Science.gov

Sample records for superconducting radiofrequency separator

  1. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1998-05-19

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The SRF window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The SRF window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the SRF window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  2. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1997-03-11

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  3. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry Lawrence; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  4. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry L.; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  5. Engineering, design and prototype tests of a 3.9 GHz transverse-mode superconducting cavity for a radiofrequency-separated kaon beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mark S.Champion et al.

    2001-07-03

    A research and development program is underway to construct superconducting cavities to be used for radiofrequency separation of a Kaon beam at Fermilab. The design calls for installation of twelve 13-cell cavities operating in the 3.9 GHz transverse mode with a deflection gradient of 5 MV/m. They present the mechanical, cryogenic and vacuum design of the cavity, cryomodule, rf power coupler, cold tuner and supporting hardware. The electromagnetic design of the cavity is presented in a companion paper by Wanzenberg and McAshan. The warm tuning system (for field flatness) and the vertical test system is presented along with test results of bench measurements and cold tests on single-cell and five-cell prototypes.

  6. Characterization of superconducting radiofrequency breakdown by two-mode excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory V.; Palczewski, Ari D.

    2014-01-14

    We show that thermal and magnetic contributions to the breakdown of superconductivity in radiofrequency (RF) fields can be separated by applying two RF modes simultaneously to a superconducting surface. We develop a simple model that illustrates how mode-mixing RF data can be related to properties of the superconductor. Within our model the data can be described by a single parameter, which can be derived either from RF or thermometry data. Our RF and thermometry data are in good agreement with the model. We propose to use mode-mixing technique to decouple thermal and magnetic effects on RF breakdown of superconductors.

  7. Radiofrequency amplifier based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device

    DOEpatents

    Hilbert, Claude; Martinis, John M.; Clarke, John

    1986-01-01

    A low noise radiofrequency amplifier (10), using a dc SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) as the input amplifying element. The dc SQUID (11) and an input coil (12) are maintained at superconductivity temperatures in a superconducting shield (13), with the input coil (12) inductively coupled to the superconducting ring (17) of the dc SQUID (11). A radiofrequency signal from outside the shield (13) is applied to the input coil (12), and an amplified radiofrequency signal is developed across the dc SQUID ring (17) and transmitted to exteriorly of the shield (13). A power gain of 19.5.+-.0.5 dB has been achieved with a noise temperature of 1.0.+-.0.4 K. at a frequency of 100 MHz.

  8. Radiofrequency amplifier based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device

    DOEpatents

    Hilbert, C.; Martinis, J.M.; Clarke, J.

    1984-04-27

    A low noise radiofrequency amplifer, using a dc SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) as the input amplifying element. The dc SQUID and an input coil are maintained at superconductivity temperatures in a superconducting shield, with the input coil inductively coupled to the superconducting ring of the dc SQUID. A radiofrequency signal from outside the shield is applied to the input coil, and an amplified radiofrequency signal is developed across the dc SQUID ring and transmitted to exteriorly of the shield. A power gain of 19.5 +- 0.5 dB has been achieved with a noise temperature of 1.0 +- 0.4 K at a frequency of 100 MHz.

  9. Superconducting surface impedance under radiofrequency field

    DOE PAGES

    Xiao, Binping P.; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2013-04-26

    Based on BCS theory with moving Cooper pairs, the electron states distribution at 0K and the probability of electron occupation with finite temperature have been derived and applied to anomalous skin effect theory to obtain the surface impedance of a superconductor under radiofrequency (RF) field. We present the numerical results for Nb and compare these with representative RF field-dependent effective surface resistance measurements from a 1.5 GHz resonant structure.

  10. Superconducting radiofrequency linac development at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Stephen D.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    As the Fermilab Tevatron Collider program draws to a close, a strategy has emerged of an experimental program built around the high intensity frontier. The centerpiece of this program is a superconducting H- linac that will support world leading programs in long baseline neutrino experimentation and the study of rare processes. Based on technology shared with the International Linear Collider, Project X will provide multi-MW beams at 60-120 GeV from the Main Injector, simultaneous with very high intensity beams at lower energies. Project X also supports development of a Muon Collider as a future facility at the energy frontier.

  11. Superconducting radio-frequency modules test faciilty operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Soyars, W.; Bossert, R.; Darve, C.; Degraff, B.; Klebaner, A.; Martinez, A.; Pei, L.; Theilacker, J.; /Fermilab

    2007-07-01

    Fermilab is heavily engaged and making strong technical contributions to the superconducting radio-frequency research and development program (SRF R&D). Four major SRF test areas are being constructed to enable vertical and horizontal cavity testing, as well as cryomodule testing. The existing Fermilab cryogenic infrastructure has been modified to service Fermilab SRF R&D needs. The first stage of the project has been successfully completed, which allows for distribution of cryogens for a single cavity cryomodule using the existing Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) that houses three Tevatron satellite refrigerators. The cooling capacity available for cryomodule testing at MDB results from the liquefaction capacity of the CTF cryogenic system. The cryogenic system for a single 9-cell cryomodule is currently operational. The paper describes the status, challenges and operational experience of the initial phase of the project.

  12. Temperature Mapping of Nitrogen-doped Niobium Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Makita, Junki; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati

    2015-09-01

    It was recently shown that diffusing nitrogen on the inner surface of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities at high temperature can improve the quality factor of the niobium cavity. However, a reduction of the quench field is also typically found. To better understand the location of rf losses and quench, we used a thermometry system to map the temperature of the outer surface of ingot Nb cavities after nitrogen doping and electropolishing. Surface temperature of the cavities was recorded while increasing the rf power and also during the quenching. The results of thermal mapping showed no precursor heating on the cavities and quenching to be ignited near the equator where the surface magnetic field is maximum. Hot-spots at the equator area during multipacting were also detected by thermal mapping.

  13. Compact Superconducting Radio-frequency Accelerators and Innovative RF Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kephart, Robert; Chattopadhyay, Swaapan; Milton, Stephen

    2015-04-10

    We will present several new technical and design breakthroughs that enable the creation of a new class of compact linear electron accelerators for industrial purposes. Use of Superconducting Radio-Frequency (SRF) cavities allow accelerators less than 1.5 M in length to create electron beams beyond 10 MeV and with average beam powers measured in 10’s of KW. These machines can have the capability to vary the output energy dynamically to produce brehmstrahlung x-rays of varying spectral coverage for applications such as rapid scanning of moving cargo for security purposes. Such compact accelerators will also be cost effective for many existing and new industrial applications. Examples include radiation crosslinking of plastics and rubbers, creation of pure materials with surface properties radically altered from the bulk, modification of bulk or surface optical properties of materials, sterilization of medical instruments animal solid or liquid waste, and destruction of organic compounds in industrial waste water effluents. Small enough to be located on a mobile platform, such accelerators will enable new remediation methods for chemical and biological spills and/or in-situ crosslinking of materials. We will describe one current design under development at Fermilab including plans for prototype and value-engineering to reduce costs. We will also describe development of new nano-structured field-emitter arrays as sources of electrons, new methods for fabricating and cooling superconducting RF cavities, and a new novel RF power source based on magnetrons with full phase and amplitude control.

  14. Method and means for separating and classifying superconductive particles

    DOEpatents

    Park, Jin Y.; Kearney, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    The specification and drawings describe a series of devices and methods for classifying and separating superconductive particles. The superconductive particles may be separated from non-superconductive particles, and the superconductive particles may be separated by degrees of susceptibility to the Meissner effect force. The particles may also be simultaneously separated by size or volume and mass to obtain substantially homogeneous groups of particles. The separation techniques include levitation, preferential sedimentation and preferential concentration. Multiple separation vector forces are disclosed.

  15. Laser nitriding for niobium superconducting radio-frequency accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Senthilraja Singaravelu, John Klopf, Gwyn Williams, Michael Kelley

    2010-10-01

    Particle accelerators are a key tool for scientific research ranging from fundamental studies of matter to analytical studies at light sources. Cost-forperformance is critical, both in terms of initial capital outlay and ongoing operating expense, especially for electricity. It depends on the niobium superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator cavities at the heart of most of these machines. Presently Nb SRF cavities operate near 1.9 K, well (and expensively) below the 4.2 K atmospheric boiling point of liquid He. Transforming the 40 nm thick active interior surface layer from Nb to delta NbN (Tc = 17 K instead of 9.2 K) appears to be a promising approach. Traditional furnace nitriding appears to have not been successful for this. Further, exposing a complete SRF cavity to the time-temperature history required for nitriding risks mechanical distortion. Gas laser nitriding instead has been applied successfully to other metals [P.Schaaf, Prog. Mat. Sci. 47 (2002) 1]. The beam dimensions and thermal diffusion length permit modeling in one dimension to predict the time course of the surface temperature for a range of per-pulse energy densities. As with the earlier work, we chose conditions just sufficient for boiling as a reference point. We used a Spectra Physics HIPPO nanosecond laser (l = 1064 nm, Emax= 0.392 mJ, beam spot@ 34 microns, PRF =15 – 30 kHz) to obtain an incident fluence of 1.73 - 2.15 J/cm2 for each laser pulse at the target. The target was a 50 mm diameter SRF-grade Nb disk maintained in a nitrogen atmosphere at a pressure of 550 – 625 torr and rotated at a constant speed of 9 rpm. The materials were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The SEM images show a sharp transition with fluence from a smooth, undulating topography to significant roughening, interpreted here as the onset of ablation. EPMA measurements of N/Nb atom ratio as a function of depth found a constant

  16. Eccentric superconducting RF cavity separator structure

    DOEpatents

    Aggus, John R.; Giordano, Salvatore T.; Halama, Henry J.

    1976-01-01

    Accelerator apparatus having an eccentric-shaped, iris-loaded deflecting cavity for an rf separator for a high energy high momentum, charged particle accelerator beam. In one embodiment, the deflector is superconducting, and the apparatus of this invention provides simplified machining and electron beam welding techniques. Model tests have shown that the electrical characteristics provide the desired mode splitting without adverse effects.

  17. Probing the fundamental limit of niobium in high radiofrequency fields by dual mode excitation in superconducting radiofrequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory; Geng, Rongli; Palczewski, Ari

    2011-07-01

    We have studied thermal breakdown in several multicell superconducting radiofrequency cavity by simultaneous excitation of two TM{sub 010} passband modes. Unlike measurements done in the past, which indicated a clear thermal nature of the breakdown, our measurements present a more complex picture with interplay of both thermal and magnetic effects. JLab LG-1 that we studied was limited at 40.5 MV/m, corresponding to B{sub peak} = 173 mT, in 8{pi}/9 mode. Dual mode measurements on this quench indicate that this quench is not purely magnetic, and so we conclude that this field is not the fundamental limit in SRF cavities.

  18. Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    DOE PAGES

    Ciovati, G.; Anlage, Steven M.; Baldwin, C.; ...

    2012-03-16

    An apparatus was created to obtain, for the first time, 2D maps of the surface resistance of the inner surface of an operating superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity by a low-temperature laser scanning microscopy technique. This allows identifying non-uniformities of the surface resistance with a spatial resolution of about one order of magnitude better than with earlier methods. A signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 dB was obtained with 240 mW laser power and 1 Hz modulation frequency. The various components of the apparatus, the experimental procedure and results are discussed in details in this contribution.

  19. Niobium Thin Film Characterization for Thin Film Technology Used in Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yishu; Valente-Feliciano, Anne-Marie

    2015-10-01

    Superconducting RadioFrequency (SRF) penetrates about 40-100 nm of the top surface, making thin film technology possible in producing superconducting cavities. Thin film is based on the deposition of a thin Nb layer on top of a good thermal conducting material such as Al or Cu. Thin film allows for better control of the surface and has negligible response to the Earth's magnetic field, eliminating the need for magnetic shielding of the cavities. Thin film superconductivity depends heavily on coating process conditions, involving controllable parameters such as crystal plane orientation, coating temperature, and ion energy. MgO and Al2O3 substrates are used because they offer very smooth surfaces, ideal for studying film growth. Atomic Force Microscopy is used to characterize surface's morphology. It is evident that a lower nucleation energy and a long coating time increases the film quality in the r-plane sapphire crystal orientation. The quality of the film increases with thickness. Nb films coated on r-plane, grow along the (001) plane and yield a much higher RRR compared to the films grown on a- and c-planes. This information allows for further improvement on the research process for thin film technology used in superconducting cavities for the particle accelerators. National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, Jefferson Lab, Old Dominion University.

  20. Calorimeters for precision power dissipation measurements on controlled-temperature superconducting radiofrequency samples.

    PubMed

    Xiao, B P; Reece, C E; Phillips, H L; Kelley, M J

    2012-12-01

    Two calorimeters, with stainless steel and Cu as the thermal path material for high precision and high power versions, respectively, have been designed and commissioned for the 7.5 GHz surface impedance characterization system at Jefferson Lab to provide low temperature control and measurement for CW power up to 22 W on a 5 cm diameter disk sample which is thermally isolated from the radiofrequency (RF) portion of the system. A power compensation method has been developed to measure the RF induced power on the sample. Simulation and experimental results show that with these two calorimeters, the whole thermal range of interest for superconducting radiofrequency materials has been covered. The power measurement error in the interested power range is within 1.2% and 2.7% for the high precision and high power versions, respectively. Temperature distributions on the sample surface for both versions have been simulated and the accuracy of sample temperature measurements have been analyzed. Both versions have the ability to accept bulk superconductors and thin film superconducting samples with a variety of substrate materials such as Al, Al(2)O(3), Cu, MgO, Nb, and Si.

  1. Defect Detection in Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavity Surface Using C + + and OpenCV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, Samantha; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) uses superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities to accelerate an electron beam. If theses cavities have a small particle or defect, it can degrade the performance of the cavity. The problem at hand is inspecting the cavity for defects, little bubbles of niobium on the surface of the cavity. Thousands of pictures have to be taken of a single cavity and then looked through to see how many defects were found. A C + + program with Open Source Computer Vision (OpenCV) was constructed to reduce the number of hours searching through the images and finds all the defects. Using this code, the SRF group is now able to use the code to identify defects in on-going tests of SRF cavities. Real time detection is the next step so that instead of taking pictures when looking at the cavity, the camera will detect all the defects.

  2. Summary of performance of superconducting radio-frequency cavities built from CBMM niobium ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Kneisel, Peter; Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2015-12-01

    Several Nb ingots have been provided by CBMM to Jefferson Lab since 2004 as part of an R&D collaboration aimed at evaluating the performance of superconducting radio-frequency cavities built from ingots with different purity, as a results of different ingot production processes. Approximately 32 multi- and single-cell cavities with resonant frequency between ˜1.3-2.3 GHz were built, treated and tested at 2 K at Jefferson Lab between 2004 and 2014. The average peak surface field achieved in cavities made of RRR˜260 and RRR˜100-150 ingots was (119 ± 4) mT and (100 ± 8) mT, respectively. Higher quality factor values at 2.0 K have been measured in medium-purity, compared to higher purity material.

  3. Summary of performance of superconducting radio-frequency cavities built from CBMM niobium ingots

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi Dhakal, Pashupati Kneisel, Peter Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2015-12-04

    Several Nb ingots have been provided by CBMM to Jefferson Lab since 2004 as part of an R&D collaboration aimed at evaluating the performance of superconducting radio-frequency cavities built from ingots with different purity, as a results of different ingot production processes. Approximately 32 multi- and single-cell cavities with resonant frequency between ∼1.3-2.3 GHz were built, treated and tested at 2 K at Jefferson Lab between 2004 and 2014. The average peak surface field achieved in cavities made of RRR∼260 and RRR∼100-150 ingots was (119 ± 4) mT and (100 ± 8) mT, respectively. Higher quality factor values at 2.0 K have been measured in medium-purity, compared to higher purity material.

  4. Ignition and monitoring technique for plasma processing of multicell superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Doleans, Marc

    2016-12-27

    In this study, an in-situ plasma processing technique has been developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to improve the performance of the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities in operation. The technique uses a low-density reactive neon-oxygen plasma at room-temperature to improve the surface work function, to help remove adsorbed gases on the RF surface and to reduce its secondary emission yield. SNS SRF cavities are six-cell elliptical cavities and the plasma typically ignites in the cell where the electric field is the highest. This article will detail a technique that was developed to ignite and monitor the plasma in each cell of the SNS cavities.

  5. GPS time server development for the RAON superconducting radio-frequency test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyojae; Son, Changwook; Son, Hyungjoo; Lee, Sangil; Park, Mijeong; Nam, Seung Hee; Hyun, Myung Ook

    2016-09-01

    An ion accelerator, RAON, is going to be built in Daejeon, Korea, by the Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) team in the Institute of Basic Science (IBS). In this accelerator, various ions, such as uranium, proton, carbon and calcium, will be accelerated and fed to researchers for experiments. To produce the ion beams and to satisfy the requirements, many devices such as accelerating structures, RF power supplies and ion sources will be installed and controlled according to the predefined control logic. For correct control of such devices, time and clock synchronization is essential. A time synchronization test bed is planned for the RAON superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) test facility, and a flexible, low-cost gps-based time server was developed for that purpose. In this paper, detailed information on the developed GPS server and the test results will be described.

  6. Nb3Sn superconducting radiofrequency cavities: fabrication, results, properties, and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posen, S.; Hall, D. L.

    2017-03-01

    A microns-thick film of Nb3Sn on the inner surface of a superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity has been demonstrated to substantially improve cryogenic efficiency compared to the standard niobium material, and its predicted superheating field is approximately twice as high. We review in detail the advantages of Nb3Sn coatings for SRF cavities. We describe the vapor diffusion process used to fabricate this material in the most successful experiments, and we compare the differences in the process used at different labs. We overview results of Nb3Sn SRF coatings, including CW and pulsed measurements of cavities as well as microscopic measurements. We discuss special considerations that must be practised when using Nb3Sn cavities in applications. Finally, we conclude by summarizing the state-of-the-art and describing the outlook for this alternative SRF material.

  7. Ignition and monitoring technique for plasma processing of multicell superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    DOE PAGES

    Doleans, Marc

    2016-12-27

    In this study, an in-situ plasma processing technique has been developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to improve the performance of the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities in operation. The technique uses a low-density reactive neon-oxygen plasma at room-temperature to improve the surface work function, to help remove adsorbed gases on the RF surface and to reduce its secondary emission yield. SNS SRF cavities are six-cell elliptical cavities and the plasma typically ignites in the cell where the electric field is the highest. This article will detail a technique that was developed to ignite and monitor the plasma in eachmore » cell of the SNS cavities.« less

  8. Surface Impedance Measurements of Single Crystal MgB2 Films for Radiofrequency Superconductivity Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Binping Xiao, Xin Zhao, Joshua Spradlin, Charles Reece, Michael Kelley, Teng Tan, Xi Xiaoxing

    2012-07-01

    We report microstructure analyses and superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) measurements of large scale epitaxial MgB{sub 2} films. MgB{sub 2} films on 5 cm dia. sapphire disks were fabricated by a Hybrid Physical Chemical Vapor Deposition (HPCVD) technique. The electron-beam backscattering diffraction (EBSD) results suggest that the film is a single crystal complying with a MgB{sub 2}(0001) {parallel} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) epitaxial relationship. The SRF properties of different film thicknesses (200 nm and 350 nm) were evaluated under different temperatures and applied fields at 7.4 GHz. A surface resistance of 9 {+-} 2 {mu}{Omega} has been observed at 2.2 K.

  9. The importance of the electron mean free path for superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniscalco, J. T.; Gonnella, D.; Liepe, M.

    2017-01-01

    Impurity-doping of niobium is an exciting new technology in the field of superconducting radio-frequency accelerators, producing cavities with record-high quality factor Q0 and Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer surface resistance that decreases with increasing radio-frequency field. Recent theoretical work has offered a promising explanation for this so-called "anti-Q-slope," but the link between the decreasing surface resistance and the shortened electron mean free path of doped cavities has remained elusive. In this work, we investigate this link, finding that the magnitude of this decrease varies directly with the mean free path: shorter mean free paths correspond to stronger anti-Q-slopes. We draw a theoretical connection between the mean free path and the overheating of the quasiparticles, which leads to the reduction of the anti-Q-slope towards the normal Q-slope of long-mean-free-path cavities. We also investigate the sensitivity of the residual resistance to trapped magnetic flux, a property that is greatly enhanced for doped cavities, and calculate an optimal doping regime for a given amount of trapped flux.

  10. Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made from medium and low-purity niobium ingots

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2016-04-07

    Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made of ingot niobium with residual resistivity ratio (RRR) greater than 250 have proven to have similar or better performance than fine-grain Nb cavities of the same purity, after standard processing. The high purity requirement contributes to the high cost of the material. As superconducting accelerators operating in continuous-wave typically require cavities to operate at moderate accelerating gradients, using lower purity material could be advantageous not only to reduce cost but also to achieve higher Q0-values. In this contribution we present the results from cryogenic RF tests of 1.3–1.5 GHz single-cell cavities made of ingot Nb of medium (RRR = 100–150) and low (RRR = 60) purity from different suppliers. Cavities made of medium-purity ingots routinely achieved peak surface magnetic field values greater than 70 mT with an average Q0-value of 2 × 1010 at 2 K after standard processing treatments. As a result, the performances of cavities made of low-purity ingots were affected by significant pitting of the surface after chemical etching.

  11. Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made from medium and low-purity niobium ingots

    DOE PAGES

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2016-04-07

    Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made of ingot niobium with residual resistivity ratio (RRR) greater than 250 have proven to have similar or better performance than fine-grain Nb cavities of the same purity, after standard processing. The high purity requirement contributes to the high cost of the material. As superconducting accelerators operating in continuous-wave typically require cavities to operate at moderate accelerating gradients, using lower purity material could be advantageous not only to reduce cost but also to achieve higher Q0-values. In this contribution we present the results from cryogenic RF tests of 1.3–1.5 GHz single-cell cavities made of ingot Nb ofmore » medium (RRR = 100–150) and low (RRR = 60) purity from different suppliers. Cavities made of medium-purity ingots routinely achieved peak surface magnetic field values greater than 70 mT with an average Q0-value of 2 × 1010 at 2 K after standard processing treatments. As a result, the performances of cavities made of low-purity ingots were affected by significant pitting of the surface after chemical etching.« less

  12. Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made from medium and low-purity niobium ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made of ingot niobium with residual resistivity ratio (RRR) greater than 250 have proven to have similar or better performance than fine-grain Nb cavities of the same purity, after standard processing. The high purity requirement contributes to the high cost of the material. As superconducting accelerators operating in continuous-wave typically require cavities to operate at moderate accelerating gradients, using lower purity material could be advantageous not only to reduce cost but also to achieve higher Q 0-values. In this contribution we present the results from cryogenic RF tests of 1.3-1.5 GHz single-cell cavities made of ingot Nb of medium (RRR = 100-150) and low (RRR = 60) purity from different suppliers. Cavities made of medium-purity ingots routinely achieved peak surface magnetic field values greater than 70 mT with an average Q 0-value of 2 × 1010 at 2 K after standard processing treatments. The performances of cavities made of low-purity ingots were affected by significant pitting of the surface after chemical etching.

  13. Calorimeters for Precision Power Dissipation Measurements on Controlled-Temperature Superconducting Radiofrequency Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Binping P.; Kelley, Michael J.; Reece, Charles E.; Phillips, H. L.

    2012-12-01

    Two calorimeters, with stainless steel and Cu as the thermal path material for high precision and high power versions, respectively, have been designed and commissioned for the surface impedance characterization (SIC) system at Jefferson Lab to provide low temperature control and measurement for CW power up to 22 W on a 5 cm dia. disk sample which is thermally isolated from the RF portion of the system. A power compensation method has been developed to measure the RF induced power on the sample. Simulation and experimental results show that with these two calorimeters, the whole thermal range of interest for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) materials has been covered. The power measurement error in the interested power range is within 1.2% and 2.7% for the high precision and high power versions, respectively. Temperature distributions on the sample surface for both versions have been simulated and the accuracy of sample temperature measurements have been analysed. Both versions have the ability to accept bulk superconductors and thin film superconducting samples with a variety of substrate materials such as Al, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Cu, MgO, Nb and Si.

  14. First Demonstration of Electron Beam Generation and Characterization with an All Superconducting Radio-frequency (SRF) Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Kamps, T; Barday, R; Jankowiak, A; Knobloch, J; Kugeler, O; Matveenko, A N; Neumann, A; Quast, T; Rudolph, J; Schubert, S G; Volker, J; Kneisel, P; Nietubyc, R; Sekutowicz, J K; Smedley, J; Volkov, V; Weinberg, G; Will, I

    2011-09-01

    In preparation for a high brightness, high average current electron source for the energy-recovery linac BERLinPro an all superconducting radio-frequency photoinjector is now in operation at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin. The aim of this experiment is beam demonstration with a high brightness electron source able to generate sub-ps pulse length electron bunches from a superconducting (SC) cathode film made of Pb coated on the backwall of a Nb SRF cavity. This paper describes the setup of the experiment and first results from beam measurements.

  15. Ultrafast electron diffraction with megahertz MeV electron pulses from a superconducting radio-frequency photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, L. W.; Lin, L.; Huang, S. L.; Quan, S. W.; Hao, J. K.; Zhu, F.; Wang, F.; Liu, K. X.; Jiang, T.; Zhu, P. F.; Fu, F.; Wang, R.; Zhao, L.; Xiang, D.

    2015-11-30

    We report ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction operating at the megahertz repetition rate where the electron beam is produced in a superconducting radio-frequency (rf) photoinjector. We show that the beam quality is sufficiently high to provide clear diffraction patterns from gold and aluminium samples. With the number of electrons, several orders of magnitude higher than that from a normal conducting photocathode rf gun, such high repetition rate ultrafast MeV electron diffraction may open up many new opportunities in ultrafast science.

  16. Insights to Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavity Processing from First Principles Calculations and Spectroscopic Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Denise Christine

    2013-03-01

    Insights to the fundamental processes that occur during the manufacturing of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are provided via analyses of density functional theory calculations and Raman, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. I show that during electropolishing fluorine is bound and released by the reaction of the acid components in the solution: HF + H2SO4 <-> HFSO3 + H2O. This result implies that new recipes can possibly be developed on the principle of controlled release of fluorine by a chemical reaction. I also show that NMR or Raman spectroscopy can be used to monitor the free fluorine when polishing with the standard electropolishing recipe. Density functional theory was applied to calculate the properties of common processing impurities – hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon – in the niobium. These impurities lower the superconducting transition temperature of niobium, and hydride precipitates are at best weakly superconducting. I modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities, and explain the phase changes in the niobium hydrogen system based on the charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen and the strain field inside of the niobium. I also present evidence for a niobium lattice vacancy serving as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. In considering the other chemical impurities in niobium, I show that the absorption of oxygen into a niobium lattice vacancy is preferred over the absorption of hydrogen, which indicates that oxygen can block these phase nucleation centers. I also show that dissolved oxygen atoms can trap dissolved hydrogen atoms to prevent niobium hydride phase formation. Nitrogen and carbon were studied in less depth, but behaved similarly to oxygen. Based on these results and a literature survey, I propose a mechanism for the success of the low-temperature anneal applied to niobium SRF cavities. Finally, I

  17. Insights to Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavity Processing from First Principles Calculations and Spectroscopic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Denise Christine

    Insights to the fundamental processes that occur during the manufacturing of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are provided via analyses of density functional theory calculations and Raman, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. I show that during electropolishing fluorine is bound and released by the reaction of the acid components in the solution: HF + H2SO4 <-> HFSO3 + H2O. This result implies that new recipes can possibly be developed on the principle of controlled release of fluorine by a chemical reaction. I also show that NMR or Raman spectroscopy can be used to monitor the free fluorine when polishing with the standard electropolishing recipe. Density functional theory was applied to calculate the properties of common processing impurities---hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon---in the niobium. These impurities lower the superconducting transition temperature of niobium, and hydride precipitates are at best weakly superconducting. I modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities, and explain the phase changes in the niobium hydrogen system based on the charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen and the strain field inside of the niobium. I also present evidence for a niobium lattice vacancy serving as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. In considering the other chemical impurities in niobium, I show that the absorption of oxygen into a niobium lattice vacancy is preferred over the absorption of hydrogen, which indicates that oxygen can block these phase nucleation centers. I also show that dissolved oxygen atoms can trap dissolved hydrogen atoms to prevent niobium hydride phase formation. Nitrogen and carbon were studied in less depth, but behaved similarly to oxygen. Based on these results and a literature survey, I propose a mechanism for the success of the low-temperature anneal applied to niobium SRF cavities. Finally, I present the beginning of a model to describe magnetic

  18. Review of ingot niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneisel, P.; Ciovati, G.; Dhakal, P.; Saito, K.; Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Myneni, G. R.

    2015-02-01

    As a result of collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração (CBMM), ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large-grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. Large-grain (LG) niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this technology. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown performances comparable to the best cavities made from standard fine-grain niobium. Several 9-cell cavities fabricated by Research Instruments and tested at DESY exceeded the best performing fine grain cavities with a record accelerating gradient of Eacc=45.6 MV/m. The quality factor of those cavities was also higher than that of fine-grain (FG) cavities processed with the same methods. Such performance levels push the state-of-the art of SRF technology and are of great interest for future accelerators. This contribution reviews the development of ingot niobium technology and highlights some of the differences compared to standard FG material and opportunities for further developments.

  19. Advances in development of Nb3Sn superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posen, Sam; Liepe, Matthias

    2014-11-01

    A 1.3 GHz Nb3Sn superconducting radio-frequency cavity prepared with a modified annealing step reached Bp k>50 mT , well above Bc 1=25 ±7 mT , without the strong Q -slope observed in previous Nb3Sn cavities. At 4.2 K, it has a Q0 of approximately 1 ×1 010 at >10 MV /m , far outperforming Nb at useable gradients. At 2 K, quench occurred at ˜55 mT , apparently due to a defect, so additional treatment may increase the maximum gradient. Material parameters of the coating were extracted from Q vs T data, including a Tc of 18.0 ±0.1 K , close to the maximum literature value. High power pulses were used to reach fields far higher than in CW measurements, and near Tc, quench fields close to the superheating field were observed. Based on a review of previous experience with Nb3Sn cavities, a speculative mechanism involving weak link grain boundaries is presented to explain how the modified annealing step could be the cause of the absence of strong Q -slope. Finally, an analysis of the progress to date provides hints that the path forward for Nb3Sn cavities should focus on minimizing defects.

  20. Review of ingot niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities

    DOE PAGES

    Kneisel, P.; Ciovati, G.; Dhakal, P.; ...

    2014-12-01

    As a result of collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração (CBMM), ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large-grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. The large-grain (LG) niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this technology. Many single cell cavities mademore » from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown performances comparable to the best cavities made from standard fine-grain niobium. Several 9-cell cavities fabricated by Research Instruments and tested at DESY exceeded the best performing fine grain cavities with a record accelerating gradient of Eacc=45.6 MV/m. The quality factor of those cavities was also higher than that of fine-grain (FG) cavities processed with the same methods. Such performance levels push the state-of-the art of SRF technology and are of great interest for future accelerators. This contribution reviews the development of ingot niobium technology and highlights some of the differences compared to standard FG material and opportunities for further developments.« less

  1. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-09-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density-functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest-energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium-hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities.

  2. Review of ingot niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kneisel, P.; Ciovati, G.; Dhakal, P.; Saito, K.; Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Myneni, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    As a result of collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração (CBMM), ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large-grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. The large-grain (LG) niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this technology. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown performances comparable to the best cavities made from standard fine-grain niobium. Several 9-cell cavities fabricated by Research Instruments and tested at DESY exceeded the best performing fine grain cavities with a record accelerating gradient of Eacc=45.6 MV/m. The quality factor of those cavities was also higher than that of fine-grain (FG) cavities processed with the same methods. Such performance levels push the state-of-the art of SRF technology and are of great interest for future accelerators. This contribution reviews the development of ingot niobium technology and highlights some of the differences compared to standard FG material and opportunities for further developments.

  3. Enhanced Field Emission Studies on Niobium Surfaces Relevant to High Field Superconducting Radio-Frequency Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tong

    2002-09-18

    Enhanced field emission (EFE) presents the main impediment to higher acceleration gradients in superconducting niobium (Nb) radiofrequency cavities for particle accelerators. The strength, number and sources of EFE sites strongly depend on surface preparation and handling. The main objective of this thesis project is to systematically investigate the sources of EFE from Nb, to evaluate the best available surface preparation techniques with respect to resulting field emission, and to establish an optimized process to minimize or eliminate EFE. To achieve these goals, a scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) was designed and built as an extension to an existing commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the SFEM chamber of ultra high vacuum, a sample is moved laterally in a raster pattern under a high voltage anode tip for EFE detection and localization. The sample is then transferred under vacuum to the SEM chamber equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for individual emitting site characterization. Compared to other systems built for similar purposes, this apparatus has low cost and maintenance, high operational flexibility, considerably bigger scan area, as well as reliable performance. EFE sources from planar Nb have been studied after various surface preparation, including chemical etching and electropolishing, combined with ultrasonic or high-pressure water rinse. Emitters have been identified, analyzed and the preparation process has been examined and improved based on EFE results. As a result, field-emission-free or near field-emission-free surfaces at ~140 MV/m have been consistently achieved with the above techniques. Characterization on the remaining emitters leads to the conclusion that no evidence of intrinsic emitters, i.e., no fundamental electric field limit induced by EFE, has been observed up to ~140 MV/m. Chemically etched and electropolished Nb are compared and no significant difference is observed up to ~140 MV/m. To

  4. Investigation of the superconducting properties of niobium radio-frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    Radio-frequency (rf) superconducting cavities are widely used to increase the energy of a charged particle beam in particle accelerators. The maximum gradients of cavities made of bulk niobium have constantly improved over the last ten years and they are approaching the theoretical limit of the material. Nevertheless, rf tests of niobium cavities are still showing some "anomalous" losses (so-called "Q-drop"), characterized by a marked increase of the surface resistance at high rf fields, in absence of field emission. A low temperature "in-situ" baking under ultra-high vacuum has been successfully applied by several laboratories to reduce those losses and improve the cavity's quality factor. Several models have been proposed to explain the cause of the Q-drop and the baking effect. We investigated the effect of baking on niobium material parameters by measuring the temperature dependence of a cavity's surface impedance and comparing it with the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer's theory of superconductivity. It was found that baking allows interstitial oxygen to diffuse from the surface deeper into the bulk. This produces a significant reduction of the normal electrons' mean free path, which causes an increase of the quality factor. The optimum baking parameters are 120°C for 24-48 h. We were also able to identify the origin of the Q-drop as due to a high magnetic field, rather then electric field, by measuring the quality factor of a cavity as function of the rf field in a resonant mode with only magnetic field present on the surface. With the aid of a thermometry system, we were able to localize the losses in the high magnetic field region. We measured the Q-drop in cavities which had undergone different treatments, such as anodization, electropolishing and post-purification, and with different metallurgical properties and we study the effectiveness of baking in each case. As a result, none of the models proposed so far can explain all the experimental observations. We

  5. Investigation of niobium surface structure and composition for improvement of superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenikhina, Yulia

    Nano-scale investigation of intrinsic properties of niobium near-surface is a key to control performance of niobium superconducting radio-frequency cavities. Mechanisms responsible for the performance limitations and their empirical remedies needs to be justified in order to reproducibly control fabrication of SRF cavities with desired characteristics. The high field Q-slope and mechanism behind its cure (120°C mild bake) were investigated by comparison of the samples cut out of the cavities with high and low dissipation regions. Material evolution during mild field Q-slope nitrogen treatment was characterized using the coupon samples as well as samples cut out of nitrogen treated cavity. Evaluation of niobium near-surface state after some typical and novel cavity treatments was accomplished. Various TEM techniques, SEM, XPS, AES, XRD were used for the structural and chemical characterization of niobium near-surface. Combination of thermometry and structural temperature-dependent comparison of the cavity cutouts with different dissipation characteristics revealed precipitation of niobium hydrides to be the reason for medium and high field Q-slopes. Step-by-step effect of the nitrogen treatment processing on niobium surface was studied by analytical and structural characterization of the cavity cutout and niobium samples, which were subject to the treatment. Low concentration nitrogen doping is proposed to explain the benefit of nitrogen treatment. Chemical characterization of niobium samples before and after various surface processing (Electropolishing (EP), 800°C bake, hydrofluoric acid (HF) rinsing) showed the differences that can help to reveal the microscopic effects behind these treatments as well as possible sources of surface contamination.

  6. Nano-fabricated superconducting radio-frequency composites, method for producing nano-fabricated superconducting rf composites

    DOEpatents

    Norem, James H.; Pellin, Michael J.

    2013-06-11

    Superconducting rf is limited by a wide range of failure mechanisms inherent in the typical manufacture methods. This invention provides a method for fabricating superconducting rf structures comprising coating the structures with single atomic-layer thick films of alternating chemical composition. Also provided is a cavity defining the invented laminate structure.

  7. Evidence for thermal boundary resistance effects on superconducting radiofrequency cavity performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Vincenzo; Rossi, Antonio Alessandro; Stark, Sergey Yu; Vaglio, Ruggero

    2014-08-01

    The majority of the literature on superconducting cavities for particle accelerators concentrates on the interaction of a radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic field with a superconductor cooled in liquid helium, generally either at a fixed temperature of 4.2 K or 1.8 K, basing the analysis of experimental results on the assumption that the superconductor is at the same temperature as the infinite reservoir of liquid helium. Only a limited number of papers have extended their analysis to the more complex overall system composed of an RF field, a superconductor and liquid helium. Only a few papers have analyzed, for example, the problem of the Kapitza resistance, i.e. the thermal boundary resistance between the superconductor and the superfluid helium. Among them, the general conclusion is that the Kapitza resistance, one of the most controversial and less understood topics in physics, is generally negligible, or not relevant for the performance enhancement of cavities. In our work presented here, studying the performance of 6 GHz niobium (Nb) test cavities, we have discovered and studied a new effect consisting of an abrupt change in the surface resistance versus temperature at the superfluid helium lambda transition Tλ. This abrupt change (or ‘jump’) clearly appears when the RF measurement of a cavity is performed at constant power rather than at a constant field. We have correlated this jump to a change in the thermal exchange regime across the lambda transition, and, through a simple thermal model and further reasonable assumptions, we have calculated the thermal boundary resistance between niobium and liquid helium in the temperature range between 4.2 K and 1.8 K. We find that the absolute values of the thermal resistance both above and below the lambda point are fully compatible with the data reported in the literature for heat transfer to pool boiling helium I (HeI) above Tλ and for the Kapitza interface resistance (below Tλ) between a polished metal

  8. A study of dynamic Lorentz force detuning of 650 MHz βg=0.9 superconducting radiofrequency cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Abhay; Ratan Jana, Arup; Kumar, Vinit

    2014-06-01

    The small bandwidth of superconducting cavities makes the study of dynamic Lorentz force detuning and its compensation indispensable in case of pulsed mode operation of high gradient accelerators. In this paper, we present the study of this detuning and also propose an optimized design for five cell 650 MHz βg=0.9 elliptic superconducting cavities, which will be used in the high energy section of the 1 GeV H- linear accelerator for the proposed Indian spallation neutron source project, by suitably inserting the inter-cell stiffeners. The paper presents a sequential design methodology which starts with study of static Lorentz force detuning and tunability; and progresses to find out the structural modes and related dynamic detuning values by performing transient structural dynamics calculations. The developed methodology is general in nature and can be used for a three dimensional model of any geometry. The work will be useful for optimizing the design against dynamic Lorentz force detuning of superconducting radiofrequency cavities of any shape.

  9. Electrostatic separation of superconducting particles from non-superconducting particles and improvement in fuel atomization by electrorheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhabria, Deepika

    This thesis has two major topics: (1) Electrostatic Separation of Superconducting Particles from a Mixture of Non-Superconducting Particles. (2) Improvement in fuel atomization by Electrorheology. (1) Based on the basic science research, the interactions between electric field and superconductors, we have developed a new technology, which can separate superconducting granular particles from their mixture with non-superconducting particles. The electric-field induced formation of superconducting balls is important aspect of the interaction between superconducting particles and electric field. When the applied electric field exceeds a critical value, the induced positive surface energy on the superconducting particles forces them to aggregate into balls or cling to the electrodes. In fabrication of superconducting materials, especially HTSC materials, it is common to come across materials with multiple phases: some grains are in superconducting state while the others are not. Our technology is proven to be very useful in separating superconducting grains from the rest non-superconducting materials. To separate superconducting particles from normal conducting particles, we apply a suitable strong electric field. The superconducting particles cling to the electrodes, while normal conducting particles bounce between the electrodes. The superconducting particles could then be collected from the electrodes. To separate superconducting particles from insulating ones, we apply a moderate electric field to force insulating particles to the electrodes to form short chains while the superconducting particles are collected from the middle of capacitor. The importance of this technology is evidenced by the unsuccessful efforts to utilize the Meissner effect to separate superconducting particles from nonsuperconducting ones. Because the Meissner effect is proportional to the particle volume, it has been found that the Meissner effect is not useful when the superconducting

  10. Separation of sources in radiofrequency measurements of partial discharges using time-power ratio maps.

    PubMed

    Albarracin, R; Robles, G; Martinez-Tarifa, J M; Ardila-Rey, J

    2015-09-01

    Partial discharges measurement is one of the most useful tools for condition monitoring of high-voltage (HV) equipment. These phenomena can be measured on-line in radiofrequency (RF) with sensors such as the Vivaldi antenna, used in this paper, which improves the signal-to-noise ratio by rejecting FM and low-frequency TV bands. Additionally, the power ratios (PR), a signal-processing technique based on the power distribution of the incoming signals in frequency bands, are used to characterize different sources of PD and electromagnetic noise (EMN). The calculation of the time length of the pulses is introduced to separate signals where the PR alone do not give a conclusive solution. Thus, if several EM sources could be previously calibrated, it is possible to detect pulses corresponding to PD activity.

  11. Microstrip superconducting quantum interference device radio-frequency amplifier: Scattering parameters and input coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Kinion, D; Clarke, J

    2008-01-24

    The scattering parameters of an amplifier based on a dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) are directly measured at 4.2 K. The results can be described using an equivalent circuit model of the fundamental resonance of the microstrip resonator which forms the input of the amplifier. The circuit model is used to determine the series capacitance required for critical coupling of the microstrip to the input circuit.

  12. Separation of Radio-Frequency Sources and Localization of Partial Discharges in Noisy Environments

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Guillermo; Fresno, José Manuel; Martínez-Tarifa, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The detection of partial discharges (PD) can help in early-warning detection systems to protect critical assets in power systems. The radio-frequency emission of these events can be measured with antennas even when the equipment is in service which reduces dramatically the maintenance costs and favours the implementation of condition-based monitoring systems. The drawback of these type of measurements is the difficulty of having a reference signal to study the events in a classical phase-resolved partial discharge pattern (PRPD). Therefore, in open-air substations and overhead lines where interferences from radio and TV broadcasting and mobile communications are important sources of noise and other pulsed interferences from rectifiers or inverters can be present, it is difficult to identify whether there is partial discharges activity or not. This paper proposes a robust method to separate the events captured with the antennas, identify which of them are partial discharges and localize the piece of equipment that is having problems. The separation is done with power ratio (PR) maps based on the spectral characteristics of the signal and the identification of the type of event is done localizing the source with an array of four antennas. Several classical methods to calculate the time differences of arrival (TDOA) of the emission to the antennas have been tested, and the localization is done using particle swarm optimization (PSO) to minimize a distance function. PMID:25923935

  13. Separation of radio-frequency sources and localization of partial discharges in noisy environments.

    PubMed

    Robles, Guillermo; Fresno, José Manuel; Martínez-Tarifa, Juan Manuel

    2015-04-27

    The detection of partial discharges (PD) can help in early-warning detection systems to protect critical assets in power systems. The radio-frequency emission of these events can be measured with antennas even when the equipment is in service which reduces dramatically the maintenance costs and favours the implementation of condition-based monitoring systems. The drawback of these type of measurements is the difficulty of having a reference signal to study the events in a classical phase-resolved partial discharge pattern (PRPD). Therefore, in open-air substations and overhead lines where interferences from radio and TV broadcasting and mobile communications are important sources of noise and other pulsed interferences from rectifiers or inverters can be present, it is difficult to identify whether there is partial discharges activity or not. This paper proposes a robust method to separate the events captured with the antennas, identify which of them are partial discharges and localize the piece of equipment that is having problems. The separation is done with power ratio (PR) maps based on the spectral characteristics of the signal and the identification of the type of event is done localizing the source with an array of four antennas. Several classical methods to calculate the time differences of arrival (TDOA) of the emission to the antennas have been tested, and the localization is done using particle swarm optimization (PSO) to minimize a distance function.

  14. Electronic phase separation transition as the origin of the superconductivity and pseudogap phase of cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mello, E. V. L.; Kasal, R. B.; Passos, C. A. C.

    2009-06-01

    To deal with the physics of cuprate superconductivity we propose an electronic phase separation transition that segregates the holes into high and low density domains. The calculated grain boundary potential favors the development of intragrain superconducting amplitudes. The zero resistivity transition arises only when the intergrain Josephson coupling EJ is of the order of the thermal energy and phase locking takes place among the superconducting grains. We show that this approach explains the pseudogap and superconducting phases and it also reproduces some recent scanning tunneling microscopy data.

  15. Electronic phase separation transition as the origin of the superconductivity and pseudogap phase of cuprates.

    PubMed

    de Mello, E V L; Kasal, R B; Passos, C A C

    2009-06-10

    To deal with the physics of cuprate superconductivity we propose an electronic phase separation transition that segregates the holes into high and low density domains. The calculated grain boundary potential favors the development of intragrain superconducting amplitudes. The zero resistivity transition arises only when the intergrain Josephson coupling E(J) is of the order of the thermal energy and phase locking takes place among the superconducting grains. We show that this approach explains the pseudogap and superconducting phases and it also reproduces some recent scanning tunneling microscopy data.

  16. Characterization of etch pits found on a large-grain bulk niobium superconducting radio-frequency resonant cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin; Ciovati, G.; Bieler, T. R.

    2010-12-15

    The performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) resonant cavities made of bulk niobium is limited by nonlinear localized effects. Surface analysis of regions of higher power dissipation is thus of intense interest. Such areas (referred to as “hotspots”) were identified in a large-grain single-cell cavity that had been buffered-chemical polished and dissected for examination by high resolution electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction microscopy (EBSD), and optical microscopy. Pits with clearly discernible crystal facets were observed in both “hotspot” and “coldspot” specimens. The pits were found in-grain, at bicrystal boundaries, and on tricrystal junctions. They are interpreted as etch pits induced by crystal defects (e.g. dislocations). All coldspots examined had a qualitatively lower density of etch pits or relatively smooth tricrystal boundary junctions. EBSD mapping revealed the crystal orientation surrounding the pits. Locations with high pit density are correlated with higher mean values of the local average misorientation angle distributions, indicating a higher geometrically necessary dislocation content. In addition, a survey of the samples by energy dispersive x-ray analysis did not show any significant contamination of the samples’ surface. In conclusion, the local magnetic field enhancement produced by the sharp-edge features observed on the samples is not sufficient to explain the observed degradation of the cavity quality factor, which starts at peak surface magnetic field as low as 20 mT.

