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Sample records for supernova remnant ctb

  1. A GeV Source in the Direction of Supernova Remnant CTB 37B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yu-Liang; Liang, Yun-Feng; Li, Xiang; Yuan, Qiang; Liu, Si-Ming; Wei, Da-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are the most attractive candidates for the acceleration sites of Galactic cosmic rays. We report the detection of GeV γ-ray emission with the Pass 8 events recorded by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) in the vicinity of the shell-type SNR CTB 37B that is likely associated with the TeV γ-ray source HESS J1713-381. The photon spectrum of CTB 37B is consistent with a power law with an index of 1.89 ± 0.08 in the energy range of 0.5-500 GeV, and the measured flux connects smoothly with that of HESS J1713-381 at a few hundred GeV. No significant spatial extension and time variation are detected. The multi-wavelength data can be well fitted with either a leptonic model or a hadronic one. However, parameters of both models suggest more efficient particle acceleration than typical SNRs. Meanwhile, the X-ray and γ-ray spectral properties of CTB 37B show that it is an interesting source bridging young SNRs dominated by non-thermal emission and old SNRs interacting with molecular clouds.

  2. A GeV SOURCE IN THE DIRECTION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT CTB 37B

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Yu-Liang; Liang, Yun-Feng; Li, Xiang; Liu, Si-Ming; Wei, Da-Ming; Yuan, Qiang E-mail: dmwei@pmo.ac.cn

    2016-01-20

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are the most attractive candidates for the acceleration sites of Galactic cosmic rays. We report the detection of GeV γ-ray emission with the Pass 8 events recorded by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) in the vicinity of the shell-type SNR CTB 37B that is likely associated with the TeV γ-ray source HESS J1713–381. The photon spectrum of CTB 37B is consistent with a power law with an index of 1.89 ± 0.08 in the energy range of 0.5–500 GeV, and the measured flux connects smoothly with that of HESS J1713–381 at a few hundred GeV. No significant spatial extension and time variation are detected. The multi-wavelength data can be well fitted with either a leptonic model or a hadronic one. However, parameters of both models suggest more efficient particle acceleration than typical SNRs. Meanwhile, the X-ray and γ-ray spectral properties of CTB 37B show that it is an interesting source bridging young SNRs dominated by non-thermal emission and old SNRs interacting with molecular clouds.

  3. A New Look at the "Jet" in the CTB 37A/B Supernova Remnant Complex

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-10

    Very Large Array observations of the unusual southern Galactic supernova remnant ( SNR ) complex near l = 348 degrees, b = 0 degrees at wavelengths of...reported by previous observers but is instead superposed on a second, previously unidentified SNR lying along the line of sight. This new SNR is designated...the presence of large-scale density inhomogeneities in the interstellar medium into which the SNR shell is expanding.

  4. X-Ray Imaging and Spectroscopy of the Supernova Remnant CTB 109 and Its Associated Pulsar 1E 2259+586

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Jeonghee; Petre, R.

    1997-07-01

    We present the results of our analysis of the X-ray spectral structure of the evolved supernova remnant CTB 109 (G109.1-1.0), using data from the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) and Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT). The deep broadband PSPC image shows the same overall remnant morphology as previous X-ray images but reveals many new details. The remnant appears as a hemispherical shell centered on the X-ray-bright central pulsar 1E 2259+586. Despite the substantial improvement in sensitivity of the PSPC image over previous images, no X-ray emission is detected from the western half of the remnant, consistent with the interpretation that the western shock front has been significantly decelerated by a dense molecular cloud. Enhanced emission along the cloud remnant boundary supports this interpretation. Among important new small-scale structures revealed are clumpy substructure within the jetlike lobe running northeastward from the pulsar to the shell, and extended emission, with 2-3 arc minute radius, around 1E 2259+586. Spatially resolved spectroscopy using the PSPC reveals an overall column density variation across the remnant as well as intrinsic spectral variations. In particular, the spectrum over most of the shell is well fitted by a single-component thermal model, while for the lobe, the northern and southern shell, two thermal components are required, with one having parameter values similar to that found in those regions fitted by a single-component model. We conclude that either the thermal conditions vary within the remnant or there exists a second, distinct gas component in some parts of the remnant. A simultaneous fit to BBXRT and PSPC spectra for part of the interior and shell to the south of the pulsar shows that the plasma there is not in ionization equilibrium. The results of fitting these spectra using nonequilibrium ionization models are ambiguous, however: equally acceptable fits were obtained using models with and without

  5. X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT CTB 87 (G74.9+1.2): AN EVOLVED PULSAR WIND NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Matheson, H.; Safi-Harb, S.; Kothes, R. E-mail: samar@physics.umanitoba.ca

    2013-09-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) studies with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory have opened a new window to address the physics of pulsar winds, zoom on their interaction with their hosting supernova remnant (SNR) and interstellar medium, and identify their powering engines. We here present a new 70 ks, plus an archived 18 ks, Chandra ACIS observation of the SNR CTB 87 (G74.9+1.2), classified as a PWN with unusual radio properties and poorly studied in X-rays. We find that the peak of the X-ray emission is clearly offset from the peak of the radio emission by {approx}100'' and located at the southeastern edge of the radio nebula. We detect a point source-the putative pulsar-at the peak of the X-ray emission and study its spectrum separately from the PWN. This new point source, CXOU J201609.2+371110, is surrounded by a compact nebula displaying a torus-like structure and possibly a jet. A more extended diffuse nebula is offset from the radio nebula, extending from the point source to the northwest for {approx}250''. The spectra of the point source, compact nebula, and extended diffuse nebula are all well described by a power-law model with a photon index of 1.1 (0.7-1.6), 1.2 (0.9-1.4), and 1.7 (1.5-1.8), respectively, for a column density N{sub H} = 1.38 (1.21-1.57) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (90% confidence). The total X-ray luminosity of the source is {approx}1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} at an assumed distance of 6.1 kpc, with {approx}2% and 6% contribution from the point source and compact nebula, respectively. The observed properties suggest that CTB 87 is an evolved ({approx}5-28 kyr) PWN, with the extended radio emission likely a ''relic'' PWN, as in Vela-X and G327.1-1.1. To date, however, there is no evidence for thermal X-ray emission from this SNR, and the SNR shell is still missing, suggesting expansion into a low-density medium (n{sub 0} < 0.2 D{sup -1/2}{sub 6.1} cm{sup -3}), likely caused by a stellar wind bubble blown by the

  6. X-Ray Observations of the Supernova Remnant CTB 87 (G74.9+1.2): An Evolved Pulsar Wind Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheson, H.; Safi-Harb, S.; Kothes, R.

    2013-09-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) studies with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory have opened a new window to address the physics of pulsar winds, zoom on their interaction with their hosting supernova remnant (SNR) and interstellar medium, and identify their powering engines. We here present a new 70 ks, plus an archived 18 ks, Chandra ACIS observation of the SNR CTB 87 (G74.9+1.2), classified as a PWN with unusual radio properties and poorly studied in X-rays. We find that the peak of the X-ray emission is clearly offset from the peak of the radio emission by ~100'' and located at the southeastern edge of the radio nebula. We detect a point source—the putative pulsar—at the peak of the X-ray emission and study its spectrum separately from the PWN. This new point source, CXOU J201609.2+371110, is surrounded by a compact nebula displaying a torus-like structure and possibly a jet. A more extended diffuse nebula is offset from the radio nebula, extending from the point source to the northwest for ~250''. The spectra of the point source, compact nebula, and extended diffuse nebula are all well described by a power-law model with a photon index of 1.1 (0.7-1.6), 1.2 (0.9-1.4), and 1.7 (1.5-1.8), respectively, for a column density N H = 1.38 (1.21-1.57) × 1022 cm-2 (90% confidence). The total X-ray luminosity of the source is ~1.6 × 1034 erg s-1 at an assumed distance of 6.1 kpc, with ~2% and 6% contribution from the point source and compact nebula, respectively. The observed properties suggest that CTB 87 is an evolved (~5-28 kyr) PWN, with the extended radio emission likely a "relic" PWN, as in Vela-X and G327.1-1.1. To date, however, there is no evidence for thermal X-ray emission from this SNR, and the SNR shell is still missing, suggesting expansion into a low-density medium (n_0 < 0.2 D^{-1/2}_{6.1} cm-3), likely caused by a stellar wind bubble blown by the progenitor star.

  7. Pulsars and supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, R.; Schaudt, K.J.

    1988-02-01

    With the recent discovery of the pulsar PSR 1951 + 22 in CTB 80, four pulsars are now known in supernova remnants (SNRs) of the plerion and composite classes. It is argued that this success rate of pulsar detections implies that young fast pulsars have long fan-beams that enable them to be seen from most directions. Based on calculations that use a pulsar luminosity model and allow for selection effects, it is suggested that the best SNRs for future pulsar searches are 3C 58, MSH 11-62, G24.7 + 0.6, and MSH 15-56. It is also concluded that the failure to detect pulsars in shell SNRs implies either that there are no pulsars in these SNRs or that the pulsars are unusually weak, possibly due to slow rotation or weak magnetic fields. 25 references.

  8. 1) The Evolution of CTB 109, 2) A Study of the Composite Remnant MSH 15-56

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plucinsky, Paul

    2000-01-01

    The subject grant is for the analysis of ASCA (Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics) observations of two well-known galactic Supernova Remnants, CTB 109 and MSH 15-56. The purpose of the proposal is to study spectral differences as a function of position within each of the remnants.

  9. Demonstrating Supernova Remnant Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Denis A.; Williams, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    We have created a software tool to calculate at display supernova remnant evolution which includes all stages from early ejecta dominated phase to late-time merging with the interstellar medium. The software was created using Python, and can be distributed as Python code, or as an executable file. The purpose of the software is to demonstrate the different phases and transitions that a supernova remnant undergoes, and will be used in upper level undergraduate astrophysics courses as a teaching tool. The usage of the software and its graphical user interface will be demonstrated.

  10. PROGENITORS OF RECOMBINING SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Takashi J.

    2012-05-01

    Usual supernova remnants have either ionizing plasma or plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium, i.e., the ionization temperature is lower than or equal to the electron temperature. However, the existence of recombining supernova remnants, i.e., supernova remnants with ionization temperature higher than the electron temperature, has been recently confirmed. One suggested way to have recombining plasma in a supernova remnant is to have a dense circumstellar medium at the time of the supernova explosion. If the circumstellar medium is dense enough, collisional ionization equilibrium can be established in the early stage of the evolution of the supernova remnant and subsequent adiabatic cooling, which occurs after the shock wave gets out of the dense circumstellar medium, makes the electron temperature lower than the ionization temperature. We study the circumstellar medium around several supernova progenitors and show which supernova progenitors can have a circumstellar medium dense enough to establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion. We find that the circumstellar medium around red supergiants (especially massive ones) and the circumstellar medium dense enough to make Type IIn supernovae can establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion and can evolve to become recombining supernova remnants. Wolf-Rayet stars and white dwarfs have the possibility to be recombining supernova remnants but the fraction is expected to be very small. As the occurrence rate of the explosions of red supergiants is much higher than that of Type IIn supernovae, the major progenitors of recombining supernova remnants are likely to be red supergiants.

  11. What Shapes Supernova Remnants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence has mounted that Type Ia and core-collapse (CC) supernovae (SNe) can have substantial deviations from spherical symmetry; one such piece of evidence is the complex morphologies of supernova remnants (SNRs). However, the relative role of the explosion geometry and the environment in shaping SNRs remains an outstanding question. Recently, we have developed techniques to quantify the morphologies of SNRs, and we have applied these methods to the extensive X-ray and infrared archival images available of Milky Way and Magellanic Cloud SNRs. In this proceeding, we highlight some results from these studies, with particular emphasis on SNR asymmetries and whether they arise from ``nature'' or ``nurture''.

  12. Dust in supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, H.

    In this Review, I will discuss our changing view on supernovae as interstellar dust sources. In particular I will focus on infrared and submillimetre studies of the historical supernova remnants Cassiopeia A, the Crab Nebula, SN 1987A, Tycho and Kepler. In the last decade (and particularly in recent years), SCUBA, Herschel and ALMA have now demonstrated that core-collapse supernovae are prolific dust factories, with evidence of 0.1 - 0.7 M⊙ of dust formed in the ejecta, though there is little evidence (as yet) for significant dust production in Type Ia supernova ejecta. There is no longer any question that dust (and molecule) formation is efficient after some supernova events, though it is not clear how much of this will survive over longer timescales. Current and future instruments will allow us to investigate the spatial distribution of dust within corecollapse ejecta, and whether this component contributes a significant amount to the dust content of the Universe or if supernovae ultimately provide a net loss once dust destruction by shocks is taken into account.

  13. The Vela Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, John C.

    We wish to obtain both emission and absorption line observations of the Vela Supernova remnant. The filament we wish to study in emission is the brightest filament in the SNR, so it will provide a spectrum twice the quality of any in existence. It is also located at the edge of an unusual bulge in the SNR, and it can be used to test the level of departure from pressure equilibrium in the remnant, which is useful as a test of evaporative models of SNR evolution. The absorption line studies will look for evidence of the drastically unstable behavior of shocks above 150 km/s predicted by Innes and Giddings. Four of the stars studied by Jenkins, Silk and Wallerstein showed marginal evidence for two positive or two negative high velocity components. If these multiple velocity components are confirmed, they support the secondary shock predictions of Innes and Giddings.

  14. Supernova Remnants And GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Slane, Patrick; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2011-11-29

    It has long been speculated that supernova remnants represent a major source of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Observations over the past decade have ceremoniously unveiled direct evidence of particle acceleration in SNRs to energies approaching the knee of the cosmic ray spectrum. Nonthermal X-ray emission from shell-type SNRs reveals multi-TeV electrons, and the dynamical properties of several SNRs point to efficient acceleration of ions. Observations of TeV gamma-ray emission have confirmed the presence of energetic particles in several remnants as well, but there remains considerable debate as to whether this emission originates with high energy electrons or ions. Equally uncertain are the exact conditions that lead to efficient particle acceleration. Based on the catalog of EGRET sources, we know that there is a large population of Galactic gamma-ray sources whose distribution is similar to that of SNRs.With the increased resolution and sensitivity of GLAST, the gamma-ray SNRs from this population will be identified. Their detailed emission structure, along with their spectra, will provide the link between their environments and their spectra in other wavebands to constrain emission models and to potentially identify direct evidence of ion acceleration in SNRs. Here I summarize recent observational and theoretical work in the area of cosmic ray acceleration by SNRs, and discuss the contributions GLAST will bring to our understanding of this problem.

  15. Superluminous Extragalactic Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H. R.; Chu, Y.-H.

    1998-12-01

    Extragalactic supernova remnants (SNRs) are conventionally surveyed by optical emission-line images, using the [S II]/Hα line ratio to diagnose SNRs. The majority of the optically identified extragalactic SNRs are too faint to be confirmed at X-ray or radio wavelengths. Conversely, extragalactic SNRs that are initially identified by X-ray or radio observations are all superluminous, e.g., the X-ray SNR in NGC 6946 (Blair & Fesen 1994, ApJ, 424, L103) and the radio SNR in NGC 5471 (Skillman 1985, ApJ, 290, 449). NGC 5471 is a giant H II region in M101. Optical echelle observations of the SNR in NGC 5471 have detected high-velocity gas with a FWZI of at least 350 km/s. Decomposing the narrow H II component and the broad SNR component in the Hα velocity profile, Chu & Kennicutt (1986) derived a total mass of 6500+/-3000 M_sun and a kinetic energy of a few *E(50) ergs. Using archival ROSAT X-ray observations, Williams & Chu (1995) measured an X-ray luminosity of ~ 1 x 10(38) ergs/s for NGC 5471. Apparently, the SNR in NGC 5471 is superluminous at all wavelengths. To determine the physical conditions and nature of the superluminous SNR in NGC 5471, we have obtained HST WFPC2 images of NGC 5471 in the Hα and [S II] lines and two continuum bands. These high-resolution images reveal a [S II]-enhanced shell with a diameter of ~ 60 pc. A recent 180-ks ROSAT High Resolution Imager image of M101 shows that the X-ray emission from NGC 5471 peaks at this SNR shell. We are thus confident in the identification of the superluminous SNR in NGC 5471. Are superluminous SNRs produced by particularly powerful supernova explosions? Are they associated with gamma-ray bursters? Are their luminosities caused by dense interstellar environment? We will report the detailed physical properties of the SNR in NGC 5471, compare it to the other superluminous SNRs, and address these questions.

  16. SNRPy: Supernova remnant evolution modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Denis A.; Williams, Jacqueline

    2017-03-01

    SNRPy (Super Nova Remnant Python) models supernova remnant (SNR) evolution and is useful for understanding SNR evolution and to model observations of SNR for obtaining good estimates of SNR properties. It includes all phases for the standard path of evolution for spherically symmetric SNRs and includes alternate evolutionary models, including evolution in a cloudy ISM, the fractional energy loss model, and evolution in a hot low-density ISM. The graphical interface takes in various parameters and produces outputs such as shock radius and velocity vs. time, SNR surface brightness profile and spectrum.

  17. The Supernova Remnant CTA 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, Frederick D.

    1996-01-01

    The supernova remnants G327.1-1.1 and G327.4+0.4 (Kes 27) are located 1.5 deg apart in the constellation Norma. In 1980, Einstein IPC observations discovered that both were irregular filled-center X-ray sources with possible point sources superposed. This paper describes new ROSAT position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) observations which both map the diffuse structure and clearly show several unresolved sources in each field. Both remnants have bright emitting regions inside the limb which might indicate the presence of high energy electrons accelerated by a pulsar. The interior region is more prominent in G327.1-1.1 than in Kes 27. The spectra are relatively strongly absorbed, as expected from distant remnants close to the galactic plane. Comparison of the X-ray and radio maps of each remnant allows us to attribute some emission to a shell and some to the interior. With this information, a blast-wave model is used to derive approximate ages and energy release. Indications are that the Kes 27 supernova deposited approximately 10(exp 51) ergs in the surrounding medium. The G327.1-1.1 event probably deposited a factor of 3-10 less.

  18. Featured Image: Modeling Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    This image shows a computer simulation of the hydrodynamics within a supernova remnant. The mixing between the outer layers (where color represents the log of density) is caused by turbulence from the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an effect that arises when the expanding core gas of the supernova is accelerated into denser shell gas. The past standard for supernova-evolution simulations was to perform them in one dimension and then, in post-processing, manually smooth out regions that undergo Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence (an intrinsically multidimensional effect). But in a recent study, Paul Duffell (University of California, Berkeley) has explored how a 1D model could be used to reproduce the multidimensional dynamics that occur in turbulence from this instability. For more information, check out the paper below!CitationPaul C. Duffell 2016 ApJ 821 76. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/821/2/76

  19. Radio emision from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, G.

    2016-06-01

    The vast majority of supernova remnants (SNRs) in our Galaxy and nearby galaxies have been discovered through radio observations, and only a very small number of the SNRs catalogued in the Milky Way have not been detected in the radio band, or are poorly defined by current radio observations. The study of the radio emission from SNRs is an excellent tool to investigate morphological characteristics, marking the location of shock fronts and contact discontinuities; the presence, orientation and intensity of the magnetic field; the energy spectrum of the emitting particles; and the dynamical consequences of the interaction with the circumstellar and interstellar medium. I will review the present knowledge of different important aspects of radio remnants and their impact on the interstellar gas. Also, new radio studies of the Crab Nebula carried out with the Karl Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) at 3 GHz and with ALMA at 100 GHz, will be presented.

  20. Supernova Remnants in High Definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slane, Patrick; Badenes, Carles; Freyer, Chris; Hughes, Jack; Lee, Herman Shiu-Hang; Lopez, Laura; Patnaude, Daniel; Reynolds, Steve; Temim, Tea; Williams, Brian; Wongwathanarat, Annop; Yamaguchi, Hiroya

    2015-10-01

    As the observable products of explosive stellar death, supernova remnants reveal some of the most direct information on the physics of the explosions, the properties of the progenitor systems, and the demographics of compact objects formed in the supernova events. High sensitivity X-ray observations have allowed us to probe the properties of the shocked plasma, providing constraints on abundances and ionization states that connect directly progenitor masses and metallicities, the nature of the explosions (core-collapse vs. thermonuclear), and the physics of shock heating and particle acceleration in fast shocks. Studies of SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds have provided information on source demographics in a low metallicity environment, and deep searches for point sources in Galactic SNRs imply that many remnants contain rapidly cooling neutron stars or black holes. Based on Chandra observations, we know that crucial measurements required to advance our knowledge in these areas are possible only with much more sensitive observations at high angular resolution. From identifying the effects of particle acceleration on the post-shock gas in young SNRs like Tycho to obtaining spatially resolved spectra - and identifying compact objects - for young SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds, the capabilities of a facility like the X-ray Surveyor are required. Here I present a summary of recent advances brought about by spectral investigations of SNRs, and discuss particular examples of new advances that will be enabled by X-ray Surveyor capabilities.

  1. Radio emission from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, Gloria; Giacani, Elsa

    2015-09-01

    The explosion of a supernova releases almost instantaneously about 10^{51} ergs of mechanic energy, changing irreversibly the physical and chemical properties of large regions in the galaxies. The stellar ejecta, the nebula resulting from the powerful shock waves, and sometimes a compact stellar remnant, constitute a supernova remnant (SNR). They can radiate their energy across the whole electromagnetic spectrum, but the great majority are radio sources. Almost 70 years after the first detection of radio emission coming from an SNR, great progress has been achieved in the comprehension of their physical characteristics and evolution. We review the present knowledge of different aspects of radio remnants, focusing on sources of the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds, where the SNRs can be spatially resolved. We present a brief overview of theoretical background, analyze morphology and polarization properties, and review and critically discuss different methods applied to determine the radio spectrum and distances. The consequences of the interaction between the SNR shocks and the surrounding medium are examined, including the question of whether SNRs can trigger the formation of new stars. Cases of multispectral comparison are presented. A section is devoted to reviewing recent results of radio SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds, with particular emphasis on the radio properties of SN 1987A, an ideal laboratory to investigate dynamical evolution of an SNR in near real time. The review concludes with a summary of issues on radio SNRs that deserve further study, and analysis of the prospects for future research with the latest-generation radio telescopes.

  2. Einstein Observations of Galactic supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, Frederick D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes the observations of Galactic supernova remnants with the imaging detectors of the Einstein Observatory. X-ray surface brightness contours of 47 remnants are shown together with gray-scale pictures. Count rates for these remnants have been derived and are listed for the HRI, IPC, and MPC detectors.

  3. ANTIPROTONS PRODUCED IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhko, E. G.; Ksenofontov, L. T.

    2014-08-20

    We present the energy spectrum of an antiproton cosmic ray (CR) component calculated on the basis of the nonlinear kinetic model of CR production in supernova remnants (SNRs). The model includes the reacceleration of antiprotons already existing in the interstellar medium as well as the creation of antiprotons in nuclear collisions of accelerated protons with gas nuclei and their subsequent acceleration by SNR shocks. It is shown that the production of antiprotons in SNRs produces a considerable effect in their resultant energy spectrum, making it essentially flatter above 10 GeV so that the spectrum at TeV energies increases by a factor of 5. The calculated antiproton spectrum is consistent with the PAMELA data, which correspond to energies below 100 GeV. As a consistency check, we have also calculated within the same model the energy spectra of secondary nuclei and show that the measured boron-to-carbon ratio is consistent with the significant SNR contribution.

  4. El remanente de supernova CTB80 y su entorno observado en la línea del hidrógeno neutro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselletti, G.; Velázquez, P. F.; Dubner, G. M.

    We have performed a study of the neutral Hydrogen (HI) distribution around the enigmatical supernova remnant CTB80 (G69.0+2.7), based on archive data obtained by Hartmann and Burton (1997) using the 25 m Dwingeloo Radiotelescope (The Netherlands) with angular resolution of 36'. The HI images were combined with a high resolution image of CTB80 in radio continuum at 1460 MHz, obtained with the radio interferometer VLA (NRAO, Socorro, New Mexico). The analysis of these data in HI, in spite of its limited angular resolution, provides an excellent means of studying the large scale distribution of the atomic gas, which is a previous step to the detailed understanding of the effects produced by the interaction of a supernova remnant with the interstellar medium. The study of the distribution of this gas over a large velocity interval, -54.6 km/s < v < 37.1 km/s and 71.1 km/s < v < 74.2 km/s, made it possible to detect structures that have likely influenced the complex morphology of CTB80. Such structures become evident in the intervals: [-19.6;-10] km/s, [-7.2;0.0] km/s, [10.3;14.4] km/s and [71.1;74.2] km/s.

  5. Fermi Proves Supernova Remnants Make Cosmic Rays

    NASA Video Gallery

    The husks of exploded stars produce some of the fastest particles in the cosmos. New findings by NASA's Fermi show that two supernova remnants accelerate protons to near the speed of light. The pro...

  6. Iron needles in supernova remnants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez (née Morgan), Haley L.; Dunne, Loretta; Eales, Stephen A.; Gomez, Edward L.; Edmunds, Michael G.

    2005-08-01

    It has been suggested by Dwek that iron needles could explain the submillimetre emission from the Cas A supernova remnant (SNR) with only a very small total mass. We investigate whether a similar model holds for the Kepler SNR, and find that its emission could indeed be explained by a dust mass of less than 10-2Msolar, dependent on the axial ratio l/a of the needles - which we constrain to be less than 700. But the implied needle model for Kepler is inconsistent with that suggested for Cas A since either the needles would have to have a resistivity one or two orders of magnitude greater than those in Cas A or the electron density in Kepler's shocked plasma must be 40 times greater than suggested by X-ray observations. An additional problem with the needle model is that the implied thickness of the needles seems to be implausibly small, if the emission properties are calculated under the usual approximations.

  7. Cooling and evolution of a supernova remnant.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the structure, evolution, and cooling of an old supernova remnant, aimed at providing a theoretical framework for relating remnants with similar energies and environments but of different ages. Discussed evolution details include the Sedov-Taylor blast wave, the electron-ion equipartition and thermal conduction, the temperature sag and the dynamics in the process of transition to a dense shell, and the history of remnant luminosity.

  8. Progenitor's Signatures in Type Ia Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiotellis, A.; Kosenko, D.; Schure, K. M.; Vink, J.

    2013-01-01

    The remnants of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) can provide important clues about their progenitor histories. We discuss two well-observed supernova remnants (SNRs) that are believed to have resulted from SNe Ia, and use various tools to shed light on the possible progenitor histories. We find that Kepler's SNR is consistent with a symbiotic binary progenitor consisting of a white dwarf and an AGB star. Our hydrosimulations can reproduce the observed kinematic and morphological properties. For Tycho's remnant we use the characteristics of the X-ray spectrum and kinematics to show that the ejecta has likely interacted with dense circumstellar gas.

  9. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for the movie

    For the first time, a multiwavelength three-dimensional reconstruction of a supernova remnant has been created. This stunning visualization of Cassiopeia A, or Cas A, the result of an explosion approximately 330 years ago, uses data from several telescopes: X-ray data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and optical data from the National Optical Astronomy Observatory 4-meter telescope at Kitt Peak, Ariz., and the Michigan-Dartmouth-MIT 2.4-meter telescope, also at Kitt Peak. In this visualization, the green region is mostly iron observed in X-rays. The yellow region is a combination of argon and silicon seen in X-rays, optical, and infrared including jets of silicon plus outer debris seen in the optical. The red region is cold debris seen in the infrared. Finally, the blue reveals the outer blast wave, most prominently detected in X-rays.

    Most of the material shown in this visualization is debris from the explosion that has been heated by a shock moving inwards. The red material interior to the yellow/orange ring has not yet encountered the inward moving shock and so has not yet been heated. These unshocked debris were known to exist because they absorb background radio light, but they were only recently discovered in infrared emission with Spitzer. The blue region is composed of gas surrounding the explosion that was heated when it was struck by the outgoing blast wave, as clearly seen in Chandra images.

    To create this visualization, scientists took advantage of both a previously known phenomenon the Doppler effect and a new technology that bridges astronomy and medicine. When elements created inside a supernova, such as iron, silicon and argon, are heated they emit light at certain wavelengths. Material moving towards the observer will have shorter wavelengths and material moving away will have longer

  10. High-Velocity H I Gas in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Bon-Chul

    1993-05-01

    Using the Hat Creek 85 foot telescope, we had carried out a survey of H I 21 cm emission lines toward all 103 known northern supernova remnants (SNRs) in order to find rapidly expanding SNR shells (Koo & Heiles 1991). We detected 15 SNRs that have associated high-velocity (HV) H I gas, most of which are quite likely the gas accelerated by the SN blast wave. Although the large beam-size (FWHM~ 30') of the 85 foot telescope prevented us to see the structure of the HV H I gas, the H I mass distribution in line-of-sight velocity suggested clumpy shell structures in several SNRs. In order to resolve the structure of the HV H I gas, we have been carrying out high-resolution H I 21 cm line observations using the Arecibo telescope and the VLA. We report preliminary results on two SNRs, CTB 80 and W51. In CTB 80, the VLA observations revealed fast moving H I clumps, which have a dense (n_H ~ 100 cm(-3) ) core surrounded by a relatively diffuse envelope. The clumps are small, 3 pc to 5 pc, and have velocities between +40 km s(-1) and +80 km s(-1) with respect to the systematic velocity of CTB 80. The clumps have relatively large momentum per unit volume, which implies that they have been swept-up at an early stage of the SNR evolution. By analyzing the Arecibo data, we found that the interstellar medium around CTB 80 is far from being uniform and homogeneous, which explains the peculiar morphology of CTB 80 in infrared and radio continuum. In W51, HV H I gas moving up to v_LSR>+150 km s(-1) has been detected. The H I distribution is elongated along the northwest-southeast direction, and the peak is very close to an X-ray bright region. We discuss the implications of our results in relation to the X-ray and the radio continuum morphology of W51. This work was supported in part by NON DIRECTED RESEARCH FUND, Korea Research Foundation, 1992.

  11. X-ray observations of Crab-like supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Distinguishing radio and morphological characteristics of Crab Nebula-like supernova remnants (SNR) are described. Radio features comprise a flat spectrum, a filled center brightness distribution, and a centrally located pulsar. The radio signals are linearly polarized and suggest a synchrotron emission mechanism. Known objects with those characteristics include the Crab Nebula, Vela X, 3C58, G21.5 - 0.9 and G74.9 + 1.2. Only the Crab Nebula exhibits pulsations, while all have unresolved X-ray sources and nonthermal X-ray spectra. Although the Crab-like SNR are distinctly different from shell-like SNR, the SNR CTB80, G326.3 - 1.8, W28 and G29.7 0.3 display characteristics of both, particularly shell-like structures and flat spectra. X-ray spectra from compact sources have also been detected from 3C58, CTB80, W28 and MSH 15 - 52 and exhibit nonthermal power law features. The X-ray spectra could be used as a measure of the evolutionary stage of the source.

  12. Evolution of High-energy Particle Distribution in Mature Shell-type Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Houdun; Xin, Yuliang; Liu, Siming; Jokipii, J. R.; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Shuinai

    2017-01-01

    Multi-wavelength observations of mature supernova remnants (SNRs), especially with recent advances in γ-ray astronomy, make it possible to constrain energy distribution of energetic particles within these remnants. In consideration of the SNR origin of Galactic cosmic rays and physics related to particle acceleration and radiative processes, we use a simple one-zone model to fit the nonthermal emission spectra of three shell-type SNRs located within 2° on the sky: RX J1713.7‑3946, CTB 37B, and CTB 37A. Although radio images of these three sources all show a shell (or half-shell) structure, their radio, X-ray, and γ-ray spectra are quite different, offering an ideal case to explore evolution of energetic particle distribution in SNRs. Our spectral fitting shows that (1) the particle distribution becomes harder with aging of these SNRs, implying a continuous acceleration process, and the particle distributions of CTB 37A and CTB 37B in the GeV range are harder than the hardest distribution that can be produced at a shock via the linear diffusive shock particle acceleration process, so spatial transport may play a role; (2) the energy loss timescale of electrons at the high-energy cutoff due to synchrotron radiation appears to be always a bit (within a factor of a few) shorter than the age of the corresponding remnant, which also requires continuous particle acceleration; (3) double power-law distributions are needed to fit the spectra of CTB 37B and CTB 37A, which may be attributed to shock interaction with molecular clouds.

  13. Isothermal blast wave model of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solinger, A.; Buff, J.; Rappaport, S.

    1975-01-01

    The validity of the 'adiabatic' assumption in supernova-remnant calculations is examined, and the alternative extreme of an isothermal blast wave is explored. It is concluded that, because of thermal conductivity, the large temperature gradients predicted by the adiabatic model probably are not maintained in nature. Self-similar solutions to the hydrodynamic equations for an isothermal blast wave have been found and studied. These solutions are then used to determine the relationship between X-ray observations and inferred parameters of supernova remnants. A comparison of the present results with those for the adiabatic model indicates differences which are less than present observational uncertainties. It is concluded that most parameters of supernova remnants inferred from X-ray measurements are relatively insensitive to the specifics of the blast-wave model.

  14. X-ray spectra of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray spectra were obtained from fields in three supernova remnants with the solid state spectrometer of the HEAO 2 satellite. These spectra, which contain lines from K-shell transitions of several abundant elements with atomic numbers between 10 and 22, were compared with various models, including some of spectra that would be produced by adiabatic phase remnants when the time-dependence of the ionization is considered.

  15. Observation of Crab-Like Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, Frederick D.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to observe the supernova remnants 3C58 and G21.5-0.9 and to search for pulsed emission. If a pulsar were to be found, the period derivative and inferred magnetic field would have extreme values if pulsar evolution had followed the standard model. If this is not the case, the standard model must be revised. We also sought to obtain very accurate measurement of the synchrotron emission spectrum of each remnant.

  16. A search for stellar remnants of supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesen, R. A.; Kirshner, R. P.; Winkler, P. F., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The slitless spectra of the stars in the central regions of six galactic supernova remnants Cas A, Kepler, Tycho, SN 1006, RCW 86, and the Cygnus Loop were obtained with the prime focus transmission gratings at the 4M telescopes on Kitt Peak and Cerro Tololo. It was found that no stellar remnant with an unusually blue or peculiar spectrum is present in any of the remnants down to the limit of m sub pg of 18.5. Except for the Cygnus Loop, the area searched in each remnant is large enough that objects with transverse velocities of 1000 km/s would be well within the field. The results are also compared with a computation of emission from gas near a neutron star and with the unpulsed emission from the Crab pulsar; in both cases upper limits were set which place constraints on a possible condensed stellar remnant.

  17. The Cygnus Loop: An Older Supernova Remnant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straka, William

    1987-01-01

    Describes the Cygnus Loop, one of brightest and most easily studied of the older "remnant nebulae" of supernova outbursts. Discusses some of the historical events surrounding the discovery and measurement of the Cygnus Loop and makes some projections on its future. (TW)

  18. Autopsy of the Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milisavljevic, Dan; Fesen, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional kinematic reconstructions of optically emitting ejecta in the young Galactic supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A) are discussed. The reconstructions encompass the remnant's faint outlying ejecta knots, including the exceptionally high-velocity NE and SW streams of debris often referred to as `jets'. The bulk of Cas A's ejecta are arranged in several circular rings with diameters between approximately 30'' (0.5 pc) and 2' (2 pc). We suggest that similar large-scale ejecta rings may be a common phenomenon of young core-collapse remnants and may explain lumpy emission line profile substructure sometimes observed in spectra of extragalactic core-collapse supernovae years after explosion. A likely origin for these large ejecta rings is post-explosion input of energy from plumes of radioactive 56Ni-rich ejecta that rise, expand, and compress non-radioactive material to form bubble-like structures.

  19. Dynamics of Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Blondin, John M.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of Kepler's SNR have revealed a strong interaction with the ambient medium, far in excess of that expected at a distance of about 600 pc away from the Galactic plane where Kepler's SNR is located. This has been interpreted as a result of the interaction of supernova ejecta with the dense circumstellar medium (CSM). Based on the bow-shock model of Bandiera (1985), we study the dynamics of this interaction. The CSM distribution consists of an undisturbed stellar wind of a moving supernova progenitor and a dense shell formed in its interaction with a tenuous interstellar medium. Supernova ejecta drive a blast wave through the stellar wind which splits into the transmitted and reflected shocks upon hitting this bow-shock shell. We identify the transmitted shock with the nonradiative, Balmer-dominated shocks found recently in Kepler's SNR. The transmitted shock most probably penetrated the shell in the vicinity of the stagnation point.

  20. The Rediscovery of the Antlia Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchard, Alexander; Benjamin, Robert A.; Gostisha, Martin; Haffner, L. Matthew; Hill, Alex S.; Barger, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    While undertaking a survey of velocity-resolved diffuse optical emission from the [S II] 6716 A line with the Wisconsin H-alpha Mapper, we have rediscovered the Antlia Supernova remnant, a 26 degree diameter remmant near the Gum Nebula that was originally detected in SHASSA (Southern H-alpha Sky Survey Atlas) by P. McCullough in 2002. The original discovery showed this remnant was associated with ¼ keV X-ray emission in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey, and argued that Antlia was potentially the closest remnant to the Sun. We will present an analysis of the H-alpha and [S II] lines in this direction: the ratio of these lines indicate the shell is consistent with being a supernova remnant and the velocities allow us to constrain its age. We discuss this remnant in the context of the evolution of the entire Gum Nebula region, noting that its proximity and age make it possible to search for geochemical evidence of this remnant on Earth. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's REU program through NSF Award AST-1004881.

  1. Spectral Mapping of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Stephen; Blair, William; Borkowski, Kazimierz; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox; Sankrit, Ravi; Williams, Brian

    2008-03-01

    We propose to leverage our extensive previous multi-wavelength investigations of Kepler's supernova remnant (SN 1604) by obtaining IRS spectral maps of this premier example of a 'massive Type Ia' remnant. Of particular interest is the dense circumstellar medium (CSM) evidently surrounding Kepler. This material is best investigated in infrared, where shock-heated dust reveals the thermal-gas density and possible composition clues such as the 10-micron silicate feature. Full LL coverage (14-38 um) will permit detailed mapping of continuum shape changes with spatial position that are only hinted at from our previous MIPS 24 and 70 um imaging. SL mapping of selected regions will permit detailed studies of changes in the silicate feature with position, suggested by two slit positions in earlier observations. Combined with our deep Chandra observation (750 ks), these data will permit a detailed study of dust destruction in fast shocks. Kepler also shows regions near the remnant edge dominated by synchrotron X-ray emission, indicating electron acceleration to energies of order 100 TeV. However, the dominance of synchrotron continuum means that properties of the thermal medium, important for understanding shock-acceleration physics, cannot be diagnosed with X-rays. Our IRS spectra should allow such diagnosis. Kepler's unique position among Type Ia supernova remnants makes it a critical target for the understanding of the Type Ia phenomenon.

  2. Shocked Clouds in the Vela Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Joy S.; Slavin, Jonathan D.

    2004-01-01

    Unusually strong high-excitation C I has been detected in eleven lines of sight through the Vela supernova remnant by means of UV absorption-line studies of IUE data. Most of these lines of sight lie near the western edge of the X-ray bright region of the supernova remnant in a spatially distinct band approximately 1deg by 4deg oriented approximately north/south. The high-excitation C I (denoted C I*) is interpreted as evidence of a complex of shocked dense clouds inside the supernova remnant, due to the high pressures indicated in this region. To further analyze the properties of this region of C I*, we present new HIRES-processed IRAS data of the entire Vela SNR. A temperature map calculated from the HIRES IRAS data, based on a two-component dust model, reveals the signature of hot dust at several locations in the SNR. The hot dust is anti-correlated spatially with X-ray emission as revealed by ROSAT, as would be expected for a dusty medium interacting with a shock wave. The regions of hot dust are strongly correlated with optical filaments, supporting a scenario of dense clouds interior to the SNR that have been shocked and are now cooling behind the supernova blast wave. With few exceptions, the lines of sight to the strong C I* pass through regions of hot dust and optical filaments. Possible mechanisms for the production of the anomalously large columns of C I and C I* are discussed. Dense clouds on the back western hemisphere of the remnant may explain the relatively low X-ray emission in the western portion of the Vela supernova remnant due to the slower forward shock velocity in regions where the shock has encountered the dense clouds. An alternate explanation for the presence of neutral, excited state, and ionized species along the same line of sight may be a magnetic precusor that heats and compresses the gas ahead of the shock.

  3. CTB 80 en bajas frecuencias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelletti, G.; Dubner, G.; Golap, H.; Goss, W. M.

    CTB 80 is a supernova remnant (SNR) which shows, in radio wavelengths, a complex morphology composed by three arms or extended regions and a central nebula formed by winds from the pulsar PSR B1951+32 physically associated with the remnant. New observations of the SNR CTB 80 have been carried out using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT, Pune-India) at 240 MHz (beam ˜ 20'') and 618 MHz (beam ˜ 8''), and at 324 MHz (beam ˜ 65'') and 1380 MHz (beam ˜ 80'') using the Very Large Array (VLA, USA). These radio-images show with unprecedented detail new structures in the nebula powered by the pulsar. Likewise, the high dynamic range attained in the images allows us identify faint structures in the extended regions which closely match the optical and infrared emission.

  4. Multi-Wavelength Observations of Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B.

    2012-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) provide a laboratory for studying various astrophysical processes, including particle acceleration, thermal and non thermal emission processes across the spectrum, distribution of heavy elements, the physics of strong shock waves, and the progenitor systems and environments of supernovae. Long studied in radio and X-rays, the past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the detection and subsequent study of SNRs in the infrared and gamma-ray regimes. Understanding the evolution of SNRs and their interaction with the interstellar medium requires a multi-wavelength approach. I will review the various physical processes observed in SNRs and how these processes are intertwined. In particular, I will focus on X-ray and infrared observations, which probe two very different but intrinsically connected phases of the ISM: gas and dust. I will discuss results from multi-wavelength studies of several SNRs at various stages of evolution, including Kepler, RCW 86, and the Cygnus Loop.

  5. Vivid View of Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This composite image of the Tycho supernova remnant combines infrared and X-ray observations obtained with NASA's Spitzer and Chandra space observatories, respectively, and the Calar Alto observatory, Spain. It shows the scene more than four centuries after the brilliant star explosion witnessed by Tycho Brahe and other astronomers of that era.

    The explosion has left a blazing hot cloud of expanding debris (green and yellow). The location of the blast's outer shock wave can be seen as a blue sphere of ultra-energetic electrons. Newly synthesized dust in the ejected material and heated pre-existing dust from the area around the supernova radiate at infrared wavelengths of 24 microns (red). Foreground and background stars in the image are white.

  6. (abstract) Supernova Remnant and Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhong

    1993-01-01

    Upon impact of the shockwaves generated by a supernova remnant, molecular gas and the associated dust grains are substantially excited and become prominent sources of infrared emission. Recent studies of such interactions, utilizing the infrared data and information from other wavelengths, have revealed many details of the physical processes in the interstellar medium. In particluar, the understanding of the temperature and ionization structures in the postshock material is helpful in modeling the star-gas cycles in the Galaxy, and probing the circumstances of star formation.

  7. Supernova Remnants with Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caragiulo, M.; Di Venere, L.

    2017-03-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), on-board the Fermi satellite, proved to be, after 8 years of data taking, an excellent instrument to detect and observe Supernova Remnants (SNRs) in a range of energies running from few hundred MeV up to few hundred GeV. It provides essential information on physical processes that occur at the source, involving both accelerated leptons and hadrons, in order to understand the mechanisms responsible for the primary Cosmic Ray (CR) acceleration. We show the latest results in the observation of Galactic SNRs by Fermi-LAT.

  8. VHE Gamma-ray Supernova Remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, Stefan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-01-22

    Increasing observational evidence gathered especially in X-rays and {gamma}-rays during the course of the last few years support the notion that Supernova remnants (SNRs) are Galactic particle accelerators up to energies close to the ''knee'' in the energy spectrum of Cosmic rays. This review summarizes the current status of {gamma}-ray observations of SNRs. Shell-type as well as plerionic type SNRs are addressed and prospect for observations of these two source classes with the upcoming GLAST satellite in the energy regime above 100 MeV are given.

  9. The Remnant of Supernova 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCray, Richard; Fransson, Claes

    2016-09-01

    Although it has faded by a factor of ˜107, SN 1987A is still bright enough to be observed in almost every band of the electromagnetic spectrum. Today, the bolometric luminosity of the debris is dominated by a far-infrared (˜200μm) continuum from ˜0.5 M⊙ of dust grains in the interior debris. The dust is heated by UV, optical, and near-infrared (NIR) emission resulting from radioactive energy deposition by 44Ti. The optical light of the supernova debris is now dominated by illumination of the debris by X-rays resulting from the impact of the outer supernova envelope with an equatorial ring (ER) of gas that was expelled some 20,000 years before the supernova explosion. X-ray and optical observations trace a complex system of shocks resulting from this impact, whereas radio observations trace synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons accelerated by these shocks. The luminosity of the remnant is dominated by an NIR (˜20μm) continuum from dust grains in the ER heated by collisions with ions in the X-ray emitting gas. With the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), we can observe the interior debris at millimeter/submillimeter wavelengths, which are not absorbed by the interior dust. The ALMA observations reveal bright emission lines from rotational transitions of CO and SiO lines that provide a new window into the interior structure of the supernova debris. Optical, NIR, and ALMA observations all indicate strongly asymmetric ejecta. Intensive searches have failed to yield any evidence for the compact object expected to reside at the center of the remnant. The current upper limit to the luminosity of such an object is a few tens of solar luminosities.

  10. The Origin of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patnaude, Daniel J.; Badenes, Carles; Park, Sangwook; Laming, J. Martin

    2012-09-01

    It is now well established that Kepler's supernova remnant (SNR) is the result of a Type Ia explosion. With an age of 407 yr and an angular diameter of ~4', Kepler is estimated to be between 3.0 and 7.0 kpc distant. Unlike other Galactic Type Ia SNRs such as Tycho and SN 1006, and SNR 0509-67.5 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, Kepler shows evidence for a strong circumstellar interaction. A bowshock structure in the north is thought to originate from the motion of a mass-losing system through the interstellar medium prior to the supernova. We present results of hydrodynamical and spectral modeling aimed at constraining the circumstellar environment of the system and the amount of 56Ni produced in the explosion. Using models that contain either 0.3 M ⊙ (subenergetic) or 1.0 M ⊙ (energetic) of 56Ni, we simulate the interaction between supernova Ia ejecta and various circumstellar density models. Based on dynamical considerations alone, we find that the subenergetic models favor a distance to the SNR of <6.4 kpc, while the model that produces 1 M ⊙ of 56Ni requires a distance to the SNR of >7 kpc. The X-ray spectrum is consistent with an explosion that produced ~1 M ⊙ of 56Ni, ruling out the subenergetic models, and suggesting that Kepler's SNR was an SN 1991T-like event. Additionally, the X-ray spectrum rules out a pure r -2 wind profile expected from isotropic mass loss up to the time of the supernova. Introducing a small cavity around the progenitor system results in modeled X-ray spectra that are consistent with the observed spectrum. If a wind-shaped circumstellar environment is necessary to explain the dynamics and X-ray emission from the shocked ejecta in Kepler's SNR, then we require that the distance to the remnant be greater than 7 kpc.

  11. Color Composite Image of the Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image is a color composite of the supernova remnant E0102-72: x-ray (blue), optical (green), and radio (red). E0102-72 is the remnant of a star that exploded in a nearby galaxy known as the Small Magellanic Cloud. The star exploded outward at speeds in excess of 20 million kilometers per hour (12 million mph) and collided with surrounding gas. This collision produced two shock waves, or cosmic sonic booms, one traveling outward, and the other rebounding back into the material ejected by the explosion. The radio image, shown in red, was made using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The radio waves are due to extremely high-energy electrons spiraling around magnetic field lines in the gas and trace the outward moving shock wave. The Chandra X-ray Observatory image, shown in blue, shows gas that has been heated to millions of degrees by the rebounding, or reverse shock wave. The x-ray data show that this gas is rich in oxygen and neon. These elements were created by nuclear reactions inside the star and hurled into space by the supernova. The Hubble Space Telescope optical image, shown in green, shows dense clumps of oxygen gas that have 'cooled' to about 30,000 degrees. Photo Credit: X-ray (NASA/CXC/SAO); optical (NASA/HST): radio: (ACTA)

  12. Tachyonic Cherenkov radiation from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaschitz, Roman

    2015-12-01

    The subexponential decay observed in the γ-ray spectral maps of supernova remnants is explained in terms of tachyonic Cherenkov emission from a relativistic electron population. The tachyonic radiation densities of an electronic spinor current are derived, the total density as well as the transversal and longitudinal polarization components, taking account of electron recoil. Tachyonic flux quantization subject to dispersive and dissipative permeabilities is discussed, the matrix elements of the transversal and longitudinal Poynting vectors of the Maxwell-Proca field are obtained, Cherenkov emission angles and radiation conditions are derived. The spectral energy flux of an ultra-relativistic electron plasma is calculated, a tachyonic Cherenkov fit to the high-energy (1 GeV to 30 TeV) γ-ray spectrum of the Crab Nebula is performed, and estimates of the linear polarization degree are given. The spectral tail shows subexponential Weibull decay, which can be modeled with a frequency-dependent tachyon mass in the dispersion relations. Tachyonic flux densities interpolate between exponential and power-law spectral decay, which is further illustrated by Cherenkov fits to the γ-ray spectra of the supernova remnants IC 443 and W44. Subexponential spectral decay is manifested in double-logarithmic spectral maps as curved Weibull or straight power-law slope.

  13. Search for gamma ray lines from supernovae and supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, E. L.; Forrest, D. J.; Suri, A. N.; Adams, R.; Tsai, C.

    1974-01-01

    A gamma ray monitor with a NaI crystal shielded with a cup-shaped CsI cover was contained in the rotating wheel compartment of the OSO-7 spacecraft for measuring the gamma ray spectra from 0.3 to 10 MeV in search for gamma ray lines from a possible remnant in the Gum Nebula and the apparent Type I supernovae in NGC5253. A brief analysis of data yielded no positive indications for X-rays, gamma ray lines, or continuum from these sources.

  14. The first Fermi LAT supernova remnant catalog

    DOE PAGES

    Acero, F.

    2016-05-16

    To uniformly determine the properties of supernova remnants (SNRs) at high energies, we have developed the first systematic survey at energies from 1 to 100 GeV using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Based on the spatial overlap of sources detected at GeV energies with SNRs known from radio surveys, we classify 30 sources as likely GeV SNRs. We also report 14 marginal associations and 245 flux upper limits. A mock catalog in which the positions of known remnants are scrambled in Galactic longitude, allows us to determine an upper limit of 22% on the number of GeV candidatesmore » falsely identified as SNRs. We have also developed a method to estimate spectral and spatial systematic errors arising from the diffuse interstellar emission model, a key component of all Galactic Fermi LAT analyses. By studying remnants uniformly in aggregate, we measure the GeV properties common to these objects and provide a crucial context for the detailed modeling of individual SNRs. Combining our GeV results with multiwavelength (MW) data, including radio, X-ray, and TeV, demonstrates the need for improvements to previously sufficient, simple models describing the GeV and radio emission from these objects. As a result, we model the GeV and MW emission from SNRs in aggregate to constrain their maximal contribution to observed Galactic cosmic rays.« less

  15. Three Great Eyes on Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Composite

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Chandra X-Ray Data (blue) Chandra X-Ray Data (green)Hubble Telescope (visible-light)Spitzer Telescope (infrared)

    NASA's three Great Observatories -- the Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory -- joined forces to probe the expanding remains of a supernova, called Kepler's supernova remnant, first seen 400 years ago by sky watchers, including astronomer Johannes Kepler.

    The combined image unveils a bubble-shaped shroud of gas and dust that is 14 light-years wide and is expanding at 4 million miles per hour (2,000 kilometers per second). Observations from each telescope highlight distinct features of the supernova remnant, a fast-moving shell of iron-rich material from the exploded star, surrounded by an expanding shock wave that is sweeping up interstellar gas and dust.

    Each color in this image represents a different region of the electromagnetic spectrum, from X-rays to infrared light. These diverse colors are shown in the panel of photographs below the composite image. The X-ray and infrared data cannot be seen with the human eye. By color-coding those data and combining them with Hubble's visible-light view, astronomers are presenting a more complete picture of the supernova remnant.

    Visible-light images from the Hubble telescope (colored yellow) reveal where the supernova shock wave is slamming into the densest regions of surrounding gas. The bright glowing knots are dense clumps from instabilities that form behind the shock wave. The Hubble data also show thin filaments of gas that look like rippled sheets seen edge-on. These filaments reveal where the shock wave is encountering lower-density, more uniform interstellar material.

    The Spitzer telescope shows microscopic dust particles (colored red) that have been heated by the

  16. A kinematic study of Tycho's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, P. J.; Sato, T.

    2016-06-01

    Thanks to its confirmed nature as the remnant of a standard Type Ia supernova from spectroscopy of its light echo, Tycho's supernova remnant is a unique object that can provide a new perspective into thermonuclear supernova explosions. More than 400 years after its discovery as a supernova in November 1572, the remnant is now spread out over an 8 arcminute diameter region in a fairly symmetric, but patchy, shell-like morphology. The remnant's thermal X-ray emission is dominated by a strong Si Kalpha line and also shows line emission from other species such as S, Ar, Ca, and Fe. Existing proper motion and X-ray line width measurements indicate that Tycho's Si-rich ejecta shell is expanding at ~4700 km/s. We have taken advantage of the huge number of Si line photons in the 750-ks Chandra ACIS observation from 2009 to make the first direct velocity measurements of ejecta in Tycho. The patchy nature of the ejecta shell allows for identification of red- and blue-shifted clumps of emission from the receding and approaching hemispheres. We use nonequilibrium ionization thermal models to jointly fit both ACIS-S and ACIS-I observations to determine the radial expansion velocity of individual clumps and associated systematic uncertainty. Red-shifted clumps have speeds of 3500-7800 km/s and blue-shifted clumps 1600--5000 km/s with a systematic uncertainty of 500-2000 km/s determined by intercomparison of the ACIS-S and ACIS-I spectral results. From our Chandra radial analysis of surface brightness, centroid energy, and line width, we have confirmed previous line width measurements from Suzaku, but are able to utilize finer radial bins that reveal additional structure in the kinematics of Tycho. In particular the Si and S line widths reach a deep minimum at the position of the peak surface brightness near the remnant's edge and where Doppler broadening from the shell expansion is minimum. From the measured line widths and assuming that Doppler and turbulent broadening can be

  17. Exploring Supernova Remnants with the SPIES Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Kari A.; Burrows, David N.; Dwarkadas, Vikram

    2017-01-01

    X-ray observations provide a key window into supernova remnants, providing measurements of a plethora of physical properties that are critical for understanding SNRs, their environments, their progenitors, and the SNe that created them. However, characterizing the entire volume of shocked plasma in a SNR is difficult, due to their complicated three dimensional morphologies and spectra. The SPIES project aims to address this problem by applying a novel X-ray analysis method, Smoothed Particle Inference (SPI), to XMM observations of 12 SNRs. SPI is a Bayesian modeling process that fits a population of gas blobs ("smoothed particles") such that their superposed emission reproduces the observed spatial and spectral distribution of photons. Emission-weighted distributions and maps of plasma properties, such as abundances and temperatures, are then extracted from the properties of the individual blobs. Additionally, because the collection of blobs is a multi-dimensional representation of the shocked plasma, we can carry out a more detailed exploration of plasma properties by extracting any subset of the blobs (e.g. those with the highest temperatures) and investigating its properties (e.g. map the abundances). Here we present preliminary results from SPI analyses of the first 6 remnants in the SPIES project.

  18. A New Galactic Center Composite Supernova Remnant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denn, G. R.; Hyman, S. D.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Kassim, N. E.

    2001-12-01

    We report the possible radio detection of a new supernova remnant located only 1 degree east of the Galactic center. The SNR candidate has both a shell and a core component on 6, 20, and 90 cm VLA images. Preliminary measurements indicate that both components have steep spectra between 6 and 20 cm, and that the spectra flatten and become inverted between 20 and 90 cm, due likely to significant free-free absorption. The source may be a composite-type SNR, which constitute only 10% of known SNRS, and which consist of a steep-spectrum radio shell corresponding to expanding debris from the supernova and a flatter spectrum, significantly polarized, core component corresponding to a central neutron star. Further radio and X-ray observations are planned in order to definitively identify this source. The detection of additional SNRs in or near the Galactic center will help place constraints on the star formation rate in this region, and may also provide clues about the GC environment. This research is supported by funding from the Sweet Briar College Faculty Grants program. Basic research in radio astronomy at NRL is supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  19. Supernova remnants and the physics of strong shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz; Chevalier, Roger; Cox, Donald P.; Dickel, John R.; Pisarski, Ryszard; Raymond, John; Spangler, Stephen R.; Volk, Heinrich J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports on a Workshop on Supernova Remnants and the Physics of Strong Shock Waves hosted by North Carolina State University at Raleigh, North Carolina, September 16-18, 1993. The workshop brought together observers, shock theorists, cosmic-ray specialists, and simulators to address the role supernova remnants can play in furthering our understanding of the complex plasma physics associated with collisionless shocks and particle acceleration. Over fifty scientists presented papers on various aspects of supernova remnants. In lieu of a proceedings volume, we present here a synopsis of the workshop, in the form of brief summaries of each workshop session.

  20. 330 MHz VLA Observations of 20 Galactic Supernova Remnants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    We present 330 MHz images and integrated flux densities for 20 previously identified 1st quadrant Galactic Supernova Remnants ( SNRs ). The...plerionic emission for SNRs whose intrinsic morphological type is not well established.

  1. Nonspherical supernova remnants. IV - Sequential explosions in OB associations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Bodenheimer, P.; Rozyczka, M.

    1987-01-01

    Multisupernova remnants, driven by sequential supernova explosions in OB associations, are modelled by means of two-dimensional hydrodynamical calculations. It is shown that due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability the remnants quickly evolve into highly irregular structures. A critical evaluation of the multisupernova model as an explanation for supershells is given.

  2. MODIFIED EQUIPARTITION CALCULATION FOR SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Arbutina, B.; Urosevic, D.; Andjelic, M. M.; Pavlovic, M. Z.; Vukotic, B.

    2012-02-10

    Determination of the magnetic field strength in the interstellar medium is one of the more complex tasks of contemporary astrophysics. We can only estimate the order of magnitude of the magnetic field strength by using a few very limited methods. Besides the Zeeman effect and Faraday rotation, the equipartition or minimum-energy calculation is a widespread method for estimating magnetic field strength and energy contained in the magnetic field and cosmic-ray particles by using only the radio synchrotron emission. Despite its approximate character, it remains a useful tool, especially when there are no other data about the magnetic field in a source. In this paper, we give a modified calculation that we think is more appropriate for estimating magnetic field strengths and energetics in supernova remnants (SNRs). We present calculated estimates of the magnetic field strengths for all Galactic SNRs for which the necessary observational data are available. The Web application for calculation of the magnetic field strengths of SNRs is available at http://poincare.matf.bg.ac.rs/{approx}arbo/eqp/.

  3. Electron acceleration by young supernova remnant blast waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blandford, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    Some general considerations regarding relativistic particle acceleration by young supernova remnants are reviewed. Recent radio observations of supernova remnants apparently locate the bounding shock and exhibit large electron density gradients which verify the presence of strong particle scattering. The radio 'rim' in Tycho's remnant has been found to contain a predominantly radial magnetic field. This may be attributable to an instability of the shock surface and a progress report on an investigation of the stability of strong shocks in partially ionized media is presented.

  4. High energy survey of supernova remnants with BATSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCollough, M. L.; Wilson, C. A.; Zhang, S. N.; Harmon, B. A.

    1997-01-01

    The burst and transient source experiment (BATSE) survey of the high energy emission from supernova remnants is reported on. The ability of BATSE to continuously monitor the entire sky in the 20 keV to 2 MeV energy range enables a large group of remnants to by studied at high energies. Preliminary analysis indicates the likely detection of several supernova remnants other than the Crab nebula. Among these are MSH 15-52, Vela, Cas A and possibly HB 9. The techniques employed are discussed together with the status of the survey and its limitations.

  5. Supernova Remnants, Cosmic Rays, and GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Steve

    2006-02-13

    The shock waves of supernova remnants (SNRs) are the traditional sources of Galactic cosmic rays, at least up to about 3000 TeV (the "knee" energy in the cosmic-ray spectrum). In the last decade or so, X-ray observations have confirmed in a few SNRs the presence of synchrotron-X-ray-emitting electrons with energies of order 100 TeV. TeV photons from SNRs have been observed with ground-based air Cerenkov telescopes as well, but it is still unclear whether they are due to hadronic processes (inelastic p-p scattering of cosmic-ray protons from thermal gas, with secondary neutral pions decaying to gamma rays), or to leptonic processes (inverse-Compton upscattering of cosmic microwave background photons, or bremsstrahlung). The spatial structure of synchrotron X-rays as observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory suggests the remarkable possibility that magnetic fields are amplified by orders of magnitude in strong shock waves. The electron spectra inferred from X-rays reach 100 TeV, but at that energy are cutting off steeply, well below the "knee" energy. Are the cutoff processes due only to radiative losses so that ion spectra might continue unsteepened? Can we confirm the presence of energetic ions in SNRs at all? Are typical SNRs capable of supplying the pool of Galactic cosmic rays? Is strong magnetic-field amplification a property of strong astrophysical shocks in general? These major questions require the next generation of observational tools. I shall outline the theoretical and observational framework of particle acceleration to high energies in SNRs, and shall describe how GLAST will advance this field.

  6. Supernova Remnants, Cosmic Rays, and GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Steve

    2006-02-13

    The shock waves of supernova remnants (SNRs) are the traditional sources of Galactic cosmic rays, at least up to about 3000 TeV (the 'knee' energy in the cosmic-ray spectrum). In the last decade or so, X-ray observations have confirmed in a few SNRs the presence of synchrotron-X-ray-emitting electrons with energies of order 100 TeV. TeV photons from SNRs have been observed with ground-based air Cerenkov telescopes as well, but it is still unclear whether they are due to hadronic processes (inelastic p-p scattering of cosmic-ray protons from thermal gas, with secondary neutral pions decaying to gamma rays), or to leptonic processes (inverse-Compton upscattering of cosmic microwave background photons, or bremsstrahlung). The spatial structure of synchrotron X-rays as observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory suggests the remarkable possibility that magnetic fields are amplified by orders of magnitude in strong shock waves. The electron spectra inferred from X-rays reach 100 TeV, but at that energy are cutting off steeply, well below the 'knee' energy. Are the cutoff processes due only to radiative losses so that ion spectra might continue unsteepened? Can we confirm the presence of energetic ions in SNRs at all? Are typical SNRs capable of supplying the pool of Galactic cosmic rays? Is strong magnetic-field amplification a property of strong astrophysical shocks in general? These major questions require the next generation of observational tools. I shall outline the theoretical and observational framework of particle acceleration to high energies in SNRs, and shall describe how GLAST will advance this field.

  7. Supernova Remnant Observations with Micro-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, Enectali

    Micro-X is a sounding rocket payload that combines an X-ray microcalorimeter with an imaging mirror to offer breakthrough science from high spectral resolution observations of extended X-ray sources. This payload has been in design and development for the last five years and is now completely built and undergoing integration; its first flight will be in November, 2012, as part of our current NASA award. This four-year follow-on proposal seeks funding for: (1) analysis of the first flight data, (2) the second flight and its data analysis, (3) development of payload upgrades and launch of the third flight, and (4) third flight data analysis. The scientific payload consists of a Transition Edge Sensor (TES) microcalorimeter array at the focus of a flight-proven conical imaging mirror. Micro-X capitalizes on three decades of NASA investment in the development of microcalorimeters and X-ray imaging optics. Micro-X offers a unique combination of bandpass, collecting area, and spectral and angular resolution. The spectral resolution goal across the 0.2 - 3.0 keV band is 2 - 4 eV Full-Width at Half Maximum (FWHM). The measured angular resolution of the mirror is 2.4 arcminute Half-Power Diameter (HPD). The effective area of the mirror, 300 square centimeters at 1 keV, is sufficient to provide observations of unprecedented quality of several astrophysical X-ray sources, even in a brief sounding rocket exposure of 300 sec. Our scientific program for this proposal will focus on supernova remnants (SNRs), whose spatial extent has made high-energy resolution observations with grating instruments extremely challenging. X-ray observations of SNRs with microcalorimeters will enable the study of the detailed atomic physics of the plasma; the determination of temperature, turbulence, and elemental abundances; and in conjunction with historical data, full three dimensional mapping of the kinematics of the remnant. These capabilities will open new avenues towards understanding the

  8. The cold, the dense and the energetic : cosmic ray bombardment of molecular cores near supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxted, Nigel Ivan

    2013-04-01

    One of the oldest unsolved mysteries in astrophysics is the origin of cosmic rays, particles that travel at speeds close to the speed of light. A plausible theory to explain the acceleration of these particles is shock-acceleration in the expanding shells of supernova remnants (SNRs) within our galaxy. In this thesis, the interstellar medium towards supernova remnants that display indicators of particle acceleration, ie., gamma-ray emission, are investigated. More specifically, results from mm-wavelength molecular gas surveys towards two gamma-ray emitting SNRs, RXJ1713.7-3946 and CTB37A are presented. Chapter 1 summarises astrophysics at high energies, including what cosmic rays are, how they may be accelerated, their connection to gamma-ray emission and how gamma-ray astronomy is performed from the ground. On the opposite (low-energy) side of the energy spectrum, Chapter 2 describes some of the theory of single dish radio astronomy, which allows us to probe molecular environments. By tuning the receiver to home-in on particular molecular species, different interstellar environoments can be targeted. Some specific molecular species are outlined in Chapter 3, before utilising these species in following chapters. The bulk of chapters 4 and 5 are composed of published articles presenting interstellar gas observations and investigation. Chapter 4 is an in-depth analysis of the molecular environment towards the supernova remnant RXJ1713.7-3946 (in 3 articles) using several independent molecular gas tracers, including transitions of the CS, NH3 and N2H+ molecules. In addition to various specific mm-phenomena, the presence of dense gas was confirmed via our observations. The issue of cosmic ray transport into dense star-forming cores was then addressed. Due to enhanced magnetic turbulence, cosmic ray propagation may be slower than the galactic average, so predictions for several slow-diffusion scenarios are made. Through modeling, scenarios where low energy cosmic rays

  9. Multiwavelength Signatures of Cosmic Ray Acceleration by Young Supernova Remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Vink, Jacco

    2008-12-24

    An overview is given of multiwavelength observations of young supernova remnants, with a focus on the observational signatures of efficient cosmic ray acceleration. Some of the effects that may be attributed to efficient cosmic ray acceleration are the radial magnetic fields in young supernova remnants, magnetic field amplification as determined with X-ray imaging spectroscopy, evidence for large post-shock compression factors, and low plasma temperatures, as measured with high resolution optical/UV/X-ray spectroscopy. Special emphasis is given to spectroscopy of post-shock plasma's, which offers an opportunity to directly measure the post-shock temperature. In the presence of efficient cosmic ray acceleration the post-shock temperatures are expected to be lower than according to standard equations for a strong shock. For a number of supernova remnants this seems indeed to be the case.

  10. A HIRES analysis of the FIR emission of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhong

    1994-01-01

    The high resolution (HiRes) algorithm has been used to analyze the far infrared emission of shocked gas and dust in supernova remnants. In the case of supernova remnant IC 443, we find a very good match between the resolved features in the deconvolved images and the emissions of shocked gas mapped in other wavelengths (lines of H2, CO, HCO+, and HI). Dust emission is also found to be surrounding hot bubbles of supernova remnants which are seen in soft X-ray maps. Optical spectroscopy on the emission of the shocked gas suggests a close correlation between the FIR color and local shock speed, which is a strong function of the ambient (preshock) gas density. These provide a potentially effective way to identify regions of strong shock interaction, and thus facilitate studies of kinematics and energetics in the interstellar medium.

