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Sample records for superfluid liquid helium

  1. Liquid acquisition devices for superfluid helium transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dipirro, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    To transfer superfluid helium (He II) in the milli-g or micro-g environment in orbit, it is necessary to provide a reasonably steady supply of liquid to the inlet of the pump in the supply dewar. To accomplish this without providing an artificial gravity through acceleration requires a liquid acquisition device. Fluid swirl and electrostatic devices have been proposed to orientate the fluid. However, the simplest mechanisms appear to be the use of surface tension or the thermomechanical effect. This paper examines four concepts for providing He II to the inlet of a thermomechanical pump. The devices are a distributed thermomechanical pump, a distributed pump with a main thermomechanical pump, a screened channel system and a vane/sponge combination. Calculations on the efficiency of these types of liquid acquisition devices are made using laboratory data from tests involving small scale devices where applicable. These calculations show that the latter two types of liquid acquisition devices are the most efficient. Questions as to the probability of cavitation and the effect of the residual shuttle acceleration on their operation remain to be answered, however.

  2. Design and testing of a superfluid liquid helium cooling loop

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, L.M.; Green, M.A.; Levin, S.M.; Smoot, G.F.; Witebsky, C.

    1989-07-01

    This paper describes the design and preliminary testing of a cryogenic cooling loop that uses a thermomechanical pump to circulate superfluid liquid helium. The cooling loop test apparatus is designed to prove forced liquid helium flow concepts that will be used on the Astromag superconducting magnet facility. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Cavitation in flowing superfluid helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daney, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Flowing superfluid helium cavitates much more readily than normal liquid helium, and there is a marked difference in the cavitation behavior of the two fluids as the lambda point is traversed. Examples of cavitation in a turbine meter and centrifugal pump are given, together with measurements of the cavitation strength of flowing superfluid helium. The unusual cavitation behavior of superfluid helium is attributed to its immense thermal conductivity .

  4. Design and Testing of a Superfluid Liquid Helium CoolingLoop

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, L.M.; Green, M.A.; Levin, S.M.; Smoot, George F.; Witebsky, C.

    1989-07-24

    This paper describes the design and preliminary testing of a cryogenic cooling loop that uses a thermomechanical pump to circulate superfluid liquid helium. The cooling loop test apparatus is designed to prove forced liquid helium flow concepts that will be used on the Astromag superconducting magnet facility.

  5. Superfluid helium 2 liquid-vapor phase separation: Technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A literature survey of helium 2 liquid vapor phase separation is presented. Currently, two types of He 2 phase separators are being investigated: porous, sintered metal plugs and the active phase separator. The permeability K(P) shows consistency in porous plug geometric characterization. Both the heat and mass fluxes increase with K(P). Downstream pressure regulation to adjust for varying heat loads and both temperatures is possible. For large dynamic heat loads, the active phase separator shows a maximum heat rejection rate of up to 2 W and bath temperature stability of 0.1 mK. Porous plug phase separation performance should be investigated for application to SIRTF and, in particular, that plugs of from 10 to the minus ninth square centimeters to 10 to the minus eighth square centimeters in conjunction with downstream pressure regulation be studied.

  6. Superfluid Helium Tanker (SFHT) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, Ralph N.; Dominick, Sam M.; Anderson, John E.; Gille, John P.; Martin, Tim A.; Marino, John S.; Paynter, Howard L.; Traill, R. Eric; Herzl, Alfred; Gotlib, Sam

    1988-01-01

    Replenishment of superfluid helium (SFHe) offers the potential of extending the on-orbit life of observatories, satellite instruments, sensors and laboratories which operate in the 2 K temperature regime. A reference set of resupply customers was identified as representing realistic helium servicing requirements and interfaces for the first 10 years of superfluid helium tanker (SFHT) operations. These included the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), the Particle Astrophysics Magnet Facility (Astromag), and the Microgravity and Materials Processing Sciences Facility (MMPS)/Critical Point Phenomena Facility (CPPF). A mixed-fleet approach to SFHT utilization was considered. The tanker permits servicing from the Shuttle cargo bay, in situ when attached to the OMV and carried to the user spacecraft, and as a depot at the Space Station. A SFHT Dewar ground servicing concept was developed which uses a dedicated ground cooling heat exchanger to convert all the liquid, after initial fill as normal fluid, to superfluid for launch. This concept permits the tanker to be filled to a near full condition, and then cooled without any loss of fluid. The final load condition can be saturated superfluid with any desired ullage volume, or the tank can be totally filed and pressurized. The SFHT Dewar and helium plumbing system design has sufficient component redundancy to meet fail-operational, fail-safe requirements, and is designed structurally to meet a 50 mission life usage requirement. Technology development recommendations were made for the selected SFHT concept, and a Program Plan and cost estimate prepared for a phase C/D program spanning 72 months from initiation through first launch in 1997.

  7. Superfluid Helium Heat Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gully, P.

    This paper reports on the development and the thermal tests of three superfluid helium heat pipes. Two of them are designed to provide a large transport capacity (4 mW at 1.7 K). They feature a copper braid located inside a 6 mm outer diameter stainless tube fitted with copper ends for mechanical anchoring. The other heat pipe has no copper braid and is designed to get much smaller heat transport capacity (0.5 mW) and to explore lower temperature (0.7 - 1 K). The copper braid and the tube wall is the support of the Rollin superfluid helium film in which the heat is transferred. The low filling pressure makes the technology very simple with the possibility to easily bend the tube. We present the design and discuss the thermal performance of the heat pipes tested in the 0.7 to 2.0 K temperature range. The long heat pipe (1.2 m with copper braid) and the short one (0.25 m with copper braid) have similar thermal performance in the range 0.7 - 2.0 K. At 1.7 K the long heat pipe, 120 g in weight, reaches a heat transfer capacity of 6.2 mW and a thermal conductance of 600 mW/K for 4 mW transferred power. Due to the pressure drop of the vapor flow and Kapitza thermal resistance, the conductance of the third heat pipe dramatically decreases when the temperature decreases. A 3.8 mW/K is obtained at 0.7 K for 0.5 mW transferred power.

  8. Superfluid helium leak sealant study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorreiter, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-one leak specimens were fabricated in the ends of stainless steel and aluminum tubes. Eighteen of these tubes were coated with a copolymer material to seal the leak. The other three specimens were left uncoated and served as control specimens. All 21 tubes were cold shocked in liquid helium 50 times and then the leak rate was measured while the tubes were submerged in superfluid helium at 1.7 K. During the cold shocks two of the coated specimens were mechanically damaged and eliminated from the test program. Of the remaining 16 coated specimens one suffered a total coating failure and resulting high leak rate. Another three of the coated specimens suffered partial coating failures. The leak rates of the uncoated specimens were also measured and reported. The significance of various leak rates is discussed in view of the infrared astronomical satellite (IRAS) Dewar performance.

  9. Behavior of turbine and Venturi flowmeters in superfluid helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daney, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus which forces liquid helium from a calibrated bellows through a flow meter is used to calibrate turbine and Venturi flow meters in both normal and superfluid helium. The bellows are driven by an ambient temperature stepping motor. Flow rates range up to 0.35 L/s, and helium temperatures range from 1.25-4.0 K. For the case of a 9.3-mm bore turbine meter, identical meter factors are found for normal and superfluid helium. For the Venturi meter, discharge coefficients between 0.98 and 1.0 are found with normal and superfluid helium.

  10. Vortex Rings in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamri, Sultan Z.; Barenghi, Carlo F.

    2008-11-01

    We present results of numerical simulations of large-scale vortex rings in superfluid helium. These large-scale vortex rings consists of many discrete (quantized) vortex filaments which interact with each other moving according to the Biot-Savart law. Lifetime, structural stability and speed of large-scale vortex rings will be discussed and compared to experimental results.

  11. Resource Letter SH-1: Superfluid Helium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallock, Robert B.

    1982-01-01

    Provides an annotated list of books, textbooks, and films on superfluid helium. Also lists research reports/reviews arranged by category, including among others, early history, microscopic understanding, ions in helium, helium in rotation, vortices and quantization, helium films and constricted geometrics, persistence flow, and superfluid helium…

  12. Vorticity matching in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels, David C.

    1991-12-01

    Recent experiments have rekindled interest in high Reynolds number flows using superfluid helium. In a continuing series of experiments, the flow of helium II through various devices (smooth pipes, corrugated pipes, valves, venturies, turbine flowmeters, and coanda flowmeters for example) was investigated. In all cases, the measured values (typically, mass flow rates and pressure drops) were found to be well described by classical relations for high Reynolds flows. This is unexpected since helium II consists of two interpenetrating fluids; one fluid with nonzero viscosity (the normal fluid) and one with zero viscosity (the superfluid). Only the normal fluid component should directly obey classical relations. Since the experiments listed above only measure the external behavior of the flow (i.e., pressure drops over devices), there is a great deal of room for interpretation of their results. One possible interpretation is that in turbulent flows the normal fluid and the superfluid velocity fields are somehow 'locked' together, presumably by the mutual friction force between the superfluid vortex filaments and the normal fluid. We refer to this locking together of the two fluids as 'vorticity matching.'

  13. Exotic Ions in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wanchun; Xie, Zhuolin; Cooper, Leon N.; Maris, Humphrey J.

    2016-11-01

    Exotic ions are negatively charged objects which have been detected in superfluid helium-4 at temperatures in the vicinity of 1 K. Mobility experiments in several different labs have revealed the existence of at least 18 such objects. These ions have a higher mobility than the normal negative ion and appear to be singly charged and smaller. We summarize the experimental situation, the possible structure of these objects, and how these objects might be formed.

  14. Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) operatons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, P.; Dipirro, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    The in-flight tests and the operational sequences of the Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) experiment are outlined. These tests include the transfer of superfluid helium at a variety of rates, the transfer into cold and warm receivers, the operation of an extravehicular activity coupling, and tests of a liquid acquisition device. A variety of different types of instrumentation will be required for these tests. These include pressure sensors and liquid flow meters that must operate in liquid helium, accurate thermometry, two types of quantity gauges, and liquid-vapor sensors.

  15. Superfluid Helium Tanker (SFHT) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The accomplishments and recommendations of the two-phase Superfluid Helium Tanker (SFHT) study are presented. During the first phase of the study, the emphasis was on defining a comprehensive set of user requirements, establishing SFHT interface parameters and design requirements, and selecting a fluid subsystem design concept. During the second phase, an overall system design concept was constructed based on appropriate analyses and more detailed definition of requirements. Modifications needed to extend the baseline for use with cryogens other than SFHT have been determined, and technology development needs related to the recommended design have been assessed.

  16. Particle detection using superfluid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Bandler, S.R.; Lanou, R.E.; Maris, H.J.; More, T.; Porter, F.S.; Seidel, G.M.; Torii, R.

    1991-01-01

    We have observed 5 MeV {alpha} particles stopped in volumes-up to two liters of liquid helium at 70 mK. A fraction of the kinetic energy of an {alpha} particle is converted to elementary excitations (rotons and phonons), which progagate ballistically in isotopically pure {sup 4}He below 0.1 K. Most of these excitations have sufficient energy to evaporate helium atoms on hitting a free surface. The evaporated helium atoms can be detected calorimetrically when adsorbed on a thin silicon wafer ({approximately}1.7 g, 35 cm{sup 2}) suspended above the liquid. Temperature changes of the silicon are measured with a NTD germanium bolometer. For the geometry studied the observed temperature change of the silicon resulting from an {alpha} event in the liquid is approximately 5% of the temperature rise from an {alpha} hitting the silicon directly. The implications of these measurements will be discussed as they relate to the possible construction of a large scale detector of solar neutrinos.

  17. Particle detection using superfluid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Bandler, S.R.; Lanou, R.E.; Maris, H.J.; More, T.; Porter, F.S.; Seidel, G.M.; Torii, R.

    1991-12-31

    We have observed 5 MeV {alpha} particles stopped in volumes-up to two liters of liquid helium at 70 mK. A fraction of the kinetic energy of an {alpha} particle is converted to elementary excitations (rotons and phonons), which progagate ballistically in isotopically pure {sup 4}He below 0.1 K. Most of these excitations have sufficient energy to evaporate helium atoms on hitting a free surface. The evaporated helium atoms can be detected calorimetrically when adsorbed on a thin silicon wafer ({approximately}1.7 g, 35 cm{sup 2}) suspended above the liquid. Temperature changes of the silicon are measured with a NTD germanium bolometer. For the geometry studied the observed temperature change of the silicon resulting from an {alpha} event in the liquid is approximately 5% of the temperature rise from an {alpha} hitting the silicon directly. The implications of these measurements will be discussed as they relate to the possible construction of a large scale detector of solar neutrinos.

  18. Acoustics of the Lambda Transition in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megson, Peter; Meichle, David; Lathrop, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Liquid Helium undergoes a phase transition and becomes a quantum superfluid when cooled below the Lambda transition temperature of 2.17 Kelvin. The superfluid, which is a partial Bose Einstein Condensate, exhibits unique macroscopic properties such as flow without viscosity and ballistic temperature propagation. We have recorded striking audio-frequency sounds using a micro electromechanical microphone (MEMS) present as the Helium goes through the Lambda transition. Characterization of this sound, as well as its relevance to theories of the Lambda transition will be presented.

  19. Germanium resistance thermometer calibration at superfluid helium temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, F. C.

    1985-01-01

    The rapid increase in resistance of high purity semi-conducting germanium with decreasing temperature in the superfluid helium range of temperatures makes this material highly adaptable as a very sensitive thermometer. Also, a germanium thermometer exhibits a highly reproducible resistance versus temperature characteristic curve upon cycling between liquid helium temperatures and room temperature. These two factors combine to make germanium thermometers ideally suited for measuring temperatures in many cryogenic studies at superfluid helium temperatures. One disadvantage, however, is the relatively high cost of calibrated germanium thermometers. In space helium cryogenic systems, many such thermometers are often required, leading to a high cost for calibrated thermometers. The construction of a thermometer calibration cryostat and probe which will allow for calibrating six germanium thermometers at one time, thus effecting substantial savings in the purchase of thermometers is considered.

  20. Hydrodynamics of superfluid helium in a single nanohole.

    PubMed

    Savard, M; Dauphinais, G; Gervais, G

    2011-12-16

    The flow of liquid helium through a single nanohole with radius smaller than 25 nm was studied. Mass flow was induced by applying a pressure difference of up to 1.4 bar across a 50 nm thick Si(3)N(4) membrane and was measured directly by means of mass spectrometry. In liquid He I, we experimentally show that the fluid is not clamped by the short pipe with diameter-to-length ratio D/L≃1, despite the small diameter of the nanohole. This viscous flow is quantitatively understood by making use of a model of flow in short pipes. In liquid He II, a two-fluid model for mass flow is used to extract the superfluid velocity in the nanohole for different pressure heads at temperatures close to the superfluid transition. These velocities compare well to existing data for the critical superflow of liquid helium in other confined systems. PMID:22243081

  1. Properties of Moving Electron Bubbles in Superfluid Helium

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Wei; Maris, Humphrey J.

    2006-09-07

    It is well known that the Bernoulli effect modifies the shape of gas bubbles moving through a liquid. In this paper we investigate the influence of the Bernoulli pressure on the shape of electron bubbles moving through superfluid helium. We show that an electron bubble moving through liquid at zero pressure becomes unstable when its velocity reaches approximately 47 m s-1. In addition, the change in shape contributes significantly to the variation of the bubble mobility with velocity.

  2. Dynamics of vortex assisted metal condensation in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Evgeny; Mammetkuliyev, Muhammet; Eloranta, Jussi

    2013-05-01

    Laser ablation of copper and silver targets immersed in bulk normal and superfluid 4He was studied through time-resolved shadowgraph photography. In normal fluid, only a sub-millimeter cavitation bubble is created and immediate formation of metal clusters is observed within a few hundred microseconds. The metal clusters remain spatially tightly focused up to 15 ms, and it is proposed that this observation may find applications in particle image velocimetry. In superfluid helium, the cavitation bubble formation process is distinctly different from the normal fluid. Due to the high thermal conductivity and an apparent lag in the breakdown of superfluidity, about 20% of the laser pulse energy was transferred directly into the liquid and a large gas bubble, up to several millimeters depending on laser pulse energy, is created. The internal temperature of the gas bubble is estimated to exceed 9 K and the following bubble cool down period therefore includes two separate phase transitions: gas-normal liquid and normal liquid-superfluid. The last stage of the cool down process was assigned to the superfluid lambda transition where a sudden formation of large metal clusters is observed. This is attributed to high vorticity created in the volume where the gas bubble previously resided. As shown by theoretical bosonic density functional theory calculations, quantized vortices can trap atoms and dimers efficiently, exhibiting static binding energies up to 22 K. This, combined with hydrodynamic Bernoulli attraction, yields total binding energies as high as 35 K. For larger clusters, the static binding energy increases as a function of the volume occupied in the liquid to minimize the surface tension energy. For heliophobic species an energy barrier develops as a function of the cluster size, whereas heliophilics show barrierless entry into vortices. The present theoretical and experimental observations are used to rationalize the previously reported metal nanowire assembly in

  3. Fiber-Cavity Optomechanics with Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flowers-Jacobs, Nathan E.; Kashkanova, Anna D.; Shkarin, Alexey B.; Hoch, Scott W.; Deutsch, Christian; Reichel, Jakob; Harris, Jack G. E.

    2014-03-01

    In a typical optomechanical device, the resonance frequency of a cavity is coupled to mechanical motion through the radiation pressure force. To date, experimental cavities have predominately coupled to a resonant mechanical mode of a solid structure, often a lithographically-defined beam or membrane. We will describe our progress towards realizing an optomechanical device in which an optical fiber-cavity couples to the acoustic modes of superfluid helium. In this system, the optical modes and the acoustic modes of the superfluid are co-located between the mirrored ends of two fiber optic cables. Changes in the density of the superfluid change the effective length of the cavity which results in a standard, linear optomechanical coupling between the 300 MHz acoustic resonances and the 200 THz optical resonances. This type of device is motivated by the self-aligning nature of the acoustic and optical modes (which eases the difficulties of operating at cryogenic temperatures) and by the low optical and mechanical losses of superfluid helium. Although we expect the mechanical quality factor to be limited by acoustic radiation into the glass fiber, we will describe a proposal to realize a dual-band Bragg mirror to confine the optical and acoustic modes more efficiently. Supported by NSF Grant #1106110, ARO Grant #W911NF-13-1-0104, and the DARPA/MTO ORCHID program through a grant from AFOSR.

  4. Triple vortex ring structure in superfluid helium II.

    PubMed

    Kivotides, D; Barenghi, C F; Samuels, D C

    2000-10-27

    Superfluids such as helium II consist of two interpenetrating fluids: the normal fluid and the superfluid. The helium II vortex ring has generally been considered merely as a superfluid object, neglecting any associated motion of the normal fluid. We report a three-dimensional calculation of the coupled motion of the normal-fluid and superfluid components, which shows that the helium II vortex ring consists of a superfluid vortex ring accompanied by two coaxial normal-fluid vortex rings of opposite polarity. The three vortex rings form a coherent, dissipative structure. PMID:11052935

  5. Dynamics of Superfluid Helium in Low-Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, David J.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under a contract entitled 'Dynamics of Superfluid Helium in Low Gravity'. This project performed verification tests, over a wide range of accelerations of two Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes of which one incorporates the two-fluid model of superfluid helium (SFHe). Helium was first liquefied in 1908 and not until the 1930s were the properties of helium below 2.2 K observed sufficiently to realize that it did not obey the ordinary physical laws of physics as applied to ordinary liquids. The term superfluidity became associated with these unique observations. The low temperature of SFHe and it's temperature unifonrmity have made it a significant cryogenic coolant for use in space applications in astronomical observations with infrared sensors and in low temperature physics. Superfluid helium has been used in instruments such as the Shuttle Infrared Astronomy Telescope (IRT), the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), the Cosmic Background Observatory (COBE), and the Infrared Satellite Observatory (ISO). It is also used in the Space Infrared Telescope (SIRTF), Relativity Mission Satellite formally called Gravity Probe-B (GP-B), and the Test of the Equivalence Principle (STEP) presently under development. For GP-B and STEP, the use of SFHE is used to cool Superconducting Quantum Interference Detectors (SQUIDS) among other parts of the instruments. The Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) experiment flown in the Shuttle studied the behavior of SFHE. This experiment attempted to get low-gravity slosh data, however, the main emphasis was to study the low-gravity transfer of SFHE from tank to tank. These instruments carried tanks of SFHE of a few hundred liters to 2500 liters. The capability of modeling the behavior of SFHE is important to spacecraft control engineers who must design systems that can overcome disturbances created by the movement of the fluid. In addition instruments such as GP-B and STEP are very

  6. Characterization of reconnecting vortices in superfluid helium

    PubMed Central

    Bewley, Gregory P.; Paoletti, Matthew S.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.; Lathrop, Daniel P.

    2008-01-01

    When two vortices cross, each of them breaks into two parts and exchanges part of itself for part of the other. This process, called vortex reconnection, occurs in classical and superfluids, and in magnetized plasmas and superconductors. We present the first experimental observations of reconnection between quantized vortices in superfluid helium. We do so by imaging micrometer-sized solid hydrogen particles trapped on quantized vortex cores and by inferring the occurrence of reconnection from the motions of groups of recoiling particles. We show that the distance separating particles on the just-reconnected vortex lines grows as a power law in time. The average value of the scaling exponent is approximately ½, consistent with the self-similar evolution of the vortices. PMID:18768790

  7. Phase order in superfluid helium films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramwell, Steven T.; Faulkner, Michael F.; Holdsworth, Peter C. W.; Taroni, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Classic experimental data on helium films are transformed to estimate a finite-size phase order parameter that measures the thermal degradation of the condensate fraction in the two-dimensional superfluid. The order parameter is found to evolve thermally with the exponent β = 3 π^2/128 , a characteristic, in analogous magnetic systems, of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) phase transition. Universal scaling near the BKT fixed point generates a collapse of experimental data on helium and ferromagnetic films, and implies new experiments and theoretical protocols to explore the phase order. These results give a striking example of experimental finite-size scaling in a critical system that is broadly relevant to two-dimensional Bose fluids. This paper is dedicated to the memory of our friend and colleague Maxime Clusel, with whom we enjoyed many stimulating discussions on related topics.

  8. On charged impurity structures in liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelmenev, A. A.; Krushinskaya, I. N.; Bykhalo, I. B.; Boltnev, R. E.

    2016-03-01

    The thermoluminescence spectra of impurity-helium condensates (IHC) submerged in superfluid helium have been observed for the first time. Thermoluminescence of impurity-helium condensates submerged in superfluid helium is explained by neutralization reactions occurring in impurity nanoclusters. Optical spectra of excited products of neutralization reactions between nitrogen cations and thermoactivated electrons were rather different from the spectra observed at higher temperatures, when the luminescence due to nitrogen atom recombination dominates. New results on current detection during the IHC destruction are presented. Two different mechanisms of nanocluster charging are proposed to describe the phenomena observed during preparation and warm-up of IHC samples in bulk superfluid helium, and destruction of IHC samples out of liquid helium.

  9. Acquisition system testing with superfluid helium. [cryopumping for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John E.; Fester, Dale A.; Dipirro, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Minus one-g outflow tests were conducted with superfluid helium in conjunction with a thermomechanical pump setup in order to study the use of capillary acquisition systems for NASA's Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) flight experiment. Results show that both fine mesh screen and porous sponge systems are capable of supplying superfluid helium to the thermomechanical pump inlet against a one-g head up to 4 cm, fulfilling the SHOOT requirements. Sponge results were found to be reproducible, while the screen results were not.

  10. Novel methods to create multielectron bubbles in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, J.; Dementyev, Anatoly E.; Tempere, J.; Silvera, Isaac F.

    2011-03-01

    An equilibrium multielectron bubble (MEB) in liquid helium is a fascinating object with a spherical two-dimensional electron gas on its surface. We discuss two ways in which they have been created. For MEBs that have been observed in the dome of a cylindrical cell with an unexpectedly short lifetime, we show analytically why these MEBs can discharge by tunneling. Using a novel method, MEBs have been extracted from a vapor sheath around a hot filament in superfluid helium by applying electric fields up to 15 kV/cm, and photographed with high-speed video. Charges as high as 1.6×10-9 C (˜1010 electrons) have been measured. The latter method provides a means of capture in an electromagnetic trap to allow the study of the extensive exciting properties of these elusive objects.

  11. Theoretical Studies of Liquid He-4 Near the Superfluid Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manousakis, Efstratios

    2002-01-01

    We performed theoretical studies of liquid helium by applying state of the art simulation and finite-size scaling techniques. We calculated universal scaling functions for the specific heat and superfluid density for various confining geometries relevant for experiments such as the confined helium experiment and other ground based studies. We also studied microscopically how the substrate imposes a boundary condition on the superfluid order parameter as the superfluid film grows layer by layer. Using path-integral Monte Carlo, a quantum Monte Carlo simulation method, we investigated the rich phase diagram of helium monolayer, bilayer and multilayer on a substrate such as graphite. We find excellent agreement with the experimental results using no free parameters. Finally, we carried out preliminary calculations of transport coefficients such as the thermal conductivity for bulk or confined helium systems and of their scaling properties. All our studies provide theoretical support for various experimental studies in microgravity.

  12. Possible Stimulation of Nuclear alpha Decay by Superfluid Helium

    SciTech Connect

    Barabanov, A. L.

    2009-08-28

    It is suggested that superfluid helium (condensate of {sup 4}He atoms) may stimulate nuclear alpha decay in a situation when an alpha emitter moves through superfluid helium with fine-tuned velocity, so that the backward-emitted alpha particle is at rest in the laboratory frame. It is shown that the probability of stimulated alpha decay in this case may be sizable enough to be detected.

  13. Possible stimulation of nuclear alpha decay by superfluid helium.

    PubMed

    Barabanov, A L

    2009-08-28

    It is suggested that superfluid helium (condensate of (4)He atoms) may stimulate nuclear alpha decay in a situation when an alpha emitter moves through superfluid helium with fine-tuned velocity, so that the backward-emitted alpha particle is at rest in the laboratory frame. It is shown that the probability of stimulated alpha decay in this case may be sizable enough to be detected.

  14. Thermal resistance at a solid/superfluid helium interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramiere, Aymeric; Volz, Sebastian; Amrit, Jay

    2016-05-01

    Kapitza in 1941 discovered that heat flowing across a solid in contact with superfluid helium (<2 K) encounters a strong thermal resistance at the interface. Khalatnikov demonstrated theoretically that this constitutes a general phenomenon related to all interfaces at all temperatures, given the dependence of heat transmission on the acoustic impedance (sound velocity × density) of each medium. For the solid/superfluid interface, the measured transmission of heat is almost one hundred times stronger than the Khalatnikov prediction. This discrepancy could be intuitively attributed to diffuse scattering of phonons at the interface but, despite several attempts, a detailed quantitative comparison between theoretical and experimental findings to explain the occurrence of scattering and its contribution to heat transmission had been lacking. Here we show that when the thermal wavelength λ of phonons of the less dense medium (liquid 4He) becomes comparable to the r.m.s. surface roughness σ, the heat flux crossing the interface is amplified; in particular when σ ~ 0.33λ, a spatial resonant mechanism occurs, as proposed by Adamenko and Fuks. We used a silicon single crystal whose surface roughness was controlled and characterized. The thermal boundary resistance measurements were performed from 0.4 to 2 K at different superfluid pressures ranging from saturated vapour pressure (SVP) to above 4He solidification, to eliminate all hypothetical artefact mechanisms. Our results demonstrate the physical conditions necessary for resonant phonon scattering to occur at all interfaces, and therefore constitute a benchmark in the design of nanoscale devices for heat monitoring.

  15. Superfluid helium-4 interferometers: construction and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Aditya Ajit

    This dissertation has two main goals: to highlight some new results in the field of superfluid 4He interferometry and to provide an in-depth, "hands-on" guide to the physics, design, construction, testing and operation of a continuously operating, fluxlocked 4 He dc-SHeQUID (Superfluid Helium Quantum Interference Device). Many of these topics haven't really been addressed in writing and the hapless new experimenter seeking to develop a SHeQUID is generally forced to reinvent the wheel rather than start at the frontier and push it forward. We would like to prevent that by making this a comprehensive guide to building and operating SHeQUIDs. We have optimized the fabrication of the nanoscale aperture arrays that are the very heart of the SHeQUID and resolved long-standing issues with their durability and long-term usability. A detailed report on this should assist in avoiding the many pitfalls that await those who fabricate and use these aperture arrays. We have constructed a new, modular SHeQUID that is designed to be easily adaptable to a wide array of proposed experiments without the necessity of rebuilding and reassembling key components like the displacement transducer. We have automated its working as a continuously operating, linearized (flux-locked) interferometer by using the so-called "chemical potential battery" in conjunction with a feedback system. We have also constructed a new reorientation system that is several orders of magnitude quieter than its predecessors. Together, these developments have allowed us to measure a changing rotation field in real time, a new development for this kind of device. We have also developed a module that allows control of the reorientation stage by automated data-taking software for investigating long-term drifts (by safely sweeping the stage back and forth). We have also investigated the chemical potential battery in further detail and report some fascinating nonlinear mode locking phenomena that have important

  16. Liquid Helium Acoustic Microscope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, Andrew Paul

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. In an acoustic microscope, images are generated by monitoring the intensity of the ultrasonic reflection, or echo, from the surface of a sample. In order to achieve this a pulse of acoustic energy is produced by the excitation of a thin film transducer. The pulse thus generated propagates through a crystal and is incident upon the acoustic lens surface, which is the boundary between the crystal and an acoustic coupling liquid. The acoustic lens is a converging element, and brings the ultrasonic beam to a focus within the liquid. A sample, placed at the focus, can act as a reflector, and the returned pulse then contains information regarding the acoustic reflectivity of this specimen. Acoustic pulses are repeatedly launched and detected while the acoustic lens is scanned over the surface of the sample. In this manner an acoustic image is constructed. Acoustic losses in room temperature liquid coupling media represent a considerable source of difficulty in the recovery of acoustic echo signals. At the frequencies of operation required in a microscope which is capable of high resolution, the ultrasonic attenuation is not only large but increases with the square of frequency. In superfluid liquid helium at temperatures below 0.1 K, however, the ultrasonic attenuation becomes negligible. Furthermore, the low sound velocity in liquid helium results in an increase in resolution, since the acoustic wavelength is proportional to velocity. A liquid helium acoustic microscope has been designed and constructed. Details of the various possible detection methods are given, and comparisons are made between them. Measurements of the performance of the system that was adopted are reported. The development of a cooled preamplifier is also described. The variation of reflected signal with object distance has been measured and compared with theoretical predictions. This variation is important in the analysis of acoustic

  17. Three Dimensional Motions, Kelvin Waves, and Nanoparticle Tracking in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meichle, David; Lathrop, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Liquid Helium becomes a quantum superfluid when cooled below the lambda transition temperature of 2.17 Kelvin. Superfluid helium exhibits interesting macroscopic effects such as zero viscosity; and its flow is irrotational except for the presence of line-like topological phase defects with quantized circulation called quantum vortices. The vortex dynamics can be observed by dispersing tracer particles into the fluid, which become trapped on the vortex cores. Using atmospheric ice particles our group recently observed the excitation and self-similar propagation of helical Kelvin waves on these quantized vortex cores following a vortex reconnection event. This observation of an intrinsically three dimensional phenomenon has motivated the development of a three dimensional imaging apparatus for liquid helium. We will present new data obtained by dispersing fluorescent nanoparticles tracers and our progress towards full three dimensional tracking of quantized vortex dynamics in liquid helium.

  18. Restricted Diffusion in Nonequilibrium Superfluid Inclusions in Solid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhin, N. P.; Birchenko, A. P.; Fysun, Ya. Yu.; Rudavskii, E. Ya.

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion processes are investigated with NMR technique in the two-phase system of solid helium matrix with superfluid inclusions. The system is formed by rapid cooling, and liquid inclusions are nonequilibrium. The diffusion coefficients of 3He are measured in each of the coexisting phases in a sample of a solid 3He-4He mixture with 1.0 % 3He using the spin-echo technique in the presence of a magnetic field gradient. It was found that the diffusion coefficient in superfluid inclusions decreases with the increasing diffusion length, which is a feature of restricted diffusion. The data obtained allowed us to estimate the typical size of the inclusions. It is shown that inclusion size decreases with time. A similar study on the equilibrium in liquid-crystal two-phase system, formed by rapid cooling of the sample near the melting curve, is performed for comparison. In this case, the restricted diffusion in the liquid phase also was observed; however, the system was stable, and the diffusion coefficient is sensitive to changes in temperature only.

  19. Characterization of quantum vortex dynamics in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meichle, David P.

    Liquid helium obtains superfluid properties when cooled below the Lambda transition temperature of 2.17 K. A superfluid, which is a partial Bose Einstein condensate, has many exotic properties including free flow without friction, and ballistic instead of diffusive heat transport. A superfluid is also uniquely characterized by the presence of quantized vortices, dynamical line-like topological phase defects around which all circulation in the flow is constrained. Two vortices can undergo a violent process called reconnection when they approach, cross, and retract having exchanged tails. With a numerical examination of a local, linearized solution near reconnection we discovered a dynamically unstable stationary solution to the Gross-Pitaevskii equation, which was relaxed to a fully non-linear solution using imaginary time propagation. This investigation explored vortex reconnection in the context of the changing topology of the order parameter, a complex field governing the superfluid dynamics at zero temperature. The dynamics of the vortices can be studied experimentally by dispersing tracer particles into a superfluid flow and recording their motions with movie cameras. The pioneering work of Bewley et al. provided the first visualization technique using frozen gases to create tracer particles. Using this technique, we experimentally observed for the first time the excitation of helical traveling waves on a vortex core called Kelvin waves. Kelvin waves are thought to be a central mechanism for dissipation in this inviscid fluid, as they provide an efficient cascade mechanism for transferring energy from large to microscopic length scales. We examined the Kelvin waves in detail, and compared their dynamics in fully self-similar non-dimensional coordinates to theoretical predictions. Additionally, two experimental advances are presented. A newly invented technique for reliably dispersing robust, nanometer-scale fluorescent tracer particles directly into the

  20. Superfluid helium cryogenic systems for superconducting RF cavities at KEK

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, H.; Hara, K.; Honma, T.; Hosoyama, K.; Kojima, Y.; Nakanishi, K.; Kanekiyo, T.; Morita, S.

    2014-01-29

    Recent accelerator projects at KEK, such as the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) for R and D of the International Linear Collider (ILC) project and the compact Energy Recovery Linac (cERL), employ superconducting RF cavities made of pure niobium, which can generate high gradient acceleration field. Since the operation temperature of these cavities is selected to be 2 K, we have developed two 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems for stable operation of superconducting RF cavities for each of STF and cERL. These two 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems are identical in principle. Since the operation mode of the cavities is different for STF and cERL, i.e. the pulse mode for STF and the continuous wave mode for cERL, the heat loads from the cavities are quite different. The 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems mainly consists of ordinary helium liquefiers/refrigerators, 2 K refrigerator cold boxes, helium gas pumping systems and high-performance transfer lines. The 2 K refrigerators and the high-performance transfer lines are designed by KEK. Some superconducting RF cavity cryomodules have been already connected to the 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems for STF and cERL respectively, and cooled down to 2 K successfully.

  1. Suspension of superfluid helium using cesium-coated surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.C.; Giese, C.F.; Halley, J.W.

    1996-03-01

    We report results of an experiment which demonstrates that a layer of superfluid helium can be suspended over a cesium-coated orifice. By measuring the layer thickness with a capacitance bridge, we have shown in two runs that fluid layers up to 2 mm thick were suspended over a 70-{mu}m-diam cesium-coated orifice in a platinum foil for over 2 h in a cryostat held at 1.2 K. The effect depends on the recently established fact that superfluid helium does not wet cesium-coated surfaces. As a consequence, superfluid helium is expected to form a stable meniscus across such a cesium-coated hole. The observed depths of suspended helium are consistent with a simple theoretical model based on this picture. We briefly discuss the possible application of this method to the performance of a proposed experiment to study quantum coherence in superfluid helium by directing pulsed beams of helium atoms at such a suspended layer of fluid. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. Large quantum superpositions of a nanoparticle immersed in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lychkovskiy, O.

    2016-06-01

    Preparing and detecting spatially extended quantum superpositions of a massive object comprises an important fundamental test of quantum theory. These quantum states are extremely fragile and tend to quickly decay into incoherent mixtures due to the environmental decoherence. Experimental setups considered up to date address this threat in a conceptually straightforward way—by eliminating the environment, i.e., by isolating an object in a sufficiently high vacuum. We show that another option exists: decoherence is suppressed in the presence of a strongly interacting environment if this environment is superfluid. Indeed, as long as an object immersed in a pure superfluid at zero temperature moves with a velocity below the critical one, it does not create, absorb, or scatter any excitations of the superfluid. Hence, in this idealized situation the decoherence is absent. In reality the decoherence will be present due to thermal excitations of the superfluid and impurities contaminating the superfluid. We examine various decoherence channels in the superfluid helium at 1 mK. Performing interference experiments in superfluid helium can provide certain practical advantages compared to conventional schemes, e.g., compensation of gravity by the buoyancy force and effective cooling.

  3. Energy spectra of finite temperature superfluid helium-4 turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kivotides, Demosthenes

    2014-10-15

    A mesoscopic model of finite temperature superfluid helium-4 based on coupled Langevin-Navier-Stokes dynamics is proposed. Drawing upon scaling arguments and available numerical results, a numerical method for designing well resolved, mesoscopic calculations of finite temperature superfluid turbulence is developed. The application of model and numerical method to the problem of fully developed turbulence decay in helium II, indicates that the spectral structure of normal-fluid and superfluid turbulence is significantly more complex than that of turbulence in simple-fluids. Analysis based on a forced flow of helium-4 at 1.3 K, where viscous dissipation in the normal-fluid is compensated by the Lundgren force, indicate three scaling regimes in the normal-fluid, that include the inertial, low wavenumber, Kolmogorov k{sup −5/3} regime, a sub-turbulence, low Reynolds number, fluctuating k{sup −2.2} regime, and an intermediate, viscous k{sup −6} range that connects the two. The k{sup −2.2} regime is due to normal-fluid forcing by superfluid vortices at high wavenumbers. There are also three scaling regimes in the superfluid, that include a k{sup −3} range that corresponds to the growth of superfluid vortex instabilities due to mutual-friction action, and an adjacent, low wavenumber, k{sup −5/3} regime that emerges during the termination of this growth, as superfluid vortices agglomerate between intense normal-fluid vorticity regions, and weakly polarized bundles are formed. There is also evidence of a high wavenumber k{sup −1} range that corresponds to the probing of individual-vortex velocity fields. The Kelvin waves cascade (the main dynamical effect in zero temperature superfluids) appears to be damped at the intervortex space scale.

  4. Imaging of quantum vortices in superfluid helium droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilesov, Andrey

    Helium nanodroplets are especially promising for exploring quantum hydrodynamics in self-contained, isolated superfluids. However, until very recently, the dynamic properties of individual droplets, such as vorticity, could not be assessed experimentally. Here we investigate the rotation of single superfluid 4-He droplets ranging from 200 to 2000 nm in diameter at T = 0.4 K via single-shot femtosecond X-ray coherent diffractive imaging. The droplets were produced by free jet expansion of liquid helium into vacuum. The angular velocities of the droplets were estimated from the centrifugal distortion and span a range from vanishing to those close to the disintegration limit. For visualization of vortices, Xe atoms were added to the droplets where they gather in cores forming nm-thin filaments. A newly developed phase retrieval technique enables the reconstruction of the instantaneous positions and shapes of the vortices from the diffraction images with about 20 nm resolution. The vorticity attainable in the nano-droplets was found to be about six orders of magnitude larger than achieved in previous experiments in the bulk. Stationary configurations of vortices are represented by triangular lattice in large (2 μm) droplets and symmetric arrangements of few vortices in smaller (200 nm) droplets. Evidence for non-stationary vortex dynamics comes from observation of asymmetric formations of vortices in some droplets. This collaborative work was performed at Linac Coherent Light Source, the free electron laser within SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The experiments and the full list of collaborators are reported in: L. F. Gomez et. al. Science, 345 (2014) 906.

  5. Experimental characterization of turbulent superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoletti, Matthew S.

    Fundamental processes in turbulent superfluid 4He are experimentally characterized by refining a visualization technique recently introduced by Bewley et al.. A mixture of hydrogen and helium gas is injected into the bulk fluid, which produces a distribution of micron-sized hydrogen tracer particles that are visualized and individually tracked allowing for local velocity measurements. Tracer trajectories are complex since some become trapped on the quantized vortices while others flow with the normal fluid. This technique is first applied to study the dynamics of a thermal counterflow. The resulting observations constitute the first direct confirmation of two-fluid motions in He II and provide a quantitative test of the expression for the dependence of the normal fluid velocity, vn, on the applied heat flux, q, derived by L. D. Landau in 1941. Nearly 20,000 individual reconnection events are identified for the first time and used to characterize the dynamics by the minimum separation distance, delta( t), between two reconnecting vortices. Dimensional arguments predict that this separation behaves asymptotically as delta(t) ≈ A(kappa∣t -- t0∣) 1/2, where kappa = h/m is the quantum of circulation. The major finding of the experiments is strong support for this asymptotic form with kappa as the dominant controlling quantity. Nevertheless there are significant event-to-event fluctuations that are equally well fit by two modified expressions: (a) an arbitrary power-law expression delta( t) = B∣t -- t0∣alpha and (b) a correction-factor expression delta(t) = A(kappa∣t -- t 0)1/2 (1 + c∣t -- t0∣). In light of various physical interpretations we regard the correction-factor expression (b), which attributes the observed deviations from the predicted asymptotic form to fluctuations in the local environment and boundary conditions, as best describing the experimental data. The observed dynamics appear statistically time-reversible, suggesting that an effective

  6. Superfluid Onset and 2D phase transitions of Helium-4 on Lithium and Sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, Angel; Huisman, Fawn; van Cleve, Eli; Taborek, Peter

    2012-02-01

    We have fabricated lithium and sodium films on quartz crystal microbalances (QCM) using in situ low temperature pulsed laser deposition. The frequency shift and dissipation of the QCM was measured as a function of helium pressure and chemical potential and used to construct the phase diagram of helium films on these substrates. Pressure measurement techniques based on an RGA mass spectrometer, which provides accurate measurement below 10-8 Torr will be described. Lithium and sodium are predicted to be intermediate strength substrates which are strong enough to be wetted by He-4 but weak enough that solid-like layers do not form, so they are candidates for observing sub-monolayer superfluidity in direct contact with a metallic surface. Helium adsorption isotherms and quenches between 0.5K and 1.6K on both lithium and sodium indicated continuous, sub-monolayer helium film growth and superfluid onsets in sub-monolayer films. Features below 1K indicate a collision between a classical 2D liquid/vapor phase transition and the Kosterlitz-Thouless superfluid phase transition. We see no evidence for the pre-wetting step instability predicted for helium on sodium.

  7. Counting Electrons on Liquid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasson, Phillip

    2004-03-01

    Electrons on liquid helium, localised in an array of quantum dots, have been proposed as condensed matter qubits [M.I.Dykman et al. Phys.Rev. B 67, 155402 (2003)]. The ground and first excited Rydberg states in the vertical potential well on the helium surface would represent |0> and |1>. This requires (a) novel electronic devices on helium using microstructured substrates, (b) excitation of Rydberg states using millimetric microwaves and (c) detection of individual electrons and their quantum states. Progress in meeting these challenges will be presented. An AC-coupled Field Effect Transistor (FET) has been made on GaAs, using free electrons on suspended liquid helium microchannels, 16 micron wide and 1.6 microns deep [P.Glasson et al, Phys.Rev.Lett. 87 176802 (2001)]. The microwave absorption to the first excited Rydberg state near 200 GHz has been measured below 1 K [E.Collin et al. Phys.Rev.Lett. 89, 245301 (2002)], where the temperature-dependent contribution to the linewidth is small. High values of the ratio of the Rabi frequency to the linewidth are obtained. Electrons are trapped on a 5 micron diameter pool of superfluid helium, above a single-electron-transistor (SET) as a detector. The pool is charged from a surface electron reservoir and we count the electrons into and out of the trap. Individual electrons can be stored, detected and counted: the next stage is quantum state detection. The prospects for qubits and quantum information processing with electrons on helium will be assessed.

  8. The superfluid transition in helium clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jortner, Joshua

    2003-12-01

    We address cluster size effects on the λ temperature (Tλ) for the rounded-off transition for the Bose-Einstein condensation and for the onset of superfluidity in (4He)N clusters of radius R0=aN1/3, where a=3.5 Å is the constituent radius. The phenomenological Ginsburg-Pitaevskii-Sobaynin theory for the order parameter of the second-order phase transition, in conjunction with the free-surface boundary condition, results in a scaling law for the cluster size dependence of Tλ, which is defined by the maximum of the specific heat and/or from the onset of the finite fraction of the superfluid density. This size scaling law (Tλ0-Tλ)/Tλ0∝R0-1/ν∝N-1/3ν, where ν (=0.67) is the critical exponent for the superfluid fraction and for the correlation length for superfluidity in the infinite bulk system, implies the depression of the finite system Tλ relative to the bulk value of Tλ0. The quantum path integral molecular dynamics simulations of Sindzingre, Ceperley, and Klein [Phys. Rev. Lett. 63, 1601 (1989)] for N=64, 128, together with experimental data for specific heat of 4He in porous gold and in other confined systems [J. Yoon and M. H. W. Chan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 4801 (1997); G. M. Zahssenhaus and J. D. Reppy, ibid. 83, 4800 (1999)], are accounted for in terms of the cluster size scaling theory (Tλ0-Tλ)/Tλ0=(πξ0/a)3/2N-1/2, where ξ0=1.7±0.3 Å is the "critical" amplitude for the correlation length in the bulk. The phenomenological theory relates Tλ for the finite system to the correlation length ξ(T) for superfluidity in the infinite bulk system, with the shift (Tλ0-Tλ) being determined by the ratio R0/ξ(T), in accord with the theory of finite-size scaling.

  9. Laser cooling and control of excitations in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, G. I.; McAuslan, D. L.; Sheridan, E.; Sachkou, Y.; Baker, C.; Bowen, W. P.

    2016-08-01

    Superfluidity is a quantum state of matter that exists macroscopically in helium at low temperatures. The elementary excitations in superfluid helium have been probed with great success using techniques such as neutron and light scattering. However, measurements of phonon excitations have so far been limited to average thermodynamic properties or the driven response far out of thermal equilibrium. Here, we use cavity optomechanics to probe the thermodynamics of phonon excitations in real time. Furthermore, strong light-matter interactions allow both laser cooling and amplification. This represents a new tool to observe and control superfluid excitations that may provide insight into phonon-phonon interactions, quantized vortices and two-dimensional phenomena such as the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. The third sound modes studied here also offer a pathway towards quantum optomechanics with thin superfluid films, including the prospect of femtogram masses, high mechanical quality factors, strong phonon-phonon and phonon-vortex interactions, and self-assembly into complex geometries with sub-nanometre feature size.

  10. Communication: Electron diffraction of ferrocene in superfluid helium droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; He, Yunteng; Kong, Wei

    2016-06-01

    We report electron diffraction of ferrocene doped in superfluid helium droplets. By taking advantage of the velocity slip in our pulsed droplet beam using a pulsed electron gun, and by doping with a high concentration of ferrocene delivered via a pulsed valve, we can obtain high quality diffraction images from singly doped droplets. Under the optimal doping conditions, 80% of the droplets sampled in the electron beam are doped with just one ferrocene molecule. Extension of this size selection method to dopant clusters has also been demonstrated. However, incomplete separation of dopant clusters might require deconvolution and modeling of the doping process. This method can be used for studies of nucleation processes in superfluid helium droplets.

  11. Communication: Electron diffraction of ferrocene in superfluid helium droplets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report electron diffraction of ferrocene doped in superfluid helium droplets. By taking advantage of the velocity slip in our pulsed droplet beam using a pulsed electron gun, and by doping with a high concentration of ferrocene delivered via a pulsed valve, we can obtain high quality diffraction images from singly doped droplets. Under the optimal doping conditions, 80% of the droplets sampled in the electron beam are doped with just one ferrocene molecule. Extension of this size selection method to dopant clusters has also been demonstrated. However, incomplete separation of dopant clusters might require deconvolution and modeling of the doping process. This method can be used for studies of nucleation processes in superfluid helium droplets. PMID:27305988

  12. Detectability of Light Dark Matter with Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutz, Katelin; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2016-09-01

    We show that a two-excitation process in superfluid helium, combined with sensitivity to meV energy depositions, can probe dark matter down to the ~keV warm dark matter mass limit. This mass reach is three orders of magnitude below what can be probed with ordinary nuclear recoils in helium at the same energy resolution. For dark matter lighter than $\\sim 100$ keV, the kinematics of the process requires the two athermal excitations to have nearly equal and opposite momentum, potentially providing a built-in coincidence mechanism for controlling backgrounds.

  13. Superfluid and normal fluid helium II in a rotating tank under low and microgravity environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The physical behavior of superfluid and normal fluid helium II is discussed. It is shown that the centrifugal force due to a rotating container can never separate the superfluid from the normal fluid helium in a large rotating cylindrical spacecraft. A classical approach is appropriate for treating superfluid and normal fluid cryogenic helium as a mixture without separation in a large rotating cylinder in a spacecraft propellant systems.

  14. Glass-to-Metal Seal Against Liquid Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, John L.; Gatewood, John R.

    1987-01-01

    Simple compression joint with indium gasket forms demountable seal for superfluids. Seal developed for metal lid on glass jar used in experiments on liquid helium. Glass container allows contents to be viewed for such purposes as calibration of liquid-level detectors and adjustments of displacement plungers. Seal contains liquid helium even when temperature drops below 2.19K. Made from inexpensive, commercially available materials and parts.

  15. Three-dimensional nanoparticle dynamics in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lathrop, Daniel

    Quantized vortices have been observed in superfluid 4He and AMO trapped atom systems, and have been infered in superfluid 3He and neutron stars. The dynamics of quantum fluids is substantially controlled by the motion of quantized vortices, which are topological phase defects analogous to crystalline dislocations. Long-range quantum order underlies a number of related physical phenomena, including superfluidity, trapped-atom Bose-Einstein condensates, superconductivity, ferromagnetism, antiferromagnetism, lasers, and the Higgs mechanism. While superfluidity in 4He is one of the first discovered of these, it is one of the least understood, given that the strongly interacting nature of helium makes theory difficult, and that development of local experimental probes is lagging. The advent of three-dimensional flow visualization of particles that trace quantized vortices provides new oportunities to investigate their creation and dynamics. We work to address the following questions using flow visualization in this system: What are field equations that express the coupling of the ordered and disordered parts of the flow? How does vortex reconnection lead to dissipation and breaking of time-reversal invariance? What are the similarities and differences between quantum and classical turbulence at small and large scales? How do quantized vortices form through the lambda transition? This work is supported by the National Science Foundation DMR CMP 1407472.

  16. Photochemistry of 3-hydroxyflavone inside superfluid helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnig, R.; Pentlehner, D.; Vdovin, A.; Dick, B.; Slenczka, A.

    2009-11-21

    3-hydroxyflavone is a prototype system for excited state intramolecular proton transfer which is one step of a closed loop photocycle. It was intensively studied for the bare molecule and for the influence of solvents. In the present paper this photocycle is investigated for 3-hydroxyflavone and some hydrated complexes when doped into superfluid helium droplets by the combined measurement of fluorescence excitation spectra and dispersed emission spectra. Significant discrepancies in the proton transfer behavior to gas phase experiments provide evidence for the presence of different complex configurations of the hydrated complexes in helium droplets. Moreover, for bare 3-hydroxyflavone and its hydrated complexes the proton transfer appears to be promoted by the helium environment.

  17. Transformation of second sound into surface waves in superfluid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Khalatnikov, I.M.; Kolmakov, G.V.; Pokrovsky, V.L.

    1995-05-01

    The Hamiltonian theory of superfluid liquid with a free boundary is developed. Nonlinear amplitudes of parametric Cherenkov radiation of a surface wave by second sound and the inner decay of second sound waves are found. Threshold amplitudes of second sound waves for these two processes are determined. 4 refs.

  18. Oscillatory motion: quantum whistling in superfluid helium-4.

    PubMed

    Hoskinson, E; Packard, R E; Haard, Thomas M

    2005-01-27

    Fundamental considerations predict that macroscopic quantum systems such as superfluids and the electrons in superconductors will undergo oscillatory motion when forced through a small constriction. Here we induce these oscillations in superfluid helium-4 (4He) by pushing it through an array of nanometre-sized apertures. The oscillations, which are detected as an audible whistling sound, obey the so-called Josephson frequency relation and occur coherently among all the apertures. The discovery of this property in 4He at the relatively high temperature of 2 K (2,000 times higher than the temperature at which a related but different phenomenon occurs in 3He) may pave the way for a new class of practical rotation sensors of unprecedented precision. PMID:15674281

  19. Probing the A-B interface of superfluid helium-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haley, Richard

    2015-03-01

    At temperatures around 1 mK helium-3 forms a BCS spin triplet condensate. The order parameter is sufficiently complex that more than one superfluid phase exists, each exhibiting a different broken symmetry, and there is a model first order transition between the two most stable phases, labeled A and B. The Lancaster Ultra-Low Temperature Group has developed techniques to probe the properties of the A-B interface in the deep sub-mK regime where the superfluid is in the pure condensate limit. Shaped and controllable magnetic fields are used to induce the transition, and to stabilize and move the A-B phase boundary inside the experimental volume. The latent heat of the transition has been measured, and the nucleation behavior shown to be incompatible with conventional thermodynamic models. Since superfluid helium-3 is inherently pure, and the order parameter transforms continuously across the A-B interface, it is the most coherent two-dimensional structure to which we have experimental access. It has been proposed that this 2D surface in the surrounding 3D bulk volume is a good analog of a cosmological brane separating two distinct quantum vacuum states; experiments that simulate brane annihilation and the creation of topological defects have been carried out at Lancaster. Other investigations have included measurements of the surface tension and wetting behavior of the interface. During these studies it was discovered that a large, unpredicted frictional force was acting on the interface even though it is moving through a pure superfluid. Recent breakthrough work on the dynamics of the A-B interface has finally solved this puzzle. Current experiments include a setup where the interface region is probed directly using quartz tuning fork resonators that couple to the local density of broken Cooper pair quasiparticle excitations and thus give insight into the order parameter energy gap structure as A transforms to B.

  20. Formation of Au and tetrapyridyl porphyrin complexes in superfluid helium.

    PubMed

    Feng, Cheng; Latimer, Elspeth; Spence, Daniel; Al Hindawi, Aula M A A; Bullen, Shem; Boatwright, Adrian; Ellis, Andrew M; Yang, Shengfu

    2015-07-14

    Binary clusters containing a large organic molecule and metal atoms have been formed by the co-addition of 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-pyridyl)porphyrin (H2TPyP) molecules and gold atoms to superfluid helium nanodroplets, and the resulting complexes were then investigated by electron impact mass spectrometry. In addition to the parent ion H2TPyP yields fragments mainly from pyrrole, pyridine and methylpyridine ions because of the stability of their ring structures. When Au is co-added to the droplets the mass spectra are dominated by H2TPyP fragment ions with one or more Au atoms attached. We also show that by switching the order in which Au and H2TPyP are added to the helium droplets, different types of H2TPyP-Au complexes are clearly evident from the mass spectra. This study suggests a new route for the control over the growth of metal-organic compounds inside superfluid helium nanodroplets.

  1. Effective Mass of an Electron Bubble in Superfluid Helium-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yunhu; Maris, Humphrey J.

    2016-10-01

    We present the results of computer simulations of the motion of an electron bubble through superfluid helium-4 when acted upon by an electric field. The simulations are based on an extended version of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The temperature is assumed to be sufficiently low for the drag exerted on the bubble by thermal excitations to be negligible, and the calculations are made for velocities below the critical velocitie for nucleation of vortices and roton production. We calculate the effective mass m* of the bubble and obtain results in excellent agreement with the measurements of Poitrenaud and Williams, and Ellis, McClintock, and Bowley.

  2. Mechanical pumps for superfluid helium transfer in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izenson, M. G.; Swift, W. L.

    1988-02-01

    Two alternate mechanical pump concepts have been identified for the transfer of superfluid helium in space. Both pumps provide flow at sufficient head and have operating characteristics suitable for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) refill mission. One pump operates at a relatively low speed and utilizes mechanical roller bearings, while the other operates at a higher rotational speed using either electromagnetic or tilting pad gas-dynamic bearings. The use of gas bearings requires transfer of normal helium so that the gas pressure within the pump casing is high enough to operate the bearings. The operating characteristics of both pumps are predicted, the dimensions are estimated and major technology issues are identified. The major issues for each pump design are cavitation performance and bearing development. Roller bearings require quantified reliability for operation in space while electromagnetic bearings require basic development as well as a complex control system. The low speed pump has significantly poorer hydraulic efficiency than the high speed pump.

  3. Nonlinear optical effects of ultrahigh-Q silicon photonic nanocavities immersed in superfluid helium

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiankai; Zhang, Xufeng; Schuck, Carsten; Tang, Hong X.

    2013-01-01

    Photonic nanocavities are a key component in many applications because of their capability of trapping and storing photons and enhancing interactions of light with various functional materials and structures. The maximal number of photons that can be stored in silicon photonic cavities is limited by the free-carrier and thermo-optic effects at room temperature. To reduce such effects, we performed the first experimental study of optical nonlinearities in ultrahigh-Q silicon disk nanocavities at cryogenic temperatures in a superfluid helium environment. At elevated input power, the cavity transmission spectra exhibit distinct blue-shifted bistability behavior when temperature crosses the liquid helium lambda point. At even lower temperatures, the spectra restore to symmetric Lorentzian shapes. Under this condition, we obtain a large intracavity photon number of about 40,000, which is limited ultimately by the local helium phase transition. These new discoveries are explained by theoretical calculations and numerical simulations. PMID:23486445

  4. Flow of superfluid helium in tubes with heated walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, H. A.; Mord, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    The equations for superfluid helium flowing through a straight tube with heated walls are integrated. The model equations are based on those of Landau as modified for superfluid turbulence by Gorter and Mellink (1949). The model is implemented by the program SUPERFLOW which runs on a personal computer. The effect of the heating level on the mass flux, the energy flux, and the pressure and temperature profiles is investigated. The four types of profiles which occur without sidewall heating are also found with heated walls. The progression through these four types is shown to depend primarily on the dimensionless parameter, defined previously to characterize the unheated profiles, and a dimensionless ratio of heat fluxes. The pressure and temperature maxima which rise well above the boundary values increase significantly with sidewall heating. Approximate design equations for estimating the mass flux and the profiles are presented. The physical basis of the results is discussed. These results are useful in the design of optimal cooling loops and other superfluid flow systems.

  5. Helium induced fine structure in the electronic spectra of anthracene derivatives doped into superfluid helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Pentlehner, D.; Slenczka, A.

    2015-01-07

    Electronic spectra of organic molecules doped into superfluid helium nanodroplets show characteristic features induced by the helium environment. Besides a solvent induced shift of the electronic transition frequency, in many cases, a spectral fine structure can be resolved for electronic and vibronic transitions which goes beyond the expected feature of a zero phonon line accompanied by a phonon wing as known from matrix isolation spectroscopy. The spectral shape of the zero phonon line and the helium induced phonon wing depends strongly on the dopant species. Phonon wings, for example, are reported ranging from single or multiple sharp transitions to broad (Δν > 100 cm{sup −1}) diffuse signals. Despite the large number of example spectra in the literature, a quantitative understanding of the helium induced fine structure of the zero phonon line and the phonon wing is missing. Our approach is a systematic investigation of related molecular compounds, which may help to shed light on this key feature of microsolvation in superfluid helium droplets. This paper is part of a comparative study of the helium induced fine structure observed in electronic spectra of anthracene derivatives with particular emphasis on a spectrally sharp multiplet splitting at the electronic origin. In addition to previously discussed species, 9-cyanoanthracene and 9-chloroanthracene will be presented in this study for the first time.