  17. Characterization of etch pits found on a large-grain bulk niobium superconducting radio-frequency resonant cavity

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Xin; Ciovati, G.; Bieler, T. R.

    2010-12-15

    The performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) resonant cavities made of bulk niobium is limited by nonlinear localized effects. Surface analysis of regions of higher power dissipation is thus of intense interest. Such areas (referred to as “hotspots”) were identified in a large-grain single-cell cavity that had been buffered-chemical polished and dissected for examination by high resolution electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction microscopy (EBSD), and optical microscopy. Pits with clearly discernible crystal facets were observed in both “hotspot” and “coldspot” specimens. The pits were found in-grain, at bicrystal boundaries, and on tricrystal junctions. They are interpreted as etch pits induced bymore » crystal defects (e.g. dislocations). All coldspots examined had a qualitatively lower density of etch pits or relatively smooth tricrystal boundary junctions. EBSD mapping revealed the crystal orientation surrounding the pits. Locations with high pit density are correlated with higher mean values of the local average misorientation angle distributions, indicating a higher geometrically necessary dislocation content. In addition, a survey of the samples by energy dispersive x-ray analysis did not show any significant contamination of the samples’ surface. In conclusion, the local magnetic field enhancement produced by the sharp-edge features observed on the samples is not sufficient to explain the observed degradation of the cavity quality factor, which starts at peak surface magnetic field as low as 20 mT.« less

  18. Operation of a high-gradient superconducting radio-frequency cavity with a non-evaporable getter pump

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, G.; Geng, R.; Lushtak, Y.; Manini, P.; Maccallini, E.; Stutzman, M.

    2016-10-28

    The use of non-evaporable getter (NEG) pumps in particle accelerators has increased significantly over the past few years because of their large pumping speed, particularly for hydrogen, compared to the size of the pump. A concern about using such pumps in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) accelerators is the possibility of shedding particulates which could then migrate into the SRF cavities and produce field emission, therefore degrading the cavity performance. One option to mitigate such issue is to use sintered getter materials which intrinsically offer superior mechanical and particle retention properties. In this article we present the results from cryogenic RF tests of a high-gradient SRF cavity after being evacuated several times with an NEG pump equipped with sintered getter disks and placed in close proximity to the cavity. Here, the results showed that the cavity performance was not affected by the pump up to the quench gradient of 34 MV/m. As a result of this study, two such NEG pumps have been installed next to a cryomodule in the CEBAF accelerator to maintain ultra-high vacuum in the SRF cryomodule and two adjacent warm girder sections.

  19. Operation of a high-gradient superconducting radio-frequency cavity with a non-evaporable getter pump

    DOE PAGES

    Ciovati, G.; Geng, R.; Lushtak, Y.; ...

    2016-10-28

    The use of non-evaporable getter (NEG) pumps in particle accelerators has increased significantly over the past few years because of their large pumping speed, particularly for hydrogen, compared to the size of the pump. A concern about using such pumps in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) accelerators is the possibility of shedding particulates which could then migrate into the SRF cavities and produce field emission, therefore degrading the cavity performance. One option to mitigate such issue is to use sintered getter materials which intrinsically offer superior mechanical and particle retention properties. In this article we present the results from cryogenic RF testsmore » of a high-gradient SRF cavity after being evacuated several times with an NEG pump equipped with sintered getter disks and placed in close proximity to the cavity. Here, the results showed that the cavity performance was not affected by the pump up to the quench gradient of 34 MV/m. As a result of this study, two such NEG pumps have been installed next to a cryomodule in the CEBAF accelerator to maintain ultra-high vacuum in the SRF cryomodule and two adjacent warm girder sections.« less

  20. Radio-Frequency Illuminated Superconductive Disks: Reverse Josephson Effects and Implications for Precise Measuring of Proposed Gravity Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Koczor, Ronald J.

    1998-01-01

    We have previously reported results using a high precision gravimeter to probe local gravity changes in the neighborhood of large bulk-processed high-temperature superconductors. It have been indicated three essential components to achieve anomalous gravity effects, namely large, two-layer high-temperature YBCO superconductors, magnetic levitation and AC input in the form of radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields. We report experiments on RF-illuminated (1-15 MHz) superconducting disks with corresponding gravity readings indicating an apparent increase in observed gravity of approximately 3-5 x l0(exp -5)cm/sq s, above and to the side of the superconductor. In this preliminary study, RF- illumination is achieved using a series of large radius (15 cm) spiral antenna with RF power inputs equal to or greater than 90 W. The observed gravitational modification range is significantly lower than the 2.1% gravity modification. The error analyses of thermal and electromagnetic interference in a magnetically shielded gravimeter with vacuum enclosures, Faraday cages and shielded instrument leads, are outlined both experimentally and theoretically. The nearly exact correspondence between the peak gravity effects reported and the well-known peak in AC resistance in superconductors (2-7 MHz, owing to reverse Josephson quantum effects) suggests that electrical resistance will arise in this frequency range and subsequently any trapped magnetic fields in the superconductor may disperse partially into the measuring instrument's local environment. Implications for propulsion initiatives and RF-heating in superconductors will be discussed.

  1. Applications of a superconducting solenoidal separator in the experimental investigation of nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinde, D. J.; Carter, I. P.; Dasgupta, M.; Simpson, E. C.; Cook, K. J.; Kalkal, Sunil; Luong, D. H.; Williams, E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes applications of a novel superconducting solenoidal separator, with magnetic fields up to 8 Tesla, for studies of nuclear reactions using the Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility at the Australian National University.

  2. Medical protein separation system using high gradient magnetic separation by superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamioka, Y.; Agatsuma, K.; Kajikawa, K.; Ueda, H.; Furuse, M.; Fuchino, S.; Iitsuka, T.; Nakamura, S.

    2014-01-01

    A high gradient magnetic separation system for medical protein using affinity magnetic nano-beads has been developed. Medical protein such as monoclonal antibody or immunoglobulin is an important substance as a medicine for cancer etc. However; the separation system of these medical protein has very low separation rate and the cost of product is extremely high. The developed system shows very high separation efficiency and can achieve low cost by large production rate compared to the system now using in this field. The system consists of a 3T superconducting magnet cooled by a cryo-cooler, a filter made of fine magnetic metal wires of about 30μm diameter and a demagnetization circuit and a liquid circulation pump for solvent containing medical protein. Affinity magnetic nano-beads is covered with the medical protein after agitation of solvent containing the protein and nano-beads, then the solvent flows through the system and the beads are trapped in the filters by high gradient magnetic field. The beads are released and flow out of the system by the AC demagnetization of the filters using LC resonance circuits after discharge of the magnet. The test results shows 97.8% of the magnetic nano-beads in pure water were captured and 94.1% of total beads were collected.

  3. Pressure-induced electronic phase separation of magnetism and superconductivity in CrAs

    PubMed Central

    Khasanov, Rustem; Guguchia, Zurab; Eremin, Ilya; Luetkens, Hubertus; Amato, Alex; Biswas, Pabitra K.; Rüegg, Christian; Susner, Michael A.; Sefat, Athena S.; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D.; Morenzoni, Elvezio

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of pressure (p) induced superconductivity in the binary helimagnet CrAs has raised questions on how superconductivity emerges from the magnetic state and on the mechanism of the superconducting pairing. In the present work the suppression of magnetism and the occurrence of superconductivity in CrAs were studied by means of muon spin rotation. The magnetism remains bulk up to p  3.5 kbar while its volume fraction gradually decreases with increasing pressure until it vanishes at p  7 kbar. At 3.5 kbar superconductivity abruptly appears with its maximum Tc  1.2 K which decreases upon increasing the pressure. In the intermediate pressure region (3.5  p  7 kbar) the superconducting and the magnetic volume fractions are spatially phase separated and compete for phase volume. Our results indicate that the less conductive magnetic phase provides additional carriers (doping) to the superconducting parts of the CrAs sample thus leading to an increase of the transition temperature (Tc) and of the superfluid density (ρs). A scaling of ρs with as well as the phase separation between magnetism and superconductivity point to a conventional mechanism of the Cooper-pairing in CrAs. PMID:26346548

  4. Pressure-induced electronic phase separation of magnetism and superconductivity in CrAs.

    PubMed

    Khasanov, Rustem; Guguchia, Zurab; Eremin, Ilya; Luetkens, Hubertus; Amato, Alex; Biswas, Pabitra K; Rüegg, Christian; Susner, Michael A; Sefat, Athena S; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D; Morenzoni, Elvezio

    2015-09-08

    The recent discovery of pressure (p) induced superconductivity in the binary helimagnet CrAs has raised questions on how superconductivity emerges from the magnetic state and on the mechanism of the superconducting pairing. In the present work the suppression of magnetism and the occurrence of superconductivity in CrAs were studied by means of muon spin rotation. The magnetism remains bulk up to p ≃ 3.5 kbar while its volume fraction gradually decreases with increasing pressure until it vanishes at p ≃ 7 kbar. At 3.5 kbar superconductivity abruptly appears with its maximum Tc ≃ 1.2 K which decreases upon increasing the pressure. In the intermediate pressure region (3.5 < or ~  p < or ~ 7 kbar) the superconducting and the magnetic volume fractions are spatially phase separated and compete for phase volume. Our results indicate that the less conductive magnetic phase provides additional carriers (doping) to the superconducting parts of the CrAs sample thus leading to an increase of the transition temperature (Tc) and of the superfluid density (ρs). A scaling of ρs with Tc(3.2) as well as the phase separation between magnetism and superconductivity point to a conventional mechanism of the Cooper-pairing in CrAs.

  5. Pressure-induced electronic phase separation of magnetism and superconductivity in CrAs

    SciTech Connect

    Khasanov, Rustem; Guguchia, Zurab; Eremin, Ilya; Luetkens, Hubertus; Amato, Alex; Biswas, Pabitra K.; Ruegg, Christian; Susner, Michael A.; Sefat, Athena S.; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D.; Morenzoni, Elvezio

    2015-09-08

    We report that the recent discovery of pressure (p) induced superconductivity in the binary helimagnet CrAs has raised questions on how superconductivity emerges from the magnetic state and on the mechanism of the superconducting pairing. In the present work the suppression of magnetism and the occurrence of superconductivity in CrAs were studied by means of muon spin rotation. The magnetism remains bulk up to p ≃ 3.5 kbar while its volume fraction gradually decreases with increasing pressure until it vanishes at p ≃ 7 kbar. At 3.5 kbar superconductivity abruptly appears with its maximum Tc ≃ 1.2 K which decreases upon increasing the pressure. In the intermediate pressure region (3.5≲ p ≲ 7 kbar) the superconducting and the magnetic volume fractions are spatially phase separated and compete for phase volume. Our results indicate that the less conductive magnetic phase provides additional carriers (doping) to the superconducting parts of the CrAs sample thus leading to an increase of the transition temperature (Tc) and of the superfluid density (ρs). A scaling of ρs with Tc3.2 as well as the phase separation between magnetism and superconductivity point to a conventional mechanism of the Cooper-pairing in CrAs.

  6. Pressure-induced electronic phase separation of magnetism and superconductivity in CrAs

    DOE PAGES

    Khasanov, Rustem; Guguchia, Zurab; Eremin, Ilya; ...

    2015-09-08

    We report that the recent discovery of pressure (p) induced superconductivity in the binary helimagnet CrAs has raised questions on how superconductivity emerges from the magnetic state and on the mechanism of the superconducting pairing. In the present work the suppression of magnetism and the occurrence of superconductivity in CrAs were studied by means of muon spin rotation. The magnetism remains bulk up to p ≃ 3.5 kbar while its volume fraction gradually decreases with increasing pressure until it vanishes at p ≃ 7 kbar. At 3.5 kbar superconductivity abruptly appears with its maximum Tc ≃ 1.2 K which decreasesmore » upon increasing the pressure. In the intermediate pressure region (3.5≲ p ≲ 7 kbar) the superconducting and the magnetic volume fractions are spatially phase separated and compete for phase volume. Our results indicate that the less conductive magnetic phase provides additional carriers (doping) to the superconducting parts of the CrAs sample thus leading to an increase of the transition temperature (Tc) and of the superfluid density (ρs). A scaling of ρs with Tc3.2 as well as the phase separation between magnetism and superconductivity point to a conventional mechanism of the Cooper-pairing in CrAs.« less

  7. Laser polishing of niobium for superconducting radio-frequency accelerator applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Klopf, J. Michael; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2014-08-01

    Interior surfaces of niobium cavities used in superconducting radio frequency accelerators are now obtained by buffered chemical polish and/or electropolish. Laser polishing is a potential alternative, having advantages of speed, freedom from noxious chemistry and availability of in-process inspection. We studied the influence of the laser power density and laser beam raster rate on the surface topography. These two factors need to be combined carefully to smooth the surface without damage. Computational modeling was used to estimate the surface temperature and gain insight into the mechanism of laser polishing. Power spectral density analysis of surface topography measurements shows that laser polishing can produce smooth topography similar to that obtained by electropolish. This is a necessary first step toward introducing laser polishing as an alternative to the currently practiced chemical polishing.

  8. Model for initiation of quality factor degradation at high accelerating fields in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyuba, A.; Romanenko, A.; Cooley, L. D.

    2010-12-01

    A model for the onset of the reduction in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity quality factor, the so-called Q-drop, at high accelerating electric fields is presented. Since magnetic fields at the cavity equator are tied to accelerating electric fields by a simple geometric factor, the onset of magnetic flux penetration determines the onset of Q-drop. We consider breakdown of the surface barrier at triangular grooves to predict the magnetic field of first flux penetration Hpen. Such defects were argued to be the worst case by Buzdin and Daumens (1998 Physica C 294 257), whose approach, moreover, incorporates both the geometry of the groove and local contamination via the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ. Since previous Q-drop models focused on either topography or contamination alone, the proposed model allows new comparisons of one effect in relation to the other. The model predicts equivalent reduction of Hpen when either roughness or contamination were varied alone, so smooth but dirty surfaces limit cavity performance about as much as rough but clean surfaces do. Still lower Hpen was predicted when both effects were combined, i.e. contamination should exacerbate the negative effects of roughness and vice versa. To test the model with actual data, coupons were prepared by buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing, and stylus profilometry was used to obtain distributions of angles. From these data, curves for surface resistance generated by simple flux flow as a function of magnetic field were generated by integrating over the distribution of angles for reasonable values of κ. This showed that combined effects of roughness and contamination indeed reduce the Q-drop onset field by ~ 20%, and that contamination contributes to Q-drop as much as roughness. The latter point may be overlooked by SRF cavity research, since access to the cavity interior by spectroscopy tools is very difficult, whereas optical images have become commonplace. The model was

  9. Microwave induced plasma discharge in multi-cell superconducting radio-frequency cavity.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shahid; Mammosser, John D

    2015-07-01

    A R&D effort for in situ cleaning of 1.5 GHz Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities at room temperature using the plasma processing technique has been initiated at Jefferson Lab. This is a step toward the cleaning of cryomodules installed in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). For this purpose, we have developed an understanding of plasma discharge in a 5-cell CEBAF-type SRF cavity having configurations similar to those in the main accelerator. The focus of this study involves the detailed investigations of developing a plasma discharge inside the cavity volume and avoids the breakdown condition in the vicinity of the ceramic RF window. A plasma discharge of the gas mixture Ar-O2 (90%:10%) can be established inside the cavity volume by the excitation of a resonant 4π/5 TM010-mode driven by a klystron. The absence of any external magnetic field for generating the plasma is suitable for cleaning cavities installed in a complex cryomodule assembly. The procedures developed in these experimental investigations can be applied to any complex cavity structure. Details of these experimental measurements and the observations are discussed in the paper.

  10. Microwave induced plasma discharge in multi-cell superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Shahid; Mammosser, John D.

    2015-07-15

    A R&D effort for in situ cleaning of 1.5 GHz Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities at room temperature using the plasma processing technique has been initiated at Jefferson Lab. This is a step toward the cleaning of cryomodules installed in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). For this purpose, we have developed an understanding of plasma discharge in a 5-cell CEBAF-type SRF cavity having configurations similar to those in the main accelerator. The focus of this study involves the detailed investigations of developing a plasma discharge inside the cavity volume and avoids the breakdown condition in the vicinity of the ceramic RF window. A plasma discharge of the gas mixture Ar–O{sub 2} (90%:10%) can be established inside the cavity volume by the excitation of a resonant 4π/5 TM{sub 010}-mode driven by a klystron. The absence of any external magnetic field for generating the plasma is suitable for cleaning cavities installed in a complex cryomodule assembly. The procedures developed in these experimental investigations can be applied to any complex cavity structure. Details of these experimental measurements and the observations are discussed in the paper.

  11. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Rigby, Wayne; Wallace, John; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2012-06-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low (˜120 °C) and high (˜800 °C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 °C with a maximum pressure of ˜1 × 10-5 Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 °C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 °C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of ˜2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  12. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Rigby, Wayne; Wallace, John; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2012-06-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low (∼120 °C) and high (∼800 °C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 °C with a maximum pressure of ∼1 × 10(-5) Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 °C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 °C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of ∼2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  13. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Rigby, Wayne; Wallace, John

    2012-06-15

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low ({approx}120 Degree-Sign C) and high ({approx}800 Degree-Sign C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 Degree-Sign C with a maximum pressure of {approx}1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 Degree-Sign C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 Degree-Sign C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of {approx}2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  14. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Pashupati Dhakal, Gianluigi Ciovati, Wayne Rigby, John Wallace, Ganapati Rao Myneni

    2012-06-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low ({approx}120 deg C) and high ({approx}800 deg C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 deg C with a maximum pressure of {approx}1 x 10{sup -5} Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 deg C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 deg C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of {approx}2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  15. Self-optimized superconductivity attainable by interlayer phase separation at cuprate interfaces.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Takahiro; Nomura, Yusuke; Biermann, Silke; Imada, Masatoshi

    2016-07-01

    Stabilizing superconductivity at high temperatures and elucidating its mechanism have long been major challenges of materials research in condensed matter physics. Meanwhile, recent progress in nanostructuring offers unprecedented possibilities for designing novel functionalities. Above all, thin films of cuprate and iron-based high-temperature superconductors exhibit remarkably better superconducting characteristics (for example, higher critical temperatures) than in the bulk, but the underlying mechanism is still not understood. Solving microscopic models suitable for cuprates, we demonstrate that, at an interface between a Mott insulator and an overdoped nonsuperconducting metal, the superconducting amplitude is always pinned at the optimum achieved in the bulk, independently of the carrier concentration in the metal. This is in contrast to the dome-like dependence in bulk superconductors but consistent with the astonishing independence of the critical temperature from the carrier density x observed at the interfaces of La2CuO4 and La2-x Sr x CuO4. Furthermore, we identify a self-organization mechanism as responsible for the pinning at the optimum amplitude: An emergent electronic structure induced by interlayer phase separation eludes bulk phase separation and inhomogeneities that would kill superconductivity in the bulk. Thus, interfaces provide an ideal tool to enhance and stabilize superconductivity. This interfacial example opens up further ways of shaping superconductivity by suppressing competing instabilities, with direct perspectives for designing devices.

  16. Self-optimized superconductivity attainable by interlayer phase separation at cuprate interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Misawa, Takahiro; Nomura, Yusuke; Biermann, Silke; Imada, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Stabilizing superconductivity at high temperatures and elucidating its mechanism have long been major challenges of materials research in condensed matter physics. Meanwhile, recent progress in nanostructuring offers unprecedented possibilities for designing novel functionalities. Above all, thin films of cuprate and iron-based high-temperature superconductors exhibit remarkably better superconducting characteristics (for example, higher critical temperatures) than in the bulk, but the underlying mechanism is still not understood. Solving microscopic models suitable for cuprates, we demonstrate that, at an interface between a Mott insulator and an overdoped nonsuperconducting metal, the superconducting amplitude is always pinned at the optimum achieved in the bulk, independently of the carrier concentration in the metal. This is in contrast to the dome-like dependence in bulk superconductors but consistent with the astonishing independence of the critical temperature from the carrier density x observed at the interfaces of La2CuO4 and La2−xSrxCuO4. Furthermore, we identify a self-organization mechanism as responsible for the pinning at the optimum amplitude: An emergent electronic structure induced by interlayer phase separation eludes bulk phase separation and inhomogeneities that would kill superconductivity in the bulk. Thus, interfaces provide an ideal tool to enhance and stabilize superconductivity. This interfacial example opens up further ways of shaping superconductivity by suppressing competing instabilities, with direct perspectives for designing devices. PMID:27482542

  17. High Temperature Superconducting Reciprocating Magnetic Separator Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    James F. Maguire

    2008-06-05

    In 2001, under DOE's Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI), E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. (Dupont) was awarded a cost-share contract to build a fully functional full-scale model high temperature superconducting reciprocating magnet unit specifically designed for the koalin clay industry. After competitive bidding, American Superconductor (AMSC) was selected to provide the coil for the magnet. Dupont performed the statement of work until September 2004, when it stopped work, with the concurrence of DOE, due to lack of federal funds. DOE had paid all invoices to that point, and Dupont had provided all cost share. At this same time, Dupont determined that this program did not fit with its corporate strategies and notified DOE that it was not interesting in resuming the program when funding became available. AMSC expressed interest in assuming performance of the Agreement to Dupont and DOE, and in March 2005, this project was transferred to AMSC by DOE amendment to the original contract and Novation Agreement between AMSC and Dupont. Design drawings and some hardware components and subassemblies were transferred to AMSC. However, no funding was obligated by DOE and AMSC never performed work on the project. This report contains a summary of the work performed by Dupont up to the September 04 timeframe.

  18. Surface properties of metal-nitride and metal-carbide films deposited on Nb for radio-frequency superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garwin, E. L.; King, F. K.; Kirby, R. E.; Aita, O.

    1987-02-01

    Various effects occur which can prevent attainment of the high Q's and/or the high gradient fields necessary for the operation of radio-frequency (rf) superconducting cavities. One of these effects, multipactor, both causes the cavity to detune during filling due to resonant secondary electron emission at the cavity walls, and lowers the quality factor (Q) by dissipative processes. TiN deposited onto the high-field regions of room-temperature Al cavities has been used at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center to successfully reduce multipactor in the past. We have therefore studied TiN and its companion materials, NbN, NbC, and TiC, all on Nb substrates under several realistic conditions: (1) as-deposited, (2) exposed to air, and (3) electron bombarded. The studied films (up to 14-nm thickness) were sputter deposited onto sputter-cleaned Nb substrates. Results indicate that all the materials tested gave substantially the same results. The maximum secondary electron yields for as-deposited films were reduced to nearly the preoxidized values after electron bombardment (2-3×1017 electrons cm-2 in the case of NbN and NbC). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that the oxides (e.g., TiO2 in the case of TiN films) formed during air exposure were slightly reduced (converted to lower oxides) by the electron-beam exposure. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) showed a slight reduction in the surface O concentration following beam exposure. These results suggest that the chemical nature of top surface layers is responsible for the substantial changes in secondary electron yield observed upon electron-beam exposures and that AES does not reflect this change strongly because of the difficulty in extracting chemical (versus elemental) information from AES. The results indicate that any of these films would be poor choices if simply deposited and exposed to air, but, in fact, the in situ electron bombardment which occurs during cavity operation serves to reduce the

  19. Separating pairing from quantum phase coherence dynamics above the superconducting transition by femtosecond spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Madan, I.; Kurosawa, T.; Toda, Y.; Oda, M.; Mertelj, T.; Kusar, P.; Mihailovic, D.

    2014-01-01

    In classical superconductors an energy gap and phase coherence appear simultaneously with pairing at the transition to the superconducting state. In high-temperature superconductors, the possibility that pairing and phase coherence are distinct and independent processes has led to intense experimental search of their separate manifestations. Using femtosecond spectroscopy methods we now show that it is possible to clearly separate fluctuation dynamics of the superconducting pairing amplitude from the phase relaxation above the critical transition temperature. Empirically establishing a close correspondence between the superfluid density measured by THz spectroscopy and superconducting optical pump-probe response over a wide region of temperature, we find that in differently doped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ crystals the pairing gap amplitude monotonically extends well beyond Tc, while the phase coherence shows a pronounced power-law divergence as T → Tc, thus showing that phase coherence and gap formation are distinct processes which occur on different timescales. PMID:25014162

  20. Switching Monopolar Radiofrequency Ablation Using a Separable Cluster Electrode in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin Woo; Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Dong Ho; Yoon, Jeong-Hee; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Yoon, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Yoon Jun; Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Yu, Su Jong; Han, Joon Koo

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to evaluate the outcomes of multi-channel switching RFA using a separable cluster electrode in patients with HCC. Methods From November 2011 to July 2013, 79 patients with 98 HCCs < 5 cm were enrolled and treated with RFA using a multi-channel switching radiofrequency system and a separable cluster electrode under the guidance of a real-time fusion imaging system. The primary and secondary endpoints were the 3-year local tumor progression (LTP) rate and recurrence-free survival (RFS) rate, respectively. For post hoc analyses, LTP, RFS, and major complication rates were retrospectively compared with a historical control group treated with RFA using the same radiofrequency system but with multiple internally-cooled electrodes. Results The technique success rate of the 98 tumors was 100%. Cumulative 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year LTP rates were 3.4%, 6.9%, and 12.4%, respectively. For patient-level data, cumulative 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year RFS rates were 83.9%, 68.6%, and 45.4%, respectively. On post hoc analyses, none of the baseline characteristics showed a significant difference between the separable cluster electrode and multiple internally-cooled electrodes group. Cumulative LTP and RFS rates of the two groups also showed no significant difference (p = 0.401 and p = 0.881, respectively). Finally, major complication rates of the separable cluster electrode group (5.0%, 4/79) and multiple internally-cooled electrodes group (5.9%, 4/74) were also comparable (p = 1.000). Conclusion Switching monopolar RFA using a separable cluster electrode is a feasible and efficient technique for the treatment of HCCs smaller than 5 cm, providing comparable local tumor control to multiple internally-cooled electrodes. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02745483 PMID:27575787

  1. Large-scale superconducting separator for Kaolin processing

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, A.J, Jr. ); Selvaggi, J.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Currently, high gradient magnetic separators (HGMSs) are used almost exclusively by the clay processing industry, particularly in producing an extremely white kaolin for the paper, coatings and rubber industries where a bright additive is desirable. As mined, the clay is a light cream color-not white. Many of these impurities can be removed chemically using a reducing agent such as sodium hydrosulfite in low pH, sulfuric acid, and alum. High purity, however, can be obtained by removing trace amounts of paramagnetic particles (100% finer than 2 {mu}m). This is accomplished by separating these particles from 28 wt% kaolin in a water slurry retaining them on magnetic wool, which is then periodically regenerated.

  2. Use of the Meissner effect to separate, purify, and classify superconducting powders

    SciTech Connect

    Barsoum, M.; Patten, D.; Tyagi, S.

    1987-12-07

    A separation technique, based on the Meissner effect, to purify and classify superconducting powders was developed. Powders of the Y/sub 1/Ba/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-//sub x/ composition were sealed in a glass tube, cooled to liquid-nitrogen temperature, and passed over the pole of a magnet. The superconducting phase responded to the field and moved away from the magnet, whereas the nonsuperconducting phases, impurities, especially magnetic, and unreacted phases did not move. X-ray diffraction revealed that the separated powder was single phase with all impurity phases eliminated. Furthermore, the powder particles separated along the length of the tube according to their size and applied magnetic field: the larger the particles and/or the field the farther the movement and the smaller the particles that moved.

  3. Feasibility of turbidity removal by high-gradient superconducting magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hua; Li, Yiran; Xu, Fengyu; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have focused on pollutant removal by magnetic seeding and high-gradient superconducting magnetic separation (HGSMS). However, few works reported the application of HGSMS for treating non-magnetic pollutants by an industrial large-scale system. The feasibility of turbidity removal by a 600 mm bore superconducting magnetic separation system was evaluated in this study. The processing parameters were evaluated by using a 102 mm bore superconducting magnetic separation system that was equipped with the same magnetic separation chamber that was used in the 600 mm bore system. The double-canister system was used to process water pollutants. Analytical grade magnetite was used as a magnetic seed and the turbidity of the simulated raw water was approximately 110 NTU, and the effects of polyaluminum chloride (PAC) and magnetic seeds on turbidity removal were evaluated. The use of more PAC and magnetic seeds had few advantages for the HGSMS at doses greater than 8 and 50 mg/l, respectively. A magnetic intensity of 5.0 T was beneficial for HGSMS, and increasing the flow rate through the steel wool matrix decreased the turbidity removal efficiency. In the breakthrough experiments, 90% of the turbidity was removed when 100 column volumes were not reached. The processing capacity of the 600 mm bore industry-scale superconducting magnetic separator for turbidity treatment was approximately 78.0 m(3)/h or 65.5 × 10(4) m(3)/a. The processing cost per ton of water for the 600 mm bore system was 0.1 $/t. Thus, the HGSMS separator could be used in the following special circumstances: (1) when adequate space is not available for traditional water treatment equipment, especially the sedimentation tank, and (2) when decentralized sewage treatment HGSMS systems are easier to transport and install.

  4. Superconductivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    SUPERCONDUCTIVITY HIGH-POWER APPLICATIONS Electric power generation/transmission Energy storage Acoustic projectors Weapon launchers Catapult Ship propulsion • • • Stabilized...temperature superconductive shields could be substantially enhanced by use of high-Tc materials. 27 28 NRAC SUPERCONDUCTIVITY SHIP PROPULSION APPLICATIONS...motor shown in the photograph. As a next step in the evolution of electric-drive ship propulsion technology, DTRC has proposed to scale up the design

  5. Research on red mud treatment by a circulating superconducting magnetic separator.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiran; Chen, Haoshu; Wang, Jun; Xu, Fengyu; Zhang, Weimin

    2014-01-01

    Red mud (RM) accumulated over the years and caused a serious environmental problem. Iron-rich fraction separation is a cost-effective way to reduce the amount of disposal RM. A circulating high-gradient superconducting magnetic separator was produced in this work. Steel wool was filled in the circulating boxes. The boxes were connected by two chains, which moved in and out the magnetic field by a drive motor. The efficiency of iron-rich RM separation by the superconducting magnetic separator was investigated. An amount of 25% (w/w) iron-rich RM fractions with a grade of 65% were separated from the 56% iron content raw RM. The parameters of the steel wool matrix were important in controlling the iron-rich RM magnetic separation. Finer steel wool increased the iron recovery ratio, but decreased the grade of the iron-rich RM concentrates. Microscopic photographs of the RM particles showed that opaque mineral particles were enriched in the collected RM. The particle size distributions of raw, concentrate and residue RM were measured. The increased particle size of concentrate RM implied that large particles were entrapped in the steel wool matrix.

  6. Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Yung K.

    Many potential high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) military applications have been demonstrated by low-temperature superconductivity systems; they encompass high efficiency electric drives for naval vessels, airborne electric generators, energy storage systems for directed-energy weapons, electromechanical launchers, magnetic and electromagnetic shields, and cavity resonators for microwave and mm-wave generation. Further HST applications in militarily relevant fields include EM sensors, IR focal plane arrays, SQUIDs, magnetic gradiometers, high-power sonar sources, and superconducting antennas and inertial navigation systems. The development of SQUID sensors will furnish novel magnetic anomaly detection methods for ASW.

  7. Nanoscale phase separation and superconductivity in the one-dimensional Hirsch model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anfossi, Alberto; Degli Esposti Boschi, Cristian; Montorsi, Arianna

    2009-06-01

    We investigate numerically at various fillings the ground state of the one-dimensional Hubbard model with correlated hopping x (Hirsch model). It is found that, for a large range of filling values n around half filling, and for repulsive Coulomb interaction u≤uc(x,n) , phase separation at a nanoscale (NPS phase) between two conducting phases at different densities occurs when x≳2/3 . The NPS phase is accompanied by the opening of a spin gap and the system behaves as a Luther-Emery liquid with dominant superconducting correlations. Close to half filling, an anomalous peak emerges in the charge structure factor related to the density of doubly occupied sites, which determines the size of the droplets in the NPS phase. For 1/2≲x≲2/3 a crossover to a homogeneous phase, still superconducting, takes place.

  8. Multilayer coating for higher accelerating fields in superconducting radio-frequency cavities: a review of theoretical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Takayuki

    2017-02-01

    The theory of the superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) multilayer structure for application in superconducting accelerating cavities is reviewed. The theoretical field limit, optimum layer thicknesses and material combination, and surface resistance are discussed for the SIS structure and are also reviewed for the superconductor-superconductor bilayer structure.

  9. Effect of high temperature heat treatments on the quality factor of a large-grain superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, P.; Ciovati, G.; Myneni, G. R.; Gray, K. E.; Groll, N.; Maheshwari, P.; McRae, D. M.; Pike, R.; Proslier, T.; Stevie, F.; Walsh, R. P.; Yang, Q.; Zasadzinzki, J.

    2013-04-01

    Large-grain Nb has become a viable alternative to fine-grain Nb for the fabrication of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. In this contribution we report the results from a heat treatment study of a large-grain 1.5 GHz single-cell cavity made of “medium purity” Nb. The baseline surface preparation prior to heat treatment consisted of standard buffered chemical polishing. The heat treatment in the range 800–1400°C was done in a newly designed vacuum induction furnace. Q{sub 0} values of the order of 2×10{sup 10} at 2.0 K and peak surface magnetic field (B{sub p}) of 90 mT were achieved reproducibly. A Q{sub 0} value of (5±1)×10{sup 10} at 2.0 K and B{sub p}=90mT was obtained after heat treatment at 1400°C. This is the highest value ever reported at this temperature, frequency, and field. Samples heat treated with the cavity at 1400°C were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive x ray, point-contact tunneling, and x-ray diffraction, and revealed a complex surface composition which includes titanium oxide, increased carbon, and nitrogen content but reduced hydrogen concentration compared to a non-heat-treated sample.

  10. Stripe-like nanoscale structural phase separation in superconducting BaPb1−xBixO3

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo-Gallo, P.; Zhang, Y.; Parra, C.; Manoharan, H.C.; Beasley, M.R.; Geballe, T.H.; Kramer, M.J.; Fisher, I.R.

    2015-01-01

    The phase diagram of BaPb1−xBixO3 exhibits a superconducting dome in the proximity of a charge density wave phase. For the superconducting compositions, the material coexists as two structural polymorphs. Here we show, via high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, that the structural dimorphism is accommodated in the form of partially disordered nanoscale stripes. Identification of the morphology of the nanoscale structural phase separation enables determination of the associated length scales, which we compare with the Ginzburg–Landau coherence length. We find that the maximum Tc occurs when the superconducting coherence length matches the width of the partially disordered stripes, implying a connection between the structural phase separation and the shape of the superconducting dome. PMID:26373890

  11. Stripe-like nanoscale structural phase separation in superconducting BaPb1-xBixO3

    DOE PAGES

    Giraldo-Gallo, P.; Zhang, Y.; Parra, C.; ...

    2015-09-16

    The phase diagram of BaPb1-xBixO3 exhibits a superconducting “dome” in the proximity of a charge density wave phase. For the superconducting compositions, the material coexists as two structural polymorphs. Here we show, via high resolution transmission electron microscopy, that the structural dimorphism is accommodated in the form of partially disordered nanoscale stripes. Identification of the morphology of the nanoscale structural phase separation enables determination of the associated length scales, which we compare to the Ginzburg-Landau coherence length. Thus, we find that the maximum Tc occurs when the superconducting coherence length matches the width of the partially disordered stripes, implying amore » connection between the structural phase separation and the shape of the superconducting dome.« less

  12. Superconductivity:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacchetti, N.

    In this paper a short historical account of the discovery of superconductivity and of its gradual development is given. The physical interpretation of its various aspects took about forty years (from 1911 to 1957) to reach a successful description of this phenomenon in terms of a microscopic theory At the very end it seemed that more or less everything could be reasonably interpreted even if modifications and refinements of the original theory were necessary. In 1986 the situation changed abruptly when a cautious but revolutionary paper appeared showing that superconductivity was found in certain ceramic oxides at temperatures above those up to then known. A rush of frantic experimental activity started world-wide and in less than one year it was shown that superconductivity is a much more widespread phenomenon than deemed before and can be found at temperatures well above the liquid air boiling point. The complexity and the number of the substances (mainly ceramic oxides) involved call for a sort of modern alchemy if compounds with the best superconducting properties are to be manufactured. We don't use the word alchemy in a deprecatory sense but just to emphasise that till now nobody can say why these compounds are what they are: superconductors.

  13. Mercury removal from solution by superconducting magnetic separation with nanostructured magnetic adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, T.; Tachibana, S.; Miura, O.; Takeuchi, M.

    2011-11-01

    Recently, mercury Hg concentration in human blood increases due to expanding the global mercury contamination. Excess mercury bioaccumulation poses a significant health risk. In order to decrease mercury concentration in the environment and human blood, we have developed two different kinds of nanostructured magnetic adsorbents for mercury to apply them to superconducting magnetic separation instead of conventional filtration. One is magnetic beads (MBs) which have nanosize magnetite particles in the core and a lot of SH radicals on the surface to adsorb Hg ions effectively. MBs were developed mainly to remove mercury from human blood. The maximum amount of the adsorption for MBs is 6.3 mg/g in the solution in less than a minute. Dithiothreitol can easily remove mercury adsorbed to MBs, hence MBs can be reusable. The other is nanostructured magnetic activated carbon (MAC) which is activated carbon with mesopores and nanosize magnetite. The maximum amount of the adsorption for MAC is 38.3 mg/g in the solution. By heat-treatment mercury can be easily removed from MAC. We have studied superconducting magnetic separation using each adsorbent for mercury removal from solution.

  14. Continuous measurement of two spatially separated superconducting qubits: Quantum trajectories and feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, M. E.; Roch, N.; Motzoi, F.; Whaley, B.; Korotkov, A. N.; Sarovar, M.; Siddiqi, I.

    2014-03-01

    Measurement can be harnessed to probabilistically generate entanglement in the absence of local interactions, for example between spatially separated quantum objects. Continuous weak measurement allows us to observe the dynamics associated with this process. In particular, we perform joint dispersive readout of two superconducting transmon qubits separated by one meter of coaxial cable. We track the evolution of a joint quantum state under the influence of measurement, both as an ensemble and as a set of individual quantum trajectories. We analyze the statistics of such quantum trajectories and find good agreement with a Bayesian formalism for a two-body quantum system. Such tracking opens the door to continuous feedback-stabilized remote entanglement. This work was supported by the Army Research Office and by the Fannie and John Hertz Foundation.

  15. Study on magnetic separation for decontamination of cesium contaminated soil by using superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Susumu; Nomura, Naoki; Mishima, Fumihito; Akiyama, Yoko

    2014-09-01

    The accident of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant caused the diffusion of radioactive cesium over the wide area. We examined the possibility of applying magnetic separation method using the superconducting magnet, which can process a large amount of the soil in high speed, to the soil decontamination and volume reduction of the radioactive cesium contaminated soil. Clay minerals are classified as 2:1 and 1:1 types by the difference of their layer structures, and these types of minerals are respectively paramagnetic and diamagnetic including some exception. It is known that most of the radioactive cesium is strongly adsorbed on the clay, especially on 2:1 type clay minerals. It is expected that the method which can separate only 2:1 type clay minerals selectively from the mixture clay minerals can enormously contribute to the volume reduction of the contaminated soil. In this study, the components in the clay before and after separation were evaluated to estimate the magnetic separation efficiency by using X-ray diffraction. From the results, the decontamination efficiency and the volume reduction ratio were estimated in order to examine the appropriate separation conditions for the practical decontamination of the soil.

  16. Proof-of-principle demonstration of Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting radiofrequency cavities for high Q{sub 0} applications

    SciTech Connect

    Posen, S. Liepe, M.; Hall, D. L.

    2015-02-23

    Many future particle accelerators require hundreds of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities operating with high duty factor. The large dynamic heat load of the cavities causes the cryogenic plant to make up a significant part of the overall cost of the facility. This contribution can be reduced by replacing standard niobium cavities with ones coated with a low-dissipation superconductor such as Nb{sub 3}Sn. In this paper, we present results for single cell cavities coated with Nb{sub 3}Sn at Cornell. Five coatings were carried out, showing that at 4.2 K, high Q{sub 0} out to medium fields was reproducible, resulting in an average quench field of 14 MV/m and an average 4.2 K Q{sub 0} at quench of 8 × 10{sup 9}. In each case, the peak surface magnetic field at quench was well above H{sub c1}, showing that it is not a limiting field in these cavities. The coating with the best performance had a quench field of 17 MV/m, exceeding gradient requirements for state-of-the-art high duty factor SRF accelerators. It is also shown that—taking into account the thermodynamic efficiency of the cryogenic plant—the 4.2 K Q{sub 0} values obtained meet the AC power consumption requirements of state-of-the-art high duty factor accelerators, making this a proof-of-principle demonstration for Nb{sub 3}Sn cavities in future applications.

  17. Model for Initiation of Quality Factor Degradation at High Accelerating Fields in Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavaties

    SciTech Connect

    Dzyuba, A.; Romanenko, A.; Cooley, L.D.; /Fermilab

    2010-07-13

    was extended to fit cavity test data, which indicated that reduction of the superconducting gap by contaminants may also play a role in Q-drop.

  18. Inert Gas Buffered Milling and Particle Size Separation of μm-Scale Superconducting Precursor Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Seshadri, S.; McIntyre, P.

    2008-06-20

    The project developed an aerosol system for the met milling and particle size separation of the precursor powders used in fabrication of powder-in-tube superconductors. The work builds upon the results of a previous SBIR-funded development that proved the basic principles of the virtual impactor (VI) technology and its efficacy for the powders of interest. The new project extended that work in three respects: it integrated provisions for recirculating the aerosol flow using inert gas to avoid contamination from O2, CO2 and water in ambient air; a quad configuration of VI subassemblies to support kg/hr throughput; and it incorporated design features that eliminate error trajectories which would introduce trace contamination of larger particles into the separated flow. The project demonstrated the technical effectiveness of the process and established its economic feasibility by achieving kg/hr throughput within a cost profile that would be profitable within the range of competitive toll fees. The project is beneficial to the public through its potential to improve the performance of superconducting materials for research and for biomedicine. It also conveys potential benefits for powders used in high-performance ceramics (for example for engines for automobiles and for aircraft) and for high-performance electrical insulators for telecommunications circuitry.

  19. Tailoring Surface Properties of Polymeric Separators for Lithium-Ion Batteries by 13.56 MHz Radio-Frequency Plasma Glow Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chia-Han; Juang, Ruey-Shin; Tsai, Ching-Yuan; Huang, Chun

    2013-11-01

    The hydrophilic surface modification of the polymeric separator is achieved by low-pressure 13.56 MHz radio-frequency Ar and He gas plasma treatments. The changes in surface hydrophilicity and surface free energy were examined by static contact angle analysis. The static water contact angle of the plasma-modified polymeric separator particularly decreased with the increase in treatment time. An obvious increase in the surface energy of polymeric separators owing to the crosslinking by activated species of inert gases effect of monatomic-gas-plasma treatments was also observed. Optical emission spectroscopy was carried out to analyze the chemical species generated after Ar and He gas plasma treatments. The variations in the surface morphology and chemical structure of the polymeric separators were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. XPS analysis showed significantly higher surface concentrations of oxygen functional groups for monatomic-gas-plasma-modified polymeric separator surfaces than for the unmodified polymeric separator surface. The experimental results show the important role of chemical species in the interaction between Ar and He gas plasmas and the polymeric separator surface, which can be controlled by surface modification to tailor the hydrophilicity of the polymeric separator.

  20. An rf separated kaon beam from the Main Injector: Superconducting aspects

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. Edwards

    1998-11-01

    ThE report is intended to focus on the superconducting aspects of a potential separated kaon beam facility for the Main Injector, and most of this document reflects that emphasis. However, the RF features cannot be divorced from the overall beam requirements, and so the next section is devoted to the latter subject. The existing optics design that meets the needs of the two proposed experiments is outliied, and its layout at Fermilab is shown. The frequency and deflection gradient choices present implementation dMiculties, and the section closes with some commentary on these issues. Sec. 3 provides an introduction to cavity design considerations, and, in particular carries forward the discussion of resonator shape and frequency selection. The R&D program is the subject of Sec. 4. Provisional parameter choices will be summarized. Initial steps toward cavity fabrication based `on copper models have been taken. The next stages in cavity fabrication will be reviewed in some detail. The infrastructure needs and availability will be discussed. Sec. 5 discusses what maybe characterized as the in~edlents of a point design. At this writing, some aspects are clear and some are not. The basic systems are reasonably clear and are described. The final section presents a cost and schedule estimate for both the Ft&D and production phase. Some supporting material and elaboration is provided in the Appendices.

  1. Superconducting open-gradient magnetic separation for the pretreatment of radioactive or mixed waste vitrification feeds. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, R.D.; Nunez, L.; Crawford, C.; Ritter, J.; Landsberger, S.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective is to reduce the volume and cost of high-level waste glass produced during US DOE remediation activities by demonstrating that magnetic separation can separate crystalline, amorphous, and colloidal constituents in vitrification feed streams known to be deleterious to the production of borosilicate glass. Magnetic separation will add neither chemicals nor generate secondary waste streams. The project includes the systematic study of magnetic interactions of waste constituents under controlled physical and chemical conditions (e.g., hydration, oxidation, temperature) to identify mechanisms that control the magnetic properties. Partitioning of radionuclides to determine their sorption mechanisms is also being studied. The identification of fundamental magnetic properties within the microscopic chemical environment in combination with hydrodynamic and electrodynamic models provides insights into the design of a system for optimal separation. Following this, experimental studies using superconducting open-gradient magnetic separation (OGMS) will be conducted to validate its effectiveness as a pretreatment technique.'

  2. Research in Superconducting Radiofrequency Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffstaetter, Georg

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the program is to transfer our successes in single cell high gradient R&D to multi-cell cavities of advanced shapes. We have also developed a new technique for electropolishing (EP) which is much less expensive than the standard EP technique used at other labs. Our aim is to apply this technique to multi-cell cavities of advanced shapes. The scientific program of this grant was concluded in 2010. An extension of this grant al-lowed us to receive ARRA funding, which we used to improve the helium-liquefier system in Cornell's SRF laboratory. Part of this system had been purchased and installed by another grant. The extension to grant DE-FG02-04ER41354 was proposed to extend this system to sufficient power so that helium can be recovered from SRF-cavity test and simultaneously can be liquefied. This significantly increased the number of cavities we can test per week. This upgrade project was finished in the spring of 2010 and has been in regular use ever since.

  3. Superconducting open-gradient magnetic separation for the pretreatment of radioactive or mixed waste vitrification feeds. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, R.; Nunez, L.; Cicero-Herman, C.A.; Ritter, J.A.; Landsberger, S.

    1997-01-01

    'Vitrification has been selected as a final waste form technology in the US for long-term storage of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW). However, a foreseeable problem during vitrification in some waste feed streams lies in the presence of elements (e.g., transition metals) in the HLW that may cause instabilities in the final glass product. The formation of spinel compounds, such as Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and FeCrO{sub 4}, results in glass phase separation and reduces vitrifier lifetime, and durability of the final waste form. A superconducting open gradient magnetic separation (OGMS) system maybe suitable for the removal of the deleterious transition elements (e.g. Fe, Co, and Ni) and other elements (lanthanides) from vitrification feed streams due to their ferromagnetic or paramagnetic nature. The OGMS systems are designed to deflect and collect paramagnetic minerals as they interact with a magnetic field gradient. This system has the potential to reduce the volume of HLW for vitrification and ensure a stable product. In order to design efficient OGMS and High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) processes, a fundamental understanding of the physical and chemical properties of the waste feed streams is required. Using HLW simulant and radioactive fly ash and sludge samples from the Savannah River Technology Center, Rocky Flats site, and the Hanford reservation, several techniques were used to characterize and predict the separation capability for a superconducting OGMS system.'

