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Sample records for supercritical co2 fluid

  1. [Supercritical CO2 fluid extraction of Rosmarinus officinalis and capability of extracts eliminate OH radical].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chong; Li, Jia-Cheng; Zhang, De-La; Feng, Yu-Hong; Zhang, Ya-Nan; Chen, Si-Li

    2008-05-01

    Supercritical CO2 fluid extraction process of antioxidation active components from Rosmarinus officinalis was studied. A new extraction process of components extracted from R. officinalis by supercritical CO2 fluid extraction (SFE-CO2 ) was studied in detail. The capability of that the extract eliminate *OH radical was tested by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique and spin catch technique. With free radical clearance as index, by range and variance analysis, the optimum extraction process conditions were: keeping pressure at 30 MPa and temperature at 75 degrees C for 1 h, in the same time adding alcohol 0.30 mL x g(-1).

  2. [Study on ingredients of essential oils of Curcuma wenyujin extracted by supercritical-CO2 fluid extraction and steam distillation].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Xia; Yang, Tie-Yao; Yang, Tian-Liang; Ge, Fa-Huan; Pan, Wei-San; Yang, Xing-Gang; Chen, Ji-Min

    2006-09-01

    To compare the ingredients of essential oils of Curcuma wenyujin extracted by supercritical-CO2 fluid extraction and by steam distillation. GC-MS was applied in this experiment. The ingredients and physical and chemical properties of essential oils of C. wenyujin extracted by supercritical-CO2 fluid extraction and by steam distillation are similar. Supercritical-CO2 fluid extraction is better than steam distillation in extraction time, power consumption, recovery and purity.

  3. [Extraction of praeruptorin A from Radix Peucedani by supercritical fluid extraction-CO2].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ai-dong; Hou, Wei; Chen, Xue-song; Qiu, Zhi-dong

    2008-12-01

    To extract praeruptorin A from Radix Peucedani by supercritical fluid extraction (SFE)-CO2. After preliminary experiment, three main factors were acquired that could influence the result of SFE-CO2, including the time, pressure and temperature of the extraction. The optimal extraction process was carried out on orthogonal design, and SFE-CO2 was compared with the traditional methods. In the extraction of the praeruptorin A, the best extraction conditions were 60 degrees C, 20 MPa, and duration for three hours. As cosolvent alcohol was added, the amount of extraction of the praeruptorin A increased, and the amount of SFE-CO2 extraction was higher than those of decoction and heating reflux. The SFE-CO2 in extracting praeruptorin A from Radix Peucedani is feasible and reliable.

  4. [Study on the dynamic model with supercritical CO2 fluid extracting the lipophilic components in Panax notoginseng].

    PubMed

    Duan, Xian-Chun; Wang, Yong-Zhong; Zhang, Jun-Ru; Luo, Huan; Zhang, Heng; Xia, Lun-Zhu

    2011-08-01

    To establish a dynamics model for extracting the lipophilic components in Panax notoginseng with supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2). Based on the theory of counter-flow mass transfer and the molecular mass transfer between the material and the supercritical CO2 fluid under differential mass-conservation equation, a dynamics model was established and computed to compare forecasting result with the experiment process. A dynamics model has been established for supercritical CO2 to extract the lipophilic components in Panax notoginseng, the computed result of this model was consistent with the experiment process basically. The supercritical fluid extract dynamics model established in this research can expound the mechanism in the extract process of which lipophilic components of Panax notoginseng dissolve the mass transfer and is tallied with the actual extract process. This provides certain instruction for the supercritical CO2 fluid extract' s industrialization enlargement.

  5. Stripping of photoresist on silicon wafer by CO(2) supercritical fluid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Lian; Wang, Yeoung-Sheng; Kuo, Hsin-I; Shu, Dun-Ying

    2006-09-15

    Supercritical CO(2)-based fluid is not only being considered as environmentally benign medium for photoresist (PR) removal in electronic device manufacture, but also capable of challenging feature dimensions. Despite many attractive properties, clear supercritical CO(2) has little solvating power for PR. Here, two acetate modifiers were selective to add in the CO(2) and evaluated individual contribution to the overall stripping rate by factorial experiment design, which included four other factors with four level ranges for each one and concluded the best 90% extraction efficiency would be obtained under the optimized parameters: 2.5min static time, 35min dynamic time, 1.25ml ethylacetate spiked, 125 degrees C oven temperature and 480atm CO(2) pressure. As analyzing the variances of these contributors to this system, it disclosed that dynamics controlled the stripping mechanism before near 35min purging but thermodynamics took over after then; and that increasing pressure was more competent for removing PR than increasing temperature. All supercritical extracts were from two commercial PR coated on two substrates and analyzed by UV absorption spectrometry. Removing PR coated on silicon oxide layer was easier than that on Al-Cu alloy one.

  6. Insights into Silicate Carbonation Processes in Water-Bearing Supercritical CO2 Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Quin RS; Thompson, Christopher J.; Loring, John S.; Windisch, Charles F.; Bowden, Mark E.; Hoyt, David W.; Hu, Jian Z.; Arey, Bruce W.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2013-07-01

    Long-term geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) is considered an integral part to moderating CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere and subsequently minimizing effects of global climate change. Although subsurface injection of CO2 is common place in certain industries, deployment at the scale required for emission reduction is unprecedented and therefore requires a high degree of predictability. Accurately modeling geochemical processes in the subsurface requires experimental derived data for mineral reactions occurring between the CO2, water, and rocks. Most work in this area has focused on aqueous-dominated systems in which dissolved CO2 reacts to form crystalline carbonate minerals. Comparatively little laboratory research has been conducted on reactions occurring between minerals in the host rock and the wet supercritical fluid phase. In this work, we studied the carbonation of wollastonite [CaSiO3] exposed to variably hydrated supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at a range of temperatures (50, 55 and 70 °C) and pressures (90,120 and 160 bar) that simulate conditions in geologic repositories. Mineral transformation reactions were followed by three novel in situ high pressure techniques, including x-ray diffraction that tracked the rate and extents of wollastonite conversion to calcite. Increased dissolved water concentrations in the supercritical CO2 resulted in increased silicate carbonation approaching ~50 wt. %. Development of thin water films on the mineral surface were directly observed with infrared spectroscopy and determined to be critical for facilitating carbonation processes. Even in extreme low water conditions, magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance detected formation of Q3 [Si(OSi)3OH] and Q4 [Si(OSi)4] amorphous silica species. Unlike the thick (<10 μm) passivating silica layers observed in the fully water saturated scCO2 experiments, images obtained from a focused ion beam sectioned sample indicted these coatings were chemically wollastonite

  7. Two-Dimensional Nanoparticle Cluster Formation in Supercritical Fluid CO2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Joanna S; Wai, Chien M; Brown, Gail J; Apt, Scott D

    2016-05-10

    Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) is capable of depositing nanoparticles in small structures of silicon substrates because of its gas-like penetration, liquid-like solvation abilities, and near-zero surface tension. In nanometer-sized shallow wells on silicon surface, formation of two-dimensional (2D) monolayer metal nanoparticle (NP) clusters can be achieved using the sc-CO2 deposition method. Nanoparticles tend to fill nanostructured holes first, and then, if sufficient nanoparticles are available, they will continue to cover the flat areas nearby, unless defects or other surface imperfections are available. In addition, SEM images of two-dimensional gold (Au) nanoparticle clusters formed on a flat silicon surface with two to a dozen or more of the nanoparticles are provided to illustrate the patterns of nanoparticle cluster formation in sc-CO2.

  8. [The extraction technology of epigoitri from isatidis radix by supercritical CO2 fluid].

    PubMed

    Nian, Si-Hui; Liu, Chun-Yun; Liu, Li-Min; Yang, Li-Fen

    2013-07-01

    To study the extraction technology of epigoitri from Isatidis Radix by supercritical CO2 fluid. The effects of pressure, temperature, time, concentration and dosage of alcohol were studied by single factor analysis and orthogonal test. The optimized conditions were as follows: The pressure was 20 MPs, the temperature was 50 degrees C, the time was 2 h, concentration of alcohol was 100%, dosage was 80 mL. The content of epigoitri in the extract could reach 38.63% under the above conditions. This method is simple, rapid and it is suitable for the extraction of epigoitri from Isatidis Radix.

  9. Silicate Carbonation Processes in Water-Bearing Supercritical CO2 Fluids: Implications for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Q. R.; Schaef, T.; Thompson, C.; Loring, J. S.; Windisch, C. F.; Bowden, M. E.; Arey, B. W.; McGrail, P.

    2012-12-01

    Global climate change is viewed by many as an anthropogenic phenomenon that could be mitigated through a combination of conservation efforts, alternative energy sources, and the development of technologies capable of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Continued increases of atmospheric CO2 concentrations are projected over the next decade, due to developing nations and growing populations. One economically favorable option for managing CO2 involves subsurface storage in deep basalt formations. The silicate minerals and glassy mesostasis basalt components act as metal cation sources, reacting with the CO2 to form carbonate minerals. Most prior work on mineral reactivity in geologic carbon sequestration settings involves only aqueous dominated reactions. However, in most sequestration scenarios, injected CO2 will reside as a buoyant fluid in contact with the sealing formation (caprock) and slowly become water bearing. Comparatively little laboratory research has been conducted on reactions occurring between minerals in the host rock and the wet scCO2. In this work, we studied the carbonation of wollastonite [CaSiO3] exposed to variably wet supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at a range of temperatures (50, 55 and 70 °C) and pressures (90,120 and 160 bar) in order to gain insight into reaction processes. Mineral transformation reactions were followed by two novel in situ high pressure techniques, including x-ray diffraction that tracked the rate and extents of wollastonite conversion to calcite. Increased dissolved water concentrations in the scCO2 resulted in increased carbonation approaching ~50 wt. %. Development of thin water films on the mineral surface were directly observed with infrared (IR) spectroscopy and indirectly with 18O isotopic labeling techniques (Raman spectroscopy). The thin water films were determined to be critical for facilitating carbonation processes in wet scCO2. Even in extreme low water conditions, the IR technique detected the formation of

  10. Impacts of Organic Ligands on Forsterite Reactivity in Supercritical CO2 Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Quin R.; Kaszuba, John; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bowden, Mark E.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2015-04-07

    Subsurface injection of CO2 for enhanced hydrocarbon recovery, hydraulic fracturing of unconventional reservoirs, and geologic carbon sequestration produces a complex geochemical setting in which CO2-dominated fluids containing dissolved water and organic compounds interact with rocks and minerals. The details of these reactions are relatively unknown and benefit from additional experimentally derived data. In this study, we utilized an in situ X-ray diffraction technique to examine the carbonation reactions of forsterite (Mg2SiO4) during exposure to supercritical CO2 (scCO2) that had been equilibrated with aqueous solutions of acetate, oxalate, malonate, or citrate at 50 °C and 90 bar. The organics affected the relative abundances of the crystalline reaction products, nesquehonite (MgCO3·3H2O) and magnesite (MgCO3), likely due to enhanced dehydration of the Mg2+ cations by the organic ligands. These results also indicate that the scCO2 solvated and transported the organic ligands to the forsterite surface. This phenomenon has profound implications for mineral transformations and mass transfer in the upper crust.

  11. Impacts of organic ligands on forsterite reactivity in supercritical CO2 fluids.

    PubMed

    Miller, Quin R S; Kaszuba, John P; Schaef, Herbert T; Bowden, Mark E; McGrail, Bernard P

    2015-04-07

    Subsurface injection of CO2 for enhanced hydrocarbon recovery, hydraulic fracturing of unconventional reservoirs, and geologic carbon sequestration produces a complex geochemical setting in which CO2-dominated fluids containing dissolved water and organic compounds interact with rocks and minerals. The details of these reactions are relatively unknown and benefit from additional experimentally derived data. In this study, we utilized an in situ X-ray diffraction technique to examine the carbonation reactions of forsterite (Mg2SiO4) during exposure to supercritical CO2 (scCO2) that had been equilibrated with aqueous solutions of acetate, oxalate, malonate, or citrate at 50 °C and 90 bar. The organics affected the relative abundances of the crystalline reaction products, nesquehonite (MgCO3 · 3H2O) and magnesite (MgCO3), likely due to enhanced dehydration of the Mg(2+) cations by the organic ligands. These results also indicate that the scCO2 solvated and transported the organic ligands to the forsterite surface. This phenomenon has profound implications for mineral transformations and mass transfer in the upper crust.

  12. Shale Micromodel Experiments: Fluid Flow and Mobilization using Supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, M. L.; Carey, J. W.; Viswanathan, H.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, use of engineered micromodels to investigate pore-scale fluid flow and transport phenomena to better understand and model field-scale observables has steadily increased. Micromodels are thin porous structures in which flow is restricted to two-dimensions and have become common since they are effective, relatively inexpensive tools for visualizing and quantifying complex flow phenomena. We describe a unique micromodel experimental system recently developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The system consists of a pressure chamber, which allows us to conduct experiments at geologic conditions. The maximum working pressure and temperature is 1500 psig and 80° C, respectively, allowing for supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) to be used as a working fluid. Additionally, we have developed micromodels fabricated in geomaterials (e.g., shale and Portland cement), whereas typical micromodels are fabricated in engineered materials such as glass or silicon. The use of geomaterial micromodels allows us to better represent the fluid-rock interactions including wetting angles and chemical reactivity at conditions representative of natural subsurface environments. In this work, we present experimental results in simple fracture systems (e.g., straight channels, pore doublets) with applications to hydrocarbon mobility in hydraulically fractured shale. We use both shale and glass micromodels, allowing for a detailed comparison between flow phenomena in different materials. In the straight channel micromodels, we investigate interfacial velocities and compare the results with theoretical models. In the pore doublet micromodels, we investigate mobilization of oil blobs and contrast the effectiveness of water and scCO2 in the extraction of hydrocarbon from fracture networks. Next, we present experimental results in complex fracture network patterns derived from 3D x-ray tomography images of actual fractures created in shale rock cores. We discuss

  13. Modeling of mass transfer of Phospholipids in separation process with supercritical CO2 fluid by RBF artificial neural networks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An artificial Radial Basis Function (RBF) neural network model was developed for the prediction of mass transfer of the phospholipids from canola meal in supercritical CO2 fluid. The RBF kind of artificial neural networks (ANN) with orthogonal least squares (OLS) learning algorithm were used for mod...

  14. Viability and adaptation potential of indigenous microorganisms from natural gas field fluids in high pressure incubations with supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Frerichs, Janin; Rakoczy, Jana; Ostertag-Henning, Christian; Krüger, Martin

    2014-01-21

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is currently under debate as large-scale solution to globally reduce emissions of the greenhouse gas CO2. Depleted gas or oil reservoirs and saline aquifers are considered as suitable reservoirs providing sufficient storage capacity. We investigated the influence of high CO2 concentrations on the indigenous bacterial population in the saline formation fluids of a natural gas field. Bacterial community changes were closely examined at elevated CO2 concentrations under near in situ pressures and temperatures. Conditions in the high pressure reactor systems simulated reservoir fluids i) close to the CO2 injection point, i.e. saturated with CO2, and ii) at the outer boundaries of the CO2 dissolution gradient. During the incubations with CO2, total cell numbers remained relatively stable, but no microbial sulfate reduction activity was detected. After CO2 release and subsequent transfer of the fluids, an actively sulfate-respiring community was re-established. The predominance of spore-forming Clostridiales provided evidence for the resilience of this taxon against the bactericidal effects of supercritical (sc)CO2. To ensure the long-term safety and injectivity, the viability of fermentative and sulfate-reducing bacteria has to be considered in the selection, design, and operation of CCS sites.

  15. Parameters optimization of supercritical fluid-CO2 extracts of frankincense using response surface methodology and its pharmacodynamics effects.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Ma, Xing-miao; Qiu, Bi-Han; Chen, Jun-xia; Bian, Lin; Pan, Lin-mei

    2013-01-01

    The volatile oil parts of frankincense (Boswellia carterii Birdw.) were extracted with supercritical carbon dioxide under constant pressure (15, 20, or 25 MPa) and fixed temperature (40, 50, or 60°C), given time (60, 90, or 120 min) aiming at the acquisition of enriched fractions containing octyl acetate, compounds of pharmaceutical interest. A mathematical model was created by Box-Behnken design, a popular template for response surface methodology, for the extraction process. The response value was characterized by synthetical score, which comprised yields accounting for 20% and content of octyl acetate for 80%. The content of octyl acetate was determined by GC. The supercritical fluid extraction showed higher selectivity than conventional steam distillation. Supercritical fluid-CO(2) for extracting frankincense under optimum condition was of great validity, which was also successfully verified by the pharmacological experiments. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. [Study on uniform-design for optimizing supercritical-CO2 fluid extraction technique of tanshinones in radix salviae].

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiao-Jian; Liu, Yong; Li, Yi; He, Yan

    2006-12-01

    To explore the optimal supercritical-CO2 fluid extraction technique of extracting tanshinones in Radix salviae. The contents of tanshinones were determined by HPLC. Choosing the overall contents of 3 tanshinones as inspecting marker and uniform-design as method, the experimentation was carried out to study the main factors that influence the result of extraction. Among all the 5 inspected factors, the amount of entrainer was most notable. The optimal technique of extraction was: extraction pressure at 30 MPa; extraction temperature at 40 degrees C; separation pressure of separating kettle I at 6 MPa; separation temperature of separating kettle I at 50 degrees C; the amount of entrainer at 10%. Adopting supercritical-CO2 fluid extraction method to extract the tanshinones in Radix salviae was feasible. The contents of tanshinones in the extract were high and the manipulation was simple, convenient and time saving.

  17. [Comparison of the chemical components of essential oil extracted by supercritical CO2 fluid and steam distillation from Pteris multifida].

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Chen, Huan; Li, Shu-Jie; Lin, Jing-Ming; Wang, Zhao-Yu

    2013-08-01

    To compare the chemical components of essential oil extracted by supercritical CO2 fluid extraction (SFE-CO2) and steam distillation extraction (SD) from Pteris multifida. The essential oil of Pteris multifida was extracted by SFE-CO2 and SD. The chemical components of essential oil were separated and analyzed by GC-MS. Their relative contents were determined by normalization of peak area. Twenty -seven compounds in the essential oil extracted by SFE-CO2 and 45 compounds in the essential oil extracted by SD were identified respectively. There were 11 common components. The chemical components of essential oil extracted by SFE-CO2 are different from that extracted by SD.

  18. Natural wax constituents of a supercritical fluid CO(2) extract from quince (Cydonia oblonga Mill.) pomace.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Peter; Berger, Melanie; Bertrams, Julia; Wende, Kristian; Wenzel, Kristin; Lindequist, Ulrike; Meyer, Ulrich; Stintzing, Florian C

    2008-05-01

    The chemical constituents of a lipophilic extract from quince (Cydonia oblonga Mill.), obtained by supercritical fluid CO(2) extraction of the dried fruit pomace were investigated. Solvent partition of quince wax with n-hexane or acetone yielded an insoluble (crystalline) and a soluble (oily) fraction. Both fractions were analyzed separately using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The insoluble fraction consisted of saturated n-aldehydes, n-alcohols and free n-alkanoic acids of carbon chain lengths between 22 and 32, with carbon chain lengths of 26 and 28 dominating. Also odd-numbered unbranched hydrocarbons, mainly C27, C29 and C31, were detected particularly in the acetone-insoluble fraction (total, 15.8%). By means of vacuum liquid chromatography, triterpenoic acids were separated from the hexane-insoluble matter and identified as a mixture of ursolic, oleanolic and betulinic acids. The major constituents of the hexane-soluble fraction were glycerides of linoleic [Δ(9,12), 18:2] and oleic [Δ(9), 18:1] acids, accompanied by free linoleic, oleic and palmitic acids (C16). Moreover β-sitosterol, Δ(5)-avenasterol as well as trace amounts of other sterols were assigned. Finally the carotenoids phytoene and phytofluene were identified and quantified by UV/vis and high-performance liquid chromatography/MS techniques, yielding 1.0 and 0.3% of the quince wax, respectively. It is anticipated that the complex of lipid constituents from quince wax may exert interesting biological activities, the elucidation of which awaits further studies.

  19. [Supercritical CO2 fluid extraction and component analysis of leaves oil from Taxus chinensis var. mairei].

    PubMed

    Tang, Bin; Zhang, Feng-su; Li, Xiang; Chen, Jian-wei; Yao, Xiao

    2013-12-01

    To research the optimal extraction process of supercritical CO2 extraction and analyze the component of the oil extracted from leaves of Taxus chinensis var. mairei. Using the yield of leaves oil from Taxus chinensis var. mairei as the index, investigated the effect of the extraction pressure, extraction temperature and extraction time on the extracting-rate of leaves oil. The chemical composition of the extracted leaves oil was analyzed by derivatized GC-MS. The optimal parameters of the supercritical CO2 extraction of the oil extracted from leaves of Taxus chinensis var. mairei were determined: CO2 compressor pump frequency was 10 Hz, the extraction pressure was 25 MPa and the temperature of extraction was 45 degrees C, the extraction time was 120 min, the isolator I pressure was 8.0 MPa and the temperature of extraction was 40 degrees C, the isolator II pressure was 5.0 MPa and the temperature of extraction was 35 degrees C. The extracted leaves oil was derivatized with boron trifluoride-methanol complex. Thirty-three kinds of fatty acids were identified by GC-MS. The yield of leaves oils are different from Taxus chinensis var. mairei from 3 habitats. The yield of leaves oil from Donggang, Wuxi city is the highest, about 2.61%. The kinds of fatty acids with high amounts in leaves oil from Taxus chinensis var. mairei is identical in general, the kinds of fatty acids with low amounts in leaves oil from Taxus chinensis var. mairei have differences.

  20. [Optimize the extraction process with supercritical CO2 fluid from lotus leaves by the uniform design and analysis on the chemical constituents by GC-MS].

    PubMed

    Yin, Hui-jing; Qian, Yi-fan; Pu, Cun-hai

    2007-04-01

    To study the optimum parameters of the supercritical CO, fluid extraction of lotus leaves and chemical constituents of extractive matters. Supercritical CO2 fluid extraction condition was selected by uniform design. The extraction pressure, extraction temperature, extraction time were three factors in the experiment. GC-MS was applied for analyzing the extraction. The optimum condition were obtained: the extraction pressure was 26 Mpa, the extraction temperature was 40 degrees C, the extracion time was 90 minutes. The major constituent was 1H-Pyrrole-2-carboxaldehyde, 1-ethyl-in extractive matters. Uniform design can optimize the CO2 Supercritical Fluid Extraction process quickly and accuratly with satisfactory results.

  1. Dehydroxyl effect of Sn-doped silicon oxide resistance random access memory with supercritical CO2 fluid treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Chang, Ting-Chang; Syu, Yong-En; Liao, Kuo-Hsiao; Tseng, Bae-Heng; Sze, Simon M.

    2012-09-01

    The tin-doped can supply conduction path to induce resistance switching behavior. However, the defect of tin-doped silicon oxide (Sn:SiOx) increased the extra leakage path lead to power consumption and joule heating degradation. In the study, supercritical CO2 fluids treatment was used to improve resistive switching property. The current conduction of high resistant state in post-treated Sn:SiOx film was transferred to Schottky emission from Frenkel-Poole due to the passivation effect. The molecular reaction model is proposed that the defect was passivated through dehydroxyl effect of supercritical fluid technology, verified by material analyses of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  2. Diameter-sensitive biocompatibility of anodic TiO2 nanotubes treated with supercritical CO2 fluid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This work reports on the diameter-sensitive biocompatibility of anodic TiO2 nanotubes with different nanotube diameters grown by a self-ordering process and subsequently treated with supercritical CO2 (ScCO2) fluid. We find that highly hydrophilic as-grown TiO2 nanotubes become hydrophobic after the ScCO2 treatment but can effectively recover their surface wettability under UV light irradiation as a result of photo-oxidation of C-H functional groups formed on the nanotube surface. It is demonstrated that human fibroblast cells show more obvious diameter-specific behavior on the ScCO2-treated TiO2 nanotubes than on the as-grown ones in the range of diameters of 15 to 100 nm. This result can be attributed to the removal of disordered Ti(OH)4 precipitates from the nanotube surface by the ScCO2 fluid, thus resulting in purer nanotube topography and stronger diameter dependence of cell activity. Furthermore, for the smallest diameter of 15 nm, ScCO2-treated TiO2 nanotubes reveal higher biocompatibility than the as-grown sample. PMID:23547743

  3. Electrodeposition from supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, P N; Cook, D A; George, M W; Hector, A L; Ke, J; Levason, W; Reid, G; Smith, D C; Zhang, W

    2014-05-28

    Recent studies have shown that it is possible to electrodeposit a range of materials, such as Cu, Ag and Ge, from various supercritical fluids, including hydrofluorocarbons and mixtures of CO2 with suitable co-solvents. In this perspective we discuss the relatively new field of electrodeposition from supercritical fluids. The perspective focuses on some of the underlying physical chemistry and covers both practical and scientific aspects of electrodeposition from supercritical fluids. We also discuss possible applications for supercritical fluid electrodeposition and suggest some key developments that are required to take the field to the next stage.

  4. Preparation of zein nanoparticles by using solution-enhanced dispersion with supercritical CO2 and elucidation with computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Li, Sining; Zhao, Yaping

    2017-01-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted more and more attention in the medicinal field. Zein is a biomacromolecule and can be used as a carrier for delivering active ingredients to prepare controlled release drugs. In this article, we presented the preparation of zein nanoparticles by solution-enhanced dispersion by supercritical CO2 (SEDS) approach. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were applied to characterize the size and morphology of the obtained particles. The nozzle structure and the CO2 flow rate greatly affected the morphology and the size of the particles. The size of zein was able to be reduced to 50-350 nm according to the different conditions. The morphologies of the resultant zein were either sphere or the filament network consisted of nanoparticles. The influence of the nozzle structure and the CO2 flow rate on the velocity field was elucidated by using computational fluid dynamics. The nozzle structure and the CO2 flow rate greatly affected the distribution of the velocity field. However, a similar velocity field could also be obtained when the nozzle structure or the CO2 flow rate, or both were different. Therefore, the influence of the nozzle structure and the CO2 flow rate on the size and morphology of the particles, can boil down to the velocity field. The results demonstrated that the velocity field can be a potential criterion for producing nanoparticles with controllable morphology and size, which is useful to scale-up the SEDS process.

  5. Preparation of zein nanoparticles by using solution-enhanced dispersion with supercritical CO2 and elucidation with computational fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sining; Zhao, Yaping

    2017-01-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted more and more attention in the medicinal field. Zein is a biomacromolecule and can be used as a carrier for delivering active ingredients to prepare controlled release drugs. In this article, we presented the preparation of zein nanoparticles by solution-enhanced dispersion by supercritical CO2 (SEDS) approach. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were applied to characterize the size and morphology of the obtained particles. The nozzle structure and the CO2 flow rate greatly affected the morphology and the size of the particles. The size of zein was able to be reduced to 50–350 nm according to the different conditions. The morphologies of the resultant zein were either sphere or the filament network consisted of nanoparticles. The influence of the nozzle structure and the CO2 flow rate on the velocity field was elucidated by using computational fluid dynamics. The nozzle structure and the CO2 flow rate greatly affected the distribution of the velocity field. However, a similar velocity field could also be obtained when the nozzle structure or the CO2 flow rate, or both were different. Therefore, the influence of the nozzle structure and the CO2 flow rate on the size and morphology of the particles, can boil down to the velocity field. The results demonstrated that the velocity field can be a potential criterion for producing nanoparticles with controllable morphology and size, which is useful to scale-up the SEDS process. PMID:28496324

  6. Heat Transfer and Fluid Transport of Supercritical CO2 in Enhanced Geothermal System with Local Thermal Non-equilibrium Model

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Le; Luo, Feng; Xu, Ruina; ...

    2014-12-31

    The heat transfer and fluid transport of supercritical CO2 in enhanced geothermal system (EGS) is studied numerically with local thermal non-equilibrium model, which accounts for the temperature difference between solid matrix and fluid components in porous media and uses two energy equations to describe heat transfer in the solid matrix and in the fluid, respectively. As compared with the previous results of our research group, the effect of local thermal non-equilibrium mainly depends on the volumetric heat transfer coefficient ah, which has a significant effect on the production temperature at reservoir outlet and thermal breakthrough time. The uniformity of volumetricmore » heat transfer coefficient ah has little influence on the thermal breakthrough time, but the temperature difference become more obvious with time after thermal breakthrough with this simulation model. The thermal breakthrough time reduces and the effect of local thermal non-equilibrium becomes significant with decreasing ah.« less

  7. Anti-diabetic properties of non-polar Toona sinensis Roem extract prepared by supercritical-CO2 fluid.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Tusty-Jiuan; Tsai, Yi-Hong; Liao, Min-Chun; Du, Ying-Chi; Lien, Pei-Jung; Sun, Chuan-Chia; Chang, Fang-Rong; Wu, Yang-Chang

    2012-03-01

    Toona sinensis Roem (T. sinensis) leaves have been used as a nutritious vegetable and been suggested for medical applications; however, the reported bioactive compounds of T. sinensis leaves are, so far, from high to mid-high polar extracts. Our aims in this study were to reveal the non-polar constituents of the T. sinensis leave extract that were prepared by a method of using a supercritical-CO2 fluid and to investigate the anti-diabetic potential of this extract. Through a GC/MS analysis, we revealed 24 major components of the non-polar T. sinensis leave extract, the most abundant of which was phytol. The non-polar T. sinensis leave extract showed to prevent the progression of diabetes and hepatosteatosis, the rise of triglycerol levels and the decrease of adiponectin levels in the type 2 diabetic mice. Our results suggest that the non-polar extract of T. sinensis leaves prepared using the supercritical-CO2 fluid may contain effective constituents to prevent type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dielectric Interactions and the Prediction of Retention Times of Pesticides in Supercritical Fluid Chromatography with CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Guillermo A.; Baumanna, Wolfram

    2005-02-01

    A thermodynamic model for the partition of a solute (pesticide) between two immiscible phases, such as the stationary and mobile phases of supercritical fluid chromatography with CO2, is developed from first principles. A key ingredient of the model is the result of the calculation made by Liptay of the energy of interaction of a polar molecule with a dielectric continuum, which represents the solvent. The strength of the interaction between the solute and the solvent, which may be considered a measure of the solvent power, is characterized by a function g = (ɛ - 1)/(2ɛ +1), where ɛ is the dielectric constant of the medium, which is a function of the temperature T and the pressure P. Since the interactions between the nonpolar supercritical CO2 solvent and the slightly polar pesticide molecules are considered to be extremely weak, a regular solution model is appropriate from the thermodynamic point of view. At constant temperature, the model predicts a linear dependence of the logarithm of the capacity factor (lnk) of the chromatographic experiment on the function g = g(P), as the pressure is varied, with a slope which depends on the dipole moment of the solute, dispersion interactions and the size of the solute cavity in the solvent. At constant pressure, once the term containing the g (solvent interaction) factor is subtracted from lnk, a plot of the resulting term against the inverse of temperature yields the enthalpy change of transfer of the solute from the mobile (supercritical CO2) phase to the stationary (adsorbent) phase. The increase in temperature with the consequent large volume expansion of the supercritical fluid lowers its solvent strength and hence the capacity factor of the column (or solute retention time) increases. These pressure and temperature effects, predicted by the model, agree excellently with the experimental retention times of seven pesticides. Beyond a temperature of about 393 K, where the liquid solvent densities approach those of

  9. Inhibitory effect of rape pollen supercritical CO2 fluid extract against testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bi-Cheng; Jin, Li-Li; Yang, Yi-Fang; Li, Kun; Peng, Dan-Ming

    2014-07-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) can lead to lower urinary tract symptoms. Rape pollen is an apicultural product that is composed of nutritionally valuable and biologically active substances. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of rape pollen supercritical CO2 fluid extract (SFE-CO2) in BPH development using a testosterone-induced BPH rat model. BPH was induced in the experimental groups by daily subcutaneous injections of testosterone for a period of 30 days. Rape pollen SFE-CO2 was administered daily by oral gavage concurrently with the testosterone injections. Animals were sacrificed at the scheduled termination and the prostates were weighed and subjected to histopathological examination. Testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), 5α-reductase and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) levels were also measured. BPH-induced animals exhibited an increase in prostate weight with increased testosterone, DHT, 5α-reductase and COX-2 expression levels. However, rape pollen SFE-CO2 treatment resulted in significant reductions in the prostate index and testosterone, DHT, 5α-reductase and COX-2 levels compared with those in BPH-induced animals. Histopathological examination also demonstrated that rape pollen SFE-CO2 treatment suppressed testosterone-induced BPH. These observations indicate that rape pollen SFE-CO2 inhibits the development of BPH in rats and these effects are closely associated with reductions in DHT, 5α-reductase and COX-2 levels. Therefore, the results of the present study clearly indicate that rape pollen SFE-CO2 extract may be a useful agent in BPH treatment.

  10. Inhibitory effect of rape pollen supercritical CO2 fluid extract against testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats

    PubMed Central

    YANG, BI-CHENG; JIN, LI-LI; YANG, YI-FANG; LI, KUN; PENG, DAN-MING

    2014-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) can lead to lower urinary tract symptoms. Rape pollen is an apicultural product that is composed of nutritionally valuable and biologically active substances. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of rape pollen supercritical CO2 fluid extract (SFE-CO2) in BPH development using a testosterone-induced BPH rat model. BPH was induced in the experimental groups by daily subcutaneous injections of testosterone for a period of 30 days. Rape pollen SFE-CO2 was administered daily by oral gavage concurrently with the testosterone injections. Animals were sacrificed at the scheduled termination and the prostates were weighed and subjected to histopathological examination. Testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), 5α-reductase and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) levels were also measured. BPH-induced animals exhibited an increase in prostate weight with increased testosterone, DHT, 5α-reductase and COX-2 expression levels. However, rape pollen SFE-CO2 treatment resulted in significant reductions in the prostate index and testosterone, DHT, 5α-reductase and COX-2 levels compared with those in BPH-induced animals. Histopathological examination also demonstrated that rape pollen SFE-CO2 treatment suppressed testosterone-induced BPH. These observations indicate that rape pollen SFE-CO2 inhibits the development of BPH in rats and these effects are closely associated with reductions in DHT, 5α-reductase and COX-2 levels. Therefore, the results of the present study clearly indicate that rape pollen SFE-CO2 extract may be a useful agent in BPH treatment. PMID:24944593

  11. How does the critical point change during a chemical reaction in supercritical fluids? A study of the hydroformylation of propene in supercritical CO(2).

    PubMed

    Ke, J; Han, B; George, M W; Yan, H; Poliakoff, M

    2001-04-25

    An understanding of homogeneous catalysis in supercritical fluids requires a knowledge of the phase behavior and the variation in critical point as the reaction proceeds. In this paper, the critical temperatures, T(c) and pressures, P(c), have been measured for a considerable number of mixtures representing the various stages of the hydroformylation reaction of propene in supercritical CO(2) and different reactant concentrations. Critical point data have also been measured for all of the binary mixtures of the components (CO(2), H(2), CO, propene, n- and isobutyraldehyde) which are not available from the literature or can be deduced from published data. We use the stoichiometry of the reacting system to simplify greatly the phase behavior problem by defining a path through the otherwise multidimensional "phase space". Satisfactory modeling of the data (0.3% in T(c) and 3.0% in P(c)) has been achieved using the Peng-Robinson equation of state and ignoring all binary interactions which do not involve CO(2). The model is used to explore the strategies needed to avoid phase separation in continuous and batch reactions. At a given temperature, a batch reactor may need to be run under much higher pressures than a flow reactor if single-phase conditions are to be preserved throughout the course of the reaction. Most of the critical point data were measured acoustically, but a selection of points were validated using more traditional view-cell procedures.

  12. [Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of Jatropha curcas leaf extracts prepared by supercritical fluid CO2 extraction].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-yu; Chen, Fei-long; Lin, Jing-ming; Huang, Shu-lin

    2009-05-01

    To analyze the bioactive components in Jatropha curcas leaves using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The bioactive components were extracted from J. curcas leaves by supercritical fluid CO2 extraction and analyzed by using GC-MS. Seventy peaks were detected by GC-MS, and 43 compounds were identified (61.43%). Among the identified compounds, 16 had a content of more than 1%, and the total contents of these 16 compounds reached 81.36%. The four most abundant components were 22,23-dihydro-stigmasterol (16.14%), alpha-tocopherol (15.18%), beta-amylin (7.73%) and dotriacontanol (7.02%). The content of gamma-tocopherol reached 2.88% and vitamin E reached 18.06% in the extract. J. curcas leaves contain multiple compounds with anti-tumor, anti-virus and antimicrobial activities.

  13. [Analysis of ant oil extracted with supercritical CO2 fluid from Polyrhachis vicina by GC-MS].

    PubMed

    Shen, Li-Rong; Ren, Yu-Cui; Feng, Feng-Qin; Du, Meng-Hao

    2005-01-01

    To study the optimum extraction parameters and components on ant oil from Polyrhachis vicina. The optimum condifious for supercritical CO2 fluid extraction (SFE-CO2), were investigated with orthogonal design, GC-MS was applied for analyzing. The components and their contents in the ant oil were analyzed by GC-MS, and the contents of lead, zinc and manganese in the oil were determined by ICP-AES. The optimum extraction parameters were achieved, temperature of 50 degrees C, pressure of 30 MPa and time of 2 hours. The extracting yield of the ant volatile oil was 11.4% - 14.3%. 51 Constituents were identified including 9-octadecenoic acid, ethyl oleate, cholesterol, n- Hexadecanoic acid, etc, and the content of various constituents was determined by orea normalization. The oil contained unsaturated fatty acid of 64.6%, lead of 0.80 microg x g(-1), zinc of 0.54 microg x g(-1) and manganese of 0.15 microg x g(-1). The method showes advantages including faster and efficient of extraction, good quality and no solvent residues in the oil.

  14. Fundamental study of CO2-H2O-mineral interactions for carbon sequestration, with emphasis on the nature of the supercritical fluid-mineral interface.

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Charles R.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Heath, Jason E.; Wang, Yifeng; Matteo, Edward N.; Meserole, Stephen P.; Tallant, David Robert

    2013-09-01

    In the supercritical CO2-water-mineral systems relevant to subsurface CO2 sequestration, interfacial processes at the supercritical fluid-mineral interface will strongly affect core- and reservoir-scale hydrologic properties. Experimental and theoretical studies have shown that water films will form on mineral surfaces in supercritical CO2, but will be thinner than those that form in vadose zone environments at any given matric potential. The theoretical model presented here allows assessment of water saturation as a function of matric potential, a critical step for evaluating relative permeabilities the CO2 sequestration environment. The experimental water adsorption studies, using Quartz Crystal Microbalance and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy methods, confirm the major conclusions of the adsorption/condensation model. Additional data provided by the FTIR study is that CO2 intercalation into clays, if it occurs, does not involve carbonate or bicarbonate formation, or significant restriction of CO2 mobility. We have shown that the water film that forms in supercritical CO2 is reactive with common rock-forming minerals, including albite, orthoclase, labradorite, and muscovite. The experimental data indicate that reactivity is a function of water film thickness; at an activity of water of 0.9, the greatest extent of reaction in scCO2 occurred in areas (step edges, surface pits) where capillary condensation thickened the water films. This suggests that dissolution/precipitation reactions may occur preferentially in small pores and pore throats, where it may have a disproportionately large effect on rock hydrologic properties. Finally, a theoretical model is presented here that describes the formation and movement of CO2 ganglia in porous media, allowing assessment of the effect of pore size and structural heterogeneity on capillary trapping efficiency. The model results also suggest possible engineering approaches for optimizing trapping capacity and for

  15. HPLC Method for the Simultaneous Determination of Ten Annonaceous Acetogenins after Supercritical Fluid CO2 Extraction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haijun; Zhang, Ning; Zeng, Qingqi; Yu, Qiping; Ke, Shihuai; Li, Xiang

    2010-09-01

    Annonaceous acetogenins (ACGs) isolated from Annonaceae plants exhibited a broad range of biological bioactivities such as cytotoxic, antitumoral, antiparasitic, pesticidal and immunosuppresive activities. However, their structures were liable to change at more than 60°C and their extraction yields were low using traditional organic solvent extraction. In the present study, all samples from Annona genus plant seeds were extracted by supercritical carbon dioxide under optimized conditions and a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was established for simultaneously determining ten ACGs. All of the ten compounds were simultaneously separated on reversed-phase C18 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm) with the column temperature at 30°C. The mobile phase was composed of (A) methanol and (B) distilled water, the flow rate was 1.0 ml/min and the detection wavelength was set at 220 nm. All calibration curves showed good linear regression (γ>0.9995) within the test range. The established method showed good precision and accuracy with overall intra-day and inter-day variations of 0.99-2.56% and 1.93-3.65%, respectively, and overall recoveries of 95.16-105.01% for the ten compounds analyzed. The established method can be applied to evaluate the intrinsic quality of Annonaceae plant seeds. The determination results recover the content-variation regularities of various ACGs in different species, which are helpful to choose the good-quality Annonaceae plant seeds for anticancer lead compound discovery.

  16. HPLC Method for the Simultaneous Determination of Ten Annonaceous Acetogenins after Supercritical Fluid CO2 Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haijun; Zhang, Ning; Zeng, Qingqi; Yu, Qiping; Ke, Shihuai; Li, Xiang

    2010-01-01

    Annonaceous acetogenins (ACGs) isolated from Annonaceae plants exhibited a broad range of biological bioactivities such as cytotoxic, antitumoral, antiparasitic, pesticidal and immunosuppresive activities. However, their structures were liable to change at more than 60°C and their extraction yields were low using traditional organic solvent extraction. In the present study, all samples from Annona genus plant seeds were extracted by supercritical carbon dioxide under optimized conditions and a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was established for simultaneously determining ten ACGs. All of the ten compounds were simultaneously separated on reversed-phase C18 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm) with the column temperature at 30°C. The mobile phase was composed of (A) methanol and (B) distilled water, the flow rate was 1.0 ml/min and the detection wavelength was set at 220 nm. All calibration curves showed good linear regression (γ>0.9995) within the test range. The established method showed good precision and accuracy with overall intra-day and inter-day variations of 0.99-2.56% and 1.93-3.65%, respectively, and overall recoveries of 95.16-105.01% for the ten compounds analyzed. The established method can be applied to evaluate the intrinsic quality of Annonaceae plant seeds. The determination results recover the content-variation regularities of various ACGs in different species, which are helpful to choose the good-quality Annonaceae plant seeds for anticancer lead compound discovery. PMID:23675194

  17. [Comparison of Chemical Components of Essential Oil from Ocimum basilicum var. pilosum Extracted by Supercritical CO2 Fluid and Steam Distillation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-yu; Zheng, Jia-huan; Shi, Sheng-ying; Luo, Zhi-xiong; Ni, Shun-yu; Lin, Jing-ming

    2015-11-01

    To compare the chemical components of essential oil prepared by steam distillation extraction (SD) and supercritical CO2 fluid extraction (SFE-CO2) from Ocimum basilicum var. pilosum whole plant. The essential oil of Ocimum basilicum var. pilosum were extracted by SD and SFE-CO2. The chemical components of essential oil were separated and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry( GC-MS). Their relative contents were determined by normalization of peak area. 40 and 42 compounds were detected in the essential oil prepared by SD and SFE-CO2 respectively. 25 compounds were common. Thereare significant differences of the chemical components between the Ocimum basilicum var. pilosum essential oil prepared by SD and thatby SFE-CO2. Different methods showed different extraction efficiency with a special compound. It might be a good idea to unite several methods in the modern traditional Chinese medicine industry.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of the key characteristics of the supercritical CO2-pentaerythritol tetraacetate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Peiyu; Jin, Zunlong; Liu, Hong; Wang, Dingbiao; Liu, Donglai

    2016-12-01

    Supercritical CO2 is widely used in many fields of industry. Investigation of statistical mechanics of CO2 fluid under quasi critical and supercritical state has great significance. Equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations are carried out to investigate the statistical mechanics and macroscopic performance of CO2 fluid under the quasi critical and supercritical state. The results show that the bond length and bond angle distributions for supercritical CO2 are Gaussian distribution basically. The dimers' proportion of supercritical CO2 system changes with pressure increasing. T-type dimer has high share within the system when pressure is higher than 9MPa. It can be inferred that T-type dimer leads to CO2 physical properties changing tempestuously under supercritical state. The effect that lubricating oil has on microstructure and heat transfer of supercritical CO2 is also investigated in the present work. The results show the lubricating oil produces significant effect on the dimers' structure under low pressure.

  19. Cleaning With Supercritical CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzstock, James J.

    1990-01-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide effective industrial cleaning agent. Replaces conventional halocarbon solvents for degreasing parts becoming coated with oil during such manufacturing procedures as forming and machining. Presents none of environmental threats and occupational hazards associated with halocarbon solvents. Spontaneously evaporates after use and leaves no waste to be disposed of. Evaporated gas readily collected and recycled.

  20. [Analyze on chemical compositions of Dalbergia odorifera essential oils extracted by CO2-supercritical-fluid-extraction and steam distillation extraction].

    PubMed

    Song, Wei-Feng; Liao, Mei-Jin; Luo, Shu-Yuan

    2011-11-01

    To analyze the chemical compositions of Dalbergia odorifera essential oils extacted by CO2-supercritical-fluid-extraction (SFE-CO2) and steam distillation extraction (SD). The essential oils of Dalbergia odorifera were extracted by steam distillation extraction and SFE-CO2. The chemical components were separated and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. 12 compounds were identified in SFE sample. The major components from essential oils were 2-propenoic acid-3(4-methoxyphenyl)-ethyl ester (14.53%), nerolidol (14.95%), ageratochromene (1.33%). 9 compounds were identified in SD sample. The major components from essential oils were nerolidol (26.61%), cedrol (1.65%). The SFE method is better than the SD method in reliability stability and reproducibility, and suitable for essential oils extraction of Dalbergia odorifera.

  1. Reducing Oyster-Associated Bacteria Levels Using Supercritical Fluid CO2 as an Agent of Warm Pasteurization

    PubMed Central

    Meujo, Damaris A.F.; Kevin, Dion; Peng, Jiangnan; Bowling, John J.; Liu, Jianping; Hamann, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    An innovative approach to Post-Harvest Processing (PHP) of oysters is introduced focusing on the effects of supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) on bacterial contaminants trapped in the digestive system of oysters. Oysters were exposed to scCO2 under two conditions: (1) 100 bar and 37 °C for 30 minutes and (2) 172 bar and 60 °C for 60 minutes. Using FDA standard guidelines for food analysis, variations in the Aerobic Plate Count (APC) was assessed. It was established that exposing oysters to CO2 at 100 bar and 37 °C for 30 minutes and at 172 bar and 60°C for 60 minutes induced 2-log and 3-log reductions in the APC respectively. The decrease in the microbial load as a result of treatment with scCO2 was found to be significant (P=0.002). A release of adductor muscles from the shell was noted in oysters treated at 172 bar and 60 °C for 60 minutes; this was not the case for oysters treated at 100 bar and 37 °C for 30 minutes. A blind study allowing sensory analysis of treated vs. untreated oysters was also completed and no significant change in the physical appearance, smell, or texture was recorded. In this paper, we also report the effect of scCO2 on several bacterial isolates, including a referenced ATCC strain of a non pathogenic Vibrio (V. fisherii) as well as several other bacterial isolates cultured from oyster’ tissues and found to share biochemical features common to pathogenic Vibrio strains. A complete inactivation (minimum 7-log reduction) was achieved with these latter bacterial isolates. A 6-log reduction was observed with V. fisherii. PMID:20022650

  2. Microbial Growth under Supercritical CO2

    PubMed Central

    Peet, Kyle C.; Freedman, Adam J. E.; Hernandez, Hector H.; Britto, Vanya; Boreham, Chris; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.

    2015-01-01

    Growth of microorganisms in environments containing CO2 above its critical point is unexpected due to a combination of deleterious effects, including cytoplasmic acidification and membrane destabilization. Thus, supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is generally regarded as a sterilizing agent. We report isolation of bacteria from three sites targeted for geologic carbon dioxide sequestration (GCS) that are capable of growth in pressurized bioreactors containing scCO2. Analysis of 16S rRNA genes from scCO2 enrichment cultures revealed microbial assemblages of varied complexity, including representatives of the genus Bacillus. Propagation of enrichment cultures under scCO2 headspace led to isolation of six strains corresponding to Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subterraneus, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus safensis, and Bacillus megaterium. Isolates are spore-forming, facultative anaerobes and capable of germination and growth under an scCO2 headspace. In addition to these isolates, several Bacillus type strains grew under scCO2, suggesting that this may be a shared feature of spore-forming Bacillus spp. Our results provide direct evidence of microbial activity at the interface between scCO2 and an aqueous phase. Since microbial activity can influence the key mechanisms for permanent storage of sequestered CO2 (i.e., structural, residual, solubility, and mineral trapping), our work suggests that during GCS microorganisms may grow and catalyze biological reactions that influence the fate and transport of CO2 in the deep subsurface. PMID:25681188

  3. Microbial growth under supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Peet, Kyle C; Freedman, Adam J E; Hernandez, Hector H; Britto, Vanya; Boreham, Chris; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B; Thompson, Janelle R

    2015-04-01

    Growth of microorganisms in environments containing CO2 above its critical point is unexpected due to a combination of deleterious effects, including cytoplasmic acidification and membrane destabilization. Thus, supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is generally regarded as a sterilizing agent. We report isolation of bacteria from three sites targeted for geologic carbon dioxide sequestration (GCS) that are capable of growth in pressurized bioreactors containing scCO2. Analysis of 16S rRNA genes from scCO2 enrichment cultures revealed microbial assemblages of varied complexity, including representatives of the genus Bacillus. Propagation of enrichment cultures under scCO2 headspace led to isolation of six strains corresponding to Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subterraneus, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus safensis, and Bacillus megaterium. Isolates are spore-forming, facultative anaerobes and capable of germination and growth under an scCO2 headspace. In addition to these isolates, several Bacillus type strains grew under scCO2, suggesting that this may be a shared feature of spore-forming Bacillus spp. Our results provide direct evidence of microbial activity at the interface between scCO2 and an aqueous phase. Since microbial activity can influence the key mechanisms for permanent storage of sequestered CO2 (i.e., structural, residual, solubility, and mineral trapping), our work suggests that during GCS microorganisms may grow and catalyze biological reactions that influence the fate and transport of CO2 in the deep subsurface.

  4. The effect of two gases forming supercritical fluids (Xe and CO 2) on the spectral characteristics and analytical capabilities of microwave induced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes-Bayón, M.; Camuña-Aguilar, F.; Pereiro, R.; Sánchez-Uria, J. E.; Sanz-Medel, A.

    1996-06-01

    A comparative study of the effect of CO 2 and Xe added along with the plasma gas to He and Ar microwave induced plasmas (MIPs), simulating possible conditions to be used when a MIP is employed as specific detector for supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC), has been carried out. The proportions of CO 2 and Xe to the plasma gas investigated are comparable to the typical percentages used for SFC-MIP couplings. The study has been performed with two different MIP systems: an atmospheric pressure discharge held in a Beenakker cavity TM 010 and a reduced pressure surfatron-MIP. The influence of CO 2 and Xe addition on the spectrochemical properties of the discharge has been studied by using the atomic emission of mercury and some typical non-metals (chlorine, carbon and sulfur) at different wavelengths (atomic and ionic lines). Results showed that ion line emission intensities are always reduced more significantly than atom line emissions by both dopant gases on study, whatever the pressure. In general terms, however, the effect of adding Xe is less severe, both for atom and ion lines, than that of CO 2; in most cases the detection limits (DLs) observed are better for Xe than for CO 2 as dopant gas. In fact, the DLs obtained for the selected lines of mercury measured were practically unaltered by the addition of 0.2% Xe to atmospheric pressure Ar or He MIPs. CO 2 addition (0.2%) produced about 1.5 times worsening of the observed DLs for mercury. For non-metal analyses better DLs were also obtained, in general terms, with Xe than with CO 2 as dopant gas.

  5. Applications of supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Gerd

    2010-01-01

    This review discusses supercritical fluids in industrial and near-to-industry applications. Supercritical fluids are flexible tools for processing materials. Supercritical fluids have been applied to mass-transfer processes, phase-transition processes, reactive systems, materials-related processes, and nanostructured materials. Some applications are already at industrial capacity, whereas others remain under development. In addition to extraction, application areas include impregnation and cleaning, multistage countercurrent separation, particle formation, coating, and reactive systems such as hydrogenation, biomass gasification, and supercritical water oxidation. Polymers are modified with supercritical fluids, and colloids and emulsions as well as nanostructured materials exhibit interesting phenomena when in contact with supercritical fluids that can be industrially exploited. For these applications to succeed, the properties of supercritical fluids in combination with the materials processed must be clearly determined and fundamental knowledge of the complex behavior must be made readily available.

  6. Final Report: Development of a Chemical Model to Predict the Interactions between Supercritical CO2, Fluid and Rock in EGS Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, Brian J.; Pan, Feng

    2014-09-24

    This report summarizes development of a coupled-process reservoir model for simulating enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) that utilize supercritical carbon dioxide as a working fluid. Specifically, the project team developed an advanced chemical kinetic model for evaluating important processes in EGS reservoirs, such as mineral precipitation and dissolution at elevated temperature and pressure, and for evaluating potential impacts on EGS surface facilities by related chemical processes. We assembled a new database for better-calibrated simulation of water/brine/ rock/CO2 interactions in EGS reservoirs. This database utilizes existing kinetic and other chemical data, and we updated those data to reflect corrections for elevated temperature and pressure conditions of EGS reservoirs.

  7. Supercritical fluid chromatography and two-dimensional supercritical fluid chromatography of polar car lubricant additives with neat CO(2) as mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Lavison, Gwenaelle; Bertoncini, Fabrice; Thiébaut, Didier; Beziau, Jean-François; Carrazé, Bernadette; Valette, Pascale; Duteurtre, Xavier

    2007-08-17

    Car lubricant additives are added to mineral or synthetic base stocks to improve viscosity and resistance to oxidation of the lubricant and to limit wear of engines. Their total amount in the commercial lubricant varies from a few percents to 20-25%. As they belong to various chemical classes and are added to a very complex medium, the base stock, their detailed chromatographic analysis is very difficult and time consuming as it should involve sample treatment and preparative scale separations in order to simplify the sample. The aim of this work is to determine the feasibility of the separation of low molecular weight lubricant additives using various packed columns with pure CO(2) as a mobile phase to enable implementation of flame ionisation detection as universal detector. This is part of a hypernated system including more sophisticated specific detectors, such as AED, FTIR or MS to obtain detailed structural information of compounds. This paper is devoted to the comparison of some stationary phases supposed to provide hydrocarbon group type separation (silica and normal phase) or separations on alkyl-bonded silica in non-aqueous mode of some selected classes of additives in test mixtures or in base stocks. Adsorption chromatography allows partial separation of additives from the base stocks while the direct elution of test additives can only be obtained on reversed phase supports having a very efficient silanol group protection so the interaction of the more polar compounds is much reduced. A two-dimensional scheme of analysis is also described. It combines adsorption chromatography to separate most of the polar additives from the base stock and alkyl-bonded silica for more detailed separation of the additives. However, overlapping between groups of compounds and the lack of resolution between some additives and the base stock should be addressed by the implementing of selective detectors.

  8. Dehydrating and Sterilizing Wastes Using Supercritical CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ian J.

    2006-01-01

    A relatively low-temperature process for dehydrating and sterilizing biohazardous wastes in an enclosed life-support system exploits (1) the superior mass-transport properties of supercritical fluids in general and (2) the demonstrated sterilizing property of supercritical CO2 in particular. The wastes to be treated are placed in a chamber. Liquid CO2, drawn from storage at a pressure of 850 psi (approx.=5.9 MPa) and temperature of 0 C, is compressed to pressure of 2 kpsi (approx.=14 MPa) and made to flow into the chamber. The compression raises the temperature to 10 C. The chamber and its contents are then further heated to 40 C, putting the CO2 into a supercritical state, in which it kills microorganisms in the chamber. Carrying dissolved water, the CO2 leaves the chamber through a back-pressure regulator, through which it is expanded back to the storage pressure. The expanded CO2 is refrigerated to extract the dissolved water as ice, and is then returned to the storage tank at 0 C

  9. Modeling Solvation in Supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Ingrosso, Francesca; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2017-07-18

    In recent decades, a microscopic understanding of solute-solvent intermolecular interactions has been key to advances in technologies based on supercritical carbon dioxide. In many cases, computational work has provided the impetus for new discoveries, shedding new light on important concepts such as the local structure around the solute in the supercritical medium, the influence of the peculiar properties of the latter on the molecular behavior of dissolved substances and, importantly, CO2 -philicity. In this Review, the theoretical work that has been relevant to these developments is surveyed and, by presenting some crucial open questions, the possible routes to achieving further progress based on the interplay between theory and experiments is discussed. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. 10 MW Supercritical CO2 Turbine Test

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, Craig

    2014-01-29

    The Supercritical CO2 Turbine Test project was to demonstrate the inherent efficiencies of a supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) power turbine and associated turbomachinery under conditions and at a scale relevant to commercial concentrating solar power (CSP) projects, thereby accelerating the commercial deployment of this new power generation technology. The project involved eight partnering organizations: NREL, Sandia National Laboratories, Echogen Power Systems, Abengoa Solar, University of Wisconsin at Madison, Electric Power Research Institute, Barber-Nichols, and the CSP Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The multi-year project planned to design, fabricate, and validate an s-CO2 power turbine of nominally 10 MWe that is capable of operation at up to 700°C and operates in a dry-cooled test loop. The project plan consisted of three phases: (1) system design and modeling, (2) fabrication, and (3) testing. The major accomplishments of Phase 1 included: Design of a multistage, axial-flow, s-CO2 power turbine; Design modifications to an existing turbocompressor to provide s-CO2 flow for the test system; Updated equipment and installation costs for the turbomachinery and associated support infrastructure; Development of simulation tools for the test loop itself and for more efficient cycle designs that are of greater commercial interest; Simulation of s-CO2 power cycle integration into molten-nitrate-salt CSP systems indicating a cost benefit of up to 8% in levelized cost of energy; Identification of recuperator cost as a key economic parameter; Corrosion data for multiple alloys at temperatures up to 650ºC in high-pressure CO2 and recommendations for materials-of-construction; and Revised test plan and preliminary operating conditions based on the ongoing tests of related equipment. Phase 1 established that the cost of the facility needed to test the power turbine at its full power and temperature would exceed the planned funding for Phases 2 and 3. Late

  11. Supercritical fluid extraction

    DOEpatents

    Wai, Chien M.; Laintz, Kenneth

    1994-01-01

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated or lipophilic crown ether or fluorinated dithiocarbamate. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  12. Towards Overhauser DNP in supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Meerten, S. G. J.; Tayler, M. C. D.; Kentgens, A. P. M.; van Bentum, P. J. M.

    2016-06-01

    Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (ODNP) is a well known technique to improve NMR sensitivity in the liquid state, where the large polarization of an electron spin is transferred to a nucleus of interest by cross-relaxation. The efficiency of the Overhauser mechanism for dipolar interactions depends critically on fast local translational dynamics at the timescale of the inverse electron Larmor frequency. The maximum polarization enhancement that can be achieved for 1H at high magnetic fields benefits from a low viscosity solvent. In this paper we investigate the option to use supercritical CO2 as a solvent for Overhauser DNP. We have investigated the diffusion constants and longitudinal nuclear relaxation rates of toluene in high pressure CO2. The change in 1H T1 by addition of TEMPO radical was analyzed to determine the Overhauser cross-relaxation in such a mixture, and is compared with calculations based on the Force Free Hard Sphere (FFHS) model. By analyzing the relaxation data within this model we find translational correlation times in the range of 2-4 ps, depending on temperature, pressure and toluene concentration. Such short correlation times may be instrumental for future Overhauser DNP applications at high magnetic fields, as are commonly used in NMR. Preliminary DNP experiments have been performed at 3.4 T on high pressure superheated water and model systems such as toluene in high pressure CO2.

  13. Towards Overhauser DNP in supercritical CO(2).

    PubMed

    van Meerten, S G J; Tayler, M C D; Kentgens, A P M; van Bentum, P J M

    2016-06-01

    Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (ODNP) is a well known technique to improve NMR sensitivity in the liquid state, where the large polarization of an electron spin is transferred to a nucleus of interest by cross-relaxation. The efficiency of the Overhauser mechanism for dipolar interactions depends critically on fast local translational dynamics at the timescale of the inverse electron Larmor frequency. The maximum polarization enhancement that can be achieved for (1)H at high magnetic fields benefits from a low viscosity solvent. In this paper we investigate the option to use supercritical CO2 as a solvent for Overhauser DNP. We have investigated the diffusion constants and longitudinal nuclear relaxation rates of toluene in high pressure CO2. The change in (1)H T1 by addition of TEMPO radical was analyzed to determine the Overhauser cross-relaxation in such a mixture, and is compared with calculations based on the Force Free Hard Sphere (FFHS) model. By analyzing the relaxation data within this model we find translational correlation times in the range of 2-4ps, depending on temperature, pressure and toluene concentration. Such short correlation times may be instrumental for future Overhauser DNP applications at high magnetic fields, as are commonly used in NMR. Preliminary DNP experiments have been performed at 3.4T on high pressure superheated water and model systems such as toluene in high pressure CO2. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of Natural Osmolytes on the Protein Structure in Supercritical CO2: Molecular Level Evidence.

    PubMed

    Monhemi, Hassan; Housaindokht, Mohammad Reza; Nakhaei Pour, Ali

    2015-08-20

    Protein instability in supercritical CO2 limits the application of this green solvent in enzyme-catalyzed reactions. CO2 molecules act as a protein denaturant at high pressure under supercritical conditions. Here, for the first time, we show that natural osmolytes could stabilize protein conformation in supercritical CO2. Molecular dynamics simulation is used to monitor the effects of adding different natural osmolytes on the conformation and dynamics of chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 (CI2) in supercritical CO2. Simulations showed that CI2 is denatured at 200 bar in supercritical CO2, which is in agreement with experimental observations. Interestingly, the protein conformation remains native after addition of ∼1 M amino acid- and sugar-based osmolyte models. These molecules stabilize protein through the formation of supramolecular self-assemblies resulting from macromolecule-osmolyte hydrogen bonds. Nevertheless, trimethylamine N-oxide, which is known as a potent osmolyte for protein stabilization in aqueous solutions, amplifies protein denaturation in supercritical CO2. On the basis of our structural analysis, we introduce a new mechanism for the osmolyte effect in supercritical CO2, an "inclusion mechanism". To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that introduces the application of natural osmolytes in a supercritical fluid and describes mechanistic insights into osmolyte action in nonaqueous media.

  15. Operation and analysis of a supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle.

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Steven Alan; Radel, Ross F.; Vernon, Milton E.; Pickard, Paul S.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2010-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is investigating advanced Brayton cycles using supercritical working fluids for use with solar, nuclear or fossil heat sources. The focus of this work has been on the supercritical CO{sub 2} cycle (S-CO2) which has the potential for high efficiency in the temperature range of interest for these heat sources, and is also very compact, with the potential for lower capital costs. The first step in the development of these advanced cycles was the construction of a small scale Brayton cycle loop, funded by the Laboratory Directed Research & Development program, to study the key issue of compression near the critical point of CO{sub 2}. This document outlines the design of the small scale loop, describes the major components, presents models of system performance, including losses, leakage, windage, compressor performance, and flow map predictions, and finally describes the experimental results that have been generated.

  16. EGS rock reactions with Supercritical CO2 saturated with water and water saturated with Supercritical CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Earl D. Mattson; Travis L. McLing; William Smith; Carl Palmer

    2013-02-01

    EGS using CO2 as a working fluid will likely involve hydro-shearing low-permeability hot rock reservoirs with a water solution. After that process, the fractures will be flushed with CO2 that is maintained under supercritical conditions (> 70 bars). Much of the injected water in the main fracture will be flushed out with the initial CO2 injection; however side fractures, micro fractures, and the lower portion of the fracture will contain connate water that will interact with the rock and the injected CO2. Dissolution/precipitation reactions in the resulting scCO2/brine/rock systems have the potential to significantly alter reservoir permeability, so it is important to understand where these precipitates form and how are they related to the evolving ‘free’ connate water in the system. To examine dissolution / precipitation behavior in such systems over time, we have conducted non-stirred batch experiments in the laboratory with pure minerals, sandstone, and basalt coupons with brine solution spiked with MnCl2 and scCO2. The coupons are exposed to liquid water saturated with scCO2 and extend above the water surface allowing the upper portion of the coupons to be exposed to scCO2 saturated with water. The coupons were subsequently analyzed using SEM to determine the location of reactions in both in and out of the liquid water. Results of these will be summarized with regard to significance for EGS with CO2 as a working fluid.

