L.; Wei, J.; Zhang, W.; Hu, G. H.; Wang, H. Q.; Duan, Y. M.; Zhao, J. L.; Wang, L.; Liu, S. C.; Ye, Y.; Li, J.; Lin, X.; Li, X. L.; Tritz, K.; Zhu, Y. B.

    2015-12-15

    A multi-energy soft x-ray (ME-SXR) diagnostic has been built for electron temperature profile in the edge plasma region in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) after two rounds of campaigns. Originally, five preamplifiers were mounted inside the EAST vacuum vessel chamber attached to five vertically stacked compact diode arrays. A custom mechanical structure was designed to protect the detectors and electronics under constraints of the tangential field of view for plasma edge and the allocation of space. In the next experiment, the mechanical structure was redesigned with a barrel structure to absolutely isolate it from the vacuum vessel. Multiple shielding structures were mounted at the pinhole head to protect the metal foils from lithium coating. The pre-amplifiers were moved to the outside of the vacuum chamber to avoid introducing interference. Twisted copper cooling tube was embedded into the back-shell near the diode to limit the temperature of the preamplifiers and diode arrays during vacuum vessel baking when the temperature reached 150 °C. Electron temperature profiles were reconstructed from ME-SXR measurements using neural networks.

  12. An Action Dependent Heuristic Dynamic Programming-controlled Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage for Transient Stability Augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinpu; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yu, Xiaopeng

    To enhance the stability of power system, the active power and reactive power can be absorbed from or released to Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit according to system power requirements. This paper proposes a control strategy based on action dependent heuristic dynamic programing (ADHDP) which can control SMES to improve the stability of electric power system with on-line learning ability. Based on back propagation (BP) neural network, ADHDP approximates the optimal control solution of nonlinear system through iteration step by step. This on-line learning ability improves its performance by learning from its own mistakes through reinforcement signal from external environment, so that it can adjust the neural network weights according to the back propagation error to achieve optimal control performance. To investigate the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy, simulation tests are carried out in Matlab/Simulink. And a conventional Proportional-Integral (PI) controlled method is used to compare the performance of ADHDP. Simulation results show that the proposed controller demonstrates superior damping performance on power system oscillation caused by three-phase fault and wind power fluctuation over the PI controller.

  13. Biological effects of magnetic fields from superconducting magnetic energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1989-12-01

    Physical interaction mechanisms and potential biological effects of static and slowly time-varying magnetic fields are summarized. The results of laboratory and human health studies on this topic are related to the fringe magnetic field levels anticipated to occur in the proximity of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems. The observed biological effects of magnetic fields include: (1) magnetic induction of electrical potentials in the circulatory system and other tissues, (2) magneto-orientation of macromolecules and membranes in strong magnetic fields, and (3) Zeeman interactions with electronic spin states in certain classes of charge transfer reactions. In general, only the first of these interactions is relevant to the establishment of occupational exposure guidelines. Physical hazards posed by the interactions of magnetic fields with cardiac pacemakers and other implanted medical devices, e.g., aneurysm clips and prostheses, are important factors that must also be considered in establishing exposure guidelines. Proposed guidelines for limiting magnetic field exposure are discussed. 50 refs., 1 fig.

  14. 30-MJ superconducting magnetic-energy-storage stabilizing system: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Roger, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.; Dean, J.W.; Schermer, R.I.; Annestrand, S.A.; Hauer, J.F.; Miller, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    The 30-MJ superconducting magnetic-energy-storage (SMES) system was devised as an alternate means to modulate the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Pacific AC Intertie, a part of the Western US Power System, to prevent undamped power oscillations at 0.35 Hz that were observed to be associated with high power transmission. The SMES system was installed at the BPA Tacoma Substation and successfully operated as an experimental device to initiate tests to determine power system dynamics, to investigate their variability, to assess system response to SMES modulation with a major variable load, and to use SMES to develop stability-control techniques. The system has been operated at frequencies of 0.1 to 1.0 Hz at power levels of +- 8.3 MW with a parallel modulation of the converter bridges and up to 9.5 MW reactive power together with +- 4.5 MW real power in constant VAR mode with buck-boost modulation of the bridges. The coil has been charged at a maximum rate of 11.8 MW. Operation of the SMES system is now under BPA jurisdiction, and all hardware has been transferred to BPA.

  15. Edge multi-energy soft x-ray diagnostic in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. L.; Xu, G. S.; Tritz, K.; Zhu, Y. B.; Wan, B. N.; Lan, H.; Liu, Y. L.; Wei, J.; Zhang, W.; Hu, G. H.; Wang, H. Q.; Duan, Y. M.; Zhao, J. L.; Wang, L.; Liu, S. C.; Ye, Y.; Li, J.; Lin, X.; Li, X. L.

    2015-12-01

    A multi-energy soft x-ray (ME-SXR) diagnostic has been built for electron temperature profile in the edge plasma region in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) after two rounds of campaigns. Originally, five preamplifiers were mounted inside the EAST vacuum vessel chamber attached to five vertically stacked compact diode arrays. A custom mechanical structure was designed to protect the detectors and electronics under constraints of the tangential field of view for plasma edge and the allocation of space. In the next experiment, the mechanical structure was redesigned with a barrel structure to absolutely isolate it from the vacuum vessel. Multiple shielding structures were mounted at the pinhole head to protect the metal foils from lithium coating. The pre-amplifiers were moved to the outside of the vacuum chamber to avoid introducing interference. Twisted copper cooling tube was embedded into the back-shell near the diode to limit the temperature of the preamplifiers and diode arrays during vacuum vessel baking when the temperature reached 150 °C. Electron temperature profiles were reconstructed from ME-SXR measurements using neural networks.

  16. Edge multi-energy soft x-ray diagnostic in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Li, Y L; Xu, G S; Tritz, K; Zhu, Y B; Wan, B N; Lan, H; Liu, Y L; Wei, J; Zhang, W; Hu, G H; Wang, H Q; Duan, Y M; Zhao, J L; Wang, L; Liu, S C; Ye, Y; Li, J; Lin, X; Li, X L

    2015-12-01

    A multi-energy soft x-ray (ME-SXR) diagnostic has been built for electron temperature profile in the edge plasma region in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) after two rounds of campaigns. Originally, five preamplifiers were mounted inside the EAST vacuum vessel chamber attached to five vertically stacked compact diode arrays. A custom mechanical structure was designed to protect the detectors and electronics under constraints of the tangential field of view for plasma edge and the allocation of space. In the next experiment, the mechanical structure was redesigned with a barrel structure to absolutely isolate it from the vacuum vessel. Multiple shielding structures were mounted at the pinhole head to protect the metal foils from lithium coating. The pre-amplifiers were moved to the outside of the vacuum chamber to avoid introducing interference. Twisted copper cooling tube was embedded into the back-shell near the diode to limit the temperature of the preamplifiers and diode arrays during vacuum vessel baking when the temperature reached 150 °C. Electron temperature profiles were reconstructed from ME-SXR measurements using neural networks.

  17. Tuning the energy gap of bilayer α-graphyne by applying strain and electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hang; Wu, Wen-Zhi; Jin, Yu; Wan-Lin, Guo

    2016-02-01

    Our density functional theory calculations show that the energy gap of bilayer α-graphyne can be modulated by a vertically applied electric field and interlayer strain. Like bilayer graphene, the bilayer α-graphyne has electronic properties that are hardly changed under purely mechanical strain, while an external electric field can open the gap up to 120 meV. It is of special interest that compressive strain can further enlarge the field induced gap up to 160 meV, while tensile strain reduces the gap. We attribute the gap variation to the novel interlayer charge redistribution between bilayer α-graphynes. These findings shed light on the modulation of Dirac cone structures and potential applications of graphyne in mechanical-electric devices. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2013CB932604 and 2012CB933403), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51472117 and 51535005), the Research Fund of State Key Laboratory of Mechanics and Control of Mechanical Structures, China (Grant No. 0414K01), the Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics (NUAA) Fundamental Research Funds, China (Grant No. NP2015203), and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions.

  18. Hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, R.C.; McConnell, B.W.; Phillips, B.A.

    1996-07-02

    A hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor includes a rotor separated from a stator by either a radial gap, an axial gap, or a combined axial and radial gap. Dual conically shaped stators are used in one embodiment to levitate a disc-shaped rotor made of superconducting material within a conduit for moving cryogenic fluid. As the rotor is caused to rotate when the field stator is energized, the fluid is pumped through the conduit. 6 figs.

  19. Hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.; McConnell, Benjamin W.; Phillips, Benjamin A.

    1996-01-01

    A hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor includes a rotor separated from a stator by either a radial gap, an axial gap, or a combined axial and radial gap. Dual conically shaped stators are used in one embodiment to levitate a disc-shaped rotor made of superconducting material within a conduit for moving cryogenic fluid. As the rotor is caused to rotate when the field stator is energized, the fluid is pumped through the conduit.

  20. Band gap widening at random CIGS grain boundary detected by valence electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Debora; Buecheler, Stephan; Reinhard, Patrick; Pianezzi, Fabian; Bissig, Benjamin; Carron, Romain; Hage, Fredrik; Ramasse, Quentin; Erni, Rolf; Tiwari, Ayodhya N.

    2016-10-01

    Cu(In,Ga) Se2 (CIGS) thin film solar cells have demonstrated very high efficiencies, but still the role of nanoscale inhomogeneities in CIGS and their impact on the solar cell performance are not yet clearly understood. Due to the polycrystalline structure of CIGS, grain boundaries are very common structural defects that are also accompanied by compositional variations. In this work, we apply valence electron energy loss spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy to study the local band gap energy at a grain boundary in the CIGS absorber layer. Based on this example, we demonstrate the capabilities of a 2nd generation monochromator that provides a very high energy resolution and allows for directly relating the chemical composition and the band gap energy across the grain boundary. A band gap widening of about 20 meV is observed at the grain boundary. Furthermore, the compositional analysis by core-loss EELS reveals an enrichment of In together with a Cu, Ga and Se depletion at the same area. The experimentally obtained results can therefore be well explained by the presence of a valence band barrier at the grain boundary.

  1. The effects of gap parameter and spin polarization on electronic Hartree and correlation energies of doped graphene nanoribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezania, Hamed; Abdi, Ameneh

    2017-04-01

    We study the behaviors of both Hartree and correlation energies of undoped gapped armchair graphene nanoribbon using random phase approximation in the context of Hubbard model Hamiltonian. Specially, the effects of spin polarization and gap parameter on electron density dependence of Hartree and correlation energies of armchair graphene nanoribbon has been addressed. Our results show the variation of gap parameter leads to considerable effect on correlation and Hartree energy behavior of spin unpolarized gapped graphene in the middle electron density region. However local Hubbard interaction parameter affects the behaviors of Hartree and correlation energy on the whole range of electron density in zero magnetization case. We also show that a considerable reduction has been observed for density dependence of Hartree and correlation energies of spin polarized gapped graphene nanoribbon.

  2. Extended Acceleration in Slot Gaps and Pulsar High-Energy Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor); Muslimov, Alex G.; Harding, Alice K.

    2003-01-01

    We revise the physics of primary electron acceleration in the "slot gap" (SG) above the pulsar polar caps (PCs), a regime originally proposed by Arons and Scharlemann (1979) in their electrodynamic model of pulsar PCs. We employ the standard definition of the SG as a pair-free space between the last open field lines and the boundary of the pair plasma column which is expected to develop above the bulk of the PC. The rationale for our revision is that the proper treatment of primary acceleration within the pulsar SGs should take into account the effect of the narrow geometry of the gap on the electrodynamics within the gap and also to include the effect of inertial frame dragging on the particle acceleration. We show that the accelerating electric field within the gap, being significantly boosted by the effect of frame dragging, becomes reduced because of the gap geometry by a factor proportional to the square of the SG width. The combination of the effects of frame dragging and geometrical screening in the gap region naturally gives rise to a regime of extended acceleration, that is not limited to favorably curved field lines as in earlier models, and the possibility of multiple-pair production by curvature photons at very high altitudes, up to several stellar radii. We present our estimates of the characteristic SG thickness across the PC, energetics of primaries accelerated within the gap, high-energy bolometric luminosities emitted from the high altitudes in the gaps, and maximum heating luminosities produced by positrons returning from the elevated pair fronts. The estimated theoretical high-energy luminosities are in good agreement with the corresponding empirical relationships for gamma-ray pulsars. We illustrate the results of our modeling of the pair cascades and gamma-ray emission from the high altitudes in the SG for the Crab pulsar. The combination of the frame-dragging field and high-altitude SG emission enables both acceleration at the smaller

  3. Higgsless superconductivity from topological defects in compact BF terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamantini, M. Cristina; Trugenberger, Carlo A.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new Higgsless model of superconductivity, inspired from anyon superconductivity but P- and T-invariant and generalisable to any dimension. While the original anyon superconductivity mechanism was based on incompressible quantum Hall fluids as average field states, our mechanism involves topological insulators as average field states. In D space dimensions it involves a (D - 1)-form fictitious pseudovector gauge field which originates from the condensation of topological defects in compact low-energy effective BF theories. In the average field approximation, the corresponding uniform emergent charge creates a gap for the (D - 2)-dimensional branes via the Magnus force, the dual of the Lorentz force. One particular combination of intrinsic and emergent charge fluctuations that leaves the total charge distribution invariant constitutes an isolated gapless mode leading to superfluidity. The remaining massive modes organise themselves into a D-dimensional charged, massive vector. There is no massive Higgs scalar as there is no local order parameter. When electromagnetism is switched on, the photon acquires mass by the topological BF mechanism. Although the charge of the gapless mode (2) and the topological order (4) are the same as those of the standard Higgs model, the two models of superconductivity are clearly different since the origins of the gap, reflected in the high-energy sectors are totally different. In 2D this type of superconductivity is explicitly realised as global superconductivity in Josephson junction arrays. In 3D this model predicts a possible phase transition from topological insulators to Higgsless superconductors.

  4. Vibrational effects on surface energies and band gaps in hexagonal and cubic ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Edgar A.; Monserrat, Bartomeu; Needs, Richard J.

    2016-07-01

    Surface energies of hexagonal and cubic water ice are calculated using first-principles quantum mechanical methods, including an accurate description of anharmonic nuclear vibrations. We consider two proton-orderings of the hexagonal and cubic ice basal surfaces and three proton-orderings of hexagonal ice prism surfaces, finding that vibrations reduce the surface energies by more than 10%. We compare our vibrational densities of states to recent sum frequency generation absorption measurements and identify surface proton-orderings of experimental ice samples and the origins of characteristic absorption peaks. We also calculate zero point quantum vibrational corrections to the surface electronic band gaps, which range from -1.2 eV for the cubic ice basal surface up to -1.4 eV for the hexagonal ice prism surface. The vibrational corrections to the surface band gaps are up to 12% smaller than for bulk ice.

  5. Energy Band Gap Study of Semiconducting Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elkadi, Asmaa; Decrossas, Emmanuel; El-Ghazaly, Samir

    2013-01-01

    The electronic properties of multiple semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) considering various distribution inside a bundle are studied. The model derived from the proposed analytical potential function of the electron density for an individual s-SWCNT is general and can be easily applied to multiple nanotubes. This work demonstrates that regardless the number of carbon nanotubes, the strong coupling occurring between the closest neighbours reduces the energy band gap of the bundle by 10%. As expected, the coupling is strongly dependent on the distance separating the s-SWCNTs. In addition, based on the developed model, it is proposed to enhance this coupling effect by applying an electric field across the bundle to significantly reduce the energy band gap of the bundle by 20%.

  6. Energy Band Gap Study of Semiconducting Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elkadi, Asmaa; Decrossas, Emmanuel; El-Ghazaly, Samir

    2013-01-01

    The electronic properties of multiple semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) considering various distribution inside a bundle are studied. The model derived from the proposed analytical potential function of electron density for na individual s-SWCNT is general and can be easily applied to multiple nanotubes. This work demonstrates that regardless the number of carbon nanotubes, the strong coupling occurring between the closet neighbors reduces the energy band gap of the bundle by 10%. As expected, the coupling is strongly dependent on the distance separating the s-SWCNTs. In addition, based on the developed model, it is proposed to enhance this coupling effect by applying an electric field across the bundle to significantly reduce the energy band gap of the bundle by 20%.

  7. Localized description of surface energy gap effects in the resonant charge exchange between atoms and surfaces.

    PubMed

    Iglesias-García, A; García, Evelina A; Goldberg, E C

    2011-02-02

    The resonant charge exchange between atoms and surfaces is described by considering a localized atomistic view of the solid within the Anderson model. The presence of a surface energy gap is treated within a simplified tight-binding model of the solid, and a proper calculation of the Hamiltonian terms based on a LCAO expansion of the solid eigenstates is performed. It is found that interference terms jointly with a surface projected gap maximum at the Γ point and the Fermi level inside it, lead to hybridization widths negligible around the Fermi level. This result can explain experimental observations related to long-lived adsorbate states and anomalous neutral fractions of low energy ions in alkali/Cu(111) systems.

  8. Electronic energy gap of molecular hydrogen from electrical conductivity measurements at high shock pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nellis, W. J.; Mitchell, A. C.; Mccandless, P. C.; Erskine, D. J.; Weir, S. T.

    1992-01-01

    Electrical conductivities were measured for liquid D2 and H2 shock compressed to pressures of 10-20 GPa (100-200 kbar), molar volumes near 8 cu cm/mol, and calculated temperatures of 2900-4600 K. The semiconducting energy gap derived from the conductivities is 12 eV, in good agreement with recent quasi-particle calculations and with oscillator frequencies measured in diamond-anvil cells.

  9. Free Energy Gap and Statistical Thermodynamic Fidelity of DNA Codes (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    reverse-complement unless otherwise stated. For strand x, let Nx denote its complement. A (perfect) Watson - Crick duplex is the joining of complement...is possible for complementary sequences to form a non-perfectly aligned duplex, we will call any x W Nx duplex a Watson - Crick (WC) duplex. Two...DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE FREE ENERGY GAP AND STATISTICAL THERMODYNAMIC FIDELITY OF DNA CODES 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8750-07

  10. The Effect of Carbon Nanotube on Band Gap Energy of TiO2 Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleshi, F.

    2015-05-01

    A composite of TiO2-carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was synthesized via a sol-gel method. The structure and morphology of the nanocomposite samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The optical properties of the samples were studied using UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results show that CNTs can decrease the value of band gap energy of TiO2 nanoparticles considerably.

  11. The microstructures and superconducting properties of MgB 2 bulks prepared by a high-energy milling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y. F.; Lu, Y. F.; Li, J. S.; Chen, S. K.; Yan, G.; Pu, M. H.; Li, C. S.; Zhang, P. X.

    2007-12-01

    We succeeded in the synthesis of high-Jc MgB2 bulks via high energy ball-milling of elemental Mg and B powder at ambient temperatures. The mixed powder was ball-milled for 1-10 h and the completed reaction was achieved by subsequent annealing. The correlations among synthesis parameters, microstructures and superconducting properties in MgB2 bulks were investigated. Samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope, and the magnetization properties were examined by a superconducting quantum interfere device magnetometer. The highest Jc, approximately 2.3 × 105 A/cm2 (15 K, 3 T), was obtained for samples milled for 5 h and sintered at 750 °C for 1 h. It is even comparable with SiC-doped MgB2 bulks made by Dou's group, which had exhibited the strongest reported flux pinning and the highest Jc in high field to date.

  12. Design and construction of the main linac module for the superconducting energy recovery linac project at Cornell

    SciTech Connect

    Eichhorn, R.; Bullock, B.; He, Y.; Hoffstaetter, G.; Liepe, M.; O'Connell, T.; Quigley, P.; Sabol, D.; Sears, J.; Smith, E.; Veshcherevich, V.

    2014-01-29

    Cornell University has been designing and building superconducting accelerators for various applications for more than 50 years. Currently, an energy-recovery linac (ERL) based synchrotron-light facility is proposed making use of the existing CESR facility. As part of the phase 1 R and D program funded by the NSF, critical challenges in the design were addressed, one of them being a full linac cryo-module. It houses 6 superconducting cavities- operated at 1.8 K in continuous wave (CW) mode - with individual HOM absorbers and one magnet/ BPM section. Pushing the limits, a high quality factor of the cavities (2⋅10{sup 10}) and high beam currents (100 mA accelerated plus 100 mA decelerated) are targeted. We will present the design of the main linac cryo-module (MLC) being finalized recently, its cryogenic features and report on the status of the fabrication which started in late 2012.

  13. Vanishing Electronic Energy Loss of Very Slow Light Ions in Insulators with Large Band Gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Markin, S. N.; Primetzhofer, D.; Bauer, P.

    2009-09-11

    Electronic energy loss of light ions in nanometer films of materials with large band gaps has been studied for very low velocities. For LiF, a threshold velocity is observed at 0.1 a.u. (250 eV/u), below which the ions move without transferring energy to the electronic system. For KCl, a lower (extrapolated) threshold velocity is found, identical for H and He ions. For SiO{sub 2}, no clear velocity threshold is observed for He particles. For protons and deuterons, electronic stopping is found to perfectly fulfill velocity scaling, as expected for binary ion-electron interaction.

  14. SUPERCONDUCTING PHOTOINJECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI,I.; BURRILL, A.; CALAGA, R.; CHANG, X.; GROVER, R.; GUPTA, R.; HAHN, H.; HAMMONS, L.; KAYRAN, D.; KEWISCH, J.; LAMBIASE, R.; LITVINENKO, V.; MCINTYRE, G.; NAIK, D.; PATE, D.; PHILLIPS, D.; POZDEYEV, E.; RAO, T.; SMEDLEY, J.; THAN, R.; TODD, R.; WEISS, D.; WU, Q.; ZALTSMAN, A.; ET AL.

    2007-08-26

    One of the frontiers in FEL science is that of high power. In order to reach power in the megawatt range, one requires a current of the order of one ampere with a reasonably good emittance. The superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photocathode is the most natural candidate to provide this performance. The development of a 1/2 cell superconducting photoinjector designed to operate at up to a current of 0.5 amperes and beam energy of 2 MeV and its photocathode system are the subjects covered in this paper. The main issues are the photocathode and its insertion mechanism, the power coupling and High Order Mode damping. This technology is being developed at BNL for DOE nuclear physics applications such as electron cooling at high energy and electron ion colliders..

  15. Control of Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Units in Multi-Machine Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranaweera, Aruna

    A new scheme, in which a synchronous generator connected to the SMES busbar is used as a feedback generator, is proposed to control superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) units in multi-machine power systems, in this dissertation. The speed and the load angle changes of the feedback generator are used to calculate the necessary real power transfers to the SMES, while the necessary reactive power transfers are calculated from the voltage changes of the common busbar. Expressions are derived for the direct and quadrature axis components of the current drawn by the SMES, for unequal firing angles in the converter bridge, and the relationships of the two currents to the total real and reactive power transfers to the SMES are shown. The expressions derived are valid for small or large systems, under steady state or transient conditions, and it is shown through computer simulations in a small power system that, the proposed scheme is quite effective in stabilizing electromechanical oscillations caused by small as well as large disturbances. It is also shown that, the SMES can improve the power output of wind turbine induction generators, and also stabilize the oscillations caused by wind power losses in a steam turbine generator system, and thereby eliminate the need to use diesel turbine generators for the same purpose. Finally, equations are derived to represent the synchronous machine in terms of its d-q circuits, while it is connected to the network which is described by complex quantities, and the formulations done for the proposed scheme are extended to study the use of SMES units with proposed control in power systems of large and complex configurations. The proposed scheme of control is simple, and does not call for a special design of a controller requiring simplifying assumptions such as the presence of an infinite busbar or steady state operating conditions on the system, and therefore, would help in the widespread use of SMES units in electric

  16. Energy Dependence and Scaling Property of Localization Length near a Gapped Flat Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Li; Tureci, Hakan

    Using a tight-binding model for a one-dimensional Lieb lattice, we show that the localization length near a gapped flat band behaves differently from the typical Urbach tail in a band gap: instead of reducing monotonically as the energy E moves away from the flat band energy Ef, the presence of the flat band causes a nonmonotonic energy dependence of the localization length. This energy dependence follows a scaling property when the energy is within the spread (W) of uniformly distributed diagonal disorder, i.e. the localization length is only a function of (E-Ef)/W. Several other lattices are compared to distinguish the effect of the flat band on the localization length, where we eliminate, shift, or duplicate the flat band, without changing the dispersion relations of other bands. Using the top right element of the Green's matrix, we derive an analytical relation between the density of states and the localization length, which shines light on these properties of the latter, including a summation rule for its inverse. This work is partially supported by NSF under Grant No. DMR-1506987.

  17. From superconducting to normal density of states of Ba 1- xK xBiO 3 by tunneling in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuely, P.; Szabó, P.; Jansen, A. G. M.; Wyder, P.; Marcus, J.; Escribe-Filippini, C.; Affronte, M.

    1994-02-01

    The tunneling effect in the superconducting Ba 1-xK xBiO 3, where x=0.4, has been measured in a magnetic field up to 20T. In the BCS-like tunneling conductance we have observed the pair-breaking effect of the field leading to a decrease of the superconducting energy gap. In the applied magnetic field the observed phonon-like anomalies in the tunneling spectra are decreased and smeared out together with the energy-gap structure, pointing to the phonon mediated pairing mechanism for the superconductivity in the system.

  18. Specific heat to Hc2: Evidence for nodes or deep minima in the superconducting gap of underdoped and overdoped Ba(Fe1–xCox)₂As₂

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J. S.; Faeth, B. D.; Wang, Y.; Hirschfeld, P. J.; Stewart, G. R.; Gofryk, K.; Ronning, F.; Sefat, A. S.; Choi, K. Y.; Kim, K. H.