  4. Radiofrequency Neurotomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 24 hours after your procedure. Avoid using a heating pad on the injection sites. Avoid baths for ... Smith AD, et al. Cervical radiofrequency neurotomy reduces central hyperexcitability and improves neck movement in individuals with ...

  5. Stripe-like nanoscale structural phase separation in superconducting BaPb1-xBixO3

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldo-Gallo, P.; Zhang, Y.; Parra, C.; Manoharan, H. C.; Beasley, M. R.; Geballe, T. H.; Kramer, M. J.; Fisher, I. R.

    2015-09-16

    The phase diagram of BaPb1-xBixO3 exhibits a superconducting dome in the proximity of a charge density wave phase. For the superconducting compositions, the material coexists as two structural polymorphs. Here we show, via high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, that the structural dimorphism is accommodated in the form of partially disordered nanoscale stripes. Identification of the morphology of the nanoscale structural phase separation enables determination of the associated length scales, which we compare with the Ginzburg–Landau coherence length. We find that the maximum Tc occurs when the superconducting coherence length matches the width of the partially disordered stripes, implying a connection between the structural phase separation and the shape of the superconducting dome.

  6. Stripe-like nanoscale structural phase separation in superconducting BaPb1-xBixO3

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldo-Gallo, P.; Zhang, Y.; Parra, C.; Manoharan, H. C.; Beasley, M. R.; Geballe, T. H.; Kramer, M. J.; Fisher, I. R.

    2015-09-16

    The phase diagram of BaPb1-xBixO3 exhibits a superconducting “dome” in the proximity of a charge density wave phase. For the superconducting compositions, the material coexists as two structural polymorphs. Here we show, via high resolution transmission electron microscopy, that the structural dimorphism is accommodated in the form of partially disordered nanoscale stripes. Identification of the morphology of the nanoscale structural phase separation enables determination of the associated length scales, which we compare to the Ginzburg-Landau coherence length. Thus, we find that the maximum Tc occurs when the superconducting coherence length matches the width of the partially disordered stripes, implying a connection between the structural phase separation and the shape of the superconducting dome.

  7. Removal of less biodegradable dissolved organic matters in water by superconducting magnetic separation with magnetic mesoporous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, K.; Jin, T.; Miura, O.

    2010-11-01

    Less biodegradable dissolved organic matters in water as typified by humic substances are known as precursors of carcinogenic trihalomethanes, and are removed about 60% by current advanced water treatments. However, further increase of the removal ratio is demand. In this study, magnetic mesoporous carbon (MMPC), which can adsorb the substances physically and be efficiently collected by using superconducting high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS), has been synthesized with coconut-shell-based activated carbon and ferric nitrate solution by the gas activation method. The MMPC has the maximum magnetization value of 30.7 emu/g and an adsorption ability of 87% to 10 mg/L humic acid in a short time. The standard MMPC having a magnetization of 6.43 emu/g was able to be separated at magnetic field of 2 T. Used MMPC regained the adsorption ability to 93.1% by N2 reactivation heat treatment. These results show promise for application of current water treatments by superconducting HGMS, which is suitable for high-speed water treatment without secondary wastes.

  8. Progress Towards High-Sensitivity Arrays of Detectors of Sub-mm Radiation using Superconducting Tunnel Junctions with Radio-Frequency Single-Electron Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, T. R.; Hsieh, W.-T.; Li, M. J.; Stahle, C. M.; Wollack, E. J.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The science drivers for the SPIRIT/SPECS missions demand sensitive, fast, compact, low-power, large-format detector arrays for high resolution imaging and spectroscopy in the far infrared and submillimeter. Detector arrays with 10,000 pixels and sensitivity less than 10(exp 20)-20 W/Hz(exp 20)0.5 are needed. Antenna-coupled superconducting tunnel junction detectors with integrated rf single-electron transistor readout amplifiers have the potential for achieving this high level of sensitivity, and can take advantage of an rf multiplexing technique when forming arrays. The device consists of an antenna structure to couple radiation into a small superconducting volume and cause quasiparticle excitations, and a single-electron transistor to measure currents through tunnel junction contacts to the absorber volume. We will describe optimization of device parameters, and recent results on fabrication techniques for producing devices with high yield for detector arrays. We will also present modeling of expected saturation power levels, antenna coupling, and rf multiplexing schemes.

  9. Removal and recovery of phosphorus in wastewater by superconducting high gradient magnetic separation with ferromagnetic adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiwata, T.; Miura, O.; Hosomi, K.; Shimizu, K.; Ito, D.; Yoda, Y.

    2010-11-01

    Prevention of eutrophication for semi-enclosed bays and ponds is serious and important challenge. In spite of the advanced wastewater treatment, typically 1 mg/L phosphorus is discharged into public water bodies from wastewater treatment plants. The total amount of the discharged water is so large that the further improvement of the removal efficiency of phosphorus in the discharged water is demanded. On the other hand, recently phosphorus has become increasingly recognized as the important strategic material due to the global food problem. Therefore, the recovery and recycling of phosphorus is also important issue. In this work, removal and recovery of phosphorus from treated wastewater by High Gradient Magnetic Separation (HGMS) with ferromagnetic zirconium ferrite adsorbent were studied. Phosphorus in the treated wastewater could be removed from 1.12 mg/L to 0.03 mg/L by the HGMS system with 500 mg/L zirconium ferrite adsorbent for 5 min in adsorption time. The magnetic separation speed achieved 1 m/s at 1 T which was necessary for practical use. We also confirmed that phosphorus could be desorbed from zirconium ferrite adsorbent by alkali treatment in a short time.

  10. Dependence of trapped-flux-induced surface resistance of a large-grain Nb superconducting radio-frequency cavity on spatial temperature gradient during cooldown through Tc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shichun; Kubo, Takayuki; Geng, R. L.

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies by Romanenko et al. revealed that cooling down a superconducting cavity under a large spatial temperature gradient decreases the amount of trapped flux and leads to reduction of the residual surface resistance. In the present paper, the flux expulsion ratio and the trapped-flux-induced surface resistance of a large-grain cavity cooled down under a spatial temperature gradient up to 80 K /m are studied under various applied magnetic fields from 5 to 20 μ T . We show the flux expulsion ratio improves as the spatial temperature gradient increases, independent of the applied magnetic field: our results support and enforce the previous studies. We then analyze all rf measurement results obtained under different applied magnetic fields together by plotting the trapped-flux-induced surface resistance normalized by the applied magnetic field as a function of the spatial temperature gradient. All the data can be fitted by a single curve, which defines an empirical formula for the trapped-flux-induced surface resistance as a function of the spatial temperature gradient and applied magnetic field. The formula can fit not only the present results but also those obtained by Romanenko et al. previously. The sensitivity rfl of surface resistance from trapped magnetic flux of fine-grain and large-grain niobium cavities and the origin of d T /d s dependence of Rfl/Ba are also discussed.

  11. Phase separation and superconductivity in K1-xFe2-ySe2 single crystals under different thermal treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Hai-Hu; Ding, Xiaxin; Tao, Jian; Yang, Huan

    2013-03-01

    Single crystals with the starting composition of K0.8Fe2Se2 have been thermally treated in three different ways: slow furnace cooling (SFC) from 1020 °C, retreated for 2 hours at 250 °C (S250) and 350 °C (S350:) and followed by quenching. The DC magnetization measurements on them exhibit very different behavior: the SFC samples show a tiny diamagnetic signal, while the sample S350 shows a quite large Meissner shielding volume with the S250 in the middle. The resistive measurements on the sample S350 show zero resistance below 31 K with a sharp transition; while those from the sample SFC or S250 show much larger residual resistance together with a much wider transition. By using the SEM, we have successfully identified that, in SFC, the superconducting areas have relatively larger sizes (about one micrometer) and are widely separated; the superconducting area change into many thin but well connected networks in the sample S350, which construct a 3D spider-web. This explains both the magnetic shielding and the resistive transitions in the three samples. In addition, the superconducting area has a composition of about K0.64Fe1.8Se2. We suggest that the thermodynamically stable phase for the superconducting state has probably one vacancy in every 10 Fe-sites.

  12. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site Index A-Z Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) of Liver Tumors Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a treatment that ... of Liver Tumors? What is Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors? Radiofrequency ablation, sometimes referred to as RFA, ...

  13. High-temperature superconducting radiofrequency probe for magnetic resonance imaging applications operated below ambient pressure in a simple liquid-nitrogen cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Simon; Ginefri, Jean-Christophe; Poirier-Quinot, Marie; Darrasse, Luc

    2013-05-01

    The present work investigates the joined effects of temperature and static magnetic field on the electrical properties of a 64 MHz planar high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coil, in order to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications with a moderate decrease of the HTS coil temperature (THTS). Temperature control is provided with accuracy better than 0.1 K from 80 to 66 K by regulating the pressure of the liquid nitrogen bath of a dedicated cryostat. The actual temperature of the HTS coil is obtained using a straightforward wireless method that eliminates the risks of coupling electromagnetic interference to the HTS coil and of disturbing the static magnetic field by DC currents near the region of interest. The resonance frequency ( f0) and the quality factor (Q) of the HTS coil are measured as a function of temperature in the 0-4.7 T field range with parallel and orthogonal orientations relative to the coil plane. The intrinsic HTS coil sensitivity and the detuning effect are then analyzed from the Q and f0 data. In the presence of the static magnetic field, the initial value of f0 in Earth's field could be entirely recovered by decreasing THTS, except for the orthogonal orientation above 1 T. The improvement of Q by lowering THTS was substantial. From 80 to 66 K, Q was multiplied by a factor of 6 at 1.5 T in orthogonal orientation. In parallel orientation, the maximum measured improvement of Q from 80 K to 66 K was a factor of 2. From 80 to 66 K, the improvement of the RF sensitivity relative to the initial value at the Earth's field and ambient pressure was up to 4.4 dB in parallel orientation. It was even more important in orthogonal orientation and continued to increase, up to 8.4 dB, at the maximum explored field of 1.5 T. Assuming that the noise contributions from the RF receiver are negligible, the SNR improvement using enhanced HTS coil cooling in NMR experiments was extracted from Q measurements either

  14. Coherent suppression of electromagnetic dissipation due to superconducting quasiparticles.

    PubMed

    Pop, Ioan M; Geerlings, Kurtis; Catelani, Gianluigi; Schoelkopf, Robert J; Glazman, Leonid I; Devoret, Michel H

    2014-04-17

    Owing to the low-loss propagation of electromagnetic signals in superconductors, Josephson junctions constitute ideal building blocks for quantum memories, amplifiers, detectors and high-speed processing units, operating over a wide band of microwave frequencies. Nevertheless, although transport in superconducting wires is perfectly lossless for direct current, transport of radio-frequency signals can be dissipative in the presence of quasiparticle excitations above the superconducting gap. Moreover, the exact mechanism of this dissipation in Josephson junctions has never been fully resolved experimentally. In particular, Josephson's key theoretical prediction that quasiparticle dissipation should vanish in transport through a junction when the phase difference across the junction is π (ref. 2) has never been observed. This subtle effect can be understood as resulting from the destructive interference of two separate dissipative channels involving electron-like and hole-like quasiparticles. Here we report the experimental observation of this quantum coherent suppression of quasiparticle dissipation across a Josephson junction. As the average phase bias across the junction is swept through π, we measure an increase of more than one order of magnitude in the energy relaxation time of a superconducting artificial atom. This striking suppression of dissipation, despite the presence of lossy quasiparticle excitations above the superconducting gap, provides a powerful tool for minimizing decoherence in quantum electronic systems and could be directly exploited in quantum information experiments with superconducting quantum bits.

  15. Coherent suppression of electromagnetic dissipation due to superconducting quasiparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Ioan M.; Geerlings, Kurtis; Catelani, Gianluigi; Schoelkopf, Robert J.; Glazman, Leonid I.; Devoret, Michel H.

    2014-04-01

    Owing to the low-loss propagation of electromagnetic signals in superconductors, Josephson junctions constitute ideal building blocks for quantum memories, amplifiers, detectors and high-speed processing units, operating over a wide band of microwave frequencies. Nevertheless, although transport in superconducting wires is perfectly lossless for direct current, transport of radio-frequency signals can be dissipative in the presence of quasiparticle excitations above the superconducting gap. Moreover, the exact mechanism of this dissipation in Josephson junctions has never been fully resolved experimentally. In particular, Josephson's key theoretical prediction that quasiparticle dissipation should vanish in transport through a junction when the phase difference across the junction is π (ref. 2) has never been observed. This subtle effect can be understood as resulting from the destructive interference of two separate dissipative channels involving electron-like and hole-like quasiparticles. Here we report the experimental observation of this quantum coherent suppression of quasiparticle dissipation across a Josephson junction. As the average phase bias across the junction is swept through π, we measure an increase of more than one order of magnitude in the energy relaxation time of a superconducting artificial atom. This striking suppression of dissipation, despite the presence of lossy quasiparticle excitations above the superconducting gap, provides a powerful tool for minimizing decoherence in quantum electronic systems and could be directly exploited in quantum information experiments with superconducting quantum bits.

  16. Simulation of the superconducting multiturn flux transformer integrated with a coplanar resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, H. R.; Zhang, Y.; Klein, N.

    2000-06-01

    The analysis of the structure of a superconducting multiturn flux transformer integrated with a coplanar resonator for radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference devices is described. Electromagnetic simulations indicate that the loss is dominated by the high loss tangent of the dielectric film used for the separation of the upper and lower superconducting films. The simulated current distribution at its resonant frequency shows that the highest current density is distributed on the multiturn input coil. This current distribution leads to a very high loss when the loss tangent of the dielectric film is high. However, for the same loss tangent of the dielectric film, it is possible to get a reasonably high unloaded quality factor by providing a normal shunt for the multiturn input coil.

  17. Observation of double resistance anomalies and excessive resistance in mesoscopic superconducting Au0.7In0.3 rings with phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Rosario, M. M.; Russell, H. L.; Liu, Y.

    2007-02-01

    We have measured mesoscopic superconducting Au0.7In0.3 rings prepared by e -beam lithography and sequential deposition of Au and In at room temperature followed by a standard lift-off procedure. The majority of the samples are found to exhibit highly unusual double resistance anomalies, two resistance peaks with the peak resistances larger than the normal-state resistance, near the onset of superconductivity in the R(T) (resistance vs temperature) curves, and an h/2e resistance oscillation with a very small amplitude. A magnetic field applied perpendicular to the ring plane appears to suppress the low-temperature peak easily, but only broadens the high-temperature peak. In the intermediate-field range, the high-temperature resistance peak becomes flat down to the lowest temperature, resulting apparently in a magnetic-field-induced metallic state with its resistance higher than the normal-state resistance, referred to here as excessive resistance. The dynamical resistance vs bias current measurements carried out in samples showing double resistance anomalies suggest that there are two critical currents in these samples. We attribute the double resistance anomalies and the two critical currents to the presence of two superconducting phases originating from the phase separation of Au0.7In0.3 in which In-rich grains of AuIn precipitate in a uniform In-dilute matrix of Au0.9In0.1 . The local superconducting transition temperature of the In-rich grains is higher than that of the In-dilute matrix. The double resistance anomalies are not found in a sample showing the conventional h/2e Little-Parks (LP) resistance oscillation, which we believe is due to the absence of the phase separation in this particular sample. Finally, we argue that the h/2e resistance oscillation observed in samples showing double resistance anomalies is not the LP but rather the Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak resistance oscillation of normal electrons enhanced by superconductivity.

  18. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Gray, K.E.

    1988-07-28

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non- superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propagating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N/sup 2/ ambiguity of charged particle events. 6 figs.

  19. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1989-01-01

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non-superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propogating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N.sup.2 ambiguity of charged particle events.

  20. Error tolerance studies for the superconducting linac of RAON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyojae; Jin, Hyunchang

    2015-10-01

    RAON, an ion accelerator, is planned in Daejeon, Korea, by the Rare Isotope Science Project. RAON has three linear accelerators, and they will accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, xenon, oxygen and rare isotopes from the isotopes separation on-line system. The linear accelerators of the RAON adopted superconducting cavities and a warm quadrupole doublet structure. Because the target beam power is 400 kWfor the uranium beam, the small beam loss in the linear accelerators can be concluded to the radiation damage to the devices in this region. As a result, estimating the allowable alignment and radio-frequency errors for the RAON linear accelerator is one of the important topics for this project. In this paper, the beam dynamics simulation results, including such errors, will be described.

  1. Superconducting Analog to Digital Converters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    superconductivity, Josephson junctions, and superconducting quantum interference devices ( SQUIDs ) are briefly described. Various techniques to perform analog-to...deployment in the 1990s may require a dynamic range in excess of 90 dB (15- bit precision) [3]. However, at the present time, A/D conversion with 16-bit...Interference Devices ( SQUIDs ). JOSEPHSON EFFECTS AND JUNCTIONS Consider a very thin, non-superconducting region separating two superconductors. In 1962

  2. Superconductive wire

    DOEpatents

    Korzekwa, David A.; Bingert, John F.; Peterson, Dean E.; Sheinberg, Haskell

    1995-01-01

    A superconductive article is made by inserting a rigid mandrel into an internal cavity of a first metallic tube, said tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface defining the interior cavity, forming a layer of a superconductive material or superconductive precursor upon the exterior surface of said first metallic tube, machining the layer of superconductive material or superconductive precursor to a predetermined diameter to form an intermediate article configured for insertion into a second metallic tube having an interior diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter, inserting the machined intermediate article into a second metallic tube having an internal diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter of the intermediate article to form a composite intermediate article, reducing or ironing the composite intermediate article to a predetermined cross-sectional diameter, and sintering the reduced or ironed composite intermediate article at temperatures and for time sufficient for the superconductive material or superconductive precursor to exhibit superconductivity.

  3. Superconductive wire

    DOEpatents

    Korzekwa, D.A.; Bingert, J.F.; Peterson, D.E.; Sheinberg, H.

    1995-07-18

    A superconductive article is made by inserting a rigid mandrel into an internal cavity of a first metallic tube, said tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface defining the interior cavity, forming a layer of a superconductive material or superconductive precursor upon the exterior surface of said first metallic tube, machining the layer of superconductive material or superconductive precursor to a predetermined diameter to form an intermediate article configured for insertion into a second metallic tube having an interior diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter, inserting the machined intermediate article into a second metallic tube having an internal diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter of the intermediate article to form a composite intermediate article, reducing or ironing the composite intermediate article to a predetermined cross-sectional diameter, and sintering the reduced or ironed composite intermediate article at temperatures and for time sufficient for the superconductive material or superconductive precursor to exhibit superconductivity. 2 figs.

  4. Superconducting transistor

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting transistor is formed by disposing three thin films of superconducting material in a planar parallel arrangement and insulating the films from each other by layers of insulating oxides to form two tunnel junctions. One junction is biased above twice the superconducting energy gap and the other is biased at less than twice the superconducting energy gap. Injection of quasiparticles into the center film by one junction provides a current gain in the second junction.

  5. Thermal compression and molding of atherosclerotic vascular tissue with use of radiofrequency energy: implications for radiofrequency balloon angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.I.; Becker, G.J.; Waller, B.F.; Barry, K.J.; Connolly, R.J.; Kaplan, J.; Shapiro, A.R.; Nardella, P.C.

    1989-04-01

    The combined delivery of pressure and thermal energy may effectively remodel intraluminal atherosclerotic plaque and fuse intimal tears. To test these hypotheses with use of a non-laser thermal energy source, radiofrequency energy was delivered to postmortem human atherosclerotic vessels from a metal hot-tip catheter, block-mounted bipolar electrodes and from a prototype radiofrequency balloon catheter. Sixty-two radiofrequency doses delivered from a metal electrode tip produced dose-dependent ablation of atherosclerotic plaque, ranging from clean and shallow craters with histologic evidence of thermal compression at doses less than 40 J to tissue charring and vaporization at higher (greater than 80 J) doses. Lesion dimensions ranged between 3.14 and 3.79 mm in diameter and 0.20 and 0.47 mm in depth. Tissue perforation was not observed. To test the potential for radiofrequency fusion of intimal tears, 5 atm of pressure and 200 J radiofrequency energy were delivered from block-mounted bipolar electrodes to 48 segments of human atherosclerotic aorta, which had been manually separated into intima-media and media-adventitial layers. Significantly stronger tissue fusion resulted (28.5 +/- 3.3 g) with radiofrequency compared with that with pressure alone (4.8 +/- 0.26 g; p less than 0.0001). A prototype radiofrequency balloon catheter was used to deliver 3 atm of balloon pressure with or without 200 J radiofrequency energy to 20 postmortem human atherosclerotic arterial segments. In 10 of 10 radiofrequency-treated vessels, thermal molding of both normal and atherosclerotic vessel wall segments resulted with increased luminal diameter and histologic evidence of medial myocyte damage.

  6. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized.

  7. Apparatus for characterizing conductivity of superconducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Doss, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and method for noncontact, radio-frequency shielding current characterization of materials. Self- or mutual inductance changes in one or more inductive elements, respectively, occur when materials capable of supporting shielding currents are placed in proximity thereto, or undergo change in resistivity while in place. Such changes can be observed by incorporating the inductor(s) in a resonant circuit and determining the frequency of oscillation or by measuring the voltage induced on a coupled inductive element. The present invention is useful for determining the critical temperature and superconducting transition width for superconducting samples.

  8. Apparatus for characterizing conductivity of superconducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Doss, J.D.

    1993-12-07

    Apparatus and method for noncontact, radio-frequency shielding current characterization of materials. Self- or mutual inductance changes in one or more inductive elements, respectively, occur when materials capable of supporting shielding currents are placed in proximity thereto, or undergo change in resistivity while in place. Such changes can be observed by incorporating the inductor(s) in a resonant circuit and determining the frequency of oscillation or by measuring the voltage induced on a coupled inductive element. The present invention is useful for determining the critical temperature and superconducting transition width for superconducting samples. 10 figures.

  9. Superconducting Cable

    DOEpatents

    Hughey, Raburn L.; Sinha, Uday K.; Reece, David S.; Muller, Albert C.

    2005-07-22

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  10. Superconducting Cable

    DOEpatents

    Hughey, Raburn L.; Sinha, Uday K.; Reece, David S.; Muller, Albert C.

    2005-03-08

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  11. Superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Satti, John A.

    1980-01-01

    A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

  12. Superconducting Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    After working with Lewis Research Center and Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Superconducting Technologies, Inc. (STI) adapted NASA requirements and refined its own standard production recipe. STI uses high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials in its basic products: high quality thin films, circuits and components. Applications include microwave circuits for radar to reduce interference.

  13. Free-standing oxide superconducting articles

    DOEpatents

    Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.

    1993-12-14

    A substrate-free, free-standing epitaxially oriented superconductive film including a layer of a template material and a layer of a ceramic superconducting material is provided together with a method of making such a substrate-free ceramic superconductive film by coating an etchable material with a template layer, coating the template layer with a layer of a ceramic superconductive material, coating the layer of ceramic superconductive material with a protective material, removing the etchable material by an appropriate means so that the etchable material is separated from a composite structure including the template layer.

  14. Superconducting structure

    DOEpatents

    Kwon, Chuhee; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2003-04-01

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  15. Superconducting Structure

    DOEpatents

    Kwon, Chuhee; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2005-09-13

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  16. Hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, R.C.; McConnell, B.W.; Phillips, B.A.

    1996-07-02

    A hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor includes a rotor separated from a stator by either a radial gap, an axial gap, or a combined axial and radial gap. Dual conically shaped stators are used in one embodiment to levitate a disc-shaped rotor made of superconducting material within a conduit for moving cryogenic fluid. As the rotor is caused to rotate when the field stator is energized, the fluid is pumped through the conduit. 6 figs.

  17. Hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.; McConnell, Benjamin W.; Phillips, Benjamin A.

    1996-01-01

    A hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor includes a rotor separated from a stator by either a radial gap, an axial gap, or a combined axial and radial gap. Dual conically shaped stators are used in one embodiment to levitate a disc-shaped rotor made of superconducting material within a conduit for moving cryogenic fluid. As the rotor is caused to rotate when the field stator is energized, the fluid is pumped through the conduit.

  18. Radiofrequency attenuator and method

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Burrell, Anthony K.; Agrawal, Anoop; Hall, Simon B.

    2009-11-10

    Radiofrequency attenuator and method. The attenuator includes a pair of transparent windows. A chamber between the windows is filled with molten salt. Preferred molten salts include quarternary ammonium cations and fluorine-containing anions such as tetrafluoroborate (BF.sub.4.sup.-), hexafluorophosphate (PF.sub.6.sup.-), hexafluoroarsenate (AsF.sub.6.sup.-), trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3 C.sup.-). Radicals or radical cations may be added to or electrochemically generated in the molten salt to enhance the RF attenuation.

  19. Radiofrequency attenuator and method

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Burrell, Anthony K.; Agrawal, Anoop; Hall, Simon B.

    2009-01-20

    Radiofrequency attenuator and method. The attenuator includes a pair of transparent windows. A chamber between the windows is filled with molten salt. Preferred molten salts include quarternary ammonium cations and fluorine-containing anions such as tetrafluoroborate (BF.sub.4.sup.-), hexafluorophosphate (PF.sub.6.sup.-), hexafluoroarsenate (AsF.sub.6.sup.-), trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3C.sup.-). Radicals or radical cations may be added to or electrochemically generated in the molten salt to enhance the RF attenuation.

  20. Superconducting multipole corrector magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    A novel concept of superconducting multipole corrector magnet is discussed. This magnet assembled from 12 identical racetrack type coils and can generate any combination of dipole, quadrupole and sextupole magnetic fields. The coil groups are powered from separate power supplies. In the case of normal dipole, quadrupole and sextupole fields the total field is symmetrical relatively the magnet median plane and there are only five powered separately coil groups. This type multipole corrector magnet was proposed for BTeV, Fermilab project and has following advantages: universal configuration, simple manufacturing and high mechanical stability. The results of magnetic design including the field quality and magnetic forces in comparison with known shell type superconducting correctors are presented.

  1. Superconducting magnet wire

    DOEpatents

    Schuller, Ivan K.; Ketterson, John B.; Banerjee, Indrajit

    1986-01-01

    A superconducting tape or wire with an improved critical field is formed of alternating layers of a niobium-containing superconductor such as Nb, NbTi, Nb.sub.3 Sn or Nb.sub.3 Ge with a thickness in the range of about 0.5-1.5 times its coherence length, supported and separated by layers of copper with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170-600 .ANG..

  2. Spin-orbit-coupled superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Lo, Shun-Tsung; Lin, Shih-Wei; Wang, Yi-Ting; Lin, Sheng-Di; Liang, C-T

    2014-06-25

    Superconductivity and spin-orbit (SO) interaction have been two separate emerging fields until very recently that the correlation between them seemed to be observed. However, previous experiments concerning SO coupling are performed far beyond the superconducting state and thus a direct demonstration of how SO coupling affects superconductivity remains elusive. Here we investigate the SO coupling in the critical region of superconducting transition on Al nanofilms, in which the strength of disorder and spin relaxation by SO coupling are changed by varying the film thickness. At temperatures T sufficiently above the superconducting critical temperature T(c), clear signature of SO coupling reveals itself in showing a magneto-resistivity peak. When T < T(c), the resistivity peak can still be observed; however, its line-shape is now affected by the onset of the quasi two-dimensional superconductivity. By studying such magneto-resistivity peaks under different strength of spin relaxation, we highlight the important effects of SO interaction on superconductivity.

  3. Superconducting Memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peotta, Sebastiano; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2014-09-01

    In his original work, Josephson predicted that a phase-dependent conductance should be present in superconducting tunnel junctions, an effect difficult to detect, mainly because it is hard to single it out from the usual nondissipative Josephson current. We propose a solution for this problem that consists of using different superconducting materials to realize the two junctions of a superconducting interferometer. According to the Ambegaokar-Baratoff relation the two junctions have different conductances if the critical currents are equal, thus the Josephson current can be suppressed by fixing the magnetic flux in the loop at half of a flux quantum without canceling the phase-dependent conductance. Our proposal can be used to study the phase-dependent conductance, an effect present in principle in all superconducting weak links. From the standpoint of nonlinear circuit theory, such a device is in fact an ideal memristor with possible applications to memories and neuromorphic computing in the framework of ultrafast and low-energy-consumption superconducting digital circuits.

  4. Measurement of radiofrequency fields

    SciTech Connect

    Leonowich, J.A.

    1992-05-01

    We are literally surrounded by radiofrequency (RFR) and microwave radiation, from both natural and man-made sources. The identification and control of man-made sources of RFR has become a high priority of radiation safety professionals in recent years. For the purposes of this paper, we will consider RFR to cover the frequencies from 3 kHz to 300 MHz, and microwaves from 300 MHz to 300 GHz, and will use the term RFR interchangeably to describe both. Electromagnetic radiation and field below 3 kHz is considered Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and will not be discussed in this paper. Unlike x- and gamma radiation, RFR is non-ionizing. The energy of any RFR photon is insufficient to produce ionizations in matter. The measurement and control of RFR hazards is therefore fundamentally different from ionizing radiation. The purpose of this paper is to acquaint the reader with the fundamental issues involved in measuring and safely using RFR fields. 23 refs.

  5. Superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Willen, E.; Dahl, P.; Herrera, J.

    1985-01-01

    This report provides a self-consistent description of a magnetic field in the aperture of a superconducting magnet and details how this field can be calculated in a magnet with cos theta current distribution in the coils. A description of an apparatus that can be used to measure the field uniformity in the aperture has been given. Finally, a detailed description of the magnet being developed for use in the Superconducting Super Collider is given. When this machine is built, it will be by far the largest application of superconductivity to date and promises to make possible the experimental discoveries needed to understand the basic laws of nature governing the world in which we live.

  6. PREFACE: Superconducting materials Superconducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charfi Kaddour, Samia; Singleton, John; Haddad, Sonia

    2011-11-01

    The discovery of superconductivity in 1911 was a great milestone in condensed matter physics. This discovery has resulted in an enormous amount of research activity. Collaboration among chemists and physicists, as well as experimentalists and theoreticians has given rise to very rich physics with significant potential applications ranging from electric power transmission to quantum information. Several superconducting materials have been synthesized. Crucial progress was made in 1987 with the discovery of high temperature superconductivity in copper-based compounds (cuprates) which have revealed new fascinating properties. Innovative theoretical tools have been developed to understand the striking features of cuprates which have remained for three decades the 'blue-eyed boy' for researchers in superconductor physics. The history of superconducting materials has been notably marked by the discovery of other compounds, particularly organic superconductors which despite their low critical temperature continue to attract great interest regarding their exotic properties. Last but not least, the recent observation of superconductivity in iron-based materials (pnictides) has renewed hope in reaching room temperature superconductivity. However, despite intense worldwide studies, several features related to this phenomenon remain unveiled. One of the fundamental key questions is the mechanism by which superconductivity takes place. Superconductors continue to hide their 'secret garden'. The new trends in the physics of superconductivity have been one of the two basic topics of the International Conference on Conducting Materials (ICoCoM2010) held in Sousse,Tunisia on 3-7 November 2010 and organized by the Tunisian Physical Society. The conference was a nice opportunity to bring together participants from multidisciplinary domains in the physics of superconductivity. This special section contains papers submitted by participants who gave an oral contribution at ICoCoM2010

  7. Light modulated electron beam driven radiofrequency emitter

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, M.T.; Tallerico, P.J.

    1979-10-10

    The disclosure relates to a light modulated electron beam-driven radiofrequency emitter. Pulses of light impinge on a photoemissive device which generates an electron beam having the pulse characteristics of the light. The electron beam is accelerated through a radiofrequency resonator which produces radiofrequency emission in accordance with the electron, hence, the light pulses.

  8. Superconducting Microelectronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Richard W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses superconducting microelectronics based on the Josephson effect and its advantages over conventional integrated circuits in speed and sensitivity. Considers present uses in standards laboratories (voltage) and in measuring weak magnetic fields. Also considers future applications in superfast computer circuitry using Superconducting…

  9. Radiofrequency fields and teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Heynick, Louis N; Merritt, James H

    2003-01-01

    Experimental studies that sought teratologic effects or developmental abnormalities from exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RFEMF) in the range 3 kHz-300 GHz are critically reviewed for their possible consequences on human health. Those studies were conducted on beetles, birds, rodents, and nonhuman primates. Collectively, those experimental studies indicate that teratologic effects can occur only from exposure levels that cause biologically detrimental increases in body temperature. No reliable experimental evidence was found for nonthermal teratologic effects; rodents, mouse fetuses, and perinatal mice are more susceptible to such effects than rats. The primary confirmed effect in rats at high RFEMF levels was initial weight deficits in fetuses and neonates that decreased with infant growth. More generally from findings with pregnant mammals, exposures at RFEMF levels far higher than those permitted under the IEEE human exposure guidelines are necessary to reach or exceed cited experimental thresholds for maternal temperature increases. Some results indicated that the levels necessary to cause such effects in pregnant mammals could exceed those lethal to the dams. In a behavioral study of squirrel monkeys, no effects were observed on usual dam-offspring interactions or EEGs, but unexpected deaths of a number of offspring had occurred. However, this finding was not confirmed in a study solely on infant death using a larger number of subjects for greater statistical validity. Also reviewed were epidemiologic studies of various human populations considered to have been chronically exposed to environmental levels of RFEMF. Early studies on the incidence of congenital anomalies yielded no credible evidence that chronic exposure of pregnant women or of fathers exposed to RFEMF from nearby sources at levels below those guidelines would cause any anomalies in their offspring. The findings of studies on pregnancy outcomes of female physiotherapists

  10. High performance superconducting radio frequency ingot niobium technology for continuous wave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Pashupati Ciovati, Gianluigi Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2015-12-04

    Future continuous wave (CW) accelerators require the superconducting radio frequency cavities with high quality factor and medium accelerating gradients (≤20 MV/m). Ingot niobium cavities with medium purity fulfill the specifications of both accelerating gradient and high quality factor with simple processing techniques and potential reduction in cost. This contribution reviews the current superconducting radiofrequency research and development and outlines the potential benefits of using ingot niobium technology for CW applications.

  11. Archimedean solidlike superconducting framework in phase-separated K0.8F e1.6 +xS e2(0 ≤x ≤0.15 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Cai, Y.; Wang, Z. W.; Ma, C.; Chen, Z.; Yang, H. X.; Tian, H. F.; Li, J. Q.

    2015-02-01

    The superconducting (SC) phase in phase-separated (PS) K0.8F e1.6 +xS e2(0 ≤x ≤0.15 ) materials is found to crystallize on Archimedean solidlike frameworks, and this structural feature originates from a spinodal phase separation (SPS) at around Ts≈540 K , depending slightly on the Fe concentration, as revealed by in situ heating TEM observations and shown in a phase diagram. Two stable phases in K0.8F e1.6 +xS e2 are demonstrated to be the SC K0.5F e2S e2 and antiferromagnetic (AFM) K0.8F e1.6S e2 . The spinodal waves go along the systematic [113 ] direction and result in notable lamellar structure as illustrated by strain-field theoretical simulations. The three-dimensional SC framework is constructed with hollow truncated octahedron similar to that discussed for Archimedean solids. Based on this structural model, we can efficiently calculate the volume fraction of the SC phase in this type of PS SC material.

  12. a Radio-Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foo, Thomas Kwok-Fah

    Radio-frequency (RF) inhomogeneity encountered in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging poses a significant impediment to obtaining images of the highest diagnostic quality. This inhomogeneity arises from the conductivity effect, which attenuates the RF field with increasing depth, and the permittivity effect. The latter is the dominant effect at 1.5 Tesla (64 MHz), and contributes to standing waves within the body. A theoretical model has been developed which describes these effects for an infinitely long right circularly cylindrical object inside a concentric RF coil and RF shield. This model assumes that the RF field propagates as a travelling wave in the z direction, along the long axis of the cylinder. The resulting solutions adequately predict the field distribution for RF coils which have both a finite wavelength and an infinite wavelength in z. This corresponds to high-pass and low-pass birdcage resonators, respectively, that are in general used in MR imaging. Standing wave models are easily obtained from the superposition of solutions of two travelling waves in opposite directions. The results of this model indicate that the axial propagation constant k_{z} is a strong function of the dielectric present in the coil -to-shield space. The field distribution in the axial plane can be represented by the Bessel function J_1(k _{rho}r), where k _sp{rho}{2} = k^2-k_sp{z}{2} . By varying the dielectric material occupying the coil-to-shield space, an optimum value of k _{z} can be obtained for a particular coil and shield configuration which minimizes the amplitude variations in the axial plane. Experimental verification of the theoretical model has been obtained. These measurements were performed on a non-resonant, travelling wave test coil with a saline phantom as a load simulating the body. The measured field profiles in the axial plane agree with the predicted values, establishing the validity of the theoretical model. As expected, optimal RF homogeneity was obtained

  13. The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator at Fermilab: Science Program

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, Philippe; Harms, Elvin; Henderson, Stuart; Leibfritz, Jerry; Nagaitsev, Sergei; Shiltsev, Vladimir; Valishev, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) currently in commissioning phase at Fermilab is foreseen to support a broad range of beam-based experiments to study fundamental limitations to beam intensity and to develop novel approaches to particle-beam generation, acceleration and manipulation. ASTA incorporates a superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) linac coupled to a flexible high-brightness photoinjector. The facility also includes a small-circumference storage ring capable of storing electrons or protons. This report summarizes the facility capabilities, and provide an overview of the accelerator-science researches to be enabled.

  14. SUPERCONDUCTING PHOTOINJECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI,I.; BURRILL, A.; CALAGA, R.; CHANG, X.; GROVER, R.; GUPTA, R.; HAHN, H.; HAMMONS, L.; KAYRAN, D.; KEWISCH, J.; LAMBIASE, R.; LITVINENKO, V.; MCINTYRE, G.; NAIK, D.; PATE, D.; PHILLIPS, D.; POZDEYEV, E.; RAO, T.; SMEDLEY, J.; THAN, R.; TODD, R.; WEISS, D.; WU, Q.; ZALTSMAN, A.; ET AL.

    2007-08-26

    One of the frontiers in FEL science is that of high power. In order to reach power in the megawatt range, one requires a current of the order of one ampere with a reasonably good emittance. The superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photocathode is the most natural candidate to provide this performance. The development of a 1/2 cell superconducting photoinjector designed to operate at up to a current of 0.5 amperes and beam energy of 2 MeV and its photocathode system are the subjects covered in this paper. The main issues are the photocathode and its insertion mechanism, the power coupling and High Order Mode damping. This technology is being developed at BNL for DOE nuclear physics applications such as electron cooling at high energy and electron ion colliders..

  15. Color superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wilczek, F.

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  16. Superconducting magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Extensive computer based engineering design effort resulted in optimization of a superconducting magnet design with an average bulk current density of approximately 12KA/cm(2). Twisted, stranded 0.0045 inch diameter NbTi superconductor in a copper matrix was selected. Winding the coil from this bundle facilitated uniform winding of the small diameter wire. Test coils were wound using a first lot of the wire. The actual packing density was measured from these. Interwinding voltage break down tests on the test coils indicated the need for adjustment of the wire insulation on the lot of wire subsequently ordered for construction of the delivered superconducting magnet. Using the actual packing densities from the test coils, a final magnet design, with the required enhancement and field profile, was generated. All mechanical and thermal design parameters were then also fixed. The superconducting magnet was then fabricated and tested. The first test was made with the magnet immersed in liquid helium at 4.2K. The second test was conducted at 2K in vacuum. In the latter test, the magnet was conduction cooled from the mounting flange end.

  17. Freely oriented portable superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Schmierer, Eric N.; Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D.

    2010-01-12

    A freely oriented portable superconducting magnet is disclosed. Coolant is supplied to the superconducting magnet from a repository separate from the magnet, enabling portability of the magnet. A plurality of support assemblies structurally anchor and thermally isolate the magnet within a thermal shield. A plurality of support assemblies structurally anchor and thermally isolate the thermal shield within a vacuum vessel. The support assemblies restrain movement of the magnet resulting from energizing and cooldown, as well as from changes in orientation, enabling the magnet to be freely orientable.

  18. Free-standing oxide superconducting articles

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Xin D.; Muenchausen, Ross E.

    1993-01-01

    A substrate-free, free-standing epitaxially oriented superconductive film including a layer of a template material and a layer of a ceramic superconducting material is provided together with a method of making such a substrate-free ceramic superconductive film by coating an etchable material with a template layer, coating the template layer with a layer of a ceramic superconductive material, coating the layer of ceramic superconductive material with a protective material, removing the etchable material by an appropriate means so that the etchable material is separated from a composite structure including the template lay This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  19. Recent developments in rf superconductivity for high-brightness and high-gradient ion beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Kennedy, W.L.; Nichols, G.L.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-02-01

    Recent progress in on-going development program leading to the design of superconducting continuous-wave (cw) linear accelerators for high-brightness ion beams is reviewed. A new spoke-resonator geometry incorporating a half-wavelength resonant line was fabricated and tested. This geometry serves as the basis for the constituent cavities of a superconducting section being designed for high-current testing with a deuterium beam. Considerable progress has been made in the design of this section. A multi-phased program leading to the development of a superconducting radio-frequency quadrupole (SCRFQ) has been initiated. Design considerations and test results from the various activities are presented.

  20. Recent developments in rf superconductivity for high-brightness and high-gradient ion beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Kennedy, W.L.; Nichols, G.L.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-01-01

    Recent progress in on-going development program leading to the design of superconducting continuous-wave (cw) linear accelerators for high-brightness ion beams is reviewed. A new spoke-resonator geometry incorporating a half-wavelength resonant line was fabricated and tested. This geometry serves as the basis for the constituent cavities of a superconducting section being designed for high-current testing with a deuterium beam. Considerable progress has been made in the design of this section. A multi-phased program leading to the development of a superconducting radio-frequency quadrupole (SCRFQ) has been initiated. Design considerations and test results from the various activities are presented.

  1. Superconducting combined function magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.; Fernow, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    Superconducting accelerators and storage rings, presently under construction or in the design phase, are based on separate dipole and quadrupole magnets. It is here suggested that a hybrid lattice configuration consisting of dipoles and combined function gradient magnets would: (1) reduce the number of magnet units and their total cost; and (2) increase the filling factor and thus the energy at a given field. Coil cross sections are presented for the example of the Brookhaven Colliding Beam Accelerator. An asymmetric two-layer cable gradient magnet would have transfer functions of 10.42 G/A and 0.628 G cm/sup -1//A versus 15.77 G/A and 2.03 G cm/sup -1//A of the present separate dipoles and quadrupoles.

  2. Space applications of superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, D. B.; Vorreiter, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Some potential applications of superconductivity in space are summarized, e.g., the use of high field magnets for cosmic ray analysis or energy storage and generation, space applications of digital superconducting devices, such as the Josephson switch and, in the future, a superconducting computer. Other superconducting instrumentation which could be used in space includes: low frequency superconducting sensors, microwave and infrared detectors, instruments for gravitational studies, and high-Q cavities for use as stabilizing elements in clocks and oscillators.

  3. Architecture for high critical current superconducting tapes

    DOEpatents

    Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2002-01-01

    Improvements in critical current capacity for superconducting film structures are disclosed and include the use of, e.g., multilayer YBCO structures where individual YBCO layers are separated by a layer of an insulating material such as CeO.sub.2 and the like, a layer of a conducting material such as strontium ruthenium oxide and the like or by a second superconducting material such as SmBCO and the like.

  4. Predicting nurses' acceptance of radiofrequency identification technology.

    PubMed

    Norten, Adam

    2012-10-01

    The technology of radiofrequency identification allows for the scanning of radiofrequency identification-tagged objects and individuals without line-of-sight requirements. Healthcare organizations use radiofrequency identification to ensure the health and safety of patients and medical personnel and to uncover inefficiencies. Although the successful implementation of a system incorporating radiofrequency identification technologies requires acceptance and use of the technology, some nurses using radiofrequency identification in hospitals feel like "Big Brother" is watching them. This predictive study used a theoretical model assessing the effect of five independent variables: privacy concerns, attitudes, subjective norms, controllability, and self-efficacy, on a dependent variable, nurses' behavioral intention to use radiofrequency identification. A Web-based questionnaire containing previously validated questions was answered by 106 US RNs. Multiple linear regression showed that all constructs together accounted for 60% of the variance in nurses' intention to use radiofrequency identification. Of the predictors in the model, attitudes provided the largest unique contribution when the other predictors in the model were held constant; subjective norms also provided a unique contribution. Privacy concerns, controllability, and self-efficacy did not provide a significant contribution to nurses' behavioral intention to use radiofrequency identification.

  5. High field superconducting magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  6. Radio-Frequency Strain Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Rogowski, Robert S.; Holben, Milford S., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) strain monitor developed to measure lengths of objects. RF waveguide or cable bonded to structure monitored. Propagation of RF signal along waveguide results in phase shift proportional to length of path traveled. Impedance mismatches placed in RF cable at nodes of structure. Records mismatches and detects overall length of line and lengths of intervals between nodes. Used to detect changes in elements of large structure with single cable. Monitor has potential for many applications, including monitoring stability of such large structures as aircraft, bridges, and buildings in Earthquake zones.

  7. Laser Navigation for Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Varro, Zoltan; Locklin, Julia K. Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    A 45-year-old male with renal cell carcinoma secondary to von-Hippel Lindau (VHL) disease presented for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of kidney tumors. Due to his prior history of several partial nephrectomies and limited renal reserve, RFA was chosen because of its relatively nephron-sparing nature. A laser guidance device was used to help guide probe placement in an attempt to reduce procedure time and improve targeting accuracy. The device was successful at guiding needle placement, as both tumors were located with a single pass. Follow-up CT scan confirmed accurate needle placement, showing an area of coagulation necrosis covering the previously seen tumor.

  8. Radiofrequency Ablation for Liver Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Interventional ablative technologies aided by imaging techniques such as ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging have been crucial in managing patients with primary liver cancer and liver metastases over the past 20 years. Several ablative technologies have been used to treat liver cancer; however, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has emerged as the most common ablative therapy for hepatic lesions, both in the United States and globally. RFA is the treatment of choice for patients who cannot have surgical resection of the liver. This article focuses on the role of imaging in RFA treatment of primary and metastatic hepatic lesions.

