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Sample records for superconducting multilayers samples

  1. Ferromagnetic/Superconducting Multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, S. D.

    1998-03-01

    Although it is well known that magnetism influences superconductivity, the converse issue has been less well explored. Recent theoretical predictions for ferromagnetic/ superconducting/ ferromagnetic trilayers exhibiting interlayer magnetic coupling in the normal state indicate that the coupling should be suppressed below the superconducting transition temperature.(C.A. R. Sá de Melo, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79), 1933 (1997); O. Sipr, B.L. Györffy, J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 7, 5239 (1995). To realize such a situation, a requirement (when the magnetic layers are thick) is that the superconducting layer thickness must simultaneously be less than the range over which the magnetic interlayer coupling decays, but greater than the superconducting coherence length. This introduces serious materials constraints. The present work describes initial explorations of three sputtered multilayer systems in an attempt to observe coupling of the ferromagnetic layers across a superconducting spacer:((a) J.E. Mattson, R.M. Osgood III, C.D. Potter, C.H. Sowers, and S.D. Bader, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 15), 1774 (1997); (b) J.E. Mattson, C.D. Potter, M.J. Conover, C.H. Sowers, and S.D. Bader, Phys. Rev. B 55, 70 (1997), and (c) R.M. Osgood III, J.E. Pearson, C.H. Sowers, and S.D. Bader, submitted (1997). (a) Ni/Nb, (b) Fe_4N/NbN, and (c) GdN/NbN. In these systems we have retained thinner superconducting layers than had been achieved previously, but interlayer magnetic coupling is not observed even in the normal state. For Ni/Nb the interfacial Ni loses its moment, which also reduces the superconducting pair-breaking. GdN is an insulating ferromagnet, so itinerancy is sacrificed, and, probably as a result of this, no coupling is observed. Each system gives rise to interesting and anisotropic superconducting properties. Thus, although the goal remains elusive, our search highlights the challenges and opportunities.

  2. Properties of Ni/Nb magnetic/superconducting multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Mattson, J.E.; Osgood III, R.M.; Potter, C.D.; Sowers, C.H.; Bader, S.D.

    1997-05-01

    We examine structural, magnetic, and superconducting properties of magnetic/superconducting Ni/Nb multilayers. The Ni(Nb) films are textured {l_brace}111{r_brace}({l_brace}110{r_brace}) and have smooth interfaces. The average moment of the Ni atoms in the structure drops by 80{percent} from that of bulk Ni for 19 {Angstrom} thick Ni layers in proximity to 140 {Angstrom} thick Nb layers, and goes to zero for smaller Ni thicknesses. The Nb layer is not superconducting for thicknesses {lt}100 {Angstrom} in the presence of a 19 {Angstrom} thick ferromagnetic Ni layer. The behavior of the superconducting critical temperature as a function of the superconducting layer thickness was fitted and an interfacial scattering parameter and scattering time for the paramagnetic Ni regime determined.

  3. Development of superconducting bonding for multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, Teresa; Axline, Christopher; Chu, Yiwen; Pfaff, Wolfgang; Frunzio, Luigi; Devoret, Michel; Schoelkopf, Robert

    Future quantum computers are likely to take the shape of multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuits. The proposed physical architecture retains the superb coherence of 3D structures while achieving superior scalability and compatibility with planar circuitry and integrated readout electronics. This hardware platform utilizes known techniques of bulk etching in silicon wafers and requires metallic bonding of superconducting materials. Superconducting wafer bonding is a crucial tool in need of development. Whether micromachined in wafers or traditionally machined in bulk metal, 3D cavities typically posses a seam where two parts meet. Ideally, this seam consists of a perfect superconducting bond. Pursuing this goal, we have developed a new understanding of seams as a loss mechanism that is applicable to 3D cavities in general. We present quality factor measurements of both 3D cavities and 2D stripline resonators to study the losses of superconducting bonds.

  4. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy of Proximity Superconductivity in Epitaxial Multilayer Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Natterer, Fabian D.; Ha, Jeonghoon; Baek, Hongwoo; Zhang, Duming; Cullen, William; Zhitenev, Nikolai B.; Kuk, Young; Stroscio, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    We report on spatial measurements of the superconducting proximity effect in epitaxial graphene induced by a graphene-superconductor interface. Superconducting aluminum films were grown on epitaxial multilayer graphene on SiC. The aluminum films were discontinuous with networks of trenches in the film morphology reaching down to exposed graphene terraces. Scanning tunneling spectra measured on the graphene terraces show a clear decay of the superconducting energy gap with increasing separation from the graphene-aluminum edges. The spectra were well described by Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory. The decay length for the superconducting energy gap in graphene was determined to be greater than 400 nm. Deviations in the exponentially decaying energy gap were also observed on a much smaller length scale of tens of nanometers. PMID:27088134

  5. A multilayered approach to superconducting tunnel junction x ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippert, E. D.; Song, S. N.; Ketterson, J. B.; Maglic, S. R.; Lomatch, S.; Thomas, C.; Cheida, M. A.; Ulmer, M. P.

    1992-01-01

    'First generation' superconducting tunnel junction X-ray detectors (characterized by a single tunnel junction in direct contact with its substrate, with totally external amplification) remain more than an order of magnitude away from their theoretical energy resolutions which are in the order of eV's. The difficulties that first generation devices are encountering are being attacked by a 'second generation' of superconducting X-ray detector designs including quasiparticle trapping configurations and Josephson junction arrays. A second generation design concept, the multilayered superconducting tunnel junction X-ray detector, consisting of tens to hundreds of tunnel junctions stacked on top of one another (a superlattice), is presented. Some of the possibilities of this engineered materials approach include the tuning of phonon transmission characteristics of the material, suppression of parasitic quasiparticle trapping and intrinsic amplification.

  6. Critical fields of Fe{sub 4}N/NbN ferromagnetic/superconducting multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Mattson, J.E.; Potter, C.D.; Conover, M.J.; Sowers, C.H.; Bader, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    Structural, magnetic, and superconducting properties of ferromagnetic/superconducting multilayers of Fe{sub 4}N/NbN are explored for a variety of thickness combinations. The superconducting properties show that 11 {Angstrom} ferromagnetic layers are sufficient to decouple the superconducting layers and to yield anisotropic behavior. The upper critical field data are well described by theory for ferromagnetic/superconducting multilayers. This analysis yields an interfacial parameter which characterizes the electron scattering at the ferromagnetic/superconducting boundary. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Topological Crystalline Superconductivity in Locally Noncentrosymmetric Multilayer Superconductors.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tomohiro; Sigrist, Manfred; Yanase, Youichi

    2015-07-10

    Topological crystalline superconductivity in locally noncentrosymmetric multilayer superconductors (SCs) is proposed. We study the odd-parity pair-density wave (PDW) state induced by the spin-singlet pairing interaction through the spin-orbit coupling. It is shown that the PDW state is a topological crystalline SC protected by a mirror symmetry, although it is topologically trivial according to the classification based on the standard topological periodic table. The topological property of the mirror subsectors is intuitively explained by adiabatically changing the Bogoliubov-de Gennes Hamiltonian. A subsector of the bilayer PDW state reduces to the two-dimensional noncentrosymmetric SC, while a subsector of the trilayer PDW state is topologically equivalent to the spinless p-wave SC. Chiral Majorana edge modes in trilayers can be realized without Cooper pairs in the spin-triplet channel and chemical potential tuning. PMID:26207495

  8. Topological Crystalline Superconductivity in Locally Noncentrosymmetric Multilayer Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Tomohiro; Sigrist, Manfred; Yanase, Youichi

    2015-07-01

    Topological crystalline superconductivity in locally noncentrosymmetric multilayer superconductors (SCs) is proposed. We study the odd-parity pair-density wave (PDW) state induced by the spin-singlet pairing interaction through the spin-orbit coupling. It is shown that the PDW state is a topological crystalline SC protected by a mirror symmetry, although it is topologically trivial according to the classification based on the standard topological periodic table. The topological property of the mirror subsectors is intuitively explained by adiabatically changing the Bogoliubov-de Gennes Hamiltonian. A subsector of the bilayer PDW state reduces to the two-dimensional noncentrosymmetric SC, while a subsector of the trilayer PDW state is topologically equivalent to the spinless p -wave SC. Chiral Majorana edge modes in trilayers can be realized without Cooper pairs in the spin-triplet channel and chemical potential tuning.

  9. Multilayer MgB2 superconducting quantum interference filter magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galan, Elias; Melbourne, Thomas; Davidson, Bruce A.; Xi, X. X.; Chen, Ke

    2016-04-01

    We report two types of all-MgB2 superconductive quantum interference filter (SQIF) magnetometers that can measure absolute magnetic fields with high sensitivity. In one configuration, the SQIFs were made of 20 multilayer nonplanar all-MgB2 superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) connected in parallel with loop areas ranging in size from 0.4 to 3.6 μm2. These devices are sensitive to magnetic fields parallel to the substrate and show a single antipeak from 3 to 16 K with a maximum transfer function of ˜16 V/T at 3 K and a field noise of ˜110 pT/Hz1/2 above 100 Hz at 10 K. In a second configuration, the SQIFs were made with 16 planar SQUIDs connected in parallel with loop areas ranging in size from 4 μm2 to 25 μm2 and are sensitive to the magnetic fields perpendicular to the substrate. The planar SQIF shows a single antipeak from 10 to 22 K with a maximum transfer function of 7800 V/T at 10 K and a field noise of ˜70 pT/Hz1/2 above 100 Hz at 20 K.

  10. Search for coupling in ferromagnetic/superconducting multilayers: Fe{sub 4}N/NbN

    SciTech Connect

    Mattson, J.E.; Potter, C.D.; Conover, M.J.; Sowers, C.H.; Bader, S.D.

    1997-09-01

    Structural, magnetic, and superconducting properties of ferromagnetic/superconducting multilayers of Fe{sub 4}N/NbN are examined. The onset of superconductivity occurs at NbN layer thickness of {approximately}100 {Angstrom}. Below this thickness ferromagnetism of the Fe{sub 4}N layers is observed. Above this thickness superconductivity of the NbN is also observed, but there is no evidence for interlayer magnetic or superconductive coupling. The results are used in the formulation of guidelines for future searches of novel interlayer coupling phenomena. The superconducting critical field curves are reasonably well described within the framework of the theory for ferromagnetic/superconducting multilayers. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Vacuum Society.}

  11. Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors with non-periodic dielectric multilayers

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Taro; Waki, Kentaro; Miki, Shigehito; Kirkwood, Robert A.; Hadfield, Robert H.; Terai, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    We present superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SSPDs) on non-periodic dielectric multilayers, which enable us to design a variety of wavelength dependences of optical absorptance by optimizing the dielectric multilayer. By adopting a robust simulation to optimize the dielectric multilayer, we designed three types of SSPDs with target wavelengths of 500 nm, 800 nm, and telecom range respectively. We fabricated SSPDs based on the optimized designs for 500 and 800 nm, and evaluated the system detection efficiency at various wavelengths. The results obtained confirm that the designed SSPDs with non-periodic dielectric multilayers worked well. This versatile device structure can be effective for multidisciplinary applications in fields such as the life sciences and remote sensing that require high efficiency over a precise spectral range and strong signal rejection at other wavelengths. PMID:27775712

  12. Microelectronic superconducting device with multi-layer contact

    DOEpatents

    Wellstood, F.C.; Kingston, J.J.; Clarke, J.

    1993-10-26

    A microelectronic component comprising a crossover is provided comprising a substrate, a first high T[sub c] superconductor thin film, a second insulating thin film comprising SrTiO[sub 3] ; and a third high T[sub c] superconducting film which has strips which crossover one or more areas of the first superconductor film. An in situ method for depositing all three films on a substrate is provided which does not require annealing steps. The photolithographic process is used to separately pattern the high T[sub c] superconductor thin films. 14 figures.

  13. Microelectronic superconducting device with multi-layer contact

    DOEpatents

    Wellstood, Frederick C.; Kingston, John J.; Clarke, John

    1993-01-01

    A microelectronic component comprising a crossover is provided comprising a substrate, a first high T.sub.c superconductor thin film, a second insulating thin film comprising SrTiO.sub.3 ; and a third high T.sub.c superconducting film which has strips which crossover one or more areas of the first superconductor film. An insitu method for depositing all three films on a substrate is provided which does not require annealing steps. The photolithographic process is used to separately pattern the high T.sub.c superconductor thin films.

  14. Superconducting composite with multilayer patterns and multiple buffer layers

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Xin D.; Muenchausen, Ross E.

    1993-01-01

    An article of manufacture including a substrate, a patterned interlayer of a material selected from the group consisting of magnesium oxide, barium-titanium oxide or barium-zirconium oxide, the patterned interlayer material overcoated with a secondary interlayer material of yttria-stabilized zirconia or magnesium-aluminum oxide, upon the surface of the substrate whereby an intermediate article with an exposed surface of both the overcoated patterned interlayer and the substrate is formed, a coating of a buffer layer selected from the group consisting of cerium oxide, yttrium oxide, curium oxide, dysprosium oxide, erbium oxide, europium oxide, iron oxide, gadolinium oxide, holmium oxide, indium oxide, lanthanum oxide, manganese oxide, lutetium oxide, neodymium oxide, praseodymium oxide, plutonium oxide, samarium oxide, terbium oxide, thallium oxide, thulium oxide, yttrium oxide and ytterbium oxide over the entire exposed surface of the intermediate article, and, a ceramic superco n FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to the field of superconducting articles having two distinct regions of superconductive material with differing in-plane orientations whereby the conductivity across the boundary between the two regions can be tailored. This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  15. Control of Superconductivity in a Hybrid Superconducting/Ferromagnetic Multilayer Using Nonequilibrium Tunneling Injection*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafranjuk, S.; Nevirkovets, I. P.; Mukhanov, O. A.; Ketterson, J. B.

    2016-08-01

    We report a theoretical and experimental study on the use of nonequilibrium tunneling injection to control the local Cooper pair amplitude ΦS in an S F sandwich involving superconducting (S ) and ferromagnetic (F ) layers coupled by the proximity effect. In an SISFIFS structure (where I is an insulator), this same S F sandwich serves as the acceptor electrode of an S I S F Josephson junction whose critical current Ica depends on ΦS . We derive the self-consistency equation describing the critical temperature Tc of the S F sandwich under nonequilibrium conditions. In addition, we compute Ica by solving the Boltzmann equation for the electron distribution function fɛ , which then allows a determination of the relative change of δ Ica/δ Ii(Vi) versus the bias voltage Vi and the injection current Ii(Vi) . The computed gain δ Ica/δ Ii(Vi) strongly depends on δ Ica/δ Ii(Vi) , and agrees well with the experimental data.

  16. Design of the multilayer insulation system for the Superconducting Super Collider 50mm dipole cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Boroski, W.N.; Nicol, T.H.; Schoo, C.J.

    1991-03-01

    The development of the multilayer insulation (MLI) system for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) 50 mm collider dipole cryostat is an ongoing extension of work conducted during the 40 mm cryostat program. While the basic design of the MLI system for the 50 mm cryostat resembles that of the 40 mm cryostat, results from measurements of MLI thermal performance below 80K have prompted a re-design of the MLI system for the 20K thermal radiation shield. Presented is the design of the MLI system for the 50 mm collider dipole cryostat, with discussion focusing on system performance, blanket geometry, cost-effective fabrication techniques, and built-in quality control measures that assure consistent thermal performance throughout the SSC accelerator. 16 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Broadband sample holder for microwave spectroscopy of superconducting qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Averkin, A. S.; Karpov, A.; Glushkov, E.; Abramov, N.; Shulga, K.; Huebner, U.; Il'ichev, E.; Ustinov, A. V.

    2014-10-15

    We present a practical design and implementation of a broadband sample holder suitable for microwave experiments with superconducting integrated circuits at millikelvin temperatures. Proposed design can be easily integrated in standard dilution cryostats, has flat pass band response in a frequency range from 0 to 32 GHz, allowing the RF testing of the samples with substrate size up to 4 × 4 mm{sup 2}. The parasitic higher modes interference in the holder structure is analyzed and prevented via design considerations. The developed setup can be used for characterization of superconducting parametric amplifiers, bolometers, and qubits. We tested the designed sample holder by characterizing of a superconducting flux qubit at 20 mK temperature.

  18. Optomechanical coupling between a multilayer graphene mechanical resonator and a superconducting microwave cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, V.; Bosman, S. J.; Schneider, B. H.; Blanter, Y. M.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Steele, G. A.

    2014-10-01

    The combination of low mass density, high frequency and high quality factor, Q, of mechanical resonators made of two-dimensional crystals such as graphene make them attractive for applications in force/mass sensing and exploring the quantum regime of mechanical motion. Microwave optomechanics with superconducting cavities offers exquisite position sensitivity and enables the preparation and detection of mechanical systems in the quantum ground state. Here, we demonstrate coupling between a multilayer graphene resonator with quality factors up to 220,000 and a high-Q superconducting cavity. Using thermomechanical noise as calibration, we achieve a displacement sensitivity of 17 fm Hz-1/2. Optomechanical coupling is demonstrated by optomechanically induced reflection and absorption of microwave photons. We observe 17 dB of mechanical microwave amplification and signatures of strong optomechanical backaction. We quantitatively extract the cooperativity C, a characterization of coupling strength, from the measurement with no free parameters and find C = 8, which is promising for the quantum regime of graphene motion.

  19. Optomechanical coupling between a multilayer graphene mechanical resonator and a superconducting microwave cavity.

    PubMed

    Singh, V; Bosman, S J; Schneider, B H; Blanter, Y M; Castellanos-Gomez, A; Steele, G A

    2014-10-01

    The combination of low mass density, high frequency and high quality factor, Q, of mechanical resonators made of two-dimensional crystals such as graphene make them attractive for applications in force/mass sensing and exploring the quantum regime of mechanical motion. Microwave optomechanics with superconducting cavities offers exquisite position sensitivity and enables the preparation and detection of mechanical systems in the quantum ground state. Here, we demonstrate coupling between a multilayer graphene resonator with quality factors up to 220,000 and a high-Q superconducting cavity. Using thermomechanical noise as calibration, we achieve a displacement sensitivity of 17 fm Hz(-1/2). Optomechanical coupling is demonstrated by optomechanically induced reflection and absorption of microwave photons. We observe 17 dB of mechanical microwave amplification and signatures of strong optomechanical backaction. We quantitatively extract the cooperativity C, a characterization of coupling strength, from the measurement with no free parameters and find C = 8, which is promising for the quantum regime of graphene motion. PMID:25150717

  20. Quantification of Multilayer Samples by Confocal {mu}XRF

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, R. Daniel; Sanchez, H. J.; Rubio, M.; Perez, C. A.

    2009-01-29

    The confocal setup consists of x-ray lenses in the excitation as well as in the detection channel. In this configuration, a micro volume defined by the overlap of the foci of both x-ray lenses is analyzed. Scanning this micro volume through the sample, 1-3 dimensional studies can be performed. For intermediate thin homogeneous layers a scanning in the normal direction to the surface sample provides information of its thickness and elemental composition. For multilayer samples it also provides the order of each layer in the stratified structure. For the confocal setup, we used a glass monocapillary in the excitation channel and a monolithic half polycapillary in the detection channel. The experiment was carried out at the D09B beamline of the LNLS using white beam. In the present work, a new algorithm was applied to analyze in detail by confocal {mu}XRF a sample of three paint layers on a glass substrate. Using the proposed algorithm, information about thickness and elemental densities was obtained for each layer of these samples.

  1. High quantum efficiency and low dark count rate in multi-layer superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Jafari Salim, A. Eftekharian, A.; Hamed Majedi, A.

    2014-02-07

    In this paper, we theoretically show that a multi-layer superconducting nanowire single-photon detector (SNSPD) is capable of approaching characteristics of an ideal SNSPD in terms of the quantum efficiency, dark count, and band-width. A multi-layer structure improves the performance in two ways. First, the potential barrier for thermally activated vortex crossing, which is the major source of dark counts and the reduction of the critical current in SNSPDs is elevated. In a multi-layer SNSPD, a vortex is made of 2D-pancake vortices that form a stack. It will be shown that the stack of pancake vortices effectively experiences a larger potential barrier compared to a vortex in a single-layer SNSPD. This leads to an increase in the experimental critical current as well as significant decrease in the dark count rate. In consequence, an increase in the quantum efficiency for photons of the same energy or an increase in the sensitivity to photons of lower energy is achieved. Second, a multi-layer structure improves the efficiency of single-photon absorption by increasing the effective optical thickness without compromising the single-photon sensitivity.

  2. Thermal performance measurements of a 100 percent polyester MLI (multilayer insulation) system for the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Gonczy, J.D.; Boroski, W.N.; Niemann, R.C.

    1989-09-01

    The plastic materials used in the multilayer insulation (MLI) blankets of the superconducting magnets of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) are comprised entirely of polyesters. This paper reports on tests conducted in three separate experimental blanket arrangements. The tests explore the thermal performance of two candidate blanket joint configurations each employing a variation of a stepped-butted joint nested between sewn blanket seams. The results from the joint configurations are compared to measurements made describing the thermal performance of the basic blanket materials as tested in an ideal joint configuration. Twenty foil sensors were incorporated within each test blanket to measure interstitial layer and joint layer temperatures. Heat flux and thermal gradients are reported for high and degraded insulating vacuums, and during transient and steady state conditions. In complement with this paper is an associate paper bearing the same title head but with the title extension Part 1: Instrumentation and experimental preparation (300K-80K)'. 5 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Automatic sequential fluid handling with multilayer microfluidic sample isolated pumping

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jixiao; Fu, Hai; Yang, Tianhang; Li, Songjing

    2015-01-01

    To sequentially handle fluids is of great significance in quantitative biology, analytical chemistry, and bioassays. However, the technological options are limited when building such microfluidic sequential processing systems, and one of the encountered challenges is the need for reliable, efficient, and mass-production available microfluidic pumping methods. Herein, we present a bubble-free and pumping-control unified liquid handling method that is compatible with large-scale manufacture, termed multilayer microfluidic sample isolated pumping (mμSIP). The core part of the mμSIP is the selective permeable membrane that isolates the fluidic layer from the pneumatic layer. The air diffusion from the fluidic channel network into the degassing pneumatic channel network leads to fluidic channel pressure variation, which further results in consistent bubble-free liquid pumping into the channels and the dead-end chambers. We characterize the mμSIP by comparing the fluidic actuation processes with different parameters and a flow rate range of 0.013 μl/s to 0.097 μl/s is observed in the experiments. As the proof of concept, we demonstrate an automatic sequential fluid handling system aiming at digital assays and immunoassays, which further proves the unified pumping-control and suggests that the mμSIP is suitable for functional microfluidic assays with minimal operations. We believe that the mμSIP technology and demonstrated automatic sequential fluid handling system would enrich the microfluidic toolbox and benefit further inventions. PMID:26487904

  4. Automatic sequential fluid handling with multilayer microfluidic sample isolated pumping.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jixiao; Fu, Hai; Yang, Tianhang; Li, Songjing

    2015-09-01

    To sequentially handle fluids is of great significance in quantitative biology, analytical chemistry, and bioassays. However, the technological options are limited when building such microfluidic sequential processing systems, and one of the encountered challenges is the need for reliable, efficient, and mass-production available microfluidic pumping methods. Herein, we present a bubble-free and pumping-control unified liquid handling method that is compatible with large-scale manufacture, termed multilayer microfluidic sample isolated pumping (mμSIP). The core part of the mμSIP is the selective permeable membrane that isolates the fluidic layer from the pneumatic layer. The air diffusion from the fluidic channel network into the degassing pneumatic channel network leads to fluidic channel pressure variation, which further results in consistent bubble-free liquid pumping into the channels and the dead-end chambers. We characterize the mμSIP by comparing the fluidic actuation processes with different parameters and a flow rate range of 0.013 μl/s to 0.097 μl/s is observed in the experiments. As the proof of concept, we demonstrate an automatic sequential fluid handling system aiming at digital assays and immunoassays, which further proves the unified pumping-control and suggests that the mμSIP is suitable for functional microfluidic assays with minimal operations. We believe that the mμSIP technology and demonstrated automatic sequential fluid handling system would enrich the microfluidic toolbox and benefit further inventions. PMID:26487904

  5. Effects of interlayer coupling on the magnetic and transport properties of superconducting multilayers and high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, K.E.; Hettinger, J.D.; Kim, D.H.

    1994-06-01

    The effect of interlayer coupling on the transport properties and dissipation in a magnetic field is reviewed for superconducting multilayers including highly-anisotropic high-temperature superconductors (HTS). For the applied field parallel to the superconducting layers the absence of any Lorentz-force dependence of the dissipation leads to an explanation other than flux motion. This is consistent with a Josephson junction dissipation which dominates flux motion of the insulating regions between layers. However, in is seen to cross over from phase slips at Josephson junctions to depinning of vortices from the external field at high fields and temperatures. For fields perpendicular to the superconducting layers the much greater resistive broadening in HTS is due to dissipation by thermally-activated flux motion, consistent with a lack of intrinsic pinning. We show experimental evidence that the associated flux motion occurs as a result of a crossover from three dimensional (3D) vortex lines to 2D independent pancake-like vortices, residing in the Cu-O layers. This 3D to 2D crossover occurs after k{sub B}T exceeds the Josephson coupling energy.

  6. High-temperature superconductivity in potassium-coated multilayer FeSe thin films.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Y; Nakayama, K; Sugawara, K; Sato, T; Takahashi, T

    2015-08-01

    The recent discovery of possible high-temperature (T(c)) superconductivity over 65 K in a monolayer FeSe film on SrTiO3 (refs 1-6) triggered a fierce debate on how superconductivity evolves from bulk to film, because bulk FeSe crystal exhibits a T(c) of no higher than 10 K (ref. 7). However, the difficulty in controlling the carrier density and the number of FeSe layers has hindered elucidation of this problem. Here, we demonstrate that deposition of potassium onto FeSe films markedly expands the accessible doping range towards the heavily electron-doped region. Intriguingly, we have succeeded in converting non-superconducting films with various thicknesses into superconductors with T(c) as high as 48 K. We also found a marked increase in the magnitude of the superconducting gap on decreasing the FeSe film thickness, indicating that the interface plays a crucial role in realizing the high-temperature superconductivity. The results presented provide a new strategy to enhance and optimize T(c) in ultrathin films of iron-based superconductors.

  7. High-temperature superconductivity in potassium-coated multilayer FeSe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Y.; Nakayama, K.; Sugawara, K.; Sato, T.; Takahashi, T.

    2015-08-01

    The recent discovery of possible high-temperature (Tc) superconductivity over 65 K in a monolayer FeSe film on SrTiO3 (refs , , , , , ) triggered a fierce debate on how superconductivity evolves from bulk to film, because bulk FeSe crystal exhibits a Tc of no higher than 10 K (ref. ). However, the difficulty in controlling the carrier density and the number of FeSe layers has hindered elucidation of this problem. Here, we demonstrate that deposition of potassium onto FeSe films markedly expands the accessible doping range towards the heavily electron-doped region. Intriguingly, we have succeeded in converting non-superconducting films with various thicknesses into superconductors with Tc as high as 48 K. We also found a marked increase in the magnitude of the superconducting gap on decreasing the FeSe film thickness, indicating that the interface plays a crucial role in realizing the high-temperature superconductivity. The results presented provide a new strategy to enhance and optimize Tc in ultrathin films of iron-based superconductors.

  8. Ac loss reduction of multilayer superconducting power transmission cables by using narrow coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amemiya, Naoyuki; Li, Quan; Ito, Kaoru; Takeuchi, Katsutoku; Nakamura, Taketsune; Okuma, Takeshi

    2011-06-01

    The ac loss characteristics of coated conductors are dominated by the magnetic field component normal to their superconductor layer. Multilayer cables as well as monolayer cables consisting of 4 mm-wide coated conductors (named 4 mm cables) and those consisting of 2 mm-wide coated conductors (named 2 mm cables) were designed, and numerical electromagnetic field analyses were performed in their cross sections to calculate their ac losses. Trapezoidal lateral critical current density Jc distributions with shoulders as well as uniform ones were assumed in coated conductors for the analyses. The former models the degraded Jc near the edges of coated conductors. In the case of the monolayer, the calculated ac losses of the 2 mm cables were comparable to those of the 4 mm cables. In the cases of the multilayers, the calculated ac losses of the 2 mm cables were obviously less than those of the 4 mm cables. The degraded Jc near the edges of coated conductors more seriously affects the ac loss characteristics of the 2 mm cables than those of the 4 mm cables. However, even if we consider the influence of the degraded Jc near the edges of coated conductors, 2 mm-wide coated conductors are more profitable than 4 mm-wide coated conductors in multilayer cables from the viewpoint of ac loss reduction.

  9. Multilayer insulation (MLI) in the Superconducting Super Collider: A practical engineering approach to physical parameters governing MLI thermal performance

    SciTech Connect

    Gonczy, J.D.; Boroski, W.N.; Niemann, R.C.

    1989-03-01

    Multilayer insulation (MLI) is employed in cryogenic devices to control the heat load of those devices. The physics defining the thermal performance of an MLI system is extremely complex due to the thermal dynamics of numerous interdependent parameters which in themselves contribute differently depending on whether boundary conditions are transient or steady-state. The Multilayer Insulation system for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) consists of full cryostat length assemblies of aluminized polyester film, fabricated in the form of blankets, and installed as blankets to the 4.5K cold mass, and the 20K and 80K thermal radiation shields. Approximately 40,000 blankets will be required in the 10,000 cryogenic devices comprising the SSC accelerator. Each blanket will be nearly 56 feet long by 6 feet wide and will consist of as many as 32 reflective and 31 spacer layers of material. Discussed are MLI material choices, and the physical parameters which contribute to the operational performance of MLI systems. Disclosed is a method for fabricating MLI blankets by employing a large diameter winding mandrel having a circumference sufficient for the required blanket length. The blanket fabrication method assures consistency in mass produced MLI blankets by providing positive control of the dimensional parameters which contribute to the MLI blanket thermal performance. The fabrication method can be used to mass produce prefabricated MLI blankets that by virtue of the product have inherent features of dimensional stability, three-dimensional uniformity, controlled layer density, layer-to-layer registration, interlayer cleanliness, and interlayer material to accommodate thermal contraction differences. 9 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Thermal performance measurements of a 100 percent polyester MLI (multilayer insulation) system for the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Boroski, W.N.; Gonczy, J.D.; Niemann, R.C.

    1989-09-01

    Thermal performance measurements of a 100 percent polyester multilayer insulation (MLI) system for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) were conducted in a Heat Leak Test Facility (HLTF) under three experimental test arrangements. Each experiment measured the thermal performance of a 32-layer MLI blanket instrumented with twenty foil sensors to measure interstitial layer temperatures. Heat leak values and sensor temperatures were monitored during transient and steady state conditions under both design and degraded insulating vacuums. Heat leak values were measured using a heatmeter. MLI interstitial layer temperatures were measured using Cryogenic Linear Temperature Sensors (CLTS). Platinum resistors monitored system temperatures. High vacuum was measured using ion gauges; degraded vacuum employed thermocouple gauges. A four-wire system monitored instrumentation sensors and calibration heaters. An on-line computerized data acquisition system recorded and processes data. This paper reports on the instrumentation and experimental preparation used in carrying out these measurements. In complement with this paper is an associate paper bearing the same title head, but with the title extension Part 2: Laboratory results (300K--80K). 13 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Correction method for the self-absorption effects in fluorescence extended X-ray absorption fine structure on multilayer samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen Bin; Yang, Xiao Yue; Zhu, Jing Tao; Tu, Yu Chun; Mu, Bao Zhong; Yu, Hai Sheng; Wei, Xiang Jun; Huang, Yu Ying; Wang, Zhan Shan

    2014-05-01

    A novel correction method for self-absorption effects is proposed for extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) detected in the fluorescence mode on multilayer samples. The effects of refraction and multiple reflection at the interfaces are fully considered in this correction method. The correction is performed in k-space before any further data analysis, and it can be applied to single-layer or multilayer samples with flat surfaces and without thickness limit when the model parameters for the samples are known. The validity of this method is verified by the fluorescence EXAFS data collected for a Cr/C multilayer sample measured at different experimental geometries. PMID:24763646

  12. Calibration of tip and sample temperature of a scanning tunneling microscope using a superconductive sample

    SciTech Connect

    Stocker, Matthias; Pfeifer, Holger; Koslowski, Berndt

    2014-05-15

    The temperature of the electrodes is a crucial parameter in virtually all tunneling experiments. The temperature not only controls the thermodynamic state of the electrodes but also causes thermal broadening, which limits the energy resolution. Unfortunately, the construction of many scanning tunneling microscopes inherits a weak thermal link between tip and sample in order to make one side movable. Such, the temperature of that electrode is badly defined. Here, the authors present a procedure to calibrate the tip temperature by very simple means. The authors use a superconducting sample (Nb) and a standard tip made from W. Due to the asymmetry in the density of states of the superconductor (SC)—normal metal (NM) tunneling junction, the SC temperature controls predominantly the density of states while the NM controls the thermal smearing. By numerically simulating the I-V curves and numerically optimizing the tip temperature and the SC gap width, the tip temperature can be accurately deduced if the sample temperature is known or measureable. In our case, the temperature dependence of the SC gap may serve as a temperature sensor, leading to an accurate NM temperature even if the SC temperature is unknown.

  13. Superconductivity:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacchetti, N.

    In this paper a short historical account of the discovery of superconductivity and of its gradual development is given. The physical interpretation of its various aspects took about forty years (from 1911 to 1957) to reach a successful description of this phenomenon in terms of a microscopic theory At the very end it seemed that more or less everything could be reasonably interpreted even if modifications and refinements of the original theory were necessary. In 1986 the situation changed abruptly when a cautious but revolutionary paper appeared showing that superconductivity was found in certain ceramic oxides at temperatures above those up to then known. A rush of frantic experimental activity started world-wide and in less than one year it was shown that superconductivity is a much more widespread phenomenon than deemed before and can be found at temperatures well above the liquid air boiling point. The complexity and the number of the substances (mainly ceramic oxides) involved call for a sort of modern alchemy if compounds with the best superconducting properties are to be manufactured. We don't use the word alchemy in a deprecatory sense but just to emphasise that till now nobody can say why these compounds are what they are: superconductors.

  14. Characterization of electron microscopes with binary pseudo-random multilayer test samples

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Conley, Raymond; Anderson, Erik H; Barber, Samuel K; Bouet, Nathalie; McKinney, Wayne R; Takacs, Peter Z; Voronov, Dmitriy L

    2010-09-17

    Verification of the reliability of metrology data from high quality x-ray optics requires that adequate methods for test and calibration of the instruments be developed. For such verification for optical surface profilometers in the spatial frequency domain, a modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays has been suggested [Proc. SPIE 7077-7 (2007), Opt. Eng. 47(7), 073602-1-5 (2008)} and proven to be an effective calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes, a phase shifting Fizeau interferometer, and a scatterometer [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 616, 172-82 (2010)]. Here we describe the details of development of binary pseudo-random multilayer (BPRML) test samples suitable for characterization of scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopes. We discuss the results of TEM measurements with the BPRML test samples fabricated from a WiSi2/Si multilayer coating with pseudo randomly distributed layers. In particular, we demonstrate that significant information about the metrological reliability of the TEM measurements can be extracted even when the fundamental frequency of the BPRML sample is smaller than the Nyquist frequency of the measurements. The measurements demonstrate a number of problems related to the interpretation of the SEM and TEM data. Note that similar BPRML test samples can be used to characterize x-ray microscopes. Corresponding work with x-ray microscopes is in progress.

  15. Characterization of Electron Microscopes with Binary Pseudo-random Multilayer Test Samples

    SciTech Connect

    V Yashchuk; R Conley; E Anderson; S Barber; N Bouet; W McKinney; P Takacs; D Voronov

    2011-12-31

    Verification of the reliability of metrology data from high quality X-ray optics requires that adequate methods for test and calibration of the instruments be developed. For such verification for optical surface profilometers in the spatial frequency domain, a modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays has been suggested [1] and [2] and proven to be an effective calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes, a phase shifting Fizeau interferometer, and a scatterometer [5]. Here we describe the details of development of binary pseudo-random multilayer (BPRML) test samples suitable for characterization of scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopes. We discuss the results of TEM measurements with the BPRML test samples fabricated from a WiSi2/Si multilayer coating with pseudo-randomly distributed layers. In particular, we demonstrate that significant information about the metrological reliability of the TEM measurements can be extracted even when the fundamental frequency of the BPRML sample is smaller than the Nyquist frequency of the measurements. The measurements demonstrate a number of problems related to the interpretation of the SEM and TEM data. Note that similar BPRML test samples can be used to characterize X-ray microscopes. Corresponding work with X-ray microscopes is in progress.

  16. Characterization of electron microscopes with binary pseudo-random multilayer test samples

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, V.V.; Conley, R.; Anderson, E.H.; Barber, S.K.; Bouet, N.; McKinney, W.R.; Takacs, P.Z. and Voronov, D.L.

    2010-12-08

    Verification of the reliability of metrology data from high quality X-ray optics requires that adequate methods for test and calibration of the instruments be developed. For such verification for optical surface profilometers in the spatial frequency domain, a modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binarypseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays has been suggested and and proven to be an effective calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes, a phase shifting Fizeau interferometer, and a scatterometer. Here we describe the details of development of binarypseudo-random multilayer (BPRML) test samples suitable for characterization of scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopes. We discuss the results of TEM measurements with the BPRML test samples fabricated from a WiSi{sub 2}/Si multilayer coating with pseudo-randomly distributed layers. In particular, we demonstrate that significant information about the metrological reliability of the TEM measurements can be extracted even when the fundamental frequency of the BPRML sample is smaller than the Nyquist frequency of the measurements. The measurements demonstrate a number of problems related to the interpretation of the SEM and TEM data. Note that similar BPRML testsamples can be used to characterize X-ray microscopes. Corresponding work with X-ray microscopes is in progress.

  17. Vortex quasi-crystals in mesoscopic superconducting samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing-Kun; Zhang, Wei; R, Sá de Melo C. A.

    2016-08-01

    There seems to be a one to one correspondence between the phases of atomic and molecular matter (AMOM) and vortex matter (VM) in superfluids and superconductors. Crystals, liquids, and glasses have been experimentally observed in both AMOM and VM. Here, we propose a vortex quasi-crystal state which can be stabilized due to boundary and surface energy effects for samples of special shapes and sizes. For finite sized pentagonal samples, it is proposed that a phase transition between a vortex crystal and a vortex quasi-crystal occurs as a function of magnetic field and temperature as the sample size is reduced. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274009, 11434011, and 111522436), the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB922000), the Research Funds of Renmin University of China (Grant Nos. 10XNL016 and 16XNLQ03), and the Program of State Key Laboratory of Quantum Optics and Quantum Optics Devices (Grant No. KF201404).

  18. Training in test samples of superconducting cables for accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, A.K.; Garber, M.; Robins, K.E.; Sampson, W.B.

    1988-08-22

    In the critical current measurement of some high current NbTi cables, the samples have to be ''trained'' by repeated quenching in order to obtain a usable voltage-current curve for I/sub c/ determination. This training behavior is most pronounced when the applied field is perpendicular to the wide face of the conductor and is strongly dependent on the copper-to-superconductor ratio and the clamping pressure. Data are given for SSC prototype cables as well as for HERA production conductors. Although a quantitative understanding of the experimental data is still lacking, some speculations regarding stability are presented. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Growth and superconducting properties of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} films on conductive SrRuO{sub 3} and LaNiO{sub 3} multilayers for coated conductor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Aytug, T.; Wu, J. Z.; Cantoni, C.; Verebelyi, D. T.; Specht, E. D.; Paranthaman, M.; Norton, D. P.; Christen, D. K.; Ericson, R. E.; Thomas, C. L.

    2000-02-07

    Conductive multilayers of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}/SrRuO{sub 3}/LaNiO{sub 3} (YBCO/SRO/LNO), YBCO/SRO, and YBCO/LNO were grown epitaxially on single-crystal LaAlO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3} substrates. Property characterizations revealed that the YBCO films on SRO and SRO/LNO buffer structures have excellent structural and superconducting properties. The YBCO/LNO, however, suffers degradation in superconducting transition temperatures and critical current densities, despite a good crystalline structure. The SRO/LNO bilayer showed excellent electrical contact with YBCO. These results have demonstrated the structural and chemical compatibility of SRO/LNO multilayers with YBCO and their potential use as conductive buffer layers for YBCO-based coated conductors as well as for other high-temperature superconducting applications. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Titania doping effect on superconducting properties of MgB2 bulk samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, G.; Bridoux, G.; Serquis, A.

    2009-05-01

    In this work we study the microstructural and superconducting properties of doped and undoped bulk MgB2 samples prepared by solid-state reaction, with 0 and 2.5 %at. nominal TiO2 nanotubes contents, annealed at different temperatures in the 750-900°C range. We discuss the Tc, Jc and Hc2 performance and their correlation with the different synthesis parameters.

  1. Note: Radio frequency surface impedance characterization system for superconducting samples at 7.5 GHz.

    PubMed

    Xiao, B P; Reece, C E; Phillips, H L; Geng, R L; Wang, H; Marhauser, F; Kelley, M J

    2011-05-01

    A radio frequency (RF) surface impedance characterization (SIC) system that uses a novel sapphire-loaded niobium cavity operating at 7.5 GHz has been developed as a tool to measure the RF surface impedance of flat superconducting material samples. The SIC system can presently make direct calorimetric RF surface impedance measurements on the central 0.8 cm(2) area of 5 cm diameter disk samples from 2 to 20 K exposed to RF magnetic fields up to 14 mT. To illustrate system utility, we present first measurement results for a bulk niobium sample. PMID:21639552

  2. Multilayer film analysis for glucose in 1-microL samples of plasma.

    PubMed

    Neeley, W E; Zettner, A

    1983-12-01

    With the ultramicroanalytical system described here we can measure glucose in 1 microL of plasma or serum. The sample is placed on a dry, multilayer film element (Eastman Kodak), where a colored spot about 3.5 mm in diameter develops. The reflectance of these spots is measured with a reflectance digital matrix photometer that was conceived, designed, and constructed in our laboratory. The spot is illuminated with monochromatic light and its image is projected by a camera lens onto the photosensitive surface of a linear photodiode array containing 512 individual photodetectors. The photodetector signals are processed by a computer to obtain the reflectance and diameter of the spot. The latter is proportional to sample volume. Because the reflectance of the spot does not depend greatly on sample volume, accurate pipetting is not required. The coefficients of variation of repeatable glucose analyses were, for 400, 3000, and 5120 mg/L, 1.7, 2.3, and 2.8%, respectively. The correlation coefficient (r) between glucose analyses by our method (y) and with the Ektachem 400 (x) was 0.9918; the regression equation was y = 1.07x - 94.3 mg/L. PMID:6640910

  3. Calorimeters for precision power dissipation measurements on controlled-temperature superconducting radiofrequency samples.

    PubMed

    Xiao, B P; Reece, C E; Phillips, H L; Kelley, M J

    2012-12-01

    Two calorimeters, with stainless steel and Cu as the thermal path material for high precision and high power versions, respectively, have been designed and commissioned for the 7.5 GHz surface impedance characterization system at Jefferson Lab to provide low temperature control and measurement for CW power up to 22 W on a 5 cm diameter disk sample which is thermally isolated from the radiofrequency (RF) portion of the system. A power compensation method has been developed to measure the RF induced power on the sample. Simulation and experimental results show that with these two calorimeters, the whole thermal range of interest for superconducting radiofrequency materials has been covered. The power measurement error in the interested power range is within 1.2% and 2.7% for the high precision and high power versions, respectively. Temperature distributions on the sample surface for both versions have been simulated and the accuracy of sample temperature measurements have been analyzed. Both versions have the ability to accept bulk superconductors and thin film superconducting samples with a variety of substrate materials such as Al, Al(2)O(3), Cu, MgO, Nb, and Si. PMID:23278016

  4. Calorimeters for Precision Power Dissipation Measurements on Controlled-Temperature Superconducting Radiofrequency Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Binping P.; Kelley, Michael J.; Reece, Charles E.; Phillips, H. L.

    2012-12-01

    Two calorimeters, with stainless steel and Cu as the thermal path material for high precision and high power versions, respectively, have been designed and commissioned for the surface impedance characterization (SIC) system at Jefferson Lab to provide low temperature control and measurement for CW power up to 22 W on a 5 cm dia. disk sample which is thermally isolated from the RF portion of the system. A power compensation method has been developed to measure the RF induced power on the sample. Simulation and experimental results show that with these two calorimeters, the whole thermal range of interest for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) materials has been covered. The power measurement error in the interested power range is within 1.2% and 2.7% for the high precision and high power versions, respectively. Temperature distributions on the sample surface for both versions have been simulated and the accuracy of sample temperature measurements have been analysed. Both versions have the ability to accept bulk superconductors and thin film superconducting samples with a variety of substrate materials such as Al, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Cu, MgO, Nb and Si.

  5. Surface characterization of Nb samples electropolished together with real superconducting rf accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Xin Zhao; Geng, Rong -Li; Tyagi, P. V.; Hayano, Hitoshi; Kato, Shigeki; Nishiwaki, Michiru; Saeki, Takayuki; Sawabe, Motoaki

    2010-12-30

    Here, we report the results of surface characterizations of niobium (Nb) samples electropolished together with a single cell superconducting radio-frequency accelerator cavity. These witness samples were located in three regions of the cavity, namely at the equator, the iris and the beam-pipe. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) was utilized to probe the chemical composition of the topmost four atomic layers. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray for elemental analysis (SEM/EDX) was used to observe the surface topography and chemical composition at the micrometer scale. A few atomic layers of sulfur (S) were found covering the samples non-uniformly. Niobium oxide granules with a sharp geometry were observed on every sample. Some Nb-O granules appeared to also contain sulfur.

  6. Surface characterization of Nb samples electropolished together with real superconducting rf accelerator cavities

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xin Zhao; Geng, Rong -Li; Tyagi, P. V.; Hayano, Hitoshi; Kato, Shigeki; Nishiwaki, Michiru; Saeki, Takayuki; Sawabe, Motoaki

    2010-12-30

    Here, we report the results of surface characterizations of niobium (Nb) samples electropolished together with a single cell superconducting radio-frequency accelerator cavity. These witness samples were located in three regions of the cavity, namely at the equator, the iris and the beam-pipe. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) was utilized to probe the chemical composition of the topmost four atomic layers. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray for elemental analysis (SEM/EDX) was used to observe the surface topography and chemical composition at the micrometer scale. A few atomic layers of sulfur (S) were found covering the samples non-uniformly. Niobium oxide granulesmore » with a sharp geometry were observed on every sample. Some Nb-O granules appeared to also contain sulfur.« less

  7. Superconducting High-Resolution X-Ray Spectrometers For Chemical State Analysis Of Dilute Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Stephan; Drury, Owen B.; Funk, Tobias; Sherrell, Darren; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Labov, Simon E.; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2004-05-01

    Cryogenic X-ray spectrometers operating at temperatures below 1 K combine high energy resolution with broadband efficiency for X-ray energies up to 10 keV. They offer advantages for chemical state analysis of dilute samples by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in cases where conventional Ge or Si(Li) detectors lack energy resolution and grating spectrometers lack detection efficiency. We are developing soft X-ray spectrometers based on superconducting Nb-Al-AlOx-Al-Nb tunnel junction (STJ) technology. X-rays absorbed in one of the superconducting electrodes generate excess charge carriers in proportion to their energy, thereby producing a measurable temporary increase in tunneling current. For STJ operation at the synchrotron, we have designed a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) with a cold finger that holds a 3 × 3 array of STJs inside the UHV sample chamber at a temperature of ˜0.1 K within ˜15 mm of a room temperature sample. Our STJ spectrometer can have an energy resolution below 10 eV FWHM for X-ray energies up to 1 keV, and has total count rate capabilities above 100,000 counts/s. We will describe detector performance in synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence experiments and demonstrate its use for XAS on a dilute metal site in a metalloprotein.

  8. Micro-Vibration Measurements on Thermally Loaded Multi-Layer Insulation Samples in Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, Georg; Grillenbeck, Anton

    2008-01-01

    Some scientific missions require to an extreme extent the absence of any on-board microvibration. Recent projects dedicated to measuring the Earth's gravity field and modeling the geoid with extremely high accuracy are examples. Their missions demand for extremely low micro-vibration environment on orbit for: (1) Not disturbing the measurement of earth gravity effects with the installed gradiometer or (2) Even not damaging the very high sensitive instruments. Based on evidence from ongoing missions multi-layer insulation (MLI) type thermal control blankets have been identified as a structural element of spacecrafts which might deform under temperature variations being caused by varying solar irradiation in orbit. Any such deformation exerts tiny forces which may cause small reactions resulting in micro-vibrations, in particular by exciting the spacecraft eigenmodes. The principle of the test set-up for the micro-vibration test was as follows. A real side wall panel of the spacecraft (size about 0.25 m2) was low-frequency suspended in a thermal vacuum chamber. On the one side of this panel, the MLI samples were fixed by using the standard methods. In front of the MLI, an IR-rig was installed which provided actively controlled IR-radiation power of about 6 kW/m2 in order to heat the MLI surface. The cooling was passive using the shroud temperature at a chamber pressure <1E-5mbar. The resulting micro-vibrations due to MLI motion in the heating and the cooling phase were measured via seismic accelerometers which were rigidly mounted to the panel. Video recording was used to correlate micro-vibration events to any visual MLI motion. Different MLI sample types were subjected to various thermal cycles in a temperature range between -60 C to +80 C. In this paper, the experience on these micro-vibration measurements will be presented and the conclusions for future applications will be discussed

  9. Identifying the origin of groundwater samples in a multi-layer aquifer system with Random Forest classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudron, Paul; Alonso-Sarría, Francisco; García-Aróstegui, José Luís; Cánovas-García, Fulgencio; Martínez-Vicente, David; Moreno-Brotóns, Jesús

    2013-08-01

    Accurate identification of the origin of groundwater samples is not always possible in complex multilayered aquifers. This poses a major difficulty for a reliable interpretation of geochemical results. The problem is especially severe when the information on the tubewells design is hard to obtain. This paper shows a supervised classification method based on the Random Forest (RF) machine learning technique to identify the layer from where groundwater samples were extracted. The classification rules were based on the major ion composition of the samples. We applied this method to the Campo de Cartagena multi-layer aquifer system, in southeastern Spain. A large amount of hydrogeochemical data was available, but only a limited fraction of the sampled tubewells included a reliable determination of the borehole design and, consequently, of the aquifer layer being exploited. Added difficulty was the very similar compositions of water samples extracted from different aquifer layers. Moreover, not all groundwater samples included the same geochemical variables. Despite of the difficulty of such a background, the Random Forest classification reached accuracies over 90%. These results were much better than the Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and Decision Trees (CART) supervised classification methods. From a total of 1549 samples, 805 proceeded from one unique identified aquifer, 409 proceeded from a possible blend of waters from several aquifers and 335 were of unknown origin. Only 468 of the 805 unique-aquifer samples included all the chemical variables needed to calibrate and validate the models. Finally, 107 of the groundwater samples of unknown origin could be classified. Most unclassified samples did not feature a complete dataset. The uncertainty on the identification of training samples was taken in account to enhance the model. Most of the samples that could not be identified had an incomplete dataset.