    2012-07-13

    Low-temperature specific heat, C, in magnetic fields up to Hc2 is reported for underdoped Ba(Fe₀.₉₅₅Co₀.₀₄₅)₂As₂ (Tc = 8 K) and for three overdoped samples Ba(Fe₁₋xCox)₂As₂ (x = 0.103, 0.13, and 0.15; Tc = 17.2, 16.5, and 11.7 K, respectively). Previous measurements of thermal conductivity (as a function of temperature and field) and penetration depth on comparable-composition samples gave some disagreement as to whether there was fully gapped/nodal behavior in the under-/overdoped materials, respectively. The present work shows that the measured behavior of the specific heat γ (∝C/T as T → 0, i.e., a measure of the electronic density of states at the Fermi energy) as a function of field approximately obeys γ ∝ H0.5±0.1, similar to the Volovik effect for nodal superconductors, for both the underdoped and the most overdoped Co samples. However, for the two overdoped compositions x = 0.103 and 0.13, the low-field (H ≤ 10 T) data show a Volovik-like behavior of γ ∝ H0.3–0.4, followed by an inflection point, followed at higher fields by γ ∝ H¹. We argue that, within the two-band theory of superconductivity, an inflection point may occur if the interband coupling is dominant.

  19. Specific heat to Hc2: Evidence for nodes or deep minima in the superconducting gap of underdoped and overdoped Ba(Fe1–xCox)₂As₂

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, J. S.; Faeth, B. D.; Wang, Y.; ...

    2012-07-13

    Low-temperature specific heat, C, in magnetic fields up to Hc2 is reported for underdoped Ba(Fe₀.₉₅₅Co₀.₀₄₅)₂As₂ (Tc = 8 K) and for three overdoped samples Ba(Fe₁₋xCox)₂As₂ (x = 0.103, 0.13, and 0.15; Tc = 17.2, 16.5, and 11.7 K, respectively). Previous measurements of thermal conductivity (as a function of temperature and field) and penetration depth on comparable-composition samples gave some disagreement as to whether there was fully gapped/nodal behavior in the under-/overdoped materials, respectively. The present work shows that the measured behavior of the specific heat γ (∝C/T as T → 0, i.e., a measure of the electronic density of statesmore » at the Fermi energy) as a function of field approximately obeys γ ∝ H0.5±0.1, similar to the Volovik effect for nodal superconductors, for both the underdoped and the most overdoped Co samples. However, for the two overdoped compositions x = 0.103 and 0.13, the low-field (H ≤ 10 T) data show a Volovik-like behavior of γ ∝ H0.3–0.4, followed by an inflection point, followed at higher fields by γ ∝ H¹. We argue that, within the two-band theory of superconductivity, an inflection point may occur if the interband coupling is dominant.« less

  20. Tuning of superconducting niobium nitride terahertz metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingbo; Jin, Biaobing; Xue, Yuhua; Zhang, Caihong; Dai, Hao; Zhang, Labao; Cao, Chunhai; Kang, Lin; Xu, Weiwei; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2011-06-20

    Superconducting planar terahertz (THz) metamaterials (MMs), with unit cells of different sizes, are fabricated on 200 nm-thick niobium nitride (NbN) films deposited on MgO substrates. They are characterized using THz time domain spectroscopy over a temperature range from 8.1 K to 300 K, crossing the critical temperature of NbN films. As the gap frequency (f(g) = 2Δ0/h, where Δ0 is the energy gap at 0 K and h is the Plank constant) of NbN is 1.18 THz, the experimentally observed THz spectra span a frequency range from below f(g) to above it. We have found that, as the resonance frequency approaches f(g), the relative tuning range of MMs is quite wide (30%). We attribute this observation to the large change of kinetic inductance of superconducting film.

  1. Focal point analysis of the singlet-triplet energy gap of octacene and larger acenes.

    PubMed

    Hajgató, Balázs; Huzak, Matija; Deleuze, Michael S

    2011-08-25

    A benchmark theoretical study of the electronic ground state and of the vertical and adiabatic singlet-triplet (ST) excitation energies of n-acenes (C(4n+2)H(2n+4)) ranging from octacene (n = 8) to undecacene (n = 11) is presented. The T1 diagnostics of coupled cluster theory and further energy-based criteria demonstrate that all investigated systems exhibit predominantly a (1)A(g) singlet closed-shell electronic ground state. Singlet-triplet (S(0)-T(1)) energy gaps can therefore be very accurately determined by applying the principle of a focal point analysis (FPA) onto the results of a series of single-point and symmetry-restricted calculations employing correlation consistent cc-pVXZ basis sets (X = D, T, Q, 5) and single-reference methods [HF, MP2, MP3, MP4SDQ, CCSD, and CCSD(T)] of improving quality. According to our best estimates, which amount to a dual extrapolation of energy differences to the level of coupled cluster theory including single, double, and perturbative estimates of connected triple excitations [CCSD(T)] in the limit of an asymptotically complete basis set (cc-pV∞Z), the S(0)-T(1) vertical (adiabatic) excitation energies of these compounds amount to 13.40 (8.21), 10.72 (6.05), 8.05 (3.67), and 7.10 (2.58) kcal/mol, respectively. In line with the absence of Peierls distortions (bond length alternations), extrapolations of results obtained at this level for benzene (n = 1) and all studied n-acenes so far (n = 2-11) indicate a vanishing S(0)-T(1) energy gap, in the limit of an infinitely large polyacene, within an uncertainty of 1.5 kcal/mol (0.06 eV). Lacking experimental values for the S(0)-T(1) energy gaps of n-acenes larger than hexacene, comparison is made with recent optical and electrochemical determinations of the HOMO-LUMO band gap. Further issues such as scalar relativistic, core correlation, and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer corrections (DBOCs) are tentatively examined.

  2. Revealing the high-energy electronic excitations underlying the onset of high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates

    PubMed Central

    Giannetti, Claudio; Cilento, Federico; Conte, Stefano Dal; Coslovich, Giacomo; Ferrini, Gabriele; Molegraaf, Hajo; Raichle, Markus; Liang, Ruixing; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Greven, Martin; Damascelli, Andrea; van der Marel, Dirk; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2011-01-01

    In strongly correlated systems the electronic properties at the Fermi energy (EF) are intertwined with those at high-energy scales. One of the pivotal challenges in the field of high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC) is to understand whether and how the high-energy scale physics associated with Mott-like excitations (|E−EF|>1 eV) is involved in the condensate formation. Here, we report the interplay between the many-body high-energy CuO2 excitations at 1.5 and 2 eV, and the onset of HTSC. This is revealed by a novel optical pump-supercontinuum-probe technique that provides access to the dynamics of the dielectric function in Bi2Sr2Ca0.92Y0.08Cu2O8+δ over an extended energy range, after the photoinduced suppression of the superconducting pairing. These results unveil an unconventional mechanism at the base of HTSC both below and above the optimal hole concentration required to attain the maximum critical temperature (Tc). PMID:21673674

  3. Revealing the high-energy electronic excitations underlying the onset of high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates.

    PubMed

    Giannetti, Claudio; Cilento, Federico; Dal Conte, Stefano; Coslovich, Giacomo; Ferrini, Gabriele; Molegraaf, Hajo; Raichle, Markus; Liang, Ruixing; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Greven, Martin; Damascelli, Andrea; van der Marel, Dirk; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2011-06-14

    In strongly correlated systems the electronic properties at the Fermi energy (E(F)) are intertwined with those at high-energy scales. One of the pivotal challenges in the field of high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC) is to understand whether and how the high-energy scale physics associated with Mott-like excitations (|E-E(F)|>1 eV) is involved in the condensate formation. Here, we report the interplay between the many-body high-energy CuO(2) excitations at 1.5 and 2 eV, and the onset of HTSC. This is revealed by a novel optical pump-supercontinuum-probe technique that provides access to the dynamics of the dielectric function in Bi(2)Sr(2)Ca(0.92)Y(0.08)Cu(2)O(8+δ) over an extended energy range, after the photoinduced suppression of the superconducting pairing. These results unveil an unconventional mechanism at the base of HTSC both below and above the optimal hole concentration required to attain the maximum critical temperature (T(c)).

  4. Universal heat conduction in Ce1-xYbxCoIn5: Evidence for robust nodal d-wave superconducting gap

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Petrovic, C.; Dong, J. K.; Lum, I. K.; Zhang, J.; Hong, X. C.; He, L. P.; Wang, K. F.; Ma, Y. C.; Maple, M. B.; Shu, L.; Li, S. Y.

    2016-02-01

    In the heavy-fermion superconductor Ce1-xYbxCoIn5, Yb doping was reported to cause a possible change from nodal d-wave superconductivity to a fully gapped d-wave molecular superfluid of composite pairs near x ≈ 0.07 (nominal value xnom = 0.2). Here we present systematic thermal conductivity measurements on Ce1-xYbxCoIn5 (x = 0.013, 0.084, and 0.163) single crystals. The observed finite residual linear term κ0/T is insensitive to Yb doping, verifying the universal heat conduction of the nodal d-wave superconducting gap in Ce1-xYbxCoIn5. Similar universal heat conduction is also observed in the CeCo(In1–yCdy)5 system. Furthermore, these results reveal a robust nodal d-wave gap in CeCoIn5 upon Yb or Cd doping.

  5. Position resolution of a double junction superconductive detector based on a single material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samedov, V. V.

    2008-02-01

    The Naples group from Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare presented the results of theoretical investigations of a new class of superconductive radiation detectors - double junction superconductive detector based on a single material [1]. In such detectors, the absorption of energy occurs in a long superconductive strip while two superconductive tunnel junctions positioned at the ends of the strip provide the readout of the signals. The main peculiarity of this type of detectors is that they are based on a single superconducting material, i.e., without trapping layers at the ends of the strip. In this paper, general approach to the position resolution of this type of detectors has been attempted. The formula for the position resolution is derived. It is shown that the application of the aluminium for the absorber may be the best possible way not only due to the small gap energy, but also mainly for STJ fabrication technology based on the aluminium oxide tunnel barrier.

  6. Dynamical Energy Gap Engineering in Graphene via Oscillating Out-of-Plane Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandler, Nancy; Zhai, Dawei

    The close relation between electronic properties and mechanical deformations in graphene has been the topic of active research in recent years. Interestingly, the effect of deformations on electronic properties can be understood in terms of pseudo-magnetic fields, whose spatial distribution and intensity are controllable via the deformation geometry. Previous results showed that electromagnetic fields (light) have the potential to induce dynamical gaps in graphene's energy bands, transforming graphene from a semimetal to a semiconductor. However, laser frequencies required to achieve these regimes are in the THz regime, which imposes challenges for practical purposes. In this talk we report a novel method to create dynamical gaps using oscillating mechanical deformations, i.e., via time-dependent pseudo-magnetic fields. Using the Floquet formalism we show the existence of a dynamical gap in the band structure at energies set by the frequency of the oscillation, and with a magnitude tuned by the geometry of the deformation. This dynamical-mechanical manipulation strategy appears as a promising venue to engineer electronic properties of suspended graphene devices. Work supported by NSF-DMR 1508325.

  7. Normal, superconducting and topological regimes of hybrid double quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Sherman, D; Yodh, J S; Albrecht, S M; Nygård, J; Krogstrup, P; Marcus, C M

    2017-03-01

    Epitaxial semiconductor-superconductor hybrid materials are an excellent basis for studying mesoscopic and topological superconductivity, as the semiconductor inherits a hard superconducting gap while retaining tunable carrier density. Here, we investigate double-quantum-dot structures made from InAs nanowires with a patterned epitaxial Al two-facet shell that proximitizes two gate-defined segments along the nanowire. We follow the evolution of mesoscopic superconductivity and charging energy in this system as a function of magnetic field and voltage-tuned barriers. Interdot coupling is varied from strong to weak using side gates, and the ground state is varied between normal, superconducting and topological regimes by applying a magnetic field. We identify the topological transition by tracking the spacing between successive co-tunnelling peaks as a function of axial magnetic field and show that the individual dots host weakly hybridized Majorana modes.

  8. Evolution towards superconductivity in granular films of bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parendo, Kevin A.; Tan, K. H. Sarwa B.; Goldman, A. M.

    2007-09-01

    The thickness-tuned two-dimensional insulator-superconductor transition has been investigated in ultrathin, granular films of amorphous bismuth. “Double reentrance” was observed in the resistance vs temperature. We suggest that the reentrance into the insulating state results from the opening of the energy gap on superconducting grains or clusters coupled by quasiparticle tunneling, and that the reentrance into the superconducting state is a consequence of the onset of intercluster Josephson coupling leading to global phase coherence. Measurements of voltage fluctuations have also been carried out. For insulators, the first power spectra exhibit 1/f2 frequency dependence and the second spectra are white, which is consistent with uncorrelated fluctuations. The first power spectra gradually change from having a 1/f2 frequency dependence in the insulating state to being independent of frequency in the superconducting state. There is no specific feature of the noise that can be associated with the onset of superconductivity

  9. Gate-independent energy gap in noncovalently intercalated bilayer graphene on SiC(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanchang

    2016-12-01

    Our first-principles calculations show that an energy gap around 0.12-0.25 eV can be engineered in epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001) through the noncovalent intercalation of transition or alkali metals but originated from the distinct mechanisms. The former is attributed to the combined effects of a metal-induced perpendicular electric field and interaction, while the latter is solely attributed to the built-in electric field. A great advantage of this scheme is that the gap size is almost independent of the gate voltage up to 1 V/nm, thus reserving the electric means to tune the Fermi level of graphene when configured as field-effect transistors. Given the recent progress in experimental techniques for intercalated graphene, our findings provide a practical way to incorporate graphene in the current semiconductor industry.

  10. Probing Critical Point Energies of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides: Surprising Indirect Gap of Single Layer WSe2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chendong; Chen, Yuxuan; Johnson, Amber; Li, Ming-Yang; Li, Lain-Jong; Mende, Patrick C; Feenstra, Randall M; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2015-10-14

    By using a comprehensive form of scanning tunneling spectroscopy, we have revealed detailed quasi-particle electronic structures in transition metal dichalcogenides, including the quasi-particle gaps, critical point energy locations, and their origins in the Brillouin zones. We show that single layer WSe2 surprisingly has an indirect quasi-particle gap with the conduction band minimum located at the Q-point (instead of K), albeit the two states are nearly degenerate. We have further observed rich quasi-particle electronic structures of transition metal dichalcogenides as a function of atomic structures and spin-orbit couplings. Such a local probe for detailed electronic structures in conduction and valence bands will be ideal to investigate how electronic structures of transition metal dichalcogenides are influenced by variations of local environment.

  11. Superconducting Quantum Interference Single-Electron Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enrico, Emanuele; Giazotto, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    We propose the concept of a quantized single-electron source based on the interplay between Coulomb blockade and magnetic flux-controllable superconducting proximity effect. We show that flux dependence of the induced energy gap in the density of states of a nanosized metallic wire can be exploited as an efficient tunable energy barrier which enables charge-pumping configurations with enhanced functionalities. This control parameter strongly affects the charging landscape of a normal metal island with non-negligible Coulombic energy. Under a suitable evolution of a time-dependent magnetic flux the structure behaves like a turnstile for single electrons in a fully electrostatic regime.

  12. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Gray, K.E.

    1988-07-28

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non- superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propagating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N/sup 2/ ambiguity of charged particle events. 6 figs.

  13. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1989-01-01

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non-superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propogating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N.sup.2 ambiguity of charged particle events.

  14. Superconductivity in an electron band just above the Fermi level: possible route to BCS-BEC superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, K; Ito, Y; Ota, Y; Kotani, Y; Shimojima, T; Kiss, T; Watanabe, S; Chen, C-T; Niitaka, S; Hanaguri, T; Takagi, H; Chainani, A; Shin, S

    2014-02-28

    Conventional superconductivity follows Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer(BCS) theory of electrons-pairing in momentum-space, while superfluidity is the Bose-Einstein condensation(BEC) of atoms paired in real-space. These properties of solid metals and ultra-cold gases, respectively, are connected by the BCS-BEC crossover. Here we investigate the band dispersions in FeTe(0.6)Se(0.4)(Tc = 14.5 K ~ 1.2 meV) in an accessible range below and above the Fermi level(EF) using ultra-high resolution laser angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We uncover an electron band lying just 0.7 meV (~8 K) above EF at the Γ-point, which shows a sharp superconducting coherence peak with gap formation below Tc. The estimated superconducting gap Δ and Fermi energy [Symbol: see text]F indicate composite superconductivity in an iron-based superconductor, consisting of strong-coupling BEC in the electron band and weak-coupling BCS-like superconductivity in the hole band. The study identifies the possible route to BCS-BEC superconductivity.

  15. Interface high-temperature superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lili; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-12-01

    Cuprate high-temperature superconductors consist of two quasi-two-dimensional (2D) substructures: CuO2 superconducting layers and charge reservoir layers. The superconductivity is realized by charge transfer from the charge reservoir layers into the superconducting layers without chemical dopants and defects being introduced into the latter, similar to modulation-doping in the semiconductor superlattices of AlGaAs/GaAs. Inspired by this scheme, we have been searching for high-temperature superconductivity in ultra-thin films of superconductors epitaxially grown on semiconductor/oxide substrates since 2008. We have observed interface-enhanced superconductivity in both conventional and unconventional superconducting films, including single atomic layer films of Pb and In on Si substrates and single unit cell (UC) films of FeSe on SrTiO3 (STO) substrates. The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity with a superconducting gap of ∼20 meV in 1UC-FeSe/STO has stimulated tremendous interest in the superconductivity community, for it opens a new avenue for both raising superconducting transition temperature and understanding the pairing mechanism of unconventional high-temperature superconductivity. Here, we review mainly the experimental progress on interface-enhanced superconductivity in the three systems mentioned above with emphasis on 1UC-FeSe/STO, studied by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and transport experiments. We discuss the roles of interfaces and a possible pairing mechanism inferred from these studies.

  16. Superconductivity Bordering Rashba Type Topological Transition

    PubMed Central

    Jin, M. L.; Sun, F.; Xing, L. Y.; Zhang, S. J.; Feng, S. M.; Kong, P. P.; Li, W. M.; Wang, X. C.; Zhu, J. L.; Long, Y. W.; Bai, H. Y.; Gu, C. Z.; Yu, R. C.; Yang, W. G.; Shen, G. Y.; Zhao, Y. S.; Mao, H. K.; Jin, C. Q.

    2017-01-01

    Strong spin orbital interaction (SOI) can induce unique quantum phenomena such as topological insulators, the Rashba effect, or p-wave superconductivity. Combining these three quantum phenomena into a single compound has important scientific implications. Here we report experimental observations of consecutive quantum phase transitions from a Rashba type topological trivial phase to topological insulator state then further proceeding to superconductivity in a SOI compound BiTeI tuned via pressures. The electrical resistivity measurement with V shape change signals the transition from a Rashba type topological trivial to a topological insulator phase at 2 GPa, which is caused by an energy gap close then reopen with band inverse. Superconducting transition appears at 8 GPa with a critical temperature TC of 5.3 K. Structure refinements indicate that the consecutive phase transitions are correlated to the changes in the Bi–Te bond and bond angle as function of pressures. The Hall Effect measurements reveal an intimate relationship between superconductivity and the unusual change in carrier density that points to possible unconventional superconductivity. PMID:28051188

  17. Superconductivity Bordering Rashba Type Topological Transition.

    PubMed

    Jin, M L; Sun, F; Xing, L Y; Zhang, S J; Feng, S M; Kong, P P; Li, W M; Wang, X C; Zhu, J L; Long, Y W; Bai, H Y; Gu, C Z; Yu, R C; Yang, W G; Shen, G Y; Zhao, Y S; Mao, H K; Jin, C Q

    2017-01-04

    Strong spin orbital interaction (SOI) can induce unique quantum phenomena such as topological insulators, the Rashba effect, or p-wave superconductivity. Combining these three quantum phenomena into a single compound has important scientific implications. Here we report experimental observations of consecutive quantum phase transitions from a Rashba type topological trivial phase to topological insulator state then further proceeding to superconductivity in a SOI compound BiTeI tuned via pressures. The electrical resistivity measurement with V shape change signals the transition from a Rashba type topological trivial to a topological insulator phase at 2 GPa, which is caused by an energy gap close then reopen with band inverse. Superconducting transition appears at 8 GPa with a critical temperature TC of 5.3 K. Structure refinements indicate that the consecutive phase transitions are correlated to the changes in the Bi-Te bond and bond angle as function of pressures. The Hall Effect measurements reveal an intimate relationship between superconductivity and the unusual change in carrier density that points to possible unconventional superconductivity.

  18. Superconductivity Bordering Rashba Type Topological Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, M. L.; Sun, F.; Xing, L. Y.; Zhang, S. J.; Feng, S. M.; Kong, P. P.; Li, W. M.; Wang, X. C.; Zhu, J. L.; Long, Y. W.; Bai, H. Y.; Gu, C. Z.; Yu, R. C.; Yang, W. G.; Shen, G. Y.; Zhao, Y. S.; Mao, H. K.; Jin, C. Q.

    2017-01-01

    Strong spin orbital interaction (SOI) can induce unique quantum phenomena such as topological insulators, the Rashba effect, or p-wave superconductivity. Combining these three quantum phenomena into a single compound has important scientific implications. Here we report experimental observations of consecutive quantum phase transitions from a Rashba type topological trivial phase to topological insulator state then further proceeding to superconductivity in a SOI compound BiTeI tuned via pressures. The electrical resistivity measurement with V shape change signals the transition from a Rashba type topological trivial to a topological insulator phase at 2 GPa, which is caused by an energy gap close then reopen with band inverse. Superconducting transition appears at 8 GPa with a critical temperature TC of 5.3 K. Structure refinements indicate that the consecutive phase transitions are correlated to the changes in the Bi–Te bond and bond angle as function of pressures. The Hall Effect measurements reveal an intimate relationship between superconductivity and the unusual change in carrier density that points to possible unconventional superconductivity.

  19. Superconductivity bordering Rashba type topological transition

    DOE PAGES

    Jin, M. L.; Sun, F.; Xing, L. Y.; ...

    2017-01-04

    Strong spin orbital interaction (SOI) can induce unique quantum phenomena such as topological insulators, the Rashba effect, or p-wave superconductivity. Combining these three quantum phenomena into a single compound has important scientific implications. Here we report experimental observations of consecutive quantum phase transitions from a Rashba type topological trivial phase to topological insulator state then further proceeding to superconductivity in a SOI compound BiTeI tuned via pressures. The electrical resistivity measurement with V shape change signals the transition from a Rashba type topological trivial to a topological insulator phase at 2 GPa, which is caused by an energy gap closemore » then reopen with band inverse. Superconducting transition appears at 8 GPa with a critical temperature TC of 5.3 K. Structure refinements indicate that the consecutive phase transitions are correlated to the changes in the Bi–Te bond and bond angle as function of pressures. As a result, the Hall Effect measurements reveal an intimate relationship between superconductivity and the unusual change in carrier density that points to possible unconventional superconductivity.« less

  20. A New Insight into Energy Distribution of Electrons in Fuel-Rod Gap in VVER-1000 Nuclear Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fereshteh, Golian; Ali, Pazirandeh; Saeed, Mohammadi

    2015-06-01

    In order to calculate the electron energy distribution in the fuel rod gap of a VVER-1000 nuclear reactor, the Fokker-Planck equation (FPE) governing the non-equilibrium behavior of electrons passing through the fuel-rod gap as an absorber has been solved in this paper. Besides, the Monte Carlo Geant4 code was employed to simulate the electron migration in the fuel-rod gap and the energy distribution of electrons was found. As for the results, the accuracy of the FPE was compared to the Geant4 code outcomes and a satisfactory agreement was found. Also, different percentage of the volatile and noble gas fission fragments produced in fission reactions in fuel rod, i.e. Krypton, Xenon, Iodine, Bromine, Rubidium and Cesium were employed so as to investigate their effects on the electrons' energy distribution. The present results show that most of the electrons in the fuel rod's gap were within the thermal energy limitation and the tail of the electron energy distribution was far from a Maxwellian distribution. The interesting outcome was that the electron energy distribution is slightly increased due to the accumulation of fission fragments in the gap. It should be noted that solving the FPE for the energy straggling electrons that are penetrating into the fuel-rod gap in the VVER-1000 nuclear reactor has been carried out for the first time using an analytical approach.

  1. Multiband superconductivity in n-doped SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnia, Kamran

    2015-03-01

    The superconducting state of n-doped SrTiO3 occupies a singular place in the history of superconductivity. Besides being the first oxide superconductor, it was one of the earliest ``semiconducting superconductors,'' the first experimentally-detected multi-gap superconductor and the first case of a superconducting dome. Half a century after its discovery, it remains the most dilute superconductor. We present a systematic study of quantum oscillations and superconducting transition in doped SrTiO3, over a wide range of carrier concentration from 1017 to 1020 cm-3. Mobile carriers were introduced either by removing oxygen or by substituting Ti by Nb. Superconductivity was found to persists down to an exceptionally low concentration of mobile electrons (n =3 1017 cm-3 and Tc = 34 mK). At this concentration range, with the Fermi temperature below 10 K, the narrowness of the relevant energy window severely restricts possible pairing scenarios. We identify two critical doping levels, which are the filling thresholds of the upper conduction bands. This clarifies the limits of single-band, two-band and three-band superconducting regimes. We find that the exceptionally-wide superconducting dome of SrTiO3 has a structure with two distinct domes, each peaking near a critical doping level. Thermal conductivity measurements uncover the existence of multiple nodeless superconducting gaps at optimal doping.

  2. Planar tunneling measurements of the energy gap in biased bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puls, Conor P.; Liu, Ying

    2012-11-01

    We present an analysis on the determination of the energy gap in biased bilayer graphene using tunneling measurements, report our experimental results obtained from planar tunneling spectroscopy, and compare them with those from electrical transport measurements. Bilayer graphene flakes were prepared by exfoliating from bulk graphite onto SiO2 thermally grown on a doped Si substrate. Due to the low carrier density of bilayer graphene, the Fermi level and electronic structure are expected to be highly sensitive to tunnel bias-induced charging, which is neglected in traditional tunnel junctions. We found that the tunneling signal generally exhibited a "V"-shaped tunneling conductance background that did not shift with back gate voltage, possibly due to a two-step tunneling process. We observed a tunable suppression in the tunneling conductance that follows theoretical predictions for a band gap in biased bilayer graphene. We explore the evolution of the band gap by tuning the electric field and charge carrier density produced by the tunneling bias and back gate, and compare experimental results with numerical simulations. Finally, we compare these findings with transport measurements of top- and bottom-gated bilayer graphene field effect transistors featuring similar gate dielectrics.