  9. Superconductivity in Ca-doped graphene laminates

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, J.; Su, Y.; Howard, C. A.; Kundys, D.; Grigorenko, A. N.; Guinea, F.; Geim, A. K.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Nair, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite graphene’s long list of exceptional electronic properties and many theoretical predictions regarding the possibility of superconductivity in graphene, its direct and unambiguous experimental observation has not been achieved. We searched for superconductivity in weakly interacting, metal decorated graphene crystals assembled into so-called graphene laminates, consisting of well separated and electronically decoupled graphene crystallites. We report robust superconductivity in all Ca-doped graphene laminates. They become superconducting at temperatures (Tc) between ≈4 and ≈6 K, with Tc’s strongly dependent on the confinement of the Ca layer and the induced charge carrier concentration in graphene. We find that Ca is the only dopant that induces superconductivity in graphene laminates above 1.8 K among several dopants used in our experiments, such as potassium, caesium and lithium. By revealing the tunability of the superconducting response through doping and confinement of the metal layer, our work shows that achieving superconductivity in free-standing, metal decorated monolayer graphene is conditional on an optimum confinement of the metal layer and sufficient doping, thereby bringing its experimental realization within grasp. PMID:26979564

  10. Superconductivity in Ca-doped graphene laminates.

    PubMed

    Chapman, J; Su, Y; Howard, C A; Kundys, D; Grigorenko, A N; Guinea, F; Geim, A K; Grigorieva, I V; Nair, R R

    2016-03-16

    Despite graphene's long list of exceptional electronic properties and many theoretical predictions regarding the possibility of superconductivity in graphene, its direct and unambiguous experimental observation has not been achieved. We searched for superconductivity in weakly interacting, metal decorated graphene crystals assembled into so-called graphene laminates, consisting of well separated and electronically decoupled graphene crystallites. We report robust superconductivity in all Ca-doped graphene laminates. They become superconducting at temperatures (Tc) between ≈4 and ≈6 K, with Tc's strongly dependent on the confinement of the Ca layer and the induced charge carrier concentration in graphene. We find that Ca is the only dopant that induces superconductivity in graphene laminates above 1.8 K among several dopants used in our experiments, such as potassium, caesium and lithium. By revealing the tunability of the superconducting response through doping and confinement of the metal layer, our work shows that achieving superconductivity in free-standing, metal decorated monolayer graphene is conditional on an optimum confinement of the metal layer and sufficient doping, thereby bringing its experimental realization within grasp.

  11. Superconductivity in Ca-doped graphene laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, J.; Su, Y.; Howard, C. A.; Kundys, D.; Grigorenko, A. N.; Guinea, F.; Geim, A. K.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Nair, R. R.

    2016-03-01

    Despite graphene’s long list of exceptional electronic properties and many theoretical predictions regarding the possibility of superconductivity in graphene, its direct and unambiguous experimental observation has not been achieved. We searched for superconductivity in weakly interacting, metal decorated graphene crystals assembled into so-called graphene laminates, consisting of well separated and electronically decoupled graphene crystallites. We report robust superconductivity in all Ca-doped graphene laminates. They become superconducting at temperatures (Tc) between ≈4 and ≈6 K, with Tc’s strongly dependent on the confinement of the Ca layer and the induced charge carrier concentration in graphene. We find that Ca is the only dopant that induces superconductivity in graphene laminates above 1.8 K among several dopants used in our experiments, such as potassium, caesium and lithium. By revealing the tunability of the superconducting response through doping and confinement of the metal layer, our work shows that achieving superconductivity in free-standing, metal decorated monolayer graphene is conditional on an optimum confinement of the metal layer and sufficient doping, thereby bringing its experimental realization within grasp.

  12. Simple Superconducting "Permanent" Electromagnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelson, Ulf E.; Strayer, Donald M.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed short tube of high-temperature-superconducting material like YBa2Cu3O7 acts as strong electromagnet that flows as long as magnetic field remains below critical value and temperature of cylinder maintained sufficiently below superconducting-transition temperature. Design exploits maximally anisotropy of high-temperature-superconducting material.

  13. Superconductivity in the metallic elements at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlin, J. J.

    2015-07-01

    Although the highest superconducting critical temperature, Tc , found in an elemental solid at ambient pressure is 9.2 K (niobium), under the application of ultra-high pressures, several elements exhibit Tc values near or above 20 K. This review includes a survey of the occurrence and understanding of pressure-induced superconductivity in the subset of elements that are metallic at ambient pressure. A particular focus is directed towards those elements that display the highest superconducting critical temperatures or exhibit substantial increases in Tc with pressure. A separate article in this issue by Shimizu will cover pressure-induced superconductivity in elements that are insulating at ambient pressure.

  14. Adaptive response in animals exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields: some underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi; Tong, Jian

    2014-04-22

    During the last few years, our research group has been investigating the phenomenon of adaptive response in animals exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields. The results from several separate studies indicated a significant increase in survival, decreases in genetic damage as well as oxidative damage and, alterations in several cellular processes in mice pre-exposed to radiofrequency fields and subsequently subjected to sub-lethal or lethal doses of γ-radiation or injected with bleomycin, a radiomimetic chemical mutagen. These observations indicated the induction of adaptive response providing the animals the ability to resist subsequent damage. Similar studies conducted by independent researchers in mice and rats have supported our observation on increased survival. In this paper, we have presented a brief review of all of our own and other independent investigations on radiofrequency fields-induced adaptive response and some underlying mechanisms discussed.

  15. Radiofrequency Ablation: A Nursing Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has emerged as a safe and predictable technology for treating certain patients with cancer who otherwise have few treatment options. Nurses need to be familiar with all phases of the RFA procedure to create an optimal environment for patients. This article offers a brief review of the RFA procedure and nurses' responsibilities in caring for these patients. Before RFA, nurses should focus on patient education and aggressive hydration. During the procedure, nurses can prevent injury by placing grounding pads appropriately, monitoring vital signs, and medicating patients as needed. After RFA, nurses should assess the skin puncture site, provide adequate pain relief, and, again, hydrate patients. Nurses who care appropriately for RFA recipients may help to improve patient outcomes and make an otherwise frightening procedure more comfortable. PMID:15973845

  16. Superconductivity in Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Jose R.; Antaya, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity is playing an increasingly important role in advanced medical technologies. Compact superconducting cyclotrons are emerging as powerful tools for external beam therapy with protons and carbon ions, and offer advantages of cost and size reduction in isotope production as well. Superconducting magnets in isocentric gantries reduce their size and weight to practical proportions. In diagnostic imaging, superconducting magnets have been crucial for the successful clinical implementation of magnetic resonance imaging. This article introduces each of those areas and describes the role which superconductivity is playing in them.

  17. Protective link for superconducting coil

    DOEpatents

    Umans, Stephen D.

    2009-12-08

    A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

  18. [Radiofrequency for the treatment of liver tumors].

    PubMed

    Elias, D; De Baere, T

    2001-04-01

    Radiofrequency is performed with thin electrodes that are placed in the center of a tumor under ultrasonographic guidance. Radiofrequency waves induce ionic agitation which destroys neighboring tissues by heat. The most recent equipment can produce necrosis of 4-cm diameter areas. Efficacy is enhanced by blocking intrahepatic blood flow which naturally refreshes the liver parenchyma. The technique has the advantage of minimal invasion and of sparing liver parenchymal tissue. radiofrequency can be performed percutaneously or by laparoscopi or laparotomy. results in most reported series have been good with low morbidity. rapid improvment of material and of new associated procedures (vascular clamping, cooling infusion of the bile ducts, transplaeurodiaphragmatic approach, combination with other new approaches in liver surgery) are continuously modifying performance levels and potential indications curently under validation. radiofrequency, like other tools for local tumor destruction, will greatly change our therapeutic strategies in the neat future.

  19. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Gianmattia; del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

  20. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified.

  1. Superconductivity in the Tungsten Bronzes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Phillip; Ishii, Satoshi; Tanabe, Kenji; Munakata, Ko; Hammond, Robert H.; Tokiwa, Kazuyasu; Geballe, Theodore H.; Beasley, Malcolm R.

    2015-03-01

    Via pulsed laser deposition and post-annealing, high quality K-doped WO3-y films with reproducible transport properties are obtained. A home built two-coil mutual inductance setup is used to probe the behavior of the films in the superconducting and normal state. The inverse penetration depths and dissipation peaks are measured as a function of temperature and field. Separately, via thin film deposition techniques, we report for the first time stable crystalline hexagonal WO3 on substrates. In order to tune the physical properties of the undoped material, we utilized an ionic liquid gating technique. We observe an insulator-to-metal transition, showing the ionic liquid gate to be a viable technique to alter the electrical transport properties of this material. By comparing the alkali and ionic liquid gated WO3, we conclude with some remarks regarding how superconductivity arises in this system.

  2. Termination for superconducting power transmission systems

    DOEpatents

    Forsyth, E.B.; Jensen, J.E.

    1975-08-26

    This patent relates to a cold, electrical gradient, terminal section for a superconducting cable for alternating current power transmission. A cold electrical gradient section filled with a gaseous coolant acting as an insulator is provided in series with a separate thermal gradient section. (auth)

  3. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzton-Maziopa, A.; Svitlyk, V.; Pomjakushina, E.; Puzniak, R.; Conder, K.

    2016-07-01

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2-y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations.

  4. High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 149 NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (Web, free access)   The NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (WebHTS) provides evaluated thermal, mechanical, and superconducting property data for oxides and other nonconventional superconductors.

  5. Superconducting energy recovery linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2016-10-01

    High-average-power and high-brightness electron beams from a combination of laser photocathode electron guns and a superconducting energy recovery linac (ERL) is an emerging accelerator science with applications in ERL light sources, high repetition rate free electron lasers , electron cooling, electron ion colliders and more. This paper reviews the accelerator physics issues of superconducting ERLs, discusses major subsystems and provides a few examples of superconducting ERLs.

  6. The radiofrequency magnetic dipole discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martines, E.; Zuin, M.; Marcante, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Fassina, A.; Spolaore, M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes a novel and simple concept of plasma source, which is able to produce a radiofrequency magnetized discharge with minimal power requirements. The source is based on the magnetron concept and uses a permanent magnet as an active electrode. The dipolar field produced by the magnet confines the electrons, which cause further ionization, thus producing a toroidally shaped plasma in the equatorial region around the electrode. A plasma can be ignited with such scheme with power levels as low as 5 W. Paschen curves have been built for four different working gases, showing that in Helium or Neon, plasma breakdown is easily obtained also at atmospheric pressure. The plasma properties have been measured using a balanced Langmuir probe, showing that the electron temperature is around 3-4 eV and higher in the cathode proximity. Plasma densities of the order of 1016 m-3 have been obtained, with a good positive scaling with applied power. Overall, the electron pressure appears to be strongly correlated with the magnetic field magnitude in the measurement point.

  7. Radiofrequency Ablation Beyond the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Neeman, Ziv; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has begun to show promise for extrahepatic indications. Although much of the reported work on image-guided RFA of liver neoplasms is quite promising, it is even earlier in the evaluation and validation process for extrahepatic RFA, with few short-term and no long-term studies reported. Although there are much more data for liver RFA with almost 3,000 cases reported in the literature, there are a number of ongoing investigations of RFA for tumors in the kidney, lung, bone, breast, bone, and adrenal gland. Debulking and pain control with RFA present palliative options becoming increasingly popular weapons in the interventionalist's oncology arsenal. Metastatic disease with a wide variety of primary histologies in a myriad of locations may be treated with RFA after a careful consideration of the risk-to-benefit ratio balance. The RFA technique can be slightly different outside the liver. Specifically, differing dielectric tissue characteristics may markedly alter the RFA treatment. Each different RFA system has a unique risk and advantage profile. Extrahepatic indications and contraindications will be suggested. Treatment tips and the unique complications and considerations will be introduced for some of the more common extrahepatic locations. PMID:12524646

  8. Dual control active superconductive devices

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Beyer, James B.; Nordman, James E.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1993-07-20

    A superconducting active device has dual control inputs and is constructed such that the output of the device is effectively a linear mix of the two input signals. The device is formed of a film of superconducting material on a substrate and has two main conduction channels, each of which includes a weak link region. A first control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the first channel and a second control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the second channel. The current flowing from the first channel flows through an internal control line which is also adjacent to the weak link region of the second channel. The weak link regions comprise small links of superconductor, separated by voids, through which the current flows in each channel. Current passed through the control lines causes magnetic flux vortices which propagate across the weak link regions and control the resistance of these regions. The output of the device taken across the input to the main channels and the output of the second main channel and the internal control line will constitute essentially a linear mix of the two input signals imposed on the two control lines. The device is especially suited to microwave applications since it has very low input capacitance, and is well suited to being formed of high temperature superconducting materials since all of the structures may be formed coplanar with one another on a substrate.

  9. Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Overton, Jr., William C.; van Hulsteyn, David B.; Flynn, Edward R.

    1991-01-01

    An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  10. Superconducting optical modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunt, Patricia S.; Ference, Thomas G.; Puzey, Kenneth A.; Tanner, David B.; Tache, Nacira; Varhue, Walter J.

    2000-12-01

    An optical modulator based on the physical properties of high temperature superconductors has been fabricated and tested. The modulator was constructed form a film of Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide (YBCO) grown on undoped silicon with a buffer layer of Yttria Stabilized Zirconia. Standard lithographic procedures were used to pattern the superconducting film into a micro bridge. Optical modulation was achieved by passing IR light through the composite structure normal to the micro bridge and switching the superconducting film in the bridge region between the superconducting and non-superconducting states. In the superconducting state, IR light reflects from the superconducting film surface. When a critical current is passed through the micro bridge, it causes the film in this region to switch to the non-superconducting state allowing IR light to pass through it. Superconducting materials have the potential to switch between these two states at speeds up to 1 picosecond using electrical current. Presently, fiber optic transmission capacity is limited by the rate at which optical data can be modulated. The superconducting modulator, when combined with other components, may have the potential to increase the transmission capacity of fiber optic lines.

  11. Energy losses in superconductive DC-electromagnets due to ferromagnetic movement

    SciTech Connect

    Ciesla, A.; Matras, A.

    1996-05-01

    A DC-current, superconductive electromagnet is a source of the magnetic field in a separator matrix. This type of separator operates in a cyclic way. Therefore, it appears as very important to ensure the electromagnet stability during operation, i.e., range of parameters` changes that could maintain the magnet winding in the superconductive state. This means selecting parameter changes representing the magnet winding in the superconductive state.

  12. 21 CFR 882.4725 - Radiofrequency lesion probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion probe is a device connected to a radiofrequency (RF) lesion generator to deliver the RF energy to the site within the nervous system where a lesion is...

  13. 21 CFR 882.4725 - Radiofrequency lesion probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion probe is a device connected to a radiofrequency (RF) lesion generator to deliver the RF energy to the site within the nervous system where a lesion is...

  14. 21 CFR 882.4725 - Radiofrequency lesion probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion probe is a device connected to a radiofrequency (RF) lesion generator to deliver the RF energy to the site within the nervous system where a lesion is...

  15. 21 CFR 882.4725 - Radiofrequency lesion probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion probe is a device connected to a radiofrequency (RF) lesion generator to deliver the RF energy to the site within the nervous system where a lesion is...

  16. 21 CFR 882.4725 - Radiofrequency lesion probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion probe is a device connected to a radiofrequency (RF) lesion generator to deliver the RF energy to the site within the nervous system where a lesion is...

  17. The interminable adolescence of superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kolm, H.H.

    1988-12-01

    The author contends that superconductivity has failed to mature into a practical technology seventy-seven years after its discovery because Americans have lacked the curiosity to understand it, the imagination to appreciate it, and the spirit of enterprise to develop it, and that America is about to miss its last chance to regain technical leadership and economic security if it continues to pretend that higher transition temperature materials alone will change the situation. He goes on to discuss a range of applications, including high-gradient magnetic separation and filtration magnetically levitated transportation and makes recommendations for future materials and application research.

  18. Superconducting fault current controller/current controller

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Yung S.

    2004-06-15

    A superconducting fault current controller/current controller employs a superconducting-shielded core reactor (SSCR) with a variable impedance in a secondary circuit to control current in a primary circuit such as an electrical distribution system. In a second embodiment, a variable current source is employed in a secondary circuit of an SSCR to control current in the primary circuit. In a third embodiment, both a variable impedance in one secondary circuit and a variable current source in a second circuit of an SSCR are employed for separate and independent control of current in the primary circuit.

  19. Propagation characteristics of superconducting microstrip lines

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, S.G.; Ke, J.Y.; Chen, C.H.

    1996-01-01

    The modified spectral-domain approach is applied to study the propagation characteristics of high temperature superconducting microstrip lines whose signal strip and ground plane are of arbitrary thickness. In this study, numerical results for effective dielectric constant, attenuation constant, and strip current distribution are presented to discuss the effects due to frequency, temperature, strip thickness, and substrate loss tangent. In particular, the conductor and dielectric attenuation constants of superconducting microstrip line are depicted separately to discuss the mechanism of the line losses. A comparison with published theoretical and experimental results is also included to check the accuracy of the new approach`s results.

  20. Superconducting super computers are on the way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, E.

    1980-03-01

    Superconducting computers are examined based on Josephson junctions, two superconductors separated by an extremely thin film of insulating material which enables the electrons to tunnel from one superconductor to the other. The advantages of superconductors are presented, which include switching times of only 7 picoseconds, 16-megabyte memories, and 70 million instructions per second. Attention is given to a description of the Josephson junctions and the Josephson interferometer. The newest computers in the superconducting field are shown to be able to produce a larger output signal and at the same time be sensitive to a large range of inputs.

  1. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro; Goto, Hidenori; Jabuchi, Taihei; Yokoya, Takayoshi; Kambe, Takashi; Sakai, Yusuke; Izumi, Masanari; Zheng, Lu; Hamao, Shino; Nguyen, Huyen L. T.; Sakata, Masafumi; Kagayama, Tomoko; Shimizu, Katsuya

    2015-07-01

    'Aromatic hydrocarbon' implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (Kxpicene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (Tc's) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting Kxpicene phase with a Tc as high as 14 K, so we now know that Kxpicene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides Kxpicene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rbxpicene and Caxpicene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for Kxpicene and Rbxpicene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of Tc that is clearly observed in some phases of aromatic hydrocarbon superconductors, suggesting behavior not explained by the standard BCS picture of superconductivity. In this article, we describe the present status of this research field, and discuss its future prospects.

  2. 47 CFR 1.1310 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits. 1... Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits. The criteria listed in table 1 shall be used to evaluate the environmental impact of human exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation as specified in § 1.1307(b), except...

  3. 47 CFR 2.801 - Radiofrequency device defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radiofrequency device defined. 2.801 Section 2.801 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.801 Radiofrequency...

  4. 47 CFR 2.801 - Radiofrequency device defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radiofrequency device defined. 2.801 Section 2.801 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.801 Radiofrequency...

  5. 47 CFR 2.801 - Radiofrequency device defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radiofrequency device defined. 2.801 Section 2.801 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.801 Radiofrequency...

  6. 47 CFR 2.801 - Radiofrequency device defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radiofrequency device defined. 2.801 Section 2.801 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.801 Radiofrequency...

  7. 47 CFR 2.801 - Radiofrequency device defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radiofrequency device defined. 2.801 Section 2.801 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.801 Radiofrequency...

  8. Radiofrequency uvulopalatoplasty for primary snoring.

    PubMed

    Samimi Ardestani, Seyed Hadi; Dadgarnia, Mohammad Hossein; Baradaranfar, Mohammad Hossein; Mazidi, Mona; Rabbani, Mahtab; Behniafard, Nasim; Baradaranfar, Amin

    2013-09-09

    Simple snoring is a social problem, one that can gravely affect the patient's married life. About 40% of men and 20% of women are affected, and it often goes along with sleep-disordered breathing. Up to now various surgical techniques have been defined such as UPPP(uvulopalatopharyngo plasty), and laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty (LAUP). Among the surgical methods, RAUP (radiofrequency assisted uvulopalatoplasty) is a minimal invasive, an easy performed, and time and cost effective one. We designed a before and after a clinical trial. The inclusion criteria were age >18 years, complaint of nocturnal snoring, have a bed partner to assess snoring, AHI<5 events per hour in the polysomnography, malampathy score (soft palate position) I or II, an elongated uvula, grade I and II of pharyngeal webbing and patient consent was needed too. A 10-score visual analog scale (VAS) of snoring severity was completed by bed partner. All of 35 included patients underwent RAUP under local anesthesia by the same expert surgeon. After 3 months, 6 months and one year, subjective snoring decreased significantly compared to the preoperative period. The decline in VAS in 6 month compared to 3 months postoperatively, was not significant (P=0.223). When comparing 1 year and 6 months after treatment, the VAS scores were increased, but they were not significant (From 1.8 to 1.9, P=0.78). Three months after treatment minor complications consisted of: nasal regurgitation in 2 patients (5.7%), nasal speech in 2 (5.7%) and exacerbation of snoring in 2 (5.7%) patients.There was no major complication including mucosal laceration, uvular damage and obstruction of the airway. The rate of snoring decrease did not correlate with age, sex and BMI. Based on this study and literature review, it seems RAUP is a safe surgery, which may decrease symptoms of snoring, at least, in short-term follow-up.

  9. Superconducting properties of protactinium.

    PubMed

    Smith, J L; Spirlet, J C; Müller, W

    1979-07-13

    The superconducting transition temperature and upper critical magnetic field of protactinium were measured by alternating-current susceptibility techniques. Since the superconducting behavior of protactinium is affected by its 5f electron character, it is clear now that protactinium is a true actinide element.

  10. Superconductivity of magnesium diboride

    DOE PAGES

    Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-15

    Over the past 14 years MgB2 has gone from a startling discovery to a promising, applied superconductor. In our article we present a brief overview of the synthesis and the basic superconducting properties of this remarkable compound. Specifically, the effect of pressure, substitutions and neutron irradiation on superconducting properties are discussed.

  11. Superconductivity of magnesium diboride

    SciTech Connect

    Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-15

    Over the past 14 years MgB2 has gone from a startling discovery to a promising, applied superconductor. In our article we present a brief overview of the synthesis and the basic superconducting properties of this remarkable compound. Specifically, the effect of pressure, substitutions and neutron irradiation on superconducting properties are discussed.

  12. Superconducting gyroscope research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, J. B.; Karr, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    Four basic areas of research and development of superconducting gyroscopes are studied. Chapter 1 studies the analysis of a SQUID readout for a superconducting gyroscope. Chapter 2 studies the dependence of spin-up torque on channel and gas properties. Chapter 3 studies the theory of super fluid plug operation. And chapter 4 studies the gyro rotor and housing manufacture.

  13. Segmented superconducting tape having reduced AC losses and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Foltyn, Stephen R.; Jia, Quanxi; Arendt, Paul N.; Holesinger, Terry G.; Wang, Haiyan

    2009-09-22

    A superconducting tape having reduced AC losses. The tape has a high temperature superconductor layer that is segmented. Disruptive strips, formed in one of the tape substrate, a buffer layer, and the superconducting layer create parallel discontinuities in the superconducting layer that separate the current-carrying elements of the superconducting layer into strips or filament-like structures. Segmentation of the current-carrying elements has the effect of reducing AC current losses. Methods of making such a superconducting tape and reducing AC losses in such tapes are also disclosed.

  14. Deterministic phase slips in mesoscopic superconducting rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petković, I.; Lollo, A.; Glazman, L. I.; Harris, J. G. E.

    2016-11-01

    The properties of one-dimensional superconductors are strongly influenced by topological fluctuations of the order parameter, known as phase slips, which cause the decay of persistent current in superconducting rings and the appearance of resistance in superconducting wires. Despite extensive work, quantitative studies of phase slips have been limited by uncertainty regarding the order parameter's free-energy landscape. Here we show detailed agreement between measurements of the persistent current in isolated flux-biased rings and Ginzburg-Landau theory over a wide range of temperature, magnetic field and ring size; this agreement provides a quantitative picture of the free-energy landscape. We also demonstrate that phase slips occur deterministically as the barrier separating two competing order parameter configurations vanishes. These results will enable studies of quantum and thermal phase slips in a well-characterized system and will provide access to outstanding questions regarding the nature of one-dimensional superconductivity.

  15. Deterministic phase slips in mesoscopic superconducting rings

    PubMed Central

    Petković, I.; Lollo, A.; Glazman, L. I.; Harris, J. G. E.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of one-dimensional superconductors are strongly influenced by topological fluctuations of the order parameter, known as phase slips, which cause the decay of persistent current in superconducting rings and the appearance of resistance in superconducting wires. Despite extensive work, quantitative studies of phase slips have been limited by uncertainty regarding the order parameter's free-energy landscape. Here we show detailed agreement between measurements of the persistent current in isolated flux-biased rings and Ginzburg–Landau theory over a wide range of temperature, magnetic field and ring size; this agreement provides a quantitative picture of the free-energy landscape. We also demonstrate that phase slips occur deterministically as the barrier separating two competing order parameter configurations vanishes. These results will enable studies of quantum and thermal phase slips in a well-characterized system and will provide access to outstanding questions regarding the nature of one-dimensional superconductivity. PMID:27882924

  16. Superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlugon, Katarzyna

    The purpose of this thesis is to explain the phenomenon of superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. In the introductory chapter, there is a description of superconductivity and how it occurs at critical temperature (Tc) that is characteristic and different to every superconducting material. The discovery of superconductivity in mercury in 1911 by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes is also mentioned. Different types of superconductors, type I and type II, low and high temperatures superconductors, as well as the BCS theory that was developed in 1957 by Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer, are also described in detail. The BCS theory explains how Cooper's pairs are formed and how they are responsible for the superconducting properties of many materials. The following chapters explain superconductivity in doped fullerenes, graphene and carbon nanotubes, respectively. There is a thorough explanation followed by many examples of different types of carbon nanomaterials in which small changes in chemical structure cause significant changes in superconducting properties. The goal of this research was not only to take into consideration well known carbon based superconductors but also to search for the newest available materials such as the fullerene nanowhiskers discovered quite recently. There is also a presentation of fairly new ideas about inducing superconductivity in a monolayer of graphene which is more challenging than inducing superconductivity in graphite by simply intercalating metal atoms between its graphene sheets. An effort has been taken to look for any available information about carbon nanomaterials that have the potential to superconduct at room temperature, mainly because discovery of such materials would be a real revolution in the modern world, although no such materials have been discovered yet.

  17. Multiple Phase Transition in Unconventional Superconducting Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyawaki, N.; Higashitani, S.

    2016-10-01

    When Andreev bound states are formed at the surfaces of a superconducting film, there may arise, as the ground state of the film, a superconducting state with broken time-reversal symmetry (T). In this state, Cooper pairs with a finite center-of-mass momentum q are formed without external fields. We focus on the T-breaking state in a d-wave superconducting film and investigate the effect of the Fermi surface shape on its stability region in the T-D^{-1} phase diagram (T: temperature, D: film thickness). The phase boundaries separating the normal state, the T-breaking superconducting state, and the trivial (q = 0 ) superconducting state are determined for various Fermi surface shapes ranging from cylindrical to square. It is found that the region of the T-breaking phase is substantially enlarged when the Fermi surface is square-shaped. This is mainly because the critical thickness D_c between the normal and T-breaking states is significantly reduced when the Fermi surface has a good nesting property.

  18. B1-based specific energy absorption rate determination for nonquadrature radiofrequency excitation.

    PubMed

    Katscher, Ulrich; Findeklee, Christian; Voigt, Tobias

    2012-12-01

    The current gold standard to estimate local and global specific energy absorption rate for MRI involves numerically modeling the patient and the transmit radiofrequency coil. Recently, a patient-individual method was presented, which estimated specific energy absorption rate from individually measured B(1) maps. This method, however, was restricted to quadrature volume coils due to difficulties distinguishing phase contributions from radiofrequency transmission and reception. In this study, a method separating these two phase contributions by comparing the electric conductivity reconstructed from different transmit channels of a parallel radiofrequency transmission system is presented. This enables specific energy absorption rate estimation not only for quadrature excitation but also for the nonquadrature excitation of the single elements of the transmit array. Though the contributions of the different phases are known, unknown magnetic field components and tissue boundary artifacts limit the technique. Nevertheless, the high agreement between simulated and experimental results found in this study is promising. B(1)-based specific energy absorption rate determination might become possible for arbitrary radiofrequency excitation on a patient-individual basis.

  19. Metal optics and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Golovashkin, A.L.

    1989-01-01

    The articles contained in this collection are dedicated to the study of the electron structure of transition metals and superconducting alloys and compounds based on them. The study of the electron structure of materials is one of the central problems of solid-state physics and defines the solution of a number of problems. One of them is the problem of high-temperature superconductivity which has attracted exceptional attention from physicists in connection with the discovery of new classes of ceramic oxides which are superconducting at liquid-nitrogen temperature. The electron structure is one of the three whales on which all of superconductivity rests. It is frequently our ignorance of the electronic properties of a metal, alloy or compound in its normal state which makes it impossible to predict superconductivity in the material, preventing use from calculating the parameters of the superconducting state. There are now a number of effective methods for investigation of the electron structure of the metals and allows. This collection discusses metal optics, tunneling and magnetic measurements in superconductors. These methods are quite informative and allow us to obtain many important electron characteristics and temperature relations. Various characteristics of the superconducting compounds Nb{sub 3}Ge, Nb{sub 3}Al, nb{sub 3}Sn and Nb{sub 3}Ga with A15 structure and NbN with B1 structure, having rather high critical temperatures, are experimentally studied.

  20. Superconductivity in Opal-based superconducting nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. K.; Charnaya, E. V.; Chang, L. J.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.; Lin, M. F.

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we investigate superconducting nanocomposites (SCNCs) to elucidate superconductivity in nanostructured type I superconductor. In, Sn and Hg are loaded into opal matrices by high pressure up to 10kbar, in which introducing superconducting metals into templates preserves their own 3D nanostructures. The opal matrices is adopted because it is a well-developed nanoconfinement and widely used in the studies of photonic crystal due to its periodically-superlatticed nanoporous structure. The SCNCs are then measured by Quantum Design MPMS 3 under different external magnetic fields reveal the field dependences of Tc and irreversibility temperature (Tirr). Next, AC susceptibility measurements of SCNCs determine grain coupling, vortex dynamics and field dependence of activation barrier (Ua) as well as Tc. Additionally, the phase diagrams of these SCNCs are analyzed to study superconductivity for a system with similar nanogeometry. Exotic phase diagrams in the opal SCNC studies reveal an enhanced upper critical field (Hc2 (0)) and curvature crossover of upper critical field line. Additionally, according to the field dependence of Ua(H), curvature crossover of the upper critical field line can occur, owing to vortex phase transition.

  1. Structures behind superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.

    1988-07-01

    The previously reported preparation and structures of superconducting materials are reviewed. The two systems, Y-Ba-Cu-O and La-Cu-O, previously reported with high transition temperatures are discussed in some detail. The new systems introduced in 1987 that were not based on a rare earth but including Bi-Sr-Cu-O are also reviewed. Superconductive materials including thallium rather than bismuth that have been reported but not thoroughly studied are discussed briefly. It is pointed out that many superconducting materials have been prepared, but good documentation of the structures and properties of these materials need much more study.

  2. Tunneling in superconducting structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2010-12-01

    Here we review our results on the breakpoint features in the coupled system of IJJ obtained in the framework of the capacitively coupled Josephson junction model with diffusion current. A correspondence between the features in the current voltage characteristics (CVC) and the character of the charge oscillations in superconducting layers is demonstrated. Investigation of the correlations of superconducting currents in neighboring Josephson junctions and the charge correlations in neighboring superconducting layers reproduces the features in the CVC and gives a powerful method for the analysis of the CVC of coupled Josephson junctions. A new method for determination of the dissipation parameter is suggested.

  3. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, David S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Martens, Jon S.

    1993-01-01

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductor allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology.

  4. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

    1993-11-16

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductors allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology. 12 figures.

  5. Design Optimization of Superconducting Parallel-bar Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, Jean R.; De Silva, Payagalage Suba

    2009-11-01

    The parallel-bar structure is a new superconducting geometry [1] whose features and properties may have significant advantages over conventional superconducting deflecting and crabbing cavities for a number of applications. Jefferson Lab is in need for a 499 MHz, 11 GeV rf separator as part of its 12 GeV upgrade program. We report on design optimization studies performed to-date for this and other applications.

  6. Note: Control of liquid helium supply to cryopanels of Kolkata superconducting cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, T. K. Pal, G.

    2015-02-15

    The Kolkata superconducting cyclotron utilises liquid helium to cool the main magnet niobium-titanium (NbTi) coil and the cryopanels. Three liquid helium cooled cryopanels, placed inside the dees of the radio-frequency system, maintain the high vacuum in the acceleration region of the superconducting cyclotron. The small cryostat placed inside the cryogenic distribution manifold located at the basement of the superconducting cyclotron building supplies liquid helium in parallel branches to three cold heads, used for cooling their associated cryopanels. The level in the cryostat has to be maintained at an optimum value to ensure uninterrupted flow of liquid helium to these three cold heads. This paper describes the transfer function of the overall system, its tuning parameters, and discusses the actual control of cryostat level by using these parameters.

  7. Hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Tixador, P.; Hiebel, P.; Brunet, Y.

    1996-07-01

    Superconductors, especially high T{sub c} ones, are the most attractive materials to design stable and fully passive magnetic suspensions which have to control five degrees of freedom. The hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions present high performances and a simple cooling mode. They consist of a permanent magnet bearing, stabilized by a suitable magnet-superconductor structure. Several designs are given and compared in terms of forces and stiffnesses. The design of the magnet bearing plays an important part. The superconducting magnetic bearing participates less in levitation but must provide a high stabilizing stiffness. This is achieved by the magnet configuration, a good material in term of critical current density and field cooling. A hybrid superconducting suspension for a flywheel is presented. This system consists of a magnet thrust bearing stabilized by superconductors interacting with an alternating polarity magnet structure. First tests and results are reported. Superconducting materials are magnetically melt-textured YBaCuO.

  8. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, John D.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

  9. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1998-05-05

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat is disclosed. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device. 4 figs.

  10. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

  11. Supertubes and Superconducting Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Cordero, Ruben; Miguel-Pilar, Zelin

    2007-02-09

    We show the equivalence between configurations that arise from string theory of type IIA, called supertubes, and superconducting membranes at the bosonic level. We find equilibrium and oscillating configurations for a tubular membrane carrying a current along its axis.

  12. High Temperature Superconducting Compounds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-04-02

    addition to superconducting films, non-superconducting mixed-valence manganite perovskites, which exhibit so-called colossal magnetoresistance were grown...The manganites are unique in that their charge carriers are believed to be almost 100% spin polarized. These materials were combined with the...brought about by the injection of spin polarized carriers from the manganite into the curate. This work may make possible new classes of devices based on

  13. Making Superconducting Welds between Superconducting Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I.; Eom, Byeong Ho

    2008-01-01

    A technique for making superconducting joints between wires made of dissimilar superconducting metals has been devised. The technique is especially suitable for fabrication of superconducting circuits needed to support persistent electric currents in electromagnets in diverse cryogenic applications. Examples of such electromagnets include those in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and in superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). Sometimes, it is desirable to fabricate different parts of a persistent-current-supporting superconducting loop from different metals. For example, a sensory coil in a SQUID might be made of Pb, a Pb/Sn alloy, or a Cu wire plated with Pb/Sn, while the connections to the sensory coil might be made via Nb or Nb/Ti wires. Conventional wire-bonding techniques, including resistance spot welding and pressed contact, are not workable because of large differences between the hardnesses and melting temperatures of the different metals. The present technique is not subject to this limitation. The present technique involves the use (1) of a cheap, miniature, easy-to-operate, capacitor-discharging welding apparatus that has an Nb or Nb/Ti tip and operates with a continuous local flow of gaseous helium and (2) preparation of a joint in a special spark-discharge welding geometry. In a typical application, a piece of Nb foil about 25 m thick is rolled to form a tube, into which is inserted a wire that one seeks to weld to the tube (see figure). The tube can be slightly crimped for mechanical stability. Then a spark weld is made by use of the aforementioned apparatus with energy and time settings chosen to melt a small section of the niobium foil. The energy setting corresponds to the setting of a voltage to which the capacitor is charged. In an experiment, the technique was used to weld an Nb foil to a copper wire coated with a Pb/Sn soft solder, which is superconducting. The joint was evaluated as

  14. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  15. Compact Superconducting Crabbing and Deflecting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Payagalage Subashini Uddika

    2012-09-01

    Recently, new geometries for superconducting crabbing and deflecting cavities have been developed that have significantly improved properties over those the standard TM{sub 110} cavities. They are smaller, have low surface fields, high shunt impedance and, more importantly for some of them, no lower-order-mode with a well-separated fundamental mode. This talk will present the status of the development of these cavities.

  16. The superconducting spin valve and triplet superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garifullin, I. A.; Leksin, P. V.; Garif`yanov, N. N.; Kamashev, A. A.; Fominov, Ya. V.; Schumann, J.; Krupskaya, Y.; Kataev, V.; Schmidt, O. G.; Büchner, B.

    2015-01-01

    A review of our recent results on the spin valve effect is presented. We have used a theoretically proposed spin switch design F1/F2/S comprising a ferromagnetic bilayer (F1/F2) as a ferromagnetic component, and an ordinary superconductor (S) as the second interface component. Based on it we have prepared and studied in detail a set of multilayers CoOx/Fe1/Cu/Fe2/S (S=In or Pb). In these heterostructures we have realized for the first time a full spin switch effect for the superconducting current, have observed its sign-changing oscillating behavior as a function of the Fe2-layer thickness and finally have obtained direct evidence for the long-range triplet superconductivity arising due to noncollinearity of the magnetizations of the Fe1 and Fe2 layers.

  17. Superconducting mirror for laser gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.

    1991-05-14

    This paper describes an apparatus for reflecting a light beam. It comprises: a mirror assembly comprising a substrate and a superconductive mirror formed on such substrate, wherein: the substrate is optically transparent to the light beam and has a thickness of from about 0.5 to about 1.0 millimeter, and the superconductive mirror has a thickness of from about 0.5 to about 1.0 microns; means for cooling the superconductive mirror; means for measuring the temperature of the superconductive mirror; means for determining the reflectivity of the superconductive mirror; and means for varying the reflectivity of the superconductive mirror.

  18. Fraxelated radiofrequency device for acne scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Babar K.; Khokher, Sairah

    2012-09-01

    Acne scars can be improved with various treatments such as topical creams, chemical peels, dermal fillers, microdermabrasion, laser, and radiofrequency devices. Some of these treatments especially lasers and deep chemical peels can have significant side effects such as post inflammatory hyperpigmentation in darker skin types. Fraxelated RF Laser devices have been reported to have lower incidence of side effects in all skin phototypes. Nine patients between ages 18 and 35 of various skin phototypes were selected from a private practice and treated with a RF fraxelated device (E-matrix) for acne scars. Outcomes were measured by physician observation, subjective feedback received by patients, and comparison of before and after photographs. In this small group of patients with various skin phototypes, fraxelated radiofrequency device improved acne scars with minimal side effects and downtime.

  19. Cryoablation and radiofrequency for kidney tumor.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Daniel S; Landman, Jaime

    2008-03-01

    The detection of incidental and asymptomatic renal cortical neoplasms has concomitantly increased with radiographic imaging use. The gold standard for treating small renal tumors includes open and laparoscopic partial nephrectomy. Ablative renal procedures intend to duplicate the excellent oncologic outcomes of partial nephrectomy, while decreasing complications and shortening hospitalization time and convalescence. Only short and medium-term data are available, but ablation with cryotherapy or radiofrequency probes may achieve these goals. Ablation also offers the advantages of a minimally invasive surgical approach, with a significantly lower complication rate than partial nephrectomy. Ablated lesions are typically left in situ. Leaving potentially malignant tissues in place, albeit in a nonviable condition, certainly represents a major change in surgical thinking processes. This article reviews the status of cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation, the two ablative modalities currently available for clinical application.

  20. Pulmonary radiofrequency ablation (Part 1): current state.

    PubMed

    Plasencia Martínez, J M

    2015-01-01

    The risks involved in surgical treatment and conventional radiotherapy in patients with early lung cancer or lung metastases often make these treatments difficult to justify. However, on the other hand, it is also unacceptable to allow these lesions to evolve freely because, left untreated, these neoplasms will usually lead to the death of the patient. In recent years, alternative local therapies have been developed, such as pulmonary radiofrequency ablation, which has proven to increase survival with a minimal risk of complications. There are common recommendations for these treatments, and although the specific indications for using one technique or another have yet to be established, there are clearly defined situations that will determine the outcome of the treatment. It is important to know these situations, because appropriate patient selection is essential for therapeutic success. This article aims to describe the characteristics and constraints of pulmonary radiofrequency ablation and to outline its role in thoracic oncology in light of the current evidence.

  1. Superconducting nanostructured materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Metlushko, V.

    1998-07-13

    Within the last year it has been realized that the remarkable properties of superconducting thin films containing a periodic array of defects (such as sub-micron sized holes) offer a new route for developing a novel superconducting materials based on precise control of microstructure by modern photolithography. A superconductor is a material which, when cooled below a certain temperature, loses all resistance to electricity. This means that superconducting materials can carry large electrical currents without any energy loss--but there are limits to how much current can flow before superconductivity is destroyed. The current at which superconductivity breaks down is called the critical current. The value of the critical current is determined by the balance of Lorentz forces and pinning forces acting on the flux lines in the superconductor. Lorentz forces proportional to the current flow tend to drive the flux lines into motion, which dissipates energy and destroys zero resistance. Pinning forces created by isolated defects in the microstructure oppose flux line motion and increase the critical current. Many kinds of artificial pinning centers have been proposed and developed to increase critical current performance, ranging from dispersal of small non-superconducting second phases to creation of defects by proton, neutron or heavy ion irradiation. In all of these methods, the pinning centers are randomly distributed over the superconducting material, causing them to operate well below their maximum efficiency. We are overcome this drawback by creating pinning centers in aperiodic lattice (see Fig 1) so that each pin site interacts strongly with only one or a few flux lines.

  2. Radio-frequency association of Efimov trimers.

    PubMed

    Lompe, Thomas; Ottenstein, Timo B; Serwane, Friedhelm; Wenz, Andre N; Zürn, Gerhard; Jochim, Selim

    2010-11-12

    The quantum mechanical three-body problem is one of the fundamental challenges of few-body physics. When the two-body interactions become resonant, an infinite series of universal three-body bound states is predicted to occur, whose properties are determined by the strength of the two-body interactions. We used radio-frequency fields to associate Efimov trimers consisting of three distinguishable fermions. The measurements of their binding energy are consistent with theoretical predictions that include nonuniversal corrections.

  3. Radiofrequency and microwave radiation in the microelectronics industry.

    PubMed

    Cohen, R

    1986-01-01

    The microscopic precision required to produce minute integrated circuits is dependent on several processes utilizing radiofrequency and microwave radiation. This article provides a review of radiofrequency and microwave exposures in microelectronics and of the physical and biologic properties of these types of radiation; summarizes the existing, relevant medical literature; and provides the clinician with guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of excessive exposures to microwave and radiofrequency radiation.

  4. Radiofrequency Microtenotomy for Elbow Epicondylitis: Midterm Results.

    PubMed

    Tasto, James P; Richmond, John M; Cummings, Jeffrey R; Hardesty, Renee; Amiel, David

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a prospective, nonrandomized, single-center clinical study to evaluate the safety and midterm effectiveness of microtenotomy using a radiofrequency probe to treat chronic tendinosis of the elbow. All patients had failed conservative treatment for 6 months. The radiofrequency-based microtenotomy was performed using the Topaz Microdebrider (ArthroCare). Patients were followed annually for up to 9 years postoperatively. Pain status was documented using a visual analog scale self-reported measure. Eighty consecutive patients with tendinosis of the elbow were enrolled; 69 patients were treated for lateral epicondylitis and 11 for medial epicondylitis. The duration of follow-up ranged from 6 months to 9 years (mean, 2.5 years). Ninety-one percent of the patients reported a successful outcome. Within the lateral epicondylitis group, the preoperative visual analog scale improved from 6.9 to 1.3 postoperatively and demonstrated an 81% improvement (P ≤ .01). For the medial epicondylitis patients, the preoperative visual analog scale improved from 6.1 to 1.3 after surgery, a 79% improvement (P ≤ .01). No complications were reported. Radiofrequency-based microtenotomy is a safe and effective procedure for elbow epicondylitis. The results are durable with successful outcomes observed at 9 years after surgery.

  5. Comparisons of radio frequency technology for superconducting accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimber, Andrew J.

    2015-12-01

    Since the introduction of radiofrequency (RF) accelerating cavities, normal conducting as well as superconducting, there has been a need to drive them with RF power. At first glance, the function of an RF drive system may seem simple and straightforward, but this belies subtleties that greatly affect the performance of the cavity itself, diminishing efforts in perfecting techniques in design and manufacture. It can also contribute to a significant portion of the initial capital and ongoing running costs of a facility, maintenance labor, downtime and future expenditure as the system ages. The RF `system', should be thought of as just that, the entire collection of components from wall plug to cavity. Following this integrated approach will enable the system to meet or exceed its design goals. This paper seeks to review the current state of RF technology for superconducting structures and to compare these technologies, looking at what has traditionally been used, developments that have enabled higher efficiencies and higher reliabilities as well as looking towards future technologies. It will concentrate on superconducting applications, but much of the narrative is equally applicable to normal conducting structures as well.

  6. Cryogenic Systems and Superconductive Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    subsystem suitable for providing reliable long-lived cryogenic refrigeration for a superconductive ship propulsion system; and, Provide a sound...technical basis for subsequent applications of superconductive power in the area of ship propulsion .

  7. Superconductivity in diamond.

    PubMed

    Ekimov, E A; Sidorov, V A; Bauer, E D; Mel'nik, N N; Curro, N J; Thompson, J D; Stishov, S M

    2004-04-01

    Diamond is an electrical insulator well known for its exceptional hardness. It also conducts heat even more effectively than copper, and can withstand very high electric fields. With these physical properties, diamond is attractive for electronic applications, particularly when charge carriers are introduced (by chemical doping) into the system. Boron has one less electron than carbon and, because of its small atomic radius, boron is relatively easily incorporated into diamond; as boron acts as a charge acceptor, the resulting diamond is effectively hole-doped. Here we report the discovery of superconductivity in boron-doped diamond synthesized at high pressure (nearly 100,000 atmospheres) and temperature (2,500-2,800 K). Electrical resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and field-dependent resistance measurements show that boron-doped diamond is a bulk, type-II superconductor below the superconducting transition temperature T(c) approximately 4 K; superconductivity survives in a magnetic field up to Hc2(0) > or = 3.5 T. The discovery of superconductivity in diamond-structured carbon suggests that Si and Ge, which also form in the diamond structure, may similarly exhibit superconductivity under the appropriate conditions.

  8. Superconducting properties and the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity in 1111 Fe arsenides as revealed by torque magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Grisonnanche, Gael; Conner, Benjamin; Zhigadlo, Nikolai; Katrych, Sergiy; Bukowski, Zbigniew; Karpinski, Janusz; Balicas, Luis

    2011-03-01

    We performed a study of the angular dependence of the magnetic torque in LaFeAs O0.9 F0.1 single crystals. We developed a method to separate the magnetic and the superconducting components inherent to the FeAs layers and which are superimposed onto the reversible torque signal τrev (θ , H , T) . We show that by exploring the amplitude of the superconducting component in τrev (θ) as a function of H , it is possible to extract the thermodynamic value of the superconducting upper critical field Hc 2 . This so obtained value can be used to extract the field and the temperature dependencies of respectively, the superconducting anisotropy and the superfluid density through the Kogan formalism. We observe a strong temperature and field dependence of the superconducting anisotropy as expectable within a multi-band superconducting scenario. The resulting T -dependence of the superfluid-density resembles the behavior previously reported for LaFePO and which was ascribed to nodal superconductivity.