  6. NMR study of the magnetization of superfluid helium-3-boron and NMR of superfluid helium-3 in aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haard, Thomas Michael

    Pulsed NMR measurements of superfluid 3He confined in 98.2% porosity silica aerogel are reported. The aerogel suppressed the superfluid transition temperature TC and the order parameter magnitude from their bulk values in qualitative agreement with impurity scattering models. Magnetization measurements showed that the superfluid is an equal spin pairing state (ESP). The superfluid exhibited positive NMR frequency shifts with similar temperature dependence to those of the bulk A-phase, only smaller. TC was independent of the magnetic field for H < 1.8 kOe to within the experimental error. At 2.18 kOe an increased suppression of TC and the order parameter was observed. Two layers of solid 3He were adsorbed to the aerogel strands. When these were replaced with solid 4He a non-ESP superfluid state was observed. An experimental cell for measuring the heat capacity of 3He in aerogel was designed and fabricated. It was tested without aerogel by measuring the heat capacity of liquid 3He over a range of temperatures from 1 to 25 mK and at pressures of 7.0, 14.0, and 28.0 bar. The measurements in both the normal and superfluid phases were consistent with the data of Greywall. The discrepancy between static and dynamic measurements of the magnetization of superfluid 3He-B was characterized over a region of the phase diagram by comparison of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data and recent SQUID data from other researchers. At the B- to A-phase transition, TAB, the discrepancy was absent at low pressure, but increased to 20% at 26.6 bar and 1.2 kOe. The NMR data were consistent with the weak-coupling-plus (wcp) theory at TAB for most pressures and fields. The Ginzburg-Landau strong-coupling parameter gz/( gz)wcp was determined from NMR results to equal 1.00 +/- 0.03 for all pressures. Combinations of the Ginzburg-Landau beta-parameters are reported that are consistent with this observation.

  7. Visualization of two-fluid flows of superfluid helium-4.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; La Mantia, Marco; Lathrop, Daniel P; Van Sciver, Steven W

    2014-03-25

    Cryogenic flow visualization techniques have been proved in recent years to be a very powerful experimental method to study superfluid turbulence. Micron-sized solid particles and metastable helium molecules are specifically being used to investigate in detail the dynamics of quantum flows. These studies belong to a well-established, interdisciplinary line of inquiry that focuses on the deeper understanding of turbulence, one of the open problem of modern physics, relevant to many research fields, ranging from fluid mechanics to cosmology. Progress made to date is discussed, to highlight its relevance to a wider scientific community, and future directions are outlined. The latter include, e.g., detailed studies of normal-fluid turbulence, dissipative mechanisms, and unsteady/oscillatory flows.

  8. STABILITY MEASUREMENTS ON CORED CABLES IN NORMAL AND SUPERFLUID HELIUM

    SciTech Connect

    GHOSH,A.K.; SAMPSON,W.B.; KIM,S.W.; LEROY,D.; OBERLI,L.R.; WILSON,M.N.

    1998-05-10

    The relative stability of LHC type cables has been measured by the direct heating of one of the individual strands with a short duration current pulse. The minimum energy required to initiate a quench has been determined for a number of cables which have a central core to increase the effective inter-strand cross-over resistance. Experiments were performed in both normal helium at 4.4 K and superfluid at 1.9 K. Conductors in general are less stable at the lower temperature when measured at the same fraction of critical current. Results show that the cored-cables, even when partially filled with solder or with a porous-metal filler exhibit a relatively low stability at currents close to the critical current. It is speculated that the high inter-strand electrical and thermal resistance inherent in these cables may effect the stability at high currents.

  9. Stability measurements on cored cables in normal and superfluid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, A.K.; Sampson, W.B.; Kim, S.W.; Leroy, D.; Oberli, L.R.; Wilson, M.N.

    1998-07-01

    The relative stability of LHC type cables has been measured by the direct heating of one of the individual strands with a short duration current pulse. The minimum energy required to initiate a quench has been determined for a number of cables which have a central core to increase the effective inter-strand cross-over resistance. Experiments were performed in both normal helium at 4.4 K and superfluid at 1.9 K. Conductors in general are less stable at the lower temperature when measured at the same fraction of critical current. Results show that the cored-cables, even when partially filled with solder or with a porous-metal filler exhibit a relatively low stability at currents close to the critical current. It is speculated that the high inter-strand electrical and thermal resistance inherent in these cables may effect the stability at high currents.

  10. Effective doping of low energy ions into superfluid helium droplets

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Lei; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We report a facile method of doping cations from an electrospray ionization (ESI) source into superfluid helium droplets. By decelerating and stopping the ion pulse of reserpine and substance P from an ESI source in the path of the droplet beam, about 104 ion-doped droplets (one ion per droplet) can be recorded, corresponding to a pickup efficiency of nearly 1 out of 1000 ions. We attribute the success of this simple approach to the long residence time of the cations in the droplet beam. The resulting size of the doped droplets, on the order of 105/droplet, is measured using deflection and retardation methods. Our method does not require an ion trap in the doping region, which significantly simplifies the experimental setup and procedure for future spectroscopic and diffraction studies. PMID:26298127

  11. Effective doping of low energy ions into superfluid helium droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Lei; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-21

    We report a facile method of doping cations from an electrospray ionization (ESI) source into superfluid helium droplets. By decelerating and stopping the ion pulse of reserpine and substance P from an ESI source in the path of the droplet beam, about 10{sup 4} ion-doped droplets (one ion per droplet) can be recorded, corresponding to a pickup efficiency of nearly 1 out of 1000 ions. We attribute the success of this simple approach to the long residence time of the cations in the droplet beam. The resulting size of the doped droplets, on the order of 10{sup 5}/droplet, is measured using deflection and retardation methods. Our method does not require an ion trap in the doping region, which significantly simplifies the experimental setup and procedure for future spectroscopic and diffraction studies.

  12. Effective doping of low energy ions into superfluid helium droplets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Lei; Freund, William M; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-21

    We report a facile method of doping cations from an electrospray ionization (ESI) source into superfluid helium droplets. By decelerating and stopping the ion pulse of reserpine and substance P from an ESI source in the path of the droplet beam, about 10(4) ion-doped droplets (one ion per droplet) can be recorded, corresponding to a pickup efficiency of nearly 1 out of 1000 ions. We attribute the success of this simple approach to the long residence time of the cations in the droplet beam. The resulting size of the doped droplets, on the order of 10(5)/droplet, is measured using deflection and retardation methods. Our method does not require an ion trap in the doping region, which significantly simplifies the experimental setup and procedure for future spectroscopic and diffraction studies.

  13. Visualization of two-fluid flows of superfluid helium-4

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; La Mantia, Marco; Lathrop, Daniel P.; Van Sciver, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    Cryogenic flow visualization techniques have been proved in recent years to be a very powerful experimental method to study superfluid turbulence. Micron-sized solid particles and metastable helium molecules are specifically being used to investigate in detail the dynamics of quantum flows. These studies belong to a well-established, interdisciplinary line of inquiry that focuses on the deeper understanding of turbulence, one of the open problem of modern physics, relevant to many research fields, ranging from fluid mechanics to cosmology. Progress made to date is discussed, to highlight its relevance to a wider scientific community, and future directions are outlined. The latter include, e.g., detailed studies of normal-fluid turbulence, dissipative mechanisms, and unsteady/oscillatory flows. PMID:24704871

  14. The Nanostructures Produced by Laser Ablation of Metals in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Eugene B.; Karabulin, Alexander V.; Matyushenko, Vladimir I.; Sizov, Vyacheslav D.; Khodos, Igor I.

    2013-07-01

    The coagulation of impurities in superfluid helium, in contrast to that in all other liquids where spherical colloid particles are usually produced, led to producing thin and long nanowires with regular internal structure. This is due to the presence in HeII of quasi one-dimensional quantized vortices serving as condensation nuclei and providing a catalyzing effect on the process of any impurities coagulation. The metal was introduced into superfluid helium by laser ablation of targets made of gold, copper, nickel, permalloy, indium, lead, tin and bismuth immersed in liquid HeII. For all of these metals, the formation of thin (about 8 nm in diameter), long high-quality nanowires was observed after laser ablation. The structure of nanowires as well as of micron-sized metallic spheres, appeared as products at high laser pulse energy, providing evidence that they were formed via molten state. The spheres are metastable, and under damage of their surface, thousands of nanoballs emerge from their interior. The hollow shells left after this event are similar to those found as the products of laser ablation in normal fluids. The metal ablation into HeII bulk from thin film was found much less effective then that from thick foils.

  15. Selection of ionization paths of K2 on superfluid helium droplets by wave packet interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hild, Marek Bastian; Dufour, Adrien; Achazi, Georg; Patas, Alexander; Scheier, Paul; Lindinger, Albrecht

    2016-08-01

    We report on the control of wave packet dynamics for the ionization of K2 attached to the surface of superfluid helium droplets. The superfluid helium matrix acts as a heat sink and reduces the coherence time of molecular processes by dissipation. We use tailor-shaped pulses in order to activate or inhibit different ionization paths by constructive or destructive wave packet interference. A drastic change of the wave packet dynamics is observed by shifting the phase between the exciting sub pulses.

  16. Imaging Anisotropic Nanoplasma Dynamics in Superfluid Helium Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacellar, Camila; Chatterley, Adam; Lackner, Florian; Pemmaraju, Sri; Tanyag, Rico; Bernando, Charles; Verma, Deepak; O'Connell, Sean; Osipiv, Timur; Ray, Dipanwita; Ferguson, Kenneth; Gorkhover, Tais; Swiggers, Michele; Bucher, Maximilian; Vilesov, Andrey; Bostedt, Christoph; Gessner, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of strong-field induced nanoplasmas inside superfluid helium droplets are studied using single-shot, single-particle femtosecond time-resolved X-ray coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Intense (~ 1015 W/ cm2, ~ 50 fs) 800 nm laser pulses are employed to initiate nanoplasma formation in sub-micron (200 nm - 600 nm) sized helium droplets. The dynamics of the nanoplasma formation and subsequent droplet evolution are probed by x-rays pulses (~ 100 fs, 600 eV) that are delayed with respect to the near-infrared (NIR) pulses by 10's of femtoseconds to hundreds of picoseconds. Pump-probe time-delay dependent effects in the CDI patterns reveal distinct dynamics evolving on multiple timescales. Very fast (<100 fs) appearing features are possibly indicative of electronic dynamics, while slower (>= 1 ps) dynamics are likely associated with structural changes correlated to nuclear motion including droplet disintegration. In particular, the CDI images exhibit strong indications for anisotropic dynamics governed by the NIR polarization axis, providing previously inaccessible insight into the mechanisms of nanoplasma formation and evolution.

  17. Oscillating-grid experiments in water and superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honey, Rose E.; Hershberger, Robert; Donnelly, Russell J.; Bolster, Diogo

    2014-05-01

    Passing a fluid through a grid is a well-known mechanism used to study the properties of turbulence. Oscillating a horizontal grid vertically in a tank has also been used extensively and is considered to be a source of almost homogenous isotropic turbulence. When the oscillating grid is turned on a turbulent flow is induced. A front translates into the experimental tank, behind which the flow is highly turbulent. Long predicted that the growth of such a front would grow diffusively as the square root of time (i.e., d ˜√t ) and Dickinson and Long presented experimental evidence for the diffusive result at a low mesh Reynolds number of 555. This paper revisits these experiments and attempts a set of two models for the advancing front in both square and round tanks. We do not observe significant differences between runs in square and round tanks. The experiments in water reach mesh Reynolds numbers of order 30000. Using some data from superfluid helium experiments we are able to explore mesh Reynolds numbers to about 43000. We find the power law for the advancing front decreases weakly with the mesh Reynolds number. Using a very long tank we find that the turbulent front stops completely at a certain depth and attempt a simple explanation for that behavior. We study the propagation of the turbulent front into tubes of different diameters inserted into the main tank. We show that these tubes exclude wavelengths much larger than the tube diameter. We explore the variation of the position of the steady-state boundary H on tube diameter D and find that H =cD with c ˜2. We suggest this may be explained by saturation of the energy-containing length scale ℓe. We also report on the effect of plugging up just one hole of the grid. Finally, we recall some earlier oscillating grid experiments in superfluid 4He in the light of the present results.

  18. Oscillating-grid experiments in water and superfluid helium.

    PubMed

    Honey, Rose E; Hershberger, Robert; Donnelly, Russell J; Bolster, Diogo

    2014-05-01

    Passing a fluid through a grid is a well-known mechanism used to study the properties of turbulence. Oscillating a horizontal grid vertically in a tank has also been used extensively and is considered to be a source of almost homogenous isotropic turbulence. When the oscillating grid is turned on a turbulent flow is induced. A front translates into the experimental tank, behind which the flow is highly turbulent. Long predicted that the growth of such a front would grow diffusively as the square root of time (i.e., d ∼ sqrt[t]) and Dickinson and Long presented experimental evidence for the diffusive result at a low mesh Reynolds number of 555. This paper revisits these experiments and attempts a set of two models for the advancing front in both square and round tanks. We do not observe significant differences between runs in square and round tanks. The experiments in water reach mesh Reynolds numbers of order 30000. Using some data from superfluid helium experiments we are able to explore mesh Reynolds numbers to about 43000. We find the power law for the advancing front decreases weakly with the mesh Reynolds number. Using a very long tank we find that the turbulent front stops completely at a certain depth and attempt a simple explanation for that behavior. We study the propagation of the turbulent front into tubes of different diameters inserted into the main tank. We show that these tubes exclude wavelengths much larger than the tube diameter. We explore the variation of the position of the steady-state boundary H on tube diameter D and find that H = cD with c ∼ 2. We suggest this may be explained by saturation of the energy-containing length scale ℓ(e). We also report on the effect of plugging up just one hole of the grid. Finally, we recall some earlier oscillating grid experiments in superfluid (4)He in the light of the present results. PMID:25353889

  19. Design considerations for a micro-g superfluid helium fluid acquisition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    The general description, the operation, and the design of a superfluid helium (SFHe) fluid acquisition system (FAS) for use under microgravity conditions is presented. For the type of FAS considered here, where fine-mesh woven screens are used to retain flowing SFHe within a gallery arm (flow) channel, those forces which determine the flow dynamics are the micro-g accelerations, liquid surface tension, and tensile strength and cumulative pressure drops along a flow path that begins at the bulk liquid and ends at the entrance to a pump. For this case, the dimensionless number, N(T) is written as the ratio between the pressure drop across the screen and the surface tension forces at the screen for low fluid velocities. Static Bond number measurements have bene taken for SFHe using 325 x 2300 twilled Dutch screen and have indicated a screen pore hydraulic radius of 0.00031 cm.

  20. Dynamics and Morphology of Superfluid Helium Drops in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, George M.; Maris, Humphrey J.

    2001-01-01

    We developed an apparatus that makes it possible to observe and study magnetically levitated drops of superfluid helium. The force on a diamagnetic substance in a magnetic field is proportional to the gradient of the square of the magnetic field B. For the magnetic force on helium to be equal to the gravitational force on Earth, it is necessary for the product of B with the field gradient dB/d z to be 21.5 T(exp 2)/cm. In addition, in order for the magnetic field to provide a stable trap, the value of B(exp 2) must increase in all directions in the horizontal plane that passes through the point where the field/field gradient product in the vertical direction has the critical value of 21.5 T(exp 2)/cm. A specially designed superconducting magnet that meets these specifications has been installed in a large helium dewar with optical access. Helium drops levitated by the magnet can be viewed along the axis of the solenoid. The sample chamber within the bore of the magnet is thermally isolated from the magnet and helium reservoir. Its temperature can be varied between 4 and 0.5 K, the lower part of the range being reached using a He-3 refrigerator. Liquid helium can be injected into the magnetic trap using a small capillary. Once a drop is contained in the trap it can be held there indefinitely. With this apparatus we have conducted a number of different types of experiments on helium drops so as to gain information necessary for performing experiments in space. With magnetically levitated drops we are limited to working with drops of 1 cm. or less in diameter. The shape of the drops larger than a few mm diameter can be distorted by the profile of the magnetic field. The study of phenomena such as the initial motion of the surfaces of two drops as they just make contact, requires the use large drops to resolve the behavior of interest. We have performed a detailed investigation of the shape oscillations of superfluid drops.

  1. Thermoluminescence Dynamics During Destructions of Porous Structures Formed by Nitrogen Nanoclusters in Bulk Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meraki, Adil; Mao, Shun; McColgan, Patrick T.; Boltnev, Roman E.; Lee, David M.; Khmelenko, Vladimir V.

    2016-03-01

    We studied the dynamics of thermoluminescence during destruction of porous structures formed by nanoclusters of nitrogen molecules containing high concentrations of stabilized nitrogen atoms. The porous structures were formed in bulk superfluid helium by injection of the products of discharges in nitrogen-helium gas mixtures through the liquid helium surface. Fast recombination of nitrogen atoms during warming-up led to explosive destruction of the porous structures accompanied by bright flashes. Intense emissions from the α -group of nitrogen atoms, the β -group of oxygen atoms and the Vegard-Kaplan bands of N_2 molecules were observed at the beginning of destruction. At the end of destruction the M- and β -bands of NO molecules as well as bands of O_2 molecules were also observed. Observation of the emissions from NO molecules at the end of destruction was explained by processes of accumulation of NO molecules in the system due to the large van der Waals interaction of NO molecules. For the first time, we observed the emission of the O_2 molecules at the end of destruction of the porous nitrogen structures as a result of the (NO)_2 dimer formation in solid nitrogen and subsequent processes leading to the appearance of excited O_2 molecules.

  2. Thermoluminescence Dynamics During Destructions of Porous Structures Formed by Nitrogen Nanoclusters in Bulk Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meraki, Adil; Mao, Shun; McColgan, Patrick T.; Boltnev, Roman E.; Lee, David M.; Khmelenko, Vladimir V.

    2016-11-01

    We studied the dynamics of thermoluminescence during destruction of porous structures formed by nanoclusters of nitrogen molecules containing high concentrations of stabilized nitrogen atoms. The porous structures were formed in bulk superfluid helium by injection of the products of discharges in nitrogen-helium gas mixtures through the liquid helium surface. Fast recombination of nitrogen atoms during warming-up led to explosive destruction of the porous structures accompanied by bright flashes. Intense emissions from the α -group of nitrogen atoms, the β -group of oxygen atoms and the Vegard-Kaplan bands of N_2 molecules were observed at the beginning of destruction. At the end of destruction the M- and β -bands of NO molecules as well as bands of O_2 molecules were also observed. Observation of the emissions from NO molecules at the end of destruction was explained by processes of accumulation of NO molecules in the system due to the large van der Waals interaction of NO molecules. For the first time, we observed the emission of the O_2 molecules at the end of destruction of the porous nitrogen structures as a result of the (NO)_2 dimer formation in solid nitrogen and subsequent processes leading to the appearance of excited O_2 molecules.

  3. Implementation of the thermodynamic and phase transition equations of superfluid helium in CFD software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, R.; Pascali, S.; Vendramini, C.; Baudouy, B.

    2015-12-01

    The cryogenic design of the next generation of superconducting accelerator magnets depends on our ability to simulate the helium heat and mass transfer in the internal structure of these magnets. For that matter accurate tools must be developed such as numerical codes integrating the thermodynamic behavior and phase transition in superfluid helium. We have implemented in 2D and 3D, the He II conservation equations in Fluent© CFD software corresponding to a simplified two-fluid model. It consists of a conventional continuity equation, a modified momentum equation for the total fluid and an energy equation including the Gorter-Mellink internal convection term modeling the turbulence regime. The code is mainly suited to simulate transient and steady-state flow configurations. In addition, a new method has been developed to simulate the He II / He I transition in 2D based on a modified Volume Of Fluid method (VOF). The interface between the two states of liquid helium has been locally recreated in the corresponding cells to properly mimic the second order phase transition (no latent heat). Both steady and unsteady numerical simulation have been performed and compared with different experimental results.

  4. Particle Detection in Superfluid Helium: R&D for Low Energy Solar Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Lanou, Robert E., Jr.

    2006-03-31

    This report presents a summary of the results from R&D conducted as a feasibility study in the Department of Physics of Brown University for detection of low energy solar neutrinos utilizing a superfluid helium target. The report outlines the results in several areas: 1) development of experimental facilities, 2) energy deposition by electrons and alphas in superfluid helium, 3) development of wafer and metallic magnetic calorimeters, 4) background studies, 5) coded apertures and conceptual design, 6) Detection of single electrons and 7) a simulation of expected performance of a full scale device. Recommendations for possible future work are also presented. A bibliography of published papers and unpublished doctoral theses is included.

  5. Vortex dynamics in rotating counterflow and plane Couette and Poiseuille turbulence in superfluid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Jou, D.; Sciacca, M.; Mongiovi, M. S.

    2008-07-01

    An equation previously proposed to describe the evolution of vortex-line density in rotating counterflow turbulent tangles in superfluid helium [Phys. Rev B 69, 094513 (2004)] is generalized to incorporate nonvanishing barycentric velocity and velocity gradients. Our generalization is compared with an analogous approach proposed by Lipniacki [Eur. J. Mech. B Fluids 25, 435 (2006)], and with experimental results by Swanson et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 50, 190 (1983)] in rotating counterflow, and it is used to evaluate the vortex density in plane Couette and Poiseuille flows of superfluid helium.

  6. Flow visualization in superfluid helium-4 using He2 molecular tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei

    Flow visualization in superfluid helium is challenging, yet crucial for attaining a detailed understanding of quantum turbulence. Two problems have impeded progress: finding and introducing suitable tracers that are small yet visible; and unambiguous interpretation of the tracer motion. We show that metastable He2 triplet molecules are outstanding tracers compared with other particles used in helium. These molecular tracers have small size and relatively simple behavior in superfluid helium: they follow the normal fluid motion at above 1 K and will bind to quantized vortex lines below about 0.6 K. A laser-induced fluorescence technique has been developed for imaging the He2 tracers. We will present our recent experimental work on studying the normal-fluid motion by tracking thin lines of He2 tracers created via femtosecond laser-field ionization in helium. We will also discuss a newly launched experiment on visualizing vortex lines in a magnetically levitated superfluid helium drop by imaging the He2 tracers trapped on the vortex cores. This experiment will enable unprecedented insight into the behavior of a rotating superfluid drop and will untangle several key issues in quantum turbulence research. We acknowledge the support from the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1507386 and the US Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02 96ER40952.

  7. (abstract) Production and Levitation of Free Drops of Liquid Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paine, C. G.; Petrac, D.; Rhim, W. K.

    1995-01-01

    We are interested in the nucleation and behavior of quantized vorticies and surface excitations in free drops of superfluid helium. We have constructed an apparatus to maintain liquid helium drops isolated from any material container in the Earth's gravitational field, and have investigated two techniques for generating and introducing liquid drops into the region of confinement. The levitation apparatus utilizes the electrostatic force acting upon a charged liquid drop to counteract the gravitational force, with drop position stability provided by a static magnetic field acting upon the helium diamagnetic moment. Electrically neutral superfluid drops have been produced with a miniature thermomechanical pump; for a given configuration the liquid initial velocity has been varied up to several centimeters per second. Liquid drops carrying either net positive or negative charge are produced by an electrode which generates a flow of ionized liquid from the bulk liquid surface. Potentials of less than one thousand volts to several thousand volts are required. The mass flow is controlled by varying duration of the ionizing voltage pulse; drops as small as 30 micrometers diameter, charged to near the Rayleigh limit, have been observed.

  8. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams

    PubMed Central

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He2+ and He4+, which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl4 doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He)nC+, (He)nCl+, and (He)nCCl+. Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets. PMID:26329210

  9. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams.

    PubMed

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-01

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He2(+) and He4(+), which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl4 doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He)(n)C(+), (He)(n)Cl(+), and (He)(n)CCl(+). Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets.

  10. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-01

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He2+ and He4+, which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl4 doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He)nC+, (He)nCl+, and (He)nCCl+. Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets.

  11. Microsolvation of molecules in superfluid helium nanodroplets revealed by means of electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Premke, Tobias; Wirths, Eva-Maria; Pentlehner, Dominik; Riechers, Ricarda; Lehnig, Rudolf; Vdovin, Alexander; Slenczka, Alkwin

    2014-01-01

    The empirical model explaining microsolvation of molecules in superfluid helium droplets proposes a non-superfluid helium solvation layer enclosing the dopant molecule. This model warrants an empirical explanation of any helium induced substructure resolved for electronic transitions of molecules in helium droplets. Despite a wealth of such experimental data, quantitative modeling of spectra is still in its infancy. The theoretical treatment of such many-particle systems dissolved into a quantum fluid is a challenge. Moreover, the success of theoretical activities relies also on the accuracy and self-critical communication of experimental data. This will be elucidated by a critical resume of our own experimental work done within the last ten years. We come to the conclusion that spectroscopic data and among others in particular the spectral resolution depend strongly on experimental conditions. Moreover, despite the fact that none of the helium induced fine structure speaks against the empirical model for solvation in helium droplets, in many cases an unequivocal assignment of the spectroscopic details is not possible. This ambiguity needs to be considered and a careful and critical communication of experimental results is essential in order to promote success in quantitatively understanding microsolvation in superfluid helium nanodroplets. PMID:25077143

  12. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-15

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He{sub 2}{sup +} and He{sub 4}{sup +}, which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl{sub 4} doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He){sub n}C{sup +}, (He){sub n}Cl{sup +}, and (He){sub n}CCl{sup +}. Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets.

  13. Superfluid-supercritical helium tradeoff analysis for the Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gier, H. L.; Stoll, R.; Brooks, W. F.

    1982-01-01

    A comparative study is made of three methods for obtaining the required cooling of the SIRTF. The first is a supercritical helium system in which the 2 K temperatures are obtained by a Joule-Thomson expander; the second is a superfluid (He II) helium system; and the third is a hybrid system in which supercritical helium provides the major cooling and small He II reservoirs supply specific detector cooling. The superfluid helium system is found to offer superior performance; it would be the system to use if funding were available. The comparative study gives equal weight to performance, operations, and cost. From this point of view, the hybrid system is selected as the best compromise to obtain an operational SIRTF.

  14. Study of Exotic Ions in Superfluid Helium-4 Using a Carbon Nanotube Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, W.; Xie, Z.-L.; Yang, Y.; Seidel, G. M.; Maris, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    We have extended our measurements of the properties of exotic negatively-charged ions in superfluid helium-4. We measured the ion mobility using the time-of-of-flight method at temperatures in the range between 1.03 and 1.16 K. Ions were generated by an electrical discharge produced by applying a voltage to sharp tips in the helium vapor above the liquid surface. Previous studies by Ihas and Sanders, Eden and McClintock, and by our group used tungsten tips and were able to detect at least twelve exotic ions in addition to the normal electron bubble. In the present work we have experimented with tips each consisting of a stainless steel wire coated with carbon nanotubes. We have found that with these tips the strength of the exotic ion signal is substantially increased making it possible to detect several ions which previously could not be seen. The present data combined with the results of the previous studies indicate that there are at least eighteen exotic ions with different mobility.

  15. Temperature dependent mobility measurements of alkali earth ions in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putlitz, Gisbert Zu; Baumann, I.; Foerste, M.; Jungmann, K.; Riediger, O.; Tabbert, B.; Wiebe, J.; Zühlke, C.

    1998-05-01

    Mobility measurements of impurity ions in superfluid helium are reported. Alkali earth ions were produced with a laser sputtering technique and were drawn inside the liquid by an electric field. The experiments were carried out in the temperature region from 1.27 up to 1.66 K. The temperature dependence of the mobility of Be^+-ions (measured here for the first time) differs from that of the other alkali earth ions Mg^+, Ca^+, Sr^+ and Ba^+, but behaves similar to that of He^+ (M. Foerste, H. Günther, O. Riediger, J. Wiebe, G. zu Putlitz, Z. Phys. B) 104, 317 (1997). Theories of Atkins (A. Atkins, Phys. Rev.) 116, 1339 (1959) and Cole (M.W. Cole, R.A. Bachmann Phys. Rev. B) 15, 1388 (1977) predict a different defect structure for He^+ and the alkali earth ions: the helium ion is assumed to form a snowball like structure whereas for the alkali earth ions a bubble structure is assumed. If the temperature dependence is a characteristic feature for the different structures, then it seems likely that the Be^+ ion builds a snowball like structure.

  16. Optical and mechanical properties of electron bubbles in superfluid helium-4

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Z.; Wei, W.; Yang, Y.; Maris, H. J.

    2014-12-15

    A series of experiments has revealed the existence of a large number (about 18) of different types of negative ions in superfluid helium-4. Despite much effort, the physical nature of these “exotic ions” has still not been determined. We discuss possible experiments which may be able to help determine the structure of these objects.

  17. Ordinary SQUID interferometers and superfluid helium matter wave interferometers: The role of quantum fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Golovashkin, A. I.; Zherikhina, L. N. Tskhovrebov, A. M.; Izmailov, G. N.; Ozolin, V. V.

    2010-08-15

    When comparing the operation of a superfluid helium matter wave quantum interferometer (He SQUID) with that of an ordinary direct-current quantum interferometer (dc SQUID), we estimate their resolution limitation that correspond to quantum fluctuations. An alternative mode of operation of the interferometer as a unified macroquantum system is considered.

  18. Resistor monitors transfer of liquid helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesketh, W. D.

    1966-01-01

    Large resistance change of a carbon resistor at the liquid helium temperature distinguishes between the transfer of liquid helium and gaseous helium into a closed Dewar. The resistor should be physically as small as possible to reduce the heat load to the helium.

  19. On the electric activity of superfluid helium at the excitation of first and second sound waves

    SciTech Connect

    Pashitskii, E. A. Gurin, A. A.

    2010-01-15

    We show that the electric activity of superfluid helium (HeII) observed in the experiments [3] during the excitation of standing second sound waves in an acoustic resonator can be described in terms of the phenomenological mechanism of the inertial polarization of atoms in a dielectric, in particular, in HeII, when the polarization field induced in the medium is proportional to the mechanical acceleration, by analogy with the Stewart-Tolman effect. The variable relative velocity w = v{sub n} - v{sub s} of the normal and superfluid HeII components that emerges in the second sound wave determines the mean group velocity of rotons, V{sub g} Almost-Equal-To w, with the density of the normal component related to their equilibrium number density in the temperature range 1.3 K {<=} T {<=} 2 K. Therefore, the acceleration of the 4He atoms involved in the formation of a roton excitation is proportional to the time derivative of the relative velocity.w. In this case, the linear local relations between the variable values of the electric induction, electric field strength, and polarization vector should be taken into account. As a result, the variable displacement current induced in the bulk of HeII and the corresponding potential difference do not depend on the anomalously low polarizability of liquid helium. This allows the ratio of the amplitudes of the temperature and potential oscillations in the second sound wave, which is almost independent of T in the above temperature range, consistent with experimental data to be obtained. At the same time, the absence of an electric response during the excitation of first sound waves in the linear regime is related to an insufficient power of the sound oscillations. Based on the experimental data on the excitation of first and second sounds, we have obtained estimates for the phenomenological coefficient of proportionality between the polarization vector and acceleration and for the drag coefficient of helium atoms by rotons in the

  20. Automatic Refilling System For Liquid Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, Aristides; Sansebastian, Mark; Geagen, Jay; Warner, Brent

    1990-01-01

    Cryogenic experiments left unattended for days. System automatically replenishes liquid helium in cryogenic experimental apparatus as liquid evaporates. Automatic filling system transfers liquid helium from storage vessel to experimental apparatus under computer control. Gaseous helium from cylinder supplies pumping pressure. Circuit senses level of liquid helium by sensing voltage across measuring resistors in series with silicon resistance thermometers (SRT's). Low voltage indicates SRT covered, while high voltage indicates uncovered.

  1. Multipurpose top for liquid helium Dewar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, R. S.; Anderholm, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Multipurpose top was fabricated for liquid helium Dewar flask which guards against flash vaporization of liquid helium and allows boiling temperature of liquid helium to be lowered by reduction of ambient pressure in Dewar flask. Device is rugged and simple, and does not require frequent calibrations or adjustments.

  2. A design and critical technology issues for on-orbit resupply of superfluid helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Richard A.; Mord, Allan J.

    1990-01-01

    The issues of and the solutions to the critical design and technology areas of the Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) experiment, presently under development at the NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center, are discussed. Special attention is given to the SHOOT design requirements for the 10,000-liter superfluid He resupply tanker system, the concept details of the system, and the resupply operations and their analysis. A block diagram of the SHOOT system is included along with fluid management schematic and configuration diagrams of the system and its subsystems. A summary of the dewar performance is also presented.

  3. Controlled evaporation of superfluid helium in a porous plug phase separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lages, Christopher R.

    1998-12-01

    regime beyond the critical mass flow rate separating this regime from the unpredictable and hysteretic 'choked' flow regime of the plug. The mass flow increase is stable, and all heat utilized in heating the downstream surface goes into evaporation of liquid helium. Data show the mass flow increase can be obtained while the thermodynamic conditions on either side of the plug are measurably unchanged. This indicates the mechanism providing the additional mass flow of liquid helium is decoupled from counterflow of its normal and superfluid components. This is consistent with the effects of parasitic heat leaking into the downstream side of a porous plug. Further results presented in this thesis include thermodynamic-based computations of liquid helium phase separation in capillaries and discussion of how computational models can be used to bind the flow regimes of porous plugs. These computational models coupled with the controlled evaporation technique simplify the flight porous plug selection process for a mission. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  4. Lab tests of a thermomechanical pump for shoot. [Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dipirro, Michael J.; Boyle, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory tests of a thermomechanical (TM) pump utilizing a commercially available porous disk have been conducted. Various size disks, heater configurations, and outlet flow impedances have been used to characterize scale models of the pump proposed for the Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) Flight Experiment. The results yield the scalability of the TM pump to larger diameters, and hence larger pumping rates, the dependence of flow rate on back pressure and heater power, and the limits of pumping speed due to internal losses within the porous disk due to mutual and superfluid friction. Analysis indicates that for low back pressures the flow rate is limited by the superfluid friction rather than the mutual friction. For the porous plug used in the early tests this amounts to a practical limit of 4.4 liters per hour per square centimeter. For a baselined flight plug area of 180 sq cm this yields 790 liters per hour.

  5. Detecting scintillations in liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, P. R.; McKinsey, D. N.

    2013-09-01

    We review our work in developing a tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB)-based detection system for a measurement of the neutron lifetime using magnetically confined ultracold neutrons (UCN). As part of the development of the detection system for this experiment, we studied the scintillation properties of liquid helium itself, characterized the fluorescent efficiencies of different fluors, and built and tested three detector geometries. We provide an overview of the results from these studies as well as references for additional information.

  6. Specifications and Performances of Series Superfluid Helium Safety Relief Valves for the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perin, A.; Fontanive, V.

    2006-04-01

    Protecting the LHC magnets requires safety relief valves operating with 1.9 K pressurized superfluid helium at their inlet. Following the evaluation of prototype valves, a specification for the production of the 360 safety relief valves needed for the LHC was issued. The production of the safety valves was then awarded to an industrial contractor. The performances of pre-series valves were assessed for a variety of aspects including thermal performance, leak tightness in superfluid helium, dynamic behavior and resistance to intensive mechanical cycling. After the initial validation phase the series production was completed within the technical requirements of the specification. This paper describes the characteristics of the safety relief valves and the specifications for their industrial production. The performances of the pre-series valves are presented and an overview of the series production phase is given.

  7. In situ radiation test of silicon and diamond detectors operating in superfluid helium and developed for beam loss monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurfürst, C.; Dehning, B.; Sapinski, M.; Bartosik, M. R.; Eisel, T.; Fabjan, C.; Rementeria, C. A.; Griesmayer, E.; Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.; Zabrodskii, A.; Fadeeva, N.; Tuboltsev, Y.; Eremin, I.; Egorov, N.; Härkönen, J.; Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E.

    2015-05-01

    As a result of the foreseen increase in the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider, the discrimination between the collision products and possible magnet quench-provoking beam losses of the primary proton beams is becoming more critical for safe accelerator operation. We report the results of ongoing research efforts targeting the upgrading of the monitoring system by exploiting Beam Loss Monitor detectors based on semiconductors located as close as possible to the superconducting coils of the triplet magnets. In practice, this means that the detectors will have to be immersed in superfluid helium inside the cold mass and operate at 1.9 K. Additionally, the monitoring system is expected to survive 20 years of LHC operation, resulting in an estimated radiation fluence of 1×1016 proton/cm2, which corresponds to a dose of about 2 MGy. In this study, we monitored the signal degradation during the in situ irradiation when silicon and single-crystal diamond detectors were situated in the liquid/superfluid helium and the dependences of the collected charge on fluence and bias voltage were obtained. It is shown that diamond and silicon detectors can operate at 1.9 K after 1×1016 p/cm2 irradiation required for application as BLMs, while the rate of the signal degradation was larger in silicon detectors than in the diamond ones. For Si detectors this rate was controlled mainly by the operational mode, being larger at forward bias voltage.

  8. Laser ionization and spectroscopy of Cu in superfluid helium nanodroplets

    PubMed Central

    Lindebner, Friedrich; Kautsch, Andreas; Koch, Markus; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2014-01-01

    Mass and optical spectroscopic methods are used for the analysis of copper (Cu) atoms and clusters doped to helium nanodroplets (HeN). A two-color resonant two-photon ionization scheme is applied to study the Cu 2P1/2,3/2∘←2S1/2 ground state transition. The absorption is strongly broadened for Cu atoms submerged inside helium nanodroplets and a comparison with computed literature values is provided. An observed ejection of the dopant from the droplet is triggered upon excitation, populating energetically lower states. The formation of Cun clusters up to Cu7 inside helium nanodroplets was observed by means of electron impact ionization mass spectroscopy. PMID:25844053

  9. Helium Saturation of Liquid Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yavrouian, A. H.; Moran, Clifford M.

    1990-01-01

    The research is in three areas which are: (1) techniques were devised for achieving the required levels of helium (He) saturation in liquid propellants (limited to monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO)); (2) the values were evaluated for equilibrium solubilities of He in liquid propellants as currently used in the industry; and (3) the He dissolved in liquid propellants were accurately measured. Conclusions drawn from these studies include: (1) Techniques for dissolving He in liquid propellants depending upon the capabilities of the testing facility (Verification of the quantity of gas dissolved is essential); (2) Until greater accuracy is obtained, the equilibrium solubility values of He in MMH and NTO as cited in the Air Force Propellant Handbooks should be accepted as standard (There are still enough uncertainties in the He saturation values to warrant further basic experimental studies); and (3) The manometric measurement of gas volume from a frozen sample of propellant should be the accepted method for gas analysis.

  10. Electron diffraction of CBr4 in superfluid helium droplets: A step towards single molecule diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Kong, Wei

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate the practicality of electron diffraction of single molecules inside superfluid helium droplets using CBr4 as a testing case. By reducing the background from pure undoped droplets via multiple doping, with small corrections for dimers and trimers, clearly resolved diffraction rings of CBr4 similar to those of gas phase molecules can be observed. The experimental data from CBr4 doped droplets are in agreement with both theoretical calculations and with experimental results of gaseous species. The abundance of monomers and clusters in the droplet beam also qualitatively agrees with the Poisson statistics. Possible extensions of this approach to macromolecular ions will also be discussed. This result marks the first step in building a molecular goniometer using superfluid helium droplet cooling and field induced orientation. The superior cooling effect of helium droplets is ideal for field induced orientation, but the diffraction background from helium is a concern. This work addresses this background issue and identifies a possible solution. Accumulation of diffraction images only becomes meaningful when all images are produced from molecules oriented in the same direction, and hence a molecular goniometer is a crucial technology for serial diffraction of single molecules.

  11. Electron diffraction of CBr4 in superfluid helium droplets: A step towards single molecule diffraction.

    PubMed

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Kong, Wei

    2016-07-21

    We demonstrate the practicality of electron diffraction of single molecules inside superfluid helium droplets using CBr4 as a testing case. By reducing the background from pure undoped droplets via multiple doping, with small corrections for dimers and trimers, clearly resolved diffraction rings of CBr4 similar to those of gas phase molecules can be observed. The experimental data from CBr4 doped droplets are in agreement with both theoretical calculations and with experimental results of gaseous species. The abundance of monomers and clusters in the droplet beam also qualitatively agrees with the Poisson statistics. Possible extensions of this approach to macromolecular ions will also be discussed. This result marks the first step in building a molecular goniometer using superfluid helium droplet cooling and field induced orientation. The superior cooling effect of helium droplets is ideal for field induced orientation, but the diffraction background from helium is a concern. This work addresses this background issue and identifies a possible solution. Accumulation of diffraction images only becomes meaningful when all images are produced from molecules oriented in the same direction, and hence a molecular goniometer is a crucial technology for serial diffraction of single molecules. PMID:27448887

  12. Grüneisen parameter for gases and superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Mariano; Menegasso, Paulo; Paupitz, Ricardo; Seridonio, Antonio; Lagos, Roberto E.

    2016-09-01

    The Grüneisen ratio (Γ), i.e. the ratio of the thermal expansivity to the specific heat at constant pressure, quantifies the degree of anharmonicity of the potential governing the physical properties of a system. While Γ has been intensively explored in solid state physics, very little is known about its behavior for gases. This is most likely due to the difficulties posed in carrying out both thermal expansion and specific heat measurements in gases with high accuracy as a function of pressure and temperature. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge a comprehensive discussion about the peculiarities of the Grüneisen ratio is still lacking in the literature. Here we report on a detailed and comprehensive overview of the Grüneisen ratio. Particular emphasis is placed on the analysis of Γ for gases. The main findings of this work are: (i) for the van der Waals gas Γ depends only on the co-volume b due to interaction effects, it is smaller than that for the ideal gas (Γ = 2/3) and diverges upon approaching the critical volume; (ii) for the Bose-Einstein condensation of an ideal boson gas, assuming the transition as first-order, Γ diverges upon approaching a critical volume, similarly to the van der Waals gas; (iii) for 4He at the superfluid transition Γ shows a singular behavior. Our results reveal that Γ can be used as an appropriate experimental tool to explore pressure-induced critical points.

  13. Grüneisen parameter for gases and superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Mariano; Menegasso, Paulo; Paupitz, Ricardo; Seridonio, Antonio; Lagos, Roberto E.

    2016-09-01

    The Grüneisen ratio (Γ), i.e. the ratio of the thermal expansivity to the specific heat at constant pressure, quantifies the degree of anharmonicity of the potential governing the physical properties of a system. While Γ has been intensively explored in solid state physics, very little is known about its behavior for gases. This is most likely due to the difficulties posed in carrying out both thermal expansion and specific heat measurements in gases with high accuracy as a function of pressure and temperature. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge a comprehensive discussion about the peculiarities of the Grüneisen ratio is still lacking in the literature. Here we report on a detailed and comprehensive overview of the Grüneisen ratio. Particular emphasis is placed on the analysis of Γ for gases. The main findings of this work are: (i) for the van der Waals gas Γ depends only on the co-volume b due to interaction effects, it is smaller than that for the ideal gas (Γ = 2/3) and diverges upon approaching the critical volume; (ii) for the Bose–Einstein condensation of an ideal boson gas, assuming the transition as first-order, Γ diverges upon approaching a critical volume, similarly to the van der Waals gas; (iii) for 4He at the superfluid transition Γ shows a singular behavior. Our results reveal that Γ can be used as an appropriate experimental tool to explore pressure-induced critical points.

  14. A Structured Approach to Analyze the Influence of Channel Dimensions on Heat Extraction via Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielert, E. R.; ten Kate, H. H. J.; Verweij, A. P.

    For the luminosity upgrade of the LHC at CERN, the final focusing quadrupole magnets will be exposed to an increased energy deposition in their coil windings. To have a higher heat transfer rate between cable and superfluid helium bath, the cable insulation has been subject of many studies. Improved cable insulation designs, making use of several layers of Kapton tape wound around Rutherford type cables, allow helium to penetrate via micro-channels, which are left open between adjacent Kapton tape sections. To better understand the thermal behaviour at operating temperatures below and some degrees above the helium lambda transition, besides experimental work, several numerical models have been developed to study the influence of the cable insulation. Here we present a new numerical model based on an earlier presented FEM model, which makes use of coupling variables such that the user can easily and quickly change the parameters of interest, giving the possibility to analyse new ideas effectively.

  15. Thermionic emission and a novel electron collector in a liquid helium environment.

    PubMed

    Fang, J; Dementyev, Anatoly E; Tempere, Jacques; Silvera, Isaac F

    2009-04-01

    We study two techniques to create electrons in a liquid helium environment. One is thermionic emission of tungsten filaments in a low temperature cell in the vapor phase with a superfluid helium film covering all surfaces; the other is operating a glowing filament immersed in bulk liquid helium. We present both the steady state and rapid sweep I-V curves and the electron current yield. These curves, having a negative dynamic resistance region, differ remarkably from those of a vacuum tube filament. A novel low temperature vapor-phase electron collector for which the insulating helium film on the collector surface can be removed is used to measure emission current. We also discuss our achievement of producing multielectron bubbles in liquid helium by a new method.

  16. Dissipation of the kinetic energy of a tuning fork immersed in superfluid helium at different oscillation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsenko, I. A.; Klokol, K. A.; Sokolov, S. S.; Sheshin, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    The drag coefficient characterizing the dissipation of the energy of oscillating tuning forks immersed in liquid helium is studied experimentally. The experiments are done at temperatures from 0.1 to 3.5 K, a range that covers both hydrodynamic flow and the ballistic transport of thermal excitations in superfluid helium below 0.6 K. It is found that a frequency dependence of the drag coefficient exists in the hydrodynamic limit, where the main dissipation mechanism is viscous friction of the liquid against the surface of the oscillating object at temperatures above 0.7 K. In this case, the drag coefficient is proportional to the square root of the oscillation frequency and its temperature dependence in He II is determined by the corresponding relationships between the density of the normal component and the viscosity of the liquid. At lower temperatures, there is no frequency dependence of the drag coefficient and the magnitude of the dissipative losses is determined only by the temperature dependence of the density of the normal component. At the same time, over the entire range of temperatures studied here, the magnitude of the dissipative losses depends on the geometrical dimensions of the oscillating object.

  17. First to second sound conversion through scattering by quantum vorticity in superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coste, Christophe; Lund, Fernando

    1997-03-01

    Following earlier results(F. Lund and V. Steinberg, Phys. Rev. Lett.) 75, 1102 (1995) on second sound to second sound scattering by quantized vortices in superfluid Helium, we have computed the scattering of first and second sound waves by quantum vorticity. Exact expressions are derived for first sound to second sound, as well as second sound to first sound, conversions. Calculations are performed using two-fluid hydrodynamics and a first Born approximation. The reason for the mode conversion lies in the nonlinear coupling between the longitudinal (sound) and transverse (vortical) hydrodynamic modes.

  18. Healing length near the lambda point in liquid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, M.J.; Spencer, D.S.; Fozooni, P.

    1989-04-01

    Viscous shear waves have been used to probe the spatial variation and healing of the viscosity and superfluid density near a solid wall in bulk He I, bulk He II, and in saturated superfluid films with thicknesses from 14 to 24 nm. The shear waves were generated at 20 and 34 MHz with an AT-cut quartz crystal resonator, and the transverse-acoustic impedance of the helium was measured at temperatures T close to the lambda point at T/sub lambda/. In bulk He II the results confirm a previous measurement of the healing length a(T) = (0.094 +- 0.002)epsilon/sup -2/3/ nm, where epsilon = chemically bond1-T/T/sub lambda/chemically bond. In bulk He I the measurements suggest that the viscosity exhibits healing above T/sub lambda/ near a solid wall with a similar healing length as in He II. Healing effects were observed below the superfluid transition temperature in the films and are also described by the same healing length as in the bulk liquid.

  19. Scattering of helium atoms by liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Frank O.; Garcia, Nicolas

    1986-04-01

    We present results from a new He-liquid-He single-atom effective potential for scattering, obtained from an integration, over the region occupied by the liquid, of a standard Lennard-Jones 6-12 pairwise potential combined with a simple model of the pair-correlation function. The new potential is consistent with (a) the accepted internal energy (the negative of the latent heat) of liquid He, (b) the accepted long-range (-C3/z3 van der Waals) atom-surface interaction potential, and (c) the scattering (reflectivity) data of Edwards et al. Production of excitons (ripplons) at the surface is not necessary to interpret the data. The theory is unsymmetrized; that is, no account is taken of the fact that scattering among identical particles is being considered.

  20. Universality of the Phonon-Roton Spectrum in Liquids and Superfluidity of 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrov, Viktor; Trigger, Sergey; Litinski, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Based on numerous experimental data on inelastic neutron and X-ray scattering in liquids, we assert that the phonon-roton spectrum of collective excitations, predicted by Landau for superfluid helium, is a universal property of the liquid state. We show that the existence of the roton minimum in the spectrum of collective excitations is caused by the short-range order in liquids. Using the virial theorem, we assume that one more branch of excitations should exist in He II, whose energy spectrum differs from the phonon-roton spectrum. Such excitations are associated with the pole of single-particle Green function, which can have a gap at small values of momenta.

  1. Hyperfine structure measurement of 87Rb atoms injected into superfluid helium as highly energetic ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, Kei; Furukawa, Takeshi; Yang, Xiaofei; Fujita, Tomomi; Wakui, Takashi; Mitsuya, Yousuke; Hayasaka, Miki; Ichikawa, Yuichi; Hatakeyama, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Tohru; Odashima, Hitoshi; Ueno, Hideki; Matsuo, Yukari; Orochi Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    We have developed a new nuclear laser spectroscopy technique that is called OROCHI (Optical RI-atoms Observation in Condensed Helium as Ioncatcher). In OROCHI, highly energetic ion beam is injected into superfluid helium (He II) and is trapped as atoms. Hyperfine structure (HFS) and Zeeman splitting of trapped atoms is measured using laser-microwave (MW)/radiofrequency (RF) double resonance method. We deduce nuclear moments and spin values from the measured splittings, respectively So far, we measured Zeeman splitting of 84-87Rb atoms To evaluate the validity of the OROCHI method, it is necessary to investigate the following two points not only for Zeeman but also for HFS splitings. (i) What is the accuracy in frequency in our measurement? (ii) How high beam intensity is necessary to observe resonance spectra? For this purpose we conducted online experiment using 87Rb beam and measured the HFS splitting of injected 87Rb atoms in He II.

  2. Design of a one-year lifetime, spaceborne superfluid helium dewar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    The Infrared Astronomical Satellite is an Explorer Mission and a joint venture of the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States scheduled for launch into earth orbit in 1981. The cryogenic system is a major part of the satellite; it incorporated many unique and state-of-the-art design features to satisfy the requirements of a one-year orbital lifetime, a focal plane temperature less than 4K, minimal launch weight, and zero-gravity operation. The 60-centimeter diameter telescope is contained within a superfluid helium dewar having a capacity of 540 liters. The telescope aperture cover employs an independent cryogenic system containing a 54-liter supercritical helium tank. The aperture cover, which is ejected two weeks after launch, protects the telescope from contamination and provides the low-temperature background needed to perform focal plane health checks. Design and predicted performance of the cryogenic systems are discussed in detail.

  3. Andreas Acrivos Dissertation Prize Lecture: Quantum Mechanics meets Fluid Dynamics: Visualization of Vortex Reconnection in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoletti, Matthew

    2010-11-01

    Long-range quantum order underlies a number of related physical phenomena including superfluidity, superconductivity and Bose-Einstein condensation. While superfluidity in helium-4 was one of the earliest discovered, it is not the best understood, owing to the strong interactions present (making theoretical progress difficult) and the lack of local experimental probes. Quantum fluids, such as superfluid helium-4, are typically described as a mixture of two interpenetrating fluids with distinct velocity fields: a viscous normal fluid akin to water and an inviscid superfluid exhibiting long-range quantum order. In this "two-fluid model," there is no conventional viscous dissipation in the superfluid component and vorticity is confined to atomically-thin vortices with quantized circulation. Turbulence may occur in either fluid component with turbulence in the superfluid exhibiting a complex tangle of quantized vortices, as first envisioned by Feynman. Approximately five years ago, our group discovered that micron-sized hydrogen particles may be used for flow visualization in superfluid helium-4. The particles can trace the motions of the normal fluid or be trapped by the quantized vortices, which enables one to characterize the dynamics of both the normal fluid and superfluid components for the first time. By directly observing and tracking these particles, we have directly confirmed the two-fluid model, observed vortex rings and quantized vortex reconnection, characterized thermal counterflows, and observed the very peculiar nature of quantum turbulence. One of many surprising observations is the existence of power-law tails in the probability distribution of velocities in quantum turbulence, which are in stark contrast to the Gaussian distributions typical of classical fluid turbulence.

  4. Study of Temperature Wave Propagation in Superfluid Helium Focusing on Radio-Frequency Cavity Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koettig, T.; Peters, B. J.; Avellino, S.; Junginger, T.; Bremer, J.

    2015-12-01

    Oscillating Superleak Transducers (OSTs) can be used to localize quenches of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. Local hot spots at the cavity surface initiate temperature waves in the surrounding superfluid helium that acts as cooling fluid at typical temperatures in the range of 1.6 K to 2 K. The temperature wave is characterised by the properties of superfluid helium such as the second sound velocity. For high heat load densities second sound velocities greater than the standard literature values are observed. This fast propagation has been verified in dedicated small scale experiments. Resistors were used to simulate the quench spots under controlled conditions. The three dimensional propagation of second sound is linked to OST signals. The aim of this study is to improve the understanding of the OST signal especially the incident angle dependency. The characterised OSTs are used as a tool for quench localisation on a real size cavity. Their sensitivity as well as the time resolution was proven to be superior to temperature sensors glued to the surface of the cavity.

  5. Effect of kinetic energy on the doping efficiency of cesium cations into superfluid helium droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-07-28

    We present an experimental investigation of the effect of kinetic energy on the ion doping efficiency of superfluid helium droplets using cesium cations from a thermionic emission source. The kinetic energy of Cs{sup +} is controlled by the bias voltage of a collection grid collinearly arranged with the droplet beam. Efficient doping from ions with kinetic energies from 20 eV up to 480 V has been observed in different sized helium droplets. The relative ion doping efficiency is determined by both the kinetic energy of the ions and the average size of the droplet beam. At a fixed source temperature, the number of doped droplets increases with increasing grid voltage, while the relative ion doping efficiency decreases. This result implies that not all ions are captured upon encountering with a sufficiently large droplet, a deviation from the near unity doping efficiency for closed shell neutral molecules. We propose that this drop in ion doping efficiency with kinetic energy is related to the limited deceleration rate inside a helium droplet. When the source temperature changes from 14 K to 17 K, the relative ion doping efficiency decreases rapidly, perhaps due to the lack of viable sized droplets. The size distribution of the Cs{sup +}-doped droplet beam can be measured by deflection and by energy filtering. The observed doped droplet size is about 5 × 10{sup 6} helium atoms when the source temperature is between 14 K and 17 K.

  6. Effect of kinetic energy on the doping efficiency of cesium cations into superfluid helium droplets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Freund, William M; Kong, Wei

    2015-07-28

    We present an experimental investigation of the effect of kinetic energy on the ion doping efficiency of superfluid helium droplets using cesium cations from a thermionic emission source. The kinetic energy of Cs(+) is controlled by the bias voltage of a collection grid collinearly arranged with the droplet beam. Efficient doping from ions with kinetic energies from 20 eV up to 480 V has been observed in different sized helium droplets. The relative ion doping efficiency is determined by both the kinetic energy of the ions and the average size of the droplet beam. At a fixed source temperature, the number of doped droplets increases with increasing grid voltage, while the relative ion doping efficiency decreases. This result implies that not all ions are captured upon encountering with a sufficiently large droplet, a deviation from the near unity doping efficiency for closed shell neutral molecules. We propose that this drop in ion doping efficiency with kinetic energy is related to the limited deceleration rate inside a helium droplet. When the source temperature changes from 14 K to 17 K, the relative ion doping efficiency decreases rapidly, perhaps due to the lack of viable sized droplets. The size distribution of the Cs(+)-doped droplet beam can be measured by deflection and by energy filtering. The observed doped droplet size is about 5 × 10(6) helium atoms when the source temperature is between 14 K and 17 K.

  7. Effect of kinetic energy on the doping efficiency of cesium cations into superfluid helium droplets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental investigation of the effect of kinetic energy on the ion doping efficiency of superfluid helium droplets using cesium cations from a thermionic emission source. The kinetic energy of Cs+ is controlled by the bias voltage of a collection grid collinearly arranged with the droplet beam. Efficient doping from ions with kinetic energies from 20 eV up to 480 V has been observed in different sized helium droplets. The relative ion doping efficiency is determined by both the kinetic energy of the ions and the average size of the droplet beam. At a fixed source temperature, the number of doped droplets increases with increasing grid voltage, while the relative ion doping efficiency decreases. This result implies that not all ions are captured upon encountering with a sufficiently large droplet, a deviation from the near unity doping efficiency for closed shell neutral molecules. We propose that this drop in ion doping efficiency with kinetic energy is related to the limited deceleration rate inside a helium droplet. When the source temperature changes from 14 K to 17 K, the relative ion doping efficiency decreases rapidly, perhaps due to the lack of viable sized droplets. The size distribution of the Cs+-doped droplet beam can be measured by deflection and by energy filtering. The observed doped droplet size is about 5 × 106 helium atoms when the source temperature is between 14 K and 17 K. PMID:26233132

  8. Stability and structure of nanowires grown from silver, copper and their alloys by laser ablation into superfluid helium.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Eugene; Karabulin, Alexander; Matyushenko, Vladimir; Sizov, Vyacheslav; Khodos, Igor

    2014-12-14

    Nanowires with 5 nm diameter made of silver, copper, and their alloys were grown in superfluid helium. The silver nanowires being heated to 300 K disintegrated into individual clusters. In contrast, copper nanowires were stable at room temperature, and nanowires made of alloys were also stable despite their low melting temperature.

  9. Use of the bare chip Cernox(TM) thermometer for the detection of second sound in superfluid helium [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuzier, S.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2004-03-01

    Bare chip Cernox™ thermometers model CX-1030 from LakeShore Cryotronics Inc. have been used to detect second sound in superfluid helium. This paper presents some examples of second sound measurements and comments on the electrical and thermal time constants of these thermometers.

  10. Investigation of bulk turbulence and nonlinear wave phenomena in liquid helium. Interim report, 1 October 1979-30 September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Rooney, J.A.; Smith, C.W.

    1980-09-01

    Generation of Turbulence by Ultrasound in HeII; Use of Acousto-optic Techniques to Detect Subharmonic and Cavitation Activity; Use of Acousto-optic Techniques to Measure Nonlinear Properties of Cryogenic Liquids; and Studies of Acoustic Streaming in Superfluid Helium.

  11. Formation of bimetallic clusters in superfluid helium nanodroplets analysed by atomic resolution electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Haberfehlner, Georg; Thaler, Philipp; Knez, Daniel; Volk, Alexander; Hofer, Ferdinand; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Kothleitner, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Structure, shape and composition are the basic parameters responsible for properties of nanoscale materials, distinguishing them from their bulk counterparts. To reveal these in three dimensions at the nanoscale, electron tomography is a powerful tool. Advancing electron tomography to atomic resolution in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope remains challenging and has been demonstrated only a few times using strong constraints or extensive filtering. Here we demonstrate atomic resolution electron tomography on silver/gold core/shell nanoclusters grown in superfluid helium nanodroplets. We reveal morphology and composition of a cluster identifying gold- and silver-rich regions in three dimensions and we estimate atomic positions without using any prior information and with minimal filtering. The ability to get full three-dimensional information down to the atomic scale allows understanding the growth and deposition process of the nanoclusters and demonstrates an approach that may be generally applicable to all types of nanoscale materials. PMID:26508471

  12. Production of ultrathin nanowires from refractory metals (Nb, Re, W, Mo) by laser ablation in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, E. B.; Karabulin, A. V.; Matyushenko, V. I.; Sizov, V. D.; Khodos, I. I.