  3. Superconducting gap function in the organic superconductor (TMTSF)2ClO4 with anion ordering; First-principles calculations and quasiclassical analysis for angle-resolved heat capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Yuki; Nakamura, Hiroki; Machida, Masahiko

    2011-03-01

    We calculate angle-dependent heat capacity in a low magnetic field range on the basis of the Kramer-Pesch approximation together with an electronic structure obtained by first-principles calculations to determine a superconducting gap function of (TMTSF)2ClO4 through its comparisons with experiments. The present comparative studies reveal that a nodal d-wave gap function consistently explains the experimental results for (TMTSF)2ClO4. It is especially emphasized that the observed unusual axis asymmetry of the angle dependence eliminates the possibility of s-wave and nodeless d-wave functions. It is also found that the directional ordering of ClO4 anions does not have any significant effects on the Fermi surface structure contrary to the previous modelings since the two Fermi surfaces obtained by the band calculations almost cross within the present full accuracy in first-principles calculations.

  4. Energy Behavior Change and Army Net Zero Energy; Gaps in the Army’s Approach to Changing Energy Behavior

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-13

    ADRP Army Doctrine Reference Publication AESIS Army Energy Security Implementation Strategy AEWRS Army Energy and Water Reporting System AMC Army...Department of Energy DPW Department of Public Works EITF Energy Initiatives Task Force EMCS Energy Management Control System EPA Environmental...Background Net Zero energy is part of the U.S. Army’s Net Zero program for energy, water , and waste. The Army’s Net Zero programs grew out of its

  5. Anomalous thickness-dependent optical energy gap of ALD-grown ultra-thin CuO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, T. S.; Terasaki, I.; Karppinen, M.

    2016-11-01

    Usually an inverse square relation between the optical energy gap and the size of crystallites is observed for semiconducting materials due to the strong quantum localization effect. Coulomb attraction that may lead to a proportional dependence is often ignored or considered less important to the optical energy gap when the crystallite size or the thickness of a thin film changes. Here we report a proportional dependence between the optical energy gap and the thickness of ALD-grown CuO thin films due to a strong Coulomb attraction. The ultrathin films deposited in the thickness range of 9-81 nm show a p-type semiconducting behavior when analyzed by Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity measurements. The indirect optical energy gap nature of the films is verified from UV-vis spectrophotometric measurements. A progressive increase in the indirect optical energy gap from 1.06 to 1.24 eV is observed with the increase in the thickness of the films. The data are analyzed in the presence of Coulomb attractions using the Brus model. The optical energy gap when plotted against the cubic root of the thickness of the films shows a linear dependence.

  6. Electron-phonon interaction and pairing mechanism in superconducting Ca-intercalated bilayer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Margine, E. R.; Lambert, Henry; Giustino, Feliciano

    2016-01-01

    Using the ab initio anisotropic Eliashberg theory including Coulomb interactions, we investigate the electron-phonon interaction and the pairing mechanism in the recently-reported superconducting Ca-intercalated bilayer graphene. We find that C6CaC6 can support phonon-mediated superconductivity with a critical temperature Tc = 6.8–8.1 K, in good agreement with experimental data. Our calculations indicate that the low-energy Caxy vibrations are critical to the pairing, and that it should be possible to resolve two distinct superconducting gaps on the electron and hole Fermi surface pockets. PMID:26892805

  7. Energy Decay in Superconducting Josephson-Junction Qubits from Nonequilibrium Quasiparticle Excitations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-26

    Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS superconducting qubits, quasiparticles, coherence John ...ARO 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER John Martinis 805-893-3910 3. DATES...Junction Qubits from Nonequilibrium Quasiparticle Excitations John M. Martinis,1 M. Ansmann,1 and J. Aumentado2 1Department of Physics, University of

  8. Competition between the pseudogap and superconductivity in the high-T(c) copper oxides.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Takeshi; Khasanov, Rustem; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Schmalian, Jörg; Kaminski, Adam

    2009-01-15

    In a classical Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superconductor, pairing and coherence of electrons are established simultaneously below the critical transition temperature (T(c)), giving rise to a gap in the electronic energy spectrum. In the high-T(c) copper oxide superconductors, however, a pseudogap extends above T(c). The relationship between the pseudogap and superconductivity is one of the central issues in this field. Spectral gaps arising from pairing precursors are qualitatively similar to those caused by competing electronic states, rendering a standard approach to their analysis inconclusive. The issue can be settled, however, by studying the correlation between the weights associated with the pseudogap and superconductivity spectral features. Here we report a study of two spectral weights using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The weight of the superconducting coherent peak increases away from the node following the trend of the superconducting gap, but starts to decrease in the antinodal region. This striking non-monotonicity reveals the presence of a competing state. We demonstrate a direct correlation, for different values of momenta and doping, between the loss in the low-energy spectral weight arising from the opening of the pseudogap and a decrease in the spectral weight associated with superconductivity. We therefore conclude that the pseudogap competes with the superconductivity by depleting the spectral weight available for pairing.

  9. Spin-bag mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrieffer, J. R.; Wen, X.-G.; Zhang, S.-C.

    1988-01-01

    A new approach to the theory of high-temperature superconductivity is proposed, based on the two-dimensional antiferromagnetic spin correlations observed in these materials over distances large compared to the lattice spacing. The spin ordering produces an electronic pseudogap which is locally suppressed by the addition of a hole. This suppression forms a bag inside which the hole is self-consistently trapped. Two holes are attracted by sharing a common bag. The resulting pairing interaction leads to a superconducting energy gap which is nodeless over the Femri surface.

  10. Theory of superconductivity by the edge states in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Ken-Ichi; Suzuki, Masahiro; Saito, Riichiro

    2008-03-01

    Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compound and carbon nanotubes has been attracting much attention due to its high superconducting transition temperature above 10 K. However, the density of states (DOS) near the Fermi energy of graphene is not sufficient to explain the observed high transition temperature. Thus, the mechanism of the superconductivity is an important issue. The STS measurements (Kobayashi et al., PRB73,125415, Niimi et al., PRB73,085421) show an anomalous DOS near the Fermi level of graphene which is relevant to localized edge states. The edge states significantly enhance the local DOS near the zigzag edge. Thus, it is valuable to examine the effect of the edge states on the superconductivity. Using the Eliashberg equation, we obtain an appreciable transition temperature for the edge states. We found that the effects of the Coulomb interaction and Fermi energy position are sensitive to the formation of superconducting gap. We will discuss the condition for observing the edge state superconductivity. (Sasaki et al., J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 76, 033702 (2007))

  11. The tunneling spectra and superconducting gaps observed by using scanning tunneling microscopy near the (100)/(110) grain-boundary of FeSe0.5Te0.5 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kuang; Li, You-Sheng; Chi, Cheng-Chung; National Tsing Hua University Team

    2013-03-01

    We have found that, using PLD method, the a- and b-axis of the FeSe0.5Te0.5 film deposited on pristine MgO substrate are parallel to those of MgO, while these axes of the film grown on MgO substrate treated with Ar-ion milling rotate 45° along its c-axis. Here, we prepared such film with two kinds of orientations (0° and 45° ab plane with respect to the substrate axis) on MgO substrate with the connection between them form a ramp at an angle about 30° to the substrate plane. We used STM to study the tunneling spectra of two orientations of c-axis planes and the connection ramp between them. In the planar region with different orientation, we have observed similar tunneling spectra with a superconducting gap about 5 meV. This gap value is consistent with the previous studies of a variety of FeSeTe samples. However, a much larger gap about 18 meV is observed in the ramp region. The only paper we found to have such a large gap in the family of Fe-based superconductors is the one by Xue et.al. They have shown a gap of 20 meV in one unit-cell thick of FeSe on STO substrate. Furthermore, we have also observed a small ZBCP inside the large gap at 4.3K. The ZBCP becomes smaller with increasing temperature and disappears near and above TC.

  12. Report of the 1990 HEPAP (High Energy Physics Advisory Panel) Subpanel on SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) Cost Estimate Oversight

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    At the request of the Office of Energy Research, the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) established a subpanel to conduct an independent assessment of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). This assessment was conducted before, during, and after the DOE's in-depth assessment of the entire project in June 1990. In summary, the subpanel believes that to reduce risk, 6 to 12 months should be added to the schedule; the project should be rephased; and additional funding planned to bring the total project cost, including contingency and escalation, to about $8.6 billion. In addition, we suggest adding another $300 million to the detector budget to allow for two large detectors and, therefore, a more balanced experimental program initially.

  13. Mechanical Design of a High Energy Beam Absorber for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Baffes, C.; Church, M.; Leibfritz, J.; Oplt, S.; Rakhno, I.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-10

    A high energy beam absorber has been built for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab. In the facility's initial configuration, an electron beam will be accelerated through 3 TTF-type or ILC-type SRF cryomodules to an energy of 750MeV. The electron beam will be directed to one of multiple downstream experimental and diagnostic beam lines and then deposited in one of two beam absorbers. The facility is designed to accommodate up to 6 cryomodules, which would produce a 75kW beam at 1.5GeV; this is the driving design condition for the beam absorbers. The beam absorbers consist of water-cooled graphite, aluminum and copper layers contained in a helium-filled enclosure. This paper describes the mechanical implementation of the beam absorbers, with a focus on thermal design and analysis. The potential for radiation-induced degradation of the graphite is discussed.

  14. Caffeine-containing energy drinks: beginning to address the gaps in what we know.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, Barbara C; Coates, Paul M

    2014-09-01

    Energy drinks are relatively new to the United States but are the fastest growing segment of the beverage market. Humans have a long history of consuming caffeine in traditional beverages, such as cocoa, coffee, tea, and yerba maté, but 2 workshops held at the Institute of Medicine (http://www.iom.edu/Activities/Nutrition/PotentialHazardsCaffeineSupplements/2013-AUG-05.aspx) and the NIH (http://ods.od.nih.gov/News/EnergyDrinksWorkshop2013.aspx) in 2013 highlighted many critical gaps in understanding the biologic and behavioral effects of the mixtures of caffeine, vitamins, herbs, sugar or other sweeteners, and other ingredients that typify caffeine-containing energy drinks (CCEDs). For example, different surveys over the same 2010–2012 timeframe report discrepant prevalence of CCED use by teenagers, ranging from 10.3% in 13–17 y olds to >30% of those in grades 10 and 12. Understanding of functional interactions between CCED ingredients, drivers of use, and biologic and behavioral effects is limited. The 4 speakers in the Experimental Biology 2014 symposium titled “Energy Drinks: Current Knowledge and Critical Research Gaps” described recent progress by their groups in extending our understanding of prevalence of CCED use, sources of caffeine in the United States, drivers of CCED use, and behavioral correlations and effects of CCEDs, including effects on attractiveness of both alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages.

  15. Electronic properties of graphene nano-flakes: Energy gap, permanent dipole, termination effect, and Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Sandeep Kumar Peeters, F. M.; Neek-Amal, M.

    2014-02-21

    The electronic properties of graphene nano-flakes (GNFs) with different edge passivation are investigated by using density functional theory. Passivation with F and H atoms is considered: C{sub N{sub c}} X{sub N{sub x}} (X = F or H). We studied GNFs with 10 < N{sub c} < 56 and limit ourselves to the lowest energy configurations. We found that: (i) the energy difference Δ between the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital decreases with N{sub c}, (ii) topological defects (pentagon and heptagon) break the symmetry of the GNFs and enhance the electric polarization, (iii) the mutual interaction of bilayer GNFs can be understood by dipole-dipole interaction which were found sensitive to the relative orientation of the GNFs, (iv) the permanent dipoles depend on the edge terminated atom, while the energy gap is independent of it, and (v) the presence of heptagon and pentagon defects in the GNFs results in the largest difference between the energy of the spin-up and spin-down electrons which is larger for the H-passivated GNFs as compared to F-passivated GNFs. Our study shows clearly the effect of geometry, size, termination, and bilayer on the electronic properties of small GNFs. This study reveals important features of graphene nano-flakes which can be detected using Raman spectroscopy.

  16. Caffeine-Containing Energy Drinks: Beginning to Address the Gaps in What We Know1234

    PubMed Central

    Sorkin, Barbara C.; Coates, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Energy drinks are relatively new to the United States but are the fastest growing segment of the beverage market. Humans have a long history of consuming caffeine in traditional beverages, such as cocoa, coffee, tea, and yerba maté, but 2 workshops held at the Institute of Medicine (http://www.iom.edu/Activities/Nutrition/PotentialHazardsCaffeineSupplements/2013-AUG-05.aspx) and the NIH (http://ods.od.nih.gov/News/EnergyDrinksWorkshop2013.aspx) in 2013 highlighted many critical gaps in understanding the biologic and behavioral effects of the mixtures of caffeine, vitamins, herbs, sugar or other sweeteners, and other ingredients that typify caffeine-containing energy drinks (CCEDs). For example, different surveys over the same 2010–2012 timeframe report discrepant prevalence of CCED use by teenagers, ranging from 10.3% in 13–17 y olds to >30% of those in grades 10 and 12. Understanding of functional interactions between CCED ingredients, drivers of use, and biologic and behavioral effects is limited. The 4 speakers in the Experimental Biology 2014 symposium titled “Energy Drinks: Current Knowledge and Critical Research Gaps” described recent progress by their groups in extending our understanding of prevalence of CCED use, sources of caffeine in the United States, drivers of CCED use, and behavioral correlations and effects of CCEDs, including effects on attractiveness of both alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages. PMID:25469387

  17. Separating pairing from quantum phase coherence dynamics above the superconducting transition by femtosecond spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Madan, I.; Kurosawa, T.; Toda, Y.; Oda, M.; Mertelj, T.; Kusar, P.; Mihailovic, D.

    2014-01-01

    In classical superconductors an energy gap and phase coherence appear simultaneously with pairing at the transition to the superconducting state. In high-temperature superconductors, the possibility that pairing and phase coherence are distinct and independent processes has led to intense experimental search of their separate manifestations. Using femtosecond spectroscopy methods we now show that it is possible to clearly separate fluctuation dynamics of the superconducting pairing amplitude from the phase relaxation above the critical transition temperature. Empirically establishing a close correspondence between the superfluid density measured by THz spectroscopy and superconducting optical pump-probe response over a wide region of temperature, we find that in differently doped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ crystals the pairing gap amplitude monotonically extends well beyond Tc, while the phase coherence shows a pronounced power-law divergence as T → Tc, thus showing that phase coherence and gap formation are distinct processes which occur on different timescales. PMID:25014162

  18. Esaki Diodes in van der Waals Heterojunctions with Broken-Gap Energy Band Alignment.

    PubMed

    Yan, Rusen; Fathipour, Sara; Han, Yimo; Song, Bo; Xiao, Shudong; Li, Mingda; Ma, Nan; Protasenko, Vladimir; Muller, David A; Jena, Debdeep; Xing, Huili Grace

    2015-09-09

    van der Waals (vdW) heterojunctions composed of two-dimensional (2D) layered materials are emerging as a solid-state materials family that exhibits novel physics phenomena that can power a range of electronic and photonic applications. Here, we present the first demonstration of an important building block in vdW solids: room temperature Esaki tunnel diodes. The Esaki diodes were realized in vdW heterostructures made of black phosphorus (BP) and tin diselenide (SnSe2), two layered semiconductors that possess a broken-gap energy band offset. The presence of a thin insulating barrier between BP and SnSe2 enabled the observation of a prominent negative differential resistance (NDR) region in the forward-bias current-voltage characteristics, with a peak to valley ratio of 1.8 at 300 K and 2.8 at 80 K. A weak temperature dependence of the NDR indicates electron tunneling being the dominant transport mechanism, and a theoretical model shows excellent agreement with the experimental results. Furthermore, the broken-gap band alignment is confirmed by the junction photoresponse, and the phosphorus double planes in a single layer of BP are resolved in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for the first time. Our results represent a significant advance in the fundamental understanding of vdW heterojunctions and broaden the potential applications of 2D layered materials.

  19. Exponential vanishing of the ground-state gap of the quantum random energy model via adiabatic quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Adame, J.; Warzel, S.

    2015-11-15

    In this note, we use ideas of Farhi et al. [Int. J. Quantum. Inf. 6, 503 (2008) and Quantum Inf. Comput. 11, 840 (2011)] who link a lower bound on the run time of their quantum adiabatic search algorithm to an upper bound on the energy gap above the ground-state of the generators of this algorithm. We apply these ideas to the quantum random energy model (QREM). Our main result is a simple proof of the conjectured exponential vanishing of the energy gap of the QREM.

  20. The onset of superconductivity in two-dimensional disordered systems

    SciTech Connect

    Haviland, D.B.

    1989-01-01

    Investigations of ultra-thin films grown by quench-evaporation and studied in-situ show an interesting evolution of normal and superconducting properties as the films are made thinner. The films are categorized into two different classes based on the nature of the evolution of superconductivity in each class: granular and homogeneous. Granular films show rich behavior which is believed to be due to quantum fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting order parameter. The onset of quasi-reentrant behavior is correlated with the activation energy of normal state conduction becoming the order of the superconducting gap, where the normal state conduction is modeled by a hopping conduction mechanism in the presence of strong Coulomb interactions. This Josephson coupling of superconducting grains on a local scale gives way to global superconducting coupling as the film is made thicker and less resistive. Homogeneous films begin to conduct at extremely low thickness, and do not exhibit complicated quasi-reentrant behavior in the evolution of superconductivity. The first appearance of superconductivity is a separation of R(T) curves at the lowest temperature attainable. In Bi this occurred at a normal state sheet resistance near h/4e squared, however in Pb and Al the separatrix was above this value. The Al film showed distinct signs of granularity which also cannot be ruled out in the Pb films, because strong suppression of the superconducting transition temperature T{sub c} make it difficult to observe properties associated with granularity. The suppression of T{sub c} is analyzed in light of theories which incorporate the effects of localization, and little agreement is found.

  1. Precision phase control for the radio frequency system of K500 superconducting cyclotron at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata

    SciTech Connect

    Som, Sumit; Ghosh, Surajit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Roy, Suprakash

    2013-11-15

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC) has commissioned K500 Superconducting cyclotron (SCC) based on MSU and Texas A and M university cyclotrons. The radio frequency (RF) system of SCC has been commissioned with the stringent requirement of various RF parameters. The three-phase RF system of Superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9–27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and ±0.1°, respectively. The phase control system has the option to change the relative phase difference between any two RF cavities and maintain the phase stability within ±0.1° during round-the-clock cyclotron operation. The said precision phase loop consists of both analogue In-phase/Quadrature modulator to achieve faster response and also Direct Digital Synthesis based phase shifter to achieve wide dynamic range as well. This paper discusses detail insights into the various issues of phase control for the K500 SCC at VECC, Kolkata.

  2. The GAPS Experiement: A Search for Dark Matter Using Low Energy Antiprotons and Antideuterons [UCLA Co-I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Rene

    This is a Co-I proposal in support of the PI lead proposal entitled "The GAPS Experiment: A Search for Dark Matter Using Low Energy Antiprotons and Antideuterons" submitted by Prof. Charles Hailey, Columbia University. Our proposed program would support the UCLA tasks on the GAPS experiment as detailed in our task statement. The primary focus of this work is on the development, construction and testing of the time-of-flight (TOF) system, the master GAPS trigger and support of the simulation and analysis tasks.

  3. High-Energy Emission From the Polar Cap and Slot Gap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2006-01-01

    Thirty-five years after the discovery of rotation-powered pulsars, we still do not understand the fundamentals of their pulsed emission at any wavelength. I will review the latest developments in understanding the high-energy emission of rotation-powered pulsars, with particular emphasis on the polar cap and slot gap models. Special and general relativistic effects play important roles in pulsar emission, from inertial frame-dragging near the stellar surface to aberration, time-of-flight and retardation of the magnetic field near the light cylinder. Understanding how these effects determine what we observe at different wavelengths is critical to unraveling the emission physics. I will discuss how the next generation of gamma-ray detectors, AGILE and GLAST, will test prediction of these models.

  4. Surprisingly High Conductivity and Efficient Exciton Blocking in Fullerene/Wide-Energy-Gap Small Molecule Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Bergemann, Kevin J; Amonoo, Jojo A; Song, Byeongseop; Green, Peter F; Forrest, Stephen R

    2015-06-10

    We find that mixtures of C60 with the wide energy gap, small molecular weight semiconductor bathophenanthroline (BPhen) exhibit a combination of surprisingly high electron conductivity and efficient exciton blocking when employed as buffer layers in organic photovoltaic cells. Photoluminescence quenching measurements show that a 1:1 BPhen/C60 mixed layer has an exciton blocking efficiency of 84 ± 5% compared to that of 100% for a neat BPhen layer. This high blocking efficiency is accompanied by a 100-fold increase in electron conductivity compared with neat BPhen. Transient photocurrent measurements show that charge transport through a neat BPhen buffer is dispersive, in contrast to nondispersive transport in the compound buffer. Interestingly, although the conductivity is high, there is no clearly defined insulating-to-conducting phase transition with increased insulating BPhen fraction. Thus, we infer that C60 undergoes nanoscale (<10 nm domain size) phase segregation even at very high (>80%) BPhen fractions.

  5. Electron energy modulation with laser light using a small gap circuit a theoretical consideration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Jongsuck; Okuyama, Sumio; Akizuki, Taiji; Mizuno, Koji

    1993-07-01

    A free electron laser (FEL) using a klystron type interaction circuit is investigated. A metal slit has been considered as the circuit. From theoretical considerations on electron transition rates in a metal film gap and a dielectric (SiO 2) film, it is found that in the metal slit a transition rate above 10 -3/s could be obtained for an incident laser power density of 10 6 W/cm 2. The optimum slit dimensions have been determined for a laser wavelength of 780 nm and an initial electron energy of 80 keV. A rough estimation implies that a laser power of 30 mW will produce a signal output of 20 000 electrons/s for an electron beam density of 1 mA/cm 2 at the laser wavelength of 780 nm.

  6. Energy gap modulation in V2O5 nanowires by gas adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byung Hoon; Kim, Ansoon; Oh, Soon-Young; Bae, Sung-Soo; Yun, Yong Ju; Yu, Han Young

    2008-12-01

    The current-voltage characteristics at various pressures (2-10 atm) and the scanning tunneling microscopy of vanadium pentoxide nanowires (VONs) with the inert gases (He, Ne, and Ar) and diatomic molecules (H2,N2, O2) have been investigated. The gas dependent conductance (G) is consistent with the inverse energy gap obtained from the scanning tunneling spectroscopy study for the gas-adsorbed single VON. The three possible interactions for gas adsorption of the VON have been discussed. Among them, we have found that the induced dipole-dipole interaction between adsorbed gases plays an important role in conductance variation in the gas adsorbed VON using the conductance per molecule (G /N).

  7. Band Gap, Molecular Energy and Electrochromic Characterization of Electrosynthesized Hydroxymethyl 3,4-Ethylenedioxythiophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Co, Thien Thanh; Tran, Tri Quoc; Le, Hai Viet; Ho, Vu Anh Pham; Tran, Lam Dai

    2016-12-01

    Hydroxymethyl functionalized 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT-MeOH) monomer was synthesized according to a previously reported procedure. Electropolymerization of EDOT-MeOH was performed in acetonitrile (ACN) containing tetrabutylammonium perchlorate (Bu4NClO4) as the supporting electrolyte by chronoamperometry on platinum (Pt) and fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated glass substrates. The resulting conjugated polymer (PEDOT-MeOH) was characterized by cyclic voltammetry and UV-Vis spectrophotometer techniques. The polymer showed a deep HOMO energy level of -5.31 eV with a very low band gap of 1.54 eV. Spectroelectrochemical study revealed that the PEDOT-MeOH has interesting electrochromic properties.

  8. Band Gap, Molecular Energy and Electrochromic Characterization of Electrosynthesized Hydroxymethyl 3,4-Ethylenedioxythiophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Co, Thien Thanh; Tran, Tri Quoc; Le, Hai Viet; Ho, Vu Anh Pham; Tran, Lam Dai

    2017-03-01

    Hydroxymethyl functionalized 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT-MeOH) monomer was synthesized according to a previously reported procedure. Electropolymerization of EDOT-MeOH was performed in acetonitrile (ACN) containing tetrabutylammonium perchlorate (Bu4NClO4) as the supporting electrolyte by chronoamperometry on platinum (Pt) and fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated glass substrates. The resulting conjugated polymer (PEDOT-MeOH) was characterized by cyclic voltammetry and UV-Vis spectrophotometer techniques. The polymer showed a deep HOMO energy level of -5.31 eV with a very low band gap of 1.54 eV. Spectroelectrochemical study revealed that the PEDOT-MeOH has interesting electrochromic properties.

  9. Ferroelectric $pi $ π -stacks of molecules with the energy gaps in the sunlight range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiak, Paweł; Wierzbowska, Małgorzata

    2017-04-01

    Ferroelectric $\\pi$-stacked molecular wires for solar cell applications are theoretically designed, in such a way that their energy gaps fall within visible and infrared range of the Sun radiation. Band engineering is tailored by a modification of the number of the aromatic rings and via a choice of the number and kind of the dipole groups. The electronic structures of molecular wires and the chemical character of the electron-hole pair are analyzed within the density functional theory (DFT) framework and the hybrid DFT approach by means of the B3LYP scheme. Moreover, it is found that one of the advantageous properties of these systems - namely the separate-path electron and hole transport - reported earlier, still holds for the larger molecules, due to the dipole selection rules for the electron-hole generation, which do not allow the lowest optical transitions between the states localized at the same part of the molecule.

  10. Imaging atomic-scale effects of high-energy ion irradiation on superconductivity and vortex pinning in Fe(Se,Te).

    PubMed

    Massee, Freek; Sprau, Peter Oliver; Wang, Yong-Lei; Davis, J C Séamus; Ghigo, Gianluca; Gu, Genda D; Kwok, Wai-Kwong

    2015-05-01

    Maximizing the sustainable supercurrent density, J C, is crucial to high-current applications of superconductivity. To achieve this, preventing dissipative motion of quantized vortices is key. Irradiation of superconductors with high-energy heavy ions can be used to create nanoscale defects that act as deep pinning potentials for vortices. This approach holds unique promise for high-current applications of iron-based superconductors because J C amplification persists to much higher radiation doses than in cuprate superconductors without significantly altering the superconducting critical temperature. However, for these compounds, virtually nothing is known about the atomic-scale interplay of the crystal damage from the high-energy ions, the superconducting order parameter, and the vortex pinning processes. We visualize the atomic-scale effects of irradiating FeSe x Te1-x with 249-MeV Au ions and find two distinct effects: compact nanometer-sized regions of crystal disruption or "columnar defects," plus a higher density of single atomic site "point" defects probably from secondary scattering. We directly show that the superconducting order is virtually annihilated within the former and suppressed by the latter. Simultaneous atomically resolved images of the columnar crystal defects, the superconductivity, and the vortex configurations then reveal how a mixed pinning landscape is created, with the strongest vortex pinning occurring at metallic core columnar defects and secondary pinning at clusters of point-like defects, followed by collective pinning at higher fields.