  9. Interface high-temperature superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lili; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-12-01

    Cuprate high-temperature superconductors consist of two quasi-two-dimensional (2D) substructures: CuO2 superconducting layers and charge reservoir layers. The superconductivity is realized by charge transfer from the charge reservoir layers into the superconducting layers without chemical dopants and defects being introduced into the latter, similar to modulation-doping in the semiconductor superlattices of AlGaAs/GaAs. Inspired by this scheme, we have been searching for high-temperature superconductivity in ultra-thin films of superconductors epitaxially grown on semiconductor/oxide substrates since 2008. We have observed interface-enhanced superconductivity in both conventional and unconventional superconducting films, including single atomic layer films of Pb and In on Si substrates and single unit cell (UC) films of FeSe on SrTiO3 (STO) substrates. The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity with a superconducting gap of ∼20 meV in 1UC-FeSe/STO has stimulated tremendous interest in the superconductivity community, for it opens a new avenue for both raising superconducting transition temperature and understanding the pairing mechanism of unconventional high-temperature superconductivity. Here, we review mainly the experimental progress on interface-enhanced superconductivity in the three systems mentioned above with emphasis on 1UC-FeSe/STO, studied by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and transport experiments. We discuss the roles of interfaces and a possible pairing mechanism inferred from these studies.

  10. Superconducting tensor gravity gradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    The employment of superconductivity and other material properties at cryogenic temperatures to fabricate sensitive, low-drift, gravity gradiometer is described. The device yields a reduction of noise of four orders of magnitude over room temperature gradiometers, and direct summation and subtraction of signals from accelerometers in varying orientations are possible with superconducting circuitry. Additional circuits permit determination of the linear and angular acceleration vectors independent of the measurement of the gravity gradient tensor. A dewar flask capable of maintaining helium in a liquid state for a year's duration is under development by NASA, and a superconducting tensor gravity gradiometer for the NASA Geodynamics Program is intended for a LEO polar trajectory to measure the harmonic expansion coefficients of the earth's gravity field up to order 300.

  11. Nonlinear terahertz superconducting plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jingbo; Zhang, Caihong; Liang, Lanju; Jin, Biaobing; Kawayama, Iwao; Murakami, Hironaru; Kang, Lin; Xu, Weiwei; Wang, Huabing; Chen, Jian; Tonouchi, Masayoshi; Wu, Peiheng

    2014-10-01

    Nonlinear terahertz (THz) transmission through subwavelength hole array in superconducting niobium nitride (NbN) film is experimentally investigated using intense THz pulses. The good agreement between the measurement and numerical simulations indicates that the field strength dependent transmission mainly arises from the nonlinear properties of the superconducting film. Under weak THz pulses, the transmission peak can be tuned over a frequency range of 145 GHz which is attributed to the high kinetic inductance of 50 nm-thick NbN film. Utilizing the THz pump-THz probe spectroscopy, we study the dynamic process of transmission spectra and demonstrate that the transition time of such superconducting plasmonic device is within 5 ps.

  12. Superconducting magnetic quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.W.; Shepard, K.W.; Nolen, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    A design was developed for a 350 T/m, 2.6-cm clear aperture superconducting quadrupole focussing element for use in a very low q/m superconducting linac as discussed below. The quadrupole incorporates holmium pole tips, and a rectangular-section winding using standard commercially-available Nb-Ti wire. The magnet was modeled numerically using both 2D and 3D codes, as a basis for numerical ray tracing using the quadrupole as a linac element. Components for a prototype singlet are being procured during FY 1995.

  13. Technology of RF superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This work has several parts, two of which are collaborative development projects with the majority of the work being performed at Argonne. The first is the development of a superconducting RFQ structure in collaboration with AccSys Technology Inc. of Pleasanton, California, funded as a Phase II SBIR grant. Another is a collaborative project with the Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi, India (who are funding the work) to develop new superconducting ion accelerating structures. Other initiatives are developing various aspects of the technology required to utilize ATLAS as a secondary beam linac for radioactive beams.

  14. Superconducting Metastable Compounds.

    PubMed

    Luo, H L; Merriam, M F; Hamilton, D C

    1964-08-07

    A number of metastable phases, germanides and tellurides of gold and silver, have been prepared, analyzed by x-ray diffraction, and investigated for superconductivity. The new superconductors and their transition temperatures are AgTe(3) (2.6 degrees K), Ag(4)Ge (0.85 degrees K), Au(3)Te(5) (1.62 degrees K), and Au(1-x)Ge(x) (0.99 degrees K-1.63 degrees K) where (0.27 superconduct above 0.32 degrees K.

  15. Ceramic superconducting components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haertling, G. H.

    1991-01-01

    An approach to the application of high-Tc ceramic superconductors to practical circuit elements was developed and demonstrated. This method, known as the rigid conductor process (RCP), involves the mounting of a preformed, sintered, and tested superconductor material onto an appropriate, rigid substrate with an epoxy adhesive which also serves to encapsulate the element from the ambient environment. Circuit elements such as straight conductors, coils and connectors were fabricated from YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconducting material. Performance results are included for a low-noise low-thermal-conductivity superconducting grounding link for NASA.

  16. The onset of superconductivity in two-dimensional disordered systems

    SciTech Connect

    Haviland, D.B.

    1989-01-01

    Investigations of ultra-thin films grown by quench-evaporation and studied in-situ show an interesting evolution of normal and superconducting properties as the films are made thinner. The films are categorized into two different classes based on the nature of the evolution of superconductivity in each class: granular and homogeneous. Granular films show rich behavior which is believed to be due to quantum fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting order parameter. The onset of quasi-reentrant behavior is correlated with the activation energy of normal state conduction becoming the order of the superconducting gap, where the normal state conduction is modeled by a hopping conduction mechanism in the presence of strong Coulomb interactions. This Josephson coupling of superconducting grains on a local scale gives way to global superconducting coupling as the film is made thicker and less resistive. Homogeneous films begin to conduct at extremely low thickness, and do not exhibit complicated quasi-reentrant behavior in the evolution of superconductivity. The first appearance of superconductivity is a separation of R(T) curves at the lowest temperature attainable. In Bi this occurred at a normal state sheet resistance near h/4e squared, however in Pb and Al the separatrix was above this value. The Al film showed distinct signs of granularity which also cannot be ruled out in the Pb films, because strong suppression of the superconducting transition temperature T{sub c} make it difficult to observe properties associated with granularity. The suppression of T{sub c} is analyzed in light of theories which incorporate the effects of localization, and little agreement is found.

  17. Proceedings of the fourth international conference and exhibition: World Congress on superconductivity. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Krishen, K.; Burnham, C.

    1994-12-31

    The goals of the World Congress on Superconductivity (WCS) have been to establish and foster the development and commercial application of superconductivity technology on a global scale by providing a non-adversarial, non-advocacy forum where scientists, engineers, businessmen and government personnel can freely exchange information and ideas on recent developments and directions for the future of superconductive research. Sessions were held on: accelerator technology, power and energy, persistent magnetic fields, performance characterization, physical properties, fabrication methodology, superconductive magnetic energy storage (SMES), thin films, high temperature materials, device applications, wire fabrication, and granular superconductors. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  18. Proximity-induced superconductivity in nanowires: minigap state and differential magnetoresistance oscillations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Shi, Chuntai; Tian, Mingliang; Zhang, Qi; Kumar, Nitesh; Jain, J K; Mallouk, T E; Chan, M H W

    2009-06-19

    We study proximity-induced superconductivity in gold nanowires as a function of the length of the nanowire, magnetic field, and excitation current. Short nanowires exhibit a sharp superconducting transition, whereas long nanowires show nonzero resistance. At intermediate lengths, however, we observe two sharp transitions; the normal and superconducting regions are separated by what we call the minigap phase. Additionally, we detect periodic oscillations in the differential magnetoresistance. We suggest that the minigap phase as well as the periodic oscillations originate from a coexistence of proximity-induced superconductivity with a normal region near the center of the wire, created either by temperature or the application of a magnetic field.

  19. Progress in the Development of Superconducting RF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinello, Martina

    2016-03-01

    The R &D of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities is focused on lowering the power dissipation, i.e. increasing the Q factor, during their operation in accelerators. Nitrogen doping is the innovative high Q SRF technology currently implemented in the LCLS-II cavity production. Of crucial importance is the understanding on how high Q factors can be maintained from the cavity vertical test to the cryomodule operation. One of the major issue of SRF cavity operation is the remnant magnetic field which will always be present during the cool down through the critical temperature, jeopardizing the cavity performance. Research is ongoing both to reduce the remnant field levels and to avoid magnetic field trapping during the SC transition. In addition, fundamental studies allowed us to define the best nitrogen doping treatment needed to lower the sensitivity to trapped flux. Recent developments on the preparation of Nb3Sn coatings for SRF cavities will be also presented. This alternative technology has been demonstrated to allow high Q operation even at 4.2 K. In addition, the maximum field limit of Nb3Sn is predicted to be twice that of niobium, potentially providing a significant decrease in the required length of an accelerator to reach a given energy.

  20. Theory of RF superconductivity for resonant cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, Alex

    2017-03-01

    An overview of a theory of electromagnetic response of superconductors in strong radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields is given with the emphasis on applications to superconducting resonant cavities for particle accelerators. The paper addresses fundamentals of the BCS surface resistance, the effect of subgap states and trapped vortices on the residual surface resistance at low RF fields, and a nonlinear surface resistance at strong fields, particularly the effect of the RF field suppression of the surface resistance. These issues are essential for the understanding of the field dependence of high quality factors Q({B}a)∼ {10}10{--}{10}11 achieved on the Nb cavities at 1.3–2 K in strong RF fields B a close to the depairing limit, and the extended Q({B}a) rise which has been observed on Ti and N-treated Nb cavities. Possible ways of further increase of Q({B}a) and the breakdown field by optimizing impurity concentration at the surface and by multilayer nanostructuring with materials other than Nb are discussed.

  1. 21 CFR 886.4100 - Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus. 886.4100 Section 886.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... electrosurgical cautery apparatus. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus is an...

  2. 21 CFR 886.4100 - Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus. 886.4100 Section 886.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... electrosurgical cautery apparatus. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus is an...

  3. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section 882.4400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to...

  4. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section 882.4400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to...

  5. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section 882.4400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to...

  6. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section 882.4400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to...

  7. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section 882.4400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to...

  8. Flexible Microstrip Circuits for Superconducting Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chervenak, James; Mateo, Jennette

    2013-01-01

    Flexible circuits with superconducting wiring atop polyimide thin films are being studied to connect large numbers of wires between stages in cryogenic apparatus with low heat load. The feasibility of a full microstrip process, consisting of two layers of superconducting material separated by a thin dielectric layer on 5 mil (approximately 0.13 mm) Kapton sheets, where manageable residual stress remains in the polyimide film after processing, has been demonstrated. The goal is a 2-mil (approximately 0.051-mm) process using spin-on polyimide to take advantage of the smoother polyimide surface for achieving highquality metal films. Integration of microstrip wiring with this polyimide film may require high-temperature bakes to relax the stress in the polyimide film between metallization steps.

  9. Applications of Superconductivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodkind, John M.

    1971-01-01

    Presents a general review of current practical applications of the properties of superconducters. The devices are classified into groups according to the property that is of primary importance. The article is inteded as a first introduction for students and professionals. (Author/DS)

  10. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  11. SUPERCONDUCTING VANADIUM BASE ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Cleary, H.J.

    1958-10-21

    A new vanadium-base alloy which possesses remarkable superconducting properties is presented. The alloy consists of approximately one atomic percent of palladium, the balance being vanadium. The alloy is stated to be useful in a cryotron in digital computer circuits.

  12. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Merlo, V.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M.; Scherillo, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2015-03-16

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, {sup 10}B + n → α + {sup 7}Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current I{sub c}, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  13. Superconducting thermometer for cryogenics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, F. A.

    1977-01-01

    Digital electronic device uses superconducting filaments as sensors. Simple solid-state circuitry combined with filaments comprise highly-reliable temperature monitor. Device has ability to track very fast thermal transients and "on/off" output is adaptable to remote sensing and telemetry.

  14. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, V.; Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Scherillo, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2015-03-01

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, 10B + n → α + 7Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current Ic, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  15. Superconducting thermal neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, V.; Pietropaolo, A.; Celentano, G.; Cirillo, M.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Salvato, M.; Scherillo, A.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Vannozzi, A.

    2016-09-01

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium nitride (NbN) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle is well described by a hot spot mechanism: upon the occurrence of the nuclear reactions n + 10B → α + 7Li + 2.8 MeV, the energy released by the secondary particles into the strip induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T below 11K and current-biased below the critical current IC, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed and compared to those of a borated Nb superconducting strip.

  16. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    Thermoelectricity is produced by applying a temperature differential to dissimilar electrically conducting or semiconducting materials, thereby producing a voltage that is proportional to the temperature difference. Thermoelectric generators use this effect to directly convert heat into electricity; however, presently-known generators have low efficiencies due to the production of high currents which in turn cause large resistive heating losses. Some thermoelectric generators operate at efficiencies between 4% and 7% in the 800{degrees} to 1200{degrees}C range. According to its major aspects and bradly stated, the present invention is an apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. In particular, the invention is a thermoelectric generator that juxtaposes a superconducting material and a semiconducting material - so that the superconducting and the semiconducting materials touch - to convert heat energy into electrical energy without resistive losses in the temperature range below the critical temperature of the superconducting material. Preferably, an array of superconducting material is encased in one of several possible configurations within a second material having a high thermal conductivity, preferably a semiconductor, to form a thermoelectric generator.

  17. AC/RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  18. New research in Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorrami, Mona

    2013-03-01

    Superconductors are materials that have no resistance to electricity's flow; they are one of the last great frontiers of scientific discovery. The theories that explain superconductor behavior seem to be constantly under review. In 1911 superconductivity was first observed in mercury by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes When he cooled it to the temperature of liquid helium, 4 degrees Kelvin (-452F, -269C), its resistance suddenly disappeared. It was necessary for Onnes to come within 4 degrees of the coldest temperature that is theoretically attainable to witness the phenomenon of superconductivity. In 1933 German researchers Walther Meissner and Robert Ochsenfeld discovered that a superconducting material will repel a magnetic field. A magnet moving by a conductor induces currents in the conductor, but, in a superconductor the induced currents exactly mirror the field that would have otherwise penetrated the superconducting material - causing the magnet to be repulsed. This phenomenon is known as strong diamagnetism and is today often referred to as the ``Meissner effect'' (an eponym). Later on the theory developed by American physicists John Bardeen, Leon Cooper, and John Schrieffer together with extensions and refinements of the theory, which followed in the years after 1957, succeeded in explaining in considerable detail the properties of superconductors.

  19. Magnetoquenched superconducting valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, T. W.; Johnson, Mark

    1998-06-01

    A superconducting switch has been developed in a simple bilayer cross strip geometry using the magnetic fringe field of a ferromagnetic film to control the critical current in an underlying superconducting bridge. The magnetization of the ferromagnet is rotated in the plane of the film to vary the magnitude of the fringe field locally applied to the superconductor from negligible to substantial values. In the latter case, the magnetization is oriented such that the magnetic poles are along the edges of the cross strip directly above the superconductor. The large fringe field near the poles suppresses superconductivity over a length of order microns, giving rise to superconducting weak link behavior. A large modulation of the critical current is observed. The effect is demonstrated in the low Tc superconductors Pb (Tc=7.3 K) and Sn (Tc=3.9 K). Fabrication of the device involves minimal processing. Applications as a high speed switch, amplifier, nonvolatile storage cell, and controllable weak link are possible.

  20. Radiofrequency energy in surgery: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Ihnát, Peter; Ihnát Rudinská, Lucia; Zonča, Pavel

    2014-06-01

    Over a period of more than 100 years, radiofrequency energy has been introduced in many fields and applications in medicine. At present, radiofrequency constitutes the basis of numerous medical devices employed in almost all medical specialties. It is particularly applicable and valuable in various minimally invasive procedures for its locally focused effects. Radiofrequency energy is a technical term established to describe high-frequency alternating electrical currents (with a frequency ranging from 300 kHz to 3 MHz) and their impact on biological tissue. The application of RF energy causes controlled tissue heating with consequent cell protein denaturation and desiccation, which leads to cell death and tissue destruction. The primary principle of radiofrequency is that the generated heat can be used to cut, coagulate or induce metabolic processes in the target tissue. The authors of this paper offer a comprehensive and compact review of the definition, history, physics, biological principles and applications of radiofrequency energy in current surgery.

  1. Radiofrequency ablation for benign thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, S; Stacul, F; Zecchin, M; Dobrinja, C; Zanconati, F; Fabris, B

    2016-09-01

    Benign thyroid nodules are an extremely common occurrence. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is gaining ground as an effective technique for their treatment, in case they become symptomatic. Here we review what are the current indications to RFA, its outcomes in terms of efficacy, tolerability, and cost, and also how it compares to the other conventional and experimental treatment modalities for benign thyroid nodules. Moreover, we will also address the issue of treating with this technique patients with cardiac pacemakers (PM) or implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD), as it is a rather frequent occurrence that has never been addressed in detail in the literature.

  2. Synthesis of superconducting Nb3Sn coatings on Nb substrates

    DOE PAGES

    Barzi, E.; Franz, S.; Reginato, F.; ...

    2015-12-01

    In the present work the electrochemical and thermal syntheses of superconductive Nb3Sn films are investigated. The Nb3Sn phase is obtained by electrodeposition of Sn layers and Cu intermediate layers onto Nb substrates followed by high temperature diffusion in inert atmosphere. Electrodeposition was performed from aqueous solutions at current densities in the 20 to 50 mA/cm2 range and at temperatures between 40 and 50°C. Subsequent thermal treatments were realized to obtain the Nb3Sn superconductive phase. Glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES) demonstrated that after thermal treatment interdiffusion of Nb and Sn occurred across a thickness of about 13 μm. Scanning Electronmore » Microscopy (SEM) allowed accurately measuring the thickness of the Nb3Sn phase, whose average for the various types of film samples was between 5.7 and 8.0 μm. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns confirmed the presence of a cubic Nb3Sn phase (A15 structure) having (210) preferred orientation. The maximum obtained Tc was 17.68 K and the Bc20 ranged between 22.5 T and 23.8 T. With the procedure described in the present paper, coating complex shapes cost-effectively becomes possible, which is typical of electrochemical techniques. Furthermore, this approach can be implemented in classical wire processes such as "Jelly Roll" or "Rod in Tube", or directly used for producing superconducting surfaces. In conclusion, the potential of this method for Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) structures is also outlined.« less

  3. Synthesis of superconducting Nb3Sn coatings on Nb substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzi, E.; Bestetti, M.; Reginato, F.; Turrioni, D.; Franz, S.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work the electrochemical and thermal syntheses of superconducting Nb3Sn films are investigated. The Nb3Sn phase is obtained by electrodeposition of Sn layers and Cu intermediate layers onto Nb substrates followed by high temperature diffusion in inert atmosphere. Electrodeposition was performed from aqueous solutions at current densities in the 20-50 mA cm-2 range and at temperatures between 40 °C and 50 °C. Subsequent thermal treatments were realized to obtain the Nb3Sn superconductive phase. Glow discharge optical emission spectrometry demonstrated that after thermal treatment interdiffusion of Nb and Sn occurred across a thickness of about 13 μm. Scanning electron microscopy allowed accurately measuring the thickness of the Nb3Sn phase, whose average for the various types of film samples was between 5.7 and 8.0 μm. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the presence of a cubic Nb3Sn phase (A15 structure) having (210) preferred orientation. The maximum obtained T c was 17.68 K and the B c20 ranged between 22.5 and 23.8 T. With the procedure described in the present paper, coating complex shapes cost-effectively becomes possible, which is typical of electrochemical techniques. Furthermore, this approach can be implemented in classical wire processes such as ‘jelly roll’ or ‘rod in tube’, or directly used for producing superconducting surfaces. The potential of this method for superconducting radiofrequency structures is also outlined.

  4. Radio-frequency scanning tunnelling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kemiktarak, U; Ndukum, T; Schwab, K C; Ekinci, K L

    2007-11-01

    The scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) relies on localized electron tunnelling between a sharp probe tip and a conducting sample to attain atomic-scale spatial resolution. In the 25-year period since its invention, the STM has helped uncover a wealth of phenomena in diverse physical systems--ranging from semiconductors to superconductors to atomic and molecular nanosystems. A severe limitation in scanning tunnelling microscopy is the low temporal resolution, originating from the diminished high-frequency response of the tunnel current readout circuitry. Here we overcome this limitation by measuring the reflection from a resonant inductor-capacitor circuit in which the tunnel junction is embedded, and demonstrate electronic bandwidths as high as 10 MHz. This approximately 100-fold bandwidth improvement on the state of the art translates into fast surface topography as well as delicate measurements in mesoscopic electronics and mechanics. Broadband noise measurements across the tunnel junction using this radio-frequency STM have allowed us to perform thermometry at the nanometre scale. Furthermore, we have detected high-frequency mechanical motion with a sensitivity approaching approximately 15 fm Hz(-1/2). This sensitivity is on par with the highest available from nanoscale optical and electrical displacement detection techniques, and the radio-frequency STM is expected to be capable of quantum-limited position measurements.

  5. Neurohumoral indicators of efficacy radiofrequency cardiac denervation

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, A. V. Evtushenko, V. V.; Saushkina, Yu. V.; Gusakova, A. M.; Suslova, T. E.; Dymbrylova, O. N.; Smyshlyaev, K. A.; Kurlov, I. O.; Lishmanov, Yu. B.; Anfinogenova, Ya. D.; Sergeevichev, D. S.; Bykov, A. N.; Syryamkin, V. I.; Kistenev, Yu. V.; Lotkov, A. I.; Pokushalov, E. A.

    2015-11-17

    In this study, we compared pre- and postoperative parameters of the cardiac sympathetic innervation. The aim of the study was to examine the approaches to evaluating the quality of radiofrequency (RF)-induced cardiac denervation by using non-invasive and laboratory methods. The study included 32 people with long-lasting persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the objectives of the study: group 1 (main) - 21 patients with mitral valve diseases, which simultaneously with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) AF carried out on the effects of the paraganglionic nervous plexuses by C. Pappone (2004) and N. Doll (2008) schemes. The second group (control) contained 11 patients with heart diseases in sinus rhythm (the RF denervation not been performed). All patients, who underwent surgical treatment, were received examination of cardiac sympathetic tone by using {sup 123}I-MIBG. All of them made blood analysis from ascending aorta and coronary sinus to determine the level of norepinephrine and its metabolites before and after cardiac denervation. Data of radionuclide examination are correlating with laboratory data.

  6. Neurohumoral indicators of efficacy radiofrequency cardiac denervation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtushenko, A. V.; Evtushenko, V. V.; Saushkina, Yu. V.; Lishmanov, Yu. B.; Pokushalov, E. A.; Sergeevichev, D. S.; Gusakova, A. M.; Suslova, T. E.; Dymbrylova, O. N.; Bykov, A. N.; Syryamkin, V. I.; Kistenev, Yu. V.; Anfinogenova, Ya. D.; Smyshlyaev, K. A.; Lotkov, A. I.; Kurlov, I. O.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we compared pre- and postoperative parameters of the cardiac sympathetic innervation. The aim of the study was to examine the approaches to evaluating the quality of radiofrequency (RF)-induced cardiac denervation by using non-invasive and laboratory methods. The study included 32 people with long-lasting persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the objectives of the study: group 1 (main) - 21 patients with mitral valve diseases, which simultaneously with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) AF carried out on the effects of the paraganglionic nervous plexuses by C. Pappone (2004) and N. Doll (2008) schemes. The second group (control) contained 11 patients with heart diseases in sinus rhythm (the RF denervation not been performed). All patients, who underwent surgical treatment, were received examination of cardiac sympathetic tone by using 123I-MIBG. All of them made blood analysis from ascending aorta and coronary sinus to determine the level of norepinephrine and its metabolites before and after cardiac denervation. Data of radionuclide examination are correlating with laboratory data.

  7. Design of a horizontal test cryostat for superconducting RF cavities for the FREIA facility at Uppsala University

    SciTech Connect

    Chevalier, N. R.; Thermeau, J.-P.; Bujard, P.; Junquera, T.; Hermansson, L.; Kern, R. Santiago; Ruber, R.

    2014-01-29

    Uppsala University is constructing a large scale facility, called FREIA (Facility for Research Instrumentation and Accelerator Development). FREIA includes a helium liquefier and an accelerator test facility and has the capacity to test superconducting radio-frequency (RF) cavities with the same RF system and RF power level as in an accelerator. A central element of FREIA is a horizontal test cryostat connected in closed loop to a helium liquefier. This cryostat can house two fully equipped (tuners, piezo, power coupler, helium tank) superconducting cavities to perform full RF high power tests and operate at temperatures between 1.8 K and 4.2 K. The cryostat is designed to accommodate a large array of superconducting cavities and magnets, among which the European Spallation Source (ESS) type spoke and high-β elliptical cavities as well as TESLA/ILC type elliptical cavities. The present status of the project and the design of the cryostat are reported.

  8. Superconducting ''transistor'' acts as high-speed switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meissner, H.

    1970-01-01

    Cryogenic, three-terminal device yields current-voltage characteristics of ordinary transistor. Device consists of two superconducting tin rods in a crossed-wire geometry, separated by a thin gold film. New construction technique is described and possible applications are discussed.

  9. Vortex pinning vs. superconducting wire network in nanostructured superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicent, Jose L.

    2014-03-01

    Superconducting films with array of ordered defects allow studying effects which are governed by the interplay between lengths of the nanostructured sample and lengths related to physical parameters, as for example coherence length. When the coherence length and the separation between the defects are similar, the sample can mimic a superconducting wire network. In this situation, applied magnetic fields induce Little-Parks oscillations due to fluxoid quantization constraint. These L-P oscillations vanish when the coherence length is smaller than the ``stripe'' superconducting region between the defects. In superconducting films with array of nanodefects periodic oscillations can also be detected in resistance R(H), critical current Ic(H), magnetization M(H) and ac-susceptibility χac(H) in a broader temperature range than the temperature interval where L-P oscillations are present. Vortex pinning mechanisms are the origin of these oscillations. These oscillations emerge due to matching effects between two lattices: the vortex lattice and the lattice of defects. These oscillations are detected in a broader temperature interval than the temperature interval where L-P oscillations are present. Worth to note that, due to the coherence length divergence at Tc, a crossover to wire network behavior is experimentally found always. Interestingly, both mechanisms coexist close to superconducting critical temperatures; i. e. in the temperature region where the sample mimics superconducting wire network. These overlapping effects can be experimentally separated and both origins can be discriminated. We have analyzed and single out, with magnetotransport measurements, both mechanisms: pinning and fluxoid quantization constraint in superconducting films with arrays of non-magnetic and magnetic dots. Work supported by Spanish MINECO and CAM.

  10. Impact of monopolar radiofrequency energy on subchondral bone viability.

    PubMed

    Balcarek, Peter; Kuhn, Anke; Weigel, Arwed; Walde, Tim A; Ferlemann, Keno G; Stürmer, Klaus M; Frosch, Karl-Heinz

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the impact of monopolar radiofrequency energy treatment on subchondral bone viability. The femoral grooves of six chinchilla bastard rabbits were exposed bilaterally to monopolar radiofrequency energy for 2, 4 and 8 s, creating a total of 36 defects. An intravital fluorescence bone-labeling technique characterized the process of subchondral bone mineralization within the 3 months following exposure to radiofrequency energy and was analyzed by widefield epifluorescence optical sectioning microscopy using an ApoTome. After 2 s of radiofrequency energy exposure, regular fluorescence staining of the subchondral bone was evident in all samples when compared to untreated areas. The depth of osteonecrosis after 4 and 8 s of radiofrequency energy treatment averaged 126 and 942 microm at 22 days (P < .05; P < .01). The 4 s treatment group showed no osteonecrosis after 44 days whereas the depth of osteonecrosis extended from 519 microm at 44 days (P < .01), to 281 microm at 66 days (P < .01) and to 133 microm at 88 days (P < .05) after 8 s of radiofrequency energy application. Though radiofrequency energy may induce transient osteonecrosis in the superficial zone of the subchondral bone, the results of this study suggest that post-arthroscopic osteonecrosis appears to be of only modest risk given the current clinical application in humans.

  11. Radio-frequency interference mitigating hyperspectral L-band radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toose, Peter; Roy, Alexandre; Solheim, Frederick; Derksen, Chris; Watts, Tom; Royer, Alain; Walker, Anne

    2017-02-01

    Radio-frequency interference (RFI) can significantly contaminate the measured radiometric signal of current spaceborne L-band passive microwave radiometers. These spaceborne radiometers operate within the protected passive remote sensing and radio-astronomy frequency allocation of 1400-1427 MHz but nonetheless are still subjected to frequent RFI intrusions. We present a unique surface-based and airborne hyperspectral 385 channel, dual polarization, L-band Fourier transform, RFI-detecting radiometer designed with a frequency range from 1400 through ≈ 1550 MHz. The extended frequency range was intended to increase the likelihood of detecting adjacent RFI-free channels to increase the signal, and therefore the thermal resolution, of the radiometer instrument. The external instrument calibration uses three targets (sky, ambient, and warm), and validation from independent stability measurements shows a mean absolute error (MAE) of 1.0 K for ambient and warm targets and 1.5 K for sky. A simple but effective RFI removal method which exploits the large number of frequency channels is also described. This method separates the desired thermal emission from RFI intrusions and was evaluated with synthetic microwave spectra generated using a Monte Carlo approach and validated with surface-based and airborne experimental measurements.

  12. Ionization of CO in radio-frequency electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoneas, M. M.; Vojnović, M. M.; Ristić, M. M.; Vićić, M. D.; Poparić, G. B.

    2017-02-01

    The rate coefficients for the electron impact ionization of the CO molecule have been calculated in the presence of the radio-frequency (RF) electric field. The non-equilibrium electron energy distribution functions, used for the rate coefficient calculations, were generated by using a Monte Carlo simulation. The rate coefficients were obtained, time resolved within one period, in the frequency range from 13.56 up to 500 MHz, at effective reduced electric field values up to 700 Td. A temporal behavior of the rate coefficients under the influence of magnitude and frequency of the fields has been studied. The total ionization rate coefficients and the rate coefficients for the production of different ion fragments have been period averaged and presented in the order to be of use for practical implementation in the RF discharges in CO. Also, the temporal characteristics of the electron energy distribution functions and the diffusion coefficients have been studied separately revealing some interesting features in their time dependence within the period of electric field oscillations.

  13. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; ...

    2015-02-26

    This study examines the field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds which has a history dating back to the 1960s. This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC₆ and YbC₆ in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how this relates to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic statesmore » and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.« less

  14. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; Dean, Mark P. M.; Rahnejat, Kaveh C.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Ellerby, Mark

    2015-02-26

    This study examines the field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds which has a history dating back to the 1960s. This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC₆ and YbC₆ in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how this relates to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.

  15. Tunable superconductivity in decorated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zheng; Allain, Adrien; Marty, Laetitia; Bendiab, Nedjma; Toulemonde, Pierre; Strobel, Pierre; Coraux, Johann; Bouchiat, Vincent

    2013-03-01

    Graphene offers an exposed bidimensional gas of high mobility charge carriers with gate tunable density. Its chemical inertness offers an outstanding platform to explore exotic 2D superconductivity. Superconductivity can be induced in graphene by means of proximity effect (by depositing a set of superconducting metal clusters such as lead or tin nanoparticles). The influence of decoration material, density or particles and disorder of graphene will be discussed. In the case of disordered graphene, Tin decoration leads to a gate-tunable superconducting-to-insulator quantum phase transition. Superconductivity in graphene is also expected to occur under strong charge doping (induced either by gating or under chemical decoration, in analogy with graphite intercalated compounds). I will also show preliminary results showing the influence of Calcium intercalation of few layer graphene and progress toward the demonstration of intrinsic superconductivity in such systems. Work supported by EU GRANT FP7-NMP GRENADA.

  16. Superconducting miniaturized planar antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pischke, A.; Chaloupka, H.; Klein, N.; Splitt, G.

    This contribution reports on experimental as well as theoretical investigations of superconducting 2.4 GHz microstrip antenna. Due to both a new stepped-impedance patch shape and a high permittivity substrate (LaAlO3) the size was reduced to an area of only 6x6 mm. The measured radiation efficiency of antennas fabricated from YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) is at 77 K in the order of 45 and 65 percent for a substrate height of 0.5 mm and 1 mm respectively. In contrast, a copper antenna yields an efficiency of 3 and 6 percent only. Deviations from a linear transmission behavior of the superconducting antenna can be observed at a current density of 500,000 A/sq cm. An increase in frequency bandwidth from 4 MHz to over 9 MHz results from replacing the single-patch structure by a double-patch structure (stacked patches).

  17. High temperature interface superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-02-01

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both 'passive' hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. We conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  18. High temperature interface superconductivity

    DOE PAGES

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-01-20

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. Here, wemore » conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.« less

  19. High temperature interface superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-01-20

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. Here, we conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  20. Separated Shoulder

    MedlinePlus

    Separated shoulder Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A separated shoulder is an injury to the ligaments that hold your collarbone (clavicle) to your shoulder blade. In a mild separated shoulder, the ligaments ...

  1. Superconducting terahertz metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hou-tong; Singh, Ranjan; O' Hara, John F; Azad, Abul K; Trugman, Stuart A; Jia, Quanxi; Taylor, Antoinette J

    2010-01-01

    During the past ten years subwavelength metallic structures have enabled metamaterials exhibiting exotic physical properties that are not possible or difficult to realize using naturally occurring materials, This bottom-up metamaterial approach is particularly attractive in the terahertz (THz) frequency range, where the THz gap is inherently associated with the lack of materials with appropriate reponse. In fact THz metamaterial devices have accomplished unprecedented performance towards practical applications. In these devices, the key is to incorporate natural materials, e,g, semiconductors, as the metamaterial substrates or integration parts of metamaterial structures. The active or dynamic tunability of metamaterials is through the application of external stimuli such as temperature, photoexcitation, or electric field. to modify the capacitive gaps in split-ring resonators (SRRs), It becomes clear that we would not be able to do much on the metallic SRRs, i.e. the metal conductivity and therefore the inductance largely remain constant not affected by external stimuli. Recently, there has been increasing interest in superconducting metamaterials towards loss reduction. Significant Joule losses have often prevented resonant metal metamaterials from achieving proposed applications. particularly in the optical frequency range. At low temperatures, superconducting materials possess superior conductivity than metals at frequencies up to THz. and therefore it is expected that superconducting melamaterials will have a lower loss than metal metamatetials, More interestingly, superconductors exhibit tunable complex conductivity over a wide range of values through change of temperature and application of photoexcitation, electrical currents and magnetic fields. Therefore, we would expect correspondingly tunable metamaterials. which originate from the superconducting materials composing the metamaterial, in contrast to tuning the metamaterial embedded environment.

  2. Fringe Field Superconducting Switch

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-31

    superconducting smp ,ine 10, and a ferromagnet ferromagnet 14 preferably has at least two easy axes of magnetization, shown here by the double- headed arrows...magnetic field of control current **p6fCooductor- S4 ’’/ eonteol^cun 7* insulator ■O Jöpptyzcöwem supercuiKhttstog-^2 ^ FIG.^ 4 //■ r.»~r

  3. A 200 SUPERCONDUCTING RACETRACK MICROTRON,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A race-track microtron is proposed consisting of two 180 degree magnets spaced 2.5 meters apart with a superconducting linac section between. The...MeV per turn. The electrons are injected into the microtron at about 12 MeV from a second superconducting accelerator section. The spacing between...superconducting linac sections, a beam current of 100 microamps at unity duty cycle is feasible. It is also possible to build the microtron using

  4. Silicon superconducting quantum interference device

    SciTech Connect

    Duvauchelle, J. E.; Francheteau, A.; Marcenat, C.; Lefloch, F.; Chiodi, F.; Débarre, D.; Hasselbach, K.; Kirtley, J. R.

    2015-08-17

    We have studied a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) made from a single layer thin film of superconducting silicon. The superconducting layer is obtained by heavily doping a silicon wafer with boron atoms using the gas immersion laser doping technique. The SQUID is composed of two nano-bridges (Dayem bridges) in a loop and shows magnetic flux modulation at low temperature and low magnetic field. The overall behavior shows very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the Ginzburg-Landau equations.

  5. Chiral magnetic superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E.

    2017-03-01

    Materials with charged chiral quasiparticles in external parallel electric and magnetic fields can support an electric current that grows linearly in time, corresponding to diverging DC conductivity. From experimental viewpoint, this "Chiral Magnetic Superconductivity" (CMS) is thus analogous to conventional superconductivity. However the underlying physics is entirely different - the CMS does not require a condensate of Cooper pairs breaking the gauge degeneracy, and is thus not accompanied by Meissner effect. Instead, it owes its existence to the (temperature-independent) quantum chiral anomaly and the conservation of chirality. As a result, this phenomenon can be expected to survive to much higher temperatures. Even though the chirality of quasiparticles is not strictly conserved in real materials, the chiral magnetic superconductivity should still exhibit itself in AC measurements at frequencies larger than the chirality-flipping rate, and in microstructures of Dirac and Weyl semimetals with thickness below the mean chirality-flipping length that is about 1 - 100 μm. In nuclear physics, the CMS should contribute to the charge-dependent elliptic flow in heavy ion collisions.

  6. Navy superconductivity efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubser, D. U.

    1990-01-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion, etc.) use LTS materials while space applications (MMW electronics, etc.) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment being conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity, with particular emphasis on the related SDIO sponsored program on HTS applications.

  7. US Navy superconductivity program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubser, Donald U.

    1991-01-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of the Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion) use LTS materials while space applications (millimeter wave electronics) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment to be conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity.

  8. Navy superconductivity efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubser, D. U.

    1990-04-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion, etc.) use LTS materials while space applications (MMW electronics, etc.) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment being conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity, with particular emphasis on the related SDIO sponsored program on HTS applications.

  9. Tunable superconducting microstrip resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamyan, A. A.; Kubatkin, S. E.; Danilov, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    We report on a simple yet versatile design for a tunable superconducting microstrip resonator. Niobium nitride is employed as the superconducting material and aluminum oxide, produced by atomic layer deposition, as the dielectric layer. We show that the high quality of the dielectric material allows to reach the internal quality factors in the order of Qi˜104 in the single photon regime. Qi rapidly increases with the number of photons in the resonator N and exceeds 105 for N ˜10 -50 . A straightforward modification of the basic microstrip design allows to pass a current bias through the strip and to control its kinetic inductance. We achieve a frequency tuning δf =62 MHz around f0=2.4 GHz for a fundamental mode and δf =164 MHz for a third harmonic. This translates into a tuning parameter Qiδf /f0=150 . The presented design can be incorporated into essentially any superconducting circuitry operating at temperatures below 2.5 K.

  10. Magnetically leviated superconducting bearing

    DOEpatents

    Weinberger, Bernard R.; Lynds, Jr., Lahmer

    1993-01-01

    A magnetically levitated superconducting bearing includes a magnet (2) mounted on a shaft (12) that is rotatable around an axis of rotation and a Type II superconductor (6) supported on a stator (14) in proximity to the magnet (2). The superconductor (6) is positioned so that when it is cooled to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field, it interacts with the magnet (2) to produce an attractive force that levitates the magnet (2) and supports a load on the shaft (12). The interaction between the superconductor (6) and magnet(2) also produces surface screening currents (8) that generate a repulsive force perpendicular to the load. The bearing also has means for maintaining the superconductor at a temperature below its critical temperature (16, 18). The bearing could also be constructed so the magnet (2) is supported on the stator (14) and the superconductor (6) is mounted on the shaft (12). The bearing can be operated by cooling the superconductor (6) to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field.

  11. Development of extruded polymer insulated superconducting cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaki, M.; Nagao, M.; Mizuno, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Horii, K.

    A superconducting power cable which has a structure similar to the conventional extruded polyethylene cable is proposed. The main features of the design are to exploit the excellent electrical properties of polymers at cryogenic temperatures and to separate the helium coolant from the electrical insulation. However, the most hazardous problem of this insulation system is cracking of the extruded polymer insulation during cooling. In order to examine the feasibility of the above proposal, a superconducting cable of rated voltage 20 kV and rated current 2 kA was manufactured, being suitable for the university laboratory tests. Extruded polyethylene or ethylene propylene rubber was adopted as electrical insulation. Current transmission tests up to 2.5 kA were performed with extruded polyethylene insulated superconducting cable though the insulation cracked during cooling. Voltage application tests were carried out with fair success at the liquid helium temperature with extruded ethylene propylene rubber insulated cable. This ia a breakthrough in terms of the electrical insulation design of cryogenic cables.

  12. Quantum device prospects of superconducting nanodiamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mtsuko, D.; Churochkin, D.; Bhattacharyya, S.

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured semiconducting carbon system, described by as a superlattice-like structure demonstrated its potential in switching device applications based on the quantum tunneling through the insulating carbon layer. This switching property can be enhanced further with the association of Josephson's tunneling between two superconducting carbon (diamond) grains separated by a very thin layer of carbon which holds the structure of the film firmly. The superconducting nanodiamond heterostructures form qubits which can lead to the development of quantum computers provided the effect of disorder present in these structure can be firmly understood. Presently we concentrate on electrical transport properties of heavily boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond films around the superconducting transition temperature measured as a function of magnetic fields and the applied bias current. Microstructure of these films is described by a two dimensional superlattice system which can also contain paramagnetic impurities. We report observation of anomalous negative Hall resistance in these films close to the superconductor-insulator-normal phase transition in the resistance versus temperature plots at low bias currents at zero and low magnetic field. The negative Hall effect is found to be suppressed as the bias current increase. Magnetoresistance study shows a distinct peak at zero field when measured in the low current regimes which suggest a superconductor-insulator-superconductor structure of films. Current vs. voltage characteristics show signature of π-Josephson like behaviour which can give rise to a characteristic frequency of several hundred of gigahertz. Signature of spin flipping also shows novel spintronic device applications.

  13. Clinical applications of radiofrequency: nonsurgical skin tightening (thermage).

    PubMed

    Hodgkinson, Darryl J

    2009-04-01

    Thermage is a nonsurgical treatment for sagging skin in the jowl, neck, and eyelids. Abdominal striae, loose upper arm skin and buttock sagging, and improvement of the appearance of cellulite have become amenable to the radiofrequency treatment. Radiofrequency passed through cooled epidermis allows for radiofrequency-induced thermal damage to the dermis and deep dermal collagen (fibrous septae). The remodeling of the collagen leads to clinically discernible improvement in the sagging skin and skin quality; the remodeling of deep dermal collagen (fibrous septae) allows modeling of contours and improvement of the cellulite appearance.

  14. Radiofrequency energy-induced heating of bovine articular cartilage using a bipolar radiofrequency electrode.

    PubMed

    Shellock, F G; Shields, C L

    2000-01-01

    Radiofrequency energy is used for thermal-assisted chondroplasty to treat grade II and III chondromalacia with the lowest possible energy setting that achieves the desired result. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the temperature changes associated with the use of radiofrequency energy delivered at different settings to bovine articular cartilage using a bipolar electrode. Cartilage samples were placed in a temperature-controlled (37 degrees C) saline bath for the delivery of radiofrequency energy. A fluoroptic thermometry probe was positioned to record the temperatures at the electrode-tissue interface. The electrode was activated for 2 seconds at settings of V2-120, V2-60, V2-40, and V2-20 in two modes: ablation and desiccation. Additionally, the cartilage samples were visually inspected to determine changes in appearance. The highest average temperatures were as follows: ablation mode, 78.5 degrees C (V2-120), 62.6 degrees C (V2-60), 58.1 degrees C (V2-40), and 54.1 degrees C (V2-20); desiccation mode, 71.8 degrees C (V2-120), 61.4 degrees C (V2-60), 57.7 degrees C (V2-40), and 53.3 degrees C (V2-20). There were statistically significant increases in temperatures associated with each of the respective settings. There were no substantial visual changes produced by the V2-20 settings, while the other settings produced a gradation of effects. These data provide information to help guide the use of a bipolar radiofrequency electrode and electrosurgical system for thermal-assisted chondroplasty.

  15. Superconducting linacs: some recent developments

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    The paper is a review of superconducting linacs that are of interest for heavy-ion acceleration. Most of the paper is concerned with energy boosters for projectiles from tandem electrostatic accelerators, the only application for which superconducting linacs are now used for heavy-ion acceleration. There is also a brief discussion of the concept of a superconducting injector linac being developed as a replacement of the tandem in a multi-stage acceleration system. Throughout, the emphasis is on the technology of the superconducting linac, including some attention to the relationships between resonator design parameters and accelerator performance characteristics. 21 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Korea's developmental program for superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Gye-Won; Won, Dong-Yeon; Kuk, Il-Hyun; Park, Jong-Chul

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity research in Korea was firstly carried out in the late 70's by a research group in Seoul National University (SNU), who fabricated a small scale superconducting magnetic energy storage system under the financial support from Korea Electric Power Company (KEPCO). But a few researchers were involved in superconductivity research until the oxide high Tc superconductor was discovered by Bednorz and Mueller. After the discovery of YBaCuO superconductor operating above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77 K)(exp 2), Korean Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) sponsored a special fund for the high Tc superconductivity research to universities and national research institutes by recognizing its importance. Scientists engaged in this project organized 'High Temperature Superconductivity Research Association (HITSRA)' for effective conducting of research. Its major functions are to coordinate research activities on high Tc superconductivity and organize the workshop for active exchange of information. During last seven years the major superconductivity research has been carried out through the coordination of HITSRA. The major parts of the Korea's superconductivity research program were related to high temperature superconductor and only a few groups were carrying out research on conventional superconductor technology, and Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI) have led this research. In this talk, the current status and future plans of superconductivity research in Korea will be reviewed based on the results presented in interim meeting of HITSRA, April 1-2, 1994. Taejeon, as well as the research activity of KAERI.

  17. Superconductivity-related insulating behavior.

    PubMed

    Sambandamurthy, G; Engel, L W; Johansson, A; Shahar, D

    2004-03-12

    We present the results of an experimental study of superconducting, disordered, thin films of amorphous indium oxide. These films can be driven from the superconducting phase to a reentrant insulating state by the application of a perpendicular magnetic field (B). We find that the high-B insulator exhibits activated transport with a characteristic temperature, TI. TI has a maximum value (TpI) that is close to the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) at B=0, suggesting a possible relation between the conduction mechanisms in the superconducting and insulating phases. Tp(I) and Tc display opposite dependences on the disorder strength.

  18. Topological Superconductivity in Dirac Semimetals.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shingo; Sato, Masatoshi

    2015-10-30

    Dirac semimetals host bulk band-touching Dirac points and a surface Fermi loop. We develop a theory of superconducting Dirac semimetals. Establishing a relation between the Dirac points and the surface Fermi loop, we clarify how the nontrivial topology of Dirac semimetals affects their superconducting state. We note that the unique orbital texture of Dirac points and a structural phase transition of the crystal favor symmetry-protected topological superconductivity with a quartet of surface Majorana fermions. We suggest the possible application of our theory to recently discovered superconducting states in Cd_{3}As_{2}.