    2015-09-01

    The ablation of targets in superfluid helium with a short-pulse laser allows introducing into liquid the atoms and small clusters of any metal. The metal is then concentrated in the core of 1D quantized vortices nucleating in the laser focus and expanding into the liquid. Subsequent metal coagulation within the vortex results in the formation of thin nanowires with perfect shape and structure. For refractory metals these wires are expected to be especially thin. The diameters of nanowires grown from niobium, molybdenum and tungsten are indeed 4.0, 2.0 and 2.5 nm, respectively. Unfortunately, under ablation of unannealed rhenium the main product is flat ‘flakes’ having irregular shape and 20-50 nm size. Short nanowires (with a 1.5 nm diameter) were present in small amounts. The wires produced by this method contain no additional impurities and have a free lateral surface. By using a diode-pumped Nd:LSB microlaser (1.06 μm wavelength, 0.4 ns pulse duration, 100 μJ pulse energy and 4 kHz repetition rate) the amounts of nanoweb sufficient for many physical and chemical applications could be produced in a single low-temperature experiment. Ultrathin wires of molybdenum and tungsten show promise for creating ‘cold’ cathodes whereas a niobium nanoweb should be an excellent catalyst.

  13. Cryogenic Microjet Source for Orthotropic Beams of Ultralarge Superfluid Helium Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grisenti, Robert E.; Toennies, J. Peter

    2003-06-01

    Liquid 4He at pressures P0=0.5 30 bars and temperatures T0=1.5 4.2 K is discharged into vacuum through two different 2 μm nozzles. The velocities of the beam of particles obey the Bernoulli equation down to 15 m/sec. With decreasing T0 and increasing P0 the velocity and angular distributions become exceedingly narrow with Δv/v≲1% and Δϑ≲1 mrad. Optical observations indicate that the beam consists of micron-sized droplets (N≳109 atoms). This new droplet source provides opportunities for novel experimental studies of superfluid behavior.

  14. Low temperature uses of helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1970-01-01

    Helium is used for purging and pressurizing cryogenic rocket propellants, welding, atmosphere control, leak detection, and refrigeration. It provides the lowest possible liquid-bath temperature and produces superconductivity in certain materials. Its superfluid effects are used in superconducting magnets.

  15. Electric breakdown and ionization detection in normal liquid and superfluid 4He for the SNA nEDM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karcz, Maciej

    Helium throughout the pressure-temperature phase space, between 1 bar and the saturation curve and between 4.2 K and 1.7 K. A new breakdown hysteresis in liquid helium was discovered and is attributed to the suppression of heterogeneous nucleation sites inside the liquid. A phenomenological model involving the Townsend breakdown mechanism and Paschen's Law in liquid helium is proposed. In addition, the many challenges faced by efficient scintillation detection in the cryogenic environment of the nEDM experiment motivated additional studies at CEEM. To test the effect of an electric field on scintillation in superfluid, a SF test cell was constructed inside a dilution refrigerator and it was found that the scintil- lation intensity from a 241Am source in the cell, is reduced at high electric fields. Alternatives to scintillation detection for the nEDM experiment were also explored and the test cell was reconfigured to operate as a superfluid ionization chamber. The superfluid ionization chamber was tested with 241Am in pulse mode and current mode configurations. While the pulse mode in superfluid, which relies on the drift velocity of charges, is hindered by quasi-particle excitations in superfluid, results of current mode measurements appear promising. To further explore the prospect of cryogenic ionization detection, a detector cryo-stat capable of detecting neutrons using a 10B converter was also constructed at CEEM and tested at the Indiana University Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS). The neutron detector cryostat has the benefit of being able to modulate the ioniza- tion source which was not possible with the superfluid ionization chamber. Tests with argon gas led to the development of more efficient boron targets. The cryogenic test of ionization detection in current mode will be discussed.

  16. THERMAL OSCILLATIONS IN LIQUID HELIUM TARGETS.

    SciTech Connect

    WANG,L.; JIA,L.X.

    2001-07-16

    A liquid helium target for the high-energy physics was built and installed in the proton beam line at the Alternate Gradient Synchrotron of Brookhaven National Laboratory in 2001. The target flask has a liquid volume of 8.25 liters and is made of thin Mylar film. A G-M/J-T cryocooler of five-watts at 4.2K was used to produce liquid helium and refrigerate the target. A thermosyphon circuit for the target was connected to the J-T circuit by a liquid/gas separator. Because of the large heat load to the target and its long transfer lines, thermal oscillations were observed during the system tests. To eliminate the oscillation, a series of tests and analyses were carried out. This paper describes the phenomena and provides the understanding of the thermal oscillations in the target system.

  17. Chemical reactions studied at ultra-low temperature in liquid helium clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisken, Friedrich; Krasnokutski, Serge A.

    2012-11-01

    Low-temperature reaction rates are important ingredients for astrophysical reaction networks modeling the formation of interstellar matter in molecular clouds. Unfortunately, such data is difficult to obtain by experimental means. In an attempt to study low-temperature reactions of astrophysical interest, we have investigated relevant reactions at ultralow temperature in liquid helium droplets. Being prepared by supersonic expansion of helium gas at high pressure through a nozzle into a vacuum, large helium clusters in the form of liquid droplets constitute nano-sized reaction vessels for the study of chemical reactions at ultra-low temperature. If the normal isotope 4He is used, the helium droplets are superfluid and characterized by a constant temperature of 0.37 K. Here we present results obtained for Mg, Al, and Si reacting with O2. Mass spectrometry was employed to characterize the reaction products. As it may be difficult to distinguish between reactions occurring in the helium droplets before they are ionized and ion-molecule reactions taking place after the ionization, additional techniques were applied to ensure that the reactions actually occurred in the helium droplets. This information was provided by measuring the chemiluminescence light emitted by the products, the evaporation of helium atoms by the release of the reaction heat, or by laser-spectroscopic identification of the reactants and products.

  18. Chemical reactions studied at ultra-low temperature in liquid helium clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Huisken, Friedrich; Krasnokutski, Serge A.

    2012-11-27

    Low-temperature reaction rates are important ingredients for astrophysical reaction networks modeling the formation of interstellar matter in molecular clouds. Unfortunately, such data is difficult to obtain by experimental means. In an attempt to study low-temperature reactions of astrophysical interest, we have investigated relevant reactions at ultralow temperature in liquid helium droplets. Being prepared by supersonic expansion of helium gas at high pressure through a nozzle into a vacuum, large helium clusters in the form of liquid droplets constitute nano-sized reaction vessels for the study of chemical reactions at ultra-low temperature. If the normal isotope {sup 4}He is used, the helium droplets are superfluid and characterized by a constant temperature of 0.37 K. Here we present results obtained for Mg, Al, and Si reacting with O{sub 2}. Mass spectrometry was employed to characterize the reaction products. As it may be difficult to distinguish between reactions occurring in the helium droplets before they are ionized and ion-molecule reactions taking place after the ionization, additional techniques were applied to ensure that the reactions actually occurred in the helium droplets. This information was provided by measuring the chemiluminescence light emitted by the products, the evaporation of helium atoms by the release of the reaction heat, or by laser-spectroscopic identification of the reactants and products.

  19. Liquid vapour spinodal of pure helium 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imre, Attila R.; Kraska, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    Unlike gases, liquids can be overheated or stretched only up to a limit. The determination of the mean-field thermodynamic stability limit-the so-called spinodal-is a very difficult theoretical and a more-or-less impossible experimental task. Based on a recent semi-empirical method, the spinodal pressure of helium-4 at given temperature is determined, using liquid-vapour surface tension, interface thickness and vapour pressure data.

  20. Solvation of molecules in superfluid helium enhances the “interaction induced localization” effect

    SciTech Connect

    Walewski, Łukasz Forbert, Harald; Marx, Dominik

    2014-04-14

    Atomic nuclei become delocalized at low temperatures as a result of quantum effects, whereas they are point-like in the high temperature (classical) limit. For non-interacting nuclei, the delocalization upon lowering the temperature is quantitatively described in terms of the thermal de Broglie wavelength of free particles. Clearly, light non-interacting nuclei – the proton being a prominent one – are much more delocalized at low temperatures compared to heavy nuclei, such as non-interacting oxygen having water in mind. However, strong interactions due to chemical bonding in conjunction with ultra-low temperatures characteristic to superfluid helium nanodroplets change this common picture substantially for nuclei in molecules or clusters. It turns out that protons shared in hydrogen bonds undergo an extreme “interaction induced localization” at temperatures on the order of 1 K, which compresses the protonic spatial distributions to the size of the much heavier donor or acceptor atoms, such as O or Cl nuclei, corresponding to about 0.1% of the volume occupied by a non-interacting proton at the same temperature. Moreover, applying our recently developed hybrid ab initio path integral molecular dynamics/bosonic path integral Monte Carlo quantum simulation technique to a HCl/water cluster, HCl(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}, we find that helium solvation has a significant additional localizing effect of up to about 30% in volume. In particular, the solvent-induced excess localization is the stronger the lesser the given nucleus is already localized in the gas phase reference situation.

  1. Experiments with single electrons in liquid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, W.; Jin, D.; Seidel, G. M.; Maris, H. J.

    2009-02-01

    We describe experiments we have performed in which we are able to image the motion of individual electrons moving in liquid helium 4. Electrons in helium form bubbles of radius {approx}19 A. We use the negative pressure produced by a sound wave to expand these bubbles to a radius of about 10 {mu}m. The bubbles are then illuminated with light from a flash lamp and their position recorded. We report on several interesting phenomena that have been observed in these experiments. It appears that the majority of the electrons that we detect result from cosmic rays passing through the experimental cell. We discuss this mechanism for electron production.

  2. A method for the three-dimensional simulation of superfluid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Bottura, L.; Darve, C.; Patankar, N.A.; Van Sciver, S.; /Natl. High Mag. Field Lab.

    2008-01-01

    Transport phenomena in superfluid helium can be described using the two-fluid Landau-Khalatnikov model and the Gorter-Mellink mutual friction. Here we discuss a mathematical formulation of the two-fluid model that uses macroscopic conservation balances of mass, momentum and energy of each species, and assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium. A particularity of this model is that it describes the state of He II as well as that of each of the two-fluid components in terms of pressure p and temperature T, which is convenient for stable numerical solution. The equations of the model form a system of partial differential equations (PDE) that can be written in matrix form for convenience. On this base, a three-dimensional numerical model using a complete and consistent, while still practical, system of PDEs was developed. In the form described, the PDE can be solved using three-dimensional Lagrangian finite element in space supplemented by a Beam-Warming time-2marching algorithm. Once validated, this solver will allow to simulate He II thermal counterflow applied to arbitrary geometry.

  3. Design and Testing of a 2K Superfluid Helium Heat Station

    SciTech Connect

    William Hicks; Edward Daly; Joseph Preble; Mark Wiseman; Claus Rode

    2005-08-29

    Three transitional cryomodules (SL21, FEL03, Renascence) have been constructed as part of an energy upgrade effort at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). Each transitional cryomodule contains eight superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. Within the vacuum vessel, waveguides transmit up to 13 kW of RF power to the superconducting niobium cavities. The waveguides also provide the thermal transition between the room temperature ceramic RF window and the niobium fundamental power coupler (FPC), a 300K temperature gradient across {approx}20cm. The thermal performance of the waveguides is determined in part by the placement of heat stations and bellows. The original 13 kW waveguide design incorporated a single 60 K heat station and two bellows resulting in a total heat load (static + dynamic) to the FPC of {approx}3W per waveguide. To minimize this heat load and stabilize the FPC temperatures, a 2K superfluid helium heat station design was incorporated into the second transitional cryomodule, FEL03, installed in the JLab Free Electron Laser (FEL). The designed heat station is capable of removing up to 1.12W, with a bath temperature of 2.05K, while remaining sub-lambda. This paper describes the design, analysis and testing of the heat station.

  4. Charge collection in Si detectors irradiated in situ at superfluid helium temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbitskaya, Elena; Eremin, Vladimir; Zabrodskii, Andrei; Dehning, Bernd; Kurfürst, Christoph; Sapinski, Mariusz; Bartosik, Marcin R.; Egorov, Nicolai; Härkönen, Jaakko

    2015-10-01

    Silicon and diamond detectors operated in a superfluid helium bath are currently being considered for the upgrade of the LHC beam loss monitoring system. The detectors would be installed in immediate proximity of the superconducting coils of the triplet magnets. We present here the results of the in situ irradiation test for silicon detectors using 23 GeV protons while keeping the detectors at a temperature of 1.9 K. Red laser (630 nm) Transient Current Technique and DC current measurements were used to study the pulse response and collected charge for silicon detectors irradiated to a maximum radiation fluence of 1×1016 p/cm2. The dependence between collected charge and irradiation fluence was parameterized using the Hecht equation and assumption of a uniform electric field distribution. The collected charge was found to degrade with particle fluence for both bias polarities. We observed that the main factor responsible for this degradation was related to trapping of holes on the donor-type radiation-induced defects. In contrast to expectations, along with formation of donors, acceptor-type defects (electron traps) are introduced into the silicon bulk. This suggests that the current models describing charge collection in irradiated silicon detectors require an extension for taking into account trapping at low temperatures with a contribution of shallow levels. New in situ irradiation tests are needed and planned now to extend statistics of the results and gain a deeper insight into the physics of low temperature detector operation in harsh radiation environment.

  5. Acoustic microscopy and nonlinear effects in pressurized superfluid helium. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Moulthrop, A.A.; Muha, M.S.; Kozlowski, G.C.; Silva, C.P.; Hadimioglu, B.

    1993-08-31

    The operation of an acoustic microscope having a resolution of 15 nm has been demonstrated. It uses as a coupling medium superfluid 4He colder than 0.9 K and pressurized to greater than 20 bar. The microscope is now being used to image objects that show little or no contrast on a scanning electron microscope. In addition, the acoustic microscope is being used to study the properties of sound propagation in the coupling fluid. At low acoustic intensities, the coupling fluid has very low acoustic attenuation at the microscope's operating frequency (15.3 GHz), but near the focal point the acoustic intensity can be high enough that the helium behaves with extreme nonlinearity. In fact, this medium is capable of entering new regimes of nonlinear interaction. Plots of the received signal versus input power display a nearly complete pump depletion at certain input power levels and a reconversion to the pump frequency at higher power levels. Such behavior has never before been observed. The authors present arguments that the process underlying this nonlinear behavior is harmonic generation. Cryogenic microscopy, Harmonic generation, Nonlinear acoustics.

  6. New light on the intriguing history of superfluidity in liquid (4)He.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Allan

    2009-04-22

    Surprisingly, it was 30 years after the first liquefaction of (4)He in 1908 that the discovery that liquid (4)He is not just a 'cold' liquid was made. Below T = 2.18 K, it is a 'quantum' liquid which exhibits spectacular macroscopic quantum behaviour that can be seen with the naked eye. Since the observation of superfluidity in liquid (4)He is one of the greatest discoveries in modern physics, we present a day-to-day chronology of the tangled events which preceded the seminal discovery of zero viscosity in 1938 by Kapitza in Moscow and by Allen and Misener in Cambridge. On the theory side, London argued in 1938 that the microscopic basis for this new superfluid phase was the forgotten phenomenon of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) first suggested by Einstein in 1925. In 1941, Landau developed a very successful theory of superfluid (4)He, but it was not anchored in a microscopic theory of interacting atoms. It took another 20 years for theorists to unify the two seemingly different theories of Landau and London. Experiments on trapped superfluid atomic gases since 1995 have shone new light on superfluid (4)He. In the mid-1930s, London had emphasized that superconductivity in metals and superfluidity in liquid (4)He were similar. Experiments on trapped two-component Fermi gases in the last five years have shown that a Bose condensate is indeed the basis of both of these superfluid phases. This confirms the now famous Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer-BEC crossover scenario developed for superfluidity by Leggett and Nozières in the early 1980s but largely ignored until a few years ago. The study of superfluid (4)He will increasingly overlap with strongly interacting dilute quantum gases, perhaps opening up a new era of research on this most amazing liquid.

  7. New light on the intriguing history of superfluidity in liquid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Allan

    2009-04-01

    Surprisingly, it was 30 years after the first liquefaction of 4He in 1908 that the discovery that liquid 4He is not just a 'cold' liquid was made. Below T = 2.18 K, it is a 'quantum' liquid which exhibits spectacular macroscopic quantum behaviour that can be seen with the naked eye. Since the observation of superfluidity in liquid 4He is one of the greatest discoveries in modern physics, we present a day-to-day chronology of the tangled events which preceded the seminal discovery of zero viscosity in 1938 by Kapitza in Moscow and by Allen and Misener in Cambridge. On the theory side, London argued in 1938 that the microscopic basis for this new superfluid phase was the forgotten phenomenon of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) first suggested by Einstein in 1925. In 1941, Landau developed a very successful theory of superfluid 4He, but it was not anchored in a microscopic theory of interacting atoms. It took another 20 years for theorists to unify the two seemingly different theories of Landau and London. Experiments on trapped superfluid atomic gases since 1995 have shone new light on superfluid 4He. In the mid-1930s, London had emphasized that superconductivity in metals and superfluidity in liquid 4He were similar. Experiments on trapped two-component Fermi gases in the last five years have shown that a Bose condensate is indeed the basis of both of these superfluid phases. This confirms the now famous Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer-BEC crossover scenario developed for superfluidity by Leggett and Nozières in the early 1980s but largely ignored until a few years ago. The study of superfluid 4He will increasingly overlap with strongly interacting dilute quantum gases, perhaps opening up a new era of research on this most amazing liquid.

  8. OROCHI experiment: Laser spectroscopy of RI atoms in superfluid helium for measurements of nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Takeshi

    2014-09-01

    We have been developing a new laser spectroscopy technique named as OROCHI (Optical RI-atom Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion-catcher) for measurements of nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of low yield exotic radioisotopes (RIs). In this technique, we use superfluid helium (He II) liquid as a stopping material of RI beam in which in-situ laser spectroscopy of the RI atoms stopped in He II is carried out. The characteristic features of He II, i.e. high trapping efficiency of He II liquid for accelerated ion beams and the characteristics of atomic spectra in He II, enables us to measure the nuclear spins and moments of the extremely low yield RIs. So far, we have demonstrated the feasibility of our method to deduce the nuclear spins and moments with stable Rb, Cs, Ag and Au isotopes supplied into He II by laser sputtering technique. In addition, we have also succeeded in observing laser-radiowave/microwave double resonance signals of 84-87Rb atoms injected into He II as energetic ion beam. In these on-line experiment, the 84-87Rb isotope beams (intensity: up to 105 particles/s) were provided with RIPS beamline in RIKEN, and introduced into He II filled in a cryostat. Special care was taken in controlling the stopping position of injected Rb isotopes. Aluminum energy degraders of varied thickness from 0 to 0.8 mm were placed upstream of the beam injection window of the He II cryostat for optimizing the stopping position The 84-87Rb atoms stopped and then neutralized in He II were optically pumped and polarized with circularly polarized pumping laser light whose wavelength were tuned to 780 nm, D1 absorption line of Rb atoms in He II. The polarized atoms were subjected to irradiation of radiowave or microwave, and then we demonstrated the double resonance spectroscopy for observing the Zeeman transition of 84-87Rb atoms and the hyperfine transition of 87Rb, respectively In this presentation we will show the details of OROCHI technique and the present

  9. Measurement of the charge transfer efficiency of electrons clocked on superfluid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Sabouret, G.; Lyon, S.A.

    2006-06-19

    Electrons floating on the surface of liquid helium are possible qubits for quantum information processing. Varying electric potentials do not modify spin states, which allows their transport on helium using a charge-coupled device (CCD)-like array of underlying gates. This scheme depends on an efficient intergate electron transfer and on the absence of electron traps. We will present a measurement of the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) of electrons clocked back and forth above a short CCD-like structure. The CTE obtained at low clocking frequencies is 0.999 with an electron density of about 4 electrons/{mu}m{sup 2}. We find no evidence for deep electron trapping.

  10. Microsolvation in superfluid helium droplets studied by the electronic spectra of six porphyrin derivatives and one chlorine compound.

    PubMed

    Riechers, R; Pentlehner, D; Slenczka, A

    2013-06-28

    After almost two decades of high resolution molecular spectroscopy in superfluid helium droplets, the understanding of microsolvation is still the subject of intense experimental and theoretical research. According to the published spectroscopic work including microwave, infrared, and electronic spectroscopy, the latter appears to be particularly promising to study microsolvation because of the appearance of pure molecular transitions and spectrally separated phonon wings. Instead of studying the very details of the influence of the helium environment for one particular dopant molecule as previously done for phthalocyanine, the present study compares electronic spectra of a series of non-polar porphyrin derivatives when doped into helium droplets consisting of 10(4)-10(5) helium atoms. Thereby, we focus on the helium-induced fine structure, as revealed most clearly at the corresponding electronic origin. The interpretation and the assignment of particular features obtained in the fluorescence excitation spectra are based on additional investigations of dispersed emission spectra and of the saturation behavior. Besides many dopant-specific results, the experimental study provides strong evidence for a particular triple peak feature representing the characteristic signature of helium solvation for all seven related dopant species.

  11. Correlation of Helium Solubility in Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDresar, Neil T.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    A correlation has been developed for the equilibrium mole fraction of soluble gaseous helium in liquid nitrogen as a function of temperature and pressure. Experimental solubility data was compiled and provided by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Data from six sources was used to develop a correlation within the range of 0.5 to 9.9 MPa and 72.0 to 119.6 K. The relative standard deviation of the correlation is 6.9 percent.

  12. Measurements of Thermal Conductivity of Superfluid Helium Near its Transition Temperature T(sub lambda) in a 2D Confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jerebets, Sergei

    2004-01-01

    We report our recent experiments on thermal conductivity measurements of superfluid He-4 near its phase transition in a two-dimensional (2D) confinement under saturated vapor pressure. A 2D confinement is created by 2-mm- and 1-mm-thick glass capillary plates, consisting of densely populated parallel microchannels with cross-sections of 5 x 50 and 1 x 10 microns, correspondingly. A heat current (2 < Q < 400 nW/sq cm) was applied along the channels long direction. High-resolution measurements were provided by DC SQUID-based high-resolution paramagnetic salt thermometers (HRTs) with a nanokelvin resolution. We might find that thermal conductivity of confined helium is finite at the bulk superfluid transition temperature. Our 2D results will be compared with those in a bulk and 1D confinement.

  13. Separator plugs for liquid helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. M.; Yuan, S. W. K.; Hepler, W. A.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1984-01-01

    Work performed during Summer 1984 (from June to Sept. 30) in the area of porous media for use in low temperature applications is discussed. Recent applications are in the area of vapor - liquid phase separation, pumping based on the fountain effect and related subsystems. Areas of potential applications of the latter are outlined in supplementary work. Experimental data have been developed. The linear equations of the two-fluid model are inspected critically in the light of forced convection evidence reported recently. It is emphasized that the Darcy permeability is a unique throughput quantity in the porous media application areas whose use will permit meaningful comparisons of data not only in one lab but also within a group of labs doing porous plug studies.

  14. Properties of slowly rotating helium II and the superfluidity of pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Tsakadze, J.S.; Tsakadze, S.J.

    1980-06-01

    Results of an experimental study of superfluid He II properties in the nonstationary rotation regime are presented. On the basis of an analysis of the experimental data it is shown that the behavior of pulsar rotation (sudden jumps in speed, long relaxation processes) can be explained on the basis of the assumption of neutron superfluid in pulsars.

  15. Liquid uranium alloy-helium fission reactor

    DOEpatents

    Minkov, Vladimir

    1986-01-01

    This invention teaches a nuclear fission reactor having a core vessel and at least one tandem heat exchanger vessel coupled therewith across upper and lower passages to define a closed flow loop. Nuclear fuel such as a uranium alloy in its liquid phase fills these vessels and flow passages. Solid control elements in the reactor core vessel are adapted to be adjusted relative to one another to control fission reaction of the liquid fuel therein. Moderator elements in the other vessel and flow passages preclude fission reaction therein. An inert gas such as helium is bubbled upwardly through the heat exchanger vessel operable to move the liquid fuel upwardly therein and unidirectionally around the closed loop and downwardly through the core vessel. This helium gas is further directed to heat conversion means outside of the reactor vessels to utilize the heat from the fission reaction to generate useful output. The nuclear fuel operates in the 1200.degree.-1800.degree. C. range, and even higher to 2500.degree. C., limited only by the thermal effectiveness of the structural materials, increasing the efficiency of power generation from the normal 30-35% with 300.degree.-500.degree. C. upper limit temperature to 50-65%. Irradiation of the circulating liquid fuel, as contrasted to only localized irradiation of a solid fuel, provides improved fuel utilization.

  16. Heat transfer through Rutherford superconducting cable with novel pattern of polyimide electrical insulation in pressurized superfluid helium environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorowski, Maciej; Polinski, Jaroslaw; Strychalski, Michal

    2012-06-01

    Future LHC accelerator luminosity upgrade will increase a beam losses heat deposition in the superconducting magnet coils. Main barrier of the heat evacuation from the coils made of Rutherford type cables is a cable electrical insulation. The insulation is made of polyimide tapes wrapped around the cable in a special configuration. Presently used insulation wrapping schemes constitute very good electrical insulation with relatively low heat transport ability. Therefore a new insulation wrapping schemes with enhanced helium permeability and adequate dielectric properties have been developed at CERN. An experimental comparative study of heat transfer perpendicular to the Rutherford type cable, for an old and new insulation wrapping schemes have been accomplished at Wroclaw University of Technology. The tests have been performed in pressurized superfluid helium conditions, and at 60 MPa of the sample applied external pressure simulating the Lorentz forces. This paper presents the measurements methodology and gives experimental results.

  17. Quartz Tuning Fork Pressure Gauge for High-Pressure Liquid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botimer, J.; Velasco, A.; Taborek, P.

    2016-08-01

    We have measured the quality factor Q and the frequency f of a 32-kHz quartz tuning fork immersed in liquid ^4 He between 0.9 and 3.0 K, over pressures ranging from the saturated vapor pressure to ≈ 25 atm. At constant pressure, as a function of temperature, the quality factor and frequency have strong features related to the temperature dependence of the superfluid fraction. At constant temperature, Q depends on the superfluid fraction, while the frequency is a smooth function of pressure. The behavior is explained using a simple hydrodynamic model. The liquid helium viscosity is obtained from measured values of Q, and together with tabulated values of the helium density as a function of pressure and temperature, the frequency shift can be parameterized as a function of temperature and pressure. The observed sensitivity is ≈ 7.8 Hz/atm. The quartz tuning fork provides a compact low power method of measuring the pressure in the bulk liquid.

  18. Liquid uranium alloy-helium fission reactor

    DOEpatents

    Minkov, V.

    1984-06-13

    This invention describes a nuclear fission reactor which has a core vessel and at least one tandem heat exchanger vessel coupled therewith across upper and lower passages to define a closed flow loop. Nuclear fuel such as a uranium alloy in its liquid phase fills these vessels and flow passages. Solid control elements in the reactor core vessel are adapted to be adjusted relative to one another to control fission reaction of the liquid fuel therein. Moderator elements in the other vessel and flow passages preclude fission reaction therein. An inert gas such as helium is bubbled upwardly through the heat exchanger vessel operable to move the liquid fuel upwardly therein and unidirectionally around the closed loop and downwardly through the core vessel. This helium gas is further directed to heat conversion means outside of the reactor vessels to utilize the heat from the fission reaction to generate useful output. The nuclear fuel operates in the 1200 to 1800/sup 0/C range, and even higher to 2500/sup 0/C.

  19. Working model of the London moment readout system. [the study of super fluid plug operation using liquid helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, J. B.; Karr, G. R.

    1975-01-01

    The operating characteristics of a porous plug which has liquid helium on one side and which is pumped on under vacuum on the other side are discussed. The system investigated consists of a container of liquid helium which is well isolated, and the only means for mass flow out of the container is through a plug mode of porous material. The plug was assumed to have liquid helium on the container side while the other side of the plug is evacuated. Three cases were considered: (1) perfect evacuation with zero pressure, (2) evacuation through a chocked orifice, and (3) evacuation through a long, small diameter pipe with heating. Mass flow rates were determined along with mass flow at temperature above the lambda point temperature. Solutions were obtained for normal and superfluid velocity.

  20. Investigation of singularities in superfluid He3 in liquid crystals by the homotopic topology methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volovik, G. E.; Mineev, V. P.

    Various singularities in the superfluid He3 are considered: vortices, disgyrations, pointlike singularities, vortices with ends, singular surfaces, and particle-like states, as well as disclinations in cholesteric liquid crystals. A classification is presented of the topologically stable singularities. The methods of homotopic topology are used and are described with examples of well known systems such as superfluid He II, an isotropic ferromagnet, and a nematic liquid crystal. The possibility of applying these methods to ordinary crytals and to liquid crytals of the smectic type is discussed.

  1. From Liquid Helium to Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behringer, Robert P.

    2016-11-01

    This article provides a brief history of work that I have either carried out with Horst Meyer, or that was connected in some way with experiences reaching back to the laboratory known as LTM for low temperature [physics] Meyer, at Duke University. It is not intended as a complete review of all relevant work, but rather to hit highlights. My work with Horst started with studies of critical phenomena in liquid helium. This system provided an extremely rich and diverse testing ground for then newly emerging theories of static and dynamic critical phenomena. A key aspect of the experimental work with Horst was high-precision measurements of temperature and pressure. The ability to measure thermal properties with exceptional precision was at the core of this work. It also provided a natural springboard for entirely different investigations of Rayleigh-Bénard convection, which had just been initiated by Guenter Ahlers. My postdoc with Guenter provided a whole new set of experiences involving convection, dynamical instabilities, and chaos, where again the special properties, measurement techniques, and creative approaches to research associated with liquid helium were critical. In fact, later, knowledge of these techniques allowed me to start a whole new research direction in granular materials, which is a primary focus of my current research.

  2. Neutrons on a surface of liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, P. D.; Zimmer, O.; Grigoriev, A. D.; Ziman, T.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the possibility of ultracold neutron (UCN) storage in quantum states defined by the combined potentials of the Earth's gravity and the neutron optical repulsion by a horizontal surface of liquid helium. We analyze the stability of the lowest quantum state, which is most susceptible to perturbations due to surface excitations, against scattering by helium atoms in the vapor and by excitations of the liquid, comprised of ripplons, phonons, and surfons. This is an unusual scattering problem since the kinetic energy of the neutron parallel to the surface may be much greater than the binding energies perpendicular. The total scattering time of these UCNs at 0.7 K is found to exceed 1 h, and rapidly increases with decreasing temperature. Such low scattering rates should enable high-precision measurements of the sequence of discrete energy levels, thus providing improved tests of short-range gravity. The system might also be useful for neutron β -decay experiments. We also sketch new experimental propositions for level population and trapping of ultracold neutrons above a flat horizontal mirror.

  3. THERMAL UNIFORMITY OF LIQUID HELIUM IN ELECTRON BUBBLE CHAMBER.

    SciTech Connect

    WANG,L.; JIA,L.

    2002-07-22

    A CRYOGENIC RESEARCH APPARATUS TO MEASURE THE MOVEMENT OF ELECTRONS UNDER A HIGH ELECTRIC FIELD IN A LIQUID HELIUM BATH WAS DESIGNED AND BUILT AT THE BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY AND THE NEVIS LABORATORY OF COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY. THE LIQUID HELIUM CHAMBER IS A DOUBLE WALLED CYLINDRICAL CONTAINER EQUIPPED WITH 5 OPTICS WINDOWS AND 10 HIGH VOLTAGE CABLES. TO SHIELD THE LIQUID HELIUM CHAMBER AGAINST THE EXTERNAL HEAT LOADS AND TO PROVIDE THE THERMAL UNIFORMITY IN THE LIQUID HELIUM CHAMBER, THE DOUBLE WALLED JACKET WAS COOLED BY A PUMPED HELIUM BATH. THE HELIUM CHAMBER WAS BUILT INTO A COMMERICAL LN2 / LHE CRYOSTAT. THIS PAPER PRESENTS THE DESIGN AND THE NUMERICAL SIMULATION ANALYSIS ON THERMAL UNIFORMITY OF THE ELECTRON BUBBLE CHAMBER.

  4. Superfluidity of Bose—Einstein condensates in ultracold atomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qi-Zhong; Wu, Biao

    2015-05-01

    Liquid helium 4 had been the only bosonic superfluid available in experiments for a long time. This situation was changed in 1995, when a new superfluid was born with the realization of the Bose-Einstein condensation in ultracold atomic gases. The liquid helium 4 is strongly interacting and has no spin; there is almost no way to change its parameters, such as interaction strength and density. The new superfluid, Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), offers various advantages over liquid helium. On the one hand, BEC is weakly interacting and has spin degrees of freedom. On the other hand, it is convenient to tune almost all the parameters of a BEC, for example, the kinetic energy by spin-orbit coupling, the density by the external potential, and the interaction by Feshbach resonance. Great efforts have been devoted to studying these new aspects, and the results have greatly enriched our understanding of superfluidity. Here we review these developments by focusing on the stability and critical velocity of various superfluids. The BEC systems considered include a uniform superfluid in free space, a superfluid with its density periodically modulated, a superfluid with artificially engineered spin-orbit coupling, and a superfluid of pure spin current. Due to the weak interaction, these BEC systems can be well described by the mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii theory and their superfluidity, in particular critical velocities, can be examined with the aid of Bogoliubov excitations. Experimental proposals to observe these new aspects of superfluidity are discussed. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2013CB921903 and 2012CB921300) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274024, 11334001, and 11429402).

  5. High-resolution infrared spectroscopy of HCN-Agn (n = 1-4) complexes solvated in superfluid helium droplets.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Paul L; Miller, Roger E

    2007-08-01

    High-resolution infrared spectroscopy has been used to determine the structures, C-H stretching frequencies, and dipole moments of the HCN-Agn (n = 1-3) complexes formed in superfluid helium droplets. The HCN-Ag4 cluster was tentatively assigned based upon pick-up cell pressure dependencies and harmonic vibrational shift calculations. Ab initio and density functional theory calculations were used in conjunction with the high-resolution spectra to analyze the bonding nature of each cluster. All monoligated species reported here are bound through the nitrogen end of the HCN molecule. The HCN-Agn complexes are structurally similar to the previously reported HCN-Cun clusters, with the exception of the HCN-Ag binary complex. Although the interaction between the HCN and the Agn clusters follows the same trends as the HCN-Cun clusters, the more diffuse nature of the electrons surrounding the silver atoms results in a much weaker interaction.

  6. Design, Project Execution, and Commissioning of the 1.8 K Superfluid Helium Refrigeration System for SRF Cryomodule Testing

    DOE PAGES

    Treite, P.; Nuesslein, U.; Jia, Yi; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.

    2015-07-15

    The Fermilab Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) provides a test bed to measure the performance of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cryomodules (CM). These SRF components form the basic building blocks of future high intensity accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC) and a Muon Collider. Linde Kryotechnik AG and Linde Cryogenics have designed, constructed and commissioned the superfluid helium refrigerator needed to support SRF component testing at the CMTF Facility. The hybrid refrigerator is designed to operate in a variety of modes and under a wide range of boundary conditions down to 1.8 Kelvin set by CM design. Special features ofmore » the refrigerator include the use of warm and cold compression and high efficiency turbo expanders.This paper gives an overview on the wide range of the challenging cooling requirements, the design, fabrication and the commissioning of the installed cryogenic system.« less

  7. Design, Project Execution, and Commissioning of the 1.8 K Superfluid Helium Refrigeration System for SRF Cryomodule Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Treite, P.; Nuesslein, U.; Jia, Yi; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.

    2015-07-15

    The Fermilab Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) provides a test bed to measure the performance of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cryomodules (CM). These SRF components form the basic building blocks of future high intensity accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC) and a Muon Collider. Linde Kryotechnik AG and Linde Cryogenics have designed, constructed and commissioned the superfluid helium refrigerator needed to support SRF component testing at the CMTF Facility. The hybrid refrigerator is designed to operate in a variety of modes and under a wide range of boundary conditions down to 1.8 Kelvin set by CM design. Special features of the refrigerator include the use of warm and cold compression and high efficiency turbo expanders.This paper gives an overview on the wide range of the challenging cooling requirements, the design, fabrication and the commissioning of the installed cryogenic system.

  8. Superfluid helium sloshing dynamics induced oscillations and fluctuations of angular momentum, force and moment actuated on spacecraft driven by gravity gradient or jitter acceleration associated with slew motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The generalized mathematical formulation of sloshing dynamics for partially filled liquid of cryogenic superfluid helium II in dewar containers driven by the gravity gradient and jitter accelerations associated with slew motion for the purpose to perform scientific observation during the normal spacecraft operation are investigated. An example is given with the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility-Spectroscopy (AXAF-S) for slew motion which is responsible for the sloshing dynamics. The jitter accelerations include slew motion, spinning motion, atmospheric drag on the spacecraft, spacecraft attitude motions arising from machinery vibrations, thruster firing, pointing control of spacecraft, crew motion, etc. Explicit mathematical expressions to cover these forces acting on the spacecraft fluid systems are derived. The numerical computation of sloshing dynamics is based on the non-inertia frame spacecraft bound coordinate, and solve time-dependent, three-dimensional formulations of partial differential equations subject to initial and boundary conditions. The explicit mathematical expressions of boundary conditions to cover capillary force effect on the liquid-vapor interface in microgravity environments are also derived. The formulations of fluid moment and angular moment fluctuations in fluid profiles induced by the sloshing dynamics, together with fluid stress and moment fluctuations exerted on the spacecraft dewar containers have also been derived. Examples are also given for cases applicable to the AXAF-S spacecraft sloshing dynamics associated with slew motion.

  9. Laser Spectroscopy of Radicals, Carbenes, and Ions in Superfluid Helium Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douberly, Gary E.

    2015-06-01

    The first beam of helium droplets was reported in the 1961 paper Strahlen aus kondensiertem Helium im Hochvakuum by Von E. W. Becker and co-workers. However, molecular spectroscopy of helium-solvated dopants wasn't realized until 30 years later in the laboratories of Scoles and Toennies. It has now been two decades since this early, seminal work on doped helium droplets, yet the field of helium droplet spectroscopy is still fresh with vast potential. Analogous in many ways to cryogenic matrix isolation spectroscopy, the helium droplet is an ideal environment to spectroscopically probe difficult to prepare molecular species, such as radicals, carbenes and ions. The quantum nature of helium at 0.35 K often results in molecular spectra that are sufficiently resolved to evoke an analysis of line shapes and fine-structure that is worthy of the International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy. The present talk will focus on our recent successful attempts to efficiently dope the title molecular species into helium droplets and probe their properties with infrared laser Stark and Zeeman spectroscopies. E. W. Becker, R. Klingelhöfer, P. Lohse, Z. Naturforsch. A 16A, 1259 (1961). S. Goyal, D. L. Schutt, G. Scoles, Phys. Rev. Lett. 69, 933 (1992). M. Hartmann, R. E. Miller, J. P. Toennies, A. F. Vilesov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 1566, (1995).

  10. Investigation of helium injection cooling to liquid oxygen propellant chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Namkyung; Kwon, Ohsung; Kim, Youngmog; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2006-02-01

    Sub-cooling of cryogenic propellant by helium injection is one of the most effective methods for suppressing bulk boiling and keeping sub-cooled liquid oxygen before rocket launch. In order to design the cooling system, understanding of the limitations of heat and mass transfer is required. In this paper, an analytical model for the helium injection system is presented. This model's main feature is the representation of bubbling system using finite-rate heat transfer and instantaneous mass transfer concept. With this simplified approach, the effect of helium injection to liquid oxygen system under several circumstances is examined. Experimental results along with simulations of single bubble rising in liquid oxygen and bubbling system are presented with various helium injection flow rates, helium temperatures, and injection methods. The overall cooling effect for rocket application is also discussed.

  11. Design of a Superconducting Magnetic Suspension System for a Liquid Helium Flow Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael R.; Eyssa, Yehia M.; VanSciver, Steven W.

    1996-01-01

    We discuss a preliminary design for a superconducting magnetic suspension system for measurement of drag on rotationally symmetric bodies in liquid helium. Superconducting materials are a natural choice for liquid helium studies, since temperatures are well below most critical temperatures, so that the resulting heat load is negligible. Also, due to its diamagnetic properties, a superconducting model (for example made or coated with Nb) is inherently stable against disturbances. Issues which we consider include model placement during initial cool-down, maintaining placement during anticipated drag and lift forces, and force measurement. This later can be achieved by a passive technique, where the body is allowed to deflect under the influence of drag from its neutral position. The resulting shift in flux is detected via a superconducting pickup coil. The pickup coil may be connected either to a SQUID, or a secondary loop wound around a Hall probe. Both options are discussed. The objective of this work is to gain a better understanding of the nature of turbulent fields in normal and superfluid helium for potential application to problems in classical high Reynolds number turbulence.

  12. Lambda Front Propagation in the Superfluid Helium Contained in the External Auxiliary Bus-Bar Line of the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capatina, O.; Poncet, A.; Skoczen, B.

    2004-06-01

    The array of the corrector magnets of the LHC arc, associated with the main and some dispersion suppressor quadrupoles are powered by a special line routed inside the cryostat, running alongside the cold mass of the half-cell. This line, composed of a 50 mm diameter stainless steel tube fixed to the cold mass, houses the superconducting multi-wire cable(s) carrying the 600 A and 6 kA current to the corrector magnets and special quadrupoles. It is cooled down to 1.9 K with pressurized superfluid helium provided by links to the cold-mass placed at regular intervals (one half-cell). The paper is focused on the process of sub-cooling the long channel from 4.5 K down to 1.9 K, including the propagation of the lambda front along the pipeline. The mechanism of sub-cooling is based on a zone of phase transformation traveling along the channel, with the heat transport both in helium and in the copper wires. A new 2-D model, including the radial heat exchange between copper and He II, has been used to study the process. A clamped temperature problem with a jump-like variable section of the channel has been solved. The model has been applied to the analysis of recovery of the line after a quench in the main magnets. A comparison with the measurements in the LHC prototype cell (String 2) is shown.

  13. Liquid Oxygen Thermodynamic Vent System Testing with Helium Pressurization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDresar, Neil T.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the results of several thermodynamic vent system (TVS) tests with liquid oxygen plus a test with liquid nitrogen. In all tests, the liquid was heated above its normal boiling point to 111 K for oxygen and 100 K for nitrogen. The elevated temperature was representative of tank conditions for a candidate lunar lander ascent stage. An initial test series was conducted with saturated oxygen liquid and vapor at 0.6 MPa. The initial series was followed by tests where the test tank was pressurized with gaseous helium to 1.4 to 1.6 MPa. For these tests, the helium mole fraction in the ullage was quite high, about 0.57 to 0.62. TVS behavior is different when helium is present than when helium is absent. The tank pressure becomes the sum of the vapor pressure and the partial pressure of helium. Therefore, tank pressure depends not only on temperature, as is the case for a pure liquid-vapor system, but also on helium density (i.e., the mass of helium divided by the ullage volume). Thus, properly controlling TVS operation is more challenging with helium pressurization than without helium pressurization. When helium was present, the liquid temperature would rise with each successive TVS cycle if tank pressure was kept within a constant control band. Alternatively, if the liquid temperature was maintained within a constant TVS control band, the tank pressure would drop with each TVS cycle. The final test series, which was conducted with liquid nitrogen pressurized with helium, demonstrated simultaneous pressure and temperature control during TVS operation. The simultaneous control was achieved by systematic injection of additional helium during each TVS cycle. Adding helium maintained the helium partial pressure as the liquid volume decreased because of TVS operation. The TVS demonstrations with liquid oxygen pressurized with helium were conducted with three different fluid-mixer configurations-a submerged axial jet mixer, a pair of spray hoops in the tank

  14. Turbine flowmeter for liquid helium with the rotor magnetically levitated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivetti, A.; Martini, G.; Goria, R.; Lorefice, S.

    A turbine flowmeter with no mechanical contact between rotor and body is described, to be used as a reference standard in our liquid helium flow rate calibration facility. The absence of contact, zeroing the bearings friction factor, ensures a good measurement repeatability, even at very low liquid helium flow rate values. The rotor is magnetically suspended by the Meissner effect: at liquid helium temperatures two magnetic fields generate sustaining forces against the surface of the two rotor ends, which are made of niobium. Due to the repulsive nature of the acting forces, the rotor equilibrium is intrinsically stable and no external electronics are required for its levitation. A particular configuration of the superconducting windings and of the rotor ends allow the rotor to levitate and hold good axial and radial stability. A detailed description of the solutions adopted for the realization of the prototype and the operation conditions are reported. The first results, made with the absolute liquid helium calibration facility, are shown.

  15. The effect of confinement on liquid helium near the lambda line

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, M.E.

    1993-12-31

    This thesis is the compilation of several projects relevant to the behavior of confined liquid helium near the {lambda}-line. The first project described is the development of two new high resolution thermometers optimized for specific heat studies of helium confined in pores. One of the thermometers is a superconductive transition thermometer (STT). The STT has a temperature resolution of about 5nK. The other high resolution thermometer described is a magnetic susceptibility thermometer. This thermometer measures the magnetization of copper ammonium bromide (CAB) using a SQUID magnetometer. The CAB thermometer has an observed sensitivity of about 20nK. Suggestions for improvements in both thermometers are made. Simulation work on the temperature profile of a thermal conductivity cell near T{lambda} is described. The simulations are compared with the experimental results, and a careful study of the stability of the numerics is described. The study of helium confined into pores and films is described next. Both previous theoretical and experimental work on finite size effects in liquid helium are described. The geometry provided by glass capillary arrays is analyzed to determine what would be observed when the specific heat of helium confined to the arrays is measured. Finally, I describe my measurements of the isobaric thermal expansion coefficient {beta}{sub P} of 4He confined in an aerogel for several isobars along the {lambda}-line. {beta}{sub P} is an asymptotically linear function of C{sub P} near the superfluid transition temperature {Tc}. Therefore, fits to power laws in t {triple_bond} T/{Tc} - 1 give the specific heat exponents {alpha} and {alpha}{prime} and amplitude ratio A{prime}/A. Such fits gave different exponents {alpha} {approx} -0.6 and {alpha}{prime} {approx} -1.0 above and below {Tc}.

  16. Shock compression of liquid helium to 56 GPa (560 kbar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nellis, W. J.; Holmes, N. C.; Mitchell, A. C.; Governo, G. K.; Ross, M.; Young, D. A.; Trainor, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Shock-wave data are presented for liquid helium which has been compressed to densities up to five times greater than the normal liquid. The helium was heated to temperatures up to 21,000 K, while the maximum pressure attained was 56 GPa. The properties of helium and hydrogen are important for modeling the giant planets Saturn and Jupiter where these elements are the major constituents. Conditions on Saturn are of particular interest because studies have suggested that this planet has an internal energy source which is associated with unmixing and gravitational separation of the hydrogen-helium fluid at pressures below 1 TPa. The existence of this phase transition depends very sensitively on the hydrogen and helium equation of state. In the experiments, strong shock waves were generated by the impact of planar projectiles into cryogenic specimen holders.

  17. Shock Compression of Liquid Helium to 56 GPa (560) Kbar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nellis, W. J.; Holmes, N. C.; Mitchell, A. C.; Trainor, R. J.; Governo, G. K.; Ross, M.; Young, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Shock-wave data are presented for liquid helium which has been compressed to densities up to five times greater than the normal liquid. The helium was heated to temperatures up to 21,000 K, while the maximum pressure attained was 56 GPa. The properties of helium and hydrogen are important for modeling the giant planets Saturn and Jupiter where these elements are the major constituents. Conditions on Saturn are of particular interest because studies have suggested that this planet has an internal energy source which is associated with unmixing and gravitational separation the hydrogen-helium fluid at pressures below 1 TPa. The existence of this phase transition depends very sensitively on the hydrogen and helium equation of state. In the experiments, strong shock waves were generated by the impact of planar projectiles into cryogenic specimen holders.

  18. Renormalization-Group Theory Study of Superfluidity and Phase Separation of Helium Mixtures Immersed in Jungle-Gym Aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopatnikova, Anna; Berker, A. Nihat

    1997-03-01

    Superfluidity and phase separation in ^3He-^4He mixtures immersed in jungle-gym (non-random) aerogel are studied by renormalization-group theory.(Phys. Rev. B, in press (1996)) Phase diagrams are calculated for a variety of aerogel concentrations. Superfluidity at very low ^4He concentrations and a depressed tricritical temperature are found at the onset of superfluidity. A superfluid-superfluid phase separation, terminating at an isolated critical point, is found entirely within the superfluid phase. These phenomena, and trends with respect to aerogel concentration, are explained by the connectivity and tenuousness of jungle-gym aerogel.

  19. Renormalization-group study of superfluidity and phase separation of helium mixtures immersed in a nonrandom aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopatnikova, Anna; Nihat Berker, A.

    1997-02-01

    Superfluidity and phase separation in 3-4He mixtures immersed in a jungle-gym (nonrandom) aerogel are studied by renormalization-group theory. Phase diagrams are calculated for a variety of aerogel concentrations. Superfluidity at very low 4He concentrations and a depressed tricritical temperature are found at the onset of superfluidity. A superfluid-superfluid phase separation, terminating at an isolated critical point, is found entirely within the superfluid phase. These phenomena and trends with respect to aerogel concentration are explained by the connectivity and tenuousness of a jungle-gym aerogel.

  20. Characterization of MEMS Devices for the Study of Superfluid Helium Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M.; Bhupathi, P.; Moon, B. H.; Zheng, P.; Ling, G.; Garcell, E.; Chan, H. B.; Lee, Y.

    2011-03-01

    Measurements on the mechanical properties of MEMS resonators were performed to characterize such devices at room temperature and low temperatures. Using state-of-the-art silicon integrated circuit technology, we have designed, fabricated, and manufactured resonators consisting of a pair of parallel plates with a well-defined gap whose size can be controlled with a high accuracy down to the sub-micron range. A full study of resonance properties at various pressures was performed at room temperature. We will discuss the details of design, fabrication, and operation. These studies open up a window of opportunities to look for novel phenomena in quantum fluids such as in superfluid 3He films.

  1. Using second-sound shock waves to probe the intrinsic critical velocity of liquid helium II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. N.

    1983-01-01

    A critical velocity truly intrinsic to liquid helium II is experimentally sought in the bulk fluid far from the apparatus walls. Termed the 'fundamental critical velocity,' it necessarily is caused by mutual interactions which operate between the two fluid components and which are activated at large relative velocities. It is argued that flow induced by second-sound shock waves provides the ideal means by which to activate and isolate the fundamental critical velocity from other extraneous fluid-wall interactions. Experimentally it is found that large-amplitude second-sound shock waves initiate a breakdown in the superfluidity of helium II, which is dramatically manifested as a limit to the maximum attainable shock strength. This breakdown is shown to be caused by a fundamental critical velocity. Secondary effects include boiling for ambient pressures near the saturated vapor pressure or the formation of helium I boundary layers at higher ambient pressures. When compared to the intrinsic critical velocity discovered in highly restricted geometries, the shock-induced critical velocity displays a similar temperature dependence and is the same order of magnitude.

  2. A helium-3 refrigerator employing capillary confinement of liquid cryogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennis, D. J.; Kittel, P.; Brooks, W.; Miller, A.; Spivak, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    A condensation refrigerator suitable for operation in a zero gravity space environment was constructed. The condensed liquid refrigerant is confined by surface tension inside a porous metal matrix. Helium-4 and helium-3 gases were condensed and held in a copper matrix. Evaporative cooling of confined liquid helium-4 resulted in a temperature of 1.4K. Using a zeolite adsorption pump external to the cryostat, a temperature of 0.6 K was achieved through evaporative cooling of liquid helium-3. The amount of time required for complete evaporation of a controlled mass of liquid helium-4 contained in the copper matrix was measured as a function of the applied background power. For heating powers below 18 mW the measured times are consistent with the normal boiling of the confined volume of liquid refrigerant. At background powers above 18 mW the rapid rise in the temperature of the copper matrix the signature of the absence of confined liquid occurs in a time a factor of two shorter than that expected on the basis of an extrapolation of the low power data.

  3. Heat transfer through cyanate ester epoxy mix and epoxy TGPAP - DETDA electrical insulations at superfluid helium temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrowicz, Slawomir; Four, Aurelian; Canfer, Simon; Jones, Stephanie; Baudouy, Bertrand

    2012-06-01

    A high magnetic field accelerator magnet of 13 T is being developed in Work Package 7 of the European Union FP7 project EuCARD. The application is to enable higher luminosities and energies for accelerators such as the LHC. The high magnetic field demands superconductors that require a heat treatment step such as Nb3Sn. This paper reports thermal tests on conventional composite electrical insulation with pressurized superfluid helium at atmospheric pressure as a coolant. Two composite insulation systems composed of cyanate ester epoxy mix or a tri-functional epoxy (TGPAP-DETDA) with Sglass fiber, have been chosen as candidate materials. The knowledge of their thermal properties is necessary for the thermal design and therefore samples have been tested in pressurized He II where heat is applied perpendicularly to the fibers between 1.6 K and 2.0 K. Overall thermal resistance is determined as a function of temperature and the results are compared with other electrical insulation systems used for accelerator magnets.

  4. High resolution electron microscopy of Ag-clusters in crystalline and non-crystalline morphologies grown inside superfluid helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, Alexander; Thaler, Philipp; Koch, Markus; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Fisslthaler, Evelin; Grogger, Werner

    2013-06-07

    We present a first investigation of structural properties of Ag clusters with a diameter of up to 5.5 nm grown inside superfluid helium nanodroplets (He{sub N}) and deposited on an amorphous C surface. With high resolution transmission electron microscope images we are able to show that in addition to the crystalline face centered cubic (fcc) structure, noncrystalline icosahedral (Ih), and decahedral (Dh) morphologies are grown. Relative abundances (56% fcc, 31% Dh, and 13% Ih) as well as the size distribution of each morphology (mean diameters d{sub fcc}=2.62(5) nm, d{sub Dh}=3.34(7) nm, and d{sub Ih}=3.93(2) nm) do not reflect the situation expected from pure energetic considerations, where small Ihs should be followed by medium sized Dhs and large fccs. Instead, kinetic factors seem to play an important role in the formation of these structures, as it appears to be the case for clusters formed by inert gas aggregation. Considering the low temperatures (0.37 K) and extremely high cooling rates, we discuss basic ideas that might lead to a qualitative picture of the cluster formation process inside He{sub N}.

  5. High resolution electron microscopy of Ag-clusters in crystalline and non-crystalline morphologies grown inside superfluid helium nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Volk, Alexander; Thaler, Philipp; Koch, Markus; Fisslthaler, Evelin; Grogger, Werner; Ernst, Wolfgang E

    2013-06-01

    We present a first investigation of structural properties of Ag clusters with a diameter of up to 5.5 nm grown inside superfluid helium nanodroplets (He(N)) and deposited on an amorphous C surface. With high resolution transmission electron microscope images we are able to show that in addition to the crystalline face centered cubic (fcc) structure, noncrystalline icosahedral (Ih), and decahedral (Dh) morphologies are grown. Relative abundances (56% fcc, 31% Dh, and 13% Ih) as well as the size distribution of each morphology (mean diameters d(fcc)=2.62(5) nm, d(Dh)=3.34(7) nm, and d(Ih)=3.93(2) nm) do not reflect the situation expected from pure energetic considerations, where small Ihs should be followed by medium sized Dhs and large fccs. Instead, kinetic factors seem to play an important role in the formation of these structures, as it appears to be the case for clusters formed by inert gas aggregation. Considering the low temperatures (0.37 K) and extremely high cooling rates, we discuss basic ideas that might lead to a qualitative picture of the cluster formation process inside He(N). PMID:23758376

  6. Superfluid Optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Glen; McAuslan, David; Sheridan, Eoin; Bowen, Warwick

    2014-03-01

    The field of quantum optomechanics has seen great progress over the last decade with many exciting theoretical proposals and impressive experimental achievements. Among the most successful optomechanical systems are the collective modes of ultra cold atoms where ponderomotive squeezing and quantization of collective atomic motion have been observed. In this context the collective motion of superfluid helium-4 appears to be a promising candidate given its zero viscosity flow; potentially leading to the simple preparation of macroscopic mechanical oscillators with ultra-high quality factors. Here we present the first observation of Brownian motion in superfluid helium-4 thin films. The superfluid film is formed around an optical whispering gallery mode resonator enabling high sensitivity readout. Furthermore, exceedingly strong dynamical backaction heating and cooling is observed with optomechanical instabilities arising from only 40nW of injected optical power. While there are still many open questions regarding the superfluid hydrodynamics we believe this to be a promising system to study macroscopic non-classical mechanical states.

  7. Experiments on the rapid mechanical expansion of liquid 4He through its superfluid transition.

    PubMed

    Efimov, V B; Griffiths, O J; Hendry, P C; Kolmakov, G V; McClintock, P V E; Skrbek, L

    2006-11-01

    Phenomena following a rapid mechanical quench of liquid 4He from its normal to its superfluid phase are reported and discussed. The mechanical expansion apparatus is an improved version of that described previously. It uses a double-cell geometry to effect a partial separation of the sample from the convolutions of the bellows that form the outer wall of the cell. Consistent with earlier work, no evidence is found for the production of quantized vortices via the Kibble-Zurek (KZ) mechanism. Although the expansion is complete within 15ms , the second-sound velocity and attenuation continue to increase for a further approximately 60ms ; correspondingly the temperature decreases. Subsequently, the temperature rises again toward its final value as the second-sound velocity and attenuation decrease. It is shown that this unexpected behavior is apparently associated with a large-amplitude second-sound oscillation produced by the expansion, and it is suggested that the observed vortices are created by the normal fluid-superfluid counterflow that constitutes the second-sound wave. If production of large-amplitude second sound is inherent to the mechanical expansion of liquid 4He through the superfluid transition, as appears to be the case for final temperatures more than 3mK from the lambda transition, the phenomenon sets a lower bound on the density of KZ vortices that can be detected in this type of experiment. PMID:17279991

  8. Shock compression of liquid helium to 56 GPa (560 kbar)

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W.J.; Holmes, N.C.; Mitchell, A.C.; Trainor, R.J.; Governo, G.K.; Ross, M.; Young, D.A.

    1984-09-24

    The first shock-compression experiments on liquid helium are reported. With a two-stage light-gas gun, liquid He at 4.3 K and 1 atm was shocked to 16 GPa and 12 000 K and double shocked to 56 GPa and 21 000 K. Liquid perturbation theory has been used to determine an effective interatomic potential from which the equation of state of He can be obtained over a wide range of densities and temperatures.

  9. Pressure driven flow studies of superfluid helium-4 through single, high aspect ratio nanopipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botimer, Jeffrey; Taborek, Peter

    We have measured flow rates of helium-4 through high aspect ratio (>10,000) single glass nanopipes and etched nanopores under the influence of a pressure drop. The initial diameter of the glass pipes is 200nm while the initial diameter of the nanopores is approximately 80nm; the diameter of both types of nanopipe were reduced using atomic layer deposition(ALD) of Al2O3. Flow rates were measured for a wide range of temperatures (0.8K to 3.0K), pressures (up to 40 atm), and pipe lengths (0.8 mm to 30 mm). We observed flow velocities in the range of 1-6 m/s which has a power law dependence on pressure. Flow appears to be governed by turbulence at low temperatures. We have found evidence for a critical pressure above which turbulent flow is eliminated. This critical pressure appears to depend on temperature.