  17. Electrochemistry in supercritical fluids

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Jack A.; Bartlett, Philip N.

    2015-01-01

    A wide range of supercritical fluids (SCFs) have been studied as solvents for electrochemistry with carbon dioxide and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) being the most extensively studied. Recent advances have shown that it is possible to get well-resolved voltammetry in SCFs by suitable choice of the conditions and the electrolyte. In this review, we discuss the voltammetry obtained in these systems, studies of the double-layer capacitance, work on the electrodeposition of metals into high aspect ratio nanopores and the use of metallocenes as redox probes and standards in both supercritical carbon dioxide–acetonitrile and supercritical HFCs. PMID:26574527

  18. Electrochemistry in supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Branch, Jack A; Bartlett, Philip N

    2015-12-28

    A wide range of supercritical fluids (SCFs) have been studied as solvents for electrochemistry with carbon dioxide and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) being the most extensively studied. Recent advances have shown that it is possible to get well-resolved voltammetry in SCFs by suitable choice of the conditions and the electrolyte. In this review, we discuss the voltammetry obtained in these systems, studies of the double-layer capacitance, work on the electrodeposition of metals into high aspect ratio nanopores and the use of metallocenes as redox probes and standards in both supercritical carbon dioxide-acetonitrile and supercritical HFCs.

  19. Forsterite Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2 and Sodium Citrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, L.; Schaef, T.; Wang, Z.; Miller, Q.; McGrail, P.

    2013-12-01

    Lin Qiu1*, Herbert T. Schaef2, Zhengrong Wang1, Quin R.S. Miller3, BP McGrail2 1. Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA 2. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA 3. University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, USA Geologic reservoirs for managing carbon emissions (mostly CO2) have expanded over the last 5 years to include unconventional formations including basalts and fractured shales. Recently, ~1000 metric tons of CO2 was injected into the Columbia River Basalt (CRB) in Eastern Washington as part of the Wallula Pilot Project, Big Sky Regional Carbon Partnership. Based on reservoir conditions, the injected CO2 is present as a supercritical fluid that dissolves into the formation water over time, and reacts with basalt components to form carbonate minerals. In this paper, we discuss mineral transformation reactions occurring when the forsterite (Mg2SiO4) is exposed to wet scCO2 in equilibrium with pure water and sodium citrate solutions. Forsterite was selected as it is an important olivine group mineral present in igneous and mafic rocks. Citrate was selected as it has been shown to enhance mineral dissolution and organic ligands are possible degradation products of the microbial communities present in the formational waters of the CRB. For the supercritical phase, transformation reactions were examined by in situ high pressure x-ray diffraction (HXRD) in the presence of supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) in contact with water and sodium citrate solutions at conditions relevant to carbon sequestration. Experimental results show close-to-complete dissolution of forsterite in contact with scCO2 equilibrated with pure water for 90 hours (90 bar and 50°C). Under these conditions, thin films of water coated the mineral surface, providing a mechanism for silicate dissolution and transport of cations necessary for carbonate formation. The primary crystalline component initially detected with in situ HXRD was the hydrated magnesium carbonate, nesquehonite [Mg

  20. Design of experimental setup for supercritical CO2 jet under high ambient pressure conditions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huaizhong; Li, Gensheng; He, Zhenguo; Wang, Haizhu; Zhang, Shikun

    2016-12-01

    With the commercial extraction of hydrocarbons in shale and tight reservoirs, efficient methods are needed to accelerate developing process. Supercritical CO2 (SC-CO2) jet has been considered as a potential way due to its unique fluid properties. In this article, a new setup is designed for laboratory experiment to research the SC-CO2 jet's characteristics in different jet temperatures, pressures, standoff distances, ambient pressures, etc. The setup is composed of five modules, including SC-CO2 generation system, pure SC-CO2 jet system, abrasive SC-CO2 jet system, CO2 recovery system, and data acquisition system. Now, a series of rock perforating (or case cutting) experiments have been successfully conducted using the setup about pure and abrasive SC-CO2 jet, and the results have proven the great perforating efficiency of SC-CO2 jet and the applications of this setup.

  1. Synthesis of siliceous hollow spheres with large mesopore wall structure by supercritical CO2-in-water interface templating.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiawei; Xia, Yongde; Wang, Wenxin; Mokaya, Robert; Poliakoff, Martyn

    2005-01-14

    Hollow silica spheres with large mesopore wall structures have been synthesized via CO(2)-in-water emulsion templating in the presence of PEO-PPO-PEO block copolymers under supercritical fluid conditions.

  2. Flow of subcritical and supercritical CO2 in coal at variable insitu conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishal, V.

    2016-12-01

    Fluid flow in unconventional reservoirs is influenced by various conditions such as the insitu pressure, temperature, pore pressure, effective stresses, reservoir characteristics such as porosity, permeability, etc. Many laboratory, pilot scale and field scale activities have only enhanced the understanding of these reservoirs such as shale and coal. An important domain of investigation, however, is the phase of the fluid itself. CO2 that is being injected into the subsurface for the purpose of geologic sequestration is likely to experience a transition of phases in the reservoirs. The present work examines the effects of change in phase of CO2 on the permeability evolution of porous coal. Experiments were conducted to examine the effects of change of phase of CO2 from gas to liquid and gas to supercritical state on the flow and deformation of coal. It was found that the permeability of coal to supercritical CO2 was nearly half than that using liquid CO2. Further, upon saturation of the sample for two days using CO2, further reduction of permeability was observed. Saturation with liquid CO2 led to nearly 24% decline in permeability of coal while supercritical CO2 led to nearly 40% reduction in the same. It is hypothesized that liquid and supercritical CO2 lead to large amount of coal matrix deformation and in turn, the matrix swelling leads to the closure of path of fluid flow, resulting in high reduction of permeability. This study presents the real-term underground scenarios likely to be encountered during CO2 flow in coal.

  3. [Chemical constituents from supercritical CO2 extraction of Schisandra chinensis].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong-yan; Lin, Hai-cheng; Wang, Guo-li; Zhang, Lian-xue

    2014-11-01

    To study the chemical constituents from the supercritical CO2 extraction of Schisandra chinensis. The compounds were separated and purified by conventional column chromatography and their structures were identified by spectroscopic methods. Nine compounds were isolated from the supercritical CO2 extraction of Schisandra chinensis, and their structures were identified as chrysophanol(1),schisandrin B(2), β-sitosterol(3), schisandrin C(4),schisandrol A(5), angeloylgomisin H(6), daucosterol(7) 1, 5-dimethyl citrate (8), and shikimic acid (9). Compounds 1, 8 and 9 are isolated from Schisandra chinensis for the first time,and compound 1 as an anthraquinone is isolated from this genus for the first time.

  4. Anomalous sorption of supercritical fluids on polymer thin films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaochu; Sanchez, Isaac C

    2006-10-24

    Unusual sorption has been reported in thin polymer films exposed to near-critical CO2. When the supercritical fluid approaches the critical point, the film appears to thicken, but it is not clear whether the film swells or there is an adsorption layer on the film surface. A combination of the gradient theory of inhomogeneous systems and the Sanchez-Lacombe equation of state has been used to investigate this phenomenon. It is shown analytically that surface adsorption on an attractive surface is proportional to the compressibility of the fluid. We have also investigated numerically the sorption of supercritical CO2 on poly(dimethylsiloxane) and polyisobutylene, and supercritical 1,1-difluoroethane on polystyrene. By calculating the Gibbs adsorption and adsorption layer thickness of the supercritical fluids, we found in all cases (different substrates, different supercritical fluids) that maximum adsorption occurs when the supercritical fluid is near its compressibility maximum.

  5. Supercritical fluids cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Butner, S.; Hjeresen, D.; Silva, L.; Spall, D.; Stephenson, R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses a proposed multi-party research and development program which seeks to develop supercritical fluid cleaning technology as an alternative to existing solvent cleaning applications. While SCF extraction technology has been in commercial use for several years, the use of these fluids as cleaning agents poses several new technical challenges. Problems inherent in the commercialization of SCF technology include: the cleaning efficacy and compatibility of supercritical working fluids with the parts to be cleaned must be assessed for a variety of materials and components; process parameters and equipment design Have been optimized for extractive applications and must be reconsidered for application to cleaning; and co-solvents and entrainers must be identified to facilitate the removal of polar inorganic and organic contaminants, which are often not well solvated in supercritical systems. The proposed research and development program would address these issues and lead to the development and commercialization of viable SCF-based technology for precision cleaning applications. This paper provides the technical background, program scope, and delineates the responsibilities of each principal participant in the program.

  6. Supercritical fluids cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butner, S.; Hjeresen, D.; Silva, L.; Spall, D.; Stephenson, R.

    1991-04-01

    This paper discusses a proposed multi-party research and development program which seeks to develop supercritical fluid cleaning (SFC) technology as an alternative to existing solvent cleaning applications. While SCF extraction technology has been in commercial use for several years, the use of these fluids as cleaning agents poses several new technical challenges. Problems inherent in the commercialization of SCF technology include: the cleaning efficacy and compatibility of supercritical working fluids with the parts to be cleaned must be assessed for a variety of materials and components; process parameters and equipment design have been optimized for extractive applications and must be reconsidered for application to cleaning; and co-solvents and entrainers must be identified to facilitate the removal of polar inorganic and organic contaminants, which are often not well solvated in supercritical systems. The proposed research and development program would address these issues and lead to the development and commercialization of viable SCF-based technology for precision cleaning applications. This paper provides the technical background, program scope, and delineates the responsibilities of each principal participant in the program.

  7. The combined extraction of sage (Salvia officinalis L.): ultrasound followed by supercritical CO2 extraction.

    PubMed

    Glisic, Sandra B; Ristic, Mihajlo; Skala, Dejan U

    2011-01-01

    A wide spectrum of phytochemicals could be isolated from sage (Salvia officinalis L.) using different extraction or distillation technique: the supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), the volatiles compounds (monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes) isolation using hydrodistillation or higher molecular compounds with Soxhlet extraction or ultrasound-assisted extraction. The combination of ultrasound-assisted extraction followed by re-extraction of obtained extract with supercritical CO(2) was performed in this study. The goal of performed investigation was to concentrate diterpenes present in sage extract which are generally considered to be responsible for antioxidant activity of extracted compounds. The fractionation using the supercritical CO(2), and different combination of the ultrasound-assisted solvent extractions (water-ethanol mixture or only water) followed by supercritical CO(2) re-extraction of obtained extract or treated plant material were analyzed and compared. Based on the results of these investigations it could be proposed the best extraction procedure: the ultrasound pretreatment of plant material with distilled water and re-extraction of plant material (residue) using supercritical CO(2). That procedure gives two valuable products: the ultrasound extract which is rich in sugars and possess the immunomodulatory activity and supercritical extract which is rich in diterpenes and sesquiterpenes.

  8. [Extraction of 10-Deacetyl Baccatin by Supercritical CO2 from Taxus yunnanensis Branches and Leaves].

    PubMed

    Tang, Yang-qin; Li, Hai-chi; Huang, Wen-jie; Xiong, Yan; Ge, Fa-huan

    2015-04-01

    To study the supercritical CO2 fluids extraction (SFE) method to extract the components from Taxus yunnanensis. Medicinal meterials were extracted by supercritical CO2, and then purified by industrial chromatography. Using the extraction yield of 10-DAB as the index,single factor test was carried out to investigate the effect of co-solvent, extraction time, extraction pressure, extraction temperature, pressure and temperature of separation kettle I. Then orthogonal experiment was used to optimize the best extraction condition. The suitable extraction condition was as follows: the ratio of co-solvent (80% ethanol) amount and the madicinal materials was 3: 1, Separation kettle I pressure was 14 MPa, separation kettle I temperature was 40 °C, extraction pressure was 25 MPa, extraction temperature was 60 T and extraction time was 90 min. The extract was separated by industrial chromatographic and then crystallized. The supercritical CO2 extraction and purification process of 10-DAB were simple and feasible.

  9. Structural Evolution of Supercritical CO2 across the Frenkel Line.

    PubMed

    Bolmatov, Dima; Zav'yalov, D; Gao, M; Zhernenkov, Mikhail

    2014-08-21

    Here, we study structural properties of the supercritical carbon dioxide and discover the existence of persistent medium-range order correlations, which make supercritical carbon dioxide nonuniform and heterogeneous on an intermediate length scale. We report on the CO2 heterogeneity shell structure where, in the first shell, both carbon and oxygen atoms experience gas-like-type interactions with short-range order correlations while within the second shell, oxygen atoms essentially exhibit a liquid-like type of interactions due to localization of transverse-like phonon packets. Importantly, we highlight a catalytic role of atoms inside of the nearest-neighbor heterogeneity shell in providing a mechanism for diffusion and proving the existence of an additional thermodynamic boundary in the supercritical carbon dioxide on an intermediate length scale. Finally, we discuss important implications for answering the intriguing question whether Venus may have had CO2 oceans and urge for an experimental detection of this persistent local-order heterogeneity.

  10. Metal extraction from the artificially contaminated soil using supercritical CO2 with mixed ligands.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwangheon; Lee, Jeongken; Sung, Jinhyun

    2013-04-01

    Supercritical fluids have good penetrating power with a high capacity to dissolve certain solutes in the fluid itself, making it applicable for soil cleaning. Supercritical CO2 along with mixed ligands has been used for cleaning artificially contaminated soil. The extraction of metal from the soil was successful, and the molar ratio of ligands to the extracted metal was as low as 3. Complicated structures with a large surface area of the real soil seemed to cause the lower efficiency. Reduced efficiency was also observed over time after the sample preparation, indicating the possibility of chemisorption of the metal ion onto the soil. The use of supercritical CO2 with dissolved mixed ligands was sufficient to extract metal from the soil. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Supercritical Fluid Infusion of Iron Additives in Polymeric Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazem, Negin; Taylor, Larry T.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this project was the experimentation to measure preparation of iron nanophases within polymeric matrices via supercritical fluid infusion of iron precursors followed by thermal reduction. Another objective was to determine if supercritical CO2 could infuse into the polymer. The experiment is described along with the materials, and the supercritical fluid infusion and cure procedures. X-ray photoelectron spectra and transmission electron micrographs were obtained. The results are summarized in charts, and tables.

  12. Corrosion in supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Propp, W.A.; Carleson, T.E.; Wai, Chen M.; Taylor, P.R.; Daehling, K.W.; Huang, Shaoping; Abdel-Latif, M.

    1996-05-01

    Integrated studies were carried out in the areas of corrosion, thermodynamic modeling, and electrochemistry under pressure and temperature conditions appropriate for potential applications of supercritical fluid (SCF) extractive metallurgy. Carbon dioxide and water were the primary fluids studied. Modifiers were used in some tests; these consisted of 1 wt% water and 10 wt% methanol for carbon dioxide and of sulfuric acid, sodium sulfate, ammonium sulfate, and ammonium nitrate at concentrations ranging from 0.00517 to 0.010 M for the aqueous fluids. The materials studied were Types 304 and 316 (UNS S30400 and S31600) stainless steel, iron, and AISI-SAE 1080 (UNS G10800) carbon steel. The thermodynamic modeling consisted of development of a personal computer-based program for generating Pourbaix diagrams at supercritical conditions in aqueous systems. As part of the model, a general method for extrapolating entropies and related thermodynamic properties from ambient to SCF conditions was developed. The experimental work was used as a tool to evaluate the predictions of the model for these systems. The model predicted a general loss of passivation in iron-based alloys at SCF conditions that was consistent with experimentally measured corrosion rates and open circuit potentials. For carbon-dioxide-based SCFs, measured corrosion rates were low, indicating that carbon steel would be suitable for use with unmodified carbon dioxide, while Type 304 stainless steel would be suitable for use with water or methanol as modifiers.

  13. SOLUBILITY OF ORGANIC BIOCIDES IN SUPERCRITICAL CO2 AND CO2+ COSOLVENT MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solubilities of four organic biocides in supercritical carbon dioxide (Sc-CO2) were measured using a dynamic flowr apparatus over a pressure range of 10 to 30 MPa and temperature of 35-80 degrees C. The biocides studied were: Amical-48 (diiodomethyl p-tolyl sulfone), chlorothalo...

  14. SOLUBILITY OF ORGANIC BIOCIDES IN SUPERCRITICAL CO2 AND CO2+ COSOLVENT MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solubilities of four organic biocides in supercritical carbon dioxide (Sc-CO2) were measured using a dynamic flowr apparatus over a pressure range of 10 to 30 MPa and temperature of 35-80 degrees C. The biocides studied were: Amical-48 (diiodomethyl p-tolyl sulfone), chlorothalo...

  15. Microfluidic study for investigating migration and residual phenomena of supercritical CO2 in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gyuryeong; Wang, Sookyun; Lee, Minhee; Um, Jeong-Gi; Kim, Seon-Ok

    2017-04-01

    The storage of CO2 in underground geological formation such as deep saline aquifers or depleted oil and gas reservoirs is one of the most promising technologies for reducing the atmospheric CO2 release. The processes in geological CO2 storage involves injection of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) into porous formations saturated with brine and initiates CO2 flooding with immiscible displacement. The CO2 migration and porewater displacement within geological formations, and , consequentially, the storage efficiency are governed by the interaction of fluid and rock properties and are affected by the interfacial tension, capillarity, and wettability in supercritical CO2-brine-mineral systems. This study aims to observe the displacement pattern and estimate storage efficiency by using micromodels. This study aims to conduct scCO2 injection experiments for visualization of distribution of injected scCO2 and residual porewater in transparent pore networks on microfluidic chips under high pressure and high temperature conditions. In order to quantitatively analyze the porewater displacement by scCO2 injection under geological CO2 storage conditions, the images of invasion patterns and distribution of CO2 in the pore network are acquired through a imaging system with a microscope. The results from image analysis were applied in quantitatively investigating the effects of major environmental factors and scCO2 injection methods on porewater displacement process by scCO2 and storage efficiency. The experimental observation results could provide important fundamental information on capillary characteristics of reservoirs and improve our understanding of CO2 sequestration progress.

  16. An Adsorption Capacity Study of Supercritical CO2 on Zeolite, Illite and Organic-Rich Shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Prasad, M.

    2016-12-01

    CO2 injection into reservoirs will change the state of stress in both reservoir and caprock formations due to poro-mechanical, thermal and chemical effects. As a result of the induced stress, the caprock can be mechanically damaged, pre-existing sealing faults and fractures can be re-activated, or new fracture systems can be created. It is the main objective of this study to determine the behavior of intact and fractured caprocks when exposed to supercritical CO2 at elevated pressures, including the characterization of the physical, chemical and geomechanical processes associated with fluid flow and storage in these systems. Hereby, an envisioned experimental setup allows high pressure, super-critical CO2 adsorption and desorption isotherm measurements on powdered rock samples is designed. Zeolite, illite and shale samples with different maturity levels are used as adsorbent to perform CO2 adsorption experiment to study the corresponding adsorption capacities.

  17. Physical and Chemical Effects of Two-Phase Brine/Supercritical-CO2 Fluid Flow on Clastic Rocks: Real-Time Monitoring and NMR Imaging of Flow-Through Core Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, C. A.; Vogt, S.; Maneval, J. E.; Brox, T.; Skidmore, M. L.; Codd, S. L.; Seymour, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    Sandstone core samples were challenged with a supercritical CO2-saturated brine mixture in a laboratory flow-through core reactor system over a range of temperatures and brine strengths. Cores of quartz arenite from the Berea formation were selected to represent ideal ‘clean’ sandstone These laboratory experiments potentially provide an analog for the acidification of pore fluids near the brine/CO2 interface during CO2 flooding of depleted clastic hydrocarbon reservoirs for carbon sequestration. Flow in the reactor was perpendicular to bedding. Initial experiments were run at 50°C and 100°C with brine concentrations of 1g/L and 10g/L (TDS) to test effects of different temperatures and brine compositions. Real-time monitoring of fluid pH and conductivity provided a measure of reaction rates. Introduction of supercritical CO2 into the brine-saturated cores initiated a reduction in pH accompanied by an increase in conductivity. NMR images of fresh cores were compared with images of challenged cores using a protocol for pixel-by-pixel comparison to determine the effects on bulk pore volume and geometry. Two types of imaging experiments were conducted: multi-slice spin echo and 3-D spin echo images. Multi-slice experiments had a slice thickness of 1.5 mm and an in-plane resolution of 0.27 mm x 0.27 mm, and 3-D experiments had a resolution of 0.47 mm x 0.55 mm x 0.55mm. Imaging results reflected the observed changes in the physical and chemical structure post-challenge. Two-dimensional relaxation correlation experiments were also conducted to probe the pore sizes, connectivity and fluid saturation of the rock cores before and after challenging. Chemical analyses and microscopic examination of the challenged cores will provide a better understanding of alteration in the cores and the changes in the volume, geometry and connectivity of pore space.

  18. [Extraction of sex hormone from antler velvet with supercritical CO2].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi-Hong; Li, Shu-Fen; Wang, Jin-Yu; Zhou, Ran; Tian, Song-Jiang

    2007-10-01

    To study the method of extraction of sex hormone from antler velvet with supercritical CO2. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) was used to extract sex hormone from antler velvet and radioimmunoassay (RIA) was used to analyze the extracts. The chemical compositions in extracts were identified by GC-MS, TLC and HPLC, respectively. The experimental results indicated that the extraction yield was 1.56% when 85% ethanol was used as co-solvent at temperature of 65 degrees C and extraction pressure of 30 MPa. Estradiol and progesterone in the extracts were 3.07, 776.18 ng x g(-1) respectively. It is feasible to extract hormone from antler velvet with supercritical CO2.

  19. Supercritical fluid technology: concepts and pharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Praful Balavant; Kumar, G Aravind; Kumar, Averineni Ranjith; Shavi, Gopal Venkatesh; Karthik, Arumugam; Reddy, Meka Sreenivasa; Udupa, Nayanabhirama

    2011-01-01

    In light of environmental apprehension, supercritical fluid technology (SFT) exhibits excellent opportunities to accomplish key objectives in the drug delivery sector. Supercritical fluid extraction using carbon dioxide (CO(2)) has been recognized as a green technology. It is a clean and versatile solvent with gas-like diffusivity and liquid-like density in the supercritical phase, which has provided an excellent alternative to the use of chemical solvents. The present commentary provides an overview of different techniques using supercritical fluids and their future opportunity for the drug delivery industry. Some of the emerging applications of SFT in pharmaceuticals, such as particle design, drug solubilization, inclusion complex, polymer impregnation, polymorphism, drug extraction process, and analysis, are also covered in this review. The data collection methods are based on the recent literature related to drug delivery systems using SFT platforms. SFT has become a much more versatile and environmentally attractive technology that can handle a variety of complicated problems in pharmaceuticals. This cutting-edge technology is growing predominantly to surrogate conventional unit operations in relevance to the pharmaceutical production process. Supercritical fluid technology has recently drawn attention in the field of pharmaceuticals. It is a distinct conception that utilizes the solvent properties of supercritical fluids above their critical temperature and pressure, where they exhibit both liquid-like and gas-like properties, which can enable many pharmaceutical applications. For example, the liquid-like properties provide benefits in extraction processes of organic solvents or impurities, drug solubilization, and polymer plasticization, and the gas-like features facilitate mass transfer processes. It has become a much more versatile and environmentally attractive technology that can handle a variety of complicated problems in pharmaceuticals. This review is

  20. [Extraction of lobetyolin from codonopsis with supercritical CO2].

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongju; Li, Shufen; Min, Jiang; Bao, Xiaomei

    2009-03-01

    To develop a green and rapid method for extraction of lobetyolin from C. pilosula. Extraction of lobetyolin from C. pilosula with supercritical carbon dioxide in the presence of ethanol was studied. The effects of pressure, temperature, volume of cosolvent and extraction time on efficiency and their interactive relationships were discussed, based on central composite design and response surface methodology (RSM). The key effect factor was volume of cosolvent. The extraction yield of lobetyolin was 0.078 6 mg x g(-1) when C. pilosula (40-60 mesh) was extracted at 30 MPa, 60 degrees C and 2 L x min(-1) (as CO2 in normal pressure and temperature) for 100 minutes with supercritical CO2 and 1 mL x min(-1) ethanol as dynamic cosolvent. This result is better than that obtained from traditional method. Therefore, the optimized process is valuable for extraction of lobetyolin from C. pilosula.

  1. Application of supercritical fluid extraction in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Khosravi-Darani, K; Vasheghani-Farahani, E

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper recent investigations on the applications of supercritical fluid extraction (SCE) from post fermentation biomass or in situ extraction of inhibitory fermentation products as a promising method for increasing the yield of extraction have been reviewed. Although supercritical CO2 (SC-CO2) is unfriendly, or even toxic, for some living cells and precludes direct fermentation in dense CO2, it does not rule out other useful applications for in situ extraction of inhibitory fermentation products and fractional extraction of biomass constituents. This technique is a highly desirable method for fractional extraction of biomass constituents, and intracellular metabolites due to the potential of system modification by physical parameters and addition of co-solvents to selectively extract compounds of different polarity, volatility and hydrophilicity without any contamination.

  2. RPCSIM-SCO2 (Reactor Power and Control SIMulator for Supercritical CO2)

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Steven A.

    2012-09-12

    The RPCSIM-SCO2 code performs a dynamic simulation of a supercritical CO2 (carbon dioxide) Brayton cycle loop. The code is based on the MathLabTM program SimulinkTM from Mathworks. The Supercritical CO2 (S-CO2) model uses direct calls to the National Institute of Standards Refprop 9.0 Fortran library for the Equation-of-State (EOS) model for the CO2 working fluid (Lemmon, 2010). The calls to Refprop are made in the form of Simulink s-Functions that use a C interface to directly call the compiled Refprop fortran program library functions. Minor changes to the code can be made to use other working fluids. The code is intended to be used to perform many different types of dynamic cycle analysis for supercritical CO2 power producing systems. The code will calculate the transient temperature and pressure and all other thermodynamic properties at the inlet and outlet of each component given user supplied inputs such as rotor shaft speed, and heater power.

  3. Eliminating Glutaraldehyde from Crosslinked Collagen Films using Supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Casali, Dominic M; Yost, Michael J; Matthews, Michael A

    2017-09-04

    Collagen has received considerable attention as a biomaterial for tissue engineering because of its low immunogenicity, controllable biodegradation, and ability to influence cell growth and proliferation. Frequently, collagen scaffolds require crosslinking to improve mechanical strength, requiring agents like glutaraldehyde that have high residual cytotoxicity. A novel method for extracting residual glutaraldehyde from crosslinked collagen films with supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2 ) is presented. CO2 is a non-toxic, non-flammable substance that is relatively inert and can be used to process biomaterials at mild pressures and physiologic temperatures. In this work, it was first determined that type I collagen is chemically compatible with both liquid and supercritical CO2 . Treated collagen showed minimal changes in physico-chemical properties as determined by differential scanning calorimetry, gel electrophoresis, and circular dichroism. CO2 was subsequently used to extract residual glutaraldehyde from crosslinked collagen films. Glutaraldehyde concentration was reduced by over 95%, from over 20 ppm before treatment to about 1 ppm, in only 1 hour. CO2 treatment caused negligible alteration of thermal stability, but did significantly increase film stiffness and tensile strength. However, these changes were minor compared to heat-based removal of glutaraldehyde. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Enhancing residual trapping of supercritical CO2 via cyclic injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herring, Anna L.; Andersson, Linnéa.; Wildenschild, Dorthe

    2016-09-01

    We utilize synchrotron X-ray tomographic imaging to investigate the pore-scale characteristics and residual trapping of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) over the course of multiple drainage-imbibition (D-I) cycles in Bentheimer sandstone cores. Capillary pressure measurements are paired with X-ray image-derived saturation and connectivity metrics which describe the extent of drainage and subsequent residual (end of imbibition) scCO2 trapping. For the first D-I cycle, residual scCO2 trapping is suppressed due to high imbibition capillary number (Ca ≈ 10-6); however, residual scCO2 trapping dramatically increases for subsequent D-I cycles carried out at the same Ca value. This behavior is not predicted by conventional multiphase trapping theory. The magnitude of scCO2 trapping increase is hysteretic and depends on the relative extent of the sequential drainage processes. The hysteretic pore-scale behavior of the scCO2-brine-sandstone system observed in this study suggests that cyclic multiphase flow could potentially be used to increase scCO2 trapping for sequestration applications.

  5. Recovery of Minerals in Martian Soils Via Supercritical Fluid Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debelak, Kenneth A.; Roth, John A.

    2001-03-01

    We are investigating the use of supercritical fluids to extract mineral and/or carbonaceous material from Martian surface soils and its igneous crust. Two candidate supercritical fluids are carbon dioxide and water. The Martian atmosphere is composed mostly of carbon dioxide (approx. 95.3%) and could therefore provide an in-situ source of carbon dioxide. Water, although present in the Martian atmosphere at only approx. 0.03%, is also a candidate supercritical solvent. Previous work done with supercritical fluids has focused primarily on their solvating properties with organic compounds. Interestingly, the first work reported by Hannay and Hogarth at a meeting of the Royal Society of London in 1879 observed that increasing or decreasing the pressure caused several inorganic salts e.g., cobalt chloride, potassium iodide, and potassium bromide, to dissolve or precipitate in supercritical ethanol. In high-pressure boilers, silica, present in most boiler feed waters, is dissolved in supercritical steam and transported as dissolved silica to the turbine blades. As the pressure is reduced the silica precipitates onto the turbine blades eventually requiring the shutdown of the generator. In supercritical water oxidation processes for waste treatment, dissolved salts present a similar problem. The solubility of silicon dioxide (SiO2) in supercritical water is shown. The solubility curve has a shape characteristic of supercritical systems. At a high pressure (greater than 1750 atmospheres) increasing the temperature results in an increase in solubility of silica, while at low pressures, less than 400 atm., the solubility decreases as temperature increases. There are only a few studies in the literature where supercritical fluids are used in extractive metallurgy. Bolt modified the Mond process in which supercritical carbon monoxide was used to produce nickel carbonyl (Ni(CO)4). Tolley and Tester studied the solubility of titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) in supercritical CO2

  6. Supercritical fluid technology

    SciTech Connect

    Penninger, J.M.L.; McHugh, M.A.; Radosz, M.; Krukonis, V.J.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the state-of-the-art in the science and technology of supercritical fluid (scf) processing. Current research as described in the book, focuses on developments in equations of state for binary and multicomponent mixtures (including polymer solutions), solubility measurements at near-critical conditions, measurements of critical properties of binary mixtures and their correlation with equations of state. Progress in thermodynamics, coupled with advances in the design and construction of high pressure equipment, has opened up a wide avenue of commercial application (e.g. decaffeination of coffee beans, extractions of flavours and spices, purification of pharmaceutical products, separations of polymeric materials, deodorization and deacidification of vegetable oils, fractionation of fatty acids, coal liquefaction, wood delignitication, etc.)

  7. Sorption Phase of Supercritical CO2 in Silica Aerogel: Experiments and Mesoscale Computer Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rother, Gernot; Vlcek, Lukas; Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S; Chialvo, Ariel A; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Banuelos, Jose Leo; Wallacher, Dirk; Grimm, Nico; Cole, David

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of supercritical CO2 in nanoporous silica aerogel was investigated by a combination of experiments and molecular-level computer modeling. High-pressure gravimetric and vibrating tube densimetry techniques were used to measure the mean pore fluid density and excess sorption at 35 C and 50 C and pressures of 0-200 bar. Densification of the pore fluid was observed at bulk fluid densities below 0.7 g/cm3. Far above the bulk fluid density, near-zero sorption or weak depletion effects were measured, while broad excess sorption maxima form in the vicinity of the bulk critical density region. The CO2 sorption properties are very similar for two aerogels with different bulk densities of 0.1 g/cm3 and 0.2 g/cm3, respectively. The spatial distribution of the confined supercritical fluid was analyzed in terms of sorption- and bulk-phase densities by means of the Adsorbed Phase Model (APM), which used data from gravimetric sorption and small-angle neutron scattering experiments. To gain more detailed insight into supercritical fluid sorption, large-scale lattice gas GCMC simulations were utilized and tuned to resemble the experimental excess sorption data. The computed three-dimensional pore fluid density distributions show that the observed maximum of the excess sorption near the critical density originates from large density fluctuations pinned to the pore walls. At this maximum, the size of these fluctuations is comparable to the prevailing pore sizes.

  8. Polymeric nanoporous materials fabricated with supercritical CO2 and CO2-expanded liquids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aijuan; Zhang, Qingkun; Bai, Hua; Li, Lei; Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Both academia and industries have put great efforts into developing non-destructive technologies for the fabrication of polymeric nanoporous materials. Such non-destructive technologies developed with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and CO2-expanded liquids (CXLs) have been attracting more and more attention because they have been demonstrated to be green and effective media for porous polymer preparation and processing. In this tutorial review, we present several such new technologies with scCO2 and CXLs, which have the capacity to prepare polymeric nanoporous materials with unique morphologies. The fabricated nanoporous polymers have significantly improved the performance of polymeric monoliths and films, and have found wide applications as templates, antireflection coatings, low-k materials, tissue engineering scaffolds and filtration membranes. This tutorial review also introduces the associated characterization methods, including the imaging, scattering and physisorption techniques.

  9. Electrochemical Reduction of Protic Supercritical CO2 on Copper Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Melchaeva, Olga; Voyame, Patrick; Bassetto, Victor Costa; Prokein, Michael; Renner, Manfred; Weidner, Eckhard; Petermann, Marcus; Battistel, Alberto

    2017-09-22

    The electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide is usually studied in aqueous solutions under ambient conditions. However, the main disadvantages of this method are high hydrogen evolution and low faradaic efficiencies of carbon-based products. Supercritical CO2 (scCO2 ) can be used as a solvent itself to suppresses hydrogen evolution and tune the carbon-based product yield; however, it has received little attention for this purpose. Therefore, the focus of this study was on the electrochemical reduction of scCO2 . The conductivity of scCO2 was increased through the addition of supporting electrolyte and a cosolvent (acetonitrile). Furthermore, the addition of protic solutions of different pH to scCO2 was investigated. 1 m H2 SO4 , trifluoroethanol, H2 O, KOH, and CsHCO3 solutions were used to determine the effect on current density, faradaic efficiency, and selectivity of the scCO2 reduction. The reduction of scCO2 to methanol and ethanol are reported for the first time. However, methane and ethylene were not observed. Additionally, corrosion of the Cu electrode was noticed. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. SAXS investigation on aggregation phenomena in supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Lo Celso, F; Triolo, A; Triolo, F; Donato, D I; Steinhart, M; Kriechbaum, M; Amenitsch, H; Triolo, R

    2002-06-01

    Synchrotron Small-Angle X-Ray scattering (SAXS) measurements on aggregate formation of a Polyvinyl acetate- b-Perfluoro octyl acrylate (PVAc- b-PFOA) block copolymer in supercritical CO(2) are here reported. Experiments were carried out for a series of different thermodynamic conditions, changing the solvent density by profiling both the pressure at constant temperature and the temperature at constant pressure. This block copolymer and in general fluorocarbon-hydrocarbon di-blocks form aggregates depending on the value of CO(2) density. A sharp transition between monomers dissolved as random coils and micelles characterized by a solvophilic shell and a solvophobic core occurs when the CO(2) density reaches a critical value. Results of critical micellization density (CMD) derived from pressure and temperature ramps experiment along with the comparison with previous SANS results are here reported to give additional experimental support to the solvent density-driven aggregation process.

  11. Extraction of oil from wheat germ by supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Piras, Alessandra; Rosa, Antonella; Falconieri, Danilo; Porcedda, Silvia; Dessì, Maria A; Marongiu, Bruno

    2009-07-15

    This study examined the supercritical fluid extraction of wheat germ oil. The effects of pressure (200-300 bar at 40 degrees C) and extraction time on the oil quality/quantity were studied. A comparison was also made between the relative qualities of material obtained by SFE and by organic solvent extraction. The extracts were analyzed for alpha-tocopherol and polyunsaturated fatty acid content. The maximum wheat germ oil yield at about 9% was obtained with supercritical carbon dioxide extraction at 300 bar, while fatty acid and alpha-tocopherol composition of the extracts was not remarkable affected by either pressure or the extraction method.

  12. Acoustic emission monitoring of hydraulic fracturing laboratory experiment with supercritical and liquid CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Aoyagi, Kazuhei; Niwa, Tomoya; Chen, Youqing; Murata, Sumihiko; Chen, Qu; Nakayama, Yoshiki

    2012-08-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is often used for enhanced oil recovery in depleted petroleum reservoirs, and its behavior in rock is also of interest in CO2 capture and storage projects. CO2 usually becomes supercritical (SC-CO2) at depths greater than 1,000 m, while it is liquid (L-CO2) at low temperatures. The viscosity of L-CO2 is one order lower than that of normal liquid water, and that of SC-CO2 is much lower still. To clarify fracture behavior induced with injection of the low viscosity fluids, we conducted hydraulic fracturing experiments using 17 cm cubic granite blocks. The AE sources with the SC- and L-CO2 injections tend to distribute in a larger area than those with water injection, and furthermore, SC-CO2 tended to generate cracks extending more three dimensionally rather than along a flat plane than L-CO2. It was also found that the breakdown pressures for SC- and L-CO2 injections are expected to be considerably lower than for water.

  13. Solvation of Esters and Ketones in Supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Kajiya, Daisuke; Imanishi, Masayoshi; Saitow, Ken-ichi

    2016-02-04

    Vibrational Raman spectra for the C═O stretching modes of three esters with different functional groups (methyl, a single phenyl, and two phenyl groups) were measured in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2). The results were compared with Raman spectra for three ketones involving the same functional groups, measured at the same thermodynamic states in scCO2. The peak frequencies of the Raman spectra of these six solute molecules were analyzed by decomposition into the attractive and repulsive energy components, based on the perturbed hard-sphere theory. For all solute molecules, the attractive energy is greater than the repulsive energy. In particular, a significant difference in the attractive energies of the ester-CO2 and ketone-CO2 systems was observed when the methyl group is attached to the ester or ketone. This difference was significantly reduced in the solute systems with a single phenyl group and was completely absent in those with two phenyl groups. The optimized structures among the solutes and CO2 molecules based on quantum chemical calculations indicate that greater attractive energy is obtained for a system where the oxygen atom of the ester is solvated by CO2 molecules.

  14. Alteration of bentonite when contacted with supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinseok, K.; Jo, H. Y.; Yun, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    Deep saline formations overlaid by impermeable caprocks with a high sealing capacity are attractive CO2 storage reservoirs. Shales, which consist of mainly clay minerals, are potential caprocks for the CO2 storage reservoirs. The properties of clay minerals in shales may affect the sealing capacity of shales. In this study, changes in clay minerals' properties when contacted with supercritical (SC) CO2 at various conditions were investigated. Bentonite, whichis composed of primarily montmorillonite, was used as the clay material in this study. Batch reactor tests on wet bentonite samples in the presence of SC CO2 with or without aqueous phases were conducted at high pressure (12 MPa) and moderate temperature (50 oC) conditions for a week. Results show that the bentonite samples obtained from the tests with SC CO2 had less change in porosity than those obtained from the tests without SC CO2 (vacuum-drying) at a given reaction time, indicating that the bentonite samples dried in the presence of SC CO2 maintained their structure. These results suggest that CO2 molecules can diffuse into interlayer of montmorillonite, which is a primary mineral of bentonite, and form a single CO2 molecule layer or double CO2 molecule layers. The CO2 molecules can displace water molecules in the interlayer, resulting in maintaining the interlayer spacing when dehydration occurs. Noticeable changes in reacted bentonite samples obtained from the tests with an aqueous phase (NaCl, CaCl2, or sea water) are decreases in the fraction of plagioclase and pyrite and formation of carbonate minerals (i.e., calcite and dolomite) and halite. In addition, no significant exchanges of Na or Ca on the exchangeable complex of the montmorillonite in the presence of SC CO2 occurred, resulting in no significant changes in the swelling capacity of bentonite samples after reacting with SC CO2 in the presence of aqueous phases. These results might be attributed by the CO2 molecule layer, which prevents

  15. Supercritical Fluid Reactions for Coal Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, Charles A

    1997-07-01

    Exciting opportunities exist for the application of supercritical fluid (SCF) reactions for the pre-treatment of coal. Utilizing reactants which resemble the organic nitrogen containing components of coal, we propose to develop a method to tailor chemical reactions in supercritical fluid solvents for the specific application of coal denitrogenation. The Diels-Alder reaction of anthracene and 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) was chosen as the model system and was investigated in supercritical carbon dioxide. Kinetic data have been previously collected for pure CO2 at 40C and pressures between the critical pressure of CO2 (73.8 bar) and 216 bar. These data support the theory of local density enhancements suggested in the literature. Data taken at 50C and pressures ranging from 70 bar to 195 bar are currently reported; they do not exhibit the molecular clustering evident closer to the critical temperature. The data taken at 40C are now being used to construct mathematical forms which can model these pressure-induced kinetic changes. One promising avenue of investigation involves treating the supercritical medium as a dense gas, which allows a kinetic model based on high reference pressure fugacity coefficients to be derived.

  16. Compositional changes of reservoir rocks through the injection of supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherf, Ann-Kathrin; Schulz, Hans-Martin; Zetzl, Carsten; Smirnova, Irina; Andersen, Jenica; Vieth, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    The European project CO2SINK is the first project on the on-shore underground storage of carbon dioxide in Europe. CO2SINK is part of the ongoing efforts to understand the impact, problems, and likelihood of using deep saline aquifers for long term storage of CO2. In Ketzin (north-east Germany, 40 km west of Berlin) a saline sandstone aquifer of the younger Triassic (Stuttgart Formation) has been chosen as a reservoir for the long-term storage of carbon dioxide. Our monitoring focuses on the composition and mobility of the organic carbon pools within the saline aquifer and their changes due to the storage of carbon dioxide. Supercritical carbon dioxide is known as an excellent solvent of non- to moderately polar organic compounds, depending on temperature and pressure (Hawthorne, 1990). The extraction of organic matter (OM) from reservoir rock, using multiple extraction methods, allows insight into the composition of the OM and the biomarker inventory of the deep biosphere. The extraction of reservoir rock using supercritical CO2 may additionally simulate the impact of CO2 storage on the deep biosphere by the possible mobilisation of OM. We will present compound specific results from laboratory CO2 extraction experiments on reservoir rocks from the CO2 storage site in Ketzin, Germany. A total of five rock samples (silt and sandstones) from the injection well and two observation wells were applied to supercritical CO2 extraction. In the experimental setup, a supercritical fluid extractor is used to simulate the conditions within the saline aquifer. The results show distinct quantitative and qualitative differences in extraction yields between the rock samples. This may be due to differences in mineralogy and porosity (12 - 27%; Norden et al., 2007a, b, c), which seem to be extraction-controlling key factors. Furthermore, the results illustrate that the amount of extracted materials depends on the length of the time interval in which CO2 flows through the rock

  17. Measuring water adsorption on mineral surfaces in air, CO2, and supercritical CO2 with a quartz-crystal microbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, C. R.; Wells, R. K.; Burton, P. D.; Heath, J. E.; Dewers, T. A.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon sequestration via underground storage in geologic formations is a proposed approach for reducing industrial CO2 emissions. However, current models for carbon injection and long-term storage of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) do not consider the development and stability of adsorbed water films at the scCO2-hydrophilic mineral interface. The thickness and properties of the water films control the surface tension and wettability of the mineral surface, and on the core scale, affect rock permeability, saturation, and capillary properties. The film thickness is strongly dependent upon the activity of water in the supercritical fluid, which will change as initially anhydrous scCO2 absorbs water from formation brine. As described in a companion paper by the coauthors, the thickness of the adsorbed water layer is controlled by the disjoining pressure; structural and van der Waals components dominate at low water activity, while electrostatic forces become more important with increasing film thickness (higher water activities). As scCO2 water activity and water layer thickness increase, concomitant changes in mineral surface properties and reservoir/caprock hydrologic properties will affect the mobility of the aqueous phase and of scCO2. Moreover, the development of a water layer may be critical to mineral dissolution reactions in scCO2. Here, we describe the use of a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) to monitor adsorption of water by mineral surfaces. QCMs utilize a piezoelectrically-stimulated quartz wafer to measure adsorbed or deposited mass via changes in vibrational frequency. When used to measure the mass of adsorbed liquid films, the frequency response of the crystal must be corrected for the viscoelastic, rather than elastic, response of the adsorbed layer. Results are presented for adsorption to silica in N2 and CO2 at one bar, and in scCO2. Additional data are presented for water uptake by clays deposited on a QCM wafer. In this case, water uptake occurs by the

  18. Diffusion coefficients of phenylbutazone in supercritical CO2 and in ethanol.

    PubMed

    Kong, Chang Yi; Watanabe, Kou; Funazukuri, Toshitaka

    2013-03-01

    The diffusion coefficients D(12) of phenylbutazone at infinite dilution in supercritical CO(2) were measured by the chromatographic impulse response (CIR) method. The measurements were carried out over the temperature range from 308.2 to 343.2 K at pressures up to 40.0 MPa. In addition, the D(12) data of phenylbutazone at infinite dilution in ethanol were also measured by the Taylor dispersion method at 298.2-333.2K and at atmospheric pressure. The D(12) value of phenylbutazone increased from 4.45×10(-10) m(2) s(-1) at 298.2 K and 0.1 MPa in ethanol to about 1.43×10(-8) m(2) s(-1) at 343.2 K and 14.0 MPa in supercritical CO(2). It was found that all diffusion data of phenylbutazone measured in this study in supercritical CO(2) and in ethanol can be satisfactorily represented by the hydrodynamic equation over a wide range of fluid viscosity from supercritical state to liquid state with average absolute relative deviation of 5.4% for 112 data points. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Supercritical fluid impregnation of polyethylene films, a new approach to studying equilibria in matrices; the hydrogen bonding of fluoroalcohols to (η 5-C 5Me 5)Ir(CO) 2 and the effect on CH activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Andrew I.; Kazarian, Sergei G.; Poliakoff, Martyn

    1993-04-01

    Polyethylene (PE) film is used as a matrix for studying temperature-dependent equilibria by IR spectroscopy; the film is impregnated with Cp*Ir(CO) 2 (Cp*=η 5-C 5Me 5) using supercritical CO 2 and subsequently saturated with HOR F (R F=(CF 3) 2CH or (CF 3) 3C). At 200 K, the equilibrium between Cp*Ip(CO) 2 and the hydrogen-bonded complex, Cp*Ir(CO) 2…HOR F, is frozen out and can be disturbed photochemically, because Cp*Ir(CO) 2 is more efficient than Cp*Ir(CO) 2…HOR F for CH activation of polyethylene.

  20. CFD analysis of supercritical CO2 used as HTF in a solar tower receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldán, M. I.; Fernández-Reche, J.

    2016-05-01

    The relative cost of a solar receiver can be minimized by the selection of an appropriate heat transfer fluid capable of achieving high receiver efficiencies. In a conventional central receiver system, the concentrated solar energy is transferred from the receiver tube walls to the heat transfer fluid (HTF), which passes through a heat exchanger to generate steam for a Rankine cycle. Thus, higher working fluid temperature is associated with greater efficiency in receiver and power cycle. Emerging receiver designs that can enable higher efficiencies using advanced power cycles, such as supercritical CO2 (s-CO2) closed-loop Brayton cycles, include direct heating of s-CO2 in tubular receiver designs capable of withstanding high internal fluid pressures (around 20 MPa) and temperatures (900 K). Due to the high pressures required and the presence of moving components installed in pipelines (ball-joints and/or flexible connections), the use of s-CO2 presents many technical challenges due to the compatibility of seal materials and fluid leakages of the moving connections. These problems are solved in solar tower systems because the receiver is fixed. In this regard, a preliminary analysis of a tubular receiver with s-CO2 as HTF has been developed using the design of a molten-salt receiver which was previously tested at Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA). Therefore, a simplified CFD model has been carried out in this study in order to analyze the feasibility of s-CO2 as HTF in solar towers. Simulation results showed that the heat gained by s-CO2 was around 75% greater than the one captured by molten salts (fluid inlet temperature of 715 K), but at a pressure range of 7.5-9.7 MPa. Thus, the use of s-CO2 as HTF in solar tower receivers appears to be a promising alternative, taking into account both the operating conditions required and their maintenance cost.

  1. [Effect of entrainer on supercritical CO2 for extraction of tradition and herbal drugs].

    PubMed

    Xi, Yanbin; Xia, Xiaohui; Jin, Ran; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Liqin; Tang, Shihuan

    2009-06-01

    Type, mode of affiliating, mechanism of action of entrainer in Supercritical CO2 on extraction of Chinese traditional and herbal drugs were briefly reviewed. Application of entrainer in Supercritical CO2 on extraction of flavones, terpenes, sterols, and saponins in Chinese traditional and herbal drugs were recommended in particular. Some problems and directions in research of entrainer in Supercritical CO2 on extraction of Chinese traditional and herbal drugs were shown in this paper.

  2. High Resolution X-ray CMT Imaging of Supercritical CO2 in Porous Media: Experimental Challenges, Solutions, and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herring, A. L.; Andersson, L.; Newell, D. L.; Carey, J. W.; Wildenschild, D.

    2013-12-01

    Geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration has been proposed as a climate change mitigation strategy to limit emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere from large fossil-fuel burning CO2 point sources; however, there are concerns associated with the long-term stability of a mobile subsurface CO2 plume. Capillary trapping of supercritical CO2 (scCO2), wherein the CO2 is held within the pore structure of the geologic matrix by capillary forces, is a more secure form of subsurface storage than structural trapping, which relies on an impermeable caprock to contain the buoyant CO2 plume. To understand the multiphase physics of CO2 transport, and to subsequently produce quantitative estimates of potential CO2 capillary trapping, it is necessary to study field, core, and pore-scale processes. X-ray computed microtomography (x-ray CMT) allows for three-dimensional (3D) in-situ visualization of fluid phases within and the physical structure of a porous medium at the pore-scale. We have designed and built a mobile experimental set-up capable of running at pressures up to 2000 PSI and temperatures up to 50°C, made with materials that are compatible with corrosive fluids. Our experimental procedure includes pressurizing, mixing, and separating fluids; and subsequently running immiscible drainage and imbibition flow experiments with brine and supercritical CO2. With this set-up and procedure, we successfully conducted a brine-scCO2 drainage experiment in Bentheimer sandstone at 1200 PSI and 36°C, and confirmed and quantified CO2 flow in the sandstone core via synchrotron-based x-ray CMT with a resolution of 4.65 μm at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. We have proven that we can observe, on a pore-scale basis, the movement of supercritical CO2 within a porous media. The properties of supercritical CO2 (e.g. viscosity, density, interfacial tension and solubility in brine) vary significantly with changes in pressure and temperature; consequently, precise

  3. Formation of Magnesite at Low Temperature in Mineral:Supercritical CO2 Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qafoku, O.; Hu, J.; Arey, B.; Liu, J.; Ilton, E. S.; Felmy, A.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most promising options for mitigating the impacts of greenhouse gases on global warming is storage and sequestration of the anthropogenic CO2 in deep geologic formations. Consequently, evaluating mineral-fluid interaction in aqueous systems saturated with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) has been the focus for subsurface CO2 storage research. An important factor in assessing mineral-fluid interactions is the potential for the formation of stable divalent metal carbonates, principally Ca and Mg, which can immobilize the disposed CO2 as mineral precipitates. The formation of some of these phases, especially the Mg anhydrous phase magnesite (MgCO3), has been hindered by slow precipitation kinetics owing to the strong affinity of Mg2+ ion for the waters of hydration. Understanding conditions that lead to formation of magnesite at temperatures significant to subsurface disposal of CO2 can be substantial in the development of efficient carbon sequestration techniques. Here we present recently obtained experimental data on the formation of magnesite at low temperature (as low as 350C) and microscopy data that can elucidate factors that might contribute to magnesite formation. The experimental studies were conducted over a range of temperature, pressure, pH, and initial Mg(HCO3)2 concentration to map out the specific solution phase conditions which result in nucleation of magnesite in aqueous solution saturated with scCO2.

  4. The Role of H2O in the Carbonation of Forsterite in Supercritical CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Hu, Jian Z.; Turcu, Romulus VF; Rosso, Kevin M.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Wang, Chong M.; Sears, Jesse A.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hoyt, David W.

    2011-07-01

    The water concentration dependence of forsterite carbonation in supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at 80°C and 76 bars was investigated by a combination of NMR, XRD, TEM and XPS. Reaction products were not detected using scCO2 alone without added H2O. When trace amounts of water were included, limited reaction was observed. Below saturation, reaction products were a mixture of partially hydrated/hydroxylated magnesium carbonates and hydroxylated silica species that were mainly in an amorphous state, forming a non-resolved layer on the forsterite surface. At water concentrations above saturation, where forsterite was in contact with both a CO2-saturated aqueous fluid and a water-saturated scCO2 fluid, solid reaction products were magnesite (MgCO3) and an amorphous polymerized SiO2 dominated by Q4, and to a lesser extent by Q3 silica coordination. Formation of these phases implies H2O initially bound in precursor hydrated/hydroxylated reaction products was liberated, inducing further reaction. Hence, for a given fluid/mineral ratio there is a water threshold above which a significant portion of the water serves in a catalytic role where more extensive carbonation reaction occurs. Defining the role of water, even in low water content environments, is therefore critical to determining the long term impact of CO2 reactivity in the subsurface.

  5. Supercritical CO(2) extraction of beta-carotene and lycopene from tomato paste waste.

    PubMed

    Baysal, T; Ersus, S; Starmans, D A

    2000-11-01

    Lycopene and beta-carotene were extracted from tomato paste waste using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO(2)). To optimize supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) results for the isolation of lycopene and beta-carotene, a factorial designed experiment was conducted. The factors assessed were the temperature of the extractor (35, 45, 55, and 65 degrees C), the pressure of the extraction fluid (200, 250, and 300 bar), addition of cosolvent (5, 10, and 15% ethanol), extraction time (1, 2, and 3 h), and CO(2) flow rate (2, 4, and 8 kg/h). The total amounts of lycopene and beta-carotene in the tomato paste waste, extracts, and residues were determined by HPLC. A maximum of 53.93% of lycopene was extracted by SC-CO(2) in 2 h (CO(2) flow rate = 4 kg/h) at 55 degrees C and 300 bar, with the addition of 5% ethanol as a cosolvent. Half of the initially present beta-carotene was extracted in 2 h (flow rate = 4 kg/h), at 65 degrees C and 300 bar, also with the addition of 5% ethanol.

  6. Research on the physical properties of supercritical CO2 and the log evaluation of CO2-bearing volcanic reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Baozhi; Lei, Jian; Zhang, Lihua; Guo, Yuhang

    2017-10-01

    CO2-bearing reservoirs are difficult to distinguish from other natural gas reservoirs during gas explorations. Due to the lack of physical parameters for supercritical CO2, particularly neutron porosity, at present a hydrocarbon gas log evaluation method is used to evaluate CO2-bearing reservoirs. The differences in the physical properties of hydrocarbon and CO2 gases have led to serious errors. In this study, the deep volcanic rock of the Songliao Basin was the research area. In accordance with the relationship between the density and acoustic velocity of supercritical CO2 and temperature and pressure, the regularity between the CO2 density and acoustic velocity, and the depth of the area was established. A neutron logging simulation was completed based on a Monte Carlo method. Through the simulation of the wet limestone neutron logging, the relationship between the count rate ratio of short and long space detectors and the neutron porosity was acquired. Then, the nature of the supercritical CO2 neutron moderation was obtained. With consideration given to the complexity of the volcanic rock mineral composition, a volcanic rock volume model was established, and the matrix neutron and density parameters were acquired using the ECS log. The properties of CO2 were applied in the log evaluation of the CO2-bearing volcanic reservoirs in the southern Songliao Basin. The porosity and saturation of CO2 were obtained, and a reasonable application was achieved in the CO2-bearing reservoir.

  7. An investigation of supercritical-CO2 copper electroplating parameters for application in TSV chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao; Lai, Wei-Hong; Sanchez, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    This study uses supercritical electroplating for the filling of through silicon vias (TSVs) in chips. The present study utilizes the inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching (ICP RIE) process technique to etch the TSVs and discusses different supercritical-CO2 electroplating parameters, such as the supercritical pressure, the electroplating current density’s effect on the TSV Cu pillar filling time, the I-V curve, the electrical resistance and the hermeticity. In addition, the results for all the tests mentioned above have been compared to results from traditional electroplating techniques. For the testing, we will first discuss the hermeticity of the TSV Cu pillars, using a helium leaking test apparatus to assess the vacuum sealing of the fabricated TSV Cu pillars. In addition, this study also conducts tests for the electrical properties, which include the measurement of the electrical resistance of the TSV at both ends in the horizontal direction, followed by the passing of a high current (10 A, due to probe limitations) to check if the TSV can withstand it without burnout. Finally, the TSV is cut in half in cross-section to observe the filling of Cu pillars by the supercritical electroplating and check for voids. The important characteristic of this study is the use of the supercritical electroplating process without the addition of any surfactants to aid the filling of the TSVs, but by taking advantage of the high permeability and low surface tension of supercritical fluids to achieve our goal. The results of this investigation point to a supercritical pressure of 2000 psi and a current density of 3 A dm-2 giving off the best electroplating filling and hermeticity, while also being able to withstand a high current of 10 A, with a relatively short electroplating time of 3 h (when compared to our own traditional dc electroplating).

  8. Supercritical CO2 extraction of essential oils from Chamaecyparis obtusa.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yinzhe; Han, Dandan; Tian, Minglei; Row, Kyung-Ho

    2010-03-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) extraction and hydrodistillation (HD) were used to determine the essential oil composition of the trunks and leaves of Chamaecyparis obtusa. The optimal extraction conditions for the oil yield within the experimental range of variables examined were temperature 50 degrees C, pressure 12 MPa, carbon dioxide flow rate 40 mL/min and extraction time 90 min. The maximum measured extraction yield was 2.9%. Entrainer solvents, such as methanol in water, had no additional effect on the extraction of essential oils. The chemical composition of the essential oils was analyzed by GC-MS. The major components were alpha-terpinyl acetate (>10.9%), 1-muurolol (>13.2%) and elemol (>8.1%). Sesquiterpenoids formed the major class of compounds present.

  9. [Study on extracting oil of radix Angelica sinensis with supercritical CO2].

    PubMed

    Nie, Shiming; Zhang, Guizhi; Zhang, Pengtao

    2005-03-01

    To study the extraction of angelica oil by SFE-CO2 (CO2 Supercritical Fluid Extraction). Investigating the influence of the granule size of medical material, extraction temperature, extraction pressure, extraction time, releasing and separating condition on the extraction of angelica oil by the orthogonal design and other methods. The optimum extraction is as follows: the granule size of medical material, 40 mu; extraction temperature, 40 degrees C; extraction pressure, 25Mpa; extraction time, 2 hours; flow of CO2, 20 L/h; pressure of separation pot I, 8Mpa; temperature of separation pot I, 50 degrees C; pressure of separation pot II, 6Mpa; temperature of separation pot II, 50 degrees C. The optimum extraction has high extraction ratio of angelica oil. The optimum extraction is reasonable and practicable.

  10. MALEIC ANHYDRIDE HYDROGENATION OF PD/AL2O3 CATALYST UNDER SUPERCRITICAL CO2 MEDIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogenation of maleic anhydride (MA) to either y-butyrolactone of succinic anhydride over simple Pd/Al2O3 impregnated catalyst in supercritical CO2 medium has been studied at different temperatures and pressures. A comparison of the supercritical CO2 medium reaction with the c...

  11. Use of liquid/supercritical CO2 extraction process for butanol recovery from fermentation broth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In order for butanol fermentation to be a viable option, it is essential to recover it from fermentation broth using economical alternate in-situ product recovery techniques such as liquid/supercritical CO2 extraction as compared to distillation. This technique (liquid CO2 extraction & supercritical...

  12. Preliminary design of a supercritical CO2 wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Re, B.; Rurale, A.; Spinelli, A.; Guardone, A.

    2017-03-01

    The preliminary design of a test-rig for non-ideal compressible-fluid flows of carbon dioxide is presented. The test-rig is conceived to investigate supersonic flows that are relevant to the study of non-ideal compressible-fluid flows in the close proximity of the critical point and of the liquid-vapor saturation curve, to the investigation of drop nucleation in compressors operating with supercritical carbon dioxide and and to the study of flow conditions similar to those encountered in turbines for Organic Rankine Cycle applications. Three different configurations are presented and examined: a batch-operating test-rig, a closed-loop Brayton cycle and a closed-loop Rankine cycle. The latter is preferred for its versatility and for economic reasons. A preliminary design of the main components is reported, including the heat exchangers, the chiller, the pumps and the test section.

  13. Supercritical CO2 extract of Cinnamomum zeylanicum: chemical characterization and antityrosinase activity.

    PubMed

    Marongiu, Bruno; Piras, Alessandra; Porcedda, Silvia; Tuveri, Enrica; Sanjust, Enrico; Meli, Massimo; Sollai, Francesca; Zucca, Paolo; Rescigno, Antonio

    2007-11-28

    The volatile oil of the bark of Cinnamomum zeylanicum was extracted by means of supercritical CO2 fluid extraction in different conditions of pressure and temperature. Its chemical composition was characterized by GC-MS analysis. Nineteen compounds, which in the supercritical extract represented >95% of the oil, were identified. (E)-Cinnamaldehyde (77.1%), (E)-beta-caryophyllene (6.0%), alpha-terpineol (4.4%), and eugenol (3.0%) were found to be the major constituents. The SFE oil of cinnamon was screened for its biological activity about the formation of melanin in vitro. The extract showed antityrosinase activity and was able to reduce the formation of insoluble flakes of melanin from tyrosine. The oil also delayed the browning effect in apple homogenate. (E)-Cinnamaldehyde and eugenol were found to be mainly responsible of this inhibition effect.

  14. Particle seeding enhances interconnectivity in polymeric scaffolds foamed using supercritical CO(2).

    PubMed

    Collins, Niki J; Bridson, Rachel H; Leeke, Gary A; Grover, Liam M

    2010-03-01

    Foaming using supercritical CO(2) is a well-known process for the production of polymeric scaffolds for tissue engineering. However, this method typically leads to scaffolds with low pore interconnectivity, resulting in insufficient mass transport and a heterogeneous distribution of cells. In this study, microparticulate silica was added to the polymer during processing and the effects of this particulate seeding on the interconnectivity of the pore structure and pore size distribution were investigated. Scaffolds comprising polylactide and a range of silica contents (0-50 wt.%) were produced by foaming with supercritical CO(2). Scaffold structure, pore size distributions and interconnectivity were assessed using X-ray computed microtomography. Interconnectivity was also determined through physical measurements. It was found that incorporation of increasing quantities of silica particles increased the interconnectivity of the scaffold pore structure. The pore size distribution was also reduced through the addition of silica, while total porosity was found to be largely independent of silica content. Physical measurements and those derived from X-ray computed microtomography were comparable. The conclusion drawn was that the architecture of foamed polymeric scaffolds can be advantageously manipulated through the incorporation of silica microparticles. The findings of this study further establish supercritical fluid foaming as an important tool in scaffold production and show how a previous limitation can be overcome.

  15. An environmentally friendly approach for contaminants removal using supercritical CO2 for remanufacturing industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei-wei; Zhang, Bin; Li, Yan-zeng; He, Yan-ming; Zhang, Hong-chao

    2014-02-01

    The cleaning technology plays an important role in product quality during the remanufacturing processing. Remanufacturing cleaning is among the most demanding steps and is a particularly essential process in remanufacturing. In the meantime, remanufacturing cleaning is often the main source of pollution in the remanufacturing process. During the past decades, supercritical fluids due to their unique properties gained an increasingly attention in many cleaning industries. The supercritical carbon dioxide as a novel cleaning technology for remanufacturing cleaning process is discussed, which can realize cleaning and drying at the same time, promoting a greener solution for remanufacturing industry. In this paper, we reported the experimental results of the effect of some operating parameters. The CO2 at different operating pressures, temperatures and residence time was made to continuously flowing over this. The decontamination rate and amount were monitored and compared. The obtained results show that the optimum parameters were operating temperature and pressure of 60 °C and 20 MPa respectively, to have the highest decontamination rate value at the investigated experimental conditions. In additon, the success of supercritical CO2 cleaning effectively promotes the research for next-generation cleaning methods for remanufacturing industry.