  19. Radio-frequency ablation of small renal tumors: minimum follow up of 1 year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Vipul; Thaly, Rahul; Shah, Ketul

    2007-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: With the increased utility of complex imaging modalities small renal tumors are being diagnosed with rising frequency. We performed radiofrequency ablation to treat tumors less than 4cm in size using a combination of temperature, impedance, ultrasound and laparoscopic guidance. In this article we reviewed the outcome of radiofrequency ablation of renal tumors at one year at our institution. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Over a three-year period 75 patients with a total of 93 renal tumors underwent radiofrequency ablation. Average patient age was 64.5 years with ASA of 2.9. Indications for nephron sparing were imperative in 33 (solitary kidney 21, renal insufficiency 12). Seventeen patients had significant co-morbidities with ASA score of 3 or more and were thought to be poor candidates for nephrectomy or partial nephrectomy. Five were Jehovah's Witness patients. Average tumor size was 3.2 cm (1.5-4.0). 60% of the tumors were exophytic and 40% deep. Radiofrequency ablation was performed via a transperitoneal approach using the single pronged 3cm Cool tip electrode (Radionics Inc). Tumor was isolated laparoscopically. Prior to ablation the lesions were biopsied. Ablation was performed using both laparoscopic and real-time ultrasound imaging of the boarders of the tumor. During ablation impedance and temperature monitoring was performed. For each tumor two separate ablations were performed at perpendicular angles, the first ablation was for 6 minutes and the second for 3 minutes. The center and periphery of the tumor was monitored to insure that the temperature rose above 70 degrees Celsius. Patients were followed at three-month intervals with triple phase CT scan or MRI to evaluate efficacy of the ablation. Our criteria for recurrent tumor were growth or enhancement of the lesion. RESULTS: Average operative time was 109 minutes with and average EBL of <25cc. Mean hospital stay was 1.4 days. At average follow up of 19.2 months (range 2-24), one lesion showed

  20. Radiofrequency thermal ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Allgaier, H P; Galandi, D; Zuber, I; Blum, H E

    2001-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the major malignancies worldwide. Due to advanced or decompensated liver cirrhosis, comorbidity and multicentricity of the tumor lesions, 70-80% of HCC patients are inoperable at the time of diagnosis. Radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFTA) is a new minimally invasive and sage technique for the nonsurgical treatment of HCCs. Similar to other ablation techniques, the treatment strategy depends on several factors, including the patient's clinical status, the stage of liver cirrhosis and of the HCC. RFTA can be performed percutaneously, laparoscopically or after laparotomy. Advanced RFTA equipment, refined techniques of modifying tumor tissue response to RFTA, and combined treatment strategies should lead to better response rates even in larger HCCs.

  1. Emerging indications of endoscopic radiofrequency ablation

    PubMed Central

    Becq, Aymeric; Camus, Marine; Rahmi, Gabriel; de Parades, Vincent; Marteau, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-validated treatment of dysplastic Barrett's esophagus. Other indications of endoscopic RFA are under evaluation. Results Four prospective studies (total 69 patients) have shown that RFA achieved complete remission of early esophageal squamous intra-epithelial neoplasia at a rate of 80%, but with a substantial risk of stricture. In the setting of gastric antral vascular ectasia, two prospective monocenter studies, and a retrospective multicenter study, (total 51 patients), suggest that RFA is efficacious in terms of reducing transfusion dependency. In the setting of chronic hemorrhagic radiation proctopathy, a prospective monocenter study and a retrospective multicenter study (total 56 patients) suggest that RFA is an efficient treatment. A retrospective comparative study (64 patients) suggests that RFA improves stents patency in malignant biliary strictures. Conclusions Endoscopic RFA is an upcoming treatment modality in early esophageal squamous intra-epithelial neoplasia, as well as in gastric, rectal, and biliary diseases. PMID:26279839

  2. Radiofrequency Ablation Therapy for Solid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kam, Anthony

    2002-12-04

    Surgical resection, systemic chemotherapy, and local radiation have been the conventional treatments for localized solid cancer. Because certain patients are not candidates for tumor resection and because many tumors are poorly responsive to chemotherapy and radiation, there has been an impetus to develop alternative therapies. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive therapy for localized solid cancers that has gained considerable attention in the last 12 years. Advantages of minimally invasive therapies over surgery include less recovery time, lower morbidity and mortality, eligibility of more patients, and lower cost. RFA has been applied most extensively to inoperable hepatic tumors. It is investigational for tumors in the kidney, lung, bone, breast, and adrenal gland. This colloquium will review the mechanism, techniques, limitations, and clinical applications of RFA. The ultimate role that RFA will play in cancer therapy will depend on the results of long-term follow-up and prospective randomized trials.

  3. Piezoelectric radiofrequency transducers as passive buried sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rétornaz, T.; Friedt, J.-M.; Alzuaga, S.; Baron, T.; Lebrasseur, É.; Martin, G.; Laroche, T.; Ballandras, S.; Griselin, M.; Simonnet, J.-P.

    2012-09-01

    We demonstrate that single-piezoelectric substrate-based acoustic transducers act as ideal sensors for probing with various RADAR strategies. Because these sensors are intrinsically passive devices working in the radiofrequency range, they exhibit improved interrogation range and robustness with respect to silicon-based radio frequency identification tags. Both wideband (acoustic delay lines) and narrowband (acoustic resonators) transducers are shown to be compatible with pulse-mode and frequency-modulated continuous-wave RADAR strategies, respectively. We particularly focus on the ground-penetrating RADAR (GPR) application in which the lack of local energy source makes these sensors suitable candidates for buried applications in roads, building or civil engineering monitoring. A novel acoustic sensor concept - high-overtone bulk acoustic resonator - is especially suited as sensor interrogated by a wide range of antenna set, as demonstrated with GPR units working in the 100 and 200 MHz range.

  4. Palliative Radiofrequency Ablation for Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jindal, Gaurav; Friedman, Marc; Locklin, Julia Wood, Bradford J.

    2006-06-15

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive local therapy for cancer. Its efficacy is now becoming well documented in many different organs, including liver, kidney, and lung. The goal of RFA is typically complete eradication of a tumor in lieu of an invasive surgical procedure. However, RFA can also play an important role in the palliative care of cancer patients. Tumors which are surgically unresectable and incompatible for complete ablation present the opportunity for RFA to be used in a new paradigm. Cancer pain runs the gamut from minor discomfort relieved with mild pain medication to unrelenting suffering for the patient, poorly controlled by conventional means. RFA is a tool which can potentially palliate intractable cancer pain. We present here a case in which RFA provided pain relief in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer with pain uncontrolled by conventional methods.

  5. Multiparametric imaging with heterogeneous radiofrequency fields

    PubMed Central

    Cloos, Martijn A.; Knoll, Florian; Zhao, Tiejun; Block, Kai T.; Bruno, Mary; Wiggins, Graham C.; Sodickson, Daniel K.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an unrivalled medical diagnostic technique able to map tissue anatomy and physiology non-invasively. MRI measurements are meticulously engineered to control experimental conditions across the sample. However, residual radiofrequency (RF) field inhomogeneities are often unavoidable, leading to artefacts that degrade the diagnostic and scientific value of the images. Here we show that, paradoxically, these artefacts can be eliminated by deliberately interweaving freely varying heterogeneous RF fields into a magnetic resonance fingerprinting data-acquisition process. Observations made based on simulations are experimentally confirmed at 7 Tesla (T), and the clinical implications of this new paradigm are illustrated with in vivo measurements near an orthopaedic implant at 3T. These results show that it is possible to perform quantitative multiparametric imaging with heterogeneous RF fields, and to liberate MRI from the traditional struggle for control over the RF field uniformity. PMID:27526996

  6. Multiparametric imaging with heterogeneous radiofrequency fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloos, Martijn A.; Knoll, Florian; Zhao, Tiejun; Block, Kai T.; Bruno, Mary; Wiggins, Graham C.; Sodickson, Daniel K.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an unrivalled medical diagnostic technique able to map tissue anatomy and physiology non-invasively. MRI measurements are meticulously engineered to control experimental conditions across the sample. However, residual radiofrequency (RF) field inhomogeneities are often unavoidable, leading to artefacts that degrade the diagnostic and scientific value of the images. Here we show that, paradoxically, these artefacts can be eliminated by deliberately interweaving freely varying heterogeneous RF fields into a magnetic resonance fingerprinting data-acquisition process. Observations made based on simulations are experimentally confirmed at 7 Tesla (T), and the clinical implications of this new paradigm are illustrated with in vivo measurements near an orthopaedic implant at 3T. These results show that it is possible to perform quantitative multiparametric imaging with heterogeneous RF fields, and to liberate MRI from the traditional struggle for control over the RF field uniformity.

  7. Electromagnetic limits to radiofrequency (RF) neuronal telemetry.

    PubMed

    Diaz, R E; Sebastian, T

    2013-12-18

    The viability of a radiofrequency (RF) telemetry channel for reporting individual neuron activity wirelessly from an embedded antenna to an external receiver is determined. Comparing the power at the transmitting antenna required for the desired Channel Capacity, to the maximum power that this antenna can dissipate in the body without altering or damaging surrounding tissue reveals the severe penalty incurred by miniaturization of the antenna. Using both Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) and thermal damage limits as constraints, and 300 Kbps as the required capacity for telemetry streams 100 ms in duration, the model shows that conventional antennas smaller than 0.1 mm could not support human neuronal telemetry to a remote receiver (1 m away.) Reducing the antenna to 10 microns in size to enable the monitoring of single human neuron signals to a receiver at the surface of the head would require operating with a channel capacity of only 0.3 bps.

  8. Radiofrequency identification for inventory in neurointerventional practice.

    PubMed

    Byers, Ernest; Gomez, Max A; Sheridan, Robert M; Orr, Nelson W; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2011-03-01

    Implementations of radiofrequency identification (RFID) systems within hospital settings are not unique or without controversy. To date, little consideration has been given to use of this technology in clinical interventional radiologic practice. The potential financial advantages coupled with benefits to quality and safety and increases in staff satisfaction are considerable. The authors outline these advantages by enabling readers to broadly consider the systemic perspective of implementing RFID technology with an associated vision toward downstream growth. Furthermore, the authors demonstrate the benefits of RFID technology integration in reducing cost and increasing quality assurance and the on-time delivery of services. Implementing RFID requires commitment from frontline technologist staff members to work collaboratively with management and external vendors. Ultimately, the authors believe this technology can positively influence patient care.

  9. Multiparametric imaging with heterogeneous radiofrequency fields.

    PubMed

    Cloos, Martijn A; Knoll, Florian; Zhao, Tiejun; Block, Kai T; Bruno, Mary; Wiggins, Graham C; Sodickson, Daniel K

    2016-08-16

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an unrivalled medical diagnostic technique able to map tissue anatomy and physiology non-invasively. MRI measurements are meticulously engineered to control experimental conditions across the sample. However, residual radiofrequency (RF) field inhomogeneities are often unavoidable, leading to artefacts that degrade the diagnostic and scientific value of the images. Here we show that, paradoxically, these artefacts can be eliminated by deliberately interweaving freely varying heterogeneous RF fields into a magnetic resonance fingerprinting data-acquisition process. Observations made based on simulations are experimentally confirmed at 7 Tesla (T), and the clinical implications of this new paradigm are illustrated with in vivo measurements near an orthopaedic implant at 3T. These results show that it is possible to perform quantitative multiparametric imaging with heterogeneous RF fields, and to liberate MRI from the traditional struggle for control over the RF field uniformity.

  10. The Superconducting Magnets of the ILC Beam Delivery System

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, B.; Anerella, M.; Escallier, J.; He, P.; Jain, A.; Marone, A.; Nosochkov, Y.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2007-09-28

    The ILC Beam Delivery System (BDS) uses a variety of superconducting magnets to maximize luminosity and minimize background. Compact final focus quadrupoles with multifunction correction coils focus incoming beams to few nanometer spot sizes while focusing outgoing disrupted beams into a separate extraction beam line. Anti-solenoids mitigate effects from overlapping focusing and the detector solenoid field. Far from the interaction point (IP) strong octupoles help minimize IP backgrounds. A low-field but very large aperture dipole is integrated with the detector solenoid to reduce backgrounds from beamstrahlung pairs generated at the IP. Physics requirements and magnetic design solutions for the BDS superconducting magnets are reviewed in this paper.

  11. Superconducting drift-tube cavity development for the RIA driver.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, K. W.; Kelly, M. P.; Fuerst, J. D.

    2002-09-23

    This paper reports the design and development of two intermediate-velocity superconducting cavities and design of an associated cryomodule for the RIA driver linac. The two cavity types are a 115 MHz, {beta}{sub GEOM} = 0.15 quarter-wave resonant (QWR) cavity, and a 173 MHz, {beta}{sub GEOM} = 0.26 half-wave loaded cavity. Both cavities are well-corrected for dipole and quadrupole asymmetries in the accelerating field. The cryomodule is being designed to incorporate a separate vacuum system for cavity vacuum to provide a particulate-free environment for the superconducting cavities.

  12. Local Recurrence After Hepatic Radiofrequency Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Mulier, Stefaan; Ni, Yicheng; Jamart, Jacques; Ruers, Theo; Marchal, Guy; Michel, Luc

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to analyze the factors that influence local recurrence after radiofrequency coagulation of liver tumors. Summary Background Data: Local recurrence rate varies widely between 2% and 60%. Apart from tumor size as an important risk factor for local recurrence, little is known about the impact of other factors. Methods: An exhaustive literature search was carried out for the period from January 1, 1990 to January 1, 2004. Only series with a minimal follow-up of 6 months and/or mean follow-up of 12 months were included. Univariate and multivariate meta-analyses were carried out. Results: Ninety-five independent series were included, allowing the analysis of the local recurrence rate of 5224 treated liver tumors. In a univariate analysis, tumor-dependent factors with significantly less local recurrences were: smaller size, neuroendocrine metastases, nonsubcapsular location, and location away from large vessels. Physician-dependent favorable factors were: surgical (open or laparoscopic) approach, vascular occlusion, general anesthesia, a 1-cm intentional margin, and a greater physician experience. In a multivariate analysis, significantly less local recurrences were observed for small size (P < 0.001) and a surgical (versus percutaneous) approach (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Radiofrequency coagulation by laparoscopy or laparotomy results in superior local control, independent of tumor size. The percutaneous route should mainly be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate a laparoscopy or laparotomy. The short-term benefits of less invasiveness for the percutaneous route do not outweigh the longer-term higher risk of local recurrence. PMID:16041205

  13. Transcutaneous temperature controlled radiofrequency for orgasmic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives To evaluate the safety, tolerability, and clinical efficacy of transcutaneous temperature controlled radiofrequency (TTCRF) on vulvovaginal tissue for orgasmic dysfunction. Study Design/Materials and Methods Subjects included 25 sexually active women, ages 21–65, with self‐reported difficulty in achieving orgasms during sex (anorgasmic or slow‐to‐orgasm). Each patient received three sessions at intervals of about 1 month. Treatment was performed using a slim S‐shaped probe with a stamp‐sized metal radiofrequency emitter on one surface of the tip (25 minutes total time on average). External treatments covered the labia majora and minora, lower mons pubis, perineal body, clitoral hood, and clitoris. Full length treatment of the vagina with concentration on the anterior wall was performed. Tissue temperature during therapy was elevated to and maintained between 40°C and 45°C. No anesthesia was required. After treatment, patients immediately resumed normal activities, including sex. Results Twenty‐three of 25 patients reported an average reduction in time to orgasm of 50%. Patients also noted significant vaginal tightening effects, increased vaginal moisture, and improved vulvar and clitoral sensitivity. All anorgasmic patients reported the ability to achieve orgasms. Two patients had minimal response. Conclusion TTCRF is an effective non‐hormonal, non‐surgical option for women having difficulty achieving orgasm. Treatment also has visible tightening effects on feminine tissues and appears to increase local blood flow, resulting in increased vaginal tightness and moisture. Improved appearance and friction resulted in improved confidence and reduced performance anxiety. Lasers Surg. Med. 48:641–645, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27197701

  14. Auditory response to pulsed radiofrequency energy.

    PubMed

    Elder, J A; Chou, C K

    2003-01-01

    The human auditory response to pulses of radiofrequency (RF) energy, commonly called RF hearing, is a well established phenomenon. RF induced sounds can be characterized as low intensity sounds because, in general, a quiet environment is required for the auditory response. The sound is similar to other common sounds such as a click, buzz, hiss, knock, or chirp. Effective radiofrequencies range from 2.4 to 10000 MHz, but an individual's ability to hear RF induced sounds is dependent upon high frequency acoustic hearing in the kHz range above about 5 kHz. The site of conversion of RF energy to acoustic energy is within or peripheral to the cochlea, and once the cochlea is stimulated, the detection of RF induced sounds in humans and RF induced auditory responses in animals is similar to acoustic sound detection. The fundamental frequency of RF induced sounds is independent of the frequency of the radiowaves but dependent upon head dimensions. The auditory response has been shown to be dependent upon the energy in a single pulse and not on average power density. The weight of evidence of the results of human, animal, and modeling studies supports the thermoelastic expansion theory as the explanation for the RF hearing phenomenon. RF induced sounds involve the perception via bone conduction of thermally generated sound transients, that is, audible sounds are produced by rapid thermal expansion resulting from a calculated temperature rise of only 5 x 10(-6) degrees C in tissue at the threshold level due to absorption of the energy in the RF pulse. The hearing of RF induced sounds at exposure levels many orders of magnitude greater than the hearing threshold is considered to be a biological effect without an accompanying health effect. This conclusion is supported by a comparison of pressure induced in the body by RF pulses to pressure associated with hazardous acoustic energy and clinical ultrasound procedures.

  15. Genetic effects of radiofrequency radiation (RFR)

    SciTech Connect

    Verschaeve, L. . E-mail: luc.verschaeve@vito.be

    2005-09-01

    The possible effects of radiofrequency (RF) exposure on the genetic material of cells are considered very important since damage to the DNA of somatic cells can be linked to cancer development or cell death whereas damage to germ cells can lead to genetic damage in next and subsequent generations. This is why the scientific literature reports many investigations on the subject. According to a number of review papers, the conclusion so far is that there is little evidence that RFR is directly mutagenic and that adverse effects that were reported in some of the papers are predominantly the result of hyperthermia. Yet, some subtle indirect effects on DNA replication and/or transcription of genes under relatively restricted exposure conditions cannot be ruled out. Furthermore, the possibility of combined effects of RFR with environmental carcinogens/mutagens merits further attention. The present paper takes into account more recent investigations but the conclusion remains the same. A majority of studies report no increased (cyto)genetic damage but yet, a considerable number of investigations do. However, many studies were not sufficiently characterized, are therefore difficult to replicate and cannot be compared to others. Experimental protocols were very different from one study to another and investigations from a single laboratory were very often limited in the sample size or number of cells investigated, preventing a robust statistical analysis. Subtle, but significant differences between RFR-exposed and sham-exposed cells cannot be found in such conditions. For the above reasons, it was concluded at a workshop in Loewenstein (November 2002) that further investigations by individual laboratories most probably will not add much to the discussion of radiofrequency radiation (RFR) genotoxicity. Large, well coordinated, international collaborative studies involving participation of several experienced scientists are considered an alternative of uttermost importance

  16. Genetic effects of radiofrequency radiation (RFR).

    PubMed

    Verschaeve, L

    2005-09-01

    The possible effects of radiofrequency (RF) exposure on the genetic material of cells are considered very important since damage to the DNA of somatic cells can be linked to cancer development or cell death whereas damage to germ cells can lead to genetic damage in next and subsequent generations. This is why the scientific literature reports many investigations on the subject. According to a number of review papers, the conclusion so far is that there is little evidence that RFR is directly mutagenic and that adverse effects that were reported in some of the papers are predominantly the result of hyperthermia. Yet, some subtle indirect effects on DNA replication and/or transcription of genes under relatively restricted exposure conditions cannot be ruled out. Furthermore, the possibility of combined effects of RFR with environmental carcinogens/mutagens merits further attention. The present paper takes into account more recent investigations but the conclusion remains the same. A majority of studies report no increased (cyto)genetic damage but yet, a considerable number of investigations do. However, many studies were not sufficiently characterized, are therefore difficult to replicate and cannot be compared to others. Experimental protocols were very different from one study to another and investigations from a single laboratory were very often limited in the sample size or number of cells investigated, preventing a robust statistical analysis. Subtle, but significant differences between RFR-exposed and sham-exposed cells cannot be found in such conditions. For the above reasons, it was concluded at a workshop in Löwenstein (November 2002) that further investigations by individual laboratories most probably will not add much to the discussion of radiofrequency radiation (RFR) genotoxicity. Large, well coordinated, international collaborative studies involving participation of several experienced scientists are considered an alternative of uttermost importance

  17. Radiofrequency exposure near high-voltage lines.

    PubMed Central

    Vignati, M; Giuliani, L

    1997-01-01

    Many epidemiologic studies suggest a relationship between incidence of diseases like cancer and leukemia and exposure to 50/60 Hz magnetic fields. Some studies suggest a relationship between leukemia incidence in populations residing near high-voltage lines and the distance to these lines. Other epidemiologic studies suggest a relationship between leukemia incidence and exposure to 50/60 Hz magnetic fields (measured or estimated) and distance from the main system (220 or 120 V). The present work does not question these results but is intended to draw attention to a possible concurrent cause that might also increase the incidence of this disease; the presence on an electric grid of radiofrequency currents used for communications and remote control. These currents have been detected on high- and medium-voltage lines. In some cases they are even used on the main system for remote reading of electric meters. This implies that radiofrequency (RF) magnetic fields are present near the electric network in addition to the 50/60 Hz fields. This intensity of these RF fields is low but the intensity of currents induced in the human body by exposure to magnetic fields increases with frequency. Because scientific research has not yet clarified whether the risk is related to the value of magnetic induction or to the currents this kind of exposure produces in the human body, it is reasonable to suggest that the presence of the RF magnetic fields must be considered in the context of epidemiologic studies. Images Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:9467084

  18. Concerning superconducting inertial guidance gyroscopes inside superconducting magnetic shields

    SciTech Connect

    Satterthwaite, J.C.; Gawlinski, E.T.

    1997-12-01

    Superconductors can in theory be used to detect rotation by Josephson interference or by detection of the London field, a magnetic induction that fills the interior of any rotating bulk superconductor. One might hope to use these properties of superconductors to build a practical inertial guidance gyroscope. A problem arises from the necessity of surrounding the device with superconducting magnetic shielding: the London field generated by a co-rotating shield eliminates the response of the superconducting device within the shield. The present article demonstrates this point more rigorously than has been done before, discussing solutions of Ampere`s law for rotating and nonrotating superconductors and paying careful attention to boundary conditions. Beginning with a supercurrent density derivable from either the Ginzburg-Landau or the London theory of superconductivity, the article shows: (1) that a superconducting device cannot distinguish between rotation and an applied magnetic field; (2) that a superconducting device surrounded by a co-rotating superconducting shield cannot detect rotation. The term `superconducting gyroscope` in this article refers only to a device whose working principle is the response of the superconductor itself to rotation, not to any device in which superconducting electronic components are used to detect some other effect. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Optimization of superconducting tiling pattern for superconducting bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1996-09-17

    An apparatus and method for reducing magnetic field inhomogeneities which produce rotational loss mechanisms in high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings are disclosed. Magnetic field inhomogeneities are reduced by dividing high temperature superconducting structures into smaller structures, and arranging the smaller structures into tiers which stagger the magnetic field maximum locations of the smaller structures. 20 figs.

  20. Optimization of superconducting tiling pattern for superconducting bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for reducing magnetic field inhomogeneities which produce rotational loss mechanisms in high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings. Magnetic field inhomogeneities are reduced by dividing high temperature superconducting structures into smaller structures, and arranging the smaller structures into tiers which stagger the magnetic field maximum locations of the smaller structures.

  1. Ultracapacitor separator

    DOEpatents

    Wei, Chang; Jerabek, Elihu Calvin; LeBlanc, Jr., Oliver Harris

    2001-03-06

    An ultracapacitor includes two solid, nonporous current collectors, two porous electrodes separating the collectors, a porous separator between the electrodes and an electrolyte occupying the pores in the electrodes and separator. The electrolyte is a polar aprotic organic solvent and a salt. The porous separator comprises a wet laid cellulosic material.

  2. Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.

    1993-01-01

    This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x.

  3. Radio-frequency wave enhanced runaway production rate

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, V.S.; McClain, F.W.

    1983-06-01

    Enhancement of runaway electron production (over that of an Ohmic discharge) can be achieved by the addition of radio-frequency waves. This effect is studied analytically and numerically using a two-dimensional Fokker--Planck quasilinear equation.

  4. Method for producing microstructured templates and their use in providing pinning enhancements in superconducting films deposited thereon

    DOEpatents

    Aytug, Tolga; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Polat, Ozgur

    2013-07-16

    The present invention relates to a method for producing a phase-separated layer useful as a flux pinning substrate for a superconducting film, wherein the method includes subjecting at least a first and a second target material to a sputtering deposition technique in order that a phase-separated layer is deposited epitaxially on a primary substrate containing an ordered surface layer. The invention is also directed to a method for producing a superconducting tape containing pinning defects therein by depositing a superconducting film on a phase-separated layer produced by the method described above.

  5. Radiofrequency plasma antenna generated by femtosecond laser filaments in air

    SciTech Connect

    Brelet, Y.; Houard, A.; Point, G.; Prade, B.; Carbonnel, J.; Andre, Y.-B.; Mysyrowicz, A.; Arantchouk, L.; Pellet, M.

    2012-12-24

    We demonstrate tunable radiofrequency emission from a meter-long linear plasma column produced in air at atmospheric pressure. A short-lived plasma column is initially produced by femtosecond filamentation and subsequently converted into a long-lived discharge column by application of an external high voltage field. Radiofrequency excitation is fed to the plasma by induction and detected remotely as electromagnetic radiation by a classical antenna.

  6. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOEpatents

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2003-06-10

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  7. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOEpatents

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  8. High critical current superconducting tapes

    DOEpatents

    Holesinger, Terry G.; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2003-09-23

    Improvements in critical current capacity for superconducting film structures are disclosed and include the use of a superconducting RE-BCO layer including a mixture of rare earth metals, e.g., yttrium and europium, where the ratio of yttrium to europium in the RE-BCO layer ranges from about 3 to 1 to from about 1.5 to 1.

  9. Treatment of acne vulgaris with fractional radiofrequency microneedling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Tae; Lee, Kang Hoon; Sim, Hyung Jun; Suh, Kee Suck; Jang, Min Soo

    2014-07-01

    Fractional radiofrequency microneedling is a novel radiofrequency technique that uses insulated microneedles to deliver energy to the deep dermis at the point of penetration without destruction of the epidermis. It has been used for the treatment of various dermatological conditions including wrinkles, atrophic scars and hypertrophic scars. There have been few studies evaluating the efficacy of fractional radiofrequency microneedling in the treatment of acne, and none measuring objective parameters like the number of inflammatory and non-inflammatory acne lesions or sebum excretion levels. The safety and efficacy of fractional radiofrequency microneedling in the treatment of acne vulgaris was investigated. In a prospective clinical trial, 25 patients with moderate to severe acne were treated with fractional radiofrequency microneedling. The procedure was carried out three times at 1-month intervals. Acne lesion count, subjective satisfaction score, sebum excretion level and adverse effects were assessed at baseline and at 4, 8 and 12 weeks after the first treatment as well as 4, 8 and 12 weeks after the last treatment. Number of acne lesions (inflammatory and non-inflammatory) decreased. Sebum excretion and subjective satisfaction were more favorable at every time point compared with the baseline values (P < 0.05). Inflammatory lesions responded better than non-inflammatory lesions (P < 0.05). Adverse effects such as pinpoint bleeding, pain and erythema were noted, but were transient and not severe enough to stop treatment. Fractional radiofrequency microneedling is a safe and effective treatment for acne vulgaris.

  10. Superconductivity in two-dimensional CoO2 layers.

    PubMed

    Takada, Kazunori; Sakurai, Hiroya; Takayama-Muromachi, Eiji; Izumi, Fujio; Dilanian, Ruben A; Sasaki, Takayoshi

    2003-03-06

    Since the discovery of high-transition-temperature (high-T(c)) superconductivity in layered copper oxides, many researchers have searched for similar behaviour in other layered metal oxides involving 3d-transition metals, such as cobalt and nickel. Such attempts have so far failed, with the result that the copper oxide layer is thought to be essential for superconductivity. Here we report that Na(x)CoO2*yH2O (x approximately 0.35, y approximately 1.3) is a superconductor with a T(c) of about 5 K. This compound consists of two-dimensional CoO2 layers separated by a thick insulating layer of Na+ ions and H2O molecules. There is a marked resemblance in superconducting properties between the present material and high-T(c) copper oxides, suggesting that the two systems have similar underlying physics.

  11. Optimized unconventional superconductivity in a molecular Jahn-Teller metal

    PubMed Central

    Zadik, Ruth H.; Takabayashi, Yasuhiro; Klupp, Gyöngyi; Colman, Ross H.; Ganin, Alexey Y.; Potočnik, Anton; Jeglič, Peter; Arčon, Denis; Matus, Péter; Kamarás, Katalin; Kasahara, Yuichi; Iwasa, Yoshihiro; Fitch, Andrew N.; Ohishi, Yasuo; Garbarino, Gaston; Kato, Kenichi; Rosseinsky, Matthew J.; Prassides, Kosmas

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between the superconducting, the neighboring insulating, and the normal metallic state above Tc is a major challenge for all unconventional superconductors. The molecular A3C60 fulleride superconductors have a parent antiferromagnetic insulator in common with the atom-based cuprates, but here, the C603– electronic structure controls the geometry and spin state of the structural building unit via the on-molecule Jahn-Teller effect. We identify the Jahn-Teller metal as a fluctuating microscopically heterogeneous coexistence of both localized Jahn-Teller–active and itinerant electrons that connects the insulating and superconducting states of fullerides. The balance between these molecular and extended lattice features of the electrons at the Fermi level gives a dome-shaped variation of Tc with interfulleride separation, demonstrating molecular electronic structure control of superconductivity. PMID:26601168

  12. Optimized unconventional superconductivity in a molecular Jahn-Teller metal.

    PubMed

    Zadik, Ruth H; Takabayashi, Yasuhiro; Klupp, Gyöngyi; Colman, Ross H; Ganin, Alexey Y; Potočnik, Anton; Jeglič, Peter; Arčon, Denis; Matus, Péter; Kamarás, Katalin; Kasahara, Yuichi; Iwasa, Yoshihiro; Fitch, Andrew N; Ohishi, Yasuo; Garbarino, Gaston; Kato, Kenichi; Rosseinsky, Matthew J; Prassides, Kosmas

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the relationship between the superconducting, the neighboring insulating, and the normal metallic state above T c is a major challenge for all unconventional superconductors. The molecular A3C60 fulleride superconductors have a parent antiferromagnetic insulator in common with the atom-based cuprates, but here, the C60 (3-) electronic structure controls the geometry and spin state of the structural building unit via the on-molecule Jahn-Teller effect. We identify the Jahn-Teller metal as a fluctuating microscopically heterogeneous coexistence of both localized Jahn-Teller-active and itinerant electrons that connects the insulating and superconducting states of fullerides. The balance between these molecular and extended lattice features of the electrons at the Fermi level gives a dome-shaped variation of T c with interfulleride separation, demonstrating molecular electronic structure control of superconductivity.

  13. A superconducting magnetic gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, A. M.

    2016-05-01

    A comparison is made between a magnetic gear using permanent magnets and superconductors. The objective is to see if there are any fundamental reasons why superconducting magnets should not provide higher power densities than permanent magnets. The gear is based on the variable permeability design of Attilah and Howe (2001 IEEE Trans. Magn. 37 2844-46) in which a ring of permanent magnets surrounding a ring of permeable pole pieces with a different spacing gives an internal field component at the beat frequency. Superconductors can provide much larger fields and forces but will saturate the pole pieces. However the gear mechanism still operates, but in a different way. The magnetisation of the pole pieces is now constant but rotates with angle at the beat frequency. The result is a cylindrical Halbach array which produces an internal field with the same symmetry as in the linear regime, but has an analytic solution. In this paper a typical gear system is analysed with finite elements using FlexPDE. It is shown that the gear can work well into the saturation regime and that the Halbach array gives a good approximation to the results. Replacing the permanent magnets with superconducting tapes can give large increases in torque density, and for something like a wind turbine a combined gear and generator is possible. However there are major practical problems. Perhaps the most fundamental is the large high frequency field which is inevitably present and which will cause AC losses. Also large magnetic fields are required, with all the practical problems of high field superconducting magnets in rotating machines. Nevertheless there are ways of mitigating these difficulties and it seems worthwhile to explore the possibilities of this technology further.

  14. Superconducting cavity material for the European XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Brinkmann, A.; Iversen, J.; Matheisen, A.; Navitski, A.; Tamashevich, Y.; Michelato, P.; Monaco, L.

    2015-08-01

    Analysis of the strategy for superconducting cavity material procurement and quality management is done on the basis of the experience with the cavity production for the European x-ray free electron laser (EXFEL) facility. An adjustment of the material specification to EXFEL requirements, procurement of material, quality control (QC), documentation, and shipment to cavity producers have been worked out and carried out by DESY. A multistep process of qualification of the material suppliers included detailed material testing, single- and nine-cell cavity fabrication, and cryogenic radiofrequency tests. Production of about 25 000 semi-finished parts of high purity niobium and niobium-titanium alloy in a period of three years has been divided finally between companies Heraeus, Tokyo Denkai, Ningxia OTIC, and PLANSEE. Consideration of large-grain (LG) material as a possible option for the EXFEL has resulted in the production of one cryogenic module consisting of seven (out of eight) LG cavities. LG materials fulfilled the EXFEL requirements and showed even 25% to 30% higher unloaded quality factor. A possible shortage of the required quantity of LG material on the market led, however, to the choice of conventional fine-grain (FG) material. Eddy-current scanning (ECS) has been applied as an additional QC tool for the niobium sheets and contributed significantly to the material qualification and sorting. Two percent of the sheets have been rejected, which potentially could affect up to one-third of the cavities. The main imperfections and defects in the rejected sheets have been analyzed. Samples containing foreign material inclusions have been extracted from the sheets and electrochemically polished. Some inclusions remained even after 150 μm surface layer removal. Indications of foreign material inclusions have been found in the industrially fabricated and treated cavities and a deeper analysis of the defects has been performed.

  15. Superconductivity in a chiral nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, F.; Shi, W.; Ideue, T.; Yoshida, M.; Zak, A.; Tenne, R.; Kikitsu, T.; Inoue, D.; Hashizume, D.; Iwasa, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Chirality of materials are known to affect optical, magnetic and electric properties, causing a variety of nontrivial phenomena such as circular dichiroism for chiral molecules, magnetic Skyrmions in chiral magnets and nonreciprocal carrier transport in chiral conductors. On the other hand, effect of chirality on superconducting transport has not been known. Here we report the nonreciprocity of superconductivity--unambiguous evidence of superconductivity reflecting chiral structure in which the forward and backward supercurrent flows are not equivalent because of inversion symmetry breaking. Such superconductivity is realized via ionic gating in individual chiral nanotubes of tungsten disulfide. The nonreciprocal signal is significantly enhanced in the superconducting state, being associated with unprecedented quantum Little-Parks oscillations originating from the interference of supercurrent along the circumference of the nanotube. The present results indicate that the nonreciprocity is a viable approach toward the superconductors with chiral or noncentrosymmetric structures.

  16. Superconductivity in a chiral nanotube.

    PubMed

    Qin, F; Shi, W; Ideue, T; Yoshida, M; Zak, A; Tenne, R; Kikitsu, T; Inoue, D; Hashizume, D; Iwasa, Y

    2017-02-16

    Chirality of materials are known to affect optical, magnetic and electric properties, causing a variety of nontrivial phenomena such as circular dichiroism for chiral molecules, magnetic Skyrmions in chiral magnets and nonreciprocal carrier transport in chiral conductors. On the other hand, effect of chirality on superconducting transport has not been known. Here we report the nonreciprocity of superconductivity-unambiguous evidence of superconductivity reflecting chiral structure in which the forward and backward supercurrent flows are not equivalent because of inversion symmetry breaking. Such superconductivity is realized via ionic gating in individual chiral nanotubes of tungsten disulfide. The nonreciprocal signal is significantly enhanced in the superconducting state, being associated with unprecedented quantum Little-Parks oscillations originating from the interference of supercurrent along the circumference of the nanotube. The present results indicate that the nonreciprocity is a viable approach toward the superconductors with chiral or noncentrosymmetric structures.

  17. High-temperature conventional superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremets, M. I.; Drozdov, A. P.

    2017-02-01

    Conventional superconductors are described well by the Bardeen – Cooper – Schrieffer (BCS) theory (1957) and its related theories, all of which importantly put no explicit limit on transition temperature Tc. While this allows, in principle, room-temperature superconductivity, no such phenomenon has been observed. Since the discovery of superconductivity in 1911, the measured critical temperature of BCS superconductors has not until recently exceeded 39 K. In 2014, hydrogen sulfide under high pressure was experimentally found to exhibit superconductivity at Tc = 200 K, a record high value which greatly exceeds that of the previous class of high-temperature superconductors, the cuprates. The superconductivity mechanism in cuprates has not yet been explained. Over a period of 25 years, the critical temperature of cuprates has not been increased above 164 K. The paper reviews research on record-high Tc superconductivity in hydrogen sulphide and other hydrides. Prospects for increasing Tc to room temperature are also discussed.

  18. High-temperature conventional superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremets, M. I.; Drozdov, A. P.

    2016-11-01

    Conventional superconductors are described well by the Bardeen - Cooper - Schrieffer (BCS) theory (1957) and its related theories, all of which importantly put no explicit limit on transition temperature T_c. While this allows, in principle, room-temperature superconductivity, no such phenomenon has been observed. Since the discovery of superconductivity in 1911, the measured critical temperature of BCS superconductors has not until recently exceeded 39 K. In 2014, hydrogen sulfide under high pressure was experimentally found to exhibit superconductivity at T_c=200 K, a record high value which greatly exceeds that of the previous class of high-temperature superconductors, the cuprates. The superconductivity mechanism in cuprates has not yet been explained. Over a period of 25 years, the critical temperature of cuprates has not been increased above 164 K. The paper reviews research on record-high T_c superconductivity in hydrogen sulphide and other hydrides. Prospects for increasing T_c to room temperature are also discussed.

  19. TOPICAL REVIEW: Superconducting bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, John R.

    2000-02-01

    The physics and technology of superconducting bearings is reviewed. Particular attention is given to the use of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) in rotating bearings. The basic phenomenology of levitational forces is presented, followed by a brief discussion of the theoretical models that can be used for conceptual understanding and calculations. The merits of various HTS bearing designs are presented, and the behaviour of HTS bearings in typical situations is discussed. The article concludes with a brief survey of various proposed applications for HTS bearings.

  20. Superconducting magnet cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Vander Arend, Peter C.; Fowler, William B.

    1977-01-01

    A device is provided for cooling a conductor to the superconducting state. The conductor is positioned within an inner conduit through which is flowing a supercooled liquid coolant in physical contact with the conductor. The inner conduit is positioned within an outer conduit so that an annular open space is formed therebetween. Through the annular space is flowing coolant in the boiling liquid state. Heat generated by the conductor is transferred by convection within the supercooled liquid coolant to the inner wall of the inner conduit and then is removed by the boiling liquid coolant, making the heat removal from the conductor relatively independent of conductor length.

  1. Superconducting dipole electromagnet

    DOEpatents

    Purcell, John R.

    1977-07-26

    A dipole electromagnet of especial use for bending beams in particle accelerators is wound to have high uniformity of magnetic field across a cross section and to decrease evenly to zero as the ends of the electromagnet are approached by disposing the superconducting filaments of the coil in the crescent-shaped nonoverlapping portions of two intersecting circles. Uniform decrease at the ends is achieved by causing the circles to overlap increasingly in the direction of the ends of the coil until the overlap is complete and the coil is terminated.

  2. Superconductivity in plutonium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrao, J. L.; Bauer, E. D.; Mitchell, J. N.; Tobash, P. H.; Thompson, J. D.

    2015-07-01

    Although the family of plutonium-based superconductors is relatively small, consisting of four compounds all of which crystallize in the tetragonal HoCoGa5 structure, these materials serve as an important bridge between the known Ce- and U-based heavy fermion superconductors and the high-temperature cuprate superconductors. Further, the partial localization of 5f electrons that characterizes the novel electronic properties of elemental plutonium appears to be central to the relatively high superconducting transition temperatures that are observed in PuCoGa5, PuRhGa5, PuCoIn5, and PuRhIn5.

  3. Analysis and characterization of high- Tc superconducting planar transmission lines for microwave circuit components

    SciTech Connect

    Kong Keonshik.

    1991-01-01

    A loss modeling of high {Tc} superconducting planar transmission lines is presented in this dissertation. Transmission structures such as microstrip lines, coplanar waveguides and conductor backed coplanar waveguides are investigated for implementation of a high-{Tc} superconductor. Also, short pulse propagation in the superconducting coplanar stripline is characterized. The motivation for this work is to provide an analytical basis for the effective application of a high {Tc} superconductor to planar transmission lines for microwave components. First, a loss characterization of the various high {Tc} superconducting microstrip line structures is presented in which either the strip or the ground plane is a high {Tc} superconductor. In the analysis, the internal impedances in the strip and the ground plane are separately calculated, and the total internal impedance is obtained by the superposition of the internal impedances. Next, the characteristic of a superconducting coplanar waveguide is investigated and compared with a superconducting microstrip line.

  4. Radio-frequency single-electron refrigerator.

    PubMed

    Pekola, Jukka P; Giazotto, Francesco; Saira, Olli-Pentti

    2007-01-19

    We propose a cyclic refrigeration principle based on mesoscopic electron transport. Synchronous sequential tunneling of electrons in a Coulomb-blockaded device, a normal metal-superconductor single-electron box, results in a cooling power of approximately k(B)T x f at temperature T over a wide range of cycle frequencies f. Electrostatic work, done by the gate voltage source, removes heat from the Coulomb island with an efficiency of approximately k(B)T/Delta, where Delta is the superconducting gap parameter. The performance is not affected significantly by nonidealities, for instance by offset charges. We propose ways of characterizing the system and of its practical implementation.

  5. Superconducting dome in doped quasi-two-dimensional organic Mott insulators: A paradigm for strongly correlated superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébert, Charles-David; Sémon, Patrick; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2015-11-01

    first-order transition between metal and pseudogap. Finally, we predict that electron doping should also lead to an increased range of U /t for superconductivity but with a reduced maximum Tc. This work also clearly shows that the superconducting dome in organic superconductors is tied to the Mott transition and its continuation as a transition separating pseudogap phase from correlated metal in doped compounds, as in the cuprates. Contrary to heavy fermions for example, the maximum Tc is definitely not attached to an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point. That can also be verified experimentally.

  6. Superconducting Bolometer Array Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic; Chervenak, Jay; Irwin, Kent; Moseley, S. Harvey; Shafer, Rick; Staguhn, Johannes; Wollack, Ed; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The next generation of far-infrared and submillimeter instruments require large arrays of detectors containing thousands of elements. These arrays will necessarily be multiplexed, and superconducting bolometer arrays are the most promising present prospect for these detectors. We discuss our current research into superconducting bolometer array technologies, which has recently resulted in the first multiplexed detections of submillimeter light and the first multiplexed astronomical observations. Prototype arrays containing 512 pixels are in production using the Pop-Up Detector (PUD) architecture, which can be extended easily to 1000 pixel arrays. Planar arrays of close-packed bolometers are being developed for the GBT (Green Bank Telescope) and for future space missions. For certain applications, such as a slewed far-infrared sky survey, feedhorncoupling of a large sparsely-filled array of bolometers is desirable, and is being developed using photolithographic feedhorn arrays. Individual detectors have achieved a Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) of -10(exp 17) W/square root of Hz at 300mK, but several orders of magnitude improvement are required and can be reached with existing technology. The testing of such ultralow-background detectors will prove difficult, as this requires optical loading of below IfW. Antenna-coupled bolometer designs have advantages for large format array designs at low powers due to their mode selectivity.

  7. Driven superconducting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yasunobu

    2014-03-01

    Driven nonlinear quantum systems show rich phenomena in various fields of physics. Among them, superconducting quantum circuits have very attractive features such as well-controlled quantum states with design flexibility, strong nonlinearity of Josephson junctions, strong coupling to electromagnetic driving fields, little internal dissipation, and tailored coupling to the electromagnetic environment. We have investigated properties and functionalities of driven superconducting quantum circuits. A transmon qubit coupled to a transmission line shows nearly perfect spatial mode matching between the incident and scattered microwave field in the 1D mode. Dressed states under a driving field are studied there and also in a semi-infinite 1D mode terminated by a resonator containing a flux qubit. An effective Λ-type three-level system is realized under an appropriate driving condition. It allows ``impedance-matched'' perfect absorption of incident probe photons and down conversion into another frequency mode. Finally, the weak signal from the qubit is read out using a Josephson parametric amplifier/oscillator which is another nonlinear circuit driven by a strong pump field. This work was partly supported by the Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology (FIRST), Project for Developing Innovation Systems of MEXT, MEXT KAKENHI ``Quantum Cybernetics,'' and the NICT Commissioned Research.

  8. Superconducting linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce; Hockney, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Special actuators are needed to control the orientation of large structures in space-based precision pointing systems. Electromagnetic actuators that presently exist are too large in size and their bandwidth is too low. Hydraulic fluid actuation also presents problems for many space-based applications. Hydraulic oil can escape in space and contaminate the environment around the spacecraft. A research study was performed that selected an electrically-powered linear actuator that can be used to control the orientation of a large pointed structure. This research surveyed available products, analyzed the capabilities of conventional linear actuators, and designed a first-cut candidate superconducting linear actuator. The study first examined theoretical capabilities of electrical actuators and determined their problems with respect to the application and then determined if any presently available actuators or any modifications to available actuator designs would meet the required performance. The best actuator was then selected based on available design, modified design, or new design for this application. The last task was to proceed with a conceptual design. No commercially-available linear actuator or modification capable of meeting the specifications was found. A conventional moving-coil dc linear actuator would meet the specification, but the back-iron for this actuator would weigh approximately 12,000 lbs. A superconducting field coil, however, eliminates the need for back iron, resulting in an actuator weight of approximately 1000 lbs.

  9. Operational Merits of Maritime Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, R.; Bosklopper, J. J.; van der Meij, K. H.