  10. Surface analyses of electropolished niobium samples for superconducting radio frequency cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Tyagi, P. V.; Nishiwaki, M.; Saeki, T.; Sawabe, M.; Hayano, H.; Noguchi, T.; Kato, S.

    2010-07-15

    The performance of superconducting radio frequency niobium cavities is sometimes limited by contaminations present on the cavity surface. In the recent years extensive research has been done to enhance the cavity performance by applying improved surface treatments such as mechanical grinding, electropolishing (EP), chemical polishing, tumbling, etc., followed by various rinsing methods such as ultrasonic pure water rinse, alcoholic rinse, high pressure water rinse, hydrogen per oxide rinse, etc. Although good cavity performance has been obtained lately by various post-EP cleaning methods, the detailed nature about the surface contaminants is still not fully characterized. Further efforts in this area are desired. Prior x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses of EPed niobium samples treated with fresh EP acid, demonstrated that the surfaces were covered mainly with the niobium oxide (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}) along with carbon, in addition a small quantity of sulfur and fluorine were also found in secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis. In this article, the authors present the analyses of surface contaminations for a series of EPed niobium samples located at various positions of a single cell niobium cavity followed by ultrapure water rinsing as well as our endeavor to understand the aging effect of EP acid solution in terms of contaminations presence at the inner surface of the cavity with the help of surface analytical tools such as XPS, SIMS, and scanning electron microscope at KEK.

  11. Study of vortex states and dynamics in mesoscopic superconducting samples with MFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polshyn, Gregory; Naibert, Tyler; Chua, Victor; Budakian, Raffi

    Vortex states in superconducting (SC) structures, their dynamics and ways to manipulate them are topics of great interest. We report a new method of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) that allows the study of vortex states in mesoscopic SC samples. For the case of a SC ring, which is biased to a half-integer flux quantum, the flux modulation through the ring caused by the motion of the magnetic tip drives the ring between two consecutive fluxoid states. The corresponding current switching in the ring produces strong position-dependent forces on the cantilever. In the regime where the frequency of the thermally activated jumps between fluxoid states is close to the frequency of the cantilever, large changes in the cantilever frequency and dissipation are observed. This effect may be understood as a stochastic resonance (SR) process. These changes in the cantilever's mechanical properties are used to ``image'' the barrier energies between fluxoid states. Additionally, SR imaging of the barrier energies are used to study the effect of the locally applied magnetic field from the MFM tip on the barrier heights. We report the results of measurements for Al rings. Further, the same imaging technique can be applied to more sophisticated SC structures such as arrays of Josephson junctions.

  12. Study on effect of annealing conditions on structural, magnetic and superconducting properties of MgB{sub 2} bulk samples

    SciTech Connect

    Phaneendra, Konduru Asokan, K. Kanjilal, D.; Awana, V. P. S.; Sastry, S. Sreehari

    2014-04-24

    Effect of annealing conditions on structural, magnetic and superconducting properties of Magnesium Diboride (MgB{sub 2}) bulk superconductor samples prepared by solid state route method are compared. The samples are made by taking Magnesium and Boron powders in stoichiometric ratio, grounded well and pelletized at pressure of about 10Tonnes. These pellets are annealed in both Argon and vacuum environment separately up to 800°c for two hours. Both the samples show clear superconducting transition at Tc ∼ 38 k. This is further conformed by AC/DC magnetization (M-T), Resistivity [ρ (T, H)] measurements under magnetic field up to 14 Tesla as well. Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction of both samples conformed the MgB{sub 2} phase formation with P6/mmm space group symmetry. Scanning Electron Microscopy images of the surface revile more agglomeration of grains in case of Argon annealed samples. This result in more critical current density (J{sub c}) of Argon annealed samples than vacuum annealed one calculated from Bean's critical state model. This high Jc is explained in terms of more inter grain connectivity for Argon annealed sample than vacuum annealed sample.

  13. Study on effect of annealing conditions on structural, magnetic and superconducting properties of MgB2 bulk samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phaneendra, Konduru; Asokan, K.; Awana, V. P. S.; Sastry, S. Sreehari; Kanjilal, D.

    2014-04-01

    Effect of annealing conditions on structural, magnetic and superconducting properties of Magnesium Diboride (MgB2) bulk superconductor samples prepared by solid state route method are compared. The samples are made by taking Magnesium and Boron powders in stoichiometric ratio, grounded well and pelletized at pressure of about 10Tonnes. These pellets are annealed in both Argon and vacuum environment separately up to 800°c for two hours. Both the samples show clear superconducting transition at Tc ˜ 38 k. This is further conformed by AC/DC magnetization (M-T), Resistivity [ρ (T, H)] measurements under magnetic field up to 14 Tesla as well. Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction of both samples conformed the MgB2 phase formation with P6/mmm space group symmetry. Scanning Electron Microscopy images of the surface revile more agglomeration of grains in case of Argon annealed samples. This result in more critical current density (Jc) of Argon annealed samples than vacuum annealed one calculated from Bean's critical state model. This high Jc is explained in terms of more inter grain connectivity for Argon annealed sample than vacuum annealed sample.

  14. Growth and Superconducting Properties of YBa2Cu3O 7-d Films on Conductive SrRuO3 and LaNiO3 Multilayers for

    SciTech Connect

    Aytug, T.

    2000-02-07

    Conductive multilayers of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}/SrRuO{sub 3}/LaNiO{sub 3} (YBCO/SRO/LNO), YBCO/SRO, and YBCO/LNO were grown epitaxially on single-crystal LaAlO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3} substrates. Property characterizations revealed that the YBCO films on SRO and SRO/LNO buffer structures have excellent structural and superconducting properties. The YBCO/LNO, however, suffers degradation in superconducting transition temperatures and critical current densities, despite a good crystalline structure. The SRO/LNO bilayer showed excellent electrical contact with BCO. These results have demonstrated the structural and chemical compatibility of SRO/LNO multilayers with YBCO and their potential use as conductive buffer layers for YBCO-based coated conductors as well as for other high-temperature superconducting applications.

  15. Versatile pulsed laser setup for depth profiling analysis of multilayered samples in the field of cultural heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, N. F. C.; Osticioli, I.; Striova, J.; Sansonetti, A.; Becucci, M.; Castellucci, E.

    2009-04-01

    The present study considers the use of a nanosecond pulsed laser setup capable of performing laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and pulsed Raman spectroscopy for the study of multilayered objects in the field of cultural heritage. Controlled etching using the 4th harmonic 266 nm emission of a Nd:YAG laser source with a 8 ns pulse duration was performed on organic films and mineral strata meant to simulate different sequence of layers usually found in art objects such as in easel and mural paintings. The process of micro ablation coupled with powerful spectroscopic techniques operating with the same laser source, constitutes an interesting alternative to mechanical sampling especially when dealing with artworks such as ceramics and metal works which are problematic due to their hardness and brittleness. Another case is that of valuable pieces where sampling is not an option and the materials to analyse lie behind the surface. The capabilities and limitations of such instrumentation were assessed through several tests in order to characterize the trend of the laser ablation on different materials. Monitored ablation was performed on commercial sheets of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), a standard material of known thickness and mechanical stability, and rabbit glue, an adhesive often used in works of art. Measurements were finally carried out on a specimen with a stratigraphy similar to those found in real mural paintings.

  16. Characterization of electron microscopes with binary pseudo-random multilayer test samples

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Conley, Raymond; Anderson, Erik H.; Barber, Samuel K.; Bouet, Nathalie; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Voronov, Dmitriy L.

    2010-07-09

    We discuss the results of SEM and TEM measurements with the BPRML test samples fabricated from a BPRML (WSi2/Si with fundamental layer thickness of 3 nm) with a Dual Beam FIB (focused ion beam)/SEM technique. In particular, we demonstrate that significant information about the metrological reliability of the TEM measurements can be extracted even when the fundamental frequency of the BPRML sample is smaller than the Nyquist frequency of the measurements. The measurements demonstrate a number of problems related to the interpretation of the SEM and TEM data. Note that similar BPRML test samples can be used to characterize x-ray microscopes. Corresponding work with x-ray microscopes is in progress.

  17. Etching of Niobium Sample Placed on Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavity Surface in Ar/CL2 Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Janardan Upadhyay, Larry Phillips, Anne-Marie Valente

    2011-09-01

    Plasma based surface modification is a promising alternative to wet etching of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. It has been proven with flat samples that the bulk Niobium (Nb) removal rate and the surface roughness after the plasma etchings are equal to or better than wet etching processes. To optimize the plasma parameters, we are using a single cell cavity with 20 sample holders symmetrically distributed over the cell. These holders serve the purpose of diagnostic ports for the measurement of the plasma parameters and for the holding of the Nb sample to be etched. The plasma properties at RF (100 MHz) and MW (2.45 GHz) frequencies are being measured with the help of electrical and optical probes at different pressures and RF power levels inside of this cavity. The niobium coupons placed on several holders around the cell are being etched simultaneously. The etching results will be presented at this conference.

  18. Microstructural and magnetic analysis of a superconducting foam and comparison with IG-processed bulk samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koblischka-Veneva, A.; Koblischka, M. R.; Ide, N.; Inoue, K.; Muralidhar, M.; Hauet, T.; Murakami, M.

    2016-03-01

    YBa2Cu3Oy (YBCO) foam samples show an open, porous foam structure, which may have benefits for many applications of high-T c superconductors. As the basic material of these foams is a pseudo-single crystalline material with the directional growth initiated by a seed crystal similar to standard melt-textured samples, the achieved texture of the YBCO is a very important parameter. We analyzed the local texture and grain orientation of the individual struts forming the foam by means of atomic force microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Furthermore, the magnetic properties of a foam strut are evaluated by means of SQUID measurements, from which the flux pinning forces were determined. A scaling of the pinning forces in the temperature range between 60 K and 85 K was performed. These data and the details of the microstructure are compared to IG-processed, bulk material.

  19. Characterization Of Superconducting Samples With SIC System For Thin Film Developments: Status And Recent Results

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, H. Lawrence; Reece, Charles E.; Valente-Feliciano, Anne-Marie; Xiao, Binping; Eremeev, Grigory V.

    2014-02-01

    Within any thin film development program directed towards SRF accelerating structures, there is a need for an RF characterization device that can provide information about RF properties of small samples. The current installation of the RF characterization device at Jefferson Lab is Surface Impedance Characterization (SIC) system. The data acquisition environment for the system has recently been improved to allow for automated measurement, and the system has been routinely used for characterization of bulk Nb, films of Nb on Cu, MgB{sub 2}, NbTiN, Nb{sub 3}Sn films, etc. We present some of the recent results that illustrate present capabilities and limitations of the system.

  20. Polyelectrolyte multilayers on magnetic silica as a new sorbent for the separation of trace copper in food samples and determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Guoqiang; Ma, Yulong; Jiang, Xiuming; Mao, Pu

    2014-12-01

    A novel magnetic silica sorbent with polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) on its surface was prepared, and the sorbent was used for the magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) of trace Cu(2+) in drinking water with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) as the detector. The experimental parameters for the MSPE procedure, such as the pH, desorption conditions, ultrasonic time and co-existing ions effects, were investigated. The adsorption capacity of the new sorbent was 14.7 mg g(-1) for Cu(2+). The detection limit of the developed method was 0.23 ng mL(-1) for Cu(2+) with an enrichment factor of 95.7. The analytical data obtained from the certified reference water and rice samples were in good agreement with the certified values. This method was also successfully applied to the determination of trace Cu(2+) in different food samples with satisfactory results.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance on room temperature samples in nanotesla fields using a two-stage dc superconducting quantum interference device sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körber, R.; Casey, A.; Shibahara, A.; Piscitelli, M.; Cowan, B. P.; Lusher, C. P.; Saunders, J.; Drung, D.; Schurig, Th.

    2007-10-01

    We describe a compact system for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at ultralow magnetic fields on small liquid samples (˜0.14ml) at room temperature. The broadband spectrometer employs an integrated two-stage superconducting quantum interference device current sensor with a coupled energy sensitivity of 50h, in the white noise limit. Environmental noise is screened using a compact arrangement of mu-metal and a superconducting shield. Proton signals in water have been observed down to 93nT (a Larmor frequency of 4.0Hz), with a minimum linewidth of 0.16Hz measured at ˜40Hz. Two-component free induction decays were observed from oil/water mixtures between 275 and 300K.

  2. MULTI-LAYER SAMPLING IN CONVENTIONAL MONITORING WELLS FOR IMPROVED ESTIMATION OF VERTICAL CONTAMINANT DISTRIBUTIONS AND MASS

    EPA Science Inventory

    "Traditional" approaches to sampling groundwater and interpreting monitoring well data often provide misleading pictures of plume shape and location in the subsurface and the true extent of contamination. Groundwater samples acquired using pumps and bailers in conventional monito...

  3. Multilayered Graphene in Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzhir, P.; Volynets, N.; Maksimenko, S.; Kaplas, T.; Svirko, Yu.

    2013-05-01

    We report on the experimental study of electromagnetic (EM) properties of multilayered graphene in Ka-band synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process in between nanometrically thin Cu catalyst film and dielectric (SiO2) substrate. The quality of the produced multilayered graphene samples were monitored by Raman spectroscopy. The thickness of graphene films was controlled by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and was found to be a few nanometers (up to 5 nm). We discovered, that the fabricated graphene provided remarkably high EM shielding efficiency caused by absorption losses at the level of 35-43% of incident power. Being highly conductive at room temperature, multi-layer graphene emerges as a promising material for manufacturing ultrathin microwave coatings to be used in aerospace applications.

  4. Superconducting Thin Films for SRF Cavity Applications: A Route to Higher Field Gradient Linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, Wiliam Michael

    Many linear accelerator (linac) applications rely on the use of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. In order to overcome the current field gradient limits imposed by the use of bulk niobium, a model involving the deposition of alternating superconducting-insulating-superconducting (SIS) thin films onto the interior surface of SRF cavities has been proposed. Since SRF performance is a surface phenomenon, the critical surface of these cavities is less than 1 micron thick, thus enabling the use of thin films. Before such approach can successfully be implemented fundamental studies correlating the microstructure and superconducting properties of thin films are needed. To this end the effect of grain boundary density and interfacial strain in thin films has been explored. Thin films with a smaller grain boundary density were found to have better superconducting properties than films with a larger grain boundary density. Interfacial strain due to a lattice mismatch between the film and substrate lead to two regions in films, one strained region near the interface and one relaxed region away from the interface. The presence of two regions in the film resulted in two types of superconducting behavior. Niobium films were deposited onto copper surfaces to help understand why previous attempts of implementing niobium coated copper cavities in order to exploit the better thermal properties of copper had varying degrees of success. It was found that an increased growth temperature produced niobium films with larger grains and correspondingly better superconducting properties. Proof of principle multilayer samples were prepared to test the SIS model. For the first time, multilayers were produced that were capable of shielding an underlying niobium film from vortex penetration beyond the lower critical field of bulk niobium. This result provides evidence supporting the feasibility of the SIS model.

  5. High temperature interface superconductivity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-01-20

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. Here, wemore » conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.« less

  6. High temperature interface superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-02-01

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both 'passive' hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. We conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  7. Superconducting slab in contact with thin superconducting layer at higher critical temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba-Ortega, J.; Silva, Clécio C. de Souza; Aguiar, J. Albino

    2009-07-01

    Within the framework of nonlinear time dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations (TDGL) we study the properties of a mesoscopic superconducting film with both surfaces in contact with a thin superconducting layer at a higher critical temperature. The properties of the layer are taken into account by the de Gennes boundary conditions via the extrapolation length b. We assume that the magnetic field is parallel to the multilayer interfaces. We obtain magnetization curves and calculate the spatial distribution of the superconducting electron density using a numerical method based on the technique of gauge invariant variables. This work tests both the rectangular cross-section size and b limit for the occurrence of vortices in a mesoscopic sample of area d xxd y where d y = 80 ξ(0) and dx varies discretely from 20 ξ(0) to 3 ξ(0). Our data also show a linear behavior of the magnetization curve and a power-law of order parameter modulus in limit b → 0 -.

  8. Superconductive wire

    DOEpatents

    Korzekwa, David A.; Bingert, John F.; Peterson, Dean E.; Sheinberg, Haskell

    1995-01-01

    A superconductive article is made by inserting a rigid mandrel into an internal cavity of a first metallic tube, said tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface defining the interior cavity, forming a layer of a superconductive material or superconductive precursor upon the exterior surface of said first metallic tube, machining the layer of superconductive material or superconductive precursor to a predetermined diameter to form an intermediate article configured for insertion into a second metallic tube having an interior diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter, inserting the machined intermediate article into a second metallic tube having an internal diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter of the intermediate article to form a composite intermediate article, reducing or ironing the composite intermediate article to a predetermined cross-sectional diameter, and sintering the reduced or ironed composite intermediate article at temperatures and for time sufficient for the superconductive material or superconductive precursor to exhibit superconductivity.

  9. Superconductive wire

    DOEpatents

    Korzekwa, D.A.; Bingert, J.F.; Peterson, D.E.; Sheinberg, H.

    1995-07-18

    A superconductive article is made by inserting a rigid mandrel into an internal cavity of a first metallic tube, said tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface defining the interior cavity, forming a layer of a superconductive material or superconductive precursor upon the exterior surface of said first metallic tube, machining the layer of superconductive material or superconductive precursor to a predetermined diameter to form an intermediate article configured for insertion into a second metallic tube having an interior diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter, inserting the machined intermediate article into a second metallic tube having an internal diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter of the intermediate article to form a composite intermediate article, reducing or ironing the composite intermediate article to a predetermined cross-sectional diameter, and sintering the reduced or ironed composite intermediate article at temperatures and for time sufficient for the superconductive material or superconductive precursor to exhibit superconductivity. 2 figs.

  10. Heat transfer through the flat surface of Rutherford superconducting cable samples with novel pattern of electrical insulation immersed in He II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strychalski, M.; Chorowski, M.; Polinski, J.

    2014-05-01

    Future accelerator magnets will be exposed to heat loads that exceed even by an order of magnitude presently observed heat fluxes transferred to superconducting magnet coils. To avoid the resistive transition of the superconducting cables, the efficiency of heat transfer between the magnet structure and the helium must be significantly increased. This can be achieved through the use of novel concepts of the cable’s electrical insulation wrapping, characterized by an enhanced permeability to helium while retaining sufficient electrical resistivity. This paper presents measurement results of the heat transfer through Rutherford NbTi cable samples immersed in a He II bath and subjected to the pressure loads simulating the counteracting of the Lorentz forces observed in powered magnets. The Rutherford cable samples that were tested used different electrical insulation wrapping schemes, including the scheme that is presently used and the proposed scheme for future LHC magnets. A new porous polyimide cable insulation with enhanced helium permeability was proposed in order to improve the evacuation of heat form the NbTi coil to He II bath. These tests were performed in a dedicated Claudet-type cryostat in pressurized He II at 1.9 K and 1 bar.

  11. Superconducting transistor

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting transistor is formed by disposing three thin films of superconducting material in a planar parallel arrangement and insulating the films from each other by layers of insulating oxides to form two tunnel junctions. One junction is biased above twice the superconducting energy gap and the other is biased at less than twice the superconducting energy gap. Injection of quasiparticles into the center film by one junction provides a current gain in the second junction.

  12. Architecture for high critical current superconducting tapes

    DOEpatents

    Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2002-01-01

    Improvements in critical current capacity for superconducting film structures are disclosed and include the use of, e.g., multilayer YBCO structures where individual YBCO layers are separated by a layer of an insulating material such as CeO.sub.2 and the like, a layer of a conducting material such as strontium ruthenium oxide and the like or by a second superconducting material such as SmBCO and the like.

  13. Laser beam induced nanoscale spot through nonlinear “thick” samples: A multi-layer thin lens self-focusing model

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Jingsong; Yan, Hui

    2014-08-14

    Self-focusing is a well-researched phenomenon. Nanoscale spots can be achieved through self-focusing, which is an alternative method for achieving high-density data storage, high-resolution light imaging, and maskless nanolithography. Several research groups have observed that self-focusing spots can be reduced to nanoscale levels via incident laser power manipulation. Self-focusing spots can be analyzed by solving the nonlinear Schrödinger equation and the finite difference time domain method. However, both procedures are complex and time-consuming. In the present work, a multi-layer thin-lens self-focusing model that considers diffraction effects and changes of refractive index along the radial and film thickness directions is proposed to analyze the self-focusing behavior and traveling process of light beams intuitively. The self-focusing behaviors of As{sub 2}S{sub 3} are simulated, and results show that a nanoscale self-focusing spot with a radius of about 0.12 μm can be formed at the bottom of nonlinear sample when the incident laser power exceeds 4.25 mW. Our findings are basically consistent with experimental reports and provide a good method for analyzing and understanding the self-focusing process. An appropriate application schematic design is also provided.

  14. Superconductivity in Ca-intercalated epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kang; Feng, Xiao; Zhang, Wenhao; Ou, Yunbo; Chen, Lianlian; He, Ke; Wang, Li-Li; Guo, Liwei; Liu, Guodong; Xue, Qi-Kun; Ma, Xucun

    2013-08-01

    We have prepared Ca-intercalated multilayer epitaxial graphene films on silicon carbide and observed superconductivity in them with both magnetic and transport measurements. Superconducting transition has been detected at temperature up to 7 K in Ca-intercalated epitaxial graphene with the thickness down to 10 layers grown on both Si-face and C-face of silicon carbide. The result demonstrates intercalated epitaxial graphene as a good platform to study graphene-based superconductivity.

  15. Evidence for Flat Bands near the Fermi Level in Epitaxial Rhombohedral Multilayer Graphene.

    PubMed

    Pierucci, Debora; Sediri, Haikel; Hajlaoui, Mahdi; Girard, Jean-Christophe; Brumme, Thomas; Calandra, Matteo; Velez-Fort, Emilio; Patriarche, Gilles; Silly, Mathieu G; Ferro, Gabriel; Soulière, Véronique; Marangolo, Massimiliano; Sirotti, Fausto; Mauri, Francesco; Ouerghi, Abdelkarim

    2015-05-26

    The stacking order of multilayer graphene has a profound influence on its electronic properties. In particular, it has been predicted that a rhombohedral stacking sequence displays a very flat conducting surface state: the longer the sequence, the flatter the band. In such a flat band, the role of electron-electron correlation is enhanced, possibly resulting in high Tc superconductivity, magnetic order, or charge density wave order. Here we demonstrate that rhombohedral multilayers are easily obtained by epitaxial growth on 3C-SiC(111) on a 2° off-axis 6H-SiC(0001). The resulting samples contain rhombohedral sequences of five layers on 70% of the surface. We confirm the presence of the flat band at the Fermi level by scanning tunneling spectroscopy and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, in close agreement with the predictions of density functional theory calculations. PMID:25893537

  16. Evidence for Flat Bands near the Fermi Level in Epitaxial Rhombohedral Multilayer Graphene.

    PubMed

    Pierucci, Debora; Sediri, Haikel; Hajlaoui, Mahdi; Girard, Jean-Christophe; Brumme, Thomas; Calandra, Matteo; Velez-Fort, Emilio; Patriarche, Gilles; Silly, Mathieu G; Ferro, Gabriel; Soulière, Véronique; Marangolo, Massimiliano; Sirotti, Fausto; Mauri, Francesco; Ouerghi, Abdelkarim

    2015-05-26

    The stacking order of multilayer graphene has a profound influence on its electronic properties. In particular, it has been predicted that a rhombohedral stacking sequence displays a very flat conducting surface state: the longer the sequence, the flatter the band. In such a flat band, the role of electron-electron correlation is enhanced, possibly resulting in high Tc superconductivity, magnetic order, or charge density wave order. Here we demonstrate that rhombohedral multilayers are easily obtained by epitaxial growth on 3C-SiC(111) on a 2° off-axis 6H-SiC(0001). The resulting samples contain rhombohedral sequences of five layers on 70% of the surface. We confirm the presence of the flat band at the Fermi level by scanning tunneling spectroscopy and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, in close agreement with the predictions of density functional theory calculations.

  17. Spin-triplet supercurrent in Co/Ni multilayer Josephson junctions with perpendicular anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingrich, E. C.; Quarterman, P.; Wang, Yixing; Loloee, R.; Pratt, W. P., Jr.; Birge, Norman O.

    2012-12-01

    We have measured spin-triplet supercurrent in Josephson junctions of the form S/F'/F/F'/S, where S is superconducting Nb, F' is a thin Ni layer with in-plane magnetization, and F is a Ni/[Co/Ni]n multilayer with out-of-plane magnetization. The supercurrent in these junctions decays very slowly with F-layer thickness and is much larger than in similar junctions not containing the two F' layers. Those two features are the characteristic signatures of spin-triplet supercurrent, which is maximized by the orthogonality of the magnetizations in the F and F' layers. Magnetic measurements confirm the out-of-plane anisotropy of the Co/Ni multilayers. These samples have their critical current optimized in the as-prepared state, which will be useful for future applications.

  18. Superconducting NbTiN thin films for superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavity applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Burton, Matthew C.; Beebe, Melissa R.; Yang, Kaida; Lukaszew, Rosa A.; Valente-Feliciano, Anne -Marie; Reece, Charles

    2016-02-12

    Current superconducting radio frequency technology, used in various particle accelerator facilities across the world, is reliant upon bulk niobium superconducting cavities. Due to technological advancements in the processing of bulk Nb cavities, the facilities have reached accelerating fields very close to a material-dependent limit, which is close to 50 MV/m for bulk Nb. One possible solution to improve upon this fundamental limitation was proposed a few years ago by Gurevich [Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 012511 (2006)], consisting of the deposition of alternating thin layers of superconducting and insulating materials on the interior surface of the cavities. The use of type-IImore » superconductors with Tc > TcNb and Hc > HcNb, (e.g., Nb3Sn, NbN, or NbTiN) could potentially greatly reduce the surface resistance (Rs) and enhance the accelerating field, if the onset of vortex penetration is increased above HcNb, thus enabling higher field gradients. Although Nb3Sn may prove superior, it is not clear that it can be grown as a suitable thin film for the proposed multilayer approach, since very high temperature is typically required for its growth, hindering achieving smooth interfaces and/or surfaces. On the other hand, since NbTiN has a smaller lower critical field (Hc1) and higher critical temperature (Tc) than Nb and increased conductivity compared to NbN, it is a promising candidate material for this new scheme. Here, the authors present experimental results correlating filmmicrostructure with superconducting properties on NbTiN thin film coupon samples while also comparing filmsgrown with targets of different stoichiometry. In conclusion, it is worth mentioning that the authors have achieved thin films with bulk-like lattice parameter and transition temperature while also achieving Hc1 values larger than bulk for films thinner than their London penetration depths.« less

  19. WAFER TEST CAVITY -Linking Surface Microstructure to RF Performance: a ‘Short-­Sample Test Facility’ for characterizing superconducting materials for SRF cavities.

    SciTech Connect

    Pogue, Nathaniel; Comeaux, Justin; McIntyre, Peter

    2014-05-30

    The Wafer Test cavity was designed to create a short sample test system to determine the properties of the superconducting materials and S-I-S hetero-structures. The project, funded by ARRA, was successful in accomplishing several goals to achieving a high gradient test system for SRF research and development. The project led to the design and construction of the two unique cavities that each severed unique purposes: the Wafer test Cavity and the Sapphire Test cavity. The Sapphire Cavity was constructed first to determine the properties of large single crystal sapphires in an SRF environment. The data obtained from the cavity greatly altered the design of the Wafer Cavity and provided the necessary information to ascertain the Wafer Test cavity’s performance.

  20. Superconducting Cable

    DOEpatents

    Hughey, Raburn L.; Sinha, Uday K.; Reece, David S.; Muller, Albert C.

    2005-07-22

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  1. Superconducting Cable

    DOEpatents

    Hughey, Raburn L.; Sinha, Uday K.; Reece, David S.; Muller, Albert C.

    2005-03-08

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  2. Study on x-ray multilayer monochromator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Changxin; Li, Mao-Lian; Miao, Tongqun; Lu, Xilin; Ma, Lie; An, Qingxiang; Liang, Guoli

    1993-01-01

    At present natural crystal TLAP used usually is replaced by artificial coated with multilayer for X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectral analysis. X-ray multilayer monochromator can be used for analyzing light elements such as F, Na, Mg etc. Diffraction intensity of the multilayer component is 5 times higher than that of TLAP. This paper describes operating principle, Fabrication method and technique of the X-ray multilayer monochromator and the components are used Model 3080 E sequential X-ray fluorescence spectroscope. The multilayer diffraction components are fabricated by means of coating alternatively multilayer with high and low electron density elements on single crystal silicon substrate by vapor deposition or sputtering. Gap between multilayers is d to be equivalent to lattice constant of crystal. Sample is excited to emit fluorescence with multi-wavelength when X-ray beam illuminates surface of the sample. Fluorescence emitted passes through collimator and incidences on multilayer diffraction component to be diffracted into various wavelengths which are corresponding some angles. Contents of elements in samples can be detected according to Bragg diffraction principle. Key technologies fabricating multilayer diffraction components are how to polish super-smooth surface substrate and to control d value of thickness of multilayer. Roughness of Si(111) substrate polished by us is up to 0.1 nm RMS. Gap d 2.5 nm between multilayers. It is very difficult to realize specification as mentioned above. Thicknesses of layers are controlled by quartz piezoelectric crystal and their monitor controlling errors is about 0.34 nm RMS. Ion sputtering device is adopted to improve surface finish and construct specialty of the layers. Finally we have developed multilayer diffraction components which have been used to analyze F, Na and Mg etc. by X-ray fluorescence spectroscope.

  3. In situ epitaxial MgB2 thin films for superconducting electronics.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xianghui; Pogrebnyakov, Alexej V; Kotcharov, Armen; Jones, James E; Xi, X X; Lysczek, Eric M; Redwing, Joan M; Xu, Shengyong; Li, Qi; Lettieri, James; Schlom, Darrell G; Tian, Wei; Pan, Xiaoqing; Liu, Zi-Kui

    2002-09-01

    The newly discovered 39-K superconductor MgB2 holds great promise for superconducting electronics. Like the conventional superconductor Nb, MgB2 is a phonon-mediated superconductor, with a relatively long coherence length. These properties make the prospect of fabricating reproducible uniform Josephson junctions, the fundamental element of superconducting circuits, much more favourable for MgB2 than for high-temperature superconductors. The higher transition temperature and larger energy gap of MgB2 promise higher operating temperatures and potentially higher speeds than Nb-based integrated circuits. However, success in MgB2 Josephson junctions has been limited because of the lack of an adequate thin-film technology. Because a superconducting integrated circuit uses a multilayer of superconducting, insulating and resistive films, an in situ process in which MgB2 is formed directly on the substrate is desirable. Here we show that this can be achieved by hybrid physical-chemical vapour deposition. The epitaxially grown MgB2 films show a high transition temperature and low resistivity, comparable to the best bulk samples, and their surfaces are smooth. This advance removes a major barrier for superconducting electronics using MgB2.

  4. Magnetic multilayer structure

    DOEpatents

    Herget, Philipp; O'Sullivan, Eugene J.; Romankiw, Lubomyr T.; Wang, Naigang; Webb, Bucknell C.

    2016-07-05

    A mechanism is provided for an integrated laminated magnetic device. A substrate and a multilayer stack structure form the device. The multilayer stack structure includes alternating magnetic layers and diode structures formed on the substrate. Each magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure is separated from another magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure by a diode structure.

  5. Superconducting Structure

    DOEpatents

    Kwon, Chuhee; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2005-09-13

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  6. Superconducting structure

    DOEpatents

    Kwon, Chuhee; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2003-04-01

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  7. Levitation force between a small magnet and a superconducting sample of finite size in the Meissner state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo, Jorge; Sosa, Victor

    1999-10-01

    The repulsion force between a cylindrical superconductor in the Meissner state and a small permanent magnet was calculated under the assumption that the superconductor was formed by a continuous array of dipoles distributed in the finite volume of the sample. After summing up the dipole-dipole interactions with the magnet, we obtained analytical expressions for the levitation force as a function of the superconductor-magnet distance, radius and thickness of the sample. We analyzed two configurations, with the magnet in a horizontal or vertical orientation.

  8. Bipolaronic superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Ranninger, J.

    1981-08-01

    Superconducting properties of narrow-band electrons are examined in the strong-coupling limit. It is shown that bipolarons (localized spatially nonoverlapping Cooper pairs) formed by strong electron-phonon interaction have under certain conditions superconducting properties which are characteristic of superfluid charged Bose systems. They represent an example of the "molecular" superconductivity proposed by Schafroth, Butler, and Blatt

    [Helv. Phys. Acta 30 93 (1957)]
    . The Meissner effect and the penetration depth of bipolaronic superconductors are examined. The relationship between Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superconductors and bipolaronic ones is discussed.

  9. Bipolaronic superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, A.; Ranninger, J.

    1981-08-01

    Superconducting properties of narrow-band electrons are examined in the strong-coupling limit. It is shown that bipolarons (localized spatially nonoverlapping Cooper pairs) formed by strong electron-phonon interaction have under certain conditions superconducting properties which are characteristic of superfluid charged Bose system. They represent an example of the ''molecular'' superconductivity proposed by Schafroth, Butler, and Blatt. The Meissner effect and the penetration depth of bipolaronic superconductor are examined. The relationship between Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superconductors and bipolaronic ones is discussed.

  10. Fabrication and Characterization of Samples for a Material Migration Experiment on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST).

    SciTech Connect

    Wampler, William R.; Van Deusen, Stuart B.

    2015-12-01

    This report documents work done for the ITER International Fusion Energy Organization (Sponsor) under a Funds-In Agreement FI 011140916 with Sandia National Laboratories. The work consists of preparing and analyzing samples for an experiment to measure material erosion and deposition in the EAST Tokamak. Sample preparation consisted of depositing thin films of carbon and aluminum onto molybdenum tiles. Analysis consists of measuring the thickness of films before and after exposure to helium plasma in EAST. From these measurements the net erosion and deposition of material will be quantified. Film thickness measurements are made at the Sandia Ion Beam Laboratory using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and nuclear reaction analysis, as described in this report. This report describes the film deposition and pre-exposure analysis. Results from analysis after plasma exposure will be given in a subsequent report.

  11. Analysis of multilayer insulation between 80K and 300K

    SciTech Connect

    Augustynowicz, S.D.; Demko, J.A.; Datskov, V.I.

    1993-07-01

    A model has been developed that can be used to determine the temperature distribution and heat transfer through a multilayer insulation (MLI) blanket. Predictions from the model were compared with a series of temperature measurements made during laboratory experiments and during a test of five superconducting magnets (dipoles) installed in a string and tested at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, FNAL (ER Test).

  12. Demonstration of superconducting micromachined cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Brecht, T. Reagor, M.; Chu, Y.; Pfaff, W.; Wang, C.; Frunzio, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2015-11-09

    Superconducting enclosures will be key components of scalable quantum computing devices based on circuit quantum electrodynamics. Within a densely integrated device, they can protect qubits from noise and serve as quantum memory units. Whether constructed by machining bulk pieces of metal or microfabricating wafers, 3D enclosures are typically assembled from two or more parts. The resulting seams potentially dissipate crossing currents and limit performance. In this letter, we present measured quality factors of superconducting cavity resonators of several materials, dimensions, and seam locations. We observe that superconducting indium can be a low-loss RF conductor and form low-loss seams. Leveraging this, we create a superconducting micromachined resonator with indium that has a quality factor of two million, despite a greatly reduced mode volume. Inter-layer coupling to this type of resonator is achieved by an aperture located under a planar transmission line. The described techniques demonstrate a proof-of-principle for multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuits for scalable quantum computing.

  13. Demonstration of superconducting micromachined cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, T.; Reagor, M.; Chu, Y.; Pfaff, W.; Wang, C.; Frunzio, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    Superconducting enclosures will be key components of scalable quantum computing devices based on circuit quantum electrodynamics. Within a densely integrated device, they can protect qubits from noise and serve as quantum memory units. Whether constructed by machining bulk pieces of metal or microfabricating wafers, 3D enclosures are typically assembled from two or more parts. The resulting seams potentially dissipate crossing currents and limit performance. In this letter, we present measured quality factors of superconducting cavity resonators of several materials, dimensions, and seam locations. We observe that superconducting indium can be a low-loss RF conductor and form low-loss seams. Leveraging this, we create a superconducting micromachined resonator with indium that has a quality factor of two million, despite a greatly reduced mode volume. Inter-layer coupling to this type of resonator is achieved by an aperture located under a planar transmission line. The described techniques demonstrate a proof-of-principle for multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuits for scalable quantum computing.

  14. Visualizing domain wall and reverse domain superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Iavarone, M; Moore, S A; Fedor, J; Ciocys, S T; Karapetrov, G; Pearson, J; Novosad, V; Bader, S D

    2014-08-28

    In magnetically coupled, planar ferromagnet-superconductor (F/S) hybrid structures, magnetic domain walls can be used to spatially confine the superconductivity. In contrast to a superconductor in a uniform applied magnetic field, the nucleation of the superconducting order parameter in F/S structures is governed by the inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution. The interplay between the superconductivity localized at the domain walls and far from the walls leads to effects such as re-entrant superconductivity and reverse domain superconductivity with the critical temperature depending upon the location. Here we use scanning tunnelling spectroscopy to directly image the nucleation of superconductivity at the domain wall in F/S structures realized with Co-Pd multilayers and Pb thin films. Our results demonstrate that such F/S structures are attractive model systems that offer the possibility to control the strength and the location of the superconducting nucleus by applying an external magnetic field, potentially useful to guide vortices for computing application.

  15. Visualizing domain wall and reverse domain superconductivity

    PubMed Central

    Iavarone, M.; Moore, S. A.; Fedor, J.; Ciocys, S. T.; Karapetrov, G.; Pearson, J.; Novosad, V.; Bader, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    In magnetically coupled, planar ferromagnet-superconductor (F/S) hybrid structures, magnetic domain walls can be used to spatially confine the superconductivity. In contrast to a superconductor in a uniform applied magnetic field, the nucleation of the superconducting order parameter in F/S structures is governed by the inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution. The interplay between the superconductivity localized at the domain walls and far from the walls leads to effects such as re-entrant superconductivity and reverse domain superconductivity with the critical temperature depending upon the location. Here we use scanning tunnelling spectroscopy to directly image the nucleation of superconductivity at the domain wall in F/S structures realized with Co-Pd multilayers and Pb thin films. Our results demonstrate that such F/S structures are attractive model systems that offer the possibility to control the strength and the location of the superconducting nucleus by applying an external magnetic field, potentially useful to guide vortices for computing application. PMID:25164004

  16. Decoupling of the CuO2 plane and superconductivity in Cu0.5Tl0.5Ba2(Ca2‑ySry)Cu3O10‑δ(y = 0-0.4) samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Nawazish A.; Usman Muzaffar, M.

    2016-05-01

    Cu0.5Tl0.5Ba2(Ca2‑ySry)Cu3O10‑δ(y = 0-0.4) samples have been synthesized at normal pressure at 860∘C. The main objectives of these experiments to study the role of inter-plane decoupling in suppressing the superconductivity of high temperature superconductors (HTSC). These samples have shown orthorhombic crystal structure and the c-axis length increases with increased Sr-doping. All the samples have shown metallic variations of resistivity (ρ) from room temperature down to the onset of superconductivity. The magnitude of the superconductivity is suppressed and the apical oxygen modes are hardened with Sr-doping. These studies have shown that Sr-doping promotes decoupling of conducting CuO2 planes which suppress the superconducting properties of final compound. The excess conductivity analyses have shown increases in the width of two-dimensional (2D) Lawrence-Doniach (LD) regime with Sr-doping. The coherence length along the c-axis ξc(0), the inter-layer coupling J, the phase relaxation time of the carriers τφ and the Fermi velocity vF of superconductor carriers is suppressed. The underlying reason for the suppression of superconductor properties is the decrease in the density of carriers in the superconductor planes. However, the values of Bc0(T), Bc1(T) and Jc(0) have been found to increase with the increased Sr-doping, which is suggested to be originating from the enhancement in the flux pinning character which is induced by Sr-doping. The values of magnetic field penetration depth λp.d and the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) parameter κ decrease with Sr-doping and it is also suggested to be originating from the increase of flux pinning character of the samples with Sr-doping.

  17. Superconducting junctions from doped nonsuperconducting CuO2 layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loktev, V. M.; Pogorelov, Yu. G.

    2011-04-01

    The theoretical approach proposed recently to describe the redistribution of electronic charge in multilayered selectively doped systems is modified for a system with a finite number of layers. Special attention is payed to the case of a finite heterostructure made of copper-oxide layers which are all nonsuperconducting (including nonconducting) because the doping levels in them are beyond the characteristic interval for superconductivity. Specific finite structures and doping configurations are proposed to obtain atomically thin superconducting heterojunctions of different compositions.

  18. Magnetic metallic multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, R.Q.

    1994-04-01

    Utilizing self-consistent Hartree-Fock calculations, several aspects of multilayers and interfaces are explored: enhancement and reduction of the local magnetic moments, magnetic coupling at the interfaces, magnetic arrangements within each film and among non-neighboring films, global symmetry of the systems, frustration, orientation of the various moments with respect to an outside applied field, and magnetic-field induced transitions. Magnetoresistance of ferromagnetic-normal-metal multilayers is found by solving the Boltzmann equation. Results explain the giant negative magnetoresistance encountered in these systems when an initial antiparallel arrangement is changed into a parallel configuration by an external magnetic field. The calculation depends on (1) geometric parameters (thicknesses of layers), (2) intrinsic metal parameters (number of conduction electrons, magnetization, and effective masses in layers), (3) bulk sample properties (conductivity relaxation times), (4) interface scattering properties (diffuse scattering versus potential scattering at the interfaces, and (5) outer surface scattering properties (specular versus diffuse surface scattering). It is found that a large negative magnetoresistance requires considerable asymmetry in interface scattering for the two spin orientations. Features of the interfaces that may produce an asymmetrical spin-dependent scattering are studied: varying interfacial geometric random roughness with no lateral coherence, correlated (quasi-periodic) roughness, and varying chemical composition of the interfaces. The interplay between these aspects of the interfaces may enhance or suppress the magnetoresistance, depending on whether it increases or decreases the asymmetry in the spin-dependent scattering of the conduction electrons.

  19. PREFACE: Superconducting materials Superconducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charfi Kaddour, Samia; Singleton, John; Haddad, Sonia

    2011-11-01

    The discovery of superconductivity in 1911 was a great milestone in condensed matter physics. This discovery has resulted in an enormous amount of research activity. Collaboration among chemists and physicists, as well as experimentalists and theoreticians has given rise to very rich physics with significant potential applications ranging from electric power transmission to quantum information. Several superconducting materials have been synthesized. Crucial progress was made in 1987 with the discovery of high temperature superconductivity in copper-based compounds (cuprates) which have revealed new fascinating properties. Innovative theoretical tools have been developed to understand the striking features of cuprates which have remained for three decades the 'blue-eyed boy' for researchers in superconductor physics. The history of superconducting materials has been notably marked by the discovery of other compounds, particularly organic superconductors which despite their low critical temperature continue to attract great interest regarding their exotic properties. Last but not least, the recent observation of superconductivity in iron-based materials (pnictides) has renewed hope in reaching room temperature superconductivity. However, despite intense worldwide studies, several features related to this phenomenon remain unveiled. One of the fundamental key questions is the mechanism by which superconductivity takes place. Superconductors continue to hide their 'secret garden'. The new trends in the physics of superconductivity have been one of the two basic topics of the International Conference on Conducting Materials (ICoCoM2010) held in Sousse,Tunisia on 3-7 November 2010 and organized by the Tunisian Physical Society. The conference was a nice opportunity to bring together participants from multidisciplinary domains in the physics of superconductivity. This special section contains papers submitted by participants who gave an oral contribution at ICoCoM2010

  20. Superconducting materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ruvalds, J.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Fermi liquid nesting in high temperature superconductors; optical properties of high temperature superconductors; Hall effect in superconducting La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4}; source of high transition temperatures; and prospects for new superconductors.

  1. Superconducting Microelectronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Richard W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses superconducting microelectronics based on the Josephson effect and its advantages over conventional integrated circuits in speed and sensitivity. Considers present uses in standards laboratories (voltage) and in measuring weak magnetic fields. Also considers future applications in superfast computer circuitry using Superconducting…

  2. Superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics on superconducting magnets: D19B and -C: The next steps for a record-setting magnet; D20: The push beyond 10 T: Beyond D20: Speculations on the 16-T regime; other advanced magnets for accelerators; spinoff applications; APC materials development; cable and cabling-machine development; and high-{Tc} superconductor at low temperature.

  3. Superconducting thermal neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, V.; Pietropaolo, A.; Celentano, G.; Cirillo, M.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Salvato, M.; Scherillo, A.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Vannozzi, A.

    2016-09-01

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium nitride (NbN) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle is well described by a hot spot mechanism: upon the occurrence of the nuclear reactions n + 10B → α + 7Li + 2.8 MeV, the energy released by the secondary particles into the strip induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T below 11K and current-biased below the critical current IC, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed and compared to those of a borated Nb superconducting strip.

  4. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Merlo, V.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M.; Scherillo, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2015-03-16

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, {sup 10}B + n → α + {sup 7}Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current I{sub c}, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  5. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, V.; Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Scherillo, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2015-03-01

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, 10B + n → α + 7Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current Ic, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  6. A Simple Demonstration of High Tc Superconductive Powder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Roger; Thompson, James C.

    1987-01-01

    Described is a simple demonstration that provides a way to determine if a given sample contains even a small fraction of superconducting material. The repulsion of the powder from a magnetic field is indicative of superconductivity. (RH)

  7. Multilayer Insulation Material Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, M. M.; Dooling, D.

    1999-01-01

    Multilayer Insulation Material Guidelines provides data on multilayer insulation materials used by previous spacecraft such as Spacelab and the Long-Duration Exposure Facility and outlines other concerns. The data presented in the document are presented for information only. They can be used as guidelines for multilayer insulation design for future spacecraft provided the thermal requirements of each new design and the environmental effects on these materials are taken into account.

  8. Search for Superconductivity in Micrometeorites

    PubMed Central

    Guénon, S.; Ramírez, J. G.; Basaran, Ali C.; Wampler, J.; Thiemens, M.; Taylor, S.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a very sensitive, highly selective, non-destructive technique for screening inhomogeneous materials for the presence of superconductivity. This technique, based on phase sensitive detection of microwave absorption is capable of detecting 10−12 cc of a superconductor embedded in a non-superconducting, non-magnetic matrix. For the first time, we apply this technique to the search for superconductivity in extraterrestrial samples. We tested approximately 65 micrometeorites collected from the water well at the Amundsen-Scott South pole station and compared their spectra with those of eight reference materials. None of these micrometeorites contained superconducting compounds, but we saw the Verwey transition of magnetite in our microwave system. This demonstrates that we are able to detect electro-magnetic phase transitions in extraterrestrial materials at cryogenic temperatures. PMID:25476841

  9. Fabrication of multilayer nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jasveer; Singh, Avtar; Kumar, Davinder; Thakur, Anup; Kaur, Raminder

    2016-05-01

    Multilayer nanowires were fabricated by potentiostate ectrodeposition template synthesis method into the pores of polycarbonate membrane. In present work layer by layer deposition of two different metals Ni and Cu in polycarbonate membrane having pore size of 600 nm were carried out. It is found that the growth of nanowires is not constant, it varies with deposition time. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to study the morphology of fabricated multilayer nanowires. An energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) results confirm the composition of multilayer nanowires. The result shows that multilayer nanowires formed is dense.

  10. Color superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wilczek, F.

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  11. SUPERCONDUCTING PHOTOCATHODES.

    SciTech Connect

    SMEDLEY, J.; RAO, T.; WARREN, J.; SEKUTOWICZ, LANGNER, J.; STRZYZEWSKI, P.; LEFFERS, R.; LIPSKI, A.

    2005-10-09

    We present the results of our investigation of lead and niobium as suitable photocathode materials for superconducting RF injectors. Quantum efficiencies (QE) have been measured for a range of incident photon energies and a variety of cathode preparation methods, including various lead plating techniques on a niobium substrate. The effects of operating at ambient and cryogenic temperatures and different vacuum levels on the cathode QE have also been studied.

  12. Superconducting magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Extensive computer based engineering design effort resulted in optimization of a superconducting magnet design with an average bulk current density of approximately 12KA/cm(2). Twisted, stranded 0.0045 inch diameter NbTi superconductor in a copper matrix was selected. Winding the coil from this bundle facilitated uniform winding of the small diameter wire. Test coils were wound using a first lot of the wire. The actual packing density was measured from these. Interwinding voltage break down tests on the test coils indicated the need for adjustment of the wire insulation on the lot of wire subsequently ordered for construction of the delivered superconducting magnet. Using the actual packing densities from the test coils, a final magnet design, with the required enhancement and field profile, was generated. All mechanical and thermal design parameters were then also fixed. The superconducting magnet was then fabricated and tested. The first test was made with the magnet immersed in liquid helium at 4.2K. The second test was conducted at 2K in vacuum. In the latter test, the magnet was conduction cooled from the mounting flange end.

  13. High-temperature superconductivity and antiferromagnetism in multilayer cuprates: 63Cu and 19F NMR on five-layer Ba2Ca4Cu5O10(F,O)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Sunao; Tabata, Shin-Ichiro; Iwai, Shiho; Mukuda, Hidekazu; Kitaoka, Yoshio; Shirage, Parasharam M.; Kito, Hijiri; Iyo, Akira

    2012-01-01

    We report systematic Cu and F NMR measurements of five-layered high-Tc cuprates Ba2Ca4Cu5O10(F,O)2. It is revealed that antiferromagnetism (AFM) uniformly coexists with superconductivity (SC) in underdoped regions, and that the critical hole density pc for AFM is ˜0.11 in the five-layered compound. We present the layer-number dependence of AFM and SC phase diagrams in hole-doped cuprates, where pc for n-layered compounds pc(n) increases from pc(1) ˜ 0.02 in La2-xSrxCuO4 or pc(2) ˜ 0.05 in YBa2Cu3O6+y to pc(5) ˜ 0.11. The variation of pc(n) is attributed to interlayer magnetic coupling, which becomes stronger with increasing n. In addition, we focus on the ground-state phase diagram of CuO2 planes, where AFM metallic states in slightly doped Mott insulators change into the uniformly mixed phase of AFM and SC and into simple d-wave SC states. The maximum Tc exists just outside the quantum critical hole density, at which AFM moments on a CuO2 plane collapse at the ground state, indicating an intimate relationship between AFM and SC. These characteristics of the ground state are accounted for by the Mott physics based on the t-J model; the attractive interaction of high-Tc SC, which raises Tc as high as 160 K, is an in-plane superexchange interaction Jin (˜0.12 eV), and the large Jin binds electrons of opposite spins between neighboring sites. It is the Coulomb repulsive interaction U (>6 eV) between Cu-3d electrons that plays a central role in the physics behind high-Tc phenomena.