  11. A multiwavelength investigation of the supernova remnant IC 443

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mufson, S. L.; Mccollough, M. L.; Dickel, J. R.; Petre, R.; White, R.

    1986-01-01

    Multiwavelength observations of the supernova remnant IC 443 at radio, infrared, optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray wavelengths are presented. This morphological study of IC 443 presents a detailed picture of an adolescent supernova remnant in a multiphase interstellar medium. Radio observations show that better than 80 percent of the continuum emission at 18 cm is in a large-scale (greater than 18 arcmin) component. Decomposition of the infrared data shows that radiatively heated dust, shocked blackbody dust emission, and infrared line emission are all important components of the observed IRAS fluxes. The morphology of the IC 443 region is consistent with a supernova blast in an interstellar medium with a nonuniform distribution of clouds. The bright northeast rim and the great extent of the remnant to the southwest are most easily explained by a cloud filling factor which is greatest in the northeast and falls off toward the southwest.

  12. SUPERNOVA REMNANT PROGENITOR MASSES IN M31

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, Zachary G.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R.; Murphy, Jeremiah W.; Dolphin, Andrew E. E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com

    2012-12-10

    Using Hubble Space Telescope photometry, we age-date 59 supernova remnants (SNRs) in the spiral galaxy M31 and use these ages to estimate zero-age main-sequence masses (M{sub ZAMS}) for their progenitors. To accomplish this, we create color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) and employ CMD fitting to measure the recent star formation history of the regions surrounding cataloged SNR sites. We identify any young coeval population that likely produced the progenitor star, then assign an age and uncertainty to that population. Application of stellar evolution models allows us to infer the M{sub ZAMS} from this age. Because our technique is not contingent on identification or precise location of the progenitor star, it can be applied to the location of any known SNRs. We identify significant young star formation around 53 of the 59 SNRs and assign progenitor masses to these, representing a factor of {approx}2 increase over currently measured progenitor masses. We consider the remaining six SNRs as either probable Type Ia candidates or the result of core-collapse progenitors that have escaped their birth sites. In general, the distribution of recovered progenitor masses is bottom-heavy, showing a paucity of the most massive stars. If we assume a single power-law distribution, dN/dM{proportional_to}M{sup {alpha}}, then we find a distribution that is steeper than a Salpeter initial mass function (IMF) ({alpha} = -2.35). In particular, we find values of {alpha} outside the range -2.7 {>=} {alpha} {>=} -4.4 to be inconsistent with our measured distribution at 95% confidence. If instead we assume a distribution that follows a Salpeter IMF up to some maximum mass, then we find that values of M{sub Max} > 26 are inconsistent with the measured distribution at 95% confidence. In either scenario, the data suggest that some fraction of massive stars may not explode. The result is preliminary and requires more SNRs and further analysis. In addition, we use our distribution to estimate a

  13. Radio evolution of the remnant of Supernova 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanardo, Giovanna

    Radio supernovae result from the collision between a supernova (SN) shock and the progenitor's circumstellar medium (CSM). Supernova 1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud, as the only nearby core-collapse supernova observed with a telescope since its early stages, has allowed unique studies of the SN-CSM interaction and the complex structure of the resulting emission. This thesis investigates the evolution of the remnant of SN 1987A, as the shock wave impacts the dense CSM in the equatorial ring, and the possible presence of a compact object in the remnant interior, using new data from the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, the Australian Long Baseline Array, and the Parkes telescope.

  14. On the nature of the Monoceros supernova remnant.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gebel, W. L.; Shore, S. N.

    1972-01-01

    A dynamical expansion time of 300,000 years and an envelope of 100 km/sec are derived for the filamentary Monoceros Loop supernova remnant. Through arguments connecting three O stars with the supernova remnant, a lower limit of 25-30 solar masses is derived for the progenitor star. A thermal soft X-ray point source is predicted based on the hypothesis of a cooling neutron star. By analogy, we interpret the Cygnus Loop X-ray source as a neutron star.

  15. X-ray Observations of the Tycho Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, John P.

    2006-06-01

    In this presentation I summarize some key new findings from recent Chandra and XMM-Newton data on the remnant of the supernova (SN) observed by Tycho Brahe in 1572, which is widely believed to have been of Type Ia origin. Studies of the Tycho supernova remnant (SNR) at the current epoch address aspects of SN Ia physics, the evolution of young SNRs, and cosmic ray acceleration at high Mach-number shocks.Research on the Tycho SNR at Rutgers has been supported by Chandra grants GO3-4066X and AR5-6010X.

  16. Energy of Tycho's Supernova Remnant is increasing with time

    PubMed Central

    Barenblatt, Grigory Isaakovich

    2008-01-01

    It is shown, using the Zeldovich integral relations, that the energy of Tycho's Supernova Remnant is strongly growing with time, approximately as t1/3. This growth can be attributed to the exothermic reactions going inside the remnant. The use of the assumption of the adiabaticity of the motion inside of the shock front, and no losses or gain of energy at the front, seems therefore unjustified. PMID:18202174

  17. A compressed cloud in the Vela supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, E. B.; Wallerstein, G.; Leep, E. M.; Silk, J.

    1981-01-01

    To elucidate the nature of the interstellar medium in the vicinity of the Vela supernova remnants (SNR) an extensive study with the International Ultraviolet Explorer of interstellar absorption lines toward 35 stars in the vicinity of the Vela SNR was undertaken. Observations of interstellar absorption, in particular of CI, towards one of these stars, HD 72350 (type B4 III), is of particular interest.

  18. X-ray studies of supernova remnants: a different view of supernova explosions.

    PubMed

    Badenes, Carles

    2010-04-20

    The unprecedented spatial and spectral resolutions of Chandra have revolutionized our view of the X-ray emission from supernova remnants. The excellent datasets accumulated on young, ejecta-dominated objects like Cas A or Tycho present a unique opportunity to study at the same time the chemical and physical structure of the explosion debris and the characteristics of the circumstellar medium sculpted by the progenitor before the explosion. Supernova remnants can thus put strong constraints on fundamental aspects of both supernova explosion physics and stellar evolution scenarios for supernova progenitors. This view of the supernova phenomenon is completely independent of, and complementary to, the study of distant extragalactic supernovae at optical wavelengths. The calibration of these two techniques has recently become possible thanks to the detection and spectroscopic follow-up of supernova light echoes. In this paper, I review the most relevant results on supernova remnants obtained during the first decade of Chandra and the impact that these results have had on open issues in supernova research.

  19. X-ray studies of supernova remnants: A different view of supernova explosions

    PubMed Central

    Badenes, Carles

    2010-01-01

    The unprecedented spatial and spectral resolutions of Chandra have revolutionized our view of the X-ray emission from supernova remnants. The excellent datasets accumulated on young, ejecta-dominated objects like Cas A or Tycho present a unique opportunity to study at the same time the chemical and physical structure of the explosion debris and the characteristics of the circumstellar medium sculpted by the progenitor before the explosion. Supernova remnants can thus put strong constraints on fundamental aspects of both supernova explosion physics and stellar evolution scenarios for supernova progenitors. This view of the supernova phenomenon is completely independent of, and complementary to, the study of distant extragalactic supernovae at optical wavelengths. The calibration of these two techniques has recently become possible thanks to the detection and spectroscopic follow-up of supernova light echoes. In this paper, I review the most relevant results on supernova remnants obtained during the first decade of Chandra and the impact that these results have had on open issues in supernova research. PMID:20404206

  20. No cold dust within the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Oliver; Birkmann, Stephan M.; Rieke, George H.; Lemke, Dietrich; Klaas, Ulrich; Hines, Dean C.; Gordon, Karl D.

    2004-12-01

    A large amount (about three solar masses) of cold (18K) dust in the prototypical type II supernova remnant Cassiopeia A was recently reported. It was concluded that dust production in type II supernovae can explain how the large quantities (~ 108 solar masses) of dust observed in the most distant quasars could have been produced within only 700 million years after the Big Bang. Foreground clouds of interstellar material, however, complicate the interpretation of the earlier submillimetre observations of Cas A. Here we report far-infrared and molecular line observations that demonstrate that most of the detected submillimetre emission originates from interstellar dust in a molecular cloud complex located in the line of sight between the Earth and Cas A, and is therefore not associated with the remnant. The argument that type II supernovae produce copious amounts of dust is not supported by the case of Cas A, which previously appeared to provide the best evidence for this possibility.

  1. No cold dust within the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A.

    PubMed

    Krause, Oliver; Birkmann, Stephan M; Rieke, George H; Lemke, Dietrich; Klaas, Ulrich; Hines, Dean C; Gordon, Karl D

    2004-12-02

    A large amount (about three solar masses) of cold (18 K) dust in the prototypical type II supernova remnant Cassiopeia A was recently reported. It was concluded that dust production in type II supernovae can explain how the large quantities (approximately 10(8) solar masses) of dust observed in the most distant quasars could have been produced within only 700 million years after the Big Bang. Foreground clouds of interstellar material, however, complicate the interpretation of the earlier submillimetre observations of Cas A. Here we report far-infrared and molecular line observations that demonstrate that most of the detected submillimetre emission originates from interstellar dust in a molecular cloud complex located in the line of sight between the Earth and Cas A, and is therefore not associated with the remnant. The argument that type II supernovae produce copious amounts of dust is not supported by the case of Cas A, which previously appeared to provide the best evidence for this possibility.

  2. Properties of optically selected supernova remnant candidates in M33

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Lee, Myung Gyoon E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-10-01

    Narrowband images covering strong emission lines are efficient for surveying supernova remnants (SNRs) in nearby galaxies. Using the narrowband images provided by the Local Group Galaxy Survey, we searched for SNRs in M33. Culling the objects with enhanced [S II]/Hα and round morphology in the continuum-subtracted Hα and [S II] images, we produced a list of 199 sources. Among them, 79 are previously unknown. Their progenitor and morphology types were classified. A majority of the sample (170 objects) are likely remnants of core-collapse supernovae (SNe), and 29 are remnants of Type Ia SNe. The cumulative size distribution of these objects is found to be similar to that of the M31 remnants derived in a similar way. We obtain a power-law slope, α = 2.38 ± 0.05. Thus, a majority of the sources are considered to be in the Sedov-Taylor phase, consistent with previous findings. The histogram of the emission-line ratio ([S II]/Hα) of the remnants has two concentrations at [S II]/Hα ∼ 0.55 and ∼0.8, as in M31. Interestingly, L {sub X} (and L {sub 20cm}) of the compact center-bright objects are correlated with their optical luminosity. The remnants with X-ray emission have brighter optical surface brightnesses and smaller diameters than those without X-ray emission.

  3. Circumstellar Dust in the Remnant of Kepler's Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Brian J.; Blair, W. P.; Borkowski, K. J.; Ghavamian, P.; Long, K. S.; Reynolds, S. P.; Sankrit, R.

    2012-01-01

    Kepler's Supernova Remnant, the remains of the supernova of 1604, is widely believed to be the result of a Type Ia supernova, and shows IR, optical, and X-ray evidence for an interaction of the blast wave with a dense circumstellar medium (CSM). We present low-resolution 7.5-38 μm IR spectra of selected regions within the remnant, obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Spectra of those regions where the blast wave is encountering circumstellar material show strong features at 10 and 18 μm. These spectral features are most consistent with various silicate particles, likely formed in the stellar outflow from the progenitor system during the AGB stage of evolution. While it is possible that some features may arise from freshly formed ejecta dust, morphological evidence suggests that it is more likely that they originate from dust in the CSM. We isolate the dust grain absorption efficiencies for several regions in Kepler and compare them to laboratory data for dust particles of various compositions. The hottest dust in the remnant originates in the regions of dense, radiatively shocked clumps of gas, identified in optical images. Models of collisionally heated dust show that such shocks are capable of heating grains to temperatures of > 150 K. We confirm the finding that Kepler's SNR is still interacting with CSM in at least part of the remnant after 400 years. The significant quantities of silicate dust are consistent with a relatively massive progenitor.

  4. Modelling Hard Gamma-Ray Emission from Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew

    2000-01-01

    The observation by the CANGAROO experiment of TeV emission from SN 1006, in conjunction with several instances of non-thermal X-ray emission from supernova remnants, has led to inferences of super-TeV electrons in these extended sources. While this is sufficient to propel the theoretical community in their modelling of particle acceleration and associated radiation, the anticipated emergence in the next decade of a number of new experiments probing the TeV and sub-TeV bands provides further substantial motivation for modellers. In particular, the quest for obtaining unambiguous gamma-ray signatures of cosmic ray ion acceleration defines a "Holy Grail" for observers and theorists alike. This review summarizes theoretical developments in the prediction of MeV-TeV gamma-rays from supernova remnants over the last five years, focusing on how global properties of models can impact, and be impacted by, hard gamma-ray observational programs, thereby probing the supernova remnant environment. Properties of central consideration include the maximum energy of accelerated particles, the density of the unshocked interstellar medium, the ambient magnetic field, and the relativistic electron-to-proton ratio. Criteria for determining good candidate remnants for observability in the TeV band are identified.

  5. Modelling Hard Gamma-Ray Emission from Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.

    1999-01-01

    The observation by the CANGAROO (Collaboration of Australia and Nippon Gamma Ray Observatory at Outback) experiment of TeV emission from SN 1006, in conjunction with several instances of non-thermal X-ray emission from supernova remnants, has led to inferences of super-TeV electrons in these extended sources. While this is sufficient to propel the theoretical community in their modelling of particle acceleration and associated radiation, the anticipated emergence in the next decade of a number of new experiments probing the TeV and sub-TeV bands provides further substantial motivation for modellers. In particular, the quest for obtaining unambiguous gamma-ray signatures of cosmic ray ion acceleration defines a "Holy Grail" for observers and theorists alike. This review summarizes theoretical developments in the prediction of MeV-TeV gamma-rays from supernova remnants over the last five years, focusing on how global properties of models can impact, and be impacted by, hard gamma-ray observational programs, thereby probing the supernova remnant environment. Properties of central consideration include the maximum energy of accelerated particles, the density of the unshocked interstellar medium, the ambient magnetic field, and the relativistic electron-to-proton ratio. Criteria for determining good candidate remnants for observability in the TeV band are identified.

  6. Excited-State OH Masers and Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihlström, Ylva M.; Fish, Vincent L.; Sjouwerman, Loránt O.; Zschaechner, Laura K.; Lockett, Philip B.; Elitzur, Moshe

    2008-03-01

    The collisionally pumped, ground-state 1720 MHz maser line of OH is widely recognized as a tracer for shocked regions and observed in star-forming regions and supernova remnants. Whereas some lines of excited states of OH have been detected and studied in star-forming regions, the subject of excited-state OH in supernova remnants—where high collision rates are to be expected—is only recently being addressed. Modeling of collisional excitation of OH demonstrates that 1720, 4765, and 6049 MHz masers can occur under similar conditions in regions of shocked gas. In particular, the 6049 and 4765 MHz masers become more significant at increased OH column densities where the 1720 MHz masers begin to be quenched. In supernova remnants, the detection of excited-state OH line maser emission could therefore serve as a probe of regions of higher column densities. Using the Very Large Array, we searched for excited-state OH in the 4.7, 7.8, 8.2, and 23.8 GHz lines in four well-studied supernova remnants with strong 1720 MHz maser emission (Sgr A East, W28, W44 and IC 443). No detections were made, at typical detection limits of around 10 mJy beam-1. The search for the 6 GHz lines were done using Effelsberg since the VLA receivers did not cover those frequencies, and are reported on in an accompanying letter (Fish and coworkers). We also cross-correlated the positions of known supernova remnants with the positions of 1612 MHz maser emission obtained from blind surveys. No probable associations were found, perhaps except in the Sgr A East region. The lack of detections of excited-state OH indicates that the OH column densities suffice for 1720 MHz inversion but not for inversion of excited-state transitions, consistent with the expected results for C-type shocks.

  7. Measuring the Symmetry of Supernova Remnants in the Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, Jennifer; Lopez, Laura A.

    2017-01-01

    Nearly 300 supernova remnants (SNRs) are known in the MIlky Way galaxy, and they offer an important means to study the explosions and interactions of supernovae at sub-pc scales. In this poster, we present analysis of the morphology of Galactic SNRs at radio wavelengths. Specifically, we measure the symmetry of several tens of SNRs in 6- and 20-cm Very Large Array images using a multipole expansion technique, the power-ratio method. We explore how the SNRs' morphology changes as a function of their size and estimated dynamical ages, with the aim of probing how SNR shapes evolve with time.

  8. Kinematic detection of supernova remnants in giant H II regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, You-Hua; Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.

    1986-12-01

    In a kinematic survey of giant H II regions in M 101, four sources that have large velocity widths at low intensity levels are detected. Two of these large-velocity-width sources (LVWSs) are, within the limit of resolution, coincident with nonthermal radio sources several times as luminous as Cas A. The LVWS in NGC 5471 B is so bright that it is possible to separate its broad profile from the narrower profile of the background H II region. H-alpha CCD photometry, optical spectroscopy, and high-resolution radio data are combined to derive its physical properties, which support Skillman's (1985) identification of the object as a supernova remnant. The other LVWSs might be supernova remnants embedded in giant H II regions, unusually massive wind-driven shells, or the combination of both.

  9. Core-collapse supernova remnants and interactions with their surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantseg, Thomas Felton

    This thesis examines three core-collapse supernova remnants (SNR)---the Cygnus Loop in the Milky Way and 0453-68.5 and 0540-69.3 in the Large Magellanic Cloud---of varying ages and in varying states of interaction with the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM), using X-ray imaging spectroscopy with Chandra and supplemental data from other wavelengths. We use results from our analysis to address three main questions. First, we examine the applicability of the common Sedov-Taylor adiabatic blast wave model to core-collapse supernovae. Second, we determine the elemental abundances around the shell of these supernova remnants to determine if the use of SNRs as a gauge of abundances in the ISM is justified. Finally, we examine the pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) in 0453-68.5 and 0540-69.3 and search for evidence of interaction between these PWNe and their immediate surroundings. We see highly inhomogeneous ISM surrounding all three surveyed SNRs, contrary to the key assumption in the Sedov-Taylor model of a uniform surrounding medium. In all three studied SNRs, we find that shock speeds are dependent on the density of the surrounding material. As subsidiary results, we also find depleted elemental abundances of oxygen, magnesium, and silicon, relative to typical ISM, around all three studied supernova remnants. Although this subsidiary result is not conclusive, we believe that it merits a followup study. In 0540-69.3 and 0453-68.5, which contain central pulsars, we find that the explosion directionality, which can be inferred from the pulsar's proper motion relative to the SNR, is not related to the morphology of the SNR itself. We conclude from this that the asymmetric shapes common in core-collapse supernova remnants can be more a function of the complex environments surrounding the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae than of the supernova explosions themselves. Finally, we see that the PWN in 0453-68.5 shows signs of having mixed with the surrounding thermal- emitting

  10. Emission and Absorption Study of the Vela Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, John C.

    The combination of emission and absorption studies of the shocked gas in a supernova remnant can provide information not available from either study by itself, especially relating to the liberation of refractory elements from interstellar grains in the cooling zone behind the shock and the effects of departures from steady flow. No such combined studies have been attempted due to the need for a hot, bright background star behind supernova remnant nebulosity bright enough for emission line observations. Wallerstein and Balick have discovered a suitable patch of nebulosity in the Vela Supernova Remnant adjacent to the B3 III star HD 72088. IUE spectra of the star show a 94 km/s component in C IV and Si IV in absorption, and the optical spectra of Wallerstein and Balick show strong high excitation emission lines close to the star. We wish to obtain IUE spectra of the nebulosity as close to the star as possible and further high dispersion spectra of the star to improve the signal-tonoise.

  11. What Produced the Ultraluminous Supernova Remnant in NGC 6946?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, B. C.; Gruendl, R. A.; Chu, Y.-H.

    1999-05-01

    The ultra-luminous supernova remnant (SNR) in NGC 6946 is the brightest X-ray SNR known, ~ 1000 times as luminous as Cas A. However, high-velocity gas with Vexp > 600 km/s has not been detected, as expected for a young remnant. HST WFPC2 images of this SNR show multiple loops. This morphology has been used as evidence of colliding SNRs of different ages, in order to explain the X-ray luminosity (Blair, Fesen, & Schlegel 1997), We have obtained high-dispersion echelle spectra of this SNR with the KPNO 4-m telescope. The SNR is detected in Hα , [N II]lambda 6584, and [O III]lambda 5007 lines. The emission lines show a narrow component (FWHM ~ 40 km/s) superposed on a broad component (FWZI ~ 360 km/s). The total [N II] flux is comparable to the Hα flux. The broad component contains ~ 1.5 times as much flux as the narrow component, and the broad component has slightly higher [N II]/Hα ratio than the narrow component. These spectral properties are qualitatively similar to some small SNRs in M33. The strong [N II] line in the narrow component suggests an anomalous nitrogen abundance usually associated with circumstellar material. The nitrogen abundance and small remnant size imply that the supernova progenitor was a WN star and the supernova exploded in a dense circumstellar bubble.

  12. What Produced the Ultraluminous Supernova Remnant in NGC 6946?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Bryan C.; Gruendl, Robert A.; Chu, You-Hua

    2000-03-01

    The ultraluminous supernova remnant (SNR) in NGC 6946 is the brightest known SNR in X-rays, about 1000 times brighter than Cas A. To probe the nature of this remnant and its progenitor, we have obtained high-dispersion optical echelle spectra. The echelle spectra detect Hα, [N II], and [O III] lines and resolve these lines into a narrow (FWHM ~20-40 km s-1) component from unshocked material and a broad (FWHM ~250 km s-1) component from shocked material. Both narrow and broad components have unusually high [N II]/Hα ratios, about 1. Using the echelle observation, archival Hubble Space Telescope images, and archival ROSAT X-ray observations, we conclude that the SNR was produced by a normal supernova whose progenitor was a massive star, either a WN star or a luminous blue variable. The high luminosity of the remnant is caused by the supernova ejecta expanding into a dense, nitrogen-rich circumstellar nebula created by the progenitor.

  13. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE DETECTION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT RCW 86

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Qiang; Huang, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Siming; Zhang, Bing

    2014-04-20

    Using 5.4 yr Fermi Large Area Telescope data, we report the detection of GeV γ-ray emission from the shell-type supernova remnant RCW 86 (G315.4-2.3) with a significance of ∼5.1σ. The data slightly favors an extended emission of this supernova remnant. The spectral index of RCW 86 is found to be very hard, Γ ∼ 1.4, in the 0.4-300 GeV range. A one-zone leptonic model can well fit the multi-wavelength data from radio to very high energy γ-rays. The very hard GeV γ-ray spectrum and the inferred low gas density seem to disfavor a hadronic origin for the γ-rays. The γ-ray behavior of RCW 86 is very similar to several other TeV shell-type supernova remnants, e.g., RX J1713.7-3946, RX J0852.0-4622, SN 1006, and HESS J1731-347.

  14. CGRO/OSSE observations of the Cassiopeia A Supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    The, L.-S.; Leising, M. D.; Clayton, D. D.; Johnson, W. N.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kurfess, J. D.; Strickman, M. S.; Jung, G. V.; Grabelsky, D. A.; Purcell, W. R.

    1995-01-01

    Cassipeia A, the youngest known supernova remnant in the Galaxy and a strong radio and X-ray source, was observed by OSSE 1992 July 16-August 6. Its close distance (approximately 3 kpc) and its young age (approximately 300 yr) make Cas A the best candidate among known supernova remnants for detecting Ti-44 gamma-ray lines. We find no evidence of emission at 67.9 keV, 78.4 keV, or 1.157 MeV, the three strongest Ti-44 decay lines. From simultaneous fits to the three lines our 99% confidence upper limit to the flux in each line is 5.5 x 10(exp -5) gamma/sq cm s. We also report upper limits for the 4.44 MeV C-12 nuclear de-excitation line, which could be produced by interactions of acclerated particles in the supernova remnant, and for the hard X-ray continuum.

  15. Supernova remnant rich fields in the Carina spiral arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markert, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    The analysis of the ROSAT PSPC data on five fields containing supernova remnants several months ago was completed. Dr. Una Hwang, prepared a paper describing our results which was published last August ('An X-ray Study of Five Supernova Remnants in the Carina Spiral Arm', by Hwang and Markert, 1994, Ap. J., 431, p. 819). Hwang's earlier analysis of this data became part of her PhD thesis ( 'X-ray Studies of Supernova Remnants', February 1994, MIT). A copy of the Hwang and Markert paper is appended. The results of the study are well-summarized in the Hwang and Markert paper: the best spatial-spectral X-ray study yet made of the intriguing SNR G296.1-0.7 was obtained. This study showed interesting spectral variations over the surface of the object.It was also determined the gross physical properties of G296 based on its X-ray emission. Four other fields were also examined. For three of these the upper limits to the radio object were determined, and in one case found a weak, but statistically significant X-ray object coincident with the peak of the radio flux.

  16. Ejecta in SN 1006: The knotty issue. [supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesen, Robert A.; Hamilton, Andrew J. S.

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 IUE SWP observations of a faint sdOB star situated behind the remnant of the supernova of AD 1006 are presented. These spectra along with IUE spectra of the star taken between 1982 and 1986 provide a detailed look at the elemental composition and dynamical properties of the SN 1006 remnant. Over the 6 years there were no significant changes in the absorption features associated with the remnant at 1281, 1330, or 1420 A. While the lack of variability in these absorption lines makes it impossible to decide whether the ejecta is distributed smoothly or in knots, it is clear that the 1281 A feature is a blend, requiring either S II absorption redshifted at 6000 km/sec plus Si II 1260 at 5200 km/sec, or else 2 individual Si absorbing regions.

  17. The evolution of the radio emission from Kepler's Supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickel, John R.; Sault, Robert; Arendt, Richard G.; Korista, Kirk T.; Matsui, Yutaka

    1988-01-01

    High-resolution radio maps of Kepler's Supernova remnant (SNR) using all four arrays of the VLA have been obtained at wavelengths of 20 and 6 cm. They show the complete structure of the remnant; all features are resolved with sizes greater than about 2 arcsec, and the relative brightness of the smooth component near the center is about 1/4 the brightness of the rim. The results have been compared with earlier more limited data to measure changes in the remnant over a four-year time span. The SNR is expanding with a mean rate of R proportional to t exp 0.50 with considerable variations around the shell. Values range from R proportional to t exp 0.35 on the bright northern rim to R proportional to t exp 0.65 on the eastern part of the shell. The measurements are consistent with expansion into a variable circumstellar medium.

  18. Chandra's View of Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This Chandra image reveals, in detail, the turbulent debris created by a supernova explosion that was observed by the Danish Astronomer Tycho Brahe in the year 1572. The colors show different x-ray energies, with red, green, and blue representing low, medium, and high energies, respectively. Most likely caused by the destruction of a white dwarf star, a shock wave produced by the expanding debris is outlined by the sharp blue circular arcs of 20 million degree Celsius gas seen on the outer rim. The stellar debris, visible only by x-ray, has a temperature of about 10 million degrees, and shows up as mottled yellow, green, and red fingers of gas.

  19. OXYGEN-RICH SUPERNOVA REMNANT IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of the tattered debris of a star that exploded 3,000 years ago as a supernova. This supernova remnant, called N132D, lies 169,000 light-years away in the satellite galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. A Hubble Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 image of the inner regions of the supernova remnant shows the complex collisions that take place as fast moving ejecta slam into cool, dense interstellar clouds. This level of detail in the expanding filaments could only be seen previously in much closer supernova remnants. Now, Hubble's capabilities extend the detailed study of supernovae out to the distance of a neighboring galaxy. Material thrown out from the interior of the exploded star at velocities of more than four million miles per hour (2,000 kilometers per second) plows into neighboring clouds to create luminescent shock fronts. The blue-green filaments in the image correspond to oxygen-rich gas ejected from the core of the star. The oxygen-rich filaments glow as they pass through a network of shock fronts reflected off dense interstellar clouds that surrounded the exploded star. These dense clouds, which appear as reddish filaments, also glow as the shock wave from the supernova crushes and heats the clouds. Supernova remnants provide a rare opportunity to observe directly the interiors of stars far more massive than our Sun. The precursor star to this remnant, which was located slightly below and left of center in the image, is estimated to have been 25 times the mass of our Sun. These stars 'cook' heavier elements through nuclear fusion, including oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, iron etc., and the titanic supernova explosions scatter this material back into space where it is used to create new generations of stars. This is the mechanism by which the gas and dust that formed our solar system became enriched with the elements that sustain life on this planet. Hubble spectroscopic observations will be used to determine the exact

  20. The Kinematics of Kepler's Supernova Remnant as Revealed by Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vink, Jacco

    2008-12-01

    I have determined the expansion of the supernova remnant of SN 1604 (Kepler's supernova) based on archival Chandra ACIS-S observations made in 2000 and 2006. The measurements were done in several distinct energy bands, and were made for the remnant as a whole, and for six individual sectors. The average expansion parameter indicates that the remnant expands on average as r propto t0.5, but there are significant differences in different parts of the remnant: the bright northwestern part expands as r propto t0.35, whereas the rest of the remnant's expansion shows an expansion r propto t0.6. The latter is consistent with an explosion in which the outer part of the ejecta has a negative power law slope for density (ρ propto v-n) of n = 7, or with an exponential density profile [ρ propto exp (- v/ve) ]. The expansion parameter in the southern region, in conjunction with the shock radius, indicates a rather low value (<5 × 1050 erg) for the explosion energy of SN 1604 for a distance of 4 kpc. A higher explosion energy is consistent with the results if the distance is larger. The filament in the eastern part of the remnant, which is dominated by X-ray synchrotron radiation, seems to mark a region with a fast shock speed r propto t0.7, corresponding to a shock velocity of v = 4200 km s-1, for a distance to SN 1604 of 4 kpc. This is consistent with the idea that X-ray synchrotron emission requires shock velocities in excess of ~2000 km s-1. The X-ray-based expansion measurements reported are consistent with results based on optical and radio measurements but disagree with previous X-ray measurements based on ROSAT and Einstein observations.

  1. Dance into the fire: dust survival inside supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micelotta, Elisabetta R.; Dwek, Eli; Slavin, Jonathan D.

    2016-06-01

    Core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are important sources of interstellar dust, potentially capable of producing 1 M_{⊙}) of dust in their explosively expelled ejecta. However, unlike other dust sources, the dust has to survive the passage of the reverse shock, generated by the interaction of the supernova blast wave with its surrounding medium. Knowledge of the net amount of dust produced by CCSNe is crucial for understanding the origin and evolution of dust in the local and high-redshift universe. Our goal is to identify the dust destruction mechanisms in the ejecta, and derive the net amount of dust that survives the passage of the reverse shock. To do so, we have developed analytical models for the evolution of a supernova blast wave and of the reverse shock, and the simultaneous processing of the dust inside the cavity of the supernova remnant. We have applied our models to the special case of the clumpy ejecta of the remnant of Cassiopeia A (Cas A), assuming that the dust (silicates and carbon grains) resides in cool oxygen-rich ejecta clumps which are uniformly distributed within the remnant and surrounded by a hot X-ray emitting plasma (smooth ejecta). The passage of the reverse shock through the clumps gives rise to a relative gas-grain motion and also destroys the clumps. While residing in the ejecta clouds, dust is processed via kinetic sputtering, which is terminated either when the grains escape the clumps, or when the clumps are destroyed by the reverse shock. In either case, grain destruction proceeds thereafter by thermal sputtering in the hot shocked smooth ejecta. We find that 12 and 16 percent of silicate and carbon dust, respectively, survive the passage of the reverse shock by the time the shock has reached the center of the remnant. These fractions depend on the morphology of the ejecta and the medium into which the remnant is expanding, as well as the composition and size distribution of the grains that formed in the ejecta. Results will

  2. Supernova remnants in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathewson, D. S.; Ford, V. L.; Dopita, M. A.; Tuohy, I. R.; Long, K. S.; Helfand, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The present updated catalog of SNRs in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) incorporates remnants recently discovered as a result of coordinated X-ray, optical, and radio surveys, and contains 25 confirmed SNRs in the LMC and six in the SMC. Optical images are included for all of the new SNRs, together with X-ray isophotes for 24 of the SNRs in the LMC which have been obtained with the high resolution imager and imaging proportional counter of the Einstein Observatory. The cumulative number-diameter relation for Type II SNRs with D smaller than 50 pc in the LMC is N(D)= 0.36 D exp 1.0 + or 0.2, suggesting that the SNRs have evolved much faster than expected from Sedov theory and that the free expansion phase dominates their evolution up to diameters of 30-40 pc. SNR production frequencies in the LMC and SMC are calculated to be 1/275 and 1/800 years, respectively, or nearly equal to the galaxies' luminosity ratios.

  3. A high sensitivity search for X-rays from supernova remnants in Aquila

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, D. A.; Bleach, D. A.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    A high sensitivity scan of the galactic plane was performed to search for 2-20 keV X-rays from supernova remnants. The spectra of five X-ray sources detected between 44 deg and 31 deg longitude, of which only two might be associated with suggested supernova remnants, are reported on. Upper limits are presented for the 19 possible supernova remnants scanned in this survey.

  4. Radio-Quiet Pulsars and Point Sources in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, David

    2002-04-01

    Since Baade and Zwicky made their prescient remark identifying the central blue star in the Crab Nebula as a neutron star, this pulsar's period has increased by 0.9 msec, turning 10^48 ergs of rotational kinetic energy into a relativistic wind that has been deposited in its surroundings. This makes the compact remnant of the supernova of 1054 AD highly conspicuous. It also makes this remnant highly anomalous. Nowhere else in the Galaxy does such a luminous young pulsar exists, despite the fact that at least half a dozen core-collapse supernovae have occurred since the Crab's birth. Indeed, the newly discovered central object in Cas A is four orders of magnitude less luminous in the X-ray band. While the Chandra and XMM-Newton Observatories are discovering an increasing number of Crab-like synchrotron nebulae (albeit, far less luminous than the prototype), they are also revealing X-ray point sources inside supernova remnants that lack detectable radio pulses and show no evidence of a relativistic outflow to power a surrounding nebula. I will provide an inventory of these objects, discuss whether or not truly radio-silent young neutron stars exist, and speculate on the emission mechanisms and power sources which make such objects shine. I will conclude with a commentary on the implications of this population for the distributions of pulsar birth parameters such as spin period, magnetic field strength, and space velocity, as well as offer a glimpse of what future observations might reveal about the demographics of core-collapse remnants.

  5. The X-ray properties of five galactic supernova remnants detected by the Spitzer glimpse survey

    SciTech Connect

    Pannuti, Thomas G.; Moffitt, William P.; Rho, Jeonghee; Heinke, Craig O. E-mail: w.moffitt@moreheadstate.edu E-mail: heinke@ualberta.ca

    2014-03-01

    We present a study of the X-ray properties of five Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs)—Kes 17 (G304.6+0.1), G311.5–0.3, G346.6–0.2, CTB 37A (G348.5+0.1), and G348.5–0.0—that were detected in the infrared by Reach et al. in an analysis of data from the Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) that was conducted by the Spitzer Space Telescope. We present and analyze archival ASCA observations of Kes 17, G311.5–0.3, and G346.6–0.2, archival XMM-Newton observations of Kes 17, CTB 37A, and G348.5–0.0, and an archival Chandra observation of CTB 37A. All of the SNRs are clearly detected in the X-ray except possibly G348.5–0.0. Our study reveals that the four detected SNRs all feature center-filled X-ray morphologies and that the observed emission from these sources is thermal in all cases. We argue that these SNRs should be classified as mixed-morphology SNRs (MM SNRs); our study strengthens the correlation between MM SNRs and SNRs interacting with molecular clouds and suggests that the origin of MM SNRs may be due to the interactions between these SNRs and adjacent clouds. Our ASCA analysis of G311.5–0.3 reveals for the first time X-ray emission from this SNR: the X-ray emission is center-filled within the radio and infrared shells and thermal in nature (kT ∼ 0.98 keV), thus motivating its classification as an MM SNR. We find considerable spectral variations in the properties associated with the plasmas of the other X-ray-detected SNRs, such as a possible overabundance of magnesium in the plasma of Kes 17. Our new results also include the first detailed spatially resolved spectroscopic study of CTB 37A using Chandra as well as a spectroscopic study of the discrete X-ray source CXOU J171428.5–383601, which may be a neutron star associated with CTB 37A. Finally, we also estimate such properties as electron density n{sub e} , radiative age t {sub rad} and swept-up mass M{sub X} for each of the four X-ray-detected SNRs. Each

  6. Fermi-LAT observations of supernova remnants Kesteven 79

    SciTech Connect

    Auchettl, Katie; Slane, Patrick; Castro, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we report on the detection of γ-ray emission coincident with the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) Kesteven 79 (Kes 79). We analyzed approximately 52 months of data obtained with the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Kes 79 is thought to be interacting with adjacent molecular clouds, based on the presence of strong {sup 12}CO J = 1 → 0 and HCO{sup +} J = 1 → 0 emission and the detection of 1720 MHz line emission toward the east of the remnant. Acceleration of cosmic rays is expected to occur at SNR shocks, and SNRs interacting with dense molecular clouds provide a good testing ground for detecting and analyzing the production of γ-rays from the decay of π{sup 0} into two γ-ray photons. This analysis investigates γ-ray emission coincident with Kes 79, which has a detection significance of ∼7σ. Additionally, we present an investigation of the spatial and spectral characteristics of Kes 79 using multiple archival XMM-Newton observations of this remnant. We determine the global X-ray properties of Kes 79 and estimate the ambient density across the remnant. We also performed a similar analysis for Galactic SNR Kesteven 78 (Kes 78), but due to large uncertainties in the γ-ray background model, no conclusion can be made about an excess of GeV γ-ray associated with the remnant.

  7. Interaction of Supernova Remnants with a Circumstellar Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwarkadas, V. V.

    1995-12-01

    We are studying the interaction of supernova remnants (SNRs) with circumstellar shells, with an emphasis on Type II supernovae (SNe). These supernovae arise from massive progenitor stars (> 8 Msun), which lose mass during their lifetime, primarily in the form of a stellar wind. Often the stellar wind creates a circumstellar bubble surrounded by a dense shell. When the star explodes as a supernova, the resulting shock wave eventually collides with this dense shell. In a recent paper on SN 1987A (Chevalier & Dwarkadas, ApJL, 452, L45) we have shown that from the radio and X-ray emission, one can infer the presence of a high density region interior to the dense circumstellar shell. This can be explained as an HII region photoionized by the flux from the pre-supernova star. Using the Zeus code and assuming spherical symmetry, we have studied the dynamics of the shock wave interacting first with the HII region and then the circumstellar shell in SN 1987A. Collision with the HII region results in a significant deceleration of the shock wave, forming a high-density shocked region that grows with time, and is primarily responsible for the X-ray emission. X-ray emission from the reflected shock may begin to dominate when the forward shock hits the dense circumstellar shell and is considerably slowed down. Simulations are in progress with parameters suited to other remnants such as Cas A and W44. Radio and X-ray images of Cas A show a shell structure, which may result from interaction with a stellar bubble. W44 also shows a double-shell structure that may have been produced by a SN explosion inside a pre-existing wind bubble. The interaction is subject to instabilities that may give rise to filamentary structure.

  8. What We Can Learn From Supernova Remnant Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elwood, Benjamin; Murphy, Jeremiah; Diaz, Mariangelly

    2016-01-01

    Previous literature regarding size distributions of supernova remnants generally discuss a uniform distribution for the radius, occasionally considering a Gaussian alternative. We indeed show that these distributions are consistent with log-normal, which can be considered a natural consequence of the Central Limit Theorem and Sedov expansion. Modeling explosion energy, remnant age, and ambient density as independent, random distributions, we show, using simple Monte Carlo simulations, that the size distribution is indistinguishable from log-normal when the SNR sample size is of order three hundred. This implies that these SNR distributions provide only information on the mean and variance, yielding additional information only when the sample size grows large. We then proceed to Bayesian statistical inference to characterize the information provided by the size distributions. In particular, we use the mean and variance of sizes and explosion energies to subsequently estimate the mean and variance of the ambient medium surrounding SNR progenitors. This in turn allows us to characterize potential bias in studies involving samples of supernova remnants.

  9. X-RAY MEASURED DYNAMICS OF TYCHO'S SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuda, Satoru; Petre, Robert; Hwang, Una; Hughes, John P.; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Hayato, Asami; Mori, Koji; Tsunemi, Hiroshi E-mail: Robert.Petre-1@nasa.go E-mail: jackph@physics.rutgers.ed E-mail: hayato@crab.riken.j E-mail: tsunemi@ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.j

    2010-02-01

    We present X-ray proper-motion measurements of the forward shock and reverse-shocked ejecta in Tycho's supernova remnant, based on three sets of archival Chandra data taken in 2000, 2003, and 2007. We find that the proper motion of the edge of the remnant (i.e., the forward shock and protruding ejecta knots) varies from 0.''20 yr{sup -1} (expansion index m = 0.33, where R = t{sup m} ) to 0.''40 yr{sup -1} (m = 0.65) with azimuthal angle in 2000-2007 measurements, and 0.''14 yr{sup -1} (m = 0.26) to 0.''40 yr{sup -1} (m = 0.65) in 2003-2007 measurements. The azimuthal variation of the proper motion and the average expansion index of approx0.5 are consistent with those derived from radio observations. We also find proper motion and expansion index of the reverse-shocked ejecta to be 0.''21-0.''31 yr{sup -1} and 0.43-0.64, respectively. From a comparison of the measured m-value with Type Ia supernova evolutionary models, we find a pre-shock ambient density around the remnant of approx<0.2 cm{sup -3}.

  10. Destruction of Interstellar Dust in Evolving Supernova Remnant Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, Jonathan D.; Dwek, Eli; Jones, Anthony P.

    2015-01-01

    Supernova generated shock waves are responsible for most of the destruction of dust grains in the interstellar medium (ISM). Calculations of the dust destruction timescale have so far been carried out using plane parallel steady shocks, however that approximation breaks down when the destruction timescale becomes longer than that for the evolution of the supernova remnant (SNR) shock. In this paper we present new calculations of grain destruction in evolving, radiative SNRs. To facilitate comparison with the previous study by Jones et al. (1996), we adopt the same dust properties as in that paper. We find that the efficiencies of grain destruction are most divergent from those for a steady shock when the thermal history of a shocked gas parcel in the SNR differs significantly from that behind a steady shock. This occurs in shocks with velocities 200 km s(exp -1) for which the remnant is just beginning to go radiative. Assuming SNRs evolve in a warm phase dominated ISM, we find dust destruction timescales are increased by a factor of approximately 2 compared to those of Jones et al. (1996), who assumed a hot gas dominated ISM. Recent estimates of supernova rates and ISM mass lead to another factor of approximately 3 increase in the destruction timescales, resulting in a silicate grain destruction timescale of approximately 2-3 Gyr. These increases, while not able resolve the problem of the discrepant timescales for silicate grain destruction and creation, are an important step towards understanding the origin, and evolution of dust in the ISM.

  11. Extremely fast acceleration of cosmic rays in a supernova remnant.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Aharonian, Felix A; Tanaka, Takaaki; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Maeda, Yoshitomo

    2007-10-04

    Galactic cosmic rays (CRs) are widely believed to be accelerated by shock waves associated with the expansion of supernova ejecta into the interstellar medium. A key issue in this long-standing conjecture is a theoretical prediction that the interstellar magnetic field can be substantially amplified at the shock of a young supernova remnant (SNR) through magnetohydrodynamic waves generated by cosmic rays. Here we report a discovery of the brightening and decay of X-ray hot spots in the shell of the SNR RX J1713.7-3946 on a one-year timescale. This rapid variability shows that the X-rays are produced by ultrarelativistic electrons through a synchrotron process and that electron acceleration does indeed take place in a strongly magnetized environment, indicating amplification of the magnetic field by a factor of more than 100. The X-ray variability also implies that we have witnessed the ongoing shock-acceleration of electrons in real time. Independently, broadband X-ray spectrometric measurements of RX J1713.7-3946 indicate that electron acceleration proceeds in the most effective ('Bohm-diffusion') regime. Taken together, these two results provide a strong argument for acceleration of protons and nuclei to energies of 1 PeV (10(15) eV) and beyond in young supernova remnants.

  12. Constraining the Progenitor Masses of Core Collapse Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Rodríguez, Mariangelly; Murphy, Jeremiah Wayne; Elwood, Benjamin; Williams, Benjamin F.; Rubin, David

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the progenitor mass distribution of supernova explosions is an important observational constraint of stellar evolution theory. Recently, a novel approach was proposed to significantly increase the number of progenitor masses: characterize the progenitor mass of supernova remnants (SNRs) by age-dating the local stellar population. Preliminary statistical analyses suggested that there is a lack of SNRs around the most massive of massive stars. This suggested that there is a maximum mass for core collapse supernova explosions, or there is a bias against finding SNRs associated with the most massive stars. We test for a bias by considering the distribution of SNRs sizes using a Monte Carlo simulation. We find that the distribution of remnants sizes is the same for low mass progenitors and high mass progenitors. This implies that there is no bias against finding SNRs around the most massive progenitors. Our next step is to apply Bayesian statistical inference and obtain the joint probability for all the parameters involved in the statistical distribution model: the minimum mass, maximum mass, and slope of the mass distribution.

  13. Future GLAST Observations of Supernova Remnants And Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-09-26

    Shell-type Supernova remnants (SNRs) have long been known to harbour a population of ultra-relativistic particles, accelerated in the Supernova shock wave by the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration. Experimental evidence for the existence of electrons up to energies of 100 TeV was first provided by the detection of hard X-ray synchrotron emission as e.g. in the shell of the young SNR SN1006. Furthermore using theoretical arguments shell-type Supernova remnants have long been considered as the main accelerator of protons - Cosmic rays - in the Galaxy; definite proof of this process is however still missing. Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWN) - diffuse structures surrounding young pulsars - are another class of objects known to be a site of particle acceleration in the Galaxy, again through the detection of hard synchrotron X-rays such as in the Crab Nebula. Gamma-rays above 100 MeV provide a direct access to acceleration processes. The GLAST Large Area telescope (LAT) will be operating in the energy range between 30 MeV and 300 GeV and will provide excellent sensitivity, angular and energy resolution in a previously rather poorly explored energy band. We will describe prospects for the investigation of these Galactic particle accelerators with GLAST.

  14. SUPERNOVA 1987A: A TEMPLATE TO LINK SUPERNOVAE TO THEIR REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Orlando, S.; Miceli, M.; Pumo, M. L.; Bocchino, F.

    2015-09-10

    The emission of supernova remnants (SNRs) reflects the properties of both the progenitor supernovae (SNe) and the surrounding environment. The complex morphology of the remnants, however, hampers the disentanglement of the two contributions. Here, we aim at identifying the imprint of SN 1987A on the X-ray emission of its remnant and at constraining the structure of the environment surrounding the SN. We performed high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations describing SN 1987A soon after the core-collapse and the following three-dimensional expansion of its remnant between days 1 and 15,000 after the SN. We demonstrated that the physical model reproducing the main observables of SN 1987A during the first 250 days of evolution also reproduces the X-ray emission of the subsequent expanding remnant, thus bridging the gap between SNe and SNRs. By comparing model results with observations, we constrained the explosion energy in the range 1.2–1.4 × 10{sup 51} erg and the envelope mass in the range 15–17 M{sub ⊙}. We found that the shape of X-ray lightcurves and spectra at early epochs (<15 years) reflects the structure of outer ejecta: our model reproduces the observations if the outermost ejecta have a post-explosion radial profile of density approximated by a power law with index α = −8. At later epochs, the shapes of X-ray lightcurves and spectra reflect the density structure of the nebula around SN 1987A. This enabled us to ascertain the origin of the multi-thermal X-ray emission, disentangle the imprint of the SN on the remnant emission from the effects of the remnant interaction with the environment, and constrain the pre-supernova structure of the nebula.

  15. Supernova 1987A: a Template to Link Supernovae to Their Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, S.; Miceli, M.; Pumo, M. L.; Bocchino, F.

    2015-09-01

    The emission of supernova remnants (SNRs) reflects the properties of both the progenitor supernovae (SNe) and the surrounding environment. The complex morphology of the remnants, however, hampers the disentanglement of the two contributions. Here, we aim at identifying the imprint of SN 1987A on the X-ray emission of its remnant and at constraining the structure of the environment surrounding the SN. We performed high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations describing SN 1987A soon after the core-collapse and the following three-dimensional expansion of its remnant between days 1 and 15,000 after the SN. We demonstrated that the physical model reproducing the main observables of SN 1987A during the first 250 days of evolution also reproduces the X-ray emission of the subsequent expanding remnant, thus bridging the gap between SNe and SNRs. By comparing model results with observations, we constrained the explosion energy in the range 1.2-1.4 × 1051 erg and the envelope mass in the range 15-17 M ⊙. We found that the shape of X-ray lightcurves and spectra at early epochs (<15 years) reflects the structure of outer ejecta: our model reproduces the observations if the outermost ejecta have a post-explosion radial profile of density approximated by a power law with index α = -8. At later epochs, the shapes of X-ray lightcurves and spectra reflect the density structure of the nebula around SN 1987A. This enabled us to ascertain the origin of the multi-thermal X-ray emission, disentangle the imprint of the SN on the remnant emission from the effects of the remnant interaction with the environment, and constrain the pre-supernova structure of the nebula.

  16. Soft x-ray spectroscopy of the Vela supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiger, Benjamin R.

    The CODEX sounding rocket payload was designed and flown to significantly improve spectral resolution of the Vela supernova remnant (SNR) in the soft x-ray (0.1--1.0 keV) bandpass. High spectral resolution (E/Delta E > 40) across its 3.25° x 3.25° field of view would disentangle thermal emission from nonthermal or line emission components to constrain the age when SNRs stop emitting nonthermal x-rays. Relatively recent observations have found significant nonthermal emission from remnants up to several kyr old, but CODEX encountered concurrent problems of higher noise and lower signal than expected, leaving the thermal versus nonthermal question unanswered in the 11 kyr-old Vela SNR. This thesis covers the motivation, design, and post-flight analysis of the CODEX instrument and data from its flight.

  17. A compressed cloud in the Vela supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, E. B.; Silk, J.; Leep, E. M.; Wallerstein, G.

    1981-01-01

    Strong interstellar absorption lines of C I, arising from the two excited fine-structure levels, are found in IUE observations of HD 72350 (type B4 III). An analysis of the excited-level populations of C I gives local temperature and pressure limits, and auxiliary data on the limit of column density for excited O I and the carbon ionization help to establish that (1) the local temperature is within the limits of 25-100 K, and (2) the pressure/Boltzmann's constant ratio is at least 10 to the 4.3/cu cm K, despite its small size. This high-pressure cloud is discussed in terms of shock compression by the Vela supernova blast wave, along with the relationship of this kind of cloud compression to star formation and to the origin of the characteristic filamentary emission arcs seen in Vela and other supernova remnants

  18. Gamma-Ray Emission From Crushed Clouds in Supernova Remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Blandford, Roger D.; Funk, Stefan; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Tanaka, Takaaki; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-10-27

    It is shown that the radio and gamma-ray emission observed from newly-found 'GeV-bright' supernova remnants (SNRs) can be explained by a model, in which a shocked cloud and shock-accelerated cosmic rays (CRs) frozen in it are simultaneously compressed by the supernova blastwave as a result of formation of a radiative cloud shock. Simple reacceleration of pre-existing CRs is generally sufficient to power the observed gamma-ray emission through the decays of {pi}{sup 0}-mesons produced in hadronic interactions between high-energy protons (nuclei) and gas in the compressed-cloud layer. This model provides a natural account of the observed synchrotron radiation in SNRs W51C, W44 and IC 443 with flat radio spectral index, which can be ascribed to a combination of secondary and reaccelerated electrons and positrons.

  19. REVERSE-SHOCK IN TYCHO’S SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, F. J.; Ge, M. Y.; Zheng, S. J.; Zhang, S. N.; Long, X.; Aschenbach, B. E-mail: gemy@ihep.ac.cn

    2015-06-01

    Thermal X-ray emission from young supernova remnants (SNRs) is usually dominated by the emission lines of the supernova ejecta, which are widely believed to be crossed and thus heated by the inward-propagating reverse shock (RS). Previous works using X-ray imaging data have shown that the ejecta are heated by the RS by locating the peak emission region of the most recently ionized matter, which is found to be well separated toward the inside from the outermost boundary. Here we report the discovery of a systematic increase of the Sulfur (S) to Silicon (Si) Kα line flux ratio with radius in Tycho’s SNR. This allows us, for the first time, to present continuous radial profiles of the ionization age and, furthermore, the elapsed ionization time since the onset of the ionization, which gives the history of the propagation of the ionization front into the SNR ejecta.

  20. Ultraviolet absorption lines associated with the Vela supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, E. B.; Wallerstein, G.; Silk, J.

    1976-01-01

    Two stars behind the Vela supernova remnant and two stars offset from the remnant have been observed with the UV spectrometer aboard the Copernicus satellite. Over 200 interstellar atomic and molecular absorption features between 1000 and 1400 A have been identified and measured for radial velocity and equivalent width. In many cases, additional information was obtained by studying the detailed shapes of the recorded profiles. Most of the stars show several absorption components, with clouds of the highest radial velocity appearing in the spectra of stars behind the remnant. For each component, column densities were derived using velocity dispersion parameters which yielded the most self-consistent results. Qualitatively, the gas toward the remnant exhibits a number of unusual properties, when compared with normal interstellar material. First, abnormally high radial velocities were evident. Second, the degree of ionization of some elements suggested the existence of ionizing processes significantly more potent than those found in general regions of space. Finally, an investigation of electron densities shows that much of the gas, especially that at high velocity, must exist in the form of relatively thin sheets or filaments. If cosmic abundances prevail, the column densities of high-velocity excited material suggest that H-alpha emission measures could be as large as 100 sq cm/cu pc.

  1. High-energy antiprotons from old supernova remnants.

    PubMed

    Blasi, Pasquale; Serpico, Pasquale D

    2009-08-21

    A recently proposed model explains the rise in energy of the positron fraction measured by the PAMELA satellite in terms of hadronic production of positrons in aged supernova remnants, and acceleration therein. Here we present a preliminary calculation of the antiproton flux produced by the same mechanism. While the model is consistent with present data, a rise of the antiproton to proton ratio is predicted at high energy, which strikingly distinguishes this scenario from other astrophysical explanations of the positron fraction (such as pulsars). We briefly discuss important implications for dark matter searches via antimatter.

  2. Late-time hohlraum pressure dynamics in supernova remnant experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurricane, O. A.; Glendinning, S. G.; Remington, B. A.; Drake, R. P.; Dannenberg, K. K.

    2001-06-01

    It is shown that laser driven hohlraums obtain significant internal pressures which affect the hydrodynamics of high-energy density shock-tube experiments. By incorporating this previously neglected hohlraum pressure effect (in addition to the usual x-ray drive) into computer simulations which model the NOVA laser driven supernova remnant experiment [R. P. Drake, S. G. Glendinning, K. Estabrook, B. A. Remington, R. McCray, R. J. Williams, L. J. Suter, T. B. Smith, J. J. Carroll III, R. A. London, and E. Liang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 2068 (1998)], calculations are able to reproduce the observed structure of hydrodynamic features.

  3. SPECTRUM OF GALACTIC COSMIC RAYS ACCELERATED IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ptuskin, Vladimir; Zirakashvili, Vladimir; Seo, Eun-Suk

    2010-07-20

    The spectra of high-energy protons and nuclei accelerated by supernova remnant (SNR) shocks are calculated, taking into account magnetic field amplification and Alfvenic drift both upstream and downstream of the shock for different types of SNRs during their evolution. The maximum energy of accelerated particles may reach 5 x 10{sup 18} eV for Fe ions in Type IIb SNRs. The calculated energy spectrum of cosmic rays after propagation through the Galaxy is in good agreement with the spectrum measured at the Earth.

  4. Evolution of Supernova Remnants near the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalinewich, A.; Piran, T.; Sari, R.

    2017-03-01

    Supernovae near the Galactic center (GC) evolve differently from regular Galactic supernovae. This is mainly due to the environment into which the supernova remnants (SNRs) propagate. SNRs near the GC propagate into a wind swept environment with a velocity directed away from the GC, and a graded density profile. This causes these SNRs to be non-spherical, and to evolve faster than their Galactic counterparts. We develop an analytic theory for the evolution of explosions within a stellar wind, and verify it using a hydrodynamic code. We show that such explosions can evolve in one of three possible morphologies. Using these results we discuss the association between the two SNRs (SGR East and SGR A’s bipolar radio/X-ray lobes) and the two neutron stars (the Cannonball and SGR J1745-2900) near the GC. We show that, given the morphologies of the SNR and positions of the neutron stars, the only possible association is between SGR A’s bipolar radio/X-ray lobes and SGR J1745-2900. If a compact object was created in the explosion of SGR East, it remains undetected, and the SNR of the supernova that created the Cannonball has already disappeared.

  5. Nonlinear Shock Acceleration and Photon Emission in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Berezhko, Evgeny G.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2000-01-01

    We have extended a simple model of nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (Berezhko & Ellison 1999: Ellison &, Berezhko 1999a) to include the injection and acceleration of electrons and the production of photons from bremsstrahlung, synchrotron, inverse Compton, and pion-decay processes. We argue that, the results of this model, which is simpler to use than more elaborate ones, offer a significant improvement, over test-particle, power-law spectra which are often used in astrophysical applications of diffusive shock acceleration. With an evolutionary supernova remnant (SNR) model to obtain shock parameters as functions of ambient interstellar medium parameters and time, we predict broad-band continuum photon emission from supernova remnants in general, and SN1006 in particular, showing that our results compare well with the more complete time-dependent and spherically symmetric nonlinear model of Berezhko, Ksenofontov, & Petukhov (1999a). We discuss the implications nonlinear shock acceleration has for X-ray line emission, and use our model to describe how ambient conditions determine the TeV/radio flux ratio, an important parameter for gamma-ray observations of radio SNRs.

  6. The X-ray surface brightness of Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. L.; Long, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    The first X-ray images of Kepler's supernova remnant (SN Ophiuchi 1604) are presented, and consequences for SNR models are discussed. Observations made with the Einstein Observatory Imaging Proportional Counter and High Resolution Imager show the remnant to be circular, with a strong shell brighter in the north than in the south. A flux of 1.2 x 10 to the -10th ergs/sq cm per sec was measured in the 0.15-4.5 keV region, which corresponds to an X-ray luminosity of 1.0 x 10 to the 36th ergs/sec at a distance of 5 kpc and an interstellar medium density of 2.8 x 10 to the 21st/sq cm. The X-ray observations do not allow the determination of whether the SNR is in the adiabatic or free expansion phase, but in either case it is shown that the mean ISM density must be greater than about 0.1/cu cm. In addition, the density of the X-ray emitting gas must be high, and its electron temperature must be fairly low. The high ISM densities derived for Kepler's SNR and other SNRs thus suggest an atypical ISM, possibly influenced by mass lost from the pre-supernova star.

  7. Planck intermediate results. XXXI. Microwave survey of Galactic supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Brogan, C. L.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Maino, D.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pasian, F.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Reich, W.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Rho, J.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-02-01

    The all-sky Planck survey in 9 frequency bands was used to search for emission from all 274 known Galactic supernova remnants. Of these, 16 were detected in at least two Planck frequencies. The radio-through-microwave spectral energy distributions were compiled to determine the mechanism for microwave emission. In only one case, IC 443, is there high-frequency emission clearly from dust associated with the supernova remnant. In all cases, the low-frequency emission is from synchrotron radiation. As predicted for a population of relativistic particles with energy distribution that extends continuously to high energies, a single power law is evident for many sources, including the Crab and PKS 1209-51/52. A decrease in flux density relative to the extrapolation of radio emission is evident in several sources. Their spectral energy distributions can be approximated as broken power laws, Sν ∝ ν-α, with the spectral index, α, increasing by 0.5-1 above a break frequency in the range 10-60 GHz. The break could be due to synchrotron losses.

  8. A new set of supernova remnant distances for the inner Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Denis A.; Ranasinghe, Sujith

    2017-01-01

    We derive new distances for supernova remnants using 1420 MHz continuum and HI observations from the VGPS survey, supplemented withCO line survey observations. The new distances yield a wide spread in the sigma-D relation, confirming previous studies that hint that the sigma-D relation is not useful for deriving distances. We assess the incompleteness of detection of radio supernova remnants, and compareto the well-measured stellar population measurements in the Galaxy to infer a new value for the supernova rate. We also assess the evolutionary states of the individual supernova remnants.

  9. Shocks in Dense Clouds in the Vela Supernova Remnant: FUSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Joy; Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have obtained 8 LWRS FUSE spectra to study a recently identified interaction of the Vela supernova remnant with a dense cloud region along its western edge. The goal is to quantify the temperature, ionization, density, and abundance characteristics associated with this shock/dense cloud interface by means of UV absorption line studies. Our detection of high-velocity absorption line C I at +90 to +130 km/s with IUE toward a narrow region interior to the Vela SNR strongly suggests the Vela supernova remnant is interacting with a dense ISM or molecular cloud. The shock/dense cloud interface is suggested by (1) the rarity of detection of high-velocity C I seen in IUE spectra, (2) its very limited spatial distribution in the remnant, and (3) a marked decrease in X-ray emission in the region immediately west of the position of these stars where one also finds a 100 micron emission ridge in IRAS images. We have investigated the shock physics and general properties of this interaction region through a focussed UV absorption line study using FUSE spectra. We have FUSE data on OVI absorption lines observed toward 8 stars behind the Vela supernova remnant (SNR). We compare the OVI observations with IUE observations of CIV absorption toward the same stars. Most of the stars, which are all B stars, have complex continua making the extraction of absorption lines difficult. Three of the stars, HD 72088, HD 72089 and HD 72350, however, are rapid rotators (v sin i less than 100 km/s) making the derivation of absorption column densities much easier. We have measured OVI and CIV column densities for the "main component" (i.e. the low velocity component) for these stars. In addition, by removing the H2 line at 1032.35A (121.6 km/s relative to OVI), we find high velocity components of OVI at approximately 150 km/s that we attribute to the shock in the Vela SNR. The column density ratios and magnitudes are compared to both steady shock models and results of hydrodynamical SNR

  10. DESTRUCTION OF INTERSTELLAR DUST IN EVOLVING SUPERNOVA REMNANT SHOCK WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Slavin, Jonathan D.; Dwek, Eli; Jones, Anthony P.

    2015-04-10

    Supernova generated shock waves are responsible for most of the destruction of dust grains in the interstellar medium (ISM). Calculations of the dust destruction timescale have so far been carried out using plane parallel steady shocks, however, that approximation breaks down when the destruction timescale becomes longer than that for the evolution of the supernova remnant (SNR) shock. In this paper we present new calculations of grain destruction in evolving, radiative SNRs. To facilitate comparison with the previous study by Jones et al., we adopt the same dust properties as in that paper. We find that the efficiencies of grain destruction are most divergent from those for a steady shock when the thermal history of a shocked gas parcel in the SNR differs significantly from that behind a steady shock. This occurs in shocks with velocities ≳200 km s{sup −1} for which the remnant is just beginning to go radiative. Assuming SNRs evolve in a warm phase dominated ISM, we find dust destruction timescales are increased by a factor of ∼2 compared to those of Jones et al., who assumed a hot gas dominated ISM. Recent estimates of supernova rates and ISM mass lead to another factor of ∼3 increase in the destruction timescales, resulting in a silicate grain destruction timescale of ∼2–3 Gyr. These increases, while not able to resolve the problem of the discrepant timescales for silicate grain destruction and creation, are an important step toward understanding the origin and evolution of dust in the ISM.

  11. On the X-ray spectrum of Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Sarazin, Craig L.; Blondin, John M.

    1994-01-01

    We have devised a method to do nonequilibrium ionization calculations on the results of two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, based on the algorithm of Hughes & Helfand (1985). We have calculated the ionization structure and X-ray emission for a two-dimensional numerical hydrodynamical simulation for the remnant of Kepler's supernova (SN); the hydrodynamical model was presented in a previous paper. In this model, the progenitor of Kepler's SN is assumed to have been a massive runaway star ejected from the Galactic plane. In its red supergiant stage, its dense stellar wind was distorted and compressed into a bow shock by the ram pressure of the tenuous interstellar medium. The subsequent interaction of the supernova ejecta with this asymmetric circumstellar matter produced a strongly asymmetric supernova remnant (SNR). In this paper, we present calculated X-ray spectra for this hydrodynamical model. A comparison with observations implies a moderate overabundance of Fe in Kepler's SNR (only 50% larger than its cosmic value), in contrast to a large (6 to 15) Fe overabundance derived previously. However, we confirm earlier conclusions that Si and S abundances are 2 to 3 times solar. These modest enhancements of Si, S, and Fe may be attributed either to heavy-element enriched SN ejecta or to the initial chemical abundances of the SN progenitor, which originated in the metal-rich inner Galaxy. The comparison of our models with the observed spectra confirm theoretical predictions that moderate electron heating occurs at strong collisionless shock fronts, with the implied electron/mean temperature ratio of approximately 0.5.

  12. Hubble Space Telescope Image, Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The colorful streamers that float across the sky in this photo taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) were created by the universe's biggest firecracker, the titanic supernova explosion of a massive star. The light from the exploding star reached Earth 320 years ago, nearly a century before the United States celebrated its birth with a bang. The dead star's shredded remains are called Cassiopeia A, or 'Cas A' for short. Cas A is the youngest known supernova remnant in our Milky Way Galaxy and resides 10,000 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia, so the star actually blew up 10,000 years before the light reached Earth in the late 1600s. This HST image of Cas A shows for the first time that the debris is arranged into thousands of small, cooling knots of gas. This material eventually will be recycled into building new generations of stars and planets. Our own Sun and planets are constructed from the debris of supernovae that exploded billions of years ago. This photo shows the upper rim of the super nova remnant's expanding shell. Near the top of the image are dozens of tiny clumps of matter. Each small clump, originally just a small fragment of the star, is tens of times larger than the diameter of our solar system. The colors highlight parts of the debris where chemical elements are glowing. The dark blue fragments, for example, are richest in oxygen; the red material is rich in sulfur. The images were taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 in January 2000 and January 2002. Image Credit: NASA and HST team (Stoics/AURA). Acknowledgment: R. Fesen (Darmouth) and J. Morse ( Univ. of Colorado).

  13. The first Fermi LAT supernova remnant catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Acero, F.

    2016-05-16

    To uniformly determine the properties of supernova remnants (SNRs) at high energies, we have developed the first systematic survey at energies from 1 to 100 GeV using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Based on the spatial overlap of sources detected at GeV energies with SNRs known from radio surveys, we classify 30 sources as likely GeV SNRs. We also report 14 marginal associations and 245 flux upper limits. A mock catalog in which the positions of known remnants are scrambled in Galactic longitude, allows us to determine an upper limit of 22% on the number of GeV candidates falsely identified as SNRs. We have also developed a method to estimate spectral and spatial systematic errors arising from the diffuse interstellar emission model, a key component of all Galactic Fermi LAT analyses. By studying remnants uniformly in aggregate, we measure the GeV properties common to these objects and provide a crucial context for the detailed modeling of individual SNRs. Combining our GeV results with multiwavelength (MW) data, including radio, X-ray, and TeV, demonstrates the need for improvements to previously sufficient, simple models describing the GeV and radio emission from these objects. As a result, we model the GeV and MW emission from SNRs in aggregate to constrain their maximal contribution to observed Galactic cosmic rays.