  10. Does one need a 4.5 K screen in cryostats of superconducting accelerator devices operating in superfluid helium? lessons from the LHL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrun, Philippe; Parma, Vittorio; Tavian, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Superfluid helium is increasingly used as a coolant for superconducting devices in particle accelerators: the lower temperature enhances the performance of superconductors in high-field magnets and reduces BCS losses in RF acceleration cavities, while the excellent transport properties of superfluid helium can be put to work in efficient distributed cooling systems. The thermodynamic penalty of operating at lower temperature however requires careful management of the heat loads, achieved inter alia through proper design and construction of the cryostats. A recurrent question appears to be that of the need and practical feasibility of an additional screen cooled by normal helium at around 4.5 K surrounding the cold mass at about 2 K, in such cryostats equipped with a standard 80 K screen. We introduce the issue in terms of first principles applied to the configuration of the cryostats, discuss technical constraints and economical limitations, and illustrate the argumentation with examples taken from large projects confronted with this issue, i.e. CEBAF, SPL, ESS, LHC, TESLA, European X-FEL, ILC.

  11. Does one need a 4.5 K screen in cryostats of superconducting accelerator devices operating in superfluid helium? lessons from the LHL

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrun, Philippe; Parma, Vittorio; Tavian, Laurent

    2014-01-29

    Superfluid helium is increasingly used as a coolant for superconducting devices in particle accelerators: the lower temperature enhances the performance of superconductors in high-field magnets and reduces BCS losses in RF acceleration cavities, while the excellent transport properties of superfluid helium can be put to work in efficient distributed cooling systems. The thermodynamic penalty of operating at lower temperature however requires careful management of the heat loads, achieved inter alia through proper design and construction of the cryostats. A recurrent question appears to be that of the need and practical feasibility of an additional screen cooled by normal helium at around 4.5 K surrounding the cold mass at about 2 K, in such cryostats equipped with a standard 80 K screen. We introduce the issue in terms of first principles applied to the configuration of the cryostats, discuss technical constraints and economical limitations, and illustrate the argumentation with examples taken from large projects confronted with this issue, i.e. CEBAF, SPL, ESS, LHC, TESLA, European X-FEL, ILC.

  12. Single and double resonance spectroscopy of methanol embedded in superfluid helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Raston, Paul L.; Douberly, Gary E.; Jäger, Wolfgang

    2014-07-28

    Methanol is one of the simplest molecules that undergo torsional oscillations, and so it has been extensively studied in the gas phase by various spectroscopic techniques. At 300 K, a large number of rotational, torsional, and vibrational energy levels is populated, and this makes for a rather complicated spectrum, which is still not fully understood. It is expected that in going from 300 K to 0.4 K (the temperature of helium nanodroplets) the population distribution of methanol will mainly collapse into two states; the J{sub K} = 0{sub 0} state for the A{sub 1} nuclear spin symmetry species (with I{sub CH{sub 3}} = 3/2), and the J{sub K} = 1{sub −1} state for the E species (I{sub CH{sub 3}} = 1/2). This results in a simplified spectrum that consists of narrow a-type (ΔK = 0) lines and broader b- and c-type (ΔK = ±1) lines. We have recorded the rotovibrational spectrum of CH{sub 3}OH in the OH stretching, CH{sub 3} stretching and bending, CH{sub 3} rocking, and CO stretching regions, and have firmly assigned five bands (v{sub 1}, v{sub 2}, v{sub 3}, v{sub 7}, and v{sub 8}), and tentatively assigned five others (v{sub 9}, 2v{sub 4}, v{sub 4} + v{sub 10}, 2v{sub 10}, and v{sub 4} + v{sub 5}). To our knowledge, the transitions we have assigned within the v{sub 4} + v{sub 10}, 2v{sub 10}, and v{sub 4} + v{sub 5} bands have not yet been assigned in the gas phase, and we hope that considering the very small “matrix” shift in helium nanodroplets (<1 cm{sup −1} for most subband origins of CH{sub 3}OH), those made here can aid in their gas phase identification. Microwave-infrared double resonance spectroscopy was used to confirm the initially tentative a-type infrared assignments in the OH stretching (v{sub 1}) band of A{sub 1} species methanol, in addition to revealing “warm” b-type lines. From a rotovibrational analysis, the B rotational constant is found to be reduced quite significantly (56%) with respect to the gas phase, and the torsional tunneling

  13. Superconductive thin film makes convenient liquid helium level sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, H. H.

    1968-01-01

    Sensor consisting of superconductive film mounted on a dipstick measures the level of liquid helium in a Dewar flask. The sensor is made by depositing a thin film of niobium metal to a thickness of 2000 angstroms on a quartz substrate, which is then mounted on a graduated dipstick.

  14. Electronic Relaxation after Resonant Laser Excitation of Cr in Superfluid Helium Nanodroplets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) atoms embedded into helium nanodroplets (HeN) are ejected from the droplets upon photoexcitation. During ejection they undergo electronic relaxation resulting in bare Cr atoms in various excited states. In a study of the relaxation process we present absorption spectra observed via laser induced fluorescence and beam depletion as well as dispersed fluorescence spectra and time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Broad and shifted absorption structures were found for the strong z7P° ← a7S3 and y7P° ← a7S3 excitations from the ground state. Emission lines are, in contrast, very narrow, which indicates that fluorescence is obtained from bare excited Cr atoms after ejection. Upon excitation into the y7P2,3,4° states we observed fluorescence from y7P2°, z5P1,2,3°, and z7P2,3,4°, indicating that these states are populated by electronic relaxation during the ejection processes. Relative population ratios are obtained from the intensities of individual spectral lines. Excitation into the z7P2,3,4° states resulted in fluorescence only from z7P2°. Estimates of the time duration of the ejection process are obtained from time-resolved measurements. PMID:23410146

  15. Superfluid Vortex Cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaeva, I. A.; Lindemann, U.; Jiang, N.; de Waele, A. T. A. M.; Thummes, G.

    2004-06-01

    A superfluid vortex cooler (SVC) is a combination of a fountain pump and a vortex cooler. The working fluid in the SVC is 4He at a temperature below the lambda line. The cooler has no moving parts, is gravity independent, and hardly requires any additional infrastructure. At saturated vapour pressure the SVC is capable of reaching a temperature as low as 0.75 K. At pressures close to the melting pressure the temperature can be brought down to 0.65 K. As the SVC operates only below the lambda line, it has to be precooled e.g. by a liquid-helium bath or a cryocooler. As a first step of our research we have carried out a number of experiments, using a liquid-helium bath as a precooler for the SVC. In this arrangement we have reached temperatures below 1 K with 3.5 mW heating power supplied to the fountain part of the SVC at 1.4 K. The next step was combining the SVC with a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR), developed at the University of Giessen. It is a two-stage G-M type refrigerator with 3He as a working fluid that reached a lowest temperature of 1.27 K. In this contribution we report on the results of the SVC tests in liquid helium and the progress in the integration of the SVC with the PTR.

  16. Microscopic molecular superfluid response: theory and simulations.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Tao; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2014-04-01

    Since its discovery in 1938, superfluidity has been the subject of much investigation because it provides a unique example of a macroscopic manifestation of quantum mechanics. About 60 years later, scientists successfully observed this phenomenon in the microscopic world though the spectroscopic Andronikashvili experiment in helium nano-droplets. This reduction of scale suggests that not only helium but also para-H2 (pH2) can be a candidate for superfluidity. This expectation is based on the fact that the smaller number of neighbours and surface effects of a finite-size cluster may hinder solidification and promote a liquid-like phase. The first prediction of superfluidity in pH2 clusters was reported in 1991 based on quantum Monte Carlo simulations. The possible superfluidity of pH2 was later indirectly observed in a spectroscopic Andronikashvili experiment in 2000. Since then, a growing number of studies have appeared, and theoretical simulations have been playing a special role because they help guide and interpret experiments. In this review, we go over the theoretical studies of pH2 superfluid clusters since the experiment of 2000. We provide a historical perspective and introduce the basic theoretical formalism along with key experimental advances. We then present illustrative results of the theoretical studies and comment on the possible future developments in the field. We include sufficient theoretical details such that the review can serve as a guide for newcomers to the field. PMID:24647079

  17. Microscopic molecular superfluid response: theory and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Tao; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2014-04-01

    Since its discovery in 1938, superfluidity has been the subject of much investigation because it provides a unique example of a macroscopic manifestation of quantum mechanics. About 60 years later, scientists successfully observed this phenomenon in the microscopic world though the spectroscopic Andronikashvili experiment in helium nano-droplets. This reduction of scale suggests that not only helium but also para-H2 (pH2) can be a candidate for superfluidity. This expectation is based on the fact that the smaller number of neighbours and surface effects of a finite-size cluster may hinder solidification and promote a liquid-like phase. The first prediction of superfluidity in pH2 clusters was reported in 1991 based on quantum Monte Carlo simulations. The possible superfluidity of pH2 was later indirectly observed in a spectroscopic Andronikashvili experiment in 2000. Since then, a growing number of studies have appeared, and theoretical simulations have been playing a special role because they help guide and interpret experiments. In this review, we go over the theoretical studies of pH2 superfluid clusters since the experiment of 2000. We provide a historical perspective and introduce the basic theoretical formalism along with key experimental advances. We then present illustrative results of the theoretical studies and comment on the possible future developments in the field. We include sufficient theoretical details such that the review can serve as a guide for newcomers to the field.

  18. Microscopic molecular superfluid response: theory and simulations.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Tao; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2014-04-01

    Since its discovery in 1938, superfluidity has been the subject of much investigation because it provides a unique example of a macroscopic manifestation of quantum mechanics. About 60 years later, scientists successfully observed this phenomenon in the microscopic world though the spectroscopic Andronikashvili experiment in helium nano-droplets. This reduction of scale suggests that not only helium but also para-H2 (pH2) can be a candidate for superfluidity. This expectation is based on the fact that the smaller number of neighbours and surface effects of a finite-size cluster may hinder solidification and promote a liquid-like phase. The first prediction of superfluidity in pH2 clusters was reported in 1991 based on quantum Monte Carlo simulations. The possible superfluidity of pH2 was later indirectly observed in a spectroscopic Andronikashvili experiment in 2000. Since then, a growing number of studies have appeared, and theoretical simulations have been playing a special role because they help guide and interpret experiments. In this review, we go over the theoretical studies of pH2 superfluid clusters since the experiment of 2000. We provide a historical perspective and introduce the basic theoretical formalism along with key experimental advances. We then present illustrative results of the theoretical studies and comment on the possible future developments in the field. We include sufficient theoretical details such that the review can serve as a guide for newcomers to the field.

  19. Formation of Positively Charged Liquid Helium Clusters in Supercritical Helium and their Solidification upon Compression.

    PubMed

    Tarchouna, Hejer Gharbi; Bonifaci, Nelly; Aitken, Frédéric; Mendoza Luna, Luis Guillermo; von Haeften, Klaus

    2015-08-01

    Positively charged ions were produced in supercritical helium at temperatures from 6 to 10 K and up to 2 MPa using a corona discharge. Their mobility was measured via current-voltage curves, and the hydrodynamic radius was derived using Stokes law. An initial increase and subsequent decrease of hydrodynamic radius was observed and interpreted in terms of growth, compression and solidification of ion clusters. The mobility was modeled using a van der Waals-type thermodynamic state equation for the ion-in-helium mixed system and a temperature-dependent Millikan-Cunningham factor, describing experimental data both in the Knudsen and the Stokes flow region. Regions of maximum hydrodynamic radius and large compressibility were interpreted as boiling points. These points were modeled over a large range of pressures and found to match the Frenkel line of pure helium up to 0.7 MPa, reflecting similarity of density fluctuations in pure supercritical helium and gas-liquid phase transitions of ionic helium clusters. PMID:26267199

  20. Formation of Positively Charged Liquid Helium Clusters in Supercritical Helium and their Solidification upon Compression.

    PubMed

    Tarchouna, Hejer Gharbi; Bonifaci, Nelly; Aitken, Frédéric; Mendoza Luna, Luis Guillermo; von Haeften, Klaus

    2015-08-01

    Positively charged ions were produced in supercritical helium at temperatures from 6 to 10 K and up to 2 MPa using a corona discharge. Their mobility was measured via current-voltage curves, and the hydrodynamic radius was derived using Stokes law. An initial increase and subsequent decrease of hydrodynamic radius was observed and interpreted in terms of growth, compression and solidification of ion clusters. The mobility was modeled using a van der Waals-type thermodynamic state equation for the ion-in-helium mixed system and a temperature-dependent Millikan-Cunningham factor, describing experimental data both in the Knudsen and the Stokes flow region. Regions of maximum hydrodynamic radius and large compressibility were interpreted as boiling points. These points were modeled over a large range of pressures and found to match the Frenkel line of pure helium up to 0.7 MPa, reflecting similarity of density fluctuations in pure supercritical helium and gas-liquid phase transitions of ionic helium clusters.

  1. A critical review of liquid helium temperature high frequency pulse tube cryocoolers for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Gan, Z. H.

    2013-08-01

    The importance of liquid helium temperature cooling technology in the aerospace field is discussed, and the results indicate that improving the efficiency of liquid helium cooling technologies, especially the liquid helium high frequency pulse tube cryocoolers, is the principal difficulty to be solved. The state of the art and recent developments of liquid helium high frequency pulse tube cryocoolers are summarized. The main scientific challenges for high frequency pulse tube cryocoolers to efficiently reach liquid helium temperatures are outlined, and the research progress addressing those challenges are reviewed. Additionally some possible solutions to the challenges are pointed out and discussed.

  2. Superconducting cable cooling system by helium gas and a mixture of gas and liquid helium

    DOEpatents

    Dean, John W.

    1977-01-01

    Thermally contacting, oppositely streaming cryogenic fluid streams in the same enclosure in a closed cycle that changes from a cool high pressure helium gas to a cooler reduced pressure helium fluid comprised of a mixture of gas and boiling liquid so as to be near the same temperature but at different pressures respectively in go and return legs that are in thermal contact with each other and in thermal contact with a longitudinally extending superconducting transmission line enclosed in the same cable enclosure that insulates the line from the ambient at a temperature T.sub.1. By first circulating the fluid in a go leg from a refrigerator at one end of the line as a high pressure helium gas near the normal boiling temperature of helium; then circulating the gas through an expander at the other end of the line where the gas becomes a mixture of reduced pressure gas and boiling liquid at its boiling temperature; then by circulating the mixture in a return leg that is separated from but in thermal contact with the gas in the go leg and in the same enclosure therewith; and finally returning the resulting low pressure gas to the refrigerator for compression into a high pressure gas at T.sub.2 is a closed cycle, where T.sub.1 >T.sub.2, the temperature distribution is such that the line temperature is nearly constant along its length from the refrigerator to the expander due to the boiling of the liquid in the mixture. A heat exchanger between the go and return lines removes the gas from the liquid in the return leg while cooling the go leg.

  3. Temperature dependence of the accommodation coefficient of liquid-helium film.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.; Olli, E. E.; Saffren, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    We have determined the accommodation coefficient, gamma, of a helium film from 1.15 to 4 K by measuring the time constant of a rotating superconducting Nb sphere levitated in vapor and covered with a saturated helium film. The conventional assumption of the phenomenological theory of superfluidity, that the order parameter psi vanishes at the free surface of helium II, implies that gamma, is unity and independent of temperature. We find that gamma, is nearly unity above the lambda point, suffers an abrupt drop close to T-lambda, and gradually levels off to the value of about 0.8 at lower temperatures.

  4. Mathematical Model of Bubble Sloshing Dynamics for Cryogenic Liquid Helium in Orbital Spacecraft Dewar Container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Pan, H. L.

    1995-01-01

    A generalized mathematical model is investigated of sloshing dynamics for dewar containers, partially filled with a liquid of cryogenic superfluid helium 2, driven by both gravity gradient and jitter accelerations applicable to two types of scientific spacecrafts, which are eligible to carry out spinning motion and/or slew motion to perform scientific observations during normal spacecraft operation. Two examples are given for the Gravity Probe-B (GP-B) with spinning motion, and the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility-Spectroscopy (AXAF-S) with slew motion, which are responsible for the sloshing dynamics. Explicit mathematical expressions for the modelling of sloshing dynamics to cover these forces acting on the spacecraft fluid systems are derived. The numerical computation of sloshing dynamics will be based on the noninertial frame spacecraft bound coordinate, and we will solve the time-dependent three-dimensional formulations of partial differential equations subject to initial and boundary conditions. Explicit mathematical expressions of boundary conditions lo cover capillary force effects on the liquid-vapor interface in microgravity environments are also derived. Results of the simulations of the mathematical model are illustrated.

  5. Development of a Cryogenic Capability for Shock Compression of Liquid Helium on the Z machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Andrew; Root, Seth; Shelton, Keegan; Villalva, Jose; Hanson, David

    2015-06-01

    A cryogenic system has been developed to generate liquid helium (LHe) samples at 2.1 K for high precision equation-of-state (EOS) and isentropic compression measurements using the Z machine. Accurate data on He properties at Mbar pressures are critical to understanding gas giant planetary interiors and for validating first principles density functional simulations; however, limited high pressure He EOS data exist due to difficulty in condensing LHe samples (<3.5 K) for gas guns, magnetic and explosive devices and laser facilities. To address this need, we have developed and demonstrated a cryogenic system to generate quiescent superfluid LHe samples (2.1 K). The cryostat system utilizes a conduction refrigerator with a pumped LHe reservoir to cool the cryocell. The cryostat design produces stable, controlled temperatures resulting in well-characterized initial states of liquid He samples, which is key for precision EOS measurements. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Numerical studies of the surface tension effect of cryogenic liquid helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The generalized mathematical formulation of sloshing dynamics for partially filled liquid of cryogenic superfluid helium II in dewar containers driven by both the gravity gradient and jitter accelerations applicable to scientific spacecraft which is eligible to carry out spinning motion and/or slew motion for the purpose of performing scientific observation during the normal spacecraft operation is investigated. An example is given with Gravity Probe-B (GP-B) spacecraft which is responsible for the sloshing dynamics. The jitter accelerations include slew motion, spinning motion, atmospheric drag on the spacecraft, spacecraft attitude motions arising from machinery vibrations, thruster firing, pointing control of spacecraft, crew motion, etc. Explicit mathematical expressions to cover these forces acting on the spacecraft fluid systems are derived. The numerical computation of sloshing dynamics has been based on the non-inertia frame spacecraft bound coordinate, and solve time-dependent, three-dimensional formulations of partial differential equations subject to initial and boundary conditions. The explicit mathematical expressions of boundary conditions to cover capillary force effect on the liquid vapor interface in microgravity environments are also derived. The formulations of fluid moment and angular moment fluctuations in fluid profiles induced by the sloshing dynamics, together with fluid stress and moment fluctuations exerted on the spacecraft dewar containers, have been derived.

  7. Emergency relief venting of the infrared telescope liquid helium dewar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, E. W.

    1980-03-01

    An analysis is made of the emergency relief venting of the liquid helium dewar of the Spacelab 2 infrared telescope experiment in the event of a massive failure of the dewar guard vacuum. Such a failure, resulting from a major accident, could cause rapid heating and pressurization of the liquid helium in the dewar and lead to relief venting through the emergency relief system. The heat input from an accident is estimated for various fluid conditions in the dewar and the relief process as it takes place through one or both of the emergency relief paths is considered. It is shown that under all reasonable circumstances the dewar will safely relieve itself, and the pressure will not exceed 85 percent of the proof pressure or 63 percent of the burst pressure.

  8. Emergency relief venting of the infrared telescope liquid helium dewar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, E. W.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis is made of the emergency relief venting of the liquid helium dewar of the Spacelab 2 infrared telescope experiment in the event of a massive failure of the dewar guard vacuum. Such a failure, resulting from a major accident, could cause rapid heating and pressurization of the liquid helium in the dewar and lead to relief venting through the emergency relief system. The heat input from an accident is estimated for various fluid conditions in the dewar and the relief process as it takes place through one or both of the emergency relief paths is considered. It is shown that under all reasonable circumstances the dewar will safely relieve itself, and the pressure will not exceed 85 percent of the proof pressure or 63 percent of the burst pressure.

  9. Shock compression of liquid helium and helium-hydrogen mixtures : development of a cryogenic capability for shock compression of liquid helium on Z, final report for LDRD Project 141536.

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Andrew J.; Knudson, Marcus D.; Shelton, Keegan P.; Hanson, David Lester

    2010-10-01

    This final report on SNL/NM LDRD Project 141536 summarizes progress made toward the development of a cryogenic capability to generate liquid helium (LHe) samples for high accuracy equation-of-state (EOS) measurements on the Z current drive. Accurate data on He properties at Mbar pressures are critical to understanding giant planetary interiors and for validating first principles density functional simulations, but it is difficult to condense LHe samples at very low temperatures (<3.5 K) for experimental studies on gas guns, magnetic and explosive compression devices, and lasers. We have developed a conceptual design for a cryogenic LHe sample system to generate quiescent superfluid LHe samples at 1.5-1.8 K. This cryogenic system adapts the basic elements of a continuously operating, self-regulating {sup 4}He evaporation refrigerator to the constraints of shock compression experiments on Z. To minimize heat load, the sample holder is surrounded by a double layer of thermal radiation shields cooled with LHe to 5 K. Delivery of LHe to the pumped-He evaporator bath is controlled by a flow impedance. The LHe sample holder assembly features modular components and simplified fabrication techniques to reduce cost and complexity to levels required of an expendable device. Prototypes have been fabricated, assembled, and instrumented for initial testing.

  10. 136. VIEW OF LIQUID NITROGEN/HELIUM HEAT EXCHANGER IN LIQUID NITROGEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    136. VIEW OF LIQUID NITROGEN/HELIUM HEAT EXCHANGER IN LIQUID NITROGEN CONTROL ROOM (115), LSB (BLDG. 770), FROM FUEL APRON WITH BAY DOOR OPEN - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  11. Lightweight Liquid Helium Dewar for High-Altitude Balloon Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, Alan; James, Bryan; Fixsen, Dale

    2013-01-01

    Astrophysical observations at millimeter wavelengths require large (2-to-5- meter diameter) telescopes carried to altitudes above 35 km by scientific research balloons. The scientific performance is greatly enhanced if the telescope is cooled to temperatures below 10 K with no emissive windows between the telescope and the sky. Standard liquid helium bucket dewars can contain a suitable telescope for telescope diameter less than two meters. However, the mass of a dewar large enough to hold a 3-to-5-meter diameter telescope would exceed the balloon lift capacity. The solution is to separate the functions of cryogen storage and in-flight thermal isolation, utilizing the unique physical conditions at balloon altitudes. Conventional dewars are launched cold: the vacuum walls necessary for thermal isolation must also withstand the pressure gradient at sea level and are correspondingly thick and heavy. The pressure at 40 km is less than 0.3% of sea level: a dewar designed for use only at 40 km can use ultra thin walls to achieve significant reductions in mass. This innovation concerns new construction and operational techniques to produce a lightweight liquid helium bucket dewar. The dewar is intended for use on high-altitude balloon payloads. The mass is low enough to allow a large (3-to-5-meter) diameter dewar to fly at altitudes above 35 km on conventional scientific research balloons without exceeding the lift capability of the balloon. The lightweight dewar has thin (250- micron) stainless steel walls. The walls are too thin to support the pressure gradient at sea level: the dewar launches warm with the vacuum space vented continuously during ascent to eliminate any pressure gradient across the walls. A commercial 500-liter storage dewar maintains a reservoir of liquid helium within a minimal (hence low mass) volume. Once a 40-km altitude is reached, the valve venting the vacuum space of the bucket dewar is closed to seal the vacuum space. A vacuum pump then

  12. Dynamic structure factor of liquid 4He across the normal-superfluid transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, G.; Boronat, J.

    2016-03-01

    We have carried out a microscopic study of the dynamic structure factor of liquid 4He across the normal-superfluid transition temperature using the path integral Monte Carlo method. The ill-posed problem of the inverse Laplace transform, from the imaginary-time intermediate scattering function to the dynamic response, is tackled by stochastic optimization. Our results show a quasiparticle peak and a small and broad multiphonon contribution. In spite of the lack of strength in the collective peaks, we clearly identify the rapid dropping of the roton peak amplitude when crossing the transition temperature Tλ. Other properties such as the static structure factor, static response, and one-phonon contribution to the response are also calculated at different temperatures. The changes of the phonon-roton spectrum with the temperature are also studied. An overall agreement with available experimental data is achieved.

  13. a Neutron Scattering Study of Liquid HELIUM-4.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Ken Holst

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The results of high-resolution, high-accuracy, high-precision neutron inelastic measurements on liquid ^4He are presented. In the collective excitation region, the temperature -dependence of the sharp one-phonon peak is studied and seen to exhibit a qualitative change at T_ {lambda}. The Woods-Svensson hypothesis that the scattering separates naturally into parts proportional to the macroscopic normal and superfluid densities is tested and is found to be too simplistic to describe the detailed temperature dependence. A novel theoretical approach by Glyde and Griffin is evaluated. Their formulation establishes the microscopic connection between the Bose condensate and the phonon excitations in superfluid ^4He. The present parameterisation of their model describes the qualitative temperature dependence well. At high momentum transfer we obtain estimates of the momentum distribution above and below T _lambda, by extracting the Q-dependence of the fourth central moment of the scattering. The obtained n(p) at T > T_lambda is in very good agreement with theoretical calculations. Our low-temperature momentum distribution is more sharply peaked than at high temperature, but reflects the lack of higher -order terms in the short-time expansion used for extraction of the fourth moment. Estimates of the mean kinetic energy per atom are obtained and are slightly higher than previous experimental estimates, but in agreement with theoretical calculations. From this, we evaluate the magnitude of the condensate fraction, and find n_0(T=0) = 10.3 +/- 1.0%.

  14. Ultracold-neutron production and up-scattering in superfluid helium between 1.1 K and 2.4 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, K. K. H.; Ivanov, S.; Piegsa, F. M.; Simson, M.; Zimmer, O.

    2016-02-01

    Ultracold neutrons (UCNs) were produced in superfluid helium using the PF1B cold-neutron beam facility at the Institut Laue-Langevin. A 4-liter beryllium-coated converter volume with a mechanical valve and windowless stainless-steel extraction system were used to accumulate and guide UCNs to a detector at room temperature. At a converter temperature of 1.08 K the total storage time constant in the vessel was (20.3 ±1.2 )s and the number of UCNs counted after accumulated was 91 700 ±300 . From this, we derive a volumetric UCN production rate of (6.9 ±1.7 ) cm-3s-1 , which includes a correction for losses in the converter during UCN extraction caused by the short storage time, but not accounting for UCN transport and detection efficiencies. The up-scattering rate of UCNs caused by excitations in the superfluid was studied by scanning the temperature between 1.2 K and 2.4 K . Using the temperature-dependent UCN production rate calculated from inelastic neutron scattering data, the only UCN up-scattering process found to occur was from two-phonon scattering. Our analysis for T <1.95 K rules out the contributions from roton-phonon scattering to <29 % (95% C.I.) and from one-phonon absorption to <47 % (95% C.I.) of their predicted levels.

  15. Relativistic superfluidity and vorticity from the nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Chi; Good, Michael R. R.; Guo, Yulong; Liu, Xiaopei; Huang, Kerson

    2014-12-01

    We investigate superfluidity, and the mechanism for creation of quantized vortices, in the relativistic regime. The general framework is a nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation in curved spacetime for a complex scalar field, whose phase dynamics gives rise to superfluidity. The mechanisms discussed are local inertial forces (Coriolis and centrifugal), and current-current interaction with an external source. The primary application is to cosmology, but we also discuss the reduction to the nonrelativistic nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which is widely used in describing superfluidity and vorticity in liquid helium and cold-trapped atomic gases.

  16. Hysteresis in a quantized superfluid 'atomtronic' circuit.

    PubMed

    Eckel, Stephen; Lee, Jeffrey G; Jendrzejewski, Fred; Murray, Noel; Clark, Charles W; Lobb, Christopher J; Phillips, William D; Edwards, Mark; Campbell, Gretchen K

    2014-02-13

    Atomtronics is an emerging interdisciplinary field that seeks to develop new functional methods by creating devices and circuits where ultracold atoms, often superfluids, have a role analogous to that of electrons in electronics. Hysteresis is widely used in electronic circuits-it is routinely observed in superconducting circuits and is essential in radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference devices. Furthermore, it is as fundamental to superfluidity (and superconductivity) as quantized persistent currents, critical velocity and Josephson effects. Nevertheless, despite multiple theoretical predictions, hysteresis has not been previously observed in any superfluid, atomic-gas Bose-Einstein condensate. Here we directly detect hysteresis between quantized circulation states in an atomtronic circuit formed from a ring of superfluid Bose-Einstein condensate obstructed by a rotating weak link (a region of low atomic density). This contrasts with previous experiments on superfluid liquid helium where hysteresis was observed directly in systems in which the quantization of flow could not be observed, and indirectly in systems that showed quantized flow. Our techniques allow us to tune the size of the hysteresis loop and to consider the fundamental excitations that accompany hysteresis. The results suggest that the relevant excitations involved in hysteresis are vortices, and indicate that dissipation has an important role in the dynamics. Controlled hysteresis in atomtronic circuits may prove to be a crucial feature for the development of practical devices, just as it has in electronic circuits such as memories, digital noise filters (for example Schmitt triggers) and magnetometers (for example superconducting quantum interference devices). PMID:24522597

  17. Hysteresis in a quantized superfluid 'atomtronic' circuit.

    PubMed

    Eckel, Stephen; Lee, Jeffrey G; Jendrzejewski, Fred; Murray, Noel; Clark, Charles W; Lobb, Christopher J; Phillips, William D; Edwards, Mark; Campbell, Gretchen K

    2014-02-13

    Atomtronics is an emerging interdisciplinary field that seeks to develop new functional methods by creating devices and circuits where ultracold atoms, often superfluids, have a role analogous to that of electrons in electronics. Hysteresis is widely used in electronic circuits-it is routinely observed in superconducting circuits and is essential in radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference devices. Furthermore, it is as fundamental to superfluidity (and superconductivity) as quantized persistent currents, critical velocity and Josephson effects. Nevertheless, despite multiple theoretical predictions, hysteresis has not been previously observed in any superfluid, atomic-gas Bose-Einstein condensate. Here we directly detect hysteresis between quantized circulation states in an atomtronic circuit formed from a ring of superfluid Bose-Einstein condensate obstructed by a rotating weak link (a region of low atomic density). This contrasts with previous experiments on superfluid liquid helium where hysteresis was observed directly in systems in which the quantization of flow could not be observed, and indirectly in systems that showed quantized flow. Our techniques allow us to tune the size of the hysteresis loop and to consider the fundamental excitations that accompany hysteresis. The results suggest that the relevant excitations involved in hysteresis are vortices, and indicate that dissipation has an important role in the dynamics. Controlled hysteresis in atomtronic circuits may prove to be a crucial feature for the development of practical devices, just as it has in electronic circuits such as memories, digital noise filters (for example Schmitt triggers) and magnetometers (for example superconducting quantum interference devices).

  18. Shell Models of Superfluid Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacks, Daniel H.; Barenghi, Carlo F.

    2011-12-01

    Superfluid helium consists of two inter-penetrating fluids, a viscous normal fluid and an inviscid superfluid, coupled by a mutual friction. We develop a two-fluid shell model to study superfluid turbulence and investigate the energy spectra and the balance of fluxes between the two fluids in a steady state. At sufficiently low temperatures a 'bottle-neck' develops at high wavenumbers suggesting the need for a further dissipative effect, such as the Kelvin wave cascade.

  19. Superconducting AC motor for centrifugal liquid helium pump

    SciTech Connect

    Rivetti, A.; Goria, R.; Martini, G.

    1982-01-01

    The behavior of flowmeters in liquid and supercritical helium is studied. A description is given of the motor and experimental apparatus. The initial results (torque vs. efficiency and power vs. slip) are chartered. The results obtained with an external rotating shield (torque vs. efficiency and power vs. slip) are also charted. One rotor provided a higher power particularly at the highest frequencies, provided that the critical point is not exceeded. Another rotor gives a better efficiency, particularly at the lowest frequencies. Recommendations for adopting a rotor design are given.

  20. Annihilation of an AB/BA interface pair in superfluid helium-3 as a simulation of cosmological brane interaction.

    PubMed

    Bradley, D Ian; Fisher, Shaun N; Guénault, Anthony M; Haley, Richard P; Kopu, Juha; Martin, Hazel; Pickett, George R; Roberts, John E; Tsepelin, Viktor

    2008-08-28

    This study presents measurements of the transport of quasiparticle excitations in the B phase of superfluid 3He at temperatures below 0.2Tc. We find that creating and then removing a layer of A-phase superfluid leads to a measurable increase in the thermal impedance of the background B phase. This increase must be due to the survival of defects created as the AB and BA interfaces on either side of the A-phase layer annihilate. We speculate that a new type of defect may have been formed. The highly ordered A-B interface may be a good analogy for branes discussed in current cosmology. If so, these experiments may provide insight into how the annihilation of branes can lead to the formation of topological defects such as cosmic strings. PMID:18534941

  1. Alkali dimers on the surface of liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Peter B.; Cole, Milton W.; Cheng, E.

    1995-09-01

    A recent paper by Ancilotto et al. (Zeitschrift für Physik B, in press), presented calculations of adsorption energies and the geometry of a surface dimple for alkali atoms bound to the surfaces of quantum liquids (4He,3He, H2). Here we present a study of the adsorption of two alkali dimers (Li2, Na2) on the surface of liquid helium. The calculations employ a model of an abrupt interface formulated by Ancilotto et al. as well as one using a diffuse interface. Our conclusion its that the dimers are bound to the surface more strongly than their respective monomers. In the case of dimers there is an additional degree of freedom-the orientation of the molecular axis relative to the surface. We study the influence of molecular anisotropy on adsorption by comparing the cases of “erect” and “spinning flat” orientations and conclude that the latter is energetically favored.

  2. Critical Landau velocity in helium nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Nils B; Smolarek, Szymon; Loginov, Evgeniy; Mateo, David; Hernando, Alberto; Pi, Marti; Barranco, Manuel; Buma, Wybren J; Drabbels, Marcel

    2013-10-11

    The best-known property of superfluid helium is the vanishing viscosity that objects experience while moving through the liquid with speeds below the so-called critical Landau velocity. This critical velocity is generally considered a macroscopic property as it is related to the collective excitations of the helium atoms in the liquid. In the present work we determine to what extent this concept can still be applied to nanometer-scale, finite size helium systems. To this end, atoms and molecules embedded in helium nanodroplets of various sizes are accelerated out of the droplets by means of optical excitation, and the speed distributions of the ejected particles are determined. The measurements reveal the existence of a critical velocity in these systems, even for nanodroplets consisting of only a thousand helium atoms. Accompanying theoretical simulations based on a time-dependent density functional description of the helium confirm and further elucidate this experimental finding.

  3. Mass Spectrometric Investigation of Anions Formed upon Free Electron Attachment to Nucleobase Molecules and Clusters Embedded in Superfluid Helium Droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Denifl, Stephan; Zappa, Fabio; Maehr, Ingo; Lecointre, Julien; Probst, Michael; Maerk, Tilmann D.; Scheier, Paul

    2006-07-28

    Here we report the first mass spectrometric study of negative ions formed via free electron attachment (EA) to nucleobases (NBs) embedded in helium clusters. Pure and mixed clusters of adenine and thymine have been formed by pickup of isolated NB molecules by cold helium droplets. In contrast to EA of isolated molecules in the gas phase we observe a long-lived parent anion NB{sup -} and, in addition, parent cluster ions NB{sub n}{sup -} up to size n=6. Moreover, we show that a low energy electron penetrating into a doped helium droplet causes efficient damage of the embedded nucleobases via resonant, site selective, dissociative electron attachment.

  4. Helium gas bubble trapped in liquid helium in high magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, H.; Hannahs, S. T.; Markiewicz, W. D.; Weijers, H. W.

    2014-03-01

    High magnetic field magnets are used widely in the area of the condensed matter physics, material science, chemistry, geochemistry, and biology at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. New high field magnets of state-of-the-art are being pursued and developed at the lab, such as the current developing 32 T, 32 mm bore fully superconducting magnet. Liquid Helium (LHe) is used as the coolant for superconducting magnets or samples tested in a high magnetic field. When the magnetic field reaches a relatively high value the boil-off helium gas bubble generated by heat losses in the cryostat can be trapped in the LHe bath in the region where BzdBz/dz is less than negative 2100 T2/m, instead of floating up to the top of LHe. Then the magnet or sample in the trapped bubble region may lose efficient cooling. In the development of the 32 T magnet, a prototype Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide coil of 6 double pancakes with an inner diameter of 40 mm and an outer diameter of 140 mm was fabricated and tested in a resistive magnet providing a background field of 15 T. The trapped gas bubble was observed in the tests when the prototype coil was ramped up to 7.5 T at a current of 200 A. This letter reports the test results on the trapped gas bubble and the comparison with the analytical results which shows they are in a good agreement.

  5. The Superfluid Transition of Helium-4 in the Presence of an Applied Heat Flow in 1-g and Below: Comparison between Experiment and Numerical Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, M.; Israelsson, U. E.

    1995-01-01

    Reported are thermal conductivity measurements of liquid Helium-4 at saturated vapor pressure. measurements were made inside a super- conducting magnet. The thermal conductivity measurements consist of ramping the temperature at the cell top while passing a constant heat current through the cell from the bottom. Numerical results are quantitatively compared with the observed experimental behavior.

  6. Advanced helium purge seals for Liquid Oxygen (LOX) turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Wilbur; Lee, Chester C.

    1989-01-01

    Program objectives were to determine three advanced configurations of helium buffer seals capable of providing improved performance in a space shuttle main engine (SSME), high-pressure liquid oxygen (LOX) turbopump environment, and to provide NASA with the analytical tools to determine performance of a variety of seal configurations. The three seal designs included solid-ring fluid-film seals often referred to as floating ring seals, back-to-back fluid-film face seals, and a circumferential sectored seal that incorporated inherent clearance adjustment capabilities. Of the three seals designed, the sectored seal is favored because the self-adjusting clearance features accommodate the variations in clearance that will occur because of thermal and centrifugal distortions without compromising performance. Moreover, leakage can be contained well below the maximum target values; minimizing leakage is important on the SSME since helium is provided by an external tank. A reduction in tank size translates to an increase in payload that can be carried on board the shuttle. The computer codes supplied under this program included a code for analyzing a variety of gas-lubricated, floating ring, and sector seals; a code for analyzing gas-lubricated face seals; a code for optimizing and analyzing gas-lubricated spiral-groove face seals; and a code for determining fluid-film face seal response to runner excitations in as many as five degrees of freedom. These codes proved invaluable for optimizing designs and estimating final performance of the seals described.

  7. The liquid helium thermosyphon for the GEM detector magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, R.P.

    1993-05-04

    The GEM detector magnet, a horizontal solenoid 19.5 m in diameter and wound with a niobium-titanium cable in conduit, will be located with it`s axis 19.5 m below grade. The conductor is wound on the inside of an aluminum bobbin which is cooled by liquid helium which flows by natural convection in a thermosyphon loop from a large storage dewar located at the ground surface. The function of the thermosyphon system is to absorb the environmental heat load as well as any internally generated heat. In the first category is included that heat which is transfered to the magnet by way of the mechanical supports, the insulation and the current leads. The internally generated heat includes the resistive heating within the normally conducting conductor splices and the inductive heating of the bobbin during current transients. Though similar systems have been employed elsewhere, there are some unique aspects to the present design. By taking advantage of the large vertical head available, the parallel heat exchanger passes within the magnet remain sub-cooled, thus insuring single phase coolant within the magnet. It is believed that this will be the first instance of such a large vertical head being used to this advantage in a helium system.

  8. Temperature variation of the structure factor of liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isihara, A.

    1981-07-01

    The temperature variation of the structure factor S( q) of liquid helium follows S(q) = h̷2q 2{{1 + 2f(ɛ)}}/{2}mɛ , where f(ɛ) is the Bose distribution function of the quasiparticles of energy ɛ( q). For very low temperatures, the formula predicts that S( q) increases linearly with q starting from a constant, S(0) = {kT}/{mc 2}. This trend changes at temperatures higher than T I = {c h̷}/{k}√24δ 1, where δ 1 is the coefficient to q2 of the energy dispersion relation. Therefore, above around 2.78 K, a minimum of S( q) is expected. These theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the recent experimental data of Sears, Svensson, Woods and Martel based on neutron diffraction and of Hallock obtained by X-ray scattering.

  9. Interferometric measurements of silicon carbide mirrors at liquid helium temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robb, Paul N.; Huff, Lynn W.; Forney, Paul B.; Petrovsky, Gury T.; Ljubarsky, Sergey V.; Khimitch, Yuri P.

    1995-10-01

    This paper presents the results of interferometric tests of two silicon carbide mirrors tested at room temperature and 6 K. The first mirror has a spherical f/1.73 surface, a diameter of 170 mm, and is of solid, plano-concave construction. The other mirror, a plano measuring 308 mm by 210 mm, is of lightweighted, closed-back construction. The mirrors were manufactured by the Vavilov State Optical Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia, and were loaned to Lockheed for these tests. Optical tests on both mirrors were performed using the Lockheed cryogenic optical test facility at liquid helium temperature and a Zygo Mark II interferometer. There was no change in the surface figure of the mirrors, within the test uncertainty of approximately plus or minus 0.02 waves at 0.6328-micrometer wavelength.

  10. Thermal conductance of pressed contacts at liquid helium temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, L. J.; Kittel, P.; Spivak, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that the optimum design of cryogenic instruments requires accurate thermal models. The present models are limited by a lack of knowledge of the low temperature thermal conductance of the bolted joints which are typically used in the instrument-to-system interface. In connection with studies of pressed contacts, it has been found that the thermal conductance does not obey the Wiedemann-Franz law. The present investigation is concerned with the characterization of the thermal conductance of pressed contacts at liquid helium-4 temperatures, taking into account the dependence of thermal contact conductance on applied force and temperature. It is shown that for the 0.4 micron OFHC copper pressed contact pair, the thermal conductance varies roughly as the second power of the temperature, and increases with increasing applied force.

  11. Thermal conductance of pressed brass contacts at liquid helium temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, L. J.; Kittel, P.; Brooks, W. F.; Spivak, A. L.; Marks, W. G., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus has been designed and fabricated which will measure the thermal conductance of pressed contacts at liquid helium temperatures as a function of applied force, with surface finish as a parameter. The apparatus is automated and was used to measure thermal conductance at temperatures from 1.5 to 6.5 K at applied forces up to 700 N for brass sample pairs having surface finishes from 0.1 to 1.6 micron rms. The experimental data were found to fit a simple power law where the thermal conductance is given by k = alpha T exp n, where k is the thermal conductance, T is the absolute temperature, and alpha and n are empirically determined constants.

  12. Helium gas bubble trapped in liquid helium in high magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, H. Hannahs, S. T.; Markiewicz, W. D.; Weijers, H. W.

    2014-03-31

    High magnetic field magnets are used widely in the area of the condensed matter physics, material science, chemistry, geochemistry, and biology at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. New high field magnets of state-of-the-art are being pursued and developed at the lab, such as the current developing 32 T, 32 mm bore fully superconducting magnet. Liquid Helium (LHe) is used as the coolant for superconducting magnets or samples tested in a high magnetic field. When the magnetic field reaches a relatively high value the boil-off helium gas bubble generated by heat losses in the cryostat can be trapped in the LHe bath in the region where BzdBz/dz is less than negative 2100 T{sup 2}/m, instead of floating up to the top of LHe. Then the magnet or sample in the trapped bubble region may lose efficient cooling. In the development of the 32 T magnet, a prototype Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide coil of 6 double pancakes with an inner diameter of 40 mm and an outer diameter of 140 mm was fabricated and tested in a resistive magnet providing a background field of 15 T. The trapped gas bubble was observed in the tests when the prototype coil was ramped up to 7.5 T at a current of 200 A. This letter reports the test results on the trapped gas bubble and the comparison with the analytical results which shows they are in a good agreement.

  13. Second sound and the superfluid fraction in a Fermi gas with resonant interactions.

    PubMed

    Sidorenkov, Leonid A; Tey, Meng Khoon; Grimm, Rudolf; Hou, Yan-Hua; Pitaevskii, Lev; Stringari, Sandro

    2013-06-01

    Superfluidity is a macroscopic quantum phenomenon occurring in systems as diverse as liquid helium and neutron stars. It occurs below a critical temperature and leads to peculiar behaviour such as frictionless flow, the formation of quantized vortices and quenching of the moment of inertia. Ultracold atomic gases offer control of interactions and external confinement, providing unique opportunities to explore superfluid phenomena. Many such (finite-temperature) phenomena can be explained in terms of a two-fluid mixture comprising a normal component, which behaves like an ordinary fluid, and a superfluid component with zero viscosity and zero entropy. The two-component nature of a superfluid is manifest in 'second sound', an entropy wave in which the superfluid and the non-superfluid components oscillate with opposite phases (as opposed to ordinary 'first sound', where they oscillate in phase). Here we report the observation of second sound in an ultracold Fermi gas with resonant interactions. The speed of second sound depends explicitly on the value of the superfluid fraction, a quantity that is sensitive to the spectrum of elementary excitations. Our measurements allow us to extract the temperature dependence of the superfluid fraction, a previously inaccessible quantity that will provide a benchmark for theories of strongly interacting quantum gases. PMID:23676679

  14. Cryogenic design of the liquid helium experiment ``critical dynamics in microgravity``

    SciTech Connect

    Moeur, W.A.; Adriaans, M.J.; Boyd, S.T.; Strayer, D.M.; Duncan, R.V. |

    1995-10-01

    Although many well controlled experiments have been conducted to measure the static properties of systems near criticality, few experiments have explored the transport properties in systems driven far away from equilibrium as a phase transition occurs. The cryogenic design of an experiment to study the dynamic aspect of critical phenomena is reported here. Measurements of the thermal gradient across the superfluid (He II) -- normal fluid (He I) interface in helium under microgravity conditions will be performed as a heat flux holds the system away from equilibrium. New technologies are under development for this experiment, which is in the definition phase for a space shuttle flight.

  15. Design and Use of a Large-Scale Liquid Helium Conversion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudsen, P. N.

    1999-01-01

    A large-scale liquid helium (LHe) to high-pressure (HP) gas conversion system has been implemented at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Helium is used by the Space Shuttle, Titan, Atlas, and Delta programs for prelaunch processing, during launch count-down, and for postlaunch securing. The first phase of modifications to the Compressor Converter Facility (CCF), operational in April 1998, allowed the facility to accept bulk liquid helium from tanker containers and to off-load the helium at super-critical pressures. The second phase of modifications, planned to be operational by January 2001, will implement a 227-cubic-meter (m(sup 3)) on-site liquid helium storage system. This paper describes the design and operation of the current system and discusses the design and implementation for the second phase system.

  16. Design and Test of a Liquid Oxygen / Liquid Methane Thruster with Cold Helium Pressurization Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, John C.; Morehead, Robert L.; Atwell, Matthew J.; Hurlbert, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    A liquid oxygen / liquid methane 2,000 lbf thruster was designed and tested in conjuction with a nozzle heat exchanger for cold helium pressurization. Cold helium pressurization systems offer significant spacecraft vehicle dry mass savings since the pressurant tank size can be reduced as the pressurant density is increased. A heat exchanger can be incorporated into the main engine design to provide expansion of the pressurant supply to the propellant tanks. In order to study the systems integration of a cold-helium pressurization system, a 2,000 lbf thruster with a nozzle heat exchanger was designed for integration into the Project Morpheus vehicle at NASA Johnson Space Center. The testing goals were to demonstrate helium loading and initial conditioning to low temperatures, high-pressure/low temperature storage, expansion through the main engine heat exchanger, and propellant tank injection/pressurization. The helium pressurant tank was an existing 19 inch diameter composite-overwrap tank, and the targert conditions were 4500 psi and -250 F, providing a 2:1 density advantage compared to room tempatrue storage. The thruster design uses like-on-like doublets in the injector pattern largely based on Project Morpheus main engine hertiage data, and the combustion chamber was designed for an ablative chamber. The heat exchanger was installed at the ablative nozzle exit plane. Stand-alone engine testing was conducted at NASA Stennis Space Center, including copper heat-sink chambers and highly-instrumented spoolpieces in order to study engine performance, stability, and wall heat flux. A one-dimensional thermal model of the integrated system was completed. System integration into the Project Morpheus vehicle is complete, and systems demonstrations will follow.

  17. Observation of electron spin resonance of negative ions in liquid helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichert, J. F.; Dahm, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    Electron spin resonance signals of negative ions in liquid helium were observed. The line width and g-value were measured. Electrons injected into helium by field emission from ferromagnetic tips are shown to be polarized. A new technique for the measurement of electron spin polarization is presented.

  18. Novel cryogenic sources for liquid droplet and solid filament beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grams, Michael P.

    Two novel atomic and molecular beam sources have been created and tested consisting first of a superfluid helium liquid jet, and secondly a solid filament of argon. The superfluid helium apparatus is the second of its kind in the world and uses a modified liquid helium cryostat to inject a cylindrical stream of superfluid helium into vacuum through glass capillary nozzles with diameters on the order of one micron created on-site at Arizona State University. The superfluid beam is an entirely new way to study superfluid behavior, and has many new applications such as superfluid beam-surface scattering, beam-beam scattering, and boundary-free study of superfluidity. The solid beam of argon is another novel beam source created by flowing argon gas through a capillary 50 microns in diameter which is clamped by a small copper plate to a copper block kept at liquid nitrogen temperature. The gas subsequently cools and solidifies plugging the capillary. Upon heating, the solid plug melts and liquid argon exits the capillary and immediately freezes by evaporative cooling. The solid filaments may find application as wall-less cryogenic matrices, or targets for laser plasma sources of extreme UV and soft x-ray sources.

  19. Second sound shock waves and critical velocities in liquid helium 2. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. N.

    1979-01-01

    Large amplitude second-sound shock waves were generated and the experimental results compared to the theory of nonlinear second-sound. The structure and thickness of second-sound shock fronts are calculated and compared to experimental data. Theoretically it is shown that at T = 1.88 K, where the nonlinear wave steepening vanishes, the thickness of a very weak shock must diverge. In a region near this temperature, a finite-amplitude shock pulse evolves into an unusual double-shock configuration consisting of a front steepened, temperature raising shock followed by a temperature lowering shock. Double-shocks are experimentally verified. It is experimentally shown that very large second-sound shock waves initiate a breakdown in the superfluidity of helium 2, which is dramatically displayed as a limit to the maximum attainable shock strength. The value of the maximum shock-induced relative velocity represents a significant lower bound to the intrinsic critical velocity of helium 2.

  20. Note: Control of liquid helium supply to cryopanels of Kolkata superconducting cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, T. K. Pal, G.

    2015-02-15

    The Kolkata superconducting cyclotron utilises liquid helium to cool the main magnet niobium-titanium (NbTi) coil and the cryopanels. Three liquid helium cooled cryopanels, placed inside the dees of the radio-frequency system, maintain the high vacuum in the acceleration region of the superconducting cyclotron. The small cryostat placed inside the cryogenic distribution manifold located at the basement of the superconducting cyclotron building supplies liquid helium in parallel branches to three cold heads, used for cooling their associated cryopanels. The level in the cryostat has to be maintained at an optimum value to ensure uninterrupted flow of liquid helium to these three cold heads. This paper describes the transfer function of the overall system, its tuning parameters, and discusses the actual control of cryostat level by using these parameters.

  1. Note: control of liquid helium supply to cryopanels of Kolkata superconducting cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, T K; Pal, G

    2015-02-01

    The Kolkata superconducting cyclotron utilises liquid helium to cool the main magnet niobium-titanium (NbTi) coil and the cryopanels. Three liquid helium cooled cryopanels, placed inside the dees of the radio-frequency system, maintain the high vacuum in the acceleration region of the superconducting cyclotron. The small cryostat placed inside the cryogenic distribution manifold located at the basement of the superconducting cyclotron building supplies liquid helium in parallel branches to three cold heads, used for cooling their associated cryopanels. The level in the cryostat has to be maintained at an optimum value to ensure uninterrupted flow of liquid helium to these three cold heads. This paper describes the transfer function of the overall system, its tuning parameters, and discusses the actual control of cryostat level by using these parameters. PMID:25725894

  2. Note: control of liquid helium supply to cryopanels of Kolkata superconducting cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, T K; Pal, G

    2015-02-01

    The Kolkata superconducting cyclotron utilises liquid helium to cool the main magnet niobium-titanium (NbTi) coil and the cryopanels. Three liquid helium cooled cryopanels, placed inside the dees of the radio-frequency system, maintain the high vacuum in the acceleration region of the superconducting cyclotron. The small cryostat placed inside the cryogenic distribution manifold located at the basement of the superconducting cyclotron building supplies liquid helium in parallel branches to three cold heads, used for cooling their associated cryopanels. The level in the cryostat has to be maintained at an optimum value to ensure uninterrupted flow of liquid helium to these three cold heads. This paper describes the transfer function of the overall system, its tuning parameters, and discusses the actual control of cryostat level by using these parameters.

  3. Advances in Helium Cryogenics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciver, S. W. Van

    This review provides a survey of major advances that have occurred in recent years in the area of helium cryogenics. Helium-temperature cryogenics is the enabling technology for a substantial and growing number of low-temperature systems from superconducting magnets to space-based experimental facilities. In recent years there have been many advances in the technology of low-temperature helium, driven mostly by new applications. However, to keep the review from being too broad, this presentation focuses mainly on three of the most significant advances. These are: (1) the development of large-scale recuperative refrigeration systems mainly for superconducting magnet applications in accelerators and other research facilities; (2) the use of stored superfluid helium (He II) as a coolant for spacebased astrophysics experiments; and (3) the application of regenerative cryocoolers operating at liquid helium temperatures primarily for cooling superconducting devices. In each case, the reader should observe that critical technologies were developed to facilitate these applications. In addition to these three primary advances, other significant helium cryogenic technologies are briefly reviewed at the end of this chapter, along with some vision for future developments in these areas.

  4. Is solid helium a supersolid?

    SciTech Connect

    Hallock, Robert

    2015-05-15

    Recent experiments suggest that helium-4 atoms can flow through an experimental cell filled with solid helium. But that incompletely understood flow is quite different from the reported superfluid-like motion that so excited physicists a decade ago.

  5. Sub-micron solid air tracers for quantum vortices and liquid helium flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonda, Enrico; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.; Lathrop, Daniel P.

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of quantized vortices in superfluids has received increased attention recently because of novel techniques developed to visualize them directly. One of these techniques [G. P. Bewley et al., Nature 441, 588 (2006)] visualized quantized vortices and their reconnections in superfluid flows of 4He by using solid hydrogen tracers of micron-size or larger. The present work improves upon the previous technique by using substantially smaller particles created by injecting atmospheric air diluted in helium gas. These smaller particles are detectable thanks to the higher index of refraction of nitrogen compared to hydrogen and thanks to an improved visualization setup. The optical counting estimate, which agrees with terminal velocity estimates, suggests that the tracer diameter is typically 400 ± 200 nm and could be as small as 200 nm; being smaller, but not so small as to be influenced by thermal motion, the particles get trapped on the vortices faster, perturb the vortices less, possess smaller Stokes drag, and stay trapped on fast-moving vortices, as also on vortices generated closer to the superfluid transition temperature. Unlike the past, the ability to create particles in the superfluid state directly (instead of creating them above the λ-point and cooling the fluid subsequently), ensures greater temperature stability for longer periods, and enables the tracking of long and isolated vortices. These advantages have also led to the direct visualization of Kelvin waves. The use of other seed gases could lead to the visualization of even smaller tracers for quantized vortices. We discuss the visualization setup and provide suggestions for further improvement.

  6. Probing quantum and classical turbulence analogy in von Kármán liquid helium, nitrogen, and water experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Saint-Michel, B.; Herbert, E.; Salort, J.; Castaing, B.; Chevillard, L.; Daviaud, F.; Dubrulle, B.; Lehner, Th.

    2014-12-15

    We report measurements of the dissipation in the Superfluid helium high REynold number von Kármán flow experiment for different forcing conditions. Statistically steady flows are reached; they display a hysteretic behavior similar to what has been observed in a 1:4 scale water experiment. Our macroscopical measurements indicate no noticeable difference between classical and superfluid flows, thereby providing evidence of the same dissipation scaling laws in the two phases. A detailed study of the evolution of the hysteresis cycle with the Reynolds number supports the idea that the stability of the steady states of classical turbulence in this closed flow is partly governed by the dissipative scales. It also supports the idea that the normal and the superfluid components at these temperatures (1.6 K) are locked down to the dissipative length scale.

  7. Thermal conductivity and Kapitza resistance of cyanate ester epoxy mix and tri-functional epoxy electrical insulations at superfluid helium temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrowicz, S.; Four, A.; Jones, S.; Canfer, S.; Baudouy, B.

    2012-02-01

    In the framework of the European Union FP7 project EuCARD, two composite insulation systems made of cyanate ester epoxy mix and tri-functional epoxy (TGPAP-DETDA) with S-glass fiber have been thermally tested as possible candidates to be the electrical insulation of 13 T Nb3Sn high field magnets under development for this program. Since it is expected to be operated in pressurized superfluid helium at 1.9 K and 1 atm, the thermal conductivity and the Kapitza resistance are the most important input parameters for the thermal design of this type of magnet and have been determined in this study. For determining these thermal properties, three sheets of each material with different thicknesses varying from 245 to 598 μm have been tested in steady-state condition in the temperature range of 1.6-2.0 K. The thermal conductivity for the tri-functional epoxy (TGPAP-DETDA) epoxy resin insulation is found to be k = [(34.2 ± 5.5)ṡT - (16.4 ± 8.2)] × 10-3 Wm-1 K-1 and for the cyanate ester epoxy k = [(26.8 ± 4.8)ṡT - (9.6 ± 5.2)] × 10-3 Wm-1 K-1. For the Kapitza resistance, Rk, the best curve fitting the experimental data is described by Rk = (3057 ± 593) × 10-6ṡT (-1.79 ± 0.34) m2 KW-1 for the TGPAP-DETDA insulation and Rk = (4114 ± 971) × 10-6ṡT (-1.73 ± 0.41) m2 KW-1 for the cyanate ester epoxy insulation. Our results are compared with other epoxy based composite electrical insulation found in the literature.

  8. Developmental competence and gene expression of immature oocytes following liquid helium vitrification in bovine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-Yi; Li, Xiao-Xia; Xu, Ya-Kun; Wu, Hua; Zheng, Jun-Jun; Yu, Xue-Li

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an effective ultra-rapid vitrification method and evaluate its effect on maturation, developmental competence and development-related gene expression in bovine immature oocytes. Bovine cumulus oocyte complexes were randomly allocated into three groups: (1) controls, (2) liquid nitrogen vitrification, and (3) liquid helium vitrification. Oocytes were vitrified and then warmed, the percentage of morphologically normal oocytes in liquid helium group (89.0%) was significantly higher (P<0.05) than that of the liquid nitrogen group (81.1%). When the vitrified-thawed oocytes were matured in vitro for 24h, the maturation rate in liquid helium group (50.6%) was higher (P<0.05) than liquid nitrogen group (42.6%). Oocytes of liquid helium vitrification had higher cleavage and blastocyst rates (41.1% and 10.0%) than that of liquid nitrogen vitrification (33.0% and 4.5%; P<0.05) after in vitro fertilization. Moreover, the expression of GDF9 (growth/differentiation factor-9), BAX (apoptosis factor) and ZAR1 (zygote arrest 1) was analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) when the vitrified-thawed oocytes were matured 24h. The expression of these genes was altered after vitrification. Expression of GDF9 and BAX in the liquid helium vitrification group was not significantly different from that of the control, however there were significant differences between the liquid nitrogen vitrification group and control. In conclusion, it was feasible to use liquid helium for vitrifying bovine immature oocytes. There existed an association between the compromised developmental competence and the altered expression levels of these genes for the vitrified oocytes.