  16. In situ infrared spectroscopic study of forsterite carbonation in wet supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Loring, John S; Thompson, Christopher J; Wang, Zheming; Joly, Alan G; Sklarew, Deborah S; Schaef, H Todd; Ilton, Eugene S; Rosso, Kevin M; Felmy, Andrew R

    2011-07-15

    Carbonation reactions are central to the prospect of CO(2) trapping by mineralization in geologic reservoirs. In contrast to the relevant aqueous-mediated reactions, little is known about the propensity for carbonation in the key partner fluid: supercritical carbon dioxide containing dissolved water ("wet" scCO(2)). We employed in situ mid-infrared spectroscopy to follow the reaction of a model silicate mineral (forsterite, Mg(2)SiO(4)) for 24 h with wet scCO(2) at 50 °C and 180 atm. The results show a dramatic dependence of reactivity on water concentration and the presence of liquid water on the forsterite particles. Exposure to neat scCO(2) showed no detectable carbonation reaction. At 47% and 81% water saturation, an Ångstrom-thick liquid-like water film was detected on the forsterite particles and less than 1% of the forsterite transformed. Most of the reaction occurred within the first 3 h of exposure to the fluid. In experiments at 95% saturation and with an excess of water (36% above water saturation), a nanometer-thick water film was detected, and the carbonation reaction proceeded continuously with approximately 2% and 10% conversion, respectively. Our collective results suggest constitutive links between water concentration, water film formation, reaction rate and extent, and reaction products in wet scCO(2).

  17. In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Forsterite Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Loring, John S.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Wang, Zheming; Joly, Alan G.; Sklarew, Deborah S.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2011-07-19

    Carbonation reactions are central to the prospect of CO2 trapping by mineralization in geologic reservoirs. In contrast to the relevant aqueous-mediated reactions, little is known about the propensity for carbonation in the long-term partner fluid: water-containing supercritical carbon dioxide (‘wet’ scCO2). We employed in situ mid-infrared spectroscopy to follow the reaction of a model silicate mineral (forsterite, Mg2SiO4) for 24 hr with wet scCO2 at 50°C and 180 atm, using water concentrations corresponding to 0%, 55%, 95%, and 136% saturation. Results show a dramatic dependence of reactivity on water concentration and the presence of liquid water on the forsterite particles. Exposure to neat scCO2 showed no detectable carbonation reaction. At 55% and 95% water saturation, a liquid-like thin water film was detected on the forsterite particles; less than 1% of the forsterite transformed, mostly within the first 3 hours of exposure to the fluid. At 136% saturation, where an (excess) liquid water film approximately several nanometers thick was intentionally condensed on the forsterite, the carbonation reaction proceeded continuously for 24 hr with 10% to 15% transformation. Our collective results suggest constitutive links between water concentration, water film formation, reaction rate and extent, and reaction products in wet scCO2.

  18. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W.sub.o that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W.sub.o of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions.

  19. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, J.L.; Smith, R.D.

    1993-11-30

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W[sub o] that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W[sub o] of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions. 27 figures.

  20. Partitioning of Organic Compounds between Crude Oil and Water under Supercritical CO2 Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rod, K. A.; Wang, G.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years depleted oil reservoirs have received special interest as carbon storage reservoirs because of their potential to offset costs through collaboration with enhanced oil recovery projects. Leakage of the injected CO2 may occur either as supercritical CO2 or CO2-saturated (brine) water. The injected supercritical CO2 is a nonpolar solvent that can potentially mobilize the residual oil compounds into supercritical CO2 and brine water through phase partitioning. For detailed risk assessment of CO2 leakage, various models can be used to quantify the mass of organic contaminants transported from carbon storage sites to potential receptors such as potable aquifers, in which the partition coefficients of crude oil hydrocarbons between CO2/crude oil/brines for subsurface CO2 sequestration scenarios are the key parameters controlling the fate and transport of organic contaminants along the CO2 leakage pathways. However, the solubilities of many of the oil organic compounds in brines under supercritical CO2 condition have not been yet fully determined. In this study, we developed a novel method to accurately measure the partitioning of crude oil organic compounds (BTEX, PAHs, etc.) between supercritical CO2 and brines and to study the effects of temperature, pressure, salinity, and compound's cosolvency (solubility enhancement) on the partitioning behavior of oil organic compounds along the various CO2 leakage paths in the subsurface.

  1. Instrumentation for analytical scale supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Berger, Terry A

    2015-11-20

    Analytical scale supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) is largely a sub-discipline of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), in that most of the hardware and software can be used for either technique. The aspects that separate the 2 techniques stem from the use of carbon dioxide (CO2) as the main component of the mobile phase in SFC. The high compressibility and low viscosity of CO2 mean that pumps, and autosamplers designed for HPLC either need to be modified or an alternate means of dealing with compressibility needs to be found. The inclusion of a back pressure regulator and a high pressure flow cell for any UV-Vis detector are also necessary. Details of the various approaches, problems and solutions are described. Characteristics, such as adiabatic vs. isothermal compressibility, thermal gradients, and refractive index issues are dealt with in detail. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mass spectrometry with direct supercritical fluid injection

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Udseth, H.R.

    1983-12-01

    Direct fluid injection mass spectrometry utilizes supercritical fluids for solvation and transfer of materials to a mass spectrometer chemical ionization (CI) source. Available data suggest that any material soluble in a supercritical fluid is transferred efficiently to the ionization region. Mass spectra are presented for mycotoxins of the trichothecene group obtained by use of supercritical carbon dioxide with isobutane as the CI reagent gas. Direct fluid injection MS/MS is also illustrated for major ions in the isobutane chemical ionization of T-2 toxin. The effect of pressure and temperature upon solubility in supercritical fluids is described and illustrated for diacetoxycirpenol. A potential method is also demonstrated for on-line fraction during MS analysis using pressure to control supercritical fluid solubility. Mass spectra are also presented for polar compounds, using supercritical ammonia, and the extension to complex mixtures is described. The fundamental basis and experimental requirements of the direct fluid injection process are discussed. 34 references, 11 figures, 1 table.

  3. Mass spectrometry with direct supercritical fluid injection

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Udseth, H.R.

    1983-12-01

    Direct fluid injection mass spectrometry utilizes supercritical fluids for solvation and transfer of materials to a mass spectrometer chemical ionization (CI) source. Available data suggest that any material soluble in a supercritical fluid is transferred efficiently to the ionization region. Mass spectra are presented for mycotoxins of the trichothecene group obtained by use of supercritical carbon dioxide with isobutane as the CI reagent gas. Direct fluid injection MS/MS is also illustrated for major ions in the isobutane chemical ionization of T-2 toxin. The effect of pressure and temperature upon solubility in supercritical fluids is described and illustrated for diacetoxyscirpenol. A potential method is also demonstrated for ''on-line fractionation'' during MS analysis using pressure to control supercritical fluid solubility. Mass spectra are also presented for polar compounds, using supercritical ammonia, and the extension to complex mixtures is described. The fundamental basis and experimental requirements of the direct fluid injection process are discussed. 1 figure, 11 tables.

  4. Lipidomics by Supercritical Fluid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Laboureur, Laurent; Ollero, Mario; Touboul, David

    2015-01-01

    This review enlightens the role of supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) in the field of lipid analysis. SFC has been popular in the late 1980s and 1990s before almost disappearing due to the commercial success of liquid chromatography (LC). It is only 20 years later that a regain of interest appeared when new commercial instruments were introduced. As SFC is fully compatible with the injection of extracts in pure organic solvent, this technique is perfectly suitable for lipid analysis and can be coupled with either highly universal (UV or evaporative light scattering) or highly specific (mass spectrometry) detection methods. A short history of the use of supercritical fluids as mobile phase for the separation oflipids will be introduced first. Then, the advantages and drawbacks of SFC are discussed for each class of lipids (fatty acyls, glycerolipids, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, sterols, prenols, polyketides) defined by the LIPID MAPS consortium. PMID:26090714

  5. Lipidomics by Supercritical Fluid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Laboureur, Laurent; Ollero, Mario; Touboul, David

    2015-06-17

    This review enlightens the role of supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) in the field of lipid analysis. SFC has been popular in the late 1980s and 1990s before almost disappearing due to the commercial success of liquid chromatography (LC). It is only 20 years later that a regain of interest appeared when new commercial instruments were introduced. As SFC is fully compatible with the injection of extracts in pure organic solvent, this technique is perfectly suitable for lipid analysis and can be coupled with either highly universal (UV or evaporative light scattering) or highly specific (mass spectrometry) detection methods. A short history of the use of supercritical fluids as mobile phase for the separation oflipids will be introduced first. Then, the advantages and drawbacks of SFC are discussed for each class of lipids (fatty acyls, glycerolipids, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, sterols, prenols, polyketides) defined by the LIPID MAPS consortium.

  6. Experimental insights into the geochemistry and mineralogy of a granite-hosted geothermal system injected with supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Re, C.; Kaszuba, J. P.; Moore, J.; McPherson, B. J.

    2011-12-01

    Supercritical CO2 may be a viable working fluid in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) due to its large expansivity, low viscosity, and reduced reactivity with rock as compared to water. Hydrothermal experiments are underway to evaluate the geochemical impact of using supercritical CO2 as a working fluid in granite-hosted geothermal systems. Synthetic aqueous fluid and a model granite are reacted at 250 °C and 250 bars in a rocking autoclave and Au-Ti reaction cell for a minimum of 28 days (water:rock ratio of approximately 20:1). Subsequent injection of supercritical CO2 increases pressure, which decays over time as the CO2 dissolves into the aqueous fluid. Initial experiments decreased to a steady state pressure of 450 bars approximately 14 hours after injection of supercritical CO2. Post-injection reaction is allowed to continue for at least an additional 28 days. Excess CO2 is injected to produce a separate supercritical fluid phase (between 1.7 and 3.1 molal), ensuring aqueous CO2 saturation for the duration of each experiment. The granite was created using mineral separates and consists of ground (75 wt%, <45 microns) and chipped (25 wt%, 0.5-1.0 cm), sub-equal portions of quartz, perthitic potassium feldspar (~ 25 wt% albite and 75 wt% potassium feldspar), oligoclase, and a minor (4 wt%) component of Fe-rich biotite. The synthetic saline water (I = 0.12 m) contains molal quantities of Na, Cl, and HCO3 and millimolal quantities of K, SiO2, SO4, Ca, Al, and Mg, in order of decreasing molality. Aqueous fluids are sampled approximately 10 times over the course of each experiment and analyzed for total dissolved carbon and sulfide by coulometric titration, anions by ion chromatography, and major, minor, and trace cations by ICP-OES and -MS. Bench pH measurements are paired with aqueous analyses to calculate in-situ pH. Solid reactants are evaluated by SEM-EDS, XRD, and/or bulk chemical analysis before and after each experiment. Analytical data are reviewed

  7. Extractive fermentation of aroma with supercritical CO2

    PubMed

    Fabre; Condoret; Marty

    1999-08-20

    This work deals with the feasibility of achieving an extractive fermentation of 2-phenylethyl alcohol, the rose aroma, coupling fermentation with Kluyveromyces marxianus and supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) extraction. The extractive process is, in this case, of special interest due to the strong yeast inhibition by 2-phenylethyl alcohol. First results confirmed that direct SCCO2 extraction is not possible, due to a drastic CO2 effect on cell viability. It is therefore necessary to perform cell separation prior to the extraction. Aroma extraction conditions from a synthetic mixture were then optimized, a pressure of 200 bar and a temperature in the range 35-45 degrees C being chosen. Under these conditions, the distribution coefficient Kd is 2 times higher than during the extraction using a conventional organic solvent, n-hexane. Using a simple model of aroma partition between aqueous and SCCO2 phases, the parameters of a continuous extraction from a synthetic broth were defined. The two substrates, glucose and phenylalanine, are not extracted whatever the conditions. As predicted by the model, more than 90% of 2-phenylethyl alcohol can be extracted, while the extraction of ethanol, the second main product, can be easily tuned with respect to operating conditions, as a function of its influence on the fermentation. Finally, the feasibility of the aroma recovery using two depressurization steps at the outflow of the extraction vessel was demonstrated; 97% of the extracted aroma was recovered, and a mass purity of 91% was achieved. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  8. Water-in-Supercritical CO2 Microemulsion Stabilized by a Metal Complex.

    PubMed

    Luo, Tian; Zhang, Jianling; Tan, Xiuniang; Liu, Chengcheng; Wu, Tianbin; Li, Wei; Sang, Xinxin; Han, Buxing; Li, Zhihong; Mo, Guang; Xing, Xueqing; Wu, Zhonghua

    2016-10-17

    Herein we propose for the first time the utilization of a metal complex for forming water-in-supercritical CO2 (scCO2 ) microemulsions. The water solubility in the metal-complex-stabilized microemulsion is significantly improved compared with the conventional water-in-scCO2 microemulsions stabilized by hydrocarbons. Such a microemulsion provides a promising route for the in situ CO2 reduction catalyzed by a metal complex at the water/scCO2 interface.

  9. Simulation studies on Enhanced Geothermal Systems with CO2 as a working fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karra, S.; Ayling, B.; Han, W.; Lichtner, P. C.; Lu, C.; McPherson, B. J.; Mclin, K. S.; Moore, J.; Pan, F.; Rose, P. E.; Xu, T.

    2011-12-01

    Supercritical CO2 has recently been considered as a working fluid in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), given its non-ionic nature, larger expansivity and lower viscosity compared to water. In addition, an EGS with supercritical CO2 as a working fluid may also act as a mechanism for CO2 sequestration. To explore this, one must understand the various interactions that may take place between the reservoir rock and the supercritical CO2. In this work, we perform simulations in two and three dimensions using the massively parallel flow and transport code PFLOTRAN, to study these interactions under various conditions (aqueous, non-aqueous and two-phase). The two dimensional results using PFLOTRAN are compared with simulations made using the TOUGH2 code. Numerical studies examining mineral dissolution and precipitation reactions that may occur in EGS that use supercritical CO2 are also shown, in addition to preliminary indications of which well placements may enable optimal flow rates and simultaneous CO2 sequestration.

  10. High-power ultrasonic system for the enhancement of mass transfer in supercritical CO2 extraction processes.

    PubMed

    Riera, Enrique; Blanco, Alfonso; García, José; Benedito, José; Mulet, Antonio; Gallego-Juárez, Juan A; Blasco, Miguel

    2010-02-01

    Oil is an important component of almonds and other vegetable substrates that can show an influence on human health. In this work the development and validation of an innovative, robust, stable, reliable and efficient ultrasonic system at pilot scale to assist supercritical CO(2) extraction of oils from different substrates is presented. In the extraction procedure ultrasonic energy represents an efficient way of producing deep agitation enhancing mass transfer processes because of some mechanisms (radiation pressure, streaming, agitation, high amplitude vibrations, etc.). A previous work to this research pointed out the feasibility of integrating an ultrasonic field inside a supercritical extractor without losing a significant volume fraction. This pioneer method enabled to accelerate mass transfer and then, improving supercritical extraction times. To commercially develop the new procedure fulfilling industrial requirements, a new configuration device has been designed, implemented, tested and successfully validated for supercritical fluid extraction of oil from different vegetable substrates.

  11. Supercritical Fluid Reactions for Coal Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Charles A. Eckert

    1997-11-01

    Exciting opportunities exist for the application of supercritical fluid (SCF) reactions for the pre-treatment of coal. Utilizing reactants which resemble the organic nitrogen containing components of coal, we developed a method to tailor chemical reactions in supercritical fluid solvents for the specific application of coal denitrogenation. The tautomeric equilibrium of a Schiff base was chosen as one model system and was investigated in supercritical ethane and cosolvent modified supercritical ethane. The Diels-Alder reaction of anthracene and 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) was selected as a second model system, and it was investigated in supercritical carbon dioxide.

  12. Investigation of Wyoming Bentonite Hydration in Dry to Water-Saturated Supercritical CH4 and CH4/CO2 Mixtures: Implications for CO2-Enhanced Gas Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loring, J.; Thompson, C.; Ilton, E. S.; McGrail, B. P.; Schaef, T.

    2014-12-01

    Injection of CO2 into low permeability shale formations leads to additional gas recovery and reduces the flux of CO2 into the atmosphere, thus combining a strong economic incentive with a permanent storage option for CO2. Reduced formation transmissivity due to clay swelling is a concern in CO2 -enhanced gas production. Clay minerals partly determine the physical (i.e. permeability, brittleness) and certain chemical properties (i.e. wetting ability, gas adsorption) of shales, and montmorillonites are of particular interest because they swell by the uptake of species in their interlayer. In this study, the hydration and expansion of a Na-saturated montmorillonite (Na-SWy-2) in high-pressure (90 bar) and moderate temperature (50 °C) methane and mixtures of methane and carbon dioxide were investigated usingCH4 IR spectroscopic titrations andCH4 XRD. The goals were to (1) determine if the hydration/expansion behavior of the clay in supercritical methane is different than in supercritical CO2, (2) determine if methane intercalates the clay, and (3) probe the effects of increasing CO2 concentrations. IR spectra were collected as Na-SWy-2 was titrated with water under several fluid exposures: pure methane, 25, 50, and 75 mole% CO2 in methane, and pure CO2. ComplementaryCH4 XRD experiments were conducted in the same fluids at discrete dissolved water concentrations to measure the d001 values of the clay and thus its volume change on hydration and CH4 and/or CO2 intercalation. In pure methane, no direct evidence of CH4 intercalation was detected in CH bending or stretching regions of the IR spectra. Similarly, in situ XRD indicated the montmorillonite structure was stable in the presence of CH4 and no measurable changes to the basal spacing were observed. However, under low water conditions where the montmorillonite structure was partially expanded (~sub 1W), the IR data indicated a rapid intercalation of CO2 into the interlayer, even with fluid mixtures containing the

  13. PULSE RADIOLYSIS IN SUPERCRITICAL RARE GAS FLUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    HOLROYD,R.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, supercritical fluids have become quite popular in chemical and semiconductor industries for applications in chemical synthesis, extraction, separation processes, and surface cleaning. These applications are based on: the high dissolving power due to density build-up around solute molecules, and the ability to tune the conditions of a supercritical fluid, such as density and temperature, that are most suitable for a particular reaction. The rare gases also possess these properties and have the added advantage of being supercritical at room temperature. Information about the density buildup around both charged and neutral species can be obtained from fundamental studies of volume changes in the reactions of charged species in supercritical fluids. Volume changes are much larger in supercritical fluids than in ordinary solvents because of their higher compressibility. Hopefully basic studies, such as discussed here, of the behavior of charged species in supercritical gases will provide information useful for the utilization of these solvents in industrial applications.

  14. Seismic signatures of supercritical CO2 injection/drainage within brine saturated sandstone samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, S.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Rees, E. V.

    2011-12-01

    Successful sequestration of CO2 in geological formations requires high-resolution monitoring of injected CO2 location and accurate determination of CO2 saturation in the pore space, typically using seismic methods. Although understanding of the rock physics (relationship between geophysical properties such as seismic velocities and attenuations and the physical characteristics and environmental parameters of rock including porosity and saturation) of partially saturated rock has advanced significantly in recent years, relationships between heterogeneities of rock (both inherent heterogeneity in the rock fabric and structure and distribution of multiple fluid phases in the rock) and its impact on seismic properties are complex and difficult to understand using existing models. Further, most laboratory experiments to date examining the seismic signatures of fluid substitution involving liquid or supercritical (sc-) CO2 have been conducted at ultrasonic frequencies which could result in very different results from field measurements, and also their interpretations are often made assuming sample homogeneity. We present the results of our recent laboratory measurements on the changes in sonic-frequency seismic properties of initially brine saturated sandstone samples during sc-CO2 injection and drainage. High-permeability reference sandstone sample (Berea, ~680 mD) and a medium-permeability (~15 mD) reservoir sandstone used for sequestration (Tuscaloosa formation from Cranfield, Mississippi) were tested. A modified resonant bar method (the Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar method) was used to measure near-1 kHz seismic velocities and attenuations. This method allows us to use small core samples which are typically available from boreholes. Although our measurement frequency was higher than typical field seismic measurements, it is close to the frequencies which have been used for recent cross-hole seismic monitoring of CO2 injection at several sequestration demonstration

  15. Behavior of water in supercritical CO2: adsorption and capillary condensation in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, J. E.; Bryan, C. R.; Dewers, T. A.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The chemical potential of water in supercritical CO2 (scCO2) may play an important role in water adsorption, capillary condensation, and evaporation under partially saturated conditions at geologic CO2 storage sites, especially if initially anhydrous CO2 is injected. Such processes may affect residual water saturations, relative permeability, shrink/swell of clays, and colloidal transport. We have developed a thermodynamic model of water or brine film thickness as a function of water relative humidity in scCO2. The model is based on investigations of liquid water configuration in the vadose zone and uses the augmented Young-Laplace equation, which incorporates both adsorptive and capillary components. The adsorptive component is based on the concept of disjoining pressure, which reflects force per area normal to the solid and water/brine-scCO2 interfaces. The disjoining pressure includes van der Waals, electrostatic, and structural interactions. The van der Waals term includes the effects of mutual dissolution of CO2 and water in the two fluid phases on partial molar volumes, dielectric coefficients, and refractive indices. Our approach treats the two interfaces as asymmetric surfaces in terms of charge densities and electrostatic potentials. We use the disjoining pressure isotherm to evaluate the type of wetting (e.g., total or partial wetting) for common reservoir and caprock minerals and kerogen. The capillary component incorporates water activity and is applied to simple pore geometries with slits and corners. Finally, we compare results of the model to a companion study by the coauthors on measurement of water adsorption to mineral phases using a quartz-crystal microbalance. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. [Optimization for supercritical CO2 extraction with response surface methodology of Prunus armeniaca oil].

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei-Fei; Wu, Yan; Ge, Fa-Huan

    2012-03-01

    To optimize the extraction conditions of Prunus armeniaca oil by Supercritical CO2 extraction and identify its components by GC-MS. Optimized of SFE-CO extraction by response surface methodology and used GC-MS to analysis Prunus armeniaca oil compounds. Established the model of an equation for the extraction rate of Prunus armeniaca oil by supercritical CO2 extraction, and the optimal parameters for the supercritical CO2 extraction determined by the equation were: the extraction pressure was 27 MPa, temperature was 39 degrees C, the extraction rate of Prunus armeniaca oil was 44.5%. 16 main compounds of Prunus armeniaca oil extracted by supercritical CO2 were identified by GC-MS, unsaturated fatty acids were 92.6%. This process is simple, and can be used for the extraction of Prunus armeniaca oil.

  17. Applicability of Supercritical CO2 Speleogenesis to Exo-Planetary Karst Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, D. D.; Polyak, V. J.; Asmerom, Y.

    2015-10-01

    Supercritical CO2 hypogene speleogenesis and its applications to exo-planetary karst features are discussed. What to look for on the planet's surface to find these types of caves and their possible use is also visited.

  18. Biocompatibility of supercritical CO2-treated titanium implants in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Hill, C M; Kang, Q K; Wahl, C; Jimenez, A; Laberge, M; Drews, M; Matthews, M A; An, Y H

    2006-04-01

    Supercritical phase CO2 is a promising method for sterilizing implantable devices and tissue grafts. The goal of this study is to evaluate the biocompatibility of titanium implants sterilized by supercritical phase CO2 in a rat subcutaneous implantation model. At 5 weeks post implantation titanium implants sterilized by supercritical phase CO2 produce a soft tissue reaction that is comparable to other methods of sterilization (steam autoclave, ultraviolet light radiation, ethylene oxide gas, and radio-frequency glow-discharge), as indicated by the thickness and density of the foreign body capsule, although there were some differences on the capillary density. Overall the soft tissue response to the implants was similar among all methods of sterilization, indicating supercritical phase CO2 treatment did not compromise the biocompatibility of the titanium implant.

  19. Direct supercritical fluid extraction from water

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, S.E.; Kruus, P.

    1993-12-01

    This paper describes the development of apparatus suitable for direct supercritical fluid extraction of organics from water. Results are presented for the extraction of pentachlorophenol present in water at concentrations of the order of 0.1 ppm. The effect of changes in apparatus design and supercritical fluid flow rate on recovery are discussed.

  20. Biocatalytic Processing Polymers in Supercritical Fluids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    Russell, A.J and Beckman, E.J. (1991) Appl. Bioch . Biotech., 31, 197-211. Enzyme activity in supercritical fluids. 22. *Russell, A.J and Beckman, E.J...S., Jacob , J., Beckman, E.J. and Russell, A.J. (1991) Enz. Microb. Technol., 13, 519. Biocatalytic synthesis of acrylates in supercritical fluids. 24

  1. Applications of supercritical CO2 in the fabrication of polymer systems for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Davies, Owen R; Lewis, Andrew L; Whitaker, Martin J; Tai, Hongyun; Shakesheff, Kevin M; Howdle, Steven M

    2008-02-14

    Supercritical CO(2) has the potential to be an excellent environment within which controlled release polymers and dry composites may be formed. The low temperature and dry conditions within the fluid offer obvious advantages in the processing of water, solvent or heat labile molecules. The low viscosity and high diffusivity of scCO(2) offer the possibility of novel processing routes for polymer drug composites, but there are still technical challenges to overcome. Moreover, the low solubility of most drug molecules in scCO(2) presents both challenges and advantages. This review explores the current methods that use high pressure and scCO(2) for the production of drug delivery systems and the more specialized application of the fluid in the formation of highly porous tissue engineering scaffolds.

  2. Preparation of drug delivery systems using supercritical fluid technology.

    PubMed

    Kompella, U B; Koushik, K

    2001-01-01

    Small changes in temperature and pressure near the critical region induce dramatic changes in the density and solubility of supercritical fluids, thereby facilitating the use of environmentally benign agents such as CO2 for their solvent and antisolvent properties in processing a wide variety of materials. While supercritical fluid technologies have been in commercial use in the food and chromatography industries for several years, only recently has this technology made inroads in the formulation of drug delivery systems. This review summarizes some of the recent applications of supercritical fluid technology in the preparation of drug delivery systems. Drugs containing polymeric particles, plain drug particles, solute-containing liposomes, and inclusion complexes of drug and carrier have been formulated using this technology. Also, polymer separation using this technology is enabling the selection of a pure fraction of a polymer, thereby allowing a more precise control of drug release from polymeric delivery systems.

  3. Supercritical CO2 Cleaning System for Planetary Protection and Contamination Control Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ying; Zhong, Fang; Aveline, David C.; Anderson, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Current spacecraft-compatible cleaning protocols involve a vapor degreaser, liquid sonication, and alcohol wiping. These methods are not very effective in removing live and dead microbes from spacecraft piece parts of slightly complicated geometry, such as tubing and loosely fitted nuts and bolts. Contamination control practices are traditionally focused on cleaning and monitoring of particulate and oily residual. Vapor degreaser and outgassing bakeout have not been proven to be effective in removing some less volatile, hydrophilic biomolecules of significant relevance to life detection. A precision cleaning technology was developed using supercritical CO2 (SCC). SCC is used as both solvent and carrier for removing organic and particulate contaminants. Supercritical fluid, like SCC, is characterized by physical and thermal properties that are between those of the pure liquid and gas phases. The fluid density is a function of the temperature and pressure. Its solvating power can be adjusted by changing the pressure or temperature, or adding a secondary solvent such as alcohol or water. Unlike a regular organic solvent, SCC has higher diffusivities, lower viscosity, and lower surface tension. It readily penetrates porous and fibrous solids and can reach hard-to-reach surfaces of the parts with complex geometry. Importantly, the CO2 solvent does not leave any residue. The results using this new cleaning device demonstrated that both supercritical CO2 with 5% water as a co-solvent can achieve cleanliness levels of 0.01 mg/cm2 or less for contaminants of a wide range of hydrophobicities. Experiments under the same conditions using compressed Martian air mix, which consists of 95% CO2, produced similar cleaning effectiveness on the hydrophobic compounds. The main components of the SCC cleaning system are a high-pressure cleaning vessel, a boil-off vessel located downstream from the cleaning vessel, a syringe-type high-pressure pump, a heat exchanger, and a back pressure

  4. Investigation of Potassium Feldspar Reactivity in Wet Supercritical CO2 by In Situ Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, C.; Widener, C.; Schaef, T.; Loring, J.; McGrail, B. P.

    2014-12-01

    Capture and subsequent storage of CO2 in deep geologic reservoirs is progressively being considered as a viable approach to reduce anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. In the long term, injected CO2 may become permanently entrapped as silicate minerals react with CO2 enriched fluids to form stable carbonate minerals. Potassium feldspars are highly abundant in the earth's crust and are present in the caprocks and storage formations of many target reservoirs. While the dissolution kinetics and carbonation reactions of feldspars have been well studied in the aqueous phase, comparatively little work has focused on K-feldspar reactivity in the CO2-rich fluid. In this study, we used in situ infrared spectroscopy to investigate the carbonation reactions of natural microcline samples. Experiments were carried out at 50 °C and 91 bar by circulating dry or wet supercritical CO2 (scCO2) past a thin film of powdered sample. Water concentrations ranged from 0% to 125% relative to saturation, and transmission-mode absorbance spectra were recorded as a function of time for 48 hours. No discernible reaction was detected when the samples were exposed to anhydrous scCO2. However, in fully water-saturated scCO2, a thin film of liquid-like water was observed on the samples' surfaces, and up to 0.6% of the microcline was converted to a carbonate phase. Potassium carbonate is the most likely reaction product, but minor amounts of sodium carbonate and siderite may also have formed from minor sample impurities. The extent of reaction appears to be related to the thickness of the water film and is likely a consequence of the film's ability to solvate and transport ions in the vicinity of the mineral surface. Other features observed in the spectra correspond to microcline dissolution and precipitation of amorphous silica. Implications about the role of water in these reactions and the relative effectiveness of alkali feldspars for mineral trapping of CO2 will be discussed.

  5. The interaction between Hontomín shale and CO2-rich brine under supercritical CO2 conditions. Percolation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dávila, Gabriela; Cama, Jordi; Luquot, Linda; Soler, Josep

    2014-05-01

    Geological CO2 sequestration at a pilot-plant scale is going to be performed at Hontomín (Spain). The main caprock is made up of marly shales, with an average composition (wt.%) of 56% calcite, 21% quartz, 17% illite, 3% clinochlore and albite and trace amounts of pyrite, gypsum and anhydrite. The reservoir brine is rich in NaCl and sulfate (I = 0.6 M) and equilibrated with respect to gypsum/anhydrite and calcite. The present study aims at evaluating the interaction between the shale and the CO2-rich brine of Hontomín by performing (1) laboratory experiments and (2) 2D reactive transport modeling. (1) Laboratory experiments: percolation experiments with artificially fractured cores (7.5 mm in diameter and 18 mm in length) under supercritical CO2 conditions (pTotal = 150 bar, pCO2 from 82 to 95 bar, T = 60 °C) are carried out to evaluate and quantify the influence of mineral dissolution/precipitation processes on fracture permeability. Two synthetic CO2-rich brines, sulfate-free and sulfate-rich brines with similar composition to that of Hontomín, circulate at constant flow rate (0.2, 1 and 60 mL h-1) through the fracture. Under supercritical pCO2 the acid brine acidic (pH ~3) reacts with the shale and induces significant dissolution of calcite and aluminosilicates (mainly, chlorite and albite). (2) 2D reactive transport modeling: CrunchFlow is utilized to match the observed variation with time of the aqueous concentrations of Ca, Si and sulfate and pH during the fracture-CO2-rich brine interaction under supercritical pCO2 conditions. Evaluation of the kinetic parameters, such as the values of the mineral surface area, will be performed. Solute transport is dominated by advection along the fracture and by diffusion through the rock matrix. This type of simulations is the basis for a prediction of the magnitude of the geochemical processes during the caprock-brine interaction at Hontomín under supercritical CO2 conditions. Acknowledgements This study was

  6. Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor; Wang, Zheming; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2011-10-10

    The capture and storage of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in deep geologic formations represents one of the most promising options for mitigating the impacts of greenhouse gases on global warming. In this regard, mineral-fluid interactions are of prime importance since such reactions can result in the long term sequestration of CO2 by trapping in mineral phases. Recently it has been recognized that interactions with neat to water-saturated non-aqueous fluids are of prime importance in understanding mineralization reactions since the introduced CO2 is likely to contain water initially or soon after injection and the supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is less dense than the aqueous phase which can result in a buoyant scCO2 plume contacting the isolating caprock. As a result, unraveling the molecular/microscopic mechanisms of mineral transformation in neat to water saturated scCO2 has taken on an added important. In this study, we are examining the interfacial reactions of the olivine mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4) over a range of water contents up to and including complete water saturation in scCO2. The surface precipitates that form on the reacted forsterite grains are extremely fragile and difficult to experimentally characterize. In order to address this issue we have developed experimental protocols for preparing and imaging electron-transparent samples from fragile structures. These electron-transparent samples are then examined using a combination of STEM/EDX, FIB-TEM, and helium ion microscope (HIM) imaging (Figures 1-3). This combination of capabilities has provided unique insight into the geochemical processes that occur on scCO2 reacted mineral surfaces. The experimental procedures and protocols that have been developed also have useful applications for examining fragile structures on a wide variety of materials. This research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and

  7. Concentration dependent refractive index of CO2/CH4 mixture in gaseous and supercritical phase.

    PubMed

    Giraudet, C; Marlin, L; Bégué, D; Croccolo, F; Bataller, H

    2016-04-07

    Carbon dioxide (CO2)/methane (CH4) binary mixtures are investigated at pressure values up to 20 MPa at 303 K in order to investigate the pressure dependence of the optical concentration contrast factor, ∂n/∂c(P,T), through gaseous and supercritical phase. Refractive index is measured by means of a Michelson interferometer. Refractivities of the mixtures are found in good agreement with Lorentz-Lorenz predictions after density calculations by means of the AGA8-DC92 equation of state. Experimental polarizabilities of pure fluids are compared to quantum calculations of monomers and dimers for each pressure; it results that the quantity of dimers is small in the investigated thermodynamic conditions. Finally, by extending our experimental database with numerical simulations, we evidence that ∂n/∂cP,T presents a critical enhancement similar to heat capacity.

  8. Supercritical CO2 Extraction of Rice Bran Oil -the Technology, Manufacture, and Applications.

    PubMed

    Sookwong, Phumon; Mahatheeranont, Sugunya

    2017-06-01

    Rice bran is a good source of nutrients that have large amounts of phytochemicals and antioxidants. Conventional rice bran oil production requires many processes that may deteriorate and degrade these valuable substances. Supercritical CO2 extraction is a green alternative method for producing rice bran oil. This work reviews production of rice bran oil by supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) extraction. In addition, the usefulness and advantages of SC-CO2 extracted rice bran oil for edible oil and health purpose is also described.

  9. Transport and relaxation processes in supercritical fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonas, J.

    Main emphasis was on design and testing of different modifications of the NMR solubility probe equipped with mixing. A new solution of the difficult problem of mixing in NMR probe at high pressure was proposed which should open new directions in supercritical fluid research. Experiments on supercritical CO2 were performed to examine collision induced scattering. The theoretical analysis of the data for SF6 and CH4 was completed, and the manuscript should be submitted for publication within the next grant period. The naphthalene/carbon dioxide solubility determination without mixing was initiated as described in the previous report. The first measurements were at 55 C and cover a range of pressures from 120 bar to 320 bar. The results are compared to the solubility data of Paulaitis, et al., and Reid, et al. Unfortunately, the data seems to be about 40% low at the higher pressures caused by diffusion of the naphthalene out of the sample cell while the equilibrium solubility is being obtained. This problem should be overcome with further sample cell design changes.

  10. Chemical Processes with Supercritical CO2 in Engineered Geologic Systems: Significance, Previous Study, and Path Forward (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, T.; Pruess, K.

    2009-12-01

    Chemical reactions with dissolved CO2 in the aqueous phase have long been considered in fundamental geosciences and practical applications. Recently, studies on geologic carbon sequestration and enhanced geothermal systems using CO2 as heat transmission fluid have brought new interests in chemical reaction processes directly with supercritical CO2 (scCO2, or gas phase). In the vicinity of a CO2 injection well, the aqueous fluid initially present in a geological formation would be quickly removed by dissolution (evaporation) into the flowing gas stream and by immiscible displacement by the scCO2, creating a gas phase dominant zone. In this zone, the water evaporation could cause formation dry-out and precipitation of salt near the injection well, reducing formation porosity, permeability, and injectivity. The scCO2 may directly attack well construction materials such as cement. Over time, the gas phase will tend to migrate upwards towards the caprock because the density of the scCO2 is lower than that of the aqueous phase. In the upper portions of the reservoir, the scCO2 will directly react with caprock minerals and alter the hydrological properties and mechanical strength. On the other hand, the scCO2 phase will maintain the dissolution into the aqueous phase, lowering pH, inducing mineral dissolution, complexing with dissolved cations, increasing CO2 solubility, increasing the density of the aqueous phase, and promoting “convective mixing”. Chemical processes are quite different in the scCO2 dominant geologic systems. The absence of an aqueous phase poses unique questions, as little is presently known about the chemistry of non-aqueous systems. Additional issues arise from the reactivity of water that is dissolved in the ScCO2 phase. In this presentation, the author will discuss the importance, state of the studies performed, and future research directions.

  11. Selective extraction of strontium with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Kulyako, Yurii; Yak, Hwa-Kwang; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Lee, Suh-Jane

    2010-01-01

    Strontium (Sr2+) can be selectively extracted from aqueous solutions into supercritical fluid CO2 at 60 °C and 100 atm with dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DC18C6) using CF3(CF2)6CO2− (PFOA−) or CF3(CF2)6CF2SO3− (PFOSA−) as a counter anion; at a mole ratio of Sr2+ : DC18C6 : PFOA− = 1:10:50, the extraction of Sr (5.6 × 10−5 M) from water at pH 3 is near quantitative whereas Ca2+ and Mg2+ at equal concentration are only extracted to a level of 7 and 1%, respectively; PFOSA− is an effective counter anion for selective extraction of Sr2+ from 1.3 M HNO3 with DC18C6 in supercritical CO2. PMID:21394239

  12. Identification of fragile microscopic structures during mineral transformations in wet supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Arey, Bruce W; Kovarik, Libor; Qafoku, Odeta; Wang, Zheming; Hess, Nancy J; Felmy, Andrew R

    2013-04-01

    This study examines the nature of highly fragile reaction products that form in low water content supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) using a combination of focus ion beam/scanning electron microscopy, confocal Raman spectroscopy, helium ion microscopy (HeIM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). HeIM images show these precipitates are fragile rosettes. Using the TEM revealed details on the interfacial structure between the newly formed surface precipitates and the underlying initial solid phases. Detailed microscopy analysis revealed that growth of the precipitates either followed a tip growth mechanism, with precipitates forming directly on the forsterite surface if the initial solid was nonporous (natural forsterite) or growth from the surface of the precipitates, where fluid was conducted through the porous (nanoforsterite) agglomerates to the growth center. Identification of the mechanism of formation of hydrated/hydroxylated magnesium carbonate compound phases is a key factor in unraveling the impact of water recycling on mineral reactivity in low water content scCO2 solutions, which has received a great deal of attention as a result of the potential for CO2 to act as an atmospheric greenhouse gas. Techniques used here to examine these fragile structures are also used to examine a wide range of fragile material surfaces.

  13. Experimental Performance Analysis of Supercritical CO2 Thermodynamic Cycle Powered by Solar Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. R.; Yamaguchi, H.; Fujima, K.; Enomoto, M.; Sawada, N.

    2006-05-01

    The interests in using carbon dioxide as working fluid increase since the Montreal and Kyoto Protocols were made. In this paper, a complete effort was made to study the performance of CO2 Rankine cycle powered by solar energy experimentally. The system utilizes evacuated solar collectors to convert CO2 into high-temperature supercritical state, used to produce electrical energy and thermal energy, which could be used for air conditioning and hot water supply and so on. The system performances were tested not only in summer, but also in winter; not only in sunny day, but also in cloudy day. The interest of the paper is the solar collector efficiency, because the absorbed heat quantity in the collector can be utilized for power generation and heat supply and other useful outputs. The results show that annually-averaged solar collector efficiency was measured at about 60.4%. The study shows the potential of the application of the solar powered CO2 cycle as a distributed power/heat generation system.

  14. Experimental and theoretical studies of the effect of temperature on supercritical CO2 adsorption on illite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joewondo, N.; Zhang, Y.; Prasad, M.

    2016-12-01

    Sequestration of carbon dioxide in shale has been a subject of interest as the result of the technological advancement in gas shale production. The process involves injection of CO2 to enhance methane recovery and storing CO2 in depleted shale reservoir at elevated pressures. To better understand both shale production and carbon storage one must study the physical phenomena acting at different scales that control the in situ fluid flow. Shale rocks are complex systems with heterogeneous structures and compositions. Pore structures of these systems are in nanometer scales and have significant gas storage capacity and surface area. Adsorption is prominent in nanometer sized pores due to the high attraction between gas molecules and the surface of the pores. Recent studies attempt to find correlation between storage capacity and the rock composition, particularly the clay content. This study, however, focuses on the study of supercritical adsorption of CO2 on pure clay sample. We have built an in-house manometric experimental setup that can be used to study both the equilibrium and kinetics of adsorption. The experiment is conducted at isothermal condition. The study of equilibrium of adsorption gives insight on the storage capacity of these systems, and the study of the kinetics of adsorption is essential in understanding the resistance to fluid transport. The diffusion coefficient, which can be estimated from the dynamic experimental results, is a parameter which quantify diffusion mobility, and is affected by many factors including pressure and temperature. The first part of this paper briefly discusses the study of both equilibrium and kinetics of the CO2 adsorption on illite. Both static and dynamic measurements on the system are compared to theoretical models available in the literature to estimate the storage capacity and the diffusion time constants. The main part of the paper discusses the effect of varying temperature on the static and dynamic experimental

  15. Relative permeabilities of supercritical CO2 and brine in carbon sequestration by a two-phase lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jian.-Fei.; He, S.; Zu, Y. Q.; Lamy-Chappuis, B.; Yardley, B. W. D.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the migration of supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2 ) in realistic sandstone rocks under conditions of saline aquifers, with applications to the carbon geological storage, has been investigated by a two-phase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). Firstly the digital images of sandstone rocks were reproduced utilizing the X-ray computed microtomography (micro-CT), and high resolutions (up to 2.5 μm) were applied to the pore-scale LBM simulations. For the sake of numerical stability, the digital images were "cleaned" by closing the dead holes and removing the suspended particles in sandstone rocks. In addition, the effect of chemical reactions occurred in the carbonation process on the permeability was taken into account. For the wetting brine and non-wetting supercritical CO2 flows, they were treated as the immiscible fluids and were driven by pressure gradients in sandstone rocks. Relative permeabilities of brine and supercritical CO2 in sandstone rocks were estimated. Particularly the dynamic saturation was applied to improve the reliability of the calculations of the relative permeabilities. Moreover, the effects of the viscosity ratio of the two immiscible fluids and the resolution of digital images on the relative permeability were systematically investigated.

  16. Relative permeabilities of supercritical CO2 and brine in carbon sequestration by a two-phase lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jian.-Fei.; He, S.; Zu, Y. Q.; Lamy-Chappuis, B.; Yardley, B. W. D.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, the migration of supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) in realistic sandstone rocks under conditions of saline aquifers, with applications to the carbon geological storage, has been investigated by a two-phase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). Firstly the digital images of sandstone rocks were reproduced utilizing the X-ray computed microtomography (micro-CT), and high resolutions (up to 2.5 μm) were applied to the pore-scale LBM simulations. For the sake of numerical stability, the digital images were "cleaned" by closing the dead holes and removing the suspended particles in sandstone rocks. In addition, the effect of chemical reactions occurred in the carbonation process on the permeability was taken into account. For the wetting brine and non-wetting supercritical CO2 flows, they were treated as the immiscible fluids and were driven by pressure gradients in sandstone rocks. Relative permeabilities of brine and supercritical CO2 in sandstone rocks were estimated. Particularly the dynamic saturation was applied to improve the reliability of the calculations of the relative permeabilities. Moreover, the effects of the viscosity ratio of the two immiscible fluids and the resolution of digital images on the relative permeability were systematically investigated.

  17. Electrodeposition of metals from supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Ke, Jie; Su, Wenta; Howdle, Steven M; George, Michael W; Cook, David; Perdjon-Abel, Magda; Bartlett, Philip N; Zhang, Wenjian; Cheng, Fei; Levason, William; Reid, Gillian; Hyde, Jason; Wilson, James; Smith, David C; Mallik, Kanad; Sazio, Pier

    2009-09-01

    Electrodeposition is a widely used materials-deposition technology with a number of unique features, in particular, the efficient use of starting materials, conformal, and directed coating. The properties of the solvent medium for electrodeposition are critical to the technique's applicability. Supercritical fluids are unique solvents which give a wide range of advantages for chemistry in general, and materials processing in particular. However, a widely applicable approach to electrodeposition from supercritical fluids has not yet been developed. We present here a method that allows electrodeposition of a range of metals from supercritical carbon dioxide, using acetonitrile as a co-solvent and supercritical difluoromethane. This method is based on a careful selection of reagent and supporting electrolyte. There are no obvious barriers preventing this method being applied to deposit a range of materials from many different supercritical fluids. We present the deposition of 3-nm diameter nanowires in mesoporous silica templates using this methodology.

  18. Electrodeposition of metals from supercritical fluids

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jie; Su, Wenta; Howdle, Steven M.; George, Michael W.; Cook, David; Perdjon-Abel, Magda; Bartlett, Philip N.; Zhang, Wenjian; Cheng, Fei; Levason, William; Reid, Gillian; Hyde, Jason; Wilson, James; Smith, David C.; Mallik, Kanad; Sazio, Pier

    2009-01-01

    Electrodeposition is a widely used materials-deposition technology with a number of unique features, in particular, the efficient use of starting materials, conformal, and directed coating. The properties of the solvent medium for electrodeposition are critical to the technique's applicability. Supercritical fluids are unique solvents which give a wide range of advantages for chemistry in general, and materials processing in particular. However, a widely applicable approach to electrodeposition from supercritical fluids has not yet been developed. We present here a method that allows electrodeposition of a range of metals from supercritical carbon dioxide, using acetonitrile as a co-solvent and supercritical difluoromethane. This method is based on a careful selection of reagent and supporting electrolyte. There are no obvious barriers preventing this method being applied to deposit a range of materials from many different supercritical fluids. We present the deposition of 3-nm diameter nanowires in mesoporous silica templates using this methodology. PMID:19706479

  19. Geothermal energy production with supercritical fluids

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald W.

    2003-12-30

    There has been invented a method for producing geothermal energy using supercritical fluids for creation of the underground reservoir, production of the geothermal energy, and for heat transport. Underground reservoirs are created by pumping a supercritical fluid such as carbon dioxide into a formation to fracture the rock. Once the reservoir is formed, the same supercritical fluid is allowed to heat up and expand, then is pumped out of the reservoir to transfer the heat to a surface power generating plant or other application.

  20. Supercritical CO2 extract from needles of Pinus nigra ssp. laricio: combined analysis by GC, GC-MS and 13C NMR.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, Emilie; Marongiu, Bruno; Castola, Vincent; Piras, Alessandra; Porcedda, Silvia; Casanova, Joseph

    2007-07-20

    The chemical composition of the volatile concentrate prepared by supercritical CO(2) extraction of the needles of Pinus nigra Arnold ssp. laricio Poiret from Corsica was investigated using GC (RI), GC-MS and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The major component was by far manoyl oxide (63%), a compound of potential interest for the perfumery and pharmaceutical industries. Consequently, the supercritical fluid extract of P. nigra ssp. laricio (yield 1.60%) could be considered as a source of this diterpene.

  1. [Supercritical CO2 extraction and component analysis of Aesculus wilsonii seed oil].

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang-Yu; Shi, Zhao-Hua; Li, Hai-Chi; Ge, Fa-Huan; Zhan, Hua-Shu

    2013-03-01

    To research the optimal extraction process of supercritical CO2 extraction and analyze the component of the oil extracted from Aesculus wilsonii seed. Using the yield of Aesculus wilsonii seed oil as the index, optimized supercritical CO2 extraction parameter by orthogonal experiment methodology and analysed the compounds of Aesculus wilsonii seed oil by GC-MS. The optimal parameters of the supercritical CO2 extraction of the oil extracted from Aesculus wilsoniit seed were determined: the extraction pressure was 28 MPa and the temperature was 38 degrees C, the separation I pressure was 12 MPa and the temperature was 40 degrees C, the separation II pressure was 5 MPa and the temperature was 40 degrees C, the extraction time was 110 min. The average extraction rate of Aesculus wilsonii seed oil was 1.264%. 26 kinds of compounds were identified by GC-MS in Aesculus wilsonii seed oil extracted by supercritical CO2. The main components were fatty acids. Comparing with the petroleum ether extraction, the supercritical CO2 extraction has higher extraction rate, shorter extraction time, more clarity oil. The kinds of fatty acids with high amounts in Aesculus wilsonii seed oil is identical in general, the kinds of fatty acids with low amounts in Aesculus wilsonii seed oil have differences.

  2. Use and practice of achiral and chiral supercritical fluid chromatography in pharmaceutical analysis and purification.

    PubMed

    Lemasson, Elise; Bertin, Sophie; West, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The interest of pharmaceutical companies for complementary high-performance chromatographic tools to assess a product's purity or enhance this purity is on the rise. The high-throughput capability and economic benefits of supercritical fluid chromatography, but also the "green" aspect of CO2 as the principal solvent, render supercritical fluid chromatography very attractive for a wide range of pharmaceutical applications. The recent reintroduction of new robust instruments dedicated to supercritical fluid chromatography and the progress in stationary phase technology have also greatly benefited supercritical fluid chromatography. Additionally, it was shown several times that supercritical fluid chromatography could be orthogonal to reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and could efficiently compete with it. Supercritical fluid chromatography is an adequate tool for small molecules of pharmaceutical interest: synthetic intermediates, active pharmaceutical ingredients, impurities, or degradation products. In this review, we first discuss about general chromatographic conditions for supercritical fluid chromatography analysis to better suit compounds of pharmaceutical interest. We also discuss about the use of achiral and chiral supercritical fluid chromatography for analytical purposes and the recent applications in these areas. The use of preparative supercritical fluid chromatography by pharmaceutical companies is also covered.

  3. Effect of impurities on the corrosion behavior of CO2 transmission pipeline steel in supercritical CO2-water environments.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon-Seok; Nesic, Srdjan; Young, David

    2010-12-01

    The corrosion property of carbon steel was evaluated using an autoclave under CO(2)-saturated water phase and water-saturated CO(2) phase with impurities (O(2) and SO(2)) at 80 bar CO(2) and 50 °C to simulate the condition of CO(2) transmission pipeline in the carbon capture and storage (CCS) applications. The results showed that the corrosion rate of carbon steel in CO(2)-saturated water was very high and it increased with adding O(2) in the system due to the inhibition effect of O(2) on the formation of protective FeCO(3). It is noteworthy that corrosion took place in the water-saturated CO(2) phase under supercritical condition when no free water is present. The addition of O(2) increased the corrosion rates of carbon steel in water-saturated CO(2) phase. The addition of 0.8 bar SO(2) (1%) in the gas phase dramatically increased the corrosion rate of carbon steel from 0.38 to 5.6 mm/y. This then increased to more than 7 mm/y with addition of both O(2) and SO(2). SO(2) can promote the formation of iron sulfite hydrate (FeSO(3)·3H(2)O) on the steel surface which is less protective than iron carbonate (FeCO(3)), and it is further oxidized to become FeSO(4) and FeOOH when O(2) is present with SO(2) in the CO(2)-rich phase. The corrosion rates of 13Cr steel were very low compared with carbon steel in CO(2)-saturated water environments with O(2), whereas it was as high as carbon steel in a water-saturated CO(2) phase with O(2) and SO(2).

  4. Dual template effect of supercritical CO2 in ionic liquid to fabricate a highly mesoporous cobalt metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huanan; Xu, Dongdong; Xu, Qun

    2015-08-28

    A hierarchical meso- and microporous metal-organic framework (MOF) was facilely fabricated in an ionic liquid (IL)/supercritical CO2 (SC CO2)/surfactant emulsion system. Notably, CO2 exerts a dual effect during the synthesis; that is, CO2 droplets act as a template for the cores of nanospheres while CO2-swollen micelles induce mesopores on nanospheres.

  5. Exploring a novel preparation method of 1D metal organic frameworks based on supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    López-Periago, A; Vallcorba, O; Frontera, C; Domingo, C; Ayllón, J A

    2015-04-28

    The preparation of copper(II) one-dimensional MOFs using an eco-efficient method is reported here. This method is based exclusively on using supercritical CO2 as a solvent, without the addition of any other additive or co-solvent. Neutral acetylacetonate copper complexes and two linear linkers, namely, the bidentate 4,4'-bipyridine and 4,4'-trimethylenedipyridine molecules, were reacted under compressed CO2 at 60 °C and 20 MPa for periods of 4 or 24 h. The success achieved in the synthesis of the different studied 1D-MOFs was related to the solubility of the reagents in supercritical CO2. The reaction yield of the synthesized coordination polymers via the supercritical route was close to 100% because both the reactants were almost completely depleted in the performed experiments.

  6. Combination of supercritical CO2 and vacuum distillation for the fractionation of bergamot oil.

    PubMed

    Fang, Tao; Goto, Motonobu; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Hirose, Tsutomu

    2004-08-11

    Supercritical CO2 can be used to separate oxygenated compounds from essential oils. This technique still cannot replace vacuum distillation as an industrial process because of low recoveries and inconsistent results. In the present work, a comparison between the two methods was made in terms of composition, recovery, and color. Vacuum distillation and supercritical CO2 are complementary processes for producing high quality oxygenated compounds with high recovery rates. The former is more suitable for removing monoterpenes at low fraction temperatures (< or =308 K), and the latter is more suitable for separating oxygenated compounds from pigments and waxes. Consequently, the two methods were combined. For supercritical CO2 fractionation, the parameters of pressure, temperature gradient, and the ratio of solvent to feed were investigated for the fractionation of oxygenated compounds with high recoveries (> or =85%) and without other macromolecules, such as pigments and waxes.

  7. Scaling considerations for a multi-megawatt class supercritical CO2 brayton cycle and commercialization.

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Darryn D.; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,; Conboy, Thomas M.; Pasch, James Jay; Wright, Steven A; Rochau, Gary E; Fuller, Robert Lynn

    2013-11-01

    Small-scale supercritical CO2 demonstration loops are successful at identifying the important technical issues that one must face in order to scale up to larger power levels. The Sandia National Laboratories supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle test loops are identifying technical needs to scale the technology to commercial power levels such as 10 MWe. The small size of the Sandia 1 MWth loop has demonstration of the split flow loop efficiency and effectiveness of the Printed Circuit Heat Exchangers (PCHXs) leading to the design of a fully recuperated, split flow, supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle demonstration system. However, there were many problems that were encountered, such as high rotational speeds in the units. Additionally, the turbomachinery in the test loops need to identify issues concerning the bearings, seals, thermal boundaries, and motor controller problems in order to be proved a reliable power source in the 300 kWe range. Although these issues were anticipated in smaller demonstration units, commercially scaled hardware would eliminate these problems caused by high rotational speeds at small scale. The economic viability and development of the future scalable 10 MWe solely depends on the interest of DOE and private industry. The Intellectual Property collected by Sandia proves that the ~10 MWe supercritical CO2 power conversion loop to be very beneficial when coupled to a 20 MWth heat source (either solar, geothermal, fossil, or nuclear). This paper will identify a commercialization plan, as well as, a roadmap from the simple 1 MWth supercritical CO2 development loop to a power producing 10 MWe supercritical CO2 Brayton loop.

  8. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of supercritical CO2-water drainage displacement in porous media: CO2 saturation and displacement mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yamabe, Hirotatsu; Tsuji, Takeshi; Liang, Yunfeng; Matsuoka, Toshifumi

    2015-01-06

    CO2 geosequestration in deep aquifers requires the displacement of water (wetting phase) from the porous media by supercritical CO2 (nonwetting phase). However, the interfacial instabilities, such as viscous and capillary fingerings, develop during the drainage displacement. Moreover, the burstlike Haines jump often occurs under conditions of low capillary number. To study these interfacial instabilities, we performed lattice Boltzmann simulations of CO2-water drainage displacement in a 3D synthetic granular rock model at a fixed viscosity ratio and at various capillary numbers. The capillary numbers are varied by changing injection pressure, which induces changes in flow velocity. It was observed that the viscous fingering was dominant at high injection pressures, whereas the crossover of viscous and capillary fingerings was observed, accompanied by Haines jumps, at low injection pressures. The Haines jumps flowing forward caused a significant drop of CO2 saturation, whereas Haines jumps flowing backward caused an increase of CO2 saturation (per injection depth). We demonstrated that the pore-scale Haines jumps remarkably influenced the flow path and therefore equilibrium CO2 saturation in crossover domain, which is in turn related to the storage efficiency in the field-scale geosequestration. The results can improve our understandings of the storage efficiency by the effects of pore-scale displacement phenomena.

  9. New topic of supercritical fluids: local activity coefficients of supercritical solvent and cosolvent around solute.

    PubMed

    Hou, Minqiang; Zhang, Xiaogang; Han, Buxing; Song, Jiyuan; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Zhaofu; Zhang, Jianling

    2008-03-14

    The study of inhomogeneity in supercritical fluids (SCFs) is of great importance. In this work, we propose the concept of local activity coefficients in supercritical (SC) solutions, which link thermodynamics and inhomogeneity in SC systems. The local activity coefficients of CO(2)+acetonitrile+phenol blue and CO(2)+acetic acid+phenol blue systems are investigated at 308.15 K in critical region and outside critical region. To do this, the local compositions of CO(2)+acetonitrile and CO(2)+acetic acid mixed solvents around phenol blue are first estimated using UV-visible spectroscopy. Then it is considered that there exist bulk phase and local phase around phenol blue in the systems. The activity coefficients of CO(2) and the cosolvents (acetonitrile or acetic acid) in bulk phase are calculated using Peng-Robinson equation of state. The local activity coefficients of CO(2) and the cosolvents are then calculated on the basis of thermodynamic principles. It is demonstrated that in the critical region the local activity coefficients differ from bulk activity coefficients significantly and are sensitive to pressure. This can explain many unusual phenomena in SC systems in critical region thermodynamically.

  10. New topic of supercritical fluids: Local activity coefficients of supercritical solvent and cosolvent around solute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Minqiang; Zhang, Xiaogang; Han, Buxing; Song, Jiyuan; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Zhaofu; Zhang, Jianling

    2008-03-01

    The study of inhomogeneity in supercritical fluids (SCFs) is of great importance. In this work, we propose the concept of local activity coefficients in supercritical (SC) solutions, which link thermodynamics and inhomogeneity in SC systems. The local activity coefficients of CO2+acetonitrile+phenol blue and CO2+aceticacid+phenol blue systems are investigated at 308.15K in critical region and outside critical region. To do this, the local compositions of CO2+acetonitrile and CO2+acetic acid mixed solvents around phenol blue are first estimated using UV-visible spectroscopy. Then it is considered that there exist bulk phase and local phase around phenol blue in the systems. The activity coefficients of CO2 and the cosolvents (acetonitrile or acetic acid) in bulk phase are calculated using Peng-Robinson equation of state. The local activity coefficients of CO2 and the cosolvents are then calculated on the basis of thermodynamic principles. It is demonstrated that in the critical region the local activity coefficients differ from bulk activity coefficients significantly and are sensitive to pressure. This can explain many unusual phenomena in SC systems in critical region thermodynamically.

  11. Surfactant/Supercritical Fluid Cleaning of Contaminated Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    CFC's and halogenated hydrocarbon solvents have been the solvents of choice to degrease and otherwise clean precision metal parts to allow proper function. Recent regulations have, however, rendered most of these solvents unacceptable for these purposes. New processes which are being used or which have been proposed to replace these solvents usually either fail to remove water soluble contaminants or produce significant aqueous wastes which must then be disposed of. In this work, a new method for cleaning surfaces will be investigated. Solubility of typical contaminants such as lubricating greases and phosphatizing bath residues will be studied in several surfactant/supercritical fluid solutions. The effect of temperature, pressure, and the composition of the cleaning mixture on the solubility of oily, polar, and ionic contaminants will be investigated. A reverse micellar solution in a supercritical light hydrocarbon solvent will be used to clean samples of industrial wastes. A reverse micellar solution is one where water is dissolved into a non-polar solvent with the aid of a surfactant. The solution will be capable of dissolving both water-soluble contaminants and oil soluble contaminants. Once the contaminants have been dissolved into the solution they will be separated from the light hydrocarbon and precipitated by a relatively small pressure drop and the supercritical solvent will be available for recycle for reuse. The process will be compared to the efficacy of supercritical CO2 cleaning by attempting to clean the same types of substrates and machining wastes with the same contaminants using supercritical CO2. It is anticipated that the supercritical CO2 process will not be capable of removing ionic residues.

  12. A Procedure for the supercritical fluid extraction of coal samples, with subsequent analysis of extracted hydrocarbons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolak, Jonathan J.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: This report provides a detailed, step-by-step procedure for conducting extractions with supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) using the ISCO SFX220 supercritical fluid extraction system. Protocols for the subsequent separation and analysis of extracted hydrocarbons are also included in this report. These procedures were developed under the auspices of the project 'Assessment of Geologic Reservoirs for Carbon Dioxide Sequestration' (see http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/fs026-03/fs026-03.pdf) to investigate possible environmental ramifications associated with CO2 storage (sequestration) in geologic reservoirs, such as deep (~1 km below land surface) coal beds. Supercritical CO2 has been used previously to extract contaminants from geologic matrices. Pressure-temperature conditions within deep coal beds may render CO2 supercritical. In this context, the ability of supercritical CO2 to extract contaminants from geologic materials may serve to mobilize noxious compounds from coal, possibly complicating storage efforts. There currently exists little information on the physicochemical interactions between supercritical CO2 and coal in this setting. The procedures described herein were developed to improve the understanding of these interactions and provide insight into the fate of CO2 and contaminants during simulated CO2 injections.

  13. Water extractable arabinoxylan aerogels prepared by supercritical CO2 drying.

    PubMed

    Marquez-Escalante, Jorge; Carvajal-Millan, Elizabeth; Miki-Yoshida, Mario; Alvarez-Contreras, Lorena; Toledo-Guillén, Alma Rosa; Lizardi-Mendoza, Jaime; Rascón-Chu, Agustín

    2013-05-14

    Water extractable arabinoxylan (WEAX) aerogels were prepared by extracting the solvent from the alcogels (WEAX hydrogels with an alcohol as the solvent) with carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions. WEAX aerogels were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and adsorption and desorption nitrogen isotherms. The micrographs indicate a heterogeneous porous network structure in WEAX aerogel. Adsorption/desorption nitrogen isotherms of this material were type IV, which confirm that this material possess a mesoporous structure. WEAX aerogels rehydration capability was evaluated and the water absorption mechanism was determined. The WEAX aerogels water absorption mechanism was non-Fickian (n = 0.54).

  14. Supercritical fluid thermodynamics for coal processing

    SciTech Connect

    van Swol, F. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Eckert, C.A. . School of Chemical Engineering)

    1988-09-15

    The main objective of this research is to develop an equation of state that can be used to predict solubilities and tailor supercritical fluid solvents for the extraction and processing of coal. To meet this objective we have implemented a two-sided. approach. First, we expanded the database of model coal compound solubilities in higher temperature fluids, polar fluids, and fluid mixtures systems. Second, the unique solute/solute, solute/cosolvent and solute/solvent intermolecular interactions in supercritical fluid solutions were investigated using spectroscopic techniques. These results increased our understanding of the molecular phenomena that affect solubility in supercritical fluids and were significant in the development of an equation of state that accurately reflects the true molecular makeup of the solution. (VC)

  15. A first principles approach to the electronic properties of liquid and supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Benedito J Costa; Rivelino, Roberto; Coutinho, Kaline; Canuto, Sylvio

    2015-01-14

    The electronic absorption spectra of liquid and supercritical CO2 (scCO2) are investigated by coupling a many-body energy decomposition scheme to configurations generated by Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. A Frenkel exciton Hamiltonian formalism was adopted and the excitation energies were calculated with time dependent density functional theory. A red-shift of ∼ 0.2 eV relative to the gas-phase monomer is observed for the first electronic absorption maximum in liquid and scCO2. The origin of this shift, which is not very dependent on deviations from the linearity of the CO2 molecule, is mainly related to polarization effects. However, the geometry changes of the CO2 monomer induced by thermal effects and intermolecular interactions in condensed phase lead to the appearance of an average monomeric electric dipole moment〈μ〉= 0.26 ± 0.04 D that is practically the same at liquid and supercritical conditions. The predicted average quadrupole moment for both liquid and scCO2 is〈Θ〉= - 5.5 D Å, which is increased by ∼ -0.9 D Å relative to its gas-phase value. The importance of investigating the electronic properties for a better understanding of the role played by CO2 in supercritical solvation is stressed.