  11. Imaging atomic-scale effects of high-energy ion irradiation on superconductivity and vortex pinning in Fe(Se,Te)

    PubMed Central

    Massee, Freek; Sprau, Peter Oliver; Wang, Yong-Lei; Davis, J. C. Séamus; Ghigo, Gianluca; Gu, Genda D.; Kwok, Wai-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Maximizing the sustainable supercurrent density, JC, is crucial to high-current applications of superconductivity. To achieve this, preventing dissipative motion of quantized vortices is key. Irradiation of superconductors with high-energy heavy ions can be used to create nanoscale defects that act as deep pinning potentials for vortices. This approach holds unique promise for high-current applications of iron-based superconductors because JC amplification persists to much higher radiation doses than in cuprate superconductors without significantly altering the superconducting critical temperature. However, for these compounds, virtually nothing is known about the atomic-scale interplay of the crystal damage from the high-energy ions, the superconducting order parameter, and the vortex pinning processes. We visualize the atomic-scale effects of irradiating FeSexTe1−x with 249-MeV Au ions and find two distinct effects: compact nanometer-sized regions of crystal disruption or “columnar defects,” plus a higher density of single atomic site “point” defects probably from secondary scattering. We directly show that the superconducting order is virtually annihilated within the former and suppressed by the latter. Simultaneous atomically resolved images of the columnar crystal defects, the superconductivity, and the vortex configurations then reveal how a mixed pinning landscape is created, with the strongest vortex pinning occurring at metallic core columnar defects and secondary pinning at clusters of point-like defects, followed by collective pinning at higher fields. PMID:26601180

  12. Wind Energy Industry Eagle Detection and Deterrents: Research Gaps and Solutions Workshop Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Karin; DeGeorge, Elise

    2016-04-13

    The Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act (BGEPA) prohibits the 'take' of these birds. The act defines take as to 'pursue, shoot, shoot at, poison, wound, kill, capture, trap, collect, destroy, molest or disturb.' The 2009 Eagle Permit Rule (74 FR 46836) authorizes the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to issue nonpurposeful (i.e., incidental) take permits, and the USFWS 2013 Eagle Conservation Plan Guidance provides a voluntary framework for issuing programmatic take permits to wind facilities that incorporate scientifically supportable advanced conservation practices (ACPs). Under these rules, the Service can issue permits that authorize individual instances of take of bald and golden eagles when the take is associated with, but not the purpose of, an otherwise lawful activity, and cannot practicably be avoided. To date, the USFWS has not approved any ACPs, citing the lack of evidence for 'scientifically supportable measures.' The Eagle Detection and Deterrents Research Gaps and Solutions Workshop was convened at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in December 2015 with a goal to comprehensively assess the current state of technologies to detect and deter eagles from wind energy sites and the key gaps concerning reducing eagle fatalities and facilitating permitting under the BGEPA. During the workshop, presentations and discussions focused primarily on existing knowledge (and limitations) about the biology of eagles as well as technologies and emerging or novel ideas, including innovative applications of tools developed for use in other sectors, such as the U.S. Department of Defense and aviation. The main activity of the workshop was the breakout sessions, which focused on the current state of detection and deterrent technologies and novel concepts/applications for detecting and minimizing eagle collisions with wind turbines. Following the breakout sessions, participants were asked about their individual impressions of the relative priority of each of

  13. Coherent suppression of electromagnetic dissipation due to superconducting quasiparticles.

    PubMed

    Pop, Ioan M; Geerlings, Kurtis; Catelani, Gianluigi; Schoelkopf, Robert J; Glazman, Leonid I; Devoret, Michel H

    2014-04-17

    Owing to the low-loss propagation of electromagnetic signals in superconductors, Josephson junctions constitute ideal building blocks for quantum memories, amplifiers, detectors and high-speed processing units, operating over a wide band of microwave frequencies. Nevertheless, although transport in superconducting wires is perfectly lossless for direct current, transport of radio-frequency signals can be dissipative in the presence of quasiparticle excitations above the superconducting gap. Moreover, the exact mechanism of this dissipation in Josephson junctions has never been fully resolved experimentally. In particular, Josephson's key theoretical prediction that quasiparticle dissipation should vanish in transport through a junction when the phase difference across the junction is π (ref. 2) has never been observed. This subtle effect can be understood as resulting from the destructive interference of two separate dissipative channels involving electron-like and hole-like quasiparticles. Here we report the experimental observation of this quantum coherent suppression of quasiparticle dissipation across a Josephson junction. As the average phase bias across the junction is swept through π, we measure an increase of more than one order of magnitude in the energy relaxation time of a superconducting artificial atom. This striking suppression of dissipation, despite the presence of lossy quasiparticle excitations above the superconducting gap, provides a powerful tool for minimizing decoherence in quantum electronic systems and could be directly exploited in quantum information experiments with superconducting quantum bits.

  14. Coherent suppression of electromagnetic dissipation due to superconducting quasiparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Ioan M.; Geerlings, Kurtis; Catelani, Gianluigi; Schoelkopf, Robert J.; Glazman, Leonid I.; Devoret, Michel H.

    2014-04-01

    Owing to the low-loss propagation of electromagnetic signals in superconductors, Josephson junctions constitute ideal building blocks for quantum memories, amplifiers, detectors and high-speed processing units, operating over a wide band of microwave frequencies. Nevertheless, although transport in superconducting wires is perfectly lossless for direct current, transport of radio-frequency signals can be dissipative in the presence of quasiparticle excitations above the superconducting gap. Moreover, the exact mechanism of this dissipation in Josephson junctions has never been fully resolved experimentally. In particular, Josephson's key theoretical prediction that quasiparticle dissipation should vanish in transport through a junction when the phase difference across the junction is π (ref. 2) has never been observed. This subtle effect can be understood as resulting from the destructive interference of two separate dissipative channels involving electron-like and hole-like quasiparticles. Here we report the experimental observation of this quantum coherent suppression of quasiparticle dissipation across a Josephson junction. As the average phase bias across the junction is swept through π, we measure an increase of more than one order of magnitude in the energy relaxation time of a superconducting artificial atom. This striking suppression of dissipation, despite the presence of lossy quasiparticle excitations above the superconducting gap, provides a powerful tool for minimizing decoherence in quantum electronic systems and could be directly exploited in quantum information experiments with superconducting quantum bits.

  15. Band Gap Engineering in a 2D Material for Solar-to-Chemical Energy Conversion.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun; Guo, Zhenkun; Mcwilliams, Peter E; Darges, John E; Druffel, Daniel L; Moran, Andrew M; Warren, Scott C

    2016-01-13

    The electronic structure of 2D semiconductors depends on their thickness, providing new opportunities to engineer semiconductors for energy conversion, electronics, and catalysis. Here we show how a 3D semiconductor, black phosphorus, becomes active for solar-to-chemical energy conversion when it is thinned to a 2D material. The increase in its band gap, from 0.3 eV (3D) to 2.1 eV (2D monolayer), is accompanied by a 40-fold enhancement in the formation of chemical products. Despite this enhancement, smaller flakes also have shorter excited state lifetimes. We deduce a mechanism in which recombination occurs at flake edges, while the "van der Waals" surface of black phosphorus bonds to chemical intermediates and facilitates electron transfer. The unique properties of black phosphorus highlight its potential as a customizable material for solar energy conversion and catalysis, while also allowing us to identify design rules for 2D photocatalysts that will enable further improvements in these materials.

  16. Linear Scaling of the Exciton Binding Energy versus the Band Gap of Two-Dimensional Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin-Ho; Cui, Ping; Lan, Haiping; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-08-01

    The exciton is one of the most crucial physical entities in the performance of optoelectronic and photonic devices, and widely varying exciton binding energies have been reported in different classes of materials. Using first-principles calculations within the G W -Bethe-Salpeter equation approach, here we investigate the excitonic properties of two recently discovered layered materials: phosphorene and graphene fluoride. We first confirm large exciton binding energies of, respectively, 0.85 and 2.03 eV in these systems. Next, by comparing these systems with several other representative two-dimensional materials, we discover a striking linear relationship between the exciton binding energy and the band gap and interpret the existence of the linear scaling law within a simple hydrogenic picture. The broad applicability of this novel scaling law is further demonstrated by using strained graphene fluoride. These findings are expected to stimulate related studies in higher and lower dimensions, potentially resulting in a deeper understanding of excitonic effects in materials of all dimensionalities.

  17. Evidence of a Nonequilibrium Distribution of Quasiparticles in the Microwave Response of a Superconducting Aluminum Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Visser, P. J.; Goldie, D. J.; Diener, P.; Withington, S.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Klapwijk, T. M.

    2014-01-01

    In a superconductor, absorption of photons with an energy below the superconducting gap leads to redistribution of quasiparticles over energy and thus induces a strong nonequilibrium quasiparticle energy distribution. We have measured the electrodynamic response, quality factor, and resonant frequency of a superconducting aluminium microwave resonator as a function of microwave power and temperature. Below 200 mK, both the quality factor and resonant frequency decrease with increasing microwave power, consistent with the creation of excess quasiparticles due to microwave absorption. Counterintuitively, above 200 mK, the quality factor and resonant frequency increase with increasing power. We demonstrate that the effect can only be understood by a nonthermal quasiparticle distribution.

  18. Local superconducting coupling in the strong-localization limit of ultrathin granular metal films

    SciTech Connect

    Haviland, D. B.; Jaeger, H. M.; Orr, B. G.; Goldman, A. M.

    1989-07-01

    The onset of fluctuations into the superconducting state, as identified bythe appearance of a local minimum in the resistance versus temperature, isfound to be coincident with the characteristic activation energy ofnormal-state conduction falling to a value of the order of the superconductingenergy gap of the material at /ital T/=0. The model of conduction used isvariable-range hopping with a Coulomb gap, appropriate to granular metals.

  19. Observation of Low-Energy Einstein Phonon and Superconductivity in Single-Crystalline LaBe13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidaka, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Yusei; Yamazaki, Seigo; Miura, Naoyuki; Nagata, Ryoma; Tabata, Chihiro; Mombetsu, Shota; Yanagisawa, Tatsuya; Amitsuka, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    The thermal and electrical transport properties of single-crystalline LaBe13 have been investigated by specific-heat (C) and electrical-resistivity (ρ) measurements. The specific-heat measurements in a wide temperature range revealed the presence of a hump anomaly near 40 K in the C(T)/T curve, indicating that LaBe13 has a low-energy Einstein-like-phonon mode with a characteristic temperature of ˜177 K. In addition, a superconducting transition was observed in the ρ measurements at the transition temperature of 0.53 K, which is higher than the value of 0.27 K reported previously by Bonville et al. Furthermore, an unusual T3 dependence was found in ρ(T) below ˜50 K, in contrast to the behavior expected from the electron-electron scattering or the electron-Debye phonon scattering.

  20. HOM damping properties of fundamental power couplers in the superconducting electron gun of the energy recovery LINAC at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hammons, L.; Hahn, H.

    2011-03-28

    Among the accelerator projects under construction at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is an R and D energy recovery LINAC (ERL) test facility. The ERL includes both a five-cell superconducting cavity as well as a superconducting, photoinjector electron gun. Because of the high-charge and high-current demands, effective higher-order mode (HOM) damping is essential, and several strategies are being pursued. Among these is the use of the fundamental power couplers as a means for damping some HOMs. Simulation studies have shown that the power couplers can play a substantial role in damping certain HOMs, and this presentation discusses these studies along with measurements.

  1. Edge currents shunt the insulating bulk in gapped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, M. J.; Kretinin, A. V.; Thompson, M. D.; Bandurin, D. A.; Hu, S.; Yu, G. L.; Birkbeck, J.; Mishchenko, A.; Vera-Marun, I. J.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Polini, M.; Prance, J. R.; Novoselov, K. S.; Geim, A. K.; Ben Shalom, M.

    2017-02-01

    An energy gap can be opened in the spectrum of graphene reaching values as large as 0.2 eV in the case of bilayers. However, such gaps rarely lead to the highly insulating state expected at low temperatures. This long-standing puzzle is usually explained by charge inhomogeneity. Here we revisit the issue by investigating proximity-induced superconductivity in gapped graphene and comparing normal-state measurements in the Hall bar and Corbino geometries. We find that the supercurrent at the charge neutrality point in gapped graphene propagates along narrow channels near the edges. This observation is corroborated by using the edgeless Corbino geometry in which case resistivity at the neutrality point increases exponentially with increasing the gap, as expected for an ordinary semiconductor. In contrast, resistivity in the Hall bar geometry saturates to values of about a few resistance quanta. We attribute the metallic-like edge conductance to a nontrivial topology of gapped Dirac spectra.

  2. Large gap magnetic suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelsalam, Moustafa K.; Eyssa, Y. M.

    1991-01-01

    The design of a large gap magnetic suspension system is discussed. Some of the topics covered include: the system configuration, permanent magnet material, levitation magnet system, superconducting magnets, resistive magnets, superconducting levitation coils, resistive levitation coils, levitation magnet system, and the nitrogen cooled magnet system.

  3. Critical analysis of soft point contact Andreev reflection spectra between superconducting films and pressed In.

    PubMed

    Parab, Pradnya; Chauhan, Prashant; Muthurajan, H; Bose, Sangita

    2017-04-05

    We present a critical analysis of an alternative technique of point contact Andreev reflection (PCAR) spectroscopy used to extract energy resolved information of superconductors which is based on making 'soft-contacts' between superconductors and indium. This technique is not sensitive to mechanical vibrations and hence can be used in a cryogen free platform increasing its accessibility to users having no access to cryogenic liquids. Through our experiments on large number of superconducting films we show that the PCAR spectra below the T c of In show sub-harmonic gap structures consistent with the theory of multiple Andreev reflection (MAR) and a zero bias conductance (ZBC) anomaly associated with the Josephson supercurrent. Furthermore, we demonstrate that large contact resistance with low transparency ballistic contacts in the PCAR regime are required to obtain reliable spectroscopic data. One limitation of the technique arises for low contact resistance junctions where the superconducting proximity effect (SPE) reduces the value of the superconducting energy gap.

  4. Critical analysis of soft point contact Andreev reflection spectra between superconducting films and pressed In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parab, Pradnya; Chauhan, Prashant; Muthurajan, H.; Bose, Sangita

    2017-04-01

    We present a critical analysis of an alternative technique of point contact Andreev reflection (PCAR) spectroscopy used to extract energy resolved information of superconductors which is based on making ‘soft-contacts’ between superconductors and indium. This technique is not sensitive to mechanical vibrations and hence can be used in a cryogen free platform increasing its accessibility to users having no access to cryogenic liquids. Through our experiments on large number of superconducting films we show that the PCAR spectra below the T c of In show sub-harmonic gap structures consistent with the theory of multiple Andreev reflection (MAR) and a zero bias conductance (ZBC) anomaly associated with the Josephson supercurrent. Furthermore, we demonstrate that large contact resistance with low transparency ballistic contacts in the PCAR regime are required to obtain reliable spectroscopic data. One limitation of the technique arises for low contact resistance junctions where the superconducting proximity effect (SPE) reduces the value of the superconducting energy gap.

  5. Evaluating frontier orbital energy and HOMO/LUMO gap with descriptors from density functional reactivity theory.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Rong, Chunying; Zhang, Ruiqin; Liu, Shubin

    2017-01-01

    Wave function theory (WFT) and density functional theory (DFT)-the two most popular solutions to electronic structure problems of atoms and molecules-share the same origin, dealing with the same subject yet using distinct methodologies. For example, molecular orbitals are artifacts in WFT, whereas in DFT, electron density plays the dominant role. One question that needs to be addressed when using these approaches to appreciate properties related to molecular structure and reactivity is if there is any link between the two. In this work, we present a piece of strong evidence addressing that very question. Using five polymeric systems as illustrative examples, we reveal that using quantities from DFT such as Shannon entropy, Fisher information, Ghosh-Berkowitz-Parr entropy, Onicescu information energy, Rényi entropy, etc., one is able to accurately evaluate orbital-related properties in WFT like frontier orbital energies and the HOMO (highest occupied molecular orbital)/LUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital) gap. We verified these results at both the whole molecule level and the atoms-in-molecules level. These results provide compelling evidence suggesting that WFT and DFT are complementary to each other, both trying to comprehend the same properties of the electronic structure and molecular reactivity from different perspectives using their own characteristic vocabulary. Hence, there should be a bridge or bridges between the two approaches.

  6. Quasiparticle band gap of organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites: Crystal structure, spin-orbit coupling, and self-energy effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Weiwei; Gao, Xiang; Abtew, Tesfaye A.; Sun, Yi-Yang; Zhang, Shengbai; Zhang, Peihong

    2016-02-01

    The quasiparticle band gap is one of the most important materials properties for photovoltaic applications. Often the band gap of a photovoltaic material is determined (and can be controlled) by various factors, complicating predictive materials optimization. An in-depth understanding of how these factors affect the size of the gap will provide valuable guidance for new materials discovery. Here we report a comprehensive investigation on the band gap formation mechanism in organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites by decoupling various contributing factors which ultimately determine their electronic structure and quasiparticle band gap. Major factors, namely, quasiparticle self-energy, spin-orbit coupling, and structural distortions due to the presence of organic molecules, and their influences on the quasiparticle band structure of organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites are illustrated. We find that although methylammonium cations do not contribute directly to the electronic states near band edges, they play an important role in defining the band gap by introducing structural distortions and controlling the overall lattice constants. The spin-orbit coupling effects drastically reduce the electron and hole effective masses in these systems, which is beneficial for high carrier mobilities and small exciton binding energies.

  7. Enhanced spin polarization in graphene with spin energy gap induced by spin-orbit coupling and strain

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zheng-Fang; Wu, Qing-Ping E-mail: aixichen@ecjtu.jx.cn; Chen, Ai-Xi E-mail: aixichen@ecjtu.jx.cn; Xiao, Xian-Bo; Liu, Nian-Hua

    2014-05-28

    We investigate the possibility of spin polarization in graphene. The result shows that a spin energy gap can be opened in the presence of both spin-orbit coupling and strain. We find that high spin polarization with large spin-polarized current is achieved in the spin energy gap. However, only one of the two modulations is present, no spin polarization can be generated. So the combination of the two modulations provides a way to design tunable spin polarization without need for a magnetic element or an external magnetic field.

  8. Superconductive wire

    DOEpatents

    Korzekwa, David A.; Bingert, John F.; Peterson, Dean E.; Sheinberg, Haskell

    1995-01-01

    A superconductive article is made by inserting a rigid mandrel into an internal cavity of a first metallic tube, said tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface defining the interior cavity, forming a layer of a superconductive material or superconductive precursor upon the exterior surface of said first metallic tube, machining the layer of superconductive material or superconductive precursor to a predetermined diameter to form an intermediate article configured for insertion into a second metallic tube having an interior diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter, inserting the machined intermediate article into a second metallic tube having an internal diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter of the intermediate article to form a composite intermediate article, reducing or ironing the composite intermediate article to a predetermined cross-sectional diameter, and sintering the reduced or ironed composite intermediate article at temperatures and for time sufficient for the superconductive material or superconductive precursor to exhibit superconductivity.

  9. Superconductive wire

    DOEpatents

    Korzekwa, D.A.; Bingert, J.F.; Peterson, D.E.; Sheinberg, H.

    1995-07-18

    A superconductive article is made by inserting a rigid mandrel into an internal cavity of a first metallic tube, said tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface defining the interior cavity, forming a layer of a superconductive material or superconductive precursor upon the exterior surface of said first metallic tube, machining the layer of superconductive material or superconductive precursor to a predetermined diameter to form an intermediate article configured for insertion into a second metallic tube having an interior diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter, inserting the machined intermediate article into a second metallic tube having an internal diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter of the intermediate article to form a composite intermediate article, reducing or ironing the composite intermediate article to a predetermined cross-sectional diameter, and sintering the reduced or ironed composite intermediate article at temperatures and for time sufficient for the superconductive material or superconductive precursor to exhibit superconductivity. 2 figs.

  10. Rapidity gaps and jets as a new-physics signature in very-high-energy hadron-hadron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorken, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    In hadron-hadron collisions, production of Higgs bosons and other color-singlet systems can occur via fusion of electroweak bosons, occasionally leaving a ``rapidity gap'' in the underlying-event structure. This observation, due to Dokshitzer, Khoze, and Troyan, is studied to see whether it serves as a signature for detection of the Higgs bosons, etc. We find it is a very strong signature at subprocess c.m. energies in excess of a few TeV. The most serious problem with this strategy is the estimation of the fraction of events containing the rapidity gap; most of the time the gap is filled by soft interactions of spectator degrees of freedom. We also study this question and estimate this ``survival probability of the rapidity gap'' to be of order 5%, with an uncertainty of a factor 3. Ways of testing this estimate and further discussion of the underlying hard-diffraction physics are presented.

  11. Intrinsic Energy Localization Through Discrete Gap Breathers in One-Dimensional Diatomic Granular Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    chanical resonators 12, superconducting Josephson junc- tions 13, Bose -Einstein condensation 14, electrical lat- tices 15, and more. In...Press, San Diego, CA, 2003. 10 M. Peyrard, Nonlinearity 17, R1 2004. 11 M. Sato, B. E. Hubbard , and A. J. Sievers, Rev. Mod. Phys. 78, 137

  12. Temperature-Dependent Energy Gap Shift and Thermally Activated Transition in Multilayer CdTe/ZnTe Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Man, Minh Tan; Lee, Hong Seok

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the influence of growth conditions on carrier dynamics in multilayer CdTe/ZnTe quantum dots (QDs) by monitoring the temperature dependence of the photoluminescence emission energy. The results were analyzed using the empirical Varshni and O'Donnell relations for temperature variation of the energy gap shift. Best fit values showed that the thermally activated transition between two different states occurs due to band low-temperature quenching with values separated by 5.0-6.5 meV. The addition of stack periods in multilayer CdTe/ZnTe QDs plays an important role in the energy gap shift, where the exciton binding energy is enhanced, and, conversely, the exciton-phonon coupling strength is suppressed with an average energy of 19.3-19.8 meV.

  13. Ultrasonic investigation of the superconducting properties of the Nb-Mo system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, L. L.

    1972-01-01

    The superconducting properties of single crystals of Nb and two alloys of Nb with Mo were investigated by ultrasonic techniques. The results of measurements of the ultrasonic attenuation and velocities as a function of temperature, Mo composition, crystallographic direction, and ultrasonic frequency are reported. The attenuation and small velocity changes associated with the superconductivity of the samples are shown to be dependent on the sample resistivity ratio which varied from 4.3 for Nb-9% Mo to 6500 for pure Nb. The ultrasonic attenuation data are analyzed in terms of the superconducting energy gap term of the BCS theory. A new model is proposed for the analysis of ultrasonic attenuation in pure superconductors with two partially decoupled energy bands. To analyze the attenuation in pure superconducting Nb, the existence of two energy gaps was assumed to be associated with the two partially decoupled energy bands. One of the gaps was found to have the normal BCS value of 3.4 and the other gap was found to have the anomalously large value of 10. No experimental evidence was found to suggest that the second energy gap had a different transition temperature. The interpretation of the results for the Nb-Mo alloys is shown to be complicated by the possible existence of a second superconducting phase in Nb-Mo alloys with a transition temperature of 0.35 of the transition temperature of the first phase. The elastic constants of Nb and Nb-Mo alloys are shown to be approximately independent of Mo composition to nine atomic percent Mo. These results do not agree with the current microscopic theory of transition temperature for the transition elements.

  14. Broadband illumination of superconducting pair breaking photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guruswamy, T.; Goldie, D. J.; Withington, S.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the detailed behaviour of superconducting pair breaking photon detectors such as Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) requires knowledge of the nonequilibrium quasiparticle energy distributions. We have previously calculated the steady state distributions resulting from uniform absorption of monochromatic sub gap and above gap frequency radiation by thin films. In this work, we use the same methods to calculate the effect of illumination by broadband sources, such as thermal radiation from astrophysical phenomena or from the readout system. Absorption of photons at multiple above gap frequencies is shown to leave unchanged the structure of the quasiparticle energy distribution close to the superconducting gap. Hence for typical absorbed powers, we find the effects of absorption of broadband pair breaking radiation can simply be considered as the sum of the effects of absorption of many monochromatic sources. Distribution averaged quantities, like quasiparticle generation efficiency η, match exactly a weighted average over the bandwidth of the source of calculations assuming a monochromatic source. For sub gap frequencies, however, distributing the absorbed power across multiple frequencies does change the low energy quasiparticle distribution. For moderate and high absorbed powers, this results in a significantly larger η-a higher number of excess quasiparticles for a broadband source compared to a monochromatic source of equal total absorbed power. Typically in KIDs the microwave power absorbed has a very narrow bandwidth, but in devices with broad resonance characteristics (low quality factors), this increase in η may be measurable.

  15. Superconductivity versus bound-state formation in a two-band superconductor with small Fermi energy: Applications to Fe pnictides/chalcogenides and doped SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubukov, Andrey V.; Eremin, Ilya; Efremov, Dmitri V.