  9. Buoyancy-Driven Natural Convection of Liquid Helium in an Electron Bubble Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Y. L.; Dodd, J. R.; Willis, W. J.

    2006-04-27

    A small liquid helium test chamber with 1.5 L active volume has been designed and constructed, to make the fundamental measurements of physical properties of electron bubble transports in liquid helium, aimed at developing a new cryogenic neutrino detector, using liquid helium as the detecting medium, for the detection of solar neutrinos. The test chamber is a double-walled cylindrical container equipped with five optical windows and ten high voltage cables. A LN2/LHe cryostat and a needle valve for vapor helium cooling are used to provide a 1.7{approx}4.5 K low temperature environments for the test chamber. One of key issues for the cryogenic design and experimental sensitivity of electron bubble tracking is that of keeping a thermally uniform liquid helium bath. The external heat loads to the chamber will generate a buoyancy-induced convection of liquid helium, which will carry the electron bubbles and accelerate or decelerate their transportation and therefore must be reduced to the minimum, so that the slow motion of the electron bubbles will not be confused by this effect. This paper will present the computational simulation and analysis on thermal convection and uniformity of the test chamber.

  10. Direct observation of the superfluid phase transition in ultracold Fermi gases.

    PubMed

    Zwierlein, Martin W; Schunck, Christian H; Schirotzek, André; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2006-07-01

    Phase transitions are dramatic phenomena: water freezes into ice, atomic spins spontaneously align in a magnet, and liquid helium becomes superfluid. Sometimes, such a drastic change in behaviour is accompanied by a visible change in appearance. The hallmark of Bose-Einstein condensation and superfluidity in trapped, weakly interacting Bose gases is the sudden formation of a dense central core inside a thermal cloud. However, in strongly interacting gases--such as the recently observed fermionic superfluids--there is no longer a clear separation between the superfluid and the normal parts of the cloud. The detection of fermion pair condensates has required magnetic field sweeps into the weakly interacting regime, and the quantitative description of these sweeps presents a major theoretical challenge. Here we report the direct observation of the superfluid phase transition in a strongly interacting gas of 6Li fermions, through sudden changes in the shape of the clouds--in complete analogy to the case of weakly interacting Bose gases. By preparing unequal mixtures of the two spin components involved in the pairing, we greatly enhance the contrast between the superfluid core and the normal component. Furthermore, the distribution of non-interacting excess atoms serves as a direct and reliable thermometer. Even in the normal state, strong interactions significantly deform the density profile of the majority spin component. We show that it is these interactions that drive the normal-to-superfluid transition at the critical population imbalance of 70 +/- 5 per cent (ref. 12).

  11. Berkeley Experiments on Superfluid Macroscopic Quantum Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Packard, Richard

    2006-09-07

    This paper provides a brief history of the evolution of the Berkeley experiments on macroscopic quantum effects in superfluid helium. The narrative follows the evolution of the experiments proceeding from the detection of single vortex lines to vortex photography to quantized circulation in 3He to Josephson effects and superfluid gyroscopes in both 4He and 3He.

  12. Investigation of helium injection cooling to liquid oxygen under pressurized condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Namkyung; Kwon, Ohsung; Kim, Youngmog; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2006-11-01

    Sub-cooling of cryogenic propellant by helium injection is one of the most effective methods for suppressing bulk boiling and keeping sub-cooled liquid oxygen before rocket launch. Compared with the helium injection cooling under atmospheric condition, helium injection cooling under pressurized condition has advantage that it can greatly reduce re-warming time of the sub-cooled liquid oxygen. Helium injection cooling under pressurized condition is characterized by cooling of initially sub-cooled cryogenic liquid, which is significantly different from that of the atmospheric condition where liquid oxygen usually exists at saturated condition. In this paper, we discuss the characteristics of helium injection cooling under pressurized condition, with the associated physical understanding of the process. Experimental results are presented along the simulations of variously combined system parameters based on the finite heat transfer and instantaneous diffusion mass transfer model. A non-dimensional parameter for identifying the cooling regime is conceived. The critical values of the non-dimensional parameters and injected helium temperatures are also estimated.

  13. Cryogenic Design and Operation of Liquid Helium in Electron Bubble Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Y. L.; Dodd, J. R.; Willis, W. J.; Jia, L. X.

    2006-04-27

    We are developing a new cryogenic neutrino detector: electron bubble chamber, using liquid helium as the detecting medium, for the detection of low-energy neutrinos (<1 MeV), from the Sun. The program focuses in particular on the interactions of neutrinos scattering off atomic electrons in the detecting medium of liquid helium, resulting in recoil electrons which can be measured. We designed and constructed a small test chamber with 1.5L active volume to start the detector R and D, and performed experimental proofs of the operation principle. The test chamber is a stainless steel cylinder equipped with five optical windows and ten high voltage cables. To shield the liquid helium chamber against the external heat loads, the chamber is made of double-walled jacket cooled by a pumped helium bath and is built into a LN2/LHe cryostat, equipped with 80 K and 4 K radiation shields. A needle valve for vapor helium cooling was used to provide a 1.7{approx}4.5 K low temperature environments. The paper gives an introduction to the liquid helium solar neutrino detector, presents the cryogenic design and operation of the small test chamber.

  14. Thermal Conductivity of Liquid He-4 near the Superfluid Transition in Restricted Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuanming

    2003-01-01

    We present measurements of the thermal conductivity near the superfluid transition of He-4 in confined geometries. The confinements we have studied include: cylindrical geometries with radii L=.5 and 1.0 microns, and parallel plates with 5 micron spacing. For L=1.0 microns, measurements at six pressures were conducted, whereas only SVP measurements have been done for other geometries. For the 1-D confinement in cylinders, the data are consistent with a universal scaling for all pressures at and above T(sub lambda). There are indications of breakdown of scaling and universality below T(sub lambda). For the 2-D confinement between parallel plates, the preliminary results indicate that the thermal conductivity is finite at the bulk superfluid transition temperature. Further analyses are needed to compare the 2-D results with those in bulk and 1-D confinement.

  15. Helium Refrigerator Liquid Nitrogen Pre-Cooler Component Parameter Sensitivity Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Knudsen, Venkatarao Ganni

    2010-04-01

    For helium refrigerators using liquid nitrogen (LN) pre-cooling it is not uncommon for the ambient helium refrigeration return stream(s) exiting the cold box to be significantly colder and for the cycle to use more nitrogen than estimated by the process studies. Often there is an emphasis on the length of 300 to 80-K helium-nitrogen heat exchangers to ensure the exiting nitrogen is as close to ambient as possible. However, it is really the size and flow distribution of the 300 to 80-K helium-helium heat exchangers which are the dominate influence of the nitrogen consumption. As such, an analysis was done to identify and quantify the sensitivity the key parameters in the refrigerator LN pre-cooler section affecting the LN consumption.

  16. Design of a horizonal liquid helium cryostat for refrigerating a flying superconducting magnet in a wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Y. Y.

    1982-01-01

    The design of a horizontal liquid helium cryostat for refrigerating a flying superconducting magnet in a wind tunnel is presented. The basic principles of magnetic suspension theory are described and theoretical calculations of the superconducting magnet are provided. The experimental results of the boil-off of liquid nitrogen and liquid helium in the cryostat are reported.

  17. Liquid helium-free cryostat and hermetically sealed cryogenic microwave cavity for hyperfine spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium.

    PubMed

    Massiczek, O; Friedreich, S; Juhász, B; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2011-12-11

    The design and properties of a new cryogenic set-up for laser-microwave-laser hyperfine structure spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium - an experiment performed at the CERN-Antiproton Decelerator (AD), Geneva, Switzerland - are described. Similar experiments for (4)He have been performed at the AD for several years. Due to the usage of a liquid helium operated cryostat and therefore necessary refilling of coolants, a loss of up to 10% beamtime occurred. The decision was made to change the cooling system to a closed-circuit cryocooler. New hermetically sealed target cells with minimised (3)He gas volume and different dimensions of the microwave resonator for measuring the (3)He transitions were needed. A new set-up has been designed and tested at Stefan Meyer Institute in Vienna before being used for the 2009 and 2010 beamtimes at the AD. PMID:22267883

  18. Liquid helium-free cryostat and hermetically sealed cryogenic microwave cavity for hyperfine spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium.

    PubMed

    Massiczek, O; Friedreich, S; Juhász, B; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2011-12-11

    The design and properties of a new cryogenic set-up for laser-microwave-laser hyperfine structure spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium - an experiment performed at the CERN-Antiproton Decelerator (AD), Geneva, Switzerland - are described. Similar experiments for (4)He have been performed at the AD for several years. Due to the usage of a liquid helium operated cryostat and therefore necessary refilling of coolants, a loss of up to 10% beamtime occurred. The decision was made to change the cooling system to a closed-circuit cryocooler. New hermetically sealed target cells with minimised (3)He gas volume and different dimensions of the microwave resonator for measuring the (3)He transitions were needed. A new set-up has been designed and tested at Stefan Meyer Institute in Vienna before being used for the 2009 and 2010 beamtimes at the AD.

  19. Liquid helium-free cryostat and hermetically sealed cryogenic microwave cavity for hyperfine spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium

    PubMed Central

    Massiczek, O.; Friedreich, S.; Juhász, B.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.

    2011-01-01

    The design and properties of a new cryogenic set-up for laser–microwave–laser hyperfine structure spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium – an experiment performed at the CERN-Antiproton Decelerator (AD), Geneva, Switzerland – are described. Similar experiments for 4He have been performed at the AD for several years. Due to the usage of a liquid helium operated cryostat and therefore necessary refilling of coolants, a loss of up to 10% beamtime occurred. The decision was made to change the cooling system to a closed-circuit cryocooler. New hermetically sealed target cells with minimised 3He gas volume and different dimensions of the microwave resonator for measuring the 3He transitions were needed. A new set-up has been designed and tested at Stefan Meyer Institute in Vienna before being used for the 2009 and 2010 beamtimes at the AD. PMID:22267883

  20. Recondensation performance of liquid helium cryostat for a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seyong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Park, Jin Yong; Ok, Jung-Woo; Shin, Chang Seouk; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Won, Mi-Sook; Kim, Byoung-Chul

    2014-02-01

    Cryostat performance is essential for the stable operation of a superconducting magnet. A closed-cycle liquid helium cryostat was adopted for use for a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source by recondensing liquid helium vapor. The goal was to maintain the liquid helium filled reservoir at a constant level without transferring any liquid helium during the normal operation of the ECR ion source. To accomplish this, Gifford-McMahon (GM) refrigerators, which have two cold heads, were installed on the top of the cryostat. The cooling power of the GM cryocooler is 1.5 W at the second stage and 50 W at the first stage. Each stage was connected to the liquid helium reservoir, a radiation shield including high-Tc current lead, and related items. Before commissioning the ECR ion source, a preliminary evaluation of the recondensation performance was carried out with the magnet in partial operation. The design of the cryostat, its fabrication, and the experimental results are reported.

  1. Recondensation performance of liquid helium cryostat for a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seyong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Park, Jin Yong; Ok, Jung-Woo; Shin, Chang Seouk; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Won, Mi-Sook; Kim, Byoung-Chul

    2014-02-01

    Cryostat performance is essential for the stable operation of a superconducting magnet. A closed-cycle liquid helium cryostat was adopted for use for a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source by recondensing liquid helium vapor. The goal was to maintain the liquid helium filled reservoir at a constant level without transferring any liquid helium during the normal operation of the ECR ion source. To accomplish this, Gifford-McMahon (GM) refrigerators, which have two cold heads, were installed on the top of the cryostat. The cooling power of the GM cryocooler is 1.5 W at the second stage and 50 W at the first stage. Each stage was connected to the liquid helium reservoir, a radiation shield including high-Tc current lead, and related items. Before commissioning the ECR ion source, a preliminary evaluation of the recondensation performance was carried out with the magnet in partial operation. The design of the cryostat, its fabrication, and the experimental results are reported.

  2. Operating experience using venturi flow meters at liquid helium temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, K.C.

    1992-01-01

    Experiences using commercial venturi to measure single phase helium flow near 4 K (degree Kelvin) for cooling superconducting magnets have been presented. The mass flow rate was calculated from the differential pressure and the helium density evaluated from measured pressure and temperature. The venturi flow meter, with a full range of 290 g/s (0.29 Kg/s) at design conditions, has been found to be reliable and accurate. The flow measurements have been used, with great success, for evaluating the performance of a cold centrifugal compressor, the thermal acoustic heat load of a cryogenic system and the cooling of a superconducting magnet after quench.

  3. Operating experience using venturi flow meters at liquid helium temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, K.C.

    1992-06-01

    Experiences using commercial venturi to measure single phase helium flow near 4 K (degree Kelvin) for cooling superconducting magnets have been presented. The mass flow rate was calculated from the differential pressure and the helium density evaluated from measured pressure and temperature. The venturi flow meter, with a full range of 290 g/s (0.29 Kg/s) at design conditions, has been found to be reliable and accurate. The flow measurements have been used, with great success, for evaluating the performance of a cold centrifugal compressor, the thermal acoustic heat load of a cryogenic system and the cooling of a superconducting magnet after quench.

  4. Optomechanics with superfluid He4 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Christopher; Harris, Glen; McAuslan, David; Sachkou, Yauhen; He, Xin; Sheridan, Eoin; Bowen, Warwick

    Cavity optomechanics focuses on the interaction between confined light and a mechanical degree of freedom. Vibrational modes of superfluid helium-4 have recently been identified as an attractive mechanical element for cavity optomechanics, thanks to their ultra-low dissipation arising from superfluid's viscosity free flow. Here we propose and demonstrate an approach to superfluid optomechanics based on femtogram thin films of superfluid helium condensed on the surface of a microscale microtoroid optical whispering gallery mode resonator. Excitations within the film, known as third sound, manifest as surface waves with a restoring force provided by the van der Waals interaction. We experimentally probe the thermodynamics of these superfluid excitations in real-time, and demonstrate both laser cooling and amplification of the thermal motion. In addition, we propose and demonstrate an entirely new approach to optical forcing based on the atomic recoil of superfluid helium-4. This technique utilizes the thermomechanical effect of superfluids, whereby frictionless fluid flow is generated in response to a local heat source. Using this technique, we achieve superfluid forces on a microtoroid mechanical mode an order of magnitude greater than the equivalent radiation pressure force.

  5. Depression of the Superfluid Transition Temperature in 4He by a Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Liang; Lin, Peng; Qi, Xin

    2014-11-01

    The depression of the superfluid transition temperature Tλ in 4He by a heat flow Q is studied. A small sealed cell with a capillary is introduced and a stable and flat superfluid transition temperature plateau is easily obtained by controlling the temperature of the variable-temperature platform and the bottom chamber of the sealed cell. Owing to the depression effect of the superfluid transition temperature by the heat flow, the heat flow through the capillary is changed by the temperature control to obtain multiple temperature plateaus of different heat flows. The thermometer self-heating effect, the residual heat leak of the 4.2 K environment, the temperature difference on the He II liquid column, the Kapiza thermal resistance between the liquid helium and the copper surface of the sealed cell, the temperature gradient of the sealed cell, the static pressure of the He II liquid column and other factors have influence on the depression effect and the influence is analyzed in detail. Twenty experiments of the depression of the superfluid transition temperature in 4He by heat flow are made with four sealed cells in one year. The formula of the superfluid transition temperature pressured by the heat flow is Tλ (Q) = -0.00000103Q + 2.1769108, and covers the range 229 <= Q <= 6462 μW/cm2.

  6. Helium tube separates nitrogen gas from liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.

    1964-01-01

    To prevent a boiloff problem, liquid nitrogen flowing from a storage tank to a container, is separated into liquid and gaseous components. This is accomplished by centrifugal and venting action, using a section of perforated helical aluminum tubing.

  7. Cold Helium Pressurization for Liquid Oxygen / Liquid Methane Propulsion Systems: Fully-Integrated Initial Hot-Fire Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morehead, R. L.; Atwell, M. J.; Melcher, J. C.; Hurlbert, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    A prototype cold helium active pressurization system was incorporated into an existing liquid oxygen (LOX) / liquid methane (LCH4) prototype planetary lander and hot-fire tested to collect vehicle-level performance data. Results from this hot-fire test series were used to validate integrated models of the vehicle helium and propulsion systems and demonstrate system effectiveness for a throttling lander. Pressurization systems vary greatly in complexity and efficiency between vehicles, so a pressurization performance metric was also developed as a means to compare different active pressurization schemes. This implementation of an active repress system is an initial sizing draft. Refined implementations will be tested in the future, improving the general knowledge base for a cryogenic lander-based cold helium system.

  8. On the mode-coupling treatment of collective density fluctuations for quantum liquids: para-hydrogen and normal liquid helium.

    PubMed

    Kletenik-Edelman, Orly; Reichman, David R; Rabani, Eran

    2011-01-28

    A novel quantum mode coupling theory combined with a kinetic approach is developed for the description of collective density fluctuations in quantum liquids characterized by Boltzmann statistics. Three mode-coupling approximations are presented and applied to study the dynamic response of para-hydrogen near the triple point and normal liquid helium above the λ-transition. The theory is compared with experimental results and to the exact imaginary time data generated by path integral Monte Carlo simulations. While for liquid para-hydrogen the combination of kinetic and quantum mode-coupling theory provides semi-quantitative results for both short and long time dynamics, it fails for normal liquid helium. A discussion of this failure based on the ideal gas limit is presented. PMID:21280769

  9. On the mode-coupling treatment of collective density fluctuations for quantum liquids: para-hydrogen and normal liquid helium.

    PubMed

    Kletenik-Edelman, Orly; Reichman, David R; Rabani, Eran

    2011-01-28

    A novel quantum mode coupling theory combined with a kinetic approach is developed for the description of collective density fluctuations in quantum liquids characterized by Boltzmann statistics. Three mode-coupling approximations are presented and applied to study the dynamic response of para-hydrogen near the triple point and normal liquid helium above the λ-transition. The theory is compared with experimental results and to the exact imaginary time data generated by path integral Monte Carlo simulations. While for liquid para-hydrogen the combination of kinetic and quantum mode-coupling theory provides semi-quantitative results for both short and long time dynamics, it fails for normal liquid helium. A discussion of this failure based on the ideal gas limit is presented.

  10. 147. EAST END OF LIQUID NITROGEN/HELIUM HEAT EXCHANGER IN FUEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    147. EAST END OF LIQUID NITROGEN/HELIUM HEAT EXCHANGER IN FUEL CONTROL ROOM (215), LSB (BLDG. 751), WITH ASSOCIATED PIPING AND VALVES - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  11. 145. VIEW OF LIQUID NITROGEN/HELIUM HEAT EXCHANGER IN FUEL CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    145. VIEW OF LIQUID NITROGEN/HELIUM HEAT EXCHANGER IN FUEL CONTROL ROOM (215), LSB (BLDG. 751), FROM FUEL APRON WITH BAY DOOR OPEN - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  12. Density domains of a photo-excited electron gas on liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monarkha, Yu. P.

    2016-06-01

    The Coulombic effect on the stability range of the photo-excited electron gas on liquid helium is shown to favor formation of domains of different densities. Domains appear to eliminate or greatly reduce regions with negative conductivity. An analysis of the density domain structure allows explaining remarkable observations reported recently for the photo-excited electron gas.

  13. Low frequency anomalies of the effective mass of charged clusters in liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikin, V.

    2013-10-01

    The dynamic behavior of charged clusters in liquid helium is discussed in detail. The matter is their added mass which has ideal, Msass, and normal, Mnass, components. The normal component has a number of interesting features of viscous origin. Some of them were found in recent experiments.

  14. A Superfluid Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin

    2004-01-01

    The performance of clocks is limited by the characteristics of the underlying oscillator. Both the quality factor of the oscillator and the signal-to-noise ratio for the resonator state measurement are important. A superfluid helium Helmholtz resonator operating at approx.100mK temperatures has the potential of maintaining frequency stability of 5x10(exp -15)/t(exp 1/2) on the time scale of a few months. The high dynamic range of lossless SQUID position displacement measurement, and low losses associated with the superfluid flow, combined with high mechanical stability of cryogenic assemblies, contribute to the projected stability. Low overall mass of the assembly allows for multiple stages of vibration isolation.

  15. Modeling the pressure increase in liquid helium cryostats after failure of the insulating vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Heidt, C.; Grohmann, S.; Süßer, M.

    2014-01-29

    The pressure relief system of liquid helium cryostats requires a careful design, due to helium's low enthalpy of vaporization and due to the low operating temperature. Hazard analyses often involve the failure of the insulating vacuum in the worst-case scenario. The venting of the insulating vacuum and the implications for the pressure increase in the helium vessel, however, have not yet been fully analyzed. Therefore, the dimensioning of safety devices often requires experience and reference to very few experimental data. In order to provide a better foundation for the design of cryogenic pressure relief systems, this paper presents an analytic approach for the strongly dynamic process induced by the loss of insulating vacuum. The model is based on theoretical considerations and on differential equation modeling. It contains only few simplifying assumptions, which will be further investigated in future experiments. The numerical solutions of example calculations are presented with regard to the heat flux into the helium vessel, the helium pressure increase and the helium flow rate through the pressure relief device. Implications concerning two-phase flow and the influence of kinetic energy are discussed.

  16. Single-File Transport of Classical Electrons on the Surface of Liquid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, David G.; Kono, Kimitoshi

    2014-07-01

    Electrons trapped on the surface of liquid helium form a model two-dimensional system. Because the electron density is low ( 109 cm-2) and the Coulomb interaction between the electrons is essentially unscreened, the system can be regarded as a classical analogue of the degenerate Fermi gas. Electrons on helium have therefore long been used to study many-body transport phenomena in two dimensions. Here we review recent experiments investigating the transport of electrons on helium through microscopic constrictions formed in microchannel devices. Two constriction geometries are studied; short saddle-point constrictions and long constrictions in which the length greatly exceeds the width. In both cases, the constriction width can be tuned electrostatically so that the electrons move in single file. As the width of the short constriction is increased, a periodic suppression of the electron current is observed due to pinning for commensurate states of the electron lattice. A related phenomenon is observed for the long constriction whereby the quasi-one-dimensional Wigner lattice exhibits reentrant melting as the number of electron chains increases. Our results demonstrate that electrons on helium are an ideal system in which to study many-body transport in the limit of single-file motion. Special Issue Comments: This article presents experimental results on the dynamics of classical electrons moving on the surface of liquid helium in narrow channels with constrictions, with a focus on the "quantum wire", i.e. single file, regime. This article is related to the Special Issue articles about advanced statistical properties in single file dynamics34 and the mathematical results on electron dynamics in liquid helium.35

  17. The nature of superfluidity and Bose-Einstein condensation: From liquid 4He to dilute ultracold atomic gases (Review Article)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilchynskyy, S. I.; Yakimenko, A. I.; Isaieva, K. O.; Chumachenko, A. V.

    2013-09-01

    We present a brief overview of crucial historical stages in creation of superfluidity theory and of the current state of the microscopic theory of superfluid 4He. We pay special attention to the role of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) in understanding of physical mechanisms of superfluidity and identification of quantum mechanical structure of 4He superfluid component below λ-point, in particular—the possibility that at least two types of condensates may appear and coexist simultaneously in superfluid 4He. In this context we discuss the properties of the binary mixtures of BECs and types of excitations, which may appear due to intercomponent interaction in such binary mixtures of condensates. We also discuss current status of investigations of persistent currents in toroidal optical traps and present an outlook of our recent findings on this subject.

  18. Calibrating the Helium Pressurization System for the Space Shuttle Liquid-Hydrogen Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the results from the STS-114 tanking tests and subsequent launch called into question existing thermal and mass models of helium pressurization of the liquid hydrogen tank. This hydrogen tank, which makes up the bottom two-thirds of the External Tank, is pressurized prior to launch to avoid cavitation in the Shuttle Main Engine pumps. At about 2 minutes prior to launch, the main vent valve is closed, and pressurized helium flows into the tank ullage space to achieve set point pressure. As the helium gas cools, its pressure drops, calling for additional helium. Subsequent helium flows are provided in short, timed pulses. The number of pulses is taken as a rough leak indicator. An analysis of thermal models by Marshall Space Flight Center showed considerable uncertainty in the pressure-versus-time behavior of the helium ullage space and the ability to predict the number of pulses normally expected. Kennedy Space Center proposed to calibrate the dime-sized orifice, which together with valves, controls the helium flow quantity (Figure 1). Pressure and temperature sensors were installed to provide upstream and downstream measurements necessary to compute flow rate based on the orifice discharge coefficient. An assessment of flow testing with helium indicated an extremely costly use of this critical resource. In order to reduce costs, we proposed removing the orifices from each Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) and asking Colorado Engineering Experiment Station Inc. (CEESI) to calibrate the flow. CEESI has a high-pressure air flow system with traceable flow meters capable of handling the large flow rates. However, literature research indicated that square-edged orifices of small diameters often exhibit significant hysteresis and nonrepeatability in the vicinity of choked or sonic flow. Fortunately, the MLP orifices behaved relatively well in testing (Figure 2). Using curve fitting of the air-flow data, in conjunction with ASME orifice modeling equations, a

  19. Cantilever anemometer based on a superconducting micro-resonator: Application to superfluid turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Salort, J.; Monfardini, A.; Roche, P.-E.

    2012-12-15

    We present a new type of cryogenic local velocity probe that operates in liquid helium (1 K < T < 4.2 K) and achieves a spatial resolution of Almost-Equal-To 0.1 mm. The operating principle is based on the deflection of a micro-machined silicon cantilever which reflects the local fluid velocity. Deflection is probed using a superconducting niobium micro-resonator sputtered on the sensor and used as a strain gauge. We present the working principle and the design of the probe, as well as calibration measurements and velocity spectra obtained in a turbulent helium flow above and below the superfluid transition.

  20. Effects of liquid helium bubble formation in a superconducting cavity cryogenic system

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, X.; Wang, E.; Xin, T.

    2011-03-01

    We constructed a simple prototype model based on the geometry of the 56 MHz superconducting cavity for RHIC. We studied the formation, in this prototype, of bubbles of liquid helium and their thermal effects on the cavity. We found that due to the low viscosity of the liquid helium, and its small surface tension, no large bubbles formed. The tiny bubbles, generated from most of the area, behaved like light gas travelling in a free space and escaped from the trapping region. The bubbles that were generated in the trapping area, due to its descending geometry, are much bigger than the other bubbles, but due to the liquid flow generated by heating, they still are negligible compared to the size of the trapping region. We expected that the effects of bubbles in our 56 MHz cavity during operation might well be negligible.

  1. Paramagnetic Attraction of Impurity-Helium Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, E. P.; Boltnev, R. E.; Khmelenko, V. V.; Lee, D. M.

    2003-01-01

    Impurity-helium solids are formed when a mixture of impurity and helium gases enters a volume of superfluid helium. Typical choices of impurity gas are hydrogen deuteride, deuterium, nitrogen, neon and argon, or a mixture of these. These solids consist of individual impurity atoms and molecules as well as clusters of impurity atoms and molecules covered with layers of solidified helium. The clusters have an imperfect crystalline structure and diameters ranging up to 90 angstroms, depending somewhat on the choice of impurity. Immediately following formation the clusters aggregate into loosely connected porous solids that are submerged in and completely permeated by the liquid helium. Im-He solids are extremely effective at stabilizing high concentrations of free radicals, which can be introduced by applying a high power RF dis- charge to the impurity gas mixture just before it strikes the super fluid helium. Average concentrations of 10(exp 19) nitrogen atoms/cc and 5 x 10(exp 18) deuterium atoms/cc can be achieved this way. It shows a typical sample formed from a mixture of atomic and molecular hydrogen and deuterium. It shows typical sample formed from atomic and molecular nitrogen. Much of the stability of Im-He solids is attributed to their very large surface area to volume ratio and their permeation by super fluid helium. Heat resulting from a chance meeting and recombination of free radicals is quickly dissipated by the super fluid helium instead of thermally promoting the diffusion of other nearby free radicals.

  2. A transition-edge-sensor-based instrument for the measurement of individual He2* excimers in a superfluid 4He bath at 100 mK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Faustin Wirkus

    This dissertation is an account of the first calorimetric detection of individual He*2 excimers within a bath of superfluid 4He. When superfluid helium is subject to ionizing radiation, diatomic He molecules are created in both the singlet and triplet states. The singlet He molecules decay within nanoseconds, but due to a forbidden spin-flip the triplet molecules have a relatively long lifetime of 13 seconds in superfluid He. When He* 2 molecules decay, they emit a ~15 eV photon. Nearly all matter is opaque to these vacuum-UV photons, although they do propagate through liquid helium. The triplet state excimers propagate ballistically through the superfluid until they quench upon a surface; this process deposits a large amount of energy into the surface. The prospect of detecting both excimer states is the motivation for building a detector immersed directly in the superfluid bath. The detector used in this work is a single superconducting titanium transition edge sensor (TES). The TES is mounted inside a hermetically sealed chamber at the baseplate of a dilution refrigerator. The chamber contains superfluid helium at 100 mK. Excimers are created during the relaxation of high-energy electrons, which are introduced into the superfluid bath either in situ via a sharp tungsten tip held above the field-emission voltage, or by using an external gamma-ray source to ionize He atoms. These excimers either propagate through the LHe bath and quench on a surface, or decay and emit vacuum-ultraviolet photons that can be collected by the detector. This dissertation discusses the design, construction, and calibration of the TES-based excimer detecting instrument. It also presents the first spectra resulting from the direct detection of individual singlet and triplet helium excimers.

  3. Study of helium transfer technology for STICCR: Fluid management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, D. J.; Yuan, S. W. K.; Grove, R. K.; Lheureux, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) is a long life cryogenically cooled space based telescope for infrared astronomy from 2 to 700 microns currently under study and planned for launch in the mid 90's. SIRTF will operate as a multi-user facility, initially carrying 3 instruments at the focal plane. It will be cooled to below 2 K by superfluid liquid helium to achieve radiometric sensitivity limited only by the statistical fluctuations in the natural infrared background radiation over most of its spectral range. The lifetime of the mission will be limited by the lifetime of the liquid helium supply, and is currently baselined to be 2 years. Candidates are reviewed for a liquid management device to be used in the resupply of liquid helium, and for the selection of an appropriate candidate.

  4. Design and development of a helium injection system to improve external leakage detection during liquid nitrogen immersion tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Andrew; Mishra, Rakesh

    2016-10-01

    The testing of assemblies for use in cryogenic systems commonly includes evaluation at or near operating (therefore cryogenic) temperature. Typical assemblies include valves and pumps for use in liquid oxygen-liquid hydrogen rocket engines. One frequently specified method of cryogenic external leakage testing requires the assembly, pressurized with gaseous helium (GHe), be immersed in a bath of liquid nitrogen (LN2) and allowed to thermally stabilize. Component interfaces are then visually inspected for leakage (bubbles). Unfortunately the liquid nitrogen will be boiling under normal, bench-top, test conditions. This boiling tends to mask even significant leakage. One little known and perhaps under-utilized property of helium is the seemingly counter-intuitive thermodynamic property that when ambient temperature helium is bubbled through boiling LN2 at a temperature of -195.8 °C, the temperature of the liquid nitrogen will reduce. This paper reports on the design and testing of a novel proof-of-concept helium injection control system confirming that it is possible to reduce the temperature of an LN2 bath below boiling point through the controlled injection of ambient temperature gaseous helium and then to efficiently maintain a reduced helium flow rate to maintain a stabilized liquid temperature, enabling clear visual observation of components immersed within the LN2. Helium saturation testing is performed and injection system sizing is discussed.

  5. Process model and capacity upgrades of the CTI-4000 liquid helium coldbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Benjamin; Quack, Hans; Klebaner, Arkadiy

    2014-01-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is in the process of re-commissioning a vintage CTI-4000 liquid helium coldbox, initially supplied by CTI-Cryogenics/Sulzer to Los Alamos in 1979. The coldbox was originally designed as a liquid helium refrigerator with capacity of ˜1200 W at nominal 4-K. The process utilized LN2 precooling, in-series operation of two centrifugal gas bearing turboexpanders and final Joule-Thomson (J-T) expansion. At FNAL, the coldbox will be utilized as a liquefier to support 2-K operations. A process model was developed to aid in the upgrade decisions and used to determine the nominal capacity of the liquefier. Capacity upgrades are achieved by safely utilizing the internal LN2 precooler, the addition of a 3-inch reciprocating wet expansion engine and increasing the overall process pressure by recertifying two limiting pressure vessels to a higher MAWP.

  6. A Liquid-Helium-Cooled Absolute Reference Cold Load forLong-Wavelength Radiometric Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Bensadoun, M.; Witebsky, C.; Smoot, George F.; De Amici,Giovanni; Kogut, A.; Levin, S.

    1990-05-01

    We describe a large (78-cm) diameter liquid-helium-cooled black-body absolute reference cold load for the calibration of microwave radiometers. The load provides an absolute calibration near the liquid helium (LHe) boiling point, accurate to better than 30 mK for wavelengths from 2.5 to 25 cm (12-1.2 GHz). The emission (from non-LHe temperature parts of the cold load) and reflection are small and well determined. Total corrections to the LHe boiling point temperature are {le} 50 mK over the operating range. This cold load has been used at several wavelengths at the South Pole and at the White Mountain Research Station. In operation, the average LHe loss rate was {le} 4.4 l/hr. Design considerations, radiometric and thermal performance and operational aspects are discussed. A comparison with other LHe-cooled reference loads including the predecessor of this cold load is given.

  7. Dynamic Polarization of Liquid Helium Three Confined in Fine Powders.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Lloyd William

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of liquid ^{3}He confined in fine powders can be produced by pumping the electron spin resonance (ESR) of paramagnetic centers in the powders. This dissertation describes measurements of the DNP of ^{3 }He in five powders, including two sucrose chars and three samples of MgO containing paramagnetic impurities. The experiments were performed with temperatures between 1.3 and 1.8 K, and fields of around 180 Oe. The largest factor by which DNP was observed to enhance the ^{3}He polarization from its value in thermal equilibrium was 1.7. In each powder, the time constant for DNP of the ^{3 }He was slightly longer than, or similar to, the ^{3}He longitudinal relaxation time. Double nuclear resonance experiments involving ^{1}H in one of the char samples, and the confined ^ {3}He were also performed, with and without simultaneous pumping of the ESR of the char. The dissertation includes a description of how observations of DNP of ^{3}He by paramagnetic centers in powders might depend on the atomic motion and spin dynamics of the nuclei in the liquid near the powders surfaces. Mechanisms that might explain the observed DNP are discussed in detail, and qualitative predictions based on those mechanisms are compared with the experimental data.

  8. UNIQUE METHOD FOR LIQUID NITROGEN PRECOOLING OF A PLATE FIN HEAT EXCHANGER IN A HELIUM REFRIGERATION CYCLE.

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, T

    2004-06-02

    Precooling of helium by means of liquid nitrogen is one the oldest and most common process features used in helium refrigerators. The principal tasks are to permit a rapid cool down to 80 K of the plant, to increase the cooling power of the plant in low temperature operation and to increase the rate of pure liquid production. The advent of aluminum plate fin heat exchangers in the design of helium refrigerators has made this task more complicated because of the potential damage to these heat exchangers.

  9. Stick-Slip Motion of the Wigner Solid on Liquid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, David G.; Beysengulov, Niyaz R.; Lin, Juhn-Jong; Kono, Kimitoshi

    2016-05-01

    We present time-resolved transport measurements of a Wigner solid (WS) on the surface of liquid helium confined in a micron-scale channel. At rest, the WS is "dressed" by a cloud of quantized capillary waves (ripplons). Under a driving force, we find that repeated WS-ripplon decoupling leads to stick-slip current oscillations, the frequency of which can be tuned by adjusting the temperature, pressing electric field, or electron density. The WS on liquid He is a promising system for the study of polaronlike decoupling dynamics.

  10. Vortices in rotating superfluid 3He.

    PubMed

    Lounasmaa, O V; Thuneberg, E

    1999-07-01

    In this review we first present an introduction to 3He and to the ROTA collaboration under which most of the knowledge on vortices in superfluid 3He has been obtained. In the physics part, we start from the exceptional properties of helium at millikelvin temperatures. The dilemma of rotating superfluids is presented. In 4He and in 3He-B the problem is solved by nucleating an array of singular vortex lines. Their experimental detection in 3He by NMR is described next. The vortex cores in 3He-B have two different structures, both of which have spontaneously broken symmetry. A spin-mass vortex has been identified as well. This object is characterized by a flow of spins around the vortex line, in addition to the usual mass current. A great variety of vortices exist in the A phase of 3He; they are either singular or continuous, and their structure can be a line or a sheet or fill the whole liquid. Altogether seven different types of vortices have been detected in 3He by NMR. We also describe briefly other experimental methods that have been used by ROTA scientists in studying vortices in 3He and some important results thus obtained. Finally, we discuss the possible applications of experiments and theory of 3He to particle physics and cosmology. In particular, we report on experiments where superfluid 3He-B was heated locally by absorption of single neutrons. The resulting events can be used to test theoretical models of the Big Bang at the beginning of our universe.

  11. Vortices in rotating superfluid 3He.

    PubMed

    Lounasmaa, O V; Thuneberg, E

    1999-07-01

    In this review we first present an introduction to 3He and to the ROTA collaboration under which most of the knowledge on vortices in superfluid 3He has been obtained. In the physics part, we start from the exceptional properties of helium at millikelvin temperatures. The dilemma of rotating superfluids is presented. In 4He and in 3He-B the problem is solved by nucleating an array of singular vortex lines. Their experimental detection in 3He by NMR is described next. The vortex cores in 3He-B have two different structures, both of which have spontaneously broken symmetry. A spin-mass vortex has been identified as well. This object is characterized by a flow of spins around the vortex line, in addition to the usual mass current. A great variety of vortices exist in the A phase of 3He; they are either singular or continuous, and their structure can be a line or a sheet or fill the whole liquid. Altogether seven different types of vortices have been detected in 3He by NMR. We also describe briefly other experimental methods that have been used by ROTA scientists in studying vortices in 3He and some important results thus obtained. Finally, we discuss the possible applications of experiments and theory of 3He to particle physics and cosmology. In particular, we report on experiments where superfluid 3He-B was heated locally by absorption of single neutrons. The resulting events can be used to test theoretical models of the Big Bang at the beginning of our universe. PMID:10393895

  12. A Ring with a Spin: Superfluidity in a toroidal Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, Anand Krishnan

    2011-12-01

    Superfluidity is a remarkable phenomenon. Superfluidity was initially characterized by flow without friction, first seen in liquid helium in 1938, and has been studied extensively since. Superfluidity is believed to be related to, but not identical to Bose-Einstein condensation, a statistical mechanical phenomena predicted by Albert Einstein in 1924 based on the statistics of Satyendra Nath Bose, where bosonic atoms make a phase transition to form a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), a gas which has macroscopic occupation of a single quantum state. Developments in laser cooling of neutral atoms and the subsequent realization of Bose-Einstein condensates in ultracold gases have opened a new window into the study of superfluidity and its relation to Bose-Einstein condensation. In our atomic sodium BEC experiment, we studied superfluidity and dissipationless flow in an all-optical toroidal trap, constructed using the combination of a horizontal "sheet"-like beam and vertical "ring"-like beam, which, like a circuit loop, allows flow around the ring. On inducing a single quantum of circulation in the condensate, the smoothness and uniformity of the toroidal BEC enabled the sustaining of a persistent current lasting 40 seconds, limited by the lifetime of the BEC due to background gas pressure. This success set the stage for further experiments studying superfluidity. In a first set of experiments, we studied the stability of the persistent current by inserting a barrier in the flow path of the ring. The superflow stopped abruptly at a barrier strength such that the local flow velocity at the barrier exceeded a critical velocity, which supported decay via the creation of a vortex-antivortex pair. Our precise control in inducing and arresting superflow in the BEC is a first step toward studying other aspects of superfluidity, such as the effect of temperature and dimensionality. This thesis discusses these experiments and also details partial-transfer absorption imaging, an

  13. Two-phase flow of solid hydrogen particles and liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Rouelle, A.; Smith, K. M.; Celik, D.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2004-06-01

    Atomic hydrogen propellant feed systems may require transporting solid hydrogen particles containing atomic species from storage tanks to the engines using liquid helium as the carrier fluid. In this paper, a three-dimensional two-phase mixture model, along with the standard k- ɛ mixture turbulence model is employed to study the turbulent mixing of the fluid-particle slurry system. Numerical results show that turbulent flow is required to keep the hydrogen particles in suspension, which otherwise form a sliding layer of particles on top of the helium layer. Hydrogen particle concentration profiles in the slurry system are functions of particle size, flow velocity, and influx volume fraction of hydrogen particles. Particle dispersion at different Stokes numbers, different Kolmogorov length scales, and different time scales are discussed.

  14. Producing and imaging a thin line of He*₂ molecular tracers in helium-4.

    PubMed

    Gao, J; Marakov, A; Guo, W; Pawlowski, B T; Van Sciver, S W; Ihas, G G; McKinsey, D N; Vinen, W F

    2015-09-01

    Cryogenic helium-4 has long been recognized as a useful material in fluids research. The unique properties of helium-4 in the gaseous phase and the normal liquid phase allow for the generation of turbulent flows with exceptionally high Reynolds and Rayleigh numbers. In the superfluid phase, helium-4 exhibits two-fluid hydrodynamics and possesses fascinating properties due to its quantum nature. However, studying the flows in helium-4 has been very challenging largely due to the lack of effective visualization and velocimetry techniques. In this article, we discuss the development of novel instrumentation for flow-visualization in helium based on the generation and imaging of thin lines of metastable He*₂ tracer molecules. These molecular tracers are created via femtosecond-laser field-ionization of helium atoms and can be imaged using a laser-induced fluorescence technique. By observing the displacement and distortion of the tracer lines in helium, quantitative information about the flow field can be extracted. We present experimental results in the study of thermal counterflow in superfluid helium that validate the concept of this technique. We also discuss anticipated future developments of this powerful visualization technique.

  15. Superfluid thermodynamic cycle refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Kotsubo, Vincent Y.

    1992-01-01

    A cryogenic refrigerator cools a heat source by cyclically concentrating and diluting the amount of .sup.3 He in a single phase .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He solution. The .sup.3 He in superfluid .sup.4 He acts in a manner of an ideal gas in a vacuum. Thus, refrigeration is obtained using any conventional thermal cycle, but preferably a Stirling or Carnot cycle. A single phase solution of liquid .sup.3 He at an initial concentration in superfluid .sup.4 He is contained in a first variable volume connected to a second variable volume through a superleak device that enables free passage of .sup.4 He while restricting passage of .sup.3 He. The .sup.3 He is compressed (concentrated) and expanded (diluted) in a phased manner to carry out the selected thermal cycle to remove heat from the heat load for cooling below 1 K.

  16. Superfluid thermodynamic cycle refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Swift, G.W.; Kotsubo, V.Y.

    1992-12-22

    A cryogenic refrigerator cools a heat source by cyclically concentrating and diluting the amount of [sup 3]He in a single phase [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He solution. The [sup 3]He in superfluid [sup 4]He acts in a manner of an ideal gas in a vacuum. Thus, refrigeration is obtained using any conventional thermal cycle, but preferably a Stirling or Carnot cycle. A single phase solution of liquid [sup 3]He at an initial concentration in superfluid [sup 4]He is contained in a first variable volume connected to a second variable volume through a superleak device that enables free passage of [sup 4]He while restricting passage of [sup 3]He. The [sup 3]He is compressed (concentrated) and expanded (diluted) in a phased manner to carry out the selected thermal cycle to remove heat from the heat load for cooling below 1 K. 12 figs.

  17. Specific heat of liquid He-4 near the superfluid transition and confined in cylindrical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aouaroun, Tahar; Ahlers, Guenter

    2006-03-01

    We present new measurements of the specific heat near the lambda transition of liquid He-4 at saturated vapor pressure and confined in micro-channel plates containing cylindrical holes. We investigated two channels diameters: 1μm and 2μm. Our results for the scaling function near the specific-heat maximum are in reasonably good agreement with previous measurements on channels with a 1 μm x 1 μm square cross section and on cylindrical channels with a 0.26μm diameter. They also are consistent with the scaling function derived from Monte Carlo calculations. However, they suggest a size- dependent systematic departure from a unique scaling function that is consistent with earlier measurements^3 on cylindrical channels of 8μm diameter. M.O. Kimbal, K.P. Mooney, and F.M. Gasparini, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 115301 (2004) J.A. Lipa, M. Coleman, and D.A. Stricker, J. Low Temp. Phys. 124, 443 (2001). N. Schultka and E. Manousakis, J. Low Temp. Phys. 111, 783 (1998)

  18. Epoxy encapsulation of the Cernox™ SD thermometer for measuring the temperature of surfaces in liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhuley, R. C.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2016-07-01

    We describe a procedure to pot a Cernox™ thermometer with the SD package in Stycast epoxy. The potting adapts the thermometer for measuring the temperature of a surface immersed in liquid helium (LHe) and other cryogens. The technique thermally insulates the sensor chip from the cryogen while preserving the surface mounting capability of the SD package. The potting introduced <1% shift in the resistance, <0.5% shift in the calibration at 4.2 K and 77 K, and provided repeatable measurements during thermal cycles between room temperature and 4.2 K.

  19. Performance Study on ST/JT Hybrid Cryocoolers Working at Liquid Helium Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongli, Liu; Xuan, Tao; Xiao, Sun; Zhihua, Gan

    The ST/JT hybridcryocooler consists of a Stirling-typecryocooler and a J-T loop. The common process of steady-state operation is given. Pressure-Enthalpy map analysis and thermodynamic calculation showhow the precooling temperature, high pressure and recuperator effectiveness affect thecooling powerat liquid helium temperature. Applying the current performance level of the Stirling cooler,the overall COP of the hybrid cryocooleris roughly optimized. This performance study shows that the hybrid cryocooler can develop its performance potential with improved J-T compressors with larger pressure ratio and aprecooler working at lower temperature.

  20. Research and development of a helium-4 based solar neutrino detector. Progress report, November 1, 1991--April 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lanou, R.E.; Maris, H.J.; Seidel, G.M.

    1993-05-01

    Superfluid helium possesses unique properties that enable it to be used as the major component of a very sensitive calorimetric detector: it is extremely pure, and the energy deposited in it is carried out by elementary excitations of the liquid which can produce quantum evaporation of He atoms at a free surface. It has a major advantage of being able to achieve very low background levels. Experimental results presented on the development of helium-4 detector include sensitivity, heat capacity of wafer-calorimeters, coincidence measurements, spectrum of alpha particles in helium, and quantum evaporation: angular dependence and efficiency. 29 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Flight model performance test results of a helium dewar for the soft X-ray spectrometer onboard ASTRO-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Seiji; Miyaoka, Mikio; Kanao, Ken'ichi; Tsunematsu, Shoji; Otsuka, Kiyomi; Hoshika, Shunji; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Yamasaki, Noriko; Takei, Yoh; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Sato, Yoichi; DiPirro, Mike; Shirron, Peter

    2016-03-01

    ASTRO-H is a Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite, scheduled to be launched in fiscal year 2015. The mission includes a soft X-ray spectrometer instrument (SXS), which contains an X-ray micro calorimeter operating at 50 mK by using an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The heat sink of the ADR is superfluid liquid helium below 1.3 K. The required lifetime of the superfluid helium is 3 years or more. In order to realize this lifetime, we have improved the thermal performance from the engineering model (EM) while maintaining the mechanical performance. Then, we have performed a thermal test of the flight model (FM). The results were that the heat load to the helium tank was reduced to below 0.8 mW in the FM from 1.2 mW in the EM. Therefore, the lifetime of the superfluid helium is more than 3 years with 30 L of liquid helium. In this paper, the thermal design and thermal test results are described.

  2. Simplified Methodology to Estimate the Maximum Liquid Helium (LHe) Cryostat Pressure from a Vacuum Jacket Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Richards, W. Lance

    2015-01-01

    The aircraft-based Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a platform for multiple infrared astronomical observation experiments. These experiments carry sensors cooled to liquid helium temperatures. The liquid helium supply is contained in large (i.e., 10 liters or more) vacuum-insulated dewars. Should the dewar vacuum insulation fail, the inrushing air will condense and freeze on the dewar wall, resulting in a large heat flux on the dewar's contents. The heat flux results in a rise in pressure and the actuation of the dewar pressure relief system. A previous NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) assessment provided recommendations for the wall heat flux that would be expected from a loss of vacuum and detailed an appropriate method to use in calculating the maximum pressure that would occur in a loss of vacuum event. This method involved building a detailed supercritical helium compressible flow thermal/fluid model of the vent stack and exercising the model over the appropriate range of parameters. The experimenters designing science instruments for SOFIA are not experts in compressible supercritical flows and do not generally have access to the thermal/fluid modeling packages that are required to build detailed models of the vent stacks. Therefore, the SOFIA Program engaged the NESC to develop a simplified methodology to estimate the maximum pressure in a liquid helium dewar after the loss of vacuum insulation. The method would allow the university-based science instrument development teams to conservatively determine the cryostat's vent neck sizing during preliminary design of new SOFIA Science Instruments. This report details the development of the simplified method, the method itself, and the limits of its applicability. The simplified methodology provides an estimate of the dewar pressure after a loss of vacuum insulation that can be used for the initial design of the liquid helium dewar vent stacks. However, since it is not an exact

  3. Testing the Effects of Helium Pressurant on Thermodynamic Vent System Performance with Liquid Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachbart, R. H.; Hastings, L. J.; Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S.; Tucker, S.

    2006-01-01

    In support of the development of a zero gravity pressure control capability for liquid hydrogen, testing was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center using the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) to evaluate the effects of helium pressurant on the performance of a spray bar thermodynamic vent system (TVS). Fourteen days of testing was performed in August - September 2005, with an ambient heat leak of about 70-80 watts and tank fill levels of 90%, 50%, and 25%. The TVS successfully controlled the tank pressure within a +/- 3.45 kPa (+/- 0.5 psi) band with various helium concentration levels in the ullage. Relative to pressure control with an "all hydrogen" ullage, the helium presence resulted in 10 to 30 per cent longer pressure reduction durations, depending on the fill level, during the mixing/venting phase of the control cycle. Additionally, the automated control cycle was based on mixing alone for pressure reduction until the pressure versus time slope became positive, at which time the Joule-Thomson vent was opened. Testing was also conducted to evaluate thermodynamic venting without the mixer operating, first with liquid then with vapor at the recirculation line inlet. Although ullage stratification was present, the ullage pressure was successfully controlled without the mixer operating. Thus, if vapor surrounded the pump inlet in a reduced gravity situation, the ullage pressure can still be controlled by venting through the TVS Joule Thomson valve and heat exchanger. It was evident that the spray bar configuration, which extends almost the entire length of the tank, enabled significant thermal energy removal from the ullage even without the mixer operating. Details regarding the test setup and procedures are presented in the paper. 1

  4. Emergency relief venting of the infrared telescope liquid helium dewar, second edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, E. W.

    1981-01-01

    An updated analysis is made of the emergency relief venting of the liquid helium dewar of the Spacelab 2 Infrared Telescope experiment in the event of a massive failure of the dewar guard vacuum. Such a failure, resulting from a major accident, could cause rapid heating and pressurization of the liquid helium in the dewar and lead to relief venting through the emergency relief system. The heat input from an accident is estimated for various fluid conditions in the dewar and the relief process considered as it takes place through one or both of the emergency relief paths. It was previously assumed that the burst diaphragms in the dewar relief paths would rupture at a pressure of 65 psi differential or 4.4 atmospheres. In fact, it has proved necessary to use burst diaphragms in the dewar which rupture at 115 psid or 7.8 atmospheres. An analysis of this case was carried out and shows that when the high pressure diaphragm rupture occurs, the dewar pressure falls within 8 s to below the 4.4 atmospheres for which the original analysis was performed, and thereafter it remains below that level.

  5. Fatigue crack growth properties of a cryogenic structural steel at liquid helium temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Konosu, Shinji; Kishiro, Tomohiro; Ivano, O.; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Nakajima, Hideo; Tsuji, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01

    The structural materials of the coils of superconducting magnets utilized in thermonuclear fusion reactors are used at liquid helium (4.2 K) temperatures and are subjected to repeated thermal stresses and electromagnetic forces. A high strength, high toughness austenitic stainless steel (12Cr-12Ni-10Mn-5Mo-0.2N) has recently been developed for large, thick-walled components used in such environments. This material is non-magnetic even when subjected to processing and, because it is a forging material, it is advantageous as a structural material for large components. In the current research, a large forging of 12Cr-12Ni-10Mn-5Mo-0.2N austenitic stainless steel, was fabricated to a thickness of 250 mm, which is typical of section thicknesses encountered in actual equipment. The tensile fatigue crack growth properties of the forging were examined at liquid helium temperature as a function of specimen location across the thickness of the forging. There was virtually no evidence of variation in tensile strength or fatigue crack growth properties attributable to different sampling locations in the thickness direction and no effect of thickness due to the forging or solution treatment associated with large forgings was observed.

  6. Superfluidity in ultracold gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Gretchen

    2016-05-01

    The study of superfluidity has a long and rich history. In Bose-Einstein condensate, superfluidity gives rise to a number of interesting effects, including quantized vortices and persistent currents. In this seminar I will give an introduction to superfluidity in ultracold atoms, including a discussion of the critical velocity and the spectrum of elementary excitations in superfluid systems.

  7. Critical flow and dissipation in a quasi-one-dimensional superfluid.

    PubMed

    Duc, Pierre-François; Savard, Michel; Petrescu, Matei; Rosenow, Bernd; Del Maestro, Adrian; Gervais, Guillaume

    2015-05-01

    In one of the most celebrated examples of the theory of universal critical phenomena, the phase transition to the superfluid state of (4)He belongs to the same three-dimensional (3D) O(2) universality class as the onset of ferromagnetism in a lattice of classical spins with XY symmetry. Below the transition, the superfluid density ρs and superfluid velocity v s increase as a power law of temperature described by a universal critical exponent that is constrained to be identical by scale invariance. As the dimensionality is reduced toward 1D, it is expected that enhanced thermal and quantum fluctuations preclude long-range order, thereby inhibiting superfluidity. We have measured the flow rate of liquid helium and deduced its superfluid velocity in a capillary flow experiment occurring in single 30-nm-long nanopores with radii ranging down from 20 to 3 nm. As the pore size is reduced toward the 1D limit, we observe the following: (i) a suppression of the pressure dependence of the superfluid velocity; (ii) a temperature dependence of v s that surprisingly can be well-fitted by a power law with a single exponent over a broad range of temperatures; and (iii) decreasing critical velocities as a function of decreasing radius for channel sizes below R ≃ 20 nm, in stark contrast with what is observed in micrometer-sized channels. We interpret these deviations from bulk behavior as signaling the crossover to a quasi-1D state, whereby the size of a critical topological defect is cut off by the channel radius. PMID:26601177

  8. Critical flow and dissipation in a quasi–one-dimensional superfluid

    PubMed Central

    Duc, Pierre-François; Savard, Michel; Petrescu, Matei; Rosenow, Bernd; Del Maestro, Adrian; Gervais, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    In one of the most celebrated examples of the theory of universal critical phenomena, the phase transition to the superfluid state of 4He belongs to the same three-dimensional (3D) O(2) universality class as the onset of ferromagnetism in a lattice of classical spins with XY symmetry. Below the transition, the superfluid density ρs and superfluid velocity vs increase as a power law of temperature described by a universal critical exponent that is constrained to be identical by scale invariance. As the dimensionality is reduced toward 1D, it is expected that enhanced thermal and quantum fluctuations preclude long-range order, thereby inhibiting superfluidity. We have measured the flow rate of liquid helium and deduced its superfluid velocity in a capillary flow experiment occurring in single 30-nm-long nanopores with radii ranging down from 20 to 3 nm. As the pore size is reduced toward the 1D limit, we observe the following: (i) a suppression of the pressure dependence of the superfluid velocity; (ii) a temperature dependence of vs that surprisingly can be well-fitted by a power law with a single exponent over a broad range of temperatures; and (iii) decreasing critical velocities as a function of decreasing radius for channel sizes below R ≃ 20 nm, in stark contrast with what is observed in micrometer-sized channels. We interpret these deviations from bulk behavior as signaling the crossover to a quasi-1D state, whereby the size of a critical topological defect is cut off by the channel radius. PMID:26601177

  9. Electronic absorption spectroscopy of PAHs in supersonic jets and ultracold liquid helium droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisken, Friedrich; Staicu, Angela; Krasnokutski, Serge; Henning, Thomas

    Neutral and cationic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are discussed as possible carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), still unassigned astrophysical absorption features observed in the spectra of reddened stars (Salama et al. 1999). Despite the importance of this class of molecules for astrophysics and nanophysics (PAHs can be regarded as nanoscale fragments of a sheet of graphite), the spectroscopic characterization of PAHs under well-defined conditions (low temperature and collision-free environment) has remained a challenge. Recently we have set up a cavity ring-down spectrometer combined with a pulsed supersonic jet expansion to study neutral and cationic PAHs under astrophysical conditions. PAHs studied so far include the neutral molecules anthracene (Staicu et al. 2004) and pyrene (Rouillé et al. 2004) as well as the cationic species naphthalene+ and anthracene+ (Sukhorukov et al. 2004). Employing another molecular beam apparatus, the same molecules (except of the cationic species) were also studied in liquid helium droplets (Krasnokutski et al. 2005, Rouillé et al. 2004). This novel technique combines several advantages of conventional matrix spectroscopy with those of gas phase spectroscopy. Notable advantages are the possibility to study molecules with low vapor pressure and to use a mass spectrometer facilitating spectral assignments. The most recent studies were devoted to phenanthrene and the more complicated (2,3)-benzofluorene. These molecules were investigated in the gas phase by cavity ring-down spectroscopy and in liquid helium droplets using depletion spectroscopy. For benzofluorene the present studies constitute the first reported measurements both in the gas phase and in helium droplets. The origin of the S1 ← S0 gas phase transition could be located at 29 894.3 cm-1, and a series of vibronic bands was recorded below 31 500 cm-1. In contrast to previously studied PAHs, the shift induced by the helium droplets was very

  10. Observing the drop of resistance in the flow of a superfluid Fermi gas.

    PubMed

    Stadler, David; Krinner, Sebastian; Meineke, Jakob; Brantut, Jean-Philippe; Esslinger, Tilman

    2012-11-29

    The ability of particles to flow with very low resistance is characteristic of superfluid and superconducting states, leading to their discovery in the past century. Although measuring the particle flow in liquid helium or superconducting materials is essential to identify superfluidity or superconductivity, no analogous measurement has been performed for superfluids based on ultracold Fermi gases. Here we report direct measurements of the conduction properties of strongly interacting fermions, observing the well-known drop in resistance that is associated with the onset of superfluidity. By varying the depth of the trapping potential in a narrow channel connecting two atomic reservoirs, we observed variations of the atomic current over several orders of magnitude. We related the intrinsic conduction properties to the thermodynamic functions in a model-independent way, by making use of high-resolution in situ imaging in combination with current measurements. Our results show that, as in solid-state systems, current and resistance measurements in quantum gases provide a sensitive probe with which to explore many-body physics. Our method is closely analogous to the operation of a solid-state field-effect transistor and could be applied as a probe for optical lattices and disordered systems, paving the way for modelling complex superconducting devices. PMID:23192151

  11. Nucleation of Quantized Vortices from Rotating Superfluid Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.

    2001-01-01

    The long-term goal of this project is to study the nucleation of quantized vortices in helium II by investigating the behavior of rotating droplets of helium II in a reduced gravity environment. The objective of this ground-based research grant was to develop new experimental techniques to aid in accomplishing that goal. The development of an electrostatic levitator for superfluid helium, described below, and the successful suspension of charged superfluid drops in modest electric fields was the primary focus of this work. Other key technologies of general low temperature use were developed and are also discussed.