  16. Recent patents on the sterilization of food and biomaterials by supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Sikin, Adi Md; Rizvi, Syed S H

    2011-09-01

    Supercritical fluid technology applies the unique characteristics of certain substances under particular conditions of pressure and temperature above their critical point. In particular, supercritical fluid sterilization provides a nonthermal solution to problems related to bacterial, viral, yeast and enzyme inactivation in the food and pharmaceutical industries as well as healthcare services. Supercritical fluid CO2 is versatile for sterilization due to its non-reactive nature, ability to penetrate into cells and tissues, reduced energy usage and improved quality retention of heat-sensitive substrates. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to illustrate the most recent and related patents for sterilizing food and biomaterials with supercritical fluids, published and/or granted from 2005 to present. Finally, the manuscript reports a discussion on the current challenges and development of supercritical fluid sterilization particularly for the food industry.

  17. Effect of sub- and supercritical CO2 treatment on the properties of Pseudomonas cepacia lipase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dawei; Zhang, Houjin; Xu, Jing; Yan, Yunjun

    2013-07-10

    In this work, we have investigated the influences of sub- and supercritical CO2 treatment on the properties of Pseudomonas cepacia lipase (PCL), including its esterification and transesterification activities, structural changes and stability. Results demonstrated that exposure time to subcritical CO2 treatment had a negative effect on PCL transesterification activity whereas exposure time to supercritical CO2 treatment had a positive effect. But generally, most compressed treatments significantly enhanced PCL esterification activity. Conformational analysis by FT-IR and fluorescence emission spectra revealed that enhanced activities after supercritical CO2 treatment were correlated with the secondary and tertiary structural changes of PCL. Secondary structure changes also appeared to be responsible for enhancement of PCL activities by subcritical CO2 treatment. Compared to native PCL, treated PCL's esterification activity significantly decreased in hydrophilic organic media, while transesterification activity significantly increased in tert-amyl alcohol and acetone. After supercritical treatment, the thermal stability of PCL significantly decreased in esterification reactions, however, there was no significant difference in transesterification reactions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pore-scale Evolution of Supercritical CO2 within Bentheimer Sandstone during Multiple Drainage-Imbibition Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herring, A. L.; Andersson, L.; Wildenschild, D.

    2014-12-01

    Geologic CO2 sequestration has been proposed as a climate change mitigation strategy to limit emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere from large fossil-fuel burning CO2 point sources; however, there are concerns associated with the long-term stability of a mobile subsurface CO2 plume. The large-scale movement of subsurface supercritical CO2 (scCO2) can be prevented via capillary trapping, wherein scCO2 is immobilized in the subsurface by capillary interactions between the solid surface, resident brine, and scCO2. Capillary trapping occurs in two steps: first, the porous medium undergoes drainage as scCO2 is injected into the system; then, wetting fluid re-enters the medium in an imbibition process, isolating small bubbles of scCO2 in the pore bodies of the medium. There are many empirical models which predict capillary trapping for a single drainage-imbibition cycle; however, in an engineered CO2 sequestration project, it is possible to implement cyclic scCO2-water injections in a water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection scheme in which the system may undergo multiple CO2 injections to potentially increase the trapping efficiency of scCO2. We present experimental results of multiple drainage-imbibition cycles of scCO2 and 1:6 by mass potassium iodide (KI) brine within Bentheimer sandstone. Capillary (differential) pressure and absolute pressures for each phase were continuously measured throughout each flow process, which is a unique feature of our experimental system. Experiments were conducted at a working pressure of 8.3 MPa (1200 PSI) and 40oC, and synchrotron x-ray computed microtomography (x-ray CMT) images were collected of the drainage and imbibition process endpoints at a resolution of 3.19 μm at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The evolution of the connectivity, topology, morphology, and capillary trapping of scCO2 phase is analyzed as a function of capillary pressure, scCO2 saturation, and sample history. Preliminary results suggest

  19. Oxy-combustor operable with supercritical fluid

    DOEpatents

    Brun, Klaus; McClung, Aaron M.; Owston, Rebecca A.

    2017-04-04

    An oxy-combustor is provided which comprises a combustion vessel including at least one solid fuel slurry inlet port, at least one oxygen inlet port and at least one supercritical fluid inlet port, wherein the combustion vessel is operable at an operating pressure of at least 1,100 psi; an interior of the combustion vessel comprises a combustion chamber and a supercritical fluid infusion chamber surrounding at least a part of the combustion chamber, the supercritical fluid infusion chamber and the combustion chamber are separated by a porous liner surrounding the combustion chamber, and the supercritical infusion chamber is located between the porous liner and an outer casing of the combustion vessel.

  20. In situ molecular spectroscopic evidence for CO2 intercalation into montmorillonite in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Loring, John S; Schaef, Herbert T; Turcu, Romulus V F; Thompson, Christopher J; Miller, Quin R S; Martin, Paul F; Hu, Jianzhi; Hoyt, David W; Qafoku, Odeta; Ilton, Eugene S; Felmy, Andrew R; Rosso, Kevin M

    2012-05-08

    The interaction of anhydrous supercritical CO(2) (scCO(2)) with both kaolinite and ~1W (i.e., close to but less than one layer of hydration) calcium-saturated montmorillonite was investigated under conditions relevant to geologic carbon sequestration (50 °C and 90 bar). The CO(2) molecular environment was probed in situ using a combination of three novel high-pressure techniques: X-ray diffraction, magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy. We report the first direct evidence that the expansion of montmorillonite under scCO(2) conditions is due to CO(2) migration into the interlayer. Intercalated CO(2) molecules are rotationally constrained and do not appear to react with waters to form bicarbonate or carbonic acid. In contrast, CO(2) does not intercalate into kaolinite. The findings show that predicting the seal integrity of caprock will have complex dependence on clay mineralogy and hydration state.

  1. In Situ Molecular Spectroscopic Evidence for CO2 Intercalation into Montmorillonite in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Loring, John S.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Turcu, Romulus VF; Thompson, Christopher J.; Miller, Quin RS; Martin, Paul F.; Hu, Jian Z.; Hoyt, David W.; Qafoku, Odeta; Ilton, Eugene S.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2012-04-25

    The interaction of anhydrous supercritical CO2 (scCO2) with both kaolinite and ~1W (i.e. close to but less than one layer of hydration) calcium-saturated montmorillonite was investigated under conditions relevant to geologic carbon sequestration (50 °C and 90 bar). The CO2 molecular environment was probed in situ using a combination of three novel high-pressure techniques: X-ray diffraction, magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy. We report the first direct evidence that the expansion of montmorillonite under scCO2 conditions is due to CO2 migration into the interlayer. Intercalated CO2 molecules are rotationally constrained and do not appear to react with waters to form bicarbonate or carbonic acid. In contrast, CO2 does not intercalate into kaolinite. The findings show that predicting the seal integrity of caprock will have complex dependence on clay mineralogy and hydration state.

  2. Supercritical fluid chromatography for lipid analysis in foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Donato, Paola; Inferrera, Veronica; Sciarrone, Danilo; Mondello, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    The task of lipid analysis has always challenged separation scientists, and new techniques in chromatography were often developed for the separation of lipids; however, no single technique or methodology is yet capable of affording a comprehensive screening of all lipid species and classes. This review acquaints the role of supercritical fluid chromatography within the field of lipid analysis, from the early developed capillary separations based on pure CO2 , to the most recent techniques employing packed columns under subcritical conditions, including the niche multidimensional techniques using supercritical fluids in at least one of the separation dimensions. A short history of supercritical fluid chromatography will be introduced first, from its early popularity in the late 1980s, to the sudden fall and oblivion until the last decade, experiencing a regain of interest within the chromatographic community. Afterwards, the subject of lipid nomenclature and classification will be briefly dealt with, before discussing the main applications of supercritical fluid chromatography for food analysis, according to the specific class of lipids.

  3. Swelling-induced changes in coal microstructure due to supercritical CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yihuai; Lebedev, Maxim; Sarmadivaleh, Mohammad; Barifcani, Ahmed; Iglauer, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Enhanced coalbed methane recovery and CO2 geostorage in coal seams are severely limited by permeability decrease caused by CO2 injection and associated coal matrix swelling. Typically, it is assumed that matrix swelling leads to coal cleat closure, and as a consequence, permeability is reduced. However, this assumption has not yet been directly observed. Using a novel in situ reservoir condition X-ray microcomputed tomography flooding apparatus, for the first time we observed such microcleat closure induced by supercritical CO2 flooding in situ. Furthermore, fracturing of the mineral phase (embedded in the coal) was observed; this fracturing was induced by the internal swelling stress. We conclude that coal permeability is drastically reduced by cleat closure, which again is caused by coal matrix swelling, which again is caused by flooding with supercritical CO2.

  4. Experimental study of crossover from capillary to viscous fingering for supercritical CO2-water displacement in a homogeneous pore network.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Changyong; Wei, Ning; Oostrom, Mart; Wietsma, Thomas W; Li, Xiaochun; Bonneville, Alain

    2013-01-02

    Carbon sequestration in saline aquifers involves displacing brine from the pore space by supercritical CO(2) (scCO(2)). The displacement process is considered unstable due to the unfavorable viscosity ratio between the invading scCO(2) and the resident brine. The mechanisms that affect scCO(2)-water displacement under reservoir conditions (41 °C, 9 MPa) were investigated in a homogeneous micromodel. A large range of injection rates, expressed as the dimensionless capillary number (Ca), was studied in two sets of experiments: discontinuous-rate injection, where the micromodel was saturated with water before each injection rate was imposed, and continuous-rate injection, where the rate was increased after quasi-steady conditions were reached for a certain rate. For the discontinuous-rate experiments, capillary fingering and viscous fingering are the dominant mechanisms for low (logCa ≤ -6.61) and high injection rates (logCa ≥ -5.21), respectively. Crossover from capillary to viscous fingering was observed for logCa = -5.91 to -5.21, resulting in a large decrease in scCO(2) saturation. The discontinuous-rate experimental results confirmed the decrease in nonwetting fluid saturation during crossover from capillary to viscous fingering predicted by numerical simulations by Lenormand et al. (J. Fluid Mech.1988, 189, 165-187). Capillary fingering was the dominant mechanism for all injection rates in the continuous-rate experiment, resulting in monotonic increase in scCO(2) saturation.

  5. Ampicillin Nanoparticles Production via Supercritical CO2 Gas Antisolvent Process.

    PubMed

    Esfandiari, Nadia; Ghoreishi, Seyyed M

    2015-12-01

    The micronization of ampicillin via supercritical gas antisolvent (GAS) process was studied. The particle size distribution was significantly controlled with effective GAS variables such as initial solute concentration, temperature, pressure, and antisolvent addition rate. The effect of each variable in three levels was investigated. The precipitated particles were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Zetasizer Nano ZS. The results indicated that decreasing the temperature and initial solute concentration while increasing the antisolvent rate and pressure led to a decrease in ampicillin particle size. The mean particle size of ampicillin was obtained in the range of 220-430 nm by varying the GAS effective variables. The purity of GAS-synthesized ampicillin nanoparticles was analyzed in contrast to unprocessed ampicillin by FTIR and HPLC. The results indicated that the structure of the ampicillin nanoparticles remained unchanged during the GAS process.

  6. The Role of H2O in Brucite-Supercritical CO2 Reaction: Relevance to CO2 Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, S.; Zhao, L.; Chen, Z.; Teng, H.

    2013-12-01

    It is widely recognized that the presence of water is vital for brucite carbonation in supercritical CO2 (scCO2) based upon the observation that nesquehonite (MgCO3`3H2O) precipitated instantly in brucite-water-scCO2 system while no carbonate was detected in brucite-scCO2 medium. The importance of water is further emphasized by the result that shows higher water concentrations led to greater carbonation rates. However, the mechanism of water effect is not fully understood as two possible pathways exist for the carbonation reaction: 1) the dissociation of H2O provides a) H+ to release Mg2+ through associating with OH- in brucite, and b) OH- to combine with CO2 to form HCO3-, leading to the interaction of magnesium cations with carbonate anions; 2) H2O molecules polarizes CO2 through hydrogen bonding to promote direct interactions between carbon dioxide and brucite followed by water release from Mg(OH)2. The present study attempts to determine whether proton-effect or polarity-effect is the governing force for brucite carbonation in scCO2 - H2O system. Experiments were carried out in water-saturated scCO2 (experimental H2O mole fraction in CO2 is 4.1×10-2, solubility of H2O in CO2 at experimental condition is 3.5×10-3), and formamide (FM, HCONH2)-saturated scCO2 (experimental FM mole fraction in CO2 is 1.8×10-2), at 50 oC temperature and 8MPa pressure. Formamide was selected because of its similar permittivity to water (ɛH2O,20oC=80.1, ɛHCONH2,20oC=84.0) but the lack of proton-donating ability. In situ Raman spectroscopy data revealed that nesquehonite and hydromagnesite (Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2`4H2O, minor quantity) formed in both brucite-water-scCO2 and brucite-FM-scCO2 systems but at a different rate, with the former within 5h and the latter 45h to reach similar carbonation extent. While this result cannot completely rule out the role of water as brucite may dehydrate in FM, it shows that liquid water may not be needed for mineral-scCO2 interaction as long as the

  7. Mineral Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2: An in situ High-Pressure Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcu, R. V.; Hoyt, D. H.; Sears, J. A.; Rosso, K. M.; Felmy, A. R.; Hu, J. Z.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms and kinetics of mineral carbonation reactions relevant to sequestering carbon dioxide as a supercritical fluid (scCO2) in geologic formations is crucial for accurately predicting long-term storage risks. In situ probes that provide molecular-level information at geologically relevant temperatures and pressures are highly desirable and challenging to develop. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) is a powerful tool for obtaining detailed molecular structure and dynamics information of a system regardless whether the system is in a solid, a liquid, a gaseous, a supercritical state, or a mixture thereof. However, MAS NMR under scCO2 conditions has never been realized due to the tremendous technical difficulties of achieving and maintaining high pressure within a fast spinning MAS sample rotor. In this work, we report development of a unique high pressure MAS NMR capability capable of handling fluid pressure exceeding 170 bars and temperatures up to 80°C, and its application to mineral carbonation in scCO2 under geologically relevant temperatures and pressures. Mineral carbonation reactions of the magnesium silicate mineral forsterite and the magnesium hydroxide brucite reacted with scCO2 (up to 170 bar) and containing variable content of H2O (at, below, and above saturation in scCO2) were investigated at 50 to 70°C. In situ 13C MAS NMR spectra show peaks corresponding to the reactants, intermediates, and the magnesium carbonation products in a single spectrum. For example, Figure 1 shows the reaction dynamics, i.e., the formation and conversion of reaction intermediates, i.e., HCO3- and nesquehonite, to magnesite as a function of time at 70°C. This capability offers a significant advantage over traditional ex situ 13C MAS experiments on similar systems, where, for example, CO2 and HCO3- are not directly observable.

  8. Inhibitory effect of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, extracted from spinach using supercritical CO2, on mammalian DNA polymerase activity.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Hiroshi; Musumi, Keiichi; Hada, Takahiko; Maeda, Naoki; Yonezawa, Yuko; Yoshida, Hiromi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2006-03-08

    We investigated the effective extraction of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) from dried spinach (Spinacia oleracea) using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SC-CO(2)) with a modifier/entrainer. The yield of MGDG in the SC-CO(2) extract was not influenced by increasing temperature at a constant pressure, although the total extract yield was decreased. The total extract yield and MGDG yield in the extract from commercially purchased spinach (unknown subspecies), were greatly influenced by lower pressure. In a modifier (i.e., ethanol) concentration range of 2.5-20%, both the extract and MGDG yield increased as the ethanol concentration rose. The highest total extract yield (69.5 mg/g of spinach) and a good MGDG yield (16.3 mg/g of spinach) were obtained at 80 degrees C, 25 MPa, and 20% ethanol. The highest MGDG concentration (76.0% in the extract) was obtained at 80 degrees C, 25 MPa, and 2.5% ethanol, although the total extract yield under these conditions was low (5.2 mg/g of spinach). The optimal conditions for the extraction of MGDG were 80 degrees C, 20 MPa, and 10% ethanol. Of the 11 subspecies of spinach tested under these conditions, "Ujyou" had the highest concentration of MGDG. The total extract yield and MGDG concentration of Ujyou were 20.4 mg of the extract/g of spinach and 70.5%, respectively. The concentration of MGDG was higher in the SC-CO(2) extract than in the extract obtained using solvents such as methanol and n-hexane. The extract of Ujyou, which was the optimal subspecies for the extraction of MGDG, inhibited the activity of calf DNA polymerase alpha with IC(50) values of 145 microg/mL but was not effective against DNA polymerase beta.

  9. Evaluation of Cannabinoid and Terpenoid Content: Cannabis Flower Compared to Supercritical CO2 Concentrate.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Michelle; Shelton, Kyle; Haley, Pam; West, Mike

    2017-09-19

    A recent cannabis use survey revealed that 60% of cannabis users rely on smelling the flower to select their cannabis. Olfactory indicators in plants include volatile compounds, principally represented by the terpenoid fraction. Currently, medicinal- and adult-use cannabis is marketed in the United States with relatively little differentiation between products other than by a common name, association with a species type, and Δ-9 tetrahydrocannabinol/cannabidiol potency. Because of this practice, how terpenoid compositions may change during an extraction process is widely overlooked. Here we report on a comparative study of terpenoid and cannabinoid potencies of flower and supercritical fluid CO2 (SC-CO2) extract from six cannabis chemovars grown in Washington State. To enable this comparison, we employed a validated high-performance liquid chromatography/diode array detector methodology for quantification of seven cannabinoids and developed an internal gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for quantification of 42 terpenes. The relative potencies of terpenoids and cannabinoids in flower versus concentrate were significantly different. Cannabinoid potency increased by factors of 3.2 for Δ-9 tetrahydrocannabinol and 4.0 for cannabidiol in concentrates compared to flower. Monoterpenes were lost in the extraction process; a ketone increased by 2.2; an ether by 2.7; monoterpene alcohols by 5.3, 7 and 9.4; and sesquiterpenes by 5.1, 4.2, 7.7, and 8.9. Our results demonstrate that the product of SC-CO2 extraction may have a significantly different chemotypic fingerprint from that of cannabis flower. These results highlight the need for more complete characterization of cannabis and associated products, beyond cannabinoid content, in order to further understand health-related consequences of inhaling or ingesting concentrated forms. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Migration behavior of supercritical and liquid CO2 in a stratified system: Experiments and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Junho; Kim, Kue-Young; Han, Weon Shik; Park, Eungyu; Kim, Jeong-Chan

    2015-10-01

    Multiple scenarios of upward CO2 migration driven by both injection-induced pressure and buoyancy force were investigated in a horizontally and vertically stratified core utilizing a core-flooding system with a 2-D X-ray scanner. Two reservoir-type scenarios were considered: (1) the terrestrial reservoir scenario (10 MPa and 50°C), where CO2 exists in a supercritical state and (2) the deep-sea sediment reservoir scenario (28 MPa and 25°C), where CO2 is stored in the liquid phase. The core-flooding experiments showed a 36% increase in migration rate in the vertical core setting compared with the horizontal setting, indicating the significance of the buoyancy force under the terrestrial reservoir scenario. Under both reservoir conditions, the injected CO2 tended to find a preferential flow path (low capillary entry pressure and high-permeability (high-k) path) and bypass the unfavorable pathways, leaving low CO2 saturation in the low-permeability (low-k) layers. No distinctive fingering was observed as the CO2 moved upward, and the CO2 movement was primarily controlled by media heterogeneity. The CO2 saturation in the low-k layers exhibited a more sensitive response to injection rates, implying that the increase in CO2 injection rates could be more effective in terms of storage capacity in the low-k layers in a stratified reservoir. Under the deep-sea sediment condition, the storage potential of liquid CO2 was more than twice as high as that of supercritical CO2 under the terrestrial reservoir scenario. In the end, multiphase transport simulations were conducted to assess the effects of heterogeneity on the spatial variation of pressure buildup, CO2 saturation, and CO2 flux. Finally, we showed that a high gravity number (Ngr) tended to be more influenced by the heterogeneity of the porous media.

  11. Experimental Investigation on the Behavior of Supercritical CO2 during Reservoir Depressurization.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Jiang, Peixue; He, Di; Chen, Xue; Xu, Ruina

    2017-08-01

    CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers is a promising way to address climate change. However, the pressure of the sequestration reservoir may decrease in practice, which induces CO2 exsolution and expansion in the reservoir. In this study, we conducted a core-scale experimental investigation on the depressurization of CO2-containing sandstone using NMR equipment. Three different series of experiments were designed to investigate the influence of the depressurization rate and the initial CO2 states on the dynamics of different trapping mechanisms. The pressure range of the depressurization was from 10.5 to 4.0 MPa, which covered the supercritical and gaseous states of the CO2 (named as CO2(sc) and CO2(g), respectively). It was found that when the aqueous phase saturated initially, the exsolution behavior strongly depended on the depressurization rate. When the CO2 and aqueous phase coexisting initially, the expansion of the CO2(sc/g) contributed to the incremental CO2 saturation in the core only when the CO2 occurred as residually trapped. It indicates that the reservoir depressurization has the possibility to convert the solubility trapping to the residual trapping phase, and/or convert the residual trapping to mobile CO2.

  12. Wettability effect on capillary trapping of supercritical CO2 at pore-scale: micromodel experiment and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, R.; Wan, J.

    2015-12-01

    Wettability of reservoir minerals along pore surfaces plays a controlling role in capillary trapping of supercritical (sc) CO2 in geologic carbon sequestration. The mechanisms controlling scCO2 residual trapping are still not fully understood. We studied the effect of pore surface wettability on CO2 residual saturation at the pore-scale using engineered high pressure and high temperature micromodel (transparent pore networks) experiments and numerical modeling. Through chemical treatment of the micromodel pore surfaces, water-wet, intermediate-wet, and CO2-wet micromodels can be obtained. Both drainage and imbibition experiments were conducted at 8.5 MPa and 45 °C with controlled flow rate. Dynamic images of fluid-fluid displacement processes were recorded using a microscope with a CCD camera. Residual saturations were determined by analysis of late stage imbibition images of flow path structures. We performed direct numerical simulations of the full Navier-Stokes equations using a volume-of-fluid based finite-volume framework for the primary drainage and the followed imbibition for the micromodel experiments with different contact angles. The numerical simulations agreed well with our experimental observations. We found that more scCO2 can be trapped within the CO2-wet micromodel whereas lower residual scCO2 saturation occurred within the water-wet micromodels in both our experiments and the numerical simulations. These results provide direct and consistent evidence of the effect of wettability, and have important implications for scCO2 trapping in geologic carbon sequestration.

  13. Supercritical fluid reactions for coal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, C.A.

    1997-04-01

    Exciting opportunities exist for the application of supercritical fluid (SCF) reactions for the pre-treatment of coal. Utilizing reactants which resemble the organic nitrogen containing components of coal, we propose to develop a method to tailor chemical reactions in supercritical fluid solvents for the specific application of coal denitrogenation. The Diels-Alder reaction of anthracene and 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) was chosen as the model system and was investigated in supercritical carbon dioxide. Kinetic data has been previously collected for pure CO{sub 2} at pressures between the critical pressure of CO{sub 2} (73.8 bar) and 216 bar. This data is now being used to construct mathematical forms which can model these pressure induced kinetic changes. One promising avenue of investigation involves treating the supercritical medium as a dense gas, which allows a kinetic model based on high reference pressure fugacity coefficients to be derived.

  14. Supercritical fluid (SCF) technologies: Assessment of applicability to installation restoration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-03-01

    USAEC has conducted an evaluation of supercritical fluid (SCF) technologies for their applicability to treatment of explosives, chlorinated hydrocarbons, and metals in soils, water, and/or waste sludge media. Off-specification explosives and propellants that have traditionally been open burned or openly detonated were also examined. Supercritical fluids are substances which have been heated and compressed to above their critical temperatures and pressures and which possess unique transport and mass transfer properties. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) uses the solvating properties of supercritical fluids to extract one or more organic components from a mixture into a supercritical solvent (commonly CO2). The concentrated extract stream may then be recycled, reclaimed, or destroyed by other methods.

  15. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2015-06-09

    A system and method for reactively refining hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20 degrees and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure, using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. A reaction portion of the system and method delivers lightweight, volatile hydrocarbons to an associated contacting unit which operates in mixed subcritical/supercritical or supercritical modes. Using thermal diffusion, multiphase contact, or a momentum generating pressure gradient, the contacting unit separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques.

  16. Innovative pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse using supercritical CO2 followed by alkaline hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Phan, Duy The; Tan, Chung-Sung

    2014-09-01

    An innovative method for pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse using sequential combination of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and alkaline hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) at mild conditions is proposed. This method was found to be superior to the individual pretreatment with scCO2, ultrasound, or H2O2 and the sequential combination of scCO2 and ultrasound regarding the yield of cellulose and hemicellulose, almost twice the yield was observed. Pretreatment with scCO2 could obtain higher amount of cellulose and hemicellulose but also acid-insoluble lignin. Pretreatment with ultrasound or H2O2 could partly depolymerize lignin, however, could not separate cellulose from lignin. The analysis of liquid products via enzymatic hydrolysis by HPLC and the characterization of the solid residues by SEM revealed strong synergetic effects in the sequential combination of scCO2 and H2O2. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Thermochromic shifts in supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Yonker, C.R.; Smith, R.D. )

    1989-02-23

    Thermochromic shifts of organic solute molecules in supercritical CO{sub 2} under conditions of both constant pressure and density are compared to previous studies of solvatochromic shifts at isothermal conditions. Similar solvatochromic and thermochromic shifts are seen as a function of density for supercritical CO{sub 2}. At constant density a small thermochromic shift ({approx}400 cm{sup {minus}1}) for supercritical CO{sub 2} was seen for both 2-nitroanisole and 4-ethylnitrobenzene. The excited-state dipole moments for 2-nitroanisole, as calculated from the thermochromic and solvatochromic data, were in agreement.

  18. Electrodeposition of germanium from supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Ke, Jie; Bartlett, Philip N; Cook, David; Easun, Timothy L; George, Michael W; Levason, William; Reid, Gillian; Smith, David; Su, Wenta; Zhang, Wenjian

    2012-01-28

    Several Ge(II) and Ge(IV) compounds were investigated as possible reagents for the electrodeposition of Ge from liquid CH(3)CN and CH(2)F(2) and supercritical CO(2) containing as a co-solvent CH(3)CN (scCO(2)) and supercritical CH(2)F(2) (scCH(2)F(2)). For Ge(II) reagents the most promising results were obtained using [NBu(n)(4)][GeCl(3)]. However the reproducibility was poor and the reduction currents were significantly less than the estimated mass transport limited values. Deposition of Ge containing films was possible at high cathodic potential from [NBu(n)(4)][GeCl(3)] in liquid CH(3)CN and supercritical CO(2) containing CH(3)CN but in all cases they were heavily contaminated by C, O, F and Cl. Much more promising results were obtained using GeCl(4) in liquid CH(2)F(2) and supercritical CH(2)F(2). In this case the reduction currents were consistent with mass transport limited reduction and bulk electrodeposition produced amorphous films of Ge. Characterisation by XPS showed the presence of low levels of O, F and C, XPS confirmed the presence of Ge together with germanium oxides, and Raman spectroscopy showed that the as deposited amorphous Ge could be crystallised by the laser used in obtaining the Raman measurements.

  19. Swelled plastics in supercritical CO2 as media for stabilization of metal nanoparticles and for catalytic hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Ohde, Hiroyuki; Ohde, Mariko; Wai, Chien M

    2004-04-21

    Swelled plastics in supercritical carbon dioxide provide unique environments for stabilizing palladium and rhodium nanoparticles and for catalytic hydrogenation. Complete hydrogenation of benzene to cyclohexane can be achieved in 10 minutes using the plastic stabilized Rh nanoparticles at 50 degrees C in supercritical CO(2). High efficiency, reusability, and rapid separation of products are some advantages of the plastic stabilized metal nanoparticles for catalytic hydrogenation in supercritical CO(2).

  20. Materials, Turbomachinery and Heat Exchangers for Supercritical CO2 Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Mark; Nellis, Greg; Corradini, Michael

    2012-10-19

    The objective of this project is to produce the necessary data to evaluate the performance of the supercritical carbon dioxide cycle. The activities include a study of materials compatibility of various alloys at high temperatures, the heat transfer and pressure drop in compact heat exchanger units, and turbomachinery issues, primarily leakage rates through dynamic seals. This experimental work will serve as a test bed for model development and design calculations, and will help define further tests necessary to develop high-efficiency power conversion cycles for use on a variety of reactor designs, including the sodium fast reactor (SFR) and very high-temperature gas reactor (VHTR). The research will be broken into three separate tasks. The first task deals with the analysis of materials related to the high-temperature S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle. The most taxing materials issues with regard to the cycle are associated with the high temperatures in the reactor side heat exchanger and in the high-temperature turbine. The system could experience pressures as high as 20MPa and temperatures as high as 650°C. The second task deals with optimization of the heat exchangers required by the S-CO{sub 2} cycle; the S-CO{sub 2} flow passages in these heat exchangers are required whether the cycle is coupled with a VHTR or an SFR. At least three heat exchangers will be required: the pre-cooler before compression, the recuperator, and the heat exchanger that interfaces with the reactor coolant. Each of these heat exchangers is unique and must be optimized separately. The most challenging heat exchanger is likely the pre-cooler, as there is only about a 40°C temperature change but it operates close to the CO{sub 2} critical point, therefore inducing substantial changes in properties. The proposed research will focus on this most challenging component. The third task examines seal leakage through various dynamic seal designs under the conditions expected in the S-CO{sub 2} cycle

  1. CO2-based mixtures as working fluids for geothermal turbines.

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Steven Alan; Conboy, Thomas M.; Ames, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is investigating advanced Brayton cycles using supercritical working fluids for application to a variety of heat sources, including geothermal, solar, fossil, and nuclear power. This work is centered on the supercritical CO{sub 2} (S-CO{sub 2}) power conversion cycle, which has the potential for high efficiency in the temperature range of interest for these heat sources and is very compact-a feature likely to reduce capital costs. One promising approach is the use of CO{sub 2}-based supercritical fluid mixtures. The introduction of additives to CO{sub 2} alters the equation of state and the critical point of the resultant mixture. A series of tests was carried out using Sandia's supercritical fluid compression loop that confirmed the ability of different additives to increase or lower the critical point of CO{sub 2}. Testing also demonstrated that, above the modified critical point, these mixtures can be compressed in a turbocompressor as a single-phase homogenous mixture. Comparisons of experimental data to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Reference Fluid Thermodynamic and Transport Properties (REFPROP) Standard Reference Database predictions varied depending on the fluid. Although the pressure, density, and temperature (p, {rho}, T) data for all tested fluids matched fairly well to REFPROP in most regions, the critical temperature was often inaccurate. In these cases, outside literature was found to provide further insight and to qualitatively confirm the validity of experimental findings for the present investigation.

  2. Supercritical CO2 Cleaning for Planetary Protection and Contamination Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ying; Zhong, Fang; Aveline, David; Anderson, Mark; Chung, Shirley; Mennella, Jerami; Schubert, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    We have designed and built a prototype Supercritical CO? Cleaning (SCC) system at JPL. The key features of the system are: 1) the parts inside a high-pressure vessel can be rotated at high speeds; 2) the same thermodynamic condition is maintained during First-In First-Out flushing to keep solvent power constant; and 3) the boil-off during decompression is induced in a separate vessel downstream. Our goal is to demonstrate SCC's ability to remove trace amounts of microbial and organic contaminants down to parts per billion levels from spacecraft material surfaces for future astrobiology missions. The initial cleaning test results showed that SCC can achieve cleanliness levels of 0.01 microgram/cm(sup 2) or less for hydrophobic contaminants such as dioctyl phthalate and silicone and it is less effective in the removal and inactivation of the hydrophilic bacterial spores as expected. However, with the use of a polar co-solvent, the efficacy may improve dramatically. The same results were obtained using liquid CO?. This opens up the possibility of using subcritical cleaning conditions, which may prove to be more compatible with certain spacecraft hardware.

  3. The Solubility of Organic Compounds in Supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Guillermo A.; Baumann, Wolfram; Adaime, Martha Bohrer; Neitzel, Frank

    2005-09-01

    A simple liquid solution model is proposed to describe the effect of solvent-solute interactions on the solubility of nonpolar and slightly polar substances in supercritical solvents. Treating the system as an ideal solution, the effect of pressure on the solubility is zero or nearly zero, as it is governed by the difference in molar volume of the pure supercooled liquid solute and the pure solid solute, and this may be nearly zero. Deviations from ideal behavior are given by activity coefficients of the Margules type with the interaction parameter w interpreted as interchange energy as in the lattice theory. The hypothesis is put forward that the interchange energy is of the same form as a function proposed by Liptay and others to describe the effect of the solvent on the wavelength of the absorption maximum of the solute dissolved in the solvent. The function consists of a radius of interaction a and a function g(ɛ ) of the dielectric constant ɛ of the solvent, treated as a continuum. The function g depends on pressure through the pressure dependence of the dielectric constant ɛ (P). The attractive feature of this formalism, introduced by Baumann et al. and here justified thermodynamically, is that plots of the logarithm of solubility vs. g are linear, except for polar solutes near the solvent's critical point. Changes in slope then admit interpretation as changes in the radius of interaction a with possible clues about the mechanism of solvation of these molecules.

  4. Supercritical CO2 Cleaning for Planetary Protection and Contamination Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ying; Zhong, Fang; Aveline, David; Anderson, Mark; Chung, Shirley; Mennella, Jerami; Schubert, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    We have designed and built a prototype Supercritical CO? Cleaning (SCC) system at JPL. The key features of the system are: 1) the parts inside a high-pressure vessel can be rotated at high speeds; 2) the same thermodynamic condition is maintained during First-In First-Out flushing to keep solvent power constant; and 3) the boil-off during decompression is induced in a separate vessel downstream. Our goal is to demonstrate SCC's ability to remove trace amounts of microbial and organic contaminants down to parts per billion levels from spacecraft material surfaces for future astrobiology missions. The initial cleaning test results showed that SCC can achieve cleanliness levels of 0.01 microgram/cm(sup 2) or less for hydrophobic contaminants such as dioctyl phthalate and silicone and it is less effective in the removal and inactivation of the hydrophilic bacterial spores as expected. However, with the use of a polar co-solvent, the efficacy may improve dramatically. The same results were obtained using liquid CO?. This opens up the possibility of using subcritical cleaning conditions, which may prove to be more compatible with certain spacecraft hardware.

  5. Shape transitions in supercritical CO2 microemulsions induced by hydrotropes.

    PubMed

    James, Craig; Hatzopoulos, Marios Hopkins; Yan, Ci; Smith, Gregory N; Alexander, Shirin; Rogers, Sarah E; Eastoe, Julian

    2014-01-14

    The ability to induce morphological transitions in water-in-oil (w/o) and water-in-CO2 (w/c) microemulsions stabilized by a trichain anionic surfactant 1,4-bis(neopentyloxy)-3-(neopentyloxycarbonyl)-1,4-dioxobutane-2-sulfonate (TC14) with simple hydrotrope additives has been investigated. High-pressure small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has revealed the addition of a small mole fraction of hydrotrope can yield a significant elongation in the microemulsion water droplets. For w/o systems, the degree of droplet growth was shown to be dependent on the water content, the hydrotrope mole fraction, and chemical structure, whereas for w/c microemulsions a similar, but less significant, effect was seen. The expected CO2 viscosity increase from such systems has been calculated and compared to related literature using fluorocarbon chain surfactants. This represents the first report of hydrotrope-induced morphology changes in w/c microemulsions and is a significant step forward toward the formation of hydrocarbon worm-like micellar assemblies in this industrially relevant solvent.

  6. Development of a Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Heterogeneous Catalysis in Supercritical CO2

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Nazrul M.; Chatterjee, Maya; Ikushima, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Toshiro; Kawanami, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    A novel type of high-pressure membrane reactor has been developed for hydrogenation in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2). The main objectives of the design of the reactor are the separate feeding of hydrogen and substrate in scCO2 for safe reactions in a continuous flow process, and to reduce the reaction time. By using this new reactor, hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde into hydrocinnamaldehyde has been successfully carried out with 100% selectivity at 50 °C in 10 MPa (H2: 1 MPa, CO2: 9 MPa) with a flow rate of substrate ranging from 0.05 to 1.0 mL/min. PMID:20162008

  7. Partitioning behaviour of organic compounds between ionic liquids and supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Roth, Michal

    2009-03-06

    Applications and prospects of two-phase, tuneable solvent systems composed of ionic liquids (ILs) and supercritical fluids with an emphasis on supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)) are reviewed. The IL-scCO(2) biphasic systems have increasingly been used in diverse fields of chemistry and technology, and some examples of these applications are mentioned here. Rational design of such applications can obviously benefit from pertinent data on phase equilibria including the partition coefficients of the prospective products and reactants between the two phases. Therefore, a reliable technique to measure the limiting partition coefficients would be of value. Here, the pros and cons of supercritical fluid chromatography in this respect are discussed. An overview of methods for predictive thermodynamic modelling of binary (IL-scCO(2)) and ternary (solute-IL-scCO(2)) systems is also included.

  8. Structural features of binary mixtures of supercritical CO2 with polar entrainers by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurina, D. L.; Antipova, M. L.; Petrenko, V. E.

    2013-10-01

    Computer simulations of supercritical carbon dioxide and its mixtures with polar cosolvents: water, methanol, and ethanol (concentration, 0.125 mole fractions) at T = 318 K and ρ = 0.7 g/cm3 are performed. Atom-atom radial distribution functions are calculated by classical molecular dynamics, while the probability distributions of relative orientation of CO2 molecules in the first and second coordination spheres describing the geometry of the nearest environment of CO2 molecules and the trajectories of cosolvent molecules are found using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics. Based on the latter, the conclusions regarding structure and interactions of polar entrainers in their mixtures with supercritical CO2 are made. It is shown that the microstructure of carbon dioxide varies only slightly upon the introduction of cosolvents.

  9. Supercritical Fluid Facilitated Growth of Copper and Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Geoffrey L.; Vohs, Jason K.; Brege, Jonathan J.; Fahlman, Bradley D.

    2005-01-01

    Supercritical fluids (SCFs) possess properties that are intermediate between liquids and gases. The combination of supercritical fluid technology with advanced characterization techniques such as electron microscopy provided a practical and rewarding undergraduate laboratory experiment.

  10. Supercritical Fluid Facilitated Growth of Copper and Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Geoffrey L.; Vohs, Jason K.; Brege, Jonathan J.; Fahlman, Bradley D.

    2005-01-01

    Supercritical fluids (SCFs) possess properties that are intermediate between liquids and gases. The combination of supercritical fluid technology with advanced characterization techniques such as electron microscopy provided a practical and rewarding undergraduate laboratory experiment.

  11. Structure and Dynamics of Confined Water and CO2 in Clays under Supercritical Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glezakou, V.; Lee, M.; Schaef, T.; Loring, J.; Davidson, C.; McGrail, P.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) driven enhanced gas recovery (EGR) from depleted fractured shale gas reservoirs has the potential for producing economic benefits and providing long term storage options for anthropogenic derived CO2 emissions. However key scientific processes related to CO2:CH4 exchange rates, mineral volume changes, organic mobility, and mineral stability in the presence of acid gas injections are not well understood. In this paper, we conduct atomistic simulations to examine interactions occurring between model clay minerals and supercritical CO2 equilibrated with water or brines to identify parameters controlling adsorption and desorption of gases. Integrated within these simulations are results derived from a set of newly developed experimental techniques designed to characterize physico-chemical reactions at reservoir conditions. In a series of cell optimizations under pressures relevant to sequestration scenarios, molecular simulations within the NVT and NPT ensembles with varying water/CO2 ratios showed a range of interlayer expansion for specific cation-saturated smectites. In conjunction with experimental in situ high pressure x-ray diffraction (HXRD), semi-quantitative concentrations of interlayer H2O and CO2 were established. For example, Ca saturated smectites maintaining sub-single to single hydration states (<1W to 1W), expand approximately 1.7-2.0 Å when exposed to anhydrous supercritical CO2. In contrast, for single to double hydration states (1W-2W), the simulations indicate formation of a quasi-single, metastable state, leading to a reduced interlayer spacing. Partial dehydration of the interlayer spacing while in contact with CO2 is due to a reduction of the interlayer cation coordination number. Structural analysis of the intercalated species shows an increase in the hydrogen bonding between waters during CO2 intercalation coincident with a decrease in the coordination population around the cations. Power spectra reveal rotationally

  12. The influence of water and supercritical CO2 on the failure behavior of chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liteanu, E.; Spiers, C. J.; de Bresser, J. H. P.

    2013-06-01

    Reduction of compressive strength by injection of water into chalk is a well-known mechanism responsible for increased compaction in chalk reservoirs. This raises the question of whether such effects might be enhanced in the context of long-term storage of CO2 or of CO2 injection for enhanced oil and gas recovery (EOR/EGR) purposes. Therefore, data regarding the effect of supercritical CO2 on the mechanical behavior of chalk are needed. The effect of supercritical CO2 on the short-term failure behavior of wet chalk was accordingly investigated by means of conventional triaxial deformation experiments, performed on Maastrichtian chalk cores under dry conditions, in the presence of saturated chalk solution and using CO2-saturated solution at temperatures simulating reservoir conditions (20-80 °C) and effective confining pressures up to 7 MPa. Increasing temperature from 20 to 80 °C did not show any significant effects on the strength of the dry samples. Addition of aqueous solution to the samples led to drastic weakening of the chalk, the effect being more pronounced at high effective confining pressures (Peff > 3 MPa). Addition of 10 MPa supercritical CO2 to wet samples did not produce any significant additional effect in comparison with the wet samples. All samples showed a yield strength envelope characterized by shear failure at low effective mean stresses giving way to a compaction cap at high mean stresses. The weakening effect of aqueous solution was explained in terms of a reduction in frictional resistance of the material, due to water-enhanced grain-contact cracking, and perhaps pressure solution, with a possible contribution by disjoining pressure effects caused by water adsorption. While CO2 does not seem to reduce short-term failure strength of wet chalk, processes such as intergranular pressure solution have to be considered for assessing mechanical stability of chalk in the context of long-term CO2 storage or EOR/EGR operations.

  13. Solubility of caffeine from green tea in supercritical CO2: a theoretical and empirical approach.

    PubMed

    Gadkari, Pravin Vasantrao; Balaraman, Manohar

    2015-12-01

    Decaffeination of fresh green tea was carried out with supercritical CO2 in the presence of ethanol as co-solvent. The solubility of caffeine in supercritical CO2 varied from 44.19 × 10(-6) to 149.55 × 10(-6) (mole fraction) over a pressure and temperature range of 15 to 35 MPa and 313 to 333 K, respectively. The maximum solubility of caffeine was obtained at 25 MPa and 323 K. Experimental solubility data were correlated with the theoretical equation of state models Peng-Robinson (PR), Soave Redlich-Kwong (SRK), and Redlich-Kwong (RK). The RK model had regressed experimental data with 15.52 % average absolute relative deviation (AARD). In contrast, Gordillo empirical model regressed the best to experimental data with only 0.96 % AARD. Under supercritical conditions, solubility of caffeine in tea matrix was lower than the solubility of pure caffeine. Further, solubility of caffeine in supercritical CO2 was compared with solubility of pure caffeine in conventional solvents and a maximum solubility 90 × 10(-3) mol fraction was obtained with chloroform.

  14. Supercritical fluid mixing in Diesel Engine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Luis; Ma, Peter; Kurman, Matthew; Tess, Michael; Ihme, Matthias; Kweon, Chol-Bum

    2014-11-01

    A numerical framework for simulating supercritical fluids mixing with large density ratios is presented in the context of diesel sprays. Accurate modeling of real fluid effects on the fuel air mixture formation process is critical in characterizing engine combustion. Recent work (Dahms, 2013) has suggested that liquid fuel enters the chamber in a transcritical state and rapidly evolves to supercritical regime where the interface transitions from a distinct liquid/gas interface into a continuous turbulent mixing layer. In this work, the Peng Robinson EoS is invoked as the real fluid model due to an acceptable compromise between accuracy and computational tractability. Measurements at supercritical conditions are reported from the Constant Pressure Flow (CPF) chamber facility at the Army Research Laboratory. Mie and Schlieren optical spray diagnostics are utilized to provide time resolved liquid and vapor penetration length measurement. The quantitative comparison presented is discussed. Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU).

  15. Transport relaxation processes in supercritical fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonas, J.

    The technique for solubility measurements of solids in compressed supercritical fluids using NMR and theoretical analysis of experimental data on collision induced scattering were examined. Initial tests for a determination of solid solubilities in supercritical fluids without mixing were previously described and these preparations have continued. Super critical carbon dioxide dissolving naphthalene, for which solubility data is already available (M. McHugh, M.E. Paulaitis, J. Chem. Eng. Data, Vol. 25 (4), 1980) is being studied. This initial testing of the NMR technique for measuring solubilities in a well characterized system should prove very valuable for our later determinations with the proposed mixing probe. Systematic experimental studies of collision induced spectra in several supercritical fluids using both Raman and Rayleigh scattering are continued. The experimental work on SF6 and CH4 was finished and the experimental data testing of the various theoretical models for collision induced scattering is being analyzed.

  16. Viral inactivation of human bone tissue using supercritical fluid extraction.

    PubMed

    Fages, J; Poirier, B; Barbier, Y; Frayssinet, P; Joffret, M L; Majewski, W; Bonel, G; Larzul, D

    1998-01-01

    A new bone tissue process using supercritical carbon dioxide fluid extraction (SFE) has been evaluated for its ability to inactivate or eliminate viruses. Four viruses, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), Sindbis virus, polio Sabin type I virus, and pseudorabies virus (PRV), were exposed to four different processing steps. In addition to supercritical CO2, hydrogen peroxide, sodium hydroxide, and ethanol treatments were evaluated. The mean cumulated reduction factors (log10) for the four viruses exposed to these four steps were > 14.2 for HIV-1, > 18.2 for Sindbis virus, > 24.4 for poliovirus, and > 17.6 for PRV. The mean reduction factors obtained by the supercritical fluid extraction alone were > 4.0, > 4.3, > 6.6, and > 4.0, respectively. These results demonstrate that the SFE process is effective in inactivating viruses on human femoral heads, and provides a level of inactivation similar to that obtained by traditional cleaning methods. It is proposed that CO2 SFE be incorporated as a routine step in the processing of bone allografts for transplantation either to replace or supplement existing procedures.

  17. Investigation of the Properties of Pore-Confined Supercritical CO2 by Vibrating Tube and Gravimetric Adsorption Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruszkiewicz, M. S.; Rother, G.; Wesolowski, D. J.; Cole, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate properties of multicomponent CO2-rich fluids are needed to understand and control the processes occurring during subsurface storage of CO2, enhanced coalbed methane recovery, and proposed geothermal heat mining using CO2 instead of water. While fluid transport in macroscopic fractures is mainly affected by bulk fluid properties, mineral dissolution and fluid-rock reactions occur at the solid-fluid interface located largely in mesopore and micropore networks. Densities, mineral solubilities, ionic and phase equilibria, and transport properties of multicomponent fluids change significantly in close proximity to mineral surfaces. Accurate modeling of the behavior of CO2-rich fluids and their effect on the evolution of the reservoir and caprock permeability depend on accurate properties of both bulk and confined phases. Although manometric, volumetric, and gravimetric techniques have been used successfully to investigate adsorption of low-density subcritical gases and vapors, they are not capable of complete characterization of interfacial processes at higher, liquid-like densities of supercritical fluids. As the density of bulk fluid becomes comparable to that of the pore fluid, excess adsorption is no longer a good estimate of total adsorption capacity of the formation and the properties of the pore fluid remain unknown. In this work vibrating tube densimetry of pore fluids was used for the first time as a novel method capable of providing the total amount of fluid contained within a pore system through a direct measurement of the mass of a fluid-saturated porous solid. The method is first demonstrated using propane at subcritical and supercritical temperatures between 35 °C and 97 °C confined in silica aerogel (density 0.2 g/cm3, porosity 90%) that was synthesized inside Hastelloy U-tubes. Sorption and desorption of carbon dioxide on the same solid was measured between 31 °C ( the critical temperature of CO2) and 50 °C at pressures to 140 bar (density

  18. Laboratory-scale interaction between CO2-rich brine and limestone and sandstone under supercritical CO2 conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Rios, Maria; Cama, Jordi; Luquot, Linda; Soler, Josep

    2014-05-01

    A test site for a prospective CO2 geological storage is situated in Hontomín (Burgos, northern Spain) with a reservoir rock that is composed of limestone (calcite) and sandstone (66 wt.% calcite, 28 wt.% quartz and 6 wt.% microcline). During and after CO2 injection, the resulting CO2-rich acid brine will likely promote the dissolution of carbonate minerals (calcite) and aluminosilicates (microcline). Since the reservoir Hontomín brine contains sulfate, gypsum (or anhydrite at depth) may precipitate. These coupled dissolution and precipitation reactions may induce changes in porosity and pore structure of the repository rocks. Percolations experiments with mechanically fractured cores (8.6 mm in diameter and 18 mm length) were performed under CO2 supercritical conditions (Pfluid = 150 bar; pCO2 ≡ 90 bar and T = 60 ºC) in order to evaluate and quantify variations in fracture permeability, preferential path formation and fracture volume. The brine sulfate content and the flow rate were varied. Regarding limestone, as the synthetic brines circulated through the fracture, the fracture permeability initially increased slowly, to thereafter increase rapidly. This change was due to a localized dissolution process (wormhole formation) along the core that occurred regardless gypsum precipitation. Nonetheless, the originated fracture volume in the sulfate-rich brine experiments was a factor of two smaller than that in sulfate-free brine experiments. Also, an increase in flow rate from 0.2 to 60 mL/h increased the volume of both dissolved calcite and precipitated gypsum. Regarding sandstone, permeability increased gradually with time. Nonetheless, this increase was not always continuous due to eventual fracture clogging. Formation of wormholes was observed. Acknowledgements This study was financed by CIUDEN (Ciudad de la Energía), the Compostilla OXYCFB300 project and the PANACEA project (European Community's Seventh Framework Programme FP7/2007-2013 under grant

  19. Research activities on supercritical fluid science in food biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Khosravi-Darani, Kianoush

    2010-06-01

    This article serves as an overview, introducing the currently popular area of supercritical fluids and their uses in food biotechnology. Within each application, and wherever possible, the basic principles of the technique, as well as a description of the history, instrumentation, methodology, uses, problems encountered, and advantages over the traditional, non-supercritical methods are given. Most current commercial application of the supercritical extraction involve biologically-produced materials; the technique may be particularly relevant to the extraction of biological compounds in cases where there is a requirement for low-temperature processing, high mass-transfer rates, and negligible carrying over of the solvent into the final product. Special applications to food processing include the decaffeination of green coffee beans, the production of hops extracts, the recovery of aromas and flavors from herbs and spices, the extraction and fractionation of edible oils, and the removal of contaminants, among others. New advances, in which the extraction is combined with reaction or crystallization steps, may further increase the attractiveness of supercritical fluids in the bioprocess industries. To develop and establish a novel and effective alternative to heating treatment, the lethal action of high hydrostatic pressure CO(2) on microorganisms, with none or only a minimal heating process, has recently received a great deal of attention.

  20. Hydraulic fracture characterization resulting from low-viscosity fluid injection: Implications for CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbey, T. J.; Zhou, X.

    2013-12-01

    The initiation of hydraulic fractures during CO2 sequestration can be either engineered or induced unintentionally. Some fractures may be desirable such as horizontal fractures that can facilitate fluid injection and migration; whereas some fractures may be unfavorable if the fractures tend to extend vertically above a certain limit, thus creating a potential leaking condition. Historically, carbon dioxide as a liquefied gas has been used in oil and gas field stimulation since the early1960s because it eliminates formation damage and residual fluids. Carbon dioxide injection is considered to be one of the most effective technologies for improving oil recovery from hard-to-extract oil reserves because CO2 is effective in penetrating the formation due to its high diffusivity, while the rock associated with petroleum-containing formations is generally porous. However, low viscosity and high compressibility fluids such as CO2 exhibit different effects on the hydraulic fracture initiation/propagation behavior in comparison with high viscosity and low compressibility fluids. Laboratory tests show that viscous fluids tend to generate thick and planar cracks with few branches, while low viscosity fluids tend to generate narrow and wavelike cracks with many secondary branches. A numerical comparison between water and supercritical CO2-like fluid has been made to investigate the influence of fluids to fracture propagation behavior. Simulation results indicate that the pore pressure fields are very different for different pore fluids even when the initial field conditions and injection schemes (rate and time) are kept the same. Thin fluids with properties of supercritical CO2 will create relatively thin and much shorter fractures in comparison to fluids exhibiting properties of water under similar injection schemes. Two significant times are recognized during fracture propagation. One is the time at which a crack ceases opening, and he other is the time at which a crack

  1. Carotenoids extraction from Japanese persimmon (Hachiya-kaki) peels by supercritical CO(2) with ethanol.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mayako; Watanabe, Hiromoto; Kikkawa, Junko; Ota, Masaki; Watanabe, Masaru; Sato, Yoshiyuki; Inomata, Hiroshi; Sato, Nobuyuki

    2006-11-01

    The extraction of carotenoids from Japanese persimmon peels by supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), of which the solvent was CO(2), was performed. In order to enhance the yield and selectivity of the extraction, some portion of ethanol (5 - 20 mol%) was added as an entrainer. The extraction temperature ranged from 313 to 353 K and the pressure was 30 MPa. The effect of temperature on the extraction yield of carotenoids was investigated at 10 mol% of the ethanol concentration in the extraction solvent, and a suitable temperature was found to be 333 K among the temperatures studied with respect to the carotenoid yield. With increasing the entrainer amount from 0 to 10 mol% at a constant temperature (333 K), the carotenoid yield in the extraction was improved, whereas the selectivity of the extracted carotenoids was drastically depressed. We also conducted qualitative and quantitative analyses for the carotenoid components in the extract by HPLC, and analyzed the extraction behavior of each individual carotenoid (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein, and zeaxanthin). The selectivity of each carotenoid changed with the elapsed time and its time evolution was dependent on the carotenoid component, indicating that the location profile and the content can be important factors to understand the SFE behavior of each carotenoid in persimmon peels.

  2. Vaccinium meridionale Swartz Supercritical CO2 Extraction: Effect of Process Conditions and Scaling Up

    PubMed Central

    López-Padilla, Alexis; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Alejandro; Restrepo Flórez, Claudia Estela; Rivero Barrios, Diana Marsela; Reglero, Guillermo; Fornari, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    Vaccinium meridionale Swartz (Mortiño or Colombian blueberry) is one of the Vaccinium species abundantly found across the Colombian mountains, which are characterized by high contents of polyphenolic compounds (anthocyanins and flavonoids). The supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of Vaccinium species has mainly focused on the study of V. myrtillus L. (blueberry). In this work, the SFE of Mortiño fruit from Colombia was studied in a small-scale extraction cell (273 cm3) and different extraction pressures (20 and 30 MPa) and temperatures (313 and 343 K) were investigated. Then, process scaling-up to a larger extraction cell (1350 cm3) was analyzed using well-known semi-empirical engineering approaches. The Broken and Intact Cell (BIC) model was adjusted to represent the kinetic behavior of the low-scale extraction and to simulate the large-scale conditions. Extraction yields obtained were in the range 0.1%–3.2%. Most of the Mortiño solutes are readily accessible and, thus, 92% of the extractable material was recovered in around 30 min. The constant CO2 residence time criterion produced excellent results regarding the small-scale kinetic curve according to the BIC model, and this conclusion was experimentally validated in large-scale kinetic experiments. PMID:28773640

  3. Control system options and strategies for supercritical CO2 cycles.

    SciTech Connect

    Moisseytsev, A.; Kulesza, K. P.; Sienicki, J. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Oregon State Univ.

    2009-06-18

    The Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton Cycle is a promising alternative to Rankine steam cycle and recuperated gas Brayton cycle energy converters for use with Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs), Lead-Cooled Fast Reactors (LFRs), as well as other advanced reactor concepts. The S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle offers higher plant efficiencies than Rankine or recuperated gas Brayton cycles operating at the same liquid metal reactor core outlet temperatures as well as reduced costs or size of key components especially the turbomachinery. A new Plant Dynamics Computer Code has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory for simulation of a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle energy converter coupled to an autonomous load following liquid metal-cooled fast reactor. The Plant Dynamics code has been applied to investigate the effectiveness of a control strategy for the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle for the STAR-LM 181 MWe (400 MWt) Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor. The strategy, which involves a combination of control mechanisms, is found to be effective for controlling the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle over the complete operating range from 0 to 100 % load for a representative set of transient load changes. While the system dynamic analysis of control strategy performance for STARLM is carried out for a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle energy converter incorporating an axial flow turbine and compressors, investigations of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle have identified benefits from the use of centrifugal compressors which offer a wider operating range, greater stability near the critical point, and potentially further cost reductions due to fewer stages than axial flow compressors. Models have been developed at Argonne for the conceptual design and performance analysis of centrifugal compressors for use in the SCO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle. Steady state calculations demonstrate the wider operating range of centrifugal compressors versus axial compressors installed in a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle as

  4. Water Reactivity in the Liquid and Supercritical CO2 Phase: Has Half the Story Been Neglected?

    SciTech Connect

    McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Dang, Liem X.; Owen, Antionette T.

    2009-02-01

    Aqueous-phase mediated chemical reactions with dissolved CO2 have long been considered the principal if not only reactive process supporting mineralization reactions with basalt and other reactive reservoir rocks and caprocks in deep geologic sequestration systems. This is not surprising given the quite high solubility of CO2 in the aqueous phase and ample evidence from natural systems of the reactivity of CO2-charged waters with a variety of silicate minerals. In contrast, comparatively scant attention has been directed at reactivity of water solvated in liquid and supercritical CO2, with the exception of interest in the impacts of water in CO2 on the corrosion of pipeline steels. The results presented in this paper show that the most interesting and important aspects of water reactivity with metal and oxide surfaces of interest in geologic sequestration systems actually occurs in the liquid or supercritical CO2 phase. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  5. Effects of Reservoir Depth and Brine Composition on the Hydrodynamic Instabilities and Dissolution of Supercritical CO2 Releases in the Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, E.; Ezzedine, S. M.

    2009-12-01

    CO2 injected into deep brine formation will be mainly present in three forms: 1) a dense supercritical gas phase, 2) a dissolved state in pore water and 3) an immobilized state through geochemical reaction with in-situ minerals. The lower density of the stored supercritical CO2 will cause buoyant flow of CO2 to the top of the injection zone below the caprock. The integrity of the caprock (no fault activation or fissure formation) is critical to CO2 sequestration and a more complete study of caprock leakage is needed to provide a full understanding of the process and its implication for CO2 sequestration. The flow depends on the density difference as well as the vertical and horizontal permeability of the formation. The very low viscosity of the supercritical CO2 will give rise to instabilities at the CO2-brine interface as CO2 is being injected into the formation, which results in fingering. Nonlinear interactions of chemical reactions and viscous fingering of a low (high) viscosity slice of fluid displaced by a higher (lower) viscosity fluid is studied in porous media by direct numerical simulations of Darcy’s law coupled to the evolution equation for the concentration of a chemically reacting solute controlling the viscosity and density solutions. Chemical kinetics introduces important topological changes in the fingering pattern formation mechanisms such as snap-off, splitting and formation of small ganglia of CO2 which enhance the dissolution of CO2 into the brine. Spatial moment analyses are conducted to assess transient fingering contribution to the increase of breakthrough time variance through a suite of physical parameters such as geological formation depth, mobility ratios, dispersion anisotropy and different brine compositions.

  6. Removal of organic template of mesoporous organosilicate thin films using supercritical carbon dioxide fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondoh, Eiichi; Segawa, Koki; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Jin, Lianhua; Zhang, Liping; Baklanov, Mikhail R.

    2017-07-01

    An organic template of periodic mesoporous organosilicate films was removed using supercritical CO2 fluids that are compressive solvents with a nanopenetration capability. The removal efficiency was evaluated by infrared spectroscopy and refractive index measurements. The removal ratio was dependent on treatment pressure and temperature and improved when the fluid density and/or temperature was high. Because a very high process temperature can deteriorate the organosilicate frame structure, the removal at a low temperature and a high pressure is preferable. The films under supercritical CO2 processing were characterized also in situ ellipsometry. It was found that the removal is a fast process and mostly completes during temperature ramping.

  7. Chemicals loading in acetylated bamboo assisted by supercritical CO2 based on phase equilibrium data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silviana, Petermann, M.

    2015-12-01

    Indonesia has a large tropical forest. However, the deforestation still appears annually and vastly. This reason drives a use of bamboo as wood alternative. Recently, there are many modifications of bamboo in order to prolong the shelf life. Unfortunately, the processes need more chemicals and time. Based on wood modification, esterifying of bamboo was undertaken in present of a dense gas, i.e. supercritical CO2. Calculation of chemicals loading referred to ASTM D1413-99 by using the phase equilibrium data at optimum condition by a statistical design. The results showed that the acetylation of bamboo assisted by supercritical CO2 required 14.73 kg acetic anhydride/m3 of bamboo for a treatment of one hour.

  8. Pore-scale supercritical CO2 dissolution and mass transfer under imbibition conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun; Zhou, Quanlin; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Oostrom, Mart; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Yu, Qingchun

    2016-06-01

    In modeling of geological carbon storage, dissolution of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is often assumed to be instantaneous with equilibrium phase partitioning. In contrast, recent core-scale imbibition experiments have shown a prolonged depletion of residual scCO2 by dissolution, implying a non-equilibrium mechanism. In this study, eight pore-scale scCO2 dissolution experiments in a 2D heterogeneous, sandstone-analog micromodel were conducted at supercritical conditions (9 MPa and 40 °C). The micromodel was first saturated with deionized (DI) water and drained by injecting scCO2 to establish a stable scCO2 saturation. DI water was then injected at constant flow rates after scCO2 drainage was completed. High resolution time-lapse images of scCO2 and water distributions were obtained during imbibition and dissolution, aided by a scCO2-soluble fluorescent dye introduced with scCO2 during drainage. These images were used to estimate scCO2 saturations and scCO2 depletion rates. Experimental results show that (1) a time-independent, varying number of water-flow channels are created during imbibition and later dominant dissolution by the random nature of water flow at the micromodel inlet, and (2) a time-dependent number of water-flow channels are created by coupled imbibition and dissolution following completion of dominant imbibition. The number of water-flow paths, constant or transient in nature, greatly affects the overall depletion rate of scCO2 by dissolution. The average mass fraction of dissolved CO2 (dsCO2) in water effluent varies from 0.38% to 2.72% of CO2 solubility, indicating non-equilibrium scCO2 dissolution in the millimeter-scale pore network. In general, the transient depletion rate decreases as trapped, discontinuous scCO2 bubbles and clusters within water-flow paths dissolve, then remains low with dissolution of large bypassed scCO2 clusters at their interfaces with longitudinal water flow, and finally increases with coupled transverse water flow and

  9. Pore-scale supercritical CO2 dissolution and mass transfer under imbibition conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chun; Zhou, Quanlin; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Oostrom, Mart; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Yu, Qingchun

    2016-06-01

    In modeling of geological carbon storage, dissolution of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is often assumed to be instantaneous with equilibrium phase partitioning. In contrast, recent core-scale imbibition experiments have shown a prolonged depletion of residual scCO2 by dissolution, implying a non-equilibrium mechanism. In this study, eight pore-scale scCO2 dissolution experiments in a 2D heterogeneous, sandstone-analogue micromodel were conducted at supercritical conditions (9 MPa and 40 °C). The micromodel was first saturated with deionized (DI) water and drained by injecting scCO2 to establish a stable scCO2 saturation. DI water was then injected at constant flow rates after scCO2 drainage was completed. High resolution time-lapse images of scCO2 and water distributions were obtained during imbibition and dissolution, aided by a scCO2-soluble fluorescent dye introduced with scCO2 during drainage. These images were used to estimate scCO2 saturations and scCO2 depletion rates. Experimental results show that (1) a time-independent, varying number of water-flow channels are created during imbibition and later dominant dissolution by the random nature of water flow at the micromodel inlet, and (2) a time-dependent number of water-flow channels are created by coupled imbibition and dissolution following completion of dominant imbibition. The number of water-flow paths, constant or transient in nature, greatly affects the overall depletion rate of scCO2 by dissolution. The average mass fraction of dissolved CO2 (dsCO2) in water effluent varies from 0.38% to 2.72% of CO2 solubility, indicating non-equilibrium scCO2 dissolution in the millimeter-scale pore network. In general, the transient depletion rate decreases as trapped, discontinuous scCO2 bubbles and clusters within water-flow paths dissolve, then remains low with dissolution of large bypassed scCO2 clusters at their interfaces with longitudinal water flow, and finally increases with coupled transverse water flow and

  10. Supercritical fluid extraction and processing of foods

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Consumers are aware of the processing techniques used to manufacture food and health supplements and are concerned about the impact of those processes on their health and the environment. Processes that use supercritical fluids as an alternative to solvents that are used to extract nutrients and bio...