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the interplay between superconductivity and the formation of bound pairs of fermions (BCS-BEC crossover) in a 2D model of interacting fermions with small Fermi energy EF and weak attractive interaction, which extends to energies well above EF. The 2D case is special because a two-particle bound state forms at arbitrary weak interaction, and already at weak coupling, one has to distinguish between the bound-state formation and superconductivity. We briefly review the situation in the one-band model and then consider two different two-band models: one with one hole band and one electron band and another with two hole or two electron bands. In each case, we obtain the bound-state energy 2 E0 for two fermions in a vacuum and solve the set of coupled equations for the pairing gaps and the chemical potentials to obtain the onset temperature of the pairing Tins and the quasiparticle dispersion at T =0 . We then compute the superfluid stiffness ρs(T =0 ) and obtain the actual Tc. For definiteness, we set EF in one band to be near zero and consider different ratios of E0 and EF in the other band. We show that at EF≫E0 , the behavior of both two-band models is BCS-like in the sense that Tc≈Tins≪EF and Δ ˜Tc . At EF≪E0 , the two models behave differently: in the model with two hole/two electron bands, Tins˜E0/lnE/0EF , Δ ˜(E0EF) 1 /2 , and Tc˜EF , like in the one-band model. In between Tins and Tc, the system displays a preformed pair behavior. In the model with one hole and one electron bands, Tc remains of order Tins, and both remain finite at EF=0 and of the order of E0. The preformed pair behavior still does exist in this model because Tc is numerically smaller than Tins. For both models, we reexpress Tins in terms of the fully renormalized two-particle scattering amplitude by extending to the two-band case (the method pioneered by Gorkov and Melik-Barkhudarov back in 1961). We apply our results for the model with a hole and an electron band to

  16. Superconductivity in MgB 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimitsu, Jun; Muranaka, Takahiro

    2003-05-01

    We recently discovered that the intermetallic compound magnesium diboride (MgB2) exhibits the highest superconducting transition temperature (Tc=39 K) of all the metallic superconductors. In this paper we report on the basic superconducting characteristics of MgB2 and the current status of the research for the unanswered problem in this superconductivity. Especially, we review the several reports for the superconducting gap (Δ) by the spectroscopic measurements. Moreover we introduce the research into its anisotropic parameter (γ), which is important for the understanding of this superconducting states in this material.

  17. Band gap and defect states of MgO thin films investigated using reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Sung; Cho, Eunseog; Lee, Hyung-Ik; Park, Gyeong Su; Kang, Hee Jae; Nagatomi, T.; Choi, Pyungho; Choi, Byoung-Deog

    2015-07-15

    The band gap and defect states of MgO thin films were investigated by using reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) and high-energy resolution REELS (HR-REELS). HR-REELS with a primary electron energy of 0.3 keV revealed that the surface F center (FS) energy was located at approximately 4.2 eV above the valence band maximum (VBM) and the surface band gap width (E{sub g}{sup S}) was approximately 6.3 eV. The bulk F center (F{sub B}) energy was located approximately 4.9 eV above the VBM and the bulk band gap width was about 7.8 eV, when measured by REELS with 3 keV primary electrons. From a first-principles calculation, we confirmed that the 4.2 eV and 4.9 eV peaks were F{sub S} and F{sub B}, induced by oxygen vacancies. We also experimentally demonstrated that the HR-REELS peak height increases with increasing number of oxygen vacancies. Finally, we calculated the secondary electron emission yields (γ) for various noble gases. He and Ne were not influenced by the defect states owing to their higher ionization energies, but Ar, Kr, and Xe exhibited a stronger dependence on the defect states owing to their small ionization energies.

  18. Evidence for Intertwining of Superconductivity and Antiferromagnetism in a Cuprate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranquada, John; Xu, Zhijun; Stock, C.; Chi, S. X.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Xu, G. Y.; Gu, G. D.

    2014-03-01

    We have used inelastic neutron scattering to measure the low-energy, incommensurate antiferromagnetic spin excitations both above and below the superconducting transition temperature (Tc = 32 K) of La1.905Ba0.095CuO4. While the magnetic excitations in optimally-doped cuprates typically show the development of a spin gap and magnetic resonance below Tc, our sample shows no such effect. Instead strong, gapless spin excitations coexist with bulk superconductivity. To understand this, we note that previous transport measurements have shown that the superconducting layers are decoupled by a magnetic field applied along the c-axis, resulting in a state with frustrated interlayer Josephson coupling, similar to LBCO with x = 1 / 8 , where it has been proposed that pair-density-wave superconductivity occurs. This suggests that, in a similar fashion, the spatially modulated antiferromagnetic correlations (which we see directly in the x = 0 . 095 sample) are intertwined with a spatially modulated superconducting pair wave function. Work at BNL supported by Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US DOE, under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  19. Synthesis, characterization and band gap energy of poly(ɛ-caprolactone)/Sr-MSA nano-composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannammal, L.; Palanikumar, S.; Meenarathi, B.; Yelilarasi, A.; Anbarasan, R.

    2014-04-01

    A mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) decorated Sr nano-particle (NP) was prepared and characterized by using various analytical techniques and was used as a chemical initiator for the ring opening polymerization (ROP) of ɛ-caprolactone (CL). The ROP of CL was carried out at various experimental conditions under N2 atmosphere with mild stirring. The initiating efficiency of MSA-decorated Sr NP was tested in terms of Fourier transform infrared-relative intensity, melting temperature (Tm), degradation temperature (Td) and molecular weight (Mw) of poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), differential scanning calorimetry, UV-visible spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and gel permeation chromatography analytical techniques. The nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum confirms the chemical structure of PCL. While increasing the [M/I] ratio, the Mw of PCL was linearly increased. The band gap energy of Sr was determined from the UV-visible spectrum. The reflectance study proves the hydrophobic nature of the Sr-hybrid and its nano-composite formation with PCL.

  20. Athermal Energy Loss from X-Rays Deposited in Thin Superconducting Bilayers on Solid Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandler, Simon R.; Kozorezov, Alexander; Balvin, Manuel A.; Busch, Sarah E.; Nagler, Peter N.; Porst, Jan-Patrick; Smith, Stephen J.; Stevenson, Thomas R.; Sadleir, John E.; Seidel, George M.

    2012-01-01

    An important feature that determines the energy resolution of any type of thin film microcalorimeter is the fraction of athermal energy that can be lost to the heat bath prior to the device coming into thermal equilibrium.

  1. Design of 57.5 MHz CW RFQ for medium energy heavy ion superconducting linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Kolomiets, A. A.; Kashinsky, D. A.; Minaev, S. A.; Pershin, V. I.; Tretyakova, T. E.; Yaramishev, S. G.; Physics; Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics

    2002-06-01

    The nuclear science community considers the construction of the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility as a top priority. The RIA includes a 1.4 GV superconducting linac for production of 400 kW cw heavy ion beams. The initial acceleration of heavy ions delivered from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source can be effectively performed by a 57.5 MHz 4-m long room temperature RFQ. The principal specifications of the RFQ are (i) formation of extremely low longitudinal emittance, (ii) stable operation over a wide range of voltage for acceleration of various ion species needed for RIA operation, and (iii) simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states of uranium ions. cw operation of an accelerating structure leads to a number of requirements for the resonators such as high shunt impedance, efficient water cooling of all parts of the resonant cavity, mechanical stability together with precise alignment, reliable rf contacts, a stable operating mode, and fine tuning of the resonant frequency during operation. To satisfy these requirements a new resonant structure has been developed. This paper discusses the beam dynamics and electrodynamics design of the RFQ cavity, as well as some aspects of the mechanical design of the low-frequency cw RFQ.

  2. Formation of quantum spin Hall state on Si surface and energy gap scaling with strength of spin orbit coupling

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Miao; Ming, Wenmei; Liu, Zheng; ...

    2014-11-19

    For potential applications in spintronics and quantum computing, it is desirable to place a quantum spin Hall insulator [i.e., a 2D topological insulator (TI)] on a substrate while maintaining a large energy gap. Here, we demonstrate a unique approach to create the large-gap 2D TI state on a semiconductor surface, based on first-principles calculations and effective Hamiltonian analysis. We show that when heavy elements with strong spin orbit coupling (SOC) such as Bi and Pb atoms are deposited on a patterned H-Si(111) surface into a hexagonal lattice, they exhibit a 2D TI state with a large energy gap of ≥0.5more » eV. The TI state arises from an intriguing substrate orbital filtering effect that selects a suitable orbital composition around the Fermi level, so that the system can be matched onto a four-band effective model Hamiltonian. Furthermore, it is found that within this model, the SOC gap does not increase monotonically with the increasing strength of SOC. These interesting results may shed new light in future design and fabrication of large-gap topological quantum states.« less

  3. Formation of quantum spin Hall state on Si surface and energy gap scaling with strength of spin orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Miao; Ming, Wenmei; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zhengfei; Yao, Yugui; Liu, Feng

    2014-11-19

    For potential applications in spintronics and quantum computing, it is desirable to place a quantum spin Hall insulator [i.e., a 2D topological insulator (TI)] on a substrate while maintaining a large energy gap. Here, we demonstrate a unique approach to create the large-gap 2D TI state on a semiconductor surface, based on first-principles calculations and effective Hamiltonian analysis. We show that when heavy elements with strong spin orbit coupling (SOC) such as Bi and Pb atoms are deposited on a patterned H-Si(111) surface into a hexagonal lattice, they exhibit a 2D TI state with a large energy gap of ≥0.5 eV. The TI state arises from an intriguing substrate orbital filtering effect that selects a suitable orbital composition around the Fermi level, so that the system can be matched onto a four-band effective model Hamiltonian. Furthermore, it is found that within this model, the SOC gap does not increase monotonically with the increasing strength of SOC. These interesting results may shed new light in future design and fabrication of large-gap topological quantum states.

  4. Illusory Continuity without Sufficient Sound Energy to Fill a Temporal Gap: Examples of Crossing Glide Tones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuroda, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Yoshitaka; Eguchi, Shuntarou

    2012-01-01

    The gap transfer illusion is an auditory illusion where a temporal gap inserted in a longer glide tone is perceived as if it were in a crossing shorter glide tone. Psychophysical and phenomenological experiments were conducted to examine the effects of sound-pressure-level (SPL) differences between crossing glides on the occurrence of the gap…

  5. Unconventional superconductivity in Ba(0.6)K(0.4)Fe2As2 from inelastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Christianson, A D; Goremychkin, E A; Osborn, R; Rosenkranz, S; Lumsden, M D; Malliakas, C D; Todorov, I S; Claus, H; Chung, D Y; Kanatzidis, M G; Bewley, R I; Guidi, T

    2008-12-18

    A new family of superconductors containing layers of iron arsenide has attracted considerable interest because of their high transition temperatures (T(c)), some of which are >50 K, and because of similarities with the high-T(c) copper oxide superconductors. In both the iron arsenides and the copper oxides, superconductivity arises when an antiferromagnetically ordered phase has been suppressed by chemical doping. A universal feature of the copper oxide superconductors is the existence of a resonant magnetic excitation, localized in both energy and wavevector, within the superconducting phase. This resonance, which has also been observed in several heavy-fermion superconductors, is predicted to occur when the sign of the superconducting energy gap takes opposite values on different parts of the Fermi surface, an unusual gap symmetry which implies that the electron pairing interaction is repulsive at short range. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy shows no evidence of gap anisotropy in the iron arsenides, but such measurements are insensitive to the phase of the gap on separate parts of the Fermi surface. Here we report inelastic neutron scattering observations of a magnetic resonance below T(c) in Ba(0.6)K(0.4)Fe(2)As(2), a phase-sensitive measurement demonstrating that the superconducting energy gap has unconventional symmetry in the iron arsenide superconductors.

  6. Energy Impacts of Wide Band Gap Semiconductors in U.S. Light-Duty Electric Vehicle Fleet.

    PubMed

    Warren, Joshua A; Riddle, Matthew E; Graziano, Diane J; Das, Sujit; Upadhyayula, Venkata K K; Masanet, Eric; Cresko, Joe

    2015-09-01

    Silicon carbide and gallium nitride, two leading wide band gap semiconductors with significant potential in electric vehicle power electronics, are examined from a life cycle energy perspective and compared with incumbent silicon in U.S. light-duty electric vehicle fleet. Cradle-to-gate, silicon carbide is estimated to require more than twice the energy as silicon. However, the magnitude of vehicle use phase fuel savings potential is comparatively several orders of magnitude higher than the marginal increase in cradle-to-gate energy. Gallium nitride cradle-to-gate energy requirements are estimated to be similar to silicon, with use phase savings potential similar to or exceeding that of silicon carbide. Potential energy reductions in the United States vehicle fleet are examined through several scenarios that consider the market adoption potential of electric vehicles themselves, as well as the market adoption potential of wide band gap semiconductors in electric vehicles. For the 2015-2050 time frame, cumulative energy savings associated with the deployment of wide band gap semiconductors are estimated to range from 2-20 billion GJ depending on market adoption dynamics.

  7. Tuning the superconductivity in single-layer FeSe/oxides by interface engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Rui

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of high Tc in single-layer FeSe films has enormous implications for both searching new high Tc superconductors and exploring the important factors for high temperature superconductivity. In this talk, I will show our recent angle-resolved photoemission studies on various FeSe-based heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We systematically studied the electronic structures and superconducting properties of FeSe with varied strain, different interfacial oxide materials and different thicknesses, and uncover that electronic correlations and superconducting gap-closing temperatures are tuned by interfacial effects. We exclude the direct relation between superconductivity and tensile strain, or the energy of an interfacial phonon mode, and demonstrate the crucial and non-trivial role of FeSe/oxide interface on the high pairing temperature. By tuning the interface, superconducting pairing temperature reaches up to 75K in FeSe/Nb:BaTiO3/KTaO3 with the in-plane lattice of 3.99 Å, which sets a new superconducting-gap-closing temperature record for iron-based superconductors, and may paves the way to more cost-effective applications of ultra-thin superconductors. Besides, in extremely tensile-strained single-layer FeSe films, we found that the Fermi surfaces consist of two elliptical electron pockets at the zone corner, without detectable hybridization. The lifting of degeneracy is clearly observed for the first time for the iron-based superconductors with only electron Fermi surfaces. Intriguingly, the superconducting gap distribution is anisotropic but nodeless around the electron pockets, with minima at the crossings of the two pockets. Our results provide important experimental foundations for understanding the interfacial superconductivity and the pairing symmetry puzzle of iron-based superconductors, and also provide clues for further enhancing Tc through interface engineering.

  8. Fields and forces in flywheel energy storage with high-temperature superconducting bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, L.R.

    1996-05-01

    The development of low-loss bearings employing high-temperature superconductors has brought closer the advent of practical flywheel energy storage systems. These systems require magnetic fields and forces for levitation, stabilization, and energy transfer. This paper describes the status of experiments on flywheel energy storage at Argonne National Laboratory and computations in support of that project, in particular computations for the permanent-magnet rotor of the motor-generator that transfers energy to and from the flywheel, for other energy-transfer systems under consideration, and for the levitation and stabilization subsystem.

  9. Fields and forces in flywheel energy storage with high-temperature superconducting bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, L.R.

    1997-03-01

    The development of low-loss bearings employing high-temperature superconductors has brought closer the advent of practical flywheel energy storage systems. These systems require magnetic fields and forces for levitation, stabilization, and energy transfer. This paper describes the status of experiments on flywheel energy storage at Argonne National Laboratory and computations in support of that project, in particular computations for the permanent-magnet rotor of the motor-generator that transfers energy to and from the flywheel, for other energy-transfer systems under consideration, and for the levitation and stability subsystems.

  10. Prospects for the medium- and long-term development of China`s electric power industry and analysis of the potential market for superconductivity technology

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.

    1998-05-01

    First of all, overall economic growth objectives in China are concisely and succinctly specified in this report. Secondly, this report presents a forecast of energy supply and demand for China`s economic growth for 2000--2050. In comparison with the capability of energy construction in China in the future, a gap between supply and demand is one of the important factors hindering the sustainable development of Chain`s economy. The electric power industry is one of China`s most important industries. To adopt energy efficiency through high technology and utilizing energy adequately is an important technological policy for the development of China`s electric power industry in the future. After briefly describing the achievements of China`s electric power industry, this report defines the target areas and policies for the development of hydroelectricity and nuclear electricity in the 2000s in China, presents the strategic position of China`s electric power industry as well as objectives and relevant plans of development for 2000--2050. This report finds that with the discovery of superconducting electricity, the discovery of new high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials, and progress in materials techniques, the 21st century will be an era of superconductivity. Applications of superconductivity in the energy field, such as superconducting storage, superconducting transmission, superconducting transformers, superconducting motors, its application in Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics (MHD), as well as in nuclear fusion, has unique advantages. Its market prospects are quite promising. 12 figs.

  11. The GAPS Experiment: A Search for Dark Matter Using Low Energy Antiprotons and Antideuterons [University of Hawaii Co-I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Doetinchem, Philip

    This is a Co-I proposal in support of the PI lead proposal entitled "The GAPS experiment: a search for dark matter using low energy antiprotons and antideuterons" submitted by Prof. Charles Hailey, Columbia University. Our proposed program would support the Umiversity of Hawaii at Manoa tasks on the GAPS experiment as detailed in our task statement. The primary focus of this work is the calibration and test of the Si(Li) detector modules, instrument simulation and support of the flight program and scientific analysis.

  12. Noncentrosymmetric superconductivity in a clean crystal of type II superconductor Bi-Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Srinivasan; Pratap, Bhanu; Thamizhavel, A.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we present the bulk superconductivity of a high-quality single crystal of monoclinic BiPd (α-BiPd, space group P21) below 3.8 K by studying its electrical resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity. This is the cleanest noncentrosymmetric superconductor (NCS) that display anisotropy due to spin-orbit scattering and also exhibits unusual superconducting properties due to s and p wave mixing as evidenced by the observation of Andreev bound state and multiple energy gaps via point contact measurements. In addition, Fermi surface studies suggest multiband superconductivity in this compound. Penetration depth studies and NQR investigations support mixing of s and p wave Copper paring in this crystal. Moroever, Muon spin rotation measurements indicate strong field dependence of the Ginzburg- Landau coefficient of this superconductor. Unusual pairing and multiband superconductivity are extremely sensitive to disorder and they can be observed only in cleanest (RRR > 170) single crystals.

  13. Graded-gap AlxGa1-xAs detector for high-energy electron beam dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silenas, Aldis; Miller, Albert; Pozela, Juras; Pozela, Karolis; Dapkus, Leonas; Juciene, Vida

    2011-05-01

    A new graded-gap p-Al0.2Ga0.8As-p-AlxGa1-xAs-n-GaAs detector structure with internal optical response was developed and investigated as a detector for high-energy electron beam dosimetry. An additional p-Al0.2Ga0.8As top layer was grown on the narrow-gap side of the structure. This thin (2 μm) top layer significantly reduces nonradiative surface recombination and increases detector sensitivity for high-energy electron beams by about 10-13%. The increase in doping level of the graded-gap AlxGa1-xAs layer from p=3×1017 to 1.9×1018 cm-3 increases detector sensitivity by about 2.3 times. The detector was encapsulated into a plastic body and fitted for dosimetric measurements in a water phantom. Linear response on absorbed dose and dose rate was obtained for beams with electron energies of 6, 12 and 20 MeV. A good agreement of relative depth dose distribution measured by the AlxGa1-xAs detector and ionization chamber is obtained for the 6 MeV energy electron beam, but a discernible discrepancy is observed for the higher electron energies.

  14. Determination of band gap energy (Eg) of Cu2ZnSnSe4 thin films: On the discrepancies of reported band gap values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, SeJin; Jung, Sunghun; Gwak, Jihye; Cho, Ara; Shin, Keeshik; Yoon, Kyunghoon; Park, Doyoung; Cheong, Hyeonsik; Yun, Jae Ho

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate experimental data to elucidate the reason for the discrepancies of reported band gap energy (Eg) of Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) thin films, i.e., 1.0 or 1.5 eV. Eg of the coevaporated CZTSe film synthesized at substrate temperature (Tsub) of 370 °C, which was apparently phase pure CZTSe confirmed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy, is found to be around 1 eV regardless of the measurement techniques. However, depth profile of the same sample reveals the formation of ZnSe at CZTSe/Mo interface. On the other hand, Eg of the coevaporated films increases with Tsub due to the ZnSe formation, from which we suggest that the existence of ZnSe, which is hardly distinguishable from CZTSe by XRD, is the possible reason for the overestimation of overall Eg.

  15. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, John D.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

  16. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1998-05-05

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat is disclosed. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device. 4 figs.

  17. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

  18. Two-band superconductivity of bulk and surface states in Ag thin films on Nb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomanic, Tihomir; Schackert, Michael; Wulfhekel, Wulf; Sürgers, Christoph; Löhneysen, Hilbert v.

    2016-12-01

    We use epitaxial strain to spatially tune the bottom of the surface-state band ESS of Ag(111) islands on Nb(110). Bulk and surface-state contributions to the Ag(111) local density of states (LDOS) can be separated with scanning tunneling spectroscopy. For thick islands (≈20 nm), the Ag surface states are decoupled from the Ag bulk states and the superconductive gap induced by proximity to Nb is due to bulk states only. However, for thin islands (3-4 nm), surface-state electrons develop superconducting correlations as identified by a complete energy gap in the LDOS when ESS is smaller than but close to the Fermi level. The induced superconductivity in this case is of a two-band nature and appears to occur when the surface-state wave function reaches down to the Ag/Nb interface.

  19. Electronic Characterization of Defects in Narrow Gap Semiconductors-Comparison of Electronic Energy Levels and Formation Energies in Mercury Cadmium Telluride, Mercury Zinc Telluride, and Mercury Zinc Selenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, James D.

    1996-01-01

    We have used a Green's function technique to calculate the energy levels and formation energy of deep defects in the narrow gap semiconductors mercury cadmium telluride (MCT), mercury zinc telluride (MZT) and mercury zinc selenide (MZS). The formation energy is calculated from the difference between the total energy with an impurity cluster and the total energy for the perfect crystal. Substitutional (including antisite), interstitial (self and foreign), and vacancy deep defects are considered. Relaxation effects are calculated (with molecular dynamics). By use of a pseudopotential, we generalize the ideal vacancy model so as to be able to consider relaxation for vacancies. Different charge states are considered and the charged state energy shift (as computed by a modified Haldane-Anderson model) can be twice that due to relaxation. Different charged states for vacancies were not calculated to have much effect on the formation energy. For all cases we find deep defects in the energy gap only for cation site s-like orbitals or anion site p-like orbitals, and for the substitutional case only the latter are appreciably effected by relaxation. For most cases for MCT, MZT, MZS, we consider x (the concentration of Cd or Zn) in the range appropriate for a band gap of 0.1 eV. For defect energy levels, the absolute accuracy of our results is limited, but the precision is good, and hence chemical trends are accurately predicted. For the same reason, defect formation energies are more accurately predicted than energy level position. We attempt, in Appendix B, to calculate vacancy formation energies using relatively simple chemical bonding ideas due to Harrison. However, these results are only marginally accurate for estimating vacancy binding energies. Appendix C lists all written reports and publications produced for the grant. We include abstracts and a complete paper that summarizes our work which is not yet available.

  20. Superconducting PM undiffused machines with stationary superconducting coils

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.; Schwenterly, S. William

    2004-03-02

    A superconducting PM machine has a stator, a rotor and a stationary excitation source without the need of a ferromagnetic frame which is cryogenically cooled for operation in the superconducting state. PM material is placed between poles on the rotor to prevent leakage or diffusion of secondary flux before reaching the main air gap, or to divert PM flux where it is desired to weaken flux in the main air gap. The PM material provides hop-along capability for the machine in the event of a fault condition.

  1. Ultrathin two-dimensional superconductivity with strong spin-orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyoungdo; Chen, Hua; Liu, Tijiang; Kim, Jisun; Zhang, Chendong; Yong, Jie; Lemberger, Thomas R; Kratz, Philip A; Kirtley, John R; Moler, Kathryn; Adams, Philip W; MacDonald, Allan H; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2016-09-20

    We report on a study of epitaxially grown ultrathin Pb films that are only a few atoms thick and have parallel critical magnetic fields much higher than the expected limit set by the interaction of electron spins with a magnetic field, that is, the Clogston-Chandrasekhar limit. The epitaxial thin films are classified as dirty-limit superconductors because their mean-free paths, which are limited by surface scattering, are smaller than their superconducting coherence lengths. The uniformity of superconductivity in these thin films is established by comparing scanning tunneling spectroscopy, scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry, double-coil mutual inductance, and magneto-transport, data that provide average superfluid rigidity on length scales covering the range from microscopic to macroscopic. We argue that the survival of superconductivity at Zeeman energies much larger than the superconducting gap can be understood only as the consequence of strong spin-orbit coupling that, together with substrate-induced inversion-symmetry breaking, produces spin splitting in the normal-state energy bands that is much larger than the superconductor's energy gap.

  2. Ultrathin two-dimensional superconductivity with strong spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Hyoungdo; Chen, Hua; Liu, Tijiang; Kim, Jisun; Zhang, Chendong; Yong, Jie; Lemberger, Thomas R.; Kratz, Philip A.; Kirtley, John R.; Moler, Kathryn; Adams, Philip W.; MacDonald, Allan H.; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2016-09-01

    We report on a study of epitaxially grown ultrathin Pb films that are only a few atoms thick and have parallel critical magnetic fields much higher than the expected limit set by the interaction of electron spins with a magnetic field, that is, the Clogston-Chandrasekhar limit. The epitaxial thin films are classified as dirty-limit superconductors because their mean-free paths, which are limited by surface scattering, are smaller than their superconducting coherence lengths. The uniformity of superconductivity in these thin films is established by comparing scanning tunneling spectroscopy, scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry, double-coil mutual inductance, and magneto-transport, data that provide average superfluid rigidity on length scales covering the range from microscopic to macroscopic. We argue that the survival of superconductivity at Zeeman energies much larger than the superconducting gap can be understood only as the consequence of strong spin-orbit coupling that, together with substrate-induced inversion-symmetry breaking, produces spin splitting in the normal-state energy bands that is much larger than the superconductor’s energy gap.