  14. STRIPES AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY IN CUPRATE SUPERCONDUCTORS

    SciTech Connect

    TRANQUADA, J.M.

    2005-08-22

    One type of order that has been observed to compete with superconductivity in cuprates involves alternating charge and antiferromagnetic stripes. Recent neutron scattering studies indicate that the magnetic excitation spectrum of a stripe-ordered sample is very similar to that observed in superconducting samples. In fact, it now appears that there may be a universal magnetic spectrum for the cuprates. One likely implication of this universal spectrum is that stripes of a dynamic form are present in the superconducting samples. On cooling through the superconducting transition temperature, a gap opens in the magnetic spectrum, and the weight lost at low energy piles up above the gap; the transition temperature is correlated with the size of the spin gap. Depending on the magnitude of the spin gap with respect to the magnetic spectrum, the enhanced magnetic scattering at low temperature can be either commensurate or incommensurate. Connections between stripe correlations and superconductivity are discussed.

  15. Superconducting Cable Termination

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Uday K.; Tolbert, Jerry

    2005-08-30

    Disclosed is a termination that connects high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable immersed in pressurized liquid nitrogen to high voltage and neutral (shield) external bushings at ambient temperature and pressure. The termination consists of a splice between the HTS power (inner) and shield (outer) conductors and concentric copper pipes which are the conductors in the termination. There is also a transition from the dielectric tape insulator used in the HTS cable to the insulators used between and around the copper pipe conductors in the termination. At the warm end of the termination the copper pipes are connected via copper braided straps to the conventional warm external bushings which have low thermal stresses. This termination allows for a natural temperature gradient in the copper pipe conductors inside the termination which enables the controlled flashing of the pressurized liquid coolant (nitrogen) to the gaseous state. Thus the entire termination is near the coolant supply pressure and the high voltage and shield cold bushings, a highly stressed component used in most HTS cables, are eliminated. A sliding seal allows for cable contraction as it is cooled from room temperature to ˜72-82 K. Seals, static vacuum, and multi-layer superinsulation minimize radial heat leak to the environment.

  16. Checking for odd-triplet pairing using novel superconducting spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapa, Pavel N.; Khaire, Trupti; Ding, Junjia; Pearson, John E.; Novosad, Valentyn; Hoffmann, Axel; Jiang, J. S.

    An excitation of odd-triplet pairing in a superconducting spin valve can be revealed by measuring the dependence of the superconducting critical temperature Tc with increasing non-collinearity of the magnetizations in adjacent ferromagnetic layers. A standard approach to create such a non-collinear magnetization configuration is to pin one ferromagnetic layers and control the magnetization in another layer by rotating the multilayer in a small magnetic field. Unfortunately, the rotation can modify the vortex current which also strongly affects the critical temperature. To exclude such spurious effects, we designed and fabricated a novel superconducting spin valve which allows us to create non-collinear magnetization configurations without using a sample rotator. The valve's operational principle is based on pinning of a synthetic antiferromagnet (SAF) by exchange coupling it to FeMn layer. The ability to imprint non-collinear magnetization configurations in the spin valve was confirmed using giant magneto resistance (GMR) measurements. The response of the magnetizations on an external magnetic field was simulated based on a coherent rotation model. The dependence of the Nb layer Tc on imprinted magnetization configuration will be presented. Work was supported by The Department of Energy Office of Science, Material Science and Engineering Division.

  17. Multifunctional lipid multilayer stamping.

    PubMed

    Nafday, Omkar A; Lowry, Troy W; Lenhert, Steven

    2012-04-10

    Nanostructured lipid multilayers on surfaces are a promising biofunctional nanomaterial. For example, surface-supported lipid multilayer diffraction gratings with optical properties that depend on the microscale spacing of the grating lines and the nanometer thickness of the lipid multilayers have been fabricated previously by dip-pen nanolithography (DPN), with immediate applications as label-free biosensors. The innate biocompatibility of such gratings makes them promising as biological sensor elements, model cellular systems, and construction materials for nanotechnology. Here a method is described that combines the lateral patterning capabilities and scalability of microcontact printing with the topographical control of nanoimprint lithography and the multimaterial integration aspects of dip-pen nanolithography in order to create nanostructured lipid multilayer arrays. This approach is denoted multilayer stamping. The distinguishing characteristic of this method is that it allows control of the lipid multilayer thickness, which is a crucial nanoscale dimension that determines the optical properties of lipid multilayer nanostructures. The ability to integrate multiple lipid materials on the same surface is also demonstrated by multi-ink spotting onto a polydimethoxysilane stamp, as well as higher-throughput patterning (on the order of 2 cm(2) s(-1) for grating fabrication) and the ability to pattern lipid materials that could not previously be patterned with high resolution by lipid DPN, for example, the gel-phase phospholipid 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) or the steroid cholesterol. PMID:22307810

  18. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Michael D.; Britten, Jerald A.; Nguyen, Hoang T.; Boyd, Robert; Shore, Bruce W.

    1999-01-01

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described.

  19. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, M.D.; Britten, J.A.; Nguyen, H.T.; Boyd, R.; Shore, B.W.

    1999-05-25

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described. 7 figs.

  20. Space applications of superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, D. B.; Vorreiter, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Some potential applications of superconductivity in space are summarized, e.g., the use of high field magnets for cosmic ray analysis or energy storage and generation, space applications of digital superconducting devices, such as the Josephson switch and, in the future, a superconducting computer. Other superconducting instrumentation which could be used in space includes: low frequency superconducting sensors, microwave and infrared detectors, instruments for gravitational studies, and high-Q cavities for use as stabilizing elements in clocks and oscillators.

  1. On new possibilities in microwave superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canabal, Alberto

    Superconductivity is a phenomenon that has been fascinating scientists, engineers, and the general public since its discovery in 1911. Many people associate the properties of superconductors with the astonishing demonstration of a levitating magnet over a superconductor when it is cooled down below its transition temperature. We now know that superconductivity is a very common phenomenon present in many metals in the periodic table. It was not until 1986 that superconductivity above about 30 K was discovered, giving birth to the era of high temperature superconductors. Today many applications take advantage of this property, ranging from medical instrumentation, transportation, high energy particle accelerators, to digital and analog electronics. Most of the applications fall within two well differentiated uses of superconductors, for which different properties are being exploited. One example is the use of superconductors to generate very large static magnetic fields, which usually employ newly discovered high temperature superconductors, taking advantage of their very large upper critical magnetic field. Alternatively, applications involving high-power microwaves usually rely on superconductors with high lower critical magnetic field, for which niobium is commonly the material of choice. Almost a century after the discovery of superconductivity, this dissertation explores potential new possibilities for high power microwave superconducting applications. First, we study and model a new method of determining the magnetic critical field of superconducting materials at microwave frequencies. Subsequently, we numerically study the theoretical performance of multilayer structures composed of alternating superconducting and dielectric materials. These structures theoretically allow us to sustain higher magnetic fields than niobium at microwave frequencies.

  2. High Spectral Resolution With Multilayer Gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Andre, J.-M.; Le Guen, K.; Jonnard, P.

    2010-04-06

    The improvement of spectral resolution brought about by the use of multilayer grating (MG) instead of multilayer mirror (MM) is analyzed. The spectrum of a complex sample containing various elements excited under electron irradiation is studied. This sample is a pellet made by pressing powders of Cu and compounds with Fe and F atoms. The MM is a Mo/B{sub 4}C periodic multilayer with a period of about 6 nm; for the MG a grating of 1 {mu}m period has been etched in the MM. It is shown that the MG can easily resolve the F Kalpha and Fe Lalpha emissions, separated by about 30 eV, whereas the MM is unable to give such a performance. A comparison with an EDS (SDD) detector is also given. It is also shown that the MG can improve the detection limit. Finally the role of the slit placed in front of the detector is discussed.

  3. Superconducting cable

    SciTech Connect

    Benz, H.

    1983-03-22

    A superconducting cable containing a plurality of individual wires which are stranded or plaited to wire bundles and ropes, wherein in order to avoid relative movement and/or deformation between the wire bundles and/or ropes as, for example, may otherwise be caused by high current loading, the individual wire bundles and the ropes are materially joined together at their points of contact, preferably by soldering, to form a mechanically rigid structure, in which the parts between the soldered areas can as well as possible deform elastically, thereby avoiding all disadvantages associated with freely movable wire bundles. In a preferred embodiment, the ropes are made from wire bundles arranged in a lattice.

  4. Emergent phenomena: Light-induced superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demsar, Jure

    2016-03-01

    Intense light pulses irradiating a sample of K3C60 result in dramatic changes of its high-frequency (terahertz) conductivity. Could these be signatures of fleeting superconductivity at 100 K and beyond?

  5. High field superconducting magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  6. Influence of sample length to magneto-impedance effect in electrodeposited [Cu/Ni80Fe20]3 multilayer wires at low frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Nuryani, Purnama, Budi

    2016-02-01

    A Magneto-impedance (MI) effect has been investigated in electrodeposited wires composed of non-magnetic conductive core coated by a soft ferromagnetic layer. In this work, a 460 µm Cu wire is coated with three soft ferromagnetic layers of Ni80Fe20 sandwiched by a thin Cu layer. The MI effect has been measured as a function of the sample length in low frequency (20 kHz - 100 kHz). The MI ratio raises by increasing the wire length; it increases approximately 400% by the increases the length of wire from 1 cm to 4 cm. This work also shows a significant increase in the field sensitivity by increasing the wire length significantly.

  7. Superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Satti, John A.

    1980-01-01

    A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

  8. High-resolution X-ray Multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Martynov, V.V.; Platonov, Yu.; Kazimirov, A.; Bilderback, D.H.

    2004-05-12

    Two new approaches are taken in multilayer fabrication to help bridge the gap in bandwidth between traditional multilayers (1 to 2%) and perfect crystals (0.01%). The first approach is based on creating many layers of low-contrast Al2O3/ B4C materials. The second approach is based on using multilayer structures with a small d-spacing using traditional W/B4C and Mo/B4C materials. With 8 keV x-rays on the Chess A2 beamline, we measured a bandwidth of 0.27% with a reflectivity of 40% and a Darwin width of 17 arc seconds from a 26 A d-spacing multilayer with 800 bi-layers of Al2O3/B4C using the low-contrast approach. On the other hand, the short period approach with a W/B4C multilayer and a 14.8 A d-spacing showed a resolution of 0.5 % and a reflectivity of 58.5%. Two more Mo/B4C samples with d-spacings of 15 A and 20 A showed energy resolutions of 0.25% and 0.52% with corresponding reflectivities of 39% and 66%. Thus we observe that both methods can produce useful x-ray optical components.

  9. Observation of Double-Dome Superconductivity in Potassium-Doped FeSe Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Song, Can-Li; Zhang, Hui-Min; Zhong, Yong; Hu, Xiao-Peng; Ji, Shuai-Hua; Wang, Lili; He, Ke; Ma, Xu-Cun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-04-15

    We report on the emergence of two disconnected superconducting domes in alkali-metal potassium- (K-)doped FeSe ultrathin films grown on graphitized SiC(0001). The superconductivity exhibits hypersensitivity to K dosage in the lower-T_{c} dome, whereas in the heavily electron-doped higher-T_{c} dome it becomes spatially homogeneous and robust against disorder, supportive of a conventional Cooper-pairing mechanism. Furthermore, the heavily K-doped multilayer FeSe films all reveal a large superconducting gap of ∼14  meV, irrespective of film thickness, verifying the higher-T_{c} superconductivity only in the topmost FeSe layer. The unusual finding of a double-dome superconducting phase is a step towards the mechanistic understanding of superconductivity in FeSe-derived superconductors.

  10. Gate-induced superconductivity in atomically thin MoS2 crystals.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Davide; Jo, Sanghyun; Berger, Helmuth; Morpurgo, Alberto F

    2016-04-01

    When thinned down to the atomic scale, many layered van der Waals materials exhibit an interesting evolution of their electronic properties, whose main aspects can be accounted for by changes in the single-particle bandstructure. Phenomena driven by interactions are also observed, but identifying experimentally systematic trends in their thickness dependence is challenging. Here, we explore the evolution of gate-induced superconductivity in exfoliated MoS2 multilayers ranging from bulk-like to individual monolayers. We observe a clear transition for all thicknesses down to the ultimate atomic limit, providing the first demonstration of gate-induced superconductivity in atomically thin exfoliated crystals. Additionally, we characterize the superconducting state by measuring the critical temperature TC and magnetic field BC in a large number of multilayer devices while decreasing their thickness. We find that the superconducting properties exhibit a pronounced reduction in TC and BC when going from bilayers to monolayers, for which we discuss possible microscopic mechanisms.

  11. Gate-induced superconductivity in atomically thin MoS2 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanzo, Davide; Jo, Sanghyun; Berger, Helmuth; Morpurgo, Alberto F.

    2016-04-01

    When thinned down to the atomic scale, many layered van der Waals materials exhibit an interesting evolution of their electronic properties, whose main aspects can be accounted for by changes in the single-particle bandstructure. Phenomena driven by interactions are also observed, but identifying experimentally systematic trends in their thickness dependence is challenging. Here, we explore the evolution of gate-induced superconductivity in exfoliated MoS2 multilayers ranging from bulk-like to individual monolayers. We observe a clear transition for all thicknesses down to the ultimate atomic limit, providing the first demonstration of gate-induced superconductivity in atomically thin exfoliated crystals. Additionally, we characterize the superconducting state by measuring the critical temperature TC and magnetic field BC in a large number of multilayer devices while decreasing their thickness. We find that the superconducting properties exhibit a pronounced reduction in TC and BC when going from bilayers to monolayers, for which we discuss possible microscopic mechanisms.

  12. Superconductivity: Squash and sandwiches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosatti, Erio

    2008-12-01

    Externally applied pressure induces superconductivity in the layer compound 1T-TaS2. Similarities to, and differences from, other superconducting systems promise exciting future experiments on this old, but suddenly rejuvenated, compound.

  13. Multilayer silicene: clear evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Padova, Paola; Generosi, Amanda; Paci, Barbara; Ottaviani, Carlo; Quaresima, Claudio; Olivieri, Bruno; Salomon, Eric; Angot, Thierry; Le Lay, Guy

    2016-09-01

    One year after the publication of the seminal paper on monolayer 3 × 3 reconstructed silicene grown on a silver (111) substrate, evidence of the synthesis of epitaxial √3 × √3 reconstructed multilayer silicene hosting Dirac fermions was presented. Although a general consensus was immediately reached in the former case, in the latter, the mere existence of multilayer silicene was questioned and strongly debated. Here, we demonstrate by means of a comprehensive x-ray crystallographic study that multilayer silicene is effectively realized upon growth at rather low growth temperatures (∼200 °C), while three-dimensional growth of silicon crystallites takes place at higher temperatures, (∼300 °C). This transition to bulk-like silicon perfectly explains the various data presented and discussed in the literature and solves their conflicting interpretations.

  14. Control of Multilayer Networks

    PubMed Central

    Menichetti, Giulia; Dall’Asta, Luca; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2016-01-01

    The controllability of a network is a theoretical problem of relevance in a variety of contexts ranging from financial markets to the brain. Until now, network controllability has been characterized only on isolated networks, while the vast majority of complex systems are formed by multilayer networks. Here we build a theoretical framework for the linear controllability of multilayer networks by mapping the problem into a combinatorial matching problem. We found that correlating the external signals in the different layers can significantly reduce the multiplex network robustness to node removal, as it can be seen in conjunction with a hybrid phase transition occurring in interacting Poisson networks. Moreover we observe that multilayer networks can stabilize the fully controllable multiplex network configuration that can be stable also when the full controllability of the single network is not stable. PMID:26869210

  15. Simple Superconducting "Permanent" Electromagnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelson, Ulf E.; Strayer, Donald M.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed short tube of high-temperature-superconducting material like YBa2Cu3O7 acts as strong electromagnet that flows as long as magnetic field remains below critical value and temperature of cylinder maintained sufficiently below superconducting-transition temperature. Design exploits maximally anisotropy of high-temperature-superconducting material.

  16. Searching for Superconductivity in Micrometeorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemens, M. H.; Guenon, S.; Ramirez, J. G.; Basaran, A. C.; Taylor, S.; Schuller, I.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a very sensitive, highly selective, non-destructive technique for screening natural materials for the presence of superconductivity. This technique, based on phase sensitive detection of microwave absorption is capable of detecting 10-12 cm3of a superconductor embedded in a non-superconducting matrix. We applied our technique to search for superconductivity in micrometeorites, small extraterrestrial (ET) particles that add most of the ET mass to the present day Earth. We measured approximately 65 micrometeorites and compared their spectra with those of eight reference materials.Micrometeorites (MMs) are ideal samples with which to test our highly sensitive superconductivity probe, as individual MMs weigh 10-5 g and the large number of micrometeorites arriving on Earth, suggests some contain minerals formed under conditions that cannot be replicated in the laboratory. Minerals in meteorites formed during planetary processes associated with accretion/condensation, planetary differentiation, and segregation. Other components such as pre-solar grains, SiC, diamonds, graphite, Si3N4, and deuterium enriched organics formed under some of the most intense physical-chemical environments in the Universe, including supernovae and stellar outflows. It is during such severe processes that exotic superconducting species may have been created.The research presented here established the methodology and proved the ultrahigh sensitivity of the technique by detecting the presence of the Verwey-transition of the magnetite present in these micrometeorites. The investigated micrometeorites contained no superconducting phases. This work was supported by an AFOSR MURI grant no. F49550-09-1-0577.

  17. Force sensitivity of multilayer graphene optomechanical devices

    PubMed Central

    Weber, P.; Güttinger, J.; Noury, A.; Vergara-Cruz, J.; Bachtold, A.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical resonators based on low-dimensional materials are promising for force and mass sensing experiments. The force sensitivity in these ultra-light resonators is often limited by the imprecision in the measurement of the vibrations, the fluctuations of the mechanical resonant frequency and the heating induced by the measurement. Here, we strongly couple multilayer graphene resonators to superconducting cavities in order to achieve a displacement sensitivity of 1.3 fm Hz−1/2. This coupling also allows us to damp the resonator to an average phonon occupation of 7.2. Our best force sensitivity, 390 zN Hz−1/2 with a bandwidth of 200 Hz, is achieved by balancing measurement imprecision, optomechanical damping, and measurement-induced heating. Our results hold promise for studying the quantum capacitance of graphene, its magnetization, and the electron and nuclear spins of molecules adsorbed on its surface. PMID:27502017

  18. Force sensitivity of multilayer graphene optomechanical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, P.; Güttinger, J.; Noury, A.; Vergara-Cruz, J.; Bachtold, A.

    2016-08-01

    Mechanical resonators based on low-dimensional materials are promising for force and mass sensing experiments. The force sensitivity in these ultra-light resonators is often limited by the imprecision in the measurement of the vibrations, the fluctuations of the mechanical resonant frequency and the heating induced by the measurement. Here, we strongly couple multilayer graphene resonators to superconducting cavities in order to achieve a displacement sensitivity of 1.3 fm Hz-1/2. This coupling also allows us to damp the resonator to an average phonon occupation of 7.2. Our best force sensitivity, 390 zN Hz-1/2 with a bandwidth of 200 Hz, is achieved by balancing measurement imprecision, optomechanical damping, and measurement-induced heating. Our results hold promise for studying the quantum capacitance of graphene, its magnetization, and the electron and nuclear spins of molecules adsorbed on its surface.

  19. Ruthenocuprates RuSr2(Eu,Ce)2Cu2O10-y: Intrinsic magnetic multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Živković, I.; Hirai, Y.; Frazer, B. H.; Prester, M.; Drobac, D.; Ariosa, D.; Berger, H.; Pavuna, D.; Margaritondo, G.; Felner, I.; Onellion, M.

    2002-04-01

    We report ac susceptibility data on RuSr2(Eu,Ce)2Cu2O10-y (Ru-1222, Ce content x=0.5 and 1.0), RuSr2GdCu2O8 (Ru-1212), and SrRuO3. Both Ru-1222 (x=0.5, 1.0) sample types exhibit unexpected magnetic dynamics in low magnetic fields: logarithmic time relaxation, switching behavior, and ``inverted'' hysteresis loops. Neither Ru-1212 nor SrRuO3 exhibit such magnetic dynamics. The results are interpreted as evidence of the complex magnetic order in Ru-1222. We propose a specific multilayer model to explain the data, and note that superconductivity in the ruthenocuprate is compatible with both the presence and absence of the magnetic dynamics.

  20. A refined model for characterizing x-ray multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Oren, A.L.; Henke, B.L.

    1987-12-01

    The ability to quickly and accurately characterize arbitrary multilayers is very valuable for not only can we use the characterizations to predict the reflectivity of a multilayer for any soft x-ray wavelength, we also can generalize the results to apply to other multilayers of the same type. In addition, we can use the characterizations as a means of evaluating various sputtering environments and refining sputtering techniques to obtain better multilayers. In this report we have obtained improved characterizations for sample molybdenum-silicon and vanadium-silicon multilayers. However, we only examined five crystals overall, so the conclusions that we could draw about the structure of general multilayers is limited. Research involving many multilayers manufactured under the same sputtering conditions is clearly in order. In order to best understand multilayer structures it may be necessary to further refine our model, e.g., adopting a Gaussian form for the interface regions. With such improvements we can expect even better agreement with experimental values and continued concurrence with other characterization techniques. 18 refs., 30 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Focus on superconducting properties of iron chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Yoshihiko

    2012-10-01

    Since the discovery of iron-based superconductors, much attention has been given to the exploration of new superconducting compounds. Numerous superconducting iron compounds have been found and categorized into five groups: LnFeAsO (Ln = lanthanide), BaFe2As2, KFeAs, FeSe and FeAs with perovskite blocking layers. Among them, FeSe has the simplest crystal structure. Since the crystal structure is composed of only superconducting Fe layers, the FeSe family must be the best material to investigate the mechanism of iron-based superconductivity. FeSe shows very strong pressure effects. The superconducting transition temperature (Tc) of FeSe is approximately 8 K at ambient pressure. However Tc dramatically increases up to 37 K under applied pressure of 4-6 GPa. This is the third highest Tc value among binary superconductors, surpassed only by CsC60 under pressure (Tc = 38 K) and MgB2 (Tc = 39 K). On the other hand, despite FeTe having a crystal structure analogous to that of FeSe, FeTe shows antiferromagnetic properties without superconductivity. Doping of small ions, either Se or S, however, can induce superconductivity in FeTe1-xSex or FeTe1-xSx . The superconductivity is very weak for small x values, and annealing under certain conditions is required to obtain strong superconductivity, for instance annealing in oxygen or alcoholic beverages such as red wine. The following selection of papers describe many important experimental and theoretical studies on iron chalcogenide superconductors including preparation of single crystals, bulk samples and thin films; NMR measurements; photoemission spectroscopy; high-pressure studies; annealing effects and research on new BiS2-based superconductors. I hope this focus issue will help researchers understand the frontiers of iron chalcogenide superconductors and assist in the discovery of new phenomena related to iron-based superconductivity.

  2. Superconductivity fact vs. fancy

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, K.

    1988-05-01

    The author says great advances have been made in superconductivity. However, the rush to secure recognition combined with public confusion over superconductivity has tainted the field with misconceptions. Some people are saying little progress towards practical use of the ceramics has been made over the last year and many researchers have left what they were doing to study superconductivity. All the hype surrounding the new found ceramic superconductors could give way to a period of disillusionment and frustration. This article discusses recent work in the field of superconductivity. IEEE Spectrum has adopted an attitude of ''just the facts'' in reporting superconductivity news.

  3. Transport Anomalies and Possible High Tc Superconductivity in interconnected multiwall carbon nanotube sheets doped by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhidov, Anvar; Howard, Austin; Cornell, Nicholas; Goskun, Ulas; Salamon, Myron; Baughman, Ray; Bykova, Julia; Mayo, Nathanael; Wang, Xuemei; Galstyan, Eduard; Freyhardt, Herbert; Kan Chu, Wei

    2012-02-01

    Ion implantation offers an alternative doping method. In searching for superconductivity,we describe here the ion-implantation doping of MWCNT interconnected networks by boron and other dopants (phosphorous, sulfur, arsenic) and report transport anomalies in oriented networks of ion implanted MWCNT sheets as compared to cross coated (non-oriented multilayer MWCNT sheets). The strong drop of resistance R(T) with temperature decrease starting at Tc1= 50-60 K and even at higher T is reminiscent of inhomogeneous superconducting islands appearing in the non-SC matrix. An unusual anomaly of the 4-terminal resistance is observed in many samples, R(T) becoming negative at lower T< Tc2 ˜ 10-20 K, This negative resistance is found to be associated with unusual I-V curves with s-shape at low T < Tc2 and R(T) shows nonlinear dependence on excitation current and other features that are studied carefully in MWCNTs with different lengths and densities. This negative-resistance behavior gives a hint for the possible incorporation of superconducting areas and can be explained in terms of an imbalanced resistance bridge.

  4. Superconducting composite with multilayer patterns and multiple buffer layers

    DOEpatents

    Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.

    1993-10-12

    An article of manufacture is described including a substrate, a patterned interlayer of a material selected from the group consisting of magnesium oxide, barium-titanium oxide or barium-zirconium oxide, the patterned interlayer material overcoated with a secondary interlayer material of yttria-stabilized zirconia or magnesium-aluminum oxide, upon the surface of the substrate whereby an intermediate article with an exposed surface of both the overcoated patterned interlayer and the substrate is formed, a coating of a buffer layer selected from the group consisting of cerium oxide, yttrium oxide, curium oxide, dysprosium oxide, erbium oxide, europium oxide, iron oxide, gadolinium oxide, holmium oxide, indium oxide, lanthanum oxide, manganese oxide, lutetium oxide, neodymium oxide, praseodymium oxide, plutonium oxide, samarium oxide, terbium oxide, thallium oxide, thulium oxide, yttrium oxide and ytterbium oxide over the entire exposed surface of the intermediate article, and, a ceramic superconductor. 5 figures.

  5. Protective link for superconducting coil

    DOEpatents

    Umans, Stephen D.

    2009-12-08

    A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

  6. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified.

  7. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified. PMID:25666075

  8. Dissipative hydride precipitates in superconducting niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Romanenko, A.; Cooley, L.D.; Ciovati, G.; Wu, G.; /Argonne

    2011-10-01

    We report the first direct observation of the microstructural features exhibiting RF losses at high surface magnetic fields of above 100 mT in field emission free superconducting niobium cavities. The lossy areas were identified by advanced thermometry. Surface investigations using different techniques were carried out on cutout samples from lossy areas and showed the presence of dendritic niobium hydrides. This finding has possible implications to the mechanisms of RF losses in superconducting niobium at all field levels.

  9. Release-rate calorimetry of multilayered materials for aircraft seats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fewell, L. L.; Parker, J. A.; Duskin, F.; Speith, H.; Trabold, E.

    1980-01-01

    Multilayered samples of contemporary and improved fire-resistant aircraft seat materials were evaluated for their rates of heat release and smoke generation. Top layers with glass-fiber block cushion were evaluated to determine which materials, based on their minimum contributions to the total heat release of the multilayered assembly, may be added or deleted. The smoke and heat release rates of multilayered seat materials were then measured at heat fluxes of 1.5 and 3.5 W/cm2. Abrasion tests were conducted on the decorative fabric covering and slip sheet to ascertain service life and compatibility of layers

  10. Critical current density in Ag/YBa2Cu3Ox and PrBa2Cu3Oy/YBa2Cu3Ox multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, V. S.; Mikheenko, P.; Sarkar, A.; Abell, J. S.; Crisan, A.

    2010-06-01

    One of successful methods of introducing artificial pinning centres in superconducting films is by alternating layers of superconducting material and incomplete layers (planar distributions of nanodots) of other materials (quasi-superlattice or quasi-multilayer approach). Most of the work on artificial pinning centres has been done on thin YBa2Cu3Ox (YBCO) films and a large variety of quasi-multilayer materials have been explored. It is still difficult to justify the choice of a quasi-multilayer material for particular superconducting applications. One of the properties to be taken into account is compatibility of the crystal lattice of YBCO and the quasi-superlattice material. Here we compare the superconducting behaviour of two very different quasi-multilayers: one with very similar crystal lattices of nanodots and YBCO: PrBa2Cu3Oy (PBCO)/YBCO, and another one with very different, Ag/YBCO. We found that the difference between crystal lattices strongly affects superconducting properties of quasi-multilayers and leads to different types of pinning in the films.

  11. Uniformly oriented gramicidin channels embedded in thick monodomain lecithin multilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, H W; Olah, G A

    1987-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine multilayers, containing 20% water by total sample weight and gramicidin/lipid molar ratios up to 1:40 were aligned by low temperature annealing (less than 60 degrees C) and mechanical stressing. We were able to obtain large (greater than 80 micron thick X 40 mm2 area) monodomain defect-free multilayers containing approximately 10(17) uniformly oriented gramicidin channels. The alignment of lipid multilayers was monitored by conoscopy and polarized microscopy. The smectic defects, which appeared during the alignment process, were identified and dissolved. The incorporation of gramicidin into the multilayers in the form of transmembrane channels was indicated by its circular dichroic (CD) spectrum. A well-defined CD spectrum of uniformly oriented gramicidin channels was obtained. The oriented samples will allow spectroscopic studies of the ion channel in its conducting state and diffraction studies of the channel-channel organization in the membrane. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:2440487

  12. High intensity neutrino source superconducting solenoid cyrostat design

    SciTech Connect

    Page, T.M.; Nicol, T.H.; Feher, S.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is involved in the development of a 100 MeV superconducting linac. This linac is part of the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) R&D Program. The initial beam acceleration in the front end section of the linac is achieved using room temperature spoke cavities, each of which is combined with a superconducting focusing solenoid. These solenoid magnets are cooled with liquid helium at 4.5K, operate at 250 A and have a maximum magnetic field strength of 7.5 T. The solenoid cryostat will house the helium vessel, suspension system, thermal shield, multilayer insulation, power leads, instrumentation, a vacuum vessel and cryogenic distribution lines. This paper discusses the requirements and detailed design of these superconducting solenoid cryostats.

  13. High Intensity Neutrino Source Superconducting Solenoid Cryostat Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, T. M.; Nicol, T. H.; Feher, S.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.

    2008-03-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is involved in the development of a 100 MeV superconducting linac. This linac is part of the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) R&D Program. The initial beam acceleration in the front end section of the linac is achieved using room temperature spoke cavities, each of which is combined with a superconducting focusing solenoid. These solenoid magnets are cooled with liquid helium at 4.5 K, operate at 250 A and have a maximum magnetic field strength of 7.5 T. The solenoid cryostat will house the helium vessel, suspension system, thermal shield, multilayer insulation, power leads, instrumentation, a vacuum vessel and cryogenic distribution lines. This paper discusses the requirements and detailed design of these superconducting solenoid cryostats.

  14. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1998-05-19

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The SRF window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The SRF window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the SRF window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  15. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1997-03-11

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  16. Superconducting levitating bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, Francis C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A superconducting bearing assembly includes a coil field source that may be superconducting and a superconducting structure. The coil field source assembly and superconducting structure are positioned so as to enable relative rotary movement therebetween. The structure and coil field source are brought to a supercooled temperature before a power supply induces a current in the coil field source. A Meissner-like effect is thereby obtained and little or no penetration of the field lines is seen in the superconducting structure. Also, the field that can be obtained from the superconducting coil is 2-8 times higher than that of permanent magnets. Since the magnetic pressure is proportioned to the square of the field, magnetic pressures from 4 to 64 times higher are achieved.

  17. The superconductivity at 18 K in LiFeAs system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. C.; Liu, Q. Q.; Lv, Y. X.; Gao, W. B.; Yang, L. X.; Yu, R. C.; Li, F. Y.; Jin, C. Q.

    2008-12-01

    The recent discovery of superconductivity in iron arsenide compounds RFeAsO (R=rare earth) or AFe 2As 2 (A=alkaline earth) has attracted great attention due to the unexpected high Tc in the system containing ferromagnetic elements like Fe. Similar to high Tc cuprates, the superconductivity in iron arsenide is related to a layered structure. Searching for new superconductors with [FeAs] layer, but of simpler structure will be of scientific significance either to build up new multilayered superconductors that may reach higher Tc or to study the mysterious underlined superconducting mechanism in iron arsenide compounds. Here we report that a new superconducting iron arsenide system LiFeAs was found. The compound crystallizes into a structure containing [FeAs] conducting layer that is interlaced with Li charge reservoir. Superconductivity was observed with Tc up to 18 K in the compounds.

  18. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2006-12-01

    A general review on high-temperature superconductivity was made. After prehistoric view and the process of discovery were stated, the special features of high-temperature superconductors were explained from the materials side and the physical properties side. The present status on applications of high-temperature superconductors were explained on superconducting tapes, electric power cables, magnets for maglev trains, electric motors, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and single flux quantum (SFQ) devices and circuits.

  19. Superconducting energy recovery linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2016-10-01

    High-average-power and high-brightness electron beams from a combination of laser photocathode electron guns and a superconducting energy recovery linac (ERL) is an emerging accelerator science with applications in ERL light sources, high repetition rate free electron lasers , electron cooling, electron ion colliders and more. This paper reviews the accelerator physics issues of superconducting ERLs, discusses major subsystems and provides a few examples of superconducting ERLs.

  20. High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 149 NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (Web, free access)   The NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (WebHTS) provides evaluated thermal, mechanical, and superconducting property data for oxides and other nonconventional superconductors.

  1. Negative nonlinear damping of a multilayer graphene mechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vibhor; Shevchuk, Olga; Blanter, Ya. M.; Steele, Gary A.

    2016-06-01

    We experimentally investigate the nonlinear response of a multilayer graphene resonator using a superconducting microwave cavity to detect its motion. The radiation pressure force is used to drive the mechanical resonator in an optomechanically induced transparency configuration. By varying the amplitudes of drive and probe tones, the mechanical resonator can be brought into a nonlinear limit. Using the calibration of the optomechanical coupling, we quantify the mechanical Duffing nonlinearity. By increasing the drive force, we observe a decrease in the mechanical dissipation rate at large amplitudes, suggesting a negative nonlinear damping mechanism in the graphene resonator. Increasing the optomechanical backaction further, we observe instabilities in the mechanical response.

  2. Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Overton, Jr., William C.; van Hulsteyn, David B.; Flynn, Edward R.

    1991-01-01

    An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  3. Superconducting imaging surface magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Overton, W.C. Jr.; van Hulsteyn, D.B.; Flynn, E.R.

    1991-04-16

    This patent describes an improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. Another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  4. Multilayer radiation shield

    DOEpatents

    Urbahn, John Arthur; Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon

    2009-06-16

    A power generation system including: a generator including a rotor including a superconductive rotor coil coupled to a rotatable shaft; a first prime mover drivingly coupled to the rotatable shaft; and a thermal radiation shield, partially surrounding the rotor coil, including at least a first sheet and a second sheet spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft. A thermal radiation shield for a generator including a rotor including a super-conductive rotor coil including: a first sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material; and at least one additional sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft, wherein each successive sheet is an incrementally greater circumferential arc length and wherein the centripetal force shapes the sheets into a substantially catenary shape.

  5. Heat Transfer in High Temperature Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Miller, Steve D.; Cunnington, George R.

    2007-01-01

    High temperature multilayer insulations have been investigated as an effective component of thermal-protection systems for atmospheric re-entry of reusable launch vehicles. Heat transfer in multilayer insulations consisting of thin, gold-coated, ceramic reflective foils and Saffil(TradeMark) fibrous insulation spacers was studied both numerically and experimentally. A finite volume numerical thermal model using combined conduction (gaseous and solid) and radiation in porous media was developed. A two-flux model with anisotropic scattering was used for radiation heat transfer in the fibrous insulation spacers between the reflective foils. The thermal model was validated by comparison with effective thermal conductivity measurements in an apparatus based on ASTM standard C201. Measurements were performed at environmental pressures in the range from 1x10(exp -4) to 760 torr over the temperature range from 300 to 1300 K. Four multilayer samples with nominal densities of 48 kg/cu m were tested. The first sample was 13.3 mm thick and had four evenly spaced reflective foils. The other three samples were 26.6 mm thick and utilized either one, two, or four reflective foils, located near the hot boundary with nominal foil spacing of 1.7 mm. The validated thermal model was then used to study relevant design parameters, such as reflective foil spacing and location in the stack-up and coating of one or both sides of foils.

  6. Research & Development on Superconducting Niobium Materials via Magnetic Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    S. B. Roy, V. C. Sahni, and G. R. Myneni

    2011-03-01

    We present a study of superconducting properties of both large grain (1 mm average grain size) and small grain (50 micron average grain size) Niobium materials containing varying amounts of Tantalum impurities that have been used in the fabrication of high accelerating gradient superconducting radio frequency cavities. We found that a buffered chemical polishing of these Niobium samples causes a distinct reduction in the superconducting parameters like TC, wt- ppm to 1300 wt-ppm. Implications of these results on the performance of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities are discussed, especially the anomalous high field RF losses that have been reported in the literature.

  7. Robust manipulation of superconducting qubits in the presence of fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Daoyi; Chen, Chunlin; Qi, Bo; Petersen, Ian R.; Nori, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting quantum systems are promising candidates for quantum information processing due to their scalability and design flexibility. However, the existence of defects, fluctuations, and inaccuracies is unavoidable for practical superconducting quantum circuits. In this paper, a sampling-based learning control (SLC) method is used to guide the design of control fields for manipulating superconducting quantum systems. Numerical results for one-qubit systems and coupled two-qubit systems show that the ``smart'' fields learned using the SLC method can achieve robust manipulation of superconducting qubits, even in the presence of large fluctuations and inaccuracies.

  8. Hysteretic magnetic pinning and reversible resistance switching in high-temperature superconductor/ferromagnet multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visani, C.; Metaxas, P. J.; Collaudin, A.; Calvet, B.; Bernard, R.; Briatico, J.; Deranlot, C.; Bouzehouane, K.; Villegas, J. E.

    2011-08-01

    We study a high-critical temperature superconducting (YBa2Cu3O7-δ)/ferromagnetic (Co/Pt multilayer) hybrid that exhibits resistance switching driven by the magnetic history: depending on the direction of the external field, a pronounced decrease or increase of the mixed-state resistance is observed as magnetization reversal occurs within the Co/Pt multilayer. We demonstrate that stray magnetic fields cause these effects via (i) creation of vortices/antivortices and (ii) magnetostatic pinning of vortices that are induced by the external field.

  9. Superconducting materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ruvalds, J.

    1992-01-01

    Our research on high temperatures superconductors has produced novel insights for the normal state properties of copper oxides that have been discovered in the last few years. Advances in materials preparation have produced singly crystal samples, and sophisticated surface cleavage techniques have unveiled truly metallic behavior in many respects. Thus, the recent confirmation of a Fermi surface in several cuprate superconductors by photoemission spectroscopy has aroused interest in experimental features which heretofore were in apparent contrast to the expectations for a conventional Fermi Liquid. Our group has discovered that nested'' nearly parallel sections of the electron orbits yields an anomalous response which influences the electrical resistivity, optical reflectance, Raman spectrum, and neutron scattering cross section. Our analysis has provided an explanation for seemingly disparate experimental features of high temperature superconductors using consistent values for the electron-electron coupling and the plasma frequency. Our results include the following properties of high temperature superconductors: Nested Fermi Liquid Response in High Temperature Superconductors, Optical Reflectivity and Electron Energy Loss Data, Raman Spectra, Neutron Scattering Cross Section and Scaling, and Prospects for New Superconductors.

  10. Release-rate calorimetry of multilayered materials for aircraft seats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fewell, L. L.; Parker, J. A.; Duskin, F.; Spieth, H.; Trabold, E.

    1980-01-01

    Multilayered samples of contemporary and improved fire-resistant aircraft seat materials (foam cushion, decorative fabric, slip sheet, fire-blocking layer, and cushion-reinforcement layer) were evaluated for their rates of heat release and smoke generation. Top layers (decorative fabric, slip sheet, fire blocking, and cushion reinforcement) with glass-fiber block cushion were evaluated to determine which materials, based on their minimum contributions to the total heat release of the multilayered assembly, may be added or deleted. Top layers exhibiting desirable burning profiles were combined with foam cushion materials. The smoke and heat-release rate of multilayered seat materials were then measured at heat fluxes of 1.5 and 3.5 W/sq cm. Choices of contact and silicon adhesives for bonding multilayered assemblies were based on flammability, burn and smoke generation, animal toxicity tests, and thermal gravimetric analysis.

  11. Multilayer Coextrusion Reveals Slip at Polymer-polymer Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rui; Macosko, Christopher W.

    2000-03-01

    De Gennes (1992) suggested that loss of entanglement in the interfacial region between two incompatible polymers causes slip at interfaces. Goveas and Fredrickson (1998) developed a quantitative model for the lowering of interfacial viscosity. However, to date there appears to be no quantitative experimental evidence for interfacial slip. We coextruded polypropylene and polystyrene with closely matched viscosities into multilayers with 2,32 and 128 layers. Pressure drop of the coextruded multilayer melts through a slit die was measured. The data showed a 40reduction when the number of layers increased from 2 to 128, which indicates interfacial slip. The steady shear viscosity of the multilayer sample was also measured in parallel plates. When the shear stress was higher than a critical value, the viscosity of the multilayers was lower than either of the components. The interfacial viscosity was estimated, and 40 times reduction was observed. Diblock copolymer which spanned the interfaces was shown to able to suppress interfacial slip.

  12. BNL Direct Wind Superconducting Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, B.; Anerella, M.; Escallier, J.; Ghosh, A.; Jain, A.; Marone, A.; Muratore, A.; Wanderer, P.

    2011-09-12

    BNL developed Direct Wind magnet technology is used to create a variety of complex multi-functional multi-layer superconducting coil structures without the need for creating custom production tooling and fixturing for each new project. Our Direct Wind process naturally integrates prestress into the coil structure so external coil collars and yokes are not needed; the final coil package transverse size can then be very compact. Direct Wind magnets are produced with very good field quality via corrections applied during the course of coil winding. The HERA-II and BEPC-II Interaction Region (IR) magnet, J-PARC corrector and Alpha antihydrogen magnetic trap magnets and our BTeV corrector magnet design are discussed here along with a full length ILC IR prototype magnet presently in production and the coils that were wound for an ATF2 upgrade at KEK. A new IR septum magnet design concept for a 6.2 T combined-function IR magnet for eRHIC, a future RHIC upgrade, is introduced here.

  13. Superconductivity in bad metals

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    It is argued that many synthetic metals, including high temperature superconductors are ``bad metals`` with such a poor conductivity that the usual mean-field theory of superconductivity breaks down because of anomalously large classical and quantum fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting order parameter. Some consequences for high temperature superconductors are described.

  14. Superconducting properties of protactinium.

    PubMed

    Smith, J L; Spirlet, J C; Müller, W

    1979-07-13

    The superconducting transition temperature and upper critical magnetic field of protactinium were measured by alternating-current susceptibility techniques. Since the superconducting behavior of protactinium is affected by its 5f electron character, it is clear now that protactinium is a true actinide element.

  15. Graphene: Carbon's superconducting footprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafek, Oskar

    2012-02-01

    Graphene exhibits many extraordinary properties, but superconductivity isn't one of them. Two theoretical studies suggest that by decorating the surface of graphene with the right species of dopant atoms, or by using ionic liquid gating, superconductivity could yet be induced.

  16. Superconducting properties of protactinium.

    PubMed

    Smith, J L; Spirlet, J C; Müller, W

    1979-07-13

    The superconducting transition temperature and upper critical magnetic field of protactinium were measured by alternating-current susceptibility techniques. Since the superconducting behavior of protactinium is affected by its 5f electron character, it is clear now that protactinium is a true actinide element. PMID:17750320

  17. Superconductivity of magnesium diboride

    SciTech Connect

    Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-15

    Over the past 14 years MgB2 has gone from a startling discovery to a promising, applied superconductor. In our article we present a brief overview of the synthesis and the basic superconducting properties of this remarkable compound. Specifically, the effect of pressure, substitutions and neutron irradiation on superconducting properties are discussed.

  18. Superconductivity of magnesium diboride

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-15

    Over the past 14 years MgB2 has gone from a startling discovery to a promising, applied superconductor. In our article we present a brief overview of the synthesis and the basic superconducting properties of this remarkable compound. Specifically, the effect of pressure, substitutions and neutron irradiation on superconducting properties are discussed.

  19. Superconducting gyroscope research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, J. B.; Karr, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    Four basic areas of research and development of superconducting gyroscopes are studied. Chapter 1 studies the analysis of a SQUID readout for a superconducting gyroscope. Chapter 2 studies the dependence of spin-up torque on channel and gas properties. Chapter 3 studies the theory of super fluid plug operation. And chapter 4 studies the gyro rotor and housing manufacture.

  20. Rapid cycling superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbricatore, P.; Farinon, S.; Gambardella, U.; Greco, M.; Volpini, G.

    2006-04-01

    The paper deals with the general problematic related to the development of fast cycled superconducting magnets for application in particle accelerator machines. Starting from the requirements of SIS300 synchrotron under design at GSI and an envisaged future Super-SPS injector at CERN, it is shown which developments are mandatory in the superconducting wire technology and in the magnet design field.

  1. Superconductivity: Finding a direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Liang

    2016-09-01

    The experimental observation of superconductivity that breaks spin-rotation symmetry in copper-doped Bi2Se3 provides a qualitatively distinct kind of unconventional superconducting behaviour -- one that brings the importance of the spin-orbit interaction to the fore.

  2. High-Resolution Hard X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Spectrometers Based on Superconducting Absorbers Coupled to Superconducting Transition Edge Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    van den Berg, M.; Chow, D.; Loshak, A.; Cunningham, M.F.; Barbee, T.W.; Matthias, F.; Labov, S.E.

    2000-09-21

    We are developing detectors based on bulk superconducting absorbers coupled to superconducting transition edge sensors (TES) for high-resolution spectroscopy of hard X-rays and soft gamma-rays. We have achieved an energy resolution of 70 eV FWHM at 60 keV using a 1 x 1 x 0.25 mm{sup 3} Sn absorber coupled to a Mo/Cu multilayer TES with a transition temperature of 100 mK. The response of the detector is compared with a simple model using only material properties data and characteristics derived from IV-measurements. We have also manufactured detectors using superconducting absorbers with a higher stopping power, such as Pb and Ta. We present our first measurements of these detectors, including the thermalization characteristics of the bulk superconducting absorbers. The differences in performance between the detectors are discussed and an outline of the future direction of our detector development efforts is given.

  3. Superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlugon, Katarzyna

    The purpose of this thesis is to explain the phenomenon of superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. In the introductory chapter, there is a description of superconductivity and how it occurs at critical temperature (Tc) that is characteristic and different to every superconducting material. The discovery of superconductivity in mercury in 1911 by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes is also mentioned. Different types of superconductors, type I and type II, low and high temperatures superconductors, as well as the BCS theory that was developed in 1957 by Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer, are also described in detail. The BCS theory explains how Cooper's pairs are formed and how they are responsible for the superconducting properties of many materials. The following chapters explain superconductivity in doped fullerenes, graphene and carbon nanotubes, respectively. There is a thorough explanation followed by many examples of different types of carbon nanomaterials in which small changes in chemical structure cause significant changes in superconducting properties. The goal of this research was not only to take into consideration well known carbon based superconductors but also to search for the newest available materials such as the fullerene nanowhiskers discovered quite recently. There is also a presentation of fairly new ideas about inducing superconductivity in a monolayer of graphene which is more challenging than inducing superconductivity in graphite by simply intercalating metal atoms between its graphene sheets. An effort has been taken to look for any available information about carbon nanomaterials that have the potential to superconduct at room temperature, mainly because discovery of such materials would be a real revolution in the modern world, although no such materials have been discovered yet.

  4. Process for manufacturing multilayer capacitors

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1996-01-01

    The invention is directed to a method of manufacture of multilayer electrical components, especially capacitors, and components made by such a method. High capacitance dielectric materials and low cost metallizations layered with such dielectrics may be fabricated as multilayer electrical components by sintering the metallizations and the dielectrics during the fabrication process by application of microwave radiation.

  5. Process for manufacturing multilayer capacitors

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.

    1996-01-02

    The invention is directed to a method of manufacture of multilayer electrical components, especially capacitors, and components made by such a method. High capacitance dielectric materials and low cost metallizations layered with such dielectrics may be fabricated as multilayer electrical components by sintering the metallizations and the dielectrics during the fabrication process by application of microwave radiation. 4 figs.

  6. Wrapped Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    New NASA vehicles, such as Earth Departure Stage (EDS), Orion, landers, and orbiting fuel depots, need improved cryogenic propellant transfer and storage for long-duration missions. Current cryogen feed line multilayer insulation (MLI) performance is 10 times worse per area than tank MLI insulation. During each launch, cryogenic piping loses approximately 150,000 gallons (equivalent to $300,000) in boil-off during transfer, chill down, and ground hold. Quest Product Development Corp., teaming with Ball Aerospace, developed an innovative advanced insulation system, Wrapped MLI (wMLI), to provide improved thermal insulation for cryogenic feed lines. wMLI is high-performance multilayer insulation designed for cryogenic piping. It uses Quest's innovative discrete-spacer technology to control layer spacing/ density and reduce heat leak. The Phase I project successfully designed, built, and tested a wMLI prototype with a measured heat leak 3.6X lower than spiral-wrapped conventional MLI widely used for piping insulation. A wMLI prototype had a heat leak of 7.3 W/m2, or 27 percent of the heat leak of conventional MLI (26.7 W/m2). The Phase II project is further developing wMLI technology with custom, molded polymer spacers and advancing the product toward commercialization via a rigorous testing program, including developing advanced vacuuminsulated pipe for ground support equipment.

  7. Wrapped Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    New NASA vehicles, such as Earth Departure Stage (EDS), Orion, landers, and orbiting fuel depots, need improved cryogenic propellant transfer and storage for long-duration missions. Current cryogen feed line multilayer insulation (MLI) performance is 10 times worse per area than tank MLI insulation. During each launch, cryogenic piping loses approximately 150,000 gallons (equivalent to $300,000) in boil-off during transfer, chill down, and ground hold. Quest Product Development Corp., teaming with Ball Aerospace, developed an innovative advanced insulation system, Wrapped MLI (wMLI), to provide improved thermal insulation for cryogenic feed lines. wMLI is high-performance multilayer insulation designed for cryogenic piping. It uses Quest's innovative discrete-spacer technology to control layer spacing/ density and reduce heat leak. The Phase I project successfully designed, built, and tested a wMLI prototype with a measured heat leak 3.6X lower than spiral-wrapped conventional MLI widely used for piping insulation. A wMLI prototype had a heat leak of 7.3 W/sq m, or 27 percent of the heat leak of conventional MLI (26.7 W/sq m). The Phase II project is further developing wMLI technology with custom, molded polymer spacers and advancing the product toward commercialization via a rigorous testing program, including developing advanced vacuuminsulated pipe for ground support equipment.