  14. A Circumstellar Shell Model for the Cassiopeia A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz; Szymkowiak, Andrew E.; Blondin, John M.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1996-08-01

    We model the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant in the framework of the circumstellar medium (C SM) interaction picture. In this model, the slow red supergiant wind of the supernova (SN) progenitor was swept into a dense shell by a fast stellar wind in the subsequent blue supergiant stage of the progenitor star. The supernova blast wave propagated quickly (≤ 100 yr) through the tenuous wind-blown bubble located within this shell and then slowed down in the dense (nH ˜15 cm-3) CSM shell. The shell was impulsively accelerated during this interaction stage; during the subsequent interaction with SN ejecta, the shell has been further accelerated to ˜2000 km s-1, the currently observed expansion rate. The comparison of our X-ray emission calculations with the ASCA spectrum suggests that about 8 Msun of X- material is present in Cas A. Most of this mass is located in the CSM shell and in the outlying red supergiant wind. The X-ray continuum and the Fe Kα line are dominated by the shell emission, but prominent Kα complexes of Mg, Si, and S must be produced by SN ejecta with strongly enhanced abundances of these elements. Our hydrodynamical models indicate that about 2 Msun of ejecta have been shocked. An explosion of a stellar He core is consistent with these findings.

  15. Non-cosmological FRBs from young supernova remnant pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Liam; Sievers, Jonathan; Pen, Ue-Li

    2016-05-01

    We propose a new extra but non-cosmological explanation for fast radio bursts (FRBs) based on very young pulsars in supernova remnants. Within a few hundred years of a core-collapse supernova, the ejecta is confined within ˜1 pc, providing a high enough column density of free electrons for the observed 375-1600 pc cm-3 of dispersion measure (DM). By extrapolating a Crab-like pulsar to its infancy in an environment like that of SN 1987A, we hypothesize such an object could emit supergiant pulses sporadically which would be bright enough to be seen at a few hundred megaparsecs. We hypothesize that such supergiant pulses would preferentially occur early in the pulsar's life when the free electron density is still high, which is why we do not see large numbers of moderate DM FRBs (≲300 pc cm-3). In this scenario, Faraday rotation at the source gives rotation measures (RMs) much larger than the expected cosmological contribution. If the emission were pulsar-like, then the polarization vector could swing over the duration of the burst, which is not expected from non-rotating objects. In this model, the scattering, large DM, and commensurate RM all come from one place which is not the case for the cosmological interpretation. The model also provides testable predictions of the flux distribution and repeat rate of FRBs, and could be furthermore verified by spatial coincidence with optical supernovae of the past several decades and cross-correlation with nearby galaxy maps.

  16. Spatially Resolved Thermal Continuum Absorption Against Supernova Remnant W49B

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    lines : ISM È scattering È supernova remnants 1. INTRODUCTION The integrated radio continuum spectra of Galactic supernova remnants ( SNRs ) are generally...remnants to a ^ [0.1 for plerions, with many presenting blended emission at intermediate indices. However, below 100 MHz, roughly two-thirds of SNRs show...the poor correlation between the presence of a turnover and the albeit poorly constrained distance to an SNR are inconsistent with absorption arising

  17. Supernovae. The bubble-like interior of the core-collapse supernova remnant Cassiopeia A.

    PubMed

    Milisavljevic, Dan; Fesen, Robert A

    2015-01-30

    The death of massive stars is believed to involve aspheric explosions initiated by the collapse of an iron core. The specifics of these catastrophic explosions remain uncertain, due partly to limited observational constraints on asymmetries deep inside the star. Here we present near-infrared observations of the young supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, descendant of a type IIb core-collapse explosion, and a three-dimensional map of its interior unshocked ejecta. The remnant's interior has a bubble-like morphology that smoothly connects to and helps explain the multiringed structures seen in the remnant's bright reverse-shocked main shell of expanding debris. This internal structure may originate from turbulent mixing processes that encouraged outwardly expanding plumes of radioactive (56)Ni-rich ejecta. If this is true, substantial amounts of its decay product, (56)Fe, may still reside in these interior cavities.

  18. Light Curve Models of Supernovae and X-ray Spectra of Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinnikov, S. I.; Baklanov, P. V.; Kozyreva, A. V.; Sorokina, E. I.

    2005-12-01

    We compare parameters of well-observed type II SN1999em derived by M. Hamuy and D. Nadyozhin based on tet*{LN85} analytic fits with those found from the simulations using our radiative hydro code STELLA. The same code applied to models of SN1993J allows us to estimate systematic errors of extracting foreground extinction toward SN1993J suggested by tet{Clo95} which is based on the assumption of black body radiation of the supernova envelope near the first maximum light after shock break out. A new implicit two-temperature hydro code code SUPREMNA is introduced which self-consistently takes into account the kinetics of ionization, electron thermal conduction, and radiative losses. Finally, a combination of STELLA and SUPREMNA allows us to use the same Type Ia supernova (SNIa) models both for building their light curves and predicting X-ray spectra of young Supernova remnants such as Tycho and Kepler. For the comparison of theoretical results with the observations we used data on Tycho supernova remnant (SNR) obtained with XMM-Newton space telescope.

  19. Second Epoch Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankrit, Ravi; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Long, Knox S.; Patnaude, Daniel; Raymond, John C.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Williams, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    We have obtained new HST/WFC3 images of Kepler's supernova remnant in H-alpha (F656N) and [N II] (F658N) emission line filters. The bright radiative shocks in dense clumps are detected in both filters, while non-radiative shocks are seen as faint filaments only in the H-alpha image. Most of these Balmer filaments lie around the periphery of the remnant where the blast wave encounters partially neutral interstellar gas. We compare the new images with HST/ACS images taken nearly 10 years previously, and find that these filaments tracing the forward shock have moved 0.6"-0.9" between the two epochs. Assuming a distance of 4 kpc to the remnant, these proper motions correspond to shock velocities of 1160-1740 km/s, which are consistent with the published values, 1550-2000 km/s (e.g. Blair et al. 1991, ApJ 366, 484). We also find a few Balmer filaments with highly non-radial proper motions. In one particularly interesting case in the projected interior of the remnant, SE of the center, the shock appears to have wrapped around a sharp density enhancement and moved about 0.3" in the period between the observations.The images allow us to study the evolution of the shock around an ejecta knot, which is punching through the remnant boundary in the northwest. The forward shock, visible as an arcuate Balmer filament, has moved about 1". At the trailing edges, the system of radiative knots formed by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities have undergone significant changes - some knots have disappeared, new ones have appeared, and many have changed in brightness. Elsewhere in the remnant we find changes in the relative intensities of many small, bright knots over the 10 year baseline, indicating the short radiative lifetimes of these features.This work has been supported in part by grant HST-GO-12885 to the Universities Space Research Association.

  20. Asymmetric Circumstellar Matter in Type Ia Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, S. P.; Blondin, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    The progenitors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe) are not well understood, but are likely to be of diverse origin, including single- and double-degenerate binary systems. Among single-degenerate progenitors, substantial amounts of circumstellar material (CSM) are expelled prior to the SN explosions by asymptotic giant branch (AGB) companions to the accreting white dwarfs. A subsequent collision of SN ejecta with the dense AGB wind has been detected among several distant SNe such as SN 2002ic, SN 2008J, and more recently PTF11kx. Dense CSM ejected by an AGB companion is present in the remnant of Kepler's SN of 1604, a Type Ia event. Observations of distant SNe hint at strongly asymmetric CSM distributions. A recent study of the CSM in Kepler's SNR by Burkey et al. indicates a large (factor of 10) density contrast between the dense, disk-like equatorial outflow and the more tenuous AGB wind above the orbital plane. A significant fraction of mature Type Ia SNRs in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) shows the presence of dense Fe-rich ejecta in their interiors that cannot be explained by standard models of Type Ia explosions in a uniform ambient interstellar medium. We explore the hypothesis that these remnants originated in Type Ia explosions with strongly asymmetric CSM distributions such as found in Kepler's SNR. We present results of 2-D hydrodynamical simulations of the interaction of SN ejecta with asymmetric, disk-like AGB winds throughout the whole adiabatic stage of SNR evolution. Dense, asymmetric, and highly-ionized Fe-rich ejecta are indeed present in the simulated remnants, while the blast wave assumes a spherical shape shortly after passage through the ambient CSM. We also present simulated X-ray images and spectra and compare them with X-ray observations of selected remnants in the LMC. These remnants include DEM L238 and L249, recently observed by Suzaku, whose X-ray emission is strongly dominated by dense Fe-rich ejecta in their interiors. We contrast these

  1. AZIMUTHAL DENSITY VARIATIONS AROUND THE RIM OF TYCHO's SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Brian J.; Hewitt, John W.; Petre, Robert; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Alwin Mao, S.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Blondin, John M.; Ghavamian, Parviz

    2013-06-20

    Spitzer images of Tycho's supernova remnant in the mid-infrared reveal limb-brightened emission from the entire periphery of the shell and faint filamentary structures in the interior. As with other young remnants, this emission is produced by dust grains, warmed to {approx}100 K in the post-shock environment by collisions with energetic electrons and ions. The ratio of the 70 to 24 {mu}m fluxes is a diagnostic of the dust temperature, which in turn is a sensitive function of the plasma density. We find significant variations in the 70/24 flux ratio around the periphery of Tycho's forward shock, implying order-of-magnitude variations in density. While some of these are likely localized interactions with dense clumps of the interstellar medium (ISM), we find an overall gradient in the ambient density surrounding Tycho, with densities 3-10 times higher in the northeast than in the southwest. This large density gradient is qualitatively consistent with the variations in the proper motion of the shock observed in radio and X-ray studies. Overall, the mean ISM density around Tycho is quite low ({approx}0.1-0.2 cm{sup -3}), consistent with the lack of thermal X-ray emission observed at the forward shock. We perform two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of a Type Ia supernova expanding into a density gradient in the ISM, and find that the overall round shape of the remnant is still easily achievable, even for explosions into significant gradients. However, this leads to an offset of the center of the explosion from the geometric center of the remnant of up to 20%, although lower values of 10% are preferred. The best match with hydrodynamical simulations is achieved if Tycho is located at a large (3-4 kpc) distance in a medium with a mean preshock density of {approx}0.2 cm{sup -3}. Such preshock densities are obtained for highly ({approx}> 50%) porous ISM grains.

  2. SN1987A: The Birth of a Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCray, Richard

    2003-01-01

    This grant was intended to support the development of theoretical models needed to interpret and understand the observations by the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-ray telescope of the rapidly developing remnant of Supernova 1987A. In addition, we carried out a few investigations of related topics. The project was spectacularly successful. The models that we developed provide the definitive framework for predicting and interpreting this phenomenon. Following is a list of publications based on our work. Some of these papers include results of both theoretical modeling supported by this project and also analysis of data supported by the Space Telescope Science Institute and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We first list papers published in refereed journals, then conference proceedings and book chapters, and also an educational web site.

  3. Grain Destruction in a Supernova Remnant Shock Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants, gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV (lambda)1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 micron and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the CIV intensity 10'' behind the shock is too high compared to the intensities at the shock and 25'' behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre- shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.

  4. Phosphorus in the young supernova remnant Cassiopeia A.

    PubMed

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Lee, Yong-Hyun; Moon, Dae-Sik; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Raymond, John C

    2013-12-13

    Phosphorus ((31)P), which is essential for life, is thought to be synthesized in massive stars and dispersed into interstellar space when these stars explode as supernovae (SNe). Here, we report on near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the young SN remnant Cassiopeia A, which show that the abundance ratio of phosphorus to the major nucleosynthetic product iron ((56)Fe) in SN material is up to 100 times the average ratio of the Milky Way, confirming that phosphorus is produced in SNe. The observed range is compatible with predictions from SN nucleosynthetic models but not with the scenario in which the chemical elements in the inner SN layers are completely mixed by hydrodynamic instabilities during the explosion.

  5. Spitzer Space Telescope Spectroscopy of the Kepler Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roellig, T. L.; Onaka, T.

    2004-01-01

    The Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope was used for observations of the Kepler supernova remnant, with all four instrument modules targeted on the bright infrared knot located at 17h30m35.80s,-21d28m54.0s (J2000). The low spectral resolution modules data show a dust continuum spectrum consistent with dust grains heated by high-energy electrons, while the high resolution modules data show atomic emission line ratios consistent with excitation by a high velocity shock of greater than 100 kilometers per second and electron densities of approximately 1,000 per centimeter. The abundance ratios for the six detected elements show signs of heavy-element enhancement. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. Support for this work was provided by NASA's Office of Space Science.

  6. The first few months of a supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabler, M.; Janka, H.-T.; Wongwathanara, A.

    2016-06-01

    We perform long-term, hydrodynamical simulations of supernova remnants in 3 dimensions. Continuing the simulations of A.Wongwathanarat "3D long-time CCSN simulations: from shock revival to shock break-out" we follow the evolution of the shock and the ejecta during the first few months after the explosion. The explosion is simulated with a ray-by-ray gray neutrino transport approximation and the so called Yin-Yang grid (an axis-free spherical polar coordinates grid). For the late phases we investigate here, the neutrino transport is no longer needed. We study the rising bubbles of the ejecta and follow how their morphology changes due to acceleration at the stellar surface. We further include the energy input caused by the decay of nickel and can identify the first traces of the influence of this radioactive heating. The bubbles, which otherwise would expand homologously, start to inflate due to the additional energy source of the nickel decay.

  7. Grain destruction in a supernova remnant shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, John C.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2013-12-01

    Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants (SNRs), gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV λ1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 μm and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus, these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the C IV intensity 10'' behind the shock is too high compared with the intensities at the shock and 25'' behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction, and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre-shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.

  8. Grain Destruction in a Supernova Remnant Shock Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, John C.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2013-12-01

    Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants (SNRs), gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV λ1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 μm and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus, these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the C IV intensity 10'' behind the shock is too high compared with the intensities at the shock and 25'' behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction, and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre-shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.

  9. Identifying Hidden Supernova Remnants in M83 with the VLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Bradley; Stockdale, Christopher; Blair, William P.; Cowan, John J.; Godfrey, Leith; Kuntz, K. D.; Long, Knox S.; Maddox, Larry A.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Pritchard, Tyler A.; Soria, Roberto; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Winkler, P. Frank

    2017-01-01

    We present results of our analysis of C and L band observations of the grand design spiral galaxy, M83 made with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). With recent optical (HST) and X-ray (Chandra) observations and utilizing the newly expanded bandwidth of the VLA, we are exploring the radio spectral properties of the historical radio point sources in M83 and have discovered more than 250 discrete radio sources. These observations allow us to probe the evolution of supernova remnants (SNRs) and to find previously undiscovered SNRs. These observations represent the fourth epoch of deep VLA observations of M83. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities.

  10. High-Resolution Polarimetry of Supernova Remnant Kesteven 69

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, C. A.; Mufson, S. L.; Dickel, J. R.

    2008-06-01

    Reported here are high-resolution 6 cm measurements of the adolescent supernova remnant (SNR) Kesteven 69 made with the hybrid BnC configuration of the Very Large Array. Several three-field mosaics of the polarized and total intensity have been used to study this SNR. These investigations lead to a coherent picture of this region. The expanding shock defines an outer rim of high total intensity, suggesting the front is running into large dense clouds with random magnetic field directions. The SNR consists of predominantly of two types of regions, those with high total and relatively weak polarized emission and those with relatively weak total and strong polarized emission. This morphology can be generally explained by the number of clouds with organized magnetic field along the line of sight. Within this SNR there are regions where the field is varying from radial to tangential. As the SN shock encounters clouds, magnetic fields within clouds will strongly affect cloud dynamics.

  11. Dynamics of Supernova Remnants with Ejecta and Circumstellar Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blondin, M. J.; Featherstone, N.; Borkowski, J. K.; Reynolds, P. S.

    2001-09-01

    Progenitors of core-collapse supernovae (SNe) blow bubbles in the ambient medium and sweep it into shells with their powerful stellar winds. After the explosion, SN ejecta initially collide with the stellar wind, then with the wind-blown bubble, and finally with a dense wind-swept shell. This collision is particularly energetic for SNe whose progenitors lost most of their outer envelopes just prior to explosion: the brightest galactic supernova remnant (SNR), Cas A, is a prime example of such an interaction with the circumstellar medium (CSM). The SN ejecta are far from being smooth for such remnants, because of vigorous turbulence and mixing of heavy-element ejecta immediately after the explosion and subsequent growth of Ni-Fe bubbles powered by the radioactive decay. We study the interaction of ``bubbly'' SN ejecta with a CSM bubble and a swept CSM shell, using hydrodynamical simulations in 2 and 3 dimensions with the VH-1 hydrocode. We compare our simulations with analytic self-similar (Chevalier & Liang 1989) solutions and with our previous simulations of interaction of bubbly ejecta with a uniform ambient medium. When compared with these simulations, the impact of bubbly ejecta with the shell results in a more vigorous turbulence and mixing. Dense and cool ejecta at the boundaries of adjacent bubbles may penetrate the shell, leading to plume-like and ring-like features. We examine whether such an interaction is responsible for the observed morphology of Cas A as seen by the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope, and for the different expansion rates seen at X-ray and radio wavelengths.

  12. Supernova Remnants in the Most Fertile Galaxy: NGC 6946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, P. Frank; Long, Knox S.; Blair, William P.

    2014-08-01

    As the host to more recorded supernovae (nine in the past century) than any other galaxy, ngal is a unique venue for studying young (and old) supernova remnants (SNRs). Using deep emission-line images of ngal we obtained from WIYN, we have identified 148 new emission nebulae through their high S II:Hα ratios, indicating that they are strong SNR candidates. This is over 5 times as many as have previously been identified; yet of the 175 total objects, only 6 have been spectroscopically confirmed. We propose multislit spectroscopy from GMOS-N to study the majority of those with no spectra to date. Some 26 are essentially unresolved in our images (diameters ≲ 1 arcsec=27 pc at ngal) and hence probably are relatively young. Several are also coincident with soft X-ray sources (a further indicator of youthful vigor) and have strong O III emission. Some may be rare, ejecta- dominated core-collapse SNRs akin to Cas A, where ``fresh" nucleosynthesis products can be seen. Only spectroscopy, to look for broad emission lines from fast-moving ejecta, can confirm this. We will include spectra of two of the nine recorded SNe in ngal-the first late-time spectrum of SN 2004et, and the first of SN 1980K with high signal-to-noise-adding to the extremely small number of spectra for SNRs only a few decades old. Finally we will use the H II:Hα ratio in a large number of ISM-dominated SNRs to map the N abundance and its gradient across the disk of ngal, and we will use archival HST images to identify the stellar environments that produced the SNe whose remnants we see today.

  13. Searches for Continuous Gravitational Waves from Nine Young Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Gossler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isler, J. C.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Lazzaro, C.; Le, J.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macarthur, J.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña na-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; McWilliams, S.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moore, B.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nagy, M. F.; Nardecchia, I.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, I.; Neri, M.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A. H.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Pai, S.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patrick, Z.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Poggiani, R.; Post, A.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quiroga, G.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Reula, O.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sawadsky, A.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szczepanczyk, M.; Szeifert, G.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Tellez, G.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Tshilumba, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van den Broeck, C.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Xie, S.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, Q.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.

    2015-11-01

    We describe directed searches for continuous gravitational waves (GWs) in data from the sixth Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) science data run. The targets were nine young supernova remnants not associated with pulsars; eight of the remnants are associated with non-pulsing suspected neutron stars. One target's parameters are uncertain enough to warrant two searches, for a total of 10. Each search covered a broad band of frequencies and first and second frequency derivatives for a fixed sky direction. The searches coherently integrated data from the two LIGO interferometers over time spans from 5.3-25.3 days using the matched-filtering {F}-statistic. We found no evidence of GW signals. We set 95% confidence upper limits as strong (low) as 4 × 10-25 on intrinsic strain, 2 × 10-7 on fiducial ellipticity, and 4 × 10-5 on r-mode amplitude. These beat the indirect limits from energy conservation and are within the range of theoretical predictions for neutron-star ellipticities and r-mode amplitudes.

  14. On VI Imaging Instrumentation and Spectroscopic Observations in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, M. N.

    2003-12-01

    For my thesis, I designed and built a high resolution imaging spectrograph, the Imaging Spectrograph for Interstellar Shocks (ISIS), that flew on a sub-orbital rocket from White Sands Missile Range on November 18th, 2002. This rocket-borne instrument was designed to image hot plasma at O vi λ λ 1032/1038 Å \\space behind a shock front in the Cygnus Loop. The new type of instrument developed for this application is a novel type of spectrograph that relies on a standard telescope for its optical layout. This layout, in conjunction with aberration-corrected holography, is capable of arcsecond quality imaging in diffracted light while maintaining arcsecond imaging at the telescope focus. The follow-up research is based on observations of N132D, a young, oxygen rich supernova remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud. These new spectroscopic observations from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer of emitting O vi in the shocked stellar ejecta were used to distinguish between different models of the ejecta and demonstrate that there is lack of appropriate observations of this type of remnant. This work was supported by NASA grants NAG5-5096, NAG5-7465, NAG5-8955, and NAG5-10319. M. Beasley was supported by a Graduate Student Research Program fellowship NGT5-50340.

  15. On VI imaging instrumentation and spectroscopic observations in supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, Matthew Nelson

    2003-10-01

    For my thesis project, I designed and built a high resolution imaging spectrograph, the Imaging Spectrograph for Interstellar Shocks (ISIS), that flew on a sub-orbital rocket from White Sands Missile Range on November 18th, 2002. This rocket-borne instrument was designed to image hot plasma at O VI lambdalambda1032/1038 A behind a shock front in the Cygnus Loop. The new type of instrument developed for this application is a novel type of spectrograph that relies on a standard telescope for its optical layout. This layout, in conjunction with aberration-corrected holography, is capable of arcsecond quality imaging in diffracted light while maintaining an arcsecond image at the telescope focus. The follow-up research is based on observations of N132D, a young, oxygen rich supernova remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud. These new spectroscopic observations from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer of emitting O VI in the shocked stellar ejecta were used to distinguish between different models of the ejecta and demonstrate that there is lack of appropriate observations of this type of remnant.

  16. DUST COOLING IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Seok, Ji Yeon; Koo, Bon-Chul; Hirashita, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    The infrared-to-X-ray (IRX) flux ratio traces the relative importance of dust cooling to gas cooling in astrophysical plasma such as supernova remnants (SNRs). We derive IRX ratios of SNRs in the LMC using Spitzer and Chandra SNR survey data and compare them with those of Galactic SNRs. IRX ratios of all the SNRs in the sample are found to be moderately greater than unity, indicating that dust grains are a more efficient coolant than gas although gas cooling may not be negligible. The IRX ratios of the LMC SNRs are systematically lower than those of the Galactic SNRs. As both dust cooling and gas cooling pertain to the properties of the interstellar medium, the lower IRX ratios of the LMC SNRs may reflect the characteristics of the LMC, and the lower dust-to-gas ratio (a quarter of the Galactic value) is likely to be the most significant factor. The observed IRX ratios are compared with theoretical predictions that yield IRX ratios an order of magnitude larger. This discrepancy may originate from the dearth of dust in the remnants due to either the local variation of the dust abundance in the preshock medium with respect to the canonical abundance or the dust destruction in the postshock medium. The non-equilibrium ionization cooling of hot gas, in particular for young SNRs, may also cause the discrepancy. Finally, we discuss implications for the dominant cooling mechanism of SNRs in low-metallicity galaxies.

  17. Shock evolution in non-radiative supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaping; Chevalier, Roger A.

    2017-03-01

    We present a new analytical approach to derive approximate solutions describing the shock evolution in non-radiative supernova remnants (SNRs). We focus on the study of the forward shock and contact discontinuity while application to the reverse shock is only discussed briefly. The spherical shock evolution of an SNR in both the interstellar medium with a constant density profile and a circumstellar medium with a wind density profile is investigated. We compared our new analytical solution with numerical simulations and found that a few per cent accuracy is achieved. For the evolution of the forward shock, we also compared our new solution to previous analytical models. In a uniform ambient medium, the accuracy of our analytical approximation is comparable to that in Truelove & McKee. In a wind density profile medium, our solution performs better than that in Micelotta, Dwek & Slavin, especially when the ejecta envelope has a steep density profile. The new solution is significantly simplified compared to previous analytical models, as it only depends on the asymptotic behaviours of the remnant during its evolution.

  18. Search for surviving companions in type Ia supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Kuo-Chuan; Ricker, Paul M.; Taam, Ronald E. E-mail: pmricker@illinois.edu E-mail: taam@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw

    2014-09-01

    The nature of the progenitor systems of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is still unclear. One way to distinguish between the single-degenerate scenario and double-degenerate scenario for their progenitors is to search for the surviving companions (SCs). Using a technique that couples the results from multi-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations with calculations of the structure and evolution of main-sequence- (MS-) and helium-rich SCs, the color and magnitude of MS- and helium-rich SCs are predicted as functions of time. The SC candidates in Galactic type Ia supernova remnants (Ia SNR) and nearby extragalactic Ia SNRs are discussed. We find that the maximum detectable distance of MS SCs (helium-rich SCs) is 0.6-4 Mpc (0.4-16 Mpc), if the apparent magnitude limit is 27 in the absence of extinction, suggesting that the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds and the Andromeda Galaxy are excellent environments in which to search for SCs. However, only five Ia SNRs have been searched for SCs, showing little support for the standard channels in the singe-degenerate scenario. To better understand the progenitors of SNe Ia, we encourage the search for SCs in other nearby Ia SNRs.

  19. IS THERE A HIDDEN HOLE IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA REMNANTS?

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Senz, D.; Badenes, C.; Serichol, N. E-mail: carles@astro.tau.ac.il

    2012-01-20

    In this paper, we report on the bulk features of the hole carved by the companion star in the material ejected during a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosion. In particular we are interested in the long-term evolution of the hole as well as in its fingerprint in the geometry of the supernova remnant (SNR) after several centuries of evolution, which is a hot topic in current SN Ia studies. We use an axisymmetric smoothed particle hydrodynamics code to characterize the geometric properties of the SNR resulting from the interaction of this ejected material with the ambient medium. Our aim is to use SNR observations to constrain the single degenerate scenario for SN Ia progenitors. Our simulations show that the hole will remain open during centuries, although its partial or total closure at later times due to hydrodynamic instabilities is not excluded. Close to the edge of the hole, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability grows faster, leading to plumes that approach the edge of the forward shock. We also discuss other geometrical properties of the simulations, like the evolution of the contact discontinuity.

  20. Evolution of Pulsar Wind Nebulae inside Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temim, T.

    2016-06-01

    Composite supernova remnants (SNRs) are those consisting of both a central pulsar that produces a wind of synchrotron-emitting relativistic particle and a supernova (SN) blast wave that expands into the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM). The evolution of the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) is coupled to the evolution of its host SNR and characterized by distinct stages, from the PWN's early expansion into the unshocked SN ejecta to its late-phase interaction with the SNR reverse shock. I will present an overview of the various evolutionary stages of composite SNRs and show how the signatures of the PWN/SNR interaction can reveal important information about the SNR and PWN dynamics, the SN progenitor and explosion asymmetry, the properties of the SN ejecta and newly-formed dust, particle injection and loss processes, and the eventual escape of energetic particles into the ISM. I will also discuss recent multi-wavelength observations and hydrodynamical modeling of evolved systems in which the PWN interacts with the SNR reverse shock and discuss their implications for our general understanding of the structure and evolution of composite SNRs.

  1. Search for Surviving Companions in Type Ia Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Kuo-Chuan; Ricker, Paul M.; Taam, Ronald E.

    2014-09-01

    The nature of the progenitor systems of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is still unclear. One way to distinguish between the single-degenerate scenario and double-degenerate scenario for their progenitors is to search for the surviving companions (SCs). Using a technique that couples the results from multi-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations with calculations of the structure and evolution of main-sequence- (MS-) and helium-rich SCs, the color and magnitude of MS- and helium-rich SCs are predicted as functions of time. The SC candidates in Galactic type Ia supernova remnants (Ia SNR) and nearby extragalactic Ia SNRs are discussed. We find that the maximum detectable distance of MS SCs (helium-rich SCs) is 0.6-4 Mpc (0.4-16 Mpc), if the apparent magnitude limit is 27 in the absence of extinction, suggesting that the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds and the Andromeda Galaxy are excellent environments in which to search for SCs. However, only five Ia SNRs have been searched for SCs, showing little support for the standard channels in the singe-degenerate scenario. To better understand the progenitors of SNe Ia, we encourage the search for SCs in other nearby Ia SNRs.

  2. Life after stellar death: Planetary Nebulae and Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boumis, P.

    2013-09-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) are powerful tracers of our Galaxy's star formation history. Their study can provide insight to the late stages of stellar evolution, the nucleosynthesis in low and intermediate mass stars (1-8Mo) and the chemical evolution of galaxies. Supernova explosions belong to the most spectacular events in the Universe. Supernova remnants (SNRs), which are the consequent results of these events and come from the late stages of massive stars (>8Mo), are among the strongest radio sources observed. They have a major influence on both the properties of the interstellar medium (ISM) and the evolution of galaxies as a whole. They enrich the ISM with heavy elements, release about 1051 ergs of energy, heat the ISM, compress the magnetic field, and efficiently accelerate, by their shock waves, energetic cosmic rays observed throughout the Galaxy. I will present results of our work on PNe and SNRs, which aims to (a) discover optical SNRs in the Galaxy, (b) study their morphology and kinematics, (c) characterize their properties (such as density, shock velocity etc.) and (d) provide information on their interaction with the ISM, using the "Aristarchos" among other telescopes.

  3. Acceleration of cosmic rays in supernova-remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorfi, E. A.; Drury, L. O.

    1985-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that supernova-explosions are the dominant source of cosmic rays up to an energy of 10 to the 14th power eV/nucleon. Moreover, these high energy particles provide a major contribution to the energy density of the interstellar medium (ISM) and should therefore be included in calculations of interstellar dynamic phenomena. For the following the first order Fermi mechanism in shock waves are considered to be the main acceleration mechanism. The influence of this process is twofold; first, if the process is efficient (and in fact this is the cas) it will modify the dynamics and evolution of a supernova-remnant (SNR), and secondly, the existence of a significant high energy component changes the overall picture of the ISM. The complexity of the underlying physics prevented detailed investigations of the full non-linear selfconsistent problem. For example, in the context of the energy balance of the ISM it has not been investigated how much energy of a SN-explosion can be transfered to cosmic rays in a time-dependent selfconsistent model. Nevertheless, a lot of progress was made on many aspects of the acceleration mechanism.

  4. Gamma-ray emission from young supernova remnants: Hadronic or leptonic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabici, Stefano; Aharonian, Felix

    2016-07-01

    The debate on the nature of the gamma-ray emission from young supernova remnants is still open. Ascribing such emission to hadronic rather than leptonic processes would provide an evidence for the acceleration of protons and nuclei, and this fact would fit with the very popular (but not proven) paradigm that supernova remnants are the sources of Galactic cosmic rays. Here, we discuss this issue with a particular focus on the best studied gamma-ray-bright supernova remnant: RX J1713.7-3946.

  5. THE MIPSGAL VIEW OF SUPERNOVA REMNANTS IN THE GALACTIC PLANE

    SciTech Connect

    Pinheiro Goncalves, D.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Paladini, R.; Carey, S. J.; Martin, P. G.

    2011-08-15

    We report the detection of Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) in the mid-infrared (at 24 and 70 {mu}m), in the coordinate ranges 10{sup 0} < l < 65{sup 0} and 285{sup 0} < l < 350{sup 0}, |b| < 1{sup 0}, using MIPS aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. We search for infrared counterparts to SNRs in Green's catalog and identify 39 out of 121, i.e., a detection rate of about 32%. Such a relatively low detection fraction is mainly due to confusion with nearby foreground/background sources and diffuse emission. The SNRs in our sample show a linear trend in [F{sub 8}/F{sub 24}] versus [F{sub 70}/F{sub 24}]. We compare their infrared fluxes with their corresponding radio flux at 1.4 GHz and find that most remnants have a ratio of 70 {mu}m to 1.4 GHz which is similar to those found in previous studies of SNRs (with the exception of a few that have ratios closer to those of H II regions). Furthermore, we retrieve a slope close to unity when correlating infrared (24 and 70 {mu}m) with 1.4 GHz emission. Our survey is more successful in detecting remnants with bright X-ray emission, which we find is well correlated with the 24 {mu}m morphology. Moreover, by comparing the power emitted in the X-ray, infrared, and radio, we conclude that the energy released in the infrared is comparable to the cooling in the X-ray range.

  6. PHYSICAL STRUCTURE AND NATURE OF SUPERNOVA REMNANTS IN M101

    SciTech Connect

    Franchetti, Nicholas A.; Gruendl, Robert A.; Chu, You-Hua; Dunne, Bryan C.; Pannuti, Thomas G.; Grimes, Caleb K.; Kuntz, Kip D.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Aldridge, Tabitha M. E-mail: gruendl@astro.illinois.edu E-mail: bdunne@astro.illinois.edu E-mail: ckgrim01@moreheadstate.edu E-mail: rchen@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de

    2012-04-15

    Supernova remnant (SNR) candidates in the giant spiral galaxy M101 have been previously identified from ground-based H{alpha} and [S II] images. We have used archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) H{alpha} and broadband images as well as stellar photometry of 55 SNR candidates to examine their physical structure, interstellar environment, and underlying stellar population. We have also obtained high-dispersion echelle spectra to search for shocked high-velocity gas in 18 SNR candidates, and identified X-ray counterparts to SNR candidates using data from archival observations made by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Twenty-one of these 55 SNR candidates studied have X-ray counterparts, although one of them is a known ultraluminous X-ray source. The multi-wavelength information has been used to assess the nature of each SNR candidate. We find that within this limited sample, {approx}16% are likely remnants of Type Ia SNe and {approx}45% are remnants of core-collapse SNe. In addition, about {approx}36% are large candidates which we suggest are either superbubbles or OB/H II complexes. Existing radio observations are not sensitive enough to detect the non-thermal emission from these SNR candidates. Several radio sources are coincident with X-ray sources, but they are associated with either giant H II regions in M101 or background galaxies. The archival HST H{alpha} images do not cover the entire galaxy and thus prevents a complete study of M101. Furthermore, the lack of HST [S II] images precludes searches for small SNR candidates which could not be identified by ground-based observations. Such high-resolution images are needed in order to obtain a complete census of SNRs in M101 for a comprehensive investigation of the distribution, population, and rates of SNe in this galaxy.

  7. Sites of Relativistic Particle Acceleration in Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, M. C.; Rudnick, L.

    1996-01-01

    We have determined the synchrotron spectral indices of 304 compact radio knots in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. A comparison of these data with the dynamical and brightness properties of these knots tabulated by Anderson & Rudnick indicates that spectral index shows a significant correlation with projected radius from the center of the remnant. Spectrally flat knots reside in a shell coincident with the bright radio ring, while steeper knots occupy a shell coincident with the diffuse radio plateau surrounding the ring. To a lesser extent, we find spectral index to be correlated also with the radio brightness of the knot, in the sense that brighter knots tend to have steeper spectra. No significant correlation is found between spectral index and knot deceleration or rate of brightness change. As the synchrotron spectral index traces the distribution of energy among relativistic particle populations, we use these results to study the nature of particle acceleration mechanisms active in Cas A. Given the dual- shell nature of the spectral index distribution in Cas A and the lack of strong correlation between spectral index and dynamical properties of the knots, we conclude that radio-bright compact features are not sites of currently active particle acceleration in Cas A. This conclusion is in agreement with models of supersonic gaseous bullets constructed by Jones, Kang, & Tregillis. In these models, the marked synchrotron brightening which accompanies bullet deceleration is due primarily to preexisting relativistic particles radiating in rapidly amplifying shear-layer magnetic fields, rather than a large infusion of new relativistic particles accelerated in situ. Spectral variations between compact features in Cas A are more likely to reflect modulations in the background particle energy spectra within the remnant, perhaps instilled by temperature variations in the underlying thermal material. This interpretation requires that the diffuse synchrotron emission

  8. Statistical modelling of supernova remnant populations in the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarbadhicary, S.; Badenes, C.; Chomiuk, L.; Caprioli, D.; Huizenga, D.

    2016-06-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Local Group offer unique insights into the origin of different types of supernovae. However, the intrinsic diversity and environment-driven evolution of SNRs require the use of statistical methods to model SNR populations in the context of their host galaxy. We introduce a semi-analytic model for SNR radio light curves that uses the physics of shock propagation through the ISM, the resultant particle acceleration and the range of kinetic energies observed in supernovae. We use this model to reproduce the fundamental properties of observed SNR populations, taking into account the detection limits of radio surveys and the wealth of observational constraints on the stellar distribution and ISM structure of the host galaxy from radio, optical, and IR images. We can reproduce the observed radio luminosity function of SNRs in M33 with a SN rate of (3.5 - 4.3)x10^-3 SN per year and an electron acceleration efficiency, ɛ_e~0.01.This is the first measurement of ɛ_e using a large sample of SNRs. We show that dim Galactic SNRs like SN1006 would have been missed by archival radio surveys at the distance of M33, and we predict that most SNRs in M33 have radio visibility times of 20-80 kyrs that are correlated with the measured ISM column densities N_H: t_vis ~ N_H^a with α = -0.36(+0.01/-0.01), whereas a small fraction of SNRs have visibility times 10 kyrs that appear uncorrelated with column density. This observationally-anchored approach to the visibility time of SNRs will allow us to use SNR catalogs as SN surveys; to calculate SN rates and delay time distributions in the Local Group.

  9. G29.7-0.3: another supernova remnant with an identity crisis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Helfand, D. J.; Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1983-01-01

    New radio and X-ray observations of the galactic supernova remnant G29.7-0.3 show that it is composed of two spectrally distinct components: a steep-spectrum, incomplete shell 3 arcmin in extent enclosing a flat-spectrum, X-ray emitting region 30 arcsec across. Thus, G29.7-0.3 joins the ranks of supernova remnants which exhibit a combination of Crab-like and shell remnant attributes. The Crab-like core has the highest ratio of X-ray radio luminosity of all the Crab-like remnants observed to date, suggesting that it is an extremely young object.

  10. DUST IN A TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PROGENITOR: SPITZER SPECTROSCOPY OF KEPLER'S SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Brian J.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Blair, William P.; Long, Knox S.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2012-08-10

    Characterization of the relatively poorly understood progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae is of great importance in astrophysics, particularly given the important cosmological role that these supernovae play. Kepler's supernova remnant, the result of a Type Ia supernova, shows evidence for an interaction with a dense circumstellar medium (CSM), suggesting a single-degenerate progenitor system. We present 7.5-38 {mu}m infrared (IR) spectra of the remnant, obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, dominated by emission from warm dust. Broad spectral features at 10 and 18 {mu}m, consistent with various silicate particles, are seen throughout. These silicates were likely formed in the stellar outflow from the progenitor system during the asymptotic giant branch stage of evolution, and imply an oxygen-rich chemistry. In addition to silicate dust, a second component, possibly carbonaceous dust, is necessary to account for the short-wavelength Infrared Spectrograph and Infrared Array Camera data. This could imply a mixed chemistry in the atmosphere of the progenitor system. However, non-spherical metallic iron inclusions within silicate grains provide an alternative solution. Models of collisionally heated dust emission from fast shocks (>1000 km s{sup -1}) propagating into the CSM can reproduce the majority of the emission associated with non-radiative filaments, where dust temperatures are {approx}80-100 K, but fail to account for the highest temperatures detected, in excess of 150 K. We find that slower shocks (a few hundred km s{sup -1}) into moderate density material (n{sub 0} {approx} 50-250 cm{sup -3}) are the only viable source of heating for this hottest dust. We confirm the finding of an overall density gradient, with densities in the north being an order of magnitude greater than those in the south.

  11. Dust in a Type Ia Supernova Progenitor: Spitzer Spectroscopy of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian J.; Borkowski, Kazimierz; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Blair, William P.; Long, Knox S.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of the relatively poorly-understood progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae is of great importance in astrophysics, particularly given the important cosmological role that these supernovae play. Kepler's Supernova Remnant, the result of a Type Ia supernova, shows evidence for an interaction with a dense circumstellar medium (CSM), suggesting a single-degenerate progenitor system. We present 7.5-38 micron IR spectra of the remnant, obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, dominated by emission from warm dust. Broad spectral features at 10 and 18 micron, consistent with various silicate particles, are seen throughout. These silicates were likely formed in the stellar outflow from the progenitor system during the AGB stage of evolution, and imply an oxygen-rich chemistry. In addition to silicate dust, a second component, possibly carbonaceous dust, is necessary to account for the short-wavelength IRS and IRAC data. This could imply a mixed chemistry in the atmosphere of the progenitor system. However, non-spherical metallic iron inclusions within silicate grains provide an alternative solution. Models of collisionally-heated dust emission from fast shocks (> 1000 km/s) propagating into the CSM can reproduce the majority of the emission associated with non-radiative filaments, where dust temperatures are approx 80-100 K, but fail to account for the highest temperatures detected, in excess of 150 K. We find that slower shocks (a few hundred km/s) into moderate density material (n(sub o) approx 50-100 / cubic cm) are the only viable source of heating for this hottest dust. We confirm the finding of an overall density gradient, with densities in the north being an order of magnitude greater than those in the south.

  12. Distribution of novae and supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Bergh, S.

    1988-12-01

    Novae in the LMC appear to be distributred like an old disk population. The fact that no concentration of novae is seen within the Bar of the Large Cloud suggests that this feature is of relatively recent origin. Supernova remnants are seen to exhibit concentrations in the 30 Dor region, in the Bar of the Large Cloud, and in Constellation III. This distribution supports the idea that most of the supernova remnants in the LMC had young massive progenitors. 11 references.

  13. Interstellar and Ejecta Dust in the Cas A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Dwek, Eli; Kober, Gladys; Rho, Jonghee; Hwang, Una

    2013-01-01

    The ejecta of the Cas A supernova remnant has a complex morphology, consisting of dense fast-moving line emitting knots and diffuse X-ray emitting regions that have encountered the reverse shock, as well as more slowly expanding, unshocked regions of the ejecta. Using the Spitzer 5-35 micron IRS data cube, and Herschel 70, 100, and 160 micron PACS data, we decompose the infrared emission from the remnant into distinct spectral components associated with the different regions of the ejecta. Such decomposition allows the association of different dust species with ejecta layers that underwent distinct nuclear burning histories, and determination of the dust heating mechanisms. Our decomposition identified three characteristic dust spectra. The first, most luminous one, exhibits strong emission features at approx. 9 and 21 micron, and a weaker 12 micron feature, and is closely associated with the ejecta knots that have strong [Ar II] 6.99 micron and [Ar III] 8.99 micron emission lines. The dust features can be reproduced by magnesium silicate grains with relatively low MgO-to-SiO2 ratios. A second, very different dust spectrum that has no indication of any silicate features, is best fit by Al2O3 dust and is found in association with ejecta having strong [Ne II] 12.8 micron and [Ne III] 15.6 micron emission lines. A third characteristic dust spectrum shows features that best matched by magnesium silicates with relatively high MgO-to-SiO2 ratio. This dust is primarily associated with the X-ray emitting shocked ejecta and the shocked interstellar/circumstellar material. All three spectral components include an additional featureless cold dust component of unknown composition. Colder dust of indeterminate composition is associated with [Si II] 34.8 micron emission from the interior of the SNR, where the reverse shock has not yet swept up and heated the ejecta. The dust mass giving rise to the warm dust component is about approx. 0.1solar M. However, most of the dust mass

  14. Supernova remnant W49B and its environment

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, H.; Tian, W. W.; Zuo, P. E-mail: tww@bao.ac.cn

    2014-10-01

    We study gamma-ray supernova remnant (SNR) W49B and its environment using recent radio and infrared data. Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph low resolution data of W49B shows shocked excitation lines of H{sub 2} (0,0) S(0)-S(7) from the SNR-molecular cloud interaction. The H{sub 2} gas is composed of two components with temperatures of ∼260 K and ∼1060 K, respectively. Various spectral lines from atomic and ionic particles are detected toward W49B. We suggest that the ionic phase has an electron density of ∼500 cm{sup –3} and a temperature of ∼10{sup 4} K by the spectral line diagnoses. The mid- and far-infrared data from MSX, Spitzer, and Herschel reveal a 151 ± 20 K hot dust component with a mass of 7.5 ± 6.6 × 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉} and a 45 ± 4 K warm dust component with a mass of 6.4 ± 3.2 M {sub ☉}. The hot dust is likely from materials swept up by the shock of W49B. The warm dust may possibly originate from the evaporation of clouds interacting with W49B. We build the H I absorption spectra of W49B and four nearby H II regions (W49A, G42.90+0.58, G42.43-0.26, and G43.19-0.53) and study the relation between W49B and the surrounding molecular clouds by employing the 2.12 μm infrared and CO data. We therefore obtain a kinematic distance of ∼10 kpc for W49B and suggest that the remnant is likely associated with the CO cloud at about 40 km s{sup –1}.

  15. Discovery of optical candidate supernova remnants in Sagittarius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alikakos, J.; Boumis, P.; Christopoulou, P. E.; Goudis, C. D.

    2012-08-01

    During an [O III] survey of planetary nebulae, we identified a region in Sagittarius containing several candidate supernova remants (SNRs) and obtained deep optical narrow-band images and spectra to explore their nature. We obtained images of the area of interest by acquiring observations in the emission lines of Hα + [N II], [S II] and [O III]. The resulting mosaic covers an area of 1.4° × 1.0°, where both filamentary and diffuse emission was discovered, suggesting that there is more than one SNR in the area. Deep long-slit spectra were also taken of eight different regions. Both the flux-calibrated images and the spectra show that the emission from the filamentary structures originates from shock-heated gas, while the photo-ionization mechanism is responsible for the diffuse emission. Part of the optical emission is found to be correlated with the radio at 4850 MHz suggesting that they are related, while the infrared emission found in the area at 12 μm and 22 μm marginally correlates with the optical. The presence of the [O III] emission line in one of the candidate SNRs implies that the shock velocities in the interstellar "clouds" are between 120 km s-1 and 200 km s-1, while its absence in the other candidate SNRs indicates that the shock velocities there are slower. For all candidate remnants, the [S II] λλ 6716/6731 ratio indicates that the electron densities are below 240 cm-3, while the Hα emission is measured to be between 0.6 and 41 × 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2 arcsec-2. The existence of eight pulsars within 1.5° of the center of the candidate SNRs also implies that there are many SNRs in the area as well as that the detected optical emission could be part of a number of supernovae explosions.

  16. The Hubble Heritage Image of the Crab Nebula Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, W. P.; English, J.; Bond, H. E.; Christian, C. A.; Frattare, L.; Hamilton, F.; Levay, Z.; Noll, K. S.

    2000-05-01

    The Hubble Heritage Project has the aim of providing the public with pictorially striking images of celestial objects obtained with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Here we present a 5-color Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) image of the Crab Nebula, a ~950 year old supernova remnant located 6500 light-years distant in the constellation Taurus. The images were obtained in 1995 January and April, and the science investigation reporting results was published by Blair, W. P., et al. (1997, ApJS, 109, 473--480). Over 10 hours of exposure time through 5 separate optical continuum band and emission-line filters were used to study size scales and ionization structures of the filaments and newly synthesized dust within the expanding ejecta. The Heritage version of these data shows several important aspects of the Crab Nebula all in one spectacular image. The continuum image shows stars, including the enigmatic pulsar (the collapsed core of the original star) and the ghostly diffuse synchrotron nebula energized by the pulsar. The synchrotron nebula in turn heats and ionizes the surrounding clumpy filaments of gas and dust visible in the emission line images. These filaments are the supernova ejecta that were expelled during the explosion and are now expanding outward from the pulsar at high speed. The different colors in the picture show optical emission lines of hydrogen (orange), nitrogen (red), sulfur (pink) and oxygen (bluish-green). The subtle changes in color from one filament to the next arise because of varying temperatures and densities of the gas, and variable chemical abundances of the ``star stuff," or the doppler shifting of emission into or out of the various narrow filter bandpasses. Support for this work was provided by NASA through grant numbers GO-07632.01-96A and GO-5354.04-93A from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  17. The evolution of supernova remnants in different galactic environments, and its effects on supernova statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kafatos, M.; Sofia, S.; Bruhweiler, F.; Gull, T. R.

    1980-01-01

    Examination of the interaction between supernova (SN) ejecta and the various environments in which the explosive event might occur shows that only a small fraction of the many SNs produce observable supernova remnants (SNRs). This fraction, which is found to depend weakly upon the lower mass limit of the SN progenitors, and more strongly on the specfic characteristics of the associated interstellar medium, decreases from approximately 15 percent near the galctic center to 10 percent at Rgal approximately 10 kpc and drops nearly to zero for Rgal 15 kpc. Generally, whether a SNR is detectable is determined by the density of the ambient interstellar medium in which it is embeeede. The presence of large, low density cavities arpund stellar associations due to the combined effects of stellar winds and supernova shells strongly suggests that a large portion of the detectable SNRs have runway stars as their progenitors. These results explain the differences between the substantially larger SN rates in the galaxy derived both from pulsar statistics and from observations of SN events in external galaxies, when compared to the substantially smaller SN rates derived form galactic SNR statistics.

  18. Hadronic γ-ray images of Sedov supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beshley, V.; Petruk, O.

    2012-01-01

    A number of modern experiments in high-energy astrophysics produce images of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the TeV and GeV γ-rays. Either relativistic electrons (due to the inverse-Compton scattering) or protons (due to the pion decays) may be responsible for this emission. In particular, the broad-band spectra of SNRs may be explained in both leptonic and hadronic scenarios. Another kind of observational data, namely, images of SNRs, is an important part of experimental information. We present a method to model γ-ray images of Sedov SNRs in uniform media and magnetic field due to hadronic emission. These γ-rays are assumed to appear as a consequence of meson decays produced in inelastic collisions of accelerated protons with thermal protons downstream of the shock - a model would be relevant for SNRs without firm confirmations of the shock-cloud interaction, as e.g. SN 1006. Distribution of surface brightness of the shell-like SNR is synthesized numerically for a number of configurations. An approximate analytical formula for azimuthal and radial variation of hadronic γ-ray brightness close to the shock is derived. The properties of images as well as the main factors determining the surface brightness distribution are determined. Some conclusions that would be relevant to SN 1006 are discussed.

  19. WHAM Observations of High-latitude Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchard, Alexander; Haffner, L. Matthew; Benjamin, Robert A.; Gostisha, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Sky Survey (WHAM-SS) traces numerous large-angle, diffuse regions containing filamentary and shell-like structures. The largest of these are complex supershells that harbor recent and on-going star formation, such as the Orion-Eridanus complex, the Gum Nebula, and the extended emission above and below the W3/W4/W5 star-forming regions in the Perseus Arm. Several large-diameter regions with simpler morphologies are also present, which we focus on here. While some of these structures are diffuse H II regions powered by nearby, isolated stars, others are clearly supernova remnants (SNRs) due to their association with X-ray or non-thermal radio emission. We highlight the structure, kinematics, and multi-wavelength properties of several SNRs using Hα maps from the WHAM-SS and data from on-going WHAM multi-wavelength surveys. WHAM research and operations are supported through NSF Award AST-1108911.

  20. HST/ACS Narrowband Imaging of the Kepler Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankrit, Ravi; Blair, William P.; Frattare, Lisa M.; Rudnick, Lawrence; DeLaney, Tracey; Harrus, Ilana M.; Ennis, Jessica A.

    2007-01-01

    We present narrowband images of the Kepler supernova remnant obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The images, with an angular resolution of 0.05" reveal the structure of the emitting gas in unprecedented detail. Radiative and nonradiative shocks are found in close proximity, unresolvable in gromd-based spectra, indicating that the pre-shock medium is highly clumped. The ionization structure, traced by differences in the [0 111] to [N 11] flux ratio, varies on subarcsecond scales. The variation is due to 110th differences in shock velocity as well as gradients in the evolutionary stage of the shocks. A prollinent complex of knots protruding beyond the boundary of the rennallt in the northwest is found to consist of bright radiative knots, collected by arcuate nonradiative filaments. Based on the coincidence of the optical emission with a bright isolated knot of X-ray emission, we infer that this feature is due to a Rayleigh-Taylor finger that formed at the contact discontinuity and overtook the primary blast wave.

  1. The First Fermi-LAT Supernova Remnant Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, T. J.; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope's Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) has shed new light on many types of Galactic objects, including many individual Supernova Remnants (SNRs). The spectral detection of hadronic gamma-ray emission from two SNRs, suggesting acceleration of cosmic ray (CR) protons, is an example of individual studies providing clues to characteristics that may be common to all SNRs. To uniformly determine SNR properties, we have developed the first systematic survey of SNRs from 1 to 100 GeV. From the 279 known radio SNRs, we found more than 100 GeV candidates, 31 of which are likely and 14 of which are marginally counterparts. These candidates span a wide range of multiwavelength properties, providing a critical context for complementary, in depth individual studies. Modeling this multiwavelength data demonstrates the need for improvements to previously sufficient, simple models describing the GeV and radio emission from hadronic and leptonic particle populations in these objects. Together with the > 240 upper limits on GeV emission at the radio position and extension, our results also enable us to indirectly constrain SNRs' aggregate ability to accelerate CRs, and with direct measurements, will additionally enable a better understanding of CR origins.

  2. Understanding the Balmer Bubble in the Vela Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinn, Brian; Smith, C.; Points, S.; Heathcote, S.

    2014-01-01

    We present imaging and spectroscopic data and analysis of the Balmer-dominated filament that is ahead of the eastern edge of the radiative shock of Bullet C in the Vela Supernova Remnant. This filament was discovered in 2002 by Carlin & Smith(2002), and was suggested to be a non-radiative shock. Images of the filament were taken using Hα and R band filters on the SMARTS 0.9m telescope at CTIO. These images were then compared to images taken in 2006 using the MOSAIC II imager on the Blanco Telescope at CTIO, in an attempt to detect proper motion of the filament. Comparison over the 7 year baseline failed to show proper motion of the filament. From this result, we are able to place an upper limit of ~270 km/s on the velocity of the Balmer-dominated filament. We also obtained moderate resolution spectra of the Balmer-dominated filament and the radiative shock using the Goodman Spectrograph at SOAR Telescope. Spectroscopic analysis of the Balmer-dominated filament failed to detect a broad component of the Hα emission line, which would be expected for a high velocity non-radiative shock.

  3. The likely Fermi detection of the supernova remnant RCW 103

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Yi; Wang, Zhongxiang; Zhang, Xiao; Chen, Yang

    2014-02-01

    We report on the results from our γ-ray analysis of the supernova remnant (SNR) RCW 103 region. The data were taken with the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. An extended source is found at a position consistent with that of RCW 103 and its emission was only detected above 1 GeV (10σ significance), with a power-law spectrum with a photon index of 2.0 ± 0.1. We obtain its 1-300 GeV spectrum and the total flux gives a luminosity of 8.3 × 10{sup 33} erg s{sup –1} at a source distance of 3.3 kpc. Given the positional coincidence and property similarities of this source with other SNRs, we identify it as the likely Fermi γ-ray counterpart to RCW 103. Including radio measurements of RCW 103, the spectral energy distribution (SED) is modeled by considering emission mechanisms based on both hadronic and leptonic scenarios. We find that models in the two scenarios can reproduce the observed SED, while in the hadronic scenario the existence of SNR-molecular cloud interactions is suggested as a high density of the target protons is required.

  4. Primary versus Secondary Leptons in the EGRET Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatuzzo, Marco; Melia, Fulvio

    2005-09-01

    The EGRET supernova remnants (SNRs) are all expanding into nearby dense molecular clouds, powering a shock at the interface where protons and electrons accelerate to relativistic energies. A viable mechanism for the emission of γ-rays in these sources is the decay of neutral pions created in collisions between the relativistic hadrons and protons in the ambient medium. But neutral pion decay alone cannot reproduce the whole high-energy spectrum, particularly below 100 MeV. A pion decay scenario thus requires a lepton population to fill in the lower part of the spectrum via bremsstrahlung emission. This population, however, is constrained by the SNR radio spectrum. Taking our cue from the behavior of Sgr A East, an energetic EGRET SNR at the Galactic center, we here examine the role played in these sources by secondary leptons-electrons and positrons produced in proton-proton scattering events and the ensuing particle cascades. We show that, while secondary leptons cannot account for the γ-rays below 100 MeV, they can account for the hard radio spectra observed from the EGRET SNRs. Thus, it appears that both primary and secondary leptons may be important contributors to the overall broadband emission from these sources, but if so, they must radiate most of their energy in different parts of the SNR-cloud environment. We show that shock acceleration in dense cores being overtaken by the expanding SNR shell can naturally lead to such a scenario.

  5. Near-infrared IFU and MOS observations of supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho-Gyu

    2016-06-01

    We present near-infrared IFU and MOS observations of two bright [Fe II] line emitting supernova remnants (SNRs). The two SNRs, G11.2-0.3 and RCW103, are selected from our near-infrared [Fe II] 1.64 um narrow band imaging survey of SNRs such as UKIRT unbiased [Fe II] imaging survey of the the Galactic plane and AAT [Fe II] imaging of some core-collapse SNRs. We detect several near-infrared hyperfine lines of [Fe II] at the southeastern shell of G11.2-0.3. We estimate the line strength and extinction-corrected density, which gives a clue to the origin of the iron-rich southeastern shell of G11.2-0.3. We obtain the MOS spectra of [Fe II]-emitting clumps inside RCW103. The observed clumps move about hundreds kilometers in radial direction, suggesting that they are shocked dense materials lost by stellar wind at the final stage of the evolution of the progenitor star.

  6. EFFECTS OF NEUTRAL PARTICLES ON MODIFIED SHOCKS AT SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka; Takahara, Fumio

    2010-09-20

    H{alpha} emission from supernova remnants (SNRs) implies the existence of neutral hydrogens in the ambient medium. In the precursor of an SNR shock modified by cosmic rays (CRs), upstream plasmas are pushed by the CR pressure, but neutral particles are not, so that the relative velocity appears and some neutral particles become pickup ions by the charge exchange process in the precursor. We investigate how the pickup ions generated in the precursor affect the shock structure and the particle acceleration. If the CR pressure is larger than 20% of the shock ram pressure, the compression of the subshock becomes smaller than that without pickup ions because of the pressure of the pickup ions. Moreover, even if the shock is modified by CRs, the total compression ratio can be smaller than 4. In addition, the pickup ions play an important role for the injection into the particle acceleration. If the shock is a quasi-perpendicular shock and if the multiply reflected ion acceleration occurs, the CR spectrum can be harder than that of the test particle diffusive shock acceleration below GeV.

  7. Chandra observation of the supernova remnant N11L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei; Chen, Yang; Chu, You-Hua; Williams, Rosa M.

    2016-06-01

    We performed a Chandra X-ray study of the supernova remnant (SNR) N11L in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The X-ray emission is predominantly distributed within the main shell and the northern loop-like filaments traced by the optical narrow band images, with an indistinct extension along the north area. The brightest emission comes from a northeast-southwest ridge, and peaks at two patches at center and southwest. Spectral analysis indicates that the blast wave is propagating in a inhomogenous environment, and the X-ray emission overall is dominated by thermal gas whose composition is consistent with the LMC average abundance. The ionization time of the hot plasma implied by the X-ray spectral analysis is consistent with the Sedov age of the SNR derived from the best-fit parameters and the apparent radius of the SNR based on the optical images, however, the consequent explosion energy is no only at least one order of magnitude less than the canonical value of 10^{51} ergs, but also takes a small portion of the thermal energy of the hot gas. That discrepancy supports the blown-out scenario.

  8. Grammage of cosmic rays around Galactic supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Marta; Blasi, Pasquale; Amato, Elena

    2016-10-01

    The residence time of cosmic rays (CRs) in the Galaxy is usually inferred from the measurement of the ratio of secondary-to-primary nuclei, for instance the boron (B)/carbon (C) ratio, which provides an estimate of the amount of matter traversed by CRs during their propagation, the so-called CR grammage. However, after being released by their parent sources, for instance, supernova remnants, CRs must cross the disc of the Galaxy, before entering the much lower density halo, in which they are believed to spend most of their time before eventually escaping the Galaxy. In the near-source region, the CR propagation is shown to be dominated by the nonlinear self-generation of waves. Here we show that due to this effect, the time that CRs with energies up to ˜10 TeV spend within a distance Lc˜100 pc from the sources is much larger than naive estimates would suggest. Depending on the level of ionization of the medium surrounding the source, the grammage accumulated in the source vicinity may be a non-negligible fraction of the total grammage traversed throughout the whole Galaxy. Moreover, there is an irreducible grammage that CRs traverse while trapped downstream of the shock that accelerated them, though this contribution is rather uncertain. We conclude that some caution should be used in inferring parameters of Galactic CR propagation from measurements of the B/C ratio.

  9. Expectation on Observation of Supernova Remnants with the LHAASO Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ye; Cao, Zhen; Chen, Songzhan; Chen, Yang; Cui, Shuwang; He, Huihai; Huang, Xingtao; Ma, Xinhua; Yuan, Qiang; Zhang, Xiao; LHAASO Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are believed to be the most important acceleration sites for cosmic rays (CRs) below ˜1015 eV in the Galaxy. High-energy photons, either directly from the shocks of the SNRs or indirectly from the interaction between SNRs and the nearby clouds, are crucial probes for the CR acceleration. Big progresses on observations of SNRs have been achieved by space- and ground-based γ-ray facilities. However, whether γ-rays come from accelerated hadrons or not, as well as their connection with the CRs observed at Earth, remains in debate. Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO), a next-generation experiment, is designed to survey the northern part of the very high energy γ-ray sky from ˜0.3 TeV to PeV with the sensitivity of ≲1% of the Crab Nebula flux. In this paper, we indicate that LHAASO will be dedicated to enlarging the γ-ray SNR samples and improving the spectral and morphological measurements. These measurements, especially at energies above 30 TeV, will be important for us to finally understand the CR acceleration in SNRs.

  10. SLOW DIFFUSION OF COSMIC RAYS AROUND A SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Yutaka; Ohira, Yutaka; Takahara, Fumio

    2010-04-01

    We study the escape of cosmic-ray protons accelerated at a supernova remnant (SNR). We are interested in their propagation in the interstellar medium (ISM) after they leave the shock neighborhood where they are accelerated, but when they are still near the SNR with their energy density higher than that in the average ISM. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we found that the cosmic rays with energies of {approx}< TeV excite Alfven waves around the SNR on a scale of the SNR itself if the ISM is highly ionized. Thus, even if the cosmic rays can leave the shock, scattering by the waves prevents them from moving further away from the SNR. The cosmic rays form a slowly expanding cosmic-ray bubble, and they spend a long time around the SNR. This means that the cosmic rays cannot actually escape from the SNR until a fairly late stage of the SNR evolution. This is consistent with some results of Fermi and H.E.S.S. observations.

  11. Pulsar Wind Nebulae, Space Velocities and Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The original proposal for this LTSA grant was for X-ray studies of pulsars, and especially pulsar wind nebulae and what they could tell us about pulsar properties, especially their space velocities. By any metric, this program has been very successful. No fewer than 14 papers on directly related topics (and several dozen more on related topics) have been published in refereed journals with the PI as lead or co-author, all observational results that have had significant impact on the field. These include the first X-ray detection of the "Duck" pulsar, a clear demonstration that estimated pulsar ages can be off by over an order of magnitude (via observations of the young supernova remnant G11.2-0.3) and the detection of the first pulsar wind nebula around a millisecond pulsar. These publications have also resulted in 4 press releases. Moreover, they also represent the thesis work of two PhD students at MIT (Froney Crawford and Mike Pivovaroff) and one postdoctoral fellow, Bryan Gaensler, now Assistant Professor at Harvard.

  12. The Non-Thermal Electron Spectrum of the Supernova Remnant SN 1006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Glenn E.; Sturner, Steven J.

    2002-01-01

    We present the results of a spectral analysis of a compilation of X-ray, radio, and gamma-ray data for the supernova remnant SN 1006. The data are used to constrain models of the electron spectrum of the remnant. We present the results for the electron spectrum and review the implications for cosmic-ray acceleration and the strength of the magnetic field in the remnant.

  13. Supernova remnants in the Local Group - I. A model for the radio luminosity function and visibility times of supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarbadhicary, Sumit K.; Badenes, Carles; Chomiuk, Laura; Caprioli, Damiano; Huizenga, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) in Local Group galaxies offer unique insights into the origin of different types of supernovae (SNe). In order to take full advantage of these insights, one must understand the intrinsic and environmental diversity of SNRs in the context of their host galaxies. We introduce a semi-analytic model that reproduces the statistical properties of a radio continuum-selected SNR population, taking into account the detection limits of radio surveys, the range of SN kinetic energies, the measured interstellar medium (ISM) and stellar mass distribution in the host galaxy from multi-wavelength images and the current understanding of electron acceleration and magnetic field amplification in SNR shocks from first-principle kinetic simulations. Applying our model to the SNR population in M33, we reproduce the SNR radio luminosity function with a median SN rate of ˜3.1 × 10-3 per year and an electron acceleration efficiency, ɛe ˜ 4.2 × 10-3. We predict that the radio visibility times of ˜70 per cent of M33 SNRs will be determined by their Sedov-Taylor lifetimes, and correlated with the measured ISM column density, NH (t_{vis} ∝ N_H^{-a}, with a ˜ 0.33) while the remaining will have visibility times determined by the detection limit of the radio survey. These observational constraints on the visibility time of SNRs will allow us to use SNR catalogues as `SN surveys' to calculate SN rates and delay-time distributions in the Local Group.

  14. The hydrodynamics of clouds overtaken by supernova remnants. II - Attrition shocks, condensation and ejection of clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozyczka, M.; Tenorio-Tagle, G.

    1987-04-01

    Hydrodynamical events resulting from interactions of supernova remnants with dense interstellar cloudlets are investigated by means of high-resolution, two dimensional modelling. Three different evolutionary paths of a cloudlet are identified, all of which eventually lead to its strong deformation and expulsion from the remnant. The main factors determining the fate of a cloudlet are the speed and geometry of transmitted and secondary ("attrition") shocks propagating through it. None of the performed calculations leads to structures which could clearly be related to filaments typical of supernova remnants.

  15. SUPERNOVA REMNANT KES 17: AN EFFICIENT COSMIC RAY ACCELERATOR INSIDE A MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfand, Joseph D.; Castro, Daniel; Slane, Patrick O.; Temim, Tea; Hughes, John P.; Rakowski, Cara E-mail: cara.rakowski@gmail.com

    2013-11-10

    The supernova remnant Kes 17 (SNR G304.6+0.1) is one of a few but growing number of remnants detected across the electromagnetic spectrum. In this paper, we analyze recent radio, X-ray, and γ-ray observations of this object, determining that efficient cosmic ray acceleration is required to explain its broadband non-thermal spectrum. These observations also suggest that Kes 17 is expanding inside a molecular cloud, though our determination of its age depends on whether thermal conduction or clump evaporation is primarily responsible for its center-filled thermal X-ray morphology. Evidence for efficient cosmic ray acceleration in Kes 17 supports recent theoretical work concluding that the strong magnetic field, turbulence, and clumpy nature of molecular clouds enhance cosmic ray production in supernova remnants. While additional observations are needed to confirm this interpretation, further study of Kes 17 is important for understanding how cosmic rays are accelerated in supernova remnants.

  16. Expansion of Kes 73, a shell supernova remnant containing a magnetar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz

    2014-09-01

    Formation and evolution of highly magnetized neutron stars (magnetars) remain poorly understood. We can learn about magnetars by studying their remnants. Kes 73 is a young supernova remnant containing a magnetar. But basic properties of Kes 73, including its age, remain poorly known. We propose a third-epoch observation of Kes 73 with Chandra. When combined with the 2000 and 2006 observations, this will allow for determination of the remnant's age through expansion rate measurements. We will also search for spatial variations in expansion rate that will help in understanding of the remnant's dynamics. New observations will also be used to determine abundances of heavy-element supernova ejecta, placing further constraints on the supernova that produced Kes 73.