  11. Ideality contours and thermodynamic regularities in supercritical molecular fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desgranges, Caroline; Margo, Abigail; Delhommelle, Jerome

    2016-08-01

    Using Expanded Wang-Landau simulations, we calculate the ideality contours for 3 molecular fluids (SF6, CO2 and H2O). We analyze how the increase in polarity, and thus, in the strength of the intermolecular interactions, impacts the contours and thermodynamic regularities. This effect results in the increase in the Boyle and H parameters, that underlie the Zeno line and the curve of ideal enthalpy. Furthermore, a detailed analysis reveals that dipole-dipole interactions lead to much larger enthalpic contributions to the Gibbs free energy. This accounts for the much higher temperatures and pressures that are necessary for supercritical H2O to achieve ideal-like thermodynamic properties.

  12. Solute Nucleation and Growth in Supercritical Fluid Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smedley, Gregory T.; Wilemski, Gerald; Rawlins, W. Terry; Joshi, Prakash; Oakes, David B.; Durgin, William W.

    1996-01-01

    This research effort is directed toward two primary scientific objectives: (1) to determine the gravitational effect on the measurement of nucleation and growth rates near a critical point and (2) to investigate the nucleation process in supercritical fluids to aid in the evaluation and development of existing theoretical models and practical applications. A nucleation pulse method will be employed for this investigation using a rapid expansion to a supersaturated state that is maintained for approximately 1 ms followed by a rapid recompression to a less supersaturated state that effectively terminates nucleation while permitting growth to continue. Nucleation, which occurs during the initial supersaturated state, is decoupled from growth by producing rapid pressure changes. Thermodynamic analysis, condensation modeling, apparatus design, and optical diagnostic design necessary for the initiation of a theoretical and experimental investigation of naphthalene nucleation from supercritical CO2 have been completed.

  13. Design of an efficient space constrained diffuser for supercritical CO2 turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keep, Joshua A.; Head, Adam J.; Jahn, Ingo H.

    2017-03-01

    Radial inflow turbines are an arguably relevant architecture for energy extraction from ORC and supercritical CO 2 power cycles. At small scale, design constraints can prescribe high exit velocities for such turbines, which lead to high kinetic energy in the turbine exhaust stream. The inclusion of a suitable diffuser in a radial turbine system allows some exhaust kinetic energy to be recovered as static pressure, thereby ensuring efficient operation of the overall turbine system. In supercritical CO 2 Brayton cycles, the high turbine inlet pressure can lead to a sealing challenge if the rotor is supported from the rotor rear side, due to the seal operating at rotor inlet pressure. An alternative to this is a cantilevered layout with the rotor exit facing the bearing system. While such a layout is attractive for the sealing system, it limits the axial space claim of any diffuser. Previous studies into conical diffuser geometries for supercritical CO 2 have shown that in order to achieve optimal static pressure recovery, longer geometries of a shallower cone angle are necessitated when compared to air. A diffuser with a combined annular-radial arrangement is investigated as a means to package the aforementioned geometric characteristics into a limited space claim for a 100kW radial inflow turbine. Simulation results show that a diffuser of this design can attain static pressure rise coefficients greater than 0.88. This confirms that annular-radial diffusers are a viable design solution for supercritical CO2 radial inflow turbines, thus enabling an alternative cantilevered rotor layout.

  14. Catalytic nanoreactors in continuous flow: hydrogenation inside single-walled carbon nanotubes using supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Thomas W; Earley, James H; Anderson, Daniel P; Khlobystov, Andrei N; Bourne, Richard A

    2014-05-25

    One nanometre wide carbon nanoreactors are utilised as the reaction vessel for catalytic chemical reactions on a preparative scale. Sub-nanometre ruthenium catalytic particles which are encapsulated solely within single-walled carbon nanotubes offering a unique reaction environment are shown to be active when embedded in a supercritical CO2 continuous flow reactor. A range of hydrogenation reactions were tested and the catalyst displayed excellent stability over extended reaction times.

  15. Mechanism of Bacillus subtilis Spore Inactivation by and Resistance to Supercritical CO2 plus Peracetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Setlow, Barbara; Korza, George; Blatt, Kelly M.S.; Fey, Julien P.; Setlow, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Aims Determine how supercritical CO2 (scCO2) plus peracetic acid (PAA) inactivates Bacillus subtilis spores, factors important in spore resistance to scCO2-PAA, and if spores inactivated by scCO2-PAA are truly dead. Methods and Results Spores of wild-type B. subtilis and isogenic mutants lacking spore protective proteins were treated with scCO2-PAA in liquid or dry at 35°C. Wild-type wet spores (aqueous suspension) were more susceptible than dry spores. Treated spores were examined for viability (and were truly dead), dipicolinic acid (DPA), mutations, permeability to nucleic acid stains, germination under different conditions, energy metabolism and outgrowth. ScCO2-PAA-inactivated spores retained DPA, and survivors had no notable DNA damage. However, DPA was released from inactivated spores at a normally innocuous temperature (85°C), and colony formation from treated spores was salt sensitive. The inactivated spores germinated but did not outgrow, and these germinated spores had altered plasma membrane permeability and defective energy metabolism. Wet or dry coat-defective spores had increased scCO2-PAA sensitivity, and dry spores but not wet spores lacking DNA protective proteins were more scCO2-PAA sensitive. Conclusions These findings suggest that scCO2-PAA inactivates spores by damaging spores’ inner membrane. The spore coat provided scCO2-PAA resistance for both wet and dry spores. DNA protective proteins provided scCO2-PAA resistance only for dry spores. Significance and Impact of Study These results provide information on mechanisms of spore inactivation of and resistance to scCO2-PAA, an agent with increasing use in sterilization applications. PMID:26535794

  16. Mechanism of Bacillus subtilis spore inactivation by and resistance to supercritical CO2 plus peracetic acid.

    PubMed

    Setlow, B; Korza, G; Blatt, K M S; Fey, J P; Setlow, P

    2016-01-01

    Determine how supercritical CO2 (scCO2 ) plus peracetic acid (PAA) inactivates Bacillus subtilis spores, factors important in spore resistance to scCO2 -PAA, and if spores inactivated by scCO2 -PAA are truly dead. Spores of wild-type B. subtilis and isogenic mutants lacking spore protective proteins were treated with scCO2 -PAA in liquid or dry at 35°C. Wild-type wet spores (aqueous suspension) were more susceptible than dry spores. Treated spores were examined for viability (and were truly dead), dipicolinic acid (DPA), mutations, permeability to nucleic acid stains, germination under different conditions, energy metabolism and outgrowth. ScCO2 -PAA-inactivated spores retained DPA, and survivors had no notable DNA damage. However, DPA was released from inactivated spores at a normally innocuous temperature (85°C), and colony formation from treated spores was salt sensitive. The inactivated spores germinated but did not outgrow, and these germinated spores had altered plasma membrane permeability and defective energy metabolism. Wet or dry coat-defective spores had increased scCO2 -PAA sensitivity, and dry spores but not wet spores lacking DNA protective proteins were more scCO2 -PAA sensitive. These findings suggest that scCO2 -PAA inactivates spores by damaging spores' inner membrane. The spore coat provided scCO2 -PAA resistance for both wet and dry spores. DNA protective proteins provided scCO2 -PAA resistance only for dry spores. These results provide information on mechanisms of spore inactivation of and resistance to scCO2 -PAA, an agent with increasing use in sterilization applications. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. H2O-CO2-S fluid triggering the 1991 Mount Pinatubo climactic eruption (Philippines)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Anastassia Y.; Toutain, Jean-Paul; Dubessy, Jean; Pallister, John; Zwick, Antoine; Salvi, Stefano

    2014-02-01

    The factors that trigger explosive eruptions often remain elusive because of the lack of direct data from representative samples. Here, we report the first micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements of fluid and multiphase inclusions trapped in quartz xenocrysts and microlites from andesitic lavas and basaltic enclaves of the 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption. Our analyses reveal two-phase H2O-CO2-S inclusions containing a CO2-dominated phase and an aqueous sulfate-bearing liquid phase and, less commonly, anhydrite (CaSO4(solid)). The two fluid phases are low-temperature products of a supercritical H2O-CO2-S fluid which was associated with a hydrous silicate melt prior to eruption. The average density of the CO2 phase is 0.4 ± 0.2 g/cm3 at room temperature, corresponding to a supercritical fluid density of 0.6 ± 0.1 g/cm3 at the conditions of entrapment at 760-1000 °C and up to ˜260 MPa. For the first time, a dense CO2-bearing fluid is reported in Mount Pinatubo volcanic samples. We suggest that this hybrid H2O-CO2-S fluid originated from mixing between sulfur-rich basaltic and hydrous dacitic magmas, as the former was intruded into and interacted with the pre-eruptive Mount Pinatubo dacite magma reservoir, at depths of at least 10 km. Thermodynamic modeling demonstrates that part of the SO2 liberated from the intruded basaltic magma was consumed via interaction with the aqueous fluid-saturated dacitic magma according to the reaction 4SO2 basalt + 4H2Odacite = 3HSO4 - + H2S + 3H+, yielding early Cu-rich sulfides, late abundant anhydrite, and SO4-rich apatites, which are commonly found in the Mount Pinatubo dacites. We suggest that this hybrid H2O-CO2-S fluid played an important role in triggering the 1991 climactic eruption.

  18. Pore-scale Simulations of Capillary Trapping of CO2 Under Supercritical Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Andersson, L.; Herring, A. L.; Wildenschild, D.; Schaap, M. G.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage is the only feasible and promising technology to reduce the global warming effects caused by carbon emissions while allowing continued large-scale use of fossil fuels. Deep saline aquifers have the largest identified storage potential for CO2. Injection of CO2 into deep saline aquifers leads to a multi-component, multiphase flow system, while capillary trapping of CO2 is an essential mechanism after the injection phase, in which CO2 becomes immobile. This process is unique and complex because CO2 phase properties (e.g. viscosity, density, and interfacial tension) exhibit large changes with pressure and temperature, which can strongly alter the efficiency of CO2 storage. This study is to investigate whether multiple drainage and imbibition of capillary trapping enhance the efficiency of geological CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers where super-critical conditions prevail. To this end, the CO2-Brine model is carried out within a Lattice Boltzmann (LB) framework to efficiently handle porous media in pore scale. A multi-component LB model with Shan-Chen-type model and Equation of State model that describe the physical interrelations among pressures, densities, and temperatures are combined.

  19. Analytical supercritical fluid extraction of adsorbent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.W.; Wright, C.W.; Gale, R.W.; Smith, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    The use of supercritical fluids for the analytical extraction of semivolatile and higher molecular weight materials from various adsorbent and particulate matrices was investigated. Instrumentation was designed to allow gram quantities of the matrix to be extracted at pressures up to 400 bar and temperatures to 235 /sup 0/C with collection of the effluent in a sealed liquid-nitrogen-cooled flask. Carbon dioxide, isobutane, and methanol modified (20 mol %) carbon dioxide fluid systems were evaluated and compared to liquid Soxhlet extraction. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) provided very rapid (approx. =30 min) extraction with comparable efficiency to the Soxhlet methods, and both more rapid and more efficient extractions appear feasible. The more polar carbon dioxide-methanol fluid system gave higher extraction efficiencies for the more polar adsorbates and the isobutane system was more efficient for the higher molecular weight and less polar compounds.

  20. Caryocar brasiliense supercritical CO2 extract possesses antimicrobial and antioxidant properties useful for personal care products

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries have an increasing interest in replacing synthetic antimicrobials in dermatological products due to increased microbial resistance to conventional antimicrobial agents. Pequi (Caryocar brasiliense) is a native fruit tree of the Brazilian Cerrado, specifically used in cosmetics, in the food industry, and for medicinal purposes. Leishmanicidal and antifungal activities have been reported previously. This study was designed to evaluate the antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of a C. brasiliense extract obtained by supercritical CO2 extraction. Methods The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus were determined by the classical microdilution method. Antiseptic activity against these organisms was evaluated by the plate diffusion method. The antioxidant potential of the extract was evaluated using a method based on the oxidation of 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS). The extract’s chemical profile was analyzed for the presence of alkaloids, saponins, anthraquinones, steroids, tannins, flavonoids, and phenolic compounds according to standard colorimetric methods. Results The C. brasiliense supercritical CO2 extract exhibits antimicrobial activity against all bacteria tested. It also possesses antioxidant activity, when compared to a vitamin E standard. Conclusions The C. brasiliense supercritical CO2 extract may be useful for the development of personal care products, primarily for antiseptic skin products that inactivate, reduce, prevent, or arrest the growth of microorganisms with the inherent intent to mitigate or prevent disease as well as products that minimize damage caused by free radicals. PMID:24565304

  1. Caryocar brasiliense supercritical CO2 extract possesses antimicrobial and antioxidant properties useful for personal care products.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Lilian F B; Moriel, Patricia; Foglio, Mary Ann; Mazzola, Priscila G

    2014-02-24

    The cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries have an increasing interest in replacing synthetic antimicrobials in dermatological products due to increased microbial resistance to conventional antimicrobial agents. Pequi (Caryocar brasiliense) is a native fruit tree of the Brazilian Cerrado, specifically used in cosmetics, in the food industry, and for medicinal purposes. Leishmanicidal and antifungal activities have been reported previously. This study was designed to evaluate the antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of a C. brasiliense extract obtained by supercritical CO2 extraction. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus were determined by the classical microdilution method. Antiseptic activity against these organisms was evaluated by the plate diffusion method. The antioxidant potential of the extract was evaluated using a method based on the oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS). The extract's chemical profile was analyzed for the presence of alkaloids, saponins, anthraquinones, steroids, tannins, flavonoids, and phenolic compounds according to standard colorimetric methods. The C. brasiliense supercritical CO2 extract exhibits antimicrobial activity against all bacteria tested. It also possesses antioxidant activity, when compared to a vitamin E standard. The C. brasiliense supercritical CO2 extract may be useful for the development of personal care products, primarily for antiseptic skin products that inactivate, reduce, prevent, or arrest the growth of microorganisms with the inherent intent to mitigate or prevent disease as well as products that minimize damage caused by free radicals.

  2. [Optimization of supercritical fluid extraction of bioactive components in Ligusticum chuanxiong by orthogonal array design].

    PubMed

    Hu, Li-Cui; Wu, Xun; Yang, Xue-Dong

    2013-10-01

    With the yields of ferulic acid, coniferylferulate, Z-ligustilide, senkyunolide A, butylidenephthalide, butylphthalide, senkyunolide I, senkyunolide H, riligustilide, levistolide A, and total pharmacologically active ingredient as evaluation indexes, the extraction of Ligusticum chuanxiong by supercritical fluid technology was investigated through an orthogonal experiment L9 (3(4)). Four factors, namely temperature, pressure, flow rate of carbon dioxide, co-solvent concentration of the supercritical fluid, were investigated and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, namely 65 degrees C of temperature, 35 MPa of pressure, 1 L x min(-1) of CO2 flow rate, 8% of co-solvent concetration, supercritical fluid extraction could achieve a better yield than the conventional reflux extraction using methanol. And the supercritical fluid extraction process was validated to be stable and reliable.

  3. Microbial Inactivation by Ultrasound Assisted Supercritical Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedito, Jose; Ortuño, Carmen; Castillo-Zamudio, Rosa Isela; Mulet, Antonio

    A method combining supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) and high power ultrasound (HPU) has been developed and tested for microbial/enzyme inactivation purposes, at different process conditions for both liquid and solid matrices. In culture media, using only SC-CO2, the inactivation rate of E. coli and S. cerevisiae increased with pressure and temperature; and the total inactivation (7-8 log-cycles) was attained after 25 and 140 min of SC-CO2 (350 bar, 36 °C) treatment, respectively. Using SC-CO2+HPU, the time for the total inactivation of both microorganisms was reduced to only 1-2 min, at any condition selected. The SC-CO2+HPU inactivation of both microorganisms was slower in juices (avg. 4.9 min) than in culture media (avg. 1.5 min). In solid samples (chicken, turkey ham and dry-cured pork cured ham) treated with SC-CO2 and SC-CO2+HPU, the inactivation rate of E. coli increased with temperature. The application of HPU to the SC-CO2 treatments accelerated the inactivation rate of E. coli and that effect was more pronounced in treatments with isotonic solution surrounding the solid food samples. The application of HPU enhanced the SC-CO2 inactivation mechanisms of microorganisms, generating a vigorous agitation that facilitated the CO2 solubilization and the mass transfer process. The cavitation generated by HPU could damage the cell walls accelerating the extraction of vital constituents and the microbial death. Thus, using the combined technique, reasonable industrial processing times and mild process conditions could be used which could result into a cost reduction and lead to the minimization in the food nutritional and organoleptic changes.

  4. Solid catalyzed isoparaffin alkylation at supercritical fluid and near-supercritical fluid conditions

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Fox, Robert V.; Kong, Peter C.

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved method for the alkylation reaction of isoparaffins with olefins over solid catalysts including contacting a mixture of an isoparaffin, an olefin and a phase-modifying material with a solid acid catalyst member under alkylation conversion conditions at either supercritical fluid, or near-supercritical fluid conditions, at a temperature and a pressure relative to the critical temperature(T.sub.c) and the critical pressure(P.sub.c) of the reaction mixture. The phase-modifying phase-modifying material is employed to promote the reaction's achievement of either a supercritical fluid state or a near-supercritical state while simultaneously allowing for decreased reaction temperature and longer catalyst life.

  5. Volumetric Properties and Fluid Phase Equilibria of CO2 + H2O

    SciTech Connect

    Capobianco, Ryan; Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David R; Bodnar, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The need for accurate modeling of fluid-mineral processes over wide ranges of temperature, pressure and composition highlighted considerable uncertainties of available property data and equations of state, even for the CO2 + H2O binary system. In particular, the solubility, activity, and ionic dissociation equilibrium data for the CO2-rich phase, which are essential for understanding dissolution/precipitation, fluid-matrix reactions, and solute transport, are uncertain or missing. In this paper we report the results of a new experimental study of volumetric and phase equilibrium properties of CO2 + H2O, to be followed by measurements for bulk and confined multicomponent fluid mixtures. Mixture densities were measured by vibrating tube densimetry (VTD) over the entire composition range at T = 200 and 250 C and P = 20, 40, 60, and 80 MPa. Initial analysis of the mutual solubilities, determined from volumetric data, shows good agreement with earlier results for the aqueous phase, but finds that the data of Takenouchi and Kennedy (1964) significantly overestimated the solubility of water in supercritical CO2 (by a factor of more than two at 200 C). Resolving this well-known discrepancy will have a direct impact on the accuracy of predictive modeling of CO2 injection in geothermal reservoirs and geological carbon sequestration through improved equations of state, needed for calibration of predictive molecular-scale models and large-scale reactive transport simulations.

  6. Microstructural response of variably hydrated Ca-rich montmorillonite to supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mal-Soon; McGrail, B Peter; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    First-principles molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to explore the mechanistic and thermodynamic ramifications of the exposure of variably hydrated Ca-rich montmorillonites to supercritical CO2 and CO2-SO2 mixtures under geologic storage conditions. In sub- to single-hydrated systems (≤ 1W), CO2 intercalation causes interlamellar expansion of 8-12%, while systems transitioning to 2W may undergo contraction (∼ 7%) or remain almost unchanged. When compared to ∼2W hydration state, structural analysis of the ≤ 1W systems, reveals more Ca-CO2 contacts and partial transition to vertically confined CO2 molecules. Infrared spectra and projected vibrational frequency analysis imply that intercalated Ca-bound CO2 are vibrationally constrained and contribute to the higher frequencies of the asymmetric stretch band. Reduced diffusion coefficients of intercalated H2O and CO2 (10(-6)-10(-7) cm(2)/s) indicate that Ca-montmorillonites in ∼ 1W hydration states can be more efficient in capturing CO2. Simulations including SO2 imply that ∼ 0.66 mmol SO2/g clay can be intercalated without other significant structural changes. SO2 is likely to divert H2O away from the cations, promoting Ca-CO2 interactions and CO2 capture by further reducing CO2 diffusion (10(-8) cm(2)/s). Vibrational bands at ∼ 1267 or 1155 cm(-1) may be used to identify the chemical state (oxidation states +4 or +6, respectively) and the fate of sulfur contaminants.

  7. Determination of diffusion coefficients for supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Medina, Ignacio

    2012-08-10

    A review of the diffusion coefficients for solutes in supercritical fluids as reported in the literature is presented together with the correlation methods applied by the authors for modeling the experimentally determined data. Supercritical carbon dioxide has been the preferred solvent in most of the systems investigated, although other solvents at elevated pressure have also been used. The influence of pressure, temperature, density, and viscosity on the binary diffusion coefficients is discussed, and some general trends have been established. A number of experimental methods for determining diffusion coefficients in supercritical fluids have been reported in the literature. The methods are described, their advantages and disadvantages are discussed and some examples of their application are given. Predictive equations based on the Stokes-Einstein model, the Rough-Hard-Sphere theory, and other methods for the calculation of diffusion coefficients in supercritical fluids at infinite dilution are reviewed. The review also looks at the ternary systems reported in the literature. The latter are discussed in terms of temperature, pressure, the type of modifier employed, amount of modifier, and solute-modifier interactions. Several equations have been proposed for correlating and predicting the diffusion coefficients in ternary systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. In-situ Optical Spectroscopy Investigation of Water and Its influence on Forsterite Transformation in Supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Thompson, C. J.; Joly, A. G.; Sklarew, D. S.; Poindexter, L.; Rosso, K. M.

    2009-12-01

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) from coal/gas-burning power plants is currently viewed as one of the most promising technologies for mitigating green house gas emissions. This strategy involves injection of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) into deep geological formations such as depleted oil and gas reservoirs and deep saline aquifers. The feasibility of this approach and the ultimate fate of the stored CO2 are determined by the interactions between scCO2, various minerals in the rock formations, and the host fluids. Currently, there is only limited knowledge about both the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the physical and chemical processes that occur between scCO2 and relevant minerals, such as metal silicates and metal aluminosilicates, and the role of water activity for catalyzing mineral transformation reactions. In this work, we have developed a modular in situ optical spectroscopic platform that integrates a scCO2 generation and manipulation system with an array of optical and laser spectroscopies including UV-visible, IR, Raman and laser fluorescence spectroscopy. We have used the system to study i) the dissolution and quantification of H2O/D2O in scCO2 and ii) interaction between scCO2 and a model metal silicate, forsterite (Mg2SiO4), and the effects of the presence of water under variable pressure, temperature and water content. Our results showed that H2O and D2O have unique IR spectral features over a broad spectral range from 700 cm-1 to ~ 2900 cm-1 in scCO2 and their concentrations are directly proportional to the characteristic IR bands that correspond to their stretching (D2O) and bending frequencies (both D2O and H2O). These bands offer a unique spectroscopic signature useful for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the properties and reactivity of small amounts of H2O in scCO2. CO2 in the presence of D2O showed systematic variations at several vibrational

  9. Basalt Reactivity in the Presence of H2O-Saturated Supercritical CO2 Containing Gaseous Sulfur Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaef, H. T.; McGrail, P.; Owen, A. T.

    2009-12-01

    Future impacts of climate change may be minimized by capture of emissions, primarily CO2 from fossil-fueled electric generating stations and subsequent sequestration in deep geologic formations. Injection of dry liquid CO2 into porous geologic reservoirs for long term storage is expected to eventually form a buoyant water-saturated bubble of supercritical fluid. Depending on purification processes and underground injection control regulations, the injected CO2 also could contain trace compounds associated with flue gas streams (SO2, N2, and O2). Once injected, the scCO2 will absorb water (1500 to 3000 ppmw) until becoming immobilized by reservoir trapping mechanisms. Reactivity of the water-bearing scCO2 with silicate minerals is relatively unknown and could have impacts on long term reservoir seal integrity and trapping by mineralization. To examine the reactivity of H2O-saturated scCO2, basalt experiments were conducted at pressures and temperatures relevant to geologic sequestration. Reaction products differed considerably depending on the gas mixtures used and type of basalt. In the presence of H2O-saturated CO2, the Newark Basin basalt reacted to produce secondary mineralization with needle-like morphologies and chemistries similar to aragonite. Exposing the same basalt to a CO2-H2S mixture (H2O saturated) produced two types of reaction products: carbonates in the form of small discrete nodules or needles and metallic-like circular areas similar in chemistry to pyrite and marcarsite. Tests conducted in the presence of CO2-SO2 produced the most extensive surface reaction products observed during the experiments. Some basalts were completely coated in white precipitate identified as a mixture of gypsum, sulfate bearing minerals (rozenite and melanterite), and a magnesium sulfate compound (MgSO4 ●5H2O). Hawaiian flow top basalts contained extensive reaction products including magnesium sulfate (MgSO4●6H2O), which formed on the large olivine crystals present

  10. Maximising opportunities in supercritical chemistry: the continuous conversion of levulinic acid to gamma-valerolactone in CO(2).

    PubMed

    Bourne, Richard A; Stevens, James G; Ke, Jie; Poliakoff, Martyn

    2007-11-28

    Phase behaviour is manipulated during the hydrogenation of aqueous levulinic acid in supercritical CO(2) to separate almost pure gamma-valerolactone from water and unreacted acid with reduced energy requirements compared to conventional processing.

  11. Molecular dynamics study of di-CF4 based reverse micelles in supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Tang, Xinpeng; Fang, Wenjing; Li, Xiaoqi; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Zhiliang; Shen, Yue; Yan, Youguo; Sun, Xiaoli; He, Jianying

    2016-10-26

    Reverse micelles (RMs) in supercritical CO2 (scCO2) are promising alternatives for organic solvents, especially when both polar and non-polar components are involved. Fluorinated surfactants, particularly double-chain fluorocarbon surfactants, are able to form well-structured RMs in scCO2. The inherent self-assembly mechanisms of surfactants in scCO2 are still subject to discussion. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the self-aggregation behavior of di-CF4 based RMs in scCO2, and stable and spherical RMs are formed. The dynamics process and the self-assembly structure in the RMs reveal a three-step mechanism to form the RMs, that is, small RMs, rod-like RMs and fusion of the rod-like RMs. Hydrogen-bonds between headgroups and water molecules, and salt bridges linking Na(+) ions, headgroups and water molecules enhance the interfacial packing efficiency of the surfactant. The results show that di-CF4 molecules have a high surfactant coverage at the RM interface, implying a high CO2-philicity. This mainly results from bending of the short chain (C-COO-CH2-(CF2)3-CF3) due to the flexible carboxyl group. The microscopic insight provided in this study is helpful in understanding surfactant self-assembly phenomena and designing new CO2-philic surfactants.

  12. Multiphase Compositional Modelling of CO2 Injection Under Sub- and Supercritical Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Andrey

    2013-04-01

    Modelling of CO2-H2O mixture flows in a porous media under subcritical conditions remains a challenging issue for carbon sequestration and possible leakage scenarios. Currently, there is no widely used and generally accepted numerical model that can simulate three-phase flows with both gaseous and liquid CO2-rich phases. We propose a new compositional modelling approach for sub- and supercritical three-phase flows of water, liquid CO2 and gaseous CO2. The new approach is based on the calculation of the thermodynamic potential of the mixture as a function of pressure, total enthalpy and mixture composition and storing it values as a spline table, which is then used for the hydrodynamic simulation. A three-parametric generalisation of the Peng-Robinson equation of state is used to fit the experimental data on CO2-H2O mixture properties. Using the developed approach, we assess several sample problems of CO2 injection in shallow reservoirs for the purpose of testing the model. We provide the simulation results for a simple 1D problem with a homogeneous reservoir and for a more complicated 2D problem with a highly heterogeneous reservoir using data from the 10th SPE comparative project reservoir. We analyse the temperature variations in the reservoir due to the dissolution of CO2 in water and the evaporation of liquid CO2 under subcritical conditions. The interplay of these processes results in a complicated non-monotonic temperature distribution. At different distances from the CO2 injection point, the temperature can either decrease or increase with respect to the reservoir temperature before injection. The main phenomenon responsible for the considerable temperature decline around the CO2 injection point is the liquid CO2 evaporation process. We also consider parallel simulations of supercritical CO2 plume evolution at Johansen formation. Firstly, we consider a test scenario using a simplified geological model. Both the free CO2 phase saturation and the integral

  13. Methods for producing films using supercritical fluid

    DOEpatents

    Yonker, Clement R.; Fulton, John L.

    2004-06-15

    A method for forming a continuous film on a substrate surface that involves depositing particles onto a substrate surface and contacting the particle-deposited substrate surface with a supercritical fluid under conditions sufficient for forming a continuous film from the deposited particles. The particles may have a mean particle size of less 1 micron. The method may be performed by providing a pressure vessel that can contain a compressible fluid. A particle-deposited substrate is provided in the pressure vessel and the compressible fluid is maintained at a supercritical or sub-critical state sufficient for forming a film from the deposited particles. The T.sub.g of particles may be reduced by subjecting the particles to the methods detailed in the present disclosure.

  14. [Study on supercritical CO2 extraction of xiaoyaosan and its GC-MS fingerprint].

    PubMed

    Zuo, Ya-Mei; Tian, Jun-Sheng; Guo, Xiao-Qing; Zhou, Yu-Zhi; Gao, Xiao-Xia; Qin, Xue-Mei

    2014-02-01

    To determine the optimum conditions of supercritical CO2 extraction of Xiaoyaosan, and establish its fingerprint by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), the yield of extract were investigated, an orthogonal test was used to quantify the effects of extraction temperature, pressure, CO2 flow rate and time, and fingerprint analysis of different batches of extracts were by GC-MS. The optimal extraction conditions were determined as follows: extraction pressure 20 MPa, extraction temperature 50 degrees C, CO2 flow rate 25 kg x h(-1), extraction time 3 h, and average yield 2.2%. The GC-MS fingerprint was established and 27 common peaks were found, whose contents add up to 81.89% of the total peak area. Among them, 21 compounds were identified, accounting for 53.20% of the total extract. The extraction process is reasonable and favorable for industrial production. The GC-MS method is accurate, reliable, reproducible, and can be used for quality control of supercritical CO2 extract from Xiaoyaosan.

  15. How Do Deep Saline Aquifer Microbial Communities Respond to Supercritical CO2 Injection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, A.; Billman-Jacobe, H.; Boreham, C.; Schacht, U.; Moreau, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is currently seen as a viable strategy for mitigating anthropogenic carbon dioxide pollution. The Cooperative Research Centre for Greenhouse Gas Technologies (CO2CRC) is currently conducting a field experiment in the Otway Basin (Australia) studying residual gas saturation in the water-saturated reservoir of the Paaratte Formation. As part of this study, a suite of pre-CO2 injection water samples were collected from approximately 1400 meters depth (60°C, 13.8 MPa) via an in situ sampling system. The in situ sampling system isolates aquifer water from sources of contamination while maintaining the formation pressure. Whole community DNA was extracted from these samples to investigate the prokaryotic biodiversity of the saline Paaratte aquifer (EC = 1509.6 uS/cm). Bioinformatic analysis of preliminary 16S ribosomal gene data revealed Thermincola, Acinetobacter, Sphingobium, and Dechloromonas amongst the closest related genera to environmental clone sequences obtained from a subset of pre-CO2 injection groundwater samples. Epifluorescent microscopy with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) highlighted an abundance of filamentous cells ranging from 5 to 45 μM. Efforts are currently directed towards utilising a high throughput sequencing approach to capture an exhaustive profile of the microbial diversity of the Paaratte aquifer CO2 injection site, and to understand better the response of in situ microbial populations to the injection of large volumes (e.g. many kilotonnes) of supercritical CO2 (sc-CO2). Sequencing results will be used to direct cultivation efforts towards enrichment of a CO2-tolerant microorganism. Understanding the microbial response to sc-CO2 is an integral aspect of carbon dioxide storage, for which very little information exists in the literature. This study aims to elucidate molecular mechanisms, through genomic and cultivation-based methods, for CO2 tolerance with the prospect of engineering biofilms to enhance

  16. Experimental investigation of supercritical CO2 trapping mechanisms at the Intermediate Laboratory Scale in well-defined heterogeneous porous media

    DOE PAGES

    Trevisan, Luca; Pini, Ronny; Cihan, Abdullah; ...

    2014-12-31

    The heterogeneous nature of typical sedimentary formations can play a major role in the propagation of the CO2 plume, eventually dampening the accumulation of mobile phase underneath the caprock. From core flooding experiments, it is also known that contrasts in capillary threshold pressure due to different pore size can affect the flow paths of the invading and displaced fluids and consequently influence the build- up of non-wetting phase (NWP) at interfaces between geological facies. The full characterization of the geologic variability at all relevant scales and the ability to make observations on the spatial and temporal distribution of the migrationmore » and trapping of supercritical CO2 is not feasible from a practical perspective. To provide insight into the impact of well-defined heterogeneous systems on the flow dynamics and trapping efficiency of supercritical CO2 under drainage and imbibition conditions, we present an experimental investigation at the meter scale conducted in synthetic sand reservoirs packed in a quasi-two-dimensional flow-cell. Two immiscible displacement experiments have been performed to observe the preferential entrapment of NWP in simple heterogeneous porous media. The experiments consisted of an injection, a fluid redistribution, and a forced imbibition stages conducted in an uncorrelated permeability field and a homogeneous base case scenario. We adopted x-ray attenuation analysis as a non-destructive technique that allows a precise measurement of phase saturations throughout the entire flow domain. By comparing a homogeneous and a heterogeneous scenario we have identified some important effects that can be attributed to capillary barriers, such as dampened plume advancement, higher non-wetting phase saturations, larger contact area between the injected and displaced phases, and a larger range of non-wetting phase saturations.« less

  17. Pt and Pt-Ru/Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites Synthesized in Supercritical Fluid as Electrocatalysts for Low-Temperature Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuehe; Cui, Xiaoli; Wang, Jun; Yen, Clive; Wai, Chien M.

    2006-06-01

    In recent years, the use of supercritical fluids (SCFs) for the synthesis and processing of nanomaterials has proven to be a rapid, direct, and clean approach to develop nanomaterials and nanocomposites. The application of supercritical fluid technology can result in products (and processes) that are cleaner, less expensive, and of higher quality than those that are produced using conventional technologies and solvents. In this work, carbon nanotube (CNT)-supported Pt and Pt-Ru nanoparticles catalysts have been synthesized in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2). The experimental results demonstrate that Pt, Pt-Ru/CNT nanocomposites synthesized in supercritical carbon dioxide are effective electrocatalysts for low-temperature fuel cells.

  18. Pore-scale supercritical CO2 dissolution and mass transfer under drainage conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun; Zhou, Quanlin; Oostrom, Mart; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Mehta, Hardeep

    2017-02-01

    Recently, both core- and pore-scale imbibition experiments have shown non-equilibrium dissolution of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and a prolonged depletion of residual scCO2. In this study, pore-scale scCO2 dissolution and mass transfer under drainage conditions were investigated using a two-dimensional heterogeneous micromodel and a novel fluorescent water dye with a sensitive pH range between 3.7 and 6.5. Drainage experiments were conducted at 9 MPa and 40 °C by injecting scCO2 into the sandstone-analogue pore network initially saturated by water without dissolved CO2 (dsCO2). During the experiments, time-lapse images of dye intensity, reflecting water pH, were obtained. These images show non-uniform pH in individual pores and pore clusters, with average pH levels gradually decreasing with time. Further analysis on selected pores and pore clusters shows that (1) rate-limited mass transfer prevails with slowly decreasing pH over time when the scCO2-water interface area is low with respect to the volume of water-filled pores and pore clusters, (2) fast scCO2 dissolution and phase equilibrium occurs when scCO2 bubbles invade into water-filled pores, significantly enhancing the area-to-volume ratio, and (3) a transition from rate-limited to diffusion-limited mass transfer occurs in a single pore when a medium area-to-volume ratio is prevalent. The analysis also shows that two fundamental processes - scCO2 dissolution at phase interfaces and diffusion of dsCO2 at the pore scale (10-100 μm) observed after scCO2 bubble invasion into water-filled pores without pore throat constraints - are relatively fast. The overall slow dissolution of scCO2 in the millimeter-scale micromodel can be attributed to the small area-to-volume ratios that represent pore-throat configurations and characteristics of phase interfaces. This finding is applicable for the behavior of dissolution at pore, core, and field scales when water-filled pores and pore clusters of varying size are surrounded

  19. Pore-scale supercritical CO2 dissolution and mass transfer under drainage conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Chang, Chun; Zhou, Quanlin; Oostrom, Mart; ...

    2016-12-05

    Recently, both core- and pore-scale imbibition experiments have shown non-equilibrium dissolution of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and a prolonged depletion of residual scCO2. In this paper, pore-scale scCO2 dissolution and mass transfer under drainage conditions were investigated using a two-dimensional heterogeneous micromodel and a novel fluorescent water dye with a sensitive pH range between 3.7 and 6.5. Drainage experiments were conducted at 9 MPa and 40 °C by injecting scCO2 into the sandstone-analogue pore network initially saturated by water without dissolved CO2 (dsCO2). During the experiments, time-lapse images of dye intensity, reflecting water pH, were obtained. These images show non-uniform pHmore » in individual pores and pore clusters, with average pH levels gradually decreasing with time. Further analysis on selected pores and pore clusters shows that (1) rate-limited mass transfer prevails with slowly decreasing pH over time when the scCO2-water interface area is low with respect to the volume of water-filled pores and pore clusters, (2) fast scCO2 dissolution and phase equilibrium occurs when scCO2 bubbles invade into water-filled pores, significantly enhancing the area-to-volume ratio, and (3) a transition from rate-limited to diffusion-limited mass transfer occurs in a single pore when a medium area-to-volume ratio is prevalent. The analysis also shows that two fundamental processes – scCO2 dissolution at phase interfaces and diffusion of dsCO2 at the pore scale (10–100 µm) observed after scCO2 bubble invasion into water-filled pores without pore throat constraints – are relatively fast. The overall slow dissolution of scCO2 in the millimeter-scale micromodel can be attributed to the small area-to-volume ratios that represent pore-throat configurations and characteristics of phase interfaces. Finally, this finding is applicable for the behavior of dissolution at pore, core, and field scales when water-filled pores and pore clusters of

  20. [Study on supercritical CO2 extraction of flavonoids from Cynomorium songaricum].

    PubMed

    Luan, Na; Li, Di

    2010-07-01

    To study the extraction technology of flavonoids from Cynomorium songaricum by supercritical CO2 extraction. The effects of pressure, temperature, time, concentration of alcohol, dosage of chemical preparation, flux of CO2 and particle size were studied by single factor analysis and orthogonal test. The optimized conditions were as follows: particle size 60 - 80 sieve mesh, the pressure was 30 MPa, the temperature was 50 degrees C, the time was 75 min, concentration of alcohol was 50%, entrainment rate was 8%, flux of CO2 was 5 mL/min. The total flavonoids yield could reach 21.18% under the above conditions. This method is simple, rapid and higher extraction yield, so it is suitable for the extraction of flavonoids from Cynomorium songaricum.

  1. Remote-Raman spectroscopic study of minerals under supercritical CO2 relevant to Venus exploration.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shiv K; Misra, Anupam K; Clegg, Samuel M; Barefield, James E; Wiens, Roger C; Acosta, Tayro E; Bates, David E

    2011-10-01

    The authors have utilized a recently developed compact Raman spectrometer equipped with an 85 mm focal length (f/1.8) Nikon camera lens and a custom mini-ICCD detector at the University of Hawaii for measuring remote Raman spectra of minerals under supercritical CO(2) (Venus chamber, ∼102 atm pressure and 423 K) excited with a pulsed 532 nm laser beam of 6 mJ/pulse and 10 Hz. These experiments demonstrate that by focusing a frequency-doubled 532 nm Nd:YAG pulsed laser beam with a 10× beam expander to a 1mm spot on minerals located at 2m inside a Venus chamber, it is possible to measure the remote Raman spectra of anhydrous sulfates, carbonates, and silicate minerals relevant to Venus exploration during daytime or nighttime with 10s integration time. The remote Raman spectra of gypsum, anhydrite, barite, dolomite and siderite contain fingerprint Raman lines along with the Fermi resonance doublet of CO(2). Raman spectra of gypsum revealed dehydration of the mineral with time under supercritical CO(2) at 423 K. Fingerprint Raman lines of olivine, diopside, wollastonite and α-quartz can easily be identified in the spectra of these respective minerals under supercritical CO(2). The results of the present study show that time-resolved remote Raman spectroscopy with a compact Raman spectrometer of moderate resolution equipped with a gated intensified CCD detector and low power laser source could be a potential tool for exploring Venus surface mineralogy both during daytime and nighttime from a lander. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Supercritical CO2 extract from strawberry seeds as a valuable component of mild cleansing compositions.

    PubMed

    Sikora, E; Michorczyk, P; Olszańska, M; Ogonowski, J

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was an elaboration of mild cleansing compositions, containing supercritical CO2 extract from strawberry seeds (SC-CO2 strawberry seed oil), as a moisturizing and skin-softening agent. The influence of concentration of the oil on user properties of shower/bath products was studied. A series of products (shower/bath cosmetics) composed mainly of mild surfactants (amphoacetates, sulfosuccinates, betaines) and containing different amounts of the oil (0.5 up to 5.0%) were prepared. For the stable products (formulations containing up to 2% of the oil), the influence of the SC-CO2 strawberry seed oil addition on the products' stability, foam ability, surface tension, pH and rheological properties was studied. Moreover, the skin compatibility and moisturizing efficiency of the cleansing products were recorded in a group of 15 volunteers (including 10 women and five men, aged 20-30 years), using skin diagnosis system AramoTS, Aram Huvis Co. Additionally, characterization of CO2 extract from strawberry seeds was performed. Measurements of the oil's analytical constants, that is acid value and saponification number, were conducted according to Polish Standard PN-EN ISO 660:2010 and PN-EN ISO 3657:2013, respectively. The oil concentration influences stability of the products. Only the formulations containing 0.5-2% of the extract have shown high stability. Moreover, used in the amount up to 2% the SC-CO2, strawberry seed oil does not affect significantly the cleansing and foaming properties of the products. The obtained shower/bath cosmetics showed good user properties and additionally good skin-moisturizing effect. The supercritical CO2 extract from strawberry seeds, rich source of unsaturated fatty acid, could be successfully used in the formulation of body washing compositions as a moisturizing and skin-softening agent. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  3. New Class of Amphiphiles Designed for Use in Water-in-Supercritical CO2 Microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Sagisaka, Masanobu; Ogiwara, Shunsuke; Ono, Shinji; James, Craig; Yoshizawa, Atsushi; Mohamed, Azmi; Rogers, Sarah E; Heenan, Richard K; Yan, Ci; Peach, Jocelyn Alice; Eastoe, Julian

    2016-11-29

    Water-in-supercritical CO2 microemulsions formed using the hybrid F-H surfactant sodium 1-oxo-1-[4-(perfluorohexyl)phenyl]hexane-2-sulfonate, FC6-HC4, have recently been shown to have the highest water-solubilizing power ever reported. FC6-HC4 demonstrated the ability to outperform not only other surfactants but also other FCm-HCn analogues containing different fluorocarbon and hydrocarbon chain lengths (Sagisaka, M. et al. Langmuir 2015, 31, 7479-7487). With the aim of clarifying the key structural features of this surfactant, this study examined the phase behavior and water/supercritical CO2 aggregate formation of 1-oxo-1-[4-(perfluorohexyl)phenyl]hexane (Nohead FC6-HC4), which is an FC6-HC4 analogue but now, interestingly, without the sulfonate headgroup. Surprisingly, Nohead FC6-HC4, which would not normally be identified as a classic surfactant, yielded transparent single-phase W/CO2 microemulsions with polar cores able to solubilize a water-soluble dye, even at pressures and temperatures so low as to approach the critical point of CO2 (e.g., ∼100 bar at 35 °C). High-pressure small-angle scattering (SANS) measurements revealed the transparent phases to consist of ellipsoidal nanodroplets of water. The morphology of these droplets was shown to be dependent on the pressure, Nohead FC6-HC4 concentration, and water-to-surfactant molar ratio. Despite having almost the same structure as Nohead FC6-HC4, analogues containing both shorter and longer hydrocarbons were unable to form W/CO2 microemulsion droplets. This shows the importance of the role of the hydrocarbon chain in the stabilization of W/CO2 microemulsions. A detailed examination of the mechanism of Nohead FC6-HC4 adsorption onto the water surface suggests that the hexanoyl group protrudes into the aqueous core, allowing for association between the carbonyl group and water.

  4. Molecular Gibbs Surface Excess and CO2-Hydrate Density Determine the Strong Temperature- and Pressure-Dependent Supercritical CO2-Brine Interfacial Tension.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jiayuan; Zhao, Lingling; Tao, Lu; Lin, Shangchao

    2017-06-29

    In CO2 geological storage, the interfacial tension (IFT) between supercritical CO2 and brine is critical for the storage capacitance design to prevent CO2 leakage. IFT relies not only on the interfacial molecule properties but also on the environmental conditions at different storage sites. In this paper, supercritical CO2-NaCl solution systems are modeled at 343-373 K and 6-35 MPa under the salinity of 1.89 mol/L using molecular dynamics simulations. After computing and comparing the molecular density profile across the interface, the atomic radial distribution function, the molecular orientation distribution, the molecular Gibbs surface excess (derived from the molecular density profile), and the CO2-hydrate number density under the above environmental conditions, we confirm that only the molecular Gibbs surface excess of CO2 molecules and the CO2-hydrate number density correlate strongly with the temperature- and pressure-dependent IFTs. We also compute the populations of two distinct CO2-hydrate structures (T-type and H-type) and attribute the observed dependence of IFTs to the dominance of the more stable, surfactant-like T-type CO2-hydrates at the interface. On the basis of these new molecular mechanisms behind IFT variations, this study could guide the rational design of suitable injecting environmental pressure and temperature conditions. We believe that the above two molecular-level metrics (Gibbs surface excess and hydrate number density) are of great fundamental importance for understanding the supercritical CO2-water interface and engineering applications in geological CO2 storage.

  5. Features of the supercritical CO2-assisted immobilization of fluorinated tetraphenylporphyrins into tetrafluoroethylene copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shershnev, I. V.; Cherkasova, A. V.; Kopylov, A. S.; Glagolev, N. N.; Bragina, N. A.; Solov'eva, A. B.

    2017-07-01

    The immobilization of fluorinated tetraphenylporphyrins (FTPPs) into tetrafluoroethylene copolymers (fluoroplast F-42 and MF-4SK, a perfluorinated sulfonic acid cation exchanger in H+-form) is conducted in supercritical CO2 (scCO2). The effects the conditions of immobilization (the temperature and pressure of scCO2, reaction time, and the addition of cosolvents) and the structure of the carrier polymer have on the content of porphyrin in these polymers is studied. The porphyrin-loaded polymer systems are shown to exhibit photosensitizing activity in anthracene and cholesterol oxidation in scCO2. Under conditions of photocatalysis, chemical and functional stability is a feature of only MF-4SK polymer systems; this is attributed to the formation of protonated forms of the porphyrins and their interaction with SO3 --groups of the polymer (an ion exchange process), which prevents leaching of the FTPP from the polymer matrix. The photocatalytic process actually occurs inside the matrix of the perfluorinated copolymer, with the protonated form of the porphyrin acting as a photosensitizer. The rate constant of anthracene photooxidation in the presence of FTPP-loaded MF-4SK films in scCO2 is found to pass through a maximum as a function of the porphyrin content and the polymer film thickness. The use of such catalytic systems for cholesterol photooxidation in scCO2 is shown to produce a virtual monoproduct (yield, 10%): 6-formyl-B-norcholestane-3,5-diol, a compound with high biological activity.

  6. Micronization, characterization and in-vitro dissolution of shellac from PGSS supercritical CO2 technique.

    PubMed

    Labuschagne, Philip W; Naicker, Brendon; Kalombo, Lonji

    2016-02-29

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether shellac, a naturally occurring material with enteric properties, could be processed in supercritical CO2 (sc-CO2) using the particles from gas saturated solution (PGSS) process and how process parameters affect the physico-chemical properties of shellac. In-situ attenuated total reflection fourier transform infra-red (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy showed that CO2 dissolves in shellac with solubility reaching a maximum of 13% (w/w) at 300 bar pressure and 40 °C and maximum swelling of 28%. The solubility of sc-CO2 in shellac allowed for the formation of porous shellac structures of which the average pore diameter and pore density could be controlled by adjustment of operating pressure and temperature. In addition, it was possible to produce shellac microparticles ranging in average diameter from 180 to 300 μm. It was also shown that processing shellac in sc-CO2 resulted in accelerated esterification reactions, potentially limiting the extent of post-processing "ageing" and thus greater stability. Due to additional hydrolysis reactions enhanced by the presence of sc-CO2, the solubility of shellac at pH 7.5 was increased by between 4 and 7 times, while dissolution rates were also increased. It was also shown that the in-vitro dissolution profiles of shellac could be modified by slight adjustment in operating temperatures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Assembling Metal-Organic Frameworks in Ionic Liquids and Supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bingxing; Zhang, Jianling; Han, Buxing

    2016-10-06

    Ionic liquids (ILs) and supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 ) are both considered to be green solvents with tunable properties. Recently, studies of the synthesis of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) in the presence of ILs and scCO2 has become a burgeoning direction in chemistry and materials science. ILs have been shown to be ideal media for the synthesis of a variety of MOFs owing to their unique properties including the ability to dissolve a wide range of organic and inorganic compounds and flexible designability. scCO2 has adjustable solvent power and excellent mass-transfer characteristics that offer the opportunity to replace organic solvents for MOF activation, MOF aerogel synthesis, and MOF construction. More interestingly, the simultaneous utilization of IL and scCO2 can combine the advantages of the two liquids, which provides novel routes for the fabrication of MOF structures. This review describes the advances in MOF synthesis in ILs, scCO2 , and IL/scCO2 systems. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. A laboratory study of supercritical CO2 adsorption on cap rocks in the geological storage conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedli, Hedi; Jbara, Abdessalem; Hedfi, Hachem; Bouzgarrou, Souhail; Slimi, Khalifa

    2017-04-01

    In the present study, various cap rocks have been experimentally reacted in water with supercritical CO2 in geological storage conditions ( P = 8 × 106 Pa and T = 80 °C) for 25 days. To characterize the potential CO2-water-rock interactions, an experimental setup has been built to provide additional information concerning the effects of structure, thermal and surface characteristics changes due to CO2 injection with cap rocks. In addition, CO2 adsorption capacities of different materials (i.e., clay evaporate and sandstone) are measured. These samples were characterized by XRD technique. The BET specific surface area was determined by nitrogen isotherms. In addition, thermal characteristics of untreated adsorbents were analyzed via TGA method and topography surfaces are identified by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Taking into account pressure and temperature, the physical as well as chemical mechanisms of CO2 retention were determined. Isotherm change profiles of samples for relative pressure range indicate clearly that CO2 was adsorbed in different quantities. In accordance with the X-ray diffraction, a crystalline phase was formed due to the carbonic acid attack and precipitation of some carbonate.

  9. Silicate Carbonation in Supercritical CO2 Containing Dissolved H2O: An in situ High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schaef, Herbert T.; Miller, Quin RS; Thompson, Christopher J.; Loring, John S.; Bowden, Mark E.; Arey, Bruce W.; McGrail, B. Peter; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2013-06-30

    Technological advances have been significant in recent years for managing environmentally harmful emissions (mostly CO2) resulting from combustion of fossil fuels. Deep underground geologic formations are emerging as reasonable options for long term storage of CO2 but mechanisms controlling rock and mineral stability in contact with injected supercritical fluids containing water are relatively unknown. In this paper, we discuss mineral transformation reactions occurring between supercritical CO2 containing water and the silicate minerals forsterite (Mg2SiO4), wollastonite (CaSiO3), and enstatite (MgSiO3). This study utilizes newly developed in situ high pressure x-ray diffraction (HXRD) and in situ infra red (IR) to examine mineral transformation reactions. Forsterite and enstatite were selected as they are important minerals present in igneous and mafic rocks and have been the subject of a large number of aqueous dissolution studies that can be compared with non-aqueous fluid tests in this study. Wollastonite, classified as a pyroxenoid (similar to a pyroxene), was chosen as a suitably fast reacting proxy for examining silicate carbonation processes associated with a wet scCO2 fluid as related to geologic carbon sequestration. The experiments were conducted under modest pressures (90 to 160 bar), temperatures between 35° to 70° C, and varying concentrations of dissolved water. Under these conditions scCO2 contains up to 3,500 ppm dissolved water.

  10. Non-catalytic transfer hydrogenation in supercritical CO2 for coal liquefaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhussien, Hussien

    This thesis presents the results of the investigation on developing and evaluating a low temperature (<150°C) non - catalytic process using a hydrogen transfer agent (instead of molecu-lar hydrogen) for coal dissolution in supercritical CO2. The main idea behind the thesis was that one hydrogen atom from water and one hydrogen atom from the hydrogen transfer agent (HTA) were used to hydrogenate the coal. The products of coal dissolution were non-polar and polar while the supercritical CO2, which enhanced the rates of hydrogenation and dissolution of the non-polar molecules and removal from the reaction site, was non-polar. The polar modifier (PM) for CO2 was added to the freed to aid in the dissolution and removal of the polar components. The addition of a phase transfer agent (PTA) allowed a seamless transport of the ions and by-product between the aqueous and organic phases. DDAB, used as the PTA, is an effective phase transfer catalyst and showed enhancement to the coal dissolution process. COAL + DH- +H 2O → COAL.H2 + DHO-- This process has a great feature due to the fact that the chemicals were obtained without requir-ing to first convert coal to CO and H2 units as in indirect coal liquefaction. The experiments were conducted in a unique reactor set up that can be connected through two lines. one line to feed the reactor with supercritical CO 2 and the other connected to gas chromatograph. The use of the supercritical CO2 enhanced the solvent option due to the chemical extraction, in addition to the low environmental impact and energy cost. In this thesis the experiment were conducted at five different temperatures from atmos-pheric to 140°C, 3000 - 6000 psi with five component of feed mixture, namely water, HTA, PTA, coal, and PM in semi batch vessels reactor system with a volume of 100 mL. The results show that the chemicals were obtained without requiring to first convert coal to CO and H2 units as in indirect coal liquefaction. The results show that

  11. Assessment of Supercritical Fluid Extraction Use in Whole Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluations

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this investigation, supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) with pure CO2 was assessed as a confirmatory tool in Phase III of whole sediment toxicity identification evaluations (TIEs). The SFE procedure was assessed on two reference sediments and three contaminated sediments usi...

  12. Assessment of Supercritical Fluid Extraction Use in Whole Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluations

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this investigation, supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) with pure CO2 was assessed as a confirmatory tool in Phase III of whole sediment toxicity identification evaluations (TIEs). The SFE procedure was assessed on two reference sediments and three contaminated sediments usi...

  13. Supercritical fluid thermodynamics for coal processing

    SciTech Connect

    van Swol, F. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Eckert, C.A. . School of Chemical Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    Because of their unusual solvating and mass transfer properties, supercritical fluids show potential for a variety of coal processing applications. We have established a database of coal model compound equilibria; to add to this database, we have developed and are testing techniques of measuring entrainer effects on solubility rapidly. In addition, we have used fluorescence spectroscopy to study the nature of entrainer effects on a molecular level. The solubility and spectroscopic measurements are being used in the development of an equation of state that includes both physical and chemical interactions; we are currently testing the equation. The equation of state will be used to predict solubility behavior so systems can be designed for the processing of coal with supercritical fluids. 3 figs.

  14. Comparative Reactivity Study of Natural Silicate Minerals in Wet Supercritical CO2 By In Situ Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, C.; Schaef, T.; Miller, Q. R.; Loring, J. S.; Wang, Z.; Johnson, K. T.; McGrail, P.

    2012-12-01

    Long-term storage of CO2 in deep geologic reservoirs is one of the strategies being developed and implemented for reducing anthropogenic emissions of CO2 into the atmosphere. Reservoirs containing basalt or peridotite have the potential to permanently entrap the CO2 as silicate minerals react with the CO2 and formation waters to form stable carbonate minerals. Although the relevant reactions have been well studied in the aqueous phase, comparatively little work has focused on silicate mineral reactivity in the CO2-rich fluid containing dissolved water at conditions relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. In this study, we used in situ infrared spectroscopy to investigate the carbonation of naturally occurring samples of San Carlos olivine (Mg2SiO4), Bramble enstatite (MgSiO3), and a Hawaiian picritic basalt rich in olivine. To enhance reactivity, subsamples were micronized to obtain higher surface area materials, in the range of 14 to 23 m2g-1. Experiments were carried out at 50 °C and 91 bar by circulating a stream of dry or wet supercritical CO2 (scCO2) past a sample overlayer deposited on the window of a high-pressure infrared flow cell. Water concentrations ranged from 0% to 135% relative to saturation, and transmission-mode absorbance spectra were recorded as a function of time for 24 hours. In experiments with excess water, a controlled temperature gradient was used to intentionally condense a film of liquid water on the overlayers' surfaces. No discernible reaction was detected when the samples were exposed to dry scCO2. When water was added to the scCO2, a thin film of liquid-like water formed on the surfaces of each sample, followed by spectral evidence of carbonation. The extents of reaction were dependent on both the thickness of the water films and the materials being tested. The thinnest water film was associated with the Bramble enstatite, which also appeared minimally reactive. The Hawaiian picritic basalt was slightly more reactive but contained

  15. Investigation of attractive and repulsive interactions associated with ketones in supercritical CO2, based on Raman spectroscopy and theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Kajiya, Daisuke; Saitow, Ken-ichi

    2013-08-07

    Carbonyl compounds are solutes that are highly soluble in supercritical CO2 (scCO2). Their solubility governs the efficiency of chemical reactions, and is significantly increased by changing a chromophore. To effectively use scCO2 as solvent, it is crucial to understand the high solubility of carbonyl compounds, the solvation structure, and the solute-solvent intermolecular interactions. We report Raman spectroscopic data, for three prototypical ketones dissolved in scCO2, and four theoretical analyses. The vibrational Raman spectra of the C=O stretching modes of ketones (acetone, acetophenone, and benzophenone) were measured in scCO2 along the reduced temperature Tr = T∕Tc = 1.02 isotherm as a function of the reduced density ρr = ρ∕ρc in the range 0.05-1.5. The peak frequencies of the C=O stretching modes shifted toward lower energies as the fluid density increased. The density dependence was analyzed by using perturbed hard-sphere theory, and the shift was decomposed into attractive and repulsive energy components. The attractive energy between the ketones and CO2 was up to nine times higher than the repulsive energy, and its magnitude increased in the following order: acetone < acetophenone < benzophenone. The Mulliken charges of the three solutes and CO2 molecules obtained by using quantum chemistry calculations described the order of the magnitude of the attractive energy and optimized the relative configuration between each solute and CO2. According to theoretical calculations for the dispersion energy, the dipole-induced-dipole interaction energy, and the frequency shift due to their interactions, the experimentally determined attractive energy differences in the three solutes were attributed to the dispersion energies that depended on a chromophore attached to the carbonyl groups. It was found that the major intermolecular interaction with the attractive shift varied from dipole-induced dipole to dispersion depending on the chromophore in the ketones

  16. Geophysical Signatures to Monitor Fluids and Mineralization for CO2 Sequestration in Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otheim, L. T.; Adam, L.; Van Wijk, K.; Batzle, M. L.; Mcling, T. L.; Podgorney, R. K.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon dioxide sequestration in large reservoirs can reduce emissions of this green house gas into the atmosphere. Basalts are promising host rocks due to their volumetric extend, worldwide distribution, and recent observations that CO2-water mixtures react with basalt minerals to precipitate as carbonate minerals, trapping the CO2. The chemical reaction between carbonic acid and minerals rich in calcium, magnesium and iron precipitates carbonates in the pore space. This process would increase the elastic modulus and velocity of the rock. At the same time, the higher compressibility of CO2 over water changes the elastic properties of the rock, decreasing the saturated rock bulk modulus and the P-wave velocity. Reservoirs where the rock properties change as a result of fluid or pressure changes are commonly monitored with seismic methods. Here we present experiments to study the feasibility of monitoring CO2 migration in a reservoir and CO2-rock reactions for a sequestration scenario in basalts. Our goal is to measure the rock's elastic response to mineralization with non-contacting ultrasonic lasers, and the effect of fluid substitution at reservoir conditions at seismic and ultrasonic frequencies. For the fluid substitution experiment we observe changes in the P- and S-wave velocities when saturating the sample with super-critical (sc) CO2, CO2-water mixtures and water alone for different pore and confining pressures. The bulk modulus of the rock is significantly dependent on frequency in the 2~to 106~Hz range, for CO2-water mixtures and pure water saturations. Dry and pure CO2 (sc or gas) do not show a frequency dependence on the modulus. Moreover, the shear wave modulus is not dispersive for either fluid. The frequency dependence of the elastic parameters is related to the attenuation (1/Q) of the rock. We will show the correlation between frequency dependent moduli and attenuation data for the different elastic moduli of the rocks. Three other basalt samples

  17. Supercritical Fluid Processing of Propellant Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    coffee decaffeination , spice extraction, and lipids purification. The processing principles have also long been well known and practiced in the...binder application, some costs for coffee decaffeination for a plant producing 50,000,000 lbs/yr are related. No absolute figures have been published...figure is based on the retail price difference between Maxwell House (the supercritical fluid coffee decaffeinator ) and Sanka brand coffee. For 13 oz of

  18. Silver nanoparticles generated by pulsed laser ablation in supercritical CO2 medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machmudah, Siti; Sato, Takayuki; Wahyudiono; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Goto, Motonobu

    2012-03-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) has been widely employed in industrial and biological applications and in other fields. The environmental conditions in which PLA is conducted are important parameters that affect both the solid particle cloud and the deposition produced by the plume. In this work, the generation of nanoparticles (NPs) has been developed by performing PLA of silver (Ag) plates in a supercritical CO2 medium. Ag NPs were successfully generated by allowing the selective generation of clusters. Laser ablation was performed with an excitation wavelength of 532 nm under various pressures and temperatures of CO2 medium. On the basis of the experimental result, both surface of the irradiated Ag plate and structure of Ag NPs were significantly affected by the changes in supercritical CO2 pressure and temperature. With increasing irradiation pressure, plume deposited in the surrounding crater created by the ablation was clearly observed. In Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) the image of the generated Ag NPs on the silicon wafer and the morphology of Ag particles were basically a sphere-like structure. Ag particles contain NPs with large-varied diameter ranging from 5 nm to 1.2 μm. The bigger Ag NPs melted during the ablation process and then ejected smaller spherical Ag NPs, which formed nanoclusters attached on the molten Ag NPs. The smaller Ag NPs were also formed around the bigger Ag NPs. Based on the results, this new method can also be used to obtain advanced nano-structured materials.

  19. Supercritical CO2 and ionic liquids for the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass in bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Gu, Tingyue; Held, Michael A; Faik, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Owing to high petroleum prices, there has been a major push in recent years to use lignocellulosic biomass as biorefinery feedstocks. Unfortunately, by nature's design, lignocellulosic biomass is notoriously recalcitrant. Cellulose is the most abundant renewable carbon source on the planet and comprises glucan polysaccharides which self-assemble into paracrystalline microfibrils. The extent of cellulose crystallinity largely contributes to biomass recalcitrance. Additionally, cellulose microfibrils are embedded into both hemicellulose and lignin polymeric networks, making cellulose accessibility an additional obstacle. Pretreatment is necessary before enzymatic hydrolysis in order to liberate high yields of glucose and other fermentable sugars from biomass polysaccharides. This work discusses two pretreatment methods, supercritical CO2 and ionic liquids (ILs). Both methods utilize green solvents that do not emit toxic vapours. Mechanisms for destroying or weakening biomass recalcitrance have been explored. Various pretreatment operating parameters such as temperature, pressure, time, dry biomass/solvent ratio, water content, etc. have been investigated for the pretreatment of various biomass types such as corn stover, switchgrass, sugarcane bagasse, soft and hard wood. The two pretreatment methods have their pros and cons. For example, supercritical CO2 explosion pretreatment uses inexpensive CO2, but requires a high pressure. By comparison, while IL pretreatment does not require an elevated pressure, ILs are still too expensive for large-scale uses. Further research and development are needed to make the two green pretreatment methods practical.