  8. Ultrahard Multilayer Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Chrzan, D.C.; Dugger, M.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Friedman, Lawrence H.; Friedmann, T.A.; Knapp, J.A.; McCarty, K.F.; Medlin, D.L.; Mirkarimi, P.B.; Missert, N.; Newcomer, P.P.; Sullivan, J.P.; Tallant, D.R.

    1999-05-01

    We have developed a new multilayer a-tC material that is thick stress-free, adherent, low friction, and with hardness and stiffness near that of diamond. The new a-tC material is deposited by J pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) at room temperature, and fully stress-relieved by a short thermal anneal at 600°C. A thick multilayer is built up by repeated deposition and annealing steps. We measured 88 GPa hardness, 1100 GPa Young's modulus, and 0.1 friction coefficient (under high load). Significantly, these results are all well within the range reported for crystalline diamond. In fact, this material, if considered separate from crystalline diamond, is the 2nd hardest material known to man. Stress-free a-tC also has important advantages over thin film diamond; namely, it is smooth, processed at lower temperature, and can be grown on a much broader range of substrates. This breakthrough will enable a host of applications that we are actively pursuing in MEMs, sensors, LIGA, etc.

  9. Metal optics and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Golovashkin, A.L.

    1989-01-01

    The articles contained in this collection are dedicated to the study of the electron structure of transition metals and superconducting alloys and compounds based on them. The study of the electron structure of materials is one of the central problems of solid-state physics and defines the solution of a number of problems. One of them is the problem of high-temperature superconductivity which has attracted exceptional attention from physicists in connection with the discovery of new classes of ceramic oxides which are superconducting at liquid-nitrogen temperature. The electron structure is one of the three whales on which all of superconductivity rests. It is frequently our ignorance of the electronic properties of a metal, alloy or compound in its normal state which makes it impossible to predict superconductivity in the material, preventing use from calculating the parameters of the superconducting state. There are now a number of effective methods for investigation of the electron structure of the metals and allows. This collection discusses metal optics, tunneling and magnetic measurements in superconductors. These methods are quite informative and allow us to obtain many important electron characteristics and temperature relations. Various characteristics of the superconducting compounds Nb{sub 3}Ge, Nb{sub 3}Al, nb{sub 3}Sn and Nb{sub 3}Ga with A15 structure and NbN with B1 structure, having rather high critical temperatures, are experimentally studied.

  10. Superconductivity in Opal-based superconducting nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. K.; Charnaya, E. V.; Chang, L. J.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.; Lin, M. F.

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we investigate superconducting nanocomposites (SCNCs) to elucidate superconductivity in nanostructured type I superconductor. In, Sn and Hg are loaded into opal matrices by high pressure up to 10kbar, in which introducing superconducting metals into templates preserves their own 3D nanostructures. The opal matrices is adopted because it is a well-developed nanoconfinement and widely used in the studies of photonic crystal due to its periodically-superlatticed nanoporous structure. The SCNCs are then measured by Quantum Design MPMS 3 under different external magnetic fields reveal the field dependences of Tc and irreversibility temperature (Tirr). Next, AC susceptibility measurements of SCNCs determine grain coupling, vortex dynamics and field dependence of activation barrier (Ua) as well as Tc. Additionally, the phase diagrams of these SCNCs are analyzed to study superconductivity for a system with similar nanogeometry. Exotic phase diagrams in the opal SCNC studies reveal an enhanced upper critical field (Hc2 (0)) and curvature crossover of upper critical field line. Additionally, according to the field dependence of Ua(H), curvature crossover of the upper critical field line can occur, owing to vortex phase transition.

  11. Fabrication of multi-layered absorption structure for high quantum efficiency photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Go; Fukuda, Daiji; Numata, Takayuki; Yoshizawa, Akio; Tsuchida, Hidemi; Fujino, Hidetoshi; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Itatani, Taro; Zama, Tatsuya; Inoue, Shuichiro

    2009-12-16

    We report on some efforts to improve a quantum efficiency of titanium-based optical superconducting transition edge sensors using the multi-layered absorption structure for maximizing photon absorption in the Ti layer. Using complex refractive index values of each film measured by a Spectroscopic Ellipsometry, we designed and optimized by a simulation code. An absorption measurement of fabricated structure was in good agreement with the design and was higher than 99% at optimized wavelength of 1550 nm.

  12. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, David S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Martens, Jon S.

    1993-01-01

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductor allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology.

  13. Superconductivity in doped insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    It is shown that many synthetic metals, including high temperature superconductors are ``bad metals``, with such a poor conductivity that the usual meanfield theory of superconductivity breaks down because of anomalously large classical and quantum fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting order parameter. It is argued that the supression of a first order phase transition (phase separation) by the long-range Coulomb interaction leads to high temperature superconductivity accompanied by static or dynamical charge inhomogeneIty. Evidence in support of this picture for high temperature superconductors is described.

  14. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

    1993-11-16

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductors allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology. 12 figures.

  15. Tunneling in superconducting structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2010-12-01

    Here we review our results on the breakpoint features in the coupled system of IJJ obtained in the framework of the capacitively coupled Josephson junction model with diffusion current. A correspondence between the features in the current voltage characteristics (CVC) and the character of the charge oscillations in superconducting layers is demonstrated. Investigation of the correlations of superconducting currents in neighboring Josephson junctions and the charge correlations in neighboring superconducting layers reproduces the features in the CVC and gives a powerful method for the analysis of the CVC of coupled Josephson junctions. A new method for determination of the dissipation parameter is suggested.

  16. Ultrasonic NDE of Multilayered Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Quarry, M J; Fisher, K A; Lehman, S K

    2005-02-14

    This project developed ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation techniques based on guided and bulk waves in multilayered structures using arrays. First, a guided wave technique was developed by preferentially exciting dominant modes with energy in the layer of interest via an ultrasonic array. Second, a bulk wave technique uses Fermat's principle of least time as well as wave-based properties to reconstruct array data and image the multilayered structure. The guided wave technique enables the inspection of inaccessible areas of a multilayered structure without disassembling it. Guided waves propagate using the multilayer as a waveguide into the inaccessible areas from an accessible position. Inspecting multi-layered structures with a guided wave relies on exciting modes with sufficient energy in the layer of interest. Multilayered structures are modeled to determine the possible modes and their distribution of energy across the thickness. Suitable modes were determined and excited by designing arrays with the proper element spacing and frequency. Bulk wave imaging algorithms were developed to overcome the difficulties of multiple reflections and refractions at interfaces. Reconstruction algorithms were developed to detect and localize flaws. A bent-ray algorithm incorporates Fermat's principle to correct time delays in the ultrasonic data that result from the difference in wave speeds in each layer and refractions at the interfaces. A planar wave-based algorithm was developed using the Green function for the multilayer structure to enhance focusing on reception for improved imaging.

  17. EUV multilayer mirrors with tailored spectral reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmann, Thomas; Yulin, Sergey A.; Feigl, Torsten; Kaiser, Norbert

    2002-12-01

    EUV multilayer mirrors with as well an increased as a reduced bandwidth in their spectral and angular reflectance have been designed and deposited with a commercial magnetron sputtering system. Concerning the broadband mirrors, a non-periodic multilayer design based on the thickness optimization of each layer by a stochastic method is compared to a design that consists of 3 different stacks. In addition, narrowband multilayer mirrors with a significantly reduced bandwidth based on high order reflection have been designed and fabricated. The EUV reflection of the samples was investigated with synchrotron radiation at the reflectometer of the PTB (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt) at BESSY II in Berlin. A reflectivity of more than 15% was reached in the whole wavelength range from 13 nm to 15 nm and a reflectivity of more than 30% was obtained for incidence angles from 0° to 20° with both designs. Both the increase and the reduction of the reflection bandwidth are unavoidably connected with a decrease of peak reflectivity. Therefore, the application of such mirrors involves areas where a maximum peak reflectivity is not required, e.g. in EUV spectroscopy and for the metrology for EUV sources. Furthermore, the use of such mirrors in combination with a broadband plasma source will result in a higher integral reflectivity.

  18. A multilayer sonic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munteanu, L.; Chiroiu, V.; Sireteanu, T.; Dumitriu, D.

    2015-10-01

    A non-periodic multilayer film was analyzed to show that, despite its non-periodicity, the film exhibits full band-gaps and localized modes at its interfaces, as well as in the sonic composites. The film consists of alternating layers of two different materials that follow a triadic Cantor sequence. The Cantor structure shows extremely low thresholds for subharmonic generation of ultrasonic waves, compared with homogeneous and periodic structures. The coupling between the extended-mode (phonon) and the localized-mode (fracton) vibration regimes explains the generation of full band-gaps, for which there are no propagating Lamb waves. The large enhancement of the nonlinear interaction results from a more favorable frequency and spatial matching of coupled modes. A full band-gap that excludes Love waves is also analyzed.

  19. Multilayer optical dielectric coating

    DOEpatents

    Emmett, John L.

    1990-01-01

    A highly damage resistant, multilayer, optical reflective coating includes alternating layers of doped and undoped dielectric material. The doping levels are low enough that there are no distinct interfaces between the doped and undoped layers so that the coating has properties nearly identical to the undoped material. The coating is fabricated at high temperature with plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques to eliminate defects, reduce energy-absorption sites, and maintain proper chemical stoichiometry. A number of differently-doped layer pairs, each layer having a thickness equal to one-quarter of a predetermined wavelength in the material are combined to form a narrowband reflective coating for a predetermined wavelength. Broadband reflectors are made by using a number of narrowband reflectors, each covering a portion of the broadband.

  20. Multilayer graphene condenser microphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorović, Dejan; Matković, Aleksandar; Milićević, Marijana; Jovanović, Djordje; Gajić, Radoš; Salom, Iva; Spasenović, Marko

    2015-12-01

    Vibrating membranes are the cornerstone of acoustic technology, forming the backbone of modern loudspeakers and microphones. Acoustic performance of a condenser microphone is derived mainly from the membrane’s size, surface mass and achievable static tension. The widely studied and available nickel has been a dominant membrane material for professional microphones for several decades. In this paper we introduce multilayer graphene as a membrane material for condenser microphones. The graphene device outperforms a high end commercial nickel-based microphone over a significant part of the audio spectrum, with a larger than 10 dB enhancement of sensitivity. Our experimental results are supported with numerical simulations, which also show that a 300 layer thick graphene membrane under maximum tension would offer excellent extension of the frequency range, up to 1 MHz.

  1. High coercivity through texture formation in SmCo5/Co multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastry, P. U.; Mishra, P. K.; Krishnan, M.; Chowdhury, P.; Ravikumar, G.

    2013-02-01

    We have shown that high coercivity in SmCo5/Co multilayer exchange spring magnet can be obtained on silicon substrates as well. This is achieved by annealing the as-grown sample at an optimum temperature that favors texture formation. This compares well with multilayers grown on MgO substrates and post-annealed at the same temperature.

  2. Hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Tixador, P.; Hiebel, P.; Brunet, Y.

    1996-07-01

    Superconductors, especially high T{sub c} ones, are the most attractive materials to design stable and fully passive magnetic suspensions which have to control five degrees of freedom. The hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions present high performances and a simple cooling mode. They consist of a permanent magnet bearing, stabilized by a suitable magnet-superconductor structure. Several designs are given and compared in terms of forces and stiffnesses. The design of the magnet bearing plays an important part. The superconducting magnetic bearing participates less in levitation but must provide a high stabilizing stiffness. This is achieved by the magnet configuration, a good material in term of critical current density and field cooling. A hybrid superconducting suspension for a flywheel is presented. This system consists of a magnet thrust bearing stabilized by superconductors interacting with an alternating polarity magnet structure. First tests and results are reported. Superconducting materials are magnetically melt-textured YBaCuO.

  3. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, John D.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

  4. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1998-05-05

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat is disclosed. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device. 4 figs.

  5. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

  6. Superconductivity and its devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, D. S.

    Among the more important developments that are discussed are cryotrons, superconducting motors and generators, and high-field magnets. Cryotrons will create faster and more economical computer systems. Superconducting motors and generators will cost much less to build than conventional electric generators and cut fuel consumption. Moreover, high-field magnets are being used to confine plasma in connection with nuclear fusion. Superconductors have a vital role to play in all of these developments. Most importantly, though, are the magnetic properties of superconductivity. Superconducting magnets are an integral part of nuclear fusion. In addition, high-field magnets are necessary in the use of accelerators, which are needed to study the interactions between elementary particles.

  7. Photoinduced superconductivity in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Garry; Aron, Camille; Chamon, Claudio

    2015-02-01

    We show that optically pumped semiconductors can exhibit superconductivity. We illustrate this phenomenon in the case of a two-band semiconductor tunnel-coupled to broad-band reservoirs and driven by a continuous wave laser. More realistically, we also show that superconductivity can be induced in a two-band semiconductor interacting with a broad-spectrum light source. We furthermore discuss the case of a three-band model in which the middle band replaces the broad-band reservoirs as the source of dissipation. In all three cases, we derive the simple conditions on the band structure, electron-electron interaction, and hybridization to the reservoirs that enable superconductivity. We compute the finite superconducting pairing and argue that the mechanism can be induced through both attractive and repulsive interactions and is robust to high temperatures.

  8. Cumulative interface roughness and magnetization in antiferromagnetically coupled NiCo/Cu multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, X.; Bian, X.; Abdouche, R.; Muir, W. B.; Stroem-Olsen, J. O.; Altounian, Z.; Sutton, M.

    1994-11-01

    Cumulative interface roughness and its influence on the magnetization process in antiferromagnetically coupled (Ni80Co20/Cu) x N multilayers is studied. In these multilayers, Cu and Ni80Co20 thicknesses are fixed at 20 and 15 A, respectively, in order to obtain the antiferromagnetic coupling at the second oscillation peak of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) versus Cu thickness. Low-angle x-ray reflectivity measurements show that cumulative interface roughness increases with increasing bilayer number N. In-plane magnetization hysteresis measured with both superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and surface magneto-optic Kerr effect (SMOKE) magnetometers are compared. When the cumulative interface roughness is significant, SMOKE hysteresis loops, which are sensitive to the top 5 or 6 magnetic layers, display nonlinear plateau region at small fields. Comparison of low-angle x-ray, and SMOKE results show that interfaces of relatively high quality in top layers only exist for sputtered multilayer with N less than 10.

  9. Integrated Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Integrated multilayer insulation (IMLI) is being developed as an improved alternative to conventional multilayer insulation (MLI), which is more than 50 years old. A typical conventional MLI blanket comprises between 10 and 120 metallized polymer films separated by polyester nets. MLI is the best thermal- insulation material for use in a vacuum, and is the insulation material of choice for spacecraft and cryogenic systems. However, conventional MLI has several disadvantages: It is difficult or impossible to maintain the desired value of gap distance between the film layers (and consequently, it is difficult or impossible to ensure consistent performance), and fabrication and installation are labor-intensive and difficult. The development of IMLI is intended to overcome these disadvantages to some extent and to offer some additional advantages over conventional MLI. The main difference between IMLI and conventional MLI lies in the method of maintaining the gaps between the film layers. In IMLI, the film layers are separated by what its developers call a micro-molded discrete matrix, which can be loosely characterized as consisting of arrays of highly engineered, small, lightweight, polymer (typically, thermoplastic) frames attached to, and placed between, the film layers. The term "micro-molded" refers to both the smallness of the frames and the fact that they are fabricated in a process that forms precise small features, described below, that are essential to attainment of the desired properties. The term "discrete" refers to the nature of the matrix as consisting of separate frames, in contradistinction to a unitary frame spanning entire volume of an insulation blanket.

  10. Stacked magnet superconducting bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Rigney, T.K. II; Saville, M.P.

    1993-06-15

    A superconducting bearing is described, comprising: a plurality of permanent magnets magnetized end-to-end and stacked side-by-side in alternating polarity, such that flux lines flow between ends of adjacent magnets; isolating means, disposed between said adjacent magnets, for reducing flux leakage between opposing sides of said adjacent magnets; and a member made of superconducting material having at least one surface in communication with said flux lines.

  11. Photoemission, Correlation and Superconductivity:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrecht, M.; Ariosa, D.; Cloëtta, D.; Pavuna, D.; Perfetti, L.; Grioni, M.; Margaritondo, G.

    We review some of the problems still affecting photoemission as a probe of high-temperature superconductivity, as well as important recent results concerning their solution. We show, in particular, some of the first important results on thin epitaxial films grown by laser ablation, which break the monopoly of cleaved BCSCO in this type of experiments. Such results, obtained on thin LSCO, may have general implications on the theory of high-temperature superconductivity.

  12. Making Superconducting Welds between Superconducting Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I.; Eom, Byeong Ho

    2008-01-01

    A technique for making superconducting joints between wires made of dissimilar superconducting metals has been devised. The technique is especially suitable for fabrication of superconducting circuits needed to support persistent electric currents in electromagnets in diverse cryogenic applications. Examples of such electromagnets include those in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and in superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). Sometimes, it is desirable to fabricate different parts of a persistent-current-supporting superconducting loop from different metals. For example, a sensory coil in a SQUID might be made of Pb, a Pb/Sn alloy, or a Cu wire plated with Pb/Sn, while the connections to the sensory coil might be made via Nb or Nb/Ti wires. Conventional wire-bonding techniques, including resistance spot welding and pressed contact, are not workable because of large differences between the hardnesses and melting temperatures of the different metals. The present technique is not subject to this limitation. The present technique involves the use (1) of a cheap, miniature, easy-to-operate, capacitor-discharging welding apparatus that has an Nb or Nb/Ti tip and operates with a continuous local flow of gaseous helium and (2) preparation of a joint in a special spark-discharge welding geometry. In a typical application, a piece of Nb foil about 25 m thick is rolled to form a tube, into which is inserted a wire that one seeks to weld to the tube (see figure). The tube can be slightly crimped for mechanical stability. Then a spark weld is made by use of the aforementioned apparatus with energy and time settings chosen to melt a small section of the niobium foil. The energy setting corresponds to the setting of a voltage to which the capacitor is charged. In an experiment, the technique was used to weld an Nb foil to a copper wire coated with a Pb/Sn soft solder, which is superconducting. The joint was evaluated as

  13. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1994 Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high {Tc} superconductivity. During the past year, 27 projects produced over 123 talks and 139 publications. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in August and January); with the second MISCON Workshop held in August; 13 external speakers; 79 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 48 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temperature superconductors.

  14. Apparatus for characterizing conductivity of superconducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Doss, J.D.

    1993-12-07

    Apparatus and method for noncontact, radio-frequency shielding current characterization of materials. Self- or mutual inductance changes in one or more inductive elements, respectively, occur when materials capable of supporting shielding currents are placed in proximity thereto, or undergo change in resistivity while in place. Such changes can be observed by incorporating the inductor(s) in a resonant circuit and determining the frequency of oscillation or by measuring the voltage induced on a coupled inductive element. The present invention is useful for determining the critical temperature and superconducting transition width for superconducting samples. 10 figures.

  15. Apparatus for characterizing conductivity of superconducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Doss, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and method for noncontact, radio-frequency shielding current characterization of materials. Self- or mutual inductance changes in one or more inductive elements, respectively, occur when materials capable of supporting shielding currents are placed in proximity thereto, or undergo change in resistivity while in place. Such changes can be observed by incorporating the inductor(s) in a resonant circuit and determining the frequency of oscillation or by measuring the voltage induced on a coupled inductive element. The present invention is useful for determining the critical temperature and superconducting transition width for superconducting samples.

  16. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  17. Electron pairing without superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guanglei; Tomczyk, Michelle; Lu, Shicheng; Veazey, Joshua P; Huang, Mengchen; Irvin, Patrick; Ryu, Sangwoo; Lee, Hyungwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom; Hellberg, C Stephen; Levy, Jeremy

    2015-05-14

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is the first and best known superconducting semiconductor. It exhibits an extremely low carrier density threshold for superconductivity, and possesses a phase diagram similar to that of high-temperature superconductors--two factors that suggest an unconventional pairing mechanism. Despite sustained interest for 50 years, direct experimental insight into the nature of electron pairing in SrTiO3 has remained elusive. Here we perform transport experiments with nanowire-based single-electron transistors at the interface between SrTiO3 and a thin layer of lanthanum aluminate, LaAlO3. Electrostatic gating reveals a series of two-electron conductance resonances-paired electron states--that bifurcate above a critical pairing field Bp of about 1-4 tesla, an order of magnitude larger than the superconducting critical magnetic field. For magnetic fields below Bp, these resonances are insensitive to the applied magnetic field; for fields in excess of Bp, the resonances exhibit a linear Zeeman-like energy splitting. Electron pairing is stable at temperatures as high as 900 millikelvin, well above the superconducting transition temperature (about 300 millikelvin). These experiments demonstrate the existence of a robust electronic phase in which electrons pair without forming a superconducting state. Key experimental signatures are captured by a model involving an attractive Hubbard interaction that describes real-space electron pairing as a precursor to superconductivity. PMID:25971511

  18. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry L.; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  19. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry Lawrence; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  20. Electron pairing without superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Jeremy

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is the first and best known superconducting semiconductor. It exhibits an extremely low carrier density threshold for superconductivity, and possesses a phase diagram similar to that of high-temperature superconductors--two factors that suggest an unconventional pairing mechanism. Despite sustained interest for 50 years, direct experimental insight into the nature of electron pairing in SrTiO3 has remained elusive. Here we perform transport experiments with nanowire-based single-electron transistors at the interface between SrTiO3 and a thin layer of lanthanum aluminate, LaAlO3. Electrostatic gating reveals a series of two-electron conductance resonances--paired electron states--that bifurcate above a critical pairing field Bp of about 1-4 tesla, an order of magnitude larger than the superconducting critical magnetic field. For magnetic fields below Bp, these resonances are insensitive to the applied magnetic field; for fields in excess of Bp, the resonances exhibit a linear Zeeman-like energy splitting. Electron pairing is stable at temperatures as high as 900 millikelvin, well above the superconducting transition temperature (about 300 millikelvin). These experiments demonstrate the existence of a robust electronic phase in which electrons pair without forming a superconducting state. Key experimental signatures are captured by a model involving an attractive Hubbard interaction that describes real-space electron pairing as a precursor to superconductivity. Support from AFOSR, ONR, ARO, NSF, DOE and NSSEFF is gratefully acknowledged.

  1. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Gray, K.E.

    1988-07-28

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non- superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propagating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N/sup 2/ ambiguity of charged particle events. 6 figs.

  2. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1989-01-01

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non-superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propogating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N.sup.2 ambiguity of charged particle events.

  3. Transport and structural studies of metallic multilayer films

    SciTech Connect

    Florczak, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive study has been made of the structural and transport properties of Fe/Ag and Fe/V multilayer films. The films used in this investigation were prepared by sequential deposition in a UHV compatible sputtering system. High-angle X-ray diffraction experiments reveal modulation satellites in the Fe/V multilayers but none in the Fe/Ag. This observation indicates the existence of a long coherence length in the Fe/V multilayers and a short coherence length in the Fe/Ag films. For bilayer thicknesses greater than 40[angstrom] both series have numerous satellite peaks in the low-angle diffraction data. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate structural degradation in the Fe/Ag multilayers with bilayer thicknesses less than 40[angstrom]. This effect is not present in the Fe/V films. The transport properties of these films were characterized by resistivity, anisotropic magnetoresistance, extraordinary Hall effect, and ordinary Hall effect measurements. For the Fe/Ag samples, a reduction in the bilayer thickness results in increases of the resistivity, anisotropic magnetoresistance, and extra ordinary Hall coefficients. The ordinary Hall coefficient is nearly the same for all the Fe/Ag multilayers. In the Fe/V samples, at 295K there are increases in all transport parameters except the anisotropic magnetoresistance, which decreases. On the other hand, at 4.2K, all of these quantities increase including the anisotropic magnetoresistance. These trends in the transport measurements are discussed using both a simple circuit analogy and a sophisticated statistical analysis of the conduction in multilayer films. The models suggest the electronic mean free paths of the nonmagnetic metals are responsible for the detailed behavior of the AMR ratio in the Fe/V and Fe/Ag multilayers.

  4. Multilayer optics for soft x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falco, Charles M.; Slaughter, Jon M.

    1994-11-01

    We have shown that high quality Be films may be grown on alpha-Al2O3 Si(111) and Ge(111) consistent with the relative lattice mismatches, films grown on Si(111) are of higher quality than those grown on alpha-Al2O3, and those grown on Ge(111) are of the highest quality. The epitaxial Be films grown on Ge during this grant period are the best quality Be films that we or anyone else have ever produced. Growth of these high quality films is a significant step toward single crystal heterostructures containing Be. Such Be-containing structures may be useful, not only in EUV optics, but also in IR optics electronic devices, and studies of thin-film superconductivity. We have been successful in growing epitaxial Co-on-Be, and Ge-on-Be, but not in making Co/Be or Ge/Be superlattices. In both cases the problem is related to limitations of our equipment. To pursue this work further would require an upgrade to our MBE apparatus. Our very recent successes with sputter-deposited Y- and B4C-based multilayers show that there is still much to be gained by studying and optimizing the growth of carefully chosen new material pairs.

  5. Superparamagnetic behavior in ultrathin CoNi layers of electrodeposited CoNi/Cu multilayer nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X.-T.; Wang, G.-C.; Shima, M.

    2006-06-01

    We present evidence that in a very thin regime the magnetic layers become discrete islands and superparamagnetic in multilayered CoNi(1-17 nm)/Cu(4.2 nm) nanowires grown by pulsed electrodeposition using a hole pattern of anodized alumina templates. Magnetic hysteresis loops measured at room temperature using a vibrating sample magnetometer show that superparamagnetism appears at t(CoNi)<1.7 nm, due to a volumetric reduction of the CoNi layers that may result in discontinuity of the layer or formation of islands. The magnetic hysteresis loops for the superparamagnetic nanowires can be represented by the Langevin function. The temperature dependence of coercivity data obtained for the superparamagnetic nanowires using a superconducting quantum interference device indicates that the magnetization reversal can be consistently explained by the Stoner-Walfarth model for coherent rotation. The volumetric reduction accounted for the observed superparamagnetism is probably due to an electrochemical exchange reaction between CoNi and Cu species at the interface during each Cu deposition cycle. The exchange reaction may cause partial dissolution of the CoNi layers at the interface which is eventually stabilized by cementation with Cu. The effects of the nucleation and growth process on the formation of superparamagnetic islands are also discussed.

  6. Multilayer coatings on flexible substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.M.; Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.; Coronado, C.A.; Bennett, W.D.; Stewart, D.C.

    1995-04-01

    Thin-film optical and non-optical multilayer coatings are deposited onto flexible substrates using a vacuum web coater developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The coater`s primary application is rapid prototyping of multilayer (1) polymer coatings, (2) polymer/metal coatings, (3) ceramic/metal coatings, and (4) hybrid polymer, ceramic, and metal coatings. The coater is fully automated and incorporates polymer evaporation and extrusion heads, high-rate magnetron sputtering cathodes, and e-beam evaporation sources. Polymer electrolytes are deposited by extrusion techniques. Flexible plastic, metal, and ceramic substrates can be coated using roll-to-roll or closed-loop configurations. Examples of multilayer optical coatings demonstrated to date are solar reflectors, heat mirrors, Fabry-Perot filters, and alpha particle sensors. Nonoptical coatings include multilayer magnetic metal/ceramic and lamellar composites.

  7. Controlling light with plasmonic multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, Alexey A.; Zhukovsky, Sergei V.; Iorsh, Ivan V.; Belov, Pavel A.

    2014-06-01

    Recent years have seen a new wave of interest in layered media - namely, plasmonic multilayers - in several emerging applications ranging from transparent metals to hyperbolic metamaterials. In this paper, we review the optical properties of such subwavelength metal-dielectric multilayered metamaterials and describe their use for light manipulation at the nanoscale. While demonstrating the recently emphasized hallmark effect of hyperbolic dispersion, we put special emphasis to the comparison between multilayered hyperbolic metamaterials and more broadly defined plasmonic-multilayer metamaterials A number of fundamental electromagnetic effects unique to the latter are identified and demonstrated. Examples include the evolution of isofrequency contour shape from elliptical to hyperbolic, all-angle negative refraction, and nonlocality-induced optical birefringence. Analysis of the underlying physical causes, which are spatial dispersion and optical nonlocality, is also reviewed. These recent results are extremely promising for a number of applications ranging from nanolithography to optical cloaking.

  8. Multilayered Magnetic Gelatin Membrane Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Sangram K.; Goranov, Vitaly; Dash, Mamoni; Russo, Alessandro; Shelyakova, Tatiana; Graziosi, Patrizio; Lungaro, Lisa; Riminucci, Alberto; Uhlarz, Marc; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Rivas, Jose; Herrmannsdörfer, Thomas; Rajadas, Jayakumar; De Smedt, Stefaan; Braeckmans, Kevin; Kaplan, David L.; Dediu, V. Alek

    2016-01-01

    A versatile approach for the design and fabrication of multilayer magnetic scaffolds with tunable magnetic gradients is described. Multilayer magnetic gelatin membrane scaffolds with intrinsic magnetic gradients were designed to encapsulate magnetized bioagents under an externally applied magnetic field for use in magnetic-field-assisted tissue engineering. The temperature of the individual membranes increased up to 43.7 °C under an applied oscillating magnetic field for 70 s by magnetic hyperthermia, enabling the possibility of inducing a thermal gradient inside the final 3D multilayer magnetic scaffolds. On the basis of finite element method simulations, magnetic gelatin membranes with different concentrations of magnetic nanoparticles were assembled into 3D multilayered scaffolds. A magnetic-gradient-controlled distribution of magnetically labeled stem cells was demonstrated in vitro. This magnetic biomaterial–magnetic cell strategy can be expanded to a number of different magnetic biomaterials for various tissue engineering applications. PMID:26451743

  9. Superconducting mirror for laser gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.

    1991-05-14

    This paper describes an apparatus for reflecting a light beam. It comprises: a mirror assembly comprising a substrate and a superconductive mirror formed on such substrate, wherein: the substrate is optically transparent to the light beam and has a thickness of from about 0.5 to about 1.0 millimeter, and the superconductive mirror has a thickness of from about 0.5 to about 1.0 microns; means for cooling the superconductive mirror; means for measuring the temperature of the superconductive mirror; means for determining the reflectivity of the superconductive mirror; and means for varying the reflectivity of the superconductive mirror.

  10. Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems

    DOEpatents

    Vance, Steven J.; Goedjen, John G.; Sabol, Stephen M.; Sloan, Kelly M.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

  11. Enhanced Superconductivity in Superlattices of high-$T_c$ Cuprates

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Satoshi; Maier, Thomas A

    2008-01-01

    The electronic properties of multilayers of strongly-correlated models for cuprate superconductors are investigated using cluster dynamical mean-field techniques. We focus on combinations of under-doped and over-doped layers and find that the superconducting order parameter in the over-doped layers is enhanced by the proximity effect of the strong pairing scale originating from the under-doped layers. The enhanced order parameter can even exceed the maximum value in uniform systems. This behavior is well reproduced in slave-boson mean-field calculations which also find higher transition temperatures than in the uniform system. These results indicate the possibility for higher critical temperatures in artificial cuprate multilayer systems.

  12. Artificial multilayers and nanomagnetic materials

    PubMed Central

    SHINJO, Teruya

    2013-01-01

    The author has been actively engaged in research on nanomagnetic materials for about 50 years. Nanomagnetic materials are comprised of ferromagnetic systems for which the size and shape are controlled on a nanometer scale. Typical examples are ultrafine particles, ultrathin films, multilayered films and nano-patterned films. In this article, the following four areas of the author’s studies are described. (1) Mössbauer spectroscopic studies of nanomagnetic materials and interface magnetism. (2) Preparation and characterization of metallic multilayers with artificial superstructures. (3) Giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect in magnetic multilayers. (4) Novel properties of nanostructured ferromagnetic thin films (dots and wires). A subject of particular interest in the author’s research was the artificially prepared multilayers consisting of metallic elements. The motivation to initiate the multilayer investigation is described and the physical properties observed in the artificial multilayers are introduced. The author’s research was initially in the field of pure physical science and gradually extended into applied science. His achievements are highly regarded not only from the fundamental point of view but also from the technological viewpoint. PMID:23391605

  13. Superconducting wind turbine generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamsen, A. B.; Mijatovic, N.; Seiler, E.; Zirngibl, T.; Træholt, C.; Nørgård, P. B.; Pedersen, N. F.; Andersen, N. H.; Østergård, J.

    2010-03-01

    We have examined the potential of 10 MW superconducting direct drive generators to enter the European offshore wind power market and estimated that the production of about 1200 superconducting turbines until 2030 would correspond to 10% of the EU offshore market. The expected properties of future offshore turbines of 8 and 10 MW have been determined from an up-scaling of an existing 5 MW turbine and the necessary properties of the superconducting drive train are discussed. We have found that the absence of the gear box is the main benefit and the reduced weight and size is secondary. However, the main challenge of the superconducting direct drive technology is to prove that the reliability is superior to the alternative drive trains based on gearboxes or permanent magnets. A strategy of successive testing of superconducting direct drive trains in real wind turbines of 10 kW, 100 kW, 1 MW and 10 MW is suggested to secure the accumulation of reliability experience. Finally, the quantities of high temperature superconducting tape needed for a 10 kW and an extreme high field 10 MW generator are found to be 7.5 km and 1500 km, respectively. A more realistic estimate is 200-300 km of tape per 10 MW generator and it is concluded that the present production capacity of coated conductors must be increased by a factor of 36 by 2020, resulting in a ten times lower price of the tape in order to reach a realistic price level for the superconducting drive train.

  14. Superconducting nanostructured materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Metlushko, V.

    1998-07-13

    Within the last year it has been realized that the remarkable properties of superconducting thin films containing a periodic array of defects (such as sub-micron sized holes) offer a new route for developing a novel superconducting materials based on precise control of microstructure by modern photolithography. A superconductor is a material which, when cooled below a certain temperature, loses all resistance to electricity. This means that superconducting materials can carry large electrical currents without any energy loss--but there are limits to how much current can flow before superconductivity is destroyed. The current at which superconductivity breaks down is called the critical current. The value of the critical current is determined by the balance of Lorentz forces and pinning forces acting on the flux lines in the superconductor. Lorentz forces proportional to the current flow tend to drive the flux lines into motion, which dissipates energy and destroys zero resistance. Pinning forces created by isolated defects in the microstructure oppose flux line motion and increase the critical current. Many kinds of artificial pinning centers have been proposed and developed to increase critical current performance, ranging from dispersal of small non-superconducting second phases to creation of defects by proton, neutron or heavy ion irradiation. In all of these methods, the pinning centers are randomly distributed over the superconducting material, causing them to operate well below their maximum efficiency. We are overcome this drawback by creating pinning centers in aperiodic lattice (see Fig 1) so that each pin site interacts strongly with only one or a few flux lines.

  15. Pantechnik new superconducting ion source: PantechniK Indian Superconducting Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Gaubert, G.; Bieth, C.; Bougy, W.; Brionne, N.; Donzel, X.; Leroy, R.; Sineau, A.; Vallerand, C.; Villari, A. C. C.; Thuillier, T.

    2012-02-15

    The new ECR ion source PantechniK Indian Superconducting Ion Source (PKISIS) was recently commissioned at Pantechnik. Three superconducting coils generate the axial magnetic field configuration, while the radial magnetic field is done with the multi-layer permanent magnets. Special care was devoted to the design of the hexapolar structure, allowing a maximum magnetic field of 1.32 T at the wall of the 82 mm diameter plasma chamber. The three superconducting coils using low temperature superconducting wires are cooled by a single double stage cryo-cooler (4.2 K). Cryogen-free technology is used, providing reliability and easy maintenance at low cost. The maximum installed RF power (18.0 GHz) is of 2 kW. Metallic beams can be produced with an oven (T{sub max}= 1400 deg. C) installed with an angle of 5 deg. with respect to the source axis or a sputtering system, mounted on the axis of the source. The beam extraction system is constituted of three electrodes in accel-decel configuration. The new source of Pantechnik is conceived for reaching optimum performances at 18 GHz RF frequencies. PKISIS magnetic fields are 2.1 T axial B{sub inj} and 1.32 T radial field in the wall, variable B{sub min} with an independent coil and a large and opened extraction region. Moreover, PKISIS integrates modern design concepts, like RF direct injection (2 kW availability), dc-bias moving disk, out-of-axis oven and axial sputtering facility for metal beams. Finally, PKISIS is also conceived in order to operate in a high-voltage platform with minor power consumption.

  16. Bulk Superconductivity and Disorder in Single Crystals of LaFePO

    SciTech Connect

    Analytis, James G.; Chu, Jiun-Haw; Erickson, Ann S.; Kucharczyk, Chris; Serafin, Alessandro; Carrington, Antony; Cox, Catherine; Kauzlarich, Susan M.; Hope, Hakon; /UC, Davis. Dept. Chem.

    2010-02-15

    We have studied the intrinsic normal and superconducting properties of the oxypnictide LaFePO. These samples exhibit bulk superconductivity and the evidence suggests that stoichiometric LaFePO is indeed superconducting, in contrast to other reports. We find that superconductivity is independent of the interplane residual resistivity {rho}{sub 0} and discuss the implications of this on the nature of the superconducting order parameter. Finally we find that, unlike T{sub c}, other properties in single-crystal LaFePO including the resistivity and magnetoresistance, can be very sensitive to disorder.

  17. Multilayer microfluidic PEGDA hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Cuchiara, Michael P; Allen, Alicia C B; Chen, Theodore M; Miller, Jordan S; West, Jennifer L

    2010-07-01

    Development of robust 3D tissue analogs in vitro is limited by passive, diffusional mass transport. Perfused microfluidic tissue engineering scaffolds hold the promise to improve mass transport limitations and promote the development of complex, metabolically dense, and clinically relevant tissues. We report a simple and robust multilayer replica molding technique in which poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) are serially replica molded to develop microfluidic PEGDA hydrogel networks embedded within independently fabricated PDMS housings. We demonstrate the ability to control solute-scaffold effective diffusivity as a function of solute molecular weight and hydrogel concentration. Within cell laden microfluidic hydrogels, we demonstrate increased cellular viability in perfused hydrogel systems compared to static controls. We observed a significant increase in cell viability at all time points greater than zero at distances up to 1 mm from the perfused channel. Knowledge of spatiotemporal mass transport and cell viability gradients provides useful engineering design parameters necessary to maximize overall scaffold viability and metabolic density. This work has applications in the development of hydrogels as in vitro diagnostics and ultimately as regenerative medicine based therapeutics.

  18. Multilayer graphene rubber nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartel, Bernhard; Frasca, Daniele; Schulze, Dietmar; Wachtendorf, Volker; Krafft, Bernd; Morys, Michael; Böhning, Martin; Rybak, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Multilayer Graphene (MLG), a nanoparticle with a specific surface of BET = 250 m2/g and thus made of only approximately 10 graphene sheets, is proposed as a nanofiller for rubbers. When homogenously dispersed, it works at low loadings enabling the replacement of carbon black (CB), increase in efficiency, or reduction in filler concentration. Actually the appropriate preparation yielded nanocomposites in which just 3 phr are sufficient to significantly improve the rheological, curing and mechanical properties of different rubbers, as shown for Chlorine-Isobutylene-Isoprene Rubber (CIIR), Nitrile-Butadiene Rubber (NBR), Natural Rubber (NR), and Styrene-Butadiene Rubber (SBR). A mere 3 phr of MLG tripled the Young's modulus of CIIR, an effect equivalent to 20 phr of carbon black. Similar equivalents are observed for MLG/CB mixtures. MLG reduces gas permeability, increases thermal and electrical conductivities, and retards fire behavior. The later shown by the reduction in heat release rate in the cone calorimeter. The higher the nanofiller concentration is (3 phr, 5 phr, and 10 phr was investigated), the greater the improvement in the properties of the nanocomposites. Moreover, the MLG nanocomposites improve stability of mechanical properties against weathering. An increase in UV-absorption as well as a pronounced radical scavenging are proposed and were proved experimentally. To sum up, MLG is interesting as a multifunctional nanofiller and seems to be quite ready for rubber development.

  19. Surface Induced Anomalous Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Herman J.; Haley, Stephen B.

    The Ginzburg Landau (GL) theory is recast using a Hamiltonian involving the complete kinetic energy density which requires that the surface energy must contain a term ∇∣ψ∣2 to support superconducting (SC) states. The GL equations contain two temperature t dependent parameters α(t) and β(t), which are respectively the coefficients of the SC pair density ∝∣ψ∣2, and the pair interaction term ∝∣ψ∣4 in the free energy density. The sign of these parameters, which defines distinct solution classes, and the ratio s(t)=√ {|α |/|β |} are governed by the characteristics of the surface energy density. In addition to the conventional bulk superconducting states with (α < 0, β > 0), anomalous superconducting states exist for all other sign combinations, including cases with β < 0 which may exist only when surface pair interactions are significant. All possible solutions of our generalized nonlinear, one-dimensional GL equations are found analytically and applied to a thin superconducting slab which manifests the possibility of states exhibiting enhanced, diminished, and pre-wetting superconductivity. Critical currents are determined as functions of s(t) and surface parameters. The results are applied to critical current experiments on SNS systems.

  20. Superconducting tensor gravity gradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    The employment of superconductivity and other material properties at cryogenic temperatures to fabricate sensitive, low-drift, gravity gradiometer is described. The device yields a reduction of noise of four orders of magnitude over room temperature gradiometers, and direct summation and subtraction of signals from accelerometers in varying orientations are possible with superconducting circuitry. Additional circuits permit determination of the linear and angular acceleration vectors independent of the measurement of the gravity gradient tensor. A dewar flask capable of maintaining helium in a liquid state for a year's duration is under development by NASA, and a superconducting tensor gravity gradiometer for the NASA Geodynamics Program is intended for a LEO polar trajectory to measure the harmonic expansion coefficients of the earth's gravity field up to order 300.

  1. Superconducting active impedance converter

    SciTech Connect

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductor allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10--80 K temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology.

  2. Nonlinear terahertz superconducting plasmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jingbo; Liang, Lanju; Jin, Biaobing E-mail: tonouchi@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp Kang, Lin; Xu, Weiwei; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng E-mail: tonouchi@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Zhang, Caihong; Kawayama, Iwao; Murakami, Hironaru; Tonouchi, Masayoshi E-mail: tonouchi@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Wang, Huabing

    2014-10-20

    Nonlinear terahertz (THz) transmission through subwavelength hole array in superconducting niobium nitride (NbN) film is experimentally investigated using intense THz pulses. The good agreement between the measurement and numerical simulations indicates that the field strength dependent transmission mainly arises from the nonlinear properties of the superconducting film. Under weak THz pulses, the transmission peak can be tuned over a frequency range of 145 GHz which is attributed to the high kinetic inductance of 50 nm-thick NbN film. Utilizing the THz pump-THz probe spectroscopy, we study the dynamic process of transmission spectra and demonstrate that the transition time of such superconducting plasmonic device is within 5 ps.

  3. A simultaneous photoacoustic tomography imaging technique in multilayer media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xian; Tang, Zhilie; He, Yongheng; Liu, Haifeng

    2008-12-01

    This study aims to develop a simultaneous photoacoustic tomography imaging technique in multilayer media. With an acoustic lens which has the ability of parallel imaging instead of other PA image reconstruction methods on the basis of complex algorithms, obtaining a two-dimensional (2D) PA image in real-time is available. Combining the advantages of the acoustic lens which has long focal depth and the fast data acquisition system, the new system is particularly excellent that it can acquire the complete PA signals from all the object planes. With the time-resolved technique, the PA signals from different object planes can be distinguished. As a result, the multilayer PAT images can be reconstructed simultaneously without any complicated reconstruction algorithms. According to the experimental results, the reconstructed multilayer images agree well with the original samples.

  4. Micromorphology, microstructure and magnetic properties of sputtered garnet multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Marcelli, R.; Padeletti, G.; Gambacorti, N.; Simeone, M.G.; Fiorani, D.

    1998-12-31

    The growth technique, the micromorphological and microstructural characterization by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and secondary ions mass spectrometry (SIMS) as well as the magnetic properties of a novel class of magnetic multilayers, based on radio frequency (RF) sputtered thin amorphous garnet films, are presented. One, three and five thin film multilayers composed by amorphous pure yttrium iron garnet (a:YIG) and amorphous gadolinium gallium garnet (a:GGG) have been grown on GGG single crystal substrates. The multilayer interfaces have been found to be comparable in both, the three and five-layers structure. Low field susceptibility measurements, showed a paramagnetic behavior for the single layer YIG film. For the three and five layers samples, irreversibility effects were observed, giving evidence of magnetic clusters at the interface YIG/GGG.

  5. Surface modification of multilayer graphene using Ga ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Quan; Shao, Ying; Ge, Daohan; Ren, Naifei; Yang, Qizhi

    2015-04-28

    The effect of Ga ion irradiation intensity on the surface of multilayer graphene was examined. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determined that the irradiation caused defects in the crystal structure of graphene. The density of defects increased with the increase in dwell times. Furthermore, the strain induced by the irradiation changed the crystallite size and the distance between defects. These defects had the effect of doping the multilayer graphene and increasing its work function. The increase in work function was determined using contact potential difference measurements. The surface morphology of the multilayer graphene changed following irradiation as determined by atomic force microscopy. Additionally, the adhesion between the atomic force microscopy tip and sample increased further indicating that the irradiation had caused surface modification, important for devices that incorporate graphene.

  6. Superconducting magnetic quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.W.; Shepard, K.W.; Nolen, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    A design was developed for a 350 T/m, 2.6-cm clear aperture superconducting quadrupole focussing element for use in a very low q/m superconducting linac as discussed below. The quadrupole incorporates holmium pole tips, and a rectangular-section winding using standard commercially-available Nb-Ti wire. The magnet was modeled numerically using both 2D and 3D codes, as a basis for numerical ray tracing using the quadrupole as a linac element. Components for a prototype singlet are being procured during FY 1995.

  7. Technology of RF superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This work has several parts, two of which are collaborative development projects with the majority of the work being performed at Argonne. The first is the development of a superconducting RFQ structure in collaboration with AccSys Technology Inc. of Pleasanton, California, funded as a Phase II SBIR grant. Another is a collaborative project with the Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi, India (who are funding the work) to develop new superconducting ion accelerating structures. Other initiatives are developing various aspects of the technology required to utilize ATLAS as a secondary beam linac for radioactive beams.

  8. Superconductivity in doped semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustarret, E.

    2015-07-01

    A historical survey of the main normal and superconducting state properties of several semiconductors doped into superconductivity is proposed. This class of materials includes selenides, tellurides, oxides and column-IV semiconductors. Most of the experimental data point to a weak coupling pairing mechanism, probably phonon-mediated in the case of diamond, but probably not in the case of strontium titanate, these being the most intensively studied materials over the last decade. Despite promising theoretical predictions based on a conventional mechanism, the occurrence of critical temperatures significantly higher than 10 K has not been yet verified. However, the class provides an enticing playground for testing theories and devices alike.

  9. Multilayer perceptron for nonlinear programming.

    SciTech Connect

    Reifman, J.; Feldman, E. E.; Reactor Analysis

    2002-08-01

    A new method for solving nonlinear programming problems within the framework of a multilayer neural network perceptron is proposed. The method employs the Penalty Function method to transform a constrained optimization problem into a sequence of unconstrained optimization problems and then solves the sequence of unconstrained optimizations of the transformed problem by training a series of multilayer perceptrons. The neural network formulation is represented in such a way that the multilayer perceptron prediction error to be minimized mimics the objective function of the unconstrained problem, and therefore, the minimization of the objective function for each unconstrained optimization is attained by training a single perceptron. The multilayer perceptron allows for the transformation of problems with two-sided bounding constraints on the decision variables x, e.g., a{<=}x{sub n}{<=}b, into equivalent optimization problems in which these constraints do not explicitly appear. Hence, when these are the only constraints in the problem, the transformed problem is constraint free (i.e., the transformed objective function contains no penalty terms) and is solved by training a multilayer perceptron only once. In addition, we present a new Penalty Function method for solving nonlinear programming problems that is parameter free and guarantees that feasible solutions are obtained when the optimal solution is on the boundary of the feasible region. Simulation results, including an example from operations research, illustrate the proposed methods.

  10. Unfolding single- and multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorens, Maria-Gema; Bons, Paul D.; Griera, Albert; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique

    2014-05-01

    When planar structures (e.g. sedimentary layers, veins, dykes, cleavages, etc.) are subjected to deformation, they have about equal chances to be shortened or stretched. The most common shortening and stretching structures are folds and boudinage, respectively. However, boudinage requires additional deformation mechanisms apart from viscous flow, like formation of fractures or strain localization. When folded layers are subjected to extension, they could potentially unfold back to straight layers. Although probably not uncommon, this would be difficult to recognize. Open questions are whether folded layers can unfold, what determines their mechanical behaviour and how we can recognize them in the field. In order to approach these questions, we present a series of numerical experiments that simulate stretching of previously folded single- and multi-layers in simple shear, using the two dimensional numerical modelling platform ELLE, including the finite element module BASIL that calculates viscous deformation. We investigate the parameters that affect a fold train once it rotates into the extensional field. The results show that the unfolding process strongly depends on the viscosity contrast between the layer and matrix (Llorens et al., 2013). Layers do not completely unfold when they experience softening before or during the stretching process or when other neighbouring competent layers prevent them from unfolding. The foliation refraction patterns are the main indicators of unfolded folds. Additionally, intrafolial folds and cusp-like folds adjacent to straight layers, as well as variations in fold amplitudes and limb lengths of irregular folds can also be used as indicators of stretching of a layer after shortening and folding. References: Llorens, M-.G., Bons, P.D., Griera, A. and Gomez-Rivas, E. 2013. When do folds unfold during progressive shear?. Geology, 41, 563-566.

  11. Onset of superconductivity in sodium and potassium intercalated molybdenum disulphide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.; Rembaum, A.

    1971-01-01

    Molybdenum disulfide in the form of natural crystals or powder has been intercalated at -65 to -70 C with sodium and potassium using the liquid ammonia technique. All intercalated samples were found to show a superconducting transition. A plot of the percent of diamagnetic throw versus temperature indicates the possible existence of two phases in the potassium intercalated molybdenum disulfide. The onset of superconductivity in potassium and sodium intercalated molybdenite powder was found to be approximately 6.2 and approximately 4.5 K, respectively. The observed superconductivity is believed to be due to an increase in electron density as a result of intercalation.