  17. G65.2+5.7: A Thermal Composite Supernova Remnant with a Cool Shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, R. L.; Kuntz, K. D.; Petre, R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents archival ROSAT PSPC observations of the G65.2+5.7 supernova remnant (also known as G65.3+5.7). Little material obscures this remnant and so it was well observed, even at the softest end of ROSATs bandpass (approx. 0.11 to 0.28 keV). These soft X-ray images reveal the remnant s centrally-filled morphology which, in combination with existing radio frequency observations, places G65.2+5.7 in the thermal composite (mixed morphology) class of supernova remnants. Not only might G65.2+5.7 be the oldest known thermal composite supernova remnant, but owing to its optically revealed cool, dense shell, this remnant supports the proposal that thermal composite supernova remnants lack X-ray bright shells because they have evolved beyond the adiabatic phase. These observations also reveal a slightly extended point source centered on RA = l9(sup h) 36(sup m) 46(sup s). dec = 30 deg.40 min.07 sec.and extending 6.5 arc min in radius in the band 67 map. The source of this emission has yet to be discovered, as there is no known pulsar at this location.

  18. Interaction of Supernova Remnants with Stellar-Wind Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Kwan; Koo, Bon-Chul

    1997-12-01

    We have developed a spherical FCT code in order to simulate the interaction of supernova remnants with stellar wind bubbles. We assume that the density profile of the supernova ejecta follows the Chevalier model(1982) where the outer portion has a power-law density distribution(rho~r^{-n}) and the SN ejecta has a kinetic energy of 10^51 ergs. The structure of wind bubble has been calculated with the stellar mass loss rate dM/dt=5x10e-6 Mo/yr and the wind velocity v=2x10e3km/s. We have simulated seven models with different initial conditions. In the first two models we computed the evolution of SNRs with n=7 and n=14 in the uniform medium. The numerical results agree with the Chevalier's similarity solution at early times. When all of the power-law portion of the ejecta is swept up by the reverse shock, the evolution slowly converges to the Sedov-Taylor stages. There is not much difference between the two cases with different n's. The other five models simulate SNRs produced inside wind bubbles. In model III, we consider the SN ejecta of 1.4 Mo and the radius of bubble ~2,76pc so that ratio of the mass alpha(=M_{W,S}/Mej) is 2. We follow the complex hydrodynamic flows produced by the interaction of SN shocks with stellar shocks and with the contact discontinuities. In the model III, the time scale for the SN shock to cross the wind shell taucross is similar to the time scale for the reverse shock to sweep the power-law density profile taubend. Hence the SN shock crosses the wind shell. At late times SN shock produces another shell in the ambient medium so that we have a SNR with double shell structure. From the numerical results of the remaining models, we have found that when taucross/taubend <= 2. or equivalently when alpha<=50, the SNRs produced inside wind bubbles have double shell structure. Otherwise, either the SN shock does not cross the wind shell or even if it crosses at one time, the reverse shock reflected at the center accelerates the wind shell to

  19. Predicted TeV Gamma-ray Spectra and Images of Shell Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, S. P.

    1999-04-01

    One supernova remnant, SN 1006, is now known to produce synchrotron X-rays (Koyama et al., 1995, Nature, 378, 255), requiring 100 TeV electrons. SN 1006 has also been seen in TeV gamma rays (Tanimori et al., 1998, ApJ, 497, L25), almost certainly due to cosmic-microwave-background photons being upscattered by those same electrons. Other young supernova remnants should also produce high-energy electrons, even if their X-ray synchrotron emission is swamped by conventional thermal X-ray emission. Upper limits to the maximum energy of shock-accelerated electrons can be found for those remnants by requiring that their synchrotron spectrum steepen enough to fall below observed thermal X-rays (Reynolds and Keohane 1999, ApJ, submitted). For those upper-limit spectra, I present predicted TeV inverse-Compton spectra and images for assumed values of the mean remnant magnetic field. Ground-based TeV gamma-ray observations of remnants may be able to put even more severe limits on the presence of highly energetic electrons in remnants, raising problems for conventional theories of galactic cosmic-ray production in supernova remnants. Detections will immediately confirm that SN 1006 is not alone, and will give mean remnant magnetic field strengths.

  20. Interstellar and Ejecta Dust in the Cas A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Dwek, Eli; Kober, Gladys; Rho, Jeonghee; Hwang, Una

    2014-05-01

    Infrared continuum observations provide a means of investigating the physical composition of the dust in the ejecta and swept up medium of the Cas A supernova remnant (SNR). Using low-resolution Spitzer IRS spectra (5-35 μm), and broad-band Herschel PACS imaging (70, 100, and 160 μm), we identify characteristic dust spectra, associated with ejecta layers that underwent distinct nuclear burning histories. The most luminous spectrum exhibits strong emission features at ~9 and 21 μm and is closely associated with ejecta knots with strong Ar emission lines. The dust features can be reproduced by magnesium silicate grains with relatively low Mg to Si ratios. Another dust spectrum is associated with ejecta having strong Ne emission lines. It has no indication of any silicate features and is best fit by Al2O3 dust. A third characteristic dust spectrum shows features that are best matched by magnesium silicates with a relatively high Mg to Si ratio. This dust is primarily associated with the X-ray-emitting shocked ejecta, but it is also evident in regions where shocked interstellar or circumstellar material is expected. However, the identification of dust composition is not unique, and each spectrum includes an additional featureless dust component of unknown composition. Colder dust of indeterminate composition is associated with emission from the interior of the SNR, where the reverse shock has not yet swept up and heated the ejecta. Most of the dust mass in Cas A is associated with this unidentified cold component, which is <~ 0.1 M ⊙. The mass of warmer dust is only ~0.04 M ⊙.

  1. Interstellar and ejecta dust in the cas a supernova remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Arendt, Richard G.; Dwek, Eli; Kober, Gladys; Rho, Jeonghee; Hwang, Una

    2014-05-01

    Infrared continuum observations provide a means of investigating the physical composition of the dust in the ejecta and swept up medium of the Cas A supernova remnant (SNR). Using low-resolution Spitzer IRS spectra (5-35 μm), and broad-band Herschel PACS imaging (70, 100, and 160 μm), we identify characteristic dust spectra, associated with ejecta layers that underwent distinct nuclear burning histories. The most luminous spectrum exhibits strong emission features at ∼9 and 21 μm and is closely associated with ejecta knots with strong Ar emission lines. The dust features can be reproduced by magnesium silicate grains with relatively low Mg to Si ratios. Another dust spectrum is associated with ejecta having strong Ne emission lines. It has no indication of any silicate features and is best fit by Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dust. A third characteristic dust spectrum shows features that are best matched by magnesium silicates with a relatively high Mg to Si ratio. This dust is primarily associated with the X-ray-emitting shocked ejecta, but it is also evident in regions where shocked interstellar or circumstellar material is expected. However, the identification of dust composition is not unique, and each spectrum includes an additional featureless dust component of unknown composition. Colder dust of indeterminate composition is associated with emission from the interior of the SNR, where the reverse shock has not yet swept up and heated the ejecta. Most of the dust mass in Cas A is associated with this unidentified cold component, which is ≲ 0.1 M {sub ☉}. The mass of warmer dust is only ∼0.04 M {sub ☉}.

  2. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM SUPERNOVA 1970G WITH CHANDRA: FILLING THE VOID BETWEEN SUPERNOVAE AND SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immler, Stefan; Kuntz, K. D.

    2005-01-01

    We report the discovery of X-ray emission from SN 1970G in M101, 35 yr after its outburst, using deep X-ray imaging with the Chundra X-Ray Observatory. The Chandra ACIS spectrum shows that the emission is soft (52 keV) and characteristic of the reverse-shock region. The X-ray luminosity, Lo,,, = (1.1 3 0.2) x lo3# ergs s-1, is likely caused by the interaction of the supernova shock with dense circumstellar matter. If the material was deposited by the stellar wind from the progenitor, a mass-loss rate of M = (2.6 ? 0.4) x M, yr-I (v,/lO km s-I) is inferred. Utilizing the high-resolution Chandra ACIS data of SN 1970G and its environment, we reconstruct the X-ray lightcurve from previous ROSAT HRI, PSPC, and XMM-Newton EPIC observations, and find a best-fit linear rate of decline of L cc t-# with index s = 2.7 t 0.9 over a period of -20-35 yr after the outburst. As the oldest supernova detected in X-rays, SN 1970G allows, for the first time, direct observation of the transition from a supenova to its supernova remnant phase.

  3. New observational insight on shock interactions toward supernovae and supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpatrick, Charles Donald

    Supernovae (SNe) are energetic explosions that signal the end of a star's life. These events and the supernova remnants (SNRs) they leave behind play a central role in stellar feedback by adding energy and momentum and metals to the interstellar medium (ISM). Emission associated with these feedback processes, especially atomic and molecular line emission as well as thermal and nonthermal continuum emission is known to be enhanced in regions of high density, such as dense circumstellar matter (CSM) around SNe and molecular clouds (MCs). In this thesis, I begin with a brief overview of the physics of SN shocks in Chapter 1, focusing on a foundation for studying pan-chromatic signatures of interactions between SNe and dense environments. In Chapter 2, I examine an unusual SN with signatures of CSM interaction in the form of narrow lines of hydrogen (Type IIn) and thermal continuum emission. This SN appears to belong to a class of Type Ia SNe that shares spectroscopic features with Type IIn SNe. I discuss the difficulties of decomposing spectra in a regime where interaction occurs between SN ejecta and CSM, potentially confusing the underlying SN type. This is followed by a discussion of rebrightening that occurred at late-time in B and V band photometry of this SN, possibly associated with clumpy or dense CSM at large distances from the progenitor. In Chapter 3, I examine synchrotron emission from Cassiopeia A, observed in the Ks band over multiple epochs. The synchrotron emission is generally diffuse over the remnant, but there is one location in the southwest portion of the remnant where it appears to be enhanced and entrained as knots of emission in the SNR ejecta. I evaluate whether the Ks band knots are dominated by synchrotron emission by comparing them to other infrared and radio imaging that is known to be dominated by synchrotron emission. Concluding that they are likely synchrotron-emitting knots, I measure the magnetic field strength and electron density

  4. N157B: X-ray evidence for a Crab-like supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotthelf, Eric V.; Wang, Q. Daniel

    1996-01-01

    The X-ray observation of the supernova remnant N 157B is described. The Rosat High Resolution Imager (HRI) X-ray emission from the remnant was decomposed into point-like sources. The spectra showed abundance-enhanced neon and magnesium lines, indicating that the remnant originated in a massive progenitor. The flat and featureless data from the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) confirm the Crab-like nature of the remnant. By interpreting both the thermal spectral component and the shell as representing the remnant's outer shock, the age of the remnant was estimated to be 4 x 10(exp 3) yr and the energy release approximately 2 x 10(exp 50) erg.

  5. Transition to the radiative phase in supernova remnant evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Eric Boyd

    1999-11-01

    The evolution of a supernova remnant (SNR) through the transition from an adiabatic Sedov-Taylor blastwave to a radiative pressure-driven snowplow phase is studied through a series of one-, two- and three-dimensional hydrodynamic (HD) and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. This transition is marked by a catastrophic collapse of the postshock gas, forming a thin, dense shell behind the forward shock. Previous studies have shown that the thin, dense shell of gas present during this transition is susceptible to both radiative and dynamical instabilities. One-dimensional HD studies indicate the presence of a radial oscillation between the forward shock and the thin shell, due to the rapid cooling of the gas in the immediate postshock region. Two-dynamical HD simulations of this transition indicate the presence of violent dynamical instabilities that alter the initially spherical morphology of the blastwave, specifically, the Pressure-driven Thin Shell Overstability (PDTSO) and the Non-linear Thin Shell Instability (NTSI). Hydrodynamical simulations, by their very nature, ignore the effects of magnetic forces on moving fluids. In general, interstellar magnetic fields will be weak enough that their effects may be safely ignored. However, the transition to the radiative phase in SNR evolution is often triggered when the blastwave interacts with dense clouds of gas in the interstellar medium (ISM). The resulting compression of the gas during the transition also compresses the magnetic fields in the cloud, possibly enhancing the field sufficiently to play a role in the further evolution of the SNR. To better understand the role of the NTSI during the transition, and to study the effects of magnetic fields on the instability itself, we performed idealized two- and three-dimensional MHD simulations. The results of the two-dimensional simulations were found to depend strongly on the orientation of the ambient magnetic field when the postshock field is dynamically

  6. The Shock Structure of Supernova Remnant IC443

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Michael R.; Higdon, S. J. U.; Burton, M. G.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    We present and discuss ISO observations of IC443, a supernova remnant interacting with a molecular cloud. An SWS spectrum centered on molecular hydrogen clump R10E (RA(2000) = 6 17 7.6, Decl(2000) = 22 25 34.6) is dominated by strong [SiII] (34 microns) emission and the pure rotational transitions of molecular hydrogen ranging from 0-0 S(1) to 0-0 S(13). Fits to these H$-2$ lines imply a large column (approx. 7E19 cm$ {-2)$) of warm (T approx. 700 K) gas and an ortho/para ratio for hydrogen near 3. LWS Fabry-Perot spectra of [OI] (63 microns) and [CII] (158 microns) at positions R10E and C (RA(2000) = 6 17 42.8, Decl(2000) = 22 21 38.1) find broad (approx. 75 km/s), blue-shifted (-40 km/s) line profiles; their similarity strongly suggests a common, shock-generated origin for these two lines. The surprisingly large [CII]/[OI] ratio (approx. 0.1 to 0.2) confirms previous observations with the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. These [CII] and [OI] line intensities, the [SiII] intensity (above), and LWS grating measurements of OH (119 microns) and [OI] (145 microns) are all readily fit by a single, fast J-shock model. Although the [OI] (63) emission can alternatively be produced by a slow C-shock, this ensemble of lines can not be produced by such a shock and provides strong evidence for the existence of a J-shock. A 24-arcmin strip map shows that this far-infrared line emission is spatially correlated with the H$-2$ 1-0 S(1) emission, which most likely arises in an associated C-shock. In addition to this spatially correlated shock emission, the strip map identifies extended [CII] and [OI] emission with a significantly larger line ratio (approx. 0.6); this 'background' component is compared with current J-shock, C-shock, photo-dissociation region (PDR), and X-ray dissociation region (XDR) models in an effort to explain its origin.

  7. Simulations of Astrophysical Hydrodynamics: Supernova Remnant Evolution and Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truelove, John Kelly

    Many problems in astrophysical hydrodynamics are analytically intractable. In such cases, numerical simulation can provide valuable insight into the nature of the solution. We consider two such problems: the interaction of stellar ejecta and ambient gas in an evolving supernova remnant (SNR), and the collapse and fragmentation of molecular clouds to form stars. We first study the dynamics of SNR evolution from the ejecta-dominated stage through the Sedov-Taylor stage, the stages which precede the onset of dynamically significant radiative losses. We emphasize that all nonradiative SNRs of a given power-law structure evolve according to a unified solution, and we discuss this general property in detail. We present 1-D numerical simulations of the flow and use these to aid the development of approximate analytic solutions for the motions of the SNR shocks. We elucidate the dependence of the evolution on the ejecta power-law index n by developing a general trajectory for all n and explaining its relation to the solutions of Chevalier (1982) & Nadyozhin (1985) for n > 5 and Hamilton & Sarazin (1984) for n = 0. These solutions should be valuable in describing relatively young SNRs at intermediate points of nonradiative evolution. We then turn to 3-D simulation of star formation using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). We demonstrate that perturbations arising from discretization of the equations of self-gravitational hydrodynamics can grow into artificial fragments. This can be avoided by ensuring the ratio of cell size to Jeans length, which we call the Jeans number, J ≡Δ x/λJ, is kept below 0.25. We refer to the constraint that λJ be resolved as the Jeans condition. We find that it is not possible a priori to have confidence that results of calculations which employ artificial viscosity to halt collapse are relevant to the astrophysical problem. Finally, we describe our new AMR code in detail. This code employs multiple grids at multiple levels of resolution and

  8. Simplified models for the evolution of supernova remnants including particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drury, L. O'C.; Markiewicz, W. J.; Voelk, H. J.

    1989-11-01

    A system of coupled ordinary differential equations is presented which models the dynamical evolution of a supernova remnant including the acceleration of the Galactic cosmic rays. In contrast to earlier two-fluid models the closure parameters needed for a hydrodynamic approximation of the cosmic ray 'gas' are not taken as prescribed constants but are estimated dynamically within the model. Diffusive coupling between the outer shock and the remnant interior is introduced; this is shown to be an important moderator of the acceleration as is heating of the thermal plasma by Alfven wave dissipation. For reasonable estimates of the suprathermal particle injection rate into the acceleration process, of the diffusion coefficient appropriate to the accelerated particles, of the coupling between interior and shock, and of wave heating, solutions are found which appear consistent both with observations of young remnants and the idea that the bulk of the Galactic cosmic rays are produced in supernova remnants.

  9. A long-period, violently variable X-ray source in a young supernova remnant.

    PubMed

    De Luca, A; Caraveo, P A; Mereghetti, S; Tiengo, A; Bignami, G F

    2006-08-11

    Observations with the Newton X-ray Multimirror Mission satellite show a strong periodic modulation at 6.67 +/- 0.03 hours of the x-ray source at the center of the 2000-year-old supernova remnant RCW 103. No fast pulsations are visible. If genetically tied to the supernova remnant, the source could either be an x-ray binary, composed of a compact object and a low-mass star in an eccentric orbit, or an isolated neutron star. In the latter case, the combination of its age and period would indicate that it is a peculiar magnetar, dramatically slowed down, possibly by a supernova debris disc. Both scenarios require nonstandard assumptions about the formation and evolution of compact objects in supernova explosions.

  10. The laboratory simulation of unmagnetized supernova remnants Absence of a blast wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borovsky, J. E.; Pongratz, M. B.; Roussel-Dupre, R. A.; Tan, T.-H.

    1984-01-01

    Supernova remnants are experimentally simulated by irradiating spherical targets with eight-beam carbon dioxide laser in a chamber containing finite amounts of neutral gas, the gas being ionized by radiation from the hot target. The expansion velocities of the target plasmas are approximately the same as the expansion velocities of supernova ejecta and the experiment is successfully scaled to the case of a supernova remnant in an unmagnetized, low-density, interstellar medium. No sweep-up of the ambient plasma is detected, indicating that no hydrodynamic shock wave is formed to couple the target ejecta to the ambient gas. The experiment implies that if supernova ejecta couple to the interstellar medium, magnetic-field effects may be crucial to the physical description.

  11. A Second Ultraviolet ``Light Bulb'' behind the Supernova Remnant SN 1006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, P. Frank; Long, Knox S.

    1997-09-01

    A point X-ray source located 9' NE of the center of SN 1006 has been spectroscopically identified as a background QSO, with a redshift of 0.335. The object is moderately bright, with magnitude V = 18.3. If its ultraviolet spectrum is typical of low-z quasars, this object will be a second source (after the Schweizer-Middleditch star) to use for absorption spectroscopy of material within SN 1006. Absorption spectra provide a unique probe for unshocked ejecta within this supernova remnant and can possibly solve the long-standing problem of ``missing'' iron in the remnants of Type Ia supernovae.

  12. Surprisingly high-pressure shocks in the supernova remnant IC 443

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhouse, A.; Brand, P. W. J. L.; Geballe, T. R.; Burton, M. G.

    1991-01-01

    The intensities of several lines of molecular hydrogen have been measured from two regions of the supernova-remnant/molecular-cloud shock in IC 443. The lines measured have upper-state energies ranging from 7000 K to 23,000 K. Their relative intensities differ in the two regions, but are consistent with those predicted from the post-shock regions of simple jump-type shocks of different pressure. The pressures so derived are far higher than the pressure in the supernova remnant itself, and a possible reason for this discrepancy is discussed.

  13. An astrophysics data program investigation of spatial structure of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, John P.

    1993-01-01

    The final report on astrophysics data program investigation of spatial structure of supernova remnants for the period 1 Aug. 1989 to 31 Jul. 1991 is presented. The goal of the project was the study of the spatial structure of supernova remnants (SNR's) as observed in the x-ray band. A number of software tools were developed for the analysis: (1) a program to fit various geometric models to high resolution x-ray data, and (2) programs for Fourier Transform analysis of clumping in SNR's. These programs were applied to high resolution imager (HRI) data on the young galactic SNR's Tycho and Kepler with some success.

  14. Supernova Ejecta in the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Hwang, Una; Green, David A.; Petre, Robert; Krishnamurthy, Kalyani; Willett, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    G1.9+0.3 is the youngest known Galactic supernova remnant (SNR), with an estimated supernova (SN) explosion date of approximately 1900, and most likely located near the Galactic Center. Only the outermost ejecta layers with free-expansion velocities (is) approximately greater than 18,000 km s-1 have been shocked so far in this dynamically young, likely Type Ia SNR. A long (980 ks) Chandra observation in 2011 allowed spatially-resolved spectroscopy of heavy-element ejecta. We denoised Chandra data with the spatio-spectral method of Krishnamurthy et al., and used a wavelet based technique to spatially localize thermal emission produced by intermediate-mass elements (IMEs: Si and S) and iron. The spatial distribution of both IMEs and Fe is extremely asymmetric, with the strongest ejecta emission in the northern rim. Fe K alpha emission is particularly prominent there, and fits with thermal models indicate strongly oversolar Fe abundances. In a localized, outlying region in the northern rim, IMEs are less abundant than Fe, indicating that undiluted Fe-group elements (including 56Ni) with velocities greater than 18,000 km s-1 were ejected by this SN. But in the inner west rim, we find Si- and S-rich ejecta without any traces of Fe, so high-velocity products of O-burning were also ejected. G1.9+0.3 appears similar to energetic Type Ia SNe such as SN 2010jn where iron-group elements at such high free-expansion velocities have been recently detected. The pronounced asymmetry in the ejecta distribution and abundance inhomogeneities are best explained by a strongly asymmetric SN explosion, similar to those produced in some recent 3D delayed-detonation Type Ia models.

  15. Association of the supernova remnant G 65.3+5.7 with ambient neutral hydrogen and a possible nature of the remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosachinskii, I. V.

    2010-04-01

    The neutral hydrogen at 21 cm has been investigated with the RATAN-600 radio telescope around the supernova remnant G 65.3+5.7, which has the largest angular sizes in the group of shell remnants. An expanding HI shell left after an old supernova explosion with an energy of ˜1051 erg and an age of 440 000 yr coincident in coordinates with the radio and optical remnant has been discovered. Since an X-ray emission from a much younger (27 000 yr) supernova remnant is observed in the same region and the shells detected by nebular lines have probably intermediate ages, we suggest that several successive supernova explosions have occurred here.

  16. DEM L241, A SUPERNOVA REMNANT CONTAINING A HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARY

    SciTech Connect

    Seward, F. D.; Charles, P. A.; Foster, D. L.; Dickel, J. R.; Romero, P. S.; Edwards, Z. I.; Perry, M.; Williams, R. M.

    2012-11-10

    A Chandra observation of the Large Magellanic Cloud supernova remnant DEM L241 reveals an interior unresolved source which is probably an accretion-powered binary. The optical counterpart is an O5III(f) star making this a high-mass X-ray binary with an orbital period likely to be of the order of tens of days. Emission from the remnant interior is thermal and spectral information is used to derive density and mass of the hot material. Elongation of the remnant is unusual and possible causes of this are discussed. The precursor star probably had mass >25 M {sub Sun}.

  17. The x-ray structure of the supernova remnant W49B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickel, John R.; Murphy, Rosa; Chu, You-Hua; Garcia, Guillermo; Goscha, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    Comparison of x-ray and radio images of W49B and other supernova remnants (SNR) provides detailed information on the mechanisms responsible for the emission and on the evolution of the remnants. There is faint x-ray emission from all parts of W49B but most of it is concentrated near the center of the remnant, unlike the radio emission which arises in a shell near the periphery. This structure indicates that this SNR is in the adolescent phase of its lifetime.

  18. A Study of Supernova Remnants with Center-Filled X-Ray Morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, Patrick O.

    2001-01-01

    The proposed study entails use of archival data, primarily from past and active X-ray observatories, to study the properties of a class of supernova remnants (SNRs) which display a centrally-bright X-ray morphology. Several models which have been proposed to explain the morphology are being investigated for comparisons with measured characteristics of several remnants: nonthermal emission from a central synchrotron nebula; thermal emission enhanced by slow evaporation of cool clouds in the hot SNR interior; and relic thermal emission from the SNR interior after the remnant has entered the radiative phase of evolution, thus causing the shell emission to cease.

  19. Investigation of Supernova Remnant Shocks in the Vela-Puppis Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankrit, Ravi

    2005-01-01

    Overview: We observed supernova remnant (SNR) shocks at four locations in the Vela- Puppis region. The targets were a bright X-ray knot in the center of the remnant, Knot D on the eastern limb of the remnant, a region overlapping the Puppis A SNR and a region within Vela overlapping the edge of the SNR Rx10852.0-4622. The aim of the observations was to characterize the properties of the shocks and identify separate kinematic components of the emission. The first round of analysis of these data produced significant interesting results as outlined below. Further analyses, in conjunction with other datasets, are planned.

  20. X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF POTENTIAL SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA REMNANTS AND THEIR ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, Q.; McEntaffer, R. L.; DeRoo, C.; Filipovic, M.; Wong, G. F.; Crawford, E. J.

    2015-04-20

    We examine three supernova remnants in the SMC, IKT 5 (supernova remnant (SNR) 0047-73.5), IKT 25 (SNR 0104-72.3), and DEM S 128 (SNR 0103-72.4), which are designated as Type Ia in the literature due to their spectra and morphology. This is troublesome because of their asymmetry, a trait not usually associated with young Type Ia remnants. We present Chandra X-ray Observatory data on these three remnants and perform a maximum likelihood analysis on their spectra. We find that the X-ray emission is dominated by interactions with the interstellar medium. In spite of this, we find a significant Fe overabundance in all three remnants. Through examination of radio, optical, and infrared data, we conclude that these three remnants are likely not Type Ia SNRs. We detect potential point sources that may be members of the progenitor systems of both DEM S 128 and IKT 5, which could suggest these could be Fe-rich core-collapse remnants.

  1. X-ray Spectroscopy of Potential Small Magellanic Cloud Type Ia Supernova Remnants and Their Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roper, Q.; McEntaffer, R. L.; DeRoo, C.; Filipovic, M.; Wong, G. F.; Crawford, E. J.

    2015-04-01

    We examine three supernova remnants in the SMC, IKT 5 (supernova remnant (SNR) 0047-73.5), IKT 25 (SNR 0104-72.3), and DEM S 128 (SNR 0103-72.4), which are designated as Type Ia in the literature due to their spectra and morphology. This is troublesome because of their asymmetry, a trait not usually associated with young Type Ia remnants. We present Chandra X-ray Observatory data on these three remnants and perform a maximum likelihood analysis on their spectra. We find that the X-ray emission is dominated by interactions with the interstellar medium. In spite of this, we find a significant Fe overabundance in all three remnants. Through examination of radio, optical, and infrared data, we conclude that these three remnants are likely not Type Ia SNRs. We detect potential point sources that may be members of the progenitor systems of both DEM S 128 and IKT 5, which could suggest these could be Fe-rich core-collapse remnants.

  2. XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS OF TWO CANDIDATE SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kargaltsev, O.; Schmitt, B. M.; Pavlov, G. G.; Misanovic, Z.

    2012-01-20

    Candidate supernova remnants (SNRs) G23.5+0.1 and G25.5+0.0 were observed by XMM-Newton in the course of a snapshot survey of plerionic and composite SNRs in the Galactic plane. In the field of G23.5+0.1, we detected an extended source, {approx}3' in diameter, which we tentatively interpret as a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) of the middle-aged radio pulsar B1830-08 (J1833-0827; P = 85.3 ms, {tau} = 147 kyr, E-dot = 5.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1}, d = 5.7 kpc), with the PWN luminosity L{sub 0.2-10keV} Almost-Equal-To 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1} Almost-Equal-To 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} E-dot . The pulsar is not resolved in the EPIC images. Our analysis suggests an association between PSR B1830-08 and the surrounding diffuse radio emission. If the radio emission is due to the SNR, then the pulsar must be significantly younger than its characteristic age. Alternatively, the radio emission may come from a relic PWN. The field also contains SGR 1833-0832 and another middle-aged pulsar B1829-08 (J1832-0827; P = 647 ms, {tau} = 161 kyr, E-dot = 9.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}, d = 4.7 kpc), none of which are detected in our observation. In the field of G25.5+0.0, which contains the extended TeV source HESS J1837-069, we detected the recently discovered young high-energy pulsar J1838-0655 (P = 70.5 ms, {tau} = 23 kyr, E-dot = 5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}) embedded in a PWN with extent of 1.'3. The unabsorbed pulsar + PWN luminosity is L{sub 2-11keV} Almost-Equal-To 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} Almost-Equal-To 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} E-dot at an assumed distance of 7 kpc. We also detected another PWN candidate (AX J1837.3-0652) with an extent of 2' and unabsorbed luminosity L{sub 2-10keV} Almost-Equal-To 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1} at d = 7 kpc. The third X-ray source, located within the extent of the HESS J1837-069, has a peculiar extended radio

  3. Acceleration of cosmic rays and gamma-ray emission from supernova remnant/molecular cloud associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabici, Stefano; Krause, Julian; Morlino, Giovanni; Nava, Lara

    2015-12-01

    The gamma-ray observations of molecular clouds associated with supernova remnants are considered one of the most promising ways to search for a solution of the problem of cosmic ray origin. Here we briefly review the status of the field, with particular emphasis on the theoretical and phenomenological aspects of the problem.

  4. Observations of supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae at gamma-ray energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, John W.; Lemoine-Goumard, Marianne

    2015-08-01

    In the past few years, gamma-ray astronomy has entered a golden age thanks to two major breakthroughs: Cherenkov telescopes on the ground and the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi satellite. The sample of supernova remnants (SNRs) detected at gamma-ray energies is now much larger: it goes from evolved supernova remnants interacting with molecular clouds up to young shell-type supernova remnants and historical supernova remnants. Studies of SNRs are of great interest, as these analyses are directly linked to the long standing issue of the origin of the Galactic cosmic rays. In this context, pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) need also to be considered since they evolve in conjunction with SNRs. As a result, they frequently complicate interpretation of the gamma-ray emission seen from SNRs and they could also contribute directly to the local cosmic ray spectrum, particularly the leptonic component. This paper reviews the current results and thinking on SNRs and PWNe and their connection to cosmic ray production.

  5. DISCRIMINATING THE PROGENITOR TYPE OF SUPERNOVA REMNANTS WITH IRON K-SHELL EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Petre, Robert; Enoto, Teruaki; Badenes, Carles; Nakano, Toshio; Hiraga, Junko S.; Castro, Daniel; Hughes, John P.; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Safi-Harb, Samar; Slane, Patrick O.; Smith, Randall K.

    2014-04-20

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) retain crucial information about both their parent explosion and circumstellar material left behind by their progenitor. However, the complexity of the interaction between supernova ejecta and ambient medium often blurs this information, and it is not uncommon for the basic progenitor type (Ia or core-collapse) of well-studied remnants to remain uncertain. Here we present a powerful new observational diagnostic to discriminate between progenitor types and constrain the ambient medium density of SNRs using solely Fe K-shell X-ray emission. We analyze all extant Suzaku observations of SNRs and detect Fe Kα emission from 23 young or middle-aged remnants, including five first detections (IC 443, G292.0+1.8, G337.2-0.7, N49, and N63A). The Fe Kα centroids clearly separate progenitor types, with the Fe-rich ejecta in Type Ia remnants being significantly less ionized than in core-collapse SNRs. Within each progenitor group, the Fe Kα luminosity and centroid are well correlated, with more luminous objects having more highly ionized Fe. Our results indicate that there is a strong connection between explosion type and ambient medium density, and suggest that Type Ia supernova progenitors do not substantially modify their surroundings at radii of up to several parsecs. We also detect a K-shell radiative recombination continuum of Fe in W49B and IC 443, implying a strong circumstellar interaction in the early evolutionary phases of these core-collapse remnants.

  6. Optical emission from a fast shock wave - The remnants of Tycho's supernova and SN 1006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, R. A.; Raymond, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    The faint optical filaments in Tycho's supernova remnant appear to be emission from a shock front moving at 5600 km/s. The intensity of the hydrogen lines, the absence of forbidden lines of heavy elements in the spectrum, and the width of the filaments are explained by a model in which a collisionless shock wave is moving into partially neutral gas. The presence of the neutral gas can be used to set an upper limit of approximately 5 x 10 to the 47th power ergs to the energy in ionizing radiation emitted by a Type I supernova. The patchy neutral gas is probably part of the warm neutral component of the interstellar medium. The existing information on the remnant of SN 1006 indicates that its emission is similar in nature to that from Tycho's remnant.

  7. A Newly Discovered Supernova Remnant and MSH 11-62 and 3C58

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, Patrick O.

    2000-01-01

    CTA 1 is a center-filled supernova remnant (SNR) whose morphology and spectrum indicate the presence of a central pulsar, a synchrotron nebula, and a thermal component associated with the expansion of the blast wave into the interstellar medium. The centrally bright emission surrounds the position of a faint point source of X-rays observed with the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC). Here we report on Advanced Spacecraft for Cosmology Astrophysics (ASCA) observations that confirm the nonthermal nature of the diffuse emission from the central regions of the remnant. We also present evidence for weak thermal emission that appears to increase in strength toward the outer boundary of the SNR. Thus, CTA 1 appears to be an X-ray composite remnant. Both the aftermath of the explosive supernova event and the energetic compact core are observable.

  8. The youngest known X-ray binary: Circinus X-1 and its natal supernova remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Heinz, S.; Sell, P.; Fender, R. P.; Jonker, P. G.; Brandt, W. N.; Calvelo-Santos, D. E.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Nowak, M. A.; Schulz, N. S.; Wijnands, R.; Van der Klis, M.

    2013-12-20

    Because supernova remnants are short-lived, studies of neutron star X-ray binaries within supernova remnants probe the earliest stages in the life of accreting neutron stars. However, such objects are exceedingly rare: none were known to exist in our Galaxy. We report the discovery of the natal supernova remnant of the accreting neutron star Circinus X-1, which places an upper limit of t < 4600 yr on its age, making it the youngest known X-ray binary and a unique tool to study accretion, neutron star evolution, and core-collapse supernovae. This discovery is based on a deep 2009 Chandra X-ray observation and new radio observations of Circinus X-1. Circinus X-1 produces type I X-ray bursts on the surface of the neutron star, indicating that the magnetic field of the neutron star is small. Thus, the young age implies either that neutron stars can be born with low magnetic fields or that they can rapidly become de-magnetized by accretion. Circinus X-1 is a microquasar, creating relativistic jets that were thought to power the arcminute-scale radio nebula surrounding the source. Instead, this nebula can now be attributed to non-thermal synchrotron emission from the forward shock of the supernova remnant. The young age is consistent with the observed rapid orbital evolution and the highly eccentric orbit of the system and offers the chance to test the physics of post-supernova orbital evolution in X-ray binaries in detail for the first time.

  9. The Youngest Known X-Ray Binary: Circinus X-1 and Its Natal Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, S.; Sell, P.; Fender, R. P.; Jonker, P. G.; Brandt, W. N.; Calvelo-Santos, D. E.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Nowak, M. A.; Schulz, N. S.; Wijnands, R.; van der Klis, M.

    2013-12-01

    Because supernova remnants are short-lived, studies of neutron star X-ray binaries within supernova remnants probe the earliest stages in the life of accreting neutron stars. However, such objects are exceedingly rare: none were known to exist in our Galaxy. We report the discovery of the natal supernova remnant of the accreting neutron star Circinus X-1, which places an upper limit of t < 4600 yr on its age, making it the youngest known X-ray binary and a unique tool to study accretion, neutron star evolution, and core-collapse supernovae. This discovery is based on a deep 2009 Chandra X-ray observation and new radio observations of Circinus X-1. Circinus X-1 produces type I X-ray bursts on the surface of the neutron star, indicating that the magnetic field of the neutron star is small. Thus, the young age implies either that neutron stars can be born with low magnetic fields or that they can rapidly become de-magnetized by accretion. Circinus X-1 is a microquasar, creating relativistic jets that were thought to power the arcminute-scale radio nebula surrounding the source. Instead, this nebula can now be attributed to non-thermal synchrotron emission from the forward shock of the supernova remnant. The young age is consistent with the observed rapid orbital evolution and the highly eccentric orbit of the system and offers the chance to test the physics of post-supernova orbital evolution in X-ray binaries in detail for the first time.

  10. Connecting the high- and low-energy Universe: dust processing inside Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micelotta, Elisabetta; Dwek, Eli; Slavin, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    The recent detection of large amounts of dust (> 10(7) M_⊙) at very high redshift (z > 6) raises a fundamental question about the origin of such dust. The main dust producers, i. e., the stars populating the Red Giant Branch and the Asymptotic Giant Branch (RGB and AGB stars) did not have time to evolve. From an evolutionary point of view, young supernovae (SNe) could represent a viable source of dust in high-redshift galaxies, however, a critical issue still needs to be addressed. While recent observations have demonstrated that supernovae are indeed efficient dust factories, at the same time SNe represent the major agent responsible for dust destruction. Supernova blast waves propagating into the interstellar medium destroy the dust residing there, while the fresh dust produced by the supernova itself is threatened by the reverse shock which propagates through the expanding ejecta towards the center of the remnant. We focus here on this second destruction mechanism, with the aim of quantifying the amount of dust able to survive the heavy processing by the reverse shock and to reach the interstellar medium. We present our results for the textbook supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A). Using recent X-ray and infrared observations, we have developed a model for the evolution of the remnant and the simultaneous processing of the dust by the reverse shock, and derived the expected amount of surviving dust. In addition, we will briefly illustrate the impact of the capabilities of the Athena mission on the variety of astrophysical problems involving the processing of dust particles in extreme environments characterized by the presence of shocked X-ray emitting gas. These range from individual supernova remnants, to starburst super winds up to AGN outflows and the hot intra-cluster medium. The study of dust processing by a shocked gas truly connects the high-energy Universe with the low-energy Universe, and Athena will play a major role in it.

  11. An X-Ray and Radio Study of the Varying Expansion Velocities in Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian J.; Chomiuk, Laura; Hewitt, John W.; Blondin, John M.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Petre, Robert; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    We present newly obtained X-ray and radio observations of Tycho's supernova remnant using Chandra and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array in 2015 and 2013/14, respectively. When combined with earlier epoch observations by these instruments, we now have time baselines for expansion measurements of the remnant of 12-15 years in the X-rays and 30 years in the radio. The remnant's large angular size allows for proper motion measurements at many locations around the periphery of the blast wave. Consistent with earlier measurements, we find a clear gradient in the expansion velocity of the remnant, despite its round shape. The proper motions on the western and southwestern sides of the remnant are about a factor of two higher than those in the east and northeast. We showed in an earlier work that this is related to an offset of the explosion site from the geometric center of the remnant due to a density gradient in the ISM, and using our refined measurements reported here, we find that this offset is approximately 23? toward the northeast. An explosion center offset in such a circular remnant has implications for searches for progenitor companions in other remnants.

  12. INVESTIGATION OF THE PROGENITORS OF THE TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE ASSOCIATED WITH THE LMC SUPERNOVA REMNANTS 0505-67.9 AND 0509-68.7

    SciTech Connect

    Pagnotta, Ashley; Schaefer, Bradley E.

    2015-01-20

    Although Type Ia supernovae have been heavily scrutinized due to their use in making cosmological distance estimates, we are still unable to definitively identify the progenitors for the entire population. While answers have been presented for certain specific systems, a complete solution remains elusive. We present observations of two supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud, SNR 0505-67.9 and SNR 0509-68.7, for which we have identified the center of the remnant and the 99.73% containment central region in which any companion star left over after the supernova must be located. Both remnants have a number of potential ex-companion stars near their centers; all possible single and double degenerate progenitor models remain viable for these two supernovae. Future observations may be able to identify the true ex-companions for both remnants.

  13. Two-temperature models of old supernova remnants with ion and electron thermal conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Wei; Cox, Donald P.

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the potential effects thermal conduction may have on the evolution of old supernova remnants, we present the results of 1D (spherically symmetric) numerical simulations of a remnant in a homogeneous interstellar medium for four different cases: (1) without thermal conduction; (2) with both electron and ion thermal conduction assuming equal temperatures; (3) with electron thermal conduction only, following electron and ion temperatures separately; and (4) with both electron and ion thermal conduction following separate temperatures. We followed the entire evolution until the completion of the remnant bubble collapse. Our most significant result is that in remnant evolution studies concerned principally with either the shell or bubble evolution at late times, reasonable results are obtained with single-temperature models. When the electron and ion temperatures are followed separately, however, ion thermal conduction cannot safely be ignored.

  14. Chandra Observations and Models of the Mixed Morphology Supernova Remnant W44: Global Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, R. L.; Kuntz, K. D.; Petre, R.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the Chandra observations of the archetypical mixed morphology (or thermal composite) supernova remnant, W44. As with other mixed morphology remnants, W44's projected center is bright in thermal X-rays. It has an obvious radio shell, but no discernable X-ray shell. In addition, X-ray bright knots dot W44's image. The spectral analysis of the Chandra data show that the remnant s hot, bright projected center is metal-rich and that the bright knots are regions of comparatively elevated elemental abundances. Neon is among the affected elements, suggesting that ejecta contributes to the abundance trends. Furthermore, some of the emitting iron atoms appear to be underionized with respect to the other ions, providing the first potential X-ray evidence for dust destruction in a supernova remnant. We use the Chandra data to test the following explanations for W44's X-ray bright center: 1.) entropy mixing due to bulk mixing or thermal conduction, 2.) evaporation of swept up clouds, and 3.) a metallicity gradient, possibly due to dust destruction and ejecta enrichment. In these tests, we assume that the remnant has evolved beyond the adiabatic evolutionary stage, which explains the X-ray dimness of the shell. The entropy mixed model spectrum was tested against the Chandra spectrum for the remnant's projected center and found to be a good match. The evaporating clouds model was constrained by the finding that the ionization parameters of the bright knots are similar to those of the surrounding regions. While both the entropy mixed and the evaporating clouds models are known to predict centrally bright X-ray morphologies, their predictions fall short of the observed brightness gradient. The resulting brightness gap can be largely filled in by emission from the extra metals in and near the remnant's projected center. The preponderance of evidence (including that drawn from other studies) suggests that W44's remarkable morphology can be attributed to dust destruction

  15. Uncovering the Properties of Young Neutron Stars and their Surrounding Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); Slane, Patrick O.

    2004-01-01

    This five-year grant involves the study of young neutron stars, particularly those in supernova remnants.In the fourth year of this program, the following studies have been undertaken in support of this effort: 1.CTA 1: Following up on our ROSAT and ASCA studies of this SNR, we obtained observations with the XMM-Newton observatory to investigate the central compact source and surrounding nebula. 2. 3C 58: Based upon our earlier Chandra observations, we submitted a successful Chandra Large Project proposal for a 350 ks observation of this young neutron star and its wind nebula. 3. G347.3 - - 0.5: Our Chandra observations of portions of this SNR were aimed at studying the nonthermal X-ray emission from the remnant shell. 4. Chandra Survey for Compact Objects in Supernova Remnants: We have formed a collaboration to carry out an extensive search for young neutron stars in nearby supernova remnants. Using X-ray observations from an approved Chandra Large Project, as well as from additional approved XMM observations, we are investigating a volume-limited sample of SNRs for which there is currently no evidence of associated neutron stars.

  16. Swift/BAT Detection of Hard X-Rays from Tycho's Supernova Remnant: Evidence for Titanium-44

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troja, E.; Segreto, A.; La Parola, V.; Hartmann, D.; Baumgartner, W.; Markwardt, C.; Barthelmy, S.; Cusumano, G.; Gehrels, N.

    2014-12-01

    We report Swift/Burst Alert Telescope survey observations of the Tycho's supernova remnant, performed over a period of 104 months since the mission's launch. The remnant is detected with high significance (>10σ) below 50 keV. We detect significant hard X-ray emission in the 60-85 keV band, above the continuum level predicted by a simple synchrotron model. The location of the observed excess is consistent with line emission from radioactive titanium-44, so far reported only for Type II supernova explosions. We discuss the implications of these results in the context of the galactic supernova rate, and nucleosynthesis in Type Ia supernova.

  17. The Progenitor of the New COMPTEL/ROSAT Supernova Remnant in Vela

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wan; Gehrels, Neil

    1999-01-01

    We show that (1) the newly discovered supernova remnant (SNR) GROJ0852-4642/RXJ0852.0-4622 was created by a core-collapse supernova of a massive star and (2) the same supernova event that produced the Ti-44 detected by COMPTEL from this source is probably also responsible for a large fraction of the observed Al-26 emission in the Vela region detected by the same instrument. The first conclusion is based on the fact that the remnant is currently expanding too slowly given its young age for it to be caused by a Type la supernova. If the current SNR shell expansion speed is greater than 3000 km/s, a 15 solar mass. Type II supernova with a moderate kinetic energy exploding at about 150 pc away is favored. If the SNR expansion speed is lower than 2000 km/s, as derived naively from X-ray data, a much more energetic supernova is required to have occurred at approximately 250 pc away in a dense environment at the edge of the Gum Nebula. This progenitor has a preferred ejecta mass of less than or equal to 10(Solar Mass), and therefore it is probably a Type Ib or Type Ic supernova. However, the required high ambient density of n(sub H) greater than or equal to 100 cu cm in this scenario is difficult to reconcile with the regional CO data. A combination of our estimates of the age/energetics of the new SNR and the almost perfect positional coincidence of the new SNR with the centroid of the COMPTEL Al-26 emission feature of the Vela region strongly favors a causal connection. If confirmed, this will be the first case in which both Ti-44 and Al-26 are detected from the same young SNR, and together they can be used to select preferred theoretical core-collapse supernova models.

  18. Dynamics of the Remnant of Kepler's Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz

    2013-09-01

    The remnant of Kepler's Type Ia SN shows an interaction of SN ejecta with a highly asymmetric ambient circumstellar medium (CSM). This material was ejected by a single-degenerate progenitor prior to the explosion, and its complex spatial distribution contains invaluable information about the progenitor itself. We propose a third-epoch observation of Kepler's SNR that will provide us with much improved expansion rates, allowing for measurements of shock speeds along the whole periphery of the remnant. These measurements will be compared with 3-D hydrodynamic simulations, thus unraveling the true shape of the CSM in a Type Ia progenitor. They will also advance our knowledge of poorly-understood particle acceleration and magnetic field amplification processes in fast SNR shocks.

  19. 1051 Ergs: The Evolution of Shell Supernova Remnants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-11-15

    3 and that SNR 1987A will become a strong source in X-ray, optical, IR, UV , and radio. Gaensler showed the radio morphology already observed for SNR...study physical pro- cesses taking place in collisionless shocks. In particular, UV observations of SN 1006 indicate that only a small fraction of...phase shell-type emission, often in the same remnant. Dickel, in an overview, emphasized this by showing a gallery of multiwavelength SNR images

  20. Search for Nonthermal X-Rays from Supernova Remnant Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, R.; Keohane, J.; Hwang, U.; Allen, G.; Gotthelf, E.

    The demonstration by ASCA that the nonthermal X-ray emission from the rim of SN1006 is synchrotron emission from TeV electrons, produced in the same environment responsible for cosmic ray protons and nuclei (Koyama et al. 1995, Nature 378, 255), has stimulated a search for nonthermal X-rays from other remnants. Nonthermal emission has subsequently been found to arise in the shells of at least two other remnants, Cas A and IC 443. In Cas A, a hard tail is detected using ASCA, XTE, and OSSE to energies exceeding 100 keV; the shape of the spectrum rules out all mechanisms except synchrotron radiation. In IC 443, the previously known hard emission has been shown using ASCA to be isolated to a small region along the rim of the remnant, where the shock is interacting most strongly with a molecular cloud. Nonthermal X-ray emission is thought to arise here by enhanced cosmic ray production associated with the shock/cloud interaction (Keohane et al. 1997, ApJ in press). We describe the properties of the nonthermal emission in SN1006, Cas A, and IC 443, and discuss the status of our search for nonthermal emission associated with the shocks of other Galactic and LMC SNR's.

  1. 3D simulations of young core-collapse supernova remnants undergoing efficient particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrand, Gilles; Safi-Harb, Samar

    2016-06-01

    Within our Galaxy, supernova remnants are believed to be the major sources of cosmic rays up to the 'knee'. However important questions remain regarding the share of the hadronic and leptonic components, and the fraction of the supernova energy channelled into these components. We address such question by the means of numerical simulations that combine a hydrodynamic treatment of the shock wave with a kinetic treatment of particle acceleration. Performing 3D simulations allows us to produce synthetic projected maps and spectra of the thermal and non-thermal emission, that can be compared with multi-wavelength observations (in radio, X-rays, and γ-rays). Supernovae come in different types, and although their energy budget is of the same order, their remnants have different properties, and so may contribute in different ways to the pool of Galactic cosmic-rays. Our first simulations were focused on thermonuclear supernovae, like Tycho's SNR, that usually occur in a mostly undisturbed medium. Here we present our 3D simulations of core-collapse supernovae, like the Cas A SNR, that occur in a more complex medium bearing the imprint of the wind of the progenitor star.

  2. Onion-shell model for cosmic ray electrons and radio synchrotron emission in supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L. O.; Voelk, H. J.; Bogdan, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrum of cosmic ray electrons, accelerated in the shock front of a supernova remnant (SNR), is calculated in the test-particle approximation using an onion-shell model. Particle diffusion within the evolving remnant is explicity taken into account. The particle spectrum becomes steeper with increasing radius as well as SNR age. Simple models of the magnetic field distribution allow a prediction of the intensity and spectrum of radio synchrotron emission and their radial variation. The agreement with existing observations is satisfactory in several SNR's but fails in other cases. Radiative cooling may be an important effect, especially in SNR's exploding in a dense interstellar medium.

  3. Improved experimental resolution of the Vishniac overstability in scaled late-stage supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, N. J.; Lewis, S. M.; Wisher, M. L.; Kimmel, M. W.; Struve, K. W.; Porter, J. L.; Bengtson, R. D.; Ditmire, T.

    2017-03-01

    Radiative shocks and blast waves are important in many astrophysical contexts, such as supernova remnant formation, cosmic ray production, and gamma ray bursts. Structure formation on radiative blast wave fronts in late-stage supernova remnants is expected to play a role in star formation via seeding of the Jeans instability. The origin of these structures is believed to be an instability described theoretically by Vishniac [1], which has been subject to continued numerical and experimental study. We report here on a series of experiments designed to examine the effect of magnetic fields on the Vishniac overstability. Preliminary results suggest that a strong transverse magnetic field appears to shift the overstability to longer wavelengths, which may have implications for gravitational star formation models. We present unmagnetized results from an experiment in progress which decomposes the spatial structure of the blast wave for quantitative analysis of magnetic and radiative effects.

  4. Measuring the cosmic-ray acceleration efficiency of a supernova remnant.

    PubMed

    Helder, E A; Vink, J; Bassa, C G; Bamba, A; Bleeker, J A M; Funk, S; Ghavamian, P; van der Heyden, K J; Verbunt, F; Yamazaki, R

    2009-08-07

    Cosmic rays are the most energetic particles arriving at Earth. Although most of them are thought to be accelerated by supernova remnants, the details of the acceleration process and its efficiency are not well determined. Here we show that the pressure induced by cosmic rays exceeds the thermal pressure behind the northeast shock of the supernova remnant RCW 86, where the x-ray emission is dominated by synchrotron radiation from ultrarelativistic electrons. We determined the cosmic-ray content from the thermal Doppler broadening measured with optical spectroscopy, combined with a proper-motion study in x-rays. The measured postshock proton temperature, in combination with the shock velocity, does not agree with standard shock heating, implying that >50% of the postshock pressure is produced by cosmic rays.

  5. Onion-shell model of cosmic ray acceleration in supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdan, T. J.; Volk, H. J.

    1983-01-01

    A method is devised to approximate the spatially averaged momentum distribution function for the accelerated particles at the end of the active lifetime of a supernova remnant. The analysis is confined to the test particle approximation and adiabatic losses are oversimplified, but unsteady shock motion, evolving shock strength, and non-uniform gas flow effects on the accelerated particle spectrum are included. Monoenergetic protons are injected at the shock front. It is found that the dominant effect on the resultant accelerated particle spectrum is a changing spectral index with shock strength. High energy particles are produced in early phases, and the resultant distribution function is a slowly varying power law over several orders of magnitude, independent of the specific details of the supernova remnant.

  6. X-ray emission from the supernova remnant G287.8-0.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Pravdo, S. H.; Rothschild, R. E.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Swank, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    The GSFC Cosmic X-ray spectroscopy experiment on OSO-8 observed a weak galactic X-ray source near theta 2 at 288 deg, b2 at -1 deg. The spectrum for this source between 2-20 keV is well represented by a thermal spectrum of kT = 7.34(+3.6), sub -2.6 keV with an intense iron emission line centered at 6.5 + or - .2 keV. The error box of the Uhuru source 4U1043-59, the only known X-ray source in our field of view, contains the radio supernova remnant G287.8-0.5. The possible association of the X-ray source with this supernova remnant is discussed.

  7. Onion-shell model of cosmic ray acceleration in supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, T. J.; Volk, H. J.

    1983-06-01

    A method is devised to approximate the spatially averaged momentum distribution function for the accelerated particles at the end of the active lifetime of a supernova remnant. The authors confine themselves to the test particle approximation and oversimplify adiabatic losses, but include unsteady shock motion, evolving shock strength, and non-uniform gas flow effects on the accelerated particle spectrum. Monoenergetic (T0 = 1 keV) protons are injected at the shock front. It is found that the dominant effect on the resultant accelerated particle spectrum is a changing spectral index with shock strength. High energy particles are produced in early phases, and the resultant distribution function is a slowly varying power law αT-μ, (T = kinetic energy), 2.1 ≤ μ ≤ 2.3 over several orders of magnitude, independent of the specific details of the supernova remnant.

  8. Recombining plasma in the remnant of a core-collapsed supernova, Kes 17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washino, Ryosaku; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Tanaka, Takaaki; Kawabata Nobukawa, Kumiko; Koyama, Katsuji

    2016-06-01

    We report on Suzaku results concerning Kes 17, a Galactic mixed-morphology supernova remnant. The X-ray spectrum of the whole Kes 17 is well explained by a pure thermal plasma, in which we found Lyα of Al XIII and Heα of Al XII, Ar XVII, and Ca XIX lines for the first time. The abundance pattern and the plasma mass suggest that Kes 17 is a remnant of a core-collapsed supernova of a 25-30 M⊙ progenitor star. The X-ray spectrum of the north region is expressed by a recombining plasma. The origin would be due to the cooling of electrons by thermal conduction to molecular clouds located near the north region.

  9. Non-linear diffusion of cosmic rays escaping from supernova remnants - I. The effect of neutrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, L.; Gabici, S.; Marcowith, A.; Morlino, G.; Ptuskin, V. S.

    2016-10-01

    Supernova remnants are believed to be the main sources of galactic cosmic rays (CR). Within this framework, particles are accelerated at supernova remnant shocks and then released in the interstellar medium. The mechanism through which CRs are released and the way in which they propagate still remain open issues. The main difficulty is the high non-linearity of the problem: CRs themselves excite the magnetic turbulence that confines them close to their sources. We solve numerically the coupled differential equations describing the evolution in space and time of the escaping particles and of the waves generated through the CR streaming instability. The warm ionized and warm neutral phases of the interstellar medium are considered. These phases occupy the largest fraction of the disc volume, where most supernovae explode, and are characterized by the significant presence of neutral particles. The friction between those neutrals and ions results in a very effective wave damping mechanism. It is found that streaming instability affects the propagation of CRs even in the presence of ion-neutral friction. The diffusion coefficient can be suppressed by more than a factor of ˜2 over a region of few tens of pc around the remnant. The suppression increases for smaller distances. The propagation of ≈10 GeV particles is affected for several tens of kiloyears after escape, while ≈1 TeV particles are affected for few kiloyears. This might have a great impact on the interpretation of gamma-ray observations of molecular clouds located in the vicinity of supernova remnants.

  10. New, fast X-ray pulsar in the supernova remnant MSH 15--52

    SciTech Connect

    Seward, F.D.; Harnden, F.R. Jr.

    1982-05-15

    A pulsing X-ray source has been discovered within the shell of the supernova remnant MSH 15--52. The period is 0.150 s, and the rate of increase of period with time is the highest measured for any pulsar. These characteristics and the fact that the pulsar is surrounded by a small, bright nebula indicate that this object is very similar to the Crab pulsar.

  11. A new, fast X-ray pulsar in the supernova remnant MSH 15-52

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, F. D.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A pulsing X-ray source has been discovered within the shell of the supernova remnant MSH 15-52. The period is 0.150 s, and the rate of increase of period with time is the highest measured for any pulsar. These characteristics and the fact that the pulsar is surrounded by a small, bright nebula indicate that this object is very similar to the Crab pulsar.

  12. X-ray emission from the supernova remnant MSH 14-63

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naranan, S.; Shulman, S.; Yentis, D.; Fritz, G.; Friedman, H.

    1977-01-01

    X-ray emission in the 0.6-2.5-keV energy range has been detected from the supernova remnant MSH 14-63. The observed flux is 3.5 by 10 to the -10th power erg/sq cm per sec. The absence of lower-energy X-rays indicates a hydrogen column density consistent with the radio and optical distance estimates of 2.5 kpc.

  13. ROSAT Observations of the Composite Supernova Remnant G326.3-1.8

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-20

    We have observed X-ray emission from the radio-defined composite (shell plus filled-center plerion) Galactic supernova remnant ( SNR ) 0326.3 - 1.8...radio studies that would place the SNR significantly further than this lower limit. Higher quality radio absorption measurements are warranted to confirm...our distance determination. This result, along with other recent ROSAT studies of SNRs , implies that improved distance estimates may be established

  14. Multi-dimensional simulations of the expanding supernova remnant of SN 1987A

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, T. M.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Reville, B.; Ng, C.-Y.; Bicknell, G. V.; Sutherland, R. S.; Wagner, A. Y.

    2014-10-20

    The expanding remnant from SN 1987A is an excellent laboratory for investigating the physics of supernovae explosions. There is still a large number of outstanding questions, such as the reason for the asymmetric radio morphology, the structure of the pre-supernova environment, and the efficiency of particle acceleration at the supernova shock. We explore these questions using three-dimensional simulations of the expanding remnant between days 820 and 10,000 after the supernova. We combine a hydrodynamical simulation with semi-analytic treatments of diffusive shock acceleration and magnetic field amplification to derive radio emission as part of an inverse problem. Simulations show that an asymmetric explosion, combined with magnetic field amplification at the expanding shock, is able to replicate the persistent one-sided radio morphology of the remnant. We use an asymmetric Truelove and McKee progenitor with an envelope mass of 10 M {sub ☉} and an energy of 1.5 × 10{sup 44} J. A termination shock in the progenitor's stellar wind at a distance of 0.''43-0.''51 provides a good fit to the turn on of radio emission around day 1200. For the H II region, a minimum distance of 0.''63 ± 0.''01 and maximum particle number density of (7.11 ± 1.78) × 10{sup 7} m{sup –3} produces a good fit to the evolving average radius and velocity of the expanding shocks from day 2000 to day 7000 after explosion. The model predicts a noticeable reduction, and possibly a temporary reversal, in the asymmetric radio morphology of the remnant after day 7000, when the forward shock left the eastern lobe of the equatorial ring.

  15. CANGAROO-III Search for Gamma Rays from Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, R.; Higashi, Y.; Yoshida, T.; Tanimori, T.; Bicknell, G. V.; Clay, R. W.; Edwards, P. G.; Gunji, S.; Hara, S.; Hara, T.; Hattori, T.; Hayashi, S.; Hirai, Y.; Inoue, K.; Kabuki, S.; Kajino, F.; Katagiri, H.; Kawachi, A.; Kifune, T.; Kiuchi, R.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; Matsubara, Y.; Mizukami, T.; Mizumoto, Y.; Mizuniwa, R.; Mori, M.; Muraishi, H.; Muraki, Y.; Naito, T.; Nakamori, T.; Nakano, S.; Nishida, D.; Nishijima, K.; Ohishi, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Seki, A.; Stamatescu, V.; Suzuki, T.; Swaby, D. L.; Thornton, G.; Tokanai, F.; Tsuchiya, K.; Watanabe, S.; Yamada, Y.; Yamazaki, E.; Yanagita, S.; Yoshikoshi, T.; Yukawa, Y.

    2008-08-01

    Kepler's supernova, discovered in 1604 October, produced a remnant that has been well studied observationally in the radio, infrared, optical, and X-ray bands, and theoretically. Some models have predicted a TeV gamma-ray flux that is detectable with current Imaging Cerenkov Atmospheric Telescopes. We report on observations carried out in 2005 April with the CANGAROO-III Telescope. No statistically significant excess was observed, and limitations on the allowed parameter range in the model are discussed.

  16. Multi-dimensional Simulations of the Expanding Supernova Remnant of SN 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, T. M.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Reville, B.; Ng, C.-Y.; Bicknell, G. V.; Sutherland, R. S.; Wagner, A. Y.

    2014-10-01

    The expanding remnant from SN 1987A is an excellent laboratory for investigating the physics of supernovae explosions. There is still a large number of outstanding questions, such as the reason for the asymmetric radio morphology, the structure of the pre-supernova environment, and the efficiency of particle acceleration at the supernova shock. We explore these questions using three-dimensional simulations of the expanding remnant between days 820 and 10,000 after the supernova. We combine a hydrodynamical simulation with semi-analytic treatments of diffusive shock acceleration and magnetic field amplification to derive radio emission as part of an inverse problem. Simulations show that an asymmetric explosion, combined with magnetic field amplification at the expanding shock, is able to replicate the persistent one-sided radio morphology of the remnant. We use an asymmetric Truelove & McKee progenitor with an envelope mass of 10 M ⊙ and an energy of 1.5 × 1044 J. A termination shock in the progenitor's stellar wind at a distance of 0.''43-0.''51 provides a good fit to the turn on of radio emission around day 1200. For the H II region, a minimum distance of 0.''63 ± 0.''01 and maximum particle number density of (7.11 ± 1.78) × 107 m-3 produces a good fit to the evolving average radius and velocity of the expanding shocks from day 2000 to day 7000 after explosion. The model predicts a noticeable reduction, and possibly a temporary reversal, in the asymmetric radio morphology of the remnant after day 7000, when the forward shock left the eastern lobe of the equatorial ring.

  17. G54. 1 + 0. 3 - a new Crab-like supernova remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Velusamy, T.; Becker, R.H.

    1988-04-01

    High-resolution multifrequency observations with the VLA and OSRT of the small-diameter flat-spectrum radio source G54.1 + 0.3 are presented. The filled-center brightness distribution, strong polarization at 6 cm, and flat radio spectrum (alpha of about -0.13) from 0.327 to 5 GHz confirm that G54.1 + 0.3 is a Crab-like supernova remnant. 22 references.

  18. ROSAT/ASCA observations of the mixed-morphology supernova remnant W28

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rho, J.; Borkowski, K. J.

    2002-01-01

    We present three sets of ROSAT PSPC and four sets of ASCA observations of the supernova remnant (SNR) W28. The overall shape of x-ray emission in W28 is elliptical, dominated by a centrally-concentrated interior emission, sharply peaked at the center. There are also partial northeastern and southwestern shells, and both central and shell x-ray emission is highly patchy.

  19. Locating the Periodic Transient GRO J1849-03; Gamma-Ray Luminous Supernovae Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, P.; White, Nicholas (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We obtained one 50 ks observation of the Monoceros supernova remnant under this proposal. This supernova remnant was selected because it overlaps the error box of a gamma-ray source. Much to our surprise, we discovered a hard x-ray point source instead of the diffuse hard x-ray emission we expected from the supernova remnant. A paper on the discovery of the hard x-ray source and on follow-up optical observations identifying a likely Bestar companion was published in the Astrophysical Journal. Subsequently, a reanalysis of the same data yielded the detection of pulsations from the x-ray source. These results were also published in the Astrophysical Journal. Subsequent x-ray observations, which we performed under later proposals, have shown that the x-ray pulsar has a characteristic spin-down age of less than 1400 years in a binary system. The system is likely the first discovered very young, highly-energetic, rotation-powered pulsar in a binary system and offers an exciting opportunity to study the infancy and early evolution of neutron-star binaries.

  20. Acceleration of cosmic rays at supernova remnant shocks: constraints from gamma-ray observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine-Goumard, Marianne

    2016-06-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are thought to be the primary sources of the bulk of Galactic cosmicray (CR) protons observed at Earth, up to the knee energy at ˜3 PeV. Our understanding of CR acceleration in SNRs mainly relies on the Diffusive Shock Acceleration theory which is commonly invoked to explain several observational (though, indirect) lines of evidence for efficient particle acceleration at the SNR forward shocks up to very high energies. In particular, recent observations of young SNRs in the high-energy (HE; 0.1 < E < 100 GeV) gamma-ray domains have raised several questions and triggered numerous theoretical investigations. However, these detections still do not constitute a conclusive proof that supernova remnants accelerate the bulk of Galactic cosmic-rays, mainly due to the difficulty of disentangling the hadronic and leptonic contributions to the observed gamma-ray emission. In my presentation, I will review the most relevant results of gamma ray astronomy on supernova remnants (shell-type and middle-age interacting with molecular clouds) and the constraints derived concerning their efficiency to accelerate cosmic-rays.

  1. Chandra Detection of a Pulsar Wind Nebula Associated With Supernova Remnant 3C 396

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olbert, C. M.; Keohane, J. W.; Arnaud, K. A.; Dyer, K. K.; Reynolds, S. P.; Safi-Harb, S.

    2003-01-01

    We present a 100 ks observation of the Galactic supernova remnant 3C396 (G39.2-0.3) with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory that we compare to a 20cm map of the remnant from the Very Large Array. In the Chandra images, a nonthermal nebula containing an embedded pointlike source is apparent near the center of the remnant which we interpret as a synchrotron pulsar wind nebula surrounding a yet undetected pulsar. From the 2-10 keV spectrum for the nebula (N(sub H) = 5.3 plus or minus 0.9 x 10(exp 22) per square centimeter, GAMMA =1.5 plus or minus 0.3) we derive an unabsorbed x-ray flux of S(sub z)=1.62 x 10(exp -12) erg per square centimeter per second, and from this we estimate the spin-down power of the neutron star to be E(sup dot) = 7.2 x 10(exp 36) ergs per second. The central nebula is morphologically complex, showing bent, extended structure. The radio and X-ray shells of the remnant correlate poorly on large scales, particularly on the eastern half of the remnant, which appears very faint in X-ray images. At both radio and X-ray wavelengths the western half of the remnant is substantially brighter than the east.

  2. Is PSR 1509-58 the remnant of supernova AD 185?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1993-01-01

    Thorsett has recently advanced the proposal that the counterpart of the supernova recorded by Chinese astronomers in AD 185 is the pulsar PSR 1509-58 in the supernova remnant MSH 15-52. This proposal is attractive since it was claimed to better fit the visibility contraints that plagued earlier identifications and since the spin-down age of the pulsar is 1690 years. I have examined in detail the question of the visibility of a supernova at the proposed position and find that the reported dates of visibility can be matched only if the supernova appeared substantially brighter than Venus at its peak. For the distance and extinction to the pulsar, this implies M(sub V) (max) was brighter than -21.4 mag, whereas the brightest known absolute magnitude of a Type II supernova is -19.65 (H(sub 0) = 75 km/s/Mpc). Thus, the high required luminosity can be used as good evidence against the identification of SN 185 with PSR 1509-58. However, if the identification is retained, then Hubble's Constant would have to have a small value and/or the supernova had to have been a type IIP event with exceptional brilliance. The earlier identification of SN 185 with MSH 14-63 by Clark and Stephenson can also be reconciled with the visibility data.