  3. Ultrathin two-dimensional superconductivity with strong spin–orbit coupling

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Hyoungdo; Chen, Hua; Liu, Tijiang; Kim, Jisun; Zhang, Chendong; Yong, Jie; Lemberger, Thomas R.; Kratz, Philip A.; Kirtley, John R.; Moler, Kathryn; Adams, Philip W.; MacDonald, Allan H.; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2016-01-01

    We report on a study of epitaxially grown ultrathin Pb films that are only a few atoms thick and have parallel critical magnetic fields much higher than the expected limit set by the interaction of electron spins with a magnetic field, that is, the Clogston–Chandrasekhar limit. The epitaxial thin films are classified as dirty-limit superconductors because their mean-free paths, which are limited by surface scattering, are smaller than their superconducting coherence lengths. The uniformity of superconductivity in these thin films is established by comparing scanning tunneling spectroscopy, scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry, double-coil mutual inductance, and magneto-transport, data that provide average superfluid rigidity on length scales covering the range from microscopic to macroscopic. We argue that the survival of superconductivity at Zeeman energies much larger than the superconducting gap can be understood only as the consequence of strong spin–orbit coupling that, together with substrate-induced inversion-symmetry breaking, produces spin splitting in the normal-state energy bands that is much larger than the superconductor’s energy gap. PMID:27601678

  4. Disappearance of nodal gap across the insulator-superconductor transition in a copper-oxide superconductor.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yingying; Meng, Jianqiao; Mou, Daixiang; He, Junfeng; Zhao, Lin; Wu, Yue; Liu, Guodong; Dong, Xiaoli; He, Shaolong; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Xiaoyang; Peng, Qinjun; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Shenjin; Yang, Feng; Chen, Chuangtian; Xu, Zuyan; Lee, T K; Zhou, X J

    2013-01-01

    The parent compound of the copper-oxide high-temperature superconductors is a Mott insulator. Superconductivity is realized by doping an appropriate amount of charge carriers. How a Mott insulator transforms into a superconductor is crucial in understanding the unusual physical properties of high-temperature superconductors and the superconductivity mechanism. Here we report high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurement on heavily underdoped Bi₂Sr₂-xLaxCuO(₆+δ) system. The electronic structure of the lightly doped samples exhibit a number of characteristics: existence of an energy gap along the nodal direction, d-wave-like anisotropic energy gap along the underlying Fermi surface, and coexistence of a coherence peak and a broad hump in the photoemission spectra. Our results reveal a clear insulator-superconductor transition at a critical doping level of ~0.10 where the nodal energy gap approaches zero, the three-dimensional antiferromagnetic order disappears, and superconductivity starts to emerge. These observations clearly signal a close connection between the nodal gap, antiferromagnetism and superconductivity.

  5. Superconducting Cable

    DOEpatents

    Hughey, Raburn L.; Sinha, Uday K.; Reece, David S.; Muller, Albert C.

    2005-07-22

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  6. Superconducting Cable

    DOEpatents

    Hughey, Raburn L.; Sinha, Uday K.; Reece, David S.; Muller, Albert C.

    2005-03-08

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  7. Free energy gap laws for the pulse-induced and stationary fluorescence quenching by reversible charge transfer in polar solutions.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Svetlana S; Burshtein, Anatoly I

    2011-01-21

    The Stern-Volmer constants for either pulse-induced or stationary fluorescence being quenched by a contact charge transfer are calculated and their free energy dependencies (the free energy gap laws) are specified. The reversibility of charge transfer is taken into account as well as spin conversion in radical ion pairs, followed by their recombination in either singlet or triplet neutral products. The natural decay of triplets as well as their impurity quenching by ionization are accounted for when estimating the fluorescence quantum yield and its free energy dependence.

  8. Athermal Energy Loss from X-rays Deposited in Thin Superconducting Films on Solid Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozorezov, Alexander G.; Lambert, Colin J.; Bandler, Simon R.; Balvin, Manuel A.; Busch, Sarah E.; Sagler, Peter N.; Porst, Jan-Patrick; Smith, Stephen J.; Stevenson, Thomas R.; Sadleir, John E.

    2013-01-01

    When energy is deposited in a thin-film cryogenic detector, such as from the absorption of an X-ray, an important feature that determines the energy resolution is the amount of athermal energy that can be lost to the heat bath prior to the elementary excitation systems coming into thermal equilibrium. This form of energy loss will be position-dependent and therefore can limit the detector energy resolution. An understanding of the physical processes that occur when elementary excitations are generated in metal films on dielectric substrates is important for the design and optimization of a number of different types of low temperature detector. We have measured the total energy loss in one relatively simple geometry that allows us to study these processes and compare measurements with calculation based upon a model for the various di.erent processes. We have modeled the athermal phonon energy loss in this device by finding an evolving phonon distribution function that solves the system of kinetic equations for the interacting system of electrons and phonons. Using measurements of device parameters such as the Debye energy and the thermal di.usivity we have calculated the expected energy loss from this detector geometry, and also the position-dependent variation of this loss. We have also calculated the predicted impact on measured spectral line-shapes, and shown that they agree well with measurements. In addition, we have tested this model by using it to predict the performance of a number of other types of detector with di.erent geometries, where good agreement is also found.

  9. Terahertz Mixing Characteristics of NbN Superconducting Tunnel Junctions and Related Astronomical Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.

    2010-01-01

    High-sensitivity superconducting SIS (superconductor-insulator-superconductor) mixers are playing an increasingly important role in the terahertz (THz) astronomical observation, which is an emerging research frontier in modern astrophysics. Superconducting SIS mixers with niobium (Nb) tunnel junctions have reached a sensitivity close to the quantum limit, but have a frequency limit about 0.7 THz (i.e., gap frequency of Nb tunnel junctions). Beyond this frequency Nb superconducting films will absorb energetic photons (i.e., energy loss) to break Cooper pairs, thereby resulting in significant degradation of the mixer performance. Therefore, it is of particular interest to develop THz superconducting SIS mixers incorporating tunnel junctions with a larger energy gap. Niobium-nitride (NbN) superconducting tunnel junctions have been long known for their large energy gap, almost double that of Nb ones. With the introduction of epitaxially grown NbN films, the fabrication technology of NbN superconducting tunnel junctions has been considerably improved in the recent years. Nevertheless, their performances are still not as good as Nb ones, and furthermore they are not yet demonstrated in real astronomical applications. Given the facts mentioned above, in this paper we systematically study the quantum mixing behaviors of NbN superconducting tunnel junctions in the THz regime and demonstrate an astronomical testing observation with a 0.5 THz superconducting SIS mixer developed with NbN tunnel junctions. The main results of this study include: (1) successful design and fabrication of a 0.4˜0.6 THz waveguide mixing circuit with the high-dielectric-constant MgO substrate; (2) successful fabrication of NbN superconducting tunnel junctions with the gap voltage reaching 5.6 mV and the quality factor as high as 15; (3) demonstration of a 0.5 THz waveguide NbN superconducting SIS mixer with a measured receiver noise temperature (no correction) as low as five times the quantum limit

  10. Superconducting linacs: some recent developments

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    The paper is a review of superconducting linacs that are of interest for heavy-ion acceleration. Most of the paper is concerned with energy boosters for projectiles from tandem electrostatic accelerators, the only application for which superconducting linacs are now used for heavy-ion acceleration. There is also a brief discussion of the concept of a superconducting injector linac being developed as a replacement of the tandem in a multi-stage acceleration system. Throughout, the emphasis is on the technology of the superconducting linac, including some attention to the relationships between resonator design parameters and accelerator performance characteristics. 21 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. ARPES Studies of Cuprate Fermiology: Superconductivity, Pseudogap and Quasiparticle Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Vishik, Inna

    2011-06-23

    We present angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies of the cuprate high-temperature superconductors which elucidate the relation between superconductivity and the pseudogap and highlight low-energy quasiparticle dynamics in the superconducting state. Our experiments suggest that the pseudogap and superconducting gap represent distinct states, which coexist below T{sub c}. Studies on Bi-2212 demonstrate that the near-nodal and near-antinodal regions behave differently as a function of temperature and doping, implying that different orders dominate in different momentum-space regions. However, the ubiquity of sharp quasiparticles all around the Fermi surface in Bi-2212 indicates that superconductivity extends into the momentum-space region dominated by the pseudogap, revealing subtlety in this dichotomy. In Bi-2201, the temperature dependence of antinodal spectra reveals particle-hole asymmetry and anomalous spectral broadening, which may constrain the explanation for the pseudogap. Recognizing that electron-boson coupling is an important aspect of cuprate physics, we close with a discussion of the multiple 'kinks' in the nodal dispersion. Understanding these may be important to establishing which excitations are important to superconductivity.

  12. Superconductivity in two-dimensional disordered Dirac semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Zhao, Peng-Lu; Wang, Jing-Rong; Liu, Guo-Zhu

    2017-02-01

    In two-dimensional Dirac semimetals, Cooper pairing instability occurs only when the attractive interaction strength |u | is larger than some critical value | uc| because the density of states vanishes at Dirac points. Disorders enhance the low-energy density of states but meanwhile shorten the lifetime of fermions, which tend to promote and suppress superconductivity, respectively. To determine which of the two competing effects wins, we study the interplay of Cooper pairing interaction and disorder scattering by means of renormalization group method. We consider three types of disorders, including random mass, random gauge potential, and random chemical potential, and show that the first two suppress superconductivity. In particular, the critical BCS coupling | uc| is increased to certain larger value if the system contains only random mass or random gauge potential, which makes the onset of superconductivity more difficult. In the case of random chemical potential, the effective disorder parameter flows to the strong coupling regime, where the perturbation expansion breaks down and cannot provide a clear answer concerning the fate of superconductivity. When different types of disorder coexist in one system, their strength parameters all flow to strong couplings. In the strong coupling regime, the perturbative renormalization group method becomes invalid, and one needs to employ other methods to treat the disorder effects. We perform a simple gap equation analysis of the impact of random chemical potential on superconductivity by using the Abrikosov-Gorkov diagrammatic approach, and also briefly discuss the possible generalization of this approach.

  13. Korea's developmental program for superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Gye-Won; Won, Dong-Yeon; Kuk, Il-Hyun; Park, Jong-Chul

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity research in Korea was firstly carried out in the late 70's by a research group in Seoul National University (SNU), who fabricated a small scale superconducting magnetic energy storage system under the financial support from Korea Electric Power Company (KEPCO). But a few researchers were involved in superconductivity research until the oxide high Tc superconductor was discovered by Bednorz and Mueller. After the discovery of YBaCuO superconductor operating above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77 K)(exp 2), Korean Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) sponsored a special fund for the high Tc superconductivity research to universities and national research institutes by recognizing its importance. Scientists engaged in this project organized 'High Temperature Superconductivity Research Association (HITSRA)' for effective conducting of research. Its major functions are to coordinate research activities on high Tc superconductivity and organize the workshop for active exchange of information. During last seven years the major superconductivity research has been carried out through the coordination of HITSRA. The major parts of the Korea's superconductivity research program were related to high temperature superconductor and only a few groups were carrying out research on conventional superconductor technology, and Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI) have led this research. In this talk, the current status and future plans of superconductivity research in Korea will be reviewed based on the results presented in interim meeting of HITSRA, April 1-2, 1994. Taejeon, as well as the research activity of KAERI.

  14. Empirical expression for the composition and temperature dependence of the energy gap in InAlSb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Sun, Weiguo; Lv, Yanqiu

    2017-03-01

    An empirical expression for the energy bandgap as a function of alloy composition x and temperature for In1-xAlxSb was reported. The In1-xAlxSb epitaxial layers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on InSb(1 0 0) substrate, utilizing a p+-p+-n-n+ structure. High resolution X-ray diffraction was used to characterize the epitaxial layers. The Al composition of 2.8% was obtained by assuming the Bragg's formula and Vegard's law. Spectral response measurement of the diodes has been employed to investigate the temperature dependence of the band gap of In1-xAlxSb alloys in the range between 77 K and 260 K. The calculated results for energy gap of InAlSb were in good agreement with the available data and our experimental observation.

  15. Fast-cycling superconducting synchrotrons and possible path to the future of US experimental high-energy particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, Henryk; /Fermilab

    2008-02-01

    The authors outline primary physics motivation, present proposed new arrangement for Fermilab accelerator complex, and then discuss possible long-range application of fast-cycling superconducting synchrotrons at Fermilab.

  16. Edge effects on band gap energy in bilayer 2H-MoS2 under uniaxial strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Liang; Wang, Jin; Namburu, Raju; O'Regan, Terrance P.; Dubey, Madan; Dongare, Avinash M.

    2015-06-01

    The potential of ultrathin MoS2 nanostructures for applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices requires a fundamental understanding in their electronic structure as a function of strain. Previous experimental and theoretical studies assume that an identical strain and/or stress state is always maintained in the top and bottom layers of a bilayer MoS2 film. In this study, a bilayer MoS2 supercell is constructed differently from the prototypical unit cell in order to investigate the layer-dependent electronic band gap energy in a bilayer MoS2 film under uniaxial mechanical deformations. The supercell contains an MoS2 bottom layer and a relatively narrower top layer (nanoribbon with free edges) as a simplified model to simulate the as-grown bilayer MoS2 flakes with free edges observed experimentally. Our results show that the two layers have different band gap energies under a tensile uniaxial strain, although they remain mutually interacting by van der Waals interactions. The deviation in their band gap energies grows from 0 to 0.42 eV as the uniaxial strain increases from 0% to 6% under both uniaxial strain and stress conditions. The deviation, however, disappears if a compressive uniaxial strain is applied. These results demonstrate that tensile uniaxial strains applied to bilayer MoS2 films can result in distinct band gap energies in the bilayer structures. Such variations need to be accounted for when analyzing strain effects on electronic properties of bilayer or multilayered 2D materials using experimental methods or in continuum models.

  17. Onset of superconductivity in ultrathin granular metal films

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, H. M.; Haviland, D. B.; Orr, B. G.; Goldman, A. M.

    1989-07-01

    The evolution of superconductivity in ultrathin films of Sn, Pb, Ga, Al,and In has been examined as a function of thickness and temperature. The filmswere grown in increments by condensation from the vapor onto substrates held attemperatures below 18 K. For each metal, global superconductivity or zeroelectrical resistance was found when the normal-state sheet resistance/ital R//sub /ital N// fell below a value close to /ital h//4/ital e//sup 2/, or 6.45k/Omega//(spec. char. missing), an observation uncorrelated with either structural ormaterial parameters such as thickness or transition temperature. Prior evidenceof superconductivity with nonzero resistance, local superconductivity, wasfound at earlier stages of film growth. All evidences of superconductingbehavior were observed at temperatures close to the bulk transition temperaturebeginning in the range of thicknesses for which normal-state resistivities weregreater than 200 /mu//Omega/-cm and were rapidly changing with thickness. Thisimplies that the films consisted of fully superconducting grains connected bytunneling junctions. The strong disorder represented by a broad distribution ofjunction parameters can be renormalized into weak disorder. Thus theoreticalcalculations based on regular arrays of superconducting sites coupled by(Josephson) junctions appear to be relevant. The extreme thinness of the filmsimplies very small junction capacitances leading to large quantum fluctuationsof the phase differences of their superconducting order parameters. Two classesof theories explaining a nearly universal resistance threshold forsuperconductivity have emerged. Both classes involve the quenching of thesequantum fluctuations. In the limit of very small junction capacitances thethreshold occurs at resistance values near /ital h//4/ital e//sup 2/, and isessentially independent of the capacitance and the energy gap, in goodagreement with the experimental data.

  18. Understanding Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) technology, applications, and economics, for end-use workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraro, R.J.; McConnell, B.W.

    1993-06-01

    The overall objective of this project was to determine the state-of-the-art and to what extent existing SMES is a viable option in meeting the needs of utilities and their customers for improving electric service power quality. By defining and analyzing SMES electrical/mechanical performance characteristics, and comparing SMES application benefits with competitive stored energy systems, industry will be able to determine SMES unique applications and potential market penetration. Building on this information base, it would also be possible to evaluate the impact of high temperature superconductors (77 K and 20-35 K) on SMES technology applications. The authors of this report constructed a network of industry contacts and research consultants that were used to collect, update, and analyze ongoing SMES R&D and marketing activities in industries, utilities, and equipment manufacturers. These key resources were utilized to assemble performance characteristics on existing SMES, battery, capacitor, flywheel, and high temperature superconductor (HTS) stored energy technologies. From this information, preliminary stored energy system comparisons were accomplished. In this way, the electric load needs would be readily comparable to the potential solutions and applications offered by each aforementioned energy storage technology.

  19. Effects of low-lying excitations on ground-state energy and energy gap of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model in a transverse field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Yang Wei

    2016-04-01

    We present an extensive numerical study of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model in a transverse field. Recent numerical studies of quantum spin glasses have focused on exact diagonalization of the full Hamiltonian for small systems (≈20 spins). However, such exact numerical treatments are difficult to apply on larger systems. We propose making an approximation by using only a subspace of the full Hilbert space spanned by low-lying excitations consisting of one-spin-flipped and two-spin-flipped states. The approximation procedure is carried out within the theoretical framework of the Hartree-Fock approximation and configuration interaction. Although not exact, our approach allows us to study larger system sizes comparable to that achievable by state-of-the-art quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We calculate two quantities of interest due to recent advances in quantum annealing, the ground-state energy and the energy gap between the ground and first excited states. For the energy gap, we derive a formula that enables it to be calculated using just the ground-state wave function, thereby circumventing the need to diagonalize the Hamiltonian. We calculate the scalings of the energy gap and the leading correction to the extensive part of the ground-state energy with system size, which are difficult to obtain with current methods.

  20. Precise Determination of the Direct-Indirect Band Gap Energy Crossover In AlxGa1-xAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluegel, Brian; Beaton, Daniel; Alberi, Kirstin; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2014-03-01

    AlxGa1-xAs is a technologically important semiconductor material system for optoelectronic applications due to its type I band alignment with GaAs under nearly lattice-matched conditions. Heterostructure design often relies on exactly controlling the relative positions of the Γ and X conduction band edges, yet despite over three decades of research on this alloy, the precise energy and composition of the direct-indirect band gap crossover is still not well resolved. We report the results of our most recent investigation of AlxGa1-xAs (0.28 < x<0.42) epitaxial films, in which the observation of concurrent photoluminescence (PL) emission peaks from the direct and indirect band gaps combined with time-resolved PL information yields a precise determination of the direct-indirect band gap crossover energy and composition. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under contract DE-AC36-08GO28308. Acknowledgement: the samples were provided by John Reno from Sandia National Laboratory.

  1. Superconducting Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    After working with Lewis Research Center and Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Superconducting Technologies, Inc. (STI) adapted NASA requirements and refined its own standard production recipe. STI uses high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials in its basic products: high quality thin films, circuits and components. Applications include microwave circuits for radar to reduce interference.

  2. UH-FLUX: Compact, Energy Efficient Superconducting Asymmetric Energy Recovery LINAC for Ultra-high Fluxes of X-ray and THz Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Konoplev, Ivan; Ainsworth, Robert; Burt, Graeme; Seryi, Andrei

    2016-06-01

    The conventional ERLs have limited peak beam current because increasing the beam charge and repetition rate leads to appearance of the beam break-up instabilities. At this stage the highest current, from the SRF ERL, is around 300 mA. A single-turn (the beam will be transported through the accelerating section, interaction point and deceleration section of the AERL only once) Asymmetric Energy Recovery LINAC (AERL) is proposed. The RF cells in different sections of the cavity are tuned in such a way that only operating mode is uniform inside all of the cells. The AERL will drive the electron beams with typical energies of 10 - 30 MeV and peak currents above 1 A, enabling the generation of high flux UV/X-rays and high power coherent THz radiation. We aim to build a copper prototype of the RF cavity for a compact AERL to study its EM properties. The final goal is to build AERL based on the superconducting RF cavity. Preliminary design for AERL's cavity has been developed and will be presented. The results of numerical and analytical models and the next steps toward the AERL operation will also be discussed.

  3. Superconducting-gap symmetry study using a/c boundary Josephson junctions in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} films

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimaru, Y.; Wen, J.; Koshizuka, N.; Enomoto, Y.

    1997-05-01

    We have investigated gap symmetry of high-T{sub c} superconductors using Josephson junctions formed along a boundary of an a-axis-oriented YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} (YBCO) grain surrounded by c-axis-oriented YBCO grains (a/c boundary). There are two types of a/c boundary junctions; one is the boundary between (001) of a-axis-oriented grains and (100) of c-axis-oriented grains, and the other is the boundary between (001) of a-axis-oriented grains and (110) of c-axis-oriented grains. TEM observation shows clean, sharp, and nearly single-facet interface along the grain boundaries in both types. In the case of the (100)-(001) type a/c boundary junction, typical resistively shunted junction (RSJ)-type I-V curves, Shapiro steps under microwave irradiation, and Fraunhofer-like diffraction pattern of I{sub c} under magnetic field are observed, indicating that the boundary works as a Josephson junction. In the case of the (110)-(001)-type a/c boundary junction, typical RSJ type I-V curves and Shapiro steps under microwave irradiation are also observed. However, the diffraction pattern of I{sub c} under magnetic field has the minimum value at zero magnetic field. This property is analogous to one observed for a corner junction which is formed between Pb and YBCO. These results show that the (110) of YBCO has a phase difference of {pi} and d{sub x{sup 2}{minus}y{sup 2}} superconducting-gap symmetry is in CuO{sub 2} planes of YBCO. But, the (001) of YBCO has no phase difference of {pi} in spite of the existence of d-wave symmetry in YBCO. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Superconducting structure

    DOEpatents

    Kwon, Chuhee; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2003-04-01

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  5. Superconducting Structure

    DOEpatents

    Kwon, Chuhee; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2005-09-13

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  6. Low-temperature magnetothermal transport investigation of a Ni-based superconductor BaNi2As2: evidence for fully gapped superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Kurita, N; Ronning, F; Tokiwa, Y; Bauer, E D; Subedi, A; Singh, D J; Thompson, J D; Movshovich, R

    2009-04-10

    We have performed low-temperature specific heat and thermal conductivity measurements of the Ni-based superconductor BaNi2As2 (T{c}=0.7 K) in a magnetic field. In a zero field, thermal conductivity shows T-linear behavior in the normal state and exhibits a BCS-like exponential decrease below T{c}. The field dependence of the residual thermal conductivity extrapolated to zero temperature is indicative of a fully gapped superconductor. This conclusion is supported by the analysis of the specific heat data, which are well fit by the BCS temperature dependence from T{c} down to the lowest temperature of 0.1 K.

  7. Superconducting nanostructured materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Metlushko, V.

    1998-07-13

    Within the last year it has been realized that the remarkable properties of superconducting thin films containing a periodic array of defects (such as sub-micron sized holes) offer a new route for developing a novel superconducting materials based on precise control of microstructure by modern photolithography. A superconductor is a material which, when cooled below a certain temperature, loses all resistance to electricity. This means that superconducting materials can carry large electrical currents without any energy loss--but there are limits to how much current can flow before superconductivity is destroyed. The current at which superconductivity breaks down is called the critical current. The value of the critical current is determined by the balance of Lorentz forces and pinning forces acting on the flux lines in the superconductor. Lorentz forces proportional to the current flow tend to drive the flux lines into motion, which dissipates energy and destroys zero resistance. Pinning forces created by isolated defects in the microstructure oppose flux line motion and increase the critical current. Many kinds of artificial pinning centers have been proposed and developed to increase critical current performance, ranging from dispersal of small non-superconducting second phases to creation of defects by proton, neutron or heavy ion irradiation. In all of these methods, the pinning centers are randomly distributed over the superconducting material, causing them to operate well below their maximum efficiency. We are overcome this drawback by creating pinning centers in aperiodic lattice (see Fig 1) so that each pin site interacts strongly with only one or a few flux lines.

  8. Nodeless pairing in superconducting copper-oxide monolayer films on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ

    DOE PAGES

    Zhong, Yong; Wang, Yang; Han, Sha; ...

    2016-07-12

    We report that the pairing mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates remains the biggest unresolved mystery in condensed matter physics. To solve the problem, one of the most effective approaches is to investigate directly the superconducting CuO2 layers. Here, by growing CuO2 monolayer films on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ substrates, we identify two distinct and spatially separated energy gaps centered at the Fermi energy, a smaller U-like gap and a larger V-like gap on the films, and study their interactions with alien atoms by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The newly discovered U-like gap exhibits strong phase coherence and is immune to scattering bymore » K, Cs and Ag atoms, suggesting its nature as a nodeless superconducting gap in the CuO2 layers, whereas the V-like gap agrees with the well-known pseudogap state in the underdoped regime. In conclusion, our results support an s-wave superconductivity in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ, which, we propose, originates from the modulation-doping resultant two-dimensional hole liquid confined in the CuO2 layers.« less

  9. Executive summary of NIH workshop on the Use and Biology of Energy Drinks: Current Knowledge and Critical Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Sorkin, Barbara C; Camp, Kathryn M; Haggans, Carol J; Deuster, Patricia A; Haverkos, Lynne; Maruvada, Padma; Witt, Ellen; Coates, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    Sales of energy drinks in the United States reached $12.5 billion in 2012. Emergency department visits related to consumption of these products have increased sharply, and while these numbers remain small relative to product sales, they raise important questions regarding biological and behavioral effects. Although some common ingredients of energy drinks have been extensively studied (e.g., caffeine, B vitamins, sugars, inositol), data on other ingredients (e.g., taurine) are limited. Summarized here are data presented elsewhere in this issue on the prevalence and patterns of caffeine-containing energy drink use, the effects of these products on alertness, fatigue, cognitive functions, sleep, mood, homeostasis, as well as on exercise physiology and metabolism, and the biological mechanisms mediating the observed effects. There are substantial data on the effects of some energy drink ingredients, such as caffeine and sugars, on many of these outcomes; however, even for these ingredients many controversies and gaps remain, and data on other ingredients in caffeine-containing energy drinks, and on ingredient interactions, are sparse. This summary concludes with a discussion of critical gaps in the data and potential next steps. PMID:25293538

  10. Executive summary of NIH workshop on the Use and Biology of Energy Drinks: Current Knowledge and Critical Gaps.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, Barbara C; Camp, Kathryn M; Haggans, Carol J; Deuster, Patricia A; Haverkos, Lynne; Maruvada, Padma; Witt, Ellen; Coates, Paul M

    2014-10-01

    Sales of energy drinks in the United States reached $12.5 billion in 2012. Emergency department visits related to consumption of these products have increased sharply, and while these numbers remain small relative to product sales, they raise important questions regarding biological and behavioral effects. Although some common ingredients of energy drinks have been extensively studied (e.g., caffeine, B vitamins, sugars, inositol), data on other ingredients (e.g., taurine) are limited. Summarized here are data presented elsewhere in this issue on the prevalence and patterns of caffeine-containing energy drink use, the effects of these products on alertness, fatigue, cognitive functions, sleep, mood, homeostasis, as well as on exercise physiology and metabolism, and the biological mechanisms mediating the observed effects. There are substantial data on the effects of some energy drink ingredients, such as caffeine and sugars, on many of these outcomes; however, even for these ingredients many controversies and gaps remain, and data on other ingredients in caffeine-containing energy drinks, and on ingredient interactions, are sparse. This summary concludes with a discussion of critical gaps in the data and potential next steps.