  12. Sectioning of multilayers to make a multilayer Laue lens

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyon Chol; Stephenson, G. Brian; Liu Chian; Conley, Ray; Khachatryan, Ruben; Wieczorek, Michael; Macrander, Albert T.; Yan Hanfei; Maser, Joerg; Hiller, Jon; Koritala, Rachel

    2007-04-15

    We report a process to fabricate multilayer Laue lenses (MLL's) by sectioning and thinning multilayer films. This method can produce a linear zone plate structure with a very large ratio of zone depth to width (e.g., >1000), orders of magnitude larger than can be attained with photolithography. Consequently, MLL's are advantageous for efficient nanofocusing of hard x rays. MLL structures prepared by the technique reported here have been tested at an x-ray energy of 19.5 keV, and a diffraction-limited performance was observed. The present article reports the fabrication techniques that were used to make the MLL's.

  13. Reflectance, Optical Properties, and Stability of Molybdenum/Strontium and Molybdenum/Yttrium Multilayer Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Kjornrattanawanich, B

    2002-09-01

    The motivation of this work is to develop high reflectance normal-incidence multilayer mirrors in the 8-12 nm wavelength region for applications in astronomy and extreme ultraviolet lithography. To achieve this goal, Mo/Sr and Mo/Y multilayers were studied. These multilayers were deposited with a UHV magnetron sputtering system and their reflectances were measured with synchrotron radiation. High normal-incidence reflectances of 23% at 8.8 nm, 40.8% at 9.4 nm, and 48.3% at 10.5 nm were achieved. However, the reflectance of Mo/Sr multilayers decreased rapidly after exposure to air. Attempts to use thin layers of carbon to passivate the surface of Mo/Sr multilayers were unsuccessful. Experimental results on the refractive index {tilde n} = 1-{delta} + i{beta} of yttrium and molybdenum in the 50-1300 eV energy region are reported in this work. This is the first time ever that values on the refractive index of yttrium are measured in this energy range. The absorption part {beta} was determined through transmittance measurements. The dispersive part {delta} was calculated by means of the Kramers-Kronig formalism. The newly determined values of the refractive index of molybdenum are in excellent agreement with the published data. Those of yttrium are more accurate and contain fine structures around the yttrium M-absorption edges where Mo/Y multilayers operate. These improved sets of optical data lead to better design and modeling of the optical properties of Mo/Y multilayers. The reflectance quality of Mo/Y multilayers is dependent on their optical and structural properties. To correlate these properties with the multilayer reflectance, x-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy were used to analyze samples. Normal-incidence reflectances of 32.6% at 9.27 nm, 38.4% at 9.48 nm, and 29.6% at 9.46 nm were obtained from three representative Mo/Y multilayers which had about 0%, 25%, and 39% atomic oxygen assimilated in their

  14. Magnetic and Superconducting Materials at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.

    2015-03-24

    transitions from magnetic to nonmagnetic phases in a broad pressure-temperature range; using X-ray methods including the newly developed RIXS high-pressure technique to explore pressure-tuned electronic excitations in strongly correlated 3d-materials; and advancing transport and magnetic techniques for measurements on small samples at very high pressures in a wide temperature range, with the application of focused ion beam technology and photolithography tailored to the design of microcircuits down to a nanoscale size, thus expanding the horizon in the search for novel physical phenomena at ultrahigh pressures. Apply new optical magnetic sensing techniques with NV- centers in diamond to detect superconductivity and magnetic transitions with unprecedented spatial resolution.

  15. Heat Transfer In High-Temperature Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Miller, Stephen D.; Cunnington, George R.

    2006-01-01

    The combined radiation/conduction heat transfer in high-temperature multilayer insulations for typical reentry of reusable launch vehicles from low Earth orbit was investigated experimentally and numerically. The high-temperature multilayer insulation investigated consisted of gold-coated reflective foils separated by alumina fibrous insulation spacers. The steady-state heat transfer through four multilayer insulation configurations was investigated experimentally over the temperature range of 300-1300 K and environmental pressure range of 1.33 10(exp -5)-101.32 kPa. It was shown that including the reflective foils reduced the effective thermal conductivity compared to fibrous insulation sample at 1.5 times the density of the multilayer sample. A finite volume numerical model was developed to solve the governing combined radiation/conduction heat transfer equations. The radiation heat transfer in the fibrous insulation spacers was modeled using the modified two-flux approximation assuming anisotropic scattering and gray medium. The numerical model was validated by comparison with steady-state experimental data. The root mean square deviation between the predicted and measured effective thermal conductivity of the samples was 9.5%.

  16. Structural reducibility of multilayer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Domenico, Manlio; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Arenas, Alexandre; Latora, Vito

    2015-04-01

    Many complex systems can be represented as networks consisting of distinct types of interactions, which can be categorized as links belonging to different layers. For example, a good description of the full protein-protein interactome requires, for some organisms, up to seven distinct network layers, accounting for different genetic and physical interactions, each containing thousands of protein-protein relationships. A fundamental open question is then how many layers are indeed necessary to accurately represent the structure of a multilayered complex system. Here we introduce a method based on quantum theory to reduce the number of layers to a minimum while maximizing the distinguishability between the multilayer network and the corresponding aggregated graph. We validate our approach on synthetic benchmarks and we show that the number of informative layers in some real multilayer networks of protein-genetic interactions, social, economical and transportation systems can be reduced by up to 75%.

  17. Ferromagnetic resonance measurements of (Co/Ni/Co/Pt) multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbiaa, R.; Shaw, J. M.; Nembach, H. T.; Bahri, M. Al; Ranjbar, M.; Åkerman, J.; Piramanayagam, S. N.

    2016-10-01

    Multilayers of [Co/Ni(t)/Co/Pt]×8 with varying Ni thickness were investigated for possible use as a free layer in magnetic tunnel junctions and spintronics devices. The thickness t of the Ni sub-layer was varied from 0.3 nm to 0.9 nm and the resulting magnetic properties were compared with (Co/Ni) and (Co/Pt) multilayers. As determined from magnetic force microscopy, magnetometry and ferromagnetic resonance measurements, all multilayers exhibited perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Compared with (Co/Pt) multilayers, the sample with t of 0.9 nm showed almost the same anisotropy field of μ 0 H k   =  1.15 T but the damping constant was 40% lower. These characteristics make these multilayers attractive for spin torque based magnetoresistive devices with perpendicular anisotropy.

  18. Resource Letter Scy-3: Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butch, N. P.; de Andrade, M. C.; Maple, M. B.

    2008-02-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on superconductivity. Since the last Resource Letter on superconductivity, Scy-2, was published in 1970, there have been dramatic advances in our basic understanding of superconductivity, discovery of new superconducting materials, and improved technological exploitation of superconductors. We review basic phenomenology, followed by concise descriptions of several main classes of superconductors recognized today. Journal articles and books are cited for the following topics: Conventional superconductors, paramagnetic impurities in superconductors, magnetically ordered superconductors, heavy fermion superconductors, high Tc superconductors, organic superconductors, applications of superconductivity, and laboratory demonstrations of superconductivity. Owing to the large volume of available literature on superconductivity, the journal articles and books we discuss constitute good starting points for further exploration of particular topics.

  19. Review of new energy. Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-03-01

    An summary is given of the research and development on high temperature superconductivity. It begins with a description of superconducting state and enumerates chemical elements, in particular oxides, associated with high temperature superconductivity. A brief account is next given on the progress of research and development on the present subject. Some of well known topics associated with superconductivity are described shortly, namely Meissner effect, quenching (transition to normal conducting state from superconducting one), Perovskite structure, positive hole earrier, Josephson effect, SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) and so on. Various devices or technology are enumerated, to which superconductivity, in particular high temperature one, is proposed to apply, namely electromagnet, MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), particle accelerator, linear motor car, electric power storage and so on. The summary is finished with a future outlook.

  20. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristiano, R.; Ejrnaes, M.; Esposito, E.; Lisitskyi, M. P.; Nappi, C.; Pagano, S.; Perez de Lara, D.

    2006-03-01

    Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors exploit the early stages of the energy down cascade which occur after the absorption of radiation. They operate on a short temporal scale ranging from few microseconds down to tens of picoseconds. In such a way they provide fast counting capability, high time discrimination and also, for some devices, energy sensitivity. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors are developed for their use both in basic science and in practical applications for detection of single photons or single ionized macromolecules. In this paper we consider two devices: distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs) based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), which are typically used for high-speed energy spectroscopy applications, and hot-electron superconductive detectors (HESDs), which are typically used as fast counters and time discriminators. Implementation of the DROID geometry to use a single superconductor is discussed. Progress in the fabrication technology of NbN nanostructured HESDs is presented. The two detectors share the high sensitivity that makes them able to efficiently detect even single photons down to infrared energy.

  1. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  2. Applications of Superconductivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodkind, John M.

    1971-01-01

    Presents a general review of current practical applications of the properties of superconducters. The devices are classified into groups according to the property that is of primary importance. The article is inteded as a first introduction for students and professionals. (Author/DS)

  3. SUPERCONDUCTING VANADIUM BASE ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Cleary, H.J.

    1958-10-21

    A new vanadium-base alloy which possesses remarkable superconducting properties is presented. The alloy consists of approximately one atomic percent of palladium, the balance being vanadium. The alloy is stated to be useful in a cryotron in digital computer circuits.

  4. Langmuir vacuum and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Veklenko, B. A.

    2012-06-15

    It is shown that, in the 'jelly' model of cold electron-ion plasma, the interaction between electrons and the quantum electromagnetic vacuum of Langmuir waves involves plasma superconductivity with an energy gap proportional to the energy of the Langmuir quantum.

  5. New research in Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorrami, Mona

    2013-03-01

    Superconductors are materials that have no resistance to electricity's flow; they are one of the last great frontiers of scientific discovery. The theories that explain superconductor behavior seem to be constantly under review. In 1911 superconductivity was first observed in mercury by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes When he cooled it to the temperature of liquid helium, 4 degrees Kelvin (-452F, -269C), its resistance suddenly disappeared. It was necessary for Onnes to come within 4 degrees of the coldest temperature that is theoretically attainable to witness the phenomenon of superconductivity. In 1933 German researchers Walther Meissner and Robert Ochsenfeld discovered that a superconducting material will repel a magnetic field. A magnet moving by a conductor induces currents in the conductor, but, in a superconductor the induced currents exactly mirror the field that would have otherwise penetrated the superconducting material - causing the magnet to be repulsed. This phenomenon is known as strong diamagnetism and is today often referred to as the ``Meissner effect'' (an eponym). Later on the theory developed by American physicists John Bardeen, Leon Cooper, and John Schrieffer together with extensions and refinements of the theory, which followed in the years after 1957, succeeded in explaining in considerable detail the properties of superconductors.

  6. AC/RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  7. Superconducting magnets 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics on Superconducting Magnets; SSC Magnet Industrialization; Collider Quadrupole Development; A Record-Setting Magnet; D20: The Push Beyond 10T; Nonaccelerator Applications; APC Materials Development; High-T{sub c} at Low Temperature; Cable and Cabling-Machine Development; and Analytical Magnet Design.

  8. Superconducting thermometer for cryogenics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, F. A.

    1977-01-01

    Digital electronic device uses superconducting filaments as sensors. Simple solid-state circuitry combined with filaments comprise highly-reliable temperature monitor. Device has ability to track very fast thermal transients and "on/off" output is adaptable to remote sensing and telemetry.

  9. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    Thermoelectricity is produced by applying a temperature differential to dissimilar electrically conducting or semiconducting materials, thereby producing a voltage that is proportional to the temperature difference. Thermoelectric generators use this effect to directly convert heat into electricity; however, presently-known generators have low efficiencies due to the production of high currents which in turn cause large resistive heating losses. Some thermoelectric generators operate at efficiencies between 4% and 7% in the 800{degrees} to 1200{degrees}C range. According to its major aspects and bradly stated, the present invention is an apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. In particular, the invention is a thermoelectric generator that juxtaposes a superconducting material and a semiconducting material - so that the superconducting and the semiconducting materials touch - to convert heat energy into electrical energy without resistive losses in the temperature range below the critical temperature of the superconducting material. Preferably, an array of superconducting material is encased in one of several possible configurations within a second material having a high thermal conductivity, preferably a semiconductor, to form a thermoelectric generator.

  10. 2D barrier in a superconducting niobium square

    SciTech Connect

    Joya, Miryam R. Barba-ortega, J.; Sardella, Edson

    2014-11-05

    The presence of barriers changes the vortex structure in superconducting Nb square in presence of a uniform applied magnetic field. The Cooper pair configurations in a mesoscopics superconducting square of Nb with a barrier are calculated within the nonlinear Ginzburg Landau equations. We predict the nucleation of multi-vortex states into the sample and a soft entry of the magnetic field inside and around into the barrier. A novel and non-conventional vortex configurations occurs at determined magnetic field.

  11. Superconductivity in the Bi-Sr-Cu-O system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimitsu, Jun; Yamazaki, Akira; Sawa, Hiroshi; Hideo, Fujiki

    1987-12-01

    A superconducting transition with an onset temperature near 8 K was observed for the Bi-Sr-Cu-O system on the basis of electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The samples were made by firing well-dried mixtures of Bi2O3, SrCO3, and CuO powders at about 880 C in air for 12 h. It is shown that the superconductivity is of a bulk nature and is reproducible.

  12. Photolithographically patterened thin-film multilayer devices of YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7-x

    SciTech Connect

    Kingston, J.J.; Wellstood, F.C.; Quan, D.; Clarke, J.

    1990-09-01

    We have fabricated thin-film YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}-SrTiO{sub 3}-YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} multilayer interconnect structures in which each in situ laser-deposited film is independently patterned by photolithography. In particular, we have constructed the two key components necessary for a superconducting multilayer interconnect technology, crossovers and window contacts. As a further demonstration of the technology, we have fabricated a thin-film flux transformer, suitable for use with a Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID), that includes a ten-turn input coil with 6{mu}m linewidth. Transport measurements showed that the critical temperature was 87K and the critical current was 135 {mu}A at 82K. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  13. A Superconducting transformer system for high current cable testing

    SciTech Connect

    Godeke, A.; Dietderich, D. R.; Joseph, J. M.; Lizarazo, J.; Prestemon, S. O.; Miller, G.; Weijers, H. W.

    2010-02-15

    This article describes the development of a direct-current (dc) superconducting transformer system for the high current test of superconducting cables. The transformer consists of a core-free 10 464 turn primary solenoid which is enclosed by a 6.5 turn secondary. The transformer is designed to deliver a 50 kA dc secondary current at a dc primary current of about 50 A. The secondary current is measured inductively using two toroidal-wound Rogowski coils. The Rogowski coil signal is digitally integrated, resulting in a voltage signal that is proportional to the secondary current. This voltage signal is used to control the secondary current using a feedback loop which automatically compensates for resistive losses in the splices to the superconducting cable samples that are connected to the secondary. The system has been commissioned up to 28 kA secondary current. The reproducibility in the secondary current measurement is better than 0.05% for the relevant current range up to 25 kA. The drift in the secondary current, which results from drift in the digital integrator, is estimated to be below 0.5 A/min. The system's performance is further demonstrated through a voltage-current measurement on a superconducting cable sample at 11 T background magnetic field. The superconducting transformer system enables fast, high resolution, economic, and safe tests of the critical current of superconducting cable samples.

  14. A study on the effect of tantalum-impurity content on the superconducting properties of niobium materials used for making superconducting radio frequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    S B Roy, L S Sharath Chandra, M K Chattopadhyay, M K Tiwari, G S Lodha, G R Myneni

    2012-10-01

    Niobium materials in highly pure form are used in the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency cavities. We present here a study of the superconducting properties of such niobium materials that have been used in the fabrication of high accelerating gradient superconducting radio frequency cavities after determining their tantalum-impurity contents using a synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy technique. Our results show that there is a small change in superconducting parameters such as T{sub C},H{sub C1} and H{sub C2} when the tantalum-impurity content varies from ≈150 to ≈1300 ppm. In contrast, a buffered chemical polishing of the same niobium samples changes all these superconducting parameters more significantly. The implications of these results on the performance of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities are discussed.

  15. Multilayer High-Gradient Insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R

    2006-08-16

    Multilayer High-Gradient Insulators are vacuum insulating structures composed of thin, alternating layers of dielectric and metal. They are currently being developed for application to high-current accelerators and related pulsed power systems. This paper describes some of the High-Gradient Insulator research currently being conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  16. PROGRESS ON LEAD PHOTOCATHODES FOR SUPERCONDUCTING INJECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    SMEDLEY, J.; RAO, T.; SEKUTOWICZ, J.; KNEISEL, P.; LANGNER, J.; STRZYZEWSKI, P.; LEFFERTS, R.; LIPSKI, A.

    2005-05-16

    We present the results of our investigation of bulk lead, along with various types of lead films, as suitable photocathode materials for superconducting RF injectors. The quantum efficiency of each sample is presented as a function of the photon energy of the incident light, from 3.9 eV to 6.5 eV. Quantum efficiencies of 0.5% have been obtained. Production of a niobium cavity with a lead-plated cathode is underway.

  17. Progress on lead photocathodes for superconducting injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Smedley, John; Rao, Triveni; Sekutowicz, Jacek; Kneisel, Peter; Langner, J; Strzyzewski, P; Lefferts, Richard; Lipski, Andrzej

    2005-05-16

    We present the results of our investigation of bulk lead, along with various types of lead films, as suitable photocathode materials for superconducting RF injectors. The quantum efficiency of each sample is presented as a function of the photon energy of the incident light, from 3.9 eV to 6.5 eV. Quantum efficiencies of 0.5% have been obtained. Production of a niobium cavity with a lead plated cathode is underway.

  18. Superconductivity in Cuba: Reaching the Frontline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arés Muzio, Oscar; Altshuler, Ernesto

    The start of experimental research in the field of superconductivity was a very special moment for Cuban physics: Cuban scientists at the Physics Faculty, University of Havana, synthesized the first Cuban superconductor (a 123-YBCO ceramic sample) just 2 months after the publication of the famous paper by Wu and co-workers that triggered the frantic race of High Tc superconductors all over the world. We timely joined the world's frontline in superconductor research.

  19. Radial transmission line analysis of multi-layer structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.

    2011-03-28

    The analysis of multi-layer beam tubes is a standard problem and involves axially propagating waves. This treatment is ill suited to a short multi-layer structure such as the present example of a ferrite covered ceramic break in the beam tube at the ERL photo-cathode electron gun. This paper demonstrates that such structure can better be treated by radial wave propagation. The theoretical method is presented and numerical results are compared with measured network analyser data and Microwave Studio generated simulations. The results confirm the concept of radial transmission lines as a valid analytical method. An Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is being constructed at this laboratory for the purpose of research towards an envisioned Electron Ion Collider. One of the pertinent topics is damping of Higher Order Modes (HOM). In this ERL, the damping is provided by ferrite absorbers in the beam tube. A modified version thereof, a ceramic break surrounded by ferrite, is planed for the superconducting electron gun. The damper here is located at room temperature just outside of the gun. If used in a cavity chain, the ceramic break is in the vacuum tube at helium temperature whereas the ferrite is moved into the cryostat insulating vacuum allowing higher temperatures. The general properties of the ferrite HOM dampers have been published but are more detailed in this paper.

  20. Multilayer Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom

    2005-01-01

    A method has been devised to enable the fabrication of lightweight pressure vessels from multilayer composite materials. This method is related to, but not the same as, the method described in gMaking a Metal- Lined Composite-Overwrapped Pressure Vessel h (MFS-31814), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 3 (March 2005), page 59. The method is flexible in that it poses no major impediment to changes in tank design and is applicable to a wide range of tank sizes. The figure depicts a finished tank fabricated by this method, showing layers added at various stages of the fabrication process. In the first step of the process, a mandrel that defines the size and shape of the interior of the tank is machined from a polyurethane foam or other suitable lightweight tooling material. The mandrel is outfitted with metallic end fittings on a shaft. Each end fitting includes an outer flange that has a small step to accommodate a thin layer of graphite/epoxy or other suitable composite material. The outer surface of the mandrel (but not the fittings) is covered with a suitable release material. The composite material is filament- wound so as to cover the entire surface of the mandrel from the step on one end fitting to the step on the other end fitting. The composite material is then cured in place. The entire workpiece is cut in half in a plane perpendicular to the axis of symmetry at its mid-length point, yielding two composite-material half shells, each containing half of the foam mandrel. The halves of the mandrel are removed from within the composite shells, then the shells are reassembled and bonded together with a belly band of cured composite material. The resulting composite shell becomes a mandrel for the subsequent steps of the fabrication process and remains inside the final tank. The outer surface of the composite shell is covered with a layer of material designed to be impermeable by the pressurized fluid to be contained in the tank. A second step on the outer flange of

  1. Simulation of EUV multilayer mirror buried defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brukman, Matthew J.; Deng, Yunfei; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    2000-07-01

    A new interface has been created to link existing deposition/etching and electromagnetic simulation software, allowing the user to program deposition and etching conditions and then find the reflective properties of the resultant structure. The application studied in this paper is the problem of three-dimensional defects which become buried during fabrication of multilayer mirrors for extreme ultraviolet lithography. The software link reads in surface information in the form of linked triangles, determines all nodes within the triangles, and then creates nodes lying between triangles of different layers to create a 3- dimensional inhomogeneous matrix containing the materials' indices of refraction. This allows etching and depositions to be input into SAMPLE-3D, a multi-surface topology to be generated, and then the electromagnetic properties of the structure to be assessed with TEMPEST. This capability was used to study substrate defects in multilayer mirrors by programming a defect and then sputter-depositing some forty layers on top of the defect. Specifically examined was how the topography depended on sputter conditions and determined the defects' impact on the mirrors' imaging properties. While this research was focused on application to EUV lithography, the general technique may be extended to other optical processes such as alignment and mask defects.

  2. Diffractive coherence in multilayer dielectric gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.; Feit, M.D.; Perry, M.D.; Boyd, R.D.; Britten, J.A.; Li, Lifeng

    1995-05-26

    Successful operation of large-scale high-power lasers, such as those in use and planned at LLNL and elsewhere, require optical elements that can withstand extremely high fluences without suffering damage. Of particular concern are dielectric diffraction gratings used for beam sampling and pulse compression. Laser induced damage to bulk dielectric material originates with coupling of the electric field of the radiation to bound electrons, proceeding through a succession of mechanisms that couple the electron kinetic energy to lattice energy and ultimately to macroscopic structural changes (e.g. melting). The constructive interference that is responsible for the diffractive behavior of a grating or the reflective properties of a multilayer dielectric stack can enhance the electric field above values that would occur in unstructured homogeneous material. Much work has been done to model damage to bulk matter. The presence of nonuniform electric fields, resulting from diffractive coherence, has the potential to affect damage thresholds and requires more elaborate theory. We shall discuss aspects of work directed towards understanding the influence of dielectric structures upon damage, with particular emphasis on computations and interpretation of electric fields within dielectric gratings and multilayer dielectric stacks, noting particularly the interference effects that occur in these structures.

  3. Optimized Geometry for Superconducting Sensing Coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Pananen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2008-01-01

    An optimized geometry has been proposed for superconducting sensing coils that are used in conjunction with superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetoencephalography (MEG), and related applications in which magnetic fields of small dipoles are detected. In designing a coil of this type, as in designing other sensing coils, one seeks to maximize the sensitivity of the detector of which the coil is a part, subject to geometric constraints arising from the proximity of other required equipment. In MRI or MEG, the main benefit of maximizing the sensitivity would be to enable minimization of measurement time. In general, to maximize the sensitivity of a detector based on a sensing coil coupled with a SQUID sensor, it is necessary to maximize the magnetic flux enclosed by the sensing coil while minimizing the self-inductance of this coil. Simply making the coil larger may increase its self-inductance and does not necessarily increase sensitivity because it also effectively increases the distance from the sample that contains the source of the signal that one seeks to detect. Additional constraints on the size and shape of the coil and on the distance from the sample arise from the fact that the sample is at room temperature but the coil and the SQUID sensor must be enclosed within a cryogenic shield to maintain superconductivity.

  4. Thermal performance of various multilayer insulation systems below 80K

    SciTech Connect

    Boroski, W.N.; Nicol, T.H.; Schoo, C.J.

    1992-04-01

    The SSC collider dipole cryostat consists of a vacuum shell operating at room temperature, two thermal shields operating near 80K and 20K respectively, and the superconducting magnet assembly operating near 4K. The cryostat design incorporates multilayer insulation (MLI) blankets to limit radiant heat transfer into the 80K and 20K thermal shields. Also, an MLI blanket is used to impede heat transfer through residual gas conduction into the 4K superconducting magnet assembly. A measurement facility at Fermilab has been used to experimentally optimize the thermal insulation system for the dipole cryostat. Previous thermal measurements have been used to define the 80K MLI system configuration and verify system performance. With the 80K MLI system defined, the current effort has focused on experimentally defining the optimum insulation scheme for the 20K thermal shield. The SSC design specification requires that radiant heat transfer be limited to 0.093 W/m[sup 2] at an insulating vacuum of 10[sup [minus]6]torr.

  5. Superconductivity in the alkali metal intercalates of molybdenum disulphide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.; Hadek, V.; Rembaum, A.

    1972-01-01

    The complete series of alkali metals, lithium through cesium, have been intercalated into molybdenum disulphide, using both the liquid ammonia and vapor techniques. All the intercalates with the exception of lithium yielded full superconducting transitions with onset temperatures of 6 K for AxMoS2(Ax=K,Rb,Cs) and 4 K for BxMoS2(Bx=Li,Na). The superconducting transition for lithium was incomplete down to 1.5 K. Stoichiometries and unit cell parameters have been determined for the intercalation compounds. Both rhombohedral and hexagonal polymorphs of MoS2 have been intercalated and found to exhibit the same superconductivity behavior. The nature of the extraneous superconducting transition of some intercalated samples on exposure to air was elucidated.

  6. Superconductivity in sputtered CuMo6S8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S.; Woollam, J. A.; Kammerdiner, L.; Luo, H.-L.; Martin, C.

    1977-01-01

    The superconducting transition temperature and the superconducting upper critical fields for sputtered films of copper-containing ternary molybdenum chalcogenides (chevrel phases) were determined. The theory presented by Werthamer, Helfand, and Hohenberg (WHH) (1966) was used to make computer-generated plots of the superconducting upper critical field values versus the superconducting transition temperature values for various values of the Maki paramagnetic pair-breaking parameter and the spin-orbit scattering parameter. The interpretation of the graph suggests that the experimental data for at least one sample are above the maximum WHH theoretical limit in the lower temperature range. Possible explanations of this situation are discussed. In other calculations, a scaling law was found suitable for determining pinning force densities; this data was used to calculate critical current values. The relation between resistivity and temperature was studied.

  7. Superconducting multipole corrector magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    A novel concept of superconducting multipole corrector magnet is discussed. This magnet assembled from 12 identical racetrack type coils and can generate any combination of dipole, quadrupole and sextupole magnetic fields. The coil groups are powered from separate power supplies. In the case of normal dipole, quadrupole and sextupole fields the total field is symmetrical relatively the magnet median plane and there are only five powered separately coil groups. This type multipole corrector magnet was proposed for BTeV, Fermilab project and has following advantages: universal configuration, simple manufacturing and high mechanical stability. The results of magnetic design including the field quality and magnetic forces in comparison with known shell type superconducting correctors are presented.

  8. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; Dean, Mark P. M.; Rahnejat, Kaveh C.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Ellerby, Mark

    2015-02-26

    This study examines the field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds which has a history dating back to the 1960s. This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC₆ and YbC₆ in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how this relates to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic statesmore » and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.« less

  9. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; Dean, Mark P. M.; Rahnejat, Kaveh C.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Ellerby, Mark

    2015-02-26

    This study examines the field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds which has a history dating back to the 1960s. This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC₆ and YbC₆ in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how this relates to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.

  10. Superconducting magnet wire

    DOEpatents

    Schuller, Ivan K.; Ketterson, John B.; Banerjee, Indrajit

    1986-01-01

    A superconducting tape or wire with an improved critical field is formed of alternating layers of a niobium-containing superconductor such as Nb, NbTi, Nb.sub.3 Sn or Nb.sub.3 Ge with a thickness in the range of about 0.5-1.5 times its coherence length, supported and separated by layers of copper with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170-600 .ANG..

  11. Helical superconducting black holes.

    PubMed

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P

    2012-05-25

    We construct novel static, asymptotically five-dimensional anti-de Sitter black hole solutions with Bianchi type-VII(0) symmetry that are holographically dual to superconducting phases in four spacetime dimensions with a helical p-wave order. We calculate the precise temperature dependence of the pitch of the helical order. At zero temperature the black holes have a vanishing entropy and approach domain wall solutions that reveal homogenous, nonisotropic dual ground states with an emergent scaling symmetry.

  12. Superconducting terahertz metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hou-tong; Singh, Ranjan; O' Hara, John F; Azad, Abul K; Trugman, Stuart A; Jia, Quanxi; Taylor, Antoinette J

    2010-01-01

    During the past ten years subwavelength metallic structures have enabled metamaterials exhibiting exotic physical properties that are not possible or difficult to realize using naturally occurring materials, This bottom-up metamaterial approach is particularly attractive in the terahertz (THz) frequency range, where the THz gap is inherently associated with the lack of materials with appropriate reponse. In fact THz metamaterial devices have accomplished unprecedented performance towards practical applications. In these devices, the key is to incorporate natural materials, e,g, semiconductors, as the metamaterial substrates or integration parts of metamaterial structures. The active or dynamic tunability of metamaterials is through the application of external stimuli such as temperature, photoexcitation, or electric field. to modify the capacitive gaps in split-ring resonators (SRRs), It becomes clear that we would not be able to do much on the metallic SRRs, i.e. the metal conductivity and therefore the inductance largely remain constant not affected by external stimuli. Recently, there has been increasing interest in superconducting metamaterials towards loss reduction. Significant Joule losses have often prevented resonant metal metamaterials from achieving proposed applications. particularly in the optical frequency range. At low temperatures, superconducting materials possess superior conductivity than metals at frequencies up to THz. and therefore it is expected that superconducting melamaterials will have a lower loss than metal metamatetials, More interestingly, superconductors exhibit tunable complex conductivity over a wide range of values through change of temperature and application of photoexcitation, electrical currents and magnetic fields. Therefore, we would expect correspondingly tunable metamaterials. which originate from the superconducting materials composing the metamaterial, in contrast to tuning the metamaterial embedded environment.

  13. Superconducting Magnetic Projectile Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jan, Darrell L.; Lawson, Daniel D.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed projectile launcher exploits Meissner effect to transfer much of kinetic energy of relatively massive superconducting plunger to smaller projectile, accelerating projectile to high speed. Because it operates with magnetic fields, launcher not limited by gas-expansion thermodynamics. Plunger energized mechanically and/or chemically, avoiding need for large electrical power supplies and energy-storage systems. Potential applications include launching of projectiles for military purposes and for scientific and industrial tests of hypervelocity impacts.

  14. Topological confinement and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Al-hassanieh, Dhaled A; Batista, Cristian D

    2008-01-01

    We derive a Kondo Lattice model with a correlated conduction band from a two-band Hubbard Hamiltonian. This mapping allows us to describe the emergence of a robust pairing mechanism in a model that only contains repulsive interactions. The mechanism is due to topological confinement and results from the interplay between antiferromagnetism and delocalization. By using Density-Matrix-Renormalization-Group (DMRG) we demonstrate that this mechanism leads to dominant superconducting correlations in aID-system.

  15. NASA/MSFC multilayer diffusion models and computer program for operational prediction of toxic fuel hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbauld, R. K.; Bjorklund, J. R.; Bowers, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The NASA/MSFC multilayer diffusion models are discribed which are used in applying meteorological information to the estimation of toxic fuel hazards resulting from the launch of rocket vehicle and from accidental cold spills and leaks of toxic fuels. Background information, definitions of terms, description of the multilayer concept are presented along with formulas for determining the buoyant rise of hot exhaust clouds or plumes from conflagrations, and descriptions of the multilayer diffusion models. A brief description of the computer program is given, and sample problems and their solutions are included. Derivations of the cloud rise formulas, users instructions, and computer program output lists are also included.

  16. Piezoelectric multilayer actuator life test.

    PubMed

    Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Jones, Christopher M; Aldrich, Jack B; Blodget, Chad J; Moore, James D; Carson, John W; Goullioud, Renaud

    2011-04-01

    Potential NASA optical missions such as the Space Interferometer Mission require actuators for precision positioning to accuracies of the order of nanometers. Commercially available multilayer piezoelectric stack actuators are being considered for driving these precision mirror positioning mechanisms. These mechanisms have potential mission operational requirements that exceed 5 years for one mission life. To test the feasibility of using these commercial actuators for these applications and to determine their reliability and the redundancy requirements, a life test study was undertaken. The nominal actuator requirements for the most critical actuators on the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) in terms of number of cycles was estimated from the Modulation Optics Mechanism (MOM) and Pathlength control Optics Mechanism (POM) and these requirements were used to define the study. At a nominal drive frequency of 250 Hz, one mission life is calculated to be 40 billion cycles. In this study, a set of commercial PZT stacks configured in a potential flight actuator configuration (pre-stressed to 18 MPa and bonded in flexures) were tested for up to 100 billion cycles. Each test flexure allowed for two sets of primary and redundant stacks to be mechanically connected in series. The tests were controlled using an automated software control and data acquisition system that set up the test parameters and monitored the waveform of the stack electrical current and voltage. The samples were driven between 0 and 20 V at 2000 Hz to accelerate the life test and mimic the voltage amplitude that is expected to be applied to the stacks during operation. During the life test, 10 primary stacks were driven and 10 redundant stacks, mechanically in series with the driven stacks, were open-circuited. The stroke determined from a strain gauge, the temperature and humidity in the chamber, and the temperature of each individual stack were recorded. Other properties of the stacks, including the

  17. Navy superconductivity efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubser, D. U.

    1990-01-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion, etc.) use LTS materials while space applications (MMW electronics, etc.) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment being conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity, with particular emphasis on the related SDIO sponsored program on HTS applications.

  18. US Navy superconductivity program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubser, Donald U.

    1991-01-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of the Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion) use LTS materials while space applications (millimeter wave electronics) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment to be conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity.

  19. Magnetically leviated superconducting bearing

    DOEpatents

    Weinberger, Bernard R.; Lynds, Jr., Lahmer

    1993-01-01

    A magnetically levitated superconducting bearing includes a magnet (2) mounted on a shaft (12) that is rotatable around an axis of rotation and a Type II superconductor (6) supported on a stator (14) in proximity to the magnet (2). The superconductor (6) is positioned so that when it is cooled to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field, it interacts with the magnet (2) to produce an attractive force that levitates the magnet (2) and supports a load on the shaft (12). The interaction between the superconductor (6) and magnet(2) also produces surface screening currents (8) that generate a repulsive force perpendicular to the load. The bearing also has means for maintaining the superconductor at a temperature below its critical temperature (16, 18). The bearing could also be constructed so the magnet (2) is supported on the stator (14) and the superconductor (6) is mounted on the shaft (12). The bearing can be operated by cooling the superconductor (6) to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field.

  20. Silicon superconducting quantum interference device

    SciTech Connect

    Duvauchelle, J. E.; Francheteau, A.; Marcenat, C.; Lefloch, F.; Chiodi, F.; Débarre, D.; Hasselbach, K.; Kirtley, J. R.

    2015-08-17

    We have studied a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) made from a single layer thin film of superconducting silicon. The superconducting layer is obtained by heavily doping a silicon wafer with boron atoms using the gas immersion laser doping technique. The SQUID is composed of two nano-bridges (Dayem bridges) in a loop and shows magnetic flux modulation at low temperature and low magnetic field. The overall behavior shows very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the Ginzburg-Landau equations.

  1. Superconducting tape characterization under flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, A.; Suárez, P.; Cáceres, D.; Pérez, B.; Cordero, E.; Castaño, A.

    2002-08-01

    Electrotechnical applications of high temperature superconducting materials are limited by the difficulty of constructing classical windings with ceramic materials. While Bi-2223 tape may be a solution, it cannot be bent to radii less than a certain value since its superconducting capacity disappears. We describe an automated measurement system of the characteristics of this tape under flexion. It consists of a device that coils the tape over cylinders with different radii. At the same time, the parameters of its superconducting behaviour (e.g. resistance) are taken and processed. This system was developed at the “Benito Mahedero Laboratory of Superconducting Electrical Applications” in the University of Extremadura.

  2. Topological Superconductivity in Dirac Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Shingo

    Dirac semimetals host bulk band-touching Dirac points and a surface Fermi loop. We develop a theory of superconducting Dirac semimetals. Establishing a relation between the Dirac points and the surface Fermi loop, we clarify how the nontrivial topology of Dirac semimetals affects their superconducting state. We note that the unique orbital texture of Dirac points and a structural phase transition of the crystal favor symmetry-protected topological superconductivity with a quartet of surface Majorana fermions. We suggest the possible application of our theory to recently discovered superconducting states in Cd3As2.

  3. Superconducting magnet development in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Yasukochi, K.

    1983-05-01

    The present state of R and D works on the superconducting magnet and its applications in Japan are presented. On electrical rotating machines, 30 MVA superconducting synchronous rotary condenser (Mitsubishi and Fuji) and 50 MVA generator are under construction. Two ways of ship propulsion by superconducting magnets are developing. A superconducting magnetically levitated and linear motor propelled train ''MAGLEV'' was developed by the Japan National Railways (JNR). The superconducting magnet development for fusion is the most active field in Japan. The Cluster Test program has been demonstrated on a 10 T Nb/sub 3/Sn coil and the first coil of Large Coil Task in IEA collaboration has been constructed and the domestic test was completed in JAERI. These works are for the development of toroidal coils of the next generation tokamak machine. R and D works on superconducting ohmic heating coil are in progress in JAERI and ETL. The latter group has constructed 3.8 MJ pulsed coil. A high ramp rate of changing field in pulsed magnet, 200 T/s, has been tested successfully. High Energy Physics Laboratory (KEK) are conducting active works. The superconducting ..mu.. meson channel and ..pi.. meson channel have been constructed and are operating successfully. KEK has also a project of big accelerator named ''TRISTAN'', which is similar to ISABELLE project of BNL. Superconducting synchrotron magnets are developed for this project. The development of superconducting three thin wall solenoid has been started. One of them, CDF, is progressing under USA-Japan collaboration.

  4. Cosmic sparks from superconducting strings.

    PubMed

    Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2008-10-01

    We investigate cosmic sparks from cusps on superconducting cosmic strings in light of the recently discovered millisecond radio burst by Lorimer et al.. We find that the observed duration, fluence, spectrum, and event rate can be reasonably explained by grand unification scale superconducting cosmic strings that carry currents approximately 10{5} GeV. The superconducting string model predicts an event rate that falls off only as S{-1/2}, where S is the energy flux, and hence predicts a population of very bright bursts. Other surveys, with different observational parameters, are shown to impose tight constraints on the superconducting string model. PMID:18851517

  5. Cosmic Sparks from Superconducting Strings

    SciTech Connect

    Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2008-10-03

    We investigate cosmic sparks from cusps on superconducting cosmic strings in light of the recently discovered millisecond radio burst by Lorimer et al.. We find that the observed duration, fluence, spectrum, and event rate can be reasonably explained by grand unification scale superconducting cosmic strings that carry currents {approx}10{sup 5} GeV. The superconducting string model predicts an event rate that falls off only as S{sup -1/2}, where S is the energy flux, and hence predicts a population of very bright bursts. Other surveys, with different observational parameters, are shown to impose tight constraints on the superconducting string model.

  6. Korea's developmental program for superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Gye-Won; Won, Dong-Yeon; Kuk, Il-Hyun; Park, Jong-Chul

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity research in Korea was firstly carried out in the late 70's by a research group in Seoul National University (SNU), who fabricated a small scale superconducting magnetic energy storage system under the financial support from Korea Electric Power Company (KEPCO). But a few researchers were involved in superconductivity research until the oxide high Tc superconductor was discovered by Bednorz and Mueller. After the discovery of YBaCuO superconductor operating above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77 K)(exp 2), Korean Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) sponsored a special fund for the high Tc superconductivity research to universities and national research institutes by recognizing its importance. Scientists engaged in this project organized 'High Temperature Superconductivity Research Association (HITSRA)' for effective conducting of research. Its major functions are to coordinate research activities on high Tc superconductivity and organize the workshop for active exchange of information. During last seven years the major superconductivity research has been carried out through the coordination of HITSRA. The major parts of the Korea's superconductivity research program were related to high temperature superconductor and only a few groups were carrying out research on conventional superconductor technology, and Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI) have led this research. In this talk, the current status and future plans of superconductivity research in Korea will be reviewed based on the results presented in interim meeting of HITSRA, April 1-2, 1994. Taejeon, as well as the research activity of KAERI.

  7. Superconducting current in hybrid structures with an antiferromagnetic interlayer

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitsev, A. V. Ovsyannikov, G. A.; Constantinian, K. Y. Kislinskii, Yu. V.; Shadrin, A. V.; Borisenko, I. V.; Komissinskiy, P. V.

    2010-02-15

    It is shown experimentally that the superconducting current density in Nb/Au/Ca{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 2}/YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} hybrid superconducting heterostructures with a Ca{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 2} anti-ferromagnetic (AF) cuprate interlayer is anomalously high for interlayer thicknesses d{sub M} = 10-50 nm and the characteristic damping length for superconducting correlations is on the order of 10 nm. The experimental results are explained on the basis of theoretical analysis of a junction of two superconductors (S' and S) connected by a magnetic multilayer with the AF ordering of magnetization in the layers. It is shown that with such a magnetization ordering, anomalous proximity effect determined by the singlet component of the condensate wavefunction may take place. As a result, the critical currents in S'/I/AF/S and S'/I/N/S structures (I denotes an insulator, and N, the normal metal) may coincide in order of magnitude even when the thickness of the AF interlayer considerably exceeds the decay length of the condensate wavefunction in ferromagnetic layers.

  8. Evidence of Inhomogeneous Superconductivity in FeTe1-xSex by Scotch-Tape Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okazaki, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Tohru; Yamaguchi, Takahide; Kawasaki, Yasuna; Deguchi, Keita; Demura, Satoshi; Ozaki, Toshinori; Denholme, Saleem. J.; Mizuguchi, Yoshikazu; Takeya, Hiroyuki; Takano, Yoshihiko

    2012-11-01

    We have fabricated thin films of FeTe1-xSex using a scotch-tape method. The superconductivities of the thin films are different from each other although these films were fabricated from the same bulk sample. The result clearly presents the inhomogeneous superconductivity in FeTe1-xSex. The difference might arise from inhomogeneity due to the excess Fe concentration. The resistivity of a thin film with low excess Fe shows good superconductivity with the sharp superconducting-transition width and more isotropic superconductivity.

  9. An outline of positron measurements of superconducting oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Fluss, M.J.

    1991-03-01

    Positron measurements on superconducting oxides have gone through an evolution from divergent results of low statistical precision on samples of suspect quality to convergent results of higher statistical precision on high quality samples. We outline the elements affecting the progress of these experiments and questions that can be addressed at our present state of the art. 11 refs.

  10. Broadband spectrophotometry on nonplanar EUV multilayer optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasa, I.; Blaschke, H.; Ristau, D.

    2011-04-01

    A reliable and compact EUV-spectrometer adapted for the broadband analysis of curved EUV-optics for near normal incidence applications will be presented. Using a specific design for the specimen holder, the limits of both types of samples, convex and concave, can be verified. The capability of the device is confirmed by investigations in the spectral reflectivity of a single EUV-multilayer mirror deposited on a silicon wafer. Its radius of curvature (ROC) is continuously adjustable, providing a direct comparison of the detected peak reflectivity, peak location and spectral bandwidth in dependence on its curvature. The range of curvature applied is in compliance with optics specifications of current projection systems for EUV-lithography.

  11. Compensation for correlated error in multilayer interferometer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yangjin; Hibino, Kenichi; Sugita, Naohiko; Mitsuishi, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    Wavelength tuning interferometry is used to measure and estimate the surface shape of a sample. However, in multilayer interferometry (e.g., a lithium niobate [LNB] crystal wafer attached to a supporting plate), the correlated error between the higher harmonics and the phase-shift error causes considerable error in the calculated phase. In this study, the correlated errors calculated by various types of windowed phase-shifting algorithms are analyzed in connection with the characteristic polynomial theory and Fourier representation of the algorithms. The surface shape and optical thickness variation of the LNB wafer are measured simultaneously using the windowed phase-shifting algorithms. The results are compared in terms of the observed ripples and measurement repeatability. The experimental results show that the 4N-3 algorithm is optimal and possesses the smallest repeatability error. PMID:26835638

  12. Robustness of superconductivity to competing magnetic phases in tetragonal FeS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, Franziska K. K.; Lang, Franz; Topping, Craig V.; Baker, Peter J.; Pratt, Francis L.; Wright, Sophie E.; Woodruff, Daniel N.; Clarke, Simon J.; Blundell, Stephen J.

    2016-10-01

    We have determined the superconducting and magnetic properties of a hydrothermally synthesized powder sample of tetragonal FeS using muon spin rotation (μ SR ) . The superconducting properties are entirely consistent with those of a recently published study, showing fully gapped behavior and giving a penetration depth of λa b=204 (3 ) nm. However, our zero-field μ SR data are rather different and indicate the presence of a small, nonsuperconducting magnetic phase within the sample. These results highlight that sample-to-sample variations in magnetism can arise in hydrothermally prepared phases, but interestingly the superconducting behavior is remarkably insensitive to these variations.

  13. Optimization of superconducting tiling pattern for superconducting bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1996-09-17

    An apparatus and method for reducing magnetic field inhomogeneities which produce rotational loss mechanisms in high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings are disclosed. Magnetic field inhomogeneities are reduced by dividing high temperature superconducting structures into smaller structures, and arranging the smaller structures into tiers which stagger the magnetic field maximum locations of the smaller structures. 20 figs.

  14. Concerning superconducting inertial guidance gyroscopes inside superconducting magnetic shields

    SciTech Connect

    Satterthwaite, J.C.; Gawlinski, E.T.

    1997-12-01

    Superconductors can in theory be used to detect rotation by Josephson interference or by detection of the London field, a magnetic induction that fills the interior of any rotating bulk superconductor. One might hope to use these properties of superconductors to build a practical inertial guidance gyroscope. A problem arises from the necessity of surrounding the device with superconducting magnetic shielding: the London field generated by a co-rotating shield eliminates the response of the superconducting device within the shield. The present article demonstrates this point more rigorously than has been done before, discussing solutions of Ampere`s law for rotating and nonrotating superconductors and paying careful attention to boundary conditions. Beginning with a supercurrent density derivable from either the Ginzburg-Landau or the London theory of superconductivity, the article shows: (1) that a superconducting device cannot distinguish between rotation and an applied magnetic field; (2) that a superconducting device surrounded by a co-rotating superconducting shield cannot detect rotation. The term `superconducting gyroscope` in this article refers only to a device whose working principle is the response of the superconductor itself to rotation, not to any device in which superconducting electronic components are used to detect some other effect. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Optimization of superconducting tiling pattern for superconducting bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for reducing magnetic field inhomogeneities which produce rotational loss mechanisms in high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings. Magnetic field inhomogeneities are reduced by dividing high temperature superconducting structures into smaller structures, and arranging the smaller structures into tiers which stagger the magnetic field maximum locations of the smaller structures.

  16. Fabrication and characterization of nanometric SiOx/SiOy multilayer structures obtained by LPCVD

    SciTech Connect

    Román-López, S.; Aceves-Mijares, M.; Pedraza-Chávez, J.; Carrillo-López, J.

    2014-05-15

    This work presents the fabrication of nanometric multilayer structures and their characterization by Atomic Force Microscopy, Photoluminescence and Fourier Transform Infra Red spectroscopy. The structures were deposited by Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (LPCVD). Three types of multilayer structure were fabricated. After the deposition some samples were annealed in N{sub 2} ambient for three hours. It was found that the structures keep the characteristics of each layer.

  17. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium. Progress report, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bement, A.L. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. Programmatic research focuses upon key materials-related problems; principally, synthesis and processing and properties limiting transport phenomena. During the past year, 26 projects produced over 133 talks and 113 publications. publications. Two Master`s Degrees and one Ph.D. were granted to students working on MISCON projects. Group activities and interactions involved two MISCON group meetings (held in July and January), twenty external speakers, 36 collaborations, 10 exchanges of samples and/or measurements, and one (1) gift of equipment from industry. Research achievements this past year expanded our understanding of processing phenomena on structure property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temperature superconductors.

  18. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1995 Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. During the past year, 26 projects produced over 133 talks and 127 publications. Three Master`s Degrees and 9 Doctor`s of Philosophy Degrees were granted to students working on MISCON projects. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in January and July); the third MISCON Summer School held in July; 12 external speakers; 81 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 54 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temp superconductors.

  19. Composite arrays of superconducting microstrip line resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Mohebbi, H. R. Miao, G. X.; Benningshof, O. W. B.; Taminiau, I. A. J.; Cory, D. G.

    2014-03-07

    A novel design of an array of half-wave superconductive microstrip resonators is described. The resonator is intended to be useful for electron spin resonance studies of thin film samples at cryogenic temperatures. It achieves a high quality factor, has a small mode-volume, and creates a uniform magnetic field in a plane above the resonator. The device is made of thin film Niobium on sapphire wafer and is tested with a static magnetic field. Variation of Q-factor versus the magnetic field's strength at different temperatures is reported and is in a good agreement with simulation when the loss due to the vortices is included. Also, the power-dependence response of the resonator is shown in experiments and is verified by capturing the nonlinearity associated with the surface impedance of the superconducting film into the circuit model of the device.

  20. Novel superconducting proximized heterostructures for ultrafast photodetection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepe, G. P.; Parlato, L.; Marrocco, N.; Pagliarulo, V.; Peluso, G.; Barone, A.; Tafuri, F.; Uccio, U. Scotti di; Miletto, F.; Radovic, M.; Pan, D.; Sobolewski, Roman

    2009-11-01

    Weak ferromagnet/superconductor (F/S) proximity bilayers have been fabricated and characterized for basic physics studies concerning the ultrafast carrier dynamics in layered materials. The normalized reflectivity change (Δ R/ R) as a function of the time delay between the pump and the probe laser beams has been measured in F/S heterostructures formed by a low critical temperature superconductor (Nb) with a NiCu overlayer, and a high Tc superconductor (YBCO) covered by Au/NiCu and manganite (LSMO) overlayers. The attention is mainly focused to the investigation of nonequilibrium excitation dynamics inside different bilayers in the low temperature region. The presence of the weak ferromagnetic overlayer produces faster optical relaxation times with respect to sole superconducting films. The results are promising in view of potential applications as ultrafast kinetic inductance superconducting photodetectors as confirmed by preliminary time-resolved photoimpedance experiments on both Nb and NiCu(21 nm)/Nb(70 nm) samples.

  1. Multilayer weighted social network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Yohsuke; Török, János; Jo, Hang-Hyun; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertész, János

    2014-11-01

    Recent empirical studies using large-scale data sets have validated the Granovetter hypothesis on the structure of the society in that there are strongly wired communities connected by weak ties. However, as interaction between individuals takes place in diverse contexts, these communities turn out to be overlapping. This implies that the society has a multilayered structure, where the layers represent the different contexts. To model this structure we begin with a single-layer weighted social network (WSN) model showing the Granovetterian structure. We find that when merging such WSN models, a sufficient amount of interlayer correlation is needed to maintain the relationship between topology and link weights, while these correlations destroy the enhancement in the community overlap due to multiple layers. To resolve this, we devise a geographic multilayer WSN model, where the indirect interlayer correlations due to the geographic constraints of individuals enhance the overlaps between the communities and, at the same time, the Granovetterian structure is preserved.