  12. Experimental Studies of the Growth Kinetics of Methane Clathrate Hydrates & Superfluid Hydrodynamics on the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botimer, Jeffrey David

    This thesis details the experimental findings of three distinct research projects. The first studies the growth kinetics of methane clathrate hydrates grown under the influence of multiple factors including surfactants, porous media, substrate wetting properties, and salt content. The second investigates the flow behaviors of superfluid helium through single, high aspect ratio nanopipes. The third models the frequency response of a quartz tuning fork in high pressure normal and superfluid helium and demonstrates how quartz tuning forks can be used as cheap, small, in situ, cryogenic pressure gauges. The first project reports studies of the kinetics of growth of methane hydrates from liquid water containing small amounts of surfactant (<500 ppm of sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS). The kinetics are monitored using simultaneous measurements of the uptake of methane detected by a pressure drop in the gas phase, and either visual observations of the amount of liquid water and solid phase in the reaction vessel, or in situ micro-Raman measurements or in situ NMR measurements. These diagnostics show that the uptake of methane and the conversion of liquid water to a solid phase do not occur simultaneously; the uptake of gas always lags the visual and spectroscopic signatures of the disappearance of liquid water and the formation of solid. The evidence suggests that the SDS causes water to form an intermediate immobile solid-like state before combining with the methane to form hydrate. The growth mechanism is related to the surfactant and disappears for low SDS concentrations (<25 ppm). Also reported are studies of the growth rates of methane hydrates as a function of substrate wetting properties, driving force, and growth media. The second project studies pressure driven flow of superfluid helium through single high aspect ratio glass nanopipes into a vacuum has been studied for a wide range of pressure drop (0--30 atm), reservoir temperature (0.8--2.5K), pipe lengths (1-30mm

  13. Two phase liquid helium flow testing to simulate the operation of a cryocondensation pump in the D3-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughon, G. J.; Baxi, C. B.; Campbell, G. L.; Mahdavi, M. A.; Makariou, C. C.; Smith, J. P.; Schaffer, M. J.; Schaubel, K. M.; Menon, M. M.

    1994-06-01

    A liquid helium-cooled cryocondensation pump has been installed in the D3-D tokamak fusion energy research experiment at General Atomics. The pump is located within the tokamak vacuum chamber beneath the divertor baffle plates and is utilized for plasma density and contamination control. Two-phase helium flows through the pump at 5 to 10 g/s utilizing the heat transfer and constant temperature characteristics of boiling liquid . helium. The pump is designed for a pumping speed of 32,000 1/s. Extensive testing was performed with a prototypical pump test fixture. Several pump geometries (simple tube, coaxial flow plug, and coaxial slotted insert) were tested, in an iterative process, to determine which was the most satisfactory for stable cryocondensation pumping. Results from the different tests illustrating the temperature distribution and flow characteristics for each configuration are presented.

  14. Two phase liquid helium flow testing to simulate the operation of a cryocondensation pump in the DIII-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughon, G. J.; Baxi, C. B.; Campbell, G. L.; Mahdavi, M. A.; Makariou, C. C.; Menon, M. M.; Smith, J. P.; Schaffer, M. J.; Schaubel, K. M.

    A liquid helium-cooled cryocondensation pump has been installed in the DIII=D tokamak fusion energy research experiment at General Atomics. The pump is located within the tokamak vacuum chamber beneath the divertor baffle plates and is utilized for plasma density and contamination control. Two-phase helium flows through the pump at 5 to 10 g/s utilizing the beat transfer and constant temperature characteristics of boiling liquid helium. The pump is designed for a pumping speed of 32,0001/s. Extensive testing was performed with a prototypical pump test fixture. Several pump geometries (simple tube, coaxial flow plug, and coaxial slotted insert) were tested, in an iterative process, to determine which was the most satisfactory for stable cryocondensation pumping. Results from the different tests illustrating the temperature distribution and flow characteristics for each configuration are presented.

  15. Thermodynamic Vent System Performance Testing with Subcooled Liquid Methane and Gaseous Helium Pressurant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachbart, R. H.; Hastings, L. J.; Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S. L.; Tucker, S. P.

    2007-01-01

    Due to its high specific impulse and favorable thermal properties for storage, liquid methane (LCH4) is being considered as a candidate propellant for exploration architectures. In order to gain an -understanding of any unique considerations involving micro-gravity pressure control with LCH4, testing was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center using the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) to evaluate the performance of a spray-bar thermodynamic vent system (TVS) with subcooled LCH4 and gaseous helium (GHe) pressurant. Thirteen days of testing were performed in November 2006, with total tank heat leak conditions of about 715 W and 420 W at a fill level of approximately 90%. The TVS system was used to subcool the LCH4 to a liquid saturation pressure of approximately 55.2 kPa before the tank was pressurized with GHe to a total pressure of 165.5 kPa. A total of 23 TVS cycles were completed. The TVS successfully controlled the ullage pressure within a prescribed control band but did not maintain a stable liquid saturation pressure. This was likely. due to a TVS design not optimized for this particular propellant and test conditions, and possibly due to a large artificially induced heat input directly into the liquid. The capability to reduce liquid saturation pressure as well as maintain it within a prescribed control band, demonstrated that the TVS could be used to seek and maintain a desired liquid inlet temperature for an engine (at a cost of propellant lost through the TVS vent). One special test was conducted at the conclusion of the planned test activities. Reduction of the tank ullage pressure by opening the Joule-Thomson valve (JT) without operating the pump was attempted. The JT remained open for over 9300 seconds, resulting in an ullage pressure reduction of 30 kPa. The special test demonstrated the feasibility of using the JT valve for limited ullage pressure reduction in the event of a pump failure.

  16. Characterisation and optimisation of flexible transfer lines for liquid helium. Part I: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, N.; Haberstroh, Ch.; Hesse, U.; Krzyzowski, M.

    2016-04-01

    The transfer of liquid helium (LHe) into mobile dewars or transport vessels is a common and unavoidable process at LHe decant stations. During this transfer reasonable amounts of LHe evaporate due to heat leak and pressure drop. Thus generated helium gas needs to be collected and reliquefied which requires a huge amount of electrical energy. Therefore, the design of transfer lines used at LHe decant stations has been optimised to establish a LHe transfer with minor evaporation losses which increases the overall efficiency and capacity of LHe decant stations. This paper presents the experimental results achieved during the thermohydraulic optimisation of a flexible LHe transfer line. An extensive measurement campaign with a set of dedicated transfer lines equipped with pressure and temperature sensors led to unique experimental data of this specific transfer process. The experimental results cover the heat leak, the pressure drop, the transfer rate, the outlet quality, and the cool-down and warm-up behaviour of the examined transfer lines. Based on the obtained results the design of the considered flexible transfer line has been optimised, featuring reduced heat leak and pressure drop.

  17. Integration of a Cryocooler into a SQUID Magnetospinography System for Reduction of Liquid Helium Consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Yoshiaki; Oyama, Daisuke; Kawai, Jun; Ogata, Hisanao; Uehara, Gen

    We are currently developing a magnetospinography (MSG) system for noninvasive functional imaging of the spinal cord. The MSG system is a device for observing a weak magnetic field accompanied by the neural activity of the spinal cord by using an array of low-temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic flux sensors. As in the case of other biomagnetic measurement systems such as the magnetoencephalography (MEG) system, the running cost of the MSG system is mainly dependent on the liquid helium (LHe) consumption of a dewar vessel. We integrated a cryocooler into the MSG system to reduce LHe consumption. A pulse tube cryocooler with a cooling power of 0.5Wat 4 K was placed adjacent to a magnetically shielded room and was directly connected to the thermal radiation shield of the dewar by an electrically isolated transfer tube. Cold helium gas was circulated between the cryocooler and the radiation shield. Consequently, the temperature of the radiation shield decreased below 40 K. Previous studies have shown that the detection of a weak magnetic field is often hindered by severe low-frequency band noise from the cryocooler. However, the band of the MSG signals is much higher than that of the cryocooler noise. Therefore, the noise can be filtered out and has a less detrimental effect on MSG measurement than on other biomagnetic field measurements such as MEG measurement. As a result, LHe consumption was reduced by 46%, with no increase in the noise floor.

  18. Characterisation and optimisation of flexible transfer lines for liquid helium. Part II: Thermohydraulic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, N.; Haberstroh, Ch.; Hesse, U.; Krzyzowski, M.

    2016-10-01

    In part one of this publication experimental results for a single-channel transfer line used at liquid helium (LHe) decant stations are presented. The transfer of LHe into mobile dewars is an unavoidable process since the places of storage and usage are generally located apart from each other. The experimental results have shown that reasonable amounts of LHe evaporate due to heat leak and pressure drop. Thus, generated helium cold gas has to be collected and reliquefied, demanding a huge amount of electrical energy. Although this transfer process is common in cryogenic laboratories, no existing code could be found to model it. Therefore, a thermohydraulic model has been developed to model the LHe flow at operating conditions using published heat transfer and pressure drop correlations. This paper covers the basic equations used to calculate heat transfer and pressure drop, as well as the validation of the thermohydraulic code, and its application within the optimisation process. The final transfer line design features reduced heat leak and pressure drop values based on a combined measurement and modelling campaign in the range of 0.112 < pin < 0.148 MPa, 190 < G < 450 kg/(m2 s), and 0.04 < xout < 0.12.

  19. Transport of electrons on liquid helium in a microchannel device near the current threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beysengulov, N. R.; Rees, D. G.; Tayurskii, D. A.; Kono, K.

    2016-09-01

    We study the transport of strongly interacting electrons on the surface of liquid helium confined in a microchannel geometry, near the current threshold point. The current threshold depends on the electrostatic confinement, created by the microchannel electrodes, and on the electrostatic potential of electron system. Depending on the geometry of the microchannel, the current pinch-off can occur at the centre or move to the edges of the microchannel, as confirmed by Finite Element Model calculations. The confining potential dependence of electron conductivity above the current threshold point is consistent with a classical charge continuum model. However, we find that below the threshold point electron transport is suppressed due to charging energy effects.

  20. Superfluid Couette flow in an enclosed annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Karen L.; Barenghi, Carlo F.

    2004-11-01

    The Couette configuration of a fluid contained between two rotating concentric cylinders has proved useful to test and validate the HVBK equations which govern the motion of superfluid helium II. We critically review the current understanding of the superfluid Couette problem and compare theory and experiment, distinguishing between the results obtained with infinitely long cylinders and those obtained at small aspect ratio. After discussing some issues which are still unsolved, we point to what should be fruitful directions of further investigation which can be pursued in the Couette configuration.

  1. Hydrogen-Free Liquid-Helium Recovery Plants: The Solution for Low-Temperature Flow Impedance Blocking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabal, M.; Arauzo, A.; Camón, A.; Castrillo, M.; Guerrero, E.; Lozano, M. P.; Pina, M. P.; Sesé, J.; Spagna, S.; Diederichs, J.; Rayner, G.; Sloan, J.; Galli, F.; van der Geest, W.; Haberstroh, C.; Dittmar, N.; Oca, A.; Grau, F.; Fernandes, A.; Rillo, C.

    2016-08-01

    The blocking of fine-capillary tubes used as flow impedances in 4H3 evaporation cryostats to achieve temperatures below 4.2 K is generally attributed to nitrogen or air impurities entering these tubes from the main bath. The failure of even the most rigorous low-temperature laboratory best practices aimed at eliminating the problem by maintaining the cleanliness of the helium bath and preventing impurities from entering the capillary tubes suggests that a different cause is responsible for the inexplicable reduction of impedance flow. Many low-temperature research laboratories around the world have suffered this nuisance at a considerable financial cost due to the fact that the affected systems have to be warmed to room temperature in order to recover their normal low-temperature operation performance. Here, we propose an underlying physical mechanism responsible for the blockages based upon the freezing of molecular H2 traces present in the liquid-helium bath. Solid H2 accumulates at the impedance low-pressure side, and, after some time, it produces a total impedance blockage. The presence of H2 traces is unavoidable due its occurrence in the natural gas wells where helium is harvested, forcing gas suppliers to specify a lower bound for impurity levels at about 100 ppb even in high-grade helium. In this paper, we present a simple apparatus to detect hydrogen traces present in liquid helium and easily check the quality of the liquid. Finally, we propose a solution to eliminate the hydrogen impurities in small- and large-scale helium recovery plants. The solution has been implemented in several laboratories that previously experienced a chronic occurrence of blocking, eliminating similar occurrences for more than one year.

  2. Copper dimer interactions on a thermomechanical superfluid {sup 4}He fountain

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Evgeny; Eloranta, Jussi

    2015-05-28

    Laser induced fluorescence imaging and frequency domain excitation spectroscopy of the copper dimer (B{sup 1}Σ{sub g}{sup +}←X{sup 1}Σ{sub u}{sup +}) in thermomechanical helium fountain at 1.7 K are demonstrated. The dimers penetrate into the fountain provided that their average propagation velocity is ca. 15 m/s. This energy threshold is interpreted in terms of an imperfect fountain liquid-gas interface, which acts as a trap for low velocity dimers. Orsay-Trento density functional theory calculations for superfluid {sup 4}He are used to characterize the dynamics of the dimer solvation process into the fountain. The dimers first accelerate towards the fountain surface and once the surface layer is crossed, they penetrate into the liquid and further slow down to Landau critical velocity by creating a vortex ring. Theoretical lineshape calculations support the assignment of the experimentally observed bands to Cu{sub 2} solvated in the bulk liquid. The vibronic progressions are decomposed of a zero-phonon line and two types of phonon bands, which correlate with solvent cavity interface compression (t < 200 fs) and expansion (200 < t < 500 fs) driven by the electronic excitation. The presented experimental method allows to perform molecular spectroscopy in bulk superfluid helium where the temperature and pressure can be varied.

  3. Perturbation Theory for Superfluid in Nonuniform Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshida, Shinji; Kato, Yusuke

    2016-05-01

    Perturbation theory of superfluid fraction in terms of nonuniform potential is constructed. We find that the coefficient of the leading term is determined by the dynamical structure factor or density fluctuation of the system. The results for the ideal Bose gas and the interacting Bose system with linear dispersion are consistent to implications from Landau's criterion. We also find that the superfluidity of Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid with K>2 is shown to be stable against nonuniform potential.

  4. Effect of Specimen Diameter on Tensile Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steels in Liquid Hydrogen and Gaseous Helium at 20K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, H.; Ohmiya, S.; Shibata, K.; Ogata, T.

    2006-03-01

    Tensile tests using round bar type specimens of 3, 5 and 7 mm in diameter were conducted at 20K in liquid hydrogen and also in gaseous helium at the same temperature for three major austenitic stainless steels, JIS SUS304L, 316L and 316LN, extensively used for cryogenic applications including liquid hydrogen transportation and storage vessels. Stress-strain curves were considerably different between circumstances and also specimen diameter, resulting in differences of strength and ductility. In liquid hydrogen, serrated deformation appeared after considerable work hardening and more active in specimens with larger diameter. Meanwhile serrated deformation was observed from the early stage of plastic deformation in gaseous helium at 20 K and serration was more frequent in specimens with smaller diameter. The serrated deformation behaviors were numerically simulated for 304L steel with taking thermal properties such as thermal conductivity, specific heat, heat transfer from specimens to cryogenic media into account, and some agreement with the experiments was obtained.

  5. Liquid Hydrogen Propellant Tank Sub-Surface Pressurization with Gaseous Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Cartagena, W.

    2015-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of a propellant tank pressurization system with the pressurant diffuser intentionally submerged beneath the surface of the liquid. Propellant tanks and pressurization systems are typically designed with the diffuser positioned to apply pressurant gas directly into the tank ullage space when the liquid propellant is settled. Space vehicles, and potentially propellant depots, may need to conduct tank pressurization operations in micro-gravity environments where the exact location of the liquid relative to the diffuser is not well understood. If the diffuser is positioned to supply pressurant gas directly to the tank ullage space when the propellant is settled, then it may become partially or completely submerged when the liquid becomes unsettled in a microgravity environment. In such case, the pressurization system performance will be adversely affected requiring additional pressurant mass and longer pressurization times. This series of tests compares and evaluates pressurization system performance using the conventional method of supplying pressurant gas directly to the propellant tank ullage, and then supplying pressurant gas beneath the liquid surface. The pressurization tests were conducted on the Engineering Development Unit (EDU) located at Test Stand 300 at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). EDU is a ground based Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) test article supported by Glenn Research Center (GRC) and MSFC. A 150 ft3 propellant tank was filled with liquid hydrogen (LH2). The pressurization system used regulated ambient helium (GHe) as a pressurant, a variable position valve to maintain flow rate, and two identical independent pressurant diffusers. The ullage diffuser was located in the forward end of the tank and was completely exposed to the tank ullage. The submerged diffuser was located in the aft end of the tank and was completely submerged when the tank liquid level was 10% or greater

  6. Kinetic properties of surface electrons over liquid helium under strong electron-electron interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buntar, V. A.; Grigoriev, V. N.; Kirichek, O. I.; Kovdrya, Yu. Z.; Monarkha, Yu. P.; Sokolov, S. S.

    1990-06-01

    The mobility μ and lifetime of ground-level electrons τ⊥ are studied experimentally in a two-dimensional electron system at the surface of liquid helium at temperatures of 0.4 to 1.4 K and charge concentrations of (2.8 12.0) × 108 cm-2. It is shown that for fairly low temperature and high concentration where the frequency of interelectronic collisions is much higher than that of electron-ripplon ones, the so-called complete control condition is realized in the electron system, i.e., when the average drift velocity of electrons and the effective electron temperature can be introduced. This model is found to describe well the kinetic properties of surface electrons in the range of charge concentrations up to 4×108 cm-2, where the one-particle approach is no longer applicable. For the value of parameter Γ=e2(πns)1/2/T=47 that corresponds to a strong electron-electron interaction, the lifetime τ⊥ is found to increase sharply and the short-range order typical of a liquid state appears in the two-dimensional electron layer.

  7. Motion of a helical vortex filament in superfluid 4He under the extrinsic form of the local induction approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2013-08-01

    Very recently, Shivamoggi ["Vortex motion in superfluid 4He: Reformulation in the extrinsic vortex-filament coordinate space," Phys. Rev. B 84, 012506 (2011)], 10.1103/PhysRevB.84.012506 studied the extrinsic form of the local induction approximation (LIA) for the motion of a Kelvin wave on a vortex filament in superfluid 4He, and obtained some results in a cubic approximation. Presently, we study the motion of helical vortex filaments in superfluid 4He under the exact fully nonlinear LIA considered in potential form by Van Gorder ["Fully nonlinear local induction equation describing the motion of a vortex filament in superfluid 4He," J. Fluid Mech. 707, 585 (2012)], 10.1017/jfm.2012.308 and obtained from the Biot-Savart law through the equations of Hall and Vinen ["The rotation of liquid helium II. I. Experiments on the propagation of second sound in uniformly rotating helium II," Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 238, 204 (1956)], 10.1098/rspa.1956.0214 including superfluid friction terms. Nonlinear dispersion relations governing the helical Kelvin wave on such a vortex filament are derived in exact form, from which we may exactly calculate the phase and group velocity of the Kelvin wave. With this, we classify the motion of a helical Kelvin wave on a vortex filament under the LIA. The dispersion relations and results, which follow are exact in nature, in contrast to most results in the literature, which are usually numerical approximations. As such, our results accurately capture the qualitative behavior of the Kelvin waves under the LIA. Extensions to other frameworks are discussed.

  8. Numerical Studies of Properties of Confined Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manousakis, Efstratios

    2003-01-01

    We carry out state of the art simulations of properties of confined liquid helium near the superfluid transition to a degree of accuracy which allows to make predictions for the outcome of fundamental physics experiments in microgravity. First we report our results for the finite-size scaling behavior of heat capacity of superfluids for cubic and parallel-plate geometry. This allows us to study the crossover from zero and two dimensions to three dimensions. Our calculated scaling functions are in good agreement with recently measured specific heat scaling functions for the above mentioned geometries. We also present our results of a quantum simulation of submonolayer of molecular hydrogen deposited on an ideal graphite substrate using path-integral quantum Monte Carlo simulation. We find that the monolayer phase diagram is rich and very similar to that of helium monolayer. We are able to uncover the main features of the complex monolayer phase diagram, such as the commensurate solid phases and the commensurate to incommensurate transition, in agreement with the experiments and to find some features which are missing from the experimental analysis.

  9. Large-scale superfluid vortex rings at nonzero temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacks, D. H.; Baggaley, A. W.; Barenghi, C. F.

    2014-12-01

    We numerically model experiments in which large-scale vortex rings—bundles of quantized vortex loops—are created in superfluid helium by a piston-cylinder arrangement. We show that the presence of a normal-fluid vortex ring together with the quantized vortices is essential to explain the coherence of these large-scale vortex structures at nonzero temperatures, as observed experimentally. Finally we argue that the interaction of superfluid and normal-fluid vortex bundles is relevant to recent investigations of superfluid turbulence.

  10. Photo-excited states in germanium at liquid-helium temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Culbertson, J.C.

    1982-12-01

    A wide variety of experimental work dealing with the basic properties of photoexcited states in Ge at liquid helium temperatures is presented. The primary emphasis is on the electron-hole liquid (EHL) and the free exciton (FE). The EHL is composed of two interpenetrating Fermi liquids, one of electrons and one of holes, each with its own Fermi level. The FE dealt with here is a mobile, loosely bound state of an electron and a hole. We report the first absolute measurement of the density dependence of the enhancement factor g/sub eh/(0) for the EHL in Ge. This factor g/sub eh/(0) is a measure of the electron-hole spatial correlation function, and provides a valuable and sensitive test for the predictions of various many-body-theory approximations. An EHL droplet - FE gas system confined to a strain induced potential well was used. The measurement approach relied on only a few simple and verifiable assumptions. A byproduct of this work was the measurement as a function of stress of: the electron and hole Fermi levels E/sub F//sup e/ and E/sub F//sup h/, the EHL density n/sub l/, the condensation energy phi of a FE relative to the EHL, and the binding energy of a FE (E/sub x/) relative to free carriers (FC). The decay of a FE-FC system confined to a strain induced potential well is studied. The first direct measurement of the FE diffusivity D/sub x/ is reported. The evolution in time of spatial profiles of FE luminescence were measured. From these FE density profiles, D/sub x/(4.2K) approx. = to 300 cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/, the surface recombination velocity S approx. = 3000 cm s/sup -1/, and the FE lifetime tau/sub x/ = 27 ..mu..s with surface effects excluded were determined. (WHK)

  11. Helium technology issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, Peter

    1987-01-01

    A number of future space missions require liquid helium for cooling scientific payloads. These missions will require the long term storage and resupply of liquid helium at temperatures of 1.4 - 2.1 Kelvin. In addition, some of the proposed instruments will require refrigeration to temperatures as low as 50 mK. A variety of liquid helium based refrigerator systems could provide this subkelvin cooling. The status of helium storage and refrigeration technologies and of several alternative technologies is presented here along with areas where further research and development are needed. (Helium resupply technologies are the topic of another presentation at this symposium). The technologies covered include passive and dynamic liquid helium storage, alternatives to liquid helium storage, He -3 refrigerators, He -3/He -4 dilution refrigerators, and alternative sub-kelvin coolers.

  12. Computation of the properties of liquid neon, methane, and gas helium at low temperature by the Feynman-Hibbs approach.

    PubMed

    Tchouar, N; Ould-Kaddour, F; Levesque, D

    2004-10-15

    The properties of liquid methane, liquid neon, and gas helium are calculated at low temperatures over a large range of pressure from the classical molecular-dynamics simulations. The molecular interactions are represented by the Lennard-Jones pair potentials supplemented by quantum corrections following the Feynman-Hibbs approach. The equations of state, diffusion, and shear viscosity coefficients are determined for neon at 45 K, helium at 80 K, and methane at 110 K. A comparison is made with the existing experimental data and for thermodynamical quantities, with results computed from quantum numerical simulations when they are available. The theoretical variation of the viscosity coefficient with pressure is in good agreement with the experimental data when the quantum corrections are taken into account, thus reducing considerably the 60% discrepancy between the simulations and experiments in the absence of these corrections.

  13. Characteristics of a liquid-helium-free calibration apparatus for cryogenic thermometers

    SciTech Connect

    Shimazaki, T.

    2013-09-11

    Closed-cycle Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocoolers have been developed at National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ)/National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) with the aim of realizing a liquid-helium-free calibration apparatus for cryogenic thermometers between 0.65 K and 25 K. The latest JT cryocooler at NMIJ/AIST consists of a {sup 3}He JT cooling circuit and a pulse tube mechanical refrigerator. The characteristics of the apparatus including a residual gas analysis of the JT cooling circuit are presented in this paper. Currently the initial cool-down is performed using a heat-exchange gas. It normally takes about 30 h to reduce the temperature from room temperature to 5 K at the thermometer comparison block of the apparatus. The correct timing of the removal of the heatexchange gas is important for the efficient operation of the apparatus. Incomplete removal of the heat-exchange gas induces excess heat load on the apparatus and thermal disturbances. Some examples of abrupt temperature bursts are discussed in this paper. Mechanical refrigerators generate cyclic mechanical vibrations, and precision resistance thermometers are usually very sensitive to a mechanical vibration. The measured vibration level of the developed apparatus is reported. The damage to the apparatus due to the magnitude 9.0 earthquake on March 11, 2011, and possible countermeasures in the case of future earthquakes are also discussed.

  14. Safety issues of space liquid-helium and solid-cryogen systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Peter V.

    2002-05-01

    Safety of hardware and personnel is a major concern in space programs. Space cryogenic systems are particularly prone to risk because of their complexity and because of the potential for overpressurization resulting from blockage of vent paths during the integration and test process. A number of space flight programs with liquid-helium and solid-cryogen systems have had incidents which resulted in risk or actual damage to flight hardware, or in risk to personnel. Since such incidents typically occur late in the development cycle, costs due to delays are extremely high. A second major of area of risk is the use of cooling loops in solid cryogen systems. When cooling is performed, the cryogen contracts and cryogen from warmer locations vaporizes and is deposited in the voids. This can lead to rupture of tankage and plumbing. Risk reduction measures include two-fault tolerant design, systematic use of burst disks and relief valves, careful analysis of possible risks, detailed and well-reviewed procedures and redundancy of critical systems, such as valves and valve drive circuitry. We will discuss the design and operation of space cryogenics systems from a safety point of view. We will also describe a number of incidents, their causes, the corrective steps taken and lessons learned.

  15. Characteristics of a liquid-helium-free calibration apparatus for cryogenic thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazaki, T.

    2013-09-01

    Closed-cycle Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocoolers have been developed at National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ)/National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) with the aim of realizing a liquid-helium-free calibration apparatus for cryogenic thermometers between 0.65 K and 25 K. The latest JT cryocooler at NMIJ/AIST consists of a 3He JT cooling circuit and a pulse tube mechanical refrigerator. The characteristics of the apparatus including a residual gas analysis of the JT cooling circuit are presented in this paper. Currently the initial cool-down is performed using a heat-exchange gas. It normally takes about 30 h to reduce the temperature from room temperature to 5 K at the thermometer comparison block of the apparatus. The correct timing of the removal of the heatexchange gas is important for the efficient operation of the apparatus. Incomplete removal of the heat-exchange gas induces excess heat load on the apparatus and thermal disturbances. Some examples of abrupt temperature bursts are discussed in this paper. Mechanical refrigerators generate cyclic mechanical vibrations, and precision resistance thermometers are usually very sensitive to a mechanical vibration. The measured vibration level of the developed apparatus is reported. The damage to the apparatus due to the magnitude 9.0 earthquake on March 11, 2011, and possible countermeasures in the case of future earthquakes are also discussed.

  16. Mapping of Ambient Magnetic Fields within Liquid Helium Dewar for Testing of a DC SQUID Magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Newhouse, Randal

    2003-09-05

    In an effort to explore the cavity lights phenomenon, Experimental Facilities Department at SLAC is testing a DC SQUID magnetometer. Due to the nature of the SQUID magnetometer and the intended tests, the earth's magnetic field must be negated. It is proposed to reduce ambient fields using bucking coils. First, however, an accurate map of the magnetic field inside the liquid helium Dewar where the experiment is going to take place needed to be made. This map was made using a three-axis fluxgate magnetometer mounted on a 3D positioning device made for this purpose. A ten inch tall volume within the Dewar was measured at data points approximately an inch from each other in all three axes. A LabVEIW program took readings from the magnetometer at 2 ms intervals for 1000 readings in such a way as to eliminate any ambient 60 Hz signals that may be present in the data. This data was stored in spreadsheet format and was analyzed to determine how the magnetic field within the Dewar was changing as a function of position.

  17. Heat Capacity of Superfluid (sup 4)He in the Presence of a Heat Current Near T

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso C. P.; Goodstein, David L.; Harter, Alexa W.; Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan

    1996-01-01

    The thermodynamic theory of superfluid helium in the presence of a heat current is presented. We show that there is a thermodynamic relation between the heat capacity and the expression ps(W), which describes the depression of the superfluid density with the counterflow velocity W. Using this relation we show that the heat capacity of superfluid super4He in the presence of a heat current diverges at a depressed lambda transition temperature, suggesting the possibility of a new second order phase transition where the superfluid wave function is not the order parameter.

  18. Formation of a Mesa Shaped Phonon Pulse in Superfluid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamenko, I. N.; Nemchenko, K. E.; Slipko, V. A.

    2010-05-01

    We present a theory for the formation of a mesa shaped phonon pulse in superfluid 4He. Starting from the hydrodynamic equations of superfluid helium, we obtain the system of equations which describe the evolution of strongly anisotropic phonon systems. Such systems can be created experimentally. The solution of the equations are simple waves, which correspond to second sound in the moving phonon pulse. Using these exact solutions, we describe the expansion of phonon pulses in superfluid helium at zero temperature. This theory gives an explanation for the mesa shape observed in the measured phonon angular distributions. Almost all dependencies of the mesa shape on the system parameters can be qualitatively understood.

  19. Test program, helium II orbital resupply coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyatt, William S.

    1991-12-01

    The full scope of this program was to have included development tests, design and production of custom test equipment and acceptance and qualification testing of prototype and protoflight coupling hardware. This program was performed by Ball Aerospace Systems Division, Boulder, Colorado until its premature termination in May 1991. Development tests were performed on cryogenic face seals and flow control devices at superfluid helium (He II) conditions. Special equipment was developed to allow quantified leak detection at large leak rates up to 8.4 x 10(exp -4) SCCS. Two major fixtures were developed and characterized: The Cryogenic Test Fixture (CTF) and the Thermal Mismatch Fixture (Glovebox). The CTF allows the coupling hardware to be filled with liquid nitrogen (LN2), liquid helium (LHe) or sub-cooled liquid helium when hardware flow control valves are either open or closed. Heat leak measurements, internal and external helium leakage measurements, cryogenic proof pressure tests and external load applications are performed in this fixture. Special reusable MLI closures were developed to provide repeatable installations in the CTF. The Thermal Mismatch Fixture allows all design configurations of coupling hardware to be engaged and disengaged while measuring applied forces and torques. Any two hardware components may be individually thermally preconditioned within the range of 117 deg K to 350 deg K prior to engage/disengage cycling. This verifies dimensional compatibility and operation when thermally mismatched. A clean, dry GN2 atmosphere is maintained in the fixture at all times. The first shipset of hardware was received, inspected and cycled at room temperature just prior to program termination.

  20. Experimental study of nanofluidics and phase transitions of normal and superfluid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, Angel Enriques

    This thesis addresses the experimental results of two different research topics. The first is the experimental work of pressure driven flows in the smallest, single nanotubes ever investigated. The nanotube boundary conditions and slip lengths from argon, nitrogen, water, and helium experiments were analyzed and compared to macroscopic boundary conditions. The second research topic discusses the work on ellipsometric and quartz microbalance measurements of the 2D superfluid phase diagram of 4He on alkali substrates. Ellipsometric results of sodium on HOPG provide the first evidence of the existence of the 2D critical point on an intermediate strength substrate. Pressure driven flows through single nanopores and microtubes were measured with a calibrated mass spectrometer with pressure drops up to 30 Atm. The nanopores were between 30 nm to 600 nm in diameter and etched in mica and PET membranes of several microns thickness. Microtubes several inches long of fused quartz and nickel material were tested with diameters between 1.8 micron and 25 micron. For 4He and argon gas we observed the flow transition between the free molecular and continuum regimes at 293 K and 77 K. No discrepancy between the macroscopic theory and the 30 nm nanopore data was found. Because of the exceptionally low viscosity of gaseous helium the laminar-turbulent transition could also be observed within these submicron channels. The small viscosity of 4He was too small to dampen inertial effects at a Reynolds number of 2000. In addition to single phase gas flows, our experimental technique also allows us to investigate flows in which the nano or micro scale pipe is either partially or completely filled with liquids. The position of the intrinsic liquid/vapor interface was important for understanding this type of flow. Strong evaporation and cooling at the liquid-vapor interface can lead to freezing for conventional fluids such as nitrogen and water, which in turn leads to complex intermittent

  1. Superfluid-superfluid phase transitions in a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate.

    PubMed

    Kuklov, Anatoly; Prokof'ev, Nikolay; Svistunov, Boris

    2004-01-23

    Depending on the Hamiltonian parameters, two-component bosons in an optical lattice can form at least three different superfluid phases in which both components participate in the superflow: a (strongly interacting) mixture of two miscible superfluids (2SF), a paired superfluid (PSF) vacuum, and (at a commensurate total filling factor) the super-counter-fluid (SCF) state. We study the universal properties of the 2SF-PSF and 2SF-SCF quantum phase transitions and show that (i) they can be mapped onto each other and (ii) their universality class is identical to the (d+1)-dimensional normal-superfluid transition in a single-component liquid. The finite-temperature 2SF-PSF(SCF) transitions and the topological properties of 2SF-PSF(SCF) interfaces are also discussed.

  2. Superfluid Reynolds number and the transition from potential flow to turbulence in superfluid 4He at millikelvin temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoepe, W.

    2015-07-01

    This comment is on Phys. Rev. Lett. 144, 155302 (2015) by M.T. Reeves, T.P. Billam, B.P. Anderson, and A.S. Bradley "Identifying a superfluid Reynolds number via dynamical similarity" where a new superfluid Reynolds number is introduced. This definition is shown to be useful in the data analysis of the finite lifetime of turbulence observed with an oscillating sphere in superfluid helium at mK temperatures in a small velocity interval Δ v = ( v-v c ) just above the critical velocity v c . The very rapid increase in the lifetime with increasing superfluid Reynolds number is compared with the "supertransient" turbulence observed in classical pipe flow.

  3. Acoustic Resonances in Helium Fluids Excited by Quartz Tuning Forks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmela, A.; Tuoriniemi, J.; Rysti, J.

    2011-03-01

    Ordinary quartz tuning fork resonators, operated at about 30 or 200 kHz frequency, couple to acoustic first and second sound resonances in helium fluids under certain conditions. We have studied acoustic resonances in supercritical 4He, normal and superfluid 4He, and in isotopic mixtures of helium. Suggestive temperature, pressure, and concentration dependences are given. Furthermore, we propose a thermometric reference point device based on second sound resonances in helium mixtures, and indicate possible differences in the nature of second sound resonances in superfluid 4He and helium mixtures.

  4. Condensate fraction in superfluid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olinto, A. C.

    1987-04-01

    Recently, a relationship between the chemical potential and the condensate fracton n0(T) has been derived for all temperatures in the superfluid region. An analysis of liquid 4He chemical-potential data yields n0(T=0)=0.062, and n0(T) is in excellent agreement with the empirical results of Svensson, Sears, and Griffin.

  5. Superfluid 3He—the Early Days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. M.; Leggett, A. J.

    2011-08-01

    A history is given of liquid 3He research from the time when 3He first became available following World War II through 1972 when the discovery of the superfluid phases was made. The Fermi liquid nature was established early on, and the Landau Fermi liquid theory provided a framework for understanding the interactions between the Fermions (quasiparticles). The theory's main triumph was to predict zero sound, which was soon discovered experimentally. Experimental techniques are treated, including adiabatic demagnetization, dilution refrigerator technology, and Pomeranchuk cooling. A description of the superfluid 3He discovery experiments using the latter two of these techniques is given. While existing theories provided a basis for understanding the newly discovered superfluid phases in terms of ℓ>0 Cooper pairs, the unexpected stability of the A phase in the high- P, high- T region of the phase diagram needed for its explanation a creative leap beyond the BCS paradigm. The use of sum rules to interpret some of the unusual magnetic resonance in liquid 3He is discussed. Eventually a complete theory of the spin dynamics of superfluid 3He was developed, which predicted many of the exciting phenomena subsequently discovered.

  6. Development of GM cryocooler separate type liquid-helium-free 3He-4He dilution refrigerator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Y.; Ito, T.; Umeno, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Kamioka, Y.; Maehata, K.

    2009-02-01

    We developed the new liquid-helium-free dilution refrigerator system, in which the Gifford-McMahon (GM) cycle cryocooler and dilution refrigerator (DR) unit are separated. We obtained the base temperature below 50 mK in this DR system. In usual liquid-helium-free DR systems, the DR unit directly couples with GM-cryocooler in the same vacuum chamber. Therefore the mechanical vibration of GM-cryocooler is hardly removed from DR unit. In order to eliminate the vibration problem, the separated vacuum chamber contacting the GM-cryocooler is connected with the DR unit chamber by the flexible hose with length of about 1 meter. Thin flexible tubes used for circulation of the refrigerant gas and radiation shield are installed in the connection hose. The 4He gas, cooled in the GM-cryocooler unit, transfers to the DR unit throw the thin flexible tubes. After cooling the DR unit, the gas returns to GM-cryocooler unit with cooling of the radiation shield. We expect that our separate-type dilution refrigerator becomes a useful piece of apparatus for the low temperature experiments.

  7. Helicity in superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Hridesh; Kleckner, Dustin; Proment, Davide; Irvine, William T. M.

    Ideal fluid flow conserves a special quantity known as helicity, in addition to energy, momentum and angular momentum. Helicity can be understood as a measure of the knottedness of vortex lines of the flow, providing an important geometric tool to study diverse physical systems such as turbulent fluids and plasmas. Since superfluids flow without resistance just like ideal (Euler) fluids, a natural question arises: Is there an extra conserved quantity akin to helicity in superfluids? We address the question of a ''superfluid helicity'' theoretically and examine its consequences in numerical simulations.

  8. Strain-cycling fatigue behavior of ten structural metals tested in liquid helium (4 K), in liquid nitrogen (78 K), and in ambient air (300 K)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachtigall, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Strain-cycling fatigue behavior of 10 different structural alloys and metals was investigated in liquid helium (4 K), in liquid nitrogen (78 K), and in ambient air (300 K). At high cyclic lives, fatigue resistance increased with decreasing temperature for all the materials investigated. At low cyclic lives, fatigue resistance generally decreased with decreasing temperature for the materials investigated. Only for Inconel 718 did fatigue resistance increase with decreasing temperature over the entire life range investigated. Comparison of the experimental fatigue behavior with that predicted by the Manson method of universal slopes showed that the fatigue behavior of these materials can be predicted for cryogenic temperatures by using material tensile properties obtained at those same temperatures.

  9. Polarization of He II films upon the relative motion of the superfluid component and the quantized vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamenko, I. N.; Nemchenko, E. K.

    2016-04-01

    Theoretical study of the electrical activity of the saturated superfluid helium (He II) film upon the relative motion of the normal and superfluid components in the film was performed. The polarization vector due to the dipole moments of the quantized vortex rings in He II in the field of van der Waals forces was calculated taking into account the relative motion of the normal and superfluid components. An explicit analytical expression for the electric potential difference arising upon the relative motion of the normal and superfluid components in a torsional oscillator was derived. The obtained time, temperature and relative velocity dependences of the potential difference were in agreement with the experimental data.

  10. Cold asymmetrical fermion superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    Caldas, Heron

    2003-12-19

    The recent experimental advances in cold atomic traps have induced a great amount of interest in fields from condensed matter to particle physics, including approaches and prospects from the theoretical point of view. In this work we investigate the general properties and the ground state of an asymmetrical dilute gas of cold fermionic atoms, formed by two particle species having different densities. We have show in a recent paper, that a mixed phase composed of normal and superfluid components is the energetically favored ground state of such a cold fermionic system. Here we extend the analysis and verify that in fact, the mixed phase is the preferred ground state of an asymmetrical superfluid in various situations. We predict that the mixed phase can serve as a way of detecting superfluidity and estimating the magnitude of the gap parameter in asymmetrical fermionic systems.

  11. Dynamics of a liquid helium I SRF cryostat at the Canadian Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regier, Chris

    2012-06-01

    The Canadian Light Source (CLS) is a third-generation synchrotron located inSaskatoon, Canada. A superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity contained in a 4.43 Kliquid helium I cryostat is used at the CLS to replenish energy loss in the electron beam. Adynamic simulation of this cryostat has been generated to examine pressure and levelfluctuations due to variations in heat loading or other system parameters. This simulatorhas led to some interesting observations in system behavior, which have been shown tooccur in the actual system as well. For example, mass rates of vaporization appear to dropas heat loading increases under certain conditions. Also, the relationship between pressureand SRF tuning characteristics is examined, and the abilities and limitations of thesimulator are presented.

  12. Vortices in Spatially Inhomogeneous Superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehy, Daniel E.; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2004-03-01

    Trapped degenerate Bose gases exhibit superfluidity with spatially nonuniform superfluid density. We study the vortex distribution in such rotating nonuniform superfluids, focusing particularly on deviations from a uniform distribution corresponding to an average rigid-body rotation. The origin of such deviations is the discrete way in which vortices impart angular momentum to the superfluid. This effect favors highest vortex density in regions where the superfluid density is most uniform, i.e., at the center of a trap, while tending to decrease the overall number of vortices. Supported by NSF DMR-0321848 and the Packard Foundation.

  13. Impedance magnitude optimization of the regenerator in Stirling pulse tube cryocoolers working at liquid-helium temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Q.; Qiu, L. M.; Zhi, X. Q.; Han, L.; Gan, Z. H.; Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, X. J.; Sun, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    The impedance magnitude is important for the design and operation of a Stirling pulse tube cryocooler (SPTC). However, the influence of the impedance magnitude on the SPTC working at liquid-helium temperatures is still not clear due to the complexity of refrigeration mechanism at this temperature range. In this study, the influence of the impedance magnitude on the viscous and thermal losses has been investigated, which contributes to the overall refrigeration efficiency. Different from the previous study at liquid nitrogen temperatures, it has been found and verified experimentally that a higher impedance magnitude may result in a larger mass flow rate accompanied with larger losses in the warmer region, hence the refrigeration efficiency is lowered. Numerical simulation is carried out in SPTCs of different geometry dimensions and working parameters, and the experimental study is carried out in a three-stage SPTC. A minimum no-load refrigeration temperature is achieved with an appropriate impedance magnitude that is determined by the combination of frequency and precooling temperature. A lowest temperature of 4.76 K is achieved at 28 Hz and a precooling temperature of 22.6 K, which is the lowest temperature ever achieved with He-4 for SPTCs. Impedance magnitude optimization is clearly an important consideration for the design of a 4 K SPTC.

  14. Contribution to the study of heat transfer mechanisms in He. Application to the stabilization of superconductors by superfluid He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentile, D.

    1980-04-01

    Models were developed of the mechanics of heat transfer between a solid and liquid or superfluid helium in the case where the thermal perturbation applied to the solid is of sufficiently long duration to be able to speak of continuous evacuation and where the perturbation is of short duration to speak of a transient state. The mechanics of heat transfer were studied in the steady state in the case of a channel locally heated in vertical and horizontal position by saturated helium and at one atmosphere. Heat transfer curves were obtained by measuring the temperature of the solid and the thermal gradients in the fluid. Numerical values are given for the maximum propagation flows and minimum recovery flows, heat transfer coefficients, thermal oscillation phenomena and hysteresis phenomena according to the geometrical parameters of the pipe, the surface state of the solid, the relative dimensions of the solid and the liquid volume, the state and nature of the fluid. The thermal fluctuations found experimentally in certain temperature and pressure conditions are interpreted in terms of the formation of gas bubbles on the surface of the solid and in terms of acoustic wave phenomena in the channel and the cavity created by the helium bath.

  15. A novel coupled VM-PT cryocooler operating at liquid helium temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Changzhao; Zhang, Tong; Zhou, Yuan; Wang, Junjie

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents experimental results on a novel two-stage gas-coupled VM-PT cryocooler, which is a one-stage VM cooler coupled a pulse tube cooler. In order to reach temperatures below the critical point of helium-4, a one-stage coaxial pulse tube cryocooler was gas-coupled on the cold end of the former VM cryocooler. The low temperature inertance tube and room temperature gas reservoir were used as phase shifters. The influence of room temperature double-inlet was first investigated, and the results showed that it added excessive heat loss. Then the inertance tube, regenerator and the length of the pulse tube were researched experimentally. Especially, the DC flow, whose function is similar to the double-orifice, was experimentally studied, and shown to contribute about 0.2 K for the no-load temperature. The minimum no-load temperature of 4.4 K was obtained with a pressure ratio near 1.5, working frequency of 2.2 Hz, and average pressure of 1.73 MPa.

  16. Anisotropic superfluidity in a dipolar Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ticknor, Christopher; Wilson, Ryan M; Bohn, John L

    2010-11-04

    A quintessential feature of superfluidity is the ability to support dissipationless flow, for example, when an object moves through a superfluid and experiences no drag. This, however, only occurs when the object is moving below a certain critical velocity; when it exceeds this critical velocity it dissipates energy into excitations of the superfluid, resulting in a net drag force on the object and the breakdown of superfluid flow. In many superfluids, such as dilute Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) of atoms with contact interactions, this critical velocity is simply the speed of sound in the system, where the speed of sound is set by the density and the s-wave scattering length of the atoms. However, for other superfluids, such as liquid {sup 4}He, this is not the case. In {sup 4}He, the critical velocity is set by a roton mode, corresponding to a peak in the static structure factor of the system at some finite, non-zero momentum, with a characteristic velocity that is considerably less than the speed of sound in the liquid. This feature has been verified experimentally via measurements of ion-drift velocity in the fluid, thereby providing insight into the detailed structure of the system. Interestingly, a roton-like feature was predicted to exist in the dispersion relation of a quasi-two-dimensional (q2D) dipolar BEC (DBEC) [16], or a BEC with dipole-dipole interactions. However, unlike the dispersion of {sup 4}He, the disperSion of a DBEC is highly tunable as a function of the condensate density or dipole-dipole interaction (ddi) strength. Additionally, the DBEC is set apart from liquid {sup 4}He in that its interactions depend on how the dipoles are oriented in space. Thus, the DBEC provides an ideal system to study the effects that anisotropies have on the bulk properties of a superfluid, such as the critical velocity. Here we consider a DBEC in a quasi-two-dimensional (q2D) geometry and allow for the dipoles to be polarized at a nonzero angle into the plane

  17. Oscillation mode transformation of edge magnetoplasmons in two-dimensional electron system on liquid-helium surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Shuji; Arai, Toshikazu; Sawada, Anju; Fukuda, Akira; Yayama, Hideki

    2013-10-01

    We measured the resonance spectra of edge magnetoplasmon (EMP) oscillations in a two-dimensional (2D) electron system located on a liquid-helium surface below 1.1 K. Systematic measurements of the resonance frequency and the damping rate as a function of the lateral confinement electric field strength shows clear evidence of the oscillation mode transformation. A pronounced change corresponding to the mode transformation was observed in the damping rate. When 2D electrons are confined in a strong lateral electric field, the damping is weak. As the lateral confinement electric field is reduced below a certain threshold value, an abrupt enhancement of the damping rate is observed. We hypothesize that the weak damping mode in the strong lateral confinement electric field is the compressive density oscillation of the electrons near the edge (conventional EMP) and the strong damping mode in the weak confinement field is the coupled mode of conventional EMP and the boundary displacement wave (BDW). The observation of the strong damping in the BDW-EMP coupled mode is a manifestation of the nearly incompressible feature of strongly interacting classical electrons, which agrees with earlier theoretical predictions.

  18. Nonequilibrium Dynamics and the Evolution of Superfluid Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauls, Jame

    2016-07-01

    The interior crust and the liquid core of neutron stars are predicted to be a mixture of neutron and proton superfluids and a liquid of relativistic electrons and muons. Quantized vortices in the neutron superfluid and quantized flux lines in the proton superconductor are topological defects of these hadronic condensates. I discuss the roles of nucleation, interaction and evolution of topological defects under non-equilibrium conditions in the context of our current understanding and models of the rotational dynamics of pulsars, as well as thermal and magnetic field evolution of neutron stars. I include some speculative ideas on possibile turbulent vortex states in neutron star interiors.

  19. Sloshing dynamics on rotating helium dewar tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    The generalized mathematical formulation of sloshing dynamics for partially filled liquid of cryogenic superfluid helium II in dewar containers driven by both the gravity gradient and jitter accelerations applicable to scientific spacecraft which is eligible to carry out spinning motion and/or slew motion for the purpose to perform scientific observation during the normal spacecraft operation are investigated. An example is given with Gravity Probe-B (GP-B) spacecraft which is responsible for the sloshing dynamics. The jitter accelerations include slew motion, spinning motion, atmospheric drag on the spacecraft, spacecraft attitude motions arising from machinery vibrations, thruster firing, pointing control of spacecraft, crew motion, etc. Explicit mathematical expressions to cover these forces acting on the spacecraft fluid systems are derived. The numerical computation of sloshing dynamics were based on the non-inertia frame spacecraft bound coordinate, and solve time dependent, three-dimensional formulations of partial differential equations subject to initial and boundary conditions. The explicit mathematical expressions of boundary conditions to cover capillary force effect on the liquid vapor interface in microgravity environments are also derived. The formulations of fluid moment and angular moment fluctuations in fluid profiles induced by the sloshing dynamics, together with fluid stress and moment fluctuations exerted on the spacecraft dewar containers were derived. Results were widely published in the open journals.

  20. Sound modes in holographic superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, Christopher P.; Yarom, Amos

    2009-11-15

    Superfluids support many different types of sound waves. We investigate the relation between the sound waves in a relativistic and a nonrelativistic superfluid by using hydrodynamics to calculate the various sound speeds. Then, using a particular holographic scalar gravity realization of a strongly interacting superfluid, we compute first, second, and fourth sound speeds as a function of the temperature. The relativistic low temperature results for second sound differ from Landau's well known prediction for the nonrelativistic, incompressible case.

  1. When superfluids are a drag

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, David C

    2008-01-01

    The article considers the dramatic phenomenon of seemingly frictionless flow of slow-moving superfluids. Specifically the question of whether an object in a superfluid flow experiences any drag force is addressed. A brief account is given of the history of this problem and it is argued that recent advances in ultracold atomic physics can shed much new light on this problem. The article presents the commonly held notion that sufficiently slow-moving superfluids can flow without drag and also discusses research suggesting that scattering quantum fluctuations might cause drag in a superfluid moving at any speed.

  2. Liquid nitrogen historical and current usage of the central helium liquefier at SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGraff, B.; Howell, M.; Kim, S.; Neustadt, T.

    2015-12-01

    The main cryogenic system for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is comprised of a 4-K cold box, a 2-K cold box, six warm compressors, and ancillary support equipment. This system has been cold and operating with little disruption since 2005. Design and operation of liquid nitrogen (LN2) supplied from a single 20,000-gallon supply Dewar will be discussed. LN2 used to precool the 4-K cold box heat exchanger started to increase around 2011. LN2 Consumption during 2012 and 2013 was almost double the nominal usage rate. Studies of this data, plant parameter changes to respond to this information, and current interpretations are detailed in this paper. The usage rate of LN2 returned to normal in late 2013 and remained there until recent additional changes. Future study plans to understand potential causes of this including contamination migration within the 4-K cold box will also be addressed.

  3. Liquid helium inertial jet for comparative study of classical and quantum turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Duri, D.; Charvin, P.; Rousset, B.; Poncet, J.-M.; Diribarne, P.

    2011-11-15

    We present a new cryogenic wind tunnel facility developed to study the high Reynolds number developed classical or quantum turbulence in liquid {sup 4}He. A stable inertial round jet flow with a Reynolds number of 4 x 10{sup 6} can be sustained in both He I and He II down to a minimum temperature of 1.7 K. The circuit can be pressurized up to 3.5 x 10{sup 5} Pa. The system has been designed to exploit the self-similar properties of the jet far field in order to adapt to the spatial resolution of the existing probes. Multiple and complementary sensors can be simultaneously installed to obtain spatial and time resolved measurements. The technical difficulties and design details are described and the system performance is presented.

  4. Massless surface waves between two different superfluid phases of 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todoshchenko, I.

    2016-04-01

    An interface between two media is a topologically stable two-dimensional object where 3D-symmetry breaks which allows for the existence of many exotic excitations. A direct way to explore surface excitations is to investigate their interaction with the surface waves, such as very well known capillary-gravity waves and crystallization waves. Helium remains liquid down to absolute zero where bulk excitations are frozen out and do not mask the interaction of the waves with the surface states. Here we show the possibility of the massless wave which can propagate along the surface between two different superfluids phases of 3He . The displacement of the surface in this wave occurs due to the transition of helium atoms from one phase to another, so that there is no flow of particles as densities of phases are equal. We calculate the dispersion of the wave in which the inertia is provided by spin supercurrents, and the restoring force is magnetic field gradient. We calculate the dissipation of the wave and show the preferable conditions to observe it.

  5. Nonlinear Transport of the Wigner Crystal on Superfluid 4He in a Quasi-One-Dimensional Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasylenko, Anna A.; Misko, Vyacheslav R.

    2014-07-01

    We study transport properties of a Wigner crystal driven by an external force on the surface of superfluid 4He, in the "quantum wire" regime, i.e. in the quasi-one-dimensional (quasi-1D) case when a typical width of the channel is comparable to the inter-electron separation. Utilizing molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the electronic transport through the channels with different constrictions: (i) geometrical constrictions with varying shape and size, and (ii) a saddle-point potential with varying gate voltage. The average particle velocity has been calculated as a function of the driving force or gate voltage. We have revealed a significant difference in the dynamical behavior for long and short constrictions. In particular, we found that the oscillations of the average particle velocity in channels with short constrictions exhibit a clear correlation with the transitions between the states with different numbers of rows of particles in the constriction, while for channels with longer constrictions these oscillations are suppressed. The obtained results are in agreement with the recent experimental observations,1 and thus bring new important insights into the dynamics of electrons floating on the surface of superfluid 4He in channels with constrictions. Special Issue Comments: This article presents results on the dynamics of electrons moving on the surface of liquid helium in narrow channels with constrictions, with a focus on the "quantum wire", i.e. single file, regime. This article is connected to the Special Issue articles about advanced statistical properties in single file dynamics39 and the experiments on liquid helium.40

  6. Reducing the Liquid Helium Consumption of Superconducting Rock Magnetometers (SRMs) used in Paleomagnetic and Rock Magnetic studies: Gallium Lubrication of Gifford-McMahon Cryocoolers Leads to a Dramatic Increase in Cool-down Efficiency, and a Drop in Liquid Helium Consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Two-stage Gifford-McMahon helium-gas cryocoolers have been used for the past 40+ years in a wide variety of cryogenic applications, including reducing the liquid helium consumption of SRMs. However, the cooling efficiency depends greatly on the friction of the displacement pistons, which need to be replaced every few years. This and the rising cost of liquid helium are major headaches in the operation of modern paleomagnetic laboratories. Although the development of efficient pulse-tube cryocoolers has eliminated the need for liquid helium in new superconducting magnetometers, there are still nearly 100 older SRMs around the globe that use liquid helium. In a failed attempt to replace the Gifford-McMahon unit on one of Caltech's SRMs with a pulse-tube, we irreversibly contaminated the cylindrical surfaces of the stainless-steel heat exchanger with a thin film of gallium, a non-toxic metal that has a melting temperature of ~ 30˚C. Liquid gallium will diffuse into other metals, altering their surface properties. We noticed that the next cryocooler-assisted cool down of the SRM went nearly twice as fast as in previous cycles, and the helium boiloff rate for the past 2 years has stabilized at less than half of its average over the past 30 years. It seems that the thin layer of gallium may be reducing the sliding friction of the Gifford-McMahon cryocoolers. We recently tested this on a second SRM, with similar results. We found that the inner cryocooler surface reached its equilibrium temperature in about 1/3 of the time that it took in previous cool-down cycles. WSGI also confirmed that this cool-down was unusually efficient compared to other instruments they have built. Subsequent records of the helium gas boiloff show that this system is also running at about half of its former loss rate. Based on these two results, we tentatively recommend this simple procedure any time cold-head swaps are performed on these cryocoolers.

  7. A liquid-helium-free superconducting coil system forming a flat minimum-magnetic-field distribution of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Ken-ichi Nara, Takayuki; Saitoh, Yuichi; Yokota, Watalu

    2014-02-15

    A flat distribution of the minimum magnetic field (flat-B{sub min}) of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) is expected to perform better in highly charged ion production than classical B{sub min}. To form a flat-B{sub min} structure with a liquid helium-free superconducting device, a coil system of seven coils with four current leads has been designed. The lead number was reduced by connecting the plural coils in series to maintain the flat-B{sub min} structure even when the coil currents are changed for adjustment. This coil system can be operated with a helium-free cryostat, since the estimation of heat from the leads to the coils is nearly equivalent to the existing superconducting ECRIS of a similar type.

  8. Superfluid 3He in ``nematically ordered'' aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    Liquid 3He immersed in aerogel allows investigation of the influence of impurities on unconventional superfluidity. In most of such experiments silica aerogels are used. These aerogels consist of thin strands which form a ``wisp.'' Although it is established that superfluid phases of 3He in silica aerogels (A-like and B-like) have the same order parameters as A and B phases of bulk 3He, many new phenomena were observed. In particular, it was found that global anisotropy of aerogel (e.g. caused by squeezing or stretching) can orient the order parameter. Depending on prehistory and on the type of the anisotropy the A-like phase may be homogeneous or in a state with random orbital part of the order parameter. Theory predicts that a large stretching anisotropy may even influence the order parameter structure: polar phase (or A phase with polar distortion), which are not realized in bulk 3He, may become more favorable than pure A phase. Large stretching anisotropy is hardly achievable in silica aerogel. Therefore in experiments described in the talk we used a new type of aerogel, consisting of Al2O3 . H2O strands which are parallel to each other, i.e. this aerogel may be considered as infinitely stretched. We found that the superfluid phase diagram of 3He in such ``nematically ordered'' aerogel is different from the case of 3He in silica aerogel and that both observed A and B phases have large polar distortion. This distortion is larger at low pressures and grows on warming. There are indications that a pure polar phase appears near the superfluid transition temperature. Recent results will be also presented.