  11. Anisotropic superconductivity driven by kinematic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. A.

    2000-11-01

    We have analysed the effect of kinematic pairing on the symmetry of superconducting order parameter for a square lattice in the frame of the strongly correlated Hubbard model. It is argued that in the first perturbation order the kinematic interaction renormalizes the Hubbard-I dispersions and provides at low doping the mixed singlet (s + s*)-wave superconductivity, giving way at higher doping to the triplet p-wave superconductivity. The obtained phase diagram depends only on the hopping integral parameter. The influence of the Coulomb repulsion on the kinematic superconducting pairing has been estimated. The (s + s*)-wave gap and the thermodynamic critical magnetic field have been derived.

  12. s- AND d-WAVE SYMMETRIES IN NONADIABATIC THEORY OF SUPERCONDUCTIVITY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paci, Paola; Grimaldi, Claudio; Pietronero, Luciano; Cappelluti, Emmanuele

    High-Tc superconductors have Fermi energies EF much smaller than conventional metals comparable to phonon frequencies. In such a situation nonadiabatic effects are important. A generalization of Eliashberg theory in the nonadiabatic regime has previously been shown to reproduce some anomalous features of the high-Tc superconductors as for instance the enhancement of Tc or the isotopic effects on Tc and m*. In this contribution we address the issue of the symmetry of the gap in the context of nonadiabatic superconductivity. We show that vertex corrections have a momentum structure which favours d-wave superconductivity when forward scattering is predominant. An additional increase of Tc is also found.

  13. Coexistence of antiferromagnetism and d+id superconducting correlations in the graphene bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanović, M. V.; Predin, S.

    2012-11-01

    We discuss the t-J-U model on a honeycomb monolayer that has the same low-energy description of the kinetic term as the graphene bilayer, and in particular study coexistence of antiferromagnetism and superconducting correlations that originate from Cooper pairs without phase coherence. We show that the model is relevant for the description of the graphene bilayer and that the presence of the d+id superconducting correlations with antiferromagnetism can lead to quadratic dependence in small magnetic fields of the gap of the effective monolayer consistent with the transport measurements of Velasco on the graphene bilayer.

  14. Pair-breaking effects by parallel magnetic field in electric-field-induced surface superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabeta, Masahiro; Tanaka, Kenta K.; Onari, Seiichiro; Ichioka, Masanori

    2016-11-01

    We study paramagnetic pair-breaking in electric-field-induced surface superconductivity, when magnetic field is applied parallel to the surface. The calculation is performed by Bogoliubov-de Gennes theory with s-wave pairing, including the screening effect of electric fields by the induced carriers near the surface. Due to the Zeeman shift by applied fields, electronic states at higher-level sub-bands become normal-state-like. Therefore, the magnetic field dependence of Fermi-energy density of states reflects the multi-gap structure in the surface superconductivity.

  15. Universal quenching of the superconducting state of two-dimensional nanosize Pb-island structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungdae; Fiete, Gregory A.; Nam, Hyoungdo; MacDonald, A. H.; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2011-07-01

    We systematically address superconductivity of Pb nano-islands with different thicknesses and lateral sizes via a scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS). Reduction of the superconducting gap (Δ) is observed even when the island is larger than the bulk coherence length (ξ) and becomes very fast below ˜50-nm lateral size. The suppression of Δ with size depends to a good approximation only on the volume of the island and is independent of its shape. Theoretical analysis indicates that the universal quenching behavior is primarily manifested by the mean number of electronic orbitals within the pairing energy window.

  16. Scoping study for compact high-field superconducting net energy tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumgaard, R. T.; Greenwald, M.; Freidberg, J. P.; Wolfe, S. M.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Brunner, D.; Sorbom, B. N.; Whyte, D. G.

    2016-10-01

    The continued development and commercialization of high temperature superconductors (HTS) may enable the construction of compact, net-energy tokamaks. HTS, in contrast to present generation low temperature superconductors, offers improved performance in high magnetic fields, higher current density, stronger materials, higher temperature operation, and simplified assembly. Using HTS along with community-consensus confinement physics (H98 =1) may make it possible to achieve net-energy (Q>1) or burning plasma conditions (Q>5) in DIII-D or ASDEX-U sized, conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. It is shown that, by operating at high plasma current and density enabled by the high magnetic field (B>10T), the required triple products may be achieved at plasma volumes under 20m3, major radii under 2m, with external heating powers under 40MW. This is at the scale of existing devices operated by laboratories, universities and companies. The trade-offs in the core heating, divertor heat exhaust, sustainment, stability, and proximity to known plasma physics limits are discussed in the context of the present tokamak experience base and the requirements for future devices. The resulting HTS-based design space is compared and contrasted to previous studies on high-field copper experiments with similar missions. The physics exploration conducted with such HTS devices could decrease the real and perceived risks of ITER exploitation, and aid in quickly developing commercially-applicable tokamak pilot plants and reactors.

  17. Advanced superconducting power conditioning system with SMES for effective use of renewable energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamajima, T.; Tsuda, M.; Miyagi, D.; Amata, H.; Iwasaki, T.; Son, K.; Atomura, N.; Shintomi, T.; Makida, Y.; Takao, T.; Munakata, K.; Kajiwara, M.

    Since it is an urgent issue to reduce the global Carbon-dioxide in the world, renewable energy should be supplied as a large amount of the electric power. However, if a large amount of fluctuating renewable energy becomes more than adjustable amount of a utility grid capacity, instabilities such as frequency deviation might occur. We propose a system that is composed of SMES and FC-H2-Electrolyzer and also installed adjacent to Liquid Hydrogen station to cool down the SMES. Since the SMES has potentials of quick response and large I/O power, and Fuel Cell has potentials of slow response and steady power supplied from a large amount of hydrogen, we combine both storage devices and apply them to suppress the fluctuating power. We convert the fluctuating power to the constant power by using a developed prediction technology of Kalman filter to predict a trend of the fluctuating power. While the trend power should be supplied by FC or absorbed by the electrolyzer to produce hydrogen, the power difference between the renewable power and the trend power should be stored by the SMES. We simulate the power balance and analyze the required SMES capacity, design the concept of the SMES, and propose an operation algorithm for the SMES to estimate the electric efficiency of the system. It is found that the electric efficiency of the ASPCS can become greater than that of a pumped hydro-machine.

  18. Superconductivity at very low density: The case of strontium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhman, Jonathan; Lee, Patrick A.

    2016-12-01

    Doped strontium titanate becomes superconducting at a density as low as n =5 ×1017cm-3 , where the Fermi energy is orders of magnitude smaller than the longitudinal-optical-phonon frequencies. In this limit, the only optical mode with a frequency which is smaller than the Fermi energy is the plasmon. In contrast to metals, the interaction strength is weak due to screening by the crystal, which allows the construction of a controllable theory of plasmon superconductivity. We show that plasma mediated pairing alone can account for the observed transition temperatures only if the dielectric screening by the crystal is reduced in the slightly doped samples compared with the insulating ones. We also discuss unique features of the plasmon mechanism, which appear in the tunneling density of states above the gap.

  19. Theory of Laser-Controlled Competing Superconducting and Charge Orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentef, M. A.; Tokuno, A.; Georges, A.; Kollath, C.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the nonequilibrium dynamics of competing coexisting superconducting (SC) and charge-density wave (CDW) orders in an attractive Hubbard model. A time-periodic laser field A →(t ) lifts the SC-CDW degeneracy, since the CDW couples linearly to the field (A →), whereas SC couples in second order (A→2) due to gauge invariance. This leads to a striking resonance: When the photon energy is red detuned compared to the equilibrium single-particle energy gap, CDW is enhanced and SC is suppressed, while this behavior is reversed for blue detuning. Both orders oscillate with an emergent slow frequency, which is controlled by the small amplitude of a third induced order, namely η pairing, given by the commutator of the two primary orders. The induced η pairing is shown to control the enhancement and suppression of the dominant orders. Finally, we demonstrate that light-induced superconductivity is possible starting from a predominantly CDW initial state.

  20. Thickness-dependent dispersion parameters, energy gap and nonlinear refractive index of ZnSe thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, Deo; Shaaban, E.R.; Shapaan, M.; Mohamed, S.H.; Othman, A.A.; Verma, K.D.

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Combined experimental and theoretical researches on ZnSe Thin Films. • The film thickness and refractive index were determined using envelope method. • The absorption coefficient and the energy gap were calculated. • Dispersion parameters were determined using Wemple-DiDomenico relation. • The third order susceptibility and nonlinear refractive index were calculated. - Abstract: Zinc selenide (ZnSe) thin films with different thicknesses were evaporated onto glass substrates using the thermal evaporation technique. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed that both the film and powder have cubic zinc-blende structure. The fundamental optical parameters like absorption coefficient, extinction coefficient and band gap were evaluated in transparent region of transmittance and reflectance spectrum. The optical transition of the films was found to be allowed, where the energy gap increased from 2.576 to 2.702 eV with increasing film thickness. Also, the refractive index value increase with increasing film thickness. The refractive indices evaluated through envelope method were extrapolated by Cauchy dispersion relationship over the whole spectra range. Additionally, the dispersion of refractive index was determined in terms of Wemple-DiDomenico single oscillator model. Third order susceptibility and nonlinear refractive index were determined for different thickness of ZnSe thin films.

  1. Singlet-triplet energy gaps for diradicals from fractional-spin density-functional theory.

    PubMed

    Ess, Daniel H; Johnson, Erin R; Hu, Xiangqian; Yang, Weitao

    2011-01-13

    Open-shell singlet diradicals are difficult to model accurately within conventional Kohn-Sham (KS) density-functional theory (DFT). These methods are hampered by spin contamination because the KS determinant wave function is neither a pure spin state nor an eigenfunction of the S(2) operator. Here we present a theoretical foray for using single-reference closed-shell ground states to describe diradicals by fractional-spin DFT (FS-DFT). This approach allows direct, self-consistent calculation of electronic properties using the electron density corresponding to the proper spin eigenfunction. The resulting FS-DFT approach is benchmarked against diradical singlet-triplet gaps for atoms and small molecules. We have also applied FS-DFT to the singlet-triplet gaps of hydrocarbon polyacenes.

  2. Singlet-Triplet Energy Gaps for Diradicals from Fractional-Spin Density-Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ess, Daniel H.; Johnson, E. R.; Hu, Xiangqian; Yang, W. T.

    2010-12-09

    Open-shell singlet diradicals are difficult to model accurately within conventional Kohn-Sham (KS) density-functional theory (DFT). These methods are hampered by spin contamination because the KS determinant wave function is neither a pure spin state nor an eigenfunction of the S2 operator. Here we present a theoretical foray for using single-reference closed-shell ground states to describe diradicals by fractional-spin DFT (FS-DFT). This approach allows direct, self-consistent calculation of electronic properties using the electron density corresponding to the proper spin eigenfunction. The resulting FS-DFT approach is benchmarked against diradical singlet-triplet gaps for atoms and small molecules. We have also applied FS-DFT to the singlet-triplet gaps of hydrocarbon polyacenes.

  3. Electronic absorption spectra and energy gap studies of Er3+ ions in different chlorophosphate glasses.

    PubMed

    Ratnakaram, Y C; Reddy, A Viswanadha; Chakradhar, R P Sreekanth

    2002-06-01

    Spectroscopic properties of Er3+ ions in different chlorophosphate glasses 50P2O5-30Na2HPO4-19.8RCl (R = Li, Na, K, Ca and Pb) are studied. The direct and indirect optical band gaps (Eopt) and the various spectroscopic parameters (E1, E2, E3, and zeta4f and alpha) are reported. The oscillator strengths of the transitions in the absorption spectrum are parameterized in terms of three Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters (omega2, omega4 and omega6). These intensity parameters are used to predict the transition probabilities (A), radiative lifetimes (tauR), branching ratios (beta) and integrated cross sections (sigma) for stimulated emission. Attention has been paid to the trend of the intensity parameters over hypersensitive transitions and optical band gaps. The lifetimes and branching ratios of certain transitions are compared with other glass matrices.

  4. Band gap opening in strongly compressed diamond observed by x-ray energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gamboa, E. J.; Fletcher, L. B.; Lee, H. J.; MacDonald, M. J.; Zastrau, U.; Gauthier, M.; Gericke, D. O.; Vorberger, J.; Granados, E.; Hastings, J. B.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-01-25

    The extraordinary mechanical and optical properties of diamond are the basis of numerous technical applications and make diamond anvil cells a premier device to explore the high-pressure behavior of materials. However, at applied pressures above a few hundred GPa, optical probing through the anvils becomes difficult because of the pressure-induced changes of the transmission and the excitation of a strong optical emission. Such features have been interpreted as the onset of a closure of the optical gap in diamond, and can significantly impair spectroscopy of the material inside the cell. In contrast, a comparable widening has been predicted for purely hydrostatic compressions, forming a basis for the presumed pressure stiffening of diamond and resilience to the eventual phase change to BC8. We here present the first experimental evidence of this effect at geo-planetary pressures, exceeding the highest ever reported hydrostatic compression of diamond by more than 200 GPa and any other measurement of the band gap by more than 350 GPa. We here apply laser driven-ablation to create a dynamic, high pressure state in a thin, synthetic diamond foil together with frequency-resolved x-ray scattering as a probe. The frequency shift of the inelastically scattered x-rays encodes the optical properties and, thus, the behavior of the band gap in the sample. Using the ultra-bright x-ray beam from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), we observe an increasing direct band gap in diamond up to a pressure of 370 GPa. This finding points to the enormous strains in the anvils and the impurities in natural Type Ia diamonds as the source of the observed closure of the optical window. Our results demonstrate that diamond remains an insulating solid to pressures approaching its limit strength.

  5. Development of Energy-Efficient Cryogenic Leads with High Temperature Superconducting Films on Ceramic Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, A. V.; Fedoseev, S. A.; Shcherbakova, O. V.; Golovchanskiy, I. A.; Zhou, S.; Dou, S. X.; Webber, R. J.; Mukhanov, O. A.; Yamashita, T.; Taylor, R.

    High temperature superconductor (HTS) material can be used for the implementation of high-speed low-heat conduction data links to transport digital data from 4 K superconductor integrated circuits to higher-temperature parts of computing systems. In this work, we present a conceptual design of energy efficient interface and results in fabricating such HTS leads. Initial calculations have shown that the microstrip line cable geometry for typical materials employed in production of HTS thin films can be a two-layered film for which the two layers of about 10 cm long are separated by an insulation layer with as low permittivity as possible. With this architecture in mind, the pulsed laser deposition process has been designed in a 45 cm diameter vacuum chamber to incorporate an oscillating sample holder with homogeneous substrate heating up to 900°C, while the laser plume is fixed. This design has allowed us to produce 200 nm to 500 nm thick, 7 cm to 10 cm long YBa2Cu3O7 thin films with the homogeneous critical temperature (Tc) of about 90 K. The critical current density (Jc) of the short samples obtained from the long sample is of (2 ± 1) × 1010 A/m2. Lines of 3-100 μm wide have been successfully patterned along the length of the samples in order to directly measure the Tc and Jc values over the entire length of the samples, as well as to attempt the structuring of multichannel data lead prototype.

  6. Coexistence of the spini-density-wave and superconductivity in the Ba1-xKxFe2As2

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Wei; Chen, H; Ren, Y; Qiu, Y; Liu, R; Wu, G H; Wu, T; Xie, Y L; Wang, F; Huang, Q; Chen, X H

    2008-01-01

    The relation between the spin-density-wave (SDW) and superconducting order is a central topic in current research on the FeAs-based high T{sub c} superconductors. Conflicting results exist in the LaFeAs(O,F)-class of materials, for which whether the SDW and superconductivity are mutually exclusive or they can coexist has not been settled. Here we show that for the (Ba,K)Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} system, the SDW and superconductivity can coexist in an extended range of compositions. The availability of single crystalline samples and high value of the energy gaps would make the materials a model system to investigate the high T{sub c} ferropnictide superconductivity.

  7. Bridging the Gap: The Role of DOD in Clean Energy Commercialization: DOD Installations as Living Laboratories

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-17

    clean energy technologies. Faced with the inextricable linkage between energy, security, environment, and economics, the DOD is positioned to play an...important role in the demonstration of new and emerging clean energy technologies, and also to become early first adopters of the technologies. Military

  8. Superconducting terahertz metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hou-tong; Singh, Ranjan; O' Hara, John F; Azad, Abul K; Trugman, Stuart A; Jia, Quanxi; Taylor, Antoinette J

    2010-01-01

    During the past ten years subwavelength metallic structures have enabled metamaterials exhibiting exotic physical properties that are not possible or difficult to realize using naturally occurring materials, This bottom-up metamaterial approach is particularly attractive in the terahertz (THz) frequency range, where the THz gap is inherently associated with the lack of materials with appropriate reponse. In fact THz metamaterial devices have accomplished unprecedented performance towards practical applications. In these devices, the key is to incorporate natural materials, e,g, semiconductors, as the metamaterial substrates or integration parts of metamaterial structures. The active or dynamic tunability of metamaterials is through the application of external stimuli such as temperature, photoexcitation, or electric field. to modify the capacitive gaps in split-ring resonators (SRRs), It becomes clear that we would not be able to do much on the metallic SRRs, i.e. the metal conductivity and therefore the inductance largely remain constant not affected by external stimuli. Recently, there has been increasing interest in superconducting metamaterials towards loss reduction. Significant Joule losses have often prevented resonant metal metamaterials from achieving proposed applications. particularly in the optical frequency range. At low temperatures, superconducting materials possess superior conductivity than metals at frequencies up to THz. and therefore it is expected that superconducting melamaterials will have a lower loss than metal metamatetials, More interestingly, superconductors exhibit tunable complex conductivity over a wide range of values through change of temperature and application of photoexcitation, electrical currents and magnetic fields. Therefore, we would expect correspondingly tunable metamaterials. which originate from the superconducting materials composing the metamaterial, in contrast to tuning the metamaterial embedded environment.

  9. Free-Energy-Gap Law for Ultrafast Charge Recombination of Ion Pairs Formed by Intramolecular Photoinduced Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Nazarov, Alexey E; Malykhin, Roman; Ivanov, Anatoly I

    2017-01-26

    In this article, regularities of ultrafast charge recombination (CR) kinetics in photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer in polar solvents are studied. The kinetics of charge separation and ensuing ultrafast CR are simulated within the framework of the multichannel stochastic model. This model accounts for the reorganization of both the solvent and a number of intramolecular high-frequency vibrational modes. The solvent relaxation is described in terms of two relaxation modes. For ultrafast CR, the free-energy-gap law strongly depends on the parameters: the electronic coupling, reorganization energy of intramolecular high-frequency vibrational modes, and the vibrational and solvent relaxation times. The semilog dependence of the CR rate constant on the free-energy gap varies from a parabolic shape to a nearly linear one with increasing the electronic coupling and decreasing the vibrational relaxation time. The dynamic solvent effect in CR is predicted to be large in the area of strong exergonicity and small in the area of weak exergonicity. This regularity is opposite to that observed for the thermal reactions.

  10. Interfacial superconductivity in a bi-collinear antiferromagnetically ordered FeTe monolayer on a topological insulator.

    PubMed

    Manna, S; Kamlapure, A; Cornils, L; Hänke, T; Hedegaard, E M J; Bremholm, M; Iversen, B B; Hofmann, Ph; Wiebe, J; Wiesendanger, R

    2017-01-17

    The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in Fe-based compounds triggered numerous investigations on the interplay between superconductivity and magnetism, and on the enhancement of transition temperatures through interface effects. It is widely believed that the emergence of optimal superconductivity is intimately linked to the suppression of long-range antiferromagnetic (AFM) order, although the exact microscopic picture remains elusive because of the lack of atomically resolved data. Here we present spin-polarized scanning tunnelling spectroscopy of ultrathin FeTe1-xSex (x=0, 0.5) films on bulk topological insulators. Surprisingly, we find an energy gap at the Fermi level, indicating superconducting correlations up to Tc∼6 K for one unit cell FeTe grown on Bi2Te3, in contrast to the non-superconducting bulk FeTe. The gap spatially coexists with bi-collinear AFM order. This finding opens perspectives for theoretical studies of competing orders in Fe-based superconductors and for experimental investigations of exotic phases in superconducting layers on topological insulators.

  11. Interfacial superconductivity in a bi-collinear antiferromagnetically ordered FeTe monolayer on a topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, S.; Kamlapure, A.; Cornils, L.; Hänke, T.; Hedegaard, E. M. J.; Bremholm, M.; Iversen, B. B.; Hofmann, Ph.; Wiebe, J.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in Fe-based compounds triggered numerous investigations on the interplay between superconductivity and magnetism, and on the enhancement of transition temperatures through interface effects. It is widely believed that the emergence of optimal superconductivity is intimately linked to the suppression of long-range antiferromagnetic (AFM) order, although the exact microscopic picture remains elusive because of the lack of atomically resolved data. Here we present spin-polarized scanning tunnelling spectroscopy of ultrathin FeTe1-xSex (x=0, 0.5) films on bulk topological insulators. Surprisingly, we find an energy gap at the Fermi level, indicating superconducting correlations up to Tc~6 K for one unit cell FeTe grown on Bi2Te3, in contrast to the non-superconducting bulk FeTe. The gap spatially coexists with bi-collinear AFM order. This finding opens perspectives for theoretical studies of competing orders in Fe-based superconductors and for experimental investigations of exotic phases in superconducting layers on topological insulators.

  12. Interfacial superconductivity in a bi-collinear antiferromagnetically ordered FeTe monolayer on a topological insulator

    PubMed Central

    Manna, S.; Kamlapure, A.; Cornils, L.; Hänke, T.; Hedegaard, E. M. J.; Bremholm, M.; Iversen, B. B.; Hofmann, Ph.; Wiebe, J.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in Fe-based compounds triggered numerous investigations on the interplay between superconductivity and magnetism, and on the enhancement of transition temperatures through interface effects. It is widely believed that the emergence of optimal superconductivity is intimately linked to the suppression of long-range antiferromagnetic (AFM) order, although the exact microscopic picture remains elusive because of the lack of atomically resolved data. Here we present spin-polarized scanning tunnelling spectroscopy of ultrathin FeTe1−xSex (x=0, 0.5) films on bulk topological insulators. Surprisingly, we find an energy gap at the Fermi level, indicating superconducting correlations up to Tc∼6 K for one unit cell FeTe grown on Bi2Te3, in contrast to the non-superconducting bulk FeTe. The gap spatially coexists with bi-collinear AFM order. This finding opens perspectives for theoretical studies of competing orders in Fe-based superconductors and for experimental investigations of exotic phases in superconducting layers on topological insulators. PMID:28094258

  13. NLO vertex for a forward jet plus a rapidity gap at high energies

    DOE PAGES

    Hentschinski, Martin; Madrigal Martínez, José Daniel; Murdaca, Beatrice; ...

    2015-04-01

    Here we present the calculation of the forward jet vertex associated to a rapidity gap (coupling of a hard pomeron to the jet) in the BFKL formalism at next-to-leading order (NLO). Real emission contributions are computed via Lipatov’s effective action. The NLO jet vertex turns out to be finite within collinear factorization and allows, together with the NLO non-forward gluon Green’s function, to perform NLO studies of jet production in diffractive events (e.g. Mueller-Tang dijets).

  14. NLO vertex for a forward jet plus a rapidity gap at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Hentschinski, Martin; Madrigal Martínez, José Daniel; Murdaca, Beatrice; Vera, Agustín Sabio

    2015-04-10

    We present the calculation of the forward jet vertex associated to a rapidity gap (coupling of a hard pomeron to the jet) in the BFKL formalism at next-to-leading order (NLO). Real emission contributions are computed via Lipatov’s effective action. The NLO jet vertex turns out to be finite within collinear factorization and allows, together with the NLO non-forward gluon Green’s function, to perform NLO studies of jet production in diffractive events (e.g. Mueller-Tang dijets)

  15. Direct band gap measurement of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} thin films using high-resolution reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Sung; Lee, Hyung-Ik; Park, Jong-Bong; Ko, Dong-Su; Chung, JaeGwan; Kim, KiHong; Kim, Seong Heon; Yun, Dong-Jin; Ham, YongNam; Park, Gyeong Su; Song, Taewon; Lee, Dongho Nam, Junggyu; Kang, Hee Jae; Choi, Pyung-Ho; Choi, Byoung-Deog

    2015-06-29

    To investigate the band gap profile of Cu(In{sub 1−x},Ga{sub x})(Se{sub 1−y}S{sub y}){sub 2} of various compositions, we measured the band gap profile directly as a function of in-depth using high-resolution reflection energy loss spectroscopy (HR-REELS), which was compared with the band gap profile calculated based on the auger depth profile. The band gap profile is a double-graded band gap as a function of in-depth. The calculated band gap obtained from the auger depth profile seems to be larger than that by HR-REELS. Calculated band gaps are to measure the average band gap of the spatially different varying compositions with respect to considering its void fraction. But, the results obtained using HR-REELS are to be affected by the low band gap (i.e., out of void) rather than large one (i.e., near void). Our findings suggest an analytical method to directly determine the band gap profile as function of in-depth.

  16. A compact planar low-energy-gap molecule with a donor-acceptor-donor nature based on a bimetal dithiolene complex.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Mikihiro; Otsubo, Kazuya; Kato, Tatsuhisa; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2015-11-11

    We present the first report of a compact, planar and low-energy-gap molecule based on a π-conjugated bimetal system comprising a tetrathiooxalate (tto) skeleton. The observed low HOMO-LUMO energy gap (1.19 eV) is attributed to its donor-acceptor-donor (D-A-D) nature because the skeleton acts as an electron acceptor as well as a tiny and noninnocent bridging moiety.