  2. Low-frequency flux noise and visualization of vortices in a YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} dc superconducting quantum interference device washer with an integrated input coil

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, R.; Keil, S.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D.

    2001-06-04

    We used low-temperature scanning electron microscopy (LTSEM) for imaging quantized magnetic flux (vortices) in dc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) with approximately 1{mu}m spatial resolution at temperature T=77K in a controllable magnetic field up to 20{mu}T. We demonstrate that LTSEM allows to image the spatial distribution of vortices in a YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}/SrTiO{sub 3}/YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} multilayer thin-film structure consisting of a dc SQUID washer with an integrated input coil on top. Simultaneously, we are able to measure the low-frequency noise of the sample under test, which allows to correlate the spatial distribution of vortices with low-frequency noise in the SQUID. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Surface-resistance measurements using superconducting stripline resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Hafner, Daniel; Dressel, Martin; Scheffler, Marc

    2014-01-15

    We present a method to measure the absolute surface resistance of conductive samples at a set of GHz frequencies with superconducting lead stripline resonators at temperatures 1–6 K. The stripline structure can easily be applied for bulk samples and allows direct calculation of the surface resistance without the requirement of additional calibration measurements or sample reference points. We further describe a correction method to reduce experimental background on high-Q resonance modes by exploiting TEM-properties of the external cabling. We then show applications of this method to the reference materials gold, tantalum, and tin, which include the anomalous skin effect and conventional superconductivity. Furthermore, we extract the complex optical conductivity for an all-lead stripline resonator to find a coherence peak and the superconducting gap of lead.

  4. Superconducting High Resolution Fast-Neutron Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Hau, Ionel Dragos

    2006-01-01

    Superconducting high resolution fast-neutron calorimetric spectrometers based on 6LiF and TiB{sub 2} absorbers have been developed. These novel cryogenic spectrometers measure the temperature rise produced in exothermal (n, α) reactions with fast neutrons in 6Li and 10B-loaded materials with heat capacity C operating at temperatures T close to 0.1 K. Temperature variations on the order of 0.5 mK are measured with a Mo/Cu thin film multilayer operated in the transition region between its superconducting and its normal state. The advantage of calorimetry for high resolution spectroscopy is due to the small phonon excitation energies kBT on the order of μeV that serve as signal carriers, resulting in an energy resolution ΔE ~ (kBT2C)1/2, which can be well below 10 keV. An energy resolution of 5.5 keV has been obtained with a Mo/Cu superconducting sensor and a TiB2 absorber using thermal neutrons from a 252Cf neutron source. This resolution is sufficient to observe the effect of recoil nuclei broadening in neutron spectra, which has been related to the lifetime of the first excited state in 7Li. Fast-neutron spectra obtained with a 6Li-enriched LiF absorber show an energy resolution of 16 keV FWHM, and a response in agreement with the 6Li(n, α)3H reaction cross section and Monte Carlo simulations for energies up to several MeV. The energy resolution of order of a few keV makes this novel instrument applicable to fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy based on the unique elemental signature provided by the neutron absorption and scattering resonances. The optimization of the energy resolution based on analytical and numerical models of the detector response is discussed in the context of these applications.

  5. Casting Of Multilayer Ceramic Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Procedure for casting thin, multilayer ceramic membranes, commonly called tapes, involves centrifugal casting at accelerations of 1,800 to 2,000 times normal gravitational acceleration. Layers of tape cast one at a time on top of any previous layer or layers. Each layer cast from slurry of ground ceramic suspended in mixture of solvents, binders, and other components. Used in capacitors, fuel cells, and electrolytic separation of oxygen from air.

  6. EUV metrology of multilayer optics

    SciTech Connect

    Ray-Chaudhuri, A.K.; Stulen, R.H.; Ng, W.; Cerrina, F.; Spector, S.; Tan, Z.; Bjorkholm, J.; Tennant, D.

    1994-11-01

    EUV metrology is central to the successful commercialization of EUV projection lithography. Metrology carried out at the EUV wavelength of 13 nm enables a gain of {approximately}50 in precision when translated from visible light wavelengths. It also uniquely measures wavefront errors due to lateral variations in the inherent phase shift upon reflection from the multilayer coating. The authors present the development of two metrology techniques: EUV Foucault and Ronchi tests.

  7. Ultra-thin multilayer capacitors.

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, Timothy Jerome; Monson, Todd C.

    2009-06-01

    The fabrication of ultra-thin lanthanum-doped lead zirconium titanate (PLZT) multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) using a high-power pulsed ion beam was studied. The deposition experiments were conducted on the RHEPP-1 facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The goal of this work was to increase the energy density of ceramic capacitors through the formation of a multilayer device with excellent materials properties, dielectric constant, and standoff voltage. For successful device construction, there are a number of challenging requirements including achieving correct stoichiometric and crystallographic composition of the deposited PLZT, as well as the creation of a defect free homogenous film. This report details some success in satisfying these requirements, although 900 C temperatures were necessary for PLZT perovskite phase formation. These temperatures were applied to a previously deposited multi-layer film which was then post-annealed to this temperature. The film exhibited mechanical distress attributable to differences in the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the various layers. This caused significant defects in the deposited films that led to shorts across devices. A follow-on single layer deposition without post-anneal produced smooth layers with good interface behavior, but without the perovskite phase formation. These issues will need to be addressed in order for ion beam deposited MLCCs to become a viable technology. It is possible that future in-situ heating during deposition may address both the CTE issue, and result in lowered processing temperatures, which in turn could raise the probability of successful MLCC formation.

  8. Oxygen tracer diffusion along interfaces of strained Y2O3/YSZ multilayers.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Halit; Korte, Carsten; Rohnke, Marcus; Janek, Jürgen

    2013-02-14

    Heterophase boundaries can offer fast transport paths in solid electrolyte materials. In recent studies an enhancement of the ionic conductivity was indeed observed in micro-/nanoscaled Y(2)O(3)-stabilised ZrO(2) (YSZ) composites and hetero multilayers of thin films. As space charge regions can be neglected due to high charger carrier concentrations, we assume that strain and microstructural changes at the heterophase boundaries are responsible for the observed conductivity effects. In order to obtain independent information on the role of heterophase boundaries for fast transport in strained solid electrolytes, systematic measurements of the (18)O-tracer diffusion coefficient in nanoscaled YSZ/Y(2)O(3) multilayers were performed. Multilayer samples were prepared by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) on (0001) Al(2)O(3) substrates and characterised by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (HRSEM) and Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). To separate interface and bulk transport from the total oxygen diffusivity of the multilayer system, the (average) thickness of the YSZ-layers in the multilayers was varied from 45 nm to 12 nm. Upon decreasing the thickness of the YSZ layers, respectively increasing the density of parallel interfaces, the total diffusion coefficient of the multilayer system is increased by a factor of 2 compared to bulk YSZ. The experimental results agree well with formerly published data for ionic conductivity measurements. They also support a negligible contribution of partial electronic conductivity in the multilayer.

  9. Recovery time of high temperature superconducting tapes exposed in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Jie; Zeng, Weina; Yao, Zhihao; Zhao, Anfeng; Hu, Daoyu; Hong, Zhiyong

    2016-08-01

    The recovery time is a crucial parameter to high temperature superconducting tapes, especially in power applications. The cooperation between the reclosing device and the superconducting facilities mostly relies on the recovery time of the superconducting tapes. In this paper, a novel method is presented to measure the recovery time of several different superconducting samples. In this method criterion used to judge whether the sample has recovered is the liquid nitrogen temperature, instead of the critical temperature. An interesting phenomenon is observed during the testing of superconducting samples exposed in the liquid nitrogen. Theoretical explanations of this phenomenon are presented from the aspect of heat transfer. Optimization strategy of recovery characteristics based on this phenomenon is also briefly discussed.

  10. Vortex pinning vs. superconducting wire network in nanostructured superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicent, Jose L.

    2014-03-01

    Superconducting films with array of ordered defects allow studying effects which are governed by the interplay between lengths of the nanostructured sample and lengths related to physical parameters, as for example coherence length. When the coherence length and the separation between the defects are similar, the sample can mimic a superconducting wire network. In this situation, applied magnetic fields induce Little-Parks oscillations due to fluxoid quantization constraint. These L-P oscillations vanish when the coherence length is smaller than the ``stripe'' superconducting region between the defects. In superconducting films with array of nanodefects periodic oscillations can also be detected in resistance R(H), critical current Ic(H), magnetization M(H) and ac-susceptibility χac(H) in a broader temperature range than the temperature interval where L-P oscillations are present. Vortex pinning mechanisms are the origin of these oscillations. These oscillations emerge due to matching effects between two lattices: the vortex lattice and the lattice of defects. These oscillations are detected in a broader temperature interval than the temperature interval where L-P oscillations are present. Worth to note that, due to the coherence length divergence at Tc, a crossover to wire network behavior is experimentally found always. Interestingly, both mechanisms coexist close to superconducting critical temperatures; i. e. in the temperature region where the sample mimics superconducting wire network. These overlapping effects can be experimentally separated and both origins can be discriminated. We have analyzed and single out, with magnetotransport measurements, both mechanisms: pinning and fluxoid quantization constraint in superconducting films with arrays of non-magnetic and magnetic dots. Work supported by Spanish MINECO and CAM.

  11. Cryostat design for the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, T.H.

    1990-09-01

    The cryostat of an SSC dipole magnet consists of all magnet components except the cold mass assembly. It serves to support the cold mass accurately and reliably within the vacuum vessel, provide all required cryogenic piping, and to insulate the cold mass from heat radiated and conducted from the environment. It must function reliably during storage, shipping and handling, normal magnet operation, quenches, and seismic excitations and must be manufacturable at low cost. The major components of the cryostat are the vacuum vessel, thermal shields, multilayer insulation (MLI) system, cryogenic piping, interconnections, and suspension system. The overall design of a cryostat for superconducting accelerator magnets requires consideration of fluid flow, proper selection of materials for their thermal and structural performance at both ambient and operating temperature, and knowledge of the environment to which the magnets will be subjected over the course their 25 year expected life. This paper describes the design of the current SSC collider dipole magnet cryostat and includes discussions on the thermal, structural, and dynamic considerations involved in the development of each of the major systems. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  12. High critical current superconducting tapes

    DOEpatents

    Holesinger, Terry G.; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2003-09-23

    Improvements in critical current capacity for superconducting film structures are disclosed and include the use of a superconducting RE-BCO layer including a mixture of rare earth metals, e.g., yttrium and europium, where the ratio of yttrium to europium in the RE-BCO layer ranges from about 3 to 1 to from about 1.5 to 1.

  13. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOEpatents

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2003-06-10

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  14. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOEpatents

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  15. A superconducting magnetic gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, A. M.

    2016-05-01

    A comparison is made between a magnetic gear using permanent magnets and superconductors. The objective is to see if there are any fundamental reasons why superconducting magnets should not provide higher power densities than permanent magnets. The gear is based on the variable permeability design of Attilah and Howe (2001 IEEE Trans. Magn. 37 2844-46) in which a ring of permanent magnets surrounding a ring of permeable pole pieces with a different spacing gives an internal field component at the beat frequency. Superconductors can provide much larger fields and forces but will saturate the pole pieces. However the gear mechanism still operates, but in a different way. The magnetisation of the pole pieces is now constant but rotates with angle at the beat frequency. The result is a cylindrical Halbach array which produces an internal field with the same symmetry as in the linear regime, but has an analytic solution. In this paper a typical gear system is analysed with finite elements using FlexPDE. It is shown that the gear can work well into the saturation regime and that the Halbach array gives a good approximation to the results. Replacing the permanent magnets with superconducting tapes can give large increases in torque density, and for something like a wind turbine a combined gear and generator is possible. However there are major practical problems. Perhaps the most fundamental is the large high frequency field which is inevitably present and which will cause AC losses. Also large magnetic fields are required, with all the practical problems of high field superconducting magnets in rotating machines. Nevertheless there are ways of mitigating these difficulties and it seems worthwhile to explore the possibilities of this technology further.

  16. Multi-layer seal for electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung [Richland, WA; Meinhardt, Kerry D [Kennewick, WA; Stevenson, Jeffry W [Richland, WA

    2010-11-16

    Multi-layer seals are provided that find advantageous use for reducing leakage of gases between adjacent components of electrochemical devices. Multi-layer seals of the invention include a gasket body defining first and second opposing surfaces and a compliant interlayer positioned adjacent each of the first and second surfaces. Also provided are methods for making and using the multi-layer seals, and electrochemical devices including said seals.

  17. Multi-layer seal for electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung [Richland, WA; Meinhardt, Kerry D [Kennewick, WA; Stevenson, Jeffry W [Richland, WA

    2010-09-14

    Multi-layer seals are provided that find advantageous use for reducing leakage of gases between adjacent components of electrochemical devices. Multi-layer seals of the invention include a gasket body defining first and second opposing surfaces and a compliant interlayer positioned adjacent each of the first and second surfaces. Also provided are methods for making and using the multi-layer seals, and electrochemical devices including said seals.

  18. Observation of Superconductivity in Tetragonal FeS.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiaofang; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Yingqi; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Xian; Lin, Jianhua; Huang, Fuqiang

    2015-08-19

    The possibility of superconductivity in tetragonal FeS has attracted considerable interest because of its similarities to the FeSe superconductor. However, all efforts made to pursue superconductivity in tetragonal FeS have failed so far, and it remains controversial whether tetragonal FeS is metallic or semiconducting. Here we report the observation of superconductivity at 5 K in tetragonal FeS that is synthesized by the hydrothermal reaction of iron powder with sulfide solution. The obtained samples are highly crystalline and less air-sensitive, in contrast to those reported in the literature, which are meta-stable and air-sensitive. Magnetic and electrical properties measurements show that the samples behave as a paramagnetic metal in the normal state and exhibit superconductivity below 5 K. The high crystallinity and the stoichiometry of the samples play important roles in the observation of superconductivity. The present results demonstrate that tetragonal FeS is a promising new platform to realize high-temperature superconductors.

  19. Superconducting Magnets for RIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeller, A. F.

    2004-06-01

    The highest priority for new construction for the nuclear physics community is the Rare Isotope Accelerator. This project's goal is to produce up to 400 kW of beams from protons to uranium. Beam transport at the high-energy end has to deal with high radiation fields and high beam rigidities. Superconducting magnets are being designed to fulfill both these requirements. The quadrupoles in the fragment separator will use superferric design with pole tip fields of up to 2.5 T to produce the required gradients in the large apertures. Several techniques are presented that deal with making the magnets radiation resistant.

  20. Superconducting magnet cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Vander Arend, Peter C.; Fowler, William B.

    1977-01-01

    A device is provided for cooling a conductor to the superconducting state. The conductor is positioned within an inner conduit through which is flowing a supercooled liquid coolant in physical contact with the conductor. The inner conduit is positioned within an outer conduit so that an annular open space is formed therebetween. Through the annular space is flowing coolant in the boiling liquid state. Heat generated by the conductor is transferred by convection within the supercooled liquid coolant to the inner wall of the inner conduit and then is removed by the boiling liquid coolant, making the heat removal from the conductor relatively independent of conductor length.

  1. Superconducting dipole electromagnet

    DOEpatents

    Purcell, John R.

    1977-07-26

    A dipole electromagnet of especial use for bending beams in particle accelerators is wound to have high uniformity of magnetic field across a cross section and to decrease evenly to zero as the ends of the electromagnet are approached by disposing the superconducting filaments of the coil in the crescent-shaped nonoverlapping portions of two intersecting circles. Uniform decrease at the ends is achieved by causing the circles to overlap increasingly in the direction of the ends of the coil until the overlap is complete and the coil is terminated.

  2. A chemically stable PVD multilayer encapsulation for lithium microbatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, J. F.; Sousa, R.; Cunha, D. J.; Vieira, E. M. F.; Silva, M. M.; Dupont, L.; Goncalves, L. M.

    2015-10-01

    A multilayer physical vapour deposition (PVD) thin-film encapsulation method for lithium microbatteries is presented. Lithium microbatteries with a lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) cathode, a lithium phosphorous oxynitride (LiPON) electrolyte and a metallic lithium anode are under development, using PVD deposition techniques. Metallic lithium film is still the most common anode on this battery technology; however, it presents a huge challenge in terms of material encapsulation (lithium reacts with almost any materials deposited on top and almost instantly begins oxidizing in contact with atmosphere). To prove the encapsulation concept and perform all the experiments, lithium films were deposited by thermal evaporation technique on top of a glass substrate, with previously patterned Al/Ti contacts. Three distinct materials, in a multilayer combination, were tested to prevent lithium from reacting with protection materials and atmosphere. These multilayer films were deposited by RF sputtering and were composed of lithium phosphorous oxide (LiPO), LiPON and silicon nitride (Si3N4). To complete the long-term encapsulation after breaking the vacuum, an epoxy was applied on top of the PVD multilayer. In order to evaluate oxidation state of lithium films, the lithium resistance was measured in a four probe setup (cancelling wires/contact resistances) and resistivity calculated, considering physical dimensions. A lithium resistivity of 0.16 Ω μm was maintained for more than a week. This PVD multilayer exonerates the use of chemical vapour deposition (CVD), glove-box chambers and sample manipulation between them, significantly reducing the fabrication cost, since battery and its encapsulation are fabricated in the same PVD chamber.

  3. 16 CFR 1616.4 - Sampling and acceptance procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Sampling and acceptance procedures. (a) General. (1) The test criteria of § 1616.3(b) shall be used in..., Fabric sampling or, for verification purposes, from randomly selected garments. (8) Multi-layer fabrics... length. Garments manufactured from multi-layer fabrics shall be tested with the edge finish which is...

  4. Superconducting magnets for MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.E.

    1984-08-01

    Three types of magnets are currently used to provide the background field required for magnet resonance imaging (MRI). (i) Permanent magnets produce fields of up to 0.3 T in volumes sufficient for imaging the head or up to 0.15 T for whole body imaging. Cost and simplicity of operation are advantages, but relatively low field, weight (up to 100 tonnes) and, to a small extent, instability are limitations. (ii) Water-cooled magnets provide fields of up to 0.25 T in volumes suitable for whole body imaging, but at the expense of power (up to 150 kW for 0.25 T) and water-cooling. Thermal stability of the field requires the maintenance of constant temperature through periods both of use and of quiescence. (iii) Because of the limitations imposed by permanent and resistive magnets, particularly on field strength, the superconducting magnet is now most widely used to provide background fields of up to 2 T for whole body MRI. It requires very low operating power and that only for refrigeration. Because of the constant low temperature, 4.2 K, at which its stressed structure operates, its field is stable. The following review deals principally with superconducting magnets for MRI. However, the sections on field analysis apply to all types of magnet and the description of the source terms of circular coils and of the principals of design of solenoids apply equally to resistive solenoidal magnets.

  5. Superconducting linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce; Hockney, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Special actuators are needed to control the orientation of large structures in space-based precision pointing systems. Electromagnetic actuators that presently exist are too large in size and their bandwidth is too low. Hydraulic fluid actuation also presents problems for many space-based applications. Hydraulic oil can escape in space and contaminate the environment around the spacecraft. A research study was performed that selected an electrically-powered linear actuator that can be used to control the orientation of a large pointed structure. This research surveyed available products, analyzed the capabilities of conventional linear actuators, and designed a first-cut candidate superconducting linear actuator. The study first examined theoretical capabilities of electrical actuators and determined their problems with respect to the application and then determined if any presently available actuators or any modifications to available actuator designs would meet the required performance. The best actuator was then selected based on available design, modified design, or new design for this application. The last task was to proceed with a conceptual design. No commercially-available linear actuator or modification capable of meeting the specifications was found. A conventional moving-coil dc linear actuator would meet the specification, but the back-iron for this actuator would weigh approximately 12,000 lbs. A superconducting field coil, however, eliminates the need for back iron, resulting in an actuator weight of approximately 1000 lbs.

  6. Superconducting Bolometer Array Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic; Chervenak, Jay; Irwin, Kent; Moseley, S. Harvey; Shafer, Rick; Staguhn, Johannes; Wollack, Ed; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The next generation of far-infrared and submillimeter instruments require large arrays of detectors containing thousands of elements. These arrays will necessarily be multiplexed, and superconducting bolometer arrays are the most promising present prospect for these detectors. We discuss our current research into superconducting bolometer array technologies, which has recently resulted in the first multiplexed detections of submillimeter light and the first multiplexed astronomical observations. Prototype arrays containing 512 pixels are in production using the Pop-Up Detector (PUD) architecture, which can be extended easily to 1000 pixel arrays. Planar arrays of close-packed bolometers are being developed for the GBT (Green Bank Telescope) and for future space missions. For certain applications, such as a slewed far-infrared sky survey, feedhorncoupling of a large sparsely-filled array of bolometers is desirable, and is being developed using photolithographic feedhorn arrays. Individual detectors have achieved a Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) of -10(exp 17) W/square root of Hz at 300mK, but several orders of magnitude improvement are required and can be reached with existing technology. The testing of such ultralow-background detectors will prove difficult, as this requires optical loading of below IfW. Antenna-coupled bolometer designs have advantages for large format array designs at low powers due to their mode selectivity.

  7. Driven superconducting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yasunobu

    2014-03-01

    Driven nonlinear quantum systems show rich phenomena in various fields of physics. Among them, superconducting quantum circuits have very attractive features such as well-controlled quantum states with design flexibility, strong nonlinearity of Josephson junctions, strong coupling to electromagnetic driving fields, little internal dissipation, and tailored coupling to the electromagnetic environment. We have investigated properties and functionalities of driven superconducting quantum circuits. A transmon qubit coupled to a transmission line shows nearly perfect spatial mode matching between the incident and scattered microwave field in the 1D mode. Dressed states under a driving field are studied there and also in a semi-infinite 1D mode terminated by a resonator containing a flux qubit. An effective Λ-type three-level system is realized under an appropriate driving condition. It allows ``impedance-matched'' perfect absorption of incident probe photons and down conversion into another frequency mode. Finally, the weak signal from the qubit is read out using a Josephson parametric amplifier/oscillator which is another nonlinear circuit driven by a strong pump field. This work was partly supported by the Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology (FIRST), Project for Developing Innovation Systems of MEXT, MEXT KAKENHI ``Quantum Cybernetics,'' and the NICT Commissioned Research.

  8. Magnetic Field Reentrant Superconductivity in Aluminum Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz-Sullivan, Terence; Goldman, Allen

    Reentrance to the superconducting state through the application of a magnetic field to quasi-one dimensional superconductors driven resistive by current, is counter to the expected properties of superconductors. It was not until recently that a microscopic mechanism explaining the phenomenon was proposed in which superconductivity and phase slip driven dissipation coexist in a non-equilibrium state. Here we present additional results of magnetic field induced reentrance into the superconducting state in quasi-one-dimensional aluminum nanowires with an in-plane magnetic field both transverse to, and along the wire axis. The reentrant behavior is seen in the magnetic field dependence of the I-V characteristic and resistance vs. temperature, and in the wire's magnetoresistance at 450mK. This work was supported by DOE Basic Energy Sciences Grant DE-FG02-02ER46004. Samples were fabricated at the Minnesota Nanofabrication Center. Parts of this work were carried out in the University of Minnesota Characterization Facility, a member of the Materials Research Facilities Network (www.mrfn.org) funded via the NSF MRSEC program.

  9. Role of superconductivity in superconducting transmission line resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xiao-Ke

    2016-06-01

    In order to understand the role of superconductivity in superconducting transmission line resonator, we derive the mode equations using the macroscopic wavefunction of the Cooper pairs. We make an appropriate scaling to obtain the dimensionless form of equations and establish the validity of good conductor approximation under most circumstances. Quantization of superconducting transmission line resonator is realized by the black-box principle. We also briefly discuss that the deviation from good conductor behavior would result in the observable effects, such as the considerable decrease of phase velocity and the soliton.

  10. ESR study of superconducting K-doped C 60 "polymer"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, N.; Grigoryan, L. S.; Kinoshita, T.; Tokumoto, M.

    1997-03-01

    ESR measurements of the superconducting K-doped C 60 "polymer" were carried out, in order to clarify the difference from ordinary K-doped C 60, i.e. monomer. Observed ESR spectrum was simulated by four Lorentzian lines. The temperature dependences of the ESR linewidth, g factor and spin susceptibility are obtained for each ESR line. At room temperature the linewidth and g factor of the broadest ESR absorption line are, about 400 G and 2.01, respectively. The linewidths for other lines are 150, 53 and 16 G with the common g factor of 2.000. The linewidths of the ESR spectrum of superconducting K-doped C 60 "polymer" are found to be much broader than those of monomer sample. Similar to monomer sample, two absorption lines with weakly temperature-dependent intensity were observed, one of which disappeared (150 G width) below the super-conducting transition temperature ( Tc = 15 K).

  11. Observation of superconductivity in hydrogen sulfide from nuclear resonant scattering.

    PubMed

    Troyan, Ivan; Gavriliuk, Alexander; Rüffer, Rudolf; Chumakov, Alexander; Mironovich, Anna; Lyubutin, Igor; Perekalin, Dmitry; Drozdov, Alexander P; Eremets, Mikhail I

    2016-03-18

    High-temperature superconductivity remains a focus of experimental and theoretical research. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been reported to be superconducting at high pressures and with a high transition temperature. We report on the direct observation of the expulsion of the magnetic field in H2S compressed to 153 gigapascals. A thin (119)Sn film placed inside the H2S sample was used as a sensor of the magnetic field. The magnetic field on the (119)Sn sensor was monitored by nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that an external static magnetic field of about 0.7 tesla is expelled from the volume of (119)Sn foil as a result of the shielding by the H2S sample at temperatures between 4.7 K and approximately 140 K, revealing a superconducting state of H2S. PMID:26989248

  12. Spin-orbit-coupled superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Lo, Shun-Tsung; Lin, Shih-Wei; Wang, Yi-Ting; Lin, Sheng-Di; Liang, C-T

    2014-06-25

    Superconductivity and spin-orbit (SO) interaction have been two separate emerging fields until very recently that the correlation between them seemed to be observed. However, previous experiments concerning SO coupling are performed far beyond the superconducting state and thus a direct demonstration of how SO coupling affects superconductivity remains elusive. Here we investigate the SO coupling in the critical region of superconducting transition on Al nanofilms, in which the strength of disorder and spin relaxation by SO coupling are changed by varying the film thickness. At temperatures T sufficiently above the superconducting critical temperature T(c), clear signature of SO coupling reveals itself in showing a magneto-resistivity peak. When T < T(c), the resistivity peak can still be observed; however, its line-shape is now affected by the onset of the quasi two-dimensional superconductivity. By studying such magneto-resistivity peaks under different strength of spin relaxation, we highlight the important effects of SO interaction on superconductivity.

  13. Superconductivity in doped Dirac semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Tatsuki; Kobayashi, Shingo; Tanaka, Yukio; Sato, Masatoshi

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically study intrinsic superconductivity in doped Dirac semimetals. Dirac semimetals host bulk Dirac points, which are formed by doubly degenerate bands, so the Hamiltonian is described by a 4 ×4 matrix and six types of k -independent pair potentials are allowed by the Fermi-Dirac statistics. We show that the unique spin-orbit coupling leads to characteristic superconducting gap structures and d vectors on the Fermi surface and the electron-electron interaction between intra and interorbitals gives a novel phase diagram of superconductivity. It is found that when the interorbital attraction is dominant, an unconventional superconducting state with point nodes appears. To verify the experimental signature of possible superconducting states, we calculate the temperature dependence of bulk physical properties such as electronic specific heat and spin susceptibility and surface state. In the unconventional superconducting phase, either dispersive or flat Andreev bound states appear between point nodes, which leads to double peaks or a single peak in the surface density of states, respectively. As a result, possible superconducting states can be distinguished by combining bulk and surface measurements.

  14. Superconducting properties in tantalum decorated three-dimensional graphene and carbon structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cobaleda, Cayetano S. F. E-mail: wpan@sandia.gov; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Burckel, D. Bruce; Polsky, Ronen; Pan, W. E-mail: wpan@sandia.gov; Huang, Duanni; Diez, Enrique

    2014-08-04

    We present here the results on superconducting properties in tantalum thin films (100 nm thick) deposited on three-dimensional graphene (3DG) and carbon structures. A superconducting transition is observed in both composite thin films with a superconducting transition temperature of 1.2 K and 1.0 K, respectively. We have further measured the magnetoresistance at various temperatures and differential resistance dV/dI at different magnetic fields in these two composite thin films. In both samples, a much large critical magnetic field (∼2 T) is observed and this critical magnetic field shows linear temperature dependence. Finally, an anomalously large cooling effect was observed in the differential resistance measurements in our 3DG-tantalum device when the sample turns superconducting. Our results may have important implications in flexible superconducting electronic device applications.

  15. Studies to Enhance Superconductivity in Thin Film Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Benjamin; Brunke, Lyle; Burke, Jack; Vier, David; Steckl, Andrew; Haugan, Timothy

    2012-02-01

    With research in the area of superconductivity growing, it is no surprise that new efforts are being made to induce superconductivity or increase transition temperatures (Tc) in carbon given its many allotropic forms. Promising results have been published for boron doping in diamond films, and phosphorus doping in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) films show hints of superconductivity.. Following these examples in the literature, we have begun studies to explore superconductivity in thin film carbon samples doped with different elements. Carbon thin films are prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on amorphous SiO2/Si and single-crystal substrates. Doping is achieved by depositing from (C1-xMx) single-targets with M = B4C and BN, and also by ion implantation into pure-carbon films. Previous research had indicated that Boron in HOPG did not elicit superconducting properties, but we aim to explore that also in thin film carbon and see if there needs to be a higher doping in the sample if trends were able to be seen in diamond films. Higher onset temperatures, Tc , and current densities, Jc, are hoped to be achieved with doping of the thin film carbon with different elements.

  16. Superconductivity in just four pairs of (BETS)2GaCl4 molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, K.; Hassanien, A.; Khan, S.; Braun, K.-F.; Tanaka, H.; Hla, S.-W.

    2010-04-01

    How small can a sample of superconducting material be and still display superconductivity? This question is relevant to our fundamental understanding of superconductivity, and also to applications in nanoscale electronics, because Joule heating of interconnecting wires is a major problem in nanoscale devices. It has been shown that ultrathin layers of metal can display superconductivity, but any limits on the size of superconducting systems remain a mystery. (BETS)2GaCl4, where BETS is bis(ethylenedithio)tetraselenafulvalene, is an organic superconductor, and in bulk it has a superconducting transition temperature Tc of ~8 K (ref. 4) and a two-dimensional layered structure that is reminiscent of the high-Tc cuprate superconductors. Here, we use scanning tunnelling spectroscopy to show that a single layer of (BETS)2GaCl4 molecules on an Ag(111) surface displays a superconducting gap that increases exponentially with the length of the molecular chain. Moreover, we show that a superconducting gap can still be detected for just four pairs of (BETS)2GaCl4 molecules. Real-space spectroscopic images directly visualize the chains of BETS molecules as the origin of the superconductivity.

  17. Multilayer Laue Lens Sequence Compiler

    2005-10-01

    For the growth of a new kind of x-ray focusing optic called a multilayer Laue lens, a device is constructed in which each layer of alernating high-z and low-z is placed in the appropriate place according to the Fresnel zone plate law. This requires that each layer have a different layer thickness. Because each layer is grown using DC magnetron sputter deposition, these layer thicknesses are not only dictated by the zone plate law, butmore » are adjusted to account for various drifting in the growth chamber due to target erosion, etc.« less

  18. Multilayer Laue Lens Sequence Compiler

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, Roy; Liu, Chian

    2005-10-01

    For the growth of a new kind of x-ray focusing optic called a multilayer Laue lens, a device is constructed in which each layer of alernating high-z and low-z is placed in the appropriate place according to the Fresnel zone plate law. This requires that each layer have a different layer thickness. Because each layer is grown using DC magnetron sputter deposition, these layer thicknesses are not only dictated by the zone plate law, but are adjusted to account for various drifting in the growth chamber due to target erosion, etc.

  19. Operational Merits of Maritime Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, R.; Bosklopper, J. J.; van der Meij, K. H.

    The perspective of superconductivity to transfer currents without loss is very appealing in high power applications. In the maritime sector many machines and systems exist in the roughly 1-100 MW range and the losses are well over 50%, which calls for dramatic efficiency improvements. This paper reports on three studies that aimed at the perspectives of superconductivity in the maritime sector. It is important to realize that the introduction of superconductivity comprises two technology transitions namely firstly electrification i.e. the transition from mechanical drives to electric drives and secondly the transition from normal to superconductive electrical machinery. It is concluded that superconductivity does reduce losses, but its impact on the total energy chain is of little significance compared to the investments and the risk of introducing a very promising but as yet not proven technology in the harsh maritime environment. The main reason of the little impact is that the largest losses are imposed on the system by the fossil fueled generators as prime movers that generate the electricity through mechanical torque. Unless electric power is supplied by an efficient and reliable technology that does not involve mechanical torque with the present losses both normal as well as superconductive electrification of the propulsion will hardly improve energy efficiency or may even reduce it. One exception may be the application of degaussing coils. Still appealing merits of superconductivity do exist, but they are rather related to the behavior of superconductive machines and strong magnetic fields and consequently reduction in volume and mass of machinery or (sometimes radically) better performance. The merits are rather convenience, design flexibility as well as novel applications and capabilities which together yield more adequate systems. These may yield lower operational costs in the long run, but at present the added value of superconductivity rather seems more

  20. The role of symmetry-breaking-induced interface anisotropy in [Fe/Pt]{sub n} multilayer films

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhenghua; Xie Hailong; Liu Xi; Bai Jianmin; Wei Fulin; Wei Dan; Yoshimura, S.; Saito, H.; Liu Xiaoxi

    2011-04-01

    The FePt films were deposited with [Fe/Pt]{sub n} multilayer structure on preheated Corning 1737F glass substrate using pure Fe and Pt target in a CMS-18 sputtering system. The dependence of FePt's texture and magnetic properties on the multilayer structure was investigated. The XRD patterns indicate that (111) texture is dominant for all [Fe/Pt]{sub n} (n = 8, 16, 20, 32) multilayer films. However, the measured M-H loops show that the perpendicular anisotropy is greatly enhanced in samples with n = 16, 20, and 32. The origin of the increased perpendicular anisotropy of [Fe/Pt]{sub n} multilayer films is related to the contributions of the interfaces, which will be analyzed using the micromagnetic models, with careful discussions of the crystalline and interface anisotropies. Finally, it is confirmed that the Fe/Pt interfaces favor the perpendicular orientation in the multilayer structure.

  1. Protection circuits for superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, W.M.; Wood, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    As the technology of controlled nuclear fusion progresses, plans for new experimental reactors include much longer duty cycles than those of earlier experiments. Many of the magnet systems for these reactors must be superconducting due to the prolonged or continuous high current levels required. The large initial investment of a superconducting magnet system justifies a protective dump circuit. This circuit must operate if the magnet goes normal or in the event of failure of some of the critical auxiliary equipment. This paper examines two applications of superconducting magnet protection for fusion experiments. A novel dc interrupter being developed especially for this purpose is also discussed.

  2. Nozzle for superconducting fiber production

    DOEpatents

    Righi, Jamal

    1992-11-17

    A nozzle apparatus for producing flexible fibers of superconducting material receives melted material from a crucible for containing a charge of the superconducting material. The material is melted in the crucible and falls in a stream through a bottom hole in the crucible. The stream falls through a protecting collar which maintains the stream at high temperatures. The stream is then supplied through the downwardly directed nozzle where it is subjected to a high velocity air flow which breaks the melted superconducting material into ligaments which solidify into the flexible fibers. The fibers are collected by blowing them against a porous cloth.

  3. Multi-Layer E-Textile Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunne, Lucy E.; Bibeau, Kaila; Mulligan, Lucie; Frith, Ashton; Simon, Cory

    2012-01-01

    Stitched e-textile circuits facilitate wearable, flexible, comfortable wearable technology. However, while stitched methods of e-textile circuits are common, multi-layer circuit creation remains a challenge. Here, we present methods of stitched multi-layer circuit creation using accessible tools and techniques.

  4. Method of making coherent multilayer crystals

    DOEpatents

    Schuller, Ivan K.; Falco, Charles M.

    1984-01-01

    A new material consisting of a coherent multilayer crystal of two or more elements where each layer is composed of a single element. Each layer may vary in thickness from about 2 .ANG. to 2500 .ANG.. The multilayer crystals are prepared by sputter deposition under conditions which slow the sputtered atoms to near substrate temperatures before they contact the substrate.

  5. Coherent multilayer crystals and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Schuller, I.K.; Falco, C.M.

    1980-10-30

    A new material is described consisting of a coherent multilayer crystal of two or more elements where each layer is composed of a single element. Each layer may vary in thickness from about 2 A to 2500 A. The multilayer crystals are prepared by sputter deposition under conditions which slow the sputtered atoms to near substrate temperatures before they contact the substrate.

  6. REAL-WORLD SORTING OF RHIC SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; GUPTA,R.; HARRISON,M.; JAIN,A.; PEGGS,S.; THOMPSON,P.; TRBOJEVIC,D.; WANDERER,P.

    1999-03-29

    During the seven-year construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), more than 1700 superconducting dipoles, quadrupoles, sextupoles, and multi-layer correctors have been constructed and installed. These magnets have been sorted at several production stages to optimize their performance and reliability. For arc magnets, priorities have been put first on quench performance and operational risk minimization, second on field transfer function and other first-order quantities, and finally on nonlinear field errors which were painstakingly optimized at design. For Interaction-Region (IR) magnets, sorting is applied to select the best possible combination of magnets for the low-{beta}* interaction points (IP). This paper summarizes the history of this real-world sorting process.

  7. Figure correction of multilayer coated optics

    DOEpatents

    Chapman; Henry N. , Taylor; John S.

    2010-02-16

    A process is provided for producing near-perfect optical surfaces, for EUV and soft-x-ray optics. The method involves polishing or otherwise figuring the multilayer coating that has been deposited on an optical substrate, in order to correct for errors in the figure of the substrate and coating. A method such as ion-beam milling is used to remove material from the multilayer coating by an amount that varies in a specified way across the substrate. The phase of the EUV light that is reflected from the multilayer will be affected by the amount of multilayer material removed, but this effect will be reduced by a factor of 1-n as compared with height variations of the substrate, where n is the average refractive index of the multilayer.

  8. Multilayer Nanoporous Graphene Membranes for Water Desalination.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Tanugi, David; Lin, Li-Chiang; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2016-02-10

    While single-layer nanoporous graphene (NPG) has shown promise as a reverse osmosis (RO) desalination membrane, multilayer graphene membranes can be synthesized more economically than the single-layer material. In this work, we build upon the knowledge gained to date toward single-layer graphene to explore how multilayer NPG might serve as a RO membrane in water desalination using classical molecular dynamic simulations. We show that, while multilayer NPG exhibits similarly promising desalination properties to single-layer membranes, their separation performance can be designed by manipulating various configurational variables in the multilayer case. This work establishes an atomic-level understanding of the effects of additional NPG layers, layer separation, and pore alignment on desalination performance, providing useful guidelines for the design of multilayer NPG membranes.

  9. Multilayer Nanoporous Graphene Membranes for Water Desalination.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Tanugi, David; Lin, Li-Chiang; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2016-02-10

    While single-layer nanoporous graphene (NPG) has shown promise as a reverse osmosis (RO) desalination membrane, multilayer graphene membranes can be synthesized more economically than the single-layer material. In this work, we build upon the knowledge gained to date toward single-layer graphene to explore how multilayer NPG might serve as a RO membrane in water desalination using classical molecular dynamic simulations. We show that, while multilayer NPG exhibits similarly promising desalination properties to single-layer membranes, their separation performance can be designed by manipulating various configurational variables in the multilayer case. This work establishes an atomic-level understanding of the effects of additional NPG layers, layer separation, and pore alignment on desalination performance, providing useful guidelines for the design of multilayer NPG membranes. PMID:26806020

  10. Spinning superconducting electrovacuum soliton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymnikova, Irina

    2006-08-01

    In nonlinear electrodynamics coupled to general relativity and satisfying the weak energy condition, a spherically symmetric electrically charged electrovacuum soliton has obligatory de Sitter center in which the electric field vanishes while the energy density of electromagnetic vacuum achieves its maximal value. De Sitter vacuum supplies a particle with the finite positive electromagnetic mass related to breaking of space-time symmetry from the de Sitter group in the origin. By the Gürses-Gürsey algorithm based on the Newman-Trautman technique it is transformed into a spinning electrovacuum soliton asymptotically Kerr-Newman for a distant observer. De Sitter center becomes de Sitter equatorial disk which has both perfect conductor and ideal diamagnetic properties. The interior de Sitter vacuum disk displays superconducting behavior within a single spinning soliton. All this concerns both black hole and particle-like structures.

  11. Superconducting energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Giese, R.F.

    1993-10-01

    This report describes the status of energy storage involving superconductors and assesses what impact the recently discovered ceramic superconductors may have on the design of these devices. Our description is intended for R&D managers in government, electric utilities, firms, and national laboratories who wish an overview of what has been done and what remains to be done. It is assumed that the reader is acquainted with superconductivity, but not an expert on the topics discussed here. Indeed, it is the author`s aim to enable the reader to better understand the experts who may ask for the reader`s attention, support, or funding. This report may also inform scientists and engineers who, though expert in related areas, wish to have an introduction to our topic.

  12. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Aized, Dawood; Schwall, Robert E.

    1996-06-11

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil.

  13. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Aized, Dawood; Schwall, Robert E.

    1999-06-22

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil.

  14. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Aized, D.; Schwall, R.E.

    1999-06-22

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil. 15 figs.

  15. Negative refraction and superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amariti, Antonio; Forcella, Davide; Mariotti, Alberto; Siani, Massimo

    2011-10-01

    We discuss exotic properties of charged hydrodynamical systems, in the broken superconducting phase, probed by electromagnetic waves. Motivated by general arguments from hydrodynamics, we observe that negative refraction, namely the propagation in opposite directions of the phase velocities and of the energy flux, is expected for low enough frequencies. We corroborate this general idea by analyzing a holographic superconductor in the AdS/CFT correspondence, where the response functions can be explicitly computed. We study the dual gravitational theory both in the probe and in the backreacted case. We find that, while in the first case the refractive index is positive at every frequency, in the second case there is negative refraction at low enough frequencies. This is in agreement with hydrodynamic considerations.

  16. Polyelectrolyte Multilayers in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Detzel, Christopher J.; Larkin, Adam L.

    2011-01-01

    The layer-by-layer assembly of sequentially adsorbed, alternating polyelectrolytes has become increasingly important over the past two decades. The ease and versatility in assembling polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) has resulted in numerous wide ranging applications of these materials. More recently, PEMs are being used in biological applications ranging from biomaterials, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug delivery. The ability to manipulate the chemical, physical, surface, and topographical properties of these multilayer architectures by simply changing the pH, ionic strength, thickness, and postassembly modifications render them highly suitable to probe the effects of external stimuli on cellular responsiveness. In the field of regenerative medicine, the ability to sequester growth factors and to tether peptides to PEMs has been exploited to direct the lineage of progenitor cells and to subsequently maintain a desired phenotype. Additional novel applications include the use of PEMs in the assembly of three-dimensional layered architectures and as coatings for individual cells to deliver tunable payloads of drugs or bioactive molecules. This review focuses on literature related to the modulation of chemical and physical properties of PEMs for tissue engineering applications and recent research efforts in maintaining and directing cellular phenotype in stem cell differentiation. PMID:21210759

  17. Impact on multilayered composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, B. S.; Moon, F. C.

    1977-01-01

    Stress wave propagation in a multilayer composite plate due to impact was examined by means of the anisotropic elasticity theory. The plate was modelled as a number of identical anisotropic layers and the approximate plate theory of Mindlin was then applied to each layer to obtain a set of difference-differential equations of motion. Dispersion relations for harmonic waves and correction factors were found. The governing equations were reduced to difference equations via integral transforms. With given impact boundary conditions these equations were solved for an arbitrary number of layers in the plate and the transient propagation of waves was calculated by means of a Fast Fourier Transform algorithm. The multilayered plate problem was extended to examine the effect of damping layers present between two elastic layers. A reduction of the interlaminar normal stress was significant when the thickness of damping layer was increased but the effect was mostly due to the softness of the damping layer. Finally, the problem of a composite plate with a crack on the interlaminar boundary was formulated.

  18. Vortices in magnetically coupled superconducting layered systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, Roman G.; Kogan, Vladimir G.; Clem, John R.

    2000-01-01

    Pancake vortices in stacks of thin superconducting films or layers are considered. It is stressed that in the absence of Josephson coupling topological restrictions upon possible configurations of vortices are removed and various examples of structures forbidden in bulk superconductors are given. In particular, it is shown that vortices may skip surface layers in samples of less than a certain size R{sub c} which might be macroscopic. The Josephson coupling suppresses R{sub c} estimates. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  19. Nanoscale constrictions in superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Mark David; Naether, Uta; Ciria, Miguel; Zueco, David; Luis, Fernando; Sesé, Javier; Atkinson, James; Barco, Enrique del; Sánchez-Azqueta, Carlos; Majer, Johannes

    2014-10-20

    We report on the design, fabrication, and characterization of superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators with nanoscopic constrictions. By reducing the size of the center line down to 50 nm, the radio frequency currents are concentrated and the magnetic field in its vicinity is increased. The device characteristics are only slightly modified by the constrictions, with changes in resonance frequency lower than 1% and internal quality factors of the same order of magnitude as the original ones. These devices could enable the achievement of higher couplings to small magnetic samples or even to single molecular spins and have applications in circuit quantum electrodynamics, quantum computing, and electron paramagnetic resonance.

  20. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, John R.; Mulcahy, Thomas M.

    1998-01-01

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure.

  1. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.

    1998-03-03

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing is disclosed including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure. 9 figs.

  2. Superconductivity from Emerging Magnetic Moments.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Shintaro; Werner, Philipp

    2015-12-11

    Multiorbital Hubbard models are shown to exhibit a spatially isotropic spin-triplet superconducting phase, where equal-spin electrons in different local orbitals are paired. This superconducting state is stabilized in the spin-freezing crossover regime, where local moments emerge in the metal phase, and the pairing is substantially assisted by spin anisotropy. The phase diagram features a superconducting dome below a non-Fermi-liquid metallic region and next to a magnetically ordered phase. We suggest that this type of fluctuating-moment-induced superconductivity, which is not originating from fluctuations near a quantum critical point, may be realized in spin-triplet superconductors such as strontium ruthenates and uranium compounds. PMID:26705649

  3. Superconductivity from Emerging Magnetic Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Shintaro; Werner, Philipp

    2015-12-01

    Multiorbital Hubbard models are shown to exhibit a spatially isotropic spin-triplet superconducting phase, where equal-spin electrons in different local orbitals are paired. This superconducting state is stabilized in the spin-freezing crossover regime, where local moments emerge in the metal phase, and the pairing is substantially assisted by spin anisotropy. The phase diagram features a superconducting dome below a non-Fermi-liquid metallic region and next to a magnetically ordered phase. We suggest that this type of fluctuating-moment-induced superconductivity, which is not originating from fluctuations near a quantum critical point, may be realized in spin-triplet superconductors such as strontium ruthenates and uranium compounds.

  4. Superconductivity: A celebration of pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Michael R.

    2007-12-01

    It is fifty years since John Bardeen, Leon Cooper and Bob Schrieffer presented the microscopic theory of superconductivity. At a wonderful conference in Urbana the 'good old days' were remembered, and the challenges ahead surveyed.

  5. Ethyl alcohol boiling heat transfer on multilayer meshed surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dåbek, Lidia; Kapjor, Andrej; Orman, Łukasz J.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents the problem of heat transfer enhancement with the application of multilayer metal mesh structures during boiling of ethyl alcohol at ambient pressure. The preparation of samples involved sintering fine copper meshes with the copper base in the reduction atmosphere in order to prevent oxidation of the samples. The experiments included testing up to 4 layers of copper meshes. Significant augmentation of boiling heat transfer is possible, however, considerable number of meshes actually hinders heat transfer conditions and leads to the reduction in the heat flux transferred from the heater surface.

  6. Energetic ion bombarded Fe/Al multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Busaidy, M.S.; Crapper, M.D.

    2006-05-15

    The utility of ion-assisted deposition is investigated to explore the possibility of counteracting the deficiency of back-reflected current of Ar neutrals in the case of lighter elements such as Al. A range of energetically ion bombarded Fe/Al multilayers sputtered with applied surface bias of 0, -200, or -400 V were deposited onto Si(111) substrates in an argon atmosphere of 4 mTorr using a computer controlled dc magnetron sputtering system. Grazing incidence reflectivity and rocking curve scans by synchrotron x rays of wavelength of 1.38 A were used to investigate the structures of the interfaces produced. Substantial evidence has been gathered to suggest the gradual suppression of interfacial mixing and reduction in interfacial roughness with increases of applied bias. The densification of the Al microstructure was noticeable and may be a consequence of resputtering attributable to the induced ion bombardment. The average interfacial roughnesses were calculated for the 0, -200, and -400 V samples to be 7{+-}0.5, 6{+-}0.5, and 5{+-}0.5 A respectfully demonstrating a 30% improvement in interface quality. Data from rocking curve scans point to improved long-range correlated roughness in energetically deposited samples. The computational code based on the recursive algorithm developed by Parratt [Phys. Rev. 95, 359 (1954)] was successful in the simulation of the specular reflectivity curves.

  7. Multilayer deformation planarization by substrate pit suturing.

    PubMed

    Chai, Yingjie; Zhu, Meiping; Xing, Huanbin; Wang, Hu; Cui, Yun; Shao, Jianda

    2016-08-01

    In the pursuit of 1064 nm high-power laser resistance dielectric coatings in the nanosecond region, a group of HfO2/SiO2 high reflectors with and without suture layers were prepared on prearranged fused silica substrates with femtosecond laser pits. Surface morphology, global coating stress, and high-resolution cross sections were characterized to determine the effects of substrate pit suturing. Laser-induced damage resistance was investigated for samples with and without suture layers. Our results indicate considerable stability in terms of the nanosecond 1064 nm laser-induced damage threshold for samples having a suture layer, due to decreased electronic field (e-field) deformation with simultaneous elimination of internal cracks. In addition, a suture layer formed by plasma ion-assisted deposition could effectively improve global mechanical stress of the coatings. By effectively reducing the multilayer deformation using a suture layer, electron-beam high-reflective coatings, whose laser-induced damage resistance was not influenced by the substrate pit, can be prepared. PMID:27472579

  8. Entanglement witnessing in superconducting beamsplitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soller, H.; Hofstetter, L.; Reeb, D.