  3. G306.3-0.9: A Newly Discovered Young Galactic Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Mark T.; Loi, Syheh T.; Murphy, Tara; Miller, Jon M.; Maitra, Dipankar; Gueltekin, Kayhan; Gehrels, Neil; Kennea, Jamie A.; Siegel, Michael H.; Gelbord, Jonathan; Kuin, Paul; Moss, Vanessa; Reeves, Sarah; Robbins, William J.; Gaensler, B. M.; Reis, Rubens C.; Petre, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We present X-ray and radio observations of the new Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G306.3-0.9, recently discovered by Swift. Chandra imaging reveals a complex morphology, dominated by a bright shock. The X-ray spectrum is broadly consistent with a young SNR in the Sedov phase, implying an age of 2500 yr for a distance of 8 kpc, plausibly identifying this as one of the 20 youngest Galactic SNRs. Australia Telescope Compact Array imaging reveals a prominent ridge of radio emission that correlates with the X-ray emission. We find a flux density of 160 mJy at 1 GHz, which is the lowest radio flux recorded for a Galactic SNR to date. The remnant is also detected at 24µm, indicating the presence of irradiated warm dust. The data reveal no compelling evidence for the presence of a compact stellar remnant.

  4. G306.3-0.9: A NEWLY DISCOVERED YOUNG GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Mark T.; Miller, Jon M.; Maitra, Dipankar; Gueltekin, Kayhan; Reis, Rubens C.; Loi, Shyeh T.; Murphy, Tara; Moss, Vanessa; Reeves, Sarah; Robbins, William J.; Gaensler, B. M.; Gehrels, Neil; Petre, Robert; Kennea, Jamie A.; Siegel, Michael H.; Gelbord, Jonathan; Kuin, Paul

    2013-04-01

    We present X-ray and radio observations of the new Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G306.3-0.9, recently discovered by Swift. Chandra imaging reveals a complex morphology, dominated by a bright shock. The X-ray spectrum is broadly consistent with a young SNR in the Sedov phase, implying an age of 2500 yr for a distance of 8 kpc, plausibly identifying this as one of the 20 youngest Galactic SNRs. Australia Telescope Compact Array imaging reveals a prominent ridge of radio emission that correlates with the X-ray emission. We find a flux density of {approx}160 mJy at 1 GHz, which is the lowest radio flux recorded for a Galactic SNR to date. The remnant is also detected at 24 {mu}m, indicating the presence of irradiated warm dust. The data reveal no compelling evidence for the presence of a compact stellar remnant.

  5. High-resolution IUE observations of interstellar absorption lines in the Vela supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, E. B.; Wallerstein, G.; Silk, J.

    1984-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectra of 45 stars in the vicinity of the Vela supernova remnant were recorded by the short-wavelength echelle spectrograph aboard the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). Over one-third of the stars show interstellar absorption lines at large radial velocities (greater than 60 km/s). The mapping of these high-velocity components in the sky suggests the motions are chaotic, rather than from a coherent expansion of the remnant material. In accord with earlier conclusions from Copernicus data, the gas at high velocity exhibits higher than normal ionization and shows substantially less depletion of nonvolatile elements than normal interstellar material at low velocities. Relatively strong lines from neutral carbon in the two excited fine-structure states indicate that the neutral clouds within the remnant have had their pressures enhanced by the passage of the blast wave from the supernova. Also, the remnant seems to show a significant enhancement in the abundances of low-velocity Si IV, C IV, and N V over those found in the general interstellar medium.

  6. Energy Dependence of Synchrotron X-Ray Rims in Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Aaron; Williams, Brian J.; Petre, Robert; Ressler, Sean M.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Several young supernova remnants exhibit thin X-ray bright rims of synchrotron radiation at their forward shocks. Thin rims require strong magnetic field amplification beyond simple shock compression if rim widths are only limited by electron energy losses. But, magnetic field damping behind the shock could produce similarly thin rims with less extreme field amplification. Variation of rim width with energy may thus discriminate between competing influences on rim widths. We measured rim widths around Tycho's supernova remnant in 5 energy bands using an archival 750 ks Chandra observation. Rims narrow with increasing energy and are well described by either loss-limited or damped scenarios, so X-ray rim width-energy dependence does not uniquely specify a model. But, radio counterparts to thin rims are not loss-limited and better reflect magnetic field structure. Joint radio and X-ray modeling favors magnetic damping in Tycho's SNR with damping lengths approximately 1-5% of remnant radius and magnetic field strengths approximately 50-400 micron G assuming Bohm diffusion. X-ray rim widths are approximately 1% of remnant radius, somewhat smaller than inferred damping lengths. Electron energy losses are important in all models of X-ray rims, suggesting that the distinction between loss-limited and damped models is blurred in soft X-rays. All loss-limited and damping models require magnetic fields approximately greater than 20 micron G, arming the necessity of magnetic field amplification beyond simple compression.

  7. Non-equilibrium x-ray emission from young supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, J.J. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A computer model (NIE model) has been developed to predict the x-ray spectra from the hot (10/sup 6 -8/K), shock-heated plasmas that are found in the remnants of supernovae. The model accounts for the lack of collisional ionization equilibrium and for the possible lack of thermal equilibrium between the electrons and ions behind the shock fronts. Both of these effects are potentially important in determining the emergent x-ray spectrum of young (supernova remnants (SNR). Both a spectral component arising from the supernova ejecta and a component arising from the shocked interstellar medium surrounding the supernova are calculated. The NIE model has been fit to the spectral data from two young SNR's, MSH 14-63 and RCW 103. The data from MSH 14-63 was collected with HEAO A-2 experiment and spans an energy range from 0.18 - 15 keV. Spectral resolution is varied over this range. For example, ..delta..E/E = 32% FWHM at 1.5 keV, and ..delta..E/E = 15% FWHM at 7 keV. The data for RCW 103 was obtained using the Solid State Spectrometer (SSS) on board the HEAO-2 spacecraft. This data set had a more limited spectral range than above (0.8 -2.5 keV) but enhanced spectral resolution (..delta..E/E approx. = 10%). In addition, the data had limited spatial resolution.

  8. Hard X-ray Emission and Efficient Particle Acceleration by Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vink, Jacco

    2009-05-01

    I discuss the non-thermal X-ray emission from young supernova remnants. Over the last decade it has become clear from both X-ray and γ-ray observations that young supernovae accelerate particles up to 100 TeV. In soft X-rays the accelerated >10 TeV electrons produce synchrotron radiation, coming from narrow filaments located at the shock fronts. The width of these filaments shows that the magnetic fields are relatively high, thus providing evidence for magnetic field amplification. The synchrotron radiation of several remnants is known to extend into the hard X-ray regime. In particular Cas A, has a spectrum that appears as a power law up to almost 100 TeV. This is very surprising, as a steepening is expected going from the soft to the hard X-ray band. The spectrum is likely a result of many superimposed individual spectra, each steepening at different energies. This implies considerable spatial variation in hard X-rays, an obvious target for Simbol-X. The variations will be important to infer local shock acceleration properties, but also magnetic field fluctuations may cause spatial and temporal variations. Finally, I draw the attention to super bubbles and supernovae as sources of cosmic rays. As such they may be sources of hard X-ray emission. In particular, supernovae exploding inside the dense red supergiants winds of their progenitors ares promising candidates for hard X-ray emission.

  9. Hard X-ray Emission and Efficient Particle Acceleration by Supernova Remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Vink, Jacco

    2009-05-11

    I discuss the non-thermal X-ray emission from young supernova remnants. Over the last decade it has become clear from both X-ray and {gamma}-ray observations that young supernovae accelerate particles up to 100 TeV. In soft X-rays the accelerated >10 TeV electrons produce synchrotron radiation, coming from narrow filaments located at the shock fronts. The width of these filaments shows that the magnetic fields are relatively high, thus providing evidence for magnetic field amplification.The synchrotron radiation of several remnants is known to extend into the hard X-ray regime. In particular Cas A, has a spectrum that appears as a power law up to almost 100 TeV. This is very surprising, as a steepening is expected going from the soft to the hard X-ray band. The spectrum is likely a result of many superimposed individual spectra, each steepening at different energies. This implies considerable spatial variation in hard X-rays, an obvious target for Simbol-X. The variations will be important to infer local shock acceleration properties, but also magnetic field fluctuations may cause spatial and temporal variations.Finally, I draw the attention to super bubbles and supernovae as sources of cosmic rays. As such they may be sources of hard X-ray emission. In particular, supernovae exploding inside the dense red supergiants winds of their progenitors ares promising candidates for hard X-ray emission.

  10. The Supernova Remnant 3C 400.2: Kinematics of its Ionized Gas and Theoretical Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrocio-Cruz, P.; de La Fuente, E.; Rosado, M.; Velázquez, P. F.

    2003-01-01

    3C 400.2 is a supernova remnant (SNR) with a complex morphology consisting of two overlapped shells of different diameters: a large shell at the southeast and a small shell at the northwest. High-resolution radio-continuum observations carried out by Dubner et al. (1994) suggested that this complex morphology could be due to the interaction of two SNRs. However, this view has been challenged by recent studies of the H I distribution around this SNR (Giacani et al. 1998) and by the confrontation of theoretical evolutionary models with the morphology at H alpha of this remnant (Velazquez et al. 2001). These recent results suggest that the double shell structure is produced by a single supernova explosion initially expanding into a dense medium encountering a lower density medium and producing a blowout. In this work we present the results of H alpha Fabry-Perot observations obtained with the PUMA equipment at the 2.1 m telescope of the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional at San Pedro Mártir, B. C., México. The kinematic results obtained can allow us to distinguish between those possibilities: two supernova explosions or one supernova explosion undergoing a blowout due to a density gradient.

  11. Using Poisson statistics to analyze supernova remnant emission in the low counts X-ray regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roper, Quentin Jeffrey

    We utilize a Poisson likelihood in a maximum likelihood statistical analysis to analyze X-ray spectragraphic data. Specifically, we examine four extragalactic supernova remnants (SNR). IKT 5 (SNR 0047-73.5), IKT 25 (SNR 0104-72.3), and DEM S 128 (SNR 0103-72.4) which are designated as Type Ia in the literature due to their spectra and morphology. This is troublesome because of their asymmetry, a trait not usually associated with young Type Ia remnants. We present Chandra X-ray Observatory data on these three remnants, and perform a maximum likelihood analysis on their spectra. We find that the X-ray emission is dominated by interactions with the interstellar medium. In spite of this, we find a significant Fe overabundance in all three remnants. Through examination of radio, optical, and infrared data, we conclude that these three remnants are likely not "classical" Type Ia SNR, but may be examples of so-called "prompt" Type Ia SNR. We detect potential point sources that may be members of the progenitor systems of both DEM S 128 and IKT 5, which could suggest a new subclass of prompt Type Ia SNR, Fe-rich CC remnants. In addition, we examine IKT 18. This remnant is positionally coincident with the X-ray point source HD 5980. Due to an outburst in 1994, in which its brightness changed by 3 magnitudes (corrsponding to an increase in luminosity by a factor of 16) HD 5980 was classified as a luminous blue variable star. We examine this point source and the remnant IKT 18 in the X-ray, and find that its non-thermal photon index has decreased from 2002 to 2013, corresponding to a larger proportion of more energetic X-rays, which is unexpected.

  12. An X- and Gamma-ray Study of the Young Supernova Remnant G306.3-0.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezer, Aytap; Yamazaki, Ryo; Gok, Fatma

    2016-07-01

    The newly discovered G306.3-0.9 is a young Galactic supernova remnant (SNR). Chandra observation indicates a complex morphology dominated by a bright shock with an age of about 2500 yr. In this study, we investigate abundances and ionization state of plasma in SNR using archival Suzaku data. We also discuss the progenitor of the remnant. G306.3-0.9 was reported as a detected candidate source in the first Fermi LAT Supernova Remnant Catalog. We present the results of the gamma-ray analysis produced using 6-years of Fermi data.

  13. Fermi-LAT Observation of Supernova Remnant S147

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuta, J.; Uchiyama, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Tajima, H.; Bechtol, K.; Funk, S.; Lande, J.; Ballet, J.; Hanabata, Y.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Takahashi, T.; /JAXA, Sagamihara

    2012-08-17

    We present an analysis of gamma-ray data obtained with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the region around SNR S147 (G180.0-1.7). A spatially extended gamma-ray source detected in an energy range of 0.2-10 GeV is found to coincide with SNR S147. We confirm its spatial extension at >5{sigma} confidence level. The gamma-ray flux is (3.8 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -8} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, corresponding to a luminosity of 1.3 x 10{sup 34} (d/1.3 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup -1} in this energy range. The gamma-ray emission exhibits a possible spatial correlation with prominent H{alpha} filaments of S147. There is no indication that the gamma-ray emission comes from the associated pulsar PSR J0538+2817. The gamma-ray spectrum integrated over the remnant is likely dominated by the decay of neutral {pi} mesons produced through the proton-proton collisions in the filaments. Reacceleration of pre-existing CRs and subsequent adiabatic compression in the filaments is sufficient to provide the required energy density of high-energy protons.

  14. Sub-Lyman-alpha observations of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, K. S.

    1993-01-01

    The first map of O VI lambda 1035 emission of the Cygnus Loop has now been obtained with Voyager. The first good spectra of the sub-Lyman-alpha region in the Cygnus Loop and in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) remnant N49 have been obtained with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope. The lines detected below 1200 A include S VI lambda lambda 933,945, C III lambda 977, N III lambda 991, and O VI lambda lambda 1032,1038. The O VI luminosities of the Cygnus Loop and of N49 exceed their soft X-ray luminosities. There is O VI emission at the primary shock front in the Cygnus Loop and from the bright optical filaments. The HUT spectra of the Cygnus Loop can be interpreted in terms of shocks with velocities of 170-190 km/s; the differences between the two spectra are due to the time since the beginning of the shock-cloud encounter.

  15. Failed supernovae explain the compact remnant mass function

    SciTech Connect

    Kochanek, C. S.

    2014-04-10

    One explanation for the absence of higher mass red supergiants (16.5 M {sub ☉} ≲ M ≲ 25 M {sub ☉}) as the progenitors of Type IIP supernovae (SNe) is that they die in failed SNe creating black holes. Simulations show that such failed SNe still eject their hydrogen envelopes in a weak transient, leaving a black hole with the mass of the star's helium core (5-8 M {sub ☉}). Here we show that this naturally explains the typical masses of observed black holes and the gap between neutron star and black hole masses without any fine-tuning of stellar mass loss, binary mass transfer, or the SN mechanism, beyond having it fail in a mass range where many progenitor models have density structures that make the explosions more likely to fail. There is no difficulty including this ∼20% population of failed SNe in any accounting of SN types over the progenitor mass function. And, other than patience, there is no observational barrier to either detecting these black hole formation events or limiting their rates to be well below this prediction.

  16. DISCOVERY OF AN APPARENT HIGH LATITUDE GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Fesen, Robert A.; Neustadt, Jack M. M.; Black, Christine S.; Koeppel, Ari H. D.

    2015-10-10

    Deep Hα images of a faint emission complex 4.°0 × 5.°5 in angular extent and located far off the Galactic plane at l = 70.°0, b = −21.°5 reveal numerous thin filaments suggestive of a supernova remnant’s (SNR’s) shock emission. Low dispersion optical spectra covering the wavelength range 4500–7500 Å show only Balmer line emissions for one filament while three others show a Balmer dominated spectrum along with weak [N i] 5198, 5200 Å, [O i] 6300, 6364 Å, [N ii] 6583 Å, [S ii] 6716, 6731 Å, and in one case [O iii] 5007 Å line emission. Many of the brighter Hα filaments are visible in near-UV GALEX images presumably due to C iii] 1909 Å line emission. ROSAT All Sky Survey images of this region show a faint crescent-shaped X-ray emission nebula coincident with the portion of the Hα nebulosity closest to the Galactic plane. The presence of long, thin Balmer dominated emission filaments with associated UV emission and coincident X-ray emission suggests this nebula is a high latitude Galactic SNR despite a lack of known associated nonthermal radio emission. Relative line intensities of the optical lines in some filaments differ from commonly observed [S ii]/Hα ≥ 0.4 radiative shocked filaments and typical Balmer filaments in SNRs. We discuss possible causes for the unusual optical SNR spectra.

  17. A kinematic search for supernova remnants in giant extragalactic H II regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Skillman, E. D.; Sramek, R. A.

    1994-02-01

    We have obtained velocity fields of the Giant H II complexes NGC 5471 in M101, NGC 2363 in NGC 2366, and the largest H II region in NGC 2403 from H-alpha observations using the TAURUS imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer. We have detected five H-alpha sources with velocity profiles which are broad when compared with the surrounding H II region. Region B in NGC 5471 has been previously determined to contain a supernova remnant by the presence of nonthermal radio continuum radiation and enhanced (O I) and (S II) emission (Skillman 1985) and broad H-alpha emission (Chu & Kennicutt 1986). Two broad H-alpha sources in NGC 2363 coincide with regions where strong splitting has been found in the (O III) line (Roy et al. 1991). Two more broad H-alpha sources have been identified in the largest H II region in NGC 2403. Very Large Array (VLA) radio continuum observations with a resolution of 2 sec at lambda(6) and lambda(20) cm of all 3 H II complexes are presented. In addition, high resolution (subarcsecond) VLA images of NGC 5471 were made at lambda(2) and lambda(6) cm. The presence of a nonthermal source in region NGC 5471 B was confirmed while region NGC 5471 A appears to be dominated by thermal emission. The nonthermal spectral index in NGC 2363 A indicates the existence of none or more supernova remnants at the position of a large velocity width source detected in H-alpha emission. No similar nonthermal sources were detected in NGC 2403 #1. Supernovae explosions and stellar winds are considered as causes for these large velocity width sources (LVWS). If the emission from the LVWSs is attributed to single supernova remnants, they are unusually luminous in both nonthermal radio continuum and H-alpha emision. The very large H-alpha luminosities could be a result of high velocity gas being ionized by the neighboring stellar cluster.

  18. A kinematic search for supernova remnants in giant extragalactic H II regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Hui; Skillman, Evan D.; Sramek, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    We have obtained velocity fields of the Giant H II complexes NGC 5471 in M101, NGC 2363 in NGC 2366, and the largest H II region in NGC 2403 from H-alpha observations using the TAURUS imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer. We have detected five H-alpha sources with velocity profiles which are broad when compared with the surrounding H II region. Region B in NGC 5471 has been previously determined to contain a supernova remnant by the presence of nonthermal radio continuum radiation and enhanced (O I) and (S II) emission (Skillman 1985) and broad H-alpha emission (Chu & Kennicutt 1986). Two broad H-alpha sources in NGC 2363 coincide with regions where strong splitting has been found in the (O III) line (Roy et al. 1991). Two more broad H-alpha sources have been identified in the largest H II region in NGC 2403. Very Large Array (VLA) radio continuum observations with a resolution of 2 sec at lambda(6) and lambda(20) cm of all 3 H II complexes are presented. In addition, high resolution (subarcsecond) VLA images of NGC 5471 were made at lambda(2) and lambda(6) cm. The presence of a nonthermal source in region NGC 5471 B was confirmed while region NGC 5471 A appears to be dominated by thermal emission. The nonthermal spectral index in NGC 2363 A indicates the existence of none or more supernova remnants at the position of a large velocity width source detected in H-alpha emission. No similar nonthermal sources were detected in NGC 2403 #1. Supernovae explosions and stellar winds are considered as causes for these large velocity width sources (LVWS). If the emission from the LVWSs is attributed to single supernova remnants, they are unusually luminous in both nonthermal radio continuum and H-alpha emision. The very large H-alpha luminosities could be a result of high velocity gas being ionized by the neighboring stellar cluster.

  19. HFPK 334: An unusual supernova remnant in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, E. J.; Filipović, M. D.; McEntaffer, R. L.; Brantseg, T.; Heitritter, K.; Roper, Q.; Haberl, F.; Urošević, D.

    2014-11-01

    We present new Australia Telescope Compact Array radio-continuum and XMM-Newton/Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of the unusual supernova remnant (SNR) HFPK 334 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The remnant follows a shell-type morphology in the radio continuum and has a size of ∼20 pc at the SMC distance. The X-ray morphology is similar; however, we detect a prominent point source close to the center of the SNR exhibiting a spectrum with a best-fit power law with a photon index of Γ = 2.7 ± 0.5. This central point source is most likely a background object and cannot be directly associated with the remnant. The high temperature, nonequilibrium conditions in the diffuse region suggest that this gas has been recently shocked and points toward a younger SNR with an age of ≲ 1800 yr. With an average radio spectral index of α = –0.59 ± 0.09, we find that an equipartition magnetic field for the remnant is ∼90 μG, a value typical of younger SNRs in low-density environments. Also, we report the detection of scattered radio polarization across the remnant at 20 cm, with a peak fractional polarization level of 25% ± 5%.

  20. The Absence of Ex-companions in Type Ia Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, R.; Kilic, Mukremin

    2012-11-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) play important roles in our study of the expansion and acceleration of the universe, but because we do not know the exact nature or natures of the progenitors, there is a systematic uncertainty that must be resolved if SNe Ia are to become more precise cosmic probes. No progenitor system has ever been identified either in the pre- or post-explosion images of a Ia event. There have been recent claims for and against the detection of ex-companion stars in several SNe Ia remnants. These studies, however, usually ignore the angular momentum gain of the progenitor white dwarf (WD), which leads to a spin-up phase and a subsequent spin-down phase before explosion. For spin-down timescales greater than 105 years, the donor star could be too dim to detect by the time of explosion. Here we revisit the current limits on ex-companion stars to SNR 0509-67.5, a 400-year-old remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud. If the effects of possible angular momentum gain on the WD are included, a wide range of single-degenerate progenitor models are allowed for this remnant. We demonstrate that the current absence of evidence for ex-companion stars in this remnant, as well as other SNe Ia remnants, does not necessarily provide the evidence of absence for ex-companions. We discuss potential ways to identify such ex-companion stars through deep imaging observations.

  1. Nonthermal X-rays and Gamma Rays from Supernova Remnants in Stellar-Wind Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, S. P.

    1997-12-01

    Electrons are expected to be accelerated in strong shock waves to energies limited by radiative losses, by the finite age of the shock, or by escape. Young supernova remnants can easily produce electron distributions that, while steepening from the slope at radio energies, still contain significant numbers of electrons at energies of 100 TeV or higher, where they produce synchrotron X-rays to 10 keV and above. In addition, these electrons can inverse-Compton scatter cosmic microwave background photons up to energies in excess of 100 GeV. For remnants of core-collapse supernovae expanding into stellar-wind bubbles, the upstream density is likely to drop as r(-2) while the upstream magnetic field is wrapped into a tight spiral, resulting in an almost perpendicular shock everywhere. Such shocks can be extremely effective in accelerating electrons to high energies. I describe spectra and images for spherical remnants, assuming the dynamics are given by the Sedov self-similar solution appropriate for an ambient r(-2) density profile (r_sh t(2/3) ). Both images and spectra differ significantly from those for remnants expanding into uniform magnetic fields, and should be distinguishable. Remnants expanding into spherical wind bubbles should show little azimuthal variation in synchrotron brightness for any viewing angle. Except at the highest photon energies, their brightness profiles peak somewhat inside the outermost edge of emission. X-ray halos caused by electrons diffusing ahead of the shock are generally narrow and faint. I shall describe inverse-Compton gamma-ray spectra produced by these electron distributions as well.

  2. 3-D Model of Broadband Emission from Supernova Remnants Undergoing Non-linear Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Ellison, Donald C.

    2008-07-02

    We present a 3-dimensional model of supernova remnants (SNRs) where the hydrodynamical evolution of the remnant is modeled consistently with nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration occurring at the outer blast wave. The model includes particle escape and diffusion outside of the forward shock, and particle interactions with arbitrary distributions of external ambient material, such as molecular clouds. We include synchrotron emission and cooling, bremsstrahlung radiation, neutral pion production, inverse-Compton (IC), and Coulomb energy-loss. Boardband spectra have been calculated for typical parameters including dense regions of gas external to a 1000 year old SNR. In this paper, we describe the details of our model but do not attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. We also do not include magnetic field amplification (MFA), even though this effect may be important in some young remnants. In this first presentation of the model we don't attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. Our aim is to develop a flexible platform, which can be generalized to include effects such as MFA, and which can be easily adapted to various SNR environments, including Type Ia SNRs, which explode in a constant density medium, and Type II SNRs, which explode in a pre-supernova wind. When applied to a specific SNR, our model will predict cosmic-ray spectra and multi-wavelength morphology in projected images for instruments with varying spatial and spectral resolutions. We show examples of these spectra and images and emphasize the importance of measurements in the hard X-ray, GeV, and TeV gamma-ray bands for investigating key ingredients in the acceleration mechanism, and for deducing whether or not TeV emission is produced by IC from electrons or pion-decay from protons.

  3. Two evolved supernova remnants with newly identified Fe-rich cores in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, P. J.; Sasaki, M.; Bozzetto, L. M.; Points, S. D.; Crawford, E. J.; Dickel, J.; Filipović, M. D.; Haberl, F.; Maggi, P.; Whelan, E. T.

    2016-02-01

    Aims: We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the evolved supernova remnants MCSNR J0506-7025 and MCSNR J0527-7104 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Methods: We used observational data from XMM-Newton, the Australian Telescope Compact Array, and the Magellanic Cloud Emission Line Survey to study their broad-band emission and used Spitzer and H i data to gain a picture of the environment into which the remnants are expanding. We performed a multi-wavelength morphological study and detailed radio and X-ray spectral analyses to determine their physical characteristics. Results: Both remnants were found to have bright X-ray cores, dominated by Fe L-shell emission, which is consistent with reverse shock-heated ejecta with determined Fe masses in agreement with Type Ia explosion yields. A soft X-ray shell, which is consistent with swept-up interstellar medium, was observed in MCSNR J0506-7025, suggestive of a remnant in the Sedov phase. Using the spectral fit results and the Sedov self-similar solution, we estimated the age of MCSNR J0506-7025 to be ~16-28 kyr, with an initial explosion energy of (0.07-0.84) × 1051 erg. A soft shell was absent in MCSNR J0527-7104, with only ejecta emission visible in an extremely elongated morphology that extends beyond the optical shell. We suggest that the blast wave has broken out into a low density cavity, allowing the shock heated ejecta to escape. We find that the radio spectral index of MCSNR J0506-7025 is consistent with the standard -0.5 for supernova remnants. Radio polarisation at 6 cm indicates a higher degree of polarisation along the western front and at the eastern knot with a mean fractional polarisation across the remnant of P ≅ (20 ± 6)%. Conclusions: The detection of Fe-rich ejecta in the remnants suggests that both resulted from Type Ia explosions. The newly identified Fe-rich cores in MCSNR J0506-7025 and MCSNR J0527-7104 make them members of the expanding class of evolved Fe-rich remnants in the Magellanic Clouds

  4. Fermi-Lat and WMAP Observations of the Puppis a Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, John William; Grondin, M. H.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Reposeur, T.; Ballet, J.; Tanaka, T.

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection of GeV gamma-ray emission from the supernova remnant Puppis A with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Puppis A is among the faintest supernova remnants yet detected at GeV energies, with a luminosity of only 2.7×10(exp 34) (D/2.2 kpc)(exp 2) erg s(exp -1) between 1 and 100 GeV. The gamma-ray emission from the remnant is spatially extended, with a morphology matching that of the radio and X-ray emission, and is well described by a simple power law with an index of 2.1. We attempt to model the broadband spectral energy distribution, from radio to gamma-rays, using standard nonthermal emission mechanisms. To constrain the relativistic electron population we use 7 years of WMAP data to extend the radio spectrum up to 93 GHz. Both leptonic and hadronic dominated models can reproduce the nonthermal spectral energy distribution, requiring a total content of cosmic ray (CR) electrons and protons accelerated in Puppis A of at least WCR is approx. (1 - 5)×10 (exp 49) erg.

  5. Recoil of the Stellar Remnant from the Puppis A Supernova: Proper-Motion Measurement from Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, Robert; Winkler, P. F.

    2006-09-01

    A sequence of three Chandra X-ray Observatory High Resolution Camera images taken over a span of five years reveals arc-second-scale displacement of RX J0822--4300, the stellar remnant near the center of the Puppis A supernova remnant. We measure its proper motion to be 0.16±0.02 arcsec yr-1 toward the west-southwest. At a distance of 2 kpc, this corresponds to a transverse space velocity of 1500 km s-1. This is the first case of a compact X-ray source with a directly measured proper motion. The space velocity is consistent with the explosion center inferred from proper motions of the oxygen-rich optical filaments, and confirms the idea that Puppis A resulted from an asymmetric explosion accompanied by a kick that imparted on the order of 3x1049 ergs of kinetic energy (some 3 percent of the supernova kinetic energy) to the stellar remnant. We will summarize this measurement and discuss possible mechanisms for producing such a violent kick. This research has been supported by NASA grant GO4-5062X.

  6. EVIDENCE FOR PARTICLE ACCELERATION TO THE KNEE OF THE COSMIC RAY SPECTRUM IN TYCHO'S SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksen, Kristoffer A.; Hughes, John P.; Badenes, Carles; Fesen, Robert; Ghavamian, Parviz; Moffett, David; Plucinksy, Paul P.; Slane, Patrick; Rakowski, Cara E.; Reynoso, Estela M.

    2011-02-20

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) have long been assumed to be the source of cosmic rays (CRs) up to the 'knee' of the CR spectrum at 10{sup 15} eV, accelerating particles to relativistic energies in their blast waves by the process of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Since CR nuclei do not radiate efficiently, their presence must be inferred indirectly. Previous theoretical calculations and X-ray observations show that CR acceleration significantly modifies the structure of the SNR and greatly amplifies the interstellar magnetic field. We present new, deep X-ray observations of the remnant of Tycho's supernova (SN 1572, henceforth Tycho), which reveal a previously unknown, strikingly ordered pattern of non-thermal high-emissivity stripes in the projected interior of the remnant, with spacing that corresponds to the gyroradii of 10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} eV protons. Spectroscopy of the stripes shows the plasma to be highly turbulent on the (smaller) scale of the Larmor radii of TeV energy electrons. Models of the shock amplification of magnetic fields produce structure on the scale of the gyroradius of the highest energy CRs present, but they do not predict the highly ordered pattern we observe. We interpret the stripes as evidence for acceleration of particles to near the knee of the CR spectrum in regions of enhanced magnetic turbulence, while the observed highly ordered pattern of these features provides a new challenge to models of DSA.

  7. The properties of the progenitor, neutron star, and pulsar wind in the supernova remnant Kes 75

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfand, J. D.; Slane, P. O.; Temim, T.

    2014-03-01

    By studying composite supernova remnants (SNRs), remnants which contain a pulsar wind nebula (PWN), it is possible to estimate physical properties of the progenitor explosion, central neutron star, and its pulsar wind that are difficult to measure directly. This is best done by fitting the dynamical and broadband spectral properties of a PWN with an evolutionary model for a PWN inside an SNR. We apply such a model to the composite SNR Kes 75, whose associated pulsar PSR J1846-0258 is thought to have an extremely strong surface magnetic field. If ˜ 3 M_⊙ of mass was ejected in the supernova, our model suggests a normal or slightly subenergetic supernova in a low density environment. Additionally, for the measured pre-outburst braking index of p=2.65, our model prefers an age of {˜ 430} years and an initial spin period P_0 ˜ 0.2 s. Lastly, the magnetization of the pulsar wind and energy spectrum of particles injected at the termination shock are similar to those observed from other PWNe powered by less magnetized neutron stars. While further study is needed to verify these results, they are nominally inconsistent with strong neutron star magnetic fields resulting from very fast initial rotation.

  8. An X-ray View of the Zoo of Compact Objects and Associated Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi-Harb, Samar

    2015-08-01

    Core-collapse explosions of massive stars leave behind some of the most exotic compact objects in the Universe. These include: rotation-powered pulsars like the Crab, powering pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) observed across the electromagnetic spectrum; highly magnetized neutron stars ("magnetars") shining or bursting at high-energies; and X-ray emitting “Central Compact Objects” (CCOs) with intrinsic properties and emission mechanism that remain largely unknown. I will highlight this observed diversity of compact stellar remnants from an X-ray perspective, and address the connection between their properties and those of their hosting supernova remnants (SNRs). In particular I will highlight topics related to their formation and evolution, including: 1) which supernovae make magnetars and the shell-less PWNe?, 2) what can we learn from the apparent age discrepancy between SNRs and their associated pulsars? I will conclude with prospects for observations of SNRs with the upcoming ASTRO-H X-ray mission. The unprecedented spectral resolution on board of ASTRO-H’s micro-calorimeter will particularly open a new discovery window for supernova progenitors' science.

  9. DENSE IRON EJECTA AND CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION IN THE YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANT G11.2-0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Dae-Sik; Koo, Bon-Chul; Seok, Ji Yeon; Lee, Ho-Gyu; Matthews, Keith; Lee, Jae-Joon; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Hayashi, Masahiko

    2009-09-20

    We present the results of near-infrared spectroscopic observations of dense ({approx}>10{sup 3} cm{sup -3}) iron ejecta in the young core-collapse supernova remnant G11.2-0.3. Five ejecta knots projected to be close to its center show a large dispersion in their Doppler shifts: two knots in the east are blueshifted by more than 1000 km s{sup -1}, while three western knots have relatively small blueshifts of 20-60 km s{sup -1}. This velocity discrepancy may indicate that the western knots have been significantly decelerated or that there exists a systematic velocity difference among the knots. One ejecta filament in the northwestern boundary, on the other hand, is redshifted by {approx}>200 km s{sup -1}, while opposite filament in the southeastern boundary shows a negligible radial motion. Some of the knots and filaments have secondary velocity components, and one knot shows a bow shock-like feature in the velocity structure. The iron ejecta appear to be devoid of strong emission from other heavy elements, such as S, which may attest to the alpha-rich freezeout process in the explosive nucleosynthesis of the core-collapse supernova explosion close to its center. The prominent bipolar distribution of the Fe ejecta in the northwestern and southeastern direction, along with the elongation of the central pulsar wind nebula in the perpendicular direction, is consistent with the interpretation that the supernova exploded primarily along the northwestern and southeastern direction.

  10. Peering into the heart of the M82 starburst: Type II supernova remnants and a possible relic GRB?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenech, Danielle Marie; Beswick, Robert; Muxlow, Tom; Argo, Megan

    2015-08-01

    M82 is considered the archetypal starburst galaxy and at a distance of ~3.6 Mpc is one of the closest examples of its kind. It therefore provides a unique opportunity to study a star-forming environment in detail and particularly the discrete products of star-formation such as supernova remnants (SNR) and HII regions. Supernovae and supernova remnants play an important role in the feedback of energy and material into the surrounding interstellar medium as evidenced in M82 by the galactic superwind driven by the numerous supernovae, SNR and massive stellar winds.Radio observations can be used to see into the core of the star-forming region in the centre of M82 as they are unaffected by the gas and dust associated with such an intense starburst environment. Since their discovery in the 1970s, radio observations have been used to study and monitor the evolution of the ~100 supernova remnants at the heart of this galaxy.We present multi-epoch millarcsecond resolution images of the most compact supernova remnants in M82, spanning 25 years of evolution. In particular, we will discuss one of the quintessential SNR 43.31+59.2 as well as the unusual object 41.95+57.5 and its potential as a GRB afterglow.

  11. Interaction between the Supernova Remnant HB 3 and the Nearby Star-forming Region W3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xin; Yang, Ji; Fang, Min; Su, Yang; Sun, Yan; Chen, Yang

    2016-12-01

    We performed millimeter observations of CO lines toward the supernova remnant (SNR) HB 3. Substantial molecular gas around -45 km s-1 is detected in the conjunction region between the SNR HB 3 and the nearby W3 complex. This molecular gas is distributed along the radio continuum shell of the remnant. Furthermore, the shocked molecular gas indicated by line wing broadening features is also distributed along the radio shell and inside it. By both morphological correspondence and dynamical evidence, we confirm that the SNR HB 3 interacts with the -45 km s-1 molecular cloud (MC), in essence, with the nearby H ii region/MC complex W3. The redshifted line wing broadening features indicate that the remnant is located at the nearside of the MC. With this association, we could place the remnant at the same distance as the W3/W4 complex, which is 1.95 ± 0.04 kpc. The spatial distribution of aggregated young stellar object candidates shows a correlation with the shocked molecular strip associated with the remnant. We also find a binary clump of CO at (l = 132.°94, b = 1.°12) around -51.5 km s-1 inside the projected extent of the remnant, and it is associated with significant mid-infrared emission. The binary system also has a tail structure resembling the tidal tails of interacting galaxies. According to the analysis of CO emission lines, the larger clump in this binary system is about stable, and the smaller clump is significantly disturbed.

  12. EXPANSION OF THE YOUNGEST GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT G1.9+0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, Ashley K.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Krishnamurthy, Kalyani; Willett, Rebecca

    2011-08-10

    We present a measurement of the expansion and brightening of G1.9 + 0.3, the youngest Galactic supernova remnant (SNR), comparing Chandra X-ray images obtained in 2007 and 2009. A simple uniform-expansion model describes the data well, giving an expansion rate of 0.642% {+-} 0.049% yr{sup -1} and a flux increase of 1.7% {+-} 1.0% yr{sup -1}. Without deceleration, the remnant age would then be 156 {+-} 11 yr, consistent with earlier results. Since deceleration must have occurred, this age is an upper limit; we estimate an age of about 110 yr or an explosion date of about 1900. The flux increase is comparable to reported increases at radio wavelengths. G1.9+0.3 is the only Galactic SNR increasing in flux, with implications for the physics of electron acceleration in shock waves.

  13. Investigating the Galactic supernova remnant Kes 78 with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miceli, Marco; Bamba, Aya; Orlando, Salvatore; Bocchino, Fabrizio

    2016-06-01

    The galactic supernova remnant Kes 78 is associated with a HESS gamma-ray source and its X-ray emission has been recently revealed by Suzaku observations which have found indications for a hard X-ray component in the spectra. We analyzed an XMM-Newton EPIC observation of Kes 78 and studied the spatial distribution of the physical and chemical properties of the X-ray emitting plasma. The EPIC data unveiled a very complex morphology for the soft X-ray emission. We performed image analysis and spatially resolved spectral analysis finding indications for the interaction of the remnant with a local molecular cloud. Finally, we investigated the origin of the hard X-ray emitting component.

  14. Investigating the galactic Supernova Remnant Kes 78 with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miceli, M.; Bamba, A.; Orlando, S.; Bocchino, F.

    2016-06-01

    The galactic supernova remnant Kes 78 is associated with a HESS gamma-ray source and its X-ray emission has been recently revealed by Suzaku observations which have found indications for a hard X-ray component in the spectra. We analyzed an XMM-Newton EPIC observation of Kes 78 and studied the spatial distribution of the physical and chemical properties of the X-ray emitting plasma. The EPIC data unveiled a very complex morphology for the soft X-ray emission. We performed image analysis and spatially resolved spectral analysis finding indications for the interaction of the remnant with a local molecular cloud. Finally, we investigated the origin of the hard X-ray emitting component.

  15. COSMIC-RAY ELECTRON EVOLUTION IN THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT RX J1713.7-3946

    SciTech Connect

    Finke, Justin D.; Dermer, Charles D.

    2012-05-20

    A simple formalism to describe nonthermal electron acceleration, evolution, and radiation in supernova remnants (SNRs) is presented. The electron continuity equation is analytically solved assuming that the nonthermal electron injection power is proportional to the rate at which the kinetic energy of matter is swept up in an adiabatically expanding SNR shell. We apply this model to Fermi and HESS data from the SNR RX J1713.7-3946 and find that a one-zone leptonic model with Compton-scattered cosmic microwave background and interstellar infrared photons has difficulty providing a good fit to its spectral energy distribution, provided the source is at a distance {approx}1 kpc from the Earth. However, the inclusion of multiple zones, as hinted at by recent Chandra observations, does provide a good fit, but requires a second zone of compact knots with magnetic fields B {approx} 16 {mu}G, comparable to shock-compressed fields found in the bulk of the remnant.

  16. An XMM-Newton study of the mixed-morphology supernova remnant W28

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ping; Safi-Harb, Samar; Chen, Yang; Zhang, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    We perform an XMM-Newton study of the mixed-morphology supernova remnant (MMSNR) W28. The X-ray spectrum arising from the northeastern shell consists of a thermal component plus a non-thermal power-law component with a hard photon index (~1.5). Non-thermal bremsstrahlung is the most favourible origin of the hard X-ray emission. The gas in the SNR interior is centrally peaked and best described by a two-temperature thermal model. We found a non-uniform absorption column density and temperature profile for the central gas, indicating that the remnant is evolving in a non-uniform environment with denser material in the east. We argue that the cloudlet evaporation is an indispensable process to explain both the spectral properties and the clumpiness in the X-ray emission.

  17. X-ray characteristics of the Lupus Loop and SN 1006 supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Toor, A.

    1980-01-01

    The spatial extent of the Lupus Loop and spectra for the Lupus Loop and SN1006 supernova remnants have been determined with a rocket-borne payload. The Lupus Loop is an extended source of soft X-rays (approx. 300' diam) that shows a correlation between its brightest x-ray and radio-emission regions. Its spectrum is characterized by a temperature of 350 eV. Thus, the Lupus Loop appears similar to Vela X and Cygnus Loop, although much weaker. Emission from SN1006 is spatially unresolved and exhibits a harder spectrum than that of the Lupus Loop. All spectral data (0.2 to 10 keV) from our observation and previous observations are satisfactorily fit with a power law (index = 2.15). This spectral dependence suggests the possibility that a rotating neutron star is the underlying source of the radiated energy although such an interpretation appears inconsistent with the remnant's morphology.

  18. X-ray studies of Remnants of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Supernovae (SNe) play an essential role in the Universe, and they are detected routinely through dedicated surveys. However, most of these SNe are often too distant (1-100 Mpc) to resolve the SN ejecta and immediate surroundings of the exploded stars. Fortunately, supernova remnants (SNRs), including SN 1987A, offer the means to study explosions and dynamics at sub-pc scales. SNRs are observable for up to 100,000 years after the explosions across the electromagnetic spectrum, and almost 400 SNRs have now been identified in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies. In this talk, I will review recent advances in the understanding of core-collapse (CC) SNe based on studies of X-ray studies of SNRs. In particular, I will focus on SN 1987A and other young CC SNRs, highlighting investigations of their explosion (a)symmetries, heavy metal (like iron and titanium) abundances, progenitors, and particle acceleration.

  19. Spitzer and near-infrared observations of the young supernova remnant 3C397

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Jeonghee; Jarrett, Tom

    2016-06-01

    We present Spitzer IRS, IRAC and MIPS observations and near-infrared imaging and spectroscopy of the young supernova remnant 3C397 (G41.1-0.2). Near-infrared observations were made using the Palomar 200 inch telescope. Both mid- and near-infrared spectra are dominated by Fe lines and near-infrared imaging shows bright Fe emission with a shell-like morphology. There is no molecular hydrogen line belong to the SNR and some are in background. The Ni, Ar, S and Si lines are detected using IRS and hydrogen recombination lines are detected in near-infrared. Two nickel lines at 18.24 and 10.69 micron are detected. 3C397 is ejecta-dominated, and our observations support 3C397 to be a Type Ia supernova.

  20. HIGH RESOLUTION 36 GHz IMAGING OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT OF SN 1987A

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, T. M.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Zanardo, G.; Ng, C.-Y.; Gaensler, B. M.; Ball, Lewis; Kesteven, M. J.; Manchester, R. N.; Tzioumis, A. K.

    2009-11-01

    The aftermath of supernova (SN) 1987A continues to provide spectacular insights into the interaction between an SN blastwave and its circumstellar environment. We here present 36 GHz observations from the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the radio remnant of SN 1987A. These new images, taken in 2008 April and 2008 October, substantially extend the frequency range of an ongoing monitoring and imaging program conducted between 1.4 and 20 GHz. Our 36.2 GHz images have a diffraction-limited angular resolution of 0.''3-0.''4, which covers the gap between high resolution, low dynamic range VLBI images of the remnant and low resolution, high dynamic range images at frequencies between 1 and 20 GHz. The radio morphology of the remnant at 36 GHz is an elliptical ring with enhanced emission on the eastern and western sides, similar to that seen previously at lower frequencies. Model fits to the data in the Fourier domain show that the emitting region is consistent with a thick inclined torus of mean radius 0.''85, and a 2008 October flux density of 27 +- 6 mJy at 36.2 GHz. The spectral index for the remnant at this epoch, determined between 1.4 GHz and 36.2 GHz, is alpha = -0.83. There is tentative evidence for an unresolved central source with flatter spectral index.

  1. Second Epoch Hubble Space Telescope Observations of Kepler's Supernova Remnant: The Proper Motions of Balmer Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankrit, Ravi; Raymond, John C.; Blair, William P.; Long, Knox S.; Williams, Brian J.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the proper motions of Balmer-dominated filaments in Kepler’s supernova remnant using high resolution images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope at two epochs separated by about 10 years. We use the improved proper motion measurements and revised values of shock velocities to derive a distance to Kepler of {5.1}-0.7+0.8 kpc. The main shock around the northern rim of the remnant has a typical speed of 1690 km s-1 and is encountering material with densities of about 8 cm-3. We find evidence for the variation of shock properties over small spatial scales, including differences in the driving pressures as the shock wraps around a curved cloud surface. We find that the Balmer filaments ahead of the ejecta knot on the northwest boundary of the remnant are becoming fainter and more diffuse. We also find that the Balmer filaments associated with circumstellar material in the interior regions of the remnant are due to shocks with significantly lower velocities and that the brightness variations among these filaments trace the density distribution of the material, which may have a disk-like geometry. Based on observations made with the Hubble Space Telescope.

  2. AN X-RAY INVESTIGATION OF THREE SUPERNOVA REMNANTS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Klimek, Matthew D.; Points, S. D.; Smith, R. C.; Shelton, R. L.; Williams, R. E-mail: spoints@ctio.noao.ed E-mail: rls@physast.uga.ed

    2010-12-20

    We have investigated three supernova remnants (SNRs) in the LMC using multi-wavelength data. These SNRs are generally fainter than the known sample (see Section 4) and may represent a previously missed population. One of our SNRs is the second LMC remnant analyzed which is larger than any Galactic remnant for which a definite size has been established. The analysis of such a large remnant contributes to the understanding of the population of highly evolved SNRs. We have obtained X-ray images and spectra of three of these recently identified SNRs using the XMM-Newton observatory. These data, in conjunction with pre-existing optical emission-line images and spectra, were used to determine the physical conditions of the optical- and X-ray-emitting gas in the SNRs. We have compared the morphologies of the SNRs in the different wavebands. The physical properties of the warm ionized shell were determined from the H{alpha} surface brightness and the SNR expansion velocity. The X-ray spectra were fit with a thermal plasma model and the physical conditions of the hot gas were derived from the model fits. Finally, we have compared our observations with simulations of SNR evolution.

  3. High Spatial Resolution Studies of Blastwave Interactions in the Vela Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, William

    1997-01-01

    The report targeted two interaction zones within the Vela supernova remnant for HRI observation and data reduction and analysis. Approximately 40 ksec of HRI integration time was awarded for each of the awarded target regions, one at priority 2 and one at priority 3. The observations have been completed for the priority 2 observation. Some observations have been made of the priority 3 target, however the data have not yet been received by the PI. The priority 2 data have been received and analyzed and the results have been prepared for publication. The chief results are as follows: (1) the radial profile of the X-ray emission from the western rim is characterized by a sudden increase in emission at the blastwave interaction region which is unresolved spatially at HRI resolution. The profile is consistent with the expanding blastwave from the remnant encountering a large, coherent structure in the surrounding ISM; (2) the X-ray emission lags slightly 'behind', approx. 10(exp 16)cm the H(alpha) and OIII optical filaments, consistent with the expected spatial profile of the emission assuming parameters derived from earlier PSPC observations of the region. the combination of the X-ray and optical interference filter data allow us to set limits on the distance to the Vela remnant and the general nature of the blastwave interactions in the remnant.

  4. Evidence for a thermally unstable shock wave in the VELA supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, John C.; Wallerstein, George; Balick, Bruce

    1991-12-01

    The emission and absorption line signatures of supernova remnant shock waves provide complementary diagnostic capabilities. This paper presents IUE spectra of the nebulosity and new spectra of HD 72088. Models of the emission and absorption lines from shocked gas are used to derive a shock velocity and elemental depletions. There is evidence from the absorption-line strengths and widths for thermally unstable cooling behind a 150 km/s shock. The shock velocity and swept-up column density estimates of Wallerstein and Balick (1990) are confirmed, and evidence is found for a nonthermal contribution to the pressure.

  5. Evidence for a thermally unstable shock wave in the Vela supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.; Wallerstein, George; Balick, Bruce

    1991-01-01

    The emission and absorption line signatures of supernova remnant shock waves provide complementary diagnostic capabilities. This paper presents IUE spectra of the nebulosity and new spectra of HD 72088. Models of the emission and absorption lines from shocked gas are used to derive a shock velocity and elemental depletions. There is evidence from the absorption-line strengths and widths for thermally unstable cooling behind a 150 km/s shock. The shock velocity and swept-up column density estimates of Wallerstein and Balick (1990) are confirmed, and evidence is found for a nonthermal contribution to the pressure.

  6. Soft X-ray emission from the Lupus Loop and Sn 1006 supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, P. F., Jr.; Hearn, D. R.; Richardson, J. A.; Behnken, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    X-ray maps of the Lupus region have been obtained in a raster scan observation from SAS 3. These show the Lupus Loop to be a faint extended source of soft X-rays with a temperature about 2.5 million K. The most prominent feature of the region is the A.D. 1006 supernova remnant, which is unexpectedly bright at 0.2-1.0 keV. One speculative interpretation of the low-energy flux from SN 1006 is as blackbody radiation from a hot neutron star.

  7. Chandra Observations of the Crab-like Supernova Remnant G21.5-0.9.

    PubMed

    Slane; Chen; Schulz; Seward; Hughes; Gaensler

    2000-04-10

    Chandra observations of the Crab-like supernova remnant G21.5-0.9 reveal a compact central core and spectral variations indicative of synchrotron burn-off of higher energy electrons in the inner nebula. The central core is slightly extended, perhaps indicating the presence of an inner wind-shock nebula surrounding the pulsar. No pulsations are observed from the central region, yielding an upper limit of approximately 40% for the pulsed fraction. A faint outer shell may be the first evidence of the expanding ejecta and blast wave formed in the initial explosion, indicating a composite nature for G21.5-0.9.

  8. Dust destruction by the reverse shock in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micelotta, Elisabetta R.; Dwek, Eli; Slavin, Jonathan D.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are important sources of interstellar dust, which are potentially capable of producing 1 M⊙ of dust in their explosively expelled ejecta. However, unlike other dust sources, the dust has to survive the passage of the reverse shock, generated by the interaction of the supernova blast wave with its surrounding medium. Knowledge of the net amount of dust produced by CCSNe is crucial for understanding the origin and evolution of dust in the local and high-redshift Universe. Aims: We identify the dust destruction mechanisms in the ejecta and derive the net amount of dust that survives the passage of the reverse shock. Methods: We use analytical models for the evolution of a supernova blast wave and of the reverse shock with special application to the clumpy ejecta of the remnant of Cassiopeia A (Cas A). We assume that the dust resides in cool oxygen-rich clumps, which are uniformly distributed within the remnant and surrounded by a hot X-ray emitting plasma (smooth ejecta), and that the dust consists of silicates (MgSiO3) and amorphous carbon grains. The passage of the reverse shock through the clumps gives rise to a relative gas-grain motion and also destroys the clumps. While residing in the ejecta clouds, dust is processed via kinetic sputtering, which is terminated either when the grains escape the clumps or when the clumps are destroyed by the reverse shock. In either case, grain destruction proceeds thereafter by thermal sputtering in the hot shocked smooth ejecta. Results: We find that 11.8 and 15.9 percent of silicate and carbon dust, respectively, survive the passage of the reverse shock by the time the shock has reached the centre of the remnant. These fractions depend on the morphology of the ejecta and the medium into which the remnant is expanding, as well as the composition and size distribution of the grains that formed in the ejecta. Results will therefore differ for different types of supernovae.

  9. Analysis of LAC Observations of Clusters of Galaxies and Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, J.

    1996-01-01

    The following publications are included and serve as the final report: The X-ray Spectrum of Abell 665; Clusters of Galaxies; Ginga Observation of an Oxygen-rich Supernova Remnant; Ginga Observations of the Coma Cluster and Studies of the Spatial Distribution of Iron; A Measurement of the Hubble Constant from the X-ray Properties and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect of Abell 2218; Non-polytropic Model for the Coma Cluster; and Abundance Gradients in Cooling Flow Clusters: Ginga LAC (Large Area Counter) and Einstein SSS (Solid State Spectrometer) Spectra of A496, A1795, A2142, and A2199.

  10. Signatures of pulsars in the light curves of newly formed supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotera, K.; Phinney, E. S.; Olinto, A. V.

    2013-07-01

    We explore the effect of pulsars, in particular those born with millisecond periods, on their surrounding supernova ejectas. While they spin down, fast-spinning pulsars release their tremendous rotational energy in the form of a relativistic magnetized wind that can affect the dynamics and luminosity of the supernova. We estimate the thermal and non-thermal radiations expected from these specific objects, concentrating at times a few years after the onset of the explosion. We find that the bolometric light curves present a high luminosity plateau (that can reach 1043-1044 erg s-1) over a few years. An equally bright TeV gamma-ray emission, and a milder X-ray peak (of the order of 1040-1042 erg s-1) could also appear a few months to a few years after the explosion, as the pulsar wind nebula emerges, depending on the injection parameters. The observations of these signatures by following the emission of a large number of supernovae could have important implications for the understanding of core-collapse supernovae and reveal the nature of the remnant compact object.

  11. An Investigation into PAH Destruction in Nearby Supernova Remnants, North Polar Spur and Cygnus Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, Sarah M.; Witt, Adolf N.

    2015-01-01

    Our goal in conducting this research was to look at the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)/large dust grain emission intensity ratio in nearby supernova remnants to find evidence for selective PAH destruction by hot gas and high velocity shock waves within these regions, as predicted by the models of Arendt et al. (2010) and Micelotta et al. (2010a,b). Two supernova remnants were studied- the North Polar Spur (NPS) and the Cygnus Loop. The data for PAHs were obtained from the WISE W3 12 micron all-sky map processed by Meisner & Finkbeiner (2014), and the data for the larger grains come from the IRAS 100 micron all-sky map processed by Schlegel, Finkbeiner & Davis (1998). After obtaining a control PAH/large grain intensity ratio of ~2.8 (DN/px)/(MJy/sr) from two high latitude clouds, MBM 30 and MBM 32, we found that the intensity ratios across the NPS and Cygnus Loop were not far off- ~2.7 (DN/px)/(MJy/sr) and ~3.1 (DN/px)/(MJy/sr), respectively- showing no evidence of selective large-scale PAH destruction in supernova remnants. The individual intensities for both PAHs and large grains do decrease inside the Cygnus Loop, however, suggesting a decrease in abundances of both grain types, which could mean total dust grain destruction with the normal ratios coming from foreground and background dust located in the line of sight of the remnant. In addition, temperature and E(B-V) measurements taken from calibrated IRAS images show that while the dust column density increases in the Eastern Veil of the Cygnus Loop, the dust temperature reaches a local maximum, indicating the heating of large grains by interaction with the hot gas in the remnant. The PAH/large grain ratio in the Eastern Veil does decrease and could be indicative of currently ongoing active grain destruction there, with the PAHs being destroyed on a more rapid timescale than the large grains.We are grateful for financial support from the NSF REU Program grant to the Department of Physics & Astronomy at

  12. High-velocity, high-excitation neutral carbon in a cloud in the Vela supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Edward B.; Wallerstein, George

    1995-01-01

    HD 72089 is situated behind the Vela supernova remnant, and the interstellar absorption lines in the spectrum of this star are remarkable for two reasons. First, there are six distinct velocity components that span the (heliocentric) velocity range -60 to +121 km/s in the lines of Na I and Ca II. Second, two of the components at high velocity, one at +85 km/s and another at +121.5 km/s, have densities that are large enough to produce observable lines from neutral carbon. The gas moving at +121.5 km/s has such a large pressure that the excited fine-structure levels of the ground electronic state of C I are collisionally populated nearly in proportion to their level degeneracies. This high-velocity gas exhibits unusually low column densities of Mg I and Na I, compared to that of C I. We propose that the +121.5 km/s component represents gas that has cooled and recombined in a zone that follows a shock driven into a cloud by the very recent passage of a supernova blast wave. A representative preshock density of n(sub H) approximately = 13/cc and velocity v(sub s) = 100 km/s is indicated by the strength of diffuse (O III) emission lines seen in directions very near HD 72089. The strong collisional population of excited C I and apparent absence of excited levels of O I give a most favorable fit to the conditions 1000 less than n(sub H) less than 2900/cc over a temperature range 300 less than T less than 1000 K. The fact that the compression is not substantially more than this indicates that the preshock gas may have had an embedded, transverse magnetic field with a strength B greater than or approximately = 1 micro-G. The large dynamical pressure of the supernova blast wave that would be needed to create the cloud shock that we describe implies that the energy of the supernova was 8 x 10(exp 51) ergs, if the Vela remnant is 500 pc away. We can bring this value much closer to typical supernova energies E less than or approximately = 10(exp 51) ergs if the distance to the

  13. LIMITS ON THE NUMBER OF GALACTIC YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANTS EMITTING IN THE DECAY LINES OF {sup 44}Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Dufour, François; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2013-09-20

    We revise the assumptions of the parameters involved in predicting the number of supernova remnants detectable in the nuclear lines of the decay chain of {sup 44}Ti. Specifically, we consider the distribution of the supernova progenitors, the supernova rate in the Galaxy, the ratios of supernova types, the Galactic production of {sup 44}Ti, and the {sup 44}Ti yield from supernovae of different types to derive credible bounds on the expected number of detectable remnants. We find that, within 1σ uncertainty, the Galaxy should contain an average of 5.1{sup +2.4}{sub -2.0} remnants detectable to a survey with a {sup 44}Ti decay line flux limit of 10{sup –5} photons cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}, with a probability of detecting a single remnant of 2.7{sup +10.0}{sub -2.4}%, and an expected number of detections between two and nine remnants, making the single detection of Cas A unlikely but consistent with our models. Our results show that the probability of detecting the brightest {sup 44}Ti flux source at the high absolute Galactic longitude of Cas A or above is ∼10%. Using the detected flux of Cas A, we attempt to constrain the Galactic supernova rate and Galactic production of {sup 44}Ti, but find the detection to be only weakly informative. We conclude that even future surveys having 200 times more sensitivity than state-of-the-art surveys can be guaranteed to detect only a few new remnants, with an expected number of detections between 8 and 21 at a limiting {sup 44}Ti decay flux of 10{sup –7} photons cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}.

  14. Maximum Energies of Shock-Accelerated Electrons in Young Shell Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.; Keohane, Jonathan W.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Young supernova remnants (SNRs) are often assumed to be the source of cosmic rays up to energies approaching the slight steepening in the cosmic ray spectrum at around 1000 TeV, known as the "knee." We show that the observed X-ray emission of 14 radio-bright shell remnants, including all five historical shells, can be used to put limits on E(sub max), the energy at which the electron energy distribution must steepen from its slope at radio-emitting energies. Most of the remnants show thermal spectra, so any synchrotron component must fall below the observed X-ray fluxes. We obtain upper limits on E(sub max) by considering the most rapid physically plausible cutoff in the relativistic electron distribution, an exponential, which is as sharp or sharper than found in any more elaborate models. This maximally curved model then gives us the highest possible E(sub max) consistent with not exceeding observed X-rays. Our results are thus independent of particular models for the electron spectrum in SNRs. Assuming homogeneous emitting volumes with a constant magnetic field strength of 10 uG, no object could reach 1000 TeV, and only one, Kes 73, has an upper limit on E(sub max), above 100 TeV. All the other remnants have limits at or below 80 TeV. E(sub max) is probably set by the finite remnant lifetime rather than by synchrotron losses for remnants younger than a few thousand years, so that an observed electron steepening should be accompanied by steepening at the same energy for protons. More complicated, inhomogeneous models could allow higher values of E(sub max) in parts of the remnant, but the emission-weighted average value, that characteristic of typical electrons, should obey these limits. The young remnants are not expected to improve much over their remaining lives at producing the highest energy Galactic cosmic rays; if they cannot, this picture of cosmic-ray origin may need major alteration.

  15. An X-ray study of five supernova remnants in the Carina spiral arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Una; Markert, Thomas H.

    1994-01-01

    The ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) is used to perform an exploratory study of four fields in the Carina spiral arm containing five radio supernova remnants, only one of which has previously been studied in X-rays. We present upper limits for the detection in X-rays of G298.5 - 0.3, G298.6 - 0.0, and G299.0+0.2, and report a 4 sigma detection of G296.8-0.3. In addition, we present detailed spatial and spectral analysis of the bright X-ray remnant G296.1-0.7, which has previously been studied by both the Einstein IPC and EXOSAT LE/CMA. We detect relatively slight, but statistically significant, variations in the spectrum across the remnant via spatially resolved spectral fits and a study of the spatial variation of hardness ratios. In general, the spectrum is characteristic of a thermal plasma with kT about 0.2 keV and N(sub H) about 1.5 x 10(exp 21/sq. cm). The total X-ray emitting mass is estimated to be about 250 solar mass for an optically estimated distance of 4 kpc to the remnant. At this distance, the linear dimensions of the remnant are roughly 35 - 50 pc, implying an age on the order of 20,000 yr. Assuming that X-ray and radio brightnesses are related by SIGMA(sub R) proportional to SIGMA(exp 0.69)(sub X) and that the four radio remnants have X-ray spectral characteristics similar to G296.1-0.7, we find that the column densities to these sources must be several times 10(exp 22)/sq cm in order to explain their low X-ray count rates. This column density is considerably in excess of the X-ray fitted column density to G296.1-0.7, but is comparable to the total column densities in H I measured via the 21 cm line in the directions to all five remnants. This implies that G296.1 - 0.7 is at a significantly smaller distance than the other remnants.

  16. SWIFT/BAT DETECTION OF HARD X-RAYS FROM TYCHO'S SUPERNOVA REMNANT: EVIDENCE FOR TITANIUM-44

    SciTech Connect

    Troja, E.; Baumgartner, W.; Markwardt, C.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Segreto, A.; La Parola, V.; Cusumano, G.; Hartmann, D.

    2014-12-10

    We report Swift/Burst Alert Telescope survey observations of the Tycho's supernova remnant, performed over a period of 104 months since the mission's launch. The remnant is detected with high significance (>10σ) below 50 keV. We detect significant hard X-ray emission in the 60-85 keV band, above the continuum level predicted by a simple synchrotron model. The location of the observed excess is consistent with line emission from radioactive titanium-44, so far reported only for Type II supernova explosions. We discuss the implications of these results in the context of the galactic supernova rate, and nucleosynthesis in Type Ia supernova.

  17. Observations of discrete gamma ray sources with SAS-2. [compact sources centered on Crab nebula and Vela X supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.

    1974-01-01

    Compact gamma ray sources centered on the Crab nebula and the Vela X supernova remnant are considered. An excess in the galactic radiation was observed in both regions. Data indicate that a large fraction of this flux is pulsed. The excess from the Vela region could reflect either a large-scale galactic feature, such as a superposition of spiral arm segments, or it could be associated with the Vela supernova remnant. Low-energy gamma ray bursts were observed in the SAS-2 anticoincidence shielding.

  18. Discovery of radio pulsations from the X-ray pulsar in the supernova remnant G32. 4-1. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Manchester, R.N.; Tuohy, I.R.; D'Amico, N.

    1982-11-15

    A radio counterpart to the X-ray pulsar discovered by Seward and Harnden in the supernova remnant G320.4-1.2 (MSH 15--52) has been detected. The radio observations confirm the very large period derivative indicated by the X-ray data. This implies that the object is not a member of a binary system and hence is an isolated pulsar similar in some ways to the Crab pulsar. Association of the pulsar and the supernova remnant is supported by the observed pulsar dispersion measure.

  19. Multi-wavelength analysis of supernova remnant MSH11-61A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchettl, Katie; Slane, Patrick; Castro, Daniel

    MSH11-61A (G290.1-0.8) has been identified as a mixed morphology supernova remnant (SNR) from its centrally bright X-ray morphology and limb brightened radio profile. The evolutionary sequence which leads to these unusual X-ray properties is not well understood and currently different models can only explain some of the features seen in individual cases. In this analysis we present a study of MSH 11-61A using archival Suzaku data. Our preliminary results indicate enhanced abundances, as previously suggested by ASCA observations and we derive the associated age, energy and ambient density conditions of the remnant using models that we constructed in an attempt to reproduce the observed X-ray properties. Observational evidence from thermal and non-thermal emission of SNRs has provided increasing support in favour of cosmic rays being accelerated at the shock front of the remnant. Whether the observed gamma-ray emission from these accelerated CRs is hadronic or leptonic in nature is currently a hotly debated topic in the literature. SNRs known to be interacting with molecular clouds provide effective targets for detecting and studying gamma-rays. As MSH11-61A is thought to be interacting with a molecular cloud towards the south west of the remnant, we perform a spatial and spectral analysis of the gamma-ray emission in the region of this remnant by using ~64 months of data from the Fermi-LAT telescope. This analysis allows us to constrain the origin of the detected gamma-ray emission.

  20. Radioactive Scandium in the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Green, David A.; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Krishnamurthy, Kalyani; Willett, Rebecca

    2010-12-01

    We report the discovery of thermal X-ray emission from the youngest Galactic supernova remnant G1.9+0.3, from a 237 ks Chandra observation. We detect strong Kα lines of Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe. In addition, we detect a 4.1 keV line with 99.971% confidence which we attribute to 44Sc, produced by electron capture from 44Ti. Combining the data with our earlier Chandra observation allows us to detect the line in two regions independently. For a remnant age of 100 yr, our measured total line strength indicates synthesis of (1-7) × 10-5 M sun of 44Ti, in the range predicted for both Type Ia and core-collapse supernovae (SNe), but somewhat smaller than the 2 × 10-4 M sun reported for Cas A. The line spectrum indicates supersolar abundances. The Fe emission has a width of about 28,000 km s-1, consistent with an age of ~100 yr and with the inferred mean shock velocity of 14,000 km s-1 deduced assuming a distance of 8.5 kpc. Most thermal emission comes from regions of lower X-ray but higher radio surface brightness. Deeper observations should allow more detailed spatial mapping of 44Sc, with significant implications for models of nucleosynthesis in Type Ia SNe.

  1. HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION FROM THE COMPOSITE SUPERNOVA REMNANT MSH 15-56

    SciTech Connect

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Castro, Daniel; Gelfand, Joseph; Dickel, John R.

    2013-05-01

    MSH 15-56 (G326.3-1.8) is a composite supernova remnant (SNR) that consists of an SNR shell and a displaced pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the radio. We present XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of the remnant that reveal a compact source at the tip of the radio PWN and complex structures that provide evidence for mixing of the supernova (SN) ejecta with PWN material following a reverse shock interaction. The X-ray spectra are well fitted by a non-thermal power-law model whose photon index steepens with distance from the presumed pulsar, and a thermal component with an average temperature of 0.55 keV. The enhanced abundances of silicon and sulfur in some regions, and the similar temperature and ionization timescale, suggest that much of the X-ray emission can be attributed to SN ejecta that have either been heated by the reverse shock or swept up by the PWN. We find one region with a lower temperature of 0.3 keV that appears to be in ionization equilibrium. Assuming the Sedov model, we derive a number of SNR properties, including an age of 16,500 yr. Modeling of the {gamma}-ray emission detected by Fermi shows that the emission may originate from the reverse shock-crushed PWN.