  17. Generalized thermoelastic wave band gaps in phononic crystals without energy dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying; Yu, Kaiping; Li, Xiao; Zhou, Haotian

    2016-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the thermoelastic wave propagation in the phononic crystals in the context of Green-Nagdhi theory by taking thermoelastic coupling into account. The thermal field is assumed to be steady. Thermoelastic wave band structures of 3D and 2D are derived by using the plane wave expansion method. For the 2D problem, the anti-plane shear mode is not affected by the temperature difference. Thermoelastic wave bands of the in-plane x-y mode are calculated for lead/silicone rubber, aluminium/silicone rubber, and aurum/silicone rubber phononic crystals. The new findings in the numerical results indicate that the thermoelastic wave bands are composed of the pure elastic wave bands and the thermal wave bands, and that the thermal wave bands can serve as the low boundary of the first band gap when the filling ratio is low. In addition, for the lead/silicone rubber phononic crystals the effects of lattice type (square, rectangle, regular triangle, and hexagon) and inclusion shape (circle, oval, and square) on the normalized thermoelastic bandwidth and the upper/lower gap boundaries are analysed and discussed. It is concluded that their effects on the thermoelastic wave band structure are remarkable.

  18. Electronic characterization of defects in narrow gap semiconductors: Comparison of electronic energy levels and formation energies in mercury cadmium telluride, mercury zinc telluride, and mercury zinc selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, James D.; Li, Wei-Gang

    1995-03-01

    The project has evolved to that of using Green's functions to predict properties of deep defects in narrow gap materials. Deep defects are now defined as originating from short range potentials and are often located near the middle of the energy gap. They are important because they affect the lifetime of charge carriers and hence the switching time of transistors. We are now moving into the arena of predicting formation energies of deep defects. This will also allow us to make predictions about the relative concentrations of the defects that could be expected at a given temperature. The narrow gap materials mercury cadmium telluride (MCT), mercury zinc telluride (MZT), and mercury zinc selenide (MZS) are of interest to NASA because they have commercial value for infrared detecting materials, and because there is a good possibility that they can be grown better in a microgravity environment. The uniform growth of these crystals on earth is difficult because of convection (caused by solute depletion just ahead of the growing interface, and also due to thermal gradients). In general it is very difficult to grow crystals with both radial and axial homogeneity.

  19. Electronic characterization of defects in narrow gap semiconductors: Comparison of electronic energy levels and formation energies in mercury cadmium telluride, mercury zinc telluride, and mercury zinc selenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, James D.; Li, Wei-Gang

    1995-01-01

    The project has evolved to that of using Green's functions to predict properties of deep defects in narrow gap materials. Deep defects are now defined as originating from short range potentials and are often located near the middle of the energy gap. They are important because they affect the lifetime of charge carriers and hence the switching time of transistors. We are now moving into the arena of predicting formation energies of deep defects. This will also allow us to make predictions about the relative concentrations of the defects that could be expected at a given temperature. The narrow gap materials mercury cadmium telluride (MCT), mercury zinc telluride (MZT), and mercury zinc selenide (MZS) are of interest to NASA because they have commercial value for infrared detecting materials, and because there is a good possibility that they can be grown better in a microgravity environment. The uniform growth of these crystals on earth is difficult because of convection (caused by solute depletion just ahead of the growing interface, and also due to thermal gradients). In general it is very difficult to grow crystals with both radial and axial homogeneity.

  20. Anisotropic superconducting property studies of single crystal PbTaSe2.

    PubMed

    Sankar, Raman; Rao, G Narsinga; Muthuselvam, I Panneer; Chang, Tay-Rong; Jeng, H T; Murugan, G Senthil; Lee, Wei-Li; Chou, F C

    2017-03-08

    The anisotropic superconducting properties of PbTaSe2 single crystal is reported. Superconductivity with T c  =  3.83  ±  0.02 K has been characterized fully with electrical resistivity ρ(T), magnetic susceptibility χ(T), and specific heat C p (T) measurements using single crystal samples. The superconductivity is type-II with lower critical field H c1 and upper critical field H c2 of 65 and 450 Oe (H⊥  to the ab-plane), 140 and 1500 Oe (H|| to the ab-plane), respectively. These results indicate that the superconductivity of PbTaSe2 is anisotropic. The superconducting anisotropy, electron-phonon coupling λ ep, superconducting energy gap Δ0, and the specific heat jump ΔC/γT c at T c confirms that PbTaSe2 can be categorized as a bulk superconductor.

  1. Anisotropic superconducting property studies of single crystal PbTaSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar, Raman; Narsinga Rao, G.; Panneer Muthuselvam, I.; Chang, Tay-Rong; Jeng, H. T.; Senthil Murugan, G.; Lee, Wei-Li; Chou, F. C.

    2017-03-01

    The anisotropic superconducting properties of PbTaSe2 single crystal is reported. Superconductivity with T c  =  3.83  ±  0.02 K has been characterized fully with electrical resistivity ρ(T), magnetic susceptibility χ(T), and specific heat C p (T) measurements using single crystal samples. The superconductivity is type-II with lower critical field H c1 and upper critical field H c2 of 65 and 450 Oe (H⊥  to the ab-plane), 140 and 1500 Oe (H|| to the ab-plane), respectively. These results indicate that the superconductivity of PbTaSe2 is anisotropic. The superconducting anisotropy, electron-phonon coupling λ ep, superconducting energy gap Δ0, and the specific heat jump ΔC/γT c at T c confirms that PbTaSe2 can be categorized as a bulk superconductor.

  2. Making Superconducting Welds between Superconducting Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I.; Eom, Byeong Ho

    2008-01-01

    A technique for making superconducting joints between wires made of dissimilar superconducting metals has been devised. The technique is especially suitable for fabrication of superconducting circuits needed to support persistent electric currents in electromagnets in diverse cryogenic applications. Examples of such electromagnets include those in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and in superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). Sometimes, it is desirable to fabricate different parts of a persistent-current-supporting superconducting loop from different metals. For example, a sensory coil in a SQUID might be made of Pb, a Pb/Sn alloy, or a Cu wire plated with Pb/Sn, while the connections to the sensory coil might be made via Nb or Nb/Ti wires. Conventional wire-bonding techniques, including resistance spot welding and pressed contact, are not workable because of large differences between the hardnesses and melting temperatures of the different metals. The present technique is not subject to this limitation. The present technique involves the use (1) of a cheap, miniature, easy-to-operate, capacitor-discharging welding apparatus that has an Nb or Nb/Ti tip and operates with a continuous local flow of gaseous helium and (2) preparation of a joint in a special spark-discharge welding geometry. In a typical application, a piece of Nb foil about 25 m thick is rolled to form a tube, into which is inserted a wire that one seeks to weld to the tube (see figure). The tube can be slightly crimped for mechanical stability. Then a spark weld is made by use of the aforementioned apparatus with energy and time settings chosen to melt a small section of the niobium foil. The energy setting corresponds to the setting of a voltage to which the capacitor is charged. In an experiment, the technique was used to weld an Nb foil to a copper wire coated with a Pb/Sn soft solder, which is superconducting. The joint was evaluated as

  3. Attempting to bridge the gap between laboratory and seismic estimates of fracture energy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGarr, A.; Fletcher, Joe B.; Beeler, N.M.

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the behavior of the fracture energy associated with expanding the rupture zone of an earthquake, we have used the results of a large-scale, biaxial stick-slip friction experiment to set the parameters of an equivalent dynamic rupture model. This model is determined by matching the fault slip, the static stress drop and the apparent stress. After confirming that the fracture energy associated with this model earthquake is in reasonable agreement with corresponding laboratory values, we can use it to determine fracture energies for earthquakes as functions of stress drop, rupture velocity and fault slip. If we take account of the state of stress at seismogenic depths, the model extrapolation to larger fault slips yields fracture energies that agree with independent estimates by others based on dynamic rupture models for large earthquakes. For fixed stress drop and rupture speed, the fracture energy scales linearly with fault slip.

  4. Effect of Al Doping on Optical Band Gap Energy of Al-TiO2 Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Song, Yo-Seung; Kim, Bae-Yeon; Cho, Nam-Ihn; Lee, Deuk Yong

    2015-07-01

    Al-TiO2 thin films were prepared using a sol-gel derived spin coating by varying the Al/Ti molar ratio from 0 to 0.73 to investigate the effect of Al doping on the optical band gap energy (Eg) of the films. GAXRD results indicated that Al-TiO2 is composed of anatase and FTO phases when the Al/Ti molar ratio was less than 0.18. Above 0.38, no other peaks except FTO were found and transparency of the films was severely deteriorated. Eg of Al-TiO2 decreased from 3.20 eV to 2.07 eV when the Al/Ti ratio was raised from 0 to 0.38. Eg of 2.59 eV was found for the anatase Al-TiO2 films having the Al/Ti ratio of 0.18. The absorption band of Al-TiO2 coatings shifted dramatically from the UV region to the visible region with increasing the amount of Al dopant. The Al doping was mainly attributed to the optical band gap energy of Al-TiO2.

  5. Superconducting and normal state properties of the systems La1 -xMxPt4Ge12 (M = Ce ,Th )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, K.; Yazici, D.; White, B. D.; Jeon, I.; Breindel, A. J.; Pouse, N.; Maple, M. B.

    2016-09-01

    Electrical resistivity, magnetization, and specific heat measurements were performed on polycrystalline samples of the filled-skutterudite systems La1 -xMxPt4Ge12(M =Ce and Th ) . Superconductivity in LaPt4Ge12 was quickly suppressed with Ce substitution and no evidence for superconductivity was found down to 1.1 K for x >0.2 . Temperature-dependent specific heat data at low temperatures for La1 -xCexPt4Ge12 show a change from power-law to exponential behavior, which may be an indication for multiband superconductivity in LaPt4Ge12 . A similar crossover was observed in the Pr1 -xCexPt4Ge12 system. However, the suppression rates of the superconducting transition temperatures Tc(x ) in the two systems are quite disparate, indicating a difference in the nature of superconductivity, which is conventional in LaPt4Ge12 and unconventional in PrPt4Ge12 . In comparison, a nearly linear and smooth evolution of Tc with increasing Th was observed in the La1 -xThxPt4Ge12 system, with no change of the superconducting energy gap in the temperature dependence of the specific heat, suggesting similar types of superconductivity in both the LaPt4Ge12 and ThPt4Ge12 compounds.

  6. Superconducting accelerating structures for very low velocity ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Shepard, K.W.; Ostroumov, P.N.; Fuerst, J.D.; Waldschmidt, G.; Gonin, I.V.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents designs for four types of very-low-velocity superconducting accelerating cavity capable of providing several MV of accelerating potential per cavity, and suitable for particle velocities in the range 0.006 < v/c < 0.06. Superconducting TEM-class cavities have been widely applied to CW acceleration of ion beams. SC linacs can be formed as an array of independently-phased cavities, enabling a variable velocity profile to maximize the output energy for each of a number of different ion species. Several laboratories in the US and Europe are planning exotic beam facilities based on SC linacs. The cavity designs presented here are intended for the front-end of such linacs, particularly for the post-acceleration of rare isotopes of low charge state. Several types of SC cavities have been developed recently to cover particle velocities above 0.06c. Superconducting four-gap quarter-wave resonators for velocities 0.008 < {beta} = v/c < 0.05 were developed about two decades ago and have been successfully operated at the ATLAS SC linac at Argonne National Laboratory. Since that time, progress in simulation tools, cavity fabrication and processing have increased SC cavity gradients by a factor of 3-4. This paper applies these tools to optimize the design of a four-gap quarter-wave resonator for exotic beam facilities and other low-velocity applications.

  7. Enhancement of the superconducting gap by nesting in CaKFe4As4: A new high temperature superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Mou, Daixiang; Kong, Tai; Meier, William R.; Lochner, Felix; Wang, Lin -Lin; Lin, Qisheng; Wu, Yun; Bud’ko, S. L.; Eremin, Ilya; Johnson, D. D.; Canfield, P. C.; Kaminski, Adam

    2016-12-28

    We use high resolution angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory with measured crystal structure parameters to study the electronic properties of CaKFe4As4. In contrast to the related CaFe2As2 compounds, CaKFe4As4 has a high Tc of 35 K at stochiometric composition. This presents a unique opportunity to study the properties of high temperature superconductivity in the iron arsenides in the absence of doping or substitution. The Fermi surface consists of several hole and electron pockets that have a range of diameters. We find that the values of the superconducting gap are nearly isotropic (within the explored portions of the Brillouin zone), but are significantly different for each of the Fermi surface (FS) sheets. Most importantly, we find that the momentum dependence of the gap magnitude plotted across the entire Brillouin zone displays a strong deviation from the simple cos(kx)cos(ky) functional form of the gap function, proposed by the scenario of Cooper pairing driven by a short range antiferromagnetic exchange interaction. Instead, the maximum value of the gap is observed on FS sheets that are closest to the ideal nesting condition, in contrast to previous observations in other ferropnictides. Finally, these results provide strong support for the multiband character of superconductivity in CaKFe4As4, in which Cooper pairing forms on the electron and the hole bands interacting via a dominant interband repulsive interaction, enhanced by band nesting.

  8. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    Thermoelectricity is produced by applying a temperature differential to dissimilar electrically conducting or semiconducting materials, thereby producing a voltage that is proportional to the temperature difference. Thermoelectric generators use this effect to directly convert heat into electricity; however, presently-known generators have low efficiencies due to the production of high currents which in turn cause large resistive heating losses. Some thermoelectric generators operate at efficiencies between 4% and 7% in the 800{degrees} to 1200{degrees}C range. According to its major aspects and bradly stated, the present invention is an apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. In particular, the invention is a thermoelectric generator that juxtaposes a superconducting material and a semiconducting material - so that the superconducting and the semiconducting materials touch - to convert heat energy into electrical energy without resistive losses in the temperature range below the critical temperature of the superconducting material. Preferably, an array of superconducting material is encased in one of several possible configurations within a second material having a high thermal conductivity, preferably a semiconductor, to form a thermoelectric generator.

  9. Impurity bound states in fully gapped d-wave superconductors with subdominant order parameters.

    PubMed

    Mashkoori, Mahdi; Björnson, Kristofer; Black-Schaffer, Annica M

    2017-03-10

    Impurities in superconductors and their induced bound states are important both for engineering novel states such as Majorana zero-energy modes and for probing bulk properties of the superconducting state. The high-temperature cuprates offer a clear advantage in a much larger superconducting order parameter, but the nodal energy spectrum of a pure d-wave superconductor only allows virtual bound states. Fully gapped d-wave superconducting states have, however, been proposed in several cuprate systems thanks to subdominant order parameters producing d + is- or d + id'-wave superconducting states. Here we study both magnetic and potential impurities in these fully gapped d-wave superconductors. Using analytical T-matrix and complementary numerical tight-binding lattice calculations, we show that magnetic and potential impurities behave fundamentally different in d + is- and d + id'-wave superconductors. In a d + is-wave superconductor, there are no bound states for potential impurities, while a magnetic impurity produces one pair of bound states, with a zero-energy level crossing at a finite scattering strength. On the other hand, a d + id'-wave symmetry always gives rise to two pairs of bound states and only produce a reachable zero-energy level crossing if the normal state has a strong particle-hole asymmetry.

  10. Impurity bound states in fully gapped d-wave superconductors with subdominant order parameters

    PubMed Central

    Mashkoori, Mahdi; Björnson, Kristofer; Black-Schaffer, Annica M.

    2017-01-01

    Impurities in superconductors and their induced bound states are important both for engineering novel states such as Majorana zero-energy modes and for probing bulk properties of the superconducting state. The high-temperature cuprates offer a clear advantage in a much larger superconducting order parameter, but the nodal energy spectrum of a pure d-wave superconductor only allows virtual bound states. Fully gapped d-wave superconducting states have, however, been proposed in several cuprate systems thanks to subdominant order parameters producing d + is- or d + id′-wave superconducting states. Here we study both magnetic and potential impurities in these fully gapped d-wave superconductors. Using analytical T-matrix and complementary numerical tight-binding lattice calculations, we show that magnetic and potential impurities behave fundamentally different in d + is- and d + id′-wave superconductors. In a d + is-wave superconductor, there are no bound states for potential impurities, while a magnetic impurity produces one pair of bound states, with a zero-energy level crossing at a finite scattering strength. On the other hand, a d + id′-wave symmetry always gives rise to two pairs of bound states and only produce a reachable zero-energy level crossing if the normal state has a strong particle-hole asymmetry. PMID:28281570

  11. Impurity bound states in fully gapped d-wave superconductors with subdominant order parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashkoori, Mahdi; Björnson, Kristofer; Black-Schaffer, Annica M.

    2017-03-01

    Impurities in superconductors and their induced bound states are important both for engineering novel states such as Majorana zero-energy modes and for probing bulk properties of the superconducting state. The high-temperature cuprates offer a clear advantage in a much larger superconducting order parameter, but the nodal energy spectrum of a pure d-wave superconductor only allows virtual bound states. Fully gapped d-wave superconducting states have, however, been proposed in several cuprate systems thanks to subdominant order parameters producing d + is- or d + id‧-wave superconducting states. Here we study both magnetic and potential impurities in these fully gapped d-wave superconductors. Using analytical T-matrix and complementary numerical tight-binding lattice calculations, we show that magnetic and potential impurities behave fundamentally different in d + is- and d + id‧-wave superconductors. In a d + is-wave superconductor, there are no bound states for potential impurities, while a magnetic impurity produces one pair of bound states, with a zero-energy level crossing at a finite scattering strength. On the other hand, a d + id‧-wave symmetry always gives rise to two pairs of bound states and only produce a reachable zero-energy level crossing if the normal state has a strong particle-hole asymmetry.

  12. Superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Willen, E.; Dahl, P.; Herrera, J.

    1985-01-01

    This report provides a self-consistent description of a magnetic field in the aperture of a superconducting magnet and details how this field can be calculated in a magnet with cos theta current distribution in the coils. A description of an apparatus that can be used to measure the field uniformity in the aperture has been given. Finally, a detailed description of the magnet being developed for use in the Superconducting Super Collider is given. When this machine is built, it will be by far the largest application of superconductivity to date and promises to make possible the experimental discoveries needed to understand the basic laws of nature governing the world in which we live.

  13. Eddy Covariance Measurements Over a Maize Field: The Contribution of Minor Flux Terms to the Energy Balance Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smidt, J.; Ingwersen, J.; Streck, T.

    2015-12-01

    The lack of energy balance closure is a long-standing problem in eddy covariance (EC) measurements. The energy balance equation is defined as Rn - G = H + λE, where Rn is net radiation, G is the ground heat flux, H is the sensible heat flux and λE is the latent heat flux. In most cases of energy imbalance, either Rn is overestimated or the ground heat and turbulent fluxes are underestimated. Multiple studies have shown that calculations, incorrect instrument installation/calibration and measurement errors alone do not entirely account for this imbalance. Rather, research is now focused on previously neglected sources of heat storage in the soil, biomass and air beneath the EC station. This project examined the potential of five "minor flux terms" - soil heat storage, biomass heat storage, energy consumption by photosynthesis, air heat storage and atmospheric moisture change, to further close the energy balance gap. Eddy covariance measurements were conducted at a maize (Zea mays) field in southwest Germany during summer 2014. Soil heat storage was measured for six weeks at 11 sites around the field footprint. Biomass and air heat storage were measured for six subsequent weeks at seven sites around the field footprint. Energy consumption by photosynthesis was calculated using the CO2 flux data. Evapotranspiration was calculated using the water balance method and then compared to the flux data processed with three post-closure methods: the sensible heat flux, the latent heat flux and the Bowen ratio post-closure methods. An energy balance closure of 66% was achieved by the EC station measurements over the entire investigation period. During the soil heat flux campaign, EC station closure was 74.1%, and the field footprint soil heat storage contributed 3.3% additional closure. During the second minor flux term measurement period, closure with the EC station data was 91%. Biomass heat storage resulted in 1.1% additional closure, the photosynthesis flux closed the gap

  14. Negative differential thermal conductance and thermal rectification effects across a graphene-based superconducting junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xingfei; Zhang, Zhi

    2016-05-01

    We study the heat transport in a graphene-based normal-superconducting junction by solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes (BdG) equation. There are two effects, the competitive and cooperative effects, which come from the interaction between the temperature-dependent energy-gap function in the superconducting region and the occupation difference of quasiparticles. It is found that the competitive effect can not only bring the negative differential thermal conductance effect but also the thermal rectification effect. By contrast, the cooperative effect just causes the thermal rectification effect. Furthermore, the thermal rectification ratio and the magnitude of heat current should be seen as two inseparable signs for characterizing the thermal rectification effect. These discoveries can add more application for the graphene-based superconducting junction, such as heat diode and heat transistor, at cryogenic temperatures.

  15. Superconducting coupling across a spin-filtering manganite tunnel barrier with magnetic disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, T.; Matvejeff, M.; Takahashi, R.; Lippmaa, M.

    2016-09-01

    Ferromagnetic insulator Josephson junctions consisting of Nb/Au/Pr0.8Ca0.2MnO3/La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 layers were fabricated. Non-linear current-voltage characteristics suggest the presence of superconducting coupling between the Nb/Au and La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 layers across a ferromagnetic Pr0.8Ca0.2MnO3 tunnel barrier. Tunneling spectra showed clear conductance peaks due to quasi-particle tunneling. Superconducting gap energies determined from the tunneling spectra were consistent with the temperature dependence of the critical current of the junctions. We argue that magnetic inhomogeneity in the ultrathin tunnel barrier plays a role in linking the superconducting states in Nb/Au and La1.85Sr0.15CuO4.

  16. Investigation of gap-closing interdigitated capacitors for electrostatic vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxaal, John; Foster, Daniel; Hella, Mona; Borca-Tasciuc, Diana-Andra

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports on the dynamic characteristics of a MEMS electrostatic harvester employing interdigitated gap-closing topology. Devices are fabricated using SOIMUMPS technology and are characterized with and without biasing voltages for a broad range of excitation accelerations. At low vibration amplitudes the presence of a dc bias causes the resonant frequency peak to shift to lower frequencies with increasing bias. At higher vibration amplitudes the dynamic response of the devices exhibits the behavior of a Duffing oscillator with spring softening due to nonlinear stiffness attributed to the effect of electrostatic forces. Specifically, the devices exhibit sweep direction hysteresis with jump phenomena due to the multivaluedness of the response curve. Amplitude sweeps at constant frequency and varying bias voltage also show jump phenomena, highlighting how slight differences in operating conditions dramatically affect device performance. Spring hardening effects are reported for devices contaminated with dust particles. The paper also discusses SOIMUMPS limitations, the importance of reducing off-axis vibration during testing, characterization methods, and the effect of grounding on parasitic capacitance.

  17. Field-Angle-Dependent Low-Energy Excitations around a Vortex in the Superconducting Topological Insulator CuxBi2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Yuki

    2014-06-01

    We study the quasiparticle excitations around a single vortex in the superconducting topological insulator CuxBi2Se3, focusing on a superconducting state with point nodes. Inspired by the recent Knight shift measurements, we propose two ways to detect the positions of point nodes, using an explicit formula of the density of states with Kramer-Pesch approximation in the quasiclassical treatment. The zero-energy local density of states around a vortex parallel to the c-axis has a twofold shape and splits along the nodal direction with increasing energy; these behaviors can be detected by the scanning tunneling microscopy. An angular dependence of the density of states with a rotating magnetic field on the a-b plane has deep minima when the magnetic field is parallel to the directions of point nodes, which can be detected by angular-resolved heat capacity and thermal conductivity measurements. All the theoretical predictions are detectable via standard experimental techniques in magnetic fields.

  18. Ultrasonic attenuation in superconducting molybdenum-rhenium alloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashkin, M.; Deis, D. W.; Gottlieb, M.; Jones, C. K.

    1971-01-01

    Investigation of longitudinal sound attenuation in superconducting Mo-Re alloys as a function of temperature, magnetic field, and frequency. Evaporated thin film CdS transducers were used for the measurements at frequencies up to 3 GHz. The normal state attenuation coefficient was found to be proportional to the square of frequency over this frequency range. Measurements in zero magnetic field yielded a value of the energy gap parameter close to the threshold value of 3.56 kTc, appropriate to a weakly coupled dirty limit superconductor.

  19. Lowering of Boson-Fermion System Energy with a Gapped Cooper Resonant-Pair Dispersion Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, T. A.; de Llano, M.

    Applying two-time Green-function techniques to the Friedberg-T.D. Lee phenomenological Hamiltonian of a many-fermion system, it is shown that positive-energy resonant bosonic pairs associated with four-fermion excitations above the Fermi sea are energetically lower in a ground-state that is a mixture of two coexisting and dynamically interacting many-particle subsystems: a) unpaired fermions and b) composite bosons. It is argued that an interaction between free fermions and bosons excited above the Fermi sea in the mixture, namely, the continuous processes of pair-formation from, and disintegration into, two unpaired electrons, results in a substantially lowering the total system energy. The positive-energy composite bosons begin to appear incoherently below a depairing temperature T* as their coupling- and temperature-dependent number density gradually increases from zero. This leads quite naturally to the pseudogap phenomenon observed in high-Tc cuprates.

  20. Lowering of Boson-Fermion System Energy with a Gapped Cooper Resonant-Pair Dispersion Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, T. A.; de Llano, M.

    2007-09-01

    Applying two-time Green-function techniques to the Friedberg-T.D. Lee phenomenological Hamiltonian of a many-fermion system, it is shown that positive-energy resonant bosonic pairs associated with four-fermion excitations above the Fermi sea are energetically lower in a ground-state that is a mixture of two coexisting and dynamically interacting many-particle subsystems: a) unpaired fermions and b) composite bosons. It is argued that an interaction between free fermions and bosons excited above the Fermi sea in the mixture, namely, the continuous processes of pair-formation from, and disintegration into, two unpaired electrons, results in a substantially lowering the total system energy. The positive-energy composite bosons begin to appear incoherently below a de-pairing temperature T* as their coupling- and temperature-dependent number density gradually increases from zero. This leads quite naturally to the pseudogap phenomenon observed in high-Tc cuprates