    2013-06-01

    We analyse a large class of superconducting beamsplitters for which the Bell parameter (CHSH violation) is a simple function of the spin detector efficiency. For these superconducting beamsplitters all necessary information to compute the Bell parameter can be obtained in Y-junction setups for the beamsplitter. Using the Bell parameter as an entanglement witness, we propose an experiment which allows to verify the presence of entanglement in Cooper pair splitters.

  9. Hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, R.C.; McConnell, B.W.; Phillips, B.A.

    1996-07-02

    A hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor includes a rotor separated from a stator by either a radial gap, an axial gap, or a combined axial and radial gap. Dual conically shaped stators are used in one embodiment to levitate a disc-shaped rotor made of superconducting material within a conduit for moving cryogenic fluid. As the rotor is caused to rotate when the field stator is energized, the fluid is pumped through the conduit. 6 figs.

  10. Hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.; McConnell, Benjamin W.; Phillips, Benjamin A.

    1996-01-01

    A hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor includes a rotor separated from a stator by either a radial gap, an axial gap, or a combined axial and radial gap. Dual conically shaped stators are used in one embodiment to levitate a disc-shaped rotor made of superconducting material within a conduit for moving cryogenic fluid. As the rotor is caused to rotate when the field stator is energized, the fluid is pumped through the conduit.

  11. Tuning the Superconducting Properties of Magnesium Diboride

    SciTech Connect

    Rudeger Heinrich Theoderich Wilke

    2005-12-17

    This work is presented in the following order: A review of the relevant physics and discussion of theoretical predictions for a two gap superconducting compound is given in chapter 2. Chapter 3 provides a review of the basic properties of MgB{sub 2}. Details of sample synthesis and characterization are given in chapter 4. Chapter 5 presents normal state and superconducting properties of Mg(B{sub 1-x}C{sub x}){sub 2} wires. Attempts to increase critical current densities in filaments via titanium additions are discussed in chapter 6. In chapters 7 and 8 alternative methods for synthesizing doped MgB{sub 2} powders are explored. In chapter 7 we synthesize Mg(B{sub 1-x}C{sub x}){sub 2} up to x=0.069 using a mixture of Mg, B, and the binary compound B{sub 4}C. Chapter 8 explores an alternative method, plasma spray synthesis, to produce nanometer sized doped boron powders for powder-in-tube applications. The effects of neutron irradiation on pure MgB{sub 2} wires is discussed in chapter 9. This is followed by a study of the effects of neutron irradiation on Mg(B{sub .962}C{sub .038}){sub 2} wires, presented in chapter 10. I will summarize the results of all of these studies in chapter 11 and discuss future directions for research in understanding the physics behind this novel material as well as its development for practical applications. In this thesis I have presented the results of investigations into the changes in the superconducting properties of MgB{sub 2} as a function of carbon doping and neutron irradiation. The goal has been to understand the physics underlying this unique two-gap superconductor as different types of perturbations are made to the system. Such knowledge not only contributes to our understanding of two-gap superconductivity, but could potentially lead to the development of superconducting MgB{sub 2} wires for the use in power applications near 20 K.

  12. The relation between ferroelasticity and superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molak, A.; Manka, R.

    1991-01-01

    The high-temperature superconductivity is explained widely by the layered crystal structure. The one- and two-dimensional subsystems and their interaction are investigated here. It is assumed that the high-T(sub c) superconductivity takes place in the two-dimensional subsystem and the increase of the phase transition temperature from 60 K up to 90 K is the consequence of turning on the influence of one-dimensional chains. The interaction between the two subsystems is transferred along the c axis by the phonons of breathing mode, which causes the hybridization of the electronic bonds between these subsystems. The experimental works indicate that the existence of both the chains Cu(1)-O and their interaction with the superconducting plane of Cu(2)-O modify the temperature of the transition to the superconducting state. It is seen from the neutron scattering data that the rates of the interatomic distance dependencies on temperature are changed around 240 K and 90 K. The 'zig-zag' order in Cu(1)-O chains has been postulated but, on the other hand, the vibrations with a large amplitude only were reported. The bi-stabilized situation of the oxygen ions can be caused by the change of distance between these ions and the Ba ions. It leads to the appearance of a two-well potential. Its parameters depend on temperature and the dynamics of the oxygen ions' movement. They can induce the antipolar order, which can be, however, more or less chaotic. The investigation of the ferroelastic properties of Y-Ba-Cu-O samples lead to the conclusion that they are related to jumps of ions inside the given chain and not to a diffusion between different sites in the ab plane. Researchers deduce, thus, that the fluctuating oxygen ions from these chains create dipoles in the ab plane. They can be described with the pseudo-spin formalism (- Pauli matrices). The system can be described with the Ising model. The pseudo-spins interact with phonons and influence the superconductivity in the second

  13. The relation between ferroelasticity and superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molak, A.; Manka, R.

    1990-01-01

    The high-temperature superconductivity is explained widely by the layered crystal structure. The one- and two-dimensional subsystems and their interaction are investigated here. It is assumed that the high-T(sub c) superconductivity takes place in the two-dimensional subsystem and the increase of the phase transition temperature from 60 K up to 90 K is the consequence of turning on the influence of one-dimensional chains. The interaction between the two subsystems is transferred along the c axis by the phonons of breathing mode, which causes the hybridization of the electronic bonds between these subsystems. The experimental works indicate that the existence of both the chains Cu(1)-O and their interaction with the superconducting plane of Cu(2)-O modify the temperature of the transition to the superconducting state. It is seen from the neutron scattering data that the rates of the interatomic distance dependencies on temperature are changed around 140 K and 90 K. The 'zig-zag' order in Cu(1)-O chains has been postulated but, on the other hand, the vibrations with a large amplitude only were reported. The bi-stabilized situation of the oxygen ions can be caused by the change of distance between these ions and the Ba ions. It leads to the appearance of a two-well potential. Its parameters depend on temperature and the dynamics of the oxygen ions' movement. They can induce the antipolar order, which can be, however, more or less chaotic. The investigation of the ferroelastic properties of Y-Ba-Cu-O samples lead to the conclusion that they are related to jumps of ions inside the given chain and not to a diffusion between different sites in the ab plane. Researchers deduce thus that the fluctuating oxygen ions from these chains create dipoles in the ab plane. They can be described with the pseudo-spin formalism/ - Pauli matrices/. The system can be described with the Ising model. The pseudo-spins interact with phonons and influence the superconductivity in the second

  14. A Beamline for High-Pressure Studies at the Advanced Light Sourcewith a Superconducting Bending Magnet as the Source

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Martin; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Caldwell, Wendel A.; Cambie, Daniella; Celestre, Richard S.; Domning, Edward E.; Duarte,Robert M.; Gleason, Arianna E.; Glossinger, James M.; Kelez, Nicholas; Plate, David W.; Yu, Tony; Zaug, Joeseph M.; Padmore, Howard A.; Jeanloz,Raymond; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Clark, Simon M.

    2005-06-30

    A new facility for high-pressure diffraction and spectroscopy using diamond anvil high-pressure cells has been built at the Advanced Light Source on Beamline 12.2.2. This beamline benefits from the hard X-radiation generated by a 6 Tesla superconducting bending magnet (superbend). Useful x-ray flux is available between 5 keV and 35 keV. The radiation is transferred from the superbend to the experimental enclosure by the brightness preserving optics of the beamline. These optics are comprised of: a plane parabola collimating mirror (M1), followed by a Kohzu monochromator vessel with a Si(111) crystals (E/DE {approx}7000) and a W/B4C multilayers (E/DE {approx} 100), and then a toroidal focusing mirror (M2) with variable focusing distance. The experimental enclosure contains an automated beam positioning system, a set of slits, ion chambers, the sample positioning goniometry and area detectors (CCD or image-plate detector). Future developments aim at the installation of a second end station dedicated for in situ laser-heating on one hand and a dedicated high-pressure single-crystal station, applying both monochromatic as well as polychromatic techniques.

  15. A BEAMLINE FOR HIGH PRESSURE STUDIES AT THE ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE WITH A SUPERCONDUCTING BENDING MAGNET AS THE SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, M; MacDowell, A A; Caldwell, W A; Cambie, D; Celestre, R S; Domning, E E; Duarte, R M; Gleason, A; Glossinger, J; Kelez, N; Plate, D W; Yu, T; Zaug, J M; Padmore, H A; Jeanloz, R; Alivisatos, A P; Clark, S M

    2005-04-19

    A new facility for high-pressure diffraction and spectroscopy using diamond anvil high-pressure cells has been built at the Advanced Light Source on Beamline 12.2.2. This beamline benefits from the hard X-radiation generated by a 6 Tesla superconducting bending magnet (superbend). Useful x-ray flux is available between 5 keV and 35 keV. The radiation is transferred from the superbend to the experimental enclosure by the brightness preserving optics of the beamline. These optics are comprised of: a plane parabola collimating mirror (M1), followed by a Kohzu monochromator vessel with a Si(111) crystals (E/{Delta}E {approx} 7000) and a W/B{sub 4}C multilayer (E/{Delta}E {approx} 100), and then a toroidal focusing mirror (M2) with variable focusing distance. The experimental enclosure contains an automated beam positioning system, a set of slits, ion chambers, the sample positioning goniometry and area detectors (CCD or image-plate detector). Future developments aim at the installation of a second end station dedicated for in situ laser-heating on one hand and a dedicated high-pressure single-crystal station, applying both monochromatic as well as polychromatic techniques.

  16. Large magnetoresistance of insulating silicon films with superconducting nanoprecipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heera, V.; Fiedler, J.; Skorupa, W.

    2016-10-01

    We report on large negative and positive magnetoresistance in inhomogeneous, insulating Si:Ga films below a critical temperature of about 7 K. The magnetoresistance effect exceeds 300 % at temperatures below 3 K and fields of 8 T. The comparison of the transport properties of superconducting samples with that of insulating ones reveals that the large magnetoresistance is associated with the appearance of local superconductivity. A simple phenomenological model based on localized Cooper pairs and hopping quasiparticles is able to describe the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the sheet resistance of such films.

  17. Electrodynamics of superconducting pnictide superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Perucchi, A.; Pietro, P. Di; Capitani, F.; Lupi, S.; Lee, S.; Kang, J. H.; Eom, C. B.; Jiang, J.; Weiss, J. D.; Hellstrom, E. E.; Dore, P.

    2014-06-02

    It was recently shown that superlattices where layers of the 8% Co-doped BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} superconducting pnictide are intercalated with non superconducting ultrathin layers of either SrTiO{sub 3} or of oxygen-rich BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, can be used to control flux pinning, thereby increasing critical fields and currents, without significantly affecting the critical temperature of the pristine superconducting material. However, little is known about the electron properties of these systems. Here, we investigate the electrodynamics of these superconducting pnictide superlattices in the normal and superconducting state by using infrared reflectivity, from THz to visible range. We find that multigap structure of these superlattices is preserved, whereas some significant changes are observed in their electronic structure with respect to those of the original pnictide. Our results suggest that possible attempts to further increase the flux pinning may lead to a breakdown of the pnictide superconducting properties.

  18. Quantum phase slips in superconducting Nb nanowire networks deposited on self-assembled Si templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirillo, C.; Trezza, M.; Chiarella, F.; Vecchione, A.; Bondarenko, V. P.; Prischepa, S. L.; Attanasio, C.

    2012-10-01

    Robust porous silicon substrates were employed for generating interconnected networks of superconducting ultrathin Nb nanowires. Scanning electron microscopy analysis was performed to investigate the morphology of the samples, which constitute of polycrystalline single wires with grain size of about 10 nm. The samples exhibit nonzero resistance over a broad temperature range below the critical temperature, fingerprint of phase slippage processes. The transport data are satisfactory reproduced by models describing both thermal and quantum fluctuations of the superconducting order parameter in thin homogeneous superconducting wires.

  19. The design and fabrication of a reverse Brayton cycle cryocooler system for the high temperature superconductivity cable cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Hong; Kwon, Yong Ha; Kim, Young Soo

    2005-01-01

    A high temperature superconductivity cable must be cooled below the nitrogen liquefaction temperature to apply the cable to power generation and transmission systems under superconducting state. To maintain the superconducting state, a reliable cryocooler system is also required. The design and fabrication of a cryocooler system have been performed with a reverse Brayton cycle using neon gas as a refrigerant. The system consists of a compressor, a recuperator, a cold-box, and control valves. The design of the system is made to have 1 kW cooling capacity. The heat loss through multilayer insulators is calculated. Conduction heat loss is about 7 W through valves and access ports and radiation heat loss is about 18 W on the surface of a cryocooler. The design factors are discussed in detail.

  20. Structural inhomogeneities in FeTe0.6Se0.4: Relation to superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokeš, K.; Schulze, M.; Hartwig, S.; Schäfer, N.; Landsgesell, S.; Blum, C. G. F.; Abou-Ras, D.; Hacisalihoglu, M. Y.; Ressouche, E.; Ouladdiaf, B.; Büchner, B.; Wurmehl, S.

    2015-12-01

    Chemical and structural phase compositions of two single-crystalline samples prepared with different cooling rates from stoichiometric FeTe0.6Se0.4 melts were studied. Both types of samples were investigated in a very comprehensive way using magnetic and electrical transport measurements combined with X-ray, neutron and electron backscatter diffraction. We show that slowly cooled samples are homogeneous on a microscopic scale with only a small excess of iron. Those slowly cooled samples do not exhibit bulk superconductivity down to 1.8 K. In contrast, fast-cooled samples are superconducting below about 14 K but are composed of several chemical phases: they consist of a matrix preserving the crystal structure of slow-cooled samples, and of core-shell structured dendritic inclusions (about 20-30 vol%). These have different crystal structures and chemical compositions and order magnetically at temperatures far above the superconducting transition temperature of the inhomogeneous samples. These structural and chemical inhomogeneities seem to play a vital role in the superconducting properties of this and similar iron-based systems as they lead to internal stress and act in a similar way as the application of the external pressure that reportedly increase the superconducting transition temperature in many iron pnictides and chalcogenides. We argue that a phase pure, homogeneous and stress-free FeTe0.6Se0.4 is non-superconducting.

  1. NiCu-based superconducting devices: fabrication and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruotolo, A.; Pullini, D.; Adamo, C.; Pepe, G. P.; Maritato, L.; Innocenti, G.; Perlo, P.

    2006-06-01

    The critical Josephson current (IC) in superconducting/ferromagnetic (S/F) multilayer-based junctions can be controlled by changing the relative directions of the magnetization in the F-layers. Recent experimental works [1, 2] show that an enhancement of IC is achieved in S/F weak links when the alternating F-layers are antiparallel aligned. We present preliminary experimental results concerning the dependence of IC on the relative orientation of the ferromagnetic layers in S/F1/I/F2/S tunnel junctions where the F-layers are obtained by changing the relative composition of NiCu alloys. The multilayers were grown by electron beam deposition, and processed by Focused Ion Beam lithography. The magnetic state of the devices was directly determined by measuring the current perpendicular to plane (CPP) magnetoresistance (MR) at high bias. IC was found to be larger when the F-layers are antiparallel aligned. The maximum change of IC corresponds to the maximum change of MR. The application of a magnetic field induces a transition in the shape of the currentvoltage curve that seems to suggest Coulomb blockade effect.

  2. Superconducting mechanism of YBaCuO superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. H.

    2009-10-01

    Electromagnetic properties of YBaCuO superconductor were measured on applying an external magnetic field to study non-volatile magnetic effect. The voltage increases with increase in applied magnetic flux, but it becomes constant at about 10 -2 T. The appearance of the voltage is ascribed to the trapping of magnetic flux. By changing the density of external magnetic flux, changes in inductance of a coil in which a superconducting bar inserted were also measured. The results showed that the filament model was valid to explain the mechanism of the occurrence of a voltage in superconducting sample. It was concluded that the electromagnetic properties arose from the interaction between the trapped magnetic flux and weak link of the filament formed in the superconducting bulk.

  3. Fractal superconductivity near localization threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Feigel'man, M.V.; Ioffe, L.B.; Kravtsov, V.E.; Cuevas, E.

    2010-07-15

    We develop a semi-quantitative theory of electron pairing and resulting superconductivity in bulk 'poor conductors' in which Fermi energy E{sub F} is located in the region of localized states not so far from the Anderson mobility edge E{sub c}. We assume attractive interaction between electrons near the Fermi surface. We review the existing theories and experimental data and argue that a large class of disordered films is described by this model. Our theoretical analysis is based on analytical treatment of pairing correlations, described in the basis of the exact single-particle eigenstates of the 3D Anderson model, which we combine with numerical data on eigenfunction correlations. Fractal nature of critical wavefunction's correlations is shown to be crucial for the physics of these systems. We identify three distinct phases: 'critical' superconductive state formed at E{sub F} = E{sub c}, superconducting state with a strong pseudo-gap, realized due to pairing of weakly localized electrons and insulating state realized at E{sub F} still deeper inside a localized band. The 'critical' superconducting phase is characterized by the enhancement of the transition temperature with respect to BCS result, by the inhomogeneous spatial distribution of superconductive order parameter and local density of states. The major new feature of the pseudo-gapped state is the presence of two independent energy scales: superconducting gap {Delta}, that is due to many-body correlations and a new 'pseudo-gap' energy scale {Delta}{sub P} which characterizes typical binding energy of localized electron pairs and leads to the insulating behavior of the resistivity as a function of temperature above superconductive T{sub c}. Two gap nature of the pseudo-gapped superconductor is shown to lead to specific features seen in scanning tunneling spectroscopy and point-contact Andreev spectroscopy. We predict that pseudo-gapped superconducting state demonstrates anomalous behavior of the optical

  4. Model multilayer structures for three-dimensional cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozole, Joseph; Szakal, Christopher; Kurczy, Michael; Winograd, Nicholas

    2006-07-01

    The prospects for SIMS three-dimensional analysis of biological materials were explored using model multilayer structures. The samples were analyzed in a ToF-SIMS spectrometer equipped with a 20 keV buckminsterfullerene (C 60+) ion source. Molecular depth information was acquired using a C 60+ ion beam to etch through the multilayer structures at specified time intervals. Subsequent to each individual erosion cycle, static SIMS spectra were recorded using a pulsed C 60+ ion probe. Molecular intensities in sequential mass spectra were monitored as a function of primary ion fluence. The resulting depth information was used to characterize C 60+ bombardment of biological materials. Specifically, molecular depth profile studies involving dehydrated dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) organic films indicate that cell membrane lipid materials do not experience significant chemical damage when bombarded with C 60+ ion fluences greater than 10 15 ions/cm 2. Moreover, depth profile analyses of DPPC-sucrose frozen multilayer structures suggest that biomolecule information can be uncovered after the C 60+ sputter removal of a 20 nm overlayer with no appreciable loss of underlying molecular signal. The experimental results support the potential for three-dimensional molecular mapping of biological materials using cluster SIMS.

  5. A MEMS lamination technology based on sequential multilayer electrodeposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M; Kim, J; Herrault, F; Schafer, R; Allen, MG

    2013-08-06

    A MEMS lamination technology based on sequential multilayer electrodeposition is presented. The process comprises three main steps: (1) automated sequential electrodeposition of permalloy (Ni80Fe20) structural and copper sacrificial layers to form multilayer structures of significant total thickness; (2) fabrication of polymeric anchor structures through the thickness of the multilayer structures and (3) selective removal of copper. The resulting structure is a set of air-insulated permalloy laminations, the separation of which is sustained by insulating polymeric anchor structures. Individual laminations have precisely controllable thicknesses ranging from 500 nm to 5 mu m, and each lamination layer is electrically isolated from adjacent layers by narrow air gaps of similar scale. In addition to air, interlamination insulators based on polymers are investigated. Interlamination air gaps with very high aspect ratio (>1:100) can be filled with polyvinylalcohol and polydimethylsiloxane. The laminated structures are characterized using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to directly examine properties such as the roughness and the thickness uniformity of the layers. In addition, the quality of the electrical insulation between the laminations is evaluated by quantifying the eddy current within the sample as a function of frequency. Fabricated laminations are comprised of uniform, smooth (surface roughness < 100 nm) layers with effective electrical insulation for all layer thicknesses and insulator approaches studied. Such highly laminated structures have potential uses ranging from energy conversion to applications where composite materials with highly anisotropic mechanical or thermal properties are required.

  6. Structural transformations in Sc/Si multilayers irradiated by EUVlasers

    SciTech Connect

    Voronov, D.L.; Zubarev, E.N.; Pershyn, Y.P.; Sevryukova, V.A.; Kondratenko, V.V.; Vinogradov, A.V.; Artioukov, I.A.; Uspenskiy, Y.A.; Grisham, M.; Vaschenko, G.; Menoni, C.S.; Rocca, J.J.

    2007-08-21

    Multilayer mirrors for the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) are keyelements for numerous applications of coherent EUV sources such as newtabletop lasers and free-electron lasers. However the field ofapplications is limited by the radiation and thermal stability of themultilayers. Taking into account the growing power of EUV sources thestability of the optics becomes crucial. To overcome this problem it isnecessary to study the degradation of multilayers and try to increasetheir temporal and thermal stability. In this paper we report the resultsof detailed study of structural changes in Sc/Simultilayers when exposedto intense EUV laser pulses. Various types of surface damage such asmelting, boiling, shockwave creation and ablation were observed asirradiation fluencies increase. Cross-sectional TEM study revealed thatthe layer structure was completely destroyed in the upper part ofmultilayer, but still survived below. The layers adjacent tothe substrateremained intact even through the multilayer surface melted down, thoughthe structure of the layers beneath the molten zone was noticeablychanged. The layer structure in this thermally affected zone is similarto that of isothermally annealed samples. All stages of scandium silicideformation such as interdiffusion, solid-state amorphization, silicidecrystallization, etc., are present in the thermally affected zone. Itindicates a thermal nature of the damage mechanism. The tungstendiffusion barriers were applied to the scandium/silicon interfaces. Itwas shown that the barriers inhibited interdiffusion and increased thethermal stability of Sc/Si mirrors.

  7. Optimization of multilayer neural network parameters for speaker recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovarek, Jaromir; Partila, Pavol; Rozhon, Jan; Voznak, Miroslav; Skapa, Jan; Uhrin, Dominik; Chmelikova, Zdenka

    2016-05-01

    This article discusses the impact of multilayer neural network parameters for speaker identification. The main task of speaker identification is to find a specific person in the known set of speakers. It means that the voice of an unknown speaker (wanted person) belongs to a group of reference speakers from the voice database. One of the requests was to develop the text-independent system, which means to classify wanted person regardless of content and language. Multilayer neural network has been used for speaker identification in this research. Artificial neural network (ANN) needs to set parameters like activation function of neurons, steepness of activation functions, learning rate, the maximum number of iterations and a number of neurons in the hidden and output layers. ANN accuracy and validation time are directly influenced by the parameter settings. Different roles require different settings. Identification accuracy and ANN validation time were evaluated with the same input data but different parameter settings. The goal was to find parameters for the neural network with the highest precision and shortest validation time. Input data of neural networks are a Mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC). These parameters describe the properties of the vocal tract. Audio samples were recorded for all speakers in a laboratory environment. Training, testing and validation data set were split into 70, 15 and 15 %. The result of the research described in this article is different parameter setting for the multilayer neural network for four speakers.

  8. Absence of superconductivity in ultrathin layers of FeSe synthesized on a topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eich, Andreas; Rollfing, Nils; Arnold, Fabian; Sanders, Charlotte; Ewen, Pascal R.; Bianchi, Marco; Dendzik, Maciej; Michiardi, Matteo; Mi, Jian-Li; Bremholm, Martin; Wegner, Daniel; Hofmann, Philip; Khajetoorians, Alexander A.

    2016-09-01

    The structural and electronic properties of FeSe ultrathin layers on B i2S e3 have been investigated with a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The FeSe multilayers, which are predominantly 3-5 monolayers (MLs) thick, exhibit a hole pocket-like electron band at Γ ¯ and a dumbbell-like feature at M ¯, similar to multilayers of FeSe on SrTi O3 . Moreover, the topological state of the B i2S e3 is preserved beneath the FeSe layer, as indicated by a heavily n-doped Dirac cone. Low temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy does not exhibit a superconducting gap for any investigated thickness down to a temperature of 5 K.

  9. Structure and superconductivity of isotope-enriched boron-doped diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Joe D; Ekimov, E A; Sidorov, V A; Zoteev, A; Lebed, Y; Stishov, S M

    2008-01-01

    Superconducting boron-doped diamond samples were synthesized with isotopes of {sup 10}B, {sup 11}B, {sup 13}C and {sup 12}C. We claim the presence of a carbon isotope effect on the superconducting transition temperature, which supports the 'diamond-carbon'-related nature of superconductivity and the importance of the electron-phonon interaction as the mechanism of superconductivity in diamond. Isotope substitution permits us to relate almost all bands in the Raman spectra of heavily boron-doped diamond to the vibrations of carbon atoms. The 500 cm{sup 01} Raman band shifts with either carbon or boron isotope substitution and may be associated with vibrations of paired or clustered boron. The absence of a superconducting transition (down to 1.6 K) in diamonds synthesized in the Co-C-B system at 1900 K correlates with the small boron concentration deduced from lattice parameters.

  10. Haptic feedback for multilayer cutting.

    PubMed

    Rianto, Sugeng; Li, Ling; Hartley, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    An approach in effectively estimating the force feedback for a tactile haptic based on multi-proxy rendering for 3D surface cuttings for a virtual surgery simulation is described in this paper. The force-models representing haptic force-feedback are approximated using D'Alembert's principle in the mechanic case of spring-damper-stiffness interaction of the surfaces. We also propose a combination between mesh refinement and adaptive re-meshing to create a progressive cutting over the layering surfaces. Experimental results prove that the physical interaction to create cutting paths over the multilayer surfaces can be deliver smoothly with haptic in real time with 3D visual stereo on a PC.

  11. Techniques for multilayer channel routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Douglas; Burns, Jeffrey L.; Romeo, Fabio; Sangiovanni-Vincentelli, Alberto; Mayaram, Kartikeya

    1988-06-01

    The techniques described have been implemented in a multilayer channel router called Chameleon. Chameleon consists of two stages: a partitioner and a detailed router. The partitioner divides the problem into two-layer and three-layer subproblems such that global channel area is minimized. The detailed router then implements the connections using generalizations of the algorithms used in YACR2. In particular, a three-dimensional maze router is used for the vertical connections; this methodology is effective even when cycle constraints are present. Chameleon has produced optimal results on a wide range of industrial and academic examples for a variety of layer and pitch combinations, and can handle a variety of technology constraints.

  12. Multilayer composites and manufacture of same

    DOEpatents

    Holesinger, Terry G.; Jia, Quanxi

    2006-02-07

    The present invention is directed towards a process of depositing multilayer thin films, disk-shaped targets for deposition of multilayer thin films by a pulsed laser or pulsed electron beam deposition process, where the disk-shaped targets include at least two segments with differing compositions, and a multilayer thin film structure having alternating layers of a first composition and a second composition, a pair of the alternating layers defining a bi-layer wherein the thin film structure includes at least 20 bi-layers per micron of thin film such that an individual bi-layer has a thickness of less than about 100 nanometers.

  13. Highly Efficient Multilayer Thermoelectric Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boufelfel, Ali

    2006-01-01

    Multilayer thermoelectric devices now at the prototype stage of development exhibit a combination of desirable characteristics, including high figures of merit and high performance/cost ratios. These devices are capable of producing temperature differences of the order of 50 K in operation at or near room temperature. A solvent-free batch process for mass production of these state-of-the-art thermoelectric devices has also been developed. Like prior thermoelectric devices, the present ones have commercial potential mainly by virtue of their utility as means of controlled cooling (and/or, in some cases, heating) of sensors, integrated circuits, and temperature-critical components of scientific instruments. The advantages of thermoelectric devices for such uses include no need for circulating working fluids through or within the devices, generation of little if any noise, and high reliability. The disadvantages of prior thermoelectric devices include high power consumption and relatively low coefficients of performance. The present development program was undertaken in the hope of reducing the magnitudes of the aforementioned disadvantages and, especially, obtaining higher figures of merit for operation at and near room temperature. Accomplishments of the program thus far include development of an algorithm to estimate the heat extracted by, and the maximum temperature drop produced by, a thermoelectric device; solution of the problem of exchange of heat between a thermoelectric cooler and a water-cooled copper block; retrofitting of a vacuum chamber for depositing materials by sputtering; design of masks; and fabrication of multilayer thermoelectric devices of two different designs, denoted I and II. For both the I and II designs, the thicknesses of layers are of the order of nanometers. In devices of design I, nonconsecutive semiconductor layers are electrically connected in series. Devices of design II contain superlattices comprising alternating electron

  14. A Closed Neon Liquefier System for Testing Superconducting Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchetti, M.; Al-Mosawi, M. K.; Yang, Y.; Beduz, C.; Giunchi, G.

    2006-04-01

    A Neon liquefier system has been developed by Southampton University (UK) and EDISON (Italy) with the aim to provide a facility for testing HTS superconducting devices using Magnesium Diboride materials, in the range 25-30K. The system consists of a liquid Neon cryostat coupled to a two stages cryocooler and a recovery system. The first stage of the cryocooler is connected to the thermal shield of the cryostat and a copper station positioned at mid point along the access neck to the liquid Neon bath to reduce heat leak and to provide pre-cooling of samples. The second stage, capable of 20W cooling power at 22K, is used to provide the cooling power for liquefaction and to refrigerate the liquid Neon bath and the superconducting device/sample during the steady state operation. The recovery system has been designed to automatically compress excess boil-off generated by a quench or a transient heating into a storage gas container. Transport measurement up to 900A can be carried out in the Ne cryostat using purposely build hybrid current leads. These leads have a copper upper section cooled by liquid Nitrogen and a superconducting lower section of Ag/AuBi2223 tapes. In this paper we report on the performance of the system and the initial measurement of superconducting samples.

  15. A combined method for synthesis of superconducting Cu doped Bi2Se3

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Song, Yanru; You, Lixing; Li, Zhuojun; Gao, Bo; Xie, Xiaoming; Jiang, Mianheng

    2016-01-01

    We present a two-step technique for the synthesis of superconducting CuxBi2Se3. Cu0.15Bi2Se3 single crystals were synthesized using the melt-growth method. Although these samples are non-superconducting, they can be employed to generate high quality superconducting samples if used as precursors in the following electrochemical synthesis step. Samples made from Cu0.15Bi2Se3 reliably exhibit zero-resistance even under the non-optimal quenching condition, while samples made from pristine Bi2Se3 require fine tuning of the quenching conditions to achieve similar performance. Moreover, under the optimal quenching condition, the average superconducting shielding fraction was still lower in the samples made from pristine Bi2Se3 than in the samples made from Cu0.15Bi2Se3. These results suggest that the pre-doped Cu atoms facilitate the formation of a superconducting percolation network. We also discuss the useful clues that we gathered about the locations of Cu dopants that are responsible for superconductivity. PMID:26936470

  16. The road to superconducting spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschrig, Matthias

    Energy efficient computing has become a major challenge, with the increasing importance of large data centres across the world, which already today have a power consumption comparable to that of Spain, with steeply increasing trend. Superconducting computing is progressively becoming an alternative for large-scale applications, with the costs for cooling being largely outweighed by the gain in energy efficiency. The combination of superconductivity and spintronics - ``superspintronics'' - has the potential and flexibility to develop into such a green technology. This young field is based on the observation that new phenomena emerge at interfaces between superconducting and other, competing, phases. The past 15 years have seen a series of pivotal predictions and experimental discoveries relating to the interplay between superconductivity and ferromagnetism. The building blocks of superspintronics are equal-spin Cooper pairs, which are generated at the interface between superconducting and a ferromagnetic materials in the presence of non-collinear magnetism. Such novel, spin-polarised Cooper pairs carry spin-supercurrents in ferromagnets and thus contribute to spin-transport and spin-control. Geometric Berry phases appear during the singlet-triplet conversion process in structures with non-coplanar magnetisation, enhancing functionality of devices, and non-locality introduced by superconducting order leads to long-range effects. With the successful generation and control of equal-spin Cooper pairs the hitherto notorious incompatibility of superconductivity and ferromagnetism has been not only overcome, but turned synergistic. I will discuss these developments and their extraordinary potential. I also will present open questions posed by recent experiments and point out implications for theory. This work is supported by the Engineering and Physical Science Research Council (EPSRC Grant No. EP/J010618/1).

  17. Superconductivity in doped fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Hebard, A.F. )

    1992-11-01

    While there is not complete agreement on the microscopic mechanism of superconductivity in alkali-metal-doped C[sub 60], further research may well lead to the production of analogous materials that lose resistance at even higher temperatures. Carbon 60 is a fascinating and arrestingly beautiful molecule. With 12 pentagonal and 20 hexagonal faces symmetrically arrayed in a soccer-ball-like structure that belongs to the icosahedral point group, I[sub h], its high symmetry alone invites special attention. The publication in September 1990 of a simple technique for manufacturing and concentrating macroscopic amounts of this new form of carbon announced to the scientific community that enabling technology had arrived. Macroscopic amounts of C[sub 60] (and the higher fullerenes, such as C[sub 70] and C[sub 84]) can now be made with an apparatus as simple as an arc furnace powered with an arc welding supply. Accordingly, chemists, physicists and materials scientists have joined forces in an explosion of effort to explore the properties of this unusual molecular building block. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Improved superconducting magnet wire

    DOEpatents

    Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1983-08-16

    This invention is directed to a superconducting tape or wire composed of alternating layers of copper and a niobium-containing superconductor such as niobium of NbTi, Nb/sub 3/Sn or Nb/sub 3/Ge. In general, each layer of the niobium-containing superconductor has a thickness in the range of about 0.05 to 1.5 times its coherence length (which for Nb/sub 3/Si is 41 A) with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170 to 600 A. With the use of very thin layers of the niobium composition having a thickness within the desired range, the critical field (H/sub c/) may be increased by factors of 2 to 4. Also, the thin layers of the superconductor permit the resulting tape or wire to exhibit suitable ductility for winding on a magnet core. These compositions are also characterized by relatively high values of critical temperature and therefore will exhibit a combination of useful properties as superconductors.

  19. Demons and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ihm, J.; Cohen, M.L.; Tuan, S.F.

    1981-04-01

    Model calculations are used to explore the role of demons (acoustic plasmons involving light and heavy mass carriers) in superconductivity. Heavy d electrons and light s and p electrons in a transition metal are used for discussion, but the calculation presented is more general, and the results can be applied to other systems. The analysis is based on the dielectric-function approach and the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory. The dielectric function includes intraband and interband s-d scattering, and a tight-binding model is used to examine the role of s-d hybridization. The demon contribution generally reduces the Coulomb interaction between the electrons. Under suitable conditions, the model calculations indicate that the electron-electron interaction via demons can be attractive, but the results also suggest that this mechanism is probably not dominant in transition metals and transition-metal compounds. An attractive interband contribution is found, and it is proposed that this effect may lead to pairing in suitable systems.

  20. Superconducting energy storage magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boom, Roger W. (Inventor); Eyssa, Yehia M. (Inventor); Abdelsalam, Mostafa K. (Inventor); Huang, Xianrui (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A superconducting magnet is formed having composite conductors arrayed in coils having turns which lie on a surface defining substantially a frustum of a cone. The conical angle with respect to the central axis is preferably selected such that the magnetic pressure on the coil at the widest portion of the cone is substantially zero. The magnet structure is adapted for use as an energy storage magnet mounted in an earthen trench or tunnel where the strength the surrounding soil is lower at the top of the trench or tunnel than at the bottom. The composite conductor may be formed having a ripple shape to minimize stresses during charge up and discharge and has a shape for each ripple selected such that the conductor undergoes a minimum amount of bending during the charge and discharge cycle. By minimizing bending, the working of the normal conductor in the composite conductor is minimized, thereby reducing the increase in resistance of the normal conductor that occurs over time as the conductor undergoes bending during numerous charge and discharge cycles.

  1. Superconducting graphite intercalation compounds with calcium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emery, N.; Hérold, C.; Marêché, J.-F.; Lagrange, P.; Bellouard, C.; Lamura, G.; Di Gennaro, E.; Andreone, A.

    2008-04-01

    In the graphite-lithium-calcium system, four well-defined intercalation compounds were synthesised. Two of them, CaC 6 and Li 3Ca 2C 6, exhibit superconducting properties at 11.5 K and 11.15 K, respectively, the highest critical temperatures among those of graphite intercalation compounds. The samples are synthesised using a liquid-solid method allowing the preparation of pure bulk samples, auspicious for crystallographic and magnetic measurements. The crystal structure of CaC 6 was entirely specified; this compound crystallises in the R-3 m space group. The two-dimensional unit cell of Li 3Ca 2C 6 is hexagonal and commensurate with that of graphite and the intercalated sheets, very rich in metal, are seven-layered. The magnetic properties of these phases were studied with an applied field parallel and perpendicular to the graphene sheets. In both cases the magnetic phase diagram indicates that these compounds are type II superconducting materials slightly anisotropic in spite of their lamellar structure. In the case of CaC 6, in-plane magnetic penetration depth measurements show a clear exponential behaviour at low temperatures, consistent with an s-wave symmetry of the gap function, well fitted by the standard BCS theory in the dirty limit.

  2. Pressure-induced electronic phase separation of magnetism and superconductivity in CrAs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khasanov, Rustem; Guguchia, Zurab; Eremin, Ilya; Luetkens, Hubertus; Amato, Alex; Biswas, Pabitra K.; Ruegg, Christian; Susner, Michael A.; Sefat, Athena S.; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D.; et al

    2015-09-08

    We report that the recent discovery of pressure (p) induced superconductivity in the binary helimagnet CrAs has raised questions on how superconductivity emerges from the magnetic state and on the mechanism of the superconducting pairing. In the present work the suppression of magnetism and the occurrence of superconductivity in CrAs were studied by means of muon spin rotation. The magnetism remains bulk up to p ≃ 3.5 kbar while its volume fraction gradually decreases with increasing pressure until it vanishes at p ≃ 7 kbar. At 3.5 kbar superconductivity abruptly appears with its maximum Tc ≃ 1.2 K which decreasesmore » upon increasing the pressure. In the intermediate pressure region (3.5≲ p ≲ 7 kbar) the superconducting and the magnetic volume fractions are spatially phase separated and compete for phase volume. Our results indicate that the less conductive magnetic phase provides additional carriers (doping) to the superconducting parts of the CrAs sample thus leading to an increase of the transition temperature (Tc) and of the superfluid density (ρs). A scaling of ρs with Tc3.2 as well as the phase separation between magnetism and superconductivity point to a conventional mechanism of the Cooper-pairing in CrAs.« less

  3. Pressure-induced electronic phase separation of magnetism and superconductivity in CrAs.

    PubMed

    Khasanov, Rustem; Guguchia, Zurab; Eremin, Ilya; Luetkens, Hubertus; Amato, Alex; Biswas, Pabitra K; Rüegg, Christian; Susner, Michael A; Sefat, Athena S; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D; Morenzoni, Elvezio

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of pressure (p) induced superconductivity in the binary helimagnet CrAs has raised questions on how superconductivity emerges from the magnetic state and on the mechanism of the superconducting pairing. In the present work the suppression of magnetism and the occurrence of superconductivity in CrAs were studied by means of muon spin rotation. The magnetism remains bulk up to p ≃ 3.5 kbar while its volume fraction gradually decreases with increasing pressure until it vanishes at p ≃ 7 kbar. At 3.5 kbar superconductivity abruptly appears with its maximum Tc ≃ 1.2 K which decreases upon increasing the pressure. In the intermediate pressure region (3.5 < or ~  p < or ~ 7 kbar) the superconducting and the magnetic volume fractions are spatially phase separated and compete for phase volume. Our results indicate that the less conductive magnetic phase provides additional carriers (doping) to the superconducting parts of the CrAs sample thus leading to an increase of the transition temperature (Tc) and of the superfluid density (ρs). A scaling of ρs with Tc(3.2) as well as the phase separation between magnetism and superconductivity point to a conventional mechanism of the Cooper-pairing in CrAs. PMID:26346548

  4. Pressure-induced electronic phase separation of magnetism and superconductivity in CrAs

    SciTech Connect

    Khasanov, Rustem; Guguchia, Zurab; Eremin, Ilya; Luetkens, Hubertus; Amato, Alex; Biswas, Pabitra K.; Ruegg, Christian; Susner, Michael A.; Sefat, Athena S.; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D.; Morenzoni, Elvezio

    2015-09-08

    We report that the recent discovery of pressure (p) induced superconductivity in the binary helimagnet CrAs has raised questions on how superconductivity emerges from the magnetic state and on the mechanism of the superconducting pairing. In the present work the suppression of magnetism and the occurrence of superconductivity in CrAs were studied by means of muon spin rotation. The magnetism remains bulk up to p ≃ 3.5 kbar while its volume fraction gradually decreases with increasing pressure until it vanishes at p ≃ 7 kbar. At 3.5 kbar superconductivity abruptly appears with its maximum Tc ≃ 1.2 K which decreases upon increasing the pressure. In the intermediate pressure region (3.5≲ p ≲ 7 kbar) the superconducting and the magnetic volume fractions are spatially phase separated and compete for phase volume. Our results indicate that the less conductive magnetic phase provides additional carriers (doping) to the superconducting parts of the CrAs sample thus leading to an increase of the transition temperature (Tc) and of the superfluid density (ρs). A scaling of ρs with Tc3.2 as well as the phase separation between magnetism and superconductivity point to a conventional mechanism of the Cooper-pairing in CrAs.

  5. Pressure-induced electronic phase separation of magnetism and superconductivity in CrAs

    PubMed Central

    Khasanov, Rustem; Guguchia, Zurab; Eremin, Ilya; Luetkens, Hubertus; Amato, Alex; Biswas, Pabitra K.; Rüegg, Christian; Susner, Michael A.; Sefat, Athena S.; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D.; Morenzoni, Elvezio

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of pressure (p) induced superconductivity in the binary helimagnet CrAs has raised questions on how superconductivity emerges from the magnetic state and on the mechanism of the superconducting pairing. In the present work the suppression of magnetism and the occurrence of superconductivity in CrAs were studied by means of muon spin rotation. The magnetism remains bulk up to p  3.5 kbar while its volume fraction gradually decreases with increasing pressure until it vanishes at p  7 kbar. At 3.5 kbar superconductivity abruptly appears with its maximum Tc  1.2 K which decreases upon increasing the pressure. In the intermediate pressure region (3.5  p  7 kbar) the superconducting and the magnetic volume fractions are spatially phase separated and compete for phase volume. Our results indicate that the less conductive magnetic phase provides additional carriers (doping) to the superconducting parts of the CrAs sample thus leading to an increase of the transition temperature (Tc) and of the superfluid density (ρs). A scaling of ρs with as well as the phase separation between magnetism and superconductivity point to a conventional mechanism of the Cooper-pairing in CrAs. PMID:26346548

  6. Pressure-induced electronic phase separation of magnetism and superconductivity in CrAs.

    PubMed

    Khasanov, Rustem; Guguchia, Zurab; Eremin, Ilya; Luetkens, Hubertus; Amato, Alex; Biswas, Pabitra K; Rüegg, Christian; Susner, Michael A; Sefat, Athena S; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D; Morenzoni, Elvezio

    2015-09-08

    The recent discovery of pressure (p) induced superconductivity in the binary helimagnet CrAs has raised questions on how superconductivity emerges from the magnetic state and on the mechanism of the superconducting pairing. In the present work the suppression of magnetism and the occurrence of superconductivity in CrAs were studied by means of muon spin rotation. The magnetism remains bulk up to p ≃ 3.5 kbar while its volume fraction gradually decreases with increasing pressure until it vanishes at p ≃ 7 kbar. At 3.5 kbar superconductivity abruptly appears with its maximum Tc ≃ 1.2 K which decreases upon increasing the pressure. In the intermediate pressure region (3.5 < or ~  p < or ~ 7 kbar) the superconducting and the magnetic volume fractions are spatially phase separated and compete for phase volume. Our results indicate that the less conductive magnetic phase provides additional carriers (doping) to the superconducting parts of the CrAs sample thus leading to an increase of the transition temperature (Tc) and of the superfluid density (ρs). A scaling of ρs with Tc(3.2) as well as the phase separation between magnetism and superconductivity point to a conventional mechanism of the Cooper-pairing in CrAs.

  7. Pressure-induced electronic phase separation of magnetism and superconductivity in CrAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasanov, Rustem; Guguchia, Zurab; Eremin, Ilya; Luetkens, Hubertus; Amato, Alex; Biswas, Pabitra K.; Rüegg, Christian; Susner, Michael A.; Sefat, Athena S.; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D.; Morenzoni, Elvezio

    2015-09-01

    The recent discovery of pressure (p) induced superconductivity in the binary helimagnet CrAs has raised questions on how superconductivity emerges from the magnetic state and on the mechanism of the superconducting pairing. In the present work the suppression of magnetism and the occurrence of superconductivity in CrAs were studied by means of muon spin rotation. The magnetism remains bulk up to p  3.5 kbar while its volume fraction gradually decreases with increasing pressure until it vanishes at p  7 kbar. At 3.5 kbar superconductivity abruptly appears with its maximum Tc  1.2 K which decreases upon increasing the pressure. In the intermediate pressure region (3.5  p  7 kbar) the superconducting and the magnetic volume fractions are spatially phase separated and compete for phase volume. Our results indicate that the less conductive magnetic phase provides additional carriers (doping) to the superconducting parts of the CrAs sample thus leading to an increase of the transition temperature (Tc) and of the superfluid density (ρs). A scaling of ρs with as well as the phase separation between magnetism and superconductivity point to a conventional mechanism of the Cooper-pairing in CrAs.

  8. Noise properties of high-Tc superconducting flux transformers fabricated using chemical-mechanical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukharkin, M.; Kalabukhov, A.; Schneiderman, J. F.; Öisjöen, F.; Snigirev, O.; Lai, Z.; Winkler, D.

    2012-07-01

    Reproducible high-temperature superconducting multilayer flux transformers were fabricated using chemical mechanical polishing. The measured magnetic field noise of the flip-chip magnetometer based on one such flux transformer with a 9 × 9 mm2 pickup loop coupled to a bicrystal dc SQUID was 15 fT/Hz1/2 above 2 kHz. We present an investigation of excess 1/f noise observed at low frequencies and its relationship with the microstructure of the interlayer connections within the flux transformer. The developed high-Tc SQUID magnetometers may be advantageous in ultra-low field magnetic resonance imaging and, with improved low frequency noise, magnetoencephalography applications.

  9. Investigation of structural stability and magnetic properties of Fe/Ni multilayers irradiated by 300 keV Fe10+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feida; Tang, Xiaobin; Yang, Yahui; Huang, Hai; Chen, Da

    2014-09-01

    The effects of irradiation on the structural stability and magnetic properties of Fe/Ni multilayers, which are promising candidate magnet materials in fusion reactors, were investigated. Three types of Fe/Ni multilayers with different modulation periods ranging from 2 nm to 10 nm were deposited on Si (1 0 0) substrate through direct current magnetron sputtering. The multilayered samples were irradiated by 300 keV Fe10+ ions in a wide fluence range of 1.7 × 1018/m2 to 2 × 1019/m2. Magnetic hysteresis loops of pre- and post-irradiation samples were obtained using a vibrating sample magnetometer, and structural stability were analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Magnetic measurements showed that the coercive force of Fe/Ni multilayers remained stable with increasing irradiation fluence. However, saturation magnetization increased with increasing irradiation fluence. The samples with 5 nm modulation period were the least affected by irradiation among the three types of Fe/Ni multilayers. The effects of temperature during irradiation were also discussed to explore the optimum temperature of multilayers.

  10. Dual anisotropic character in Fe/Pt multilayer grown on (001) MgO substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Himanshu; Rakshit, R. K.; Gupta, Anurag; Maurya, K. K.; Dalai, M. K.; Budhani, R. C.

    2014-04-24

    The multilayers of [Fe(5Å)/Pt(25 Å)]{sub ×15} were prepared by dc magnetron sputtering on 50 Å Pt-buffered MgO substrates. The structural characterization of the multilayers was carried out using X-ray diffraction, X-ray reflectivity. The Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurement reveals the depth profile and compositional modulations of the multilayer films as per our design specifications. Room temperature magnetic measurements were carried out by using SQUID both in-plane and out-of-plane sample geometry. Magnetization measurements show similar M-H loops for both in-plane and out-of-plane directions of external magnetic field with a coercivity of 190 Oe. These measurements indicate that our samples are magnetically soft and have multifunctional character which is important for making magnetic tunnel junctions.

  11. Performance measurements of multilayer insulation at variable cold temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funke, Thomas; Haberstroh, Christoph

    2012-06-01

    Multilayer insulation (MLI) is commonly used in most cryogenic devices such as LHe-cryostats or superconductive cables. Typically thermal performance measurements have been carried out using bath cryostats. Inherent to all this devices is a fixed cold temperature at the boiling point of the particular cryogenic liquid. A recent approach for cryogenic pressure vessels covers a broad temperature range, i.e. hydrogen storage from 20 K to ambient temperature. Thus, a new calorimeter cryostat has been designed at TU Dresden to meet these requirements. The design as a flow cryostat allows the measurement of the thermal performance with variable cold temperature between 20 K and 300 K. It can be operated in vertical as well as in horizontal orientation. The insulation material is wrapped around a nearly isothermal cylinder which is held at the desired temperature by a cooling fluid. Preferably LHe respectively helium cold gas is used. Several design features reduce undesired interference errors. It is reported about design and equipment of this cryostat plus first experiences in operation

  12. Two-Dimensional Superconductivity in the Cuprates Revealed by Atomic-Layer-by- Layer Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    A. T. Bollinger; Bozovic, I.

    2016-08-12

    Various electronic phases displayed by cuprates that exhibit high temperature superconductivity continue to attract much interest. We provide a short review of several experiments that we have performed aimed at investigating the superconducting state in these compounds. Measurements on single-phase films, bilayers, and superlattices all point to the conclusion that the high-temperature superconductivity in these materials is an essentially quasi-two dimensional phenomenon. With proper control over the film growth, high-temperature superconductivity can exist in a single copper oxide plane with the critical temperatures as high as that achieved in the bulk samples.

  13. Fabrication of wedged multilayer Laue lenses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Prasciolu, M.; Leontowich, A. F. G.; Krzywinski, J.; Andrejczuk, A.; Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to fabricate wedged multilayer Laue lenses, in which the angle of diffracting layers smoothly varies in the lens to achieve optimum diffracting efficiency across the entire pupil of the lens. This was achieved by depositing a multilayer onto a flat substrate placed in the penumbra of a straight-edge mask. The distance between the mask and the substrate was calibrated and the multilayer Laue lens was cut in a position where the varying layer thickness and the varying layer tilt simultaneously satisfy the Fresnel zone plate condition and Bragg’s law for all layers in the stack.more » This method can be used to extend the achievable numerical aperture of multilayer Laue lenses to reach considerably smaller focal spot sizes than achievable with lenses composed of parallel layers.« less

  14. Fabrication of wedged multilayer Laue lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Prasciolu, M.; Leontowich, A. F. G.; Krzywinski, J.; Andrejczuk, A.; Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to fabricate wedged multilayer Laue lenses, in which the angle of diffracting layers smoothly varies in the lens to achieve optimum diffracting efficiency across the entire pupil of the lens. This was achieved by depositing a multilayer onto a flat substrate placed in the penumbra of a straight-edge mask. The distance between the mask and the substrate was calibrated and the multilayer Laue lens was cut in a position where the varying layer thickness and the varying layer tilt simultaneously satisfy the Fresnel zone plate condition and Bragg’s law for all layers in the stack. This method can be used to extend the achievable numerical aperture of multilayer Laue lenses to reach considerably smaller focal spot sizes than achievable with lenses composed of parallel layers.