  20. A combined spectroscopic and theoretical study of dibutyltin diacetate and dilaurate in supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Renault, Benjamin; Cloutet, Eric; Cramail, Henri; Hannachi, Yacine; Tassaing, Thierry

    2008-09-11

    Two organotin catalysts, namely, dibutyltin dilaurate (DBTDL) and dibutyltin diacetate (DBTDA), commonly used in the synthesis of polyurethanes, have been investigated combining vibrational spectroscopic measurements with molecular modeling. The structure and vibrational spectra of the DBTDA molecule have been simulated using density functional theory. Thus, because of the Sn...O interactions, the lowest energy conformer reveals an asymmetrically chelated structure of the acetate groups with a C2v symmetry. The experimental IR spectra of DBTDA and DBTDL diluted in carbon tetrachloride and in supercritical CO2 show unambiguously that these molecules adopt the asymmetrically chelated conformation in the solvent. A new attribution of the main peaks constituting the respective IR spectra of the catalysts could be carried out. Finally, from the IR spectra of the two catalysts diluted in supercritical CO2 reported as a function of time, it was found that both molecules react slightly with CO2. However, their spectrum remains unchanged at the earliest stage of the polymerization, indicating that these molecules preserve a catalytic activity similar to that noted in conventional organic solvent.

  1. Breaking it into pieces for storage: An engineering approach to enhancing supercritical CO2 entrapment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Bryan, C. R.; Dewers, T. A.; Heath, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic carbon sequestration and storage (CSS) is a possible option for the mitigation of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions to the atmosphere. Residual trapping of a non-wetting liquid phase in a brine reservoir is considered as an important mechanism for long-term CSS, because similar processes have been observed in a variety of fields such as oil recovery and groundwater remediation of non-aqueous phase liquids. Residual trapping can potentially relax stringent requirements for the integrity of cap rocks and allow utilization of open or dipping structures for carbon storage. Here, we propose an engineering approach to enhancing the immobilization of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) in a brine reservoir. This approach is based on the concept of viscous instability of immiscible flow and the dynamics of the movement of scCO2 ganglia in porous media. The movement of a non-wetting ganglion is inversely dependent on its dimension: the smaller the ganglion, the more difficult to move. The critical size (lc) for a ganglion to become immobilized, given its buoyancy, is determined by: lc=2βσ/(rkrw Δρg) where β is the geometric factor characterizing the grain size and pore neck radius (r), σ is the interfacial tension between scCO2 and water, rkrw is the relative permeability to water, Δρ is the density difference between water and scCO2, and g is the gravity. This suggests that, by dispersing injected scCO2 into small ganglia, we can potentially immobilize the injected scCO2 for very long times. The dispersal of scCO2 into small ganglia could be accomplished by controlling the injection rate and the alternating injection of scCO2 and water. The injection rate is required to be high enough to ensure the scCO2 at the advancing front to be broken into pieces, small enough for immobilization, through viscous instability: v>(2π2 r2 krkrw Δρ2 g2)/(μβ2 σ) where v is the velocity of the advancement of scCO2 front, k is the permeability of water and μ is the viscosity of

  2. Partitioning of Organic Compounds into Supercritical CO2 in Depleted Oil Reservoirs - A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burant, A.; Lowry, G. V.; Karamalidis, A.

    2012-12-01

    Depleted oil reservoirs, with enhanced oil recovery, will be one of the first adopters of carbon capture and storage (CCS), which is a promising mitigation strategy for global climate change. The large scale implementation of CCS mandates better understanding of the risks associated with CO2 injection, especially in regards to potential leakage of the stored CO2. Organics, in the residual oil and dissolved in the brine, can partition into supercritical CO2 (sc-CO2) and move with that phase if it leaks. This review presents an overview of the thermodynamic models and trends in experimental partitioning data needed to understand what compounds may be expected to move with the sc-CO2. There are two main types of thermodynamic models used for predicting the solubility of organic compounds in sc-CO2, equations of state and quantitative structure activity relationships. Both can predict the partitioning behavior of one compound in sc-CO2, however only equations of state can predict solubility in multicomponent systems. In addition, equations of state have been developed to determine the effect of electrolytes on the partitioning behavior of organics dissolved in brines. There are three main trends in the partitioning behavior of organics in sc-CO2: Pure phase solubility follows trends in vapor pressure; compounds with higher volatility have higher solubility in sc-CO2. Second, the partitioning from water to sc-CO2 follows trends in Henry's constants, which follow the relative solubility of a compound in both the sc-CO2 and aqueous phases. Thirdly, the solubility of a compound can be enhanced by the presence of another; highly volatile compounds enhance the solubility of compounds with lower volatility. Finally, the review presents the gaps in experimental research that can be used to improve the modeling of the partitioning behavior of organics in sc-CO2, specifically in regards to co-solvency effects and the effects of electrolytes on the partitioning of dissolved

  3. Rapid analysis of polyolefin antioxidants and light stabilisers by supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kithinji, J P; Bartle, K D; Raynor, M W; Clifford, A A

    1990-02-01

    Nineteen commercial antioxidants and light stabilisers, with a wide range of relative molecular masses and boiling-points, present in polyolefins were analysed by packed column supercritical fluid chromatography on four different phases with CO2 or 10% MeOH-CO2 as the mobile phase and with UV detection. The technique is shown to yield short analysis times and sufficient resolution for a number of additives present in a given polyolefin.

  4. Fayalite Dissolution and Siderite Formation in Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Odeta; Kovarik, Libor; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Arey, Bruce W.; Tucek, Jiri; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2012-11-25

    Olivines, a significant constituent of basaltic rocks, have the potential to immobilize permanently CO2 after it is injected in the deep subsurface, due to carbonation reactions occurring between CO2 and the host rock. To investigate the reactions of fayalitic olivine with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and formation of mineral carbonates, experiments were conducted at temperatures of 35 °C to 80 °C, 90 atm pressure and anoxic conditions. For every temperature, the dissolution of fayalite was examined both in the presence of liquid water and H2O-saturated scCO2. The experiments were conducted in a high pressure batch reactor at reaction time extending up to 85 days. The newly formed products were characterized using a comprehensive suite of bulk and surface characterization techniques X-ray diffraction, Transmission/Emission Mössbauer Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Focused Ion Beam, and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy. Siderite with rhombohedral morphology was formed at 35 °C, 50 °C, and 80 °C in the presence of liquid water and scCO2. In H2O-saturated scCO2, the formation of siderite was confirmed only at high temperature (80 °C). Characterization of reacted samples in H2O-saturated scCO2 with high resolution TEM indicated that siderite formation initiated inside voids created during the initial steps of fayalite dissolution. Later stages of fayalite dissolution result in the formation of siderite in layered vertical structures, columns or pyramids with a rhombus base morphology.

  5. Experimental study on effects of geologic heterogeneity in enhancing dissolution trapping of supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agartan, Elif; Trevisan, Luca; Cihan, Abdullah; Birkholzer, Jens; Zhou, Quanlin; Illangasekare, Tissa H.

    2015-03-01

    Dissolution trapping is one of the primary mechanisms that enhance the storage security of supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) in saline geologic formations. When scCO2 dissolves in formation brine produces an aqueous solution that is denser than formation brine, which leads to convective mixing driven by gravitational instabilities. Convective mixing can enhance the dissolution of CO2 and thus it can contribute to stable trapping of dissolved CO2. However, in the presence of geologic heterogeneities, diffusive mixing may also contribute to dissolution trapping. The effects of heterogeneity on mixing and its contribution to stable trapping are not well understood. The goal of this experimental study is to investigate the effects of geologic heterogeneity on mixing and stable trapping of dissolved CO2. Homogeneous and heterogeneous media experiments were conducted in a two-dimensional test tank with various packing configurations using surrogates for scCO2 (water) and brine (propylene glycol) under ambient pressure and temperature conditions. The results show that the density-driven flow in heterogeneous formations may not always cause significant convective mixing especially in layered systems containing low-permeability zones. In homogeneous formations, density-driven fingering enhances both storage in the deeper parts of the formation and contact between the host rock and dissolved CO2 for the potential mineralization. On the other hand, for layered systems, dissolved CO2 becomes immobilized in low-permeability zones with low-diffusion rates, which reduces the risk of leakage through any fault or fracture. Both cases contribute to the permanence of the dissolved plume in the formation.

  6. MOLECULAR DESIGN OF COLLOIDS IN SUPERCRITICAL FLUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Keith P. Johnston

    2009-04-06

    The environmentally benign, non-toxic, non-flammable fluids water and carbon dioxide (CO2) are the two most abundant and inexpensive solvents on earth. Emulsions of these fluids are of interest in many industrial processes, as well as CO2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery. Until recently, formation of these emulsions required stabilization with fluorinated surfactants, which are expensive and often not environmentally friendly. In this work we overcame this severe limitation by developing a fundamental understanding of the properties of surfactants the CO2-water interface and using this knowledge to design and characterize emulsions stabilized with either hydrocarbon-based surfactants or nanoparticle stabilizers. We also discovered a new concept of electrostatic stabilization for CO2-based emulsions and colloids. Finally, we were able to translate our earlier work on the synthesis of silicon and germanium nanocrystals and nanowires from high temperatures and pressures to lower temperatures and ambient pressure to make the chemistry much more accessible.

  7. The U-tube: A novel system for acquiring borehole fluid samples from a deep geologic CO2 sequestration experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freifeld, Barry M.; Trautz, Robert C.; Kharaka, Yousif K.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Myer, Larry R.; Hovorka, Susan D.; Collins, Daniel J.

    2005-10-01

    A novel system has been deployed to obtain geochemical samples of water and gas, at in situ pressure, during a geologic CO2 sequestration experiment conducted in the Frio brine aquifer in Liberty County, Texas. Project goals required high-frequency recovery of representative and uncontaminated aliquots of a rapidly changing two-phase fluid (supercritical CO2 and brine) fluid from 1.5 km depth. The data sets collected, using both the liquid and gas portions of the downhole samples, provide insights into the coupled hydrogeochemical issues affecting CO2 sequestration in brine-filled formations. While the basic premise underlying the U-tube sampler is not new, the system is unique because careful consideration was given to the processing of the recovered two-phase fluids. In particular, strain gauges mounted beneath the high-pressure surface sample cylinders measured the ratio of recovered brine to supercritical CO2. A quadrupole mass spectrometer provided real-time gas analysis for perfluorocarbon and noble gas tracers that were injected along with the CO2. The U-tube successfully acquired frequent samples, facilitating accurate delineation of the arrival of the CO2 plume, and on-site analysis revealed rapid changes in geochemical conditions.

  8. The U-tube: A novel system for acquiring borehole fluid samples from a deep geologic CO2 sequestration experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freifeild, Barry M.; Trautz, Robert C.; Kharaka, Yousif K.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Myer, Larry R.; Hovorka, Susan D.; Collins, Daniel J.

    2005-01-01

    A novel system has been deployed to obtain geochemical samples of water and gas, at in situ pressure, during a geologic CO2 sequestration experiment conducted in the Frio brine aquifer in Liberty County, Texas. Project goals required high-frequency recovery of representative and uncontaminated aliquots of a rapidly changing two-phase fluid (supercritical CO2 and brine) fluid from 1.5 km depth. The data sets collected, using both the liquid and gas portions of the downhole samples, provide insights into the coupled hydrogeochemical issues affecting CO2sequestration in brine-filled formations. While the basic premise underlying the U-tube sampler is not new, the system is unique because careful consideration was given to the processing of the recovered two-phase fluids. In particular, strain gauges mounted beneath the high-pressure surface sample cylinders measured the ratio of recovered brine to supercritical CO2. A quadrupole mass spectrometer provided real-time gas analysis for perfluorocarbon and noble gas tracers that were injected along with the CO2. The U-tube successfully acquired frequent samples, facilitating accurate delineation of the arrival of the CO2 plume, and on-site analysis revealed rapid changes in geochemical conditions.

  9. The U-tube: A novel system for acquiring borehole fluid samples from a deep geologic CO2 sequestration experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freifeild, Barry M.; Trautz, Robert C.; Kharaka, Yousif K.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Myer, Larry R.; Hovorka, Susan D.; Collins, Daniel J.

    2005-01-01

    A novel system has been deployed to obtain geochemical samples of water and gas, at in situ pressure, during a geologic CO2 sequestration experiment conducted in the Frio brine aquifer in Liberty County, Texas. Project goals required high-frequency recovery of representative and uncontaminated aliquots of a rapidly changing two-phase fluid (supercritical CO2 and brine) fluid from 1.5 km depth. The data sets collected, using both the liquid and gas portions of the downhole samples, provide insights into the coupled hydrogeochemical issues affecting CO2 sequestration in brine-filled formations. While the basic premise underlying the U-tube sampler is not new, the system is unique because careful consideration was given to the processing of the recovered two-phase fluids. In particular, strain gauges mounted beneath the high-pressure surface sample cylinders measured the ratio of recovered brine to supercritical CO2. A quadrupole mass spectrometer provided real-time gas analysis for perfluorocarbon and noble gas tracers that were injected along with the CO2. The U-tube successfully acquired frequent samples, facilitating accurate delineation of the arrival of the CO2 plume, and on-site analysis revealed rapid changes in geochemical conditions.

  10. Chemical deposition methods using supercritical fluid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Sievers, Robert E.; Hansen, Brian N.

    1990-01-01

    A method for depositing a film of a desired material on a substrate comprises dissolving at least one reagent in a supercritical fluid comprising at least one solvent. Either the reagent is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the solvent to form the desired product, or at least one additional reagent is included in the supercritical solution and is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the first reagent or with a compound derived from the first reagent to form the desired material. The supercritical solution is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol and a chemical reaction is induced in the vapor or aerosol so that a film of the desired material resulting from the chemical reaction is deposited on the substrate surface. In an alternate embodiment, the supercritical solution containing at least one reagent is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol which is then mixed with a gas containing at least one additional reagent. A chemical reaction is induced in the resulting mixture so that a film of the desired material is deposited.

  11. Application of a phosphazene derivative as a flame retardant for cotton fabric using conventional method and supercritical CO2

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Conventional pad-dry-cure (non-scCO2) and supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) application methods were investigated to study the effectiveness of a phosphazene derivative as a flame retardant on cotton fabric. 1,1',4,5-tetrahydrotrispiro[1,3,2-diazaphosphole-2,2'-[1,3,5,2,4,6]triazatriphosphinine-4...

  12. Microstructural Response of Variably Hydrated Ca-Rich Montmorillonite to Supercritical CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Mal Soon; McGrail, B. Peter; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra

    2014-08-05

    We report on ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of Ca-rich montmorillonite systems, in different hydration states in the presence of supercritical CO2. Analysis of the molecular trajectories provides estimates of the relative H2O:CO2 ratio per interspatial cation. The vibrational density of states in direct comparison with dipole moment derived IR spectra for these systems provide unique signatures that can used to follow molecular transformation. In a co-sequestration scenario, these signatures could be used to identify the chemical state and fate of Sulfur compounds. Interpretation of CO2 asymmetric stretch shift is given based on a detailed analysis of scCO2 structure and intermolecular interactions of the intercalated species. Based on our simulations, smectites with higher charge interlayer cations at sub-single to single hydration states should be more efficient in capturing CO2, while maintaining caprock integrity. This research would not have been possible without the support of the office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. The computational resources were made available through a user proposal of the EMSL User facility, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  13. Effects of Hexane in Supercritical Fluid Chromatography for the Separation of Enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haihong; Yu, Stanley; Zeng, Lu

    2016-03-01

    Supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC), operated in conventional mode, is normally recognized as normal phase chromatography, and uses a solvent combination of supercritical CO2 and alcohols to separate compounds. Hexane, a commonly used solvent in normal phase liquid chromatography (NP-LC), is rarely used in SFC and, in some cases, is added to the organic modifiers to increase liquid content in order to achieve better efficiency in preparative SFC for poorly retained compounds. Although hexane is believed to have similar solvent strength to that of supercritical CO2, its effects on the enantioseparation in SFC is largely unknown. To understand the chromatographic effects of an apolar solvent, such as hexane in SFC, we compared the chromatographic behaviors of 35 chiral compounds using a parallel SFC method under traditional SFC mode of only “pure” alcohol-CO2 to that of hexane-assisted SFC (HA-SFC), which uses mixtures of alcohol and hexane (as cosolvents) and CO2. We observed that, in some cases, hexane behaves just like supercritical CO2, where replacement of a portion of CO2 with hexane does not significantly change retention times or resolution of the peaks. In many cases, however, addition of hexane in mobile phases does affect chromatographic behavior of one or both enantiomers. Such effects might provide opportunities for separation of some enantiomers.

  14. Complete synthesis of germanium nanocrystal encrusted carbon colloids in supercritical CO2 and their superhydrophobic properties.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Christopher A; Singh, Ajay; Murphy, Joseph A; O'Sullivan, Catriona; Buckley, D N; Ryan, Kevin M

    2011-09-06

    Colloidal carbon spheres were synthesized by the carbonization of squalane, a nonvolatile hydrocarbon solvent, in supercritical carbon dioxide. Precise pressure modulation of the fluid medium led to size controlled growth of carbon spheres ranging from 300 to 1500 nm in diameter. This unique synthetic approach of carbonizing a hydrocarbon suspension in supercritical fluid is found to suppress any particle aggregation, resulting in excellent sphere monodispersity. Core-shell hybrid structures of C-Ge were subsequently formed by inducing the growth of 10-40 nm sized germanium nanocrystals from the spheres in a hierarchical bottom-up approach. Extensive characterization of the spheres and nanocrystals was conducted using transmission and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman, and thermogravametric analysis. Assemblies of nanocrystal modified carbon colloids impart outstanding superhydrophobic properties due to the combined nano- and microstructuring of the particle arrays. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  15. Frenkel line and solubility maximum in supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Brazhkin, V V; Dove, M T; Trachenko, K

    2015-01-01

    A new dynamic line, the Frenkel line, has recently been proposed to separate the supercritical state into rigid-liquid and nonrigid gaslike fluid. The location of the Frenkel line on the phase diagram is unknown for real fluids. Here we map the Frenkel line for three important systems: CO(2), H(2)O, and CH(4). This provides an important demarcation on the phase diagram of these systems, the demarcation that separates two distinct physical states with liquidlike and gaslike properties. We find that the Frenkel line can have a similar trend as the melting line above the critical pressure. Moreover, we discuss the relationship between unexplained solubility maxima and Frenkel line, and we propose that the Frenkel line corresponds to the optimal conditions for solubility.

  16. Effect of cosmetic matrices on the release and odour profiles of the supercritical CO2 extract of Origanum majorana L.

    PubMed

    Costa, P; Velasco, C V; Loureiro, J M; Rodrigues, A E

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the effect of different cosmetic matrices on the release profile and odour intensity of the fragrance O. majorana was investigated for the first time. The fragrance compounds of O. majorana were extracted by supercritical fluid extraction using carbon dioxide (SFE-CO2 ) at 40°C and two operating pressures (8.5 and 10 MPa), and their chemical profiles were assessed by gas chromatography with flame ionization detector coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-FID/MS). Lastly, the fragrance compounds were incorporated into three cosmetic matrices (glycerine, dipropylene glycol and skin lotion) to assess their release and odour profiles over time using dynamic headspace (DHS)/GC-FID/MS and Odour Value concept, respectively. The SFE-CO2 enabled recovering extracts with the pleasant scent of the living plant, and the increment of pressure induced an increase on the extraction yield. GC-FID/MS analyses revealed that oxygen-containing monoterpenes was the principal group of components identified in both SFE-CO2 extracts. The fragrance compounds were more retained in dipropylene glycol, and the major deviations from the original odour intensity (control) were observed in the presence of dipropylene glycol and skin lotion. The hydrophilic character of the cosmetic matrices strongly influenced the release of the fragrance compounds, thus affecting the odour profile of the studied mixtures. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  17. Lipase-catalyzed transesterification of soybean oil and phytosterol in supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lizhi; Llibin, Sun; Li, Jun; Qi, Liangjun; Zhang, Xu; Yu, Dianyu; Walid, Elfalleh; Jiang, Lianzhou

    2015-12-01

    The transesterification of phytosterol and soybean oil was performed using Novozym 435 in supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2). The transesterification reaction was conducted in soybean oil containing 5-25% phytosterol at 55-95 °C and free-water solvent. The effects of temperature, reaction time, phytosterol concentration, lipase dosage and reaction pressure on the conversion rate of transesterification were investigated. The optimal reaction conditions were the reaction temperature (85 °C), reaction time (1 h), phytosterol concentration (5%), reaction pressure (8 Mpa) and lipase dosage (1%). The highest conversion rate of 92% could be achieved under the optimum conditions. Compared with the method of lipase-catalyzed transesterification of phytosterol and soybean oil at normal pressure, the transesterification in SC-CO2 reduced significantly the reaction temperature and reaction time.

  18. Extraction of Lutein Diesters from Tagetes Erecta using Supercritical CO2 and Liquid Propane.

    PubMed

    Skerget, Mojca; Bezjak, Miran; Makovšek, Katja; Knez, Zeljko

    2010-03-01

    The efficiency of high pressure extraction of lutein diesters from marigold (Tagetes erecta) flower petals has been investigated. The solvents used for extraction were supercritical carbon dioxide and liquid propane. Operating parameters were 300 bar and 40, 60 and 80 °C for CO2 and 100, 150, 200 bar and 40 and 60 °C for propane, respectively. The influence of process parameters on the total yield of extraction and content of lutein diesters in the extracts was investigated. The results show, that solvent power of propane for lutein diesters is approximately 3.5 times higher than of CO2. The calculation procedure based on the Fick's second law was applied to determine the diffusivities of lutein diesters during extraction from marigold flower petals for both extraction stages: a constant rate stage followed by a stage of decreasing rate. The mathematical model based on the Fick's second law well described the experimental extraction results.

  19. Biological Properties of Fucoxanthin in Oil Recovered from Two Brown Seaweeds Using Supercritical CO2 Extraction.

    PubMed

    Sivagnanam, Saravana Periaswamy; Yin, Shipeng; Choi, Jae Hyung; Park, Yong Beom; Woo, Hee Chul; Chun, Byung Soo

    2015-05-29

    The bioactive materials in brown seaweeds hold great interest for developing new drugs and healthy foods. The oil content in brown seaweeds (Saccharina japonica and Sargassum horneri) was extracted by using environmentally friendly supercritical CO2 (SC-CO2) with ethanol as a co-solvent in a semi-batch flow extraction process and compared the results with a conventional extraction process using hexane, ethanol, and acetone mixed with methanol (1:1, v/v). The SC-CO2 method was used at a temperature of 45 °C and pressure of 250 bar. The flow rate of CO2 (27 g/min) was constant for the entire extraction period of 2 h. The obtained oil from the brown seaweeds was analyzed to determine their valuable compounds such as fatty acids, phenolic compounds, fucoxanthin and biological properties including antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antihypertension effects. The amounts of fucoxanthin extracted from the SC-CO2 oils of S. japonica and S. horneri were 0.41 ± 0.05 and 0.77 ± 0.07 mg/g, respectively. High antihypertensive activity was detected when using mixed acetone and methanol, whereas the phenolic content and antioxidant property were higher in the oil extracted by SC-CO2. The acetone-methanol mix extracts exhibited better antimicrobial activities than those obtained by other means. Thus, the SC-CO2 extraction process appears to be a good method for obtaining valuable compounds from both brown seaweeds, and showed stronger biological activity than that obtained by the conventional extraction process.

  20. Biological Properties of Fucoxanthin in Oil Recovered from Two Brown Seaweeds Using Supercritical CO2 Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Periaswamy Sivagnanam, Saravana; Yin, Shipeng; Choi, Jae Hyung; Park, Yong Beom; Woo, Hee Chul; Chun, Byung Soo

    2015-01-01

    The bioactive materials in brown seaweeds hold great interest for developing new drugs and healthy foods. The oil content in brown seaweeds (Saccharina japonica and Sargassum horneri) was extracted by using environmentally friendly supercritical CO2 (SC-CO2) with ethanol as a co-solvent in a semi-batch flow extraction process and compared the results with a conventional extraction process using hexane, ethanol, and acetone mixed with methanol (1:1, v/v). The SC-CO2 method was used at a temperature of 45 °C and pressure of 250 bar. The flow rate of CO2 (27 g/min) was constant for the entire extraction period of 2 h. The obtained oil from the brown seaweeds was analyzed to determine their valuable compounds such as fatty acids, phenolic compounds, fucoxanthin and biological properties including antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antihypertension effects. The amounts of fucoxanthin extracted from the SC-CO2 oils of S. japonica and S. horneri were 0.41 ± 0.05 and 0.77 ± 0.07 mg/g, respectively. High antihypertensive activity was detected when using mixed acetone and methanol, whereas the phenolic content and antioxidant property were higher in the oil extracted by SC-CO2. The acetone–methanol mix extracts exhibited better antimicrobial activities than those obtained by other means. Thus, the SC-CO2 extraction process appears to be a good method for obtaining valuable compounds from both brown seaweeds, and showed stronger biological activity than that obtained by the conventional extraction process. PMID:26035021

  1. Supercritical CO2 induces marked changes in membrane phospholipids composition in Escherichia coli K12.

    PubMed

    Tamburini, Sabrina; Anesi, Andrea; Ferrentino, Giovanna; Spilimbergo, Sara; Guella, Graziano; Jousson, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) treatment is one of the most promising alternative techniques for pasteurization of both liquid and solid food products. The inhibitory effect of SC-CO2 on bacterial growth has been investigated in different species, but the precise mechanism of action remains unknown. Membrane permeabilization has been proposed to be the first event in SC-CO2-mediated inactivation. Flow cytometry, high performance liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization–mass spectrometry and NMR analyses were performed to investigate the effect of SC-CO2 treatment on membrane lipid profile and membrane permeability in Escherichia coli K12. After 15 min of SC-CO2 treatment at 120 bar and 35 °C, the majority of bacterial cells dissipated their membrane potential (95 %) and lost membrane integrity, as 81 % become partially permeabilized and 18 % fully permeabilized. Membrane permeabilization was associated with a 20 % decrease in bacterial biovolume and to a strong (>50 %) reduction in phosphatidylglycerol (PG) membrane lipids, without altering the fatty acid composition and the degree of unsaturation of acyl chains. PGs are thought to play an important role in membrane stability, by reducing motion of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) along the membrane bilayer, therefore promoting the formation of inter-lipid hydrogen bonds. In addition, the decrease in intracellular pH induced by SC-CO2 likely alters the chemical properties of phospholipids and the PE/PG ratio. Biophysical effects of SC-CO2 thus cause a strong perturbation of membrane architecture in E. coli, and such alterations are likely associated with its strong inactivation effect.

  2. Exfoliation Propensity of Oxide Scale in Heat Exchangers Used for Supercritical CO2 Power Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Shingledecker, John P.; Kung, Steve; Wright, Ian G.; Nash, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Supercritical CO2 (sCO2) Brayton cycle systems offer the possibility of improved efficiency in future fossil energy power generation plants operating at temperatures of 650 C and above. As there are few data on the oxidation/corrosion behavior of structural alloys in sCO2 at these temperatures, modeling to predict the propensity for oxide exfoliation is not well developed, thus hindering materials selection for these novel cycles. The ultimate goal of this effort is to provide needed data on scale exfoliation behavior in sCO2 for confident alloy selection. To date, a model developed by ORNL and EPRI for the exfoliation of oxide scales formed on boiler tubes in high-temperature, high-pressure steam has proven useful for managing exfoliation in conventional steam plants. A major input provided by the model is the ability to predict the likelihood of scale failure and loss based on understanding of the evolution of the oxide morphologies and the conditions that result in susceptibility to exfoliation. This paper describes initial steps taken to extend the existing model for exfoliation of steam-side oxide scales to sCO2 conditions. The main differences between high-temperature, high-pressure steam and sCO2 that impact the model involve (i) significant geometrical differences in the heat exchangers, ranging from standard pressurized tubes seen typically in steam-producing boilers to designs for sCO2 that employ variously-curved thin walls to create shaped flow paths for extended heat transfer area and small channel cross-sections to promote thermal convection and support pressure loads; (ii) changed operating characteristics with sCO2 due to the differences in physical and thermal properties compared to steam; and (iii) possible modification of the scale morphologies, hence properties that influence exfoliation behavior, due to reaction with carbon species from sCO2. The numerical simulations conducted were based on an assumed sCO2 operating schedule and several

  3. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2014-11-25

    This is a method to reactively refine hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20.degree. and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. The reaction portion of the method delivers lighter weight, more volatile hydrocarbons to an attached contacting device that operates in mixed subcritical or supercritical modes. This separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques. This method produces valuable products with fewer processing steps, lower costs, increased worker safety due to less processing and handling, allow greater opportunity for new oil field development and subsequent positive economic impact, reduce related carbon dioxide, and wastes typical with conventional refineries.

  4. Supercritical fluid extraction and separation of uranium from other actinides.

    PubMed

    Quach, Donna L; Mincher, Bruce J; Wai, Chien M

    2014-06-15

    The feasibility of separating U from nitric acid solutions of mixed actinides using tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP)-modified supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) was investigated. The actinides U, Np, Pu, and Am were extracted into sc-CO2 modified with TBP from a range of nitric acid concentrations, in the absence of, or in the presence of, a number of traditional reducing and/or complexing agents to demonstrate the separation of these metals from U under sc-CO2 conditions. The separation of U from Pu using sc-CO2 was successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3M in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) or oxalic acid (OA) to mitigate Pu extraction, and the separation of U from Np was successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 1M in the presence of AHA, OA, or sodium nitrite to mitigate Np extraction. Americium was not well extracted under any condition studied. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Bioethanol production from raffinate phase of supercritical CO2 extracted Stevia rebaudiana leaves.

    PubMed

    Coban, Isik; Sargin, Sayit; Celiktas, Melih Soner; Yesil-Celiktas, Ozlem

    2012-09-01

    The extracts of Stevia rebaudiana are marketed as dietary supplements and utilized as natural sweetening agent in food products. Subsequent to extraction on industrial scale, large quantities of solid wastes are produced. The aim of this study was to investigate the bioconversion efficiency of supercritical CO(2) extracted S. rebaudiana residues. Therefore, leaves were extracted with supercritical CO(2) and ethanol mixture in order to obtain glycosides, then the raffinate phase was hydrolyzed by both dilute acid and various concentrations of cellulase and β-glucosidase cocktail. The maximum yield of reducing sugars reached 25.67 g/L under the optimal conditions of enzyme pretreatment, whereas 32.00 g/L was reached by consecutive enzymatic and acid hydrolyses. Bioethanol yield (20 g/L, 2.0% inoculum, 2 days) based on the sugar consumed was 45.55% corresponding to a productivity of 0.19 kg/m(3)h which demonstrates challenges to be utilized as a potential feedstock for the production of bioethanol.

  6. Dynamic analysis of concentrated solar supercritical CO2-based power generation closed-loop cycle

    DOE PAGES

    Osorio, Julian D.; Hovsapian, Rob; Ordonez, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    Here, the dynamic behavior of a concentrated solar power (CSP) supercritical CO2 cycle is studied under different seasonal conditions. The system analyzed is composed of a central receiver, hot and cold thermal energy storage units, a heat exchanger, a recuperator, and multi-stage compression-expansion subsystems with intercoolers and reheaters between compressors and turbines respectively. Energy models for each component of the system are developed in order to optimize operating and design parameters such as mass flow rate, intermediate pressures and the effective area of the recuperator to lead to maximum efficiency. Our results show that the parametric optimization leads the systemmore » to a process efficiency of about 21 % and a maximum power output close to 1.5 MW. The thermal energy storage allows the system to operate for several hours after sunset. This operating time is approximately increased from 220 to 480 minutes after optimization. The hot and cold thermal energy storage also lessens the temperature fluctuations by providing smooth changes of temperatures at the turbines and compressors inlets. Our results indicate that concentrated solar systems using supercritical CO2 could be a viable alternative to satisfying energy needs in desert areas with scarce water and fossil fuel resources.« less

  7. Controlled morphology and size of curcumin using ultrasound in supercritical CO2 antisolvent.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jingfu; Wang, Wucong; Gao, Yahui; Zhao, Yaping

    2015-11-01

    Controllable morphology and size of crystal materials prepared by using a supercritical antisolvent (SAS) technique is still challenge. In this study, ultrasound was introduced into the SAS process to produce the particles of curcumin, a model compound. The effects of ultrasound power on the particle morphology and size were investigated in the range of 0 and 240 W at three different pressures. The observation of jet flow indicated ultrasound could accelerate the mixing speed between the liquid solution and the CO2, and thus reduced the gaseous region and the local saturation gradient. Mixed polymorphic and uniform particles of the curcumin were produced at a low and high mixing speed, respectively, confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The needle- or rod-like particle, irregular lumpy particle and nano spherical particle were generated with the increase of the ultrasound power, attributed to the changes of the degree of supersaturation. Therefore, the ultrasound can be potentially applied to adjust the morphology and size of the crystal materials in supercritical CO2 antisolvent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Supercritical fluids: Reactions, materials and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tumas, W.; Jacobson, G.B.; Josephsohn, N.S.; Brown, G.H.

    1999-04-09

    A number of important processes utilizing supercritical fluids have been either implemented or are emerging for extractions, separations and a wide range of cleaning applications. Supercritical fluids can be reasonable solvents yet share many of the advantages of gases including miscibility with other gases (i.e. hydrogen and oxygen), low viscosities and high diffusivities. Carbon dioxide has the further advantages of being nontoxic, nonflammable, inexpensive and currently unregulated. The use of compressed gases, either as liquids or supercritical fluids, as reaction media offers the opportunity to replace conventional hazardous solvents and also to optimize and potentially control the effect of solvent on chemical and material processing. The last several years has seen a significant growth in advances in chemical synthesis, catalytic transformations and materials synthesis and processing. The authors report on results from an exploratory program at Los Alamos National Laboratory aimed at investigating the use of dense phase fluids, particularly carbon dioxide, as reaction media for homogeneous, heterogeneous and phase-separable catalytic reactions in an effort to develop new, environmentally-friendly methods for chemical synthesis and processing. This approach offers the possibility of opening up substantially different chemical pathways, increasing selectivity at higher reaction rates, facilitating downstream separations and mitigating the need for hazardous solvents. Developing and understanding chemical and catalytic transformations in carbon dioxide could lead to greener chemistry at three levels: (1) Solvent replacement; (2) Better chemistry (e.g. higher reactivity, selectivity, less energy consumption); and (3) New chemistry (e.g. novel separations, use of COP{sub 2} as a C-1 source).

  9. Supercritical fluid extraction of N-nitrosamines

    SciTech Connect

    Tewani, S.

    1993-01-01

    The detailed chemistry of N-nitrosamines including the mechanism of carcinogenicity, modes of formation, inhibition and destruction are discussed in detail. The occurrence and risk assessment of human exposure of these suspect cancer agents is described. The methods of isolation and analysis of N-nitrosamines are critically discussed with emphasis on Gas Chromatography (GC)-Electrochemical Detectors, GC-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (GC-HRMS), GC-Thermal Energy Analyser (GC-TEA). The theoretical concepts of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) are discussed. A comparison of physical and chemical properties of supercritical fluids (SF) with other phases is given. A comparison of static, dynamic, recirculating SFEs shows the versatility of this technique. The advantages over conventional methods such as Soxhlet extraction are discussed. The instrumentation and operational technique of a laboratory built supercritical fluid extractor is explained. A brief review of applications (industrial and analytical) of SFE is given. The evaluation of SFE for analytical sample preparation and analyses of volatile N-nitrosamines (VNAs), tobacco specific N-nitrosamines (TSNAs), and N-nitrosodiethanolamine (NDELA) from spiked matrices, tobacco and cutting fluids is presented. Experimental parameters such as pressure, temperature, equilibration time, collector materials, modifier are evaluated to optimize the recoveries. The extracts are analysed by GC-TEA which is already proven to be highly selective and sensitive to quantitation of N-nitrosamines. The extraction of VNAs in pure SF-CO[sub 2] is quantitative at moderate pressures and low temperatures. For the extraction of TSNAs and NDELA, it is imperative to have high pressures and presence of an additive ([approximately]10% methanol) to achieve satisfactory results. This study offers a simple, rapid, accurate and environmentally advantageous sample preparation technique for the estimation of N-nitrosamines at nanogram levels.

  10. Hydrolases in supercritical CO2 and their use in a high-pressure membrane reactor.

    PubMed

    Knez, Z; Habulin, M; Primozic, M

    2003-03-01

    The thermal stability and activity of enzymes in supercritical carbon dioxide (SC CO(2)) and near-critical propane were studied at a pressure of 300 bar in the temperature range 20-90 degrees C. Proteinase from Carica papaya was incubated in microaqueous SC CO(2) at atmospheric pressure in a nonaqueous system. Lipase stability in an aqueous medium at atmospheric pressure and in SC CO(2) as well as near-critical propane at 100 bar and 40 degrees C was studied. In order to investigate the impact of solvent on lipases, these were chosen from different sources: Pseudomonas fluorescences, Rhizpous javanicus, Rhizopus niveus and porcine pancreas. On the basis of our previous study on lipase activities in dense gases, a high-pressure continuous flat-shape membrane reactor was designed. The hydrolysis of sunflower oil in SC CO(2) was performed as a model reaction in this reactor. The reaction was catalyzed by the lipase preparation Lipolase 100T and was performed at 50 degrees C and 200 bar.

  11. TheU-Tube: A Novel System for Acquiring Borehole Fluid Samplesfrom a Deep Geologic CO2 Sequestration Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Freifeld, Barry M.; Trautz, Robert C.; Kharaka, Yousif K.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Myer, Larry R.; Hovorka, Susan D.; Collins, Daniel J.

    2005-03-17

    A novel system has been deployed to obtain geochemical samples of water and gas, at in situ pressure, during a geologic CO2 sequestration experiment conducted in the Frio brine aquifer in Liberty County, Texas. Project goals required high-frequency recovery of representative and uncontaminated aliquots of a rapidly changing two-phase (supercritical CO2-brine) fluid from 1.5 km depth. The datasets collected, using both the liquid and gas portions of the downhole samples, provide insights into the coupled hydro-geochemical issues affecting CO2 sequestration in brine-filled formations. While the basic premise underlying the U-Tube sampler is not new, the system is unique because careful consideration was given to the processing of the recovered two-phase fluids. In particular, strain gauges mounted beneath the high-pressure surface sample cylinders measured the ratio of recovered brine to supercritical CO2. A quadrupole mass spectrometer provided real-time gas analysis for perfluorocarbon and noble gas tracers that were injected along with the CO2. The U-Tube successfully acquired frequent samples, facilitating accurate delineation of the arrival of the CO2 plume, and on-site analysis revealed rapid changes in geochemical conditions.

  12. Ultrasound assisted supercritical fluid extraction of oil and coixenolide from adlay seed.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ai-jun; Zhao, Shuna; Liang, Hanhua; Qiu, Tai-qiu; Chen, Guohua

    2007-02-01

    Oil and coixenolide are important components of adlay seed (Coix lachrymal-jobi L. var. Adlay) with many beneficial functions to human health. In this work, a novel extraction technique--ultrasound assisted supercritical fluid extraction (USFE)--was studied. Effects of operating conditions on the extraction, including extraction temperature (T), pressure (P), time (t), CO(2) flow rate (F) and ultrasonic power (I) were investigated. There are optimum temperatures which gives the maximum extraction yields (EYs) for the supercritical fluid extractions with and without ultrasound. The effect of pressure on EYs for is similar to that of pressure on CO(2) density. Based on the yield of extraction, the favorable conditions for supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) were: T at 45 degrees C, P at 25 MPa, t at 4.0 h and F at 3.5L/h. While ultrasound was applied as in USFE, the following parameters were preferred: T at 40 degrees C, P at 20 MPa, t at 3.5h and F at 3.0 L/h, respectively. The results show that supercritical fluid extraction with the assistance of ultrasound could reduce the temperature, pressure, CO(2) flow rate, as well as time used in the process. Compared with SFE, USFE could give a 14% increase in the yield for extracting oil and coixenolide from adlay seed with less severe operating conditions.

  13. Near-infrared spectroscopic investigation of water in supercritical CO2 and the effect of CaCl2

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Felmy, Andrew R.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Loring, John S.; Joly, Alan G.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Dixon, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy was applied to investigate the dissolution and chemical interaction of water dissolved into supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and the influence of CaCl2 in the co-existing aqueous phase at fo empe e : 40 50 75 nd 100 C at 90 atm. Consistent with the trend of the vapor pressure of water, the solubility of pure water in scCO2 inc e ed f om 40 °C (0.32 mole%) o 100 °C (1.61 mole%). The presence of CaCl2 negatively affects the solubility of water in scCO2: at a given temperature and pressure the solubility of water decreased as the concentration of CaCl2 in the aqueous phase increased, following the trend of the activity of water. A 40 °C, the water concentration in scCO2 in contact with saturated CaCl2 aqueous solution was only 0.16 mole%, a drop of more than 50% as compared to pure water while that a 100 °C was 1.12 mole%, a drop of over 30% as compared to pure water, under otherwise the same conditions. Analysis of the spectral profiles suggested that water dissolved into scCO2 exists in the monomeric form under the evaluated temperature and pressure conditions, for both neat water and CaCl2 solutions. However, its rotational degrees of freedom decrease at lower temperatures due to higher fluid densities, leading to formation of weak H2O:CO2 Lewis acid-base complexes. Similarly, the nearly invariant spectral profiles of dissolved water in the presence and absence of saturated CaCl2 under the same experimental conditions was taken as evidence that CaCl2 dissolution in scCO2 was limited as the dissolved Ca2+/CaCl2 would likely be highly hydrated and would alter the overall spectra of waters in the scCO2 phase.

  14. Mixtures of SF6 CO2 as working fluids for geothermal power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Hebi; Sabau, Adrian S; Conklin, Jim; McFarlane, Joanna; Qualls, A L

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, supercritical/transcritical thermodynamic cycles using mixtures of SF6 CO2 as working fluids were investigated for geothermal power plants. The system of equations that described the thermodynamic cycle was solved using a Newton-Raphson method. This approach allows a high computational efficiency even when thermophysical properties of the working fluid depend strongly on the temperature and pressure. The thermophysical properties of the mixtures were obtained from National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) REFPROP software and constituent cubic equations. The local heat transfer coefficients in the heat exchangers were calculated based on the local properties of the working fluid, geothermal brine, and cooling water. The heat exchanger areas required were calculated. Numerical simulation results presented for different cycle configurations were used to assess the effects of the SF6 fraction in CO2, brine temperature, and recuperator size on the cycle thermal efficiency, and size of heat exchangers for the evaporator and condenser. Optimal thermodynamic cycle efficiencies were calculated to be approximately 13 and 15% mole content of SF6 in a CO2- SF6 mixture for a Brayton cycle and a Rankine cycle, respectively.

  15. Preparation of waterborne dispersions of epoxy resin by ultrasonic-assisted supercritical CO2 nanoemulsification technique.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hanyang; Hu, Guoxin; Liu, Kun; Wu, Liqun

    2017-11-01

    Waterborne nanoemulsion of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A type epoxy resin (DGEBA) with droplet size of around 124nm was prepared by using an ultrasonic-assisted supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) technique in an autoclave reactor at a low temperature (32°C). A view cell positioned in-line with the ultrasonic probe allowed observation of the emulsification process. From the image analysis and droplet size measurement, the influence mechanisms of the ultrasonic power, the degree of mixing of scCO2 with DGEBA, the adding amount of emulsifier, and the system pressure on emulsification process and emulsion droplet size were investigated. In the emulsification process, scCO2 penetrated into the mixture and absorbed on the DGEBA molecular. The interactions between CO2 and the functional groups of DGEBA reduced the chain-chain interactions of polymer segments and therefore efficiently reduced the viscosity of DGEBA at a low temperature. Meantime, the cavitation and acoustic streaming of ultrasound provided a shear force for the nanoemulsification and a disturbance force for the homogeneity of the emulsion. Therefore, the combination of scCO2 and ultrasonication made it possible to prepare a long-term stable nanoemulsion under a low temperature. This ultrasonic-assisted scCO2 emulsification method provides an efficient and solvent-free process for the preparation of waterborne nanoemulsions of, for example, some heat-sensitive and water-insoluble active substances at low temperature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Supercritical Fluids Processing of Biomass to Chemicals and Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Norman K.

    2011-09-28

    The main objective of this project is to develop and/or enhance cost-effective methodologies for converting biomass into a wide variety of chemicals, fuels, and products using supercritical fluids. Supercritical fluids will be used both to perform reactions of biomass to chemicals and products as well as to perform extractions/separations of bio-based chemicals from non-homogeneous mixtures. This work supports the Biomass Program’s Thermochemical Platform Goals. Supercritical fluids are a thermochemical approach to processing biomass that, while aligned with the Biomass Program’s interests in gasification and pyrolysis, offer the potential for more precise and controllable reactions. Indeed, the literature with respect to the use of water as a supercritical fluid frequently refers to “supercritical water gasification” or “supercritical water pyrolysis.”

  17. Occurrence of turbulent flow conditions in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Ruben; Choikhet, Konstantin; Desmet, Gert; Broeckhoven, Ken

    2014-09-26

    Having similar densities as liquids but with viscosities up to 20 times lower (higher diffusion coefficients), supercritical CO2 is the ideal (co-)solvent for fast and/or highly efficient separations without mass-transfer limitations or excessive column pressure drops. Whereas in liquid chromatography the flow remains laminar in both the packed bed and tubing, except in extreme cases (e.g. in a 75 μm tubing, pure acetonitrile at 5 ml/min), a supercritical fluid can experience a transition from laminar to turbulent flow in more typical operation modes. Due to the significant lower viscosity, this transition for example already occurs at 1.3 ml/min for neat CO2 when using connection tubing with an ID of 127 μm. By calculating the Darcy friction factor, which can be plotted versus the Reynolds number in a so-called Moody chart, typically used in fluid dynamics, higher values are found for stainless steel than PEEK tubing, in agreement with their expected higher surface roughness. As a result turbulent effects are more pronounced when using stainless steel tubing. The higher than expected extra-column pressure drop limits the kinetic performance of supercritical fluid chromatography and complicates the optimization of tubing ID, which is based on a trade-off between extra-column band broadening and pressure drop. One of the most important practical consequences is the non-linear increase in extra-column pressure drop over the tubing downstream of the column which leads to an unexpected increase in average column pressure and mobile phase density, and thus decrease in retention. For close eluting components with a significantly different dependence of retention on density, the selectivity can significantly be affected by this increase in average pressure. In addition, the occurrence of turbulent flow is also observed in the detector cell and connection tubing. This results in a noise-increase by a factor of four when going from laminar to turbulent flow (e.g. going

  18. Effect of Fluorocarbon and Hydrocarbon Chain Lengths in Hybrid Surfactants for Supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Sagisaka, Masanobu; Ono, Shinji; James, Craig; Yoshizawa, Atsushi; Mohamed, Azmi; Guittard, Frédéric; Rogers, Sarah E; Heenan, Richard K; Yan, Ci; Eastoe, Julian

    2015-07-14

    Hybrid surfactants containing both fluorocarbon (FC) and hydrocarbon (HC) chains have recently been shown to solubilize water and form elongated reversed micelles in supercritical CO2. To clarify the most effective FC and HC chain lengths, the aggregation behavior and interfacial properties of hybrid surfactants FCm-HCn (FC length m/HC length n = 4/2, 4/4, 6/2, 6/4, 6/5, 6/6, and 6/8) were examined in W/CO2 mixtures as functions of pressure, temperature, and water-to-surfactant molar ratio (W0). The solubilizing power of hybrid surfactants for W/CO2 microemulsions was strongly affected by not only the FC length but also by that of the HC. Although the surfactants having short FC and/or HC tails (namely, m/n = 4/2, 4/4, and 6/2) did not dissolve in supercritical CO2 (even at ∼17 mM, ≤400 bar, temperature ≤ 75 °C, and W0 = 0-40), the other hybrid surfactants were able to yield transparent single-phase W/CO2 mixtures identified as microemulsions. The solubilizing power of FC6-HCm surfactants reached a maximum (W0 ∼ 80 at 45 °C and 350 bar) with a hydrocarbon length, m, of 4. The W0 value of 80 is the highest for a HC-FC hybrid surfactant, matching the highest value reported for a FC surfactant which contained more FC groups. High-pressure small-angle neutron scattering measurements from FCm-HCn/D2O/CO2 microemulsions were consistent with growth of the microemulsion droplets with increasing W0. In addition, not only spherical reversed micelles but also nonspherical assemblies (rodlike or ellipsoidal) were found for the systems with FC6-HCn (n = 4-6). At fixed surfactant concentration and W0 (17 mM and W0 = 20), the longest reversed micelles were obtained for FC6-HC6 where a mean aspect ratio of 6.3 was calculated for the aqueous cores.

  19. Experimental methods for the simulation of supercritical CO2 injection at laboratory scale aimed to investigate capillary trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisan, L.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Rodriguez, D.; Sakaki, T.; Cihan, A.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Zhou, Q.

    2011-12-01

    Geological storage of carbon dioxide in deep geologic formations is being considered as a technical option to reduce greenhouse gas loading to the atmosphere. The processes associated with the movement and stable trapping are complex in deep naturally heterogeneous formations. Three primary mechanisms contribute to trapping; capillary entrapment due to immobilization of the supercritical fluid CO2 within soil pores, liquid CO2 dissolving in the formation water and mineralization. Natural heterogeneity in the formation is expected to affect all three mechanisms. A research project is in progress with the primary goal to improve our understanding of capillary and dissolution trapping during injection and post-injection process, focusing on formation heterogeneity. It is expected that this improved knowledge will help to develop site characterization methods targeting on obtaining the most critical parameters that capture the heterogeneity to design strategies and schemes to maximize trapping. This research combines experiments at the laboratory scale with multiphase modeling to upscale relevant trapping processes to the field scale. This paper presents the results from a set of experiments that were conducted in an intermediate scale test tanks. Intermediate scale testing provides an attractive alternative to investigate these processes under controlled conditions in the laboratory. Conducting these types of experiments is highly challenging as methods have to be developed to extrapolate the data from experiments that are conducted under ambient laboratory conditions to high temperatures and pressures settings in deep geologic formations. We explored the use of a combination of surrogate fluids that have similar density, viscosity contrasts and analogous solubility and interfacial tension as supercritical CO2-brine in deep formations. The extrapolation approach involves the use of dimensionless numbers such as Capillary number (Ca) and the Bond number (Bo). A set of

  20. Injection of Super-Critical CO2 in Brine Saturated Sandstone:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Holger; de Kloe, Kees; Taberner, Conxita; Marcelis, Fons; Makurat, Axel

    2010-05-01

    Presently, large-scale geological sequestration of CO2, originating from sources like fossil-fueled power plants and contaminated gas production, is seen as an option to reduce anthropogenic emission of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. Deep saline aquifers and depleted oil and gas fields are potential subsurface deposits for CO2. Injected CO2, however, interacts physically and chemically with the formation leading to uncertainties for CCS projects. One of these uncertainties is related to a dry-out zone that is likely to form around the well bore owing to the injection of dry CO2. Precipitation of salt (mainly halite) that is associated with that drying out of a saline formation has the potential to impair injectivity, and could even lead to the loss of a well. If dry (or under-saturated), super-critical (SC) CO2 is injected into water-bearing geological formations like saline aquifers, water is removed by either advection of the aqueous phase or by evaporation of water and subsequent advection in the injected CO2-rich phase. Both mechanisms act in parallel, however while advection of the aqueous phase decreases with increasing CO2 saturation (diminished mobility), evaporation becomes increasingly important as the aqueous phase becomes immobile. Below residual water saturation, only evaporation takes place and the formation dries out if no additional source of water is available. If water evaporates, the salts originally present in the water are left behind. In case of highly saline formations, the amount of salt that potentially precipitates per unit volume can be quite substantial. It depends on salinity, the solubility limit of water in the CO2 rich phase, and on the ratio of advection and evaporation rates. Since saturations and flow rates cover a large range as functions of space and time close to the well bore, there is no easy answer to the questions whether, where and how salt precipitation impacts injectivity. The present paper presents results of core

  1. Mineralogical changes of a well cement in various H2S-CO2(-brine) fluids at high pressure and temperature.

    PubMed

    Jacquemet, Nicolas; Pironon, Jacques; Saint-Marc, Jérémie

    2008-01-01

    The reactivity of a crushed well cement in contact with (1) a brine with dissolved H2S-CO2; (2) a dry H2S-CO2 supercritical phase; (3) a two-phase fluid associating a brine with dissolved H2S-CO2 and a H2S-CO2 supercritical phase was investigated in batch experiments at 500 bar and 120, 200 degrees C. All of the experiments showed that following 15-60 days cement carbonation occurred. The H2S reactivity with cement is limited since it only transformed the ferrites (minor phases) by sulfidation. It appeared that the primary parameter controlling the degree of carbonation (i.e., the rate of calcium carbonates precipitation and CSH (Calcium Silicate Hydrates) decalcification) is the physical state of the fluid phase contacting the minerals. The carbonation degree is complete when the minerals contact at least the dry H2S-CO2 supercritical phase and partial when they contactthe brine with dissolved H2S-CO2. Aragonite (calcium carbonate polymorph) precipitated specifically within the dry H2S-CO2 supercritical phase. CSH cristallinity is improved by partial carbonation while CSH are amorphized by complete carbonation. However, the features evidenced in this study cannot be directly related to effective features of cement as a monolith. Further studies involving cement as a monolith are necessary to ascertain textural, petrophysical, and mechanical evolution of cement.

  2. Preparation and anti-tumor evaluation of polyactin A microparticles from supercritical CO 2 processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Jianhong; Zhao, Jinglan; Bao, Lang; Liu, Yan; Wu, Caosong

    2008-11-01

    This paper reports the use of a coating process based on supercritical fluid technology to prepare a solvent-free microparticles, loaded with a polymannopeptide (polyactin A, PAA) for enhancing optimal host response in cancer immunotherapy. Microparticles were characterized as regards their morphology, drug content and in vitro release. A prolonged release of the PAA had been achieved over a 24 h period from microparticles coated with the lipidic compound, which produced a more homogeneous, film-forming coating. Furthermore, it was shown that PAA did not undergo any degradation under the supercritical conditions used in the coating process. In vitro immunoactivity and anti-tumor effect analysis results showed that the PAA microparticle could efficiently trigger the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in a sustained manner.

  3. Dynamics of chelation-supercritical fluid extraction from wood fibers.

    PubMed

    Al-Jabari, Maher

    2004-06-01

    The dynamics of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of the metal content of wood fibers chelated with lithium bis(trifluoroethyl) dithiocarbamate (FDDC) by supercritical (SF) CO2 was investigated experimentally by monitoring the spectra of the eluted metal complex as a function of time. The characteristic shape of the dynamic SFE curve was determined mainly by the flow conditions in the extraction vessel, the mass transfer resistance in the SF phase, and the solubility. High extraction yields of metal content were obtained in two-stage extraction including static (batch) and dynamic (semi-batch) stages. Increasing the length of the static stage increased the rate of dynamic elution of metal complex until it approached the dynamics of fluid displacement for a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). In such cases, increasing the flow rate had no effect on the dynamic extraction curve when it was plotted using dimensionless time. Efficient chelation-SFE from wood fibers was obtained at a pressure of 20.3 MPa and with a static time of 30 min.

  4. Modern supercritical fluid technology for food applications.

    PubMed

    King, Jerry W

    2014-01-01

    This review provides an update on the use of supercritical fluid (SCF) technology as applied to food-based materials. It advocates the use of the solubility parameter theory (SPT) for rationalizing the results obtained when employing sub- and supercritical media to food and nutrient-bearing materials and for optimizing processing conditions. Total extraction and fractionation of foodstuffs employing SCFs are compared and are illustrated by using multiple fluids and unit processes to obtain the desired food product. Some of the additional prophylactic benefits of using carbon dioxide as the processing fluid are explained and illustrated with multiple examples of commercial products produced using SCF media. I emphasize the role of SCF technology in the context of environmentally benign and sustainable processing, as well as its integration into an overall biorefinery concept. Conclusions are drawn in terms of current trends in the field and future research that is needed to secure new applications of the SCF platform as applied in food science and technology.

  5. Effects of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO(2)) oil extraction on the cell wall composition of almond fruits.

    PubMed

    Femenia, A; García-Marín, M; Simal, S; Rosselló, C; Blasco, M

    2001-12-01

    Extraction of oil from almond fruits using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO(2)) was carried out at 50 degrees C and 330 bar on three sets of almonds: raw almond seeds, raw almond kernels, and toasted almond seeds. Three different oil extraction percentages were applied on each set ranging from approximately 15 to 16%, from approximately 27 to 33%, and from approximately 49 to 64%. Although no major changes were detected in the fatty acid composition between fresh and partially defatted samples, carbohydrate analysis of partially defatted materials revealed important changes in cell wall polysaccharides from almond tissues. Thus, at low extraction percentages (up to approximately 33%), pectic polysaccharides and hemicellulosic xyloglucans were the main type of polymers affected, suggesting the modification of the cell wall matrix, although without breakage of the walls. Then, as supercritical fluid extraction (SCFE) continues and higher extraction rates are achieved (up to approximately 64%), a major disruption of the cell wall occurred as indicated by the losses of all major types of cell wall polysaccharides, including cellulose. These results suggest that, under the conditions used for oil extraction using SC-CO(2), fatty acid chains are able to exit the cells through nonbroken walls; the modification of the pectin-hemicellulose network might have increased the porosity of the wall. However, as high pressure is being applied, there is a progressive breakage of the cell walls allowing the free transfer of the fatty acid chains from inside the cells. These findings might contribute to providing the basis for the optimization of SCFE procedures based on plant food sources.

  6. Supercritical fluid thermodynamics from equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovangigli, Vincent; Matuszewski, Lionel

    2012-03-01

    Supercritical multicomponent fluid thermodynamics are often built from equations of state. We investigate mathematically such a construction of a Gibbsian thermodynamics compatible at low density with that of ideal gas mixtures starting from a pressure law. We further study the structure of chemical production rates obtained from nonequilibrium statistical thermodynamics. As a typical application, we consider the Soave-Redlich-Kwong cubic equation of state and investigate mathematically the corresponding thermodynamics. This thermodynamics is then used to study the stability of H2-O2-N2 mixtures at high pressure and low temperature as well as to illustrate the role of nonidealities in a transcritical H2-O2-N2 flame.

  7. Supercritical fluid chromatography in food analysis.

    PubMed

    Bernal, José L; Martín, María T; Toribio, Laura

    2013-10-25

    In the last years, supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) has increased its acceptance between scientists. The unique selectivity, short analysis times, low consumption of organic solvents as well as the improvements in instrumentation have contributed to expand its use. These characteristics make SFC a powerful tool when food analysis requires individualized evaluation of several compounds in very complex samples. In this work, the advantages and main applications of SFC in food analysis are reviewed, focusing special attention onto analytical and preparative separations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Supercritical fluid extraction: Recent advances and applications.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Miguel; Mendiola, Jose A; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Ibáñez, Elena

    2010-04-16

    Among the different extraction techniques used at analytical and preparative scale, supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is one of the most used. This review covers the most recent developments of SFE in different fields, such as food science, natural products, by-product recovery, pharmaceutical and environmental sciences, during the period 2007-2009. The revision is focused on the most recent advances and applications in the different areas; among them, it is remarkable the strong impact of SFE to extract high value compounds from food and natural products but also its increasing importance in areas such as heavy metals recovery, enantiomeric resolution or drug delivery systems.

  9. Modeling and optimization of a concentrated solar supercritical CO2 power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, Julian D.

    Renewable energy sources are fundamental alternatives to supply the rising energy demand in the world and to reduce or replace fossil fuel technologies. In order to make renewable-based technologies suitable for commercial and industrial applications, two main challenges need to be solved: the design and manufacture of highly efficient devices and reliable systems to operate under intermittent energy supply conditions. In particular, power generation technologies based on solar energy are one of the most promising alternatives to supply the world energy demand and reduce the dependence on fossil fuel technologies. In this dissertation, the dynamic behavior of a Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) supercritical CO2 cycle is studied under different seasonal conditions. The system analyzed is composed of a central receiver, hot and cold thermal energy storage units, a heat exchanger, a recuperator, and multi-stage compression-expansion subsystems with intercoolers and reheaters between compressors and turbines respectively. The effects of operating and design parameters on the system performance are analyzed. Some of these parameters are the mass flow rate, intermediate pressures, number of compression-expansion stages, heat exchangers' effectiveness, multi-tank thermal energy storage, overall heat transfer coefficient between the solar receiver and the environment and the effective area of the recuperator. Energy and exergy models for each component of the system are developed to optimize operating parameters in order to lead to maximum efficiency. From the exergy analysis, the components with high contribution to exergy destruction were identified. These components, which represent an important potential of improvement, are the recuperator, the hot thermal energy storage tank and the solar receiver. Two complementary alternatives to improve the efficiency of concentrated solar thermal systems are proposed in this dissertation: the optimization of the system's operating

  10. Essential oil composition of Valeriana officinalis L. roots cultivated in Iran. Comparative analysis between supercritical CO2 extraction and hydrodistillation.

    PubMed

    Safaralie, Asghar; Fatemi, Shohreh; Sefidkon, Fatemeh

    2008-02-08

    The composition of essential oil extracted from Valeriana officinalis L. roots growing wild in Iran was studied by hydrodistillation and supercritical CO2 extraction. Forty-seven components representing 89.3% and 35 constituents varying from 86.1% to 95.1% of the oil obtained by hydrodistillation and supercritical CO2 were identified, respectively. The major components in the extracted oil from supercritical CO2 were isovaleric acid (18.7-41.8%), valerenic acid (8.2-11.8%), acetoxyvaleranone (5.6-9.6%), (Z)-valernyl acetate (4.5-6.5%), bornyl acetate (2.3-7.7%) and valerenol (3.7-5.2%), whereas by hydrodistillation were bornyl acetate (11.6%), valerenic acid (8.0%), (Z)-valernyl acetate (7.9%) and acetoxyvaleranone (7.6%). The analysis of the extracts was performed by capillary GC and GC/MS.

  11. Mass transfer in supercritical fluids instancing selected fluids in supercritical carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Miao; Benning, Rainer; Delgado, Antonio; Ertunc, Oezguer

    solvent -sub-critical CO2. The ex-periment pressure is reached by reducing the volume of the container above the critical pressure of the solvent. For nucleation the container is firstly filled with saturated mixture of solvent -supercritical CO2 and the sample, the experiment pressure is achieved by enlarging the volume of the container below the critical pressure of the solvent. During the experiments the pressure and temperature data are monitored and recorded. As a direct observation means a high speed camera is used, the visual changes inside are recorded through the windows integrated on the container. The experiments are carried out under three different initial conditions, namely with three start temperatures (313K, 333K and 353K), to cover the area from vicinity of the critical point. This research serves as a pilot project topic in cooperation with DLR, which has the ultimate aim of performing the experiments of mass transfer processes in a longtime microgravity facility (e.g. ISS) in order to further explore the influences and utilities of earth gravity on these basic transport processes.

  12. Supercritical CO2 fractionation of bio-oil produced from wheat-hemlock biomass.

    PubMed

    Naik, Satyanarayan; Goud, Vaibhav V; Rout, Prasant K; Dalai, Ajay K

    2010-10-01

    The biomass i.e. wheat-hemlock used in this study was first characterized for its composition. The physical and chemical characterization of biomass was estimated using proximate analysis, calorific value, crystallinity, devolatilization behaviour, ultimate analysis, ICP-MS of ash, FT-IR, XRD, CHNS, and HPLC analysis. For commercial purpose the same biomass was used for conversion to bio-oil by fast pyrolysis process. Therefore, in order to investigate its composition, the bio-oil was also characterized using proximate analysis, calorific value, whereas the chemical composition of the bio-oil was estimated using CHNS, (1)H NMR, GC-FID and GC/MS. The bio-oil obtained from wheat-hemlock biomass was supplied by Advanced Biorefinery Co. and after the analysis, its composition has been determined. It contains a mixture of hydrocarbons, pyranoids, furanoids, benzenoids and fatty acids/alcohols with 45% of water, which forms azeotrope with organic polar compounds. The supercritical CO(2) (SC-CO(2)) is an advanced method for selective extraction of valuable chemicals from bio-oil without solvent residue. The organic fraction of the bio-oil was isolated by SC-CO(2). It was observed that SC-CO(2) fractions collected at 10 and 25 MPa pressure were enriched with furanoids, pyranoids and bezenoids. Similarly the bio-oil was also fractionated by conventional column chromatographic method and the yields and chemical compositions were compared with fractionated bio-oil obtained using SC-CO(2). Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Tuning Micellar Structures in Supercritical CO2 Using Surfactant and Amphiphile Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Peach, Jocelyn; Czajka, Adam; Hazell, Gavin; Hill, Christopher; Mohamed, Azmi; Pegg, Jonathan C; Rogers, Sarah E; Eastoe, Julian

    2017-03-14

    For equivalent micellar volume fraction (ϕ), systems containing anisotropic micelles are generally more viscous than those comprising spherical micelles. Many surfactants used in water-in-CO2 (w/c) microemulsions are fluorinated analogues of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT): here it is proposed that mixtures of CO2-philic surfactants with hydrotropes and cosurfactants may generate elongated micelles in w/c systems at high-pressures (e.g., 100-400 bar). A range of novel w/c microemulsions, stabilized by new custom-synthesized CO2-phillic, partially fluorinated surfactants, were formulated with hydrotropes and cosurfactant. The effects of water content (w = [water]/[surfactant]), surfactant structure, and hydrotrope tail length were all investigated. Dispersed water domains were probed using high pressure small-angle neutron scattering (HP-SANS), which provided evidence for elongated reversed micelles in supercritical CO2. These new micelles have significantly lower fluorination levels than previously reported (6-29 wt % cf. 14-52 wt %), and furthermore, they support higher water dispersion levels than other related systems (w = 15 cf. w = 5). The intrinsic viscosities of these w/c microemulsions were estimated based on micelle aspect ratio; from this value a relative viscosity value can be estimated through combination with the micellar volume fraction (ϕ). Combining these new results with those for all other reported systems, it has been possible to "map" predicted viscosity increases in CO2 arising from elongated reversed micelles, as a function of surfactant fluorination and micellar aspect ratio.