    The perspective of superconductivity to transfer currents without loss is very appealing in high power applications. In the maritime sector many machines and systems exist in the roughly 1-100 MW range and the losses are well over 50%, which calls for dramatic efficiency improvements. This paper reports on three studies that aimed at the perspectives of superconductivity in the maritime sector. It is important to realize that the introduction of superconductivity comprises two technology transitions namely firstly electrification i.e. the transition from mechanical drives to electric drives and secondly the transition from normal to superconductive electrical machinery. It is concluded that superconductivity does reduce losses, but its impact on the total energy chain is of little significance compared to the investments and the risk of introducing a very promising but as yet not proven technology in the harsh maritime environment. The main reason of the little impact is that the largest losses are imposed on the system by the fossil fueled generators as prime movers that generate the electricity through mechanical torque. Unless electric power is supplied by an efficient and reliable technology that does not involve mechanical torque with the present losses both normal as well as superconductive electrification of the propulsion will hardly improve energy efficiency or may even reduce it. One exception may be the application of degaussing coils. Still appealing merits of superconductivity do exist, but they are rather related to the behavior of superconductive machines and strong magnetic fields and consequently reduction in volume and mass of machinery or (sometimes radically) better performance. The merits are rather convenience, design flexibility as well as novel applications and capabilities which together yield more adequate systems. These may yield lower operational costs in the long run, but at present the added value of superconductivity rather seems more

  10. Fundamental study of cesium decontamination from soil by superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Susumu; Mishima, Fumihito; Akiyama, Yoko; Nishijima, Shigehiro

    2013-11-01

    The radioactive substances have been spread out all over the surrounding area of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant caused by the accident in March 2011. Decontamination and volume reduction of radioactive substances, especially cesium ion, are desired issue. This study proposed a decontamination method of the soil by the magnetic separation using superconducting magnet. Cesium ion was adsorbed by Prussian blue in the potassium iodide solution. We succeeded in separating selectively the cesium ion-adsorbed Prussian blue out of the liquid phase by high gradient magnetic separation. High recovery ratio of the Prussian blue was achieved by this method.

  11. Near-field radiofrequency electromagnetic exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Rubtsova, Nina; Perov, Sergey; Belaya, Olga; Kuster, Niels; Balzano, Quirino

    2015-09-01

    Personal wireless telecommunication devices, such as radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic field (EMF) sources operated in vicinity of human body, have possible adverse health effects. Therefore, the correct EMF assessment is necessary in their near field. According to international near-field measurement criteria, the specific absorption rate (SAR) is used for absorbed energy distribution assessment in tissue simulating liquid phantoms. The aim of this investigation is to validate the relationship between the H-field of incident EMF and absorbed energy in phantoms. Three typical wireless telecommunication system frequencies are considered (900, 1800 and 2450 MHz). The EMF source at each frequency is an appropriate half-wave dipole antenna and the absorbing medium is a flat phantom filled with the suitable tissue simulating liquid. Two methods for SAR estimation have been used: standard procedure based on E-field measured in tissue simulating medium and a proposed evaluation by measuring the incident H-field. Compared SAR estimations were performed for various distances between sources and phantom. Also, these research data were compared with simulation results, obtained by using finite-difference time-domain method. The acquired data help to determine the source near-field space characterized by the smallest deviation between SAR estimation methods. So, this region near the RF source is suitable for correct RF energy absorption assessment using the magnetic component of the RF fields.

  12. Radiofrequency Ablation of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Lagana, Domenico; Cotta, Elisa; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Bandiera, Francesca; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2010-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous ultrasound (US)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICCA) in a small, nonrandomized series. From February 2004 to July 2008, six patients (four men and two women; mean age 69.8 years [range 48 to 83]) with ICCA underwent percutaneous US-guided RFA. Preintervetional transarterial embolization was performed in two cases to decrease heat dispersion during RFA in order to increase the area of ablation. The efficacy of RFA was evaluated using contrast-enhanced dynamic computed tomography (CT) 1 month after treatment and then every 3 months thereafter. Nine RFA sessions were performed for six solid hepatic tumors in six patients. The duration of follow-up ranged from 13 to 21 months (mean 17.5). Posttreatment CT showed total necrosis in four of six tumors after one or two RFA sessions. Residual tumor was observed in two patients with larger tumors (5 and 5.8 cm in diameter). All patients tolerated the procedure, and there with no major complications. Only 1 patient developed post-RFA syndrome (pain, fever, malaise, and leukocytosis), which resolved with oral administration of acetaminophen. Percutaneous RFA is a safe and effective treatment for patients with hepatic tumors: It is ideally suited for those who are not eligible for surgery. Long-term follow-up data regarding local and systemic recurrence and survival are still needed.

  13. Micro pulsed radio-frequency electroporation chips.

    PubMed

    He, Huiqi; Chang, Donald C; Lee, Yi-Kuen

    2006-01-01

    Electroporation (EP) is one of the most important physical methods in biotechnology, which employs electrical pulses to transiently permeabilize cell membranes. In this study, a new micro pulsed radio-frequency electroporation cell (microPREP) chip was fabricated using a lift-off technique and SU-8 photolithography. The biological tests were carried out using three different plant protoplasts (cabbage, spinach and oil rape) on the micro EP chip and a pulsed RF electric field was applied to the microchip. The variations of fluorescent intensity and cell viability as functions of the electric pulse amplitude and duration time during the electroporation process were studied in detail at the single-cell level. Using such chip design and test method, one can easily optimize the efficiency and cell viability. Also, a large amount of statistical data can be quickly obtained. Finally, results of this parametric study were presented in the "phase diagram", from which the critical electric field for inducing single-cell electroporation under different conditions can be clearly determined.

  14. Radiofrequency Heating Pathways for Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Collins, C. B.; McCoy, R. S.; Ackerson, B. J.; Collins, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    This feature article reviews the thermal dissipation of nanoscopic gold under radiofrequency (RF) irradiation. It also presents previously unpublished data addressing obscure aspects of this phenomenon. While applications in biology motivated initial investigation of RF heating of gold nanoparticles, recent controversy concerning whether thermal effects can be attributed to nanoscopic gold highlight the need to understand the involved mechanism or mechanisms of heating. Both the nature of the particle and the nature of the RF field influence heating. Aspects of nanoparticle chemistry and physics, including the hydrodynamic diameter of the particle, the oxidation state and related magnetism of the core, and the chemical nature of the ligand shell may all strongly influence to what extent a nanoparticle heats in an RF field. Aspects of RF include: power, frequency and antenna designs that emphasize relative strength of magnetic or electric fields, and also influence the extent to which a gold nanoparticle heats in RF. These nanoparticle and RF properties are analysed in the context of three heating mechanisms proposed to explain gold nanoparticle heating in an RF field. This article also makes a critical analysis of the existing literature in the context of the nanoparticle preparations, RF structure, and suggested mechanisms in previously reported experiments. PMID:24962620

  15. Epidemiology of Health Effects of Radiofrequency Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ahlbom, Anders; Green, Adele; Kheifets, Leeka; Savitz, David; Swerdlow, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    We have undertaken a comprehensive review of epidemiologic studies about the effects of radiofrequency fields (RFs) on human health in order to summarize the current state of knowledge, explain the methodologic issues that are involved, and aid in the planning of future studies. There have been a large number of occupational studies over several decades, particularly on cancer, cardiovascular disease, adverse reproductive outcome, and cataract, in relation to RF exposure. More recently, there have been studies of residential exposure, mainly from radio and television transmitters, and especially focusing on leukemia. There have also been studies of mobile telephone users, particularly on brain tumors and less often on other cancers and on symptoms. Results of these studies to date give no consistent or convincing evidence of a causal relation between RF exposure and any adverse health effect. On the other hand, the studies have too many deficiencies to rule out an association. A key concern across all studies is the quality of assessment of RF exposure. Despite the ubiquity of new technologies using RFs, little is known about population exposure from RF sources and even less about the relative importance of different sources. Other cautions are that mobile phone studies to date have been able to address only relatively short lag periods, that almost no data are available on the consequences of childhood exposure, and that published data largely concentrate on a small number of outcomes, especially brain tumor and leukemia. PMID:15579422

  16. Directional Radio-Frequency Identification Tag Reader

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J.; Taylor, John D.; Henderson, John J.

    2004-01-01

    A directional radio-frequency identification (RFID) tag reader has been designed to facilitate finding a specific object among many objects in a crowded room. The device could be an adjunct to an electronic inventory system that tracks RFID-tagged objects as they move through reader-equipped doorways. Whereas commercial RFID-tag readers do not measure directions to tagged objects, the device is equipped with a phased-array antenna and a received signal-strength indicator (RSSI) circuit for measuring direction. At the beginning of operation, it is set to address only the RFID tag of interest. It then continuously transmits a signal to interrogate that tag while varying the radiation pattern of the antenna. It identifies the direction to the tag as the radiation pattern direction of peak strength of the signal returned by the tag. An approximate distance to the tag is calculated from the peak signal strength. The direction and distance can be displayed on a screen. A prototype containing a Yagi antenna was found to be capable of detecting a 915.5-MHz tag at a distance of approximately equal to 15 ft (approximately equal to 4.6 m).

  17. Electromagnetic limits to radiofrequency (RF) neuronal telemetry

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, R. E.; Sebastian, T.

    2013-01-01

    The viability of a radiofrequency (RF) telemetry channel for reporting individual neuron activity wirelessly from an embedded antenna to an external receiver is determined. Comparing the power at the transmitting antenna required for the desired Channel Capacity, to the maximum power that this antenna can dissipate in the body without altering or damaging surrounding tissue reveals the severe penalty incurred by miniaturization of the antenna. Using both Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) and thermal damage limits as constraints, and 300 Kbps as the required capacity for telemetry streams 100 ms in duration, the model shows that conventional antennas smaller than 0.1 mm could not support human neuronal telemetry to a remote receiver (1 m away.) Reducing the antenna to 10 microns in size to enable the monitoring of single human neuron signals to a receiver at the surface of the head would require operating with a channel capacity of only 0.3 bps. PMID:24346503

  18. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-01-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment. PMID:26165830

  19. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  20. Radiofrequency radiation effects on the common bean

    SciTech Connect

    Thomkins, K.; Griggs, L.; Myles, E.L.

    1995-07-01

    Our environment is bombarded daily with thousands of objects we can visually detect. However, invisible to humans are the electromagnetic waves that penetrate our environment. Electromagnetic waves consist of a large spectrum of waves including the harmful gamma rays, x-rays, and ultraviolet rays. The question that has increased tremendously is: can low energy electromagnetic waves become harmful to living organisms? The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of radiofrequency radiation on protein synthesis of the common bean. Phaseolus vulgaris (kidney bean) was surface-sterilized and allowed to germinate on Mushurage and Skoog`s medium for 1 week. Hypocotyls were wounded and placed on media to initiate callus production. Six petri dishes containing 1 g of callus were used in the experiment. Three dishes were exposed to 100kH in a Crawford cell for 24h. The remaining three petri dishes with callus were used as a control. After the exposure period, the protein from callus was extracted and analyzed by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The results show that hypocotyl growth was not different between control and experimental groups after 24 h. The result of one-dimensional gel electrophoresis did not show observable differences in protein synthesized by the control and experimental groups. Analysis of protein synthesis is still ongoing.

  1. Radiofrequency radiation leakage from microwave ovens.

    PubMed

    Lahham, Adnan; Sharabati, Afifeh

    2013-12-01

    This work presents data on the amount of radiation leakage from 117 microwave ovens in domestic and restaurant use in the West Bank, Palestine. The study of leakage is based on the measurements of radiation emissions from the oven in real-life conditions by using a frequency selective field strength measuring system. The power density from individual ovens was measured at a distance of 1 m and at the height of centre of door screen. The tested ovens were of different types, models with operating powers between 1000 and 1600 W and ages ranging from 1 month to >20 y, including 16 ovens with unknown ages. The amount of radiation leakage at a distance of 1 m was found to vary from 0.43 to 16.4 μW cm(-2) with an average value equalling 3.64 μW cm(-2). Leakages from all tested microwave ovens except for seven ovens (∼6 % of the total) were below 10 μW cm(-2). The highest radiation leakage from any tested oven was ∼16.4 μW cm(-2), and found in two cases only. In no case did the leakage exceed the limit of 1 mW cm(-2) recommended by the ICNIRP for 2.45-GHz radiofrequency. This study confirms a linear correlation between the amount of leakage and both oven age and operating power, with a stronger dependence of leakage on age.

  2. Characterization of tracked radiofrequency ablation in phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chun-Cheng R.; Miga, Michael I.; Galloway, Robert L.

    2007-10-15

    In radiofrequency ablation (RFA), successful therapy requires accurate, image-guided placement of the ablation device in a location selected by a predictive treatment plan. Current planning methods rely on geometric models of ablations that are not sensitive to underlying physical processes in RFA. Implementing plans based on computational models of RFA with image-guided techniques, however, has not been well characterized. To study the use of computational models of RFA in planning needle placement, this work compared ablations performed with an optically tracked RFA device with corresponding models of the ablations. The calibration of the tracked device allowed the positions of distal features of the device, particularly the tips of the needle electrodes, to be determined to within 1.4{+-}0.6 mm of uncertainty. Ablations were then performed using the tracked device in a phantom system based on an agarose-albumin mixture. Images of the sliced phantom obtained from the ablation experiments were then compared with the predictions of a bioheat transfer model of RFA, which used the positional data of the tracked device obtained during ablation. The model was demonstrated to predict 90% of imaged pixels classified as being ablated. The discrepancies between model predictions and observations were analyzed and attributed to needle tracking inaccuracy as well as to uncertainties in model parameters. The results suggest the feasibility of using finite element modeling to plan ablations with predictable outcomes when implemented using tracked RFA.

  3. Superconducting interfaces between insulating oxides.

    PubMed

    Reyren, N; Thiel, S; Caviglia, A D; Kourkoutis, L Fitting; Hammerl, G; Richter, C; Schneider, C W; Kopp, T; Rüetschi, A-S; Jaccard, D; Gabay, M; Muller, D A; Triscone, J-M; Mannhart, J

    2007-08-31

    At interfaces between complex oxides, electronic systems with unusual electronic properties can be generated. We report on superconductivity in the electron gas formed at the interface between two insulating dielectric perovskite oxides, LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. The behavior of the electron gas is that of a two-dimensional superconductor, confined to a thin sheet at the interface. The superconducting transition temperature of congruent with 200 millikelvin provides a strict upper limit to the thickness of the superconducting layer of congruent with 10 nanometers.

  4. Antiferromagnetic hedgehogs with superconducting cores

    SciTech Connect

    Goldbart, P.M.; Sheehy, D.E.

    1998-09-01

    Excitations of the antiferromagnetic state that resemble antiferromagnetic hedgehogs at large distances but are predominantly superconducting inside a core region are discussed within the context of Zhang{close_quote}s SO(5)-symmetry-based approach to the physics of high-temperature superconducting materials. Nonsingular, in contrast with their hedgehog cousins in pure antiferromagnetism, these texture excitations are what hedgehogs become when the antiferromagnetic order parameter is permitted to {open_quotes}escape{close_quotes} into superconducting directions. The structure of such excitations is determined in a simple setting, and a number of their experimental implications are examined. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Antiferromagnetic hedgehogs with superconducting cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbart, Paul M.; Sheehy, Daniel E.

    1998-09-01

    Excitations of the antiferromagnetic state that resemble antiferromagnetic hedgehogs at large distances but are predominantly superconducting inside a core region are discussed within the context of Zhang's SO(5)-symmetry-based approach to the physics of high-temperature superconducting materials. Nonsingular, in contrast with their hedgehog cousins in pure antiferromagnetism, these texture excitations are what hedgehogs become when the antiferromagnetic order parameter is permitted to ``escape'' into superconducting directions. The structure of such excitations is determined in a simple setting, and a number of their experimental implications are examined.

  6. Nozzle for superconducting fiber production

    DOEpatents

    Righi, Jamal

    1992-11-17

    A nozzle apparatus for producing flexible fibers of superconducting material receives melted material from a crucible for containing a charge of the superconducting material. The material is melted in the crucible and falls in a stream through a bottom hole in the crucible. The stream falls through a protecting collar which maintains the stream at high temperatures. The stream is then supplied through the downwardly directed nozzle where it is subjected to a high velocity air flow which breaks the melted superconducting material into ligaments which solidify into the flexible fibers. The fibers are collected by blowing them against a porous cloth.

  7. Superconducting multiturn flux transformers for radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, H. R.; Zhang, Y.; Schubert, J.; Zander, W.; Zeng, X. H.; Klein, N.

    2000-11-01

    This article describes three planar layouts of superconducting multiturn flux transformers integrated with a coplanar resonator for radio frequency (rf) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers. The best magnetic field noise values of 22 and 11.5 fT/Hz1/2 in the white noise regime were obtained for the layout with two input coils and the layout with the labyrinth resonator, respectively. Excess low-frequency noise (about 200 fT/Hz1/2 at 10 Hz) was present. Computer simulation showed that the loss in this trilayer system was dominated by the high loss tangent of the dielectric film used for the separation of the upper and lower superconducting films. The rf coupling coefficient krf between the resonator and the flip-chip-coupled SQUID was also estimated. The values krf2≈14×10-3 obtained for the layout with two input coils, and krf2≈45×10-3 for the layout with the labyrinth resonator were considerably higher than the typical value of krf2≈7×10-3 for the single-layer coplanar resonator. These high coupling coefficients have compensated the somewhat degraded unloaded quality factor of the resonator, thus securing the optimum operation of the rf SQUID.

  8. Continuous Cavitation Designed for Enhancing Radiofrequency Ablation via a Special Radiofrequency Solidoid Vaporization Process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Pei; Chen, Hangrong; Bo, Xiaowan; Li, Xiaolong; Xu, Huixiong

    2016-02-23

    Lowering power output and radiation time during radiofrequency (RF) ablation is still a challenge. Although it is documented that metal-based magnetothermal conversion and microbubbles-based inertial cavitation have been tried to overcome above issues, disputed toxicity and poor magnetothermal conversion efficiency for metal-based nanoparticles and violent but transient cavitation for microbubbles are inappropriate for enhancing RF ablation. In this report, a strategy, i.e., continuous cavitation, has been proposed, and solid menthol-encapsulated poly lactide-glycolide acid (PLGA) nanocapsules have been constructed, as a proof of concept, to validate the role of such a continuous cavitation principle in continuously enhancing RF ablation. The synthesized PLGA-based nanocapsules can respond to RF to generate menthol bubbles via distinctive radiofrequency solidoid vaporization (RSV) process, meanwhile significantly enhance ultrasound imaging for HeLa solid tumor, and further facilitate RF ablation via the continuous cavitation, as systematically demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, this RSV strategy can overcome drawbacks and limitations of acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) and optical droplet vaporization (ODV), and will probably find broad applications in further cancer theranostics.

  9. Superconducting electromagnetic thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, J.

    1993-02-11

    An electromagnetic thruster for marine vehicles using a jet of water driven by the interaction of a mutually perpendicular intensified magnetic field and an intensified electric field is disclosed. The intensified magnetic field is produced by superconducting coils cooled by a coolant such as liquid helium. An intensified electric field is produced by passing high amperage current across the seawater jet. These interacting fields produce a Lorentz force perpendicular to mutually perpendicular electric and magnetic field vectors which is used to drive the seawater jet. In some embodiments, the force may also be used to draw water into the jet from the boundary layer flow around the vehicle thereby reducing boundary layer turbulence and associated radiated noise.

  10. Super-Hard Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Philip; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2005-03-01

    We present the magnetic response of Type-II superconductivity in the extreme pinning limit, where screening currents within an order of magnitude of the Ginzburg-Landau depairing critical current density develop upon the application of a magnetic field. We show that this ``super-hard'' limit is well approximated in highly disordered, cold drawn, Nb wire whose magnetization response is characterized by a cascade of Meissner-like phases, each terminated by a catastrophic collapse of the magnetization. Direct magneto-optic measurements of the flux penetration depth in the virgin magnetization branch are in excellent agreement with the exponential model in which Jc(B)=Jco(-B/Bo), where Jco˜5x10^6 A/cm^2 for Nb. The implications for the fundamental limiting hardness of a superconductor will be discussed.

  11. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Aized, Dawood; Schwall, Robert E.

    1996-06-11

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil.

  12. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Aized, D.; Schwall, R.E.

    1999-06-22

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil. 15 figs.

  13. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Aized, Dawood; Schwall, Robert E.

    1999-06-22

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil.

  14. Superconducting magnetic energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W.

    1988-08-01

    Recent programmatic developments in Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) have prompted renewed and widespread interest in this field. In mid 1987 the Defense Nuclear Agency, acting for the Strategic Defense Initiative Office, issued a request for proposals for the design and construction of SMES Engineering Test Model (ETM). Two teams, one led by Bechtel and the other by Ebasco, are now engaged in the first phase of the development of a 10 to 20 MWhr ETM. This report presents the rationale for energy storage on utility systems, describes the general technology of SMES, and explains the chronological development of the technology. The present ETM program is outlined; details of the two projects for ETM development are described in other papers in these proceedings. The impact of high T/sub c/ materials on SMES is discussed. 69 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Superconductivity in Cuprate Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozovic, Ivan; Eckstein, J. N.

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * YBCO/DBCO superlattices: the commencement * YBCO/PBCO superlattices: conjectures * Bi-2212:2201 superlattices: Q2D superconductivity * YBCO/(Pr,Y,Ca)BCO superlattices: clarification * More Bi-2212 superlattices: afterthoughts * Positive proximity effect in Dy-doped 2212 * Long-range proximity effect in 2201 * HTS in one-unit-cell thick 2212 layer * Inelastic hopping via localized states * Materials and layering * Integrity of ultrathin layers * Thickness dependence of the barrier resistance * Temperature dependence of the barrier resistance * Voltage dependence of current through the barrier * Interpretation: multiple inelastic hopping * Negative proximity effect on 2212 * Interlayer coupling in HTS superlattices: conclusions * The science and technology of HTS superlattices * Vortex dynamics * Critical current scaling law * Thermal activation of vortex motion * Superlattice phonons * Atomic-layer engineering of artificial HTS materials * Technological applications of HTS superlattices * Summary * Intercell coupling in HTS superlattices * Vortex dynamics * Phonon spectra * Atomic-layer engineering of artificial HTS materials * Applications * Acknowledgments * References

  16. Negative refraction and superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amariti, Antonio; Forcella, Davide; Mariotti, Alberto; Siani, Massimo

    2011-10-01

    We discuss exotic properties of charged hydrodynamical systems, in the broken superconducting phase, probed by electromagnetic waves. Motivated by general arguments from hydrodynamics, we observe that negative refraction, namely the propagation in opposite directions of the phase velocities and of the energy flux, is expected for low enough frequencies. We corroborate this general idea by analyzing a holographic superconductor in the AdS/CFT correspondence, where the response functions can be explicitly computed. We study the dual gravitational theory both in the probe and in the backreacted case. We find that, while in the first case the refractive index is positive at every frequency, in the second case there is negative refraction at low enough frequencies. This is in agreement with hydrodynamic considerations.

  17. Superconducting energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Giese, R.F.

    1993-10-01

    This report describes the status of energy storage involving superconductors and assesses what impact the recently discovered ceramic superconductors may have on the design of these devices. Our description is intended for R&D managers in government, electric utilities, firms, and national laboratories who wish an overview of what has been done and what remains to be done. It is assumed that the reader is acquainted with superconductivity, but not an expert on the topics discussed here. Indeed, it is the author`s aim to enable the reader to better understand the experts who may ask for the reader`s attention, support, or funding. This report may also inform scientists and engineers who, though expert in related areas, wish to have an introduction to our topic.

  18. Anyon Superconductivity of Sb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksoed, Wh-; Parengkuan, August

    2016-10-01

    In any permutatives to Pedro P. Kuczhynski from Peru, for anyon superconductivity sought EZ Kuchinskii et al.: ``Anion height dependence of Tc & d.o.s of Fe-based Superconductors'', 2010 as well as ``on the basis of electron microscopy & AFM measurements, these phenomena are quantified with focus on fractal dimension, particle perimeter & size of the side branch(tip width) in bert Stegemann et al.:Crystallization of Sb nanoparticles-Pattern Formation & Fractal Growth'', J.PhysChem B., 2004. For dendritic & dendrimer fractal characters shown further: ``antimony denrites were found to be composed of well-crystallized nanoflakes with size 20-4 nm''- Bou Zhau, et al., MaterialLetters, 59 (2005). The alkyl triisopropyl attached in TIPSb those includes in DNA, haemoglobin membrane/fixed-bed reactor for instance quotes in Dragony Fu, Nature Review Cancer, 12 (Feb 2012). Heartfelt Gratitudes to HE. Mr. Prof. Ir. Handojo.

  19. Radiofrequency for the treatment of skin laxity: mith or truth*

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo, Angélica Rodrigues; Soares, Viviane Pinheiro Campos; da Silva, Fernanda Souza; Moreira, Tatiane da Silva

    2015-01-01

    The nonablative radiofrequency is a procedure commonly used for the treatment of skin laxity from an increase in tissue temperature. The goal is to induce thermal damage to thus stimulate neocollagenesis in deep layers of the skin and subcutaneous tissue. However, many of these devices haven't been tested and their parameters are still not accepted by the scientific community. Because of this, it is necessary to review the literature regarding the physiological effects and parameters for application of radiofrequency and methodological quality and level of evidence of studies. A literature search was performed in MEDLINE, PEDro, SciELO, PubMed, LILACS and CAPES and experimental studies in humans, which used radiofrequency devices as treatment for facial or body laxity, were selected. The results showed that the main physiological effect is to stimulate collagen synthesis. There was no homogeneity between studies in relation to most of the parameters used and the methodological quality of studies and level of evidence for using radiofrequency are low. This fact complicates the determination of effective parameters for clinical use of this device in the treatment of skin laxity. The analyzed studies suggest that radiofrequency is effective, however the physiological mechanisms and the required parameters are not clear in the literature. PMID:26560216

  20. A Rare Complication of Radiofrequency Tonsil Ablation: Horner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ozbay, Isa; Yildirim, Nadir; Zeybek Sivas, Zuhal; Canbaz Kabay, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    Chronic tonsillitis is a common disease, and several different surgical techniques are used to treat this condition. In recent years, techniques such as radiofrequency ablation and coblation have been commonly used for tonsil surgery. In this report, we present the cases of two pediatric patients who developed ptosis, miosis, and enophthalmos (Horner syndrome) after radiofrequency ablation for tonsil reduction and discuss the technique of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. In the early postoperative period, miosis and ptosis were observed on the right side in one patient and on the left side in the other patient. Both patients were treated with 1 mg/kg/day methylprednisolone, which were tapered by halving the dose every 3 days. Miosis and ptosis improved after treatment in both patients. Along with the case presentation, we discuss the effectiveness and complications of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. These unusual complications of tonsil ablation may help ENT physicians who do not yet have a preferred surgical technique for tonsillectomy to make an informed decision. Limited data are available about the possible complications of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. The present report contributes to the literature on this topic. PMID:26064747

  1. Magnetoreception in birds: the effect of radio-frequency fields

    PubMed Central

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Thalau, Peter; Gehring, Dennis; Nießner, Christine; Ritz, Thorsten; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The avian magnetic compass, probably based on radical pair processes, works only in a narrow functional window around the local field strength, with cryptochrome 1a as most likely receptor molecule. Radio-frequency fields in the MHz range have been shown to disrupt the birds' orientation, yet the nature of this interference is still unclear. In an immuno-histological study, we tested whether the radio-frequency fields interfere with the photoreduction of cryptochrome, but this does not seem to be the case. In behavioural studies, birds were not able to adjust to radio-frequency fields like they are able to adjust to static fields outside the normal functional range: neither a 2-h pre-exposure in a 7.0 MHz field, 480 nT, nor a 7-h pre-exposure in a 1.315 MHz field, 15 nT, allowed the birds to regain their orientation ability. This inability to adjust to radio-frequency fields suggests that these fields interfere directly with the primary processes of magnetoreception and therefore disable the avian compass as long as they are present. They do not have lasting adverse after-effects, however, as birds immediately after exposure to a radio-frequency field were able to orient in the local geomagnetic field. PMID:25540238

  2. Magnetoreception in birds: the effect of radio-frequency fields.

    PubMed

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Thalau, Peter; Gehring, Dennis; Nießner, Christine; Ritz, Thorsten; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2015-02-06

    The avian magnetic compass, probably based on radical pair processes, works only in a narrow functional window around the local field strength, with cryptochrome 1a as most likely receptor molecule. Radio-frequency fields in the MHz range have been shown to disrupt the birds' orientation, yet the nature of this interference is still unclear. In an immuno-histological study, we tested whether the radio-frequency fields interfere with the photoreduction of cryptochrome, but this does not seem to be the case. In behavioural studies, birds were not able to adjust to radio-frequency fields like they are able to adjust to static fields outside the normal functional range: neither a 2-h pre-exposure in a 7.0 MHz field, 480 nT, nor a 7-h pre-exposure in a 1.315 MHz field, 15 nT, allowed the birds to regain their orientation ability. This inability to adjust to radio-frequency fields suggests that these fields interfere directly with the primary processes of magnetoreception and therefore disable the avian compass as long as they are present. They do not have lasting adverse after-effects, however, as birds immediately after exposure to a radio-frequency field were able to orient in the local geomagnetic field.

  3. MATHEMATICAL MODELS FOR SOME RADIO-FREQUENCY TRANSMISSION-LINE TRANSFORMERS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MATRICES(MATHEMATICS), *PHASE SHIFT CIRCUITS, *RADIOFREQUENCY, *TRANSFORMERS, *TRANSMISSION LINES, BROADBAND, DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES, ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE, FERRITES, IMPEDANCE MATCHING , MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS.

  4. Chiral Separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalcup, A. M.

    2010-07-01

    The main goal of this review is to provide a brief overview of chiral separations to researchers who are versed in the area of analytical separations but unfamiliar with chiral separations. To researchers who are not familiar with this area, there is currently a bewildering array of commercially available chiral columns, chiral derivatizing reagents, and chiral selectors for approaches that span the range of analytical separation platforms (e.g., high-performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, supercritical-fluid chromatography, and capillary electrophoresis). This review begins with a brief discussion of chirality before examining the general strategies and commonalities among all of the chiral separation techniques. Rather than exhaustively listing all the chiral selectors and applications, this review highlights significant issues and differences between chiral and achiral separations, providing salient examples from specific classes of chiral selectors where appropriate.

  5. Intrinsic noise measurement of an ultra-sensitive radio-frequency single electron transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, W. W.; Ji, Z.; Pan, Feng; Rimberg, A. J.

    2008-03-01

    The radio-frequency single electron transistor (rf-SET) has been the focus of intense interest since its invention in 1998[1]. Using cryogenic ultra-thin film evaporation techniques [2] and an improved on-chip superconducting matching network [3], we have consistently fabricated rf-SETs with charge sensitivity of 1.7--5μe/√Hz and uncoupled energy sensitivity 1.1--5. Using our 1GHz resonant circuit, intrinsic noise in the SET arising from a dc voltage bias was measured in the white noise limit. We measured the offset charge dependence of the intrinsic noise in the vicinity of the Josephson-quasiparticle and double Josephson-quasiparticle transport cycles. In regions for which the offset charge and resistance noise are strongly suppressed, we can determine the SET shot noise in the sup-gap regime. We discuss the effects of correlations between charge carriers on the measured Fano factor. [1] R.J.Schoelkopf et al., Science 280,1238 (1998); [2] N.A.Court et al., Cond-mat 0706.4150 (2007); [3] W.W.Xue et al., Appl.Phys.Lett. 91, 093511 (2007).

  6. Superconductivity in a chiral nanotube

    PubMed Central

    Qin, F.; Shi, W.; Ideue, T.; Yoshida, M.; Zak, A.; Tenne, R.; Kikitsu, T.; Inoue, D.; Hashizume, D.; Iwasa, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Chirality of materials are known to affect optical, magnetic and electric properties, causing a variety of nontrivial phenomena such as circular dichiroism for chiral molecules, magnetic Skyrmions in chiral magnets and nonreciprocal carrier transport in chiral conductors. On the other hand, effect of chirality on superconducting transport has not been known. Here we report the nonreciprocity of superconductivity—unambiguous evidence of superconductivity reflecting chiral structure in which the forward and backward supercurrent flows are not equivalent because of inversion symmetry breaking. Such superconductivity is realized via ionic gating in individual chiral nanotubes of tungsten disulfide. The nonreciprocal signal is significantly enhanced in the superconducting state, being associated with unprecedented quantum Little-Parks oscillations originating from the interference of supercurrent along the circumference of the nanotube. The present results indicate that the nonreciprocity is a viable approach toward the superconductors with chiral or noncentrosymmetric structures. PMID:28205518

  7. Search for Superconductivity in Micrometeorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guénon, S.; Ramírez, J. G.; Basaran, Ali C.; Wampler, J.; Thiemens, M.; Taylor, S.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a very sensitive, highly selective, non-destructive technique for screening inhomogeneous materials for the presence of superconductivity. This technique, based on phase sensitive detection of microwave absorption is capable of detecting 10-12 cc of a superconductor embedded in a non-superconducting, non-magnetic matrix. For the first time, we apply this technique to the search for superconductivity in extraterrestrial samples. We tested approximately 65 micrometeorites collected from the water well at the Amundsen-Scott South pole station and compared their spectra with those of eight reference materials. None of these micrometeorites contained superconducting compounds, but we saw the Verwey transition of magnetite in our microwave system. This demonstrates that we are able to detect electro-magnetic phase transitions in extraterrestrial materials at cryogenic temperatures.

  8. Superconductivity from Emerging Magnetic Moments.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Shintaro; Werner, Philipp

    2015-12-11

    Multiorbital Hubbard models are shown to exhibit a spatially isotropic spin-triplet superconducting phase, where equal-spin electrons in different local orbitals are paired. This superconducting state is stabilized in the spin-freezing crossover regime, where local moments emerge in the metal phase, and the pairing is substantially assisted by spin anisotropy. The phase diagram features a superconducting dome below a non-Fermi-liquid metallic region and next to a magnetically ordered phase. We suggest that this type of fluctuating-moment-induced superconductivity, which is not originating from fluctuations near a quantum critical point, may be realized in spin-triplet superconductors such as strontium ruthenates and uranium compounds.

  9. Cryogenic Systems and Superconductive Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report defines, investigates, and experimentally evaluates the key elements of a representative crogenic turborefrigerator subsystem suitable for providing reliable long-lived cryogenic refrigeration for a superconductive ship propulsion system.

  10. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.; Mulcahy, Thomas M.

    1998-01-01

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure.

  11. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.

    1998-03-03

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing is disclosed including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure. 9 figs.

  12. Superconductivity: A celebration of pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Michael R.

    2007-12-01

    It is fifty years since John Bardeen, Leon Cooper and Bob Schrieffer presented the microscopic theory of superconductivity. At a wonderful conference in Urbana the 'good old days' were remembered, and the challenges ahead surveyed.

  13. Search for Superconductivity in Micrometeorites

    PubMed Central

    Guénon, S.; Ramírez, J. G.; Basaran, Ali C.; Wampler, J.; Thiemens, M.; Taylor, S.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a very sensitive, highly selective, non-destructive technique for screening inhomogeneous materials for the presence of superconductivity. This technique, based on phase sensitive detection of microwave absorption is capable of detecting 10−12 cc of a superconductor embedded in a non-superconducting, non-magnetic matrix. For the first time, we apply this technique to the search for superconductivity in extraterrestrial samples. We tested approximately 65 micrometeorites collected from the water well at the Amundsen-Scott South pole station and compared their spectra with those of eight reference materials. None of these micrometeorites contained superconducting compounds, but we saw the Verwey transition of magnetite in our microwave system. This demonstrates that we are able to detect electro-magnetic phase transitions in extraterrestrial materials at cryogenic temperatures. PMID:25476841

  14. Search for superconductivity in micrometeorites.

    PubMed

    Guénon, S; Ramírez, J G; Basaran, Ali C; Wampler, J; Thiemens, M; Taylor, S; Schuller, Ivan K

    2014-12-05

    We have developed a very sensitive, highly selective, non-destructive technique for screening inhomogeneous materials for the presence of superconductivity. This technique, based on phase sensitive detection of microwave absorption is capable of detecting 10(-12) cc of a superconductor embedded in a non-superconducting, non-magnetic matrix. For the first time, we apply this technique to the search for superconductivity in extraterrestrial samples. We tested approximately 65 micrometeorites collected from the water well at the Amundsen-Scott South pole station and compared their spectra with those of eight reference materials. None of these micrometeorites contained superconducting compounds, but we saw the Verwey transition of magnetite in our microwave system. This demonstrates that we are able to detect electro-magnetic phase transitions in extraterrestrial materials at cryogenic temperatures.

  15. Water separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, W. F.; Austin, I. G. (Inventor)

    1964-01-01

    An apparatus for separating liquids from gases or gaseous fluids is described. Features of the apparatus include: (1) the collection and removal of the moisture in the fluid is not dependent upon, or affected by gravity; (2) all the collected water is cyclically drained from the apparatus irrespective of the attitude of the separator; and (3) a fluid actuator is utilized to remove the collected water from the separator.

  16. Battery separators.

    PubMed

    Arora, Pankaj; Zhang, Zhengming John

    2004-10-01

    The ideal battery separator would be infinitesimally thin, offer no resistance to ionic transport in electrolytes, provide infinite resistance to electronic conductivity for isolation of electrodes, be highly tortuous to prevent dendritic growths, and be inert to chemical reactions. Unfortunately, in the real world the ideal case does not exist. Real world separators are electronically insulating membranes whose ionic resistivity is brought to the desired range by manipulating the membranes thickness and porosity. It is clear that no single separator satisfies all the needs of battery designers, and compromises have to be made. It is ultimately the application that decides which separator is most suitable. We hope that this paper will be a useful tool and will help the battery manufacturers in selecting the most appropriate separators for their batteries and respective applications. The information provided is purely technical and does not include other very important parameters, such as cost of production, availability, and long-term stability. There has been a continued demand for thinner battery separators to increase battery power and capacity. This has been especially true for lithiumion batteries used in portable electronics. However, it is very important to ensure the continued safety of batteries, and this is where the role of the separator is greatest. Thus, it is essential to optimize all the components of battery to improve the performance while maintaining the safety of these cells. Separator manufacturers should work along with the battery manufacturers to create the next generation of batteries with increased reliability and performance, but always keeping safety in mind. This paper has attempted to present a comprehensive review of literature on separators used in various batteries. It is evident that a wide variety of separators are available and that they are critical components in batteries. In many cases, the separator is one of the major factors

  17. The superconducting cavity stability ruby maser oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. J.; Strayer, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    Analysis of an application of the rudy maser to a superconducting Cavity Stabilized oscillator shows many attractive features. These derive from the mechancial stability inherent in an all-cryogenic design and from the properties of the ruby maser itself. A multiple-cavity design has been developed to allow physical separation of the high-Q superconducting cavity and the ruby element with its requried applied magnetic field. Mode selection is accomplished in this design by tuning the ruby by means of the applied field. We conclude that such an oscillator would perform well, even with cavity Q's as low as 10 to the 8th power allowing the use of a superconductor-on-sapphire resonator with its greater rigidity and lower thermal expansion. A first test of the Superconducting Cavity Stabilized Maser Oscillator (SCSMO) confirms the efficacy of the multiple-cavity design and the applicability of the ruby maser. Frequency variation less than 4x10 to the minus 11th power was measured in the stabilized mode and is attributed to the reference oscillator and to instabilities in the pump source. Variation of 10 to the minus 10th power was observed in the low-Q unstabilized mode, again attributable to pump fluctuations. Even so, direct scaling to a Q of 10 the 9th power predicts a stability better than 10 to the minus 15th power. Together with results showing the lowest losses to date in sapphire at microwave frequencies, and preliminary experiments on superconductor-on-sapphire resonators, frequency stability, levels as low as 10 to the minus 17th power are indicated.

  18. Transition-Metal Oxide Superconductivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-20

    pyramidally coordinated complexes of the 02"- deficient compounds, and (iii) that ordering of the sources that produce the mixed-valence Cu2+ɛ+) ions in...With the strong antiferromagnetic exchange coupling of the Fe2+(3+) pairs in ferrites , no superconducting cells should be anticipated and only normal...I couplings dictate significant antiferromagnetic ordering and little chance of superconductivity. This group includes the common ferrite conduction

  19. Y-Ba Superconducting Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shunbao, Tian; Xiaofei, Li; Tinglian, Wen; Zuxiang, Lin; Shichun, Li; Huijun, Yu

    Polycrystalline Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting materials have been studied. It was found that chemical composition and processing condition may play an important role in the final structure and superconducting properties. The density has been determined and compared with the calculated value according to the structure model reported by Bell Labs. The grain size and the morphology of the materials were observed by SEM.

  20. Development of Concepts in Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardeen, John

    This is an excerpt from a talk that John Bardeen gave on the development of the theory of superconductivity in London, England on September 17, 1962 when he received the Fritz London award for his work developing the BCS theory of superconductivity. The talk was given at the Eighth International Conference on Low Temperature Physics at Queen Mary College in London and was reprinted in Physics Today in January of 1963.

  1. 21 CFR 179.30 - Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food... PRODUCTION, PROCESSING AND HANDLING OF FOOD Radiation and Radiation Sources § 179.30 Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies. Radiofrequency radiation,...

  2. 21 CFR 179.30 - Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food... FOOD Radiation and Radiation Sources § 179.30 Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies. Radiofrequency radiation, including microwave frequencies, may be...

  3. 21 CFR 179.30 - Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food... PRODUCTION, PROCESSING AND HANDLING OF FOOD Radiation and Radiation Sources § 179.30 Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies. Radiofrequency radiation,...

  4. 21 CFR 179.30 - Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food... PRODUCTION, PROCESSING AND HANDLING OF FOOD Radiation and Radiation Sources § 179.30 Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies. Radiofrequency radiation,...

  5. 21 CFR 179.30 - Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food... PRODUCTION, PROCESSING AND HANDLING OF FOOD Radiation and Radiation Sources § 179.30 Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies. Radiofrequency radiation,...

  6. 21 CFR 870.2910 - Radiofrequency physiological signal transmitter and receiver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiofrequency physiological signal transmitter... Devices § 870.2910 Radiofrequency physiological signal transmitter and receiver. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency physiological signal transmitter and receiver is a device used to condition a physiological...

  7. 21 CFR 870.2910 - Radiofrequency physiological signal transmitter and receiver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiofrequency physiological signal transmitter... Devices § 870.2910 Radiofrequency physiological signal transmitter and receiver. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency physiological signal transmitter and receiver is a device used to condition a physiological...

  8. 21 CFR 870.2910 - Radiofrequency physiological signal transmitter and receiver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiofrequency physiological signal transmitter... Devices § 870.2910 Radiofrequency physiological signal transmitter and receiver. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency physiological signal transmitter and receiver is a device used to condition a physiological...

  9. 21 CFR 870.2910 - Radiofrequency physiological signal transmitter and receiver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiofrequency physiological signal transmitter... Devices § 870.2910 Radiofrequency physiological signal transmitter and receiver. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency physiological signal transmitter and receiver is a device used to condition a physiological...

  10. 21 CFR 870.2910 - Radiofrequency physiological signal transmitter and receiver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiofrequency physiological signal transmitter... Devices § 870.2910 Radiofrequency physiological signal transmitter and receiver. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency physiological signal transmitter and receiver is a device used to condition a physiological...

  11. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. (a) Identification. An implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information is a device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implantable radiofrequency transponder system...

  12. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. (a) Identification. An implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information is a device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implantable radiofrequency transponder system...

  13. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. (a) Identification. An implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information is a device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implantable radiofrequency transponder system...

  14. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. (a) Identification. An implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information is a device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Implantable radiofrequency transponder system...

  15. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. (a) Identification. An implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information is a device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implantable radiofrequency transponder system...

  16. An unshielded radio-frequency atomic magnetometer with sub-femtoTesla sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Keder, David A.; Prescott, David W.; Conovaloff, Adam W.; Sauer, Karen L.

    2014-12-15

    We demonstrate a radio-frequency potassium-vapor magnetometer operating with sensitivities of 0.3 fT/√(Hz) at 0.5 MHz and 0.9 fT/√(Hz) at 1.31 MHz in the absence of radio-frequency and mu-metal or magnetic shielding. The use of spatially separated magnetometers, two voxels within the same cell, permits for the subtraction of common mode noise and the retention of a gradient signal, as from a local source. At 0.5 MHz the common mode noise was white and measured to be 3.4 fT/√(Hz); upon subtraction the noise returned to the values observed when the magnetometer was shielded. At 1.31 MHz, the common mode noise was from a nearby radio station and was reduced by a factor of 33 upon subtraction, limited only by the radio signal picked up by receiver electronics. Potential applications include in-the-field low-field magnetic resonance, such as the use of nuclear quadrupole resonance for the detection of explosives.

  17. An unshielded radio-frequency atomic magnetometer with sub-femtoTesla sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keder, David A.; Prescott, David W.; Conovaloff, Adam W.; Sauer, Karen L.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate a radio-frequency potassium-vapor magnetometer operating with sensitivities of 0.3 fT/ √{ Hz } at 0.5 MHz and 0.9 fT/ √{ Hz } at 1.31 MHz in the absence of radio-frequency and mu-metal or magnetic shielding. The use of spatially separated magnetometers, two voxels within the same cell, permits for the subtraction of common mode noise and the retention of a gradient signal, as from a local source. At 0.5 MHz the common mode noise was white and measured to be 3.4 fT/ √{ Hz } ; upon subtraction the noise returned to the values observed when the magnetometer was shielded. At 1.31 MHz, the common mode noise was from a nearby radio station and was reduced by a factor of 33 upon subtraction, limited only by the radio signal picked up by receiver electronics. Potential applications include in-the-field low-field magnetic resonance, such as the use of nuclear quadrupole resonance for the detection of explosives.

  18. Process for producing clad superconductive materials

    DOEpatents

    Cass, Richard B.; Ott, Kevin C.; Peterson, Dean E.

    1992-01-01

    A process for fabricating superconducting composite wire by the steps of placing a superconductive precursor admixture capable of undergoing a self propagating combustion in stoichiometric amounts sufficient to form a superconductive product within a metal tube, sealing one end of said tube, igniting said superconductive precursor admixture whereby said superconductive precursor admixture endburns along the length of the admixture, and cross-section reducing said tube at a rate substantially equal to the rate of burning of said superconductive precursor admixture and at a point substantially planar with the burnfront of the superconductive precursor mixture, whereby a clad superconductive product is formed in situ, the product characterized as superconductive without a subsequent sintering stage, is disclosed.

  19. Interplay between density and superconducting quantum critical fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Caprara, S; Bergeal, N; Lesueur, J; Grilli, M

    2015-10-28

    We consider the case of a density-driven metal-superconductor transition in the proximity of an electronic phase separation. In particular, we investigate the interplay between superconducting fluctuations and density fluctuations, which become quantum critical when the electronic phase separation vanishes at zero temperature into a quantum critical point. In this situation, the critical dynamical density fluctuations strongly affect the dynamics of the Cooper-pair fluctuations, which acquire a more singular character with a z  =  3 dynamical critical index. This gives rise to a scenario that possibly rules the disappearance of superconductivity when the electron density is reduced by electrostatic gating at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface.