  15. Kerr effect in multilayer dielectric coatings.

    PubMed

    Fedulova, Elena; Trubetskov, Michael; Amotchkina, Tatiana; Fritsch, Kilian; Baum, Peter; Pronin, Oleg; Pervak, Vladimir

    2016-09-19

    We report the utilization of the optical Kerr effect in multilayer dielectric coatings, previously discussed only theoretically. We present the design and realization of multilayer dielectric optical structures with layer-specific Kerr nonlinearities, which permit tailoring of the intensity-dependent effects. The modulation depth in reflectance reaches up to 6% for the demonstrated examples of dielectric nonlinear multilayer coatings. We show that the nonlinearity is based on the optical Kerr effect, with the recovery time faster than the laser pulse envelope of 1 ps. Due to high flexibility in design, the reported dielectric nonlinear multilayer coatings have the potential to open hitherto unprecedented possibilities in nonlinear optics and ultrafast laser applications. PMID:27661917

  16. Exact solution of multilayered piezoelectric diaphragms.

    PubMed

    Yao, Linquan; Lu, Li; Wang, Zhihong; Zhu, Weiguang; Dai, Ying

    2003-10-01

    This paper investigates dynamic behavior of multilayered piezoelectric diaphragms that are simplified as laminated plates. The validity of the dynamic analysis based on the simplified clamped multilayered plate model has first been studied using ANSYS finite element (FE)-codes. The simplified, clamped, multilayered plate model has been verified to be a reasonable one in comparison with the exact model. Subsequently, the frequency characteristics of clamped rectangular piezoelectric laminated plates were further analytically investigated. Using the classical laminated plate theory, mechanical, electrical, and electromechanical characteristics of the multilayered piezoelectric diaphragms were studied. For ease of calculation, the dimensionless method was adopted. Furthermore, numerical analysis was carried out using the Rayleigh-Ritz method. Influence of dimensions of the laminar diaphragm on nature frequencies also was studied. The thickness ratio of the PZT layer to the total thickness of the laminar diaphragm has been optimized to obtain the largest deflection.

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of thermoelectric multilayer films

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, A.V.; Foreman, R.J.; Summers, L.J.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Farmer, J.C.

    1996-03-21

    The deposition of compositionally modulated (Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}){sub 2}(Te{sub 1-y}Se{sub y}){sub 3} thermoelectric multilayer films by magnetron sputtering has been demonstrated. Structures with a period of 140{Angstrom} are shown to be stable to interdiffusion at the high deposition temperatures necessary for growth of single layer crystalline films with ZT {gt} 0.5. These multilayers are of the correct dimension to exhibit the electronic properties of quantum well structures. Furthermore it is shown that the Seebeck coefficient of the films is not degraded by the presence of this multilayer structure. It may be possible to synthesize a multilayer thermoelectric material with enhanced ZT by maximizing the barrier height through optimization of the composition of the barrier.

  18. Square-loop cobalt/gold multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambino, R. J.; Ruf, R. R.

    1990-05-01

    Multilayers of Co and Au with perpendicular hysteresis loop squareness ratios of ˜1 have been prepared by e-beam evaporation. These films have perpendicular anisotropy in the as-deposited condition in contrast to other work in which Co/Au multilayers, prepared by ion beam sputtering, showed perpendicular anisotropy only after annealing at 300 °C. The Faraday rotation of these square-loop multilayers is about 9×105 deg/cm of Co or 1×105 deg/cm of total thickness at a wavelength of 633 nm. These values indicate an enhancement of the Faraday rotation of Co at this wavelength by about a factor of 2. This may be a plasma-edge enhancement effect similar to that reported by Katayama et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 60, 1426 (1988)] in the Kerr effect of Fe/Au multilayers.

  19. Superconducting six-axis accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, H. J.

    1990-01-01

    A new superconducting accelerometer, capable of measuring both linear and angular accelerations, is under development at the University of Maryland. A single superconducting proof mass is magnetically levitated against gravity or any other proof force. Its relative positions and orientations with respect to the platform are monitored by six superconducting inductance bridges sharing a single amplifier, called the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). The six degrees of freedom, the three linear acceleration components and the three angular acceleration components, of the platform are measured simultaneously. In order to improve the linearity and the dynamic range of the instrument, the demodulated outputs of the SQUID are fed back to appropriate levitation coils so that the proof mass remains at the null position for all six inductance bridges. The expected intrinsic noise of the instrument is 4 x 10(exp -12)m s(exp -2) Hz(exp -1/2) for linear acceleration and 3 x 10(exp -11) rad s(exp -2) Hz(exp -1/2) for angular acceleration in 1-g environment. In 0-g, the linear acceleration sensitivity of the superconducting accelerometer could be improved by two orders of magnitude. The design and the operating principle of a laboratory prototype of the new instrument is discussed.

  20. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Yehuda; Mahale, Narayan K.

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  1. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    SciTech Connect

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1995-12-31

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with an electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater than the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. Magnetic switches and particularly fast kicker magnets are used in the accelerator industry to quickly deflect particle beams into and out of various transport lines, storage rings, dumps, and specifically to differentially route individual bunches of particles from a train of bunches which are injected or ejected from a given ring.

  2. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1996-08-06

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. 6 figs.

  3. The Superconducting Bird: A Didactical Toy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarner, E.; Sanchez, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    Describes the design of the superconducting bird, a device to demonstrate the phenomenon of superconductivity. Discusses the utilization of the device as an example of a motor and compares it to the toy called the drinking bird. (MDH)

  4. Spin/orbital and magnetic quantum number selective magnetization measurements for CoFeB/MgO multilayer films.

    PubMed

    Yamazoe, M; Kato, T; Suzuki, K; Adachi, M; Shibayama, A; Hoshi, K; Itou, M; Tsuji, N; Sakurai, Y; Sakurai, H

    2016-11-01

    Spin selective magnetic hysteresis (SSMH) curves, orbital selective magnetic hysteresis (OSMH) curves and magnetic quantum number selective SSMH curves are obtained for CoFeB/MgO multilayer films by combining magnetic Compton profile measurements and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer measurements. Although the SQUID magnetometer measurements do not show perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in the CoFeB/MgO multilayer film, PMA behavior is observed in the OSMH and SSMH curves for the |m|  =  2 magnetic quantum number states. These facts indicate that magnetization switching behavior is dominated by the orbital magnetization of the |m|  =  2 magnetic quantum number states. PMID:27602698

  5. Spin/orbital and magnetic quantum number selective magnetization measurements for CoFeB/MgO multilayer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazoe, M.; Kato, T.; Suzuki, K.; Adachi, M.; Shibayama, A.; Hoshi, K.; Itou, M.; Tsuji, N.; Sakurai, Y.; Sakurai, H.

    2016-11-01

    Spin selective magnetic hysteresis (SSMH) curves, orbital selective magnetic hysteresis (OSMH) curves and magnetic quantum number selective SSMH curves are obtained for CoFeB/MgO multilayer films by combining magnetic Compton profile measurements and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer measurements. Although the SQUID magnetometer measurements do not show perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in the CoFeB/MgO multilayer film, PMA behavior is observed in the OSMH and SSMH curves for the |m|  =  2 magnetic quantum number states. These facts indicate that magnetization switching behavior is dominated by the orbital magnetization of the |m|  =  2 magnetic quantum number states.

  6. Fitting X-ray multilayer reflectivities by means of the PPM code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, Daniele; Mirone, Alessandro; Ferrero, Claudio; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Pareschi, Giovanni; Sanchez del Rio, Manuel; Vernani, Dervis

    2004-10-01

    A number of future hard X-ray (10-100 keV) telescopes will implement focusing optics with multilayer coatings. In this framework, we are developing (at INAF/Brera-Merate Astronomical Observatory) multilayer optics based on the e-beam deposition technique: this approach is suitable to coat very large surfaces at an high deposition rate; in order to test the performances of the deposited samples, X-ray reflectivity scans at the two "standard" photon energies of 8.05 and 17.4 keV are taken, returning very positive results with high peak reflectivities. However, the exact interpretation of the reflectivity curves is a complex task since it depends on a large number of parameters: the software PPM (Pythonic Program for Multilayers) has been recently developed by A. Mirone (ESRF) specifically to the aim of a friendly and fast determination of the parameters of multilayer structures. In particular, for this paper we present the layer-by-layer modelization of the characteristics (roughness, density, thickness) of multilayer stacks (Ni/C, Pt/C) by a multi-parametric "global" automatic optimization to reach the best fitting performances. In order to physically constrain the parameters, the data will be compared with the results of TEM measurements performed on the same samples, when available.

  7. Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy of Tb/Fe and Gd/Fe Multilayers Studied with Torque Magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Ataur

    Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) of multilayers critically depend on the magnetic and structural ordering of the interface. To study the effect of interface on PMA, Tb/Fe and Gd/Fe multilayers with varying Fe (0.8-9.0 nm) and Gd (0.5-2.8 nm) or Tb (0.3-6.3 nm) layer thicknesses were fabricated by planar magnetron sputtering. The magnetometer results of spin orientation clearly reveals that samples with Gd or Tb layer thickness of more than 1.2 nm display no PMA, regardless of the Fe layer thickness. Tb/Fe and Gd/Fe multilayers with thin (<1.2 nm) Tb or Gd layers display large PMA, but no PMA is observed when the Fe layer thickness is increased to 4.0 nm and higher. The bulk magnetization and anisotropy energy constant of the samples are found to increase with increasing Fe layer thickness. Torque measurement also reveals that there are two distinctly different axes of spin alignment at different energy. Tb/Fe and Gd/Fe multilayers with similar composition reveal similar magnetic and structural characteristics, and it may imply that single-ion-anisotropy of rare-earth element, which is quite large for Tb ions and very small for Gd ions, may not be the dominating cause of PMA in Td/Fe and Gd/Fe multilayers. A detailed explanation of the results will be provided based on exchange interaction at the interface.

  8. Pulsed laser irradiation of metal multilayers.

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, David Price; McDonald, Joel Patrick

    2010-11-01

    Vapor-deposited, exothermic metal-metal multilayer foils are an ideal class of materials for detailed investigations of pulsed laser-ignited chemical reactions. Created in a pristine vacuum environment by sputter deposition, these high purity materials have well-defined reactant layer thicknesses between 1 and 1000 nm, minimal void density and intimate contact between layers. Provided that layer thicknesses are made small, some reactive metal-metal multilayer foils can be ignited at a point by laser irradiation and exhibit subsequent high-temperature, self-propagating synthesis. With this presentation, we describe the pulsed laser-induced ignition characteristics of a single multilayer system (equiatomic Al/Pt) that exhibits self-propagating synthesis. We show that the thresholds for ignition are dependent on (i) multilayer design and (ii) laser pulse duration. With regard to multilayer design effects on ignition, there is a large range of multilayer periodicity over which ignition threshold decreases as layer thicknesses are made small. We attribute this trend of decreased ignition threshold to reduced mass transport diffusion lengths required for rapid exothermic mixing. With regard to pulse duration effects, we have determined how ignition threshold of a single Al/Pt multilayer varies with pulse duration from 10{sup -2} to {approx} 10{sup -13} sec (wavelength and spot size are held constant). A higher laser fluence is required for ignition when using a single laser pulse {approx} 100 fs or 1 ps compared with nanosecond or microsecond exposure, and we attribute this, in part, to the effects of reactive material being ablated when using the shorter pulse durations. To further understand these trends and other pulsed laser-based processes, our discussion concludes with an analysis of the heat-affected depths in multilayers as a function of pulse duration.

  9. [Hygienic evaluation of multilayer carbon nanotubes].

    PubMed

    Haliullin, T O; Zalyalov, R R; Shvedova, A A; Tkachov, A G

    2015-01-01

    The authors demonstrate that traditional methods evaluating work conditions on contemporary innovative enterprises producing nanomaterials assess these conditions as harmless and safe. At the same time, special investigation methods enable to reveal new hazards for workers' health: the study results prove that workers engaged into multilayer carbon nanotubes production are exposed to multilayer carbon nanotubes aerosols in concentrations exceeding internationally acceptable levels of 1 μg/ml (NIOSH)--that can harm the workers' health.

  10. Ordered organic-organic multilayer growth

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Lunt, Richard R.

    2016-04-05

    An ordered multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure is formed by depositing at least two layers of thin film crystalline organic materials successively wherein the at least two thin film layers are selected to have their surface energies within .+-.50% of each other, and preferably within .+-.15% of each other, whereby every thin film layer within the multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure exhibit a quasi-epitaxial relationship with the adjacent crystalline organic thin film.

  11. Ordered organic-organic multilayer growth

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R; Lunt, Richard R

    2015-01-13

    An ordered multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure is formed by depositing at least two layers of thin film crystalline organic materials successively wherein the at least two thin film layers are selected to have their surface energies within .+-.50% of each other, and preferably within .+-.15% of each other, whereby every thin film layer within the multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure exhibit a quasi-epitaxial relationship with the adjacent crystalline organic thin film.

  12. Spherical cloaking with homogeneous isotropic multilayered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Hu, Li; Xu, Xiaofei; Feng, Yijun

    2009-04-01

    We propose a practical realization of electromagnetic spherical cloaking by layered structure of homogeneous isotropic materials. By mimicking the classic anisotropic cloak by many alternating thin layers of isotropic dielectrics, the permittivity and permeability in each isotropic layer can be properly determined by effective medium theory in order to achieve invisibility. The model greatly facilitates modeling by Mie theory and realization by multilayer coating of dielectrics. Eigenmode analysis is also presented to provide insights of the discretization in multilayers.

  13. Spherical cloaking with homogeneous isotropic multilayered structures.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Hu, Li; Xu, Xiaofei; Feng, Yijun

    2009-04-01

    We propose a practical realization of electromagnetic spherical cloaking by layered structure of homogeneous isotropic materials. By mimicking the classic anisotropic cloak by many alternating thin layers of isotropic dielectrics, the permittivity and permeability in each isotropic layer can be properly determined by effective medium theory in order to achieve invisibility. The model greatly facilitates modeling by Mie theory and realization by multilayer coating of dielectrics. Eigenmode analysis is also presented to provide insights of the discretization in multilayers. PMID:19518392

  14. Superconducting PM undiffused machines with stationary superconducting coils

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.; Schwenterly, S. William

    2004-03-02

    A superconducting PM machine has a stator, a rotor and a stationary excitation source without the need of a ferromagnetic frame which is cryogenically cooled for operation in the superconducting state. PM material is placed between poles on the rotor to prevent leakage or diffusion of secondary flux before reaching the main air gap, or to divert PM flux where it is desired to weaken flux in the main air gap. The PM material provides hop-along capability for the machine in the event of a fault condition.

  15. Magnetism and Superconductivity in Iron Pnictides

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, David J

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of high temperature superconductivity in iron pnictides and chalcogenides has resulted in surprising new insights into high temperature superconductivity and its relationship with magnetism. Here we provide an overview of some of what is known about these materials and in particular about the interplay of magnetism and superconductivity in them. Similarities and contrasts with cuprate superconductors are emphasized and the superconducting pairing is discussed within the framework of spin fluctuation induced pairing.

  16. Space applications of superconductivity - Digital electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    Superconducting electronics offers a variety of remarkable properties including high speed and low dissipation. The paper discusses fundamental considerations which appear to suggest that superconducting (cryogenic) technology will offer significant advantages for future digital devices. It shows how the active element in superconducting electronics, the Josephson junction, works and discusses the technology for fabricating the devices. The characteristics of published circuits are briefly reviewed, and the capabilities of future superconducting computers and instruments are projected.

  17. Superconductive articles including cerium oxide layer

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Xin D.; Muenchausen, Ross E.

    1993-01-01

    A ceramic superconductor comprising a metal oxide substrate, a ceramic high temperature superconductive material, and a intermediate layer of a material having a cubic crystal structure, said layer situated between the substrate and the superconductive material is provided, and a structure for supporting a ceramic superconducting material is provided, said structure comprising a metal oxide substrate, and a layer situated over the surface of the substrate to substantially inhibit interdiffusion between the substrate and a ceramic superconducting material deposited upon said structure.

  18. Laterally graded multilayer double-monochromator.

    SciTech Connect

    Als-Nielsen, J.; Erdmann, J.; Gaarde, P.; Krasnicki, S.; Liu, C.; Macrander, A. T.; Maj, J.; Mancini, D.

    1999-09-01

    The authors describe a tunable multilayer monochromator with an adjustable bandpass to be used for reflectivity and grazing incidence diffraction studies on surfaces at energies near 10 keV. Multilayers have a bandpass typically 100 times larger than the Si(111) reflection, and by using multilayers an experimenter can significantly increase data collection rates over those available with a Si monochromator. The transmission through 1 and 2 laterally graded multilayer (LGML) reflections was recorded versus photon energy. The identical LGMLs were comprised of 60 bilayers of W and C on 100 x 25 x 3 mm float glass with a bilayer spacing varying from 35 to 60 {angstrom}. The average gradient was 0.27 {angstrom}/mm along the long dimension. The rms deviation of the data for the bilayer spacing from a linear fit was 0.36 {angstrom}. Data were obtained for a nondispersive ({+-}) double-multilayer arrangement. The relative bandpass width (FWHM) when the two multilayers exposed the same bilayer spacing was measured to be 2.2% with a transmission of 78.7 {+-} 1.6%. This value is consistent with the transmission of 88.9% that they also measured for a single LGML at HASYLAB beamline D4. The bandpass was tunable in the range 1.1% to 2.2%.

  19. Strain tolerant microfilamentary superconducting wire

    DOEpatents

    Finnemore, Douglas K.; Miller, Theodore A.; Ostenson, Jerome E.; Schwartzkopf, Louis A.; Sanders, Steven C.

    1993-02-23

    A strain tolerant microfilamentary wire capable of carrying superconducting currents is provided comprising a plurality of discontinuous filaments formed from a high temperature superconducting material. The discontinuous filaments have a length at least several orders of magnitude greater than the filament diameter and are sufficiently strong while in an amorphous state to withstand compaction. A normal metal is interposed between and binds the discontinuous filaments to form a normal metal matrix capable of withstanding heat treatment for converting the filaments to a superconducting state. The geometry of the filaments within the normal metal matrix provides substantial filament-to-filament overlap, and the normal metal is sufficiently thin to allow supercurrent transfer between the overlapped discontinuous filaments but is also sufficiently thick to provide strain relief to the filaments.

  20. Sensing with Superconducting Point Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Nurbawono, Argo; Zhang, Chun

    2012-01-01

    Superconducting point contacts have been used for measuring magnetic polarizations, identifying magnetic impurities, electronic structures, and even the vibrational modes of small molecules. Due to intrinsically small energy scale in the subgap structures of the supercurrent determined by the size of the superconducting energy gap, superconductors provide ultrahigh sensitivities for high resolution spectroscopies. The so-called Andreev reflection process between normal metal and superconductor carries complex and rich information which can be utilized as powerful sensor when fully exploited. In this review, we would discuss recent experimental and theoretical developments in the supercurrent transport through superconducting point contacts and their relevance to sensing applications, and we would highlight their current issues and potentials. A true utilization of the method based on Andreev reflection analysis opens up possibilities for a new class of ultrasensitive sensors. PMID:22778630

  1. Superconductivity in magnetic multipole states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumita, Shuntaro; Yanase, Youichi

    2016-06-01

    Stimulated by recent studies of superconductivity and magnetism with local and global broken inversion symmetry, we investigate the superconductivity in magnetic multipole states in locally noncentrosymmetric metals. We consider a one-dimensional zigzag chain with sublattice-dependent antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling and suppose three magnetic multipole orders: monopole order, dipole order, and quadrupole order. It is demonstrated that the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer state, the pair-density wave (PDW) state, and the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) state are stabilized by these multipole orders, respectively. We show that the PDW state is a topological superconducting state specified by the nontrivial Z2 number and winding number. The origin of the FFLO state without macroscopic magnetic moment is attributed to the asymmetric band structure induced by the magnetic quadrupole order and spin-orbit coupling.

  2. Superconducting Metallic Glass Transition-Edge-Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Charles C. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A superconducting metallic glass transition-edge sensor (MGTES) and a method for fabricating the MGTES are provided. A single-layer superconducting amorphous metal alloy is deposited on a substrate. The single-layer superconducting amorphous metal alloy is an absorber for the MGTES and is electrically connected to a circuit configured for readout and biasing to sense electromagnetic radiation.

  3. Superconducting wire with improved strain characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Luhman, Thomas; Klamut, Carl J.; Suenaga, Masaki; Welch, David

    1982-01-01

    A superconducting wire comprising a superconducting filament and a beryllium strengthened bronze matrix in which the addition of beryllium to the matrix permits a low volume matrix to exhibit reduced elastic deformation after heat treating which increases the compression of the superconducting filament on cooling and thereby improves the strain characteristics of the wire.

  4. Superconducting wire with improved strain characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Luhman, Thomas; Klamut, Carl J.; Suenaga, Masaki; Welch, David

    1982-01-01

    A superconducting wire comprising a superconducting filament and a beryllium strengthened bronze matrix in which the addition of beryllium to the matrix permits a low volume matrix to exhibit reduced elastic deformation after heat treating which increases the compression of the superconducting filament on cooling and thereby improve the strain characteristics of the wire.

  5. Superconducting wire with improved strain characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Luhman, T.; Klamut, C.J.; Suenaga, M.; Welch, D.

    1979-12-19

    A superconducting wire comprising a superconducting filament and a beryllium strengthened bronze matrix in which the addition of beryllium to the matrix permits a low volume matrix to exhibit reduced elastic deformation after heat treating which increases the compression of the superconducting filament on cooling and thereby improve the strain characteristics of the wire.

  6. Crystal growth and annealing study of fragile, non-bulk superconductivity in YFe2Ge 2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, H.; Ran, S.; Mun, E. D.; Hodovanets, H.; Tanatar, M. A.; Prozorov, R.; Bud’ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2015-02-05

    In this study, we investigated the occurrence and nature of superconductivity in single crystals of YFe2Ge2 grown out of Sn flux by employing X-ray diffraction, electrical resistivity and specific heat measurements. We found that the residual resistivity ratio (RRR) of single crystals can be greatly improved, reaching as high as ~60, by decanting the crystals from the molten Sn at ~350°C and/or by annealing at temperatures between 550°C and 600°C. We found that the samples with RRR ≳ 34 showed resistive signatures of superconductivity with the onset of the superconducting transition Tc ≈ 1.4K. RRR values vary between 35 andmore » 65 with, on average, no systematic change in value Tc, indicating that the systematic changes in RRR do not lead to comparable changes in Tc. Specific heat measurements on samples that showed the clear resistive signatures of a superconducting transition did not show any signature of a superconducting phase transition, which suggests that the superconductivity observed in this compound is either some sort of filamentary, strain-stabilized superconductivity associated with small amounts of stressed YFe2Ge2 (perhaps at twin boundaries or dislocations) or is a second crystallographic phase that is present at level below detection capability of conventional powder X-ray techniques.« less

  7. Layer-Resolved Magnetic Moments in Ni/Pt Multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, F.; Poulopoulos, P.; Ceballos, G.; Wende, H.; Baberschke, K.; Srivastava, P.; Benea, D.; Ebert, H.; Angelakeris, M.; Flevaris, N. K.; Niarchos, D.; Rogalev, A.; Brookes, N. B.

    2000-07-01

    The magnetic moments in Ni/Pt multilayers are thoroughly studied by combining experimental and ab initio theoretical techniques. SQUID magnetometry probes the samples' magnetizations. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism separates the contribution of Ni and Pt and provides a layer-resolved magnetic moment profile for the whole system. The results are compared to band-structure calculations. Induced Pt magnetic moments localized mostly at the interface are revealed. No magnetically ``dead'' Ni layers are found. The magnetization per Ni volume is slightly enhanced compared to bulk NiPt alloys.

  8. (In,Mn)As multilayer quantum dot structures

    SciTech Connect

    Bouravleuv, Alexei; Sapega, Victor; Nevedomskii, Vladimir; Khrebtov, Artem; Samsonenko, Yuriy; Cirlin, George

    2014-12-08

    (In,Mn)As multilayer quantum dots structures were grown by molecular beam epitaxy using a Mn selective doping of the central parts of quantum dots. The study of the structural and magneto-optical properties of the samples with three and five layers of (In,Mn)As quantum dots has shown that during the quantum dots assembly, the out-diffusion of Mn from the layers with (In,Mn)As quantum dots can occur resulting in the formation of the extended defects. To produce a high quality structures using the elaborated technique of selective doping, the number of (In,Mn)As quantum dot layers should not exceed three.

  9. Massless Fermions in multilayer graphitic systems with misoriented layers.

    SciTech Connect

    Latil, Sylvain; Meunier, Vincent; Henrard, Luc

    2007-01-01

    We examine how the misorientation of a few stacked graphene layers affects the electronic structure of carbon nanosystems. We present ab initio calculations on bilayer and trilayer systems to demonstrate that the massless fermion behavior typical of single-layered graphene is also found in incommensurate multilayered graphitic systems. We also investigate the consequences of this property on experimental fingerprints, such as Raman spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Our simulations reveal that STM images of turbostratic few-layer graphite are sensitive to the layer arrangement. We also predict that the resonant Raman signals of graphitic samples are more sensitive to the orientation of the layers than to their number.

  10. Superconductivity in CVD Diamond Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Yoshihiko

    2005-03-01

    The recent news of superconductivity 2.3K in heavily boron-doped diamond synthesized by high pressure sintering was received with considerable surprise (1). Opening up new possibilities for diamond-based electrical devices, a systematic investigation of these phenomena clearly needs to be achieved. Application of diamond to actual devices requires it to be made into the form of wafers or thin films. We show unambiguous evidence for superconductivity in a heavily boron-doped diamond thin film deposited by the microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) method (2). An advantage of the MPCVD deposited diamond is that it can control boron concentration in its wider range, particularly in (111) oriented films. The temperature dependence of resistivity for (111) and (100) homoepitaxial thin films were measured under several magnetic fields. Superconducting transition temperatures of (111) homoepitaxial film are determined to be 11.4K for Tc onset and 7.2K for zero resistivity. And the upper critical field is estimated to be about 8T. These values are 2-3 times higher than these ever reported (1,3). On other hand, for (100) homoepitaxial film, Tc onset and Tc zero resistivity were estimated to be 6.3 and 3.2K respectively. The superconductivity in (100) film was strongly suppressed even at the same boron concentration. These differences of superconductivity in film orientation will be discussed. These findings established the superconductivity as a universal property of boron-doped diamond, demonstrating that device application is indeed a feasible challenge. 1. E. A. Ekimov et al. Nature, 428, 542 (2004). 2. Y. Takano et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 85, 2851 (2004). 3. E. Bustarret et al., ond-mat 0408517.

  11. Superconductivity devices: Commercial use of space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haertling, Gene; Furman, Eugene; Hsi, Chi-Shiung; Li, Guang

    1993-01-01

    A YBCO thick film containing 20 percent Ag2O with a T(sub c) of 86.8 K and J(sub c) of 108 A/sq cm was obtained. The film was fabricated by a two-step firing process, i.e., firing the film at 1000 C for 10 minutes and annealing at 970 C for 30 minutes. The two-step firing process, however, was not suitable for the multiple-lead YBCO sample due to the formation of the 211 green phase at 1000 C in the multiple-lead YBCO sample. A BSCCO thick film printed on a MgO coated MSZ substrate and fired at 845 C for 2 hours exhibited a superconducting behavior at 89 K. Because of its porous microstructure, the critical current density of the BSCCO thick film was limited. This report also includes the results of the YBCO and BSCCO materials used as oxide electrodes for ferroelectric materials. The YBCO electroded PLZT showed higher remanent polarization and coercive field than the sample electroded with silver paste. A higher Curie temperature for the PLZT was obtained from the YBCO electroded sample. The BSCCO electroded sample, however, exhibited the same Curie temperature as that of a silver electroded sample. Dissipation factors of the ferroelectric samples increased when the oxide electrode was applied.

  12. Microwave study of superconducting Sn films above and below percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutel, Manfred H.; Ebensperger, Nikolaj G.; Thiemann, Markus; Untereiner, Gabriele; Fritz, Vincent; Javaheri, Mojtaba; Nägele, Jonathan; Rösslhuber, Roland; Dressel, Martin; Scheffler, Marc

    2016-08-01

    The electronic properties of superconducting Sn films ({T}{{c}}≈ 3.8 {{K}}) change significantly when reducing the film thickness down to a few {nm}, in particular close to the percolation threshold. The low-energy electrodynamics of such Sn samples can be probed via microwave spectroscopy, e.g. with superconducting stripline resonators. Here we study Sn thin films, deposited via thermal evaporation—ranging in thickness between 38 and 842 {nm}—which encompasses the percolation transition. We use superconducting Pb stripline resonators to probe the microwave response of these Sn films in a frequency range between 4 and 20 {GHz} at temperatures from 7.2 down to 1.5 {{K}}. The measured quality factor of the resonators decreases with rising temperature due to enhanced losses. As a function of the sample thickness we observe three regimes with significantly different properties: samples below percolation, i.e. ensembles of disconnected superconducting islands, exhibit dielectric properties with negligible losses, demonstrating that macroscopic current paths are required for appreciable dynamical conductivity of Sn at GHz frequencies. Thick Sn films, as the other limit, lead to low-loss resonances both above and below T c of Sn, as expected for bulk conductors. But in an intermediate thickness regime, just above percolation and with labyrinth-like morphology of the Sn, we observe a quite different behavior: the superconducting state has a microwave response similar to the thicker, completely covering films with low microwave losses; but the metallic state of these Sn films is so lossy that resonator operation is suppressed completely.

  13. Thermal depinning of a single superconducting vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Sok, J.

    1995-10-01

    Thermal depinning has been studied for a single vortex trapped in a superconducting thin film in order to determine the value of the superconducting order parameter and the superfluid density when the vortex depins and starts to move around the film. For the Pb film in Pb/Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/PbBi junction having a gold line, the vortex depins from the artificial pinning site (Au line) and reproducibly moves through the same sequence of other pinning sites before it leaves the junction area of the Pb film. Values of the normalized order parameter {triangle}/{triangle}{sub o} vary from {triangle}/{triangle}{sub o}=0.20 at the first motion of the vortex to {triangle}/{triangle}{sub o}=0.16 where the vortex finally leaves the junction. Equivalently, the value of the normalized superfluid density changes from 4% to 2.5% for this sample in this same temperature interval. For the Nb film in Nb/Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Nb junction, thermal depinning occurs when the value of {triangle}/{triangle}{sub o} is approximately 0.22 and the value of {rho}{sub s}/{rho}{sub so} is approximately 5%. These values are about 20% larger than those of a Pb sample having a gold line, but the values are really very close. For the Nb sample, grain boundaries are important pinning sites whereas, for the Pb sample with a gold line, pinning may have been dominated by an array Pb{sub 3}AU precipitates. Because roughly the same answer was obtained for these rather different kinds of pinning site, there is a reasonable chance that this is a general value within factors of 2 for a wide range of materials.

  14. Freely oriented portable superconducting magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Schmierer, Eric N.; Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D.

    2010-01-12

    A freely oriented portable superconducting magnet is disclosed. Coolant is supplied to the superconducting magnet from a repository separate from the magnet, enabling portability of the magnet. A plurality of support assemblies structurally anchor and thermally isolate the magnet within a thermal shield. A plurality of support assemblies structurally anchor and thermally isolate the thermal shield within a vacuum vessel. The support assemblies restrain movement of the magnet resulting from energizing and cooldown, as well as from changes in orientation, enabling the magnet to be freely orientable.

  15. Four-junction superconducting circuit

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J. Q.

    2016-01-01

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit. PMID:27356619

  16. Four-junction superconducting circuit.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J Q

    2016-01-01

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit. PMID:27356619

  17. Four-junction superconducting circuit.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J Q

    2016-06-30

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit.

  18. Superconducting Resonators: Protecting Schrodinger's Cat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, Jose; Mauskopf, Philip

    2015-03-01

    Over the past decade, superconducting resonators have played a fundamental role in various novel astronomical detectors and quantum information processors. One example is the microwave kinetic inductance detector that is able to resolve photon energies by measuring shifts in its resonant frequency. Similar resonators have been integrated with superconducting qubits, specifically the transmon, to substantially improve quantum coherence times. The purpose of this investigation is to survey various resonant structures within the requirements of circuit quantum electrodynamics giving special attention to quality factors, TLS noise, and quasi-particle generation. Specifically, planar and three dimensional cavities with varying geometries and materials are characterized - primarily focusing on NbTiN and Nb.

  19. Superconducting augmented rail gun (SARG)

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, C.G.; Cummings, C.E.; Fowler, C.M.

    1986-11-01

    Superconducting augmentation consists of a superconducting coil operating in the persistent mode closely coupled magnetically with a normally conducting rail gun. A theoretical investigation of the effect of this system on a rail gun has shown that two benefits occur. Projectile velocities and launch efficiencies increase significantly depending on the magnetic coupling between the rail and augmentation circuits. Previous work evaluated an idealized system by neglecting energy dissipation effects. In this paper, the authors extend the analysis to include the neglected terms and show improved actual launch efficiencies for the SARG configuration. In this paper, the authors discuss details of projectile design in depth and present preliminary results of rail gun performance.

  20. A Planar Two-Dimensional Superconducting Bolometer Array for the Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Chervenak, James A.; Chen, Tina C.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Wollack, Edward J.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Supanich, Mark

    2004-01-01

    In order to provide high sensitivity rapid imaging at 3.3mm (90GHz) for the Green Bank Telescope - the world's largest steerable aperture - a camera is being built by the University of Pennsylvania, NASA/GSFC, and NRAO. The heart of this camera is an 8x8 close-packed, Nyquist-sampled detector array. We have designed and are fabricating a functional superconducting bolometer array system using a monolithic planar architecture. Read out by SQUID multiplexers, the superconducting transition edge sensors will provide fast, linear, sensitive response for high performance imaging. This will provide the first ever superconducting bolometer array on a facility instrument.

  1. Magnetic Ordering In Superconducting Nb-doped Bi2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbae, Paul; Lawson, Benjamin; Li, Gang; Yu, Fan; Asaba, Tomoya; Tinsman, Colin; Qui, Yusheng; Hor, Yew San; Li, Lu

    Coexistence of superconductivity and magnetic order has been suggested by early studies of topological superconductor candidate, niobium doped Bi2Se3. In order to elucidate the interesting physics of this coexistence, we performed highly sensitive torque magnetometry to study the material's magnetization. We observed a bump feature in the magnetization around 8 Tesla in both the superconducting and non-superconducting samples. This is distinct from the paramagnetic torque response of the parent compound, Bi2Se3, suggesting some interesting magnetic order in Nb-doped Bi2Se3.

  2. Moisture in multilayer ceramic capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahoe, Daniel Noel

    When both precious metal electrode and base metal electrode (BME) capacitors were subjected to autoclave (120°C/100% RH) testing, it was found that the precious metal capacitors aged according to a well known aging mechanism (less than 3% from their starting values), but the BME capacitors degraded to below the -30% criterion at 500 hours of exposure. The reasons for this new failure mechanism are complex, and there were two theories that were hypothesized. The first was that there could be oxidation or corrosion of the nickel plates. The other hypothesis was that the loss of capacitance was due to molecular changes in the barium titanate. This thesis presents the evaluation of these hypotheses and the physics of the degradation mechanism. It is concluded by proof by elimination that there are molecular changes in the barium titanate. Furthermore, the continuous reduction in capacitor size makes the newer base metal electrode capacitors more vulnerable to moisture degradation than the older generation precious metal capacitors. In addition, standard humidity life testing, such as JESD-22 THB and HAST, will likely not uncover this problem. Therefore, poor reliability due to degradation of base metal electrode multilayer ceramic capacitors may catch manufacturers and consumers by surprise.

  3. Multilayer Piezoelectric Stack Actuator Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Jones, Christopher M.; Aldrich, Jack B.; Blodget, Chad; Bao, Xioaqi; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2008-01-01

    Future NASA missions are increasingly seeking to use actuators for precision positioning to accuracies of the order of fractions of a nanometer. For this purpose, multilayer piezoelectric stacks are being considered as actuators for driving these precision mechanisms. In this study, sets of commercial PZT stacks were tested in various AC and DC conditions at both nominal and extreme temperatures and voltages. AC signal testing included impedance, capacitance and dielectric loss factor of each actuator as a function of the small-signal driving sinusoidal frequency, and the ambient temperature. DC signal testing includes leakage current and displacement as a function of the applied DC voltage. The applied DC voltage was increased to over eight times the manufacturers' specifications to investigate the correlation between leakage current and breakdown voltage. Resonance characterization as a function of temperature was done over a temperature range of -180C to +200C which generally exceeded the manufacturers' specifications. In order to study the lifetime performance of these stacks, five actuators from one manufacturer were driven by a 60volt, 2 kHz sine-wave for ten billion cycles. The tests were performed using a Lab-View controlled automated data acquisition system that monitored the waveform of the stack electrical current and voltage. The measurements included the displacement, impedance, capacitance and leakage current and the analysis of the experimental results will be presented.

  4. Multilayer heterostructures and their manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Scott R; Reese, Matthew; Rupert, Benjamin; Miedaner, Alexander; Curtis, Clavin; Olson, Dana; Ginley, David S

    2015-11-04

    A method of synthesizing multilayer heterostructures including an inorganic oxide layer residing on a solid substrate is described. Exemplary embodiments include producing an inorganic oxide layer on a solid substrate by a liquid coating process under relatively mild conditions. The relatively mild conditions include temperatures below 225.degree. C. and pressures above 9.4 mb. In an exemplary embodiment, a solution of diethyl aluminum ethoxide in anhydrous diglyme is applied to a flexible solid substrate by slot-die coating at ambient atmospheric pressure, and the diglyme removed by evaporation. An AlO.sub.x layer is formed by subjecting material remaining on the solid substrate to a relatively mild oven temperature of approximately 150.degree. C. The resulting AlO.sub.x layer exhibits relatively high light transmittance and relatively low vapor transmission rates for water. An exemplary embodiment of a flexible solid substrate is polyethylene napthalate (PEN). The PEN is not substantially adversely affected by exposure to 150.degree. C

  5. Multilayer waveguide-grating filters.

    PubMed

    Wang, S S; Magnusson, R

    1995-05-10

    The properties of guided-mode resonance reflection filters constructed with multiple thin-film layers are addressed. Greatly improved filter characteristics are shown to follow by the incorporation of multiple homogeneous layers with the spatially modulated layer. Calculated results for single-layer, double-layer, and triple-layer filter structures are presented. Whereas good filter characteristics are obtainable with single layers that are half-resonance-wavelength thick, there remains a residual reflection in the sidebands unless the cover and the substrate permittivities are equal. With double-layer and triple-layer designs, extensive wavelength ranges with low sideband-reflectance values are shown to be possible without requiring equal cover and substrate permittivities. The antireflection properties of the layer stack can be understood if the modulated layer is modeled as a homogeneous layer characterized by its average relative permittivity. However, as the grating-modulation index increases, this approximation deteriorates. In particular it is found that, for a given high modulation index, the double-layer antireflection thin-film approximation fails, whereas for the same modulation in a triple-layer system it holds firmly. Multilayer designs can thus have significantly large filter passbands, as they may contain heavily modulated resonant gratings without corruption of the ideal filter characteristics.

  6. Dependence of superconductivity in CuxBi2Se3 on quenching conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schneeloch, J. A.; Zhong, R. D.; Xu, Z. J.; Gu, G. D.; Tranquada, J. M.

    2015-04-20

    Topological superconductivity, implying gapless protected surface states, has recently been proposed to exist in the compound CuxBi₂Se₃. Unfortunately, low diamagnetic shielding fractions and considerable inhomogeneity have been reported in this compound. In an attempt to understand and improve on the finite superconducting volume fractions, we have investigated the effects of various growth and post-annealing conditions. With a melt-growth (MG) method, diamagnetic shielding fractions of up to 56% in Cu₀̣₃Bi₂Se₃ have been obtained, the highest value reported for this method. We investigate the efficacy of various quenching and annealing conditions, finding that quenching from temperatures above 560°C is essential for superconductivity,more » whereas quenching from lower temperatures or not quenching at all is detrimental. A modified floating zone (FZ) method yielded large single crystals but little superconductivity. Even after annealing and quenching, FZ-grown samples had much less chance of being superconducting than MG-grown samples. Thus, from the low shielding fractions in FZ-grown samples and the quenching dependence, we suggest that a metastable secondary phase having a small volume fraction in most of the samples may be responsible for the superconductivity.« less

  7. Superconducting heterostructures: from antipinning to pinning potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreira, S. J.; Chiliotte, C.; Bekeris, V.; Rosen, Y. J.; Monton, C.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2014-08-01

    We study vortex lattice dynamics in a heterostructure that combines two type-II superconductors: a niobium film and a dense triangular array of submicrometric vanadium (V) pillars. Magnetic ac susceptibility measurements reveal a sudden increase in ac penetration, related to an increase in vortex mobility above a magnetic field, {{H}^{*}}\\left( T \\right), that decreases linearly with temperature. Additionally, temperature independent matching effects that occur when the number of vortices in the sample is an integer of the number of V pillars, strongly reduce vortex mobility, and were observed for the first and second matching fields, {{H}_{1}} and {{H}_{2}}. The angular dependence of {{H}_{1}}, {{H}_{2}} and {{H}^{*}}\\left( T \\right) shows that matching is determined by the normal applied field component, while {{H}^{*}}\\left( T \\right) is independent of the applied field orientation. This important result identifies {{H}^{*}}\\left( T \\right) with the critical field boundary for the normal to superconducting transition of V pillars. Below {{H}^{*}}\\left( T \\right), superconducting V pillars repel vortices, and the array becomes an ‘antipinning’ landscape that is more effective in reducing vortex mobility than the ‘pinning’ landscape of the normal V sites above {{H}^{*}}\\left( T \\right). Matching effects are observed both below and above {{H}^{*}}\\left( T \\right), implying the presence of ordered vortex configurations for ‘antipinning’ or ‘pinning’ arrays.

  8. Free-standing oxide superconducting articles

    DOEpatents

    Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.

    1993-12-14

    A substrate-free, free-standing epitaxially oriented superconductive film including a layer of a template material and a layer of a ceramic superconducting material is provided together with a method of making such a substrate-free ceramic superconductive film by coating an etchable material with a template layer, coating the template layer with a layer of a ceramic superconductive material, coating the layer of ceramic superconductive material with a protective material, removing the etchable material by an appropriate means so that the etchable material is separated from a composite structure including the template layer.

  9. Status of superconducting power transformer development

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.C.; McConnell, B.W.; Mehta, S.P.

    1996-03-01

    Development of the superconducting transformer is arguably the most difficult of the ac power applications of superconductivity - this is because of the need for very low ac losses, adequate fault and surge performance, and the rigors of the application environment. This paper briefly summarizes the history of superconducting transformer projects, reviews the key issues for superconducting transformers, and examines the status of HTS transformer development. Both 630-kVA, three-phase and 1-MVA single phase demonstration units are expected to operate in late 1996. Both efforts will further progress toward the development of economical and performance competitive superconducting transformers.

  10. Cosmic String Global Superconducting Dirac Born Infeld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikrima, Ika; Ramadhan, Handhika S.; Mart, Terry

    2016-08-01

    Superconducting cosmic string possibly plays an important role in the formation of the universe structure. The physics of this phenomenon has been explored by studying the field theory in the string interior. Numerical solutions of superconducting strings with all relevant fields are presented in this paper. The field is constructed from a generalization of the usual field theory of superconducting global string, but the kinetic term consists of the Dirac Born Infeld (DBI). Some changes in the characteristic of the superconducting string DBI from the usual superconducting string case have been observed. The observation includes physical mechanism of all related fields.

  11. MoRu/Be multilayers for extreme ultraviolet applications

    DOEpatents

    Bajt, Sasa C.; Wall, Mark A.

    2001-01-01

    High reflectance, low intrinsic roughness and low stress multilayer systems for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography comprise amorphous layers MoRu and crystalline Be layers. Reflectance greater than 70% has been demonstrated for MoRu/Be multilayers with 50 bilayer pairs. Optical throughput of MoRu/Be multilayers can be 30-40% higher than that of Mo/Be multilayer coatings. The throughput can be improved using a diffusion barrier to make sharper interfaces. A capping layer on the top surface of the multilayer improves the long-term reflectance and EUV radiation stability of the multilayer by forming a very thin native oxide that is water resistant.

  12. Superconductivity in highly disordered dense carbon disulfide.

    PubMed

    Dias, Ranga P; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Struzhkin, Viktor V; Kim, Minseob; Muramatsu, Takaki; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Ohishi, Yasuo; Sinogeikin, Stanislav

    2013-07-16

    High pressure plays an increasingly important role in both understanding superconductivity and the development of new superconducting materials. New superconductors were found in metallic and metal oxide systems at high pressure. However, because of the filled close-shell configuration, the superconductivity in molecular systems has been limited to charge-transferred salts and metal-doped carbon species with relatively low superconducting transition temperatures. Here, we report the low-temperature superconducting phase observed in diamagnetic carbon disulfide under high pressure. The superconductivity arises from a highly disordered extended state (CS4 phase or phase III[CS4]) at ~6.2 K over a broad pressure range from 50 to 172 GPa. Based on the X-ray scattering data, we suggest that the local structural change from a tetrahedral to an octahedral configuration is responsible for the observed superconductivity.

  13. Unconventional superconductivity in heavy-fermion compounds

    SciTech Connect

    White, B. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-02-27

    Over the past 35 years, research on unconventional superconductivity in heavy-fermion systems has evolved from the surprising observations of unprecedented superconducting properties in compounds that convention dictated should not superconduct at all to performing explorations of rich phase spaces in which the delicate interplay between competing ground states appears to support emergent superconducting states. In this article, we review the current understanding of superconductivity in heavy-fermion com- pounds and identify a set of characteristics that is common to their unconventional superconducting states. These core properties are compared with those of other classes of unconventional superconductors such as the cuprates and iron-based superconductors. Lastly, we conclude by speculating on the prospects for future research in this field and how new advances might contribute towards resolving the long-standing mystery of how unconventional superconductivity works.

  14. Unconventional superconductivity in heavy-fermion compounds

    DOE PAGESBeta

    White, B. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-02-27

    Over the past 35 years, research on unconventional superconductivity in heavy-fermion systems has evolved from the surprising observations of unprecedented superconducting properties in compounds that convention dictated should not superconduct at all to performing explorations of rich phase spaces in which the delicate interplay between competing ground states appears to support emergent superconducting states. In this article, we review the current understanding of superconductivity in heavy-fermion com- pounds and identify a set of characteristics that is common to their unconventional superconducting states. These core properties are compared with those of other classes of unconventional superconductors such as the cuprates andmore » iron-based superconductors. Lastly, we conclude by speculating on the prospects for future research in this field and how new advances might contribute towards resolving the long-standing mystery of how unconventional superconductivity works.« less

  15. Nonlinear diffusion and superconducting hysteresis

    SciTech Connect

    Mayergoyz, I.D.

    1996-12-31

    Nonlinear diffusion of electromagnetic fields in superconductors with ideal and gradual resistive transitions is studied. Analytical results obtained for linear and nonlinear polarizations of electromagnetic fields are reported. These results lead to various extensions of the critical state model for superconducting hysteresis.

  16. Superconducting flux flow digital circuits

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1995-02-14

    A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs) are disclosed. Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics. 8 figs.

  17. Superconducting flux flow digital circuits

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, Vincent M.; Martens, Jon S.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs). Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics.

  18. Hitachi develops ceramic superconducting device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1987-09-01

    A ceramic superconducting quantum interference device (squid) made into the form of a fine film by applying its semiconductor fine process technology was tested. The squid, which reached its superconducting temperature through cooling with a cheap liquid nitrogen at minus 196 C, can detect faint magnetic fields with a strength only a millionth that of the Earth's magnetic field. This means that the squid can be incorporated into medical diagnostic equipment intended for diagnosing brain and heart disorders by catching changes in the extremely weak magnetic fields these organs generate. Hitachi's squid is made using a high frequency sputtering process to form a thin film of yttrium-barium-copper oxide onto a substrate of magnesium oxide, which is then heat treated in an oxygen environment. The resulting superconducting film is one to two microns thick and superconducts at minus 187 C, at which temperature it has a maximum current density in excess of 6,000 amperes per square centimeter. Optical exposure and chemical etching process are then used to make a hole in the middle of the film, after which two Josephson junctions are connected to both of the holes to form a squid.

  19. Design, Fabrication and Characterization of Multilayered Chiral Metamaterials in Visible Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Jenny

    In this thesis I report the design and fabrication of well aligned repeatable multilayered gold and silver chiral metamaterials of high uniformity in the 100nm scale which show significant circular dichroism in the visible range. Two layered Dolmen structure, two layered 3-4-5 right-angled-triangle structure and three layered 'V' structure are successfully fabricated, allowing possible applications in wave-plates and circular polarizers. These samples are produced by an e-beam direct write technique with a precise multi-layer alignment control and a lift-off process. The experimental results are well matched with simulations using a finite-integration technique from CST microwave studio. None of the structures show circular dichroism upon first layer fabrication due to the achiral property of single layer, except for the single layer 3-4-5 right-angled-triangle structure which processes 2-D chirality. All the multilayered structures exhibit circular dichroism showing qualitatively the same shape upon opposite incident direction because of the handedness of structures; and with deviations due to the presence of the substrate and buffer layers. For the 'V' structure within the first three layers the CD increases with number of layers, unveiling the importance between 3-D chirality and optical activity. The mastering of alignment technique is important for successful fabrication of multilayered optical metamaterials. This project achieves precise multi-layer alignment control which is difficult and challenging.

  20. Enhanced ultrasonic attenuation of Tl-Ca-Ba-Cu-O at the superconducting transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, K. J.; Winfree, W. P.; Xu, M.-F.; Levy, M.; Sarma, Bimal K.

    1990-01-01

    Temperature-dependent ultrasonic attenuation measurements have been performed on polycrystalline samples of Tl-Ca-Ba-Cu-O at various frequencies. An attenuation anomaly was observed close to the superconducting transition temperature T(c) (103 K) whose temperature position was frequency-independent. The attenuation decreased exponentially with temperature in the superconducting state for both transverse and longitudinal waves. It was also found that the temperature-dependent sound velocity showed a slope change around T(c).