  14. Micro-PIV Study of Supercritical CO2-Water Interactions in Porous Micromodels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemifar, Farzan; Blois, Gianluca; Christensen, Kenneth T.

    2015-11-01

    Multiphase flow of immiscible fluids in porous media is encountered in numerous natural systems and engineering applications such as enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and CO2 sequestration among others. Geological sequestration of CO2 in saline aquifers has emerged as a viable option for reducing CO2 emissions, and thus it has been the subject of numerous studies in recent years. A key objective is improving the accuracy of numerical models used for field-scale simulations by incorporation/better representation of the pore-scale flow physics. This necessitates experimental data for developing, testing and validating such models. We have studied drainage and imbibition processes in a homogeneous, two-dimensional porous micromodel with CO2 and water at reservoir-relevant conditions. Microscopic particle image velocimetry (micro-PIV) technique was applied to obtain spatially- and temporally-resolved velocity vector fields in the aqueous phase. The results provide new insight into the flow processes at the pore scale.

  15. Bio-oil production from biomass via supercritical fluid extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Durak, Halil

    2016-04-18

    Supercritical fluid extraction is used for producing bio-fuel from biomass. Supercritical fluid extraction process under supercritical conditions is the thermally disruption process of the lignocellulose or other organic materials at 250-400 °C temperature range under high pressure (4-5 MPa). Supercritical fluid extraction trials were performed in a cylindrical reactor (75 mL) in organic solvents (acetone, ethanol) under supercritical conditions with (calcium hydroxide, sodium carbonate) and without catalyst at the temperatures of 250, 275 and 300 °C. The produced liquids at 300 °C in supercritical liquefaction were analyzed and characterized by elemental, GC-MS and FT-IR. 36 and 37 different types of compounds were identified by GC-MS obtained in acetone and ethanol respectively.

  16. Bio-oil production from biomass via supercritical fluid extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durak, Halil

    2016-04-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction is used for producing bio-fuel from biomass. Supercritical fluid extraction process under supercritical conditions is the thermally disruption process of the lignocellulose or other organic materials at 250-400 °C temperature range under high pressure (4-5 MPa). Supercritical fluid extraction trials were performed in a cylindrical reactor (75 mL) in organic solvents (acetone, ethanol) under supercritical conditions with (calcium hydroxide, sodium carbonate) and without catalyst at the temperatures of 250, 275 and 300 °C. The produced liquids at 300 °C in supercritical liquefaction were analyzed and characterized by elemental, GC-MS and FT-IR. 36 and 37 different types of compounds were identified by GC-MS obtained in acetone and ethanol respectively.

  17. Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) extraction of essential oil from Swietenia mahagoni seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norodin, N. S. M.; Salleh, L. M.; Hartati; Mustafa, N. M.

    2016-11-01

    Swietenia mahagoni (Mahogany) is a traditional plant that is rich with bioactive compounds. In this study, process parameters such as particle size, extraction time, solvent flowrate, temperature and pressure were studied on the extraction of essential oil from Swietenia mahagoni seeds by using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) extraction. Swietenia mahagoni seeds was extracted at a pressure of 20-30 MPa and a temperature of 40-60°C. The effect of particle size on overall extraction of essential oil was done at 30 MPa and 50°C while the extraction time of essential oil at various temperatures and at a constant pressure of 30 MPa was studied. Meanwhile, the effect of flowrate CO2 was determined at the flowrate of 2, 3 and 4 ml/min. From the experimental data, the extraction time of 120 minutes, particle size of 0.5 mm, the flowrate of CO2 of 4 ml/min, at a pressure of 30 MPa and the temperature of 60°C were the best conditions to obtain the highest yield of essential oil.

  18. Supercritical CO2 extraction of lipids from grain sorghum dried distillers grains with solubles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijun; Weller, Curtis L; Schlegel, Vicki L; Carr, Timothy P; Cuppett, Susan L

    2008-03-01

    Experiments were carried out on a lab supercritical CO(2) extraction system to determine the effects of extraction conditions, including mass ratio of CO(2) consumed to distillers dry grain with solubles (DDGS) extracted, extraction pressure, extraction temperature and time, on yield and composition of extracted lipids. A maximum lipid yield of 150 g/kg DDGS was achieved with a mass ratio approximately 45, an extraction pressure at 27.5 MPa, an extraction temperature at 70 degrees C and an extraction time of 4 h. Under these extraction conditions, the contents of tocols, phytosterols, policosanols and free fatty acids were 0.44, 15.6, 31.2 and 155.3 mg/g in the extract. Experimental results indicated that shorter extraction time and higher flow rate of CO(2) can achieve higher contents of tocols, phytosterols and policosanols but lower content of free fatty acids in the lipid extract. Extraction conditions had no observed effects on the composition of free fatty acids in the extract. Palmitic, oleic and linoleic acids were three main free fatty acids extracted and constituted about 94% of all free fatty acids.

  19. Formation of porous HPCL/LPCL/HA scaffolds with supercritical CO2 gas foaming method.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, M Zahedi; Hassanajili, Sh; Esmaeilzadeh, F; Ayatollahi, M; Ahmadi, M

    2017-05-01

    Scaffold is a 3D porous structure that is made of different materials, such as synthetic and natural polymers. It plays the role of a synthetic extracellular matrix and permits adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of the cells. Porosity and pore size are the important factors for any 3D scaffold used in bone tissue engineering. In this study, porous scaffolds were prepared by adding hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles as filler to the polymeric matrix of polycaprolactone (PCL) blends with two different molecular weight by using supercritical CO2 (ScCO2) foaming method. The effect of different parameters such as CO2 pressure, ratios of the polymers and amount of the filler on the scaffold properties was investigated. The results showed that porosity increased with increment of pressure and decreased with increasing the ratio of the high molecular weight PCL to the low molecular weight PCL in the scaffolds and also HA content. Optimum condition for obtaining adequate porous scaffold of HPCL/LPCL/HA occurred at 140bar and 45°C. The physical and mechanical properties of the prepared scaffolds were characterized using DSC, XRD, FTIR, SEM, contact angle and compression test. By analyzing the results of these tests, optimum sample for cell culture was selected. The biocompatibility of the selected HPCL/LPCL/HA scaffold (HPCL/LPCL 60/40 containing 2.5% HA) was assessed in vitro by using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Study on supercritical CO2 extraction of fatty oils from the seed of Akebia trifoliata (Thunb) Koidz].

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-xia; Ge, Fa-huan

    2007-03-01

    The extraction of fatty oils from the seed of Akebia trifoliata (Thunb) Koidz with supercritical CO2 was studied. The effects of extraction pressure, extraction temperature on the yields were discussed. The optimal condition of this method was as follow: extraction pressure 30 MPa, extraction temerature 45 degrees C, separator I pressure 11 MPa, separator I temperature 50 degrees C, separator II pressure 6MPa, separator II temperature 45 degrees C, extraction period 2 hours. Compared with the traditional solvent extraction, with a GC-MS analysis, it revealed that the component extracted with supercritical CO2 was basically consistent with that extracted with petroleum ether, and it was rich unsaturated fatty acid.

  1. Supercritical extraction of essential oil from aniseed (Pimpinella anisum L) using CO2: solubility, kinetics, and composition data.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Vera M; Rosa, Paulo T V; Marques, Marcia O M; Petenate, Ademir J; Meireles, M Angela A

    2003-03-12

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) from aniseed using carbon dioxide was performed at 30 degrees C and pressures of 80-180 bar. The chemical composition of the SFE extract was determined by GC-MS; the quantitative analysis was done by GC-FID and TLC. The total amount of extractable substances or global yield (mass of extract/mass of feed) for the SFE process varied from 3.13 to 10.67% (mass). The solubilities of the anise essential oil in CO(2) were 0.0110, 0.0277, 0.0143, and 0.0182 kg of solute/kg of CO(2) at 80, 100, 140, and 180 bar, respectively. The major compounds identified and quantified in the extracts were anethole ( approximately 90%), gamma-himachalene (2-4%), p-anisaldehyde (<1%), methylchavicol (0.9-1.5%), cis-pseudoisoeugenyl 2-methylbutyrate ( approximately 3%), and trans-pseudoisoeugenyl 2-methylbutyrate ( approximately 1.3%). The Sovová model described quite well the experimental overall extraction curves.

  2. [Analysis of the chemical constituents of volatile oil from the Folium Rhododendri Daurici by supercritical CO2 extraction].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Shu-qing; Liu, Feng-hua

    2009-02-01

    To compare the chemical constituents of volatile oils from Folium Rhododendri Daurici between supercritical CO2 extraction (SCE-CO2) and steam distillation (SD). The chemical constituents of volatile oils obtained by two methods were analyzed by GC-MS. 52 compounds in the volatile oil extracted by SCE-CO2 and 48 compounds in the volatile oil extracted by SD were separated and identified separately. There were 45 same components. The chemical constituents obtained by SCE-CO2 and SD are approached.

  3. CO2 fluid inclusions in Jack Hills zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menneken, Martina; Geisler, Thorsten; Nemchin, Alexander A.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Wilde, Simon A.; Gasharova, Biliana; Pidgeon, Robert T.

    2017-08-01

    The discovery of Hadean to Paleoarchean zircons in a metaconglomerate from Jack Hills, Western Australia, has catalyzed intensive study of these zircons and their mineral inclusions, as they represent unique geochemical archives that can be used to unravel the geological evolution of early Earth. Here, we report the occurrence and physical properties of previously undetected CO2 inclusions that were identified in 3.36-3.47 Ga and 3.80-4.13 Ga zircon grains by confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy. Minimum P-T conditions of zircon formation were determined from the highest density of the inclusions, determined from the density-dependence of the Fermi diad splitting in the Raman spectrum and Ti-in-zircon thermometry. For both age periods, the CO2 densities and Ti-in-zircon temperatures correspond to high-grade metamorphic conditions (≥5 to ≥7 kbar/ 670 to 770 °C) that are typical of mid-crustal regional metamorphism throughout Earth's history. In addition, fully enclosed, highly disordered graphitic carbon inclusions were identified in two zircon grains from the older population that also contained CO2 inclusions. Transmission electron microscopy on one of these inclusions revealed that carbon forms a thin amorphous film on the inclusion wall, whereas the rest of the volume was probably occupied by CO2 prior to analysis. This indicates a close relationship between CO2 and the reduced carbon inclusions and, in particular that the carbon precipitated from a CO2-rich fluid, which is inconsistent with the recently proposed biogenic origin of carbon inclusions found in Hadean zircons from Jack Hills.

  4. Leaching of organic acids from macromolecular organic matter by non-supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, P.; Glombitza, C.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2012-04-01

    The storage of CO2 in underground reservoirs is discussed controversly in the scientific literature. The worldwide search for suitable storage formations also considers coal-bearing strata. CO2 is already injected into seams for enhanced recovery of coal bed methane. However, the effects of increased CO2 concentration, especially on organic matter rich formations, are rarely investigated. The injected CO2 will dissolve in the pore water, causing a decrease in pH and resulting in acidic formation waters. Huge amounts of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) are chemically bound to the macromolecular matrix of sedimentary organic matter and may be liberated by hydrolysis, which is enhanced by the acidic porewater. Recent investigations outlined the importance of LMWOAs as a feedstock for microbial life in the subsurface [1]. Therefore, injection of CO2 into coal formations may result in enhanced nutrient supply for subsurface microbes. To investigate the effect of high concentrations of dissolved CO2 on the release of LMWOAs from coal we developed an inexpensive high-pressure high temperature system that allows manipulating the partial pressure of dissolved gases at pressures and temperatures up to 60 MPa and 120° C, respectively. In a reservoir vessel, gases are added to saturate the extraction medium to the desired level. Inside the extraction vessel hangs a flexible and inert PVDF sleeve (polyvinylidene fluoride, almost impermeable for gases), holding the sample and separating it from the pressure fluid. The flexibility of the sleeve allows for subsampling without loss of pressure. Coal samples from the DEBITS-1 well, Waikato Basin, NZ (R0 = 0.29, TOC = 30%). were extracted at 90° C and 5 MPa, either with pure or CO2-saturated water. Subsamples were taken at different time points during the extraction. The extracted LMWOAs such as formate, acetate and oxalate were analysed by ion chromatography. Yields of LMWOAs were higher with pure water than with CO2

  5. Supercritical fluid extraction of lycopene from tomato processing byproducts.

    PubMed

    Rozzi, N L; Singh, R K; Vierling, R A; Watkins, B A

    2002-04-24

    Tomato seeds and skins acquired from the byproduct of a local tomato processing facility were studied for supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of phytochemicals. The extracts were analyzed for lycopene, beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol, and delta-tocopherol content using high-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection and compared to a chemically extracted control. SFEs were carried out using CO(2) at seven temperatures (32-86 degrees C) and six pressures (13.78-48.26 MPa). The effect of CO(2) flow rate and volume also was investigated. The results indicated that the percentage of lycopene extracted increased with elevated temperature and pressure until a maximum recovery of 38.8% was reached at 86 degrees C and 34.47 MPa, after which the amount of lycopene extracted decreased. Conditions for the optimum extraction of lycopene from 3 g of raw material were determined to be 86 degrees C, 34.47 MPa, and 500 mL of CO(2) at a flow rate of 2.5 mL/min. These conditions resulted in the extraction of 61.0% of the lycopene (7.19 microg lycopene/g).

  6. Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Separation of Uranium from Other Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Donna L. Quach; Bruce J. Mincher; Chien M. Wai

    2014-06-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of separating uranium from other actinides by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) as a solvent modified with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) for the development of an extraction and counter current stripping technique, which would be a more efficient and environmentally benign technology for used nuclear fuel reprocessing compared to traditional solvent extraction. Several actinides (U(VI), Np(VI), Pu(IV), and Am(III)) were extracted in sc-CO2 modified with TBP over a range of nitric acid concentrations and then the actinides were exposed to reducing and complexing agents to suppress their extractability. According to this study, the separation of uranium from plutonium in sc-CO2 modified with TBP was successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3 M in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid or oxalic acid, and the separation of uranium from neptunium was successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 1 M in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid, oxalic acid, or sodium nitrite.

  7. [Optimization for supercritical CO2 extraction with response surface methodology and component analysis of Sapindus mukorossi oil].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Xiao, Xin-yu; Ge, Fa-huan

    2012-02-01

    To study the extraction conditions of Sapindus mukorossi oil by Supercritical CO2 Extraction and identify its components. Optimized SFE-CO2 Extraction by response surface methodology and used GC-MS to analysie Sapindus mukorossi oil compounds. Established the model of an equation for the extraction rate of Sapindus mukorossi oil by Supercritical CO2 Extraction, and the optimal parameters for the Supercritical CO2 Extraction determined by the equation were: the extraction pressure was 30 MPa, temperature was 40 degrees C; The separation I pressure was 14 MPa, temperature was 45 degrees C; The separation II pressure was 6 MPa, temperature was 40 degrees C; The extraction time was 60 min and the extraction rate of Sapindus mukorossi oil of 17.58%. 22 main compounds of Sapindus mukorossi oil extracted by supercritical CO2 were identified by GC-MS, unsaturated fatty acids were 86.59%. This process is reliable, safe and with simple operation, and can be used for the extraction of Sapindus mukorossi oil.

  8. Oxidation catalysis in a supercritical fluid medium

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, K.M.; Knopf, F.C.

    1986-01-01

    The supercritical fluid (SCF) extraction technique was extended by its application to SCF-solid catalyzed reactions that otherwise take place in a two-fluid-phase reactor. Using CO/sub 2/ as a solvent, an alkylaromatic hydrocarbon such as toluene was contacted with air in the presence of solid metal redox or acid catalysts, and underwent partial oxidation to benzaldehyde, benzyl alcohol, and cresols. This process should result in more rapid rates of mass transfer and intrinsic reaction than is customary for such reactions at conventional conditions, and more efficient quenching of the oxidation at the desired products; in addition it should allow an easier product separation and a decrease in reaction temperature that will improve the yield to desired products.

  9. Experimental study of the hydrogeochemical properties of the Hontomin cap rock under CO2 supercritical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cama, Jordi; Soler, Josep M.; Davila, Gabriela; Luquot, Linda

    2013-04-01

    Gabriela Dávila, Linda Luquot, Jordi Cama and Josep M. Soler Departament de Geociències, Institut de Diagnosi Ambiental i Estudis de l'Aigua (IDAEA), CSIC, Barcelona 08034. The main cap rock for CO2 injection at the PDT Hontomin site (Spain) is a marly shale made up of calcite (56 %), quartz (21%), illite (17%) clinochlore (3%) and others (albite, gypsum, anhydrite, pyrite) (~3%). Contact with CO2-rich acid brines may induce the dissolution of these minerals. Since the brine contains sulfate, gypsum (or anhydrite at depth) may precipitate, which may coat the surface of the dissolving calcite grains and cause their passivation. These mineral reactions will also induce changes in porosity and permeability. Percolation laboratory experiments with Hontomin shale rock cores under controlled pCO2 (8 MPa) are being performed to quantify these processes. In mechanically fractured cores (7.5 mm in diameter and 18 mm in length), two synthetic brines (a sulfate-free solution and a version of the Hontomin formation brine (sulfate solution)) were injected into the rock at constant flow rates (0.2, 1 and 60 mL/h) under CO2 supercritical conditions (pCO2 = 8 MPa and T = 60 °C). As the pH of the injecting brines in equilibrium with a pCO2 of 8 MPa is acidic (~3), it was observed that in the case of the sulfate-free brine experiments, the main processes that yield variation in the hydrodynamic behavior of the fractured rock was the dissolution of calcite, Si-bearing minerals, clinochlore and pyrite. In the sulfate-rich brine experiments, the dissolution of calcite and Si-bearing minerals also occurred, together with gypsum precipitation in the experiments run at low flow rates. As a result, initial fracture permeability tends (i) to stabilize or increase when the cap rock interacts with the sulfate-free brine and (ii) to decrease as the rock interacts with the sulfate-rich brine. The interpretation (reactive transport modeling) of the changes in mineralogy and solution

  10. [Optimization of extraction process for tannins from Geranium orientali-tibeticum by supercritical CO2 method].

    PubMed

    Xie, Song; Tong, Zhi-Ping; Tan, Rui; Liu, Xiao-Zhen

    2014-08-01

    In order to optimize extraction process conditions of tannins from Geranium orientali-tibeticum by supercritical CO2, the content of tannins was determined by phosphomolybdium tungsten acid-casein reaction, with extraction pressure, extraction temper- ature and extraction time as factors, the content of tannins from extract of G. orientali-tibeticum as index, technology conditions were optimized by orthogonal test. Optimum technology conditions were as follows: extraction pressure was 25 MPa, extraction temperature was 50 °C, extracted 1.5 h. The content of tannins in extract was 12.91 mg x g(-1), extract rate was 3.67%. The method established could be used for assay the contents of tannin in G. orientali-tibeticum. The circulated extraction was an effective extraction process that was stable and feasible, and that provides a way of the extraction process conditions of tannin from G. orientali-tibeticum.

  11. Oxazoline-based antimicrobial oligomers: synthesis by CROP using supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Correia, Vanessa G; Bonifácio, Vasco D B; Raje, Vivek P; Casimiro, Teresa; Moutinho, Guilhermina; da Silva, Cláudia Lobato; Pinho, Mariana G; Aguiar-Ricardo, Ana

    2011-08-11

    A method using supercritical CO(2) to obtain biocompatible 2-oxazoline-based oligomers quaternized with different amines is described. The synthesized oligo(2-oxazoline)s display partial carbamic-acid insertion at one end. The syntheses of quaternary oligo(2-bisoxazoline)s and linear oligoethylenimine hydrochlorides are reported. Oligo(2-methyl-2-oxazoline) and oligo(2-bisoxazoline) quaternized with N,N-dimethyldodecylamine are the most efficient biocidal agents showing fast killing rates against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Linear oligoethylenimine hydrochloride shows the lowest MIC values but higher killing times against both bacteria. Based on the antimicrobial activity studies, a cooperative action of carbamic acid with the ammonium end group is proposed.

  12. [Studies on extraction of active fraction from Rhizoma et Radix Ligustici by supercritical CO2 extraction].

    PubMed

    Mao, Cai-Ni; He, Wei; Li, Yong; Yuan, Wan-Rui

    2008-10-01

    To study the conditions of extraction of active fraction in Rhizoma et Radix Ligustici by supercritical CO2 extraction (SFE). Using the content of ferulic acid as the index, conditions for the extraction including extracting pressure, extracting temperature, temperature of resolution and extracting time were optimized by uniform design. The best SFE conclusions were as follows: cosolvent was 50% ethanol (ml/g), extracting pressure was 40 MPa, extracting temperature was 50 degrees C, pressure of resolution was 6 MPa, temperature of resolution was 50 degrees C, extracting time was 3.5 hours. The optimum extraction has high extraction ratio of active fraction in Rhizoma et Radix Ligustici, so it is reasonable and practicable.

  13. Comparative analysis of the oil and supercritical CO(2) extract of Cymbopogon citratus Stapf.

    PubMed

    Marongiu, Bruno; Piras, Alessandra; Porcedda, Silvia; Tuveri, Enrica

    2006-05-10

    Dried and ground leaves of lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus Stapf.) were used as a matrix for supercritical extraction of essential oil with CO(2). The objective of this study was to analyze the influence of pressure on the supercritical extraction. A series of experiments were carried out, for 360 min, at 50 degrees C and at different pressures: 90, 100, 110 and 120 bar. Extraction conditions were chosen to maximize citral content in the extract oil. The collected extracts were analysed by GC-MS and their composition was compared with that of the essential oil isolated by hydrodistillation and by steam distillation. At higher solvent density the extract aspect changes passing from a characteristic yellow essential oil to yellowish semi-solid mass because of the extraction of high molecular mass compounds. The optimum conditions for citral extraction were 90 bar and 50 degrees C, at these conditions citral represent more than 68% of the essential oil and the extraction yield was 0.65% while the yield obtained from hydrodistillation was 0.43% with a content of citral of 73%.

  14. [Harmful elements removal from Polygonum multiflorum by supercritical CO2 extraction].

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhen; Liu, Bo; Zheng, Zong-Kun; You, Xin-Kui; Pu, Yi-Tao; Dang, Zhi

    2008-10-01

    To remove harmful elements as copper, lead and arsenic from Polygonum multiflorum, a Chinese traditional medicine, by supercritical carbon dioxide extraction. With sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (NaDDC) as a chelating agent and ethanol as a modifier, the effects of extraction style, time, pressure, temperature and amount of chelating agent on chelating extraction process were discussed. The condition was optimized as following: 28 MP as extraction pressure, 60 degrees C as extraction temperature, 1 h as static extraction time, 2 h as dynamic extraction time, m(herb) : m(NaDDC) = 5 : 1, m(herb) : m(ethanol) = 1 : 1. Under this condition, the extraction rate of Cu, Pb and As were up to 60% which achieved US FDA standard, while the physioloically active substance of 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxy-silbene-2-O-beta-D-glucoside was not extracted. The results show chelating extraction by supercritical CO2 can provide a non-destructive method to decrease the content of harmful elements from Chinese traditional medicines.

  15. Optimization of Operation Parameters for Helical Flow Cleanout with Supercritical CO2 in Horizontal Wells Using Back-Propagation Artificial Neural Network.

    PubMed

    Song, Xianzhi; Peng, Chi; Li, Gensheng; He, Zhenguo; Wang, Haizhu

    2016-01-01

    Sand production and blockage are common during the drilling and production of horizontal oil and gas wells as a result of formation breakdown. The use of high-pressure rotating jets and annular helical flow is an effective way to enhance horizontal wellbore cleanout. In this paper, we propose the idea of using supercritical CO2 (SC-CO2) as washing fluid in water-sensitive formation. SC-CO2 is manifested to be effective in preventing formation damage and enhancing production rate as drilling fluid, which justifies tis potential in wellbore cleanout. In order to investigate the effectiveness of SC-CO2 helical flow cleanout, we perform the numerical study on the annular flow field, which significantly affects sand cleanout efficiency, of SC-CO2 jets in horizontal wellbore. Based on the field data, the geometry model and mathematical models were built. Then a numerical simulation of the annular helical flow field by SC-CO2 jets was accomplished. The influences of several key parameters were investigated, and SC-CO2 jets were compared to conventional water jets. The results show that flow rate, ambient temperature, jet temperature, and nozzle assemblies play the most important roles on wellbore flow field. Once the difference between ambient temperatures and jet temperatures is kept constant, the wellbore velocity distributions will not change. With increasing lateral nozzle size or decreasing rear/forward nozzle size, suspending ability of SC-CO2 flow improves obviously. A back-propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN) was successfully employed to match the operation parameters and SC-CO2 flow velocities. A comprehensive model was achieved to optimize the operation parameters according to two strategies: cost-saving strategy and local optimal strategy. This paper can help to understand the distinct characteristics of SC-CO2 flow. And it is the first time that the BP-ANN is introduced to analyze the flow field during wellbore cleanout in horizontal wells.

  16. Formation of curcumin nanoparticles via solution-enhanced dispersion by supercritical CO2

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zheng; Xie, Maobin; Li, Yi; Chen, Aizheng; Li, Gang; Zhang, Jing; Hu, Huawen; Wang, Xinyu; Li, Shipu

    2015-01-01

    In order to enhance the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble curcumin, solution-enhanced dispersion by supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) (SEDS) was employed to prepare curcumin nanoparticles for the first time. A 24 full factorial experiment was designed to determine optimal processing parameters and their influence on the size of the curcumin nanoparticles. Particle size was demonstrated to increase with increased temperature or flow rate of the solution, or with decreased precipitation pressure, under processing conditions with different parameters considered. The single effect of the concentration of the solution on particle size was not significant. Curcumin nanoparticles with a spherical shape and the smallest mean particle size of 325 nm were obtained when the following optimal processing conditions were adopted: P =20 MPa, T =35°C, flow rate of solution =0.5 mL·min−1, concentration of solution =0.5%. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy measurement revealed that the chemical composition of curcumin basically remained unchanged. Nevertheless, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and thermal analysis indicated that the crystalline state of the original curcumin decreased after the SEDS process. The solubility and dissolution rate of the curcumin nanoparticles were found to be higher than that of the original curcumin powder (approximately 1.4 μg/mL vs 0.2 μg/mL in 180 minutes). This study revealed that supercritical CO2 technologies had a great potential in fabricating nanoparticles and improving the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. PMID:25995627

  17. The self-assembly structure and the CO2-philicity of a hybrid surfactant in supercritical CO2: effects of hydrocarbon chain length.

    PubMed

    Wang, Muhan; Fang, Timing; Wang, Pan; Tang, Xinpeng; Sun, Baojiang; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Bing

    2016-10-04

    Hybrid surfactants containing both fluorocarbon (FC) and hydrocarbon (HC) chains, as effective CO2-philic surfactants, could improve the solubility of polar substances in supercritical CO2. Varying the length of the HC of hybrid surfactants is an effective way to improve the CO2-philicity. In this paper, we have investigated the effects of the HC length on the self-assembly process and the CO2-philicity of hybrid surfactants (F7Hn, n = 1, 4, 7 and 10) in water/CO2 mixtures using molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the self-assembly time of F7Hn exhibits a maximum when the length of the HC is equal to that of the FC (F7H7). In this case, the investigation of H-bonds between the water core and CO2 phase shows that F7H7 has the strongest CO2-philicity because it has the best ability to separate water and CO2. To explain the origin of the differences in separation ability, the analysis of the structures of the reverse micelles shows that there are two competing mechanisms with a shortening HC. Firstly, the volume of F7Hn is reduced, which thus decreases the separation ability. Moreover, this also leads to the curved conformation of the FC. As a result, the separation ability is enhanced. These two mechanisms are balanced in F7H7, which has the best ability to separate water and CO2. Our simulation results demonstrate that the increased volume and the curved conformation of the hybrid surfactant tail could enhance the CO2-philicity in F7Hn surfactants. It is expected that this work will provide valuable information for the design of CO2-philic surfactants.

  18. Welding immiscible polymers with a supercritical fluid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaochu; Sanchez, Isaac C

    2007-11-20

    Polymer adhesion between two immiscible polymers is usually poor because there is little interpenetration of one polymer into the other at the interface. Increasing the width of the interfacial zone can enhance adhesion and mechanical properties. In principle, this can be accomplished by exposing heterogeneous polymer materials to a high-pressure fluid. The fluid can act as a common solvent and promote interpenetration. It also increases chain mobility at the interface, which helps to promote "welding" of the two polymers. A combination of the gradient theory of inhomogeneous systems and the Sanchez-Lacombe equation of state was used to investigate this phenomenon, especially the effect of the high compressibility of supercritical (SC) fluid on the compatibilization of two incompatible polymers. We calculate the interfacial density profile, interfacial thickness, and interfacial tension between the two polymers with and without the SC fluid. We find that the interfacial tension is decreased and the interfacial thickness is increased with high-pressure SC fluid for the ternary systems we have investigated. As the critical point is approached and the SC compressibility becomes large, no enhancement or deleterious effects on compatibilization were observed.

  19. In Situ Natural Abundance (17)O and (25)Mg NMR Investigation of Aqueous Mg(OH)2 Dissolution in the Presence of Supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mary Y; Deng, Xuchu; Thanthiriwatte, K Sahan; Jackson, Virgil E; Wan, Chuan; Qafoku, Odeta; Dixon, David A; Felmy, Andrew R; Rosso, Kevin M; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2016-11-15

    We report an in situ high-pressure NMR capability that permits natural abundance (17)O and (25)Mg NMR characterization of dissolved species in aqueous solution and in the presence of supercritical CO2 fluid (scCO2). The dissolution of Mg(OH)2 (brucite) in a multiphase water/scCO2 fluid at 90 atm pressure and 50 °C was studied in situ, with relevance to geological carbon sequestration. (17)O NMR spectra allowed identification and distinction of various fluid species including dissolved CO2 in the H2O-rich phase, scCO2, aqueous H2O, and HCO3(-). The widely separated spectral peaks for various species can all be observed both dynamically and quantitatively at concentrations as low as 20 mM. Measurement of the concentrations of these individual species also allows an in situ estimate of the hydrogen ion concentration, or pCH(+) values, of the reacting solutions. The concentration of Mg(2+) can be observed by natural abundance (25)Mg NMR at a concentration as low as 10 mM. Quantum chemistry calculations of the NMR chemical shifts on cluster models aided in the interpretation of the experimental results. Evidence for the formation of polymeric Mg(2+) clusters at high concentrations in the H2O-rich phase, a possible critical step needed for magnesium carbonate formation, was found.

  20. Geochemical modeling of fluid-fluid and fluid-mineral interactions during geological CO2 storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, C.; Ji, X.; Lu, P.

    2013-12-01

    The long time required for effective CO2 storage makes geochemical modeling an indispensable tool for CCUS. One area of geochemical modeling research that is in urgent need is impurities in CO2 streams. Permitting impurities, such as H2S, in CO2 streams can lead to potential capital and energy savings. However, predicting the consequences of co-injection of CO2 and impurities into geological formations requires the understanding of the phase equilibrium and fluid-fluid interactions. To meet this need, we developed a statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT)-based equation of state (EOS) for the H2S-CO2-H2O-NaCl system at 373.15 CO2 streams may lead to two-phase flow in pipelines. For H2S-CO2 mixtures at a given temperature the bubble and dew pressures decrease with increasing H2S content, while the mass density increases at low pressures and decreases at high pressures. Furthermore, the EoS can be incorporated into reservoir simulators so that the dynamic development of mixed fluid plumes in the reservoir can be simulated. Accurate modeling of fluid-mineral interactions must confront unresolved uncertainties of silicate dissolution - precipitation reaction kinetics. Most prominent among these uncertainties is the well-known lab-field apparent discrepancy in dissolution rates. Although reactive transport models that simulate the interactions between reservoir rocks and brine, and their attendant effects on porosity and permeability changes, have proliferated, whether these results have acceptable uncertainties are unknown. We have conducted a series of batch experiments at elevated temperatures and numerical simulations of coupled dissolution and precipitation reactions. The results show that taking into account

  1. Low-temperature, selective catalytic deoxygenation of vegetable oil in supercritical fluid media.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok Ki; Lee, Hong-Shik; Hong, Moon Hyun; Lim, Jong Sung; Kim, Jaehoon

    2014-02-01

    The effects of supercritical fluids on the production of renewable diesel-range hydrocarbons from natural triglycerides were investigated. Various supercritical fluids, which included CO2 (scCO2 ), propane (scC3 H8 ) and n-hexane (scC6 H14 ), were introduced with H2 and soybean oil into a fixed-bed reactor that contained pre-activated CoMo/γ-Al2 O3 . Among these supercritical fluids, scC3 H8 and scC6 H14 efficiently allowed the reduction of the reaction temperature by as much as 50 °C as a result of facilitated heat and mass transfer and afforded similar yields to reactions in the absence of supercritical fluids. The compositional analyses of the gas and liquid products indicated that the addition of scC3 H8 during the hydrotreatment of soybean oil promoted specific deoxygenation pathways, decarbonylation and decarboxylation, which consumed less H2 than the hydrodeoxygenation pathway. As a result, the quantity of H2 required to obtain a high yield of diesel-range hydrocarbons could be reduced to 57 % if scC3 H8 was used. As decarboxylation and decarbonylation are mildly endothermic reactions, the reduced heat transfer resistance in scC3 H8 may drive the deoxygenation reaction to thermodynamically favourable pathways.

  2. Toward modeling of supercritical CO2 flow using the one-dimensional turbulence model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, F. T.; Glawe, C.; Schmidt, H.; Kerstein, A. R.

    2012-04-01

    Within the CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage) technology the transport of captured CO2 is increasingly regarded as the missing link in research. For industrial applications it is essential to transport CO2 from power plants to geological sites through pipelines and well bores. The effectiveness of such a transport could be increased by keeping CO2 in a supercritical state. This however requires a temperature of at least 31Celsius and a pressure above 73.8 bar. If these conditions are not maintained throughout the whole pipeline, which is challenging and expensive under non-laboratory conditions, density and phase changes and pressure fluctuations may result in harmful vibrations of the pipelines. Typically, simulations of pipeline flow are based on large-eddy simulations (LES) or the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations which both do not resolve the smallest turbulent scales or even phase boundaries. Due to the effect that on pipe diameter scales the flow statistically changes predominantly in the wall normal direction one might consider 1D modeling approaches. The work presented here is part of the GeoEn II activities funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) to better understand risks and benefits of CCS technology. Our project goal is to better understand the small scale physics in turbulent CO2 flows and to improve subgrid-scale models used in LES codes. To achieve this we use ODT (One-Dimensional Turbulence), a statistical turbulence modeling strategy, where turbulent flow evolution along a notional 1D line of sight is emulated by applying instantaneous maps to represent the effect of individual turbulent eddies on property profiles along the line. The occurrence of an eddy itself is affected by the property profiles, resulting in a self-contained flow evolution that obeys the applicable conservation laws. Using a 1D ansatz permits a higher resolution of boundary and single phase density gradients which is key to understand the

  3. Nanoparticles synthesis using supercritical fluid technology - towards biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Byrappa, K; Ohara, S; Adschiri, T

    2008-02-14

    Supercritical fluid (SCF) technology has become an important tool of materials processing in the last two decades. Supercritical CO(2) and H(2)O are extensively being used in the preparation of a great variety of nanomaterials. The greatest requirement in the application of nanomaterials is its size and morphology control, which determine the application potential of the nanoparticles, as their properties vary significantly with size. Although significance of SCF technology has been described earlier by various authors, the importance of this technology for the fabrication of inorganic and hybrid nanomaterials in biomedical applications has not been discussed thoroughly. This review presents the nanomaterial preparation systematically using SCF technology with reference to the processing of biomedical materials. The basic principles of each one of the processes have been described in detail giving their merits and perspectives. The actual experimental data and results have been discussed in detail with respect to the selected nanomaterials for biomedical applications. The SCF synthesis of nanoparticles like phosphors, magnetic materials, carbon nanotubes, etc. have been discussed as they have potential applications in bio-imaging, hyperthermia, cancer therapy, neutron capture therapy, targeted drug delivery systems and so on. The more recent approach towards the in situ surface modification, dispersibility, single nanocrystal formation, and morphology control of the nanoparticles has been discussed in detail.

  4. Preparation of monolithic matrices for oral drug delivery using a supercritical fluid assisted hot melt extrusion process.

    PubMed

    Lyons, John G; Hallinan, Mark; Kennedy, James E; Devine, Declan M; Geever, Luke M; Blackie, Paul; Higginbotham, Clement L

    2007-02-01

    The use of supercritical fluids as plasticisers in polymer processing has been well documented. The body of work described in this research paper outlines the use of a supercritical CO(2) assisted extrusion process in the preparation of a hot melt extruded monolithic polymer matrix for oral drug delivery. Several batches of matrix material were prepared with Carvedilol used as the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). These batches were subsequently extruded both with and without supercritical CO(2) incorporation. The resultant matrices were characterised using steady-state parallel plate rheometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), atomic force microscopy (AFM), micro-thermal analysis (microTA) and dissolution testing. Dissolution analysis showed that the use of supercritical CO(2) during the extrusion process resulted in a faster dissolution of API when compared with unassisted extrusion. The supercritical CO(2) incorporation also resulted in reduced viscosity during processing, therefore allowing for quicker throughput and productivity. The results detailed within this paper indicate that supercritical fluid assisted hot melt extrusion is a viable enhancement to conventional hot melt extrusion for the production of monolithic dosage forms.

  5. A biocompatible tissue scaffold produced by supercritical fluid processing for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Hee; Jung, Youngmee; Kim, Soo Hyun

    2013-03-01

    Supercritical fluids are used in various industrial fields, such as the food and medical industries, because they have beneficial physical and chemical properties and are also nonflammable and inexpensive. In particular, supercritical carbon dioxide (ScCO(2)) is attractive due to its mild critical temperature, pressure values, and nontoxicity. Poly(L-lactide-co-ɛ-caprolactone) (PLCL), which is a biocompatible, biodegradable, and very elastic polymer, has been used in cartilage tissue engineering. However, organic solvents, such as chloroform or dichloromethane, are usually used for the fabrication of a PLCL scaffold through conventional methods. This leads to a cytotoxic effect and long processing time for removing solvents. To alleviate these problems, supercritical fluid processing is introduced here. In this study, we fabricated a mechano-active PLCL scaffold by supercritical fluid processing for cartilage tissue engineering, and we compared it with a scaffold made by a conventional solvent-casting method in terms of physical and biological performance. Also, to examine the optimum condition for preparing scaffolds with ScCO(2), we investigated the effects of pressure, temperature, and the depressurization rate on PLCL foaming. The PLCL scaffolds produced by supercritical fluid processing had a homogeneously interconnected porous structure, and they exhibited a narrow pore size distribution. Also, there was no cytotoxicity of the scaffolds made with ScCO(2) compared to the scaffolds made by the solvent-pressing method. The scaffolds were seeded with chondrocytes, and they were subcutaneously implanted into nude mice for up to 4 weeks. In vivo accumulation of extracellular matrix of cell-scaffold constructs demonstrated that the PLCL scaffold made with ScCO(2) formed a mature and well-developed cartilaginous tissue compared to the PLCL scaffold formed by solvent pressing. Consequently, these results indicated that the PLCL scaffolds made by supercritical fluid

  6. Investigation of Transient, Turbulent Natural Convection in Vertical Tubes for Thermal Energy Storage in Supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghaei Lakeh, Reza; Lavine, Adrienne S.; Kavehpour, H. Pirouz; Wirz, Richard E.

    2013-11-01

    Heat transfer can be a limiting factor in the operation of thermal energy storage, including sensible heat and latent heat storage systems. Poor heat transfer between the energy storage medium and the container walls impairs the functionality of the thermal storage unit by requiring excessively long times to charge or discharge the system. In this study, the effect of turbulent, unsteady buoyancy-driven flow on heat transfer in vertical storage tubes containing supercritical CO2 as the storage medium is investigated computationally. The heat transfer from a constant-temperature wall to the storage fluid is studied during the charge cycle. The results of this study show that turbulent natural convection dominates the heat transfer mechanism and significantly reduces the required time for charging compared to pure conduction. Changing the L/D ratio of the storage tube has a major impact on the charge time. The charge time shows a decreasing trend with RaL. The non-dimensional model of the problem shows that Nusselt number and non-dimensional mean temperature of the storage fluid in different configurations of the tube is a function Buoyancy-Fourier number defined as of FoL * RaLm* L/D. This study was supported by award No. DE-AR0000140 granted by U.S. Department of Energy under Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) and by award No. 5660021607 granted by Southern California Gas Company.

  7. Significant improvement of thermal stability for CeZrPrNd oxides simply by supercritical CO(2) drying.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yunzhao; Wang, Zizi; Xin, Ying; Li, Qian; Zhang, Zhaoliang; Wang, Yingxia

    2014-01-01

    Pr and Nd co-doped Ce-Zr oxide solid solutions (CZPN) were prepared using co-precipitation and microemulsion methods. It is found that only using supercritical CO(2) drying can result in a significant improvement of specific surface area and oxygen storage capacity at lower temperatures for CZPN after aging at 1000°C for 12 h in comparison with those using conventional air drying and even supercritical ethanol drying. Furthermore, the cubic structure was obtained in spite of the fact that the atomic ratio of Ce/(Ce+Zr+Pr+Nd) is as low as 29%. The high thermal stability can be attributed to the loosely aggregated morphology and the resultant Ce enrichment on the nanoparticle surface, which are caused by supercritical CO(2) drying due to the elimination of surface tension effects on the gas-liquid interface.

  8. Significant Improvement of Thermal Stability for CeZrPrNd Oxides Simply by Supercritical CO2 Drying

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yunzhao; Wang, Zizi; Xin, Ying; Li, Qian; Zhang, Zhaoliang; Wang, Yingxia

    2014-01-01

    Pr and Nd co-doped Ce-Zr oxide solid solutions (CZPN) were prepared using co-precipitation and microemulsion methods. It is found that only using supercritical CO2 drying can result in a significant improvement of specific surface area and oxygen storage capacity at lower temperatures for CZPN after aging at 1000°C for 12 h in comparison with those using conventional air drying and even supercritical ethanol drying. Furthermore, the cubic structure was obtained in spite of the fact that the atomic ratio of Ce/(Ce+Zr+Pr+Nd) is as low as 29%. The high thermal stability can be attributed to the loosely aggregated morphology and the resultant Ce enrichment on the nanoparticle surface, which are caused by supercritical CO2 drying due to the elimination of surface tension effects on the gas-liquid interface. PMID:24516618

  9. HYDROGENATION OF 4-OXOISOPHORONE OVER PD/AL2/O2 CATALYST UNDER SUPERCRITICAL CO2 MEDIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogenation of 4-oxoisophorone has been studied over 1% Pd/Al2O3 impregnated catalyst in supercritical CO2 medium at different reaction conditions. The effect of temperature, pressure and reaction medium on the conversion and product selectivity is discussed. Phase behavior stu...

  10. HYDROGENATION OF 4-OXOISOPHORONE OVER PD/AL2/O2 CATALYST UNDER SUPERCRITICAL CO2 MEDIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogenation of 4-oxoisophorone has been studied over 1% Pd/Al2O3 impregnated catalyst in supercritical CO2 medium at different reaction conditions. The effect of temperature, pressure and reaction medium on the conversion and product selectivity is discussed. Phase behavior stu...

  11. Effect of combined treatment with supercritical CO2 and rosemary on microbiological and physicochemical properties of ground pork stored at 4°C.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shirong; Liu, Bin; Ge, Du; Dai, Jiehui

    2017-03-01

    The effect of combined treatment with supercritical CO2 (2000psi, 35°C for 2h) and rosemary powder (2.5% and 5.0% (w/w)) on microbiological and physicochemical properties of ground pork stored at 4°C was investigated. The changes in total viable count, pH, total volatile base nitrogen (TVB-N), lipid oxidation and instrumental color (CIE L(⁎), a(⁎), b(⁎)) were analyzed during a week period of refrigerated storage. It was found that microbial populations were reduced by supercritical CO2 treatment, with the more pronounced effect being achieved by combined treatment with supercritical CO2 and 5.0g rosemary powder/100g meat. Supercritical CO2 treatment for 2h could accelerate lipid oxidation of ground pork during refrigerated storage, whereas combination with rosemary can significantly slow down the increase of oxidation rate. Combined treatment of supercritical CO2 and rosemary significantly increased L(⁎) and b(⁎) values of the ground pork, while the a(⁎), pH and TVB-N value were not affected as compared to the treatment with supercritical CO2 alone. The results of this study indicate that combined treatment of supercritical CO2 and rosemary may be useful in the meat industry to enhance the storage stability of ground pork treated with long time exposure of supercritical CO2 during refrigerated storage.

  12. Optimization of Supercritical CO2 Extraction of Fish Oil from Viscera of African Catfish (Clarias gariepinus)

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Mohamed Zaidul Islam; Selamat, Jinap; Habib, Abu Sayem Md. Ahsan; Ferdosh, Sahena; Akanda, Mohamed Jahurul Haque; Jaffri, Juliana Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Fish oil was extracted from the viscera of African Catfish using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2). A Central Composite Design of Response Surface methodology (RSM) was employed to optimize the SC-CO2 extraction parameters. The oil yield (Y) as response variable was executed against the four independent variables, namely pressure, temperature, flow rate and soaking time. The oil yield varied with the linear, quadratic and interaction of pressure, temperature, flow rate and soaking time. Optimum points were observed within the variables of temperature from 35 °C to 80 °C, pressure from 10 MPa to 40 MPa, flow rate from 1 mL/min to 3 mL/min and soaking time from 1 h to 4 h. However, the extraction parameters were found to be optimized at temperature 57.5 °C, pressure 40 MPa, flow rate 2.0 mL/min and soaking time 2.5 h. At this optimized condition, the highest oil yields were found to be 67.0% (g oil/100 g sample on dry basis) in the viscera of catfish which was reasonable to the yields of 78.0% extracted using the Soxhlet method. PMID:23109854

  13. Supercritical CO2 Power Cycles: Design Considerations for Concentrating Solar Power

    SciTech Connect

    Neises, Ty; Turchi, Craig

    2014-09-01

    A comparison of three supercritical CO2 Brayton cycles: the simple cycle, recompression cycle and partial-cooling cycle indicates the partial-cooling cycle is favored for use in concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. Although it displays slightly lower cycle efficiency versus the recompression cycle, the partial-cooling cycle is estimated to have lower total recuperator size, as well as a lower maximum s-CO2 temperature in the high-temperature recuperator. Both of these effects reduce recuperator cost. Furthermore, the partial-cooling cycle provides a larger temperature differential across the turbine, which translates into a smaller, more cost-effective thermal energy storage system. The temperature drop across the turbine (and by extension, across a thermal storage system) for the partial-cooling cycle is estimated to be 23% to 35% larger compared to the recompression cycle of equal recuperator conductance between 5 and 15 MW/K. This reduces the size and cost of the thermal storage system. Simulations by NREL and Abengoa Solar indicate the partial-cooling cycle results in a lower LCOE compared with the recompression cycle, despite the former's slightly lower cycle efficiency. Advantages of the recompression cycle include higher thermal efficiency and potential for a smaller precooler. The overall impact favors the use of a partial-cooling cycle for CSP compared to the more commonly analyzed recompression cycle.

  14. A facile synthesis of poly(3-octylthiophene)-titanium dioxide nanocomposite particles in supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Yuvaraj, Haldorai; Woo, Min Hee; Park, Eun Ju; Gal, Yeong-Soon; Lim, Kwon Taek

    2008-09-01

    Poly(3-octylthiophene) (P3OT)-titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanocomposite powder where TiO2 was embedded with homogeneous dispersion was synthesized by in-situ chemical oxidative polymerization of 3-octylthiophene in the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2), using ferric chloride as the oxidant. The synthesized materials could be obtained as dry powder upon venting of CO2 after the polymerization. The composites were subsequently characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction studies (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and photoluminescence (PL). The incorporation of TiO2 in the composite was endorsed by FT-IR studies. TGA revealed enhanced thermal stability of P3OT/TiO2 nanocomposite compared to 3-octylthiophene. TEM analysis showed that well dispersed TiO2 nanoparticles in the polymer matrix. Photoluminescence quenching increased with increasing TiO2 concentration in the composite.

  15. Development and stability of semisolid preparations based on a supercritical CO2 Arnica extract.

    PubMed

    Bilia, Anna Rita; Bergonzi, Maria Camilla; Mazzi, Giovanni; Vincieri, Franco Francesco

    2006-05-03

    Conventional herbal drug preparations (HDP) based on Arnica montana L. have a low content of the active principles, sesquiterpene lactones, which show poor stability and low physical compatibility in semisolid formulations. Recently, an innovative supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) extract with high sesquiterpene content has been marketed. Development of six semisolid preparations (cetomacrogol, polysorbate 60, polawax, anphyphil, natrosol and sepigel) based on this innovative CO2 extract is discussed. Stability of these preparations was investigated according to ICH guidelines. The evaluation of in vitro release of active constituents was performed using the cell method reported in the European Pharmacopoeia. Preliminary data on in vivo permeation of three selected formulations is demonstrated using the "skin stripping" test, according to the FDA, in healthy subjects. Analysis of sesquiterpene lactones within the extract and in vitro and in vivo studies was performed by RP-HPLC-DAD-MS method. The cetomacrogol showed the best release profile in the in vitro test, while in the in vivo test the best preparation resulted polysorbate 60 and polawax.

  16. Supercritical fluid extraction of Beauvericin from maize.

    PubMed

    Ambrosino, P; Galvano, F; Fogliano, V; Logrieco, A; Fresa, R; Ritieni, A

    2004-02-27

    Beauvericin (BEA), a supercritical fluid extraction with supercritical carbon dioxide from maize was investigated. Extraction efficiencies under several different extraction conditions were examined. Pressure, temperature, extraction time, organic modifier and water matrix content (10%) were investigated. The best extraction conditions were at a temperature of 60 degrees C, 3200psi, for 30min static extraction time and methanol as modifier solvent. Extraction recovery of 36% without modifier by adding water to the matrix in the extraction vessel (reproducibility relative standard deviations (R.S.D.)=3-5%) were recorded. Extraction recovery of 76.9% with methanol as co-solvent (reproducibility R.S.D.=3-5%) was obtained. Data shows that SFE gives a lower BEA recovery compared to conventional extraction protocol with organic solvents while SFE with modifier and conventional extraction yields are comparable. BEA extract contents were determined by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a diode array detector (DAD) at 205nm and BEA peak confirmed by LC-MS. Acetonitrile-water as mobile phase and column C-18 were both tested. Instrumental and analytical parameters were optimized in the range linear interval from 1 to 500mgkg(-1) and reached a detection limit of 2ng.

  17. Quantifying the flow dynamics of supercritical CO2-water displacement in a 2D porous micromodel using fluorescent microscopy and microscopic PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemifar, Farzan; Blois, Gianluca; Kyritsis, Dimitrios C.; Christensen, Kenneth T.

    2016-09-01

    The multi-phase flow of liquid/supercritical CO2 and water (non-wetting and wetting phases, respectively) in a two-dimensional silicon micromodel was investigated at reservoir conditions (80 bar, 24 °C and 40 °C). The fluorescent microscopy and microscopic particle image velocimetry (micro-PIV) techniques were combined to quantify the flow dynamics associated with displacement of water by CO2 (drainage) in the porous matrix. To this end, water was seeded with fluorescent tracer particles, CO2 was tagged with a fluorescent dye and each phase was imaged independently using spectral separation in conjunction with microscopic imaging. This approach allowed simultaneous measurement of the spatially-resolved instantaneous velocity field in the water and quantification of the spatial configuration of the two fluid phases. The results, acquired with sufficient time resolution to follow the dynamic progression of both phases, provide a comprehensive picture of the flow physics during the migration of the CO2 front, the temporal evolution of individual menisci, and the growth of fingers within the porous microstructure. During that growth process, velocity jumps 20-25 times larger in magnitude than the bulk velocity were measured in the water phase and these bursts of water flow occurred both in-line with and against the bulk flow direction. These unsteady velocity events support the notion of pressure bursts and Haines jumps during pore drainage events as previously reported in the literature [1-3]. After passage of the CO2 front, shear-induced flow was detected in the trapped water ganglia in the form of circulation zones near the CO2-water interfaces as well as in the thin water films wetting the surfaces of the silicon micromodel. To our knowledge, the results presented herein represent the first quantitative spatially and temporally resolved velocity-field measurements at high pressure for water displacement by liquid/supercritical CO2 injection in a porous micromodel.

  18. A numerical study of the supercritical CO2 plate heat exchanger subject to U-type, Z-type, and multi-pass arrangements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chen-Xi; Wang, Chi-Chuan

    2017-07-01

    This study proposes a numerical model for plate heat exchanger that is capable of handling supercritical CO2 fluid. The plate heat exchangers under investigation include Z-type (1-pass), U-type (1-pass), and 1-2 pass configurations. The plate spacing is 2.9 mm with a plate thickness of 0.8 mm, and the size of the plate is 600 mm wide and 218 mm in height with 60 degrees chevron angle. The proposed model takes into account the influence of gigantic change of CO2 properties. The simulation is first compared with some existing data for water-to-water plate heat exchangers with good agreements. The flow distribution, pressure drop, and heat transfer performance subject to the supercritical CO2 in plate heat exchangers are then investigated. It is found that the flow velocity increases consecutively from the entrance plate toward the last plate for the Z-type arrangement, and this is applicable for either water side or CO2 side. However, the flow distribution of the U-type arrangement in the water side shows opposite trend. Conversely, the flow distribution for U-type arrangement of CO2 depends on the specific flow ratio (C*). A lower C* like 0.1 may reverse the distribution, i.e. the flow velocity increases moderately alongside the plate channel like Z-type while a large C* of 1 would resemble the typical distribution in water channel. The flow distribution of CO2 side at the first and last plate shows a pronounced drop/surge phenomenon while the channels in water side does not reveal this kind of behavior. The performance of 2-pass plate heat exchanger, in terms of heat transfer rate, is better than that of 1-pass design only when C* is comparatively small (C* < 0.5). Multi-pass design is more effective when the dominant thermal resistance falls in the CO2 side.

  19. Liberation of microbial substrates from macromolecular organic matter by non-supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, P.; Glombitza, C.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2012-12-01

    The worldwide search for suitable underground storage formations for CO2 also considers coal-bearing strata. CO2 is already injected into coal seams for enhanced recovery of coal bed methane. However, the geochemical and microbiological effects of increased CO2 concentrations on organic matter rich formations are rarely investigated. The injected CO2 will dissolve in the pore water, causing a decrease in pH and resulting in acidic formation waters. Low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) are chemically bound to the macromolecular matrix of sedimentary organic matter and may be liberated by hydrolysis, which is enhanced under acidic conditions. Recent investigations outlined the importance of LMWOAs as a feedstock for subsurface microbial life [1]. Therefore, injection of CO2 into coal formations may result in enhanced nutrient supply for subsurface microbes. To investigate the effects of highly CO2-saturated waters on the release of LMWOAs from coal, we developed an inexpensive high-pressure-high-temperature system that allows manipulating the concentration of dissolved gases up to 60 MPa and 120°C, respectively. The sample is placed in a flexible, gas-tight and inert PVDF sleeve, separating it from the pressure fluid and allowing for subsampling without loss of pressure. Lignite samples from the DEBITS-1 well, Waikato Basin, NZ and the Welzow-Süd open-cast mine, Niederlausitz, Germany, were extracted at 90° C and 5 MPa, with either pure water, CO2-saturated water, CO2/NO2 or CO2/SO2-saturated water. Subsamples were taken at different time points during the 72 hrs. long extraction. Extraction of LMWOAs from coal samples with our pressurised system resulted in yields that were up to four times higher than those reported for Soxhlet extraction [2]. These higher yields may be explained by the fact that during Soxhlet extraction the sample only gets into contact with freshly distilled water, whereas in our system the extraction fluid is circulated, resulting in

  20. Phytochemical profile, antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of extracts obtained from erva-mate (Ilex paraguariensis) fruit using compressed propane and supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ciro E F; Scapinello, Jaqueline; Bohn, Aline; Boligon, Aline A; Athayde, Margareth L; Magro, Jacir Dall; Palliga, Marshall; Oliveira, J Vladimir; Tres, Marcus V

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, Ilex paraguariensis leaves are consumed in tea form or as typical drinks like mate and terere, while the fruits are discarded processing and has no commercial value. The aim of this work to evaluate phytochemical properties, total phenolic compounds, antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of extracts of Ilex paraguariensis fruits obtained from supercritical CO2 and compressed propane extraction. The extraction with compressed propane yielded 2.72 wt%, whereas with supercritical CO2 1.51 wt% was obtained. The compound extracted in larger amount by the two extraction solvents was caffeine, 163.28 and 54.17 mg/g by supercritical CO2 and pressurized propane, respectively. The antioxidant activity was more pronounced for the supercritical CO2 extract, with no difference found in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration for Staphylococcus aureus for the two extracts and better results observed for Escherichia coli when using supercritical CO2.

  1. Solubility of purified lutein diesters obtained from Tagetes erecta in supercritical CO(2) and the effect of solvent modifiers.

    PubMed

    Naranjo-Modad, S; López-Munguía, A; Vilarem, G; Gaset, A; Bárzana, E

    2000-11-01

    Purified lutein diesters deposited on commercial nonporous glass beads were solubilized in supercritical CO(2) in a computerized batch extractor, and their solubilities were compared to their solubilities in hexane. Densities of 0.7, 0.8, and 0.9 g/mL were evaluated without modifiers. Both pressure and temperature increased solubility, although temperatures >50 degrees C promoted carotenoid loss as determined by mass balance. Solubility was enhanced by the use of modifiers and was related to their log P. Chloroform (log P = 2) increased 2.8 times the amount of solubilized lutein diesters compared to pure CO(2) at the same extraction conditions (0.9 g/mL and 40 degrees C) to yield 65% of the amount extracted with hexane. Supercritical CO(2) extraction of lutein diesters could represent a cleaner technology as compared to the current industrial use of hexane with important ecological and health-related implications.

  2. Fluid dynamic effects on precision cleaning with supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, M.R.; Hogan, M.O.; Silva, L.J.

    1994-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff have assembled a small supercritical fluids parts cleaning test stand to characterize how system dynamics affect the efficacy of precision cleaning with supercritical carbon dioxide. A soiled stainless steel coupon, loaded into a ``Berty`` autoclave, was used to investigate how changes in system turbulence and solvent temperature influenced the removal of test dopants. A pulsed laser beam through a fiber optic was used to investigate real-time contaminant removal. Test data show that cleaning efficiency is a function of system agitation, solvent density, and temperature. These data also show that high levels of cleaning efficiency can generally be achieved with high levels of system agitation at relatively low solvent densities and temperatures. Agitation levels, temperatures, and densities needed for optimal cleaning are largely contaminant dependent. Using proper system conditions, the levels of cleanliness achieved with supercritical carbon dioxide compare favorably with conventional precision cleaning methods. Additional research is currently being conducted to generalize the relationship between cleaning performance and parameters such as contaminant solubilities, mass transfer rates, and solvent agitation. These correlations can be used to optimize cleaning performance, system design, and time and energy consumption for particular parts cleaning applications.

  3. Fluid chemistry of the onshore CO2 sequestration formation at Nagaoka, Japan: 5 years passed since CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mito, S.; Asahara, Y.; Xue, Z.

    2011-12-01

    The CO2 injection into structural reservoirs in deep permeable geologic formations is now expected one of the most realizable methods from the point of view of the cost and the CO2 preserving capability of the geological reservoirs. The first Japanese pilot-scale CO2 sequestration project has been done in an onshore saline aquifer at Nagaoka-site, Japan. 10,400 tones of CO2 were injected into a thin aquifer at the depth of 1110 m at a rate of 20-40 tones from July 2003 to January 2005. To investigate a chemical reaction between CO2 fluids and rock forming minerals at the sequestration formation, formation water was collected before and after 1year of the injection (Mito et al., 2008). The result of chemical analyses exhibited a high concentration of HCO3-, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn and Si in the post-CO2 injection samples compared to the original formation water. The result indicated that a chemical reaction between CO2 and formation water and rock forming minerals had occurred in the sequestration formation at the early stage of CO2 storage. A continuous resistivity monitoring from 2003 to 2011 showed an existence of stagnant free CO2 at the depth of 1110m and gradual spreading of CO2 dissolved water at a top and a bottom of the free CO2 layer (Mito and Xue 2011). This observation suggests that the CO2 trapped by formation water have gradually diffused and chemical trapping of CO2 by surrounding minerals have progressed in the formation. For long-term CO2 storage, we should clarify the reaction between CO2 and minerals occurred at the edge of the spreading CO2 fluids. We are going to collect formation water in the sequestration site at November 2011. We will show the analytical result of the sampled water and discuss about the long-term chemical reaction between the diffused CO2 fluids and rock forming minerals at the Nagaoka sequestration site. References Mito et al., 2008. International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, 2, 309-318. Mito and Xue 2011. Energy procedia, 4

  4. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) for determination of metalworking fluid aerosols.

    PubMed

    Brudin, Stella; Hjalmarsson, Theres; Ljungkvist, Göran; Mathiasson, Lennart; Lillienberg, Linnéa

    2006-07-01

    A common methodology for analyzing metalworking fluid (MWF) aerosols in workplace air is based on gravimetry before and after organic solvent extraction of the MWFs from a suitable collection filter. Because MWFs have different chemical and physical properties, various mixtures of organic solvents have been used to extract the MWFs from their collection device. An alternative to organic solvents, used in the work presented in this article, is the use of a supercritical fluid. The efficiency of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) was investigated by weighing conditioned filters before and after extraction of samples spiked with MWFs at different concentrations using the American Society for Testing and Materials method. For three common straight oil MWFs spiked on filters, supercritical carbon dioxide gave recoveries of 92-101% with a low standard deviation (0.2-1.9%). For semisynthetic MWFs, carbon dioxide had to be mixed with methanol to obtain recoveries above 80%. With the optimized method using 7% methanol in carbon dioxide, the 10 investigated MWFs could be extracted in 30 min with a recovery of 90-98%. The amount of MWFs spiked on the filters varied between 0.10-1.65 mg. In Sweden, the limit value for MWFs is 1 mg/m3. Thus, our spike level is in the range of 10-200% of the limit value if sampling for 8 hours with 2 L/min. The use of SFE methodology results in small volume extracts (3 mL) with concentrations at such high levels that analysis of chemical components in the MWF can be carried out without further volume reduction.

  5. Supercritical CO2 Extraction of Porogen Phase: An Alternative Route to Nanoporous Dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Lubguban, J.

    2004-11-04

    We present a supercritical CO{sub 2} (SCCO{sub 2}) process for the preparation of nanoporous organosilicate thin films for ultra low dielectric constant materials. The porous structure was generated by SCCO{sub 2} extraction of a sacrificial poly(propylene glycol) (PPG) from a nanohybrid film, where the nanoscopic domains of PPG porogen are entrapped within the crosslinked poly(methylsilsesquioxane) (PMSSQ) matrix. As a comparison, porous structures generated by both the usual thermal decomposition (at ca. 450 C) and by a SCCO{sub 2} process for 25 wt% and 55 wt% porogen loadings were evaluated. It is found that the SCCO{sub 2} process is effective in removing the porogen phase at relatively low temperatures (< 200 C) through diffusion of the supercritical fluid into the phase-separated nanohybrids and selective extraction of the porogen phase. Pore morphologies generated from the two methods are compared from representative three-dimensional (3D) images built from small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) data.