  2. High-energy Emission from the Composite Supernova Remnant MSH 15-56

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Castro, Daniel; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Gelfand, Joseph; Dickel, John R.

    2013-05-01

    MSH 15-56 (G326.3-1.8) is a composite supernova remnant (SNR) that consists of an SNR shell and a displaced pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the radio. We present XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of the remnant that reveal a compact source at the tip of the radio PWN and complex structures that provide evidence for mixing of the supernova (SN) ejecta with PWN material following a reverse shock interaction. The X-ray spectra are well fitted by a non-thermal power-law model whose photon index steepens with distance from the presumed pulsar, and a thermal component with an average temperature of 0.55 keV. The enhanced abundances of silicon and sulfur in some regions, and the similar temperature and ionization timescale, suggest that much of the X-ray emission can be attributed to SN ejecta that have either been heated by the reverse shock or swept up by the PWN. We find one region with a lower temperature of 0.3 keV that appears to be in ionization equilibrium. Assuming the Sedov model, we derive a number of SNR properties, including an age of 16,500 yr. Modeling of the γ-ray emission detected by Fermi shows that the emission may originate from the reverse shock-crushed PWN.

  3. AKARI AND BLAST OBSERVATIONS OF THE CASSIOPEIA A SUPERNOVA REMNANT AND SURROUNDING INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Sibthorpe, B.; Ade, P. A. R.; Griffin, M.; Hargrave, P. C.; Mauskopf, P.; Bock, J. J.; Chapin, E. L.; Halpern, M.; Marsden, G.; Devlin, M. J.; Dicker, S.; Klein, J.; Gundersen, J. O.; Hughes, D. H.; Jeong, W.-S.; Kaneda, H.; Koo, B.-C.; Lee, H.-G.; Martin, P. G.; Moon, D.-S.

    2010-08-20

    We use new large area far infrared maps ranging from 65 to 500 {mu}m obtained with the AKARI and the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope missions to characterize the dust emission toward the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant (SNR). Using the AKARI high-resolution data we find a new 'tepid' dust grain population at a temperature of {approx}35 K and with an estimated mass of 0.06 M{sub sun}. This component is confined to the central area of the SNR and may represent newly formed dust in the unshocked supernova ejecta. While the mass of tepid dust that we measure is insufficient by itself to account for the dust observed at high redshift, it does constitute an additional dust population to contribute to those previously reported. We fit our maps at 65, 90, 140, 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m to obtain maps of the column density and temperature of 'cold' dust (near 16 K) distributed throughout the region. The large column density of cold dust associated with clouds seen in molecular emission extends continuously from the surrounding interstellar medium to project on the SNR, where the foreground component of the clouds is also detectable through optical, X-ray, and molecular extinction. At the resolution available here, there is no morphological signature to isolate any cold dust associated only with the SNR from this confusing interstellar emission. Our fit also recovers the previously detected 'hot' dust in the remnant, with characteristic temperature 100 K.

  4. High-energy Emission from the Composite Supernova Remnant MSH 15-56

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Castro, Daniel; Plucinsky, Paul; Gelfand, Joseph; Dickel, John R.

    2013-01-01

    MSH 1556 (G326.3-1.8) is a composite supernova remnant (SNR) that consists of an SNR shell and a displaced pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the radio. We present XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of the remnant that reveal a compact source at the tip of the radio PWN and complex structures that provide evidence for mixing of the supernova (SN) ejecta with PWN material following a reverse shock interaction. The X-ray spectra are well fitted by a non-thermal power-law model whose photon index steepens with distance from the presumed pulsar, and a thermal component with an average temperature of 0.55 keV. The enhanced abundances of silicon and sulfur in some regions, and the similar temperature and ionization timescale, suggest that much of the X-ray emission can be attributed to SN ejecta that have either been heated by the reverse shock or swept up by the PWN. We find one region with a lower temperature of 0.3 keV that appears to be in ionization equilibrium.Assuming the Sedov model, we derive a number of SNR properties, including an age of 16,500 yr. Modeling of the gamma-ray emission detected by Fermi shows that the emission may originate from the reverse shock-crushed PWN.

  5. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation and Emission from Relativistic Jets and Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hartmann, D. H.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C.; Mizunno, Y.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    We performed numerical simulations of particle acceleration, magnetic field generation, and emission from shocks in order to understand the observed emission from relativistic jets and supernova remnants. The investigation involves the study of collisionless shocks, where the Weibel instability is responsible for particle acceleration as well as magnetic field generation. A 3-D relativistic particle-in-cell (RPIC) code has been used to investigate the shock processes in electron-positron plasmas. The evolution of theWeibe1 instability and its associated magnetic field generation and particle acceleration are studied with two different jet velocities (0 = 2,5 - slow, fast) corresponding to either outflows in supernova remnants or relativistic jets, such as those found in AGNs and microquasars. Slow jets have intrinsically different structures in both the generated magnetic fields and the accelerated particle spectrum. In particular, the jet head has a very weak magnetic field and the ambient electrons are strongly accelerated and dragged by the jet particles. The simulation results exhibit jitter radiation from inhomogeneous magnetic fields, generated by the Weibel instability, which has different spectral properties than standard synchrotron emission in a homogeneous magnetic field.

  6. TYCHO SN 1572: A NAKED Ia SUPERNOVA REMNANT WITHOUT AN ASSOCIATED AMBIENT MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, W. W.; Leahy, D. A.

    2011-03-10

    The historical supernova remnant (SNR) Tycho SN 1572 originates from the explosion of a normal Type Ia supernova that is believed to have originated from a carbon-oxygen white dwarf in a binary system. We analyze the 21 cm continuum, H I, and {sup 12}CO-line data from the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey in the direction of SN 1572 and the surrounding region. We construct H I absorption spectra to SN 1572 and three nearby compact sources. We conclude that SN 1572 has no molecular cloud interaction, which argues against previous claims that a molecular cloud is interacting with the SNR. This new result does not support a recent claim that dust, newly detected by AKARI, originates from such an SNR-cloud interaction. We suggest that the SNR has a kinematic distance of 2.5-3.0 kpc based on a nonlinear rotational curve model. Very high energy {gamma}-ray emission from the remnant has been detected by the VERITAS telescope, so our result shows that its origin should not be an SNR-cloud interaction. Both radio and X-ray observations support that SN 1572 is an isolated Type Ia SNR.

  7. Computer simulations of cosmic-ray diffusion near supernova remnant shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, C. E.; Zachary, A. L.; Arons, J.

    1989-01-01

    A plasma simulation model was used to study the resonant interactions between streaming cosmic-ray ions and a self-consistent spectrum of Alfven waves, such as might exist in the interstellar medium upstream of a supernova remnant shock wave. The computational model is a hybrid one, in which the background interstellar medium is an MHD fluid and the cosmic-rays are discrete kinetic particles. The particle sources for the electromagnetic fields are obtained by averaging over the fast cyclotron motions. When the perturbed magnetic field is larger than 10 percent of the background field, the macro- and microphysics are no longer correctly predicted by quasi-linear theory. The particles are trapped by the waves and show sharp jumps in their pitch-angles relative to the background magnetic field, and the effective ninety-degree scattering time for diffusion parallel to the background magnetic field is reduced to between 5 and 30 cyclotron periods. Simulation results suggest that Type 1 supernova remnants may be the principal sites of cosmic ray acceleration.

  8. The End of Amnesia: Measuring the Metallicities of Type Ia SN Progenitors with Manganese Lines in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badenes, Carles; Bravo, Eduardo; Hughes, John P.

    2009-05-01

    The Mn to Cr mass ratio in supernova ejecta has recently been proposed as a tracer of Type Ia SN progenitor metallicity. We review the advantages and problems of this observable quantity, and discuss them in the framework of the Tycho Supernova Remnant. The fluxes of the Mn and Cr Kα lines in the X-ray spectra of Tycho observed by the Suzaku satellite suggests a progenitors of supersolar metallicity.

  9. An X-ray and optical study of the supernova remnant W44

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rho, Jeongee; Petre, R.; Schlegel, Eric M.

    1994-01-01

    We report the results of a 8000 s observation of the supernova remnant W44 using the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC). The image shows the same centrally peaked morphology observed by the Einstein IPC and contrasts with the shell-like radio morphology. The eastern limb shows a lack of X-ray emission within the radio shell, probably due to the interaction between the Supernova Remnants (SNR) and a molecular cloud. No counterpart to the pulsar 1853 + 01 in W44 has been detected, with L(sub X) less than 1.3 x 10(exp 32) ergs/s in the 0.2 to 2.4 keV band. The spectral analysis of the central part of W44, combining EXOSAT ME and Einstein SSS data, shows that the shocked plasma has not reached ionization equilibrium. The best nonequilibrium fit to PSPC, ME, and SSS spectra gives Eta = 10(exp 51) ergs cm(exp -6), T(sub s) = 10(exp 7) K with T(sub e) = T(sub i), suggesting conditions are approaching ionization equilibrium. There is no evidence of enhanced abundances of Mg, Si, S, or Fe. The variation of temperature and column density was obtained region by region using the PSPC and Einstein IPC. The temperature is largely uniform over the remnant, but strong column density variations are found to be consistent with molecular clouds in the line of sight. An evaporation model with a two-phase interstellar medium structure of clumps and interclump gas (White & Long 1991) can explain the X-ray centrally peaked morphology of W44. The clumps remaining behind a SN shock provide a reservoir of material, and evaporat e to increase the density of X-ray emitting gas in the interior of a SNR. The uniform temperature distribution of W44 strongly supports the predictions of this model. In addition, mosaiced H alpha and (S II) images of W44, taken using the prime focus universal extragalactic instrument (PFUEI) camera on the Palomar 60 sec telescope, reveal the first discovery of optical filaments (both H alpha and (S II)) in the northwestern and southeastern portion

  10. Diffusive propagation of cosmic rays from supernova remnants in the Galaxy. I: spectrum and chemical composition

    SciTech Connect

    Blasi, Pasquale; Amato, Elena E-mail: amato@arcetri.astro.it

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effect of stochasticity in the spatial and temporal distribution of supernova remnants on the spectrum and chemical composition of cosmic rays observed at Earth. The calculations are carried out for different choices of the diffusion coefficient D(E) experienced by cosmic rays during propagation in the Galaxy. In particular, at high energies we assume that D(E)∝E{sup δ}, with δ = 1/3 and δ = 0.6 being the reference scenarios. The large scale distribution of supernova remnants in the Galaxy is modeled following the distribution of pulsars, with and without accounting for the spiral structure of the Galaxy. We find that the stochastic fluctuations induced by the spatial and temporal distribution of supernovae, together with the effect of spallation of nuclei, lead to mild but sensible violations of the simple, leaky-box-inspired rule that the spectrum observed at Earth is N(E)∝E{sup −α} with α = γ+δ, where γ is the slope of the cosmic ray injection spectrum at the sources. Spallation of nuclei, even with the small rates appropriate for He, may account for small differences in spectral slopes between different nuclei, possibly providing an explanation for the recent CREAM observations. For δ = 1/3 we find that the slope of the proton and helium spectra are ∼ 2.67 and ∼ 2.6 respectively (with fluctuations depending on the realization of source distribution) at energies around ∼ 1 TeV (to be compared with the measured values of 2.66±0.02 and 2.58±0.02). For δ = 0.6 the hardening of the He spectra is not observed. The stochastic effects discussed above cannot be found in ordinary propagation calculations, such as GALPROP, where these effects and the point like nature of the sources are not taken into account. We also comment on the effect of time dependence of the escape of cosmic rays from supernova remnants, and of a possible clustering of the sources in superbubbles. In a second paper we will discuss the

  11. ENERGY DEPENDENCE OF SYNCHROTRON X-RAY RIMS IN TYCHO’S SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Aaron; Williams, Brian J.; Petre, Robert; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2015-10-20

    Several young supernova remnants (SNRs) exhibit thin X-ray bright rims of synchrotron radiation at their forward shocks. Thin rims require strong magnetic field amplification beyond simple shock compression if rim widths are only limited by electron energy losses. But, magnetic field damping behind the shock could produce similarly thin rims with less extreme field amplification. Variation of rim width with energy may thus discriminate between competing influences on rim widths. We measured rim widths around Tycho's SNR in five energy bands using an archival 750 ks Chandra observation. Rims narrow with increasing energy and are well described by either loss-limited or damped scenarios, so X-ray rim width-energy dependence does not uniquely specify a model. But, radio counterparts to thin rims are not loss-limited and better reflect magnetic field structure. Joint radio and X-ray modeling favors magnetic damping in Tycho's SNR with damping lengths ∼1%–5% of remnant radius and magnetic field strengths ∼50–400 μG assuming Bohm diffusion. X-ray rim widths are ∼1% of remnant radius, somewhat smaller than inferred damping lengths. Electron energy losses are important in all models of X-ray rims, suggesting that the distinction between loss-limited and damped models is blurred in soft X-rays. All loss-limited and damping models require magnetic fields ≳20 μG, affirming the necessity of magnetic field amplification beyond simple compression.

  12. Mechanism for spectral break in cosmic ray proton spectrum of supernova remnant W44.

    PubMed

    Malkov, M A; Diamond, P H; Sagdeev, R Z

    2011-02-15

    Recent observations of supernova remnant W44 by the Fermi spacecraft observatory support the idea that the bulk of galactic cosmic rays is accelerated in such remnants by a Fermi mechanism, also known as diffusive shock acceleration. However, the W44 expands into weakly ionized dense gas, and so a significant revision of the mechanism is required. Here, we provide the necessary modifications and demonstrate that strong ion-neutral collisions in the remnant surrounding lead to the steepening of the energy spectrum of accelerated particles by exactly one power. The spectral break is caused by Alfven wave evanescence leading to the fractional particle losses. The gamma-ray spectrum generated in collisions of the accelerated protons with the ambient gas is calculated and successfully fitted to the Fermi Observatory data. The parent proton spectrum is best represented by a classical test particle power law ∝E(-2), steepening to E(-3) at E(br)≈7 GeV due to deteriorated particle confinement.

  13. A Chandra X-Ray Survey of Ejecta in the Cassiopeia A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Una; Laming, J. Martin

    2011-01-01

    We present a survey of the X-ray emitting ejecta in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant based on an extensive analysis of over 6000 spectral regions extracted on 2.5-10" angular scales using the Chandra 1 Ms observation. We interpret these results in the context of hydrodynamical models for the evolution of the remnant. The distributions of fitted temperature and ionization age are highly peaked and suggest that the ejecta were subjected to multiple secondary shocks. Based on the fitted emission measure and element abundances, and an estimate of the emitting volume, we derive masses for the X-ray emitting ejecta as well as showing the distribution of the mass of various elements over the remnant. The total shocked Fe mass appears to be roughly 0.14 Solar Mass, which accounts for nearly all of the mass expected in Fe ejecta. We find two populations of Fe ejecta, that associated with normal Si-burning and that associated with alpha-rich freeze-out, with a mass ratio of approximately 2:1. Surprisingly, essentially all of this Fe (both components) is well outside the central regions of the SNR, presumably having been ejected by hydrodynamic instabilities during the explosion. We discuss this, and its implications for the neutron star kick.

  14. Hard X-ray emission and {sup 44}Ti line features of the Tycho supernova remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Li, Zhuo E-mail: zhuo.li@pku.edu.cn

    2014-07-10

    A deep hard X-ray survey of the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) satellite has detected for the first time non-thermal emission up to 90 keV in the Tycho supernova (SN) remnant. Its 3-100 keV spectrum is fitted with a thermal bremsstrahlung of kT ∼ 0.81 ± 0.45 keV plus a power-law model of Γ ∼ 3.01 ± 0.16. Based on diffusive shock acceleration theory, this non-thermal emission, together with radio measurements, implies that the Tycho remnant may not accelerate protons up to >PeV but to hundreds TeV. Only heavier nuclei may be accelerated to the cosmic ray spectral 'knee'. In addition, using INTEGRAL, we search for soft gamma-ray lines at 67.9 and 78.4 keV that come from the decay of radioactive {sup 44}Ti in the Tycho remnant. A bump feature in the 60-90 keV energy band, potentially associated with the {sup 44}Ti line emission, is found with a marginal significance level of ∼2.6σ. The corresponding 3σ upper limit on the {sup 44}Ti line flux amounts to 1.5 × 10{sup –5} photon cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}. Implications on the progenitor of the Tycho SN, considered to be a Type Ia SN prototype, are discussed.

  15. Multi-wavelength Analysis of the Galactic Supernova Remnant MSH 11-61A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchettl, Katie; Slane, Patrick; Castro, Daniel; Foster, Adam R.; Smith, Randall K.

    2015-09-01

    Due to its centrally bright X-ray morphology and limb brightened radio profile, MSH 11-61A (G290.1-0.8) is classified as a mixed morphology supernova remnant (SNR). H i and CO observations determined that the SNR is interacting with molecular clouds found toward the north and southwest regions of the remnant. In this paper we report on the detection of γ-ray emission coincident with MSH 11-61A, using 70 months of data from the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. To investigate the origin of this emission, we perform broadband modeling of its non-thermal emission considering both leptonic and hadronic cases and concluding that the γ-ray emission is most likely hadronic in nature. Additionally we present our analysis of a 111 ks archival Suzaku observation of this remnant. Our investigation shows that the X-ray emission from MSH 11-61A arises from shock-heated ejecta with the bulk of the X-ray emission arising from a recombining plasma, while the emission toward the east arises from an ionizing plasma.

  16. A BROADBAND STUDY OF THE EMISSION FROM THE COMPOSITE SUPERNOVA REMNANT MSH 11-62

    SciTech Connect

    Slane, Patrick; Castro, Daniel; Foight, Dillon; and others

    2012-04-20

    MSH 11-62 (G291.0-0.1) is a composite supernova remnant for which radio and X-ray observations have identified the remnant shell as well as its central pulsar wind nebula. The observations suggest a relatively young system expanding into a low-density region. Here, we present a study of MSH 11-62 using observations with the Chandra, XMM -Newton, and Fermi observatories, along with radio observations from the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We identify a compact X-ray source that appears to be the putative pulsar that powers the nebula, and show that the X-ray spectrum of the nebula bears the signature of synchrotron losses as particles diffuse into the outer nebula. Using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope, we identify {gamma}-ray emission originating from MSH 11-62. With density constraints from the new X-ray measurements of the remnant, we model the evolution of the composite system in order to constrain the properties of the underlying pulsar and the origin of the {gamma}-ray emission.

  17. High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy and Imaging of Supernova Remnant N132D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Ehud; Rasmussen, Andrew; Griffiths, R. Gareth; Dennerl, Konrad; Audard, Marc; Aschenbach, Bernd

    2000-01-01

    The observation of the supernova remnant N132D by the scientific instruments on board the XMM-Newton satellite is presented. The X-rays from N132D are dispersed into a detailed line-rich spectrum using the Reflection Grating Spectrometers. Spectral lines of C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe are identified. Images of the remnant, in narrow wavelength bands, produced by the European Photon Imaging Cameras reveal a complex spatial structure of the ionic distribution. While K - shell Fe seems to originate near the centre, all of the other ions are observed along the shell. An emission excess of O(6+) over O(7+) is detected on the northeastern edge of the remnant. This can be a sign of hot ionising conditions, or it can reflect a relatively cool region. Spectral fitting of the CCD spectrum suggests high temperatures in this region, but a detailed analysis of the atomic processes involved in producing the O(6+) spectral lines leads to the conclusion that the intensities of these lines alone cannot provide a conclusive distinction between the two scenarios.

  18. A progenitor binary and an ejected mass donor remnant of faint type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, S.; Marsh, T. R.; Wang, B.; Dunlap, B.; Barlow, B. N.; Schaffenroth, V.; Chen, X.; Irrgang, A.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Ziegerer, E.; Kupfer, T.; Miszalski, B.; Heber, U.; Han, Z.; Shporer, A.; Telting, J. H.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Østensen, R. H.; O'Toole, S. J.; Napiwotzki, R.

    2013-06-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) are the most important standard candles for measuring the expansion history of the universe. The thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf can explain their observed properties, but neither the progenitor systems nor any stellar remnants have been conclusively identified. Underluminous SN Ia have been proposed to originate from a so-called double-detonation of a white dwarf. After a critical amount of helium is deposited on the surface through accretion from a close companion, the helium is ignited causing a detonation wave that triggers the explosion of the white dwarf itself. We have discovered both shallow transits and eclipses in the tight binary system CD-30°11223 composed of a carbon/oxygen white dwarf and a hot helium star, allowing us to determine its component masses and fundamental parameters. In the future the system will transfer mass from the helium star to the white dwarf. Modelling this process we find that the detonation in the accreted helium layer is sufficiently strong to trigger the explosion of the core. The helium star will then be ejected at such high velocity that it will escape the Galaxy. The predicted properties of this remnant are an excellent match to the so-called hypervelocity star US 708, a hot, helium-rich star moving at more than 750 km s-1, sufficient for it to leave the Galaxy. The identification of both progenitor and remnant provides a consistent picture of the formation and evolution of underluminous SNIa.

  19. A Broadband Study of the Emission from the Composite Supernova Remnant MSH 11-62

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, Patrick; Hughes, John P.; Temim, Tea; Rousseau, Romain; Castro, Daniel; Foight, Dillon; Gaensler, B. M.; Funk, Stefan; Lemoine-Goumard, Marianne; Gelfand, Joseph D.; Moffett, David A.

    2012-01-01

    MSH 11-62 (G29U)-Q.1) is a composite supernova remnant for which radio and X-ray observations have identified the remnant shell as well as its central pulsar wind nebula. The observations suggest a relatively young system expanding into a low-density region. Here, we present a study of MSH ll-62 using observations with the Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Fermi observatories, along with radio observations from the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We identify a compact X-ray source that appears to be the putative pulsar that powers the nebula, and show that the X-ray spectrum of the nebula bears the signature of synchrotron losses as particles diffuse into the outer nebula. Using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope, we identify gamma-ray emission originating from MSH 11-62. With density constraints from the new X-ray measurements of the remnant, we model the evolution of the composite system in order to constrain the properties of the underlying pulsar and the origin of the gamma-ray emission.

  20. AN ATTEMPT AT A UNIFIED MODEL FOR THE GAMMA-RAY EMISSION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Qiang; Bi Xiaojun; Liu Siming

    2012-12-20

    Shocks of supernova remnants (SNRs) are important (and perhaps the dominant) agents for the production of the Galactic cosmic rays. Recent {gamma}-ray observations of several SNRs have made this case more compelling. However, these broadband high-energy measurements also reveal a variety of spectral shapes demanding more comprehensive modeling of emissions from SNRs. According to the locally observed fluxes of cosmic-ray protons and electrons, the electron-to-proton number ratio is known to be about 1%. Assuming such a ratio is universal for all SNRs and identical spectral shape for all kinds of accelerated particles, we propose a unified model that ascribes the distinct {gamma}-ray spectra of different SNRs to variations of the medium density and the spectral difference between cosmic-ray electrons and protons observed from Earth to transport effects. For low-density environments, the {gamma}-ray emission is inverse-Compton dominated. For high-density environments like systems of high-energy particles interacting with molecular clouds, the {gamma}-ray emission is {pi}{sup 0}-decay dominated. The model predicts a hadronic origin of {gamma}-ray emission from very old remnants interacting mostly with molecular clouds and a leptonic origin for intermediate-age remnants whose shocks propagate in a low-density environment created by their progenitors via, e.g., strong stellar winds. These results can be regarded as evidence in support of the SNR origin of Galactic cosmic rays.

  1. MULTI-WAVELENGTH ANALYSIS OF THE GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT MSH 11-61A

    SciTech Connect

    Auchettl, Katie; Slane, Patrick; Foster, Adam R.; Smith, Randall K.; Castro, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Due to its centrally bright X-ray morphology and limb brightened radio profile, MSH 11–61A (G290.1–0.8) is classified as a mixed morphology supernova remnant (SNR). H i and CO observations determined that the SNR is interacting with molecular clouds found toward the north and southwest regions of the remnant. In this paper we report on the detection of γ-ray emission coincident with MSH 11–61A, using 70 months of data from the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. To investigate the origin of this emission, we perform broadband modeling of its non-thermal emission considering both leptonic and hadronic cases and concluding that the γ-ray emission is most likely hadronic in nature. Additionally we present our analysis of a 111 ks archival Suzaku observation of this remnant. Our investigation shows that the X-ray emission from MSH 11–61A arises from shock-heated ejecta with the bulk of the X-ray emission arising from a recombining plasma, while the emission toward the east arises from an ionizing plasma.

  2. Giant-scale supernova remnants - The role of differential galactic rotation and the formation of molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Palous, J.

    1987-01-01

    The evolution of remnants produced by the total supernova power from an evolved OB association in a differentially rotating galactic disk is presented. The calculations at 5 kpc and 10 kpc from the galactic center lead to column densities across the remnant shell, or across sections of the remnants, which eventually exceed the opacity criterion of Franco and Cox (1986) and thus form molecular clouds. The resultant clouds have masses larger than 100,000 solar masses, dimensions of several hundred parsecs, and a separation larger than 1 kpc. In contrast, at 20 kpc from the galactic center the opacity criterion is never fulfilled.

  3. Spitzer Observations of the Type Ia Supernova Remnant N103B: A Type Ia with CSM Interaction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Brian J.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Raymond, John C.; Long, Knox S.; Blair, William P.; Sankrit, Ravi; Winkler, P. Frank; Hendrick, Sean Patrick

    2014-08-01

    A small but growing subclass of Type Ia supernovae show signs of interaction with material in a circumstellar medium (CSM), likely the result of significant pre-supernova mass loss from the progenitor system. Among Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs), only the remnant of Kepler's supernova has been shown to be interacting with a dense CSM. We report results from Spitzer observations of SNR 0509-68.7, also known as N103B, a young Type Ia supernova remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud that shows interaction with a dense medium in its western hemisphere. Our images show that N103B has strong IR emission from warm dust in the post-shock environment. The post-shock gas density we derive, 45 cm$^{-3}$, is much higher than in other Type Ia remnants in the LMC, though a lack of spatial resolution may bias measurements towards regions of higher than average density. Thisdensity is similar to that in Kepler's SNR. Optical images show H$\\alpha$ emission along the entire periphery of the western portion of the shock, with [O III] and [S II] lines emitted from a few dense clumps of material where the shock has become radiative. The dust is silicate in nature, though standard silicate dust models fail to reproduce the ``18 $\\mu$m'' silicate feature that peaks instead at 17.3 $\\mu$m. We propose that the dense material is circumstellar material lost from the progenitor system, as with Kepler. If the CSM interpretation is correct, this remnant would become the second member, along with Kepler, of a class of Type Ia remnants characterized by interaction with a dense CSM hundreds of years post-explosion. A lack of N enhancement eliminates symbiotic AGB progenitors. The white dwarf companion must have been relatively unevolved at the time of the explosion.

  4. Swift/BAT detection of hard X-rays from Tycho;s Supernova Remnant: Evidence for 44Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Dieter; Troja, Eleonora; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Markwardt, Craig; Barthelmy, Scott Douglas; Gehrels, Neil; Segreto, Alberto; La Parola, Valentina

    2014-06-01

    We report Swift/BAT survey observations of the Tycho supernova remnant, performed over a period of 104 month. A total exposure of 19.6 Ms was used to detect significant hard X-ray emission up to about 100 keV. Excess emission above this continuum in the 60-85 keV band was found, consistent with line emission from radioactive 44T. We discuss the implications of these results in the context of the galactic supernova rate, and nucleosynthesis in Type II and Type Ia supernova, with emphasis on the production of 44Ti.

  5. The X-ray spectra of the Vela and Puppis supernova remnants and the shock-wave model of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Tucker, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    The structure and spectrum of the Vela and Puppis supernova remnants (SNRs) were observed in soft (0.1 to 1.5 keV) X rays from a rocket. The spectral data of both objects below 1.5 keV are consistent with thermal radiation from a hot plasma and are not consistent with a simple power-law function. Fitting the data to a Tucker-Koren model results in values of T = (4.3 plus or minus 0.3) x 1,000,000 K for Vela and T = (7 plus or minus 1) x 1,000,000 K for Puppis. The present data, earlier data from the Cygnus Loop, and results on Cas A and Tycho reported by others are considered within the context of a simple model in which X rays are thermally produced as a result of a shock wave expanding into the interstellar medium. X-ray data on the temperature, intrinsic diameter, and intrinsic luminosity of the five SNRs are used to compute the age, energy release, and initial interstellar density for each one. From measurements of X-ray absorption along the line of sight, and also from shock-wave model interpretations of temperature-diameter-luminosity relations, it is concluded that the average density of interstellar material is about 0.1 per cu cm between the sun and the nearest X-ray emitting SNR, Vela.

  6. A Search for Evidence of Non-Thermal Emission from the Supernova Remnants 37A/B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, R.

    2002-01-01

    The ADP grant NAG5-9211 entitled 'A Search for Evidence of Non-Thermal Emission from the Supernova Remnants 37 A/B' was not used to support an analysis of the ASCA data for these two remnants because the ASCA mission ended before the remnants were observed. The grant was used to support similar research on two remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud, N132D and N 103B. An analysis of the Chandra data for these two remnants exhibits some evidence of non-thermal emission from small regions in the remnants. The X-ray spectra for these regions can not be adequately described by a single thermal X-ray emission model. However, if an X-ray synchrotron component is also included, the spectral data can be well described by the model and the values of the fit parameters are consistent with the values expected. These results were presented at the 199th Meeting of the American Astronomical Society. In summary, the grant has enabled us to strengthen the evidence that supernova remnants outside our Galaxy can also accelerate electrons to very-high energies. The results of this analysis will be published soon in the Astrophysical Journal,

  7. Spitzer observations of the type IA supernova remnant N103B: Kepler's older cousin?

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Brian J.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Raymond, John C.; Long, Knox S.; Blair, William P.; Sankrit, Ravi; Hendrick, Sean P.

    2014-08-01

    We report results from Spitzer observations of SNR 0509-68.7, also known as N103B, a young Type Ia supernova remnant (SNR) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) that shows interaction with a dense medium in its western hemisphere. Our images show that N103B has strong IR emission from warm dust in the post-shock environment. The post-shock gas density we derive, 45 cm{sup –3}, is much higher than in other Type Ia remnants in the LMC, though a lack of spatial resolution may bias measurements toward regions of higher than average density. This density is similar to that in Kepler's SNR, a Type Ia interacting with a circumstellar medium (CSM). Optical images show Hα emission along the entire periphery of the western portion of the shock, with [O III] and [S II] lines emitted from a few dense clumps of material where the shock has become radiative. The dust is silicate in nature, though standard silicate dust models fail to reproduce the '18 μm' silicate feature that peaks instead at 17.3 μm. We propose that the dense material is circumstellar material lost from the progenitor system, as with Kepler. If the CSM interpretation is correct, this remnant would become the second member, along with Kepler, of a class of Type Ia remnants characterized by interaction with a dense CSM hundreds of years post-explosion. A lack of N enhancement eliminates symbiotic asymptotic giant branch progenitors. The white dwarf companion must have been relatively unevolved at the time of the explosion.

  8. Spitzer Observations of the Type Ia Supernova Remnant N103B: Kepler's Older Cousin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Brian J.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Raymond, John C.; Long, Knox S.; Blair, William P.; Sankrit, Ravi; Winkler, P. Frank; Hendrick, Sean P.

    2014-08-01

    We report results from Spitzer observations of SNR 0509-68.7, also known as N103B, a young Type Ia supernova remnant (SNR) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) that shows interaction with a dense medium in its western hemisphere. Our images show that N103B has strong IR emission from warm dust in the post-shock environment. The post-shock gas density we derive, 45 cm-3, is much higher than in other Type Ia remnants in the LMC, though a lack of spatial resolution may bias measurements toward regions of higher than average density. This density is similar to that in Kepler's SNR, a Type Ia interacting with a circumstellar medium (CSM). Optical images show Hα emission along the entire periphery of the western portion of the shock, with [O III] and [S II] lines emitted from a few dense clumps of material where the shock has become radiative. The dust is silicate in nature, though standard silicate dust models fail to reproduce the "18 μm" silicate feature that peaks instead at 17.3 μm. We propose that the dense material is circumstellar material lost from the progenitor system, as with Kepler. If the CSM interpretation is correct, this remnant would become the second member, along with Kepler, of a class of Type Ia remnants characterized by interaction with a dense CSM hundreds of years post-explosion. A lack of N enhancement eliminates symbiotic asymptotic giant branch progenitors. The white dwarf companion must have been relatively unevolved at the time of the explosion.

  9. EVOLUTION OF THE RADIO REMNANT OF SUPERNOVA 1987A: MORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES FROM DAY 7000

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, C.-Y.; Zanardo, G.; Potter, T. M.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Gaensler, B. M.; Manchester, R. N.; Tzioumis, A. K.

    2013-11-10

    We present radio imaging observations of supernova remnant 1987A at 9 GHz, taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array over 21 years from 1992 to 2013. By employing a Fourier modeling technique to fit the visibility data, we show that the remnant structure has evolved significantly since day 7000 (mid-2006): the emission latitude has gradually decreased such that the overall geometry has become more similar to a ring structure. Around the same time, we find a decreasing trend in the east-west asymmetry of the surface emissivity. These results could reflect the increasing interaction of the forward shock with material around the circumstellar ring, and the relative weakening of the interaction with the lower-density material at higher latitudes. The morphological evolution caused an apparent break in the remnant expansion measured with a torus model, from a velocity of 4600{sup +150}{sub -}200 km s{sup –1} between day 4000 and 7000 to 2400{sup +100}{sub -200} km s{sup –1} after day 7000. However, we emphasize that there is no conclusive evidence for a physical slowing of the shock at any given latitude in the expanding remnant, and that a change of radio morphology alone appears to dominate the evolution. This is supported by our ring-only fits which show a constant expansion of 3890 ± 50 km s{sup –1} without deceleration between days 4000 and 9000. We suggest that once the emission latitude no longer decreases, the expansion velocity obtained from the torus model should return to the same value as that measured with the ring model.

  10. Spectroscopic mapping of the physical properties of supernova remnant N 49

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauletti, D.; Copetti, M. V. F.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Physical conditions inside a supernova remnant can vary significantly between different positions. However, typical observational data of supernova remnants are integrated data or contemplate specific portions of the remnant. Aims: We study the spatial variation in the physical properties of the N 49 supernova remnant based on a spectroscopic mapping of the whole nebula. Methods: Long-slit spectra were obtained with the slit (~4' × 1.03″) aligned along the east-west direction from 29 different positions spaced by 2″ in declination. A total of 3248 1D spectra were extracted from sections of 2″ of the 2D spectra. More than 60 emission lines in the range 3550 Å to 8920 Å were measured in these spectra. Maps of the fluxes and of intensity ratios of these emission lines were built with a spatial resolution of 2″ × 2″. Results: An electron density map has been obtained using the [S II] λ6716 /λ6731 line ratio. Values vary from ~500 cm-3 at the northeast region to more than 3500 cm-3 at the southeast border. We calculated the electron temperature using line ratio sensors for the ions S+, O++, O+, and N+. Values are about 3.6 × 104 K for the O++ sensor and about 1.1 × 104 K for other sensors. The Hα/Hβ ratio map presents a ring structure with higher values that may result from collisional excitation of hydrogen. We detected an area with high values of [N II] λ6583/Hα extending from the remnant center to its northeastern border, which may be indicating an overabundance of nitrogen in the area due to contamination by the progenitor star. We found a radial dependence in many line intensity ratio maps. We observed an increase toward the remnant borders of the intensity ratio of any two lines in which the numerator comes before in the sequence [O III] λ5007, [O III] λ4363, [Ar III] λ7136, [Ne III] λ3869, [O II] λ7325, [O II] λ3727, He II λ4686, Hβ λ4861, [N II] λ6583, He I λ6678, [S II] λ6731, [S II] λ6716, [O i] λ6300, [Ca II]

  11. The End of Amnesia: A New Method for Measuring the Metallicity of Type Ia Supernova Progenitors Using Manganese Lines in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badenes, Carles; Bravo, Eduardo; Hughes, John P.

    2008-06-01

    We propose a new method to measure the metallicity of Type Ia supernova progenitors using Mn and Cr lines in the X-ray spectra of young supernova remnants. We show that the Mn-to-Cr mass ratio in Type Ia supernova ejecta is tightly correlated with the initial metallicity of the progenitor, as determined by the neutron excess of the white dwarf material before thermonuclear runaway. We use this correlation, together with the flux of the Cr and Mn Kα X-ray lines in the Tycho supernova remnant recently detected by Suzaku, to derive a metallicity of log (Z) = - 1.32+ 0.67-0.33 for the progenitor of this supernova, which corresponds to log (Z/Z⊙) = 0.60+ 0.31-0.60 according to the latest determination of the solar metallicity by Asplund and coworkers. The uncertainty in the measurement is large, but metallicities much smaller than the solar value can be confidently discarded. We discuss the implications of this result for future research on Type Ia supernova progenitors.

  12. The Expansion Rate, Age, and Distance of the Supernova Remnant G266.2-1.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Glenn E.; DeLaney, Tracey; Filipovic, Miroslav D; Houck, John C.; Pannuti, Thomas; Stage, Michael D.

    2014-08-01

    We reprocessed and analyzed the 2003 and 2008 Chandra ACIS data for the supernova remnant G266.2-1.2. The data for two adjacent annular wedges along a relatively bright and narrow portion of the northwestern rim indicate that it has moved by about 2.39 ± 0.57 arcsec over a period of 5.652 yr. The corresponding expansion rate (0.42 ± 0.10 arcsec/yr or 13.6 ± 5.7 %/kyr) is about half of the rate reported for an analysis of XMM data from a similar region of the remnant over a similar time interval (Katsuda, Tsunemi & Mori, 2008). A hydrodynamic analysis was performed using the models of Truelove & McKee (1999). Many scenarios were considered using broad ranges of initial kinetic energies, ejecta masses, ejecta mass density distributions, ambient densities, and evolutionary states. The results were constrained by the Chandra expansion rate (assuming it is representative of the remnant as a whole), an inferred lower limit on the forward shock speed, an upper limit on the inferred thermal X-ray emission, and energy considerations. The results of this analysis suggest that G266.2-1.2 is most likely between 2.4 and 5.1 kyr old, whether or not it was produced by a type Ia or type II event. If the remnant is expanding into the material shed by a steady stellar wind instead of a uniform ambient medium, then it could be older by a factor of up to 1.5. In no case is the remnant expected to be younger than 2.2 kyr. Therefore, it is too old to be associated with emission from the decay of Ti-44 or with features in the abundance of nitrate in South Pole ice core samples. The hydrodynamic results provide only a weak constraint on the distance of G266.2-1.2. An analysis of previously-published distance estimates and constraints suggests that the remnant is between about 0.5 and 1.0 kpc. This limitation does not significantly affect the estimate of the age. We adopt the distance of thecloser of two groups of material in the Vela Molecular Ridge (i.e. 0.7 ± 0.2 kpc, Liseau et al

  13. Measuring Dust Production in the Small Magellanic Cloud Core-Collapse Supernova Remnant 1E 0102.2-7219

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, Karin M.; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Stanimirović, Snežana; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Smith, J. D. T.

    2009-05-01

    We present mid-infrared spectral mapping observations of the core-collapse supernova remnant 1E 0102.2-7219 in the Small Magellanic Cloud using the InfraRed Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The remnant shows emission from fine structure transitions of neon and oxygen as well as continuum emission from dust. Comparison of the mid-IR dust emission with observations at X-ray, radio, and optical wavelengths shows that the dust is associated with the supernova ejecta and is thus newly formed in the remnant. The spectrum of the newly formed dust is well reproduced by a model that includes 3 × 10-3 M sun of amorphous carbon dust at 70 K and 2 × 10-5 M sun of Mg2SiO4 (forsterite) at 145 K. Our observations place a lower limit on the amount of dust in the remnant since we are not sensitive to the cold dust in the unshocked ejecta. We compare our results to observations of other core-collapse supernovae and remnants, particularly Cas A where very similar spectral mapping observations have been carried out. We observe a factor of ~10 less dust in E 0102 than seen in Cas A, although the amounts of amorphous carbon and forsterite are comparable. Finally, we present evidence suggesting that the grain size distribution of the newly formed dust in E 0102 has been altered by the hot plasma behind the reverse shock.

  14. Nonthermal X-Ray Emission from the Shell-Type Supernova Remnant G347.3-0.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, Patrick O.; Gaensler, Bryan M.; Dame, T. M.; Hughes, John P.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Green, Anne

    2002-01-01

    Recent Advanced Spacecraft for Cosmology Astrophysics (ASCA) observations of G347.3-0.5, a supernova remnant (SNR) discovered in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey, reveal nonthermal emission from a region along the northwestern shell. Here we report on new pointed ASCA observations of G347.3-0.5 that confirm this result for all the bright shell regions and also reveal similar emission, although with slightly different spectral properties, from the remainder of the SNR. Curiously, no thermal X-ray emission is detected anywhere in the remnant. We derive limits on the amount of thermal emitting material present in G347.3-0.5 and present new radio continuum, CO, and infrared results that indicate that the remnant is distant and of moderate age. We show that our observations are broadly consistent with a scenario that has most of the supernova remnant shock wave still within the stellar wind bubble of its progenitor star, while part of it appears to be interacting with denser material. A point source at the center of the remnant has spectral properties similar to those expected for a neutron star and may represent the compact relic of the supernova progenitor.

  15. Expansion measurements of supernova remnant RX J1713.7-3946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Naomi; Uchiyama, Yasunobu

    2016-12-01

    Supernova remnant (SNR) RX J1713.7-3946 is well known for its bright TeV gamma-ray emission with a shell-like morphology. Strong synchrotron X-ray emission dominates the total X-ray flux in SNR RX J1713.7-3946 and the X-ray morphology is broadly similar to the TeV gamma-ray appearance. The synchrotron X-ray and TeV gamma-ray brightness allows us to perform detailed analysis of the acceleration of TeV-scale particles in this SNR. To constrain the hydrodynamical evolution of RX J1713.7-3946, we have performed six observations of the northwestern (NW) shell with the Chandra X-ray Observatory from 2005 to 2011, and measured the proper motion by using these data and the first epoch observation taken in 2000. The blast-wave shock speed at the NW shell is measured to be (3900 ± 300)(d/ kpc) km s-1 with an estimated distance of d = 1 kpc, and the proper motions of other structures within the NW shell are significantly less than that. Assuming that the measured blast-wave shock speed is representative of the remnant's outer shock wave as a whole, we have confronted our measurements, as well as a recent detection of thermal X-ray lines, with the analytic solution of the hydrodynamical properties of SNRs. Our hydrodynamical analysis indicates that the age of the remnant is 1580-2100 yr, supporting the association with SN393. A model with supernova kinetic energy of E = 1051 erg, ejecta mass of Mej = 3 M⊙, and ambient density at the current blast wave location of n2 = 0.015 cm-3, provides a reasonable explanation for our measurements and previous findings at the X-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths. We find that the transition to the Sedov-Taylor phase is incomplete for any reasonable set of parameters, implying that the current maximum energy of accelerated protons in RX J1713.7-3946 would not correspond to the maximum attainable energy for this remnant.

  16. Very high energy gamma-ray emission from Tycho's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxon, Dana Boltuch

    Supernova remnant (SNR) G120.1+1.4 (also known as Tycho's SNR) is the remnant of one of only five confirmed historical supernovae. As such, it has been well studied across the electromagnetic spectrum. This thesis describes the first statistically significant detection of very high energy (VHE) (˜ 100 GeV to 100 TeV) gamma rays from Tycho's SNR, reported in 2011 by the VERITAS collaboration. The analysis that led to that detection was performed by this author, and this dissertation will discuss the process in detail. Subsequently, a statistically significant detection in high energy (HE) (˜ 30 MeV to 100 GeV) gamma rays was reported by other authors using data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Comparison of models to the spectral energy distribution of the photon flux from this remnant in HE and VHE gamma rays favors a hadronic origin for the emission, particularly when combined with current X-ray data, although a leptonic origin cannot be ruled out at this time. This is significant because a confirmed hadronic origin for the gamma-ray emission would identify this SNR as a site of cosmic ray acceleration, providing observational evidence for the idea that SNRs are the source of the Galactic cosmic ray population. Chapter 1 of this dissertation will provide historical background on Tycho's SNR, along with a summary of modern observations of the remnant across the electromagnetic spectrum. Chapter 2 is a discussion of the role played by SNRs in the process of cosmic ray acceleration, including both theoretical underpinnings and observational evidence. Chapter 3 provides an overview of the field of VHE gamma-ray astronomy, with discussions of gamma-ray production mechanisms and gamma-ray source classes. Chapter 4 describes the instruments used to observe HE and VHE gamma rays. Chapter 5 is a discussion of general analysis methods and techniques for data from Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs). Chapter 6 provides details about the specific

  17. The Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope discovers the Pulsar in the Young Galactic Supernova-Remnant CTA 1

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, Aous A.; Ackermann, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M.G.; Bastieri, Denis; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, Elliott D.; Bogaert, G.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.

    2009-05-15

    Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves (supernova remnants, SNRs) are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a period of 316.86 ms, a period derivative of 3.614 x 10{sup -13} s s{sup -1}. Its characteristic age of 10{sup 4} years is comparable to that estimated for the SNR. It is conjectured that most unidentified Galactic gamma ray sources associated with star-forming regions and SNRs are such young pulsars.

  18. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope discovers the pulsar in the young galactic supernova remnant CTA 1.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bogaert, G; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Carlson, P; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Davis, D S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dormody, M; do Couto E Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Farnier, C; Focke, W B; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Harding, A K; Hartman, R C; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Kanai, Y; Kanbach, G; Katagiri, H; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Kishishita, T; Kiziltan, B; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Komin, N; Kuehn, F; Kuss, M; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Lonjou, V; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mineo, T; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nolan, P L; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piano, G; Pieri, L; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Schalk, T L; Sellerholm, A; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Thorsett, S E; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Usher, T L; Van Etten, A; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Wang, P; Watters, K; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Yasuda, H; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2008-11-21

    Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves [supernova remnants (SNRs)] are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a period of 316.86 milliseconds and a period derivative of 3.614 x 10(-13) seconds per second. Its characteristic age of 10(4) years is comparable to that estimated for the SNR. We speculate that most unidentified Galactic gamma-ray sources associated with star-forming regions and SNRs are such young pulsars.

  19. Detection of the characteristic pion-decay signature in supernova remnants.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Allafort, A; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Busetto, G; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Charles, E; Chaty, S; Chaves, R C G; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Cillis, A N; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Corbel, S; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Falletti, L; Favuzzi, C; Ferrara, E C; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hayashi, K; Hays, E; Hewitt, J W; Hill, A B; Hughes, R E; Jackson, M S; Jogler, T; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Kamae, T; Kataoka, J; Katsuta, J; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Massaro, F; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mignani, R P; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nemmen, R; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ritz, S; Romoli, C; Sánchez-Conde, M; Schulz, A; Sgrò, C; Simeon, P E; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stecker, F W; Strong, A W; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Thorsett, S E; Tibaldo, L; Tibolla, O; Tinivella, M; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Werner, M; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Yamazaki, R; Yang, Z; Zimmer, S

    2013-02-15

    Cosmic rays are particles (mostly protons) accelerated to relativistic speeds. Despite wide agreement that supernova remnants (SNRs) are the sources of galactic cosmic rays, unequivocal evidence for the acceleration of protons in these objects is still lacking. When accelerated protons encounter interstellar material, they produce neutral pions, which in turn decay into gamma rays. This offers a compelling way to detect the acceleration sites of protons. The identification of pion-decay gamma rays has been difficult because high-energy electrons also produce gamma rays via bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton scattering. We detected the characteristic pion-decay feature in the gamma-ray spectra of two SNRs, IC 443 and W44, with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. This detection provides direct evidence that cosmic-ray protons are accelerated in SNRs.

  20. A neutron star with a carbon atmosphere in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant.

    PubMed

    Ho, Wynn C G; Heinke, Craig O

    2009-11-05

    The surface of hot neutron stars is covered by a thin atmosphere. If there is accretion after neutron-star formation, the atmosphere could be composed of light elements (H or He); if no accretion takes place or if thermonuclear reactions occur after accretion, heavy elements (for example, Fe) are expected. Despite detailed searches, observations have been unable to confirm the atmospheric composition of isolated neutron stars. Here we report an analysis of archival observations of the compact X-ray source in the centre of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant. We show that a carbon atmosphere neutron star (with low magnetic field) produces a good fit to the spectrum. Our emission model, in contrast with others, implies an emission size consistent with theoretical predictions for the radius of neutron stars. This result suggests that there is nuclear burning in the surface layers and also identifies the compact source as a very young ( approximately 330-year-old) neutron star.

  1. Energetics and Birth Rates of Supernova Remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, D. A.

    2017-03-01

    Published X-ray emission properties for a sample of 50 supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) are used as input for SNR evolution modeling calculations. The forward shock emission is modeled to obtain the initial explosion energy, age, and circumstellar medium density for each SNR in the sample. The resulting age distribution yields a SNR birthrate of 1/(500 yr) for the LMC. The explosion energy distribution is well fit by a log-normal distribution, with a most-probable explosion energy of 0.5× {10}51 erg, with a 1σ dispersion by a factor of 3 in energy. The circumstellar medium density distribution is broader than the explosion energy distribution, with a most-probable density of ∼0.1 cm‑3. The shape of the density distribution can be fit with a log-normal distribution, with incompleteness at high density caused by the shorter evolution times of SNRs.

  2. The modified equipartition calculation for supernova remnants with the spectral index α = 0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urošević, Dejan; Pavlović, Marko Z.; Arbutina, Bojan; Dobardžić, Aleksandra

    2015-03-01

    Recently, the modified equipartition calculation for supernova remnants (SNRs) has been derived by Arbutina et al. (2012). Their formulae can be used for SNRs with the spectral indices between 0.5 < α < 1. Here, by using approximately the same analytical method, we derive the equipartition formulae useful for SNRs with spectral index α=0.5. These formulae represent next step upgrade of Arbutina et al. (2012) derivation, because among 30 Galactic SNRs with available observational parameters for the equipartition calculation, 16 have spectral index α = 0.5. For these 16 Galactic SNRs we calculated the magnetic field strengths which are approximately 40 per cent higher than those calculated by using Pacholczyk (1970) equipartition and similar to those calculated by using Beck & Krause (2005) calculation.

  3. Spitzer Observations of Dust Destruction in the Puppis A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Dwek, Eli,; Blair, William P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox S.

    2010-01-01

    Imaging and spectral observations of the Puppis A supernova remnant (SNR) with the Spitzer Space Telescope confirm that its IR emission is dominated by the thermal continuum emission of swept-up interstellar dust which is collisionally heated by the X-ray emitting gas of the SNR. Line emission is too weak to affect the fluxes measured in broadband observations, and is poorly correlated with the IR or X-ray emission. Modeling of spectra from regions both in the SNR and in the associated ISM show that the ubiquitous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of the ISM are destroyed within the SNR, along with nearly 25% of the mass of graphite and silicate dust grains.

  4. Detection of class I methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) maser candidates in supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Pihlström, Y. M.; Mesler, R. A.; McEwen, B. C.; Sjouwerman, L. O.; Frail, D. A.; Claussen, M. J.

    2014-04-01

    We have used the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to search for 36 GHz and 44 GHz methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) lines in a sample of 21 Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs). Mainly the regions of the SNRs with 1720 MHz OH masers were observed. Despite the limited spatial extent covered in our search, methanol masers were detected in both G1.4–0.1 and W28. Additional masers were found in Sgr A East. More than 40 masers were found in G1.4–0.1, which we deduce are due to interactions between the SNR and at least two separate molecular clouds. The six masers in W28 are associated with the molecular cloud that is also associated with the OH maser excitation. We discuss the possibility that the methanol maser may be more numerous in SNRs than the OH maser, but harder to detect due to observational constraints.

  5. PLASMA INSTABILITIES AS A RESULT OF CHARGE EXCHANGE IN THE DOWNSTREAM REGION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka; Takahara, Fumio; Terasawa, Toshio

    2009-09-20

    Halpha emission from supernova remnants (SNRs) implies the existence of neutral hydrogen in the circumstellar medium. Some of the neutral particles penetrating the shock are ionized by the charge-exchange process and make a cold ion beam in the shock downstream region. We perform linear analyses of collisionless plasma instabilities between the cold beam and the hot downstream plasma. We find that, under typical SNR conditions, either the resonant instability or the Weibel instability is the most unstable. This mechanism may amplify the magnetic field to more than 100 muG and changes the shock structure. As a result, the radio spectrum and the large magnetic field can be explained, apart from the widely discussed Bell's mechanism.

  6. Observation of Nonthermal Emission from the Supernova Remnant IC443 with RXTE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturner, S. J.; Keohane, J. W.; Reimer, O.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present analysis of X-ray spectra from the supernova remnant IC443 obtained using the PCA on RXTE. The spectra in the 3 - 20 keV band are well fit by a two-component model consisting of thermal and nonthermal components. We compare these results with recent results of other X-ray missions and discuss the need for a cut-off in the nonthermal spectrum. Recent Chandra and XMM-Newton observations suggest that much of the nonthermal emission from IC443 can be attributed to a pulsar wind nebula. We present the results of our search for periodic emission in the RXTE PCA data. We then discuss the origin o f the nonthermal component and its possible association with the unidentified EGRET source.

  7. The Fascinating High-Energy World of Neutron Stars and Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi-Harb, Samar

    2006-06-01

    The past few years have witnessed a fast growth in the high-energy astrophysics community in Canada, thanks to new opportunities including the University Faculty Award (UFA) program introduced by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) to appoint promising female researchers to faculty positions in science and engineering. As a UFA fellow at the University of Manitoba, I have had the unique opportunity to contribute to the launch of a new astronomy program in the department of Physics (renamed to Physics and Astronomy). My research focuses on observational studies of neutron stars, pulsar wind nebulae, and supernova remnants. The study of these exotic objects helps address the physics of the extreme and probe some of the most energetic events in the Universe. I will highlight exciting discoveries in this field and some of the questions to be addressed with current and future high-energy missions.

  8. The Second Epoch Molonglo Galactic Plane Survey: Images and Candidate Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, A. J.; Reeves, S. N.; Murphy, T.

    2014-11-01

    The second epoch Molonglo Galactic Plane Survey covers the area 245° ⩽ l ⩽ 365° and |b| ⩽ 10° at a frequency of 843 MHz and an angular resolution of 45 arcsec × 45 arcsec cosec(δ). The sensitivity varies between 1-2 mJy beam- 1 depending on the presence of strong extended sources. This survey is currently the highest resolution and most sensitive large-scale continuum survey of the southern Galactic plane. In this paper, we present the images of the complete survey, including postage stamps of some new supernova remnant (SNR) candidates and a discussion of the highly structured features detected in the interstellar medium. The intersection of these two types of features is discussed in the context of the `missing' SNR population in the Galaxy.

  9. The Three-dimensional Structure of the Cassiopeia A Supernova Remnant. I. The Spherical Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Jeri E.; Hester, J. Jeff; Fabian, A. C.; Winkler, P. F.

    1995-02-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant is explored via 73 long-slit optical spectra (spanning 6250-7600 Å) which cross the face and "jet" region of the nebula. We extracted position, radial velocity, and line intensity information from nearly 25,000 cross sections of these original data, resulting in a library of 3663 fast-moving knots (FMKs) and 450 quasi-stationary flocculi (QSFs) detections. We performed an iterative least-squares spherical fit to the data, using this to convert radial velocities to line-of-sight distances. We have built up a picture of the remnant as a spherical circumstellar shell of 104"5±0"7 radius, corresponding to 5.3 × 1018 cm (1.7 pc). The center on the sky is displaced by 8".7 west and 12".6 north of the proper motion center. The velocity center of our fitted sphere has been redshifted by 770±40 km s-1 from the presumed expansion center at zero velocity. This expansion of the ejecta from a displaced center accounts for the observed radial velocity difference at the front and back faces. The average rate of expansion of the FMKs is 5290±90 km s-1, while the asymmetric values are 4520 km s-1 at the blueshifted face, and 6060 km s-1 at the redshifted face. Based on a comparison of our suite of radial velocities with all the available proper-motion and age data, we find the distance to Cas A to be 3.4+0.3-0.1 kpc. Our kinematic analysis shows the optically emitting ejecta of Cas A have been slowed certainly by less than 7%, and probably by less than 4% and that the velocity of the reverse shock driven into the knots is about 200 km s-1. We conclude that the center of expansion of the supernova is displaced by about 0.36 pc (1.1 × 1018 cm) to the northwest and front of the geometric center of the bubble. The geometry suggests that the density of the surrounding medium is greater in the direction of displacement. The asymmetrically distributed radial velocities of the QSFs, of which 76% are blueshifted

  10. Electron heating, magnetic field amplification, and cosmic-ray precursor length at supernova remnant shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Laming, J. Martin; Hwang, Una; Ghavamian, Parviz; Rakowski, Cara E-mail: Una.Hwang-1@nasa.gov

    2014-07-20

    We investigate the observability, by direct and indirect means, of a shock precursor arising from magnetic field amplification by cosmic rays. We estimate the depth of such a precursor under conditions of nonresonant amplification, which can provide magnetic field strengths comparable to those inferred for supernova remnants. Magnetic field generation occurs as the streaming cosmic rays induce a plasma return current, and it may be quenched by either nonresonant or resonant channels. In the case of nonresonant saturation, the cosmic rays become magnetized and amplification saturates at higher magnetic fields. The precursor can extend out to 10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} cm and is potentially detectable. If resonant saturation occurs, the cosmic rays are scattered by turbulence and the precursor length will likely be much smaller. The dependence of precursor length on shock velocity has implications for electron heating. In the case of resonant saturation, this dependence is similar to that in the more familiar resonantly generated shock precursor, which when expressed in terms of the cosmic-ray diffusion coefficient kappav and shock velocity v{sub s} is kappav/v{sub s} . In the nonresonantly saturated case, the precursor length declines less quickly with increasing v{sub s} . Where precursor length proportional to 1/v{sub s} gives constant electron heating, this increased precursor length could be expected to lead to higher electron temperatures for nonresonant amplification. This should be expected at faster supernova remnant shocks than studied by previous works. Existing results and new data analysis of SN 1006 and Cas A suggest some observational support for this idea.

  11. An X-ray study of the supernova remnant W44

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrus, Ilana; Hughes, John P.

    1994-12-01

    We report results from the analysis and modeling of data for the supernova remnant (SNR) W44. Spectral analysis of archival data from the Einstein Solid State Spectrometer, the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter, and the Large Area Counters on Ginga, covering an energy range from 0.3 to 8 keV, indicates that the SNR can be described well using a nonequilibrium ionization model with temperature ~ 0.8 keV, ionization timescale ~ 9000 cm(-3) years, and elemental abundances close to the solar ratios. The column density toward the SNR is high: greater than 10(22) atoms cm(-2) . As has been known for some time, W44 presents a centrally peaked surface brightness distribution in the soft X-ray band while at radio wavelengths it shows a limb-brightened shell morphology, in contradiction to predictions of standard models (e.g., Sedov) for SNR evolution. We have investigated two different evolutionary scenarios which can explain the centered X-ray morphology of the remnant: (1) the White and Long (1991) model involving the slow thermal evaporation of clouds engulfed by the supernova blast wave as it propagates though a clumpy interstellar medium (ISM), and (2) a hydrodynamical simulation of a blast wave propagating through a homogeneous ISM, including the effects of radiative cooling. Both models can have their respective parameters tuned to reproduce approximately the morphology of the SNR. We find that, for the case of the radiative-phase shock model, the best agreement is obtained for an initial explosion energy in the range (0.5 - 0.6) times 10(51) ergs and an ambient ISM density of between 1.5 and 2 cm(-3) .

  12. SUBARU HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF STAR G IN THE TYCHO SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Kerzendorf, Wolfgang E.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Yong, David; Asplund, M.; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Podsiadlowski, Ph.; Frebel, Anna; Fesen, Robert A. E-mail: brian@mso.anu.edu.au E-mail: nomoto@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: anna@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2009-08-20

    It is widely believed that Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) originate in binary systems where a white dwarf accretes material from a companion star until its mass approaches the Chandrasekhar mass and carbon is ignited in the white dwarf's core. This scenario predicts that the donor star should survive the supernova (SNe) explosion, providing an opportunity to understand the progenitors of SNe Ia. In this paper, we argue that rotation is a generic signature expected of most nongiant donor stars that is easily measurable. Ruiz-Lapuente et al. examined stars in the center of the remnant of SN 1572 (Tycho SN) and showed evidence that a subgiant star (Star G by their naming convention) near the remnant's center was the system's donor star. We present high-resolution (R {approx_equal} 40, 000) spectra taken with the High Dispersion Spectrograph on Subaru of this candidate donor star and measure the star's radial velocity as 79 {+-} 2 km s{sup -1} with respect to the local standard of rest and put an upper limit on the star's rotation of 7.5 km s{sup -1}. In addition, by comparing images that were taken in 1970 and 2004, we measure the proper motion of Star G to be {mu} {sub l} = -1.6 {+-} 2.1 mas yr{sup -1} and {mu} {sub b} = -2.7 {+-} 1.6 mas yr{sup -1}. We demonstrate that all of the measured properties of Star G presented in this paper are consistent with those of a star in the direction of Tycho SN that is not associated with the SN event. However, we discuss an unlikely, but still viable scenario for Star G to be the donor star, and suggest further observations that might be able to confirm or refute it.

  13. The imprint of a symbiotic binary progenitor on the properties of Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiotellis, A.; Schure, K. M.; Vink, J.

    2012-01-01

    We present a model for the type Ia supernova remnant (SNR) of SN 1604, also known as Kepler's SNR. We find that its main features can be explained by a progenitor model of a symbiotic binary consisting of a white dwarf and an AGB donor star with an initial mass of 4-5 M⊙. The slow, nitrogen-rich wind emanating from the donor star has partially been accreted by the white dwarf, but has also created a circumstellar bubble. On the basis of observational evidence, we assume that the system moves with a velocity of 250 km s-1. Owing to the spatial velocity, the interaction between the wind and the interstellar medium has resulted in the formation of a bow shock, which can explain the presence of a one-sided, nitrogen-rich shell. We present two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of both the shell formation and the SNR evolution. The SNR simulations show good agreement with the observed kinematic and morphological properties of Kepler's SNR. In particular, the model reproduces the observed expansion parameters (m = V/(R/t)) of m ≈ 0.35 in the north and m ≈ 0.6 in the south of Kepler's SNR. We discuss the variations among our hydrodynamical simulations in light of the observations, and show that part of the blast wave may have completely traversed through the one-sided shell. The simulations suggest a distance to Kepler's SNR of 6 kpc, or otherwise imply that SN 1604 was a sub-energetic type Ia explosion. Finally, we discuss the possible implications of our model for type Ia supernovae and their remnants in general.

  14. X-ray study of the supernova remnant G337.2-0.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, Akihiro; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Tanaka, Takaaki; Koyama, Katsuji

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports on the Suzaku result of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G337.2-0.7. The X-ray spectrum is well explained by three components in ionizing phase. One is a plasma with a low temperature kT = 0.70_{-0.03}^{+0.02}keV, solar abundances, and an ionization parameter n_et = 5.7^{+0.7}_{-0.4}× 10^{11}s cm-3. The second is a middle-temperature plasma with kT = 1.54^{+0.13}_{-0.02}keV and high metal abundances in a highly ionized state of n_et = 3.6^{+0.2}_{-0.5}× 10^{11}s cm-3, and the third is a high-temperature plasma with kT = 3.1^{+0.2}_{-0.1}keV and high metal abundances in a low-ionized state of n_et=2.1^{+0.4}_{-0.2}× 10^{10}s cm-3. The high metal-abundance plasmas are likely to be of an ejecta origin, while the solar abundance plasma would be of an interstellar-gas origin. The abundance pattern and mass of the ejecta confirm that G337.2-0.7 is a remnant of a Type Ia supernova (SN). The derived Fe mass of ejecta MFe = 0.025-0.039 M⊙ is far smaller than that expected from any Type Ia model, suggesting that most Fe has not yet been heated by the reverse shock. The ejecta has enhanced distribution in the northeastern region compared to the central region, and therefore the SN explosion or SNR evolution would be asymmetric.

  15. An On-line Catalog of Supernova Remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaVine, J.; Smith, R. C.; MC SNR Collaboration

    2001-12-01

    Using the CFCCD imager on CTIO 1.5m telescope, we have obtained optical emission-line images of the majority of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Most of the SNRs have been observed in the light of Hα, [SII], and [OIII], together with ``continuum" images in one or two off-emission-line bands. These continuum images have been aligned and subtracted from the emission-line images to provide star-subtracted images which allow for study of both fine detail of the filaments and the fainter filaments of the remnants. WCS coordinate solutions have also been calculated for all images based on the USNO-A2 catalog, providing detailed positional information for the remant filaments. This project has been undertaken to provide a database of images for studies of the global emission-line properties of the SNRs in the LMC. The database will also serve as the foundation for further multi-wavelength comparisons with data ranging from radio to X-ray wavelengths. This work was supported by Union College's overseas program, and performed as a part of CTIO's student research programs.

  16. Accounting for the foreground contribution to the dust emission towards Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, H. L.; Dunne, L.; Ivison, R. J.; Reynoso, E. M.; Thompson, M. A.; Sibthorpe, B.; Eales, S. A.; Delaney, T. M.; Maddox, S.; Isaak, K.

    2009-08-01

    Whether or not supernovae contribute significantly to the overall dust budget is a controversial subject. Submillimetre (sub-mm) observations, sensitive to cold dust, have shown an excess at 450 and 850μm in young remnants Cassiopeia A (Cas A) and Kepler. Some of the sub-mm emission from Cas A has been shown to be contaminated by unrelated material along the line of sight. In this paper, we explore the emission from material towards Kepler using sub-mm continuum imaging and spectroscopic observations of atomic and molecular gas, via HI, 12CO(J = 2-1) and 13CO(J = 2-1). We detect weak CO emission (peak T*A = 0.2-1K, 1-2kms-1 full width at half-maximum) from diffuse, optically thin gas at the locations of some of the sub-mm clumps. The contribution to the sub-mm emission from foreground molecular and atomic clouds is negligible. The revised dust mass for Kepler's remnant is 0.1-1.2Msolar, about half of the quoted values in the original study by Morgan et al., but still sufficient to explain the origin of dust at high redshifts.

  17. DISCOVERY OF TeV GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM TYCHO'S SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W.; Aliu, E.; Errando, M.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Bradbury, S. M.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Finley, J. P.; Duke, C.; Finnegan, G. E-mail: wakely@uchicago.edu

    2011-04-01

    We report the discovery of TeV gamma-ray emission from the Type Ia supernova remnant (SNR) G120.1+1.4, known as Tycho's SNR. Observations performed in the period 2008-2010 with the VERITAS ground-based gamma-ray observatory reveal weak emission coming from the direction of the remnant, compatible with a point source located at 00{sup h}25{sup m}27.{sup s}0, + 64{sup 0}10'50'' (J2000). The TeV photon spectrum measured by VERITAS can be described with a power law dN/dE = C(E/3.42 TeV){sup -}{Gamma} with {Gamma} = 1.95 {+-} 0.51{sub stat} {+-} 0.30{sub sys} and C = (1.55 {+-} 0.43{sub stat} {+-} 0.47{sub sys}) x 10{sup -14} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} TeV{sup -1}. The integral flux above 1 TeV corresponds to {approx}0.9% of the steady Crab Nebula emission above the same energy, making it one of the weakest sources yet detected in TeV gamma rays. We present both leptonic and hadronic models that can describe the data. The lowest magnetic field allowed in these models is {approx}80 {mu}G, which may be interpreted as evidence for magnetic field amplification.