  9. Theory of dark matter superfluidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhiani, Lasha; Khoury, Justin

    2015-11-01

    We propose a novel theory of dark matter (DM) superfluidity that matches the successes of the Λ cold dark matter (Λ CDM ) model on cosmological scales while simultaneously reproducing the modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) phenomenology on galactic scales. The DM and MOND components have a common origin, representing different phases of a single underlying substance. DM consists of axionlike particles with mass of order eV and strong self-interactions. The condensate has a polytropic equation of state P ˜ρ3 giving rise to a superfluid core within galaxies. Instead of behaving as individual collisionless particles, the DM superfluid is more aptly described as collective excitations. Superfluid phonons, in particular, are assumed to be governed by a MOND-like effective action and mediate a MONDian acceleration between baryonic matter particles. Our framework naturally distinguishes between galaxies (where MOND is successful) and galaxy clusters (where MOND is not); due to the higher velocity dispersion in clusters, and correspondingly higher temperature, the DM in clusters is either in a mixture of superfluid and the normal phase or fully in the normal phase. The rich and well-studied physics of superfluidity leads to a number of observational signatures: an array of low-density vortices in galaxies; merger dynamics that depend on the infall velocity vs phonon sound speed; distinct mass peaks in bulletlike cluster mergers, corresponding to superfluid and normal components; and interference patters in supercritical mergers. Remarkably, the superfluid phonon effective theory is strikingly similar to that of the unitary Fermi gas, which has attracted much excitement in the cold atom community in recent years. The critical temperature for DM superfluidity is of order mK, comparable to known cold atom Bose-Einstein condensates. Identifying a precise cold atom analog would give important insights on the microphysical interactions underlying DM superfluidity

  10. Superfluidity versus Bloch oscillations in confined atomic gases.

    PubMed

    Büchler, H P; Geshkenbein, V B; Blatter, G

    2001-09-01

    We study the superfluid properties of (quasi) one-dimensional bosonic atom gases/liquids in traps with finite geometries in the presence of strong quantum fluctuations. Driving the condensate with a moving defect we find the nucleation rate for phase slips using instanton techniques. While phase slips are quenched in a ring resulting in a superfluid response, they proliferate in a tube geometry where we find Bloch oscillations in the chemical potential. These Bloch oscillations describe the individual tunneling of atoms through the defect and thus are a consequence of particle quantization.

  11. Resonantly paired fermionic superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurarie, V.; Radzihovsky, L.

    2007-01-01

    We present a theory of a degenerate atomic Fermi gas, interacting through a narrow Feshbach resonance, whose position and therefore strength can be tuned experimentally, as demonstrated recently in ultracold trapped atomic gases. The distinguishing feature of the theory is that its accuracy is controlled by a dimensionless parameter proportional to the ratio of the width of the resonance to Fermi energy. The theory is therefore quantitatively accurate for a narrow Feshbach resonance. In the case of a narrow s-wave resonance, our analysis leads to a quantitative description of the crossover between a weakly paired BCS superconductor of overlapping Cooper pairs and a strongly paired molecular Bose-Einstein condensate of diatomic molecules. In the case of pairing via a p-wave resonance, that we show is always narrow for a sufficiently low density, we predict a detuning-temperature phase diagram, that in the course of a BCS-BEC crossover can exhibit a host of thermodynamically distinct phases separated by quantum and classical phase transitions. For an intermediate strength of the dipolar anisotropy, the system exhibits a px + i py paired superfluidity that undergoes a topological phase transition between a weakly coupled gapless ground state at large positive detuning and a strongly paired fully gapped molecular superfluid for a negative detuning. In two dimensions the former state is characterized by a Pfaffian ground state exhibiting topological order and non-Abelian vortex excitations familiar from fractional quantum Hall systems.

  12. A cosmic superfluid phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradwohl, Ben-Ami

    1991-01-01

    The universe may have undergone a superfluid-like phase during its evolution, resulting from the injection of nontopological charge into the spontaneously broken vacuum. In the presence of vortices this charge is identified with angular momentum. This leads to turbulent domains on the scale of the correlation length. By restoring the symmetry at low temperatures, the vortices dissociate and push the charges to the boundaries of these domains. The model can be scaled (phenomenologically) to very low energies, it can be incorporated in a late time phase transition and form large scale structure in the boundary layers of the correlation volumes. The novel feature of the model lies in the fact that the dark matter is endowed with coherent motion. The possibilities of identifying this flow around superfluid vortices with the observed large scale bulk motion is discussed. If this identification is possible, then the definite prediction can be made that a more extended map of peculiar velocities would have to reveal large scale circulations in the flow pattern.

  13. Dissipative superfluid dynamics from gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Jyotirmoy; Bhattacharyya, Sayantani; Minwalla, Shiraz

    2011-04-01

    Charged asymptotically AdS 5 black branes are sometimes unstable to the condensation of charged scalar fields. For fields of infinite charge and squared mass -4 Herzog was able to analytically determine the phase transition temperature and compute the endpoint of this instability in the neighborhood of the phase transition. We generalize Herzog's construction by perturbing away from infinite charge in an expansion in inverse charge and use the solutions so obtained as input for the fluid gravity map. Our tube wise construction of patched up locally hairy black brane solutions yields a one to one map from the space of solutions of superfluid dynamics to the long wavelength solutions of the Einstein Maxwell system. We obtain explicit expressions for the metric, gauge field and scalar field dual to an arbitrary superfluid flow at first order in the derivative expansion. Our construction allows us to read off the the leading dissipative corrections to the perfect superfluid stress tensor, current and Josephson equations. A general framework for dissipative superfluid dynamics was worked out by Landau and Lifshitz for zero superfluid velocity and generalized to nonzero fluid velocity by Clark and Putterman. Our gravitational results do not fit into the 13 parameter Clark-Putterman framework. Purely within fluid dynamics we present a consistent new generalization of Clark and Putterman's equations to a set of superfluid equations parameterized by 14 dissipative parameters. The results of our gravitational calculation fit perfectly into this enlarged framework. In particular we compute all the dissipative constants for the gravitational superfluid.

  14. The superfluid diffusion equation S(T)(@T/@t) = nabla ter dot (K(T)( nabla T) sup 1/3 )

    SciTech Connect

    Dresner, L.

    1990-06-01

    This report deals with the superfluid diffusion equation, S(T)({partial derivative}T/{partial derivative}t) = {nabla}{center dot}(K(T)({nabla}T){sup 1/3}), which describes heat transport in turbulent helium-II (superfluid helium). Three methods of solution -- the method of similarity, the variational method, and the method of maximum/minimum principles -- are applied to this equation. The solutions discovered are helpful in addressing the use of helium-II in superconducting magnets and other applications. 22 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Far-Infrared Photometry with an 0.4-Meter Liquid Helium Cooled Balloon-Borne Telescope. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, M. R.

    1977-01-01

    A 0.4-meter aperture, liquid helium cooled multichannel far-infrared balloon-borne telescope was constructed to survey the galactic plane. Nine new sources, above a 3-sigma confidence level of 1300 Jy, were identified. Although two-thirds of the scanned area was more than 10 degrees from the galactic plane, no sources were detected in that region; all nine fell within 10 degrees and eight of those within 4 degrees of the galactic equator. Correlations with visible, compact H lines associated with radio continuum and with sources displaying spectra steeply rising between 11 and 20 microns were noted, while stellar objects were not detected.

  16. Is BEC behind superfluidity/superconductivity in fermions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Llano, Manuel

    2000-06-01

    In the late 1930's London conjectured that BEC must be behind the superfluid transition in helium-4, a Bose system. What about Fermi systems where boson Cooper pairs (CPs) are formed? CPs in two (2D) and three (3D) dimensions are analyzed for an interaction general enough to mimic either helium-3 or electron- (or hole-) charge-carrier Fermi systems. Bosonic CPs with non-zero center-of-mass momentum (CMM)---usually neglected in BCS theory---are included. The CP binding energy is expanded analytically in 2D in powers of the CMM up to quadratic terms. For either 2D or 3D, in the weak-coupling (so-called BCS) regime of severely-overlapped CPs a term linear in the CMM dominates the pair excitation energy, whereas in the strong-coupling (so-called Bose) regime the quadratic-in-CMM kinetic energy of the strongly-bound, well-separated composite boson pairs dominates. Results are expected to play a nontrivial role in testing a BEC model of superfluid helium-3 or of superconductivity based upon their respective CPs.

  17. Helium jet dispersion to atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Hasna J.

    1986-01-01

    On the event of loss of vacuum guard of superinsulated helium dewar, high rate of heat transfer into the tank occurs. The rapid boiling of liquid helium causes the burst disk to rupture at four atmospheres and consequently the helium passes to the atmosphere through vent lines. The gaseous helium forms a vertical buoyant jet as it exits the vent line into a stagnant environment. Characterization of the gaseous jet is achieved by detailed analysis of the axial and radial dependence of the flow parameters.

  18. Conservation of helicity in superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Hridesh; Kleckner, Dustin; Proment, Davide; Irvine, William T. M.

    2015-03-01

    Helicity arises as a special conserved quantity in ideal fluids, in addition to energy, momentum and angular momentum. As a measure of the knottedness of vortex lines, Helicity provides an important tool for studying a wide variety of physical systems such as plasmas and turbulent fluids. Superfluids flow without resistance just like ideal (Euler) fluids, making it natural to ask whether their knottedness is similarly preserved. We address the conservation of helicity in superfluids theoretically and examine its consequences in numerical simulations.

  19. Infrared transmission at the 3.39 micron helium-neon laser wavelength in liquid-core quartz fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, A. K.; Hinkley, E. D.; Menzies, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared transmission at the 3.39 micron helium-neon laser wavelength has been measured in a tetrachloroethylene-filled fused-quartz fiber. The loss measurements were taken for three different settings of laser light intensity using a series of neutral density filters. The average value of transmission loss at this wavelength was found to be 56 dB/km.

  20. Performance of compact liquid helium free 3He-4He dilution refrigerator directly coupled with GM cooler in TES microcalorimeter operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeno, T.; Kamioka, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Maehata, K.; Ishibashi, K.; Takasaki, K.; Tanaka, K.

    2009-02-01

    A superconducting transition edge thermosensor (TES) microcalorimeter was cooled by a compact liquid-helium-free 3He-4He dilution refrigerator with loading a Gifford-McMahon (GM) cooler for detection of LX-ray photons emitted from an 241Am source. The first and second stages of the GM cooler are directly coupled with the first and the second precool heat exchangers of a stick shaped dilution unit through copper plates in the vacuum chamber, respectively. The circulating 3He-4He gas through the precooled heat exchangers is condensed into a liquid of condense mixture by the isoenthalpic expansion through the Joule-Thomson impedance. A cascade of two mixing chambers are employed for achieving sufficient cooling power. The helium-free dilution refrigerator performs the cooling power of 20 μW at 100 mK. The TES and SQUID chips suffered from mechanical vibrations induced by a reciprocating motion of the displacer of the GM cooler. Detection signals of LX-ray photons emitted from 241Am source were observed by operating the TES microcalorimeter in severe noise environment induced by mechanical vibrations.

  1. Unconventional Superfluidity in Yttrium Iron Garnet Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chen; Nattermann, Thomas; Pokrovsky, Valery L.

    2016-06-01

    We argue that the magnon condensate in yttrium iron garnet may display experimentally observable superfluidity at room temperature despite the 100 times dominance of the normal density over superfluid ones. The superfluidity has a more complicated nature than in known superfluids since the U(1) symmetry of the global phase shift is violated by the dipolar interaction leading to the exchange of spin moment between the condensate and the crystal lattice. It produces periodic inhomogeneity in the stationary superfluid flow. We discuss the manner of observation and possible applications of magnon superfluidity. It may strongly enhance the spin-torque effects and reduce the energy consumption of the magnonic devices.

  2. Fermionic superfluidity with imbalanced spin populations.

    PubMed

    Zwierlein, Martin W; Schirotzek, André; Schunck, Christian H; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2006-01-27

    We established superfluidity in a two-state mixture of ultracold fermionic atoms with imbalanced state populations. This study relates to the long-standing debate about the nature of the superfluid state in Fermi systems. Indicators for superfluidity were condensates of fermion pairs and vortices in rotating clouds. For strong interactions, near a Feshbach resonance, superfluidity was observed for a broad range of population imbalances. We mapped out the superfluid regime as a function of interaction strength and population imbalance and characterized the quantum phase transition to the normal state, known as the Pauli limit of superfluidity.

  3. Unconventional Superfluidity in Yttrium Iron Garnet Films.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chen; Nattermann, Thomas; Pokrovsky, Valery L

    2016-06-24

    We argue that the magnon condensate in yttrium iron garnet may display experimentally observable superfluidity at room temperature despite the 100 times dominance of the normal density over superfluid ones. The superfluidity has a more complicated nature than in known superfluids since the U(1) symmetry of the global phase shift is violated by the dipolar interaction leading to the exchange of spin moment between the condensate and the crystal lattice. It produces periodic inhomogeneity in the stationary superfluid flow. We discuss the manner of observation and possible applications of magnon superfluidity. It may strongly enhance the spin-torque effects and reduce the energy consumption of the magnonic devices. PMID:27391750

  4. Measurement of wall relaxation times of polarized Helium-3 in bulk liquid Helium-4 for the neutron electric dipole moment experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Jacob

    The Neutron Electric Dipole Moment (nEDM) experiment that will take place at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee will measure the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron with a precision of order 10-28 e-cm, utilizing spin-polarized 3He in bulk liquid 4He to detect neutron precession in a 10 mG magnetic field and 50 kV/cm electric field. Since depolarized 3He will produce a background, relaxation of the polarized 3He, characterized by the probability of depolarization per bounce, Pd, was measured for materials that will be in contact with polarized 3He. Depolarization probabilities were determined from measurements of the longitudinal relaxation time of polarized 3He in bulk liquid 4He inside an acrylic cell coated with the wavelength shifter deuterated tetraphenyl butadiene (d-TPB), which will be used to coat the nEDM measurement cell. Relaxation measurements were also performed while rods, made from plumbing material Torlon and valve bellows material BeCu, were present in the cell. The BeCu was coated with Pyralin resin prior to relaxation measurements, while relaxation measurements were performed both before and after the Torlon rod was coated with Pyralin resin. The depolarization probabilities were found to be Pd-TPBd <1.32x10-7 PBareTorlon d=1.01+/-0.08 x10-6 PCoatedTorlon d=2.5+/-0.1 x10-7 PCoatedBeCu d=7.9+/-0.3 x10-7 The relaxation rates extrapolated from the observed values of Pd for d-TPB, coated Torlon, and coated BeCu in the nEDM apparatus were found to be consistent with design goals.

  5. Rotating superfluid turbulence.

    PubMed

    Tsubota, Makoto; Araki, Tsunehiko; Barenghi, Carlo F

    2003-05-23

    Almost all studies of vortex states in helium II have been concerned with either ordered vortex arrays or disordered vortex tangles. This work numerically studies what happens in the presence of both rotation (which induces order) and thermal counterflow (which induces disorder). We find a new statistically steady state in which the vortex tangle is polarized along the rotational axis. Our results are used to interpret an instability that was discovered experimentally by Swanson et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 50, 190 (1983)

  6. Metastable Aluminum Atoms Floating on the Surface of Helium Nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Jay; Besley, Nicholas A; Stace, Anthony J; Sarma, Gautam; Cunningham, Ethan M; Boatwright, Adrian; Yang, Shengfu; Ellis, Andrew M

    2015-06-12

    Metal atoms have proved to be sensitive probes of the properties of superfluid helium nanodroplets. To date, all experiments on the doping of helium droplets have concentrated on the attachment of metal atoms in their ground electronic states. Here we report the first examples of metal atoms in excited states becoming attached to helium nanodroplets. The atoms in question are aluminum, and they have been generated by laser ablation in a metastable quartet state, which attaches to and remains on the surface of helium droplets. Evidence for a surface location comes from electronic spectra, which consist of very narrow absorption profiles that show very small spectral shifts. Supporting ab initio calculations show there to be an energy incentive for a metastable Al atom to remain on the surface of a helium droplet rather than move to the interior. The results suggest that helium droplets may provide a method for the capture and transport of metastable excited atomic and molecular species.

  7. Superfluid Stirling refrigerator with a counterflow regenerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisson, J. G.; Swift, G. W.

    The superfluid Stirling refrigerator (SSR) uses a He-3-He-4 liquid mixture as a working fluid. It operates at temperatures below 2 K where the He-4 component of the working fluid is superfluid. The He-3 component of the working fluid, to first approximation, behaves thermodynamically like an ideal gas in the inert background of superfluid He-4. Using pistons equipped with a superleak bypass, it is possible to expand and compress the He-3 solute 'gas'. The SSR is a Stirling machine equipped with these 'superleaked' pistons to take advantage of the properties of the He-3 solute to cool below 1 K. The proof of principle was shown by Kotsubo and Swift in 1990. There are three other techniques for cooling below 1 K: (1) the He-3-He-4 dilution refrigerator which utilizes the endothermic heat of mixing of He-3 into He-4 to reach temperatures below 0.010 K; (2) the evaporation of He-3 which can reach temperatures of 0.3 K; and, (3) adiabatic demagnetization of a paramagnetic salt. There are several advantages of the SSR over each of the other techniques. The power consumption of a dilution refrigerator is typically on the order of kilowatts; whereas, the SSR consumes hundreds of watts. The SSR has the potential to cool below 0.3 K and out-perform the evaporative He-3 refrigerator. Adiabatic demagnetization often requires magnetic shielding between the refrigerator and the object to be cooled; obviously, the SSR requires no such shielding. There is an interest in developing subkelvin cryocoolers for satellite-borne X-ray and infrared detectors. In space applications, the power consumption of an SSR can be reduced to tens of watts. This coupled with the SSR's insensitivity to a zero G environment makes it an attractive option to cool detectors in space.

  8. Superfluid Stirling refrigerator with a counterflow regenerator

    SciTech Connect

    Brisson, J.G.; Swift, G.W.

    1992-01-01

    The superfluid Stirling refrigerator (SSR) uses a [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He liquid mixture as a working fluid. It operates at temperatures below 2 K where the [sup 4]He component of the working fluid is superfluid. The [sup 3]He component of the working fluid, to first approximation, behaves thermodynamically like an ideal gas in the inert background of superfluid [sup 4]He. Using pistons equipped with a superleak bypass, it is possible to expand and compress the [sup 3]He solute gas.'' The SSR is a Stirling machine equipped with these superleaked'' pistons to take advantage of the properties of the [sup 3]He solute to cool below 1 K. The proof of principle was shown by Kotsubo and Swift in 1990. There are three other techniques for cooling below 1 K: (1) the [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He dilution refrigerator which utilizes the endothermic heat of mixing of [sup 3]He into [sup 4]He to reach temperatures below 0.010 K; (2) the evaporation of [sup 3]He which can reach temperatures of 0.3 K; and, (3) adiabatic demagnetization of a paramagnetic salt. There are several advantages of the SSR over each of the other techniques. The power consumption of a dilution refrigerator is typically on the order of kilowatts; whereas, the SSR consumes hundreds of watts. The SSR has the potential to cool below 0.3 K and out-perform the evaporative [sup 3]He refrigerator. Adiabatic demagnetization often requires magnetic shielding between the refrigerator and the object to be cooled; obviously, the SSR requires no such shielding. There is an interest in developing subkelvin cryocoolers for satellite-borne X-ray and infrared detectors. In space applications, the power consumption of an SSR can be reduced to tens of watts. This coupled with the SSR's insensitivity to a zero G environment makes it an attractive option to cool detectors in space.

  9. Helium-refrigeration system

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, J.R.; Millar, B.; Sutherland, A.

    1995-08-01

    The design, procurement, and preliminary construction was completed for adding two more wet expansion engines to two helium refrigerators. These will be added in mid-year FY 1995. In addition a variable speed drive will be added to an existing helium compressor. This is part of an energy conservation upgrade project to reduce operating costs from the use of electricity and liquid nitrogen. This project involves the replacement of Joule-Thompson valves in the refrigerators with expansion engines resulting in system efficiency improvements of about 30% and improved system reliability.

  10. High-performance MgB2 superconducting wires for use under liquid-helium-free conditions fabricated using an internal Mg diffusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, ShuJun; Song, Minghui; Matsumoto, Akiyoshi; Togano, Kazumasa; Takeguchi, Masaki; Ohmura, Takahito; Kumakura, Hiroaki

    2013-12-01

    MgB2 has a superconducting transition temperature (Tc) of 39 K, which is much higher than that for practical metallic superconductors. Thus, it is hoped that MgB2 can not only replace metallic superconductors, but can be used under liquid-helium-free conditions, for example, at temperatures of 10-20 K that can easily be achieved using cryocooling systems. However, to date, the reported critical current density (Jc) for MgB2 wires is not high enough for large-scale applications in liquid-helium-free conditions. In the present study, successful fabrication of high-performance MgB2 superconducting wires was carried out using an internal Mg diffusion (IMD) process, involving a p-dimethylbenzene (C8H10) pre-treatment of carbon-coated B powder with nanometer-sized particles. The resulting wires exhibited the highest ever Jc of 1.2 × 105 A cm-2 at 4.2 K and 10 T, and an engineering critical current density (Je) of about 1 × 104 A cm-2. Not only in 4.2 K, but also in 10 K, the Jc values for the wires fabricated in the present study are in fact higher than that for Nb-Ti wires at 4.2 K for the magnetic fields at which the measurements were carried out. At 20 K and 5 T, the Jc and Je were about 7.6 × 105 A cm-2 and 5.3 × 103 A cm-2, respectively, which are the highest values reported for MgB2 wires to date. The results of a detailed microstructural analysis suggested that the main reason for the superior electrical performance was the high density of the MgB2 layer rather than just the small grain size, and that the critical current could be further increased by suitable control of the microstructure. These high-performance IMD-processed MgB2 wires are thus promising superconductors for applications such as magnetic resonance imaging and maglev trains that can operate under liquid-helium-free conditions.

  11. Nonlocality in homogeneous superfluid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dix, O. M.; Zieve, R. J.

    2014-10-01

    Simulating superfluid turbulence using the localized induction approximation allows neighboring parallel vortices to proliferate. In many circumstances a turbulent tangle becomes unsustainable, degenerating into a series of parallel, noninteracting vortex lines. Calculating with the fully nonlocal Biot-Savart law prevents this difficulty but also increases computation time. Here we use a truncated Biot-Savart integral to investigate the effects of nonlocality on homogeneous turbulence. We find that including the nonlocal interaction up to roughly the spacing between nearest-neighbor vortex segments prevents the parallel alignment from developing, yielding an accurate model of homogeneous superfluid turbulence with less computation time.

  12. Superfluid Turbulence in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, Bennett

    Project Summary: Superfluid Turbulence in Neutron Stars The purpose of this proposal is to use recent progress in condensed matter physics and nuclear physics to advance our understanding of the inner workings of neutron stars and the associated observable phenomena. We will focus on determination of the observable consequences of superfluid turbulence in neutron stars. In particular, we will address these questions: 1) What is the signature of superfluid turbulence in the spin glitches seen in magnetars and pulsars? Observed post-glitch recovery in magnetars occurs more quickly than current theory predicts. We will explore if glitch recovery observed in magnetars can be explained by turbulent flow of the superfluid. 2) Are observed stochastic spin variations related to turbulence? Superfluid turbulence will exert a stochastic torque on the neutron star crust. We will calculate the response of the crust to compare with the observed power spectra of spin fluctuations. 3) Can superfluid turbulence produce observed spin glitches? We will study if transient effects arising from non-linearities in turbulent flow can produce observed glitches. We will predict the spin-up timescale to compare with existing and future data, and investigate if the basic features of the observed glitch distribution can be explained. Significant progress on these issues is now possible with modern models of the neutron star interior, in conjunction with laboratory observations of superfluid turbulence and the development of powerful new techniques for modeling superfluid turbulence. This project will be a synthesis of theoretical study of fundamental physical processes and testable predictions that will constrain the physics. Our goal is to develop theoretical background and realistic physical models with which to explain and interpret existing and future data of spin glitches in magnetars from RXTE, Fermi, Swift, Chandra, Suzaku, and XMM-Newton. This work addresses the ATP goal to explain

  13. Vortex lattice inhomogeneity in spatially inhomogeneous superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehy, Daniel E.; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2004-11-01

    A trapped degenerate Bose gas exhibits superfluidity with spatially nonuniform superfluid density. We show that the vortex distribution in such a highly inhomogeneous rotating superfluid is nevertheless nearly uniform. The inhomogeneity in vortex density, which diminishes in the rapid-rotation limit, is driven by the discrete way vortices impart angular momentum to the superfluid. This effect favors the highest vortex density in regions where the superfluid density is most uniform (e.g., the center of a harmonically trapped gas). A striking consequence of this is that the boson velocity deviates from a rigid-body form exhibiting a radial-shear flow past the vortex lattice.

  14. A Study on the Heat Transfer Properties of Pressurized Helium II through Fine Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, N.; Nakai, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Murakami, M.; Shintomi, T.

    2006-04-27

    An experimental study was carried out on the heat transfer properties of pressurized superfluid helium in the Gorter-Mellink heat transfer region. By using channels of hydraulic diameter from 5.6 x 10- through 4.81 x 10-3 m, the heat transfer properties of pressurized superfluid helium were measured in the experiment. The temperature dependence of Gorter-Mellink parameter, AGM, is revealed from the experimental results. It is also proven that AGM depend only on temperature, and not on the channel size and shape. The effect of quantized vortices on heat transfer of pressurized superfluid helium is discussed in comparison of the channel diameter with the mean vortex line spacing.

  15. Dewar to dewar model for superfluid helium transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, H. A.

    1988-01-01

    A model has been developed to predict the flow of He II between a source and a receiving dewar. The model uses a finite difference aproximation to integrate the describing equations. The transfer path may contain porous plugs or mechanical pumps, heater sections, heat leaks, constrictions due to valves, and bends. These line elements may occur in any order and in any quantity. The line elements are easily reconfigured by changing the input data. The input consists of the number of finite element cells, the pressure in each dewar, the heat input to each section and the dimensions of each section. The output is the temperature, pressure, flow rate, velocities and heat flux in each section. An internal reference table provides the properties of He II. The model is programmed for a LOTUS work sheet. It converges rapidly and usually requires 10 to 15 iterations. For most applications an iteration takes 30 s on an AT. The predictions agree well with experimental data.

  16. Helium dilution refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Roach, Patrick R.; Gray, Kenneth E.

    1988-01-01

    A helium dilution refrigeration system operable over a limited time period, and recyclable for a next period of operation. The refrigeration system is compact with a self-contained pumping system and heaters for operation of the system. A mixing chamber contains .sup.3 He and .sup.4 He liquids which are precooled by a coupled container containing .sup.3 He liquid, enabling the phase separation of a .sup.3 He rich liquid phase from a dilute .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He liquid phase which leads to the final stage of a dilution cooling process for obtaining low temperatures. The mixing chamber and a still are coupled by a fluid line and are maintained at substantially the same level with the still cross sectional area being smaller than that of the mixing chamber. This configuration provides maximum cooling power and efficiency by the cooling period ending when the .sup.3 He liquid is depleted from the mixing chamber with the mixing chamber nearly empty of liquid helium, thus avoiding unnecessary and inefficient cooling of a large amount of the dilute .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He liquid phase.

  17. Helium dilution refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Roach, P.R.; Gray, K.E.

    1988-09-13

    A helium dilution refrigeration system operable over a limited time period, and recyclable for a next period of operation is disclosed. The refrigeration system is compact with a self-contained pumping system and heaters for operation of the system. A mixing chamber contains [sup 3]He and [sup 4]He liquids which are precooled by a coupled container containing [sup 3]He liquid, enabling the phase separation of a [sup 3]He rich liquid phase from a dilute [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He liquid phase which leads to the final stage of a dilution cooling process for obtaining low temperatures. The mixing chamber and a still are coupled by a fluid line and are maintained at substantially the same level with the still cross sectional area being smaller than that of the mixing chamber. This configuration provides maximum cooling power and efficiency by the cooling period ending when the [sup 3]He liquid is depleted from the mixing chamber with the mixing chamber nearly empty of liquid helium, thus avoiding unnecessary and inefficient cooling of a large amount of the dilute [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He liquid phase. 2 figs.

  18. Curious Fluid Flows: From Complex Fluid Breakup to Helium Wetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Fawn Mitsu

    This work encompasses three projects; pinch-off dynamics in non-Newtonian fluids; helium wetting on alkali metals; and the investigation of quartz tuning forks as cryogenic pressure transducers. Chapter 1 discusses the breakup of a non-Newtonian yield stress fluid bridge. We measured the minimum neck radius, hmin, as a function of time and fit it to a power law with exponent n 1. We then compare n1 to exponent n2, obtained from a rotational rheometer using a Herschel-Bulkley model. We confirm n1=n2 for the widest variety of non-Newtonian fluids to date. When these fluids are diluted with a Newtonian fluid n1 does not equal n2. No current models predict that behavior, identifying a new class of fluid breakup. Chapter 2 presents the first chemical potential-temperature phase diagram of helium on lithium, sodium and gold, using a novel pressure measurement system. The growth and superfluid transition of a helium film on these substrates is measured via an oscillator for isotherms (fixed temperature, varying amount of helium gas), and quenches (fixed amount of helium gas, varying temperature). The chemical potential-temperature plot is similar for gold, lithium and sodium despite the large difference in the substrate binding energies. No signs of a 2-D liquid-vapor transition were seen. Chapter 3 discusses the creation of a 32.768 kHz quartz tuning fork in situ pressure transducer. Tuning forks are used to measure pressure at room temperature, but no work addresses their potential as cryogenic pressure transducers. We mapped out the behavior of a tuning fork as a function of pressure at 298, 7.0, 2.5, 1.6, 1.0 and 0.7 K by measuring the quality factor. The fork is sensitive to pressures above 0.1 mTorr, limiting its use as a pressure gauge at 0.6 K and below. The experimental curves were compared to a theoretical Q(P, T) function that was refined using the 298 K data. At cryogenic temperatures the formula breaks down in the viscous region and becomes inaccurate. The

  19. Quantum decoupling transition in a one-dimensional Feshbach-resonant superfluid.

    PubMed

    Sheehy, Daniel E; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2005-09-23

    We study a one-dimensional gas of fermionic atoms interacting via an s-wave molecular Feshbach resonance. At low energies the system is characterized by two Josephson-coupled Luttinger liquids, corresponding to paired atomic and molecular superfluids. We show that, in contrast to higher dimensions, the system exhibits a quantum phase transition from a phase in which the two superfluids are locked together to one in which, at low energies, quantum fluctuations suppress the Feshbach resonance (Josephson) coupling, effectively decoupling the molecular and atomic superfluids. Experimental signatures of this quantum transition include the appearance of an out-of-phase gapless mode (in addition to the standard gapless in-phase mode) in the spectrum of the decoupled superfluid phase and a discontinuous change in the molecular momentum distribution function. PMID:16197122

  20. Quantum Decoupling Transition in a One-Dimensional Feshbach-Resonant Superfluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehy, Daniel E.; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2005-09-01

    We study a one-dimensional gas of fermionic atoms interacting via an s-wave molecular Feshbach resonance. At low energies the system is characterized by two Josephson-coupled Luttinger liquids, corresponding to paired atomic and molecular superfluids. We show that, in contrast to higher dimensions, the system exhibits a quantum phase transition from a phase in which the two superfluids are locked together to one in which, at low energies, quantum fluctuations suppress the Feshbach resonance (Josephson) coupling, effectively decoupling the molecular and atomic superfluids. Experimental signatures of this quantum transition include the appearance of an out-of-phase gapless mode (in addition to the standard gapless in-phase mode) in the spectrum of the decoupled superfluid phase and a discontinuous change in the molecular momentum distribution function.

  1. Coalescence of Liquid Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Wei-Jun

    2003-01-01

    When two liquid drops come into contact, a neck forms between them and grows rapidly. We are interested in the very early stage of the coalescence process, which can be characterized by the time dependence of the radius of the neck. The functional dependence of the size of the neck on time depends on the properties of the liquid. Experimentally, we are investigating a liquid in Stokes flow regime where the viscosity provides the principal retarding force to the surface tension. Recently, it has been predicted that the neck radius should change as t ln|t| in this regime. Theoretically, we have studied the situation when the velocity at each point on the surface is proportional to the local curvature and directed normal to the surface. This is the case that should be applicable to superfluid helium at low temperature when the mean free path of the thermal excitations are comparable to the size of liquid drops. For this system, the radius of the neck is found to be proportional to t(sup 1/3). We are able to find a simple expression for the shape of the interface in the vicinity of the neck.

  2. Calibration of a liquid xenon detector with {sup 83}Kr{sup m}

    SciTech Connect

    Kastens, L. W.; Cahn, S. B.; Manzur, A.; McKinsey, D. N.

    2009-10-15

    We report the preparation of a {sup 83}Kr{sup m} source and its use in calibrating a liquid xenon detector. {sup 83}Kr{sup m} atoms were produced through the decay of {sup 83}Rb and introduced into liquid xenon. Decaying {sup 83}Kr{sup m} nuclei were detected through liquid xenon scintillation. Conversion electrons with energies of 9.4 and 32.1 keV from the decay of {sup 83}Kr{sup m} were observed. This calibration source will allow the characterization of the response of noble liquid detectors at low energies. {sup 83}Kr{sup m} may also be useful for measuring fluid flow dynamics, both to understand purification in noble liquid-based particle detectors, as well as for studies of classical and quantum turbulence in superfluid helium.

  3. Scale invariance and superfluid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Siddhartha; Ray, Koushik

    2013-11-01

    We construct a Schroedinger field theory invariant under local spatial scaling. It is shown to provide an effective theory of superfluid turbulence by deriving, analytically, the observed Kolmogorov 5/3 law and to lead to a Biot-Savart interaction between the observed filament excitations of the system as well.

  4. A recuperative superfluid stirling refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Brisson, J.G.; Swift, G.W.

    1993-07-01

    A superfluid Stirling refrigerator has been built with a counterflow heat exchanger serving as a recuperative regenerator. It has achieved temperatures of 296 mK with a 4% {sup 3}He-{sup 4}He mixture. Cooling power versus temperature and speed is presented for a 6.6% mixture.

  5. [Formation of liquid crystal structures in the tissue fluid in wound healing during periodic irradiation with helium-neon laser].

    PubMed

    Mints, R I; Skopinov, S A; Iakovleva, S V; Lisienko, V M; Drobinina, O V

    1989-01-01

    Rabbit tissue fluid at different stages of wound healing was studied. Interaction between the formation of liquid crystalline fractions and the course of healing was revealed both under natural conditions and under periodic laser irradiation of the wound.

  6. Twisted complex superfluids in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Ole; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2015-09-08

    We show that correlated pair tunneling drives a phase transition to a twisted superfluid with a complex order parameter. This unconventional superfluid phase spontaneously breaks the time-reversal symmetry and is characterized by a twisting of the complex phase angle between adjacent lattice sites. We discuss the entire phase diagram of the extended Bose-Hubbard model for a honeycomb optical lattice showing a multitude of quantum phases including twisted superfluids, pair superfluids, supersolids and twisted supersolids. Furthermore, we show that the nearest-neighbor interactions lead to a spontaneous breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice and give rise to dimerized density-wave insulators, where particles are delocalized on dimers. For two components, we find twisted superfluid phases with strong correlations between the species already for surprisingly small pair-tunneling amplitudes. Interestingly, this ground state shows an infinite degeneracy ranging continuously from a supersolid to a twisted superfluid.

  7. Twisted complex superfluids in optical lattices

    PubMed Central

    Jürgensen, Ole; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2015-01-01

    We show that correlated pair tunneling drives a phase transition to a twisted superfluid with a complex order parameter. This unconventional superfluid phase spontaneously breaks the time-reversal symmetry and is characterized by a twisting of the complex phase angle between adjacent lattice sites. We discuss the entire phase diagram of the extended Bose—Hubbard model for a honeycomb optical lattice showing a multitude of quantum phases including twisted superfluids, pair superfluids, supersolids and twisted supersolids. Furthermore, we show that the nearest-neighbor interactions lead to a spontaneous breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice and give rise to dimerized density-wave insulators, where particles are delocalized on dimers. For two components, we find twisted superfluid phases with strong correlations between the species already for surprisingly small pair-tunneling amplitudes. Interestingly, this ground state shows an infinite degeneracy ranging continuously from a supersolid to a twisted superfluid. PMID:26345721

  8. Twisted complex superfluids in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Ole; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2015-01-01

    We show that correlated pair tunneling drives a phase transition to a twisted superfluid with a complex order parameter. This unconventional superfluid phase spontaneously breaks the time-reversal symmetry and is characterized by a twisting of the complex phase angle between adjacent lattice sites. We discuss the entire phase diagram of the extended Bose-Hubbard model for a honeycomb optical lattice showing a multitude of quantum phases including twisted superfluids, pair superfluids, supersolids and twisted supersolids. Furthermore, we show that the nearest-neighbor interactions lead to a spontaneous breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice and give rise to dimerized density-wave insulators, where particles are delocalized on dimers. For two components, we find twisted superfluid phases with strong correlations between the species already for surprisingly small pair-tunneling amplitudes. Interestingly, this ground state shows an infinite degeneracy ranging continuously from a supersolid to a twisted superfluid. PMID:26345721

  9. Superfluidity of Dense {sup 4}He in Vycor

    SciTech Connect

    Khairallah, Saad A.; Ceperley, D.M.

    2005-10-28

    We calculate properties of a model of {sup 4}He in Vycor using the path integral Monte Carlo method. We find that {sup 4}He forms a distinct layered structure with a highly localized first layer, a disordered second layer with some atoms delocalized and able to give rise to the observed superfluid response, and higher layers of nearly perfect crystals. The addition of a single {sup 3}He atom was enough to bring down the total superfluidity by blocking the exchange in the second layer. Our results are consistent with the persistent liquid-layer model to explain the observations. Such a model may be relevant to the experiments on bulk solid {sup 4}He, if there is a fine network of grain boundaries in those systems.

  10. Optical superfluid phase transitions and trapping of polariton condensates.

    PubMed

    Cristofolini, P; Dreismann, A; Christmann, G; Franchetti, G; Berloff, N G; Tsotsis, P; Hatzopoulos, Z; Savvidis, P G; Baumberg, J J

    2013-05-01

    Semiconductor microcavities are used to support freely flowing polariton quantum liquids allowing the direct observation and optical manipulation of macroscopic quantum states. Incoherent optical excitation at a point produces radially expanding condensate clouds within the planar geometry. By using arbitrary configurations of multiple pump spots, we discover a geometrically controlled phase transition, switching from the coherent phase-locking of multiple condensates to the formation of a single trapped condensate. The condensation threshold becomes strongly dependent on the programmed superfluid geometry and sensitive to cooperative interactions between condensates. We directly image persistently circulating superfluid and show how flows of light-matter quasiparticles are dominated by the quantum pressure in such configurable laser-written potential landscapes.

  11. Microphotonic Forces from Superfluid Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuslan, D. L.; Harris, G. I.; Baker, C.; Sachkou, Y.; He, X.; Sheridan, E.; Bowen, W. P.

    2016-04-01

    In cavity optomechanics, radiation pressure and photothermal forces are widely utilized to cool and control micromechanical motion, with applications ranging from precision sensing and quantum information to fundamental science. Here, we realize an alternative approach to optical forcing based on superfluid flow and evaporation in response to optical heating. We demonstrate optical forcing of the motion of a cryogenic microtoroidal resonator at a level of 1.46 nN, roughly 1 order of magnitude larger than the radiation pressure force. We use this force to feedback cool the motion of a microtoroid mechanical mode to 137 mK. The photoconvective forces we demonstrate here provide a new tool for high bandwidth control of mechanical motion in cryogenic conditions, while the ability to apply forces remotely, combined with the persistence of flow in superfluids, offers the prospect for new applications.

  12. Bulk viscosity of superfluid hyperon stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gusakov, Mikhail E.; Kantor, Elena M.

    2008-10-15

    We calculate the bulk viscosity due to nonequilibrium weak processes in superfluid nucleon-hyperon matter of neutron stars. For that, the dissipative relativistic hydrodynamics, formulated eariler [M. E. Gusakov, Phys. Rev. D 76, 083001 (2007).] for superfluid mixtures, is extended to the case when both nucleons and hyperons are superfluid. It is demonstrated that in the most general case (when neutrons, protons, {lambda}, and {sigma}{sup -} hyperons are superfluid), nonequilibrium weak processes generate 16 bulk viscosity coefficients, with only three of them being independent. In addition, we correct an inaccuracy in a widely used formula for the bulk viscosity of nonsuperfluid nucleon-hyperon matter.

  13. An efficient helium circulation system with small GM cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Tsunehiro; Okamoto, Masayoshi; Atsuda, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Akihiro; Owaki, Takashi; Katagiri, Keishi

    2008-01-01

    We developed a helium circulating system that re-liquefies all the evaporating helium gas and consumes far less power than conventional systems, because warm helium gas at about 40 K collected high above the surface of the liquid helium in the Dewar is used to keep the Dewar cold, and because cold helium gas just above the liquid helium surface is collected and re-liquefied while still cold. A special transfer tube with multi-concentric pipes was developed to make the system operate efficiently. The system can produce up to 35.5 l/D of liquid helium from the evaporated helium using two 1.5 W@4.2 K GM cryocoolers.

  14. Slow dynamics at Re =108 in turbulent Helium flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguete, Javier; Roche, Philippe; Rousset, Bernard

    2014-11-01

    The presence of slow dynamics is a recurrent feature of many turbulent flows. This behaviour can be created by instabilities of the mean flow or by other mechanisms. In this work we analyze the behavior of a highly turbulent flow (maximum Reynolds number Re =108 , with a Reynolds based on the Taylor microscale Reλ = 2000). The experimental cell consists on a closed cavity filled with liquid Helium (330 liters) close to the lambda point (between 1.8 and 2.5 K) where two inhomogeneous and strongly turbulent flows collide in a thin region. The cylindrical cavity has a diameter of 78cm and two impellers rotate in opposite directions with rotation frequencies up to 2 Hz. The distance between the propellers is 70 cm. Different experimental runs have been performed, both in the normal and superfluid phases. We have performed velocity measurements using home-made Pitot tubes. Here we would like to present preliminary results on this configuration. The analysis of the data series reveals that below the injection frequencies there are different dynamical regimes with time scales two orders of magnitude below the injection scale. We acknowledge support from the EuHIT network and the SHREK Collaboration.

  15. Vortices in spatially inhomogeneous superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehy, Daniel E.; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2004-12-01

    We study vortices in a radially inhomogeneous superfluid, as realized by a trapped degenerate Bose gas in a uniaxially symmetric potential. We show that, in contrast to a homogeneous superfluid, an off-axis vortex corresponds to an anisotropic superflow whose profile strongly depends on the distance to the trap axis. One consequence of this superflow anisotropy is vortex precession about the trap axis in the absence of an imposed rotation. In the complementary regime of a finite prescribed rotation, we compute the minimum-energy vortex density, showing that in the rapid-rotation limit it is extremely uniform, despite a strongly inhomogeneous (nearly) Thomas-Fermi condensate density ρs(r) . The weak radially dependent contribution [∝∇2lnρs(r)] to the vortex distribution, that vanishes with the number of vortices Nv as 1/Nv , arises from the interplay between vortex quantum discreteness (namely their inability to faithfully support the imposed rigid-body rotation) and the inhomogeneous superfluid density. This leads to an enhancement of the vortex density at the center of a typical concave trap, a prediction that is in quantitative agreement with recent experiments. One striking consequence of the inhomogeneous vortex distribution is an azimuthally directed, radially shearing superflow.

  16. Thermal Performance of the XRS Helium Insert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breon, Susan R.; DiPirro, Michael J.; Tuttle, James G.; Shirron, Peter J.; Warner, Brent A.; Boyle, Robert F.; Canavan, Edgar R.

    1999-01-01

    The X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) is an instrument on the Japanese Astro-E satellite, scheduled for launch early in the year 2000. The XRS Helium Insert comprises a superfluid helium cryostat, an Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR), and the XRS calorimeters with their cold electronics. The calorimeters are capable of detecting X-rays over the energy range 0.1 to 10 keV with a resolution of 12 eV. The Helium Insert completed its performance and verification testing at Goddard in January 1999. It was shipped to Japan, where it has been integrated with the neon dewar built by Sumitomo Heavy Industries. The Helium Insert was given a challenging lifetime requirement of 2.0 years with a goal of 2.5 years. Based on the results of the thermal performance tests, the predicted on-orbit lifetime is 2.6 years with a margin of 30%. This is the result of both higher efficiency in the ADR cycle and the low temperature top-off, more than compensating for an increase in the parasitic heat load. This paper presents a summary of the key design features and the results of the thermal testing of the XRS Helium Insert.

  17. Optical fiber distributed sensing structural health monitoring (SHM) strain measurements taken during cryotank Y-joint test article load cycling at liquid helium temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Prosser, William H.; Hare, David A.; Moore, Thomas C.; Kenner, W. S.

    2007-09-01

    This paper outlines cryogenic Y-joint testing at Langley Research Center (LaRC) to validate the performance of optical fiber Bragg grating strain sensors for measuring strain at liquid helium temperature (-240°C). This testing also verified survivability of fiber sensors after experiencing 10 thermal cool-down, warm-up cycles and 400 limit load cycles. Graphite composite skins bonded to a honeycomb substrate in a sandwich configuration comprised the Y-joint specimens. To enable SHM of composite cryotanks for consideration to future spacecraft, a light-weight, durable monitoring technology is needed. The fiber optic distributed Bragg grating strain sensing system developed at LaRC is a viable substitute for conventional strain gauges which are not practical for SHM. This distributed sensing technology uses an Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR). This measurement approach has the advantage that it can measure hundreds of Bragg grating sensors per fiber and the sensors are all written at one frequency, greatly simplifying fiber manufacturing. Fiber optic strain measurements compared well to conventional strain gauge measurements obtained during these tests. These results demonstrated a high potential for a successful implementation of a SHM system incorporating LaRC's fiber optic sensing system on the composite cryotank and other future cryogenic applications.

  18. Temperature effects on the retention of n-alkanes and arenes in helium-squalane gas-liquid chromatography. Experiment and molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Wick, Collin D; Siepman, J Ilja; Klotz, Wendy L; Schure, Mark R

    2002-04-19

    Experiments and molecular simulations were carried out to study temperature effects (in the range of 323 to 383 K) on the absolute and relative retention of n-hexane, n-heptane, n-octane, benzene, toluene and the three xylene isomers in gas-liquid chromatography. Helium and squalane were used as the carrier gas and retentive phase, respectively. Both the experiments and the simulations show a markedly different temperature dependence of the retention for the n-alkanes compared to the arenes. For example, over the 60 K temperature range studied, the Kovats retention index of benzene is found to increase by about 16 or 18+/-10 retention index units determined from the experiments or simulations, respectively. For toluene and the xylenes, the experimentally measured increases are similar in magnitude and range from 14 to 17 retention index units for m-xylene to o-xylene. The molecular simulation data provide an independent method of obtaining the transfer enthalpies and entropies. The change in retention indices is shown to be the result of the larger entropic penalty and the larger heat capacity for the transfer of the alkane molecules.

  19. Maximum Expected Wall Heat Flux and Maximum Pressure After Sudden Loss of Vacuum Insulation on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) Liquid Helium (LHe) Dewars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.

    2014-01-01

    The aircraft-based Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a platform for multiple infrared observation experiments. The experiments carry sensors cooled to liquid helium (LHe) temperatures. A question arose regarding the heat input and peak pressure that would result from a sudden loss of the dewar vacuum insulation. Owing to concerns about the adequacy of dewar pressure relief in the event of a sudden loss of the dewar vacuum insulation, the SOFIA Program engaged the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC). This report summarizes and assesses the experiments that have been performed to measure the heat flux into LHe dewars following a sudden vacuum insulation failure, describes the physical limits of heat input to the dewar, and provides an NESC recommendation for the wall heat flux that should be used to assess the sudden loss of vacuum insulation case. This report also assesses the methodology used by the SOFIA Program to predict the maximum pressure that would occur following a loss of vacuum event.

  20. Optical Fiber Distributed Sensing Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) Strain Measurements Taken During Cryotank Y-Joint Test Article Load Cycling at Liquid Helium Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Prosser, William H.; Hare, David A.; Moore, Thomas C.; Kenner, Winfred S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines cryogenic Y-joint testing at Langley Research Center (LaRC) to validate the performance of optical fiber Bragg grating strain sensors for measuring strain at liquid helium temperature (-240 C). This testing also verified survivability of fiber sensors after experiencing 10 thermal cool-down, warm-up cycles and 400 limit load cycles. Graphite composite skins bonded to a honeycomb substrate in a sandwich configuration comprised the Y-joint specimens. To enable SHM of composite cryotanks for consideration to future spacecraft, a light-weight, durable monitoring technology is needed. The fiber optic distributed Bragg grating strain sensing system developed at LaRC is a viable substitute for conventional strain gauges which are not practical for SHM. This distributed sensing technology uses an Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR). This measurement approach has the advantage that it can measure hundreds of Bragg grating sensors per fiber and the sensors are all written at one frequency, greatly simplifying fiber manufacturing. Fiber optic strain measurements compared well to conventional strain gauge measurements obtained during these tests. These results demonstrated a high potential for a successful implementation of a SHM system incorporating LaRC's fiber optic sensing system on the composite cryotank and other future cryogenic applications.

  1. Evidence for a Common Physical Origin of the Landau and BEC Theories of Superfluidity

    DOE PAGES

    Diallo, Souleymane Omar; Azuah, R. T.; Abernathy, D. L.; Taniguchi, Junko; Suzuki, Masaru; Bossy, Jacques; Mulders, N.; Glyde, H. R.

    2014-11-20

    There are two renowned theories of superfluidity in liquid 4He, quite different and each with specific domains of application. In the first, the Landau theory, superflow follows from the existence of a well-defined collective mode supported by dense liquid 4He, the phonon-roton mode. In the second, superflow is a manifestation of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) and phase coherence in the liquid. We present combined measurements of superfluidity, BEC and phonon-roton (P-R) modes in liquid 4He confined in the porous medium MCM-41. The results integrate the two theories by showing that well-defined P-R modes exist where there is BEC. The two aremore » common properties of a Bose condensed liquid and either can be used as a basis of a theory of superfluidity. In addition, the confinement and disorder suppresses the critical temperature for superfluidity, Tc, below that for BEC creating a localized BEC phase consisting of islands of BEC and P-R modes. This phase is much like the pseudogap phase in the cuprate superconductors.« less

  2. Evidence for a Common Physical Origin of the Landau and BEC Theories of Superfluidity

    SciTech Connect

    Diallo, Souleymane Omar; Azuah, R. T.; Abernathy, D. L.; Taniguchi, Junko; Suzuki, Masaru; Bossy, Jacques; Mulders, N.; Glyde, H. R.

    2014-11-20

    There are two renowned theories of superfluidity in liquid 4He, quite different and each with specific domains of application. In the first, the Landau theory, superflow follows from the existence of a well-defined collective mode supported by dense liquid 4He, the phonon-roton mode. In the second, superflow is a manifestation of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) and phase coherence in the liquid. We present combined measurements of superfluidity, BEC and phonon-roton (P-R) modes in liquid 4He confined in the porous medium MCM-41. The results integrate the two theories by showing that well-defined P-R modes exist where there is BEC. The two are common properties of a Bose condensed liquid and either can be used as a basis of a theory of superfluidity. In addition, the confinement and disorder suppresses the critical temperature for superfluidity, Tc, below that for BEC creating a localized BEC phase consisting of islands of BEC and P-R modes. This phase is much like the pseudogap phase in the cuprate superconductors.

  3. Evidence for a Common Physical Origin of the Landau and BEC Theories of Superfluidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diallo, S. O.; Azuah, R. T.; Abernathy, D. L.; Taniguchi, Junko; Suzuki, Masaru; Bossy, Jacques; Mulders, N.; Glyde, H. R.

    2014-11-01

    There are two renowned theories of superfluidity in liquid He 4 , quite different and each with specific domains of application. In the first, the Landau theory, superflow follows from the existence of a well-defined collective mode supported by dense liquid He 4 , the phonon-roton mode. In the second, superflow is a manifestation of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) and phase coherence in the liquid. We present combined measurements of superfluidity, BEC and phonon-roton (P-R) modes in liquid He 4 confined in the porous medium MCM-41. The results integrate the two theories by showing that well-defined P-R modes exist where there is BEC. The two are common properties of a Bose condensed liquid and either can be used as a basis of a theory of superfluidity. In addition, the confinement and disorder suppresses the critical temperature for superfluidity, Tc, below that for BEC creating a localized BEC "phase" consisting of islands of BEC and P-R modes. This phase is much like the pseudogap phase in the cuprate superconductors.

  4. Theoretical study of the spectral shift of the absorption line of Rb and Cs in liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modesto-Costa, Lucas; Mukherjee, Prasanta K.; Canuto, Sylvio

    2015-07-01

    A combined and sequential use of Monte Carlo simulation and time-dependent density functional theory is made to obtain the excitation line shifts and widths of Rb and Cs embedded in liquid 4He. In each case calculations are made on 100 statistically uncorrelated configurations with Rb (Cs) surrounded by nearly 60 He atoms treated explicitly. Different basis sets and functionals are used for obtaining the blue shifts of the absorption lines 5s → 5p of Rb and 6s → 6p of Cs. Estimate of the line broadening is also made and results for both the shift and broadening are obtained in good agreement with experiment.

  5. The Importance of Nonlocal Terms in Superfluid Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieve, Rena; Dix, Owen

    2015-03-01

    Simulations of vortex motion in superfluid helium based on the Biot-Savart law plus vortex reconnections can model homogeneous superfluid turbulence. However, the quantitative properties of the turbulent tangle are disturbingly sensitive to details of how the computations are carried out, and in some cases the tangle degenerates unphysically into an arrangement of parallel straight vortices. These problems have been attributed to the reconnection procedure, to the periodic boundary conditions used for most calculations, and to the localized induction approximation (LIA) which often replaces the (non-local) Biot-Savart integral. Previous work using numerical calculation of the complete Biot-Savart integral does not show the same issues as the LIA calculations, but these are time-consuming calculations. We show here that numerical integration over a relatively small region can suffice, as long as the size of the region exceeds the typical intervortex spacing. This result explains why the non-local contribution has a strong effect. It contributes an attraction between nearby vortices that ultimately leads to reconnections, which prevent the vortices from settling into an array of parallel lines.

  6. Cryogen free scanning probe microscope: the solution for atomic scale surface science below 10 Kelvin without liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byoung; Venegas, Miguel; RHK Team

    We present a cryogen free low temperature scanning probe microscope (LT-SPM) working at 9K on both tip and sample. The performance of the microscope was validated in various conditions such as noisy environment and modulated temperature as well as the long time elapsed measurements. Building on the stability and consistency of the closed cycle refrigerator, time extended measurements are available with this state-of-the-art LT-SPM. Studies can now be performed without interrupting the critical moment of the tip on the surface while refilling the conventional liquid cryogen tank. We will present the time evolution of the dopant induced topographic and spectroscopic properties of some topological insulators such as Bi2Se3 and Bi2Te3. The compact and rigid design of the microscope also allows this instrument to work as a practical variable temperature microscope without the hassle of liquid cryogen consumption. We will present temperature dependent STM/STS results on a TiSe2 surface at the temperature between 10K and 350K. Finally, we will discuss how the cryogen free LT-SPM will make the study of the atomic scale phenomenon at low temperature both economical and easy, opening promising new capabilities to surface scientists and researchers in nanotechnology.

  7. The development of high cooling power and low ultimate temperature superfluid Stirling refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ashok B.

    The superfluid Stirling refrigerator (SSR) is a recuperative Stirling cycle refrigerator which provides cooling to below 2 K by using a liquid 3He-4He mixture as the working fluid. In 1990, Kotsubo and Swift demonstrated the first SSR, and by 1995, Brisson and Swift had developed an experimental prototype capable of reaching a low temperature of 296 mK. The goal of this thesis was to improve these capabilities by developing a better understanding of the SSR and building SSR's with higher cooling powers and lower ultimate temperatures. This thesis contains four main parts. In the first part, a numerical analysis demonstrates that the optimal design and ultimate performance of a recuperative Stirling refrigerator is fundamentally different from that of a standard regenerative Stirling refrigerator due to a mass flow imbalance within the recuperator. The analysis also shows that high efficiency recuperators remain a key to SSR performance. Due to a quantum effect called Kapitza resistance, the only realistic and economical method of creating higher efficiency recuperators for use with an SSR is to construct the heat exchangers from very thin (12 μm - 25 μm thick) plastic films. The second part of this thesis involves the design and construction of these recuperators. This research resulted in Kapton heat exchangers which are leaktight to superfluid helium and capable of surviving repeated thermal cycling. In the third part of this thesis, two different single stage SSR's are operated to test whether the plastic recuperators would actually improve SSR performance. Operating from a high temperature of 1.0 K and with 1.5% and 3.0% 3He-4He mixtures, these SSR's achieved a low temperature of 291 mK and delivered net cooling powers of 3705 μW at 750 mK, 977 μW at 500 mK, and 409 μW at 400 mK. Finally, this thesis describes the operation of three versions of a two stage SSR. Unfortunately, due to experimental difficulties, the merits of a two stage SSR were not

  8. A review of surface effects in Kapitza's experiments on heat transfer between solids and helium II (Review Article)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrit, Jay

    2016-08-01

    In a recent paper, it is shown that the thermal boundary Kapitza resistance between a solid and superfluid helium is explained by resonant scattering of phonons from surface roughness heights, as described in the Adamenko and Fuks (AF) model. We reexamine the original experiments of thermal transfer between a solid (platinum and copper) and superfluid helium conducted by Kapitza in 1940. In particular, we analyze his experimental results for the different surface treatments of the solid in light of the AF model. Time scales for diffuse scattering of phonons at the interface are estimated. Also the role of a layer of varnish on a copper surface is reinterpreted.

  9. Torsional oscillator experiment on superfluid 4He confined in a porous alumina nanopore array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakawa, S.; Higashino, R.; Yoshimura, K.; Chikazawa, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Kuriyama, K.; Honda, K.; Shibayama, Y.; Shirahama, K.

    2012-12-01

    We studied superfluidity of liquid 4He confined in an array of well-characterized straight nanopores of porous alumina (PA). The PA plate sample of 45 nm pore size is set in an annular flow channel and the superflow is detected by torsional oscillator (TO) technique. Superfluid transition Tc in the nanopores is suppressed by 3.5 mK from the bulk λ point. Tc is consistent with the temperature at which the healing length is equal to the pore radius. We have observed many anti-crossing anomalies in the TO frequency associated with dissipation peaks, which are attributed to the coupling to second sound resonances.

  10. Instability on the Free Surface of Superfluid He-II Induced by a Steady Heat Flow in Bulk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remizov, I. A.; Levchenko, A. A.; Mezhov-Deglin, L. P.

    2016-06-01

    We report observations of the onset of irregular motion on a free surface of superfluid He-II induced by a quasi-stationary heat flow in a rectangular container. The container open from the top is mounted inside an optical cell partly filled with superfluid He-II. Three holes in the container walls provide free circulation of the normal and superfluid components inside and outside the container. The results of measurements are discussed in terms of the Korshunov theory (Eurphys Lett 16:673, 1991; JETP Lett 75:423, 2002) of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on an initially flat He-II surface induced by a relative motion of superfluid and normal components of the liquid along the surface when the counterflow velocity exceeds the threshold value. The experimental data are qualitatively consistent with the theoretical predictions (Korshunov in JETP Lett 75:423, 2002) taking into account the finite viscosity of He-II.

  11. Instability on the Free Surface of Superfluid He-II Induced by a Steady Heat Flow in Bulk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remizov, I. A.; Levchenko, A. A.; Mezhov-Deglin, L. P.

    2016-11-01

    We report observations of the onset of irregular motion on a free surface of superfluid He-II induced by a quasi-stationary heat flow in a rectangular container. The container open from the top is mounted inside an optical cell partly filled with superfluid He-II. Three holes in the container walls provide free circulation of the normal and superfluid components inside and outside the container. The results of measurements are discussed in terms of the Korshunov theory (Eurphys Lett 16:673, 1991; JETP Lett 75:423, 2002) of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on an initially flat He-II surface induced by a relative motion of superfluid and normal components of the liquid along the surface when the counterflow velocity exceeds the threshold value. The experimental data are qualitatively consistent with the theoretical predictions (Korshunov in JETP Lett 75:423, 2002) taking into account the finite viscosity of He-II.