  6. Fatty and resin acid analysis in tall oil products via supercritical fluid extraction-supercritical fluid reaction using enzymatic catalysis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, S L; King, J W

    2001-07-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is combined with supercritical fluid reaction (SFR) in an analytical mode to assess tall oil products for their fatty or resin acid content or both. The SFR consists of an inline enzymatically catalyzed reaction in which a lipase transesterifies specific lipids with methanol. The SFE-SFR sequence is conducted employing commercially available extractors using supported lipases in the extraction cell to form methyl esters. In this study, six different commercially available lipases are screened for activity. The SFE-SFR extracts are analyzed by capillary gas chromatography and supercritical fluid chromatography and then compared with tall oil products derivatized by conventional chemical derivatization techniques.

  7. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Aflatoxin B 1 from Soil

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research describes the development of a Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) method to recover aflatoxin B1 from fortified soil. The effects of temperature, pressure, modifier (identity and percentage), and extraction type were assessed. Using the optimized SFE conditions, ...

  8. Clay hydration/dehydration in dry to water-saturated supercritical CO2: Implications for caprock integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Loring, John S.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Turcu, Romulus VF; Miller, Quin R.; Chen, Jeffrey; Hu, Jian Z.; Hoyt, David W.; Martin, Paul F.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Injection of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) for the geologic storage of carbon dioxide will displace formation water, and the pore space adjacent to overlying caprocks could eventually be dominated by dry to water-saturated scCO2. Wet scCO2 is highly reactive and capable of carbonating and hydrating certain minerals, whereas anhydrous scCO2 can dehydrate water-containing minerals. Because these geochemical processes affect solid volume and thus porosity and permeability, they have the potential to affect the long-term integrity of the caprock seal. In this study, we investigate the swelling and shrinkage of an expandable clay found in caprock formations, montmorillonite (Ca-STx-1), when exposed to variable water-content scCO2 at 50 °C and 90 bar using a combination of in situ probes, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), in situ magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS NMR), and in situ attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). We show that the extent of montmorillonite clay swelling/shrinkage is dependent not only on water hydration/dehydration, but also on CO2 intercalation reactions. Our results also suggest a competition between water and CO2 for interlayer residency where increasing concentrations of intercalated water lead to decreasing concentrations of intercalated CO2. Overall, this paper demonstrates the types of measurements required to develop fundamental knowledge that will enhance modeling efforts and reduce risks associated with subsurface storage of CO2.

  9. Comparative study of lipid extraction from microalgae by organic solvent and supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chen-Hsi; Du, Tz-Bang; Pi, Hsien-Chueh; Jang, Shyue-Ming; Lin, Yun-Huin; Lee, Hom-Ti

    2011-11-01

    Pavlova sp. was employed to evaluate the efficiency of different lipid extraction methods. The microalgal crude lipids content determined using the mixed solvent with ultrasonic method was 44.7 wt.%. The triglyceride content obtained by the mixed solvent method was 15.6 wt.%. The extraction yield was the FAME yield divided by the maximum FAME (15.9 wt.%). The extraction yield was improved by cell disruption prior to extraction, and the highest triglyceride extraction yield of 98.7% was observed using the supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) method with bead-beating. The results indicate that the SFE method is effective and provides higher selectivity for triglyceride extraction though the total lipid extracted was less than that using solvent extraction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Supercritical CO2 direct cycle Gas Fast Reactor (SC-GFR) concept.

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Steven Alan; Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Al Rashdan, Ahmad; Tsvetkov, Pavel Valeryevich; Vernon, Milton E.; Fleming, Darryn D.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2011-05-01

    This report describes the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) direct cycle gas fast reactor (SC-GFR) concept. The SC-GFR reactor concept was developed to determine the feasibility of a right size reactor (RSR) type concept using S-CO{sub 2} as the working fluid in a direct cycle fast reactor. Scoping analyses were performed for a 200 to 400 MWth reactor and an S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle. Although a significant amount of work is still required, this type of reactor concept maintains some potentially significant advantages over ideal gas-cooled systems and liquid metal-cooled systems. The analyses presented in this report show that a relatively small long-life reactor core could be developed that maintains decay heat removal by natural circulation. The concept is based largely on the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) commercial power plants operated in the United Kingdom and other GFR concepts.

  11. Investigation of Wyoming Bentonite Hydration in Dry to Water-Saturated Supercritical CH4 and CH4/CO2 Mixtures: Implications for CO2-Enhanced Gas Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loring, J.

    2015-12-01

    Injection of CO2 into low permeability shale formations leads to additional gas recovery and reduces the flux of CO2 into the atmosphere, thus combining a strong economic incentive with a permanent storage option for CO2. Reduced formation transmissivity due to clay swelling is a concern in CO2-enhanced gas production. Clay minerals partly determine the physical (i.e. permeability, brittleness) and certain chemical properties (i.e. wetting ability, gas adsorption) of shales, and montmorillonites are of particular interest because they swell by the uptake of species in their interlayer. In this study, the hydration and expansion of Na-, Cs-, and NH4+-saturated montmorillonite (Na-, Cs-, and NH4-SWy-2) in high-pressure (90 bar) and moderate temperature (50 °C) methane, carbon dioxide, and CO2/CH4 mixtures (3 and 25 mole% CO2) were investigated using in situ IR spectroscopic titrations, in situ XRD, in situ MAS-NMR, and ab initio electronic structure calculations. The overarching goal was to better understand the hydration/expansion behavior of Na-SWy-2 in CO2/CH4 fluid mixtures by comparison to Cs-, and NH4+-saturated clays. Specific aims were to (1) determine if CH4 intercalates the clays, (2) probe the effects of increasing dissolved CO2 and H2O concentrations, and (3) understand the role of cation solvation by H2O and/or CO2. In pure CH4, no evidence of CH4 intercalation was detected by IR for any of the clays. Similarly, no measurable changes to the basal spacing were observed by XRD in the presence of pure CH4. However, when dry Cs- and NH4-SWy-2 were exposed to dry fluids containing CO2, IR showed maximum CO2 penetrated the interlayer, XRD indicated the clays expanded, and NMR showed evidence for cation solvation by CO2, in line with theoretical predictions. IR titration of these clays with water showed sorbed H2O concentrations decreased with increasing dissolved CO2, suggesting competition for interlayer residency by CO2 and H2O. For Na-SWy-2, on the other

  12. Economic Analysis of an Integrated Annatto Seeds-Sugarcane Biorefinery Using Supercritical CO2 Extraction as a First Step

    PubMed Central

    Albarelli, Juliana Q.; Santos, Diego T.; Cocero, María José; Meireles, M. Angela A.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) has been indicated to be utilized as part of a biorefinery, rather than as a stand-alone technology, since besides extracting added value compounds selectively it has been shown to have a positive effect on the downstream processing of biomass. To this extent, this work evaluates economically the encouraging experimental results regarding the use of SFE during annatto seeds valorization. Additionally, other features were discussed such as the benefits of enhancing the bioactive compounds concentration through physical processes and of integrating the proposed annatto seeds biorefinery to a hypothetical sugarcane biorefinery, which produces its essential inputs, e.g., CO2, ethanol, heat and electricity. For this, first, different configurations were modeled and simulated using the commercial simulator Aspen Plus® to determine the mass and energy balances. Next, each configuration was economically assessed using MATLAB. SFE proved to be decisive to the economic feasibility of the proposed annatto seeds-sugarcane biorefinery concept. SFE pretreatment associated with sequential fine particles separation process enabled higher bixin-rich extract production using low-pressure solvent extraction method employing ethanol, meanwhile tocotrienols-rich extract is obtained as a first product. Nevertheless, the economic evaluation showed that increasing tocotrienols-rich extract production has a more pronounced positive impact on the economic viability of the concept. PMID:28773616

  13. Photoreduction of CO2 using [Ru(bpy)2(CO)L]n+ catalysts in biphasic solution/supercritical CO2 systems.

    PubMed

    Voyame, Patrick; Toghill, Kathryn E; Méndez, Manuel A; Girault, Hubert H

    2013-10-07

    The reduction of CO2 in a biphasic liquid-condensed gas system was investigated as a function of the CO2 pressure. Using 1-benzyl-1,4-dihydronicotinamide (BNAH) as sacrificial electron donor dissolved in a dimethylformamide-water mixture and [Ru(bpy)2(CO)L](n+) as a catalyst and [Ru(bpy)3](2+) as a photosensitizer, the reaction was found to produce a mixture of CO and formate, in total about 250 μmol after just 2 h. As CO2 pressure increases, CO formation is greatly favored, being four times greater than that of formate in aqueous systems. In contrast, formate production was independent of CO2 pressure, present at about 50 μmol. Using TEOA as a solvent instead of water created a single-phase supercritical system and greatly favored formate synthesis, but similarly increasing CO2 concentration favored the CO catalytic cycle. Under optimum conditions, a turnover number (TON) of 125 was obtained. Further investigations of the component limits led to an unprecedented TON of over 1000, and an initial turnover frequency (TOF) of 1600 h(-1).

  14. Interaction Between CO2-Rich Sulfate Solutions and Carbonate Reservoir Rocks from Atmospheric to Supercritical CO2 Conditions: Experiments and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cama, J.; Garcia-Rios, M.; Luquot, L.; Soler Matamala, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    A test site for CO2 geological storage is situated in Hontomín (Spain) with a reservoir rock that is mainly composed of limestone. During and after CO2 injection, the resulting CO2-rich acid brine gives rise to the dissolution of carbonate minerals (calcite and dolomite) and gypsum (or anhydrite at depth) may precipitate since the reservoir brine contains sulfate. Experiments using columns filled with crushed limestone or dolostone were conducted under different P-pCO2 conditions (atmospheric: 1-10-3.5 bar; subcritical: 10-10 bar; and supercritical: 150-34 bar), T (25, 40 and 60 ºC) and input solution compositions (gypsum-undersaturated and gypsum-equilibrated solutions). We evaluated the effect of these parameters on the coupled reactions of calcite/dolomite dissolution and gypsum/anhydrite precipitation. The CrunchFlow and PhreeqC (v.3) numerical codes were used to perform reactive transport simulations of the experiments. Under the P-pCO2-T conditions, the volume of precipitated gypsum was smaller than the volume of dissolved carbonate minerals, yielding an increase in porosity (Δporosity up to ≈ 4%). A decrease in T favored limestone dissolution regardless of pCO2 owing to increasing undersaturation with decreasing temperature. However, gypsum precipitation was favored at high T and under atmospheric pCO2 conditions but not at high T and under 10 bar of pCO2 conditions. The increase in limestone dissolution with pCO2 was directly attributed to pH, which was more acidic at higher pCO2. Increasing pCO2, carbonate dissolution occurred along the column whereas it was localized in the very inlet under atmospheric conditions. This was due to the buffer capacity of the carbonic acid, which maintains pH at around 5 and keeps the solution undersaturated with respect to calcite and dolomite along the column. 1D reactive transport simulations reproduced the experimental data (carbonate dissolution and gypsum precipitation for different P-pCO2-T conditions). Drawing

  15. Comparative analysis of the oil and supercritical CO2 extract of Elettaria cardamomum (L.) Maton.

    PubMed

    Marongiu, Bruno; Piras, Alessandra; Porcedda, Silvia

    2004-10-06

    The volatile oil of Elettaria cardamomum (L.) Maton seeds was obtained by supercritical CO(2) extraction (SC-CO(2)). The effect of the extraction conditions on the yield and composition of the resulting cardamom volatile oil was examined by testing two pressure values, 9.0 and 11.0 MPa; two temperatures, 40 and 50 degrees C; two flow rate values, 0.6 and 1.2 kg/h; and two particles size values, 250-425 and >850 microm. The extraction conditions that gave the highest yield, Y (grams of extract per gram of seeds), of 5.5%, were as follows: pressure, 9.0 MPa; temperature, 40 degrees C; carbon dioxide flow, phi = 1.2 kg/h; and particles sizes in the range of 250-425 microm. Waxes, recovered as traces, were entrapped in the first separator set at 9.0 MPa and -10 degrees C. The oil was recovered in the second separator working at 1.5 MPa and 10 degrees C. The main components were as follows: alpha-terpinyl acetate, 42.3%; 1,8-cineole, 21.4%; linalyl acetate, 8.2%; limonene, 5.6%; and linalool, 5.4%. A comparison with the hydrodistilled oil, obtained at a yield of 5.0%, did not reveal any consistent difference. In contrast, the extract obtained using hexane, Y = 7.6%, showed strong composition differences. Indeed, the volatile fraction of the extract was made up mainly of the following: limonene, 36.4%; 1,8-cineole, 23.5%; terpinolene, 8.6%; and myrcene, 6.6%.

  16. High Density Thermal Energy Storage with Supercritical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapathi, Gani B.; Wirz, Richard

    2012-01-01

    A novel approach to storing thermal energy with supercritical fluids is being investigated, which if successful, promises to transform the way thermal energy is captured and utilized. The use of supercritical fluids allows cost-affordable high-density storage with a combination of latent heat and sensible heat in the two-phase as well as the supercritical state. This technology will enhance penetration of several thermal power generation applications and high temperature water for commercial use if the overall cost of the technology can be demonstrated to be lower than the current state-of-the-art molten salt using sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate eutectic mixtures.

  17. High Density Thermal Energy Storage with Supercritical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapathi, Gani B.; Wirz, Richard

    2012-01-01

    A novel approach to storing thermal energy with supercritical fluids is being investigated, which if successful, promises to transform the way thermal energy is captured and utilized. The use of supercritical fluids allows cost-affordable high-density storage with a combination of latent heat and sensible heat in the two-phase as well as the supercritical state. This technology will enhance penetration of several thermal power generation applications and high temperature water for commercial use if the overall cost of the technology can be demonstrated to be lower than the current state-of-the-art molten salt using sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate eutectic mixtures.

  18. Anomalous change in the dynamics of a supercritical fluid.

    PubMed

    Han, Sungho

    2011-11-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to investigate dynamical properties of a supercritical Lennard-Jones fluid. We find that in the supercritical region there is a short-ranged deviation in dynamic character. We further find that this anomalous change is associated with the presence of the Widom line, the locus of specific heat maxima, of the liquid-vapor phase transition. The salient change in dynamics is consistent with a crossover in the correlation of the diffusion coefficient with the excess entropy. Our results lead to an interpretation that, even though a supercritical fluid excludes a singularity, its dynamical properties can be significantly affected by the existence of thermodynamic response maxima.

  19. Hydroxyapatite-TiO(2)-based nanocomposites synthesized in supercritical CO(2) for bone tissue engineering: physical and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Salarian, Mehrnaz; Xu, William Z; Wang, Zhiqiang; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Charpentier, Paul A

    2014-10-08

    Calcium phosphate-based nanocomposites offer a unique solution toward producing scaffolds for orthopedic and dental implants. However, despite attractive bioactivity and biocompatibility, hydroxyapatite (HAp) has been limited in heavy load-bearing applications due to its intrinsically low mechanical strength. In this work, to improve the mechanical properties of HAp, we grew HAp nanoplates from the surface of one-dimensional titania nanorod structures by combining a coprecipitation and sol-gel methodology using supercritical fluid processing with carbon dioxide (scCO2). The effects of metal alkoxide concentration (1.1-1.5 mol/L), reaction temperature (60-80 °C), and pressure (6000-8000 psi) on the morphology, crystallinity, and surface area of the resulting nanostructured composites were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) method. Chemical composition of the products was characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analyses. HAp nanoplates and HAp-TiO2 nanocomposites were homogeneously mixed within poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) to develop scaffolds with enhanced physical and mechanical properties for bone regeneration. Mechanical behavior analysis demonstrated that the Young's and flexural moduli of the PCL/HAp-TiO2 composites were substantially higher than the PCL/HAp composites. Therefore, this new synthesis methodology in scCO2 holds promise for bone tissue engineering with improved mechanical properties.

  20. In-vitro and in-vivo study of amorphous spironolactone prepared by adsorption method using supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qikun; Li, Yuanyuan; Fu, Qiang; Geng, Yajie; Zhao, Juanhang; Ma, Panqin; Zhang, Tianhong

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to improve the oral bioavailability of spironolactone (SP). SP was adsorbed on the fumed silica using supercritical CO2 (scCO2) technology and further compressed into tablets. The morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the crystalline form was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). The dissolution test was performed in water, 0.1 M HCl solution, pH 4.5 acetate buffers and pH 6.8 phosphate buffers using the paddle method. The pharmacokinetics was undertaken in six dogs in a crossover fashion. SP was successfully prepared into tablets and presented in amorphous state. SP-silica scCO2 tablets displayed higher dissolution profiles than SP-silica physical mixtures tablets in different media. The AUC0-t and Cmax of SP-silica supercritical CO2 was 1.61- and 1.52-fold greater than those of SP-silica physical mixtures (p < 0.05), respectively. It is a promising method in improving dissolution and bioavailability by adsorbing SP, a poorly soluble drug, on the fumed silica using rapid expansion of supercritical solutions.

  1. Surface modification of chitin using ultrasound-assisted and supercritical CO2 technologies for cobalt adsorption.

    PubMed

    Dotto, Guilherme L; Cunha, Jeanine M; Calgaro, Camila O; Tanabe, Eduardo H; Bertuol, Daniel A

    2015-09-15

    Ultrasound-assisted (UA) and supercritical CO2 technologies (SCO2) were used to modify the chitin surface and, improve its adsorption characteristics regarding to cobalt. Chitin, before and after the treatments, was characterized by N2 adsorption isotherms (BET), infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Unmodified and surface modified chitins were used as adsorbents to remove cobalt from aqueous solutions. The adsorption study was performed by equilibrium isotherms and kinetic curves. The chitin particle characteristics, such as, surface area, pore volume and porosity were improved by the UA and SCO2 treatments. The crystallinity index decreased after the UA and SCO2 treatments, and also, intense surface modifications were observed. Langmuir and Freundlich models were adequate to represent the adsorption equilibrium. The maximum adsorption capacities were 50.03, 83.94 and 63.08 mg g(-1) for unmodified chitin, UA surface modified chitin and SCO2 surface modified chitin. The adsorption kinetic curves were well represented by the pseudo-second order model. UA and SCO2 technologies are alternatives to modify the chitin surface and improve its adsorption characteristics.

  2. [Supercritical CO2 extraction of fatty oils from bee pollen and its GC-MS analysis].

    PubMed

    Lei, Huaping; Shi, Qinglong; Ge, Fahuan; Pan, Jianguo

    2004-03-01

    The extraction of fatty oils from bee pollen with supercritical CO2 was studied. The effects of extraction pressure, extraction temperature and the grinding size of the bee pollen on the yields were discussed. The optimal condition of this method was: extraction pressure 30MPa,extraction temperature 55 degrees C, separator I pressure 14MPa, separator I temperature 45 degrees C, separator II pressure 6MPa, separator II temperature 40 degrees C, extraction period 2 hours. Compared with the traditional solvent extraction, this method had some virtues, such as shortening the extraction period greatly, escaping oxidation of unsaturated fatty acid, and the products from which having better quality. With a GC-MS analysis, the main composition of the fatty oil from the bee pollen was: oleic acid, palmitic acid, linoic acid, pentacosane, octacosane and so on. The contents of alpha-linolenic acid in the fatty oils from separator I and separator II were 42% and 8.8%, which differed greatly. It proved that this method succeeded in extraction, separating and enriching alpha-linolenic acid.

  3. Genotoxicity of rice bran oil extracted by supercritical CO2 extraction.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Suk; Cheon, Eun Jin; Kim, Tae-Uk; Moon, Woi-Sook; Kim, Joo-Wan; Kim, Mi-Ryung

    2014-01-01

    Rice bran oil extracted by supercritical CO2 extraction (RB-SCE) reportedly exhibits pharmacological activities such as antioxidant and in vivo hair growth-inducing effects. Such activities raise the possibility of the development of novel hair growth-inducing agents using RB-SCE. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential genotoxic effects of RB-SCE in three short-term mutagenicity assays (bacterial reverse mutation assay, in vitro mammalian chromosomal aberration test, and in vivo micronucleus assay). RB-SCE showed no genotoxicity in the bacterial reverse mutation assay up to 5000 mg/plate and in the in vivo micronucleus test up to 600 mg/kg body weight. However, at 120 µg/mL with S9 mix and 200 µg/mL without S9 mix RB-SCE showed significantly different genotoxicity than the negative control in the in vitro chromosome aberration test. The induction of chromosomal aberrations under the present conditions may have no biological significance. We have herein demonstrated that RB-SCE can be regarded as a non-genotoxic material based on the available in vivo and in vitro results.

  4. Capillary pressure heterogeneity and hysteresis for the supercritical CO2/water system in a sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pini, Ronny; Benson, Sally M.

    2017-10-01

    We report results from an experimental investigation on the hysteretic behaviour of the capillary pressure curve for the supercritical CO2-water system in a Berea Sandstone core. Previous observations have highlighted the importance of subcore-scale capillary heterogeneity in developing local saturations during drainage; we show in this study that the same is true for the imbibition process. Spatially distributed drainage and imbibition scanning curves were obtained for mm-scale subsets of the rock sample non-invasively using X-ray CT imagery. Core- and subcore-scale measurements are well described using the Brooks-Corey formalism, which uses a linear trapping model to compute mobile saturations during imbibition. Capillary scaling yields two separate universal drainage and imbibition curves that are representative of the full subcore-scale data set. This enables accurate parameterisation of rock properties at the subcore-scale in terms of capillary scaling factors and permeability, which in turn serve as effective indicators of heterogeneity at the same scale even when hysteresis is a factor. As such, the proposed core-analysis workflow is quite general and provides the required information to populate numerical models that can be used to extend core-flooding experiments to conditions prevalent in the subsurface, which would be otherwise not attainable in the laboratory.

  5. Atomic Layer Deposition of High-k Dielectrics Using Supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shende, Rajesh

    2005-03-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of high-κdielectric was performed in supercritical CO2 (SCCO2), using a two-step reaction sequence. In step one, tetraethoxy silane (TEOS) precursor was injected in SCCO2 at 80-100 C and 50 MPa pressure to obtain a chemisorbed surface monolayer, which was then oxidized into SiO2 using peroxide entrained in SCCO2. ALD process was controlled by estimating precursor solubility and its mass transport with respect to the density of SCCO2, and correlating these parameters with precursor injection volume. In the ALD process, 7 pulses of precursor were used anticipating deposition of one atomic layer in each of the pulses. The thickness of the SiO2 atomic layers deposited using SCCO2 was measured by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE), and the C-V measurements were also performed. The result obtained using VASE indicates that there were 7 monolayers of SiO2 with total thickness of 35 å, and the dielectric constant of the deposited layers was 4.0±0.1. Our initial findings clearly demonstrate that SCCO2 is capable of atomic layer deposition of high quality dielectric films at very low process temperatures preventing interface reaction. More research is in progress to achieve ALD of HfO2 and TiO2 in SCCO2.

  6. Optimized, Competitive Supercritical-CO2 Cycle GFR for Gen IV Service

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. Driscoll; P. Hejzlar; G. Apostolakis

    2008-09-08

    An overall plant design was developed for a gas-cooled fast reactor employing a direct supercritical Brayton power conversion system. The most important findings were that (1) the concept could be capital-cost competitive, but startup fuel cycle costs are penalized by the low core power density, specified in large part to satisfy the goal of significatn post-accident passive natural convection cooling; (2) active decay heat removal is preferable as the first line of defense, with passive performance in a backup role; (3) an innovative tube-in-duct fuel assembly, vented to the primpary coolant, appears to be practicable; and (4) use of the S-Co2 GFR to support hydrogen production is a synergistic application, since sufficient energy can be recuperated from the product H2 and 02 to allow the electrolysis cell to run 250 C hotter than the reactor coolant, and the water boilers can be used for reactor decay heat removal. Increasing core poer density is identified as the top priority for future work on GFRs of this type.

  7. Laboratory Seismic Monitoring and X-ray CT imaging of Supercritical CO2 Injection in Reservoir Sand: WESTCAB King Island Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, S.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Nakagawa, S.; Harper, E. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Central Valley of California contains promising locations for on-shore geologic CO2 storage. DOE's WESTCARB (West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership) project drilled and cored a borehole (Citizen Green Well) at King Island (near Stockton, CA) to study the CO2 storage capability of saline and gas-bearing formations in the southwestern Sacramento Basin. Potential reservoirs encountered in the borehole include Domengine, Mokelumne River (primary target), and Top Starkey formations. In anticipation of geophysical monitoring of possible CO2 injection into this particular borehole and of the long-term migration of the CO2, we conducted small-scale CO2 injection experiments on three core samples retrieved from the well (Mokelumne River sand A and B) and from a mine outcrop (Domengine sandstone). During the experiment, a jacketed core sample (diameter 1.5 inches, length 4.0-6.0 inches) saturated with brine- (1% NaCl aq.) was confined within a pressure vessel via compressed nitrogen to 3,500-4,000psi, and supercritical CO2 was injected into the core at 2,000-2,500psi and 45-60 degrees C. The CO2 pressure and temperature were adjusted so that the bulk elastic modulus of the CO2 was close to the expected in-situ modulus--which affects the seismic properties most--while keeping the confining stress within our experimental capabilities. After the CO2 broke through the core, fresh brine was re-injected to remove the CO2 by both displacement and dissolution. Throughout the experiment, seismic velocity and attenuation of the core sample were measured using the Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar method (Nakagawa, 2012, Rev. Sci. Instr.) at near 1 kHz (500Hz--1.5 kHz), and the CO2 distribution determined via x-ray CT imaging. In contrast to relatively isotropic Mokelumne sand A, Domengine sandstone and Mokelumne sand B cores exhibited CO2 distributions strongly controlled by the bedding planes. During the CO2 injection, P-wave velocity and attenuation of the layered

  8. Wettability-Water/brine Film Thickness Relationship and the Effect of Supercritical CO2 Pre-contact for CO2/brine/mineral Systems under Geologic CO2 Sequestration Conditions: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Song, Y.; Li, W.

    2016-12-01

    Injection CO2 into deep saline aquifers is one of the main options for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS). A successful GCS in saline aquifers requires full knowledge about CO2/brine/mineral systems under sequestration conditions to reduce uncertainties during subsurface storage of CO2. Adsorbed water film thickness and wettability on mineral surfaces are two key characteristics for CO2/brine/mineral systems. Wettability and water/brine film thickness have been measured experimentally and predicted by molecular simulation (MD) studies. However, these studies only consider the films apart from contact angles. Investigations on wettability for CO2/brine/mineral systems only consider contact angles without measurements on film thickness. The relationship between film thicknesses with water contact angles is open to questions. In this paper, MD simulations have been performed to investigate the interrelationship between water film thicknesses and water contact angles. Three silica surfaces with different silanol group number densities (Q3, Q3-50%, Q3/Q4) were selected to represent silica surfaces with different wettabilities. We found that as water contact angle increases, the film thickness decreases. We also studied the effect of CO2-mineral pre-contact and found that: on Q3 surface, if a CO2 bubble was pre-contacted with the surface, it can remain on the surface without forming a water film; however, if a CO2 bubble was placed certain distances away from the surface, it formed a water film. Wettability analysis revealed that on the same surface, water contact angle was larger when there was no water film. These findings show that on some silica surfaces, water film may be destroyed by supercritical CO2 even the silica surfaces are hydrophilic. A water film rupture mechanism was propsed for CO2 adhesion on mineral surfaces [Wang (2013) Environ. Sci. Technol. 47, 11858; Zhang (2016) Environ. Sci. Technol. Lett. 10.1021/acs.estlett.5b00359]. The rupture of water film

  9. Phase behaviour and conductivity study on multi-component mixtures for electrodeposition in supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Philip N; Cook, David C; George, Michael W; Ke, Jie; Levason, William; Reid, Gillian; Su, Wenta; Zhang, Wenjian

    2010-01-14

    Electrochemistry in supercritical CO(2) (scCO(2)) is difficult because the very low dielectric constant of the fluid restricts the solubility of ionic species and the conductivity of dissolved electrolytes. To overcome this problem to allow us to carry out electrodeposition at macroelectrodes from scCO(2) we have investigated the use of co-solvents and modified electrolyte salts chosen to increase their solubility and dissociation in the supercritical fluid. Here we report results of phase behaviour studies for mixtures of CO(2) with [NBu(n)(4)][BF(4)] and either methanol (CH(3)OH) or acetonitrile (CH(3)CN) as the co-solvent. These show that the solubility of [NBu(n)(4)][BF(4)] is approximately 5 times larger when CH(3)CN is the co-solvent rather than CH(3)OH. Consequently the phase behaviour of the ternary of CO(2)-[NBu(n)(4)][BF(4)]-CH(3)CN was studied in greater detail over a range of compositions. To enhance the conductivity of scCO(2)-CH(3)CN a range of electrolyte salts was synthesised in which the [NBu(n)(4)](+) and/or [BF(4)](-) ion were replaced by different derivatives. Results for the phase behaviour and conductivity of these modified electrolyte salts in scCO(2)-CH(3)CN are reported for several different compositions. We find that increasing the degree of fluorination and size of the ions increases the solubility of the electrolyte salt in scCO(2)-CH(3)CN. Of the 11 electrolytes investigated [NBu(n)(4)][B{3,5-C(6)H(3)(CF(3))(2)}(4)] appears the most suitable for use in scCO(2)-CH(3)CN with a molar conductivity of 22-26 S cm(2) mol(-1) and a maximum measured conductivity of approximately 3 mS cm(-1) for 0.07 M [NBu(n)(4)][B{3,5-C(6)H(3)(CF(3))(2)}(4)] dissolved in scCO(2)-CH(3)CN (molar ratio CH(3)CN : CO(2) approximately 0.12) at 20 MPa and 328.15 K. This is an order of magnitude improvement over similar results for the [NBu(n)(4)][BF(4)] parent. Studies of the conductance as a function of the electrolyte concentration suggest that triple ions make an

  10. Modeling of the Kinetics of Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Lipids from Microalgae with Emphasis on Extract Desorption

    PubMed Central

    Sovová, Helena; Nobre, Beatriz P.; Palavra, António

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae contain valuable biologically active lipophilic substances such as omega-3 fatty acids and carotenoids. In contrast to the recovery of vegetable oils from seeds, where the extraction with supercritical CO2 is used as a mild and selective method, economically viable application of this method on similarly soluble oils from microalgae requires, in most cases, much higher pressure. This paper presents and verifies hypothesis that this difference is caused by high adsorption capacity of microalgae. Under the pressures usually applied in supercritical fluid extraction from plants, microalgae bind a large fraction of the extracted oil, while under extremely high CO2 pressures their adsorption capacity diminishes and the extraction rate depends on oil solubility in supercritical CO2. A mathematical model for the extraction from microalgae was derived and applied to literature data on the extraction kinetics in order to determine model parameters. PMID:28773546

  11. Particle Formation by Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Expansion Process

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Junbo; Li, Haiting; Quan, Can

    2013-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction and expansion (SFEE) patented technology combines the advantages of both supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and rapid expansion of supercritical solution (RESS) with on-line coupling, which makes the nanoparticle formation feasible directly from matrix such as Chinese herbal medicine. Supercritical fluid extraction is a green separation technology, which has been developed for decades and widely applied in traditional Chinese medicines or natural active components. In this paper, a SFEE patented instrument was firstly built up and controlled by LABVIEW work stations. Stearic acid was used to verify the SFEE process at optimized condition; via adjusting the preexpansion pressure and temperature one can get different sizes of particles. Furthermore, stearic acid was purified during the SFEE process with HPLC-ELSD detecting device; purity of stearic acid increased by 19%, and the device can purify stearic acid. PMID:24223031

  12. Processing energetic materials with supercritical fluid precipitation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essel, Jonathan

    cm 50% drop height instead of the standard 17 cm by ERL impact test) or ESD sensitivity (4 no-gos for NAWC ESD test) but showed a significant reduction towards initiation by friction (521 lbs threshold initiation level force instead of the standard 468 lbs by ABL friction test). The RESS-N process was used to coat nano-sized ALEX ® aluminum particles with RDX. Coatings were observed on the ALEX ® particles by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). A method of injecting ALEX ® particles into the RDX/CO2 supercritical solution was developed that was effective in coating small batches with RDX.

  13. Supercritical fluid extraction and bioactivity of cedarwood oil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (70°C, 4,000 psi) was used to extract cedarwood oil from Eastern redcedar, Juniperus virginiana L. The CO2-derived oil was tested for biological activity against several species of arthropods, including mosquitoes, ticks, houseflies, and ants. The cedarwood oil was found...

  14. Antifungal activities of three supercritical fluid extracted cedar oils

    Treesearch

    Tianchuan Du; Todd F. Shupe; Chung Y. Hse

    2009-01-01

    The antifungal activities of three supercritical CO2 (SCC) extracted cedar oils, Port-Orford-cedar (POC) (Chamaecyparis lawsoniana), Alaska yellow cedar (AYC) (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis), and Eastern red cedar (ERC) (Juniperus virginiana L), were evaluated against two common wood decay fungi, brown-rot fungi (...

  15. Reactive fluid transport in CO2 reservoir caprocks: constraints from scientific drilling of a natural CO2 reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampman, N.; Bickle, M. J.; Bertier, P.; Busch, A.; Chapman, H.; Evans, J. P.; Graham, C.; Harrington, J.; Maskell, A.

    2013-12-01

    The long-term performance of reservoir caprocks in geological CO2 storage sites remains uncertain due to the poorly constrained nature of field-scale fluid-mineral reaction kinetics and CO2 transport processes in low permeability rocks. Predicting the nature, rates and impacts of CO2 penetration into the caprocks from numerical modelling studies maybe undermined by their reliance on laboratory derived reaction kinetics from short-term experiments, and the complexity of the coupled reactive transport processes at the nano- and micro-scale. We report here on the early results from scientific drilling and laboratory analysis of the caprocks of a stacked sequence of natural CO2 reservoir at Green River, Utah. In summer 2012, diamond drilling to a depth of 325m, adjacent to a CO2 degassing normal fault recovered core from two major CO2 reservoirs in the Entrada and Navajo Sandstones and from the intervening Carmel Formation regional caprock. In-situ pH, CO2 concentrations and fluid element and isotope geochemistry were determined from wireline downhole sampling of pressurized fluids from the reservoirs. The fluid geochemistry provides important constraints on reservoir filling by flow of CO2-charged brines through the fault damage zone, macro-scale fluid flow in the reservoirs and the state of fluid-mineral thermodynamic disequilibrium from which the nature of the fluid-mineral reactions can be interpreted. Mineralogical, geochemical and petrophysical profiles through portions of the caprocks in contact with the CO2-charged reservoirs have been used to constrain the nature and penetration depths of the CO2-promoted fluid-mineral reaction fronts. The major reactions are the dissolution of diagenetic dolomite cements and hematite grain coatings which generate porosity in the caprocks. Analysis of the generated pore structure from a variety of analytical techniques will be discussed. Stable C- and O-isotopic shifts in the composition of the carbonate cements record their

  16. Antimicrobial activity and composition profile of grape (Vitis vinifera) pomace extracts obtained by supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Daniela A; Salvador, Ana Augusta; Smânia, Artur; Smânia, Elza F A; Maraschin, Marcelo; Ferreira, Sandra R S

    2013-04-10

    The possibility of increasing the aggregated value of the huge amount of residues generated by wineries around the world foment studies using the grape pomace - the residue from the wine production, composed by seed, skin and stems - to obtain functional ingredients. Nowadays, consumers in general prefer natural and safe products mainly for food and cosmetic fields, where the supercritical fluid extraction is of great importance due to the purity of the extracts provided. Therefore, the objective of this work is to evaluate the global extraction yield, the antimicrobial activity and the composition profile of Merlot and Syrah grape pomace extracts obtained by supercritical CO2 (SC-CO2) and CO2 added with co-solvent at pressures up to 300 bar and temperatures of 50 and 60 °C. The results were compared with the ones obtained by Soxhlet and by ultrasound-assisted leaching extraction methods. The main components from the extracts, identified by HPLC, were gallic acid, p-OH-benzoic acid, vanillic acid and epicatechin. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the extracts were evaluated using four strains of bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and three fungi strains (Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida krusei). Despite lower extraction yield results, the supercritical fluid extracts presented the highest antimicrobial effectiveness compared to the other grape pomace extracts due to the presence of antimicrobial active compounds. Syrah extracts were less efficient against the microorganisms tested and Merlot extracts were more active against Gram-positive bacteria.

  17. A supercritical-CO2 extract of Ganoderma lucidum spores inhibits cholangiocarcinoma cell migration by reversing the epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Li, Lian; Guo, Hui-Jun; Zhu, Ling-Yan; Zheng, Limin; Liu, Xin

    2016-05-15

    Ganoderma lucidum (G. lucidum) is an oriental medical mushroom that has been widely used in Asian countries for centuries to prevent and treat different diseases, including cancer. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of A supercritical-CO2 extract of G. lucidum spores on the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1)-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of cholangiocarcinoma cells. This was an in vitro study with human cholangiocarcinoma TFK-1 cells treated with varying concentrations of G. lucidum. A supercritical-CO2 extract of G. lucidum spores (GLE) was obtained from completely sporoderm-broken germinating G. lucidum spores by supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SCF-CO2) extraction. GLE pre-incubated with human cholangiocarcinoma TFK-1 cells prior to TGF-β1 treatment (2ng/ml) for 48h. Changes in EMT markers were analyzed by western blotting and immunofluorescence. The formation of F-actin stress fibers was assessed via immunostaining with phalloidin and examined using confocal microscopy. Additionally, the effect of the GLE on TGF-β1-induced migration was investigated by a Boyden chamber assay. TGF-β1-induced reduction in E-cadherin expression was associated with a loss of epithelial morphology and cell-cell contact. Concomitant increases in N-cadherin and Fibronectin were evident in predominantly elongated fibroblast-like cells. The GLE suppressed the TGF-β1-induced morphological changes and the changes in cadherin expression, and also inhibited the formation of F-actin stress fibers, which are a hallmark of EMT. The GLE also inhibited TGF-β1-induced migration of TFK-1 cells. Our findings provide new evidence that GLE suppress cholangiocarcinoma migration in vitro through inhibition of TGF-β1-induced EMT. The GLE may be clinically applied in the prevention and/or treatment of cancer metastasis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  18. Supercritical fluid extraction of vapor-deposited pyrene from carbonaceous coal stack ash.

    PubMed

    Mauldin, R F; Vienneau, J M; Wehry, E L; Mamantov, G

    1990-11-01

    The efficiencies of extraction of vapor-deposited pyrene from a high-carbon coal stack ash by Soxhlet extraction with methanol, ultrasonic extraction with toluene, acid pretreatment and subsequent ultrasonic extraction with toluene, batch extraction with toluene, and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) are compared. SFE using CO(2) or isobutane yielded extraction recoveries virtually identical with those obtained using ultrasonic or Soxhlet extraction processes. Collection of the SFE extract was performed by expansion into a solvent or onto the head of a gas chromatography (GC) column. No loss of extracted pyrene was observed upon collection of methanol-modified CO(2) SFE by expansion into methanol. Also, no loss of pure CO(2) SFE extract was observed upon collection on the head of a GC column. However, use of a methanol or toluene modifier for CO(2) SFE directly coupled to GC effected complete loss of extracted pyrene.

  19. A man-portable supercritical fluid extractor

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.W.; Zemanian, T.S.; Lee, R.N.; Wright, C.W.

    1995-02-01

    A new prototype supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) apparatus has been developed for the on-site preparation of solid matrix samples for subsequent organic analysis. The apparatus consists of two parts, each of which satisfy weight and size requirements for portability. They are a generator module that supplies high-pressure carbon dioxide (the source of which is dry ice) and a briefcase containing a pressure regulator, extraction cells, valves for flow control, flow restriction hardware, equipment for sample collection, temperature control devices, and ancillary supplies. The generator module provides carbon dioxide at pressures to 1 kbar ({approximately}14,500 psi), incorporates no moving parts, and allows rapid loading without tools due to novel fingertight closures. Samples are contained in sintered inserts that fit inside three extraction cells that also have rapid, fingertight closures. Analyte collection can be accomplished using liquid solvent or restrictorless rapid depressurization techniques. Control schemes allow operation at a wide variety of pressures and temperatures and the use of static, dynamic, or hybrid static/dynamic extraction strategies. The technical performance of the prototype apparatus was evaluated by comparison of results from the SFE of a soil sample spiked with six to nine organic compounds of environmental interest to Soxhlet extraction.

  20. A man-portable supercritical fluid extractor

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.W.; Zemanian, T.S.; Lee, R.N.; Wright, C.W.

    1995-12-31

    A new prototype supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) apparatus has been developed for the on-site preparation of solid matrix samples for subsequent organic analysis. The apparatus consists of two parts, each of which satisfy weight and size requirements for portability. They are a generator module that supplies high-pressure carbon dioxide (the source of which is dry ice) and a briefcase containing a pressure regulator, extraction cells, valves for flow control, flow restriction hardware, equipment for sample collection, temperature control devices, and ancillary supplies. The generator module provides carbon dioxide at pressures to 1 kbar ({approximately}14,500 psi), incorporates no moving parts, and allows rapid loading without tools due to novel fingertight closures. Samples are contained in sintered inserts that fit inside three extraction cells that also have rapid, fingertight closures. Analyte collection may be accomplished using liquid solvent or restrictorless rapid depressurization techniques. Control schemes allow operation at a wide variety of pressures and temperatures and the use of static, dynamic, or hybrid static/dynamic extraction strategies. The technical performance of the prototype apparatus was evaluated by comparison of results from the SFE of a soil sample spiked with six to nine organic compounds of environmental interest to Soxhlet extraction.

  1. Supercritical fluid precipitation of recombinant human immunoglobulin from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Nesta, D P; Elliott, J S; Warr, J P

    2000-02-20

    Supercritical carbon dioxide was used as an antisolvent for producing recombinant human immunoglobulin G (rIgG) particulate powders. Liquid carbon dioxide (CO(2)) was premixed with ethanol to create a single-phase, modified supercritical fluid (SCF). The modified SCF was then vigorously mixed with a pharmaceutically acceptable, aqueous formulation of rIgG, and the mixture was immediately atomized into a pressurized vessel where rapid expansion of the modified SCF extracted the aqueous phase, resulting in precipitation of the protein powder. The process was reproducible, and resulting powder products were characterized by their aqueous solubilities, and the spectroscopic profile, molecular integrity, and antigen binding activity of the individual soluble fractions. Molecular integrity was assessed via size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography (SEC), whereas antigen binding activity was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Attempts to characterize particle size and morphology were confounded due to the extremely deliquescent nature of the powders, causing them to absorb moisture rapidly and become gummy. Operational conditions were optimized to a point which yielded powders that were completely soluble, and had ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopic and SEC profiles indistinguishable from those of the reference standard starting solution from which the powders were derived. Antigen binding activities of the powders, however, were

  2. Initial assessment of Ni-base alloy performance in 0.1 MPa and supercritical CO2

    DOE PAGES

    Pint, B. A.; Keiser, J. R.

    2015-09-25

    There is considerable interest in increasing the working temperature of both open and closed supercritical CO2 (sCO2) cycles to ≥700 °C. At these temperatures, it is unlikely that any Fe-base alloys have suitable strength and therefore the focus is on Ni-base alloys for this application. To begin addressing the lack of compatibility data under these conditions, initial work exposed a wide range of candidate alloys in 500-h exposures at 20 MPa (200 bar) CO2 at 650 -750 °C in high purity CO2. In general, the reaction products were thin and protective in these exposures. A smaller group of alloy couponsmore » focusing on chromia- and alumina-forming alloys was exposed for 500h in 0.1 MPa (1bar) air, CO2, CO2+O2 and CO2+H2O for comparison. Thus, the thin surface oxides formed were very similar to those formed at high pressure and no clear detrimental effect of CO2 oxidation or O2 or H2O impurities could be observed in these exposures.« less

  3. Dewetting of silica surfaces upon reactions with supercritical CO2 and brine: pore-scale studies in micromodels.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongman; Wan, Jiamin; Kneafsey, Timothy J; Tokunaga, Tetsu K

    2012-04-03

    Wettability of reservoir minerals and rocks is a critical factor controlling CO(2) mobility, residual trapping, and safe-storage in geologic carbon sequestration, and currently is the factor imparting the greatest uncertainty in predicting capillary behavior in porous media. Very little information on wettability in supercritical CO(2) (scCO(2))-mineral-brine systems is available. We studied pore-scale wettability and wettability alteration in scCO(2)-silica-brine systems using engineered micromodels (transparent pore networks), at 8.5 MPa and 45 °C, over a wide range of NaCl concentrations up to 5.0 M. Dewetting of silica surfaces upon reactions with scCO(2) was observed through water film thinning, water droplet formation, and contact angle increases within single pores. The brine contact angles increased from initial values near 0° up to 80° with larger increases under higher ionic strength conditions. Given the abundance of silica surfaces in reservoirs and caprocks, these results indicate that CO(2) induced dewetting may have important consequences on CO(2) sequestration including reducing capillary entry pressure, and altering quantities of CO(2) residual trapping, relative permeability, and caprock integrity.

  4. Supercritical CO2 Dissolution and Mass Transfer in a Heterogeneous Pore Network under Drainage and Imbibition Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Chang, C.; Zhou, Q.; Oostrom, M.; Wietsma, T. W.; Yu, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolution trapping of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is usually modeled by assuming instantaneous scCO2 dissolution and equilibrium phase partitioning. Our recent core-scale imbibition experiments show a prolonged depletion of residual scCO2 by dissolution, implying a non-equilibrium mechanism. In our 2D sandstone-analogue micromodel experimental study, pore-scale scCO2 dissolution was inferred from imaging (1) drainage using a pH-sensitive water dye and (2) imbibition using a scCO2 dye. The drainage experiment was conducted by injecting scCO2 into the dissolved-CO2 (dsCO2)-free water-filled pore network. The time-lapse images of non-uniform dye intensities indicating varying pH show that dsCO2 concentration varies from zero to solubility in individual pores and pore clusters and the average concentration gradually increases with time. The different rates of dissolution in different pores/clusters can be attributed to (1) fast scCO2 dissolution at scCO2-water interfaces, (2) rate-limited mass transfer due to limited interface areas, and (3) a transition from rate-limited to diffusion-limited mass transfer, revealed by detailed analysis on selected pores and pore clusters. The imbibition experiments conducted by injecting deionized water at different rates show (1) water flow in channels bypassing scCO2 at high residual saturations, (2) subsequent, slow scCO2 depletion by dissolution and mass transfer as effluent dsCO2 concentration varies from 0.06% to 4.44% of solubility, and (3) creation of new water flow paths by dissolution, enhancing scCO2 depletion by coupled displacement and dissolution. Both the drainage and imbibitions experiments indicate non-equilibrium scCO2 dissolution in the centimeter-scale pore network over 4.5 hours and up to 14 hours, respectively. The pore-scale imaging can help better understand the effects of pore-throat characteristics on scCO2 dissolution and mass transfer during drainage and imbibition and the interplay between displacement and

  5. Supercritical CO2 assisted process for the production of high-purity and sterile nano-hydroxyapatite/chitosan hybrid scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Ruphuy, G; Souto-Lopes, M; Paiva, D; Costa, P; Rodrigues, A E; Monteiro, F J; Salgado, C L; Fernandes, M H; Lopes, J C; Dias, M M; Barreiro, M F

    2017-05-04

    Hybrid scaffolds composed of hydroxyapatite (HAp), in particular in its nanometric form (n-HAp), and chitosan (CS) are promising materials for non-load-bearing bone graft applications. The main constraints of their production concern the successful implementation of the final purification/neutralization and sterilization steps. Often, the used purification strategies can compromise scaffold structural features, and conventional sterilization techniques can result in material's thermal degradation and/or contamination with toxic residues. In this context, this work presents a process to produce n-HAp/CS scaffolds mimicking bone composition and structure, where an innovative single step based on supercritical CO2 extraction was used for both purification and sterilization. A removal of 80% of the residual acetic acid was obtained (T = 75°C, p = 8.0 MPa, 2 extraction cycles of 2 h) giving rise to scaffolds exhibiting adequate interconnected porous structure, fast swelling and storage modulus compatible with non-load-bearing applications. Moreover, the obtained scaffolds showed cytocompatibility and osteoconductivity without further need of disinfection/sterilization procedures. Among the main advantages, the proposed process comprises only three steps (n-HAp/CS dispersion preparation; freeze-drying; and supercritical CO2 extraction), and the supercritical CO2 extraction show clear advantages over currently used procedures based on neutralization steps. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Investigation of parameter estimation and impact of injection rate on relative permeability measurements for supercritical CO2 and water by unsteady-state method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiratsuka, Y.; Yamamoto, H.

    2014-12-01

    CCS (Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage) is a promising option for mitigating climate changes. To predict the behavior of injected CO2 in a deep reservoir, relative permeability of supercritical CO2 and water of the reservoir rock is one of the most fundamental and influential properties. For determining the relative permeability, we employed the unsteady state method, in which the relative permeability is determined based on history matching of transient monitoring data with a multi-phase flow model. The unsteady-state method is relatively simple and short, but obviously its accuracy strongly depends on the flow model assumed in the history matching. In this study, we conducted relative permeability measurements of supercritical CO2-water system for Berea sandstone with the unsteady-state method under a reservoir condition at a 1km depth (P= 9.5MPa, T = 44˚C). Automatic history matching was performed with an inversion simulator iTOUGH2/ECO2N for multi-phase flow system of supercritical CO2, NaCl, and water. A sensitivity analysis of relative permeability parameters for CO2 and water was carried out to better understand the uniqueness and the uncertainty of the optimum solution estimated by the history matching. Among the parameters of the Corey-type curve employed in this study, while the end-point permeability could be optimized in a limited range, the other parameters were correlated and their combinations were not unique. However it was found that any combination of these parameters results in nearly identical shapes of the curve in the range of CO2 saturation in this study (0 to 60%). The optimally estimated curve from the unsteady-method was well comparable with those from the steady-state method acquired in the previous studies. Our experiment also focuses on the impact of injection rate on the estimates of relative permeability, as it is known that the injection rate could have a significant effect on fluid distribution such as viscous fingering with

  7. Electrochemistry in Near-Critical and Supercritical Fluids. 6. The Electrochemistry of Ferrocene and Phenazine in Acetonitrile between 25C and 300C.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    electrochemical studies in near-critical CO2 with water. We describe here electrochemistry in the organic supercritical fluid acetonitrile (MeCN), where the...RESEARCH 1 FlE COP Contract NO0014- 84-K-0428 Task No. NR 051-693 TECHNICAL REPORT No. 8 (Electrochemistry in Near-Critical and Supercritical Fluids. 6. The...is suggested. FF V.. I r.M I- .- Electrochemistry in Near-Critical and Supercritical Fluids. 6. The Electrochemistry of Ferrocene and Phenazine in

  8. Supercritical fluid technology: a promising approach in pharmaceutical research.

    PubMed

    Girotra, Priti; Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Nagpal, Kalpana

    2013-02-01

    Supercritical fluids possess the unique properties of behaving like liquids and gases, above their critical point. Supercritical fluid technology has recently emerged as a green and novel technique for various processes such as solubility enhancement of poorly soluble drugs, plasticization of polymers, surface modification, nanosizing and nanocrystal modification, and chromatographic extraction. Research interest in this area has been fuelled because of the numerous advantages that the technology offers over the conventional methods. This work aims to review the merits, demerits, and various processes such as rapid expansion of supercritical solutions (RESS), particles from gas saturated solutions (PGSS), gas antisolvent process (GAS), supercritical antisolvent process (SAS) and polymerization induced phase separation (PIPS), that have enabled this technology to considerably raise the interest of researchers over the past two decades. An insight has been given into the numerous applications of this technology in pharmaceutical industry and the future challenges which must be appropriately dealt with to make it effective on a commercial scale.

  9. TOUGH+CO 2: A multiphase fluid-flow simulator for CO 2 geologic sequestration in saline aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Keni; Moridis, George; Pruess, Karsten

    2011-06-01

    TOUGH+CO 2 is a new simulator for modeling of CO 2 geologic sequestration in saline aquifers. It is a member of TOUGH+, the successor to the TOUGH2 family of codes for multicomponent, multiphase fluid and heat flow simulation. The code accounts for heat and up to 3 mass components, which are partitioned into three possible phases. In the code, the thermodynamics and thermophysical properties of H 2O-NaCl-CO 2 mixtures are determined based on system status and subdivided into six different phase combinations. By solving coupled mass and heat balance equations, TOUGH+CO 2 can model non-isothermal or isothermal CO 2 injection, phase behavior and flow of fluids and heat under typical conditions of temperature, pressure and salinity in CO 2 geologic storage projects. The code takes into account effects of salt precipitation on porosity and permeability changes, and the wettability phenomena. The new simulator inherits all capabilities of TOUGH2 in handling fractured media and using unstructured meshes for complex simulation domains. The code adds additional relative permeability and capillary pressure functions. The FORTRAN 95 OOP architecture and other new language features have been extensively used to enhance memory use and computing efficiency. In addition, a domain decomposition approach has been implemented for parallel simulation. All these features lead to increased computational efficiency, and allow applicability of the code to multi-core/processor parallel computing platforms with excellent scalability.

  10. In Situ Study of CO2 and H2O Partitioning Between Na-Montmorillonite and Variably Wet Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Loring, John S.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Chen, Jeffrey; Thompson, Christopher J.; Martin, Paul F.; Benezeth, Pascale; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2014-06-03

    Shale formations play fundamental roles in large-scale geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) aimed primarily to mitigate climate change, and in smaller-scale GCS targeted mainly for CO2-enhanced gas recovery operations. In both technologies, CO2 is injected underground as a supercritical fluid (scCO2), where interactions with shale minerals could influence successful GCS implementation. Reactive components of shales include expandable clays, such as montmorillonites and mixed-layer illite/smectite clays. In this work, we used in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and in situ infrared (IR) spectroscopy to investigate the swelling/shrinkage and water/CO2 sorption of a pure montmorillonite, Na-SWy-2, when the clay is exposed to variably hydrated scCO2 at 50 °C and 90 bar. Measured interlayer spacings and sorbed water concentrations at varying levels of scCO2 hydration are similar to previously reported values measured in air at ambient pressure over a range of relative humidities. IR spectra show evidence of both water and CO2 intercalation, and variations in peak shapes and positions suggest multiple sorbed types with distinct chemical environments. Based on the intensity of the asymmetric CO stretching band of the CO2 associated with the Na-SWy-2, we observed a significant increase in sorbed CO2 as the clay expands from a 0W to a 1W state, suggesting that water props open the interlayer so that CO2 can enter. However, as the clay transitions from a 1W to a 2W state, CO2 desorbs sharply. These observations were placed in the context of two conceptual models concerning hydration mechanisms for expandable clays and were also discussed in light of recent theoretical studies on CO2-H2O-clay interactions. The swelling/shrinkage of expandable clays could affect solid volume, porosity, and permeability of shales. Consequently, the results from this work could aid predictions of shale caprock integrity in large-scale GCS, as well as methane transmissivity in enhanced gas recovery

  11. Particle Formation and Product Formulation Using Supercritical Fluids.

    PubMed

    Knez, Željko; Knez Hrnčič, Maša; Škerget, Mojca

    2015-01-01

    Traditional methods for solids processing involve either high temperatures, necessary for melting or viscosity reduction, or hazardous organic solvents. Owing to the negative impact of the solvents on the environment, especially on living organisms, intensive research has focused on new, sustainable methods for the processing of these substances. Applying supercritical fluids for particle formation may produce powders and composites with special characteristics. Several processes for formation and design of solid particles using dense gases have been studied intensively. The unique thermodynamic and fluid-dynamic properties of supercritical fluids can be used also for impregnation of solid particles or for the formation of solid powderous emulsions and particle coating, e.g., for formation of solids with unique properties for use in different applications. We give an overview of the application of sub- and supercritical fluids as green processing media for particle formation processes and present recent advances and trends in development.

  12. Evaluation and Countermeasures of Convective Heat Transfer on Thermal Conductivity Measurement Using the Peltier Effect and Application to Supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zai-hua; Tozaki, Ken-ichi; Nishikawa, Keiko

    1999-12-01

    In the previous paper, the present authors reported a newlydeveloped method of thermal conductivity measurement for fluids usinga thermoelectric module. It was very simple and effective for samplesin supercritical states. However, the countermeasures against thermalperturbation were insufficient. In the present work, some improvementshave been made on the apparatus to eliminate thermal convection. Theconvective heat transfer effect on the measurement has been evaluatedby varying the temperature difference across the sample layer. It hasbeen found that the convection-free conductivity for critical andsupercritical fluids can be determined by extrapolation of thetemperature difference to 0. The thermal conductivity ofsupercritical CO2 measured by the improved method is presented,including the states near the critical point.

  13. Isolation of essential oil from different plants and herbs by supercritical fluid extraction.

    PubMed

    Fornari, Tiziana; Vicente, Gonzalo; Vázquez, Erika; García-Risco, Mónica R; Reglero, Guillermo

    2012-08-10

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is an innovative, clean and environmental friendly technology with particular interest for the extraction of essential oil from plants and herbs. Supercritical CO(2) is selective, there is no associated waste treatment of a toxic solvent, and extraction times are moderate. Further, supercritical extracts were often recognized of superior quality when compared with those produced by hydro-distillation or liquid-solid extraction. This review provides a comprehensive and updated discussion of the developments and applications of SFE in the isolation of essential oils from plant matrices. SFE is normally performed with pure CO(2) or using a cosolvent; fractionation of the extract is commonly accomplished in order to isolate the volatile oil compounds from other co-extracted substances. In this review the effect of pressure, temperature and cosolvent on the extraction and fractionation procedure is discussed. Additionally, a comparison of the extraction yield and composition of the essential oil of several plants and herbs from Lamiaceae family, namely oregano, sage, thyme, rosemary, basil, marjoram and marigold, which were produced in our supercritical pilot-plant device, is presented and discussed.

  14. Ionic Effects on Supercritical CO2-Brine Interfacial Tensions: Molecular Dynamics Simulations and a Universal Correlation with Ionic Strength, Temperature, and Pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lingling; Ji, Jiayuan; Tao, Lu; Lin, Shangchao

    2016-09-13

    For geological CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers, the interfacial tension (IFT) between supercritical CO2 and brine is critical for the storage security and design of the storage capacitance. However, currently, no predictive model exists to determine the IFT of supercritical CO2 against complex electrolyte solutions involving various mixed salt species at different concentrations and compositions. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the effect of salt ions on the incremental IFT at the supercritical CO2-brine interface with respect to that at the reference supercritical CO2-water interface. Supercritical CO2-NaCl solution, CO2-CaCl2 solution and CO2-(NaCl+CaCl2) mixed solution systems are simulated at 343 K and 20 MPa under different salinities and salt compositions. We find that the valence of the cations is the primary contributor to the variation in IFT, while the Lennard-Jones potentials for the cations pose a smaller impact on the IFT. Interestingly, the incremental IFT exhibits a general linear correlation with the ionic strength in the above three electrolyte systems, and the slopes are almost identical and independent of the solution types. Based on this finding, a universal predictive formula for IFTs of CO2-complex electrolyte solution systems is established, as a function of ionic strength, temperature, and pressure. The predicted IFTs using the established formula agree perfectly (with a high statistical confidence level of ∼96%) with a wide range of experimental data for CO2 interfacing with different electrolyte solutions, such as those involving MgCl2 and Na2SO4. This work provides an efficient and accurate route to directly predict IFTs in supercritical CO2-complex electrolyte solution systems for practical engineering applications, such as geological CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers and other interfacial systems involving complex electrolyte solutions.

  15. New Linear Partitioning Models Based on Experimental Water: Supercritical CO2 Partitioning Data of Selected Organic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Burant, Aniela; Thompson, Christopher; Lowry, Gregory V; Karamalidis, Athanasios K

    2016-05-17

    Partitioning coefficients of organic compounds between water and supercritical CO2 (sc-CO2) are necessary to assess the risk of migration of these chemicals from subsurface CO2 storage sites. Despite the large number of potential organic contaminants, the current data set of published water-sc-CO2 partitioning coefficients is very limited. Here, the partitioning coefficients of thiophene, pyrrole, and anisole were measured in situ over a range of temperatures and pressures using a novel pressurized batch-reactor system with dual spectroscopic detectors: a near-infrared spectrometer for measuring the organic analyte in the CO2 phase and a UV detector for quantifying the analyte in the aqueous phase. Our measured partitioning coefficients followed expected trends based on volatility and aqueous solubility. The partitioning coefficients and literature data were then used to update a published poly parameter linear free-energy relationship and to develop five new linear free-energy relationships for predicting water-sc-CO2 partitioning coefficients. A total of four of the models targeted a single class of organic compounds. Unlike models that utilize Abraham solvation parameters, the new relationships use vapor pressure and aqueous solubility of the organic compound at 25 °C and CO2 density to predict partitioning coefficients over a range of temperature and pressure conditions. The compound class models provide better estimates of partitioning behavior for compounds in that class than does the model built for the entire data set.

  16. Deposition of Ni nanoparticles onto porous supports using supercritical CO2: effect of the precursor and reduction methodology.

    PubMed

    Morère, Jacobo; Royuela, Sergio; Asensio, Guillermo; Palomino, Pablo; Enciso, Eduardo; Pando, Concepción; Cabañas, Albertina

    2015-12-28

    The deposition of Ni nanoparticles into porous supports is very important in catalysis. In this paper, we explore the use of supercritical CO(2) (scCO(2)) as a green solvent to deposit Ni nanoparticles on mesoporous SiO2 SBA-15 and a carbon xerogel. The good transport properties of scCO(2) allowed the efficient penetration of metal precursors dissolved in scCO(2) within the pores of the support without damaging its structure. Nickel hexafluoroacetylacetonate hydrate, nickel acetylacetonate, bis(cyclopentadienyl)nickel, Ni(NO(3))2⋅6H(2)O and NiCl(2)⋅6H(2)O were tried as precursors. Different methodologies were used: impregnation in scCO(2) and reduction in H(2)/N(2) at 400°C and low pressure, reactive deposition using H(2) at 200-250°C in scCO(2) and reactive deposition using ethanol at 150-200°C in scCO(2). The effect of precursor and methodology on the nickel particle size and the material homogeneity (on the different substrates) was analysed. This technology offers many opportunities in the preparation of metal-nanostructured materials. © 2015 The Author(s).

  17. Effects of salinity and the extent of water on supercritical CO2-induced phlogopite dissolution and secondary mineral formation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hongbo; Ray, Jessica R; Jun, Young-Shin

    2011-02-15

    To ensure the viability of geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS), we need a holistic understanding of reactions at supercritical CO2 (scCO2)-saline water-rock interfaces and the environmental factors affecting these interactions. This research investigated the effects of salinity and the extent of water on the dissolution and surface morphological changes of phlogopite [KMg2.87Si3.07Al1.23O10(F,OH)2], a model clay mineral in potential GCS sites. Salinity enhanced the dissolution of phlogopite and affected the location, shape, size, and phase of secondary minerals. In low salinity solutions, nanoscale particles of secondary minerals formed much faster, and there were more nanoparticles than in high salinity solutions. The effect of water extent was investigated by comparing scCO2-H2O(g)-phlogopite and scCO2-H2O(l)-phlogopite interactions. Experimental results suggested that the presence of a thin water film adsorbed on the phlogopite surface caused the formation of dissolution pits and a surface coating of secondary mineral phases that could change the physical properties of rocks. These results provide new information for understanding reactions at scCO2-saline water-rock interfaces in deep saline aquifers and will help design secure and environmentally sustainable CO2 sequestration projects.

  18. Application of supercritical CO2 for extraction of polyisoprenoid alcohols and their esters from plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Jozwiak, Adam; Brzozowski, Robert; Bujnowski, Zygmunt; Chojnacki, Tadeusz; Swiezewska, Ewa

    2013-07-01

    In this study, a method of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) with carbon dioxide of polyisoprenoids from plant photosynthetic tissues is described. SFE was an effective extraction method for short- and medium-chain compounds with even higher yield than that observed for the "classical extraction" method with organic solvents. Moreover, SFE-derived extracts contained lower amounts of impurities (e.g., chlorophylls) than those obtained by extraction of the same tissue with organic solvents. Elevated temperature and extended extraction time of SFE resulted in a higher rate of extraction of long-chain polyisoprenoids. Ethanol cofeeding did not increase the extraction efficiency of polyisoprenoids; instead, it increased the content of impurities in the lipid extract. Optimization of SFE time and temperature gives the opportunity of prefractionation of complex polyisoprenoid mixtures accumulated in plant tissues. Extracts obtained with application of SFE are very stable and free from organic solvents and can further be used directly in experimental diet supplementation or as starting material for preparation of semisynthetic polyisoprenoid derivatives, e.g., polyisoprenoid phosphates.