  20. Influence of radiofrequency surgery on architecture of the palatine tonsils.

    PubMed

    Plzak, Jan; Macokova, Pavla; Zabrodsky, Michal; Kastner, Jan; Lastuvka, Petr; Astl, Jaromir

    2014-01-01

    Radiofrequency surgery is a widely used modern technique for submucosal volume reduction of the tonsils. So far there is very limited information on morphologic changes in the human tonsils after radiofrequency surgery. We performed histopathological study of tonsillectomy specimens after previous bipolar radiofrequency induced thermotherapy (RFITT). A total of 83 patients underwent bipolar RFITT for hypertrophy of palatine tonsils. Tonsil volume reduction was measured by 3D ultrasonography. Five patients subsequently underwent tonsillectomy. Profound histopathological examination was performed to determine the effect of RFITT on tonsillar architecture. All tonsillectomy specimens showed the intact epithelium, intact germinal centers, normal vascularization, and no evidence of increased fibrosis. No microscopic morphological changes in tonsillectomy specimens after bipolar RFITT were observed. RFITT is an effective submucosal volume reduction procedure for treatment of hypertrophic palatine tonsils with no destructive effect on microscopic tonsillar architecture and hence most probably no functional adverse effect.

  1. Laparoscopic radiofrequency ablation of neuroendocrine liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Berber, Eren; Flesher, Nora; Siperstein, Allan E

    2002-08-01

    We previously reported on the safety and efficacy of laparoscopic radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA) for treating hepatic neuroendocrine metastases. The aim of this study is to report our 5-year RFA experience in the treatment of these challenging group of patients. Of the 222 patients with 803 liver primary and secondary tumors undergoing laparoscopic RFA between January 1996 and August 2001, a total of 34 patients with 234 tumors had neuroendocrine liver metastases. There were 25 men and 9 women with a mean +/- SEM age of 52 +/- 2 years who underwent 42 ablations. Primary tumor types included carcinoid tumor in 18 patients, medullary thyroid cancer in 7, secreting islet cell tumor in 5, and nonsecreting islet cell tumor in 4. There was no mortality, and the morbidity was 5%. The mean hospital stay was 1.1 days. Symptoms were ameliorated in 95%, with significant or complete symptom control in 80% of the patients for a mean of 10+ months (range 6-24 months). All patients were followed for a mean +/- SEM of 1.6 +/- 0.2 years (range 1.0-5.4 years). During this period new liver lesions developed in 28% of patients, new extrahepatic disease in 25%, and local liver recurrence in 13%; existing liver lesions progressed in 13%. Overall 41% of patients showed no progression of their cancer. Nine patients (27%) died. Mean +/- SEM survivals after diagnosis of primary disease, detection of liver metastases, and performance of RFA were 5.5 +/- 0.8 years, 3.0 +/- 0.3 years, and 1.6 +/- 0.2 years, respectively. Sixty-five percent of the patients demonstrated a partial or significant decrease in their tumor markers during follow-up. In conclusion, RFA provides excellent local tumor control with overnight hospitalization and low morbidity in the treatment of liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumors. It is a useful modality in the management of these challenging group of patients.

  2. Photoacoustic characterization of radiofrequency ablation lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Richard; Dana, Nicholas; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-02-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures are used to destroy abnormal electrical pathways in the heart that can cause cardiac arrhythmias. Current methods relying on fluoroscopy, echocardiography and electrical conduction mapping are unable to accurately assess ablation lesion size. In an effort to better visualize RFA lesions, photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasonic (US) imaging were utilized to obtain co-registered images of ablated porcine cardiac tissue. The left ventricular free wall of fresh (i.e., never frozen) porcine hearts was harvested within 24 hours of the animals' sacrifice. A THERMOCOOLR Ablation System (Biosense Webster, Inc.) operating at 40 W for 30-60 s was used to induce lesions through the endocardial and epicardial walls of the cardiac samples. Following lesion creation, the ablated tissue samples were placed in 25 °C saline to allow for multi-wavelength PA imaging. Samples were imaged with a VevoR 2100 ultrasound system (VisualSonics, Inc.) using a modified 20-MHz array that could provide laser irradiation to the sample from a pulsed tunable laser (Newport Corp.) to allow for co-registered photoacoustic-ultrasound (PAUS) imaging. PA imaging was conducted from 750-1064 nm, with a surface fluence of approximately 15 mJ/cm2 maintained during imaging. In this preliminary study with PA imaging, the ablated region could be well visualized on the surface of the sample, with contrasts of 6-10 dB achieved at 750 nm. Although imaging penetration depth is a concern, PA imaging shows promise in being able to reliably visualize RF ablation lesions.

  3. Histopomorphic evaluation of radiofrequency mediated débridement chondroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Kumkum; McRury, Ian D; Goodwin, Peter M; Morgan, Roy E; Augé Ii, Wayne K

    2010-06-29

    The use of radiofrequency devices has become widespread for surgical ablation procedures. When ablation devices have been deployed in treatment settings requiring tissue preservation like débridement chondroplasty, adoption has been limited due to the collateral damage caused by these devices in healthy tissue surrounding the treatment site. Ex vivo radiofrequency mediated débridement chondroplasty was performed on osteochondral specimens demonstrating surface fibrillation obtained from patients undergoing knee total joint replacement. Three radiofrequency systems designed to perform débridement chondroplasty were tested each demonstrating different energy delivery methods: monopolar ablation, bipolar ablation, and non-ablation energy. Treatment outcomes were compared with control specimens as to clinical endpoint and histopomorphic characteristics. Fibrillated cartilage was removed in all specimens; however, the residual tissue remaining at the treatment site displayed significantly different characteristics attributable to radiofrequency energy delivery method. Systems that delivered ablation-based energies caused tissue necrosis and collateral damage at the treatment site including corruption of cartilage Superficial and Transitional Zones; whereas, the non-ablation system created a smooth articular surface with Superficial Zone maintenance and without chondrocyte death or tissue necrosis. The mechanism of radiofrequency energy deposition upon tissues is particularly important in treatment settings requiring tissue preservation. Ablation-based device systems can cause a worsened state of articular cartilage from that of pre-treatment. Non-ablation energy can be successful in modifying/preconditioning tissue during débridement chondroplasty without causing collateral damage. Utilizing a non-ablation radiofrequency system provides the ability to perform successful débridement chondroplasty without causing additional articular cartilage tissue damage and may

  4. Interplay between ferromagnetism and superconductivity in tunneling currents.

    PubMed

    Grønsleth, M S; Linder, J; Børven, J-M; Sudbø, A

    2006-10-06

    We study tunneling currents in a model consisting of two nonunitary ferromagnetic spin-triplet superconductors separated by a thin insulating layer. We find a novel interplay between ferromagnetism and superconductivity, manifested in the Josephson effect. This offers the possibility of tuning dissipationless currents of charge and spin in a well-defined manner by adjusting the magnetization direction on either side of the junction.

  5. Color superconductivity in dense quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, Mark G.; Schmitt, Andreas; Rajagopal, Krishna; Schaefer, Thomas

    2008-10-15

    Matter at high density and low temperature is expected to be a color superconductor, which is a degenerate Fermi gas of quarks with a condensate of Cooper pairs near the Fermi surface that induces color Meissner effects. At the highest densities, where the QCD coupling is weak, rigorous calculations are possible, and the ground state is a particularly symmetric state, the color-flavor locked (CFL) phase. The CFL phase is a superfluid, an electromagnetic insulator, and breaks chiral symmetry. The effective theory of the low-energy excitations in the CFL phase is known and can be used, even at more moderate densities, to describe its physical properties. At lower densities the CFL phase may be disfavored by stresses that seek to separate the Fermi surfaces of the different flavors, and comparison with the competing alternative phases, which may break translation and/or rotation invariance, is done using phenomenological models. We review the calculations that underlie these results and then discuss transport properties of several color-superconducting phases and their consequences for signatures of color superconductivity in neutron stars.

  6. Quantum antiferromagnets and high temperature superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, David Benedict

    The problem of accurately calculating the various properties of high temperature superconductors remains one of the chief issues in theoretical condensed matter physics. In my thesis, I attempt to extend and refine certain aspects of a computational technique which is based on the gauge theory of the t-J Hamiltonian. I argue that the mean field solution used in previous work is inadequate for describing high temperature superconductivity, although it is not entirely inappropriate for describing certain gross properties of the high-Tsb{c} materials. The zero temperature magnetic properties of the t-J model, computed at the mean field level and modified with a crude vertex correction, agree quantitatively with those found in exact diagonalizations. A comparison with experimental results, however, reveals the specific nature of the deficiencies of the gauge theory approach. I claim that there are two modifications which, when made, rectify most of the shortcomings of this approach. The first is to consider the tendency toward phase separation in the t-J model and its manifestation in the behavior of the gauge field variables. The second is to address the issue of time reversal symmetry breaking, the lack of evidence for which has been construed as a major, if not fatal, drawback of the calculational technique. I conclude by suggesting a course of action which, if taken, should help to clean up the mess in the gauge theory of the t-J model and reconcile several of the existing theories of high temperature superconductivity.

  7. [NMR radiofrequency microcoil design: usefulness of electromagnetic simulation].

    PubMed

    Armenean, Mircea; Briguet, André; Saint-Jalmes, Hervé

    2002-04-01

    The extraction of the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectra of samples having smaller and smaller volumes is a real challenge. Either these reductions of volume are dictated by the difficulties of production of sufficiently large samples or by necessities of miniaturisation of the analysing system, in both cases a careful design of the radiofrequency coil, ensuring an optimum reception of the NMR signal, is required. We have also evaluated the usefulness of electromagnetic simulation software for the design and optimisation of these radio-frequency coils, which are more and more used in biology and health research projects.

  8. Bulk superconductivity at 38 K in a molecular system.

    PubMed

    Ganin, Alexey Y; Takabayashi, Yasuhiro; Khimyak, Yaroslav Z; Margadonna, Serena; Tamai, Anna; Rosseinsky, Matthew J; Prassides, Kosmas

    2008-05-01

    C(60)-based solids are archetypal molecular superconductors with transition temperatures (Tc) as high as 33 K (refs 2-4). Tc of face-centred-cubic (f.c.c.) A(3)C(60) (A=alkali metal) increases monotonically with inter C(60) separation, which is controlled by the A(+) cation size. As Cs(+) is the largest such ion, Cs(3)C(60) is a key material in this family. Previous studies revealing trace superconductivity in Cs(x)C(60) materials have not identified the structure or composition of the superconducting phase owing to extremely small shielding fractions and low crystallinity. Here, we show that superconducting Cs(3)C(60) can be reproducibly isolated by solvent-controlled synthesis and has the highest Tc of any molecular material at 38 K. In contrast to other A(3)C(60) materials, two distinct cubic Cs(3)C(60) structures are accessible. Although f.c.c. Cs(3)C(60) can be synthesized, the superconducting phase has the A15 structure based uniquely among fullerides on body-centred-cubic packing. Application of hydrostatic pressure controllably tunes A15 Cs(3)C(60) from insulating at ambient pressure to superconducting without crystal structure change and reveals a broad maximum in Tc at approximately 7 kbar. We attribute the observed Tc maximum as a function of inter C(60)separation--unprecedented in fullerides but reminiscent of the atom-based cuprate superconductors--to the role of strong electronic correlations near the metal-insulator transition onset.

  9. Fractal superconductivity near localization threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Feigel'man, M.V.; Ioffe, L.B.; Kravtsov, V.E.; Cuevas, E.

    2010-07-15

    We develop a semi-quantitative theory of electron pairing and resulting superconductivity in bulk 'poor conductors' in which Fermi energy E{sub F} is located in the region of localized states not so far from the Anderson mobility edge E{sub c}. We assume attractive interaction between electrons near the Fermi surface. We review the existing theories and experimental data and argue that a large class of disordered films is described by this model. Our theoretical analysis is based on analytical treatment of pairing correlations, described in the basis of the exact single-particle eigenstates of the 3D Anderson model, which we combine with numerical data on eigenfunction correlations. Fractal nature of critical wavefunction's correlations is shown to be crucial for the physics of these systems. We identify three distinct phases: 'critical' superconductive state formed at E{sub F} = E{sub c}, superconducting state with a strong pseudo-gap, realized due to pairing of weakly localized electrons and insulating state realized at E{sub F} still deeper inside a localized band. The 'critical' superconducting phase is characterized by the enhancement of the transition temperature with respect to BCS result, by the inhomogeneous spatial distribution of superconductive order parameter and local density of states. The major new feature of the pseudo-gapped state is the presence of two independent energy scales: superconducting gap {Delta}, that is due to many-body correlations and a new 'pseudo-gap' energy scale {Delta}{sub P} which characterizes typical binding energy of localized electron pairs and leads to the insulating behavior of the resistivity as a function of temperature above superconductive T{sub c}. Two gap nature of the pseudo-gapped superconductor is shown to lead to specific features seen in scanning tunneling spectroscopy and point-contact Andreev spectroscopy. We predict that pseudo-gapped superconducting state demonstrates anomalous behavior of the optical

  10. Radio frequency cavity analysis, measurement, and calibration of absolute Dee voltage for K-500 superconducting cyclotron at VECC, Kolkata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, Sumit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Duttagupta, Anjan

    2013-02-01

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre has commissioned a K-500 superconducting cyclotron for various types of nuclear physics experiments. The 3-phase radio-frequency system of superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9-27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and ±0.20, respectively. The analysis of the RF cavity has been carried out using 3D Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio code and various RF parameters and accelerating voltages ("Dee" voltage) are calculated from simulation. During the RF system commissioning, measurement of different RF parameters has been done and absolute Dee voltage has been calibrated using a CdTe X-ray detector along with its accessories and known X-ray source. The present paper discusses about the measured data and the simulation result.

  11. Radio frequency cavity analysis, measurement, and calibration of absolute Dee voltage for K-500 superconducting cyclotron at VECC, Kolkata.

    PubMed

    Som, Sumit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Duttagupta, Anjan

    2013-02-01

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre has commissioned a K-500 superconducting cyclotron for various types of nuclear physics experiments. The 3-phase radio-frequency system of superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9-27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and ±0.2(0), respectively. The analysis of the RF cavity has been carried out using 3D Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio code and various RF parameters and accelerating voltages ("Dee" voltage) are calculated from simulation. During the RF system commissioning, measurement of different RF parameters has been done and absolute Dee voltage has been calibrated using a CdTe X-ray detector along with its accessories and known X-ray source. The present paper discusses about the measured data and the simulation result.

  12. The road to superconducting spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschrig, Matthias

    Energy efficient computing has become a major challenge, with the increasing importance of large data centres across the world, which already today have a power consumption comparable to that of Spain, with steeply increasing trend. Superconducting computing is progressively becoming an alternative for large-scale applications, with the costs for cooling being largely outweighed by the gain in energy efficiency. The combination of superconductivity and spintronics - ``superspintronics'' - has the potential and flexibility to develop into such a green technology. This young field is based on the observation that new phenomena emerge at interfaces between superconducting and other, competing, phases. The past 15 years have seen a series of pivotal predictions and experimental discoveries relating to the interplay between superconductivity and ferromagnetism. The building blocks of superspintronics are equal-spin Cooper pairs, which are generated at the interface between superconducting and a ferromagnetic materials in the presence of non-collinear magnetism. Such novel, spin-polarised Cooper pairs carry spin-supercurrents in ferromagnets and thus contribute to spin-transport and spin-control. Geometric Berry phases appear during the singlet-triplet conversion process in structures with non-coplanar magnetisation, enhancing functionality of devices, and non-locality introduced by superconducting order leads to long-range effects. With the successful generation and control of equal-spin Cooper pairs the hitherto notorious incompatibility of superconductivity and ferromagnetism has been not only overcome, but turned synergistic. I will discuss these developments and their extraordinary potential. I also will present open questions posed by recent experiments and point out implications for theory. This work is supported by the Engineering and Physical Science Research Council (EPSRC Grant No. EP/J010618/1).

  13. Superconductivity and the environment: a Roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishijima, Shigehiro; Eckroad, Steven; Marian, Adela; Choi, Kyeongdal; Kim, Woo Seok; Terai, Motoaki; Deng, Zigang; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Jiasu; Umemoto, Katsuya; Du, Jia; Febvre, Pascal; Keenan, Shane; Mukhanov, Oleg; Cooley, Lance D.; Foley, Cathy P.; Hassenzahl, William V.; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2013-11-01

    disasters will be helped by future supercomputer technologies that support huge amounts of data and sophisticated modeling, and with the aid of superconductivity these systems might not require the energy of a large city. We present different sections on applications that could address (or are addressing) a range of environmental issues. The Roadmap covers water purification, power distribution and storage, low-environmental impact transport, environmental sensing (particularly for the removal of unexploded munitions), monitoring the Earth’s magnetic fields for earthquakes and major solar activity, and, finally, developing a petaflop supercomputer that only requires 3% of the current supercomputer power provision while being 50 times faster. Access to fresh water. With only 2.5% of the water on Earth being fresh and climate change modeling forecasting that many areas will become drier, the ability to recycle water and achieve compact water recycling systems for sewage or ground water treatment is critical. The first section (by Nishijima) points to the potential of superconducting magnetic separation to enable water recycling and reuse. Energy. The Equinox Summit held in Waterloo Canada 2011 (2011 Equinox Summit: Energy 2030 http://wgsi.org/publications-resources) identified electricity use as humanity’s largest contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. Our appetite for electricity is growing faster than for any other form of energy. The communiqué from the summit said ‘Transforming the ways we generate, distribute and store electricity is among the most pressing challenges facing society today…. If we want to stabilize CO2 levels in our atmosphere at 550 parts per million, all of that growth needs to be met by non-carbon forms of energy’ (2011 Equinox Summit: Energy 2030 http://wgsi.org/publications-resources). Superconducting technologies can provide the energy efficiencies to achieve, in the European Union alone, 33-65% of the required reduction in greenhouse

  14. Method of isotope separation by chemi-ionization

    DOEpatents

    Wexler, Sol; Young, Charles E.

    1977-05-17

    A method for separating specific isotopes present in an isotopic mixture by aerodynamically accelerating a gaseous compound to form a jet of molecules, and passing the jet through a stream of electron donor atoms whereby an electron transfer takes place, thus forming negative ions of the molecules. The molecular ions are then passed through a radiofrequency quadrupole mass filter to separate the specific isotopes. This method may be used for any compounds having a sufficiently high electron affinity to permit negative ion formation, and is especially useful for the separation of plutonium and uranium isotopes.

  15. Improved superconducting magnet wire

    DOEpatents

    Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1983-08-16

    This invention is directed to a superconducting tape or wire composed of alternating layers of copper and a niobium-containing superconductor such as niobium of NbTi, Nb/sub 3/Sn or Nb/sub 3/Ge. In general, each layer of the niobium-containing superconductor has a thickness in the range of about 0.05 to 1.5 times its coherence length (which for Nb/sub 3/Si is 41 A) with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170 to 600 A. With the use of very thin layers of the niobium composition having a thickness within the desired range, the critical field (H/sub c/) may be increased by factors of 2 to 4. Also, the thin layers of the superconductor permit the resulting tape or wire to exhibit suitable ductility for winding on a magnet core. These compositions are also characterized by relatively high values of critical temperature and therefore will exhibit a combination of useful properties as superconductors.

  16. High temperature superconducting compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Allen M.

    1992-11-01

    The major accomplishment of this grant has been to develop techniques for the in situ preparation of high-Tc superconducting films involving the use of ozone-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The techniques are generalizable to the growth of trilayer and multilayer structures. Films of both the DyBa2Cu3O(7-x) and YBa2Cu3O(7-x) compounds as well as the La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 compound have been grown on the usual substrates, SrTiO3, YSZ, MgO, and LaAlO3, as well as on Si substrates without any buffer layer. A bolometer has been fabricated on a thermally isolated SiN substrate coated with YSZ, an effort carried out in collaboration with Honeywell Inc. The deposition process facilitates the fabrication of very thin and transparent films creating new opportunities for the study of superconductor-insulator transitions and the investigation of photo-doping with carriers of high temperature superconductors. In addition to a thin film technology, a patterning technology has been developed. Trilayer structures have been developed for FET devices and tunneling junctions. Other work includes the measurement of the magnetic properties of bulk single crystal high temperature superconductors, and in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, measurement of electric transport properties of T1-based high-Tc films.

  17. Superconducting energy storage magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boom, Roger W. (Inventor); Eyssa, Yehia M. (Inventor); Abdelsalam, Mostafa K. (Inventor); Huang, Xianrui (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A superconducting magnet is formed having composite conductors arrayed in coils having turns which lie on a surface defining substantially a frustum of a cone. The conical angle with respect to the central axis is preferably selected such that the magnetic pressure on the coil at the widest portion of the cone is substantially zero. The magnet structure is adapted for use as an energy storage magnet mounted in an earthen trench or tunnel where the strength the surrounding soil is lower at the top of the trench or tunnel than at the bottom. The composite conductor may be formed having a ripple shape to minimize stresses during charge up and discharge and has a shape for each ripple selected such that the conductor undergoes a minimum amount of bending during the charge and discharge cycle. By minimizing bending, the working of the normal conductor in the composite conductor is minimized, thereby reducing the increase in resistance of the normal conductor that occurs over time as the conductor undergoes bending during numerous charge and discharge cycles.

  18. Superconducting wire manufactured

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuexian; Sun, Yue; Xu, Shiming; Peng, Ying

    1985-10-01

    The MF Nb/Cu Extrusion Tube Method was used to manufacture 3 kg of stable practical MF Nb2Sn composite superconducting wire containing pure Cu(RRR approx. 200)/Ta. The draw state composite wire diameter was 0.56 mm, it contained 11,448 x 2.6 micron Nb core, and the twist distance was 1.5 cm. The composite wire cross-section was pure Cu/Ta/11,448 Nb core/Cu/ 91Sn-Cu; containing 22.8 v. % pure Cu, 13.3 v. % Ta; within the Ta layer to prevent Sn diffusion. The wire was sheathed in nonalkaline glass fiber as an insulating layer. A section of wire weighing 160 g was cut off and coiled it into a small solenoid. After reaction diffusion processing at 675 C/30 and curing by vacuum dipping in paraffin, it was measured in a Nb-Ti backfield of 7.2 T intensity, a current of 129 A was passed through the Nb3Sn solenoid and produced a strength of 2.5 T, the overall magnetic field intensity of the composite magnet reached 9.7 T. At this time, the wire full current density J sub c.w. = 5.2 x 10 to the 4th power A/sq cm; the effective current density J sub c (Nb + Sn - Cu) = 8.2 x 10 to the 4th power A/sq cm.

  19. Superconducting Cable Termination

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Uday K.; Tolbert, Jerry

    2005-08-30

    Disclosed is a termination that connects high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable immersed in pressurized liquid nitrogen to high voltage and neutral (shield) external bushings at ambient temperature and pressure. The termination consists of a splice between the HTS power (inner) and shield (outer) conductors and concentric copper pipes which are the conductors in the termination. There is also a transition from the dielectric tape insulator used in the HTS cable to the insulators used between and around the copper pipe conductors in the termination. At the warm end of the termination the copper pipes are connected via copper braided straps to the conventional warm external bushings which have low thermal stresses. This termination allows for a natural temperature gradient in the copper pipe conductors inside the termination which enables the controlled flashing of the pressurized liquid coolant (nitrogen) to the gaseous state. Thus the entire termination is near the coolant supply pressure and the high voltage and shield cold bushings, a highly stressed component used in most HTS cables, are eliminated. A sliding seal allows for cable contraction as it is cooled from room temperature to ˜72-82 K. Seals, static vacuum, and multi-layer superinsulation minimize radial heat leak to the environment.

  20. Fascicular ventricular tachycardia: experience with radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Magalhaes, Sónia; Gonçalves, Helena; Primo, João; Sá, Ana Paula; Silva, Paula; Rosas, Rui; Gama, Vasco

    2006-05-01

    at the tachycardia exit site failing, with no complications. If we include the success of a repeated case with three-dimensional mapping, the overall success rate was 80%. Ablation of fascicular tachycardia appears to be a good therapeutic option with a good success rate and without significant adverse events. The poor reproducibility as a consequence of contact inhibition during endocardial left ventricular mapping is the principal limiting factor. With the help of currently available mapping systems, we hope that this limitation will disappear, as it is now possible with some devices to acquire accurate information on suitable sites for subsequent radiofrequency application with little or no contact, facilitating the ablation procedure. Ablation at a site with simultaneous recording of DP and PP is considered by most authors to be more effective than that performed at the tachycardia exit site.

  1. Superconducting Solenoid for Superfast THz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragin, A. V.; Khrushchev, S. V.; Kubarev, V. V.; Mezencev, N. A.; Tsukanov, V. M.; Sozinov, G. I.; Shkaruba, V. A.

    This project is related to new spectroscopy method in little-developed THz range. The method is founded on using of a free electron laser (NovoFEL) with high spectral power radiation which can be smoothly tuned in desirable range of spectrum. The objects of research of this method are fast processes in physics, chemical and biological reactions. Uniform magnetic field of 6 T value in the research area can considerably increase possibilities of this method. The magnetic field will modulate radiation of free molecules induction on characteristic frequencies of the Zeeman splitting that gives more possibilities of identification of molecules having even weak magnetic momentum. Moreover, the use of magnetic field allows essentially increase sensitivity of this method due to almost complete separation of weak measuring signals from powerful radiation of the laser. A superconducting solenoid was developed for this method. Its design and peculiarities are described in this paper.

  2. JT-60SA superconducting magnet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koide, Y.; Yoshida, K.; Wanner, M.; Barabaschi, P.; Cucchiaro, A.; Davis, S.; Decool, P.; Di Pietro, E.; Disset, G.; Genini, L.; Hajnal, N.; Heller, R.; Honda, A.; Ikeda, Y.; Kamada, Y.; Kashiwa, Y.; Kizu, K.; Kamiya, K.; Murakami, H.; Michel, F.; Marechal, J. L.; Phillips, G.; Polli, G. M.; Rossi, P.; Shibanuma, K.; Takahata, K.; Tomarchio, V.; Tsuchiya, K.; Usui, K.; Verrecchia, M.; Zani, L.

    2015-08-01

    The most distinctive feature of the superconducting magnet system for JT-60SA is the optimized coil structure in terms of the space utilization as well as the highly accurate coil manufacturing, thus meeting the requirements for the steady-state tokamak research: a conceptually new outer inter-coil structure separated from the casing is introduced to the toroidal field coils to realize their slender shape, allowing large-bore diagnostic ports for detailed plasma measurements. A method to minimize the manufacturing error of the equilibrium-field coils has been established, aiming at the precise plasma shape/position control. A compact butt-joint has been successfully developed for the Central Solenoid, which allows an optimized utilization of the limited space for the Central Solenoid to extend the duration of the plasma pulse.

  3. Type-1.5 superconductivity in multicomponent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaev, E.; Carlström, J.; Silaev, M.; Speight, J. M.

    2017-02-01

    In general a superconducting state breaks multiple symmetries and, therefore, is characterized by several different coherence lengths ξi, i = 1 , … , N . Moreover in multiband material even superconducting states that break only a single symmetry are nonetheless described, under certain conditions by multi-component theories with multiple coherence lengths. As a result of that there can appear a state where some coherence lengths are smaller and some are larger than the magnetic field penetration length λ: ξ1 ≤ξ2 … <√{ 2} λ <ξM ≤ …ξN . That state was recently termed "type-1.5" superconductivity. This breakdown of type-1/type-2 dichotomy is rather generic near a phase transition between superconducting states with different symmetries. The examples include the transitions between U(1) and U(1) × U(1) states or between U(1) and U(1) × Z2 states. The later example is realized in systems that feature transition between s-wave and s + is states. The extra fundamental length scales have many physical consequences. In particular in these regimes vortices can attract one another at long range but repel at shorter ranges. Such a system can form vortex clusters in low magnetic fields. The vortex clustering in the type-1.5 regime gives rise to many physical effects, ranging from macroscopic phase separation in domains of different broken symmetries, to unusual transport properties. Prepared for the proceedings of Vortex IX conference, Rhodes 12-17 September 2015.

  4. Stereoisomers Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieczorek, Piotr

    The use of capillary electrophoresis for enantiomer separation and optical purity determination is presented. The contents start with basic information about the nature of stereoizomers and the mechanism of enantioseparation using capillary electrophoresis techniques. The molecules to be separated show identical chemical structure and electrochemical behavior. Therefore, the chiral recognition of enantiomers is possible only by bonding to chiral selector and the separation based on very small differences in complexation energies of diastereomer complexes formed. This method is useful for this purpose due to the fact that different compounds can be used as chiral selectors. The mostly used chiral selectors like cyclodextrins, crown ethers, chiral surfactants, macrocyclic antibiotics, transition metal complexes, natural, and synthetic polymers and their application for this purpose is also discussed. Finally, examples of practical applications of electromigration techniques for enantiomers separation and determination are presented.

  5. Mist separator

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, T.M.

    1984-04-17

    An apparatus for the removal of particulates from a flowing gas stream and a process for its use are provided. A perforated screen separator formed as a plate having parallel rows of perforations formed by pushing alternating strips of the plate material forward and backward from the plane of the plate is used. The perforated screen separator may be used alone or with a fiber bed mist eliminator for increased particulate removal.

  6. Product separator

    DOEpatents

    Welsh, Robert A.; Deurbrouck, Albert W.

    1976-01-20

    A secondary light sensitive photoelectric product separator for use with a primary product separator that concentrates a material so that it is visually distinguishable from adjacent materials. The concentrate separation is accomplished first by feeding the material onto a vibratory inclined surface with a liquid flow, such as a wet concentrating table. Vibrations generally perpendicular to the stream direction of flow cause the concentrate to separate from its mixture according to its color. When the concentrate and its surrounding stream reach the recovery end of the table, a detecting device notes the line of color demarcation and triggers a signal if it differs from a normal condition. If no difference is noted nothing moves on the second separator. However, if a difference is detected in the constant monitoring of the color line's location, a product splitter and recovery unit normally positioned near the color line at the recovery end, moves to a new position. In this manner the selected separated concentrate is recovered at a maximum rate regardless of variations in the flow stream or other conditions present.

  7. The Superconducting Bird: A Didactical Toy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarner, E.; Sanchez, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    Describes the design of the superconducting bird, a device to demonstrate the phenomenon of superconductivity. Discusses the utilization of the device as an example of a motor and compares it to the toy called the drinking bird. (MDH)

  8. Superconducting six-axis accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, H. J.

    1990-01-01

    A new superconducting accelerometer, capable of measuring both linear and angular accelerations, is under development at the University of Maryland. A single superconducting proof mass is magnetically levitated against gravity or any other proof force. Its relative positions and orientations with respect to the platform are monitored by six superconducting inductance bridges sharing a single amplifier, called the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). The six degrees of freedom, the three linear acceleration components and the three angular acceleration components, of the platform are measured simultaneously. In order to improve the linearity and the dynamic range of the instrument, the demodulated outputs of the SQUID are fed back to appropriate levitation coils so that the proof mass remains at the null position for all six inductance bridges. The expected intrinsic noise of the instrument is 4 x 10(exp -12)m s(exp -2) Hz(exp -1/2) for linear acceleration and 3 x 10(exp -11) rad s(exp -2) Hz(exp -1/2) for angular acceleration in 1-g environment. In 0-g, the linear acceleration sensitivity of the superconducting accelerometer could be improved by two orders of magnitude. The design and the operating principle of a laboratory prototype of the new instrument is discussed.

  9. Interplay Between Ferromagnetism and Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, Jacob; Sudbø, Asle

    This chapter presents results on transport properties of hybrid structures where the interplay between ferromagnetism and superconductivity plays a central role. In particular, the appearance of so-called odd-frequency pairing in such structures is investigated in detail. The basic physics of superconductivity in such structures is presented, and the quasiclassical theory of Greens functions with appropriate boundary conditions is given. Results for superconductor∣ferromagnet bilayers as well as magnetic Josephson junctions and spin valves are presented. Further phenomena that are studied include transport in the presence of inhomogenous magnetic textures, spin-Josephon effect, and crossed Andreev reflection. We also investigate the possibility of intrinsic coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity, as reported in a series of uranium-based heavy-fermion compounds. The nature of such a coexistence and the resulting superconducting order parameter is discussed along with relevant experimental results. We present a thermodynamic treatment for a model of a ferromagnetic supercondcutor and moreover suggest ways to experimentally determine the pairing symmetry of the superconducting gap, in particular by means of conductance spectroscopy.

  10. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Yehuda; Mahale, Narayan K.

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  11. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1996-08-06

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. 6 figs.

  12. Electromagnetic Initiation and Propagation of Bipolar Radiofrequency Tissue Reactions via Invasive Non-Insulated Microneedle Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Na, Jongju; Zheng, Zhenlong; Dannaker, Christopher; Lee, Sang Eun; Kang, Jin-Soo; Cho, Sung Bin

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) energy can be emitted into the skin, either non- or invasively, via a monopolar mode that utilizes an active electrode and a grounded electrode or via a bipolar mode that employs two active electrodes. In this experimental study of RF tissue reactions, bipolar RF energy was emitted in vivo to micropig skin at varying microneedle penetration depths, signal amplitudes, and conduction times. Immediately after RF treatment, skin samples exhibited RF-induced coagulation columns of thermal injury, separately generated around each microneedle in the dermis. In ex vivo bovine liver tissue, the thermal coagulation columns were found to be concentrated maximally around the pointed tips of each electrode. After a RF conduction time of 2 seconds, the individual areas of thermal coagulation began to converge with neighboring RF-induced coagulation columns; the convergence of coagulation columns was found to start from the tips of neighboring electrodes. PMID:26563971

  13. Effect of resonance in external radio-frequency circuit on very high frequency plasma discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Rauf, Shahid; Chen Zhigang; Collins, Ken

    2010-05-15

    A fully electromagnetic plasma model for an asymmetric capacitively coupled plasma discharge is used to understand the interaction between the external radio-frequency (rf) distributed circuit and the plasma. The plasma is excited using a 150 MHz rf source connected to the top electrode, the bottom electrode is connected to a shorted transmission line, and the electrodes are separated from the chamber walls through dielectric rings. Under typical conditions, the electron density peaks in the center of the plasma chamber due to the standing electromagnetic wave and the rf current from the top electrode primarily returns through the bottom electrode. When the electrical length of the bottom transmission line is adjusted such that it presents a large (open-circuit) impedance at the plasma chamber interface, the rf return current shifts from the bottom electrode to the chamber wall. As a consequence, the peak in electron density also moves from the center of the chamber toward its outer periphery.

  14. Rolled-up transmission line structure for a radiofrequency integrated circuit (RFIC)

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xiuling; Huang, Wen

    2015-04-28

    A rolled-up transmission line structure for a radiofrequency integrated circuit (RFIC) comprises a multilayer sheet in a rolled configuration comprising multiple turns about a longitudinal axis, where the multilayer sheet comprises a conductive pattern layer on a strain-relieved layer. The conductive pattern layer comprises a first conductive film and a second conductive film separated from the first conductive film in a rolling direction. In the rolled configuration, the first conductive film surrounds the longitudinal axis, and the second conductive film surrounds the first conductive film. The first conductive film serves as a signal line and the second conductive film serves as a conductive shield for the rolled-up transmission line structure.

  15. Genetic damage in subjects exposed to radiofrequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Verschaeve, Luc

    2009-01-01

    Despite many research efforts and public debate there is still great concern about the possible adverse effects of radiofrequency (RF) radiation on human health. This is especially due to the enormous increase of wireless mobile telephones and other telecommunication devices throughout the world. The possible genetic effects of mobile phone radiation and other sources of radiofrequencies constitute one of the major points of concern. In the past several review papers were published on laboratory investigations that were devoted to in vitro and in vivo animal (cyto)genetic studies. However, it may be assumed that some of the most important observations are those obtained from studies with individuals that were exposed to relatively high levels of radiofrequency radiation, either as a result of their occupational activity or as frequent users of radiofrequency emitting tools. In this paper the cytogenetic biomonitoring studies of RF-exposed humans are reviewed. A majority of these studies do show that RF-exposed individuals have increased frequencies of genetic damage (e.g., chromosomal aberrations) in their lymphocytes or exfoliated buccal cells. However, most of the studies, if not all, have a number of shortcomings that actually prevents any firm conclusion. Radiation dosimetry was lacking in all papers, but some of the investigations were flawed by much more severe imperfections. Large well-coordinated multidisciplinary investigations are needed in order to reach any robust conclusion.

  16. 47 CFR 1.1310 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Criteria for Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields,” NCRP Report No. 86, Sections 17.4.1, 17.4.1.1, 17.4.2... Levels with Respect to Human Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields, 3 kHz to 300 GHz,”...

  17. The imprint of radiofrequency in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bramis, Ioannis; Triantopoulou, Charikleia; Madariaga, Juan; Dervenis, Christos

    2006-01-01

    Background. This article reviews the current results of radiofrequency application in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with reference to the comparison between the different surgical modalities. Method. An electronic search was performed for studies on the treatment of HCC. Results. Thermoablation by means of radiofrequency (RFA), microwave coagulation therapy (MCT) and laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) provides tumor necrosis with a low complication rate. These methods are still not predictable and it is difficult to monitor the extent of necrosis in a real-time manner. Combined transarterial embolization and RF ablation is a promising strategy for large HCCs. Radiofrequency-assisted liver resection is unique and has become very popular recently because it permits parenchymal transection with minimal blood loss. Conclusion. Many alternative techniques have been applied recently for the management of HCC but their exact roles need to be defined by randomized studies. Advances in technology and refinements in technique may provide an effective and predictable way to ablate liver tumors using radiofrequency devices. PMID:18333136

  18. Extreme diffusion limited electropolishing of niobium radiofrequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Anthony C.

    2017-03-01

    A deeply modulated, regular, continuous, oscillating current waveform is reliably and repeatably achieved during electropolishing of niobium single-cell elliptical radiofrequency cavities. Details of the technique and cavity test results are reported here. The method is applicable for cavity frequencies in the range 500 MHz to 3.9 GHz and can be extended to multicell structures.

  19. Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Cha, C.Y.

    1993-09-21

    This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x]. 1 figure.

  20. Radio-frequency energy in fusion power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, J.Q.; Becraft, W.R.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    The history of radio-frequency (rf) energy in fusion experiments is reviewed, and the status of current efforts is described. Potential applications to tasks other than plasma heating are described, as are the research and development needs of rf energy technology.

  1. Longevity of radiofrequency identification device microchips in citrus trees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term identification of individual plants in the field is an important part of many types of botanical and horticultural research. In a previous report, we described methods for using implanted radiofrequency (RFID) microchips to tag citrus trees for field research. This report provides an upd...

  2. 21 CFR 886.4100 - Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus. 886.4100 Section 886.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...-powered or battery-powered device intended for use during ocular surgery to coagulate tissue or...

  3. 21 CFR 886.4100 - Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus. 886.4100 Section 886.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...-powered or battery-powered device intended for use during ocular surgery to coagulate tissue or...

  4. 21 CFR 886.4100 - Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus. 886.4100 Section 886.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...-powered or battery-powered device intended for use during ocular surgery to coagulate tissue or...

  5. 77 FR 43535 - Grantee Codes for Certified Radiofrequency Equipment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 2 Grantee Codes for Certified Radiofrequency Equipment AGENCY: Federal Communications... grantee codes must consist of only three characters. This action will permit the Commission to issue longer grantee codes, thus greatly increasing the supply of available codes and ensuring that it...

  6. [Instrumental radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation dosimetry: general principals and modern methodology].

    PubMed

    Perov, S Iu; Kudriashov, Iu B; Rubtsova, N B

    2012-01-01

    The modern experimental radiofrequency electromagnetic field dosimetry approach has been considered. The main principles of specific absorbed rate measurement are analyzed for electromagnetic field biological effect assessment. The general methodology of specific absorbed rate automated dosimetry system applied to establish the compliance of radiation sources with the safety standard requirements (maximum permissible levels and base restrictions) is described.

  7. Cardiovascular risk in operators under radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Vangelova, Katia; Deyanov, Christo; Israel, Mishel

    2006-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the long-term effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (EMR) on the cardiovascular system. Two groups of exposed operators (49 broadcasting (BC) station and 61 TV station operators) and a control group of 110 radiorelay station operators, matched by sex and age, with similar job characteristics except for the radiofrequency EMR were studied. The EMR exposure was assessed and the time-weighted average (TWA) was calculated. The cardiovascular risk factors arterial pressure, lipid profile, body mass index, waist/hip ratio, smoking, and family history of cardiovascular disease were followed. The systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP), total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were significantly higher in the two exposed groups. It was found that the radiofrequency EMR exposure was associated with greater chance of becoming hypertensive and dyslipidemic. The stepwise multiple regression equations showed that the SBP and TWA predicted the high TC and high LDL-C, while the TC, age and abdominal obesity were predictors for high SBP and DBP. In conclusion, our data show that the radiofrequency EMR contributes to adverse effects on the cardiovascular system.

  8. 47 CFR 1.1310 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... environmental impact of human exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation as specified in § 1.1307(b) within the... human exposure to RF radiation as specified in § 1.1307(b), except for portable devices as defined in... the environmental impact of human exposure to RF radiation as specified in § 1.1307(b). (4) Both...

  9. 47 CFR 1.1310 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... environmental impact of human exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation as specified in § 1.1307(b) within the... human exposure to RF radiation as specified in § 1.1307(b), except for portable devices as defined in... the environmental impact of human exposure to RF radiation as specified in § 1.1307(b). (4) Both...

  10. Extreme diffusion limited electropolishing of niobium radiofrequency cavities

    DOE PAGES

    Crawford, Anthony C.

    2017-01-04

    In this study, a deeply modulated, regular, continuous, oscillating current waveform is reliably and repeatably achieved during electropolishing of niobium single-cell elliptical radiofrequency cavities. Details of the technique and cavity test results are reported here. The method is applicable for cavity frequencies in the range 500 MHz to 3.9 GHz and can be extended to multicell structures.

  11. 78 FR 33633 - Human Exposure to Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ... June 4, 2013 Part IV Federal Communications Commission 47 CFR Parts 1, 2, and 15, et al. Human Exposure..., and 95 Human Exposure to Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields AGENCY: Federal Communications... National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) as they relate to the guidelines for human exposure to...

  12. Osteoid osteoma of the cuboid managed by percutaneous radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Chakraverty, Julian; Al-Mokhtar, Namir; James, Steven L

    2014-01-01

    We present details of a case of osteoid osteoma of the tarsal cuboid bone. Osteoid osteoma arising in the foot is not very common, and localization in the cuboid is rare. To our knowledge, this is the first case of osteoid osteoma of the cuboid bone treated successfully by percutaneous radiofrequency ablation.

  13. Investigation of Radiofrequency Radiation Effects on Excitable Tissues.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-31

    Barnes, "Microwave Effects on Isolated Neurons Vary with Field Orientation," (abstract) Bioelectro - magnetics 1:205, 1980. 88 25. W. F. Pickard, Y. H...Barsoum, and F. J. Rosenbaum, "Is the Characean Plasmalemma a Radio-Frequency Rectifier?" (abstract), Bioelectro - magnetics 1:216, 1980. 26. W. F

  14. [Thrombus visualisation during radiofrequency catheter ablation. A case report].

    PubMed

    Maciag, Aleksander; Szwed, Hanna; Pytkowski, Mariusz; Kraska, Alicja; Sterliński, Maciej

    2005-10-01

    We report two patients in whom thrombus formation during radiofrequency catheter ablation was detected by echocardiography. Resolution of thrombus after intravenous use of heparin was observed in both patients. Transesophageal and intracardiac echocardiography may be useful in management of this complication.

  15. Palliation of Painful Perineal Metastasis Treated with Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Thanos, L. Mylona, S.; Kalioras, V.; Pomoni, M.; Batakis, N.

    2005-04-15

    We report a case of painful perineal metastasis from urinary bladder carcinoma in a 73-years-old woman, treated with CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA). The pain was immediately relieved and follow-up at 1 and 6 months showed total necrosis of the mass. One year later, the patient has no pain and her quality of life is improved.

  16. Arthroscopic gluteal muscle contracture release with radiofrequency energy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Jie; Wang, Yan; Xue, Jing; Lui, Pauline Po-Yee; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-03-01

    Gluteal muscle contracture is common after repeated intramuscular injections and sometimes is sufficiently debilitating to require open surgery. We asked whether arthroscopic release of gluteal muscle contracture using radiofrequency energy would decrease complications with clinically acceptable results. We retrospectively reviewed 108 patients with bilateral gluteal muscle contractures (57 males, 51 females; mean age, 23.7 years). We used inferior, anterosuperior, and posterosuperior portals. With the patient lying laterally, we developed and enlarged a potential space between the gluteal muscle group and the subcutaneous fat using blunt dissection. Under arthroscopic guidance through the inferior portal, we débrided and removed fatty tissue overlying the contractile band of the gluteal muscle group using a motorized shaver introduced through the superior portal. Radiofrequency then was introduced through the superior portal to gradually excise the contracted bands from superior to inferior. Finally, hemostasis was ensured using radiofrequency. Patients were followed a minimum of 7 months (mean, 17.4 months; range, 7-42 months). At last followup, the adduction and flexion ranges of the hip were 45.3 degrees +/- 8.7 degrees and 110.2 degrees +/- 11.9 degrees, compared with 10.4 degrees +/- 7.2 degrees and 44.8 degrees +/- 14.1 degrees before surgery. No hip abductor contracture recurred and no patient had residual hip pain or gluteal muscle wasting. We found gluteal muscle contracture could be released effectively with radiofrequency energy.

  17. Superconducting PM undiffused machines with stationary superconducting coils

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.; Schwenterly, S. William

    2004-03-02

    A superconducting PM machine has a stator, a rotor and a stationary excitation source without the need of a ferromagnetic frame which is cryogenically cooled for operation in the superconducting state. PM material is placed between poles on the rotor to prevent leakage or diffusion of secondary flux before reaching the main air gap, or to divert PM flux where it is desired to weaken flux in the main air gap. The PM material provides hop-along capability for the machine in the event of a fault condition.

  18. 4. MESOSCOPIC SUPERCONDUCTIVITY: Proximity Action theory of superconductive nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skvortsov, M. A.; Larkin, A. I.; Feigel'man, M. V.

    2001-10-01

    We review a novel approach to the superconductive proximity effect in disordered normal-superconducting (N-S) structures. The method is based on the multicharge Keldysh action and is suitable for the treatment of interaction and fluctuation effects. As an application of the formalism, we study the subgap conductance and noise in two-dimensional N-S systems in the presence of the electron-electron interaction in the Cooper channel. It is shown that singular nature of the interaction correction at large scales leads to a nonmonotonuos temperature, voltage and magnetic field dependence of the Andreev conductance.

  19. Space applications of superconductivity - Digital electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    Superconducting electronics offers a variety of remarkable properties including high speed and low dissipation. The paper discusses fundamental considerations which appear to suggest that superconducting (cryogenic) technology will offer significant advantages for future digital devices. It shows how the active element in superconducting electronics, the Josephson junction, works and discusses the technology for fabricating the devices. The characteristics of published circuits are briefly reviewed, and the capabilities of future superconducting computers and instruments are projected.

  20. Superconductive articles including cerium oxide layer

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Xin D.; Muenchausen, Ross E.

    1993-01-01

    A ceramic superconductor comprising a metal oxide substrate, a ceramic high temperature superconductive material, and a intermediate layer of a material having a cubic crystal structure, said layer situated between the substrate and the superconductive material is provided, and a structure for supporting a ceramic superconducting material is provided, said structure comprising a metal oxide substrate, and a layer situated over the surface of the substrate to substantially inhibit interdiffusion between the substrate and a ceramic superconducting material deposited upon said structure.