  12. Breathers on quantized superfluid vortices.

    PubMed

    Salman, Hayder

    2013-10-18

    We consider the propagation of breathers along a quantized superfluid vortex. Using the correspondence between the local induction approximation (LIA) and the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, we identify a set of initial conditions corresponding to breather solutions of vortex motion governed by the LIA. These initial conditions, which give rise to a long-wavelength modulational instability, result in the emergence of large amplitude perturbations that are localized in both space and time. The emergent structures on the vortex filament are analogous to loop solitons but arise from the dual action of bending and twisting of the vortex. Although the breather solutions we study are exact solutions of the LIA equations, we demonstrate through full numerical simulations that their key emergent attributes carry over to vortex dynamics governed by the Biot-Savart law and to quantized vortices described by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The breather excitations can lead to self-reconnections, a mechanism that can play an important role within the crossover range of scales in superfluid turbulence. Moreover, the observation of breather solutions on vortices in a field model suggests that these solutions are expected to arise in a wide range of other physical contexts from classical vortices to cosmological strings. PMID:24182275

  13. Breathers on Quantized Superfluid Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Hayder

    2013-10-01

    We consider the propagation of breathers along a quantized superfluid vortex. Using the correspondence between the local induction approximation (LIA) and the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, we identify a set of initial conditions corresponding to breather solutions of vortex motion governed by the LIA. These initial conditions, which give rise to a long-wavelength modulational instability, result in the emergence of large amplitude perturbations that are localized in both space and time. The emergent structures on the vortex filament are analogous to loop solitons but arise from the dual action of bending and twisting of the vortex. Although the breather solutions we study are exact solutions of the LIA equations, we demonstrate through full numerical simulations that their key emergent attributes carry over to vortex dynamics governed by the Biot-Savart law and to quantized vortices described by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The breather excitations can lead to self-reconnections, a mechanism that can play an important role within the crossover range of scales in superfluid turbulence. Moreover, the observation of breather solutions on vortices in a field model suggests that these solutions are expected to arise in a wide range of other physical contexts from classical vortices to cosmological strings.

  14. Superfluid state of repulsively interacting three-component fermionic atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suga, Sei-Ichiro; Inaba, Kensuke

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the superfluid state of repulsively interacting three-component (color) fermionic atoms in optical lattices using Feynman diagrammatic approaches and the dynamical mean field theory. When the anisotropy of the three repulsive interactions is strong, atoms of two of the three colors form Cooper pairs and atoms of the third color remain a Fermi liquid. This superfluid emerges close to half filling at which the Mott insulating state characteristic of the three-component repulsive fermions appears. An effective attractive interaction is induced by density fluctuations of the third-color atoms. The superfluid state is stable against the phase separation that occurs in the strongly repulsive region. We determine the phase diagrams in terms of temperature, filling, and the anisotropy of the repulsive interactions. This work was supported by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C) (No. 23540467) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

  15. Observation of the Q(3/2) Λ-doublet transitions for X2Π3/2 OD in helium nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raston, Paul L.; Liang, Tao; Douberly, Gary E.

    2014-01-01

    The deuteroxyl radical (OD) has been isolated in superfluid helium nanodroplets and characterised by infrared depletion spectroscopy. Two resolved Q(3/2) lines are observed, with a separation that is 4.88 (10) times larger than in the gas phase. This is similar to that previously reported for He-solvated OH (5.30 (2)), for which it was shown that the splitting could be reproduced by a model that assumes a small parity dependence of the rotor's effective moment of inertia [P.L. Raston, T. Liang, and G.E. Douberly, J. Phys. Chem. A (2013). DOI:10.1021/jp312335q]. With this model, the OD Λ-doublet splitting in liquid He is reproduced with Be and Bf rotational constants that differ by ≈0.24%.

  16. Anomalous superfluid density in quantum critical superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Kenichiro; Mizukami, Yuta; Katsumata, Ryo; Shishido, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Minoru; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Matsuda, Yuji; Schlueter, John A.; Fletcher, Jonathan D.; Carrington, Antony; Gnida, Daniel; Kaczorowski, Dariusz; Shibauchi, Takasada

    2013-01-01

    When a second-order magnetic phase transition is tuned to zero temperature by a nonthermal parameter, quantum fluctuations are critically enhanced, often leading to the emergence of unconventional superconductivity. In these “quantum critical” superconductors it has been widely reported that the normal-state properties above the superconducting transition temperature Tc often exhibit anomalous non-Fermi liquid behaviors and enhanced electron correlations. However, the effect of these strong critical fluctuations on the superconducting condensate below Tc is less well established. Here we report measurements of the magnetic penetration depth in heavy-fermion, iron-pnictide, and organic superconductors located close to antiferromagnetic quantum critical points, showing that the superfluid density in these nodal superconductors universally exhibits, unlike the expected T-linear dependence, an anomalous 3/2 power-law temperature dependence over a wide temperature range. We propose that this noninteger power law can be explained if a strong renormalization of effective Fermi velocity due to quantum fluctuations occurs only for momenta k close to the nodes in the superconducting energy gap Δ(k). We suggest that such “nodal criticality” may have an impact on low-energy properties of quantum critical superconductors. PMID:23404698

  17. LOX Tank Helium Removal for Propellant Scavenging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2009-01-01

    System studies have shown a significant advantage to reusing the hydrogen and oxygen left in these tanks after landing on the Moon in fuel cells to generate power and water for surface systems. However in the current lander concepts, the helium used to pressurize the oxygen tank can substantially degrade fuel cell power and water output by covering the reacting surface with inert gas. This presentation documents an experimental investigation of methods to remove the helium pressurant while minimizing the amount of the oxygen lost. This investigation demonstrated that significant quantities of Helium (greater than 90% mole fraction) remain in the tank after draining. Although a single vent cycle reduced the helium quantity, large amounts of helium remained. Cyclic venting appeared to be more effective. Three vent cycles were sufficient to reduce the helium to small (less than 0.2%) quantities. Two vent cycles may be sufficient since once the tank has been brought up to pressure after the second vent cycle the helium concentration has been reduced to the less than 0.2% level. The re-pressurization process seemed to contribute to diluting helium. This is as expected since in order to raise the pressure liquid oxygen must be evaporated. Estimated liquid oxygen loss is on the order of 82 pounds (assuming the third vent cycle is not required).

  18. Pulsar timing noise from superfluid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melatos, Andrew; Link, Bennett

    2014-01-01

    Shear-driven turbulence in the superfluid interior of a neutron star exerts a fluctuating torque on the rigid crust, causing the rotational phase to walk randomly. The phase fluctuation spectrum is calculated analytically for incompressible Kolmogorov turbulence and is found to be red; the half-power point is set by the observed spin-down rate, the crust-superfluid lag and the dynamical response time of the superfluid. Preliminary limits are placed on the latter quantities using selected time- and frequency-domain data. It is found that measurements of the normalization and slope of the power spectrum are reproduced for reasonable choices of the turbulence parameters. The results point preferentially to the neutron star interior containing a turbulent superfluid rather than a turbulent Navier-Stokes fluid. The implications for gravitational wave detection by pulsar timing arrays are discussed briefly.

  19. Local and nonlocal dynamics in superfluid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwin-Robson, L. K.; Barenghi, C. F.; Baggaley, A. W.

    2015-03-01

    In turbulent superfluid He II, the quantized vortex lines interact via the classical Biot-Savart law to form a complicated vortex tangle. We show that vortex tangles with the same vortex line density will have different energy spectra, depending on the normal fluid which feeds energy into the superfluid component, and identify the spectral signature of two forms of superfluid turbulence: Kolmogorov tangles and Vinen tangles. By decomposing the superfluid velocity field into local and nonlocal contributions, we find that in Vinen tangles the motion of vortex lines depends mainly on the local curvature, whereas in Kolmogorov tangles the long-range vortex interaction is dominant and leads to the formation of clustering of lines, in analogy to the "worms" of ordinary turbulence.

  20. Nonlinear interactions in superfluid dynamics: Nonstationary heat transfer due to second sound shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liepmann, H. W.; Torczynski, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Second sound techniques were used to study superfluid helium. Second sound shock waves produced relative velocities in the bulk fluid. Maximum counterflow velocities produced in this way are found to follow the Langer-Fischer prediction for the fundamental critical velocity in its functional dependence on temperature and pressure. Comparison of successive shock and rotating experiments provides strong evidence that breakdown results in vorticity production in the flow behind the shock. Schlieren pictures have verified the planar nature of second sound shocks even after multiple reflections. The nonlinear theory of second sound was repeatedly verified in its prediction of double shocks and other nonlinear phenomena.

  1. Andreev-Majorana bound states in superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    Silaev, M. A. Volovik, G. E.

    2014-12-15

    We consider Andreev-Majorana (AM) bound states with zero energy on surfaces, interfaces, and vortices in different phases of the p-wave superfluids. We discuss the chiral superfluid {sup 3}He-A and time reversal invariant phases: superfluid {sup 3}He-B, planar and polar phases. The AM zero modes are determined by topology in the bulk and disappear at the quantum phase transition from the topological to nontopological state of the superfluid. The topology demonstrates the interplay of dimensions. In particular, the zero-dimensional Weyl points in chiral superfluids (the Berry phase monopoles in momentum space) give rise to the one-dimensional Fermi arc of AM bound states on the surface and to the one-dimensional flat band of AM modes in the vortex core. The one-dimensional nodal line in the polar phase produces a two-dimensional flat band of AM modes on the surface. The interplay of dimensions also connects the AM states in superfluids with different dimensions. For example, the topological properties of the spectrum of bound states in three-dimensional {sup 3}He-B are connected to the properties of the spectrum in the two-dimensional planar phase (thin film)

  2. High efficiency pump for space helium transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenbein, Robert; Izenson, Michael G.; Swift, Walter L.; Sixsmith, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    A centrifugal pump was developed for the efficient and reliable transfer of liquid helium in space. The pump can be used to refill cryostats on orbiting satellites which use liquid helium for refrigeration at extremely low temperatures. The pump meets the head and flow requirements of on-orbit helium transfer: a flow rate of 800 L/hr at a head of 128 J/kg. The overall pump efficiency at the design point is 0.45. The design head and flow requirements are met with zero net positive suction head, which is the condition in an orbiting helium supply Dewar. The mass transfer efficiency calculated for a space transfer operation is 0.99. Steel ball bearings are used with gas fiber-reinforced teflon retainers to provide solid lubrication. These bearings have demonstrated the longest life in liquid helium endurance tests under simulated pumping conditions. Technology developed in the project also has application for liquid helium circulation in terrestrial facilities and for transfer of cryogenic rocket propellants in space.

  3. Diffusion of cyclooctane (1); helium (2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of (1) cyclooctane; (2) helium

  4. Theoretical modeling of electron mobility in superfluid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, Frédéric; Bonifaci, Nelly; von Haeften, Klaus; Eloranta, Jussi

    2016-07-01

    The Orsay-Trento bosonic density functional theory model is extended to include dissipation due to the viscous response of superfluid 4He present at finite temperatures. The viscous functional is derived from the Navier-Stokes equation by using the Madelung transformation and includes the contribution of interfacial viscous response present at the gas-liquid boundaries. This contribution was obtained by calibrating the model against the experimentally determined electron mobilities from 1.2 K to 2.1 K along the saturated vapor pressure line, where the viscous response is dominated by thermal rotons. The temperature dependence of ion mobility was calculated for several different solvation cavity sizes and the data are rationalized in the context of roton scattering and Stokes limited mobility models. Results are compared to the experimentally observed "exotic ion" data, which provides estimates for the corresponding bubble sizes in the liquid. Possible sources of such ions are briefly discussed.

  5. Theoretical modeling of electron mobility in superfluid (4)He.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Frédéric; Bonifaci, Nelly; von Haeften, Klaus; Eloranta, Jussi

    2016-07-28

    The Orsay-Trento bosonic density functional theory model is extended to include dissipation due to the viscous response of superfluid (4)He present at finite temperatures. The viscous functional is derived from the Navier-Stokes equation by using the Madelung transformation and includes the contribution of interfacial viscous response present at the gas-liquid boundaries. This contribution was obtained by calibrating the model against the experimentally determined electron mobilities from 1.2 K to 2.1 K along the saturated vapor pressure line, where the viscous response is dominated by thermal rotons. The temperature dependence of ion mobility was calculated for several different solvation cavity sizes and the data are rationalized in the context of roton scattering and Stokes limited mobility models. Results are compared to the experimentally observed "exotic ion" data, which provides estimates for the corresponding bubble sizes in the liquid. Possible sources of such ions are briefly discussed. PMID:27475346

  6. Superfluid phase of 3He -B near the boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusov, Peter; Brusov, Pavel

    2005-10-01

    Having analyzed old and some of the most recent transverse sound experiments in superfluid He3-B we are now able to solve the old problem of superfluid quantum liquids in confined geometry—that is, the boundary state of He3-B . We pay attention to the difference between the transverse sound experiments data and those of longitudinal sound experiments. We consider several possible explanations of the above experimental data: the existence of a new superfluid phase in the vicinity of the boundary, excitation of different branches of the squashing mode by longitudinal and transverse sound, and deformation of B phase near the boundary. We have come to the conclusion that the last possibility seems the most likely and that the boundary state of He3-B is indeed a deformed B phase, as suggested by Brusov and Popov 20years ago for the case of the presence of external perturbations such as magnetic and electric fields. Our result implies that the influence of the wall or, generally speaking, of confined geometry does not lead to the existence of a new phase near the boundary, as has been suggested up to now, but like other external perturbations (e.g., magnetic and electric fields) the wall deforms the order parameter of the B phase and this deformation leads to some important consequences. In particular, the frequencies of collective modes in the vicinity of the boundary change by up to 20%. One other evidence in support of our conclusion with regard to the realization of the deformed B-phase in He3-B phase near the boundary is the peak in transverse ultrasound impedance observed at a temperature of 0.94 Tc and interpreted by the authors as a manifestation of the transition from a supercooled A-phase to B-phase, which is really the transition between A-phase and deformed B-phase.

  7. An apparatus for studying electrical breakdown in liquid helium at 0.4 K and testing electrode materials for the neutron electric dipole moment experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source

    DOE PAGES

    Ito, T. M.; Ramsey, J. C.; Yao, W.; Beck, D. H.; Cianciolo, V.; Clayton, S. M.; Crawford, C.; Currie, S. A.; Filippone, B. W.; Griffith, W. C.; et al

    2016-04-25

    In this study, we have constructed an apparatus to study DC electrical breakdown in liquid helium at temperatures as low as 0.4 K and at pressures between the saturated vapor pressure and ~600 Torr. The apparatus can house a set of electrodes that are 12 cm in diameter with a gap of 1–2 cm between them, and a potential up to ±50 kV can be applied to each electrode. Initial results demonstrated that it is possible to apply fields exceeding 100 kV/cm in a 1 cm gap between two electropolished stainless steel electrodes 12 cm in diameter for a widemore » range of pressures at 0.4 K. We also measured the current between two electrodes. Our initial results, I < 1 pA at 45 kV, correspond to a lower bound on the effective volume resistivity of liquid helium of ρV > 5 × 1018 Ω cm. This lower bound is 5 times larger than the bound previously measured. Finally, we report the design, construction, and operational experience of the apparatus, as well as initial results« less

  8. Equations of motion for superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.G.; Elser, V.

    1995-06-01

    To the principles of least action and minimum error, for determining the time evolution of the parameters in a variational wave function, we add a third: continuous collapse dynamics. In this formulation, exact time evolution is applied for an infinitesimal time and is followed by projection of the state back into the variational manifold (``collapse``). All three principles lead to the same equations of motion when applied to complex parameters but take two distinct forms when the parameters are real. As an application of these principles, we study the time evolution of two variational wave functions for superfluids. The first wave function, containing real parameters, was considered by Kerman and Koonin [Ann. Phys. (N.Y.) 100, 332 (1976)] and leads to the Euler equation in the hydrodynamic limit. The equation for our second wave function, a coherent state of Feynman excitations with complex parameters, has essentially the same hydrodynamic limit. The latter wave function, however, has a significant advantage in that the equation it generates is useful and meaningful on a microscopic scale as well.

  9. Liquid-vapor critical behavior in silica aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Tobias Kent

    Fluids in porous media provide a testing ground for the effects of disorder and confinement on phase transitions and critical phenomena. Specifically, highly porous silica aerogel with its tenuous solid structure has allowed low temperature physicists to probe the effect of dilute fixed impurities on both the 4He superfluid transition and the 3He superfluid transition. Both systems have yielded exciting results and work is ongoing, especially on 3He in aerogel. This thesis explores the effect of aerogel on another transition---the liquid-vapor transition near the liquid-vapor critical point. In dense porous media, the liquid-vapor transition is usually described as capillary condensation---a process which assigns surface tension a primary role in determining the thermodynamic state of the system. However, aerogels are often so diffuse (less than 5% silica by volume---the rest is open space) that it becomes difficult to speak of pore size and meniscus shape as one would in a denser porous medium. As one approaches the liquid-vapor critical point, thermal fluctuations within the fluid grow until they exceed the scale of the aerogel strands and pores themselves. In this regime one cannot expect surface tension to control the thermodynamics of the system---it is instead in a regime where thermal fluctuations may govern its behavior. In the past there were even suggestions that the addition of aerogel might shift the character of the transition into another universality class. The following chapters present data collected on helium and neon in aerogel near their respective liquid-vapor critical points. While the behavior of the fluid at low temperatures is consistent with the pictures provided by capillary condensation, closer to the critical point they are incompatible and remain somewhat unexplained. Evidence for a shift in universality class was not found---in fact there was very little evidence for a macroscopic equilibrium transition of any type.

  10. Note on zero temperature holographic superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Minyong; Lan, Shanquan; Niu, Chao; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Hongbao

    2016-06-01

    In this note, we have addressed various issues on zero temperature holographic superfluids. First, inspired by our numerical evidence for the equality between the superfluid density and particle density, we provide an elegant analytic proof for this equality by a boost trick. Second, using not only the frequency domain analysis but also the time domain analysis from numerical relativity, we identify the hydrodynamic normal modes and calculate out the sound speed, which is shown to increase with the chemical potential and saturate to the value predicted by the conformal field theory in the large chemical potential limit. Third, the generic non-thermalization is demonstrated by the fully nonlinear time evolution from a non-equilibrium state for our zero temperature holographic superfluid. Furthermore, a conserved Noether charge is proposed in support of this behavior.

  11. Study of superfluid Bose-Fermi mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Sebastien; Delehaye, Marion; Jin, Shuwei; Pierce, Matthieu; Yefsah, Tarik; Chevy, Frederic; Salomon, Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Using fermionic and bosonic isotopes of lithium we produce and study ultracold Bose-Fermi mixtures. First in a low temperature counterflow experiment, we measure the critical velocity of the system in the BEC-BCS crossover. Around unitarity, we observe a remarkably high superfluid critical velocity which reaches the sound velocity of the strongly interacting Fermi gas. Second, when we increase the temperature of the system slightly above the superfluid transitions we observe an unexpected phase locking of the oscillations of the clouds induced by dissipation. Finally, as suggested in, we explore the nature of the superfluid phase when we impose a spin polarization in the situation where the mean field potential created by the bosons on the fermions tends to cancel out the trapping potential of the latter.

  12. Quenched bond randomness: Superfluidity in porous media and the strong violation of universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falicov, Alexis; Berker, A. Nihat

    1997-04-01

    The effects of quenched bond randomness are most readily studied with superfluidity immersed in a porous medium. A lattice model for3He-4He mixtures and incomplete4He fillings in aerogel yields the signature effect of bond randomness, namely the conversion of symmetry-breaking first-order phase transitions into second-order phase transitions, the λ-line reaching zero temperature, and the elimination of non-symmetry-breaking first-order phase transitions. The model recognizes the importance of the connected nature of aerogel randomness and thereby yields superfluidity at very low4He concentrations, a phase separation entirely within the superfluid phase, and the order-parameter contrast between mixtures and incomplete fillings, all in agreement with experiments. The special properties of the helium mixture/aerogel system are distinctly linked to the aerogel properties of connectivity, randomness, and tenuousness, via the additional study of a regularized “jungle-gym” aerogel. Renormalization-group calculations indicate that a strong violation of the empirical universality principle of critical phenomena occurs under quenched bond randomness. It is argued that helium/aerogel critical properties reflect this violation and further experiments are suggested. Renormalization-group analysis also shows that, adjoiningly to the strong universality violation (which hinges on the occurrence or non-occurrence of asymptotic strong coupling—strong randomness under rescaling), there is a new “hyperuniversality” at phase transitions with asymptotic strong coupling—strong randomness behavior, for example assigning the same critical exponents to random- bond tricriticality and random- field criticality.

  13. Dark solitons in a superfluid Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Antezza, Mauro; Dalfovo, Franco; Stringari, Sandro; Pitaevskii, Lev P.

    2007-10-15

    We investigate the behavior of dark solitons in a superfluid Fermi gas along the BCS-BEC crossover by solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations and looking for real and odd solutions for the order parameter. We show that in the resonance unitary region, where the scattering length is large, the density profile of the soliton has a deep minimum, differently from what happens in the BCS regime. The superfluid gap is found to be significantly quenched by the presence of the soliton due to the occurrence of Andreev fermionic bound states localized near the nodal plane of the order parameter.

  14. Coherent structure formation in turbulent thermal superfluids.

    PubMed

    Kivotides, Demosthenes

    2006-05-01

    By means of numerical calculations, we show that in turbulent thermal superfluids the normal fluid induces coherent bundles of quantized line vortices in the superfluid. These filamentary structures are formed in between the normal fluid vortices, acquiring eventually comparable circulation. They are self-stretched and evolve according to self-regulating dynamics. Their spectrum mimics the normal fluid spectrum with the mutual friction force exciting the large scales and damping the small scales. Strongly interacting triads of them merge sporadically into stronger, braided vortex filaments, inducing strong fluctuations in the system's energetics. A theoretical account of the system's statistical mechanics is proposed. PMID:16712309

  15. Superfluid-like turbulence in cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradwohl, Ben-Ami

    1991-01-01

    A network of vortices in a superfluid system exhibits turbulent behavior. It is argued that the universe may have experienced such a phase of superfluid-like turbulence due to the existence of a coherent state with non-topological charge and a network of global strings. The unique feature of a distribution of turbulent domains is that it can yield non-gravitationally induced large-scale coherent velocities. It may be difficult, however, to relate these velocities to the observed large-scale bulk motion.

  16. Superfluid light in bulk nonlinear media.

    PubMed

    Carusotto, Iacopo

    2014-09-01

    We review how the paraxial approximation naturally leads to a hydrodynamic description of light propagation in a bulk Kerr nonlinear medium in terms of a wave equation analogous to the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the order parameter of a superfluid. The main features of the many-body collective dynamics of the fluid of light in this propagating geometry are discussed: generation and observation of Bogoliubov sound waves in the fluid of light is first described. Experimentally accessible manifestations of superfluidity are then highlighted. Perspectives in view of realizing analogue models of gravity are finally given. PMID:25197252

  17. How superfluid vortex knots untie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleckner, Dustin; Kauffman, Louis H.; Irvine, William T. M.

    2016-07-01

    Knots and links often occur in physical systems, including shaken strands of rope and DNA (ref. ), as well as the more subtle structure of vortices in fluids and magnetic fields in plasmas. Theories of fluid flows without dissipation predict these tangled structures persist, constraining the evolution of the flow much like a knot tied in a shoelace. This constraint gives rise to a conserved quantity known as helicity, offering both fundamental insights and enticing possibilities for controlling complex flows. However, even small amounts of dissipation allow knots to untie by means of `cut-and-splice’ operations known as reconnections. Despite the potentially fundamental role of these reconnections in understanding helicity--and the stability of knotted fields more generally--their effect is known only for a handful of simple knots. Here we study the evolution of 322 elemental knots and links in the Gross-Pitaevskii model for a superfluid, and find that they universally untie. We observe that the centreline helicity is partially preserved even as the knots untie, a remnant of the perfect helicity conservation predicted for idealized fluids. Moreover, we find that the topological pathways of untying knots have simple descriptions in terms of minimal two-dimensional knot diagrams, and tend to concentrate in states which are twisted in only one direction. These results have direct analogies to previous studies of simple knots in several systems, including DNA recombination and classical fluids. This similarity in the geometric and topological evolution suggests there are universal aspects in the behaviour of knots in dissipative fields.

  18. Helium-Recycling Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    Proposed system recovers and stores helium gas for reuse. Maintains helium at 99.99-percent purity, preventing water vapor from atmosphere or lubricating oil from pumps from contaminating gas. System takes in gas at nearly constant low back pressure near atmospheric pressure; introduces little or no back pressure into source of helium. Concept also extended to recycling of other gases.

  19. The Federal Helium supply: How we got here and where we might be going

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsesser, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Helium is a limited, non-renewable resource with large uncertainties in both supply and price. It's essential for academic researchers across the physical sciences and engineering disciplines who depend on liquid helium to perform experiments and maintain critical instruments. However, because only about three percent of helium is used for scientific research, academic users have little leverage in the helium marketplace. With the Federal Helium Reserve required to sell off its remaining supply and close its doors within the next decade, many in academia are wondering ``what's next''? I will discuss the history of the Federal Helium Reserve, including legislation that shaped its development, and possibilities going forward. Additionally, I will describe a new APS initiative where we have formed a small consortium of academic liquid helium users and are allowing the Defense Logistics Agency to represent the consortium in liquid helium contract negotiations.

  20. Equation of state of metallic helium

    SciTech Connect

    Shvets, V. T.

    2013-01-15

    The effective ion-ion interaction, free energy, pressure, and electric resistance of metallic liquid helium have been calculated in wide density and temperature ranges using perturbation theory in the electron-ion interaction potential. In the case of conduction electrons, the exchange interaction has been taken into account in the random-phase approximation and correlations have been taken into account in the local-field approximation. The solid-sphere model has been used for the nuclear subsystem. The diameter of these spheres is the only parameter of this theory. The diameter and density of the system at which the transition of helium from the singly ionized to doubly ionized state occurs have been estimated by analyzing the pair effective interaction between helium atoms. The case of doubly ionized helium atoms has been considered. Terms up to the third order of perturbation theory have been taken into account in the numerical calculations. The contribution of the third-order term is significant in all cases. The electric resistance and its temperature dependence for metallic helium are characteristic of simple divalent metals in the liquid state. The thermodynamic parameters-temperature and pressure densities-are within the ranges characteristic of the central regions of giant planets. This makes it possible to assume the existence of helium in the metallic state within the solar system.

  1. Investigations of levitated helium drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, Dwight Lawrence

    1999-11-01

    We report on the development of two systems capable of levitating drops of liquid helium. Helium drops of ˜20 mum have been levitated with the radiation pressure from two counter-propagating Nd:YAG laser beams. Drops are produced with a submerged piezoelectric transducer, and could be held for up to three minutes in our optical trap. Calculations show that Brillouin and Raman scattering of the laser light in the liquid helium produces a negligible rate of evaporation of the drop. Evaporation caused by the enhanced vapor pressure of the curved drop surfaces appears to be a significant effect limiting the drop lifetimes. Helium drops as large as 2 cm in diameter have been suspended in the earth's gravitational field with a magnetic field. A commercial superconducting solenoid provides the necessary field, field-gradient product required to levitate the drops. Drops are cooled to 0.5 K with a helium-3 refrigerator, and can be held in the trap indefinitely. We have found that when two or more drops are levitated in the same magnetic trap, the drops often remain in a state of apparent contact without coalescing. This effect is a result of the evaporation of liquid from between the two drops, and is found to occur only for normal fluid drops. We can induce shape oscillations in charged, levitated drops with an applied ac electric field. We have measured the resonance frequencies and damping rates for the l = 2 mode of oscillation as function of temperature. We have also developed a theory to describe the small amplitude shape oscillations of a He II drop surrounded by its saturated vapor. In our theory, we have considered two sets of boundary conditions---one where the drop does not evaporate and another in which the liquid and vapor are in thermodynamic equilibrium. We have found that both solutions give a frequency that agrees well with experiment, but that the data for the damping rate agree better with the solution without evaporation.

  2. Commissioning of a new helium pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges addresses the audience at the commissioning of a new high-pressure helium pipeline at Kennedy Space Center that will service launch needs at the new Delta IV Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The nine-mile- long buried pipeline will also serve as a backup helium resource for Shuttle launches. Nearly one launch's worth of helium will be available in the pipeline to support a Shuttle pad in an emergency. The line originates at the Helium Facility on KSC and terminates in a meter station at the perimeter of the Delta IV launch pad. Others at the ceremony were Jerry Jorgensen, pipeline project manager, Space Gateway Support (SGS); Col. Samuel Dick, representative of the 45th Space Wing; Ramon Lugo, acting executive director, JPMO; David Herst, director, Delta IV Launch Sites; Pierre Dufour, president and CEO, Air Liquide America Corporation; and Michael Butchko, president, SGS.

  3. Commissioning of a new helium pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Jerry Jorgensen welcomes the audience to the commissioning of a new high-pressure helium pipeline at Kennedy Space Center. Jorgensen, with Space Gateway Support (SGS), is the pipeline project manager. To the right is Ramon Lugo, acting executive director, JPMO. Others at the ceremony were Center Director Roy Bridges; Col. Samuel Dick, representative of the 45th Space Wing; David Herst, director, Delta IV Launch Sites; Pierre Dufour, president and CEO, Air Liquide America Corporation; and Michael Butchko, president, SGS. The pipeline will service launch needs at the new Delta IV Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The nine-mile-long buried pipeline will also serve as a backup helium resource for Shuttle launches. Nearly one launch's worth of helium will be available in the pipeline to support a Shuttle pad in an emergency. The line originates at the Helium Facility on KSC and terminates in a meter station at the perimeter of the Delta IV launch pad.

  4. Commissioning of a new helium pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At the commissioning of a new high-pressure helium pipeline at Kennedy Space Center, Ramon Lugo, acting executive director, JPMO , presents a plaque to Center Director Roy Bridges. The pipeline will service launch needs at the new Delta IV Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Others at the ceremony were Jerry Jorgensen, pipeline project manager, Space Gateway Support (SGS); Col. Samuel Dick, representative of the 45th Space Wing; David Herst, director, Delta IV Launch Sites; Pierre Dufour, president and CEO, Air Liquide America Corporation; and Michael Butchko, president, SGS. The nine-mile-long buried pipeline will also serve as a backup helium resource for Shuttle launches. Nearly one launch's worth of helium will be available in the pipeline to support a Shuttle pad in an emergency. The line originates at the Helium Facility on KSC and terminates in a meter station at the perimeter of the Delta IV launch pad.

  5. Surface Waves on the Superfluids ^3He and ^4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manninen, M. S.; Ranni, A.; Rysti, J.; Todoshchenko, I. A.; Tuoriniemi, J. T.

    2016-06-01

    Free surface waves were examined both in superfluids ^3He and ^4He with the premise that these inviscid media would represent ideal realizations for this fluid dynamics problem. The work in ^3He is one of the first of its kind, but in ^4He, it was possible to produce a much more complete set of data for meaningful comparison with theoretical models. Most measurements were performed at the zero temperature limit, meaning T< 100 mK for ^4He and T˜ 100 μ K for ^3He. Dozens of surface wave resonances, including up to 11 overtones, were observed and monitored as the liquid depth in the cell was varied. Despite of the wealth of data, perfect agreement with the constructed theoretical models could not be achieved.

  6. Dynamics of Laser Ablation in Superfluid ^4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buelna, X.; Popov, E.; Eloranta, J.

    2016-10-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of metal targets immersed in superfluid ^4He is visualized by time-resolved shadowgraph photography and the products are analyzed by post-experiment atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. The expansion dynamics of the gaseous ablation half-bubble on the target surface appears underdamped and follows the predicted behavior for the thermally induced bubble growth mechanism. An inherent instability of the ablation bubble appears near its maximum radius and no tightly focused cavity collapse or rebound events are observed. During the ablation bubble retreat phase, the presence of sharp edges in the target introduces flow patterns that lead to the creation of large classical vortex rings. Furthermore, on the nanometer scale, AFM data reveal that the metal nanoparticles created by laser ablation are trapped in spherical vortex tangles and quantized vortex rings present in the non-equilibrium liquid.

  7. Entrainment parameters in a cold superfluid neutron star core

    SciTech Connect

    Chamel, Nicolas; Haensel, Pawel

    2006-04-15

    Hydrodynamic simulations of neutron star cores that are based on a two-fluid description in terms of a neutron-proton superfluid mixture require the knowledge of the Andreev-Bashkin entrainment matrix which relates the momentum of one constituent to the currents of both constituents. This matrix is derived for arbitrary nuclear asymmetry at zero temperature and in the limits of small relative currents in the framework of the energy density functional theory. The Skyrme energy density functional is considered as a particular case. General analytic formulas for the entrainment parameters and various corresponding effective masses are obtained. These formulas are applied to the liquid core of a neutron star composed of homogeneous plasma of nucleons, electrons, and possibly muons in {beta} equilibrium.

  8. Superfluidity and Chaos in low dimensional circuits.

    PubMed

    Arwas, Geva; Vardi, Amichay; Cohen, Doron

    2015-01-01

    The hallmark of superfluidity is the appearance of "vortex states" carrying a quantized metastable circulating current. Considering a unidirectional flow of particles in a ring, at first it appears that any amount of scattering will randomize the velocity, as in the Drude model, and eventually the ergodic steady state will be characterized by a vanishingly small fluctuating current. However, Landau and followers have shown that this is not always the case. If elementary excitations (e.g. phonons) have higher velocity than that of the flow, simple kinematic considerations imply metastability of the vortex state: the energy of the motion cannot dissipate into phonons. On the other hand if this Landau criterion is violated the circulating current can decay. Below we show that the standard Landau and Bogoliubov superfluidity criteria fail in low-dimensional circuits. Proper determination of the superfluidity regime-diagram must account for the crucial role of chaos, an ingredient missing from the conventional stability analysis. Accordingly, we find novel types of superfluidity, associated with irregular or chaotic or breathing vortex states. PMID:26315272

  9. Magnus force in superfluids and superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Sonin, E.B. |

    1997-01-01

    The forces on the vortex, transverse to its velocity, are considered. In addition to the superfluid Magnus force from the condensate (superfluid component), there are transverse forces from thermal quasiparticles and external fields violating the Galilean invariance. The forces between quasiparticles and the vortex originate from interference of quasiparticles with trajectories on the left and on the right from the vortex like similar forces for electrons interacting with the thin magnetic-flux tube (the Aharonov-Bohm effect). These forces are derived for phonons from the equations of superfluid hydrodynamics, and for BCS quasiparticles from the Bogolyubov{endash}de Gennes equations. The effect of external fields breaking Galilean invariance is analyzed for vortices in the two-dimensional Josephson junction array. The symmetry analysis of the classical equations for the array shows that the total transverse force on the vortex vanishes. Therefore the Hall effect which is linear in the transverse force is absent also. This means that the Magnus force from the superfluid component {ital exactly} cancels with the transverse force from the external fields. The results of other approaches are also brought together for discussion. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Fermionic Paired Superfluids at High Rotation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veillette, Martin Y.; Sheehy, Daniel E.; Gurarie, Victor; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2006-03-01

    I will describe our recent work on rotating resonantly-paired superfluids, mapping out the Feshbach resonance detuning, temperature and rotational frequency phase diagram. I will compare our predictions with the recent experiments on degenerate atomic ^6Li gases across a Feshbach resonance [Zwierlein et al. Nature 435, 1047 (2005)] and will make proposals for future experiments in such systems.

  11. Nonlocal Magnetoresistance Mediated by Spin Superfluidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, So; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2015-10-01

    The electrical response of two diffusive metals is studied when they are linked by a magnetic insulator hosting a topologically stable (superfluid) spin current. We discuss how charge currents in the metals induce a spin supercurrent state, which in turn generates a magnetoresistance that depends on the topology of the electrical circuit. This magnetoresistance relies on phase coherence over the entire magnet and gives direct evidence for spin superfluidity. We show that driving the magnet with an ac current allows coherent spin transport even in the presence of U(1)-breaking magnetic anisotropy that can preclude dc superfluid transport. Spin transmission in the ac regime shows a series of resonance peaks as a function of frequency. The peak locations, heights, and widths can be used to extract static interfacial properties, e.g., the spin-mixing conductance and effective spin Hall angle, and to probe dynamic properties such as the spin-wave dispersion. Thus, ac transport may provide a simpler route to realizing nonequilbrium coherent spin transport and a useful way to characterize the magnetic system, serving as a precursor to the realization of dc superfluid spin transport.

  12. Measurements with a recuperative superfluid Stirling refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, A.; Swift, G.W.; Brisson, J.G.

    1995-08-01

    A superfluid Stirling refrigerator cooled to 168 mK using a 4.9% {sup 3}He- {sup 4}He mixture and exhausting its waste heat at 383 mK. Cooling power versus temperature and speed is presented for 4.9%, 17%, and 36% mixtures. At the highest concentration, a dissipation mechanism of unknown origin is observed.

  13. Second sound experiments in superfluid 3He-A1 phase in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastea, Marina

    The Asb1 phase of sp3He is the first observed magnetic superfluid, stable only in the presence of an external magnetic field. Due to the broken relative gauge and spin rotational symmetry, the two associated collective modes, the second sound and the longitudinal spin waves are expected to appear as a single mode which we call the spin-entropy wave. Our work is focused on consistently mapping the behavior of the spin-entropy wave in the superfluid Asb{1} phase of sp3He, under a wide range of experimental conditions. Our results address fundamental questions such as the identification of the order parameter symmetry in the superfluid states, the nature of the pairing state in the Asb1 phase and the superfluid density anisotropy. We extensively investigated the propagation of the spin-entropy wave as a function of temperature, magnetic field between 1 and 8 Tesla and liquid pressure up to 30 bar. Our results show that the superfluid density is directly proportional to the magnitude of the external field in the specified range, as predicted by theory. We discovered that in the vicinity of the transition to the Asb2 phase, over a fairly large temperature range, the spin-entropy wave suffers a divergent attenuation. The observed effects were suggested as evidence for the presence of a minority condensate population, "down spin" pairs, specific for the Asb2 phase, as predicted by Monien and Tewordt. We measured the superfluid density dependence on the pressure between 10 and 30 bar and directly related it to the fourth order coefficients of the Ginzburg-Landau free energy expansion. The pressure dependence of three of these coefficients and their strong coupling corrections was found to be consistent with the theoretical predictions of Sauls and Serene. Our results support the identification of the A phase as the Anderson-Brinkman-Morel axial state and provide an important consistency check for the phase diagram carried out by groups at USC and Cornell. We performed

  14. The Astro-E2/XRS-2 helium insert system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirron, P. J.; DiPirro, M. J.; Panek, J.; Kelley, R.; Mitsuda, K.; Fujimoto, R.; Hirabayashi, M.; McCammon, D.

    2006-04-01

    The X-ray Spectrometer (XRS-2) instrument on the Japanese Space Agency (JAXA) Astro-E2 spacecraft will measure faint X-ray emissions in the energy range of 0.2-10 keV. A square array of 32 X-ray microcalorimeters used will be able to distinguish individual photons to better than 10 eV at 6 keV, with a quantum efficiency near 100%. The detectors are cooled to 60 mK by means of an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The ADR rejects heat to a 1.3 K superfluid helium tank, which is surrounded by a 17 K solid neon tank. A Stirling cycle cryocooler precools an outer shield around the neon tank. This system will provide an estimated 3 years of on-orbit lifetime. This paper describes the helium insert, the ADR, the high temperature superconducting leads, and early on-orbit performance.

  15. Stability of Surface State Electrons on Helium Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiderer, P.; Scheer, E.; Kono, K.; Lin, J.-J.; Rees, D. G.

    2016-05-01

    Electrons on helium substrates form a model Coulomb system in which the transition from classical electron liquid to Wigner crystal is readily observed. However, attempts to increase the electron density in order to observe the `quantum melting' of the system to a Fermi degenerate gas are hindered by an instability of the helium surface. Here we describe experimental efforts to reach the degenerate regime on thin helium films and microstructured substrates, for which the surface instability is suppressed. We demonstrate that, although the electron densities obtained exceed those for bulk helium substrates, observation of quantum melting remains challenging. We discuss possible solutions to the technical challenges involved.

  16. Experiments on Rogue Waves in Superfluid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, Viktor; McClintock, Peter; Ganshin, Andrei; Kolmakov, German; Mezhov-Deglin, Leonid

    2010-05-01

    We describe an experimental and theoretical study of nonlinear wave interactions in superfluid helium and report the observation of rogue waves. Rogue waves (or freak waves, or killer waves, or extreme waves) have long been recognized by sailors as a menace to shipping and are believed to have been responsible for the unexplained losses of vessels of all sizes, including e.g. 22 super-carriers between 1968 and 1994 [1, 2]. Rogue waves on the ocean are rare, and are much higher (and steeper) than all the other waves around them. They seem to appear from nowhere and subsequently to disappear without trace [3]. Following the famous 'New Year wave' measured by instruments on the Draupner North Sea oil rig at the beginning of 1995, the existence of oceanic rogue waves is no longer in doubt. There have been several suggestions about possible mechanisms for the creation of rogue waves. These include the combined effects of wind and currents, and the focusing effects associated with the profile of the ocean floor and nearby shorelines. Where rogue waves appear in deep water far from any shore, which they sometimes do, it seems likely that they must evolve through nonlinear interactions within the 'noisy background" of smaller wind-blown waves [4]. Rogue waves have been modeled theoretically, especially by exploiting the special properties of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. They have been sought experimentally and/or studied in large wave tanks [5], optical systems [6, 7], and superfluid 4He [8]. Our experimental system consists of high intensity second sound (temperature-entropy) waves within a resonant cavity filled with superfluid 4He at 2.1 K. Under steady state conditions, with a constant oscillatory driving force at the resonant frequency, the second sound waves are turbulent and fluxes of energy flow towards both high and low frequencies. It is found that rogue waves appear under the nonequilibrium conditions that prevail shortly after the drive has been

  17. Investigation Development Plan for Reflight of the Small Helium-cooled Infrared Telescope Experiment. Volume 1: Investigation and Technical/management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Infrared Telescope (IRT) is designed to survey extended celestial sources of infrared radiation between 4 and 120 micrometers wavelength. It will provide data regarding Space Shuttle induced environmental contamination and the zodical light. And, it will provide experience in the management of large volumes of superfluid helium in the space environment.

  18. Possible superfluidity of molecular hydrogen in a two-dimensional crystal phase of sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazorla, Claudio; Boronat, Jordi

    2013-12-01

    We theoretically investigate the ground-state properties of a molecular para-hydrogen (p-H2) film in which crystallization is energetically frustrated by embedding sodium (Na) atoms periodically distributed in a triangular lattice. In order to fully deal with the quantum nature of p-H2 molecules, we employ the diffusion Monte Carlo method and realistic semiempirical pairwise potentials describing the interactions between H2-H2 and Na-H2 species. In particular, we calculate the energetic, structural, and superfluid properties of two-dimensional Na-H2 systems within a narrow density interval around equilibrium at zero temperature. In contrast to previous computational studies considering other alkali metal species such as rubidium and potassium, we find that the p-H2 ground state is a liquid with a significantly large superfluid fraction of ρs/ρ=0.29(2). The appearance of p-H2 superfluid response is due to the fact that the interactions between Na atoms and H2 molecules are less attractive than between H2 molecules. This induces a considerable reduction of the hydrogen density which favors the stabilization of the liquid phase.

  19. Recovery of purified helium or hydrogen from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Merriman, J.R.; Pashley, J.H.; Stephenson, M.J.; Dunthorn, D.I.

    1974-01-15

    A process is described for the removal of helium or hydrogen from gaseous mixtures also containing contaminants. The gaseous mixture is contacted with a liquid fluorocarbon in an absorption zone maintained at superatomspheric pressure to preferentially absorb the contaminants in the fluorocarbon. Unabsorbed gas enriched in hydrogen or helium is withdrawn from the absorption zone as product. Liquid fluorocarbon enriched in contaminants is withdrawn separately from the absorption zone. (10 claims)

  20. Quantum turbulence in superfluids with wall-clamped normal component.

    PubMed

    Eltsov, Vladimir; Hänninen, Risto; Krusius, Matti

    2014-03-25

    In Fermi superfluids, such as superfluid (3)He, the viscous normal component can be considered to be stationary with respect to the container. The normal component interacts with the superfluid component via mutual friction, which damps the motion of quantized vortex lines and eventually couples the superfluid component to the container. With decreasing temperature and mutual friction, the internal dynamics of the superfluid component becomes more important compared with the damping and coupling effects from the normal component. As a result profound changes in superfluid dynamics are observed: the temperature-dependent transition from laminar to turbulent vortex motion and the decoupling from the reference frame of the container at even lower temperatures. PMID:24704879

  1. Abnormal superfluid fraction of harmonically trapped few-fermion systems.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yangqian; Blume, D

    2014-06-13

    Superfluidity is a fascinating phenomenon that, at the macroscopic scale, leads to dissipationless flow and the emergence of vortices. While these macroscopic manifestations of superfluidity are well described by theories that have their origin in Landau's two-fluid model, our microscopic understanding of superfluidity is far from complete. Using analytical and numerical ab initio approaches, this Letter determines the superfluid fraction and local superfluid density of small harmonically trapped two-component Fermi gases as a function of the interaction strength and temperature. At low temperature, we find that the superfluid fraction is, in certain regions of the parameter space, negative. This counterintuitive finding is traced back to the symmetry of the system's ground state wave function, which gives rise to a diverging quantum moment of inertia I(q). Analogous abnormal behavior of I(q) has been observed in even-odd nuclei at low temperature. Our predictions can be tested in modern cold atom experiments.

  2. Disappearance of Roton Propagation in Superfluid {sup 4}He at T{sub {lambda}}

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson, E.C.; Montfrooij, W.; de Schepper, I.M.

    1996-11-01

    Using neutron scattering, we determine the dynamic structure factor {ital S}({ital q},{nu}) of liquid {sup 4}He for the roton wave number {ital q}=2.0{sup {minus}1} as a function of frequency {nu} at constant density 0.1715 gcm{sup {minus}3} and for ten temperatures in the range 1.08{le}{ital T}{le}2.00 K, primarily near the superfluid transition temperature {ital T}{sub {lambda}}=1.9202 K. The {lambda} transition is marked by a complete softening of the roton mode and a rapid decrease in lifetime. This change is continuous with temperature, and we find no evidence for a new mode appearing as one enters the superfluid phase, as has been proposed on the basis of theoretical considerations. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. Coupling between Solid 3He on Aerogel and Superfluid 3He in the Low Temperature Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D. I.; Fisher, S. N.; Guenault, A. M.; Haley, R. P.; Pickett, G. R.; Tsepelin, V.; Whitehead, R. C. V.; Skyba, P.

    2006-09-07

    We have cooled liquid 3He contained in a 98% open aerogel sample surrounded by bulk superfluid 3He-B at zero pressure to below 120 {mu}K. The aerogel sample is placed in a quasiparticle blackbody radiator cooled by a Lancaster-style nuclear cooling stage to {approx}200 {mu}K. We monitor the temperature of the 3He inside the blackbody radiator using a vibrating wire resonator. We find that reducing the magnetic field on the aerogel sample causes substantial cooling of all the superfluid inside the blackbody radiator. We believe this is due to the demagnetization of the solid 3He layers on the aerogel strands. This system has potential for achieving extremely low temperatures in the confined fluid.

  4. Superfluid Transitions in Bosonic Atom-Molecule Mixtures near a Feshbach Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzihovsky, Leo; Park, Jae; Weichman, Peter B.

    2004-04-01

    We study bosonic atoms near a Feshbach resonance and predict that, in addition to standard normal and atomic superfluid phases, this system generically exhibits a distinct phase of matter: a molecular superfluid, where molecules are superfluid while atoms are not. We explore zero- and finite-temperature properties of the molecular superfluid (a bosonic, strong-coupling analog of a BCS superconductor), and study quantum and classical phase transitions between the normal, molecular superfluid, and atomic superfluid states.

  5. Superfluid transitions in bosonic atom-molecule mixtures near a Feshbach resonance.

    PubMed

    Radzihovsky, Leo; Park, Jae; Weichman, Peter B

    2004-04-23

    We study bosonic atoms near a Feshbach resonance and predict that, in addition to standard normal and atomic superfluid phases, this system generically exhibits a distinct phase of matter: a molecular superfluid, where molecules are superfluid while atoms are not. We explore zero- and finite-temperature properties of the molecular superfluid (a bosonic, strong-coupling analog of a BCS superconductor), and study quantum and classical phase transitions between the normal, molecular superfluid, and atomic superfluid states. PMID:15169205

  6. Novel p-wave superfluids of fermionic polar molecules

    PubMed Central

    Fedorov, A. K.; Matveenko, S. I.; Yudson, V. I.; Shlyapnikov, G. V.

    2016-01-01

    Recently suggested subwavelength lattices offer remarkable prospects for the observation of novel superfluids of fermionic polar molecules. It becomes realistic to obtain a topological p-wave superfluid of microwave-dressed polar molecules in 2D lattices at temperatures of the order of tens of nanokelvins, which is promising for topologically protected quantum information processing. Another foreseen novel phase is an interlayer p-wave superfluid of polar molecules in a bilayer geometry. PMID:27278711

  7. Novel p-wave superfluids of fermionic polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A. K.; Matveenko, S. I.; Yudson, V. I.; Shlyapnikov, G. V.

    2016-06-01

    Recently suggested subwavelength lattices offer remarkable prospects for the observation of novel superfluids of fermionic polar molecules. It becomes realistic to obtain a topological p-wave superfluid of microwave-dressed polar molecules in 2D lattices at temperatures of the order of tens of nanokelvins, which is promising for topologically protected quantum information processing. Another foreseen novel phase is an interlayer p-wave superfluid of polar molecules in a bilayer geometry.

  8. Monopole strength function of deformed superfluid nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoitsov, M.; Kortelainen, M.; Nakatsukasa, T.; Losa, C.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2011-10-01

    We present an efficient method for calculating strength functions using the finite-amplitude method (FAM) for deformed superfluid heavy nuclei within the framework of the nuclear density functional theory. We demonstrate that FAM reproduces strength functions obtained with the fully self-consistent quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) at a fraction of the computational cost. As a demonstration, we compute the isoscalar and isovector monopole strengths for strongly deformed configurations in 100Zr and 240Pu by considering huge quasiparticle QRPA spaces. Our approach to FAM, based on Broyden's iterative procedure, opens the possibility for large-scale calculations of strength distributions in well-deformed superfluid nuclei across the nuclear landscape.

  9. Bistability in a Driven-Dissipative Superfluid.

    PubMed

    Labouvie, Ralf; Santra, Bodhaditya; Heun, Simon; Ott, Herwig

    2016-06-10

    We experimentally study a driven-dissipative Josephson junction array, realized with a weakly interacting Bose-Einstein condensate residing in a one-dimensional optical lattice. Engineered losses on one site act as a local dissipative process, while tunneling from the neighboring sites constitutes the driving force. We characterize the emerging steady states of this atomtronic device. With increasing dissipation strength γ the system crosses from a superfluid state, characterized by a coherent Josephson current into the lossy site, to a resistive state, characterized by an incoherent hopping transport. For intermediate values of γ, the system exhibits bistability, where a superfluid and an incoherent branch coexist. We also study the relaxation dynamics towards the steady state, where we find a critical slowing down, indicating the presence of a nonequilibrium phase transition. PMID:27341243

  10. Bistability in a Driven-Dissipative Superfluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labouvie, Ralf; Santra, Bodhaditya; Heun, Simon; Ott, Herwig

    2016-06-01

    We experimentally study a driven-dissipative Josephson junction array, realized with a weakly interacting Bose-Einstein condensate residing in a one-dimensional optical lattice. Engineered losses on one site act as a local dissipative process, while tunneling from the neighboring sites constitutes the driving force. We characterize the emerging steady states of this atomtronic device. With increasing dissipation strength γ the system crosses from a superfluid state, characterized by a coherent Josephson current into the lossy site, to a resistive state, characterized by an incoherent hopping transport. For intermediate values of γ , the system exhibits bistability, where a superfluid and an incoherent branch coexist. We also study the relaxation dynamics towards the steady state, where we find a critical slowing down, indicating the presence of a nonequilibrium phase transition.

  11. Dark matter superfluid and DBI dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Wang, Shao-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    It was shown recently that, without jeopardizing the success of the Λ cold dark matter model on cosmic scales, the modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) can be derived as an emergent phenomenon when axionlike dark matter particles condense into superfluid on the galactic scales. We propose in this paper a Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) scalar field conformally coupled to the matter components. To maintain the success of MOND phenomenon of dark matter superfluid on the galactic scales, the fifth force introduced by the DBI scalar should be screened on the galactic scales. It turns out that the screening effect naturally leads to a simple explanation for a longstanding puzzle that the MOND critical acceleration coincides with present Hubble scale. This galactic coincidence problem is solved, provided that the screened DBI scalar also plays the role of dark energy on the cosmic scales.

  12. Landau superfluids as nonequilibrium stationary states

    SciTech Connect

    Wreszinski, Walter F.

    2015-01-15

    We define a superfluid state to be a nonequilibrium stationary state (NESS), which, at zero temperature, satisfies certain metastability conditions, which physically express that there should be a sufficiently small energy-momentum transfer between the particles of the fluid and the surroundings (e.g., pipe). It is shown that two models, the Girardeau model and the Huang-Yang-Luttinger (HYL) model, describe superfluids in this sense and, moreover, that, in the case of the HYL model, the metastability condition is directly related to Nozières’ conjecture that, due to the repulsive interaction, the condensate does not suffer fragmentation into two (or more) parts, thereby assuring its quantum coherence. The models are rigorous examples of NESS in which the system is not finite, but rather a many-body system.

  13. Dynamics and nucleation of vorticity in superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, Jose Arruda De Oliveira

    1997-11-01

    This thesis contains numerical studies on vortex dynamics and on quantum nucleation of vorticity in superfluids at zero temperature. In both cases the superfluid was described by the Gross-Pitaevskii model. In the first part of the thesis, the vortex mass problem is analyzed by a numerical integration of the condensate equation of motion, the nonlinear Schrodinger equation. We were able to extract, from the observed vortex dynamics in a time-dependent superflow, the frequency dependence of the vortex effective mass. In the second part, the problem of quantum nucleation of vorticity in superflows past obstacles, in both one and two dimensions, is studied by the application of the bounce formalism of Coleman (12) to the coherent state action of the Gross-Pitaevskii model. We obtained bounce solutions and tunneling rates by directly solving the field equations for the condensate in imaginary time.

  14. Magnus and Iordanskii Forces in Superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    Wexler, C.

    1997-08-01

    The transverse force acting on a quantized vortex in a superfluid is a problem that has eluded a complete understanding for more than three decades. In this Letter I calculate the {ital superfluid } velocity part of the transverse force in a way closely related to Laughlin{close_quote}s argument for the quantization of conductance in the quantum Hall effect. A combination of this result, the {ital vortex} velocity part of the transverse force found by Thouless, Ao, and Niu [Phys.Rev.Lett.{bold 76}, 3758 (1996)], and Galilean invariance shows that there cannot be a transverse force proportional to the normal fluid velocity. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Electric generation of vortices in polariton superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flayac, H.; Pavlovic, G.; Kaliteevski, M. A.; Shelykh, I. A.

    2012-02-01

    We have theoretically demonstrated the on-demand electric generation of vortices in an exciton-polariton superfluid. Electric pulses applied to a horseshoe-shaped metallic mesa, deposited on top of the microcavity, generate a noncylindrically symmetric solitonic wave in the system. Breakdown of its wave front at focal points leads to the formation of vortex-antivortex pairs, which subsequently propagate in the superfluid. The trajectory of these vortex dipoles can be controlled by applying a voltage to additional electrodes. They can be confined within channels formed by metallic stripes and unbound by a wedged mesa giving birth to grey solitons. Finally, single static vortices can be generated using a single metallic plate configuration.

  16. Dynamics of rotating superfluid systems with pinning

    SciTech Connect

    Sedrakyan, A.D.; Sedrakyan, D.M.

    1995-08-01

    Equations describing the dynamics of motion of superfluid systems with pinning are derived, and analytical solutions of these equations are established for the case where the difference between the angular velocities of the superfluid and normal components is small. The solutions can be used to explain the time-dependent behavior of the angular velocity of the Vela pulsar. It is shown that vortex pinning in the period between two consecutive jumps in the pulsar angular velocity can redistribute the vortex number density so as to produce both the observed jump and the after-jump relaxation of the pulsar. For one thing, the formulas obtained are shown to provide an explanation of the 1988 Christmas discontinuity in the angular velocity of the Vela pulsar. 8 refs.

  17. Simulating infinite vortex lattices in superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingarelli, Luca; Keaveny, Eric E.; Barnett, Ryan

    2016-07-01

    We present an efficient framework to numerically treat infinite periodic vortex lattices in rotating superfluids described by the Gross-Pitaevskii theory. The commonly used split-step Fourier (SSF) spectral methods are inapplicable to such systems as the standard Fourier transform does not respect the boundary conditions mandated by the magnetic translation group. We present a generalisation of the SSF method which incorporates the correct boundary conditions by employing the so-called magnetic Fourier transform. We test the method and show that it reduces to known results in the lowest-Landau-level regime. While we focus on rotating scalar superfluids for simplicity, the framework can be naturally extended to treat multicomponent systems and systems under more general ‘synthetic’ gauge fields.

  18. Superfluid stiffness of a driven dissipative condensate with disorder.

    PubMed

    Janot, Alexander; Hyart, Timo; Eastham, Paul R; Rosenow, Bernd

    2013-12-01

    Observations of macroscopic quantum coherence in driven systems, e.g. polariton condensates, have strongly stimulated experimental as well as theoretical efforts during the last decade. We address the question of whether a driven quantum condensate is a superfluid, allowing for the effects of disorder and its nonequilibrium nature. We predict that for spatial dimensions d<4 the superfluid stiffness vanishes once the condensate exceeds a critical size, and treat in detail the case d=2. Thus a nonequilibrium condensate is not a superfluid in the thermodynamic limit, even for weak disorder, although superfluid behavior would persist in small systems.

  19. Polarized superfluidity in the attractive hubbard model with population imbalance.

    PubMed

    Dao, Tung-Lam; Ferrero, Michel; Georges, Antoine; Capone, Massimo; Parcollet, Olivier

    2008-12-01

    We study a two-component Fermi system with attractive interactions and different populations of the two species in a cubic lattice. For an intermediate coupling, we find a uniformly polarized superfluid which is stable down to very low temperatures. The momentum distribution of this phase closely resembles that of the Sarma phase, characterized by two Fermi surfaces. This phase is shown to be stabilized by a potential energy gain, as in a BCS superfluid, in contrast with the unpolarized Bose-Einstein condensate which is stabilized by kinetic energy. We present general arguments suggesting that preformed pairs in the unpolarized superfluid favor the stabilization of a polarized superfluid phase.

  20. Anisotropice superfluid fraction of3He A1 phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastea, M.; Kojima, H.

    1995-11-01

    The superfluid fraction of3He a1 phase is computed from measurements of the velocity of spin/entropy waves induced in a cylindrical chamber, for two different directions of the magnetic field: parallel and perpendicular to the axis of the chamber. The ratio of the superfluid fractions in the parallel and perpendicular orientations is 1.85, and does not depend on the field between 1 and 5 Tesla. We adapt a theoretical texture model to account for the superfluid flow, and the results are consistent with the above ratio and direct estimates of superfluid velocity.