  18. Hadronic Scenarios for Gamma-Ray Emission from Three Supernova Remnants Interacting with Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huan; Fang, Jun; Zhang, Li

    2014-04-01

    GeV γ-rays detected with the large area telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray space telescope in the direction of HB21, MSH 17-39 and G337.0-0.1 have been recently reported. The three supernova remnants (SNRs) show interactions with molecular clouds, and they are effective gamma-ray emitters as the relativistic protons accelerated by the SNR shocks inelastically colliding with the dense gas in the clouds. The origin of the observed γ-rays for the three remnants is investigated in the scenario of the diffusive shock acceleration. In the model, a part of the SNR shock transmits into the nearby molecular clouds, and the shock velocity is greatly reduced. As a result, a shock with a relatively low Alfvén Mach number is generated, and the spectra of the accelerated protons and the γ-ray photons produced via proton-proton interaction can be obtained. The results show that the observed γ-ray spectra for the three SNRs interacting with the molecular clouds can be reproduced. It can be concluded that the hadronic origin of the γ-rays for the three SNRs is approved, and the ability of SNR shocks to accelerate protons is also supported.

  19. Interstellar medium structure and the slope of the radio Σ-D relation of supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostić, P.; Vukotić, B.; Urošević, D.; Arbutina, B.; Prodanović, T.

    2016-09-01

    We analyse the influence of fractal structure of the interstellar medium (ISM) density on the parameter values for the radio surface brightness-to-diameter (Σ-D) relation for supernova remnants (SNRs). We model a dense ISM as a molecular cloud with fractal density structure. SNRs are modelled as spheres of different radius scattered in the modelled ISM. The surface brightness of the SNRs is calculated from the simple relation Σ ∝ ρ0.5D-3.5 and also from the parametrized more general form Σ ∝ ρ ^{η }D^{-β _0}. Our results demonstrate that empirical Σ-D slopes that are steeper than the ones derived from theory might be partly explained with the fractal structure of the ambient medium into which SNRs expand. The slope of the Σ-D relation steepens if the density of the regions where SNRs are formed is higher. The simple geometrical effects combined with the fractal structure of the ISM can contribute to steeper empirical Σ-D slopes, especially for older remnants, and this is more pronounced if Σ has a stronger dependence on ambient density.

  20. Wide-Field Emission-Line Imaging of Galactic Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, P. Frank; Smith, R. Chris

    2001-02-01

    We propose to complete narrow-band emission-line imaging of all the southern supernova remnants (SNRs) for which optical emission has been reported. The great majority of these have never been systematically studied using CCDs. Images in Hα, S II, and O III will enable us to distinguish shock-heated SNR filaments from photo-ionized nebulosity and to search for rare, ejecta-dominated filaments. With matched continuum images we will subtract the stars to give pure emission-line images and reveal faint diffuse features. The results will be used in conjunction with X-ray and radio images for multi-wavelength studies of SNRs and the ISM. We plan to assemble an emission-line atlas of SNRs, to be available in both published form and on-line as digital images. This study requires the unique wide field and fast beam of the Schmidt, so we request sufficient time to complete it in the last semester of this instrument's availability. In addition, we plan deep, broad-band imaging of the SN 1006 remnant in attempt at the first measurement of optical synchrotron emission behind an SNR shock. Detection at the level expected from extrapolation of radio and X-ray power-law spectra would support the picture that Fermi acceleration of electrons to TeV energies produces both X-ray emission and cosmic rays, while significant upper limits would raise questions about this picture.

  1. Radio-Continuum Emission from the Young Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Horta, A. Y.; Filipovic, M. D.; Crawford, E. J.; Stootman, F. H.; Pannuti, T. G.; Bozzetto, L. M.; Collier, J. D.; Sommer, E. R.; Kosakowski, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    We present an analysis of a new Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) radio-continuum observation of supernova remnant (SNR) G1.9+0.3, which at an age of ˜181±25 years is the youngest known in the Galaxy. We analysed all available radio-continuum observations at 6-cm from the ATCA and Very Large Array. Using this data we estimate an expansion rate for G1.9+0.3 of 0.563±0.078 percent per year between 1984 and 2009. We note that in the 1980's G1.9+0.3 expanded somewhat slower (0.484 percent per year) than more recently (0.641 percent per year). We estimate that the average spectral index between 20-cm and 6-cm, across the entire SNR is α=-0.72±0.26 which is typical for younger SNRs. At 6-cm, we detect an average of 6 percent fractionally polarised radio emission with a peak of 17±3 percent. The polarised emission follows the contours of the strongest of X-ray emission. Using the new equipartition formula we estimate a magnetic field strength of B≈273~μ G, which to date, is one of the highest magnetic field strength found for any SNR and consistent with G1.9+0.3 being a very young remnant.

  2. RE-EXAMINATION OF THE EXPECTED GAMMA-RAY EMISSION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT SN 1987A

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhko, E. G.; Ksenofontov, L. T.; Völk, H. J.

    2015-09-01

    A nonlinear kinetic theory, combining cosmic-ray (CR) acceleration in supernova remnants (SNRs) with their gas dynamics, is used to re-examine the nonthermal properties of the remnant of SN 1987A for an extended evolutionary period of 5–50 year. This spherically symmetric model is approximately applied to the different features of the SNR, consisting of (i) a blue supergiant wind and bubble, and (ii) of the swept-up red supergiant (RSG) wind structures in the form of an H ii region, an equatorial ring (ER), and an hourglass region. The RSG wind involves a mass loss rate that decreases significantly with elevation above and below the equatorial plane. The model adapts recent three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations by Potter et al. in 2014 that use a significantlysmaller ionized mass of the ER than assumed in the earlier studies by the present authors. The SNR shock recently swept up the ER, which is the densest region in the immediate circumstellar environment. Therefore, the expected gamma-ray energy flux density at TeV energies in the current epoch has already reached its maximal value of ∼10{sup −13} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. This flux should decrease by a factor of about two over the next 10 years.

  3. Supernova Remnants and Nucleosynthesis (fos 30): Augmentation Cycle 2 Observations - Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidsen, Arthur

    1991-07-01

    Overall program: UV and optical spectra of four supernova remnants (SNRs) will be used to study a number of problems related to abundances, grain destruction, interstellar medium properties and physical conditions in SNR shocks. Representatives of three of the main classes of SNRs (Crab-nebula like, Balmer-line and "normal") will be studied in the LMC, where reasonably low reddening permits UV observations. An oxygen-rich SNR in NGC 4449 will be observed, taking advantage of the small FOS slits to isolate the SNR from surrounding H II emission. Two M33 SNRs that were previously part of this proposal have been dropped due to time limitations. This proposal is augmented time to obtain early acq images of two LMC remnants and spectra of N49, which had early acq images in Cy. 0. NOTE: SPECTROSCOPY AND IMAGING ORIGINALLY IN THE CYCLE 2 PROPOSAL 4108 HAVE BEEN SPLIT BY STSCI INTO TWO SEPARATE PROPOSALS TO ALLOW FOR SCHEDULING OF CYCLE 2 EARLY ACQ IMAGING ( THIS PROPOSAL ) SINCE CYCLE 2 SPECTROSCOPY DEPENDS ON MEASUREMENT OF EARLY ACQ IMAGING OF OTHER TARGETS FROM EARLIER CYCLES.

  4. Supernova Remnants and Nucleosynthesis (fos 30): Augmentation Cycle 2 Observations - Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidsen, Arthur

    1991-07-01

    Overall program: UV and optical spectra of four supernova remnants (SNRs) will be used to study a number of problems related to abundances, grain destruction, interstellar medium properties and physical conditions in SNR shocks. Representatives of three of the main classes of SNRs (Crab-nebula like, Balmer-line and "normal") will be studied in the LMC, where reasonably low reddening permits UV observations. An oxygen-rich SNR in NGC 4449 will be observed, taking advantage of the small FOS slits to isolate the SNR from surrounding H II emission. Two M33 SNRs that were previously part of this proposal have been dropped due to time limitations. This proposal is augmented time to obtain early acq images of two LMC remnants and spectra of N49, which had early acq images in Cy. 0. NOTE: SPECTROSCOPY AND IMAGING ORIGINALLY IN THIS CYCLE 2 PROPOSAL HAVE BEEN SPLIT BY STSCI INTO TWO SEPARATE PROPOSALS TO ALLOW FOR SCHEDULING OF CYCLE 2 EARLY ACQ IMAGING ( FOR LATER CYCLES ) SINCE CYCLE 2 SPECTROSCOPY DEPENDS ON MEASUREMENT OF EARLY ACQ IMAGING OF OTHER TARGETS FROM EARLIER CYCLES.

  5. A Kinship Between the EGRET Supernova Remnants and Sagittarius A East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatuzzo, Marco; Melia, Fulvio

    2003-10-01

    Sgr A East appears to be a single, mixed-morphology 10,000 yr old supernova remnant (SNR) at the Galactic center. It also appears to belong to a class of remnants that have been observed and detected at 1720 MHz, the transition frequency of OH maser emission. However, if the EGRET source 3EG J1746-2852, coincident with the Galactic center, is itself associated with this object, it would endow it with a γ-ray luminosity almost 2 orders of magnitude greater than that of the other EGRET-detected SNRs. We here reconsider the viability of a pion-production mechanism as the source of the broadband emission observed from Sgr A East, and show that what connects these objects-and ultimately also accounts for their different γ-ray emissivity-is the very important interaction between the expanding SNR shell and the surrounding molecular cloud environment. The singularly high γ-ray luminosity of Sgr A East, as well as its unusually steep radio spectral index, can thereby be attributed to the high-density (nH=103 cm-3), strongly magnetized (B~0.18 mG) environment in which it is located.

  6. Re-examination of the Expected Gamma-Ray Emission of Supernova Remnant SN 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhko, E. G.; Ksenofontov, L. T.; Völk, H. J.

    2015-09-01

    A nonlinear kinetic theory, combining cosmic-ray (CR) acceleration in supernova remnants (SNRs) with their gas dynamics, is used to re-examine the nonthermal properties of the remnant of SN 1987A for an extended evolutionary period of 5-50 year. This spherically symmetric model is approximately applied to the different features of the SNR, consisting of (i) a blue supergiant wind and bubble, and (ii) of the swept-up red supergiant (RSG) wind structures in the form of an H ii region, an equatorial ring (ER), and an hourglass region. The RSG wind involves a mass loss rate that decreases significantly with elevation above and below the equatorial plane. The model adapts recent three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations by Potter et al. in 2014 that use a significantlysmaller ionized mass of the ER than assumed in the earlier studies by the present authors. The SNR shock recently swept up the ER, which is the densest region in the immediate circumstellar environment. Therefore, the expected gamma-ray energy flux density at TeV energies in the current epoch has already reached its maximal value of ˜10-13 erg cm-2 s-1. This flux should decrease by a factor of about two over the next 10 years.

  7. FERMI-LAT AND WMAP OBSERVATIONS OF THE PUPPIS A SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Hewitt, J. W.; Grondin, M.-H.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Reposeur, T.

    2012-11-10

    We report the detection of GeV {gamma}-ray emission from the supernova remnant (SNR) Puppis A with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Puppis A is among the faintest SNRs yet detected at GeV energies, with a luminosity of only 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 34} (D/2.2 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup -1} between 1 and 100 GeV. The {gamma}-ray emission from the remnant is spatially extended, with a morphology matching that of the radio and X-ray emission, and is well described by a simple power law with an index of 2.1. We attempt to model the broadband spectral energy distribution (SED), from radio to {gamma}-rays, using standard nonthermal emission mechanisms. To constrain the relativistic electron population we use 7 years of Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data to extend the radio spectrum up to 93 GHz. Both leptonic- and hadronic-dominated models can reproduce the nonthermal SED, requiring a total content of cosmic-ray electrons and protons accelerated in Puppis A of at least W {sub CR} Almost-Equal-To (1-5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 49} erg.

  8. Changes in the optical remnant of Kepler's supernova during the period 1942-1989

    SciTech Connect

    Bandiera, R.; Van den bergh, S. Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Victoria )

    1991-06-01

    Images of the optical nebulosity associated with Kepler's supernova have been obtained at the Mount Wilson Observatory in 1941-1943, at the Palomar Observatory in 1950-1983, and on La Silla in 1989. These data have been used to study the luminosity evolution of individual knots and the expansion and translation of the optical remnant of Kepler's supernova of 1604. From the study of the motions of 50 long-lived knots, expansion is {minus}0.623 + or {minus} 0.045 arcsec/century, translation is 0.484 + or {minus} 0.049 arcsec/century, and expansion time scale of 32,000 + or {minus} 12,000 yr. For an assumed distance of 4.5 kpc the centroid of the nebulosity tangential velocity is 117 + or {minus} 10 km/s to the W and 105 + or {minus} 11 km/s to the N. By combining astrometric and spectroscopic information, a space velocity of 278 + or {minus} 12 km/s is estimated. This indicates that the progenitor of SN 1604 was a high-velocity object. It could have been either a Population II star or a massive high-velocity runaway star. 30 refs.

  9. A Deep Chandra Observation of Kepler's Supernova Remnant: A Type Ia Event with Circumstellar Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Hwang, Una; Hughes, John P.; Badenes, Carles; Laming, J. M.; Blondin, J. M.

    2007-10-01

    We present initial results of a 750 ks Chandra observation of the remnant of Kepler's supernova of AD 1604. The strength and prominence of iron emission, together with the absence of O-rich ejecta, demonstrate that Kepler resulted from a thermonuclear supernova, even though evidence for circumstellar interaction is also strong. We have analyzed spectra of over 100 small regions, and find that they fall into three classes. (1) The vast majority show Fe L emission between 0.7 and 1 keV and Si and S Kα emission; we associate these with shocked ejecta. A few of these are found at or beyond the mean blast wave radius. (2) A very few regions show solar O/Fe abundance ratios; these we associate with shocked circumstellar medium (CSM). Otherwise O is scarce. (3) A few regions are dominated by continuum, probably synchrotron radiation. Finally, we find no central point source, with a limit ~100 times fainter than the central object in Cas A. The evidence that the blast wave is interacting with CSM may indicate a Ia explosion in a more massive progenitor.

  10. An Evaluation of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability in Supernova Remnant Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J. |; Drake, R.P. |; Remington, B.A. |

    1999-01-01

    We present an initial evaluation of the role of the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability in supernova remnant (SNR) formation. Although the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is most often considered in the canonical picture of SNR formation, the theoretical penetration depths for RM instability suggest that it could play a significant role in the early stages of SNR formation. We have used the code PROMETHEUS to perform a sequence of two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations in order to test this possibility. Here we discuss a case in which we impose a large perturbation in the expanding ejecta behind the reverse shock. The interaction of the reverse shock with the perturbation produces significant early RM growth, with spikes penetrating from the contact surface to near the forward shock. Then the RM instability weakens, RT growth eventually dominates, and the perturbation of the forward shock diminishes. We conclude that RM instability growth due to the type of perturbation we have studied might contribute to, but alone cannot account for, the observed radio and X-ray structures that extend to the forward shock in such SNRs as supernova 1006. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1999.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  11. X-ray observations of the supernova remnant MSH 11-54

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, P.C.; Riegler, G.R.

    1980-04-15

    Soft X-ray observations of the X-ray source H1122--59 in the 0.4--2 keV band made with the low-energy detector 1 of the HEAO A-2 experiment are described. Based on positional coincidence, the source is identified with the supernova remnant MSH 11-54, thus confirming the report of Share et al. (1978). The object is a bright source in the 0.4--2 keV band with an X-ray flux of approx.9 x 10/sup -11/ ergs cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/ near the Earth. The measured source spectrum implies a plasma temperature of approx.4 x 10/sup 6/ K and X-ray luminosity in the 0.4--2 keV band of approx.10/sup 37/ ergs s/sup -1/ using a distance of 10 kpc for MSH 11-54. The X-ray observations, interpreted in terms of an adiabatic shock wave model, give a shock velocity of approx.560 km s/sup -1/ and a supernova age of approx.2300 yr, in good agreement with the age derived from the radio observations.

  12. X-ray observations of the supernova remnant MSH 11-54

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, P. C.; Riegler, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    Soft X-ray observations of the X-ray source H1122-59 in the 0.4-2 keV band made with the low-energy detector 1 of the HEAO A-2 experiment are described. Based on positional coincidence, the source is identified with the supernova remnant MSH-11-54, thus confirming the report of Share et al. (1980). The object is a bright source in the 0.4-2 keV band with an X-ray flux of 9 x 10 to the -11th ergs/sq cm s near the earth. The measured source spectrum implies a plasma temperature of 4 million K and X-ray luminosity in the 0.4-2 keV band of 10 to the 37th ergs/s using a distance of 10 kpc for MSH 11-54. The X-ray observations, interpreted in terms of an adiabatic shock wave model, give a shock velocity of about 560 km/s and a supernova age of about 2300 yr, in good agreement with the age derived from the radio observations.

  13. Spitzer Observations of Dust Destruction in the Puppis A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Dweek, Eli; Blair, William P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Hwang, Una; Long, Knox X.; Petre, Robert; Rho, Jeonghee; Winkler, P. Frank

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of the Puppis A supernova remnant (SNR) with a neighboring molecular cloud provides a unique opportunity to measure the amount of grain destruction in an SNR shock. Spitzer Space Telescope MIPS imaging of the entire SNR at 24, 70, and 160 micrometers shows an extremely good correlation with X-ray emission, indicating that the SNR's IR radiation is dominated by the thermal emission of swept-up interstellar dust, collisionally heated by the hot shocked gas. Spitzer IRS spectral observations targeted both the Bright Eastern Knot (BEK) of the SNR where a small cloud has been engulfed by the supernova blast wave and outlying portions of the associated molecular cloud that are yet to be hit by the shock front. Modeling the spectra from both regions reveals the composition and the grain size distribution of the interstellar dust, both in front of and behind the SNR shock front. The comparison shows that the ubiquitous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of the interstellar medium are destroyed within the BEK, along with nearly 25% of the mass of graphite and silicate dust grains.

  14. XMM-Newton studies of Supernova Remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosino, William; Guinan, E. F.; Maggi, Pierre; Haberl, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are leading contributors to the energy balance, chemical enrichment, and mixing of the interstellar medium (ISM). The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) hosts a large sample of SNRs. The close proximity of the LMC (~50 kpc), combined with moderate foreground ISM absorption, makes it an ideal target for studying these significant objects. In the course of an X-ray survey of the LMC, the space-borne observatory XMM-Newton discovered several new SNRs. A sample of previously known SNRs was observed for the first time with modern X-ray instruments as well. We used these new data to perform X-ray imaging and spectral analyses. We measure properties of the sample such as temperature, composition, and age. Based on the local stellar populations, we also discuss the nature of their parent supernovae. This research is supported by the Villanova Undergraduate Research Fellows (VURF), the Max Planck Society (MPG), and the DAAD-RISE scholarship program. We also acknowledge support from NSF/RUI Grant AST 1009903 to Villanova University.

  15. Discovery of recombining plasma in the supernova remnant 3C 391

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tamotsu; Koyama, Katsuji; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Odaka, Hirokazu; Nakashima, Shinya

    2014-12-01

    Recent X-ray study of middle-aged supernova remnants (SNRs) reveals strong radiative recombination continua (RRCs) associated with overionized plasmas, which origin still remains uncertain. We report a discovery of an RRC in the middle-aged SNR 3C 391. If the X-ray spectrum is fitted with a two-temperature plasma model in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE), residuals of a Si XIV Lyα line at 2.006 keV, a S XVI Lyα line at 2.623 keV and the edge of a RRC of Si XIII at 2.666 keV are found. In fact, the X-ray spectrum is well described by the composite model consisting of the CIE plasma and a recombining plasma (RP). The abundance pattern suggests that the RP is due to ejecta from core-collapse supernova of the progenitor mass of about 15 M⊙. There is no significant difference of the recombining parameters between the south-east region and the north-west region surrounded by dense molecular clouds. We also find a hint of a Fe I Kα line at 6.4 keV (2.4 σ detection) from the south-east region of the SNR.

  16. MOLECULAR CLOUDS AS A PROBE OF COSMIC-RAY ACCELERATION IN A SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Yutaka; Ohira, Yutaka; Tanaka, Shuta J.; Takahara, Fumio

    2009-12-20

    We study cosmic-ray acceleration in a supernova remnant (SNR) and the escape from it. We model nonthermal particle and photon spectra for the hidden SNR in the open cluster Westerlund 2, and the old-age mixed-morphology SNR W 28. We assume that the SNR shock propagates in a low-density cavity, which is created and heated through the activities of the progenitor stars and/or previous supernova explosions. We indicate that the diffusion coefficient for cosmic rays around the SNRs is less than approx1% of that away from them. We compare our predictions with the gamma-ray spectra of molecular clouds illuminated by the cosmic rays (Fermi and H.E.S.S.). We found that the spectral indices of the particles are approx2.3. This may be because the particles were accelerated at the end of the Sedov phase, and because energy-dependent escape and propagation of particles did not much affect the spectrum.

  17. Protrusions Beyond the Blast Waves of Young Type Ia Supernova Remnants: Hydrodynamic Instabilities or Ejecta Bullets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Ashton; Blondin, J. M.; Reynolds, S. P.

    2014-01-01

    High resolution imaging of two young Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs), Tycho and SN 1006, has revealed several morphological features which have resisted explanation with numerical simulations. One such feature is the presence of shocked ejecta blobs protruding beyond the mean forward shock radius. Two current theories explain the presence of such ejecta: highly dense ejecta shrapnel produced in the explosion penetrating the forward shock, or plumes generated by hydrodynamic instabilities long after the initial explosion. We investigate the shrapnel theory through hydrodynamic simulations in 2D and 3D of the evolution of dense ejecta clumps embedded in an exponential density profile, appropriate for Type Ia supernovae. We use high-resolution 2D simulations to identify relevant clump parameters which we investigate further in 3D. In contradiction to some former work, we find that sufficiently resolved clumps in 2D models shatter upon collision with the forward shock, yielding new protrusion features. In both 2D and 3D, shrapnel is capable of penetrating the forward shock, but the resultant protrusions in 3D simulations vary significantly from those in similar 2D runs, implying 2D simulations may not be an accurate method of investigating the shrapnel theory. We compare the our simulations with Chandra observations of projections seen in Tycho and SN 1006. This work was performed as part of NC State University's Undergraduate Research in Computational Astrophysics (URCA) program, an REU program supported by the National Science Foundation through award AST-1032736.

  18. The Origin of the Iron-rich Knot in Tycho’s Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Hughes, John P.; Badenes, Carles; Bravo, Eduardo; Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Martínez-Rodríguez, Héctor; Park, Sangwook; Petre, Robert

    2017-01-01

    X-ray observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) allow us to investigate the chemical inhomogeneity of ejecta, offering unique insight into the nucleosynthesis in supernova explosions. Here we present detailed imaging and spectroscopic studies of the “Fe knot” located along the eastern rim of the Type Ia SNR Tycho (SN 1572) using Suzaku and Chandra long-exposure data. Surprisingly, the Suzaku spectrum of this knot shows no emission from Cr, Mn, or Ni, which is unusual for the Fe-rich regions in this SNR. Within the framework of the canonical delayed-detonation models for SN Ia, the observed mass ratios {M}{Cr}/{M}{Fe}< 0.023, {M}{Mn}/{M}{Fe}< 0.012, and {M}{Ni}/{M}{Fe}< 0.029 (at 90% confidence) can only be achieved for a peak temperature of (5.3–5.7) × {10}9 K and a neutron excess of ≲ 2.0× {10}-3. These constraints rule out the deep, dense core of a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf as the origin of the Fe knot and favor either incomplete Si burning or an α-rich freeze-out regime, probably close to the boundary. An explosive He burning regime is a possible alternative, although this hypothesis is in conflict with the main properties of this SNR.

  19. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON PROCESSING IN THE BLAST WAVE OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT N132D

    SciTech Connect

    Tappe, A.; Rho, J.; Micelotta, E. R.

    2012-08-01

    We present Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph 14-36 {mu}m mapping observations of the supernova remnant N132D in the Large Magellanic Cloud. This study focuses on the processing of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that we previously identified in the southern blast wave. The mid-infrared spectra show strong continuum emission from shock-heated dust and a unique, nearly featureless plateau in the 15-20 {mu}m region, which we attribute to PAH molecules. The typical PAH emission bands observed in the surrounding interstellar medium ahead of the blast wave disappear, which indicates shock processing of PAH molecules. The PAH plateau appears most strongly at the outer edge of the blast wave and coincides with diffuse X-ray emission that precedes the brightest X-ray and optical filaments. This suggests that PAH molecules in the surrounding medium are swept up and processed in the hot gas of the blast wave shock, where they survive the harsh conditions long enough to be detected. We also observe a broad emission feature at 20 {mu}m appearing with the PAH plateau. We speculate that this feature is either due to FeO dust grains or connected to the processing of PAHs in the supernova blast wave shock.

  20. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF DUST DESTRUCTION IN THE PUPPIS A SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Arendt, Richard G.; Dwek, Eli; Blair, William P.; Hwang, Una; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox S.; Petre, Robert; Rho, Jeonghee; Winkler, P. Frank

    2010-12-10

    The interaction of the Puppis A supernova remnant (SNR) with a neighboring molecular cloud provides a unique opportunity to measure the amount of grain destruction in an SNR shock. Spitzer Space Telescope MIPS imaging of the entire SNR at 24, 70, and 160 {mu}m shows an extremely good correlation with X-ray emission, indicating that the SNR's IR radiation is dominated by the thermal emission of swept-up interstellar dust, collisionally heated by the hot shocked gas. Spitzer IRS spectral observations targeted both the Bright Eastern Knot (BEK) of the SNR where a small cloud has been engulfed by the supernova blast wave and outlying portions of the associated molecular cloud that are yet to be hit by the shock front. Modeling the spectra from both regions reveals the composition and the grain size distribution of the interstellar dust, both in front of and behind the SNR shock front. The comparison shows that the ubiquitous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of the interstellar medium are destroyed within the BEK, along with nearly 25% of the mass of graphite and silicate dust grains.

  1. Spatial Distribution of Mg-rich Ejecta in LMC Supernova Remnant N49B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sangwook; Bhalerao, Jayant

    2017-01-01

    The supernova remnant (SNR) N49B in the Large Magellanic Cloud is a peculiar example of a core-collapse SNR that shows the shocked metal-rich ejecta enriched only in Mg without evidence for a similar overabundance in O and Ne. Based on archival Chandra data, we present results from our extensive spatially resolved spectral analysis of N49B. We find that the Mg-rich ejecta gas extends from the central regions of the SNR out to the southeastern outermost boundary of the SNR. This elongated feature shows an overabundance for Mg similar to that of the main ejecta region at the SNR center, and its electron temperature appears to be higher than the central main ejecta gas. We estimate that the Mg mass in this southeastern elongated ejecta feature is ∼10% of the total Mg ejecta mass. Our estimated lower limit of >0.1 M⊙ on the total mass of the Mg-rich ejecta confirms the previously suggested large mass for the progenitor star (M ≳ 25 M⊙). We entertain scenarios of an SNR expanding into a nonuniform medium and an energetic jet-driven supernova in an attempt to interpret these results. However, with the current results, the origins of the extended Mg-rich ejecta and the Mg-only-rich nature of the overall metal-rich ejecta in this SNR remain elusive.

  2. Radio Continuum Emission from the Central Stars of M20, and the Detection of a New Supernova Remnant Near M20

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-10

    also report the discovery of a barrel-shaped supernova remnant, SNR G7.06[0.12, at the northwest rim of the nebula, and two shell-like features, G6.67...supernova remnant ( SNR ) lying adjacent to M20 and two shell-type features to the north and east of SNR W28. 2. OBSERVATIONS The Very Large Array of the...A SUPERNOVA REMNANT AND TWO SHELL-LIKE FEATURES 4.1. G7.06[0.12: A Barrel-shaped SNR Figure 6 shows a large-scale gray-scale image of M20 and its

  3. Hα imaging spectroscopy of Balmer-dominated shocks in Tycho's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezevic, Sladjana; Laesker, Ronald; van de Ven, Glenn; Font-Serra, Joan; Raymond, John C.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Beckman, John

    2016-06-01

    We present Fabry-Pérot interferometric observations of the narrow Hα component in the shock front of the historical supernova remnant Tycho (SN 1572). Using GHαFaS (Galaxy Hα Fabry-Pérot Spectrometer) on the William Herschel Telescope, we observed a great portion of the shock front in the northeastern (NE) region of the remnant. The angular resolution of ~1" and spectral resolving power of R~21 000 together with the large field-of-view (3.4' × 3.4') of the instrument allow us to measure the narrow Hα -line width in 73 bins across individual parts of the shock simultaneously and thereby study the indicators of several shock precursors in a large variety of shock front conditions. Compared to previous studies, the detailed spatial resolution of the filament also allows us to mitigate possible artificial broadening of the line from unresolved differential motion and projection. Covering one quarter of the remnant's shell, we confirm the broadening of the narrow Hα line beyond its intrinsic width of ~20 km/s and report it to extend over most of the filament, not only the previously investigated dense 'knot g'. Similarly, we confirm and find additional strong evidence for wide-spread intermediate-line (~150 km/s) emission. Our Bayesian analysis approach allows us to quantify the evidence for this intermediate component as well as a possible split in the narrow line. Suprathermal narrow line widths point toward an additional heating mechanism in the form of a cosmic-ray precursor, while the intermediate component, previously only qualitatively reported as a small non-Gaussian contribution to the narrow component, reveals a broad-neutral precursor.

  4. A Spatial and Spectral Study of Nonthermal Filaments in Historical Supernova Remnants: Observational Results with Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamba, Aya; Yamazaki, Ryo; Yoshida, Tatsuo; Terasawa, Toshio; Koyama, Katsuji

    2005-03-01

    The outer shells of young supernova remnants (SNRs) are the most plausible acceleration sites of high-energy electrons with the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) mechanism. We studied spatial and spectral properties close to the shock fronts in four historical SNRs (Cas A, Kepler's remnant, Tycho's remnant, and RCW 86) with excellent spatial resolution of Chandra. In all of the SNRs, hard X-ray emissions were found on the rims of the SNRs, which concentrate in very narrow regions (so-called filaments); apparent scale widths on the upstream side are below or on the order of the point-spread function of Chandra, while they are 0.5"-40" (0.01-0.4 pc) on the downstream side with most reliable distances. The spectra of these filaments can be fitted with both thermal and nonthermal (power law and SRCUT) models. The former requires unrealistic high temperature (>~2 keV) and low abundances (<~1 solar) for emission from young SNRs and may be thus unlikely. The latter reproduces the spectra with best-fit photon indices of 2.1-3.8, or roll-off frequencies of (0.1-28)×1017 Hz, which reminds us of the synchrotron emission from electrons accelerated via DSA. We consider various physical parameters as functions of the SNR age, including the previous results on SN 1006; the filament width on the downstream side increases with the SNR age, and the spectrum becomes softer, keeping a nonthermal feature. It was also found that a function, that is, the roll-off frequency divided by the square of the scale width on the downstream side, shows negative correlation with the age, which might provide us some information on the DSA theory.

  5. XMM-Newton studies of the supernova remnant G350.0-2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpova, A.; Shternin, P.; Zyuzin, D.; Danilenko, A.; Shibanov, Yu.

    2016-11-01

    We report the results of XMM-Newton observations of the Galactic mixed-morphology supernova remnant G350.0-2.0. Diffuse thermal X-ray emission fills the north-western part of the remnant surrounded by radio shell-like structures. We did not detect any X-ray counterpart of the latter structures, but found several bright blobs within the diffuse emission. The X-ray spectrum of the most part of the remnant can be described by a collisionally ionized plasma model VAPEC with solar abundances and a temperature of ≈0.8 keV. The solar abundances of plasma indicate that the X-ray emission comes from the shocked interstellar material. The overabundance of Fe was found in some of the bright blobs. We also analysed the brightest point-like X-ray source 1RXS J172653.4-382157 projected on the extended emission. Its spectrum is well described by the two-temperature optically thin thermal plasma model MEKAL typical for cataclysmic variable stars. The cataclysmic variable source nature is supported by the presence of a faint (g ≈ 21) optical source with non-stellar spectral energy distribution at the X-ray position of 1RXS J172653.4-382157. It was detected with the XMM-Newton optical/UV monitor in the U filter and was also found in the archival Hα and optical/near-infrared broad-band sky survey images. On the other hand, the X-ray spectrum is also described by the power law plus thermal component model typical for a rotation powered pulsar. Therefore, the pulsar interpretation of the source cannot be excluded. For this source, we derived the upper limit for the pulsed fraction of 27 per cent.

  6. Spitzer IRS Observations of the XA Region in the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankrit, Ravi; Raymond, John C.; Bautista, Manuel; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Long, Knox S.

    2014-05-01

    We report on spectra of two positions in the XA region of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant obtained with the InfraRed Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The spectra span the 10-35 μm wavelength range, which contains a number of collisionally excited forbidden lines. These data are supplemented by optical spectra obtained at the Whipple Observatory and an archival UV spectrum from the International Ultraviolet Explorer. Coverage from the UV through the IR provides tests of shock wave models and tight constraints on model parameters. Only lines from high ionization species are detected in the spectrum of a filament on the edge of the remnant. The filament traces a 180 km s-1 shock that has just begun to cool, and the oxygen to neon abundance ratio lies in the normal range found for Galactic H II regions. Lines from both high and low ionization species are detected in the spectrum of the cusp of a shock-cloud interaction, which lies within the remnant boundary. The spectrum of the cusp region is matched by a shock of about 150 km s-1 that has cooled and begun to recombine. The post-shock region has a swept-up column density of about 1.3 × 1018 cm-2, and the gas has reached a temperature of 7000-8000 K. The spectrum of the Cusp indicates that roughly half of the refractory silicon and iron atoms have been liberated from the grains. Dust emission is not detected at either position. Based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope.

  7. Magnetic fields in Supernova Remnants and Pulsar-Wind Nebulae: Deductions from X-ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, S. P.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic field strengths B in synchrotron sources are notoriously difficult to measure. Simple arguments such as equipartition of energy can give values for which the total energy is a minimum, but there is no guarantee that Nature obeys it, or even if so, what particle population (just electrons? electrons plus ions?) should have an energy density comparable to that in magnetic field. However, the operation of synchrotron losses can provide additional information, if those losses are manifested in the synchrotron spectra as steepenings of the spectral-energy distribution above some characteristic frequency often called a "break" (though it is more typically a gradual curvature). A source of known age, if it has been accelerating particles continuously, will have such a break above the energy at which particle radiative lifetimes equal the source age, and this can give B. However, in spatially resolved sources such as supernova remnants (SNRs) and pulsar-wind nebulae (PWNe), systematic advection of particles, if at a known rate, gives a second measure of particle age to compare with radiative lifetimes. In most young SNRs, synchrotron X-rays make a contribution to the X-ray spectrum, and are usually found in thin rims at the remnant edges. If the rims are thin in the radial direction due to electron energy losses, a magnetic-field strength can be estimated. I present recent modeling of this process, along with models in which rims are thin due to decay of magnetic turbulence, and apply them to the remnants of SN 1006 and Tycho. In PWNe, outflows of relativistic plasma behind the pulsar wind termination shock are likely quite inhomogeneous, so magnetic-field estimates based on source lifetimes and assuming spatial uniformity can give misleading values for B. I shall discuss inhomogeneous PWN models and the effects they can have on B estimates.

  8. Spitzer IRS observations of the XA region in the cygnus loop supernova remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Sankrit, Ravi; Bautista, Manuel; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Long, Knox S.

    2014-05-20

    We report on spectra of two positions in the XA region of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant obtained with the InfraRed Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The spectra span the 10-35 μm wavelength range, which contains a number of collisionally excited forbidden lines. These data are supplemented by optical spectra obtained at the Whipple Observatory and an archival UV spectrum from the International Ultraviolet Explorer. Coverage from the UV through the IR provides tests of shock wave models and tight constraints on model parameters. Only lines from high ionization species are detected in the spectrum of a filament on the edge of the remnant. The filament traces a 180 km s{sup –1} shock that has just begun to cool, and the oxygen to neon abundance ratio lies in the normal range found for Galactic H II regions. Lines from both high and low ionization species are detected in the spectrum of the cusp of a shock-cloud interaction, which lies within the remnant boundary. The spectrum of the cusp region is matched by a shock of about 150 km s{sup –1} that has cooled and begun to recombine. The post-shock region has a swept-up column density of about 1.3 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup –2}, and the gas has reached a temperature of 7000-8000 K. The spectrum of the Cusp indicates that roughly half of the refractory silicon and iron atoms have been liberated from the grains. Dust emission is not detected at either position.

  9. MOLECULAR ENVIRONMENT AND AN X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT KESTEVEN 78

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Ping; Chen Yang

    2011-12-10

    We investigate the molecular environment of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) Kesteven 78 and perform an XMM-Newton X-ray spectroscopic study for the northeastern edge of the remnant. SNR Kes 78 is found to interact with the molecular clouds (MCs) at a systemic local standard of rest velocity of 81 km s{sup -1}. At around this velocity, the SNR appears to contact a long molecular strip in the northeast and a large cloud in the east as revealed in the {sup 13}CO line, which may be responsible for the radio brightness peak and the OH maser, respectively. The {sup 12}CO-line bright region morphologically matches the eastern bright radio shell in general, and the SNR is consistent in extent with a CO cavity. Broadened {sup 12}CO-line profiles discerned in the eastern maser region and the western clumpy molecular arc and the elevated {sup 12}CO (J = 2-1)/(J = 1-0) ratios along the SNR boundary may be signatures of shock perturbation in the molecular gas. The SNR-MC association places the SNR at a kinematic distance of 4.8 kpc. The X-rays arising from the northeastern radio shell are emitted by underionized hot ({approx}1.5 keV), low-density ({approx}0.1 cm{sup -3}) plasma with solar abundance, and the plasma may be of intercloud origin. The age of the remnant is inferred to be about 6 kyr. The size of the molecular cavity in Kes 78 implies an initial mass around 22 M{sub Sun} for the progenitor.

  10. Possible detection of the stellar donor or remnant for the type Iax supernova 2008ha

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Ryan J.; McCully, Curtis; Jha, Saurabh W.; Bildsten, Lars; Fong, Wen-fai; Narayan, Gautham; Rest, Armin; Stritzinger, Maximilian D.

    2014-09-01

    Type Iax supernovae (SNe Iax) are thermonuclear explosions that are related to SNe Ia, but are physically distinct. The most important differences are that SNe Iax have significantly lower luminosity (1%-50% that of typical SNe Ia), lower ejecta mass (∼0.1-0.5 M {sub ☉}), and may leave a bound remnant. The most extreme SN Iax is SN 2008ha, which peaked at M{sub V} = –14.2 mag, about 5 mag below that of typical SNe Ia. Here, we present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of UGC 12682, the host galaxy of SN 2008ha, taken 4.1 yr after the peak brightness of SN 2008ha. In these deep, high-resolution images, we detect a source coincident (0.86 HST pixels; 0.''043; 1.1σ) with the position of SN 2008ha with M {sub F814W} = –5.4 mag. We determine that this source is unlikely to be a chance coincidence, but that scenario cannot be completely ruled out. If this source is directly related to SN 2008ha, it is either the luminous bound remnant of the progenitor white dwarf (WD) or its companion star. The source is consistent with being an evolved >3 M {sub ☉} initial mass star, and is significantly redder than the SN Iax 2012Z progenitor system, the first detected progenitor system for a thermonuclear SN. If this source is the companion star for SN 2008ha, there is a diversity in SN Iax progenitor systems, perhaps related to the diversity in SN Iax explosions. If the source is the bound remnant of the WD, it must have expanded significantly. Regardless of the nature of this source, we constrain the progenitor system of SN 2008ha to have an age of <80 Myr.

  11. Near-Infrared Knots and Dense Fe Ejecta in the Cassiopeia A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong-Hyun; Koo, Bon-Chul; Moon, Dae-Sik; Burton, Michael G.; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2017-03-01

    We report the results of broadband (0.95–2.46 μm) near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant. Using a clump-finding algorithm in two-dimensional dispersed images, we identify 63 “knots” from eight slit positions and derive their spectroscopic properties. All of the knots emit [Fe ii] lines together with other ionic forbidden lines of heavy elements, and some of them also emit H and He lines. We identify 46 emission line features in total from the 63 knots and measure their fluxes and radial velocities. The results of our analyses of the emission line features based on principal component analysis show that the knots can be classified into three groups: (1) He-rich, (2) S-rich, and (3) Fe-rich knots. The He-rich knots have relatively small, ≲ 200 {km} {{{s}}}-1, line-of-sight speeds and radiate strong He i and [Fe ii] lines resembling closely optical quasi-stationary flocculi of circumstellar medium, while the S-rich knots show strong lines from O-burning material with large radial velocities up to ∼ 2000 {km} {{{s}}}-1 indicating that they are supernova ejecta material known as fast-moving knots. The Fe-rich knots also have large radial velocities but show no lines from O-burning material. We discuss the origin of the Fe-rich knots and conclude that they are most likely “pure” Fe ejecta synthesized in the innermost region during the supernova explosion. The comparison of [Fe ii] images with other waveband images shows that these dense Fe ejecta are mainly distributed along the southwestern shell just outside the unshocked 44Ti in the interior, supporting the presence of unshocked Fe associated with 44Ti.

  12. Deep optical observations of the central X-ray source in the Puppis A supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, R. P.; de Luca, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P. A.

    2009-06-01

    Context: X-ray observations revealed a group of radio-silent isolated neutron stars (INSs) at the centre of young supernova remnants (SNRs), dubbed central compact objects or CCOs, with properties different from those of classical rotation-powered pulsars. In at least three cases, evidence points towards CCOs being low-magnetized INSs, born with slow rotation periods, and possibly accreting from a debris disc of material formed out of the supernova event. Understanding the origin of the diversity of the CCOs can shed light on supernova explosion and neutron star formation models. Optical/infrared (IR) observations are crucial to test different CCO interpretations. Aims: The aim of our work is to perform a deep optical investigation of the CCO RX J0822.0-4300 in the Puppis A SNR, one of the most poorly understood in the CCO family. Methods: By using as a reference the Chandra X-ray coordinates of RX J0822.0-4300 we performed deep optical observations in the B, V and I bands with the Very Large Telescope (VLT). Results: We found no candidate optical counterpart within 3 σ of the computed Chandra X-ray position down to 5 σ limits of B ~ 27.2, V ~ 26.9, and I ~ 25.6, the deepest obtained in the optical band for this source. Conclusions: These limits confirm the non-detection of a companion brighter than an M 5 dwarf. At the same time, they do not constrain optical emission from the neutron star surface, while emission from the magnetosphere would require a spectral break in the optical/IR. Based on observations collected at ESO, Paranal, under Programme 78.D-0706(A).

  13. The Three-Dimensional Motions of the Ejecta of Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Brian J.; Coyle, Nina; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; DePasquale, Joseph M.; Hewitt, John W.; Blondin, John M.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Petre, Robert; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2017-01-01

    We present the first three-dimensional measurements of the velocity of various ejecta knots in Tycho's supernova remnant, the remains of SN 1572, known to be a Type Ia explosion. When the ejecta knots pass through the reverse shock, they become heated to X-ray emitting temperatures, and Chandra's unmatched spatial resolution combined with the small age of this remnant allows us to watch it expand on measurable timescales. By combining a new epoch of 2015 Chandra X-ray observations with a previous 2003 epoch, we have a 12-year baseline over which we can measure proper motions from nearly 60 "tufts" of Si-rich ejecta, giving us the velocity in the plane of the sky. For the line of sight velocity, we use two different methods: a non-equilibrium ionization model fit to the strong Si and S lines in the 1.2-2.8 keV regime, and a fit consisting of a series of Gaussian lines. These methods give consistent results, and allow us to determine the red or blue shift of each of the knots, and thus, the third dimension of the velocity vector. Assuming a distance of 3.5 kpc, we find total velocities that range from roughly 2400 to 6600 km/s, with mean and median values of 4429 and 4450 km/s, respectively. In the plane of the sky, we find several regions where the ejecta knots have overtaken the forward shock. These regions have proper motions in excess of 6000 km/s. Some Type Ia supernova explosion models predict a velocity asymmetry in the ejecta, where the ejecta on one side of the remnant is moving faster than another side. We find no such velocity asymmetries in Tycho, and discuss our findings in light of various explosion models. Our previous work has shown an asymmetry in the velocity of the forward shock, with speeds in the southwest being significantly higher than those in the northeast. We have attributed this to a measured density gradient in the ISM, and not an asymmetry in the explosion. We compare our measurements with hydrodynamic simulations to show how the forward

  14. A Study of the Non-Thermal X-Ray Emission of Shell-Type Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Glenn E.

    2002-01-01

    The term of the second year of the award is the period from March 15, 2001 to March 14, 2002. As was the specified goal of the second year, we analyzed the spatial and spectral X-ray data for several young supernova remnants. I published a paper about an analysis of the ROSAT, ASCA, and RXTE data for the supernova remnant SN 1006. A copy of this paper is enclosed. As described in the paper, we believe that we accurately modeled the nonthermal X-ray emission from the remnant. The results of this analysis are used to infer properties about the cosmic rays accelerated in the remnant and to argue that the strength of the magnetic field in the remnant is considerably larger than the value of about 10 micro G reported elsewhere. The results were presented at the August 2001 International Cosmic Ray Conference in Hamburg, German),. I began analyzing new Chandra X-ray data for SN 1006. This analysis will yield the first measure of the strength of the magnetic field in the remnant for the first time. Preliminary results support our previous conclusion that the magnetic field strength in the remnant is much larger than 10 micro G. The field strength seems to be about the strength expected based on an equipartition calculation. The result supports recent models that describe the how the shock structure is influenced by the efficient acceleration of cosmic rays. This work will be presented at the April 2002 High Energy Astrophysics Division meeting in Albuquerque and published this summer. A copy of the abstract for the talk is enclosed. I began studying new Chandra X-ray data for the supernova remnant Cas A. The results of this work show that the forward shock is a region where cosmic-ray electrons are accelerated, which is consistent with theoretical expectations. The work was presented at the September 2001 Two Years of Science with Chandra symposium in Washington, DC. A copy of the poster paper is enclosed. Dr. Thomas Pannuti, whose research work is supported by the award

  15. An X-Ray and Radio Study of the Varying Expansion Velocities in Tycho’s Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Brian J.; Chomiuk, Laura; Hewitt, John W.; Blondin, John M.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Petre, Robert; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2016-06-01

    We present newly obtained X-ray and radio observations of Tycho’s supernova remnant using Chandra and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array in 2015 and 2013/14, respectively. When combined with earlier epoch observations by these instruments, we now have time baselines for expansion measurements of the remnant of 12-15 years in the X-rays and 30 years in the radio. The remnant’s large angular size allows for proper motion measurements at many locations around the periphery of the blast wave. Consistent with earlier measurements, we find a clear gradient in the expansion velocity of the remnant, despite its round shape. The proper motions on the western and southwestern sides of the remnant are about a factor of two higher than those in the east and northeast. We showed in an earlier work that this is related to an offset of the explosion site from the geometric center of the remnant due to a density gradient in the ISM, and using our refined measurements reported here, we find that this offset is ˜23″ toward the northeast. An explosion center offset in such a circular remnant has implications for searches for progenitor companions in other remnants.

  16. Molecules and dust in Cassiopeia A. II. Dust sputtering and diagnosis of supernova dust survival in remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biscaro, Chiara; Cherchneff, Isabelle

    2016-05-01

    We study the dust evolution in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. We follow the processing of dust grains that formed in the Type II-b supernova ejecta by modelling the sputtering of grains. The dust is located in dense ejecta clumps that are crossed by the reverse shock. We also investigate further sputtering in the inter-clump medium gas once the clumps have been disrupted by the reverse shock. The dust evolution in the dense ejecta clumps of Type II-P supernovae and their remnants is also explored. We study oxygen-rich clumps that describe the oxygen core of the ejecta, and carbon-rich clumps that correspond to the outermost carbon-rich ejecta zone. We consider the various dust components that form in the supernova, several reverse shock velocities and inter-clump gas temperatures, and derive grain-size distributions and masses for the dust as a function of time. Both non-thermal sputtering within clumps and thermal sputtering in the inter-clump medium gas are studied. We find that non-thermal sputtering in the clumps is important for all supernova types and accounts for reducing the grain population by ~ 40% to 80% in mass, depending on the clump gas over-density, the grain type and size, and the shock velocity in the clump. A Type II-b SN forms small grains that are sputtered within the clumps and in the inter-clump medium. For Cas A, silicate grains do not survive thermal sputtering in the inter-clump medium, while alumina, silicon carbide, and carbon dust may survive in the remnant. Our derived masses of currently processed silicate, alumina and carbon grains agree well with the values derived from the observations of warm dust, and seem to indicate that the dust is currently being processed within clumps by non-thermal sputtering. Out of the ~ 0.03M⊙ of dust formed in the ejecta, between 30% and 60% of this mass is present today in Cas A, and only 6% to 11% of the initial mass will survive the remnant phase. Grains formed in Type II-P supernovae are

  17. Spatial Variations of the Synchrotron Spectrum Within Tycho’s Supernova Remnant (3C 10): A Spectral Tomography Analysis of Radio Observations at 20 and 90 Centimeter Wavelengths

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-20

    individual ( Tycho ) 1. INTRODUCTION A new star observed by Tycho Brahe (1573) is now identi- Ðed as a supernova whose remnant (SNR) is 3C 10 (SN 1572... Tycho SNR, SNR 120.1]1.4 ; Lozinskaya 1992 and references therein). The explosion itself was mostly likely a Type Ia supernova, and the remnant seems...we adopted.3 Again, this procedure tends to reduce any spectral variations. However, as Reynoso et al. (1997) found, Tycho is not expanding

  18. An absence of ex-companion stars in the type Ia supernova remnant SNR 0509-67.5.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Bradley E; Pagnotta, Ashley

    2012-01-11

    A type Ia supernova is thought to begin with the explosion of a white dwarf star. The explosion could be triggered by the merger of two white dwarfs (a 'double-degenerate' origin), or by mass transfer from a companion star (the 'single-degenerate' path). The identity of the progenitor is still controversial; for example, a recent argument against the single-degenerate origin has been widely rejected. One way to distinguish between the double- and single-degenerate progenitors is to look at the centre of a known type Ia supernova remnant to see whether any former companion star is present. A likely ex-companion star for the progenitor of the supernova observed by Tycho Brahe has been identified, but that claim is still controversial. Here we report that the central region of the supernova remnant SNR 0509-67.5 (the site of a type Ia supernova 400 ± 50 years ago, based on its light echo) in the Large Magellanic Cloud contains no ex-companion star to a visual magnitude limit of 26.9 (an absolute magnitude of M(V) = +8.4) within a region of radius 1.43 arcseconds. (This corresponds to the 3σ maximum distance to which a companion could have been 'kicked' by the explosion.) This lack of any ex-companion star to deep limits rules out all published single-degenerate models for this supernova. The only remaining possibility is that the progenitor of this particular type Ia supernova was a double-degenerate system.

  19. An absence of ex-companion stars in the type Ia supernova remnant SNR 0509-67.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Pagnotta, Ashley

    2012-01-01

    A type Ia supernova is thought to begin with the explosion of a white dwarf star. The explosion could be triggered by the merger of two white dwarfs (a `double-degenerate' origin), or by mass transfer from a companion star (the `single-degenerate' path). The identity of the progenitor is still controversial; for example, a recent argument against the single-degenerate origin has been widely rejected. One way to distinguish between the double- and single-degenerate progenitors is to look at the centre of a known type Ia supernova remnant to see whether any former companion star is present. A likely ex-companion star for the progenitor of the supernova observed by Tycho Brahe has been identified, but that claim is still controversial. Here we report that the central region of the supernova remnant SNR 0509-67.5 (the site of a type Ia supernova 400 +/- 50 years ago, based on its light echo) in the Large Magellanic Cloud contains no ex-companion star to a visual magnitude limit of 26.9 (an absolute magnitude of MV = +8.4) within a region of radius 1.43 arcseconds. (This corresponds to the 3σ maximum distance to which a companion could have been `kicked' by the explosion.) This lack of any ex-companion star to deep limits rules out all published single-degenerate models for this supernova. The only remaining possibility is that the progenitor of this particular type Ia supernova was a double-degenerate system.

  20. High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Galactic Supernova Remnant Puppis A with the XMM-Newton RGS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Mori, Koji; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Petre, Robert; Yamada, Shinya; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Konami, Saori; Tamagawa, Toru

    2012-01-01

    We present high-resolution X-ray spectra of cloud-shock interaction regions in the eastern and northern rims of the Galactic supernova remnant Puppis A, using the Reflection Grating Spectrometer onboard the XMM-Newton satellite. A number of emission lines including K(alpha) triplets of He-like N, O , and Ne are clearly resolved for the first time. Intensity ratios of forbidden to resonance lines in the triplets are found to be higher than predictions by thermal emission models having plausible plasma parameters. The anomalous line ratios cannot be reproduced by effects of resonance scattering, recombination, or inner-shell ionization processes, but could be explained by charge-exchange emission that should arise at interfaces between the cold/warm clouds and the hot plasma. Our observations thus provide observational support for charge-exchange X-ray emission in supernova remnants.

  1. Uncovering The Properties of Young Neutron Stars and Their Surrounding Supernova A Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, Patrick O.; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    star formed in the explosion that produced the remnant. There is no evidence for a surrounding pulsar wind nebula. The source properties are similar to the central source in Cas A even though the Kes 79 remnant is considerably older. The results have been published in the Astrophysical Journal (Seward, Slane, Smith, and Sun 2003, ApJ, 584,414). Chandra Survey for Compact Objects in Supernova Remnants: We have formed a collaboration to carry out an extensive search for young neutron stars in nearby supernova remnants. Using X-ray observations from an approved Chandra Large Project, as well as from additional approved XMM observations, we are investigating a volume-limited sample of SNRs for which there is currently no evidence of associated neutron stars. We have obtained extensive optical and 1R data to complement the project, and analysis of these data is currently underway.

  2. The population of X-ray supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, P.; Haberl, F.; Kavanagh, P. J.; Sasaki, M.; Bozzetto, L. M.; Filipović, M. D.; Vasilopoulos, G.; Pietsch, W.; Points, S. D.; Chu, Y.-H.; Dickel, J.; Ehle, M.; Williams, R.; Greiner, J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: We present a comprehensive X-ray study of the population of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Using primarily XMM-Newton observations, we conduct a systematic spectral analysis of LMC SNRs to gain new insight into their evolution and the interplay with their host galaxy. Methods: We combined all the archival XMM-Newton observations of the LMC with those of our Very Large Programme LMC survey. We produced X-ray images and spectra of 51 SNRs, out of a list of 59 objects compiled from the literature and augmented with newly found objects. Using a careful modelling of the background, we consistently analysed all the X-ray spectra and measure temperatures, luminosities, and chemical compositions. The locations of SNRs are compared to the distributions of stars, cold gas, and warm gas in the LMC, and we investigated the connection between the SNRs and their local environment, characterised by various star formation histories. We tentatively typed all LMC SNRs, in order to constrain the ratio of core-collapse to type Ia SN rates in the LMC. We also compared the column densities derived from X-ray spectra to H i maps, thus probing the three-dimensional structure of the LMC. Results: This work provides the first homogeneous catalogue of the X-ray spectral properties of SNRs in the LMC. It offers a complete census of LMC remnants whose X-ray emission exhibits Fe K lines (13% of the sample), or reveals the contribution from hot supernova ejecta (39%), which both give clues to the progenitor types. The abundances of O, Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe in the hot phase of the LMC interstellar medium are found to be between 0.2 and 0.5 times the solar values with a lower abundance ratio [α/Fe] than in the Milky Way. The current ratio of core-collapse to type Ia SN rates in the LMC is constrained to NCC/NIa=1.35(-0.24+0.11), which is lower than in local SN surveys and galaxy clusters. Our comparison of the X-ray luminosity functions of SNRs in Local Group

  3. Nonuniform Expansion of the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Green, David; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert

    2014-08-01

    G1.9+0.3 is the youngest known Galactic supernova remnant (SNR), about 100 yr old from global expansion measurements, and most likely the result of an asymmetric Type Ia supernova explosion. We smoothed a Chandra image from a 1 Ms observation in 2011 and fit the resulting model to unsmoothed images from 2007 and 2009, allowing for expansion and image shifts. The measured expansion rates strongly deviate from uniform expansion, increasing inward by about 60% along the X-ray bright SE-NW axis, from 0.52% +- 0.03% per yr to 0.84% +- 0.06% per yr. This corresponds to undecelerated ages of 120 - 190 yr, confirming the young age of G1.9 +0.3, and implying a significant (deceleration parameter m < 0.6) deceleration of the blast wave. The spatially-integrated X-ray flux, strongly dominated by synchrotron emission, increases at a rate of 1.9% +- 0.7% per year, in agreement with previous measurements. G1.9+0.3 is the only Galactic SNR brightening at X-ray and radio wavelengths. We identify the inner rims with the reverse shock and more slowly-expanding rims farther out with the blast wave. The large spread in expansion ages between the reverse shock and the blast wave requires abrupt density gradients in either the ejecta or the ambient medium, to suddenly decelerate the reverse shock or the blast wave. The blast wave could have been decelerated recently by an encounter with a modest (factor of several) density discontinuity in the ambient medium, such as found at a wind termination shock, implying a strong presupernova wind from the progenitor system. Alternatively, the reverse shock might have encountered a larger (factor of 10 or more) density discontinuity within the SN ejecta, such as found in pulsating delayed-detonation Type Ia SN models. Through 1D hydrodynamical simulations, we demonstrate that the blast wave is much more decelerated than the reverse shock in these models for remnants at ages similar to G1.9+0.3. The presence of strong density gradients in the outer

  4. Gamma ray emission from middle aged supernova remnants interacting with molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaping; Chevalier, Roger A.

    2016-06-01

    Gamma ray emission from several middle aged supernova remnants (SNRs) has been detected in space-based GeV observations and ground-based TeV observations. The characteristic pion-decay signature identified in spectra of the remnants IC443 and W44 provides strong evidence for cosmic ray (CR) proton acceleration in SNRs. Multi-wavelength observations further reveal a spatial correlation between the molecular cloud (MC) interaction region and the gamma ray emitting region. Radio emission, however, was found not to be well-correlated with the high energy emission. Based on observed MC associations, two scenarios have been proposed to explain the observed gamma ray emission from these middle aged SNRs. In one, accelerated CR particles escape from the SNR and then illuminate nearby MCs, producing gamma ray emission, while the other involves direct interaction between the SNR and molecular clumps. Here I present a new model of the direct interaction type that involves the collision between MC clumps and a radiative SNR. The model can explain the discrepancy between radio and gamma ray emission morphology. The gamma ray spectra from these middle aged SNRs show steeping from GeV to TeV energies that is believed to be due to the limited acceleration time of CR particles. However, the spectral shape cannot be fitted by a simple exponential profile. We derive a time dependent solution for diffusive shock acceleration in the test particle limit and show that it is capable of explaining the observed spectral steepening at high energy.

  5. NONUNIFORM EXPANSION OF THE YOUNGEST GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT G1.9+0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Green, David A.; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Willett, Rebecca

    2014-08-01

    We report measurements of the X-ray expansion of the youngest Galactic supernova remnant, G1.9+0.3, using Chandra observations in 2007, 2009, and 2011. The measured rates strongly deviate from uniform expansion, decreasing radially by about 60% along the X-ray bright SE-NW axis from 0.84% ± 0.06% yr{sup –1} to 0.52% ± 0.03% yr{sup –1}. This corresponds to undecelerated ages of 120-190 yr, confirming the young age of G1.9+0.3 and implying a significant deceleration of the blast wave. The synchrotron-dominated X-ray emission brightens at a rate of 1.9% ± 0.4% yr{sup –1}. We identify bright outer and inner rims with the blast wave and reverse shock, respectively. Sharp density gradients in either the ejecta or ambient medium are required to produce the sudden deceleration of the reverse shock or the blast wave implied by the large spread in expansion ages. The blast wave could have been decelerated recently by an encounter with a modest density discontinuity in the ambient medium, such as may be found at a wind termination shock, requiring strong mass loss in the progenitor. Alternatively, the reverse shock might have encountered an order-of-magnitude density discontinuity within the ejecta, such as may be found in pulsating delayed-detonation Type Ia models. We demonstrate that the blast wave is much more decelerated than the reverse shock in these models for remnants at ages similar to G1.9+0.3. Similar effects may also be produced by dense shells possibly associated with high-velocity features in Type Ia spectra. Accounting for the asymmetry of G1.9+0.3 will require more realistic three-dimensional Type Ia models.

  6. The abundances of major elements in Cas A and Tycho supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this program was to map the abundances of major elements such as O, Si, S, and Fe in the supernova remnants, Tycho and Cas A. The approach was based upon using archival cosmic X-ray data from several space missions, notably, the Einstein Observatory, EXOSAT, ROSAT, BBSRT, and ASCA. Two of the missions, Einstein and ROSAT, had high resolution telescopes that provided excellent images, but no spectral information. Two missions with much poorer resolution telescopes, BBXRT and ASCA, gave good spectral information through pulse height of signals in their cooled solid state detector, but rather crude spatial information. Our goal was to extract spectral information from the combined analysis of the Einstein and ROSAT images of Cas A and Tycho and to verify or refine the spectral map by checking its agreement with the BBSRT or ASCA spectra results for larger regions. In particular, we note that the Einstein and ROSAT telescopes have different spectral responses. The Einstein bandwidth includes the 2-4 keV region which is absent from ROSAT. Hence, by forming linear combinations of the Einstein and ROSAT images, we are able to resolve the contributions of the 0.5-2 keV band from the 2-4 keV band. The former contains lines of O and Fe while the latter is dominated by Si and S. We correct for the expansion that has taken place in the remnants during the ten-year interval between the Einstein and ROSAT measurements, but we must assume that no significant spectral changes have occurred during that time. The analysis of the Tycho SNR was completed and the results have been published. A copy of the paper is included. The analysis of Cas A has proved to be more complicated. It is continuing with support from another program. Part of the problem may be due to difficulties in the aspect information which is needed to precisely register the ROSAT and Einstein images.

  7. G11.2-0.3: The Young Remnant of a Stripped-envelope Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Roberts, Mallory S. E.

    2016-03-01

    We present results of a 400 ks Chandra observation of the young shell supernova remnant (SNR) G11.2-0.3, containing a pulsar and pulsar-wind nebula (PWN). We measure a mean expansion rate for the shell since 2000 of 0.0277 ± 0.0018% yr-1, implying an age between 1400 and 2400 yr, and making G11.2-0.3 one of the youngest core-collapse SNRs in the Galaxy. However, we find very high absorption (AV ˜ 16m ± 2m), confirming near-IR determinations and ruling out a claimed association with the possible historical SN of 386 CE. The PWN shows strong jets and a faint torus within a larger, more diffuse region of radio emission and nonthermal X-rays. Central soft thermal X-ray emission is anticorrelated with the PWN; that, and more detailed morphological evidence, indicates that the reverse shock has already reheated all ejecta and compressed the PWN. The pulsar characteristic energy-loss timescale is well in excess of the remnant age, and we suggest that the bright jets have been produced since the recompression. The relatively pronounced shell and diffuse hard X-ray emission in the interior, enhanced at the inner edge of the shell, indicate that the immediate circumstellar medium into which G11.2-0.3 is expanding was quite anisotropic. We propose a possible origin for G11.2-0.3 in a stripped-envelope progenitor that had lost almost all its envelope mass, in an anisotropic wind or due to binary interaction, leaving a compact core whose fast winds swept previously lost mass into a dense irregular shell, and which exploded as a SN cIIb or Ibc.

  8. Gamma-Ray Observations of Tycho’s Supernova Remnant with VERITAS and Fermi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archambault, S.; Archer, A.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Bourbeau, E.; Buchovecky, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Cerruti, M.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dwarkadas, V. V.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Griffin, S.; Hütten, M.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kelley-Hoskins, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Krause, M.; Kumar, S.; Lang, M. J.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nieto, D.; O’Brien, S.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Pueschel, E.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Sadeh, I.; Santander, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Slane, P.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Trepanier, S.; Tyler, J.; Wakely, S. P.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Wilcox, P.; Wilhelm, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.

    2017-02-01

    High-energy gamma-ray emission from supernova remnants (SNRs) has provided a unique perspective for studies of Galactic cosmic-ray acceleration. Tycho’s SNR is a particularly good target because it is a young, type Ia SNR that has been well-studied over a wide range of energies and located in a relatively clean environment. Since the detection of gamma-ray emission from Tycho’s SNR by VERITAS and Fermi-LAT, there have been several theoretical models proposed to explain its broadband emission and high-energy morphology. We report on an update to the gamma-ray measurements of Tycho’s SNR with 147 hr of VERITAS and 84 months of Fermi-LAT observations, which represent about a factor of two increase in exposure over previously published data. About half of the VERITAS data benefited from a camera upgrade, which has made it possible to extend the TeV measurements toward lower energies. The TeV spectral index measured by VERITAS is consistent with previous results, but the expanded energy range softens a straight power-law fit. At energies higher than 400 GeV, the power-law index is 2.92 ± 0.42stat ± 0.20sys. It is also softer than the spectral index in the GeV energy range, 2.14 ± 0.09stat ± 0.02sys, measured in this study using Fermi-LAT data. The centroid position of the gamma-ray emission is coincident with the center of the remnant, as well as with the centroid measurement of Fermi-LAT above 1 GeV. The results are consistent with an SNR shell origin of the emission, as many models assume. The updated spectrum points to a lower maximum particle energy than has been suggested previously.

  9. Nonuniform Expansion of the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Green, David A.; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Krishnamurthy, Kalyani; Willett, Rebecca

    2014-08-01

    We report measurements of the X-ray expansion of the youngest Galactic supernova remnant, G1.9+0.3, using Chandra observations in 2007, 2009, and 2011. The measured rates strongly deviate from uniform expansion, decreasing radially by about 60% along the X-ray bright SE-NW axis from 0.84% ± 0.06% yr-1 to 0.52% ± 0.03% yr-1. This corresponds to undecelerated ages of 120-190 yr, confirming the young age of G1.9+0.3 and implying a significant deceleration of the blast wave. The synchrotron-dominated X-ray emission brightens at a rate of 1.9% ± 0.4% yr-1. We identify bright outer and inner rims with the blast wave and reverse shock, respectively. Sharp density gradients in either the ejecta or ambient medium are required to produce the sudden deceleration of the reverse shock or the blast wave implied by the large spread in expansion ages. The blast wave could have been decelerated recently by an encounter with a modest density discontinuity in the ambient medium, such as may be found at a wind termination shock, requiring strong mass loss in the progenitor. Alternatively, the reverse shock might have encountered an order-of-magnitude density discontinuity within the ejecta, such as may be found in pulsating delayed-detonation Type Ia models. We demonstrate that the blast wave is much more decelerated than the reverse shock in these models for remnants at ages similar to G1.9+0.3. Similar effects may also be produced by dense shells possibly associated with high-velocity features in Type Ia spectra. Accounting for the asymmetry of G1.9+0.3 will require more realistic three-dimensional Type Ia models.

  10. Spectral and morphological analysis of the remnant of supernova 1987A with ALMA and ATCA

    SciTech Connect

    Zanardo, Giovanna; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Indebetouw, Remy; Chevalier, Roger A.; Matsuura, Mikako; Barlow, Michael J.; Gaensler, Bryan M.; Fransson, Claes; Lundqvist, Peter; Manchester, Richard N.; Baes, Maarten; Kamenetzky, Julia R.; Lakićević, Maša; Marcaide, Jon M.; Meixner, Margaret; Ng, C.-Y.; Park, Sangwook; and others

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive spectral and morphological analysis of the remnant of supernova (SN) 1987A with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The non-thermal and thermal components of the radio emission are investigated in images from 94 to 672 GHz (λ 3.2 mm to 450 μm), with the assistance of a high-resolution 44 GHz synchrotron template from the ATCA, and a dust template from ALMA observations at 672 GHz. An analysis of the emission distribution over the equatorial ring in images from 44 to 345 GHz highlights a gradual decrease of the east-to-west asymmetry ratio with frequency. We attribute this to the shorter synchrotron lifetime at high frequencies. Across the transition from radio to far infrared, both the synchrotron/dust-subtracted images and the spectral energy distribution (SED) suggest additional emission beside the main synchrotron component (S {sub ν}∝ν{sup –0.73}) and the thermal component originating from dust grains at T ∼ 22 K. This excess could be due to free-free flux or emission from grains of colder dust. However, a second flat-spectrum synchrotron component appears to better fit the SED, implying that the emission could be attributed to a pulsar wind nebula (PWN). The residual emission is mainly localized west of the SN site, as the spectral analysis yields –0.4 ≲ α ≲ –0.1 across the western regions, with α ∼ 0 around the central region. If there is a PWN in the remnant interior, these data suggest that the pulsar may be offset westward from the SN position.

  11. THE MAGELLAN/IMACS CATALOG OF OPTICAL SUPERNOVA REMNANT CANDIDATES IN M83

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, William P.; Winkler, P. Frank; Long, Knox S. E-mail: winkler@middlebury.edu

    2012-11-15

    We present a new optical imaging survey of supernova remnants (SNRs) in M83, using data obtained with the Magellan I 6.5 m telescope and IMACS instrument under conditions of excellent seeing. Using the criterion of strong [S II] emission relative to H{alpha}, we confirm all but three of the 71 SNR candidates listed in our previous survey, and expand the SNR candidate list to 225 objects, more than tripling the earlier sample. Comparing the optical survey with a new deep X-ray survey of M83 with Chandra, we find that 61 of these SNR candidates have X-ray counterparts. We also identify an additional list of 46 [O III]-selected nebulae for follow-up as potential ejecta-dominated remnants, seven of which have associated X-ray emission that makes them strong candidates. Some of the other [O III]-bright objects could also be normal interstellar medium (ISM) dominated SNRs with shocks fast enough to doubly ionize oxygen, but with H{alpha} and [S II] emission faint enough to have been missed. A few of these objects may also be H II regions with abnormally high [O III] emission compared with the majority of M83 H II regions, compact nebulae excited by young Wolf-Rayet stars, or even background active galactic nuclei. The SNR H{alpha} luminosity function in M83 is shifted by a factor of {approx}4.5 times higher than for M33 SNRs, indicative of a higher mean ISM density in M83. We describe the search technique used to identify the SNR candidates and provide basic information and finder charts for the objects.

  12. Discovering and Characterizing the Young Supernova Remnant Population in M101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, William

    2013-10-01

    Young supernova remnants {SNRs}, especially ones like Cas A where heavy elements are still prominent, provide insights into SNe, the stars that produce them, and the galaxies where they reside. Here we propose to leverage and expand on existing Hubble ACS/WFC images of the iconic face-on spiral M101 by obtaining new [O III] data and [S II] images with WFC3 to identify and characterize the SNR population of M101. Deep H-alpha images of M101 already exist for 4 ACS fields, as does an extremely deep {1 Ms Chandra} X-ray study-important since many SNRs, including ALL of the known ejecta-dominated ones, are strong X-ray sources. While existing data have enabled exploration of SNRs previously identified from the ground, they do not allow identifications of new {and especially young} SNRs. We propose to observe these fields in [O III] {strongest line in ejecta-dominated SNRs} and [S II] {to provide the [S II]/H-alpha ratio diagnostic to distinguish SNRs from photoionized nebulae}, plus adding one new field in these lines plus H-alpha. For a modest time investment, all the optical and X-ray diagnostics will be in hand to explore what we expect to be a rich population of young SNRs in the complex inner regions of the galaxy where HST resolution is most needed. Furthermore, ACS images in BVI also exist for these fields, so we will use CMD fitting to constrain the progenitor masses for many of these as we did for the SN 1957D remnant in M83. We will compare to other galaxies, especially M83 where the young SNRs appear to have evolved quickly beyond the ejecta-dominated stage. M101 and M83 differ in mean abundances and star formation rate areal density, providing contrasting conditions.

  13. Identification of Ambient Molecular Clouds Associated with Galactic Supernova Remnant IC 443

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Joon; Koo, Bon-Chul; Snell, Ronald L.; Yun, Min S.; Heyer, Mark H.; Burton, Michael G.

    2012-04-01

    The Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) IC 443 is one of the most studied core-collapse SNRs for its interaction with molecular clouds. However, the ambient molecular clouds with which IC 443 is interacting have not been thoroughly studied and remain poorly understood. Using the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory 14 m telescope, we obtained fully sampled maps of the ~1° × 1° region toward IC 443 in the 12CO J = 1-0 and HCO+ J = 1-0 lines. In addition to the previously known molecular clouds in the velocity range v LSR = -6 to -1 km s-1 (-3 km s-1 clouds), our observations reveal two new ambient molecular cloud components: small (~1') bright clouds in v LSR = -8 to -3 km s-1 (SCs) and diffuse clouds in v LSR = +3 to +10 km s-1 (+5 km s-1 clouds). Our data also reveal the detailed kinematics of the shocked molecular gas in IC 443 however, the focus of this paper is the physical relationship between the shocked clumps and the ambient cloud components. We find strong evidence that the SCs are associated with the shocked clumps. This is supported by the positional coincidence of the SCs with shocked clumps and other tracers of shocks. Furthermore, the kinematic features of some shocked clumps suggest that these are the ablated material from the SCs upon the impact of the SNR shock. The SCs are interpreted as dense cores of parental molecular clouds that survived the destruction by the pre-supernova evolution of the progenitor star or its nearby stars. We propose that the expanding SNR shock is now impacting some of the remaining cores and the gas is being ablated and accelerated, producing the shocked molecular gas. The morphology of the +5 km s-1 clouds suggests an association with IC 443. On the other hand, the -3 km s-1 clouds show no evidence for interaction.

  14. On the size distribution of supernova remnants in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badenes, Carles; Maoz, Dan; Draine, Bruce T.

    2010-09-01

    The physical sizes of supernova remnants (SNRs) in a number of nearby galaxies follow an approximately linear cumulative distribution, contrary to what is expected for decelerating shock fronts. This phenomenon has been variously attributed to observational selection effects, or to a majority of SNRs being in `free expansion', with shocks propagating at a constant velocity into a tenuous ambient medium. We compile multi-wavelength observations of the 77 known SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds, and argue that they provide a fairly complete record of the SNe that have exploded over the last ~20 kyr, with most of them now in the adiabatic, Sedov phase of their expansions. The roughly linear cumulative distribution of sizes (roughly uniform in a differential distribution) can be understood to result from the combination of the deceleration during this phase, a transition to a radiation-loss-dominated phase at a radius that depends on the local gas density and a probability distribution of densities in the interstellar medium varying approximately as ρ-1. This explanation is supported by the observed power-law distributions, with index ~ -1, of three independent tracers of density: neutral hydrogen column density, Hα surface brightness and star formation rate based on resolved stellar populations. In this picture, the observed cut-off at a radius of 30 pc in the SNR size distribution is due to a minimum in the mean ambient gas density in the regions where supernovae (SNe) explode. We show that M33 has an SNR size distribution very similar to that of the Magellanic Clouds, suggesting these features, and their explanation, may be universal. In a companion paper, we use our sample of SNRs as an effective `SN survey' to calculate the SN rate and delay time distribution in the Magellanic Clouds. The hypothesis that most SNRs are in free expansion, rather than in the Sedov phase of their evolution, would result in SN rates that are in strong conflict with independent

  15. A CR-hydro-NEI model of the structure and broadband emission from Tycho's supernova remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Slane, P.; Patnaude, D. J.; Lee, S.-H.; Nagataki, S.; Ellison, D. C.; Hughes, J. P.; Eriksen, K. A.; Castro, D. E-mail: dpatnaude@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: shigehiro.nagataki@riken.jp E-mail: jph@physics.rutgers.edu E-mail: castro@mit.edu

    2014-03-01

    Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR) is well-established as a source of particle acceleration to very high energies. Constraints from numerous studies indicate that the observed γ-ray emission results primarily from hadronic processes, providing direct evidence of highly relativistic ions that have been accelerated by the SNR. Here we present an investigation of the dynamical and spectral evolution of Tycho's SNR by carrying out hydrodynamical simulations that include diffusive shock acceleration of particles in the amplified magnetic field at the forward shock of the SNR. Our simulations provide a consistent view of the shock positions, the nonthermal emission, the thermal X-ray emission from the forward shock, and the brightness profiles of the radio and X-ray emission. We compare these with the observed properties of Tycho to determine the density of the ambient material, the particle acceleration efficiency and maximum energy, the accelerated electron-to-proton ratio, and the properties of the shocked gas downstream of the expanding SNR shell. We find that evolution of a typical Type Ia supernova in a low ambient density (n {sub 0} ∼ 0.3 cm{sup –3}), with an upstream magnetic field of ∼5 μG, and with ∼16% of the SNR kinetic energy being converted into relativistic electrons and ions through diffusive shock acceleration, reproduces the observed properties of Tycho. Under such a scenario, the bulk of observed γ-ray emission at high energies is produced by π{sup 0}-decay resulting from the collisions of energetic hadrons, while inverse-Compton emission is significant at lower energies, comprising roughly half of the flux between 1 and 10 GeV.

  16. Transport of relativistic electrons at shocks in shell-type supernova remnants: diffusive and superdiffusive regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, Silvia; Amato, Elena; Zimbardo, Gaetano

    2016-11-01

    Context. Understanding the transport properties of energetic particles in the presence of magnetic turbulence is crucial for interpreting observations of supernova remnants (SNR) and for assessing the cosmic-ray acceleration mechanism. Aims: We aim at obtaining information on the transport regimes of energetic electrons upstream and downstream of SNR blast waves by studying the X-ray rims. Methods: We considered emission profiles expected when synchrotron energy losses dominate, normal diffusion (typically causing an exponential decay), and superdiffusion (causing a power-law decay) for a spherically symmetric model. Then we compared the model profiles, projected on the plane of the sky, with Chandra observations of supernova (SN)1006 and Tycho's SN. Results: Our study shows that downstream of the blast wave the observed profile is exponentially cut-off due to synchrotron energy losses in the amplified and shock compressed magnetic field present. Upstream of the blast wave and close to the shock, the observed profile of SN1006 is well reproduced by electron diffusion in the Bohm regime. However, the long X-ray tail far upstream of the shock is better explained by considering a change in the energetic electrons' transport regime, that appears to become superdiffusive and gives rise to a power law intensity profile on scales over which the magnetic field strength can be assumed to be constant. Similar results are obtained for Tycho, although in this case the nonlinear effects associated with particle acceleration appear to be stronger close to the shock. Conclusions: The analysis of Chandra observations of the X-ray thin rims of SN1006 and of Tycho's SN, SN 1572, can be well explained assuming normal diffusion in the vicinity of the blast wave and superdiffusion far upstream, similarly to what has been found for particles accelerated at interplanetary shocks. This suggests that anomalous transport is common in both interplanetary space and interstellar medium.

  17. A SYSTEMATIC SURVEY FOR BROADENED CO EMISSION TOWARD GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kilpatrick, Charles D.; Bieging, John H.; Rieke, George H.

    2016-01-01

    We present molecular spectroscopy toward 50 Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) taken at millimeter wavelengths in {sup 12}CO J = 2 − 1. These observations are part of a systematic survey for broad molecular line (BML) regions indicative of interactions with molecular clouds (MCs). We detected BML regions toward 19 SNRs, including 9 newly identified BML regions associated with SNRs (G08.3–0.0, G09.9–0.8, G11.2–0.3, G12.2+0.3, G18.6–0.2, G23.6+0.3, 4C–04.71, G29.6+0.1, and G32.4+0.1). The remaining 10 SNRs with BML regions confirm previous evidence for MC interaction in most cases (G16.7+0.1, Kes 75, 3C 391, Kes 79, 3C 396, 3C 397, W49B, Cas A, and IC 443), although we confirm that the BML region toward HB 3 is associated with the W3(OH) H ii region, not the SNR. Based on the systemic velocity of each MC, molecular line diagnostics, and cloud morphology, we test whether these detections represent SNR–MC interactions. One of the targets (G54.1+0.3) had previous indications of a BML region, but we did not detect broadened emission toward it. Although broadened {sup 12}CO J = 2 − 1 line emission should be detectable toward virtually all SNR–MC interactions, we find relatively few examples; therefore, the number of interactions is low. This result favors mechanisms other than supernova feedback as the basic trigger for star formation. In addition, we find no significant association between TeV gamma-ray sources and MC interactions, contrary to predictions that SNR–MC interfaces are the primary venues for cosmic ray acceleration.

  18. Suzaku spectra of a Type-II supernova remnant, Kes 79

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tamotsu; Koyama, Katsuji; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports on results of a Suzaku observation of the supernova remnant (SNR) Kes 79 (G33.6+0.1). The X-ray spectrum is best fitted by a two-temperature model: a non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) plasma and a collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) plasma. The NEI plasma is spatially confined within the inner radio shell with kT ˜ 0.8 keV, while the CIE plasma is found in more spatially extended regions associated with the outer radio shell with kT ˜0.2 keV and solar abundance. Therefore, the NEI plasma is attributable to the SN ejecta, and the CIE plasma is the forward shocked interstellar medium. In the NEI plasma, we discovered K-shell lines of Al, Ar, and Ca for the first time. The abundance pattern and estimated mass of the ejecta are consistent with a core-collapse supernova explosion of a ˜30-40M⊙ progenitor star. An Fe line with a center energy of ˜6.4 keV is also found in the southeast (SE) portion of the SNR, a close peripheral region around dense molecular clouds. One possibility is that the line is associated with the ejecta. However, the centroid energy of ˜6.4 keV and the spatial distribution of enhancement near the SE peripheral do not favor this scenario. Since the ˜6.4 keV emitting region coincides with the molecular clouds, we propose another possibility, that the Fe line is due to K-shell ionization of neutral Fe by the interaction of locally accelerated protons (LECRp) with the surrounding molecular cloud. Both of these possibilities, heated ejecta or LECRp origin, are discussed based on the observational facts.

  19. KINEMATICS OF SHOCKED MOLECULAR GAS ADJACENT TO THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT W44

    SciTech Connect

    Sashida, Tomoro; Oka, Tomoharu; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Aono, Kazuya; Matsumura, Shinji; Nagai, Makoto; Seta, Masumichi

    2013-09-01

    We mapped molecular gas toward the supernova remnant W44 in the HCO{sup +} J = 1-0 line with the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope and in the CO J = 3-2 line with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment 10 m telescope. High-velocity emission wings were detected in both lines over the area where the radio shell of W44 overlaps with the molecular cloud in the plane of the sky. We found that the average velocity distributions of the wing emission can be fit by a uniform expansion model. The best-fit expansion velocities are 12.2 {+-} 0.3 km s{sup -1} and 13.2 {+-} 0.2 km s{sup -1} in HCO{sup +} and CO, respectively. The non-wing CO J = 3-2 component is also fit by the same model with an expansion velocity of 4.7 {+-} 0.1 km s{sup -1}. This component might be dominated by a post-shock higher-density region where the shock velocity had slowed down. The kinetic energy of the shocked molecular gas is estimated to be (3.5 {+-} 1.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 49} erg. Adding this and the energy of the previously identified H I shell, we conclude that (1.2 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 50} erg has been converted into gas kinetic energy from the initial baryonic energy of the W44 supernova. We also found ultra-high-velocity CO J = 3-2 wing emission with a velocity width of {approx}100 km s{sup -1} at (l, b) = (+34. Degree-Sign 73, -0. Degree-Sign 47). The origin of this extremely high velocity wing is a mystery.

  20. NONTHERMAL RADIATION FROM SUPERNOVA REMNANTS: EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELD AMPLIFICATION AND PARTICLE ESCAPE

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyesung; Jones, T. W.; Edmon, Paul P. E-mail: twj@msi.umn.edu

    2013-11-01

    We explore nonlinear effects of wave-particle interactions on the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) process in Type Ia-like supernova remnant (SNR) blast waves by implementing phenomenological models for magnetic field amplification (MFA), Alfvénic drift, and particle escape in time-dependent numerical simulations of nonlinear DSA. For typical SNR parameters, the cosmic-ray (CR) protons can be accelerated to PeV energies only if the region of amplified field ahead of the shock is extensive enough to contain the diffusion lengths of the particles of interest. Even with the help of Alfvénic drift, it remains somewhat challenging to construct a nonlinear DSA model for SNRs in which of the order of 10% of the supernova explosion energy is converted into CR energy and the magnetic field is amplified by a factor of 10 or so in the shock precursor, while, at the same time, the energy spectrum of PeV protons is steeper than E {sup –2}. To explore the influence of these physical effects on observed SNR emission, we also compute the resulting radio-to-gamma-ray spectra. Nonthermal emission spectra, especially in X-ray and gamma-ray bands, depend on the time-dependent evolution of the CR injection process, MFA, and particle escape, as well as the shock dynamic evolution. This result comes from the fact that the high-energy end of the CR spectrum is composed of particles that are injected in the very early stages of the blast wave evolution. Thus, it is crucial to better understand the plasma wave-particle interactions associated with collisionless shocks in detailed modeling of nonthermal radiation from SNRs.

  1. Cr-K EMISSION LINE AS A CONSTRAINT ON THE PROGENITOR PROPERTIES OF SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X. J.; Xiang, F. Y.; Xiao, H. P.; Zhong, J. X.; Tsunemi, H.; Lu, F. J.; Li, Aigen

    2013-03-20

    We perform a survey of the Cr, Mn, and Fe-K emission lines in young supernova remnants (SNRs) with the Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite Suzaku. The Cr and/or Mn emission lines are detected in 3C 397 and 0519-69.0 for the first time. We also confirm the detection of these lines in Kepler, W49B, N103B, and Cas A. We derive the line parameters (i.e., the line centroid energy, flux, and equivalent width (EW)) for these six sources and perform a correlation analysis for the line center energies of Cr, Mn, and Fe. Also included in the correlation analysis are Tycho and G344.7-0.1 for which the Cr, Mn, and Fe-K line parameters were available in the literature through Suzaku observations. We find that the line center energies of Cr correlate very well with that of Fe and that of Mn. This confirms our previous findings that Cr, Mn, and Fe are spatially co-located, share a similar ionization state, and have a common origin in the supernova nucleosynthesis. We find that the ratio of the EW of the Cr emission line to that of Fe ({gamma}{sub Cr/Fe}{identical_to}EW(Cr)/EW(Fe)) provides useful constraints on the SNR progenitors and on the SN explosion mechanisms: for SNRs with {gamma}{sub Cr/Fe} > 2%, a Type Ia origin is favored (e.g., N103B, G344.7-0.1, 3C 397, and 0519-69.0); for SNRs with {gamma}{sub Cr/Fe} < 2%, they could be of either core-collapse origin or carbon-deflagration Ia origin.

  2. Low radio frequency observations and spectral modelling of the remnant of Supernova 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callingham, J. R.; Gaensler, B. M.; Zanardo, G.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Hancock, P. J.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Bell, M. E.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Hindson, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A.; For, B.-Q.; Lenc, E.; McKinley, B.; Morgan, J.; Offringa, A. R.; Procopio, P.; Wayth, R. B.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.

    2016-10-01

    We present Murchison Widefield Array observations of the supernova remnant (SNR) 1987A between 72 and 230 MHz, representing the lowest frequency observations of the source to date. This large lever arm in frequency space constrains the properties of the circumstellar medium created by the progenitor of SNR 1987A when it was in its red supergiant phase. As of late 2013, the radio spectrum of SNR 1987A between 72 MHz and 8.64 GHz does not show any deviation from a non-thermal power law with a spectral index of -0.74 ± 0.02. This spectral index is consistent with that derived at higher frequencies, beneath 100 GHz, and with a shock in its adiabatic phase. A spectral turnover due to free-free absorption by the circumstellar medium has to occur below 72 MHz, which places upper limits on the optical depth of ≤0.1 at a reference frequency of 72 MHz, emission measure of ≲13 000 cm-6 pc, and an electron density of ≲110 cm-3. This upper limit on the electron density is consistent with the detection of prompt radio emission and models of the X-ray emission from the supernova. The electron density upper limit implies that some hydrodynamic simulations derived a red supergiant mass-loss rate that is too high, or a wind velocity that is too low. The mass-loss rate of ˜5 × 10-6 M⊙ yr-1 and wind velocity of 10 km s-1 obtained from optical observations are consistent with our upper limits, predicting a current turnover frequency due to free-free absorption between 5 and 60 MHz.

  3. Hard-X-ray emission lines from the decay of 44Ti in the remnant of supernova 1987A.

    PubMed

    Grebenev, S A; Lutovinov, A A; Tsygankov, S S; Winkler, C

    2012-10-18

    It is assumed that the radioactive decay of (44)Ti powers the infrared, optical and ultraviolet emission of supernova remnants after the complete decay of (56)Co and (57)Co (the isotopes that dominated the energy balance during the first three to four years after the explosion) until the beginning of active interaction of the ejecta with the surrounding matter. Simulations show that the initial mass of (44)Ti synthesized in core-collapse supernovae is (0.02-2.5) × 10(-4) solar masses (M circled dot). Hard X-rays and γ-rays from the decay of this (44)Ti have been unambiguously observed from Cassiopeia A only, leading to the suggestion that values of the initial mass of (44)Ti near the upper bound of the predictions occur only in exceptional cases. For the remnant of supernova 1987A, an upper limit to the initial mass of (44)Ti of <10(-3) M circled dot has been obtained from direct X-ray observations, and an estimate of (1-2) × 10(-4) M circled dot has been made from infrared light curves and ultraviolet spectra by complex and model-dependent computations. Here we report observations of hard X-rays from the remnant of supernova 1987A in the narrow band containing two direct-escape lines of (44)Ti at 67.9 and 78.4 keV. The measured line fluxes imply that this decay provided sufficient energy to power the remnant at late times. We estimate that the initial mass of (44)Ti was (3.1 ± 0.8) × 10(-4), which is near the upper bound of theoretical predictions.

  4. The slow X-ray pulsar SXP 1062 and associated supernova remnant in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskinova, L. M.; Guerrero, M. A.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; Sun, W.; Chu, Y.-H.; Evans, C.; Gallagher, J. S.; Gruendl, R. A.; Reyes-Iturbide, J.

    2013-03-01

    SXP 1062 is an exceptional case of a young neutron star in a wind-fed high-mass X-ray binary associated with a supernova remnant. A unique combination of measured spin period, its derivative, luminosity and young age makes this source a key probe for the physics of accretion and neutron star evolution. Theoretical models proposed to explain the properties of SXP 1062 shall be tested with new data.

  5. Discovery of a pre-existing molecular filament associated with supernova remnant G127.1+0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xin; Yang, Ji; Fang, Min; Su, Yang

    2014-08-20

    We performed millimeter observations in CO lines toward the supernova remnant (SNR) G127.1+0.5. We found a molecular filament at 4-13 km s{sup –1} consisting of two distinct parts: a straight part coming out of the remnant region and a curved part in the remnant region. The curved part is coincides well with the bright SNR shell detected in 1420 MHz radio continuum and mid-infrared observations in the northeastern region. In addition, redshifted line wing broadening is found only in the curved part of the molecular filament, which indicates a physical interaction. These provide strong evidences, for the first time, to confirm the association between an SNR and a pre-existing long molecular filament. Multi-band observations in the northeastern remnant shell could be explained by the interaction between the remnant shock and the dense molecular filament. RADEX radiative transfer modeling of the quiet and shocked components yield physical conditions consistent with the passage of a non-dissociative J-type shock. We argue that the curved part of the filament is fully engulfed by the remnant's forward shock. A spatial correlation between aggregated young stellar objects (YSOs) and the adjacent molecular filament close to the SNR is also found, which could be related to the progenitor's activity.

  6. Probing the Reverse Shock in an Oxygen-Rich Supernovae Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaetz, Terrance (Principal Investigator); Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to examine the O VI emission from the X-ray bright ring of the supernova remnant 1 E0102.2-729 in the small Magellanic cloud. Three pointings were positioned tangent to the ring, north (N), northeast (NE), and southeast (SE), to examine a range of X-ray emitting regions overlapping a range of optical [O III] nebulosity and to examine the velocity structure. One background pointing was also obtained, but it was contaminated by a star. The background levels in the pointings on the remnant were low enough that the background pointing was not required for the remaining analysis. The SE pointing was reobserved in August, 2004, in order to bring the total exposure up to the originally requested 15 ks. The archive notified us of the data's availability in mid September. Significant broad O VI 1032 and O VI 1038 emission was found, brightest in the NE and SE pointings. In the NE and SE pointings, the FWHM of the broad O VI component is approx.800-1000 km/s, while in the N pointing, the line is approx.1500 km/s wide. The O VI is redshifted in the N (approx.380 km/s) and NE (approx.60 km/s) but is blueshifted in the SE (approx. -160 km/s). These FUSE O VI velocity dispersions can be compared to the X-ray gas velocities inferred from Doppler distortions in the Chandra X-ray data as reported by Flanagan et al. 2004 (ApJ 605, 230). The bulk velocities in the X-ray bright ring of order +/- 1000 km/s, comparable to the velocity dispersion seen in the FUSE data. However, the X-ray data indicates a redshift of approx.1000 km/s in the SE, while the FUSE data show a blueshift of approx.160 km/s, underscoring the complex velocity structure in this remnant. The O VI fluxes estimated from the fits to the FUSE data were combined with X-ray (XMM- Newton) O VI1 and O VIII fluxes and compared with predictions from a plasma nonequilibrium ionization model in a "line-based" analysis. We found that the plasma departs significantly from collisional

  7. Studying Young and Old Supernova Remnants with the Upcoming ASTRO-H X-ray Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi-Harb, Samar; Hughes, John P.; Long, Knox; Bamba, Aya; Aharonian, Felix; Foster, Adam; Funk, Stefan; Hiraga, Junko; Ishida, Manabu; Katsuda, Satoru; Koyama, Katsuji; Leutenegger, Maurice; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Matsumoto, Hironori; Mori, Koji; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takashi; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Petre, Robert; Sawada, Makoto; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Keisuke; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uno, Shin'ichiro; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamauchi, Shigeo; ASTRO-H Science Working Group

    2015-01-01

    The upcoming X-ray mission ASTRO-H will open a new discovery window to the high-energy Universe thanks to the unprecedented high-resolution spectroscopy (~7eV) to be achieved with the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) combined with its broadband coverage (0.5-600 keV) with the Soft X-ray Imager (SXI), Hard X-ray Imager (HXI) and the Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD). Supernova remnants (SNRs) are a prime science focus for ASTRO-H, particularly with the SXS providing accurate plasma diagnostics of line-rich spectra expected from the youngest, ejecta-dominated, SNRs to the oldest SNRs impacted by their interaction with the Interstellar Medium (ISM). We here highlight the SNR science topics and program that the ASTRO-H team considers of highest priority and impact. For the younger SNRs, the primary science goals are (1) using abundance measurements to unveil SNR progenitors, (2) using spatial and velocity distribution of the ejecta to understand supernova explosion mechanisms, and (3) revealing the link between the thermal plasma state of SNRs and the efficiency of their particle acceleration. For the older SNRs where thermal emission is dominated or heavily impacted by the ISM, the primary goals are (1) constraining metal abundances and physical processes in the mature limb-brightened SNRs, and (2) understanding the puzzling nature of the `mixed-morphology' SNRs and the physics of recombining plasma. For the pulsar-powered nebulae, also known as Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe) or plerions with many still lacking thermal X-ray emission from their supernova shells, ASTRO-H will shed light on their progenitors and environment. The hard X-ray coverage on board ASTRO-H will further allow a study of their broadband spectra (for the brightest objects), beyond NuSTAR's range, filling the gap between the soft X-ray regime (with current X-ray missions) and the gamma-ray regime (with Fermi in the GeV and H.E.S.S. in the TeV), allowing the search for spectral breaks in the hard X-ray band.

  8. X-RAY EJECTA KINEMATICS OF THE GALACTIC CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA REMNANT G292.0+1.8

    SciTech Connect

    Bhalerao, Jayant; Park, Sangwook; Dewey, Daniel; Hughes, John P.; Mori, Koji; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2015-02-10

    We report on the results from the analysis of our 114 ks Chandra High Energy Transmision Grating Spectrometer observation of the Galactic core-collapse supernova remnant G292.0+1.8. To probe the three-dimensional structure of the clumpy X-ray emitting ejecta material in this remnant, we measured Doppler shifts in emission lines from metal-rich ejecta knots projected at different radial distances from the expansion center. We estimate radial velocities of ejecta knots in the range of –2300 ≲ v{sub r}  ≲ 1400 km s{sup –1}. The distribution of ejecta knots in velocity versus projected-radius space suggests an expanding ejecta shell with a projected angular thickness of ∼90'' (corresponding to ∼3 pc at d = 6 kpc). Based on this geometrical distribution of the ejecta knots, we estimate the location of the reverse shock approximately at the distance of ∼4 pc from the center of the supernova remnant, putting it in close proximity to the outer boundary of the radio pulsar wind nebula. Based on our observed remnant dynamics and the standard explosion energy of 10{sup 51} erg, we estimate the total ejecta mass to be ≲8 M {sub ☉}, and we propose an upper limit of ≲35 M {sub ☉} on the progenitor's mass.

  9. X-Ray Ejecta Kinematics of the Galactic Core-Collapse Supernova Remnant G292.0+1.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalerao, Jayant; Park, Sangwook; Dewey, Daniel; Hughes, John P.; Mori, Koji; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2015-02-01

    We report on the results from the analysis of our 114 ks Chandra High Energy Transmision Grating Spectrometer observation of the Galactic core-collapse supernova remnant G292.0+1.8. To probe the three-dimensional structure of the clumpy X-ray emitting ejecta material in this remnant, we measured Doppler shifts in emission lines from metal-rich ejecta knots projected at different radial distances from the expansion center. We estimate radial velocities of ejecta knots in the range of -2300 lsim vr lsim 1400 km s-1. The distribution of ejecta knots in velocity versus projected-radius space suggests an expanding ejecta shell with a projected angular thickness of ~90'' (corresponding to ~3 pc at d = 6 kpc). Based on this geometrical distribution of the ejecta knots, we estimate the location of the reverse shock approximately at the distance of ~4 pc from the center of the supernova remnant, putting it in close proximity to the outer boundary of the radio pulsar wind nebula. Based on our observed remnant dynamics and the standard explosion energy of 1051 erg, we estimate the total ejecta mass to be lsim8 M ⊙, and we propose an upper limit of lsim35 M ⊙ on the progenitor's mass.

  10. FERMI-LAT DISCOVERY OF GeV GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM THE YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANT CASSIOPEIA A

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Ballet, J.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bonamente, E.; Brigida, M. E-mail: uchiyama@slac.stanford.edu

    2010-02-10

    We report on the first detection of GeV high-energy gamma-ray emission from a young supernova remnant (SNR) with the Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. These observations reveal a source with no discernible spatial extension detected at a significance level of 12.2{sigma} above 500 MeV at a location that is consistent with the position of the remnant of the supernova explosion that occurred around 1680 in the Cassiopeia constellation-Cassiopeia A (Cas A). The gamma-ray flux and spectral shape of the source are consistent with a scenario in which the gamma-ray emission originates from relativistic particles accelerated in the shell of this remnant. The total content of cosmic rays (electrons and protons) accelerated in Cas A can be estimated as W {sub CR} {approx_equal} (1-4) x 10{sup 49} erg thanks to the well-known density in the remnant assuming that the observed gamma ray originates in the SNR shell(s). The magnetic field in the radio-emitting plasma can be robustly constrained as B {>=} 0.1 mG, providing new evidence of the magnetic field amplification at the forward shock and the strong field in the shocked ejecta.0.

  11. Fermi-LAT Discovery of GeV Gamma-ray Emission from the Young Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A.A.

    2011-08-19

    We report on the first detection of GeV high-energy gamma-ray emission from a young supernova remnant with the Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. These observations reveal a source with no discernible spatial extension detected at a significance level of 12.2{sigma} above 500 MeV at a location that is consistent with the position of the remnant of the supernova explosion that occurred around 1680 in the Cassiopeia constellation - Cassiopeia A. The gamma-ray flux and spectral shape of the source are consistent with a scenario in which the gamma-ray emission originates from relativistic particles accelerated in the shell of this remnant. The total content of cosmic rays (electrons and protons) accelerated in Cas A can be estimated as W{sub CR} {approx_equal} (1-4) x 10{sup 49} erg thanks to the well-known density in the remnant assuming that the observed gamma-ray originates in the SNR shell(s). The magnetic field in the radio-emitting plasma can be robustly constrained as B {ge} 0.1 mG, providing new evidence of the magnetic field amplification at the forward shock and the strong field in the shocked ejecta.

  12. X-ray emission from MSH 14-63 - Probable remnant of the A.D. 185 supernova

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, P. F., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Observations during 1972 from an experiment on OSO 7 detected a 2-10-keV X-ray flux of 1.7 by 10 to the -10th power erg/sq cm per sec from a source coincident with MSH 14-63, the most probable candidate for association with the A.D. 185 supernova. Both the present data and those of Naranan et al. (1977) at lower energy can be fitted by a dual-temperature thermal spectrum similar to that observed in other young supernova remnants. Model calculations indicate that a mass in excess of 5 solar masses must have been ejected in the A.D. 185 supernova event.

  13. An interpretation of the overionized plasma in supernova remnant W49B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xin; Miceli, Marco; Bocchino, Fabrizio; Orlando, Salvatore; Chen, Yang; Ji, Li; Yang, Ji

    2014-01-01

    W49B is a mixed-morphology supernova remnant (SNR) with the presence of enhanced abundances and overionization confirmed by X-ray observation. For the overionization, a strong radiative recombination continuum (RRC) has been detected and confirmed by SUZAKU and XMM-Newton. Here, we investigate these intriguing observational results through a multidimensional hydrodynamic model that takes into account, for the first time, the mixing of ejecta with the circumstellar and interstellar medium, thermal conduction, and non-equilibrium ionization. The model can reproduce the morphology and the overionization pattern of W49B. We found that the overionized plasma originates from the rapid cooling of the hot plasma originally heated by the shock reflected from the dense ring-like cloud. In addition, based on the most updated ATOMDB (v2.0.2), we calculated the spectrum of one cell in the overionized region from the simulation results at present. We got the overionized spectrum that is in agreement with the observational results. Thus, our primary result indicates that the model is consistent with the observations both spatially and spectrally.

  14. Interstellar absorptions and shocked clouds towards the supernova remnant RX J0852.0-4622

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomov, Yu. V.; Chugai, N. N.; Iyudin, A. F.

    2012-08-01

    We present the results from a survey of interstellar absorptions towards the supernova remnant (SNR) RX J0852.0-4622. The distribution of K I absorbers along the distance of the background stars is indicative of a local region (d < 600 pc) strongly depopulated by K I line-absorbing clouds. This fact is supported by the behaviour of the interstellar extinction. We find four high-velocity Ca II components with velocities of >100 km s-1 towards three stars and we identify these with shocked clouds of the Vela SNR. We reveal and measure the acceleration of two shocked clouds on the approaching and receding sides of the Vela SNR along the same line of sight. The acceleration, velocity and Ca II column density of the clouds are used to probe their parameters. The total hydrogen column density of both accelerating clouds is found to be similar (˜6 × 1017 cm-2), which indicates that there is possibly a significant number of small-sized clouds in the vicinity of the Vela SNR. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, 080.D-0012(A)

  15. COSMIC-RAY STREAMING FROM SUPERNOVA REMNANTS AND GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM NEARBY MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Huirong; Lazarian, A.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2012-02-01

    High-energy gamma-ray emission has been detected recently from supernova remnants (SNRs) and their surroundings. The existence of molecular clouds near some of the SNRs suggests that the gamma rays originate predominantly from p-p interactions with cosmic rays (CRs) accelerated at a closeby SNR shock wave. Here we investigate the acceleration of CRs and the gamma-ray production in the cloud self-consistently by taking into account the interactions of the streaming instability and the background turbulence both at the shock front and in the ensuing propagation to the clouds. We focus on the later evolution of SNRs, when the conventional treatment of the streaming instability is valid but the magnetic field is enhanced due to Bell's current instability and/or the dynamo generation of magnetic field in the precursor region. We calculate the time dependence of the maximum energy of the accelerated particles. This result is then used to determine the diffusive flux of the runaway particles escaping the shock region, from which we obtain the gamma spectrum consistent with observations. Finally, we check the self-consistency of our results by comparing the required level of diffusion with the level of the streaming instability attainable in the presence of turbulence damping. The energy range of CRs subject to the streaming instability is able to produce the observed energy spectrum of gamma rays.

  16. Class I methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) maser conditions near supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    McEwen, Bridget C.; Pihlström, Ylva M.; Sjouwerman, Loránt O.

    2014-10-01

    We present results from calculations of the physical conditions necessary for the occurrence of 36.169 (4{sub –1}-3{sub 0} E), 44.070 (7{sub 0}-6{sub 1} A {sup +}), 84.521 (5{sub –1}-4{sub 0} E), and 95.169 (8{sub 0}-7{sub 1} A {sup +}) GHz methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) maser emission lines near supernova remnants (SNRs), using the MOLPOP-CEP program. The calculations show that given a sufficient methanol abundance, methanol maser emission arises over a wide range of densities and temperatures, with optimal conditions at n ∼ 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} cm{sup –3} and T > 60 K. The 36 GHz and 44 GHz transitions display more significant maser optical depths compared to the 84 GHz and 95 GHz transitions over the majority of physical conditions. It is also shown that line ratios are an important and applicable probe of the gas conditions. The line ratio changes are largely a result of the E-type transitions becoming quenched faster at increasing densities. The modeling results are discussed using recent observations of CH{sub 3}OH and hydroxyl (OH) masers near the SNRs G1.4–0.1, W28, and Sgr A East.

  17. A high-energy catalogue of Galactic supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi-Harb, Samar; Ferrand, Gilles; Matheson, Heather

    2013-03-01

    Motivated by the wealth of past, existing, and upcoming X-ray and gamma-ray missions, we have developed the first public database of high-energy observations of all known Galactic Supernova Remnants (SNRs): http://www.physics.umanitoba.ca/snr/SNRcat The catalogue links to, and complements, other existing related catalogues, including Dave Green's radio SNRs catalogue. We here highlight the features of the high-energy catalogue, including allowing users to filter or sort data for various purposes. The catalogue is currently targeted to Galactic SNR observations with X-ray and gamma-ray missions, and is timely with the upcoming launch of X-ray missions (including Astro-H in 2014). We are currently developing the existing database to include an up-to-date Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe)-dedicated webpage, with the goal to provide a global view of PWNe and their associated neutron stars/pulsars. This extensive database will be useful to both theorists to apply their models or design numerical simulations, and to observers to plan future observations or design new instruments. We welcome input and feedback from the SNR/PWN/neutron stars community.

  18. Thermal and Nonthermal X-ray Emission from the Forward Shock in Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Una; Decourchelle, Anne; Holt, Stephen S.; Petre, Robert; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present Chandra CCD images of Tycho's supernova remnant that delineate its outer shock, seen as a thin, smooth rim along the straight northeastern edge and most of the circular western half. The images also show that the Si and S ejecta are highly clumpy, and have reached the forward shock at numerous locations. Most of the X-ray spectra that we examine along the rim show line emission from Si and S, which in some cases must come from ejecta; the continuum is well represented by either thermal or nonthermal models. In the case that the continuum is assumed to be thermal, the temperatures at the rim are all similar at about 2 keV, and the ionization ages are very low because of the overall weakness of the line emission. Assuming shock velocities inferred from radio and X-ray expansion measurements, these temperatures are substantially below those expected for equilibration of the electron and ion temperatures; electron to mean temperature ratios of approximately less than 0.1 - 0.2 indicate at most modest collisionless heating of the electrons at the shock. The nonthermal contribution to these spectra may be important, however, and may account for as many as half of the counts in the 4-6 keV energy range, based on an extrapolation of the hard X-ray spectrum above 10 keV.

  19. The X-ray spectrum of the supernova remnant 1E 0102.2-7219

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, A. P.; Behar, E.; Kahn, S. M.; den Herder, J. W.; van der Heyden, K.

    2001-01-01

    In this letter we present the soft X-ray (5-35 Å) spectrum of the supernova remnant (SNR) 1E 0102.2-7219 in the Small Magellanic Cloud, acquired by the reflection grating spectrometers (RGS) aboard ESA's XMM-Newton Observatory. Because the RGS features a large dispersion angle, spatial-spectral confusion is suppressed even for moderately extended (Delta theta ~ 2arcmin ) sources. Consequently, these data, along with the spectrum of N132d (Behar et al. \\cite{Behar00}), provide what are probably the most detailed soft X-ray spectrum of entire SNRs. The diagnostic power of performing spectroscopy using groups of emission lines from single ions is demonstrated. In particular, the bright Lyman and helium series lines for light elements (C Vi, O Vii, O Viii, Ne Ix & Ne X) show peculiar ratios, where the values [1s-np]/[1s-(n+1)p] are systematically weaker than expected for electron impact excitation close to ionization equilibrium, indicating nonequilibrium ionizing (NEI) conditions in the source. The well known temperature diagnostics {G}(T_e)=(i+f)/r of helium-like triplets (O Vii & Ne Ix) confirm this suggestion, with values that are inconsistent with ionization equilibrium. The temperatures implied are well above the maximum emission temperature Tm for each ion, and consistent with a purely ionizing plasma. The density diagnostics R(ne)=f/i meanwhile, are consistent with the low density limit, as expected.

  20. Soft X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntaffer, R. L.; Cash, W.

    2008-06-01

    The Cygnus X-Ray Emission Spectroscopic Survey (CyXESS) sounding rocket payload was launched from White Sands Missile Range on 2006 November 20 and obtained a high-resolution spectrum of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant in the soft X-ray. The novel X-ray spectrograph incorporated a wire-grid collimator feeding an array of gratings in the extreme off-plane mount that ultimately dispersed the spectrum onto gaseous electron multiplier (GEM) detectors. This instrument recorded 65 s of usable data between 43 and 49.5 Å in two prominent features. The first feature near 45 Å is dominated by the He-like triplet of O VII in second order with contributions from Mg X and Si IX-Si XII in first order, while the second feature near 47.5 Å is first-order S IX and S X. Fits to the spectra give an equilibrium plasma at log (T) = 6.2 (kTe = 0.14 keV) and near cosmic abundances. This is consistent with previous observations, which demonstrated that the soft X-ray emission from the Cygnus Loop is dominated by interactions between the initial blast wave and the walls of a precursor-formed cavity surrounding the Cygnus Loop and that this interaction can be described using equilibrium conditions.

  1. Evidence of a pulsar wind nebula in supernova remnant IC 443

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olbert, Charles M.; Clearfield, Christopher R.; Williams, Nikolas E.; Keohane, Jonathan W.; Frail, Dale A.

    2001-05-01

    New Chandra X-Ray Observatory and Very Large Array observations of the hard X-ray feature along the southern edge of the supernova remnant IC 443 have revealed a comet-shaped nebula of hard emission with a soft X-ray point source at its apex. Based on the X-ray spectrum, X-ray and radio morphology, and the radio polarization properties, we argue that this object is a synchrotron nebula powered by the compact source. The derived parameters of the system favor an interpretation in which the central object is a young, energetic neutron star physically associated with IC 443. The cometary morphology of the nebula originates from the supersonic motion of the pulsar (VPSR~=250+/-50 km s-1), which causes the relativistic wind of the pulsar to terminate in a bow shock and trail behind as a synchrotron tail. This velocity is consistent with an age of 30,000 years for the SNR and its associated pulsar. .

  2. CONSTRAINING THE EVOLUTIONARY FATE OF CENTRAL COMPACT OBJECTS: ''OLD'' RADIO PULSARS IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Ng, C.-Y.; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2014-09-10

    Central compact objects (CCOs) constitute a population of radio-quiet, slowly spinning (≥100 ms) young neutron stars with anomalously high thermal X-ray luminosities. Their spin-down properties imply weak dipole magnetic fields (∼10{sup 10-11} G) and characteristic ages much greater than the ages of their host supernova remnants (SNRs). However, CCOs may posses strong ''hidden'' internal magnetic fields that may re-emerge on timescales of ≳10 kyr, with the neutron star possibly activating as a radio pulsar in the process. This suggests that the immediate descendants of CCOs may be masquerading as slowly spinning ''old'' radio pulsars. We present an X-ray survey of all ordinary radio pulsars within 6 kpc that are positionally coincident with Galactic SNRs in order to test the possible connection between the supposedly old but possibly very young pulsars and the SNRs. None of the targets exhibit anomalously high thermal X-ray luminosities, suggesting that they are genuine old ordinary pulsars unrelated to the superposed SNRs. This implies that CCOs are either latent radio pulsars that activate long after their SNRs dissipate or they remain permanently radio-quiet. The true descendants of CCOs remain at large.

  3. An Optical and X-Ray Examination of Two Radio Supernova Remnant Candidates in 30 Doradus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert A.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Lazendic, Jasmina S.; Dickel, John R.

    2004-11-01

    The giant H II region 30 Doradus is known for its violent internal motions and bright diffuse X-ray emission, suggesting the existence of supernova remnants (SNRs), but no nonthermal radio emission has been detected. Recently, Lazendic et al. compared the Hα/Hβ and radio/Hα ratios and suggested two small radio sources to be nonthermal and thus SNR candidates; however, no optical or X-ray counterparts were detected. We have used high-resolution optical images and high-dispersion spectra to examine the morphological, spectral, and kinematic properties of these two SNR candidates and still find no optical evidence supporting their identification as SNRs. We have also determined the X-ray luminosities of these SNR candidates and find them 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than those commonly seen in young SNRs. High extinction can obscure optical and X-ray signatures of an SNR, but would prohibit the use of a high radio/Hα ratio to identify nonthermal radio emission. We suggest that the SNR candidate MCRX J053831.8-690620 is associated with a young star-forming region; while the radio emission originates from the obscured star-forming region, the observed optical emission is dominated by the foreground. We suggest that the SNR candidate MCRX J053838.8-690730 is associated with a dust/molecular cloud, which obscures some optical emission but not the radio emission.

  4. GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM SUPERNOVA REMNANT INTERACTION WITH MOLECULAR CLUMPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaping; Chevalier, R.

    2014-01-01

    Observations of the middle-aged supernova remnants IC 443, W28, and W51C indicate that the brightnesses at GeV and TeV energies are correlated with each other and with regions of molecular clump interaction, but not with the radio synchrotron brightness. We suggest that the radio emission is primarily associated with a radiative shell in the interclump medium of a molecular cloud, while the Gamma-ray emission is primarily associated with the interaction of the radiative shell with molecular clumps. The shell interaction produces a high pressure region, so that the Gamma-ray luminosity can be approximately reproduced even if shock acceleration of particles is not efficient, provided that energetic particles are trapped in the cooling shell. In addition, the GeV through TeV emission can be produced in the interaction region if the trapping occurs to sufficiently high energies. Alternatively, diffusive acceleration may be efficient; in this case the observed GeV emission can be approximately reproduced, but not the TeV emission.

  5. HESS J1640-465 - an exceptionally luminous TeV γ-ray supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Benkhali, F. Ait; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E.; Anton, G.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Bissaldi, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Naumann, C. L.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; Ohm, S.; Wilhelmi, E. de Oña; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Arribas, M. Paz; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Raue, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; Reyes, R. de los; Rieger, F.; Rob, L.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Szostek, A.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Zabalza, V.; Zacharias, M.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.

    2014-04-01

    The results of follow-up observations of the TeV γ-ray source HESS J1640-465 from 2004 to 2011 with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) are reported in this work. The spectrum is well described by an exponential cut-off power law with photon index Γ = 2.11 ± 0.09stat ± 0.10sys, and a cut-off energy of E_c = 6.0^{+2.0}_{-1.2} TeV. The TeV emission is significantly extended and overlaps with the northwestern part of the shell of the SNR G338.3-0.0. The new HESS results, a re-analysis of archival XMM-Newton data and multiwavelength observations suggest that a significant part of the γ-ray emission from HESS J1640-465 originates in the supernova remnant shell. In a hadronic scenario, as suggested by the smooth connection of the GeV and TeV spectra, the product of total proton energy and mean target density could be as high as WpnH ˜ 4 × 1052(d/10kpc)2 erg cm-3.

  6. SPECTRA OF COSMIC-RAY PROTONS AND HELIUM PRODUCED IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ptuskin, Vladimir; Zirakashvili, Vladimir; Seo, Eun-Suk

    2013-01-20

    Data obtained in the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC-2), Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass (CREAM), and Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) experiments suggest that the elemental interstellar spectra of cosmic rays below the knee at a few times 10{sup 6} GeV are not simple power laws, but that they experience hardening at a magnetic rigidity of about 240 GV. Another essential feature is the difference between proton and helium energy spectra, such that the He/p ratio increases by more than 50% in the energy range from 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 4} GV. We consider the concavity of the particle spectrum resulting from the nonlinear nature of diffusive shock acceleration in supernova remnants (SNRs) as a possible reason for the observed spectrum hardening. The increase of the helium-to-proton ratio with energy can be interpreted as a consequence of cosmic-ray acceleration by forward and reverse shocks in SNRs. The contribution of particles accelerated by reverse shocks makes the concavity of the produced overall cosmic-ray spectrum more pronounced. The spectra of protons and helium nuclei accelerated in SNRs and released into the interstellar medium are calculated. The derived steady-state interstellar spectra are in reasonably good agreement with observations.

  7. Soft X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakley, Phil; McEntaffer, Randall; Cash, Webster

    2013-03-01

    We present the results of a suborbital rocket flight whose scientific target was the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant. The payload consists of wire grid collimators, off-plane grating arrays, and gaseous electron multiplier (GEM) detectors. The system is designed for spectral measurements in the 17-107 Å bandpass with a resolution up to ~60 (λ/Δλ). The Extended X-ray Off-plane Spectrometer (EXOS) was launched on a Terrier-Black Brant rocket on 2009 November 13 from White Sands Missile Range and obtained 340 s of useable scientific data. The X-ray emission is dominated by O VII and O VIII, including the He-like O VII triplet at ~22 Å. Another emission feature at ~45 Å is composed primarily of Si XI and Si XII. The best-fit model to this spectrum is an equilibrium plasma model at a temperature of log(T) = 6.4 (0.23 keV).

  8. Synchrotron X-ray diagnostics of cutoff shape of nonthermal electron spectrum at young supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Ryo; Ohira, Yutaka; Sawada, Makoto; Bamba, Aya

    2014-02-01

    Synchrotron X-rays can be a useful tool to investigate electron acceleration at young supernova remnants (SNRs). At present, since the magnetic field configuration around the shocks of SNRs is uncertain, it is not clear whether electron acceleration is limited by SNR age, synchrotron cooling, or even escape from the acceleration region. We study whether the acceleration mechanism can be constrained by the cutoff shape of the electron spectrum around the maximum energy. We derive analytical formulae of the cutoff shape in each case where the maximum electron energy is determined by SNR age, synchrotron cooling and escape from the shock. They are related to the energy dependence of the electron diffusion coefficient. Next, we discuss whether information on the cutoff shape can be provided by observations in the near future which will simply give the photon indices and the flux ratios in the soft and hard X-ray bands. We find that if the power-law index of the electron spectrum is independently determined by other observations, then we can constrain the cutoff shape by comparing theoretical predictions of the photon indices and/or the flux ratios with observed data which will be measured by NuSTAR and/or ASTRO-H. Such study is helpful in understanding the acceleration mechanism. In particular, it will supply another independent constraint on the magnetic field strength around the shocks of SNRs.

  9. DUST DESTRUCTION IN A NON-RADIATIVE SHOCK IN THE CYGNUS LOOP SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Sankrit, Ravi; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Raymond, John C.; Blair, William P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox S.

    2010-04-01

    We present 24 {mu}m and 70 {mu}m images of a non-radiative shock in the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant, obtained with the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. The post-shock region is resolved in these images. The ratio of the 70 {mu}m to the 24 {mu}m flux rises from about 14 at a distance 0.'1 behind the shock front to about 22 in a zone 0.'75 further downstream, as grains are destroyed in the hot plasma. Models of dust emission and destruction using post-shock electron temperatures between 0.15 keV and 0.30 keV and post-shock densities, n{sub H}{approx} 2.0 cm{sup -3}, predict flux ratios that match the observations. Non-thermal sputtering (i.e., sputtering due to bulk motion of the grains relative to the gas) contributes significantly to the dust destruction under these shock conditions. From the model calculations, we infer that about 35% by mass of the grains are destroyed over a 0.14 pc region behind the shock front.

  10. Dust Destruction in a Nonradiative Shock in the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Sankrit, Ravi; Raymond, John C.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Blair, William P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox S.

    2009-11-11

    We present 24 {mu}m and 70 {mu}m images of a non-radiative shock in the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant, obtained with the Multiband Imaging Photometer on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. The observed emission is from dust grains heated in the post-shock region. The 70 {mu}m to 24 {mu}m flux ratio depends on the dust heating and the dust destruction rates, and thereby it is a sensitive tracer of the gas density and temperature in the shocked plasma. We model the dust emission and grain destruction in the post-shock flow, and find that the observed 70 {mu}m to 24 {mu}m flux ratios are produced for post-shock densities, n{sub H}{approx}2.0 cm{sup -3} and electron temperatures of about 0.20 keV. We find that about 35% of the dust has been destroyed in the shock, and that non-thermal sputtering (i.e. sputtering due to bulk motion of the grains relative to the gas) contributes significantly to the dust destruction.

  11. The Nature of the Vela Supernova Remnant as Revealed by O VI and C IV Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lines, Nichols J.; Slavin, J.; Anderson, C.

    2001-01-01

    Highly ionized gas, in particular C IV and O VI, is produced in the interstellar medium in regions with hot (T approx. 10(exp 6) K) X-ray emitting gas and at the boundaries where hot gas and cooler (T approx. 10(exp 4) K) gas interact. Supernova remnant shocks produce most of the hot gas in the ISM and, if they are in the correct range of speeds, should produce observable quantities of C IV and O VI absorption. In turn, the column densities of these ions are potentially powerful diagnostics of the shock speed and interstellar environment in which the SNR is evolving. With the advent of FUSE, the power of this diagnostic technique is now available. We have FUSE data toward 8 stars behind the Vela SNR, and have developed a data reduction and analysis method that produces reasonably reliable O VI column densities, in spite of the complexities of the FUSE spectra in this region. In order to gain insight into the observational results, the Vela SNR evolution was modelled using Piecewise Parabolic Method numerical hydrodynamics code. The code is 1-D and incorporates non-equilibrium ionization, radiative cooling, thermal conduction and magnetic pressure.

  12. Nonuniform Expansion of the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Green, David A.; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Krishnamurthy, Kalyani; Willett, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    We report measurements of the X-ray expansion of the youngest Galactic supernova remnant, G1.9+0.3, using Chandra observations in 2007, 2009, and 2011. The measured rates strongly deviate from uniform expansion, decreasing radially by about 60 along the X-ray bright SE-NW axis from 0.84 plus or minus 0.06% yr(exp -1) to 0.52% plus or minus 0.03 yr(exp -1). This corresponds to undecelerated ages of 120-190 yr, confirming the young age of G1.9+0.3 and implying a significant deceleration of the blast wave. The synchrotron-dominated X-ray emission brightens at a rate of 1.9% plus or minus 0.4% yr(exp -1). We identify bright outer and inner rims with the blast wave and reverse shock, respectively. Sharp density gradients in either the ejecta or ambient medium are required to produce the sudden deceleration of the reverse shock or the blast wave implied by the large spread in expansion ages. The blast wave could have been decelerated recently by an encounter with a modest density discontinuity in the ambient medium, such as may be found at a wind termination shock, requiring strong mass loss in the progenitor.

  13. The X-Ray Spectrum of the Supernova Remnant 1E 0102-72.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, Andrew P.; Behar, Ehud; Kahn, Steven M.; denHerder, Jan Willem; vanderHeyden, Kurt

    1997-01-01

    In this letter we present the soft X-ray (5-35A) spectrum of the supernova remnant (SNR) IE 0102-72.3 in the Small Magellanic Cloud, acquired by the reflection grating spectrometer (RGS) aboard ESA's XMM-Newton Observatory. This extended-source X-ray spectrum of unprecedented spectral resolution (lambda/Delta(lambda) approx. 300) permits, for the first time, unabiguous identification and measurement of isolated emission lines and line complexes alike. The diagnostic power of performing spectroscopy using groups of emission lines from single ions is exemplified. In particular, the bright Lyman and helium series lines for light elements (C VI, O VII, O VIII, Ne IX, Ne X and possibly Mg XI & Mg XII) show peculiar ratios, where the values [1s - np] / [1s - (n + l)p] are systematically weaker than expected for electron impact excitation. These measured ratios resemble signatures of recombining or charge exchanging plasmas. We argue that charge exchange, given its large cross section and evidence for inhomogeneous media within the SNR, is a likely mechanism for the observed emission. Also. the well known temperature diagnostics G(T(sub e)) = (i + f)/r of helium- like triplets (O VII & Ne IX) indicate high temperatures, well above the maximum emission temperature T(sub m) for each ion, and consistent with a purely ionizing plasma. The density diagnostics R(n(sub e)) = f / i meanwhile, are consistent with the low density limit, as expected.

  14. Radio properties of M33 supernova remnants: results from a new deep JVLA Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Knox S.; White, Richard L.; Becker, Robert H.; Helfand, David J.; Blair, William P.; Winkler, P. Frank

    2016-06-01

    We have carried out new 6 and 20 cm observations of M33 with the Jansky Very Large Array, primarily to study the properties of supernova remnants in the galaxy. Our scaled array observations have a limiting sensitivity of about 25 μJy (5σ) and a resolution of 5`` (FWHM), corresponding to a spatial resolution of 20 pc at the distance of M33. We detect about 85 of the SNRs contained in the list of 137 optically identified SNRs described by Long et al. (2010), and a few additional objects from the survey of Lee & Lee (2014). A substantial fraction of the optical SNRs not detected are in regions where emission from H II recombination makes identification of non-thermal emission from the SNR difficult. We also discuss a blind search for SNRs based on the radio emission alone. Of the SNRs we detect in this search at radio wavelengths, 53 have also been detected at X-ray wavelengths. Thus we are able make a direct comparison of the X-ray, optical, and radio properties of the SNRs in M33, the first time that has been possible to a significant extent in an external spiral galaxy.

  15. GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM SUPERNOVA REMNANT INTERACTIONS WITH MOLECULAR CLUMPS

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xiaping; Chevalier, Roger A. E-mail: rac5x@virginia.edu

    2014-04-01

    Observations of the middle-aged supernova remnants IC 443, W28, and W51C indicate that the brightnesses at GeV and TeV energies are correlated with each other and with regions of molecular clump interaction, but not with the radio synchrotron brightness. We suggest that the radio emission is primarily associated with a radiative shell in the interclump medium of a molecular cloud, while the γ-ray emission is primarily associated with the interaction of the radiative shell with molecular clumps. The shell interaction produces a high pressure region, so that the γ-ray luminosity can be approximately reproduced even if shock acceleration of particles is not efficient, provided that energetic particles are trapped in the cooling region. In this model, the spectral shape ≳ 2 GeV is determined by the spectrum of cosmic ray protons. Models in which diffusive shock acceleration determines the spectrum tend to underproduce TeV emission because of the limiting particle energy that is attained.

  16. TIME-DEPENDENT DIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION IN SLOW SUPERNOVA REMNANT SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xiaping; Chevalier, Roger A. E-mail: rac5x@virginia.edu

    2015-02-20

    Recent gamma-ray observations show that middle-aged supernova remnants (SNRs) interacting with molecular clouds can be sources of both GeV and TeV emission. Models involving reacceleration of preexisting cosmic rays (CRs) in the ambient medium and direct interaction between SNR and molecular clouds have been proposed to explain the observed gamma-ray emission. For the reacceleration process, standard diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) theory in the test particle limit produces a steady-state particle spectrum that is too flat compared to observations, which suggests that the high-energy part of the observed spectrum has not yet reached a steady state. We derive a time-dependent DSA solution in the test particle limit for situations involving reacceleration of preexisting CRs in the preshock medium. Simple estimates with our time-dependent DSA solution plus a molecular cloud interaction model can reproduce the overall shape of the spectra of IC 443 and W44 from GeV to TeV energies through pure π{sup 0}-decay emission. We allow for a power-law momentum dependence of the diffusion coefficient, finding that a power-law index of 0.5 is favored.

  17. The Suzaku Key Project of the Kepler Supernova Remnant: A Status Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sangwook; Badenes, C.; Hughes, J. P.; Slane, P. O.; Burrows, D. N.; Mori, K.

    2010-03-01

    The Kepler supernova remnant (SNR) is a historical (SN 1604) Type Ia SNR with a peculiar progenitor that exploded in the ambient medium modified by stellar winds. We detect atomic emission lines from trace ejecta elements Mn and Cr in the Kepler SNR using our initial 100 ks Suzaku observation. The detection of these low abundant metal species produced by incomplete Si-burning in the Type Ia SN provides a unique opportunity to reveal the progenitor's metallicity. We also detect K line emission from the Ni-rich ejecta which was produced in the nuclear statistical equilibrium at the deepest core of the progenitor. As the start of our Suzaku Key Project of the Kepler SNR to place a tight constraint on the progenitor's metallicity, we performed 220 ks background observations to reduce the systematic errors on the Mn and Cr line flux measurements. We report on the refined measurements of the Mn to Cr line flux ratio using our new background data. Our preliminary results suggest an enhanced metallicity (several times the Solar) for the Kepler SNR's progenitor. The completion of our Suzaku Key Project with the upcoming deep Kepler observation will be essential to pin down the suggested high metallicity of the progenitor by significantly reducing the large statistical uncertainties embedded in the current data.

  18. On the diversity of compact objects within supernova remnants - II. Energy-loss mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Adam; Safi-Harb, Samar

    2017-02-01

    Energy losses from isolated neutron stars are commonly attributed to the emission of electromagnetic radiation from a rotating point-like magnetic dipole in vacuum. This emission mechanism predicts a braking index n = 3, which is not observed in highly magnetized neutron stars. Despite this fact, the assumptions of a dipole field and rapid early rotation are often assumed a priori, typically causing a discrepancy between the characteristic age and the associated supernova remnant (SNR) age. We focus on neutron stars with `anomalous' magnetic fields that have established SNR associations and known ages. Anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) are usually described in terms of the magnetar model that posits a large magnetic field established by dynamo action. The high magnetic field pulsars (HBPs) have extremely large magnetic fields just above quantum electrodynamics scale (but below that of the AXPs and SGRs), and central compact objects (CCOs) may have buried fields that will emerge in the future as nascent magnetars. In the first part of this series, we examined magnetic field growth as a method of uniting the CCOs with HBPs and X-ray dim isolated neutron stars (XDINSs) through evolution. In this work, we constrain the characteristic age of these neutron stars using the related SNR age for a variety of energy-loss mechanisms and allowing for arbitrary initial spin periods. In addition to the SNR age, we also use the observed braking indices and X-ray luminosities to constrain the models.

  19. SOFT X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF THE CYGNUS LOOP SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Oakley, Phil; McEntaffer, Randall; Cash, Webster

    2013-03-20

    We present the results of a suborbital rocket flight whose scientific target was the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant. The payload consists of wire grid collimators, off-plane grating arrays, and gaseous electron multiplier (GEM) detectors. The system is designed for spectral measurements in the 17-107 A bandpass with a resolution up to {approx}60 ({lambda}/{Delta}{lambda}). The Extended X-ray Off-plane Spectrometer (EXOS) was launched on a Terrier-Black Brant rocket on 2009 November 13 from White Sands Missile Range and obtained 340 s of useable scientific data. The X-ray emission is dominated by O VII and O VIII, including the He-like O VII triplet at {approx}22 A. Another emission feature at {approx}45 A is composed primarily of Si XI and Si XII. The best-fit model to this spectrum is an equilibrium plasma model at a temperature of log(T) = 6.4 (0.23 keV).

  20. N49: The First Robust Discovery of Recombining Plasma in an Extra-galactic Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Katsuji; Yamaguchi, Hiroya

    2015-07-01

    Recent discoveries of recombining plasmas (RPs) in supernova remnants (SNRs) have dramatically changed our understanding of SNR evolution. To date, a dozen RP SNRs have been identified in the Galaxy. Here, we present Suzaku deep observations of four SNRs in the LMC, namely, N49, N49B, N23, and DEM L71, for accurate determination of their plasma states. Our uniform analysis reveals that of these SNRs, only N49 is in the recombining state, which is the first robust discovery of an RP from an extra-galactic SNR. Given that RPs have only been identified in core-collapse SNRs, our results strongly suggest a massive star origin for this SNR. On the other hand, no clear evidence of an RP is confirmed in N23, for which detection of recombination lines and continua was previously claimed. Comparing the physical properties of the RP SNRs identified so far, we find that all of them can be categorized into the “mixed-morphology” class, interacting with surrounding molecular clouds. This might be a key to determining the formation mechanisms of RPs.

  1. Suzaku study on the ejecta of the supernova remnant G272.2-3.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamitsukasa, Fumiyoshi; Koyama, Katsuji; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Mori, Koji; Katsuda, Satoru; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    We report reanalyses of the Suzaku observations of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G272.2-3.2, for which previous studies were limited below 3 keV. With careful data reduction and background subtraction, we discover the K-shell lines of Ar, Ca, and Fe above 3 keV. The X-ray spectrum of G272.2-3.2 consists of two components, a low-temperature collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) plasma (kTe ˜ 0.2 keV) and a high-temperature non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) plasma (kTe = 0.6-3 keV). The CIE plasma has solar abundances over the entire area, hence it originates from the interstellar medium. On the other hand, the abundances of the NEI plasma increase toward the inner region, suggesting ejecta origin. The line center energy of the Fe K-shell emission (˜6.4 keV) suggests that the ejecta are recently heated by reverse shock, a common feature in Type Ia SNRs.

  2. Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Katagiri, H.; Tibaldo, L.; Ballet, J.; Giordano, F.; Grenier, I.A.; Porter, T.A.; Roth, M.; Tibolla, O.; Uchiyama, Y.; Yamazaki, R.; /Sagamihara, Aoyama Gakuin U.

    2011-11-08

    We present an analysis of the gamma-ray measurements by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the region of the supernova remnant (SNR) Cygnus Loop (G74.0-8.5). We detect significant gamma-ray emission associated with the SNR in the energy band 0.2-100 GeV. The gamma-ray spectrum shows a break in the range 2-3 GeV. The gamma-ray luminosity is {approx} 1 x 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1} between 1-100 GeV, much lower than those of other GeV-emitting SNRs. The morphology is best represented by a ring shape, with inner/outer radii 0{sup o}.7 {+-} 0{sup o}.1 and 1{sup o}.6 {+-} 0{sup o}.1. Given the association among X-ray rims, H{alpha} filaments and gamma-ray emission, we argue that gamma rays originate in interactions between particles accelerated in the SNR and interstellar gas or radiation fields adjacent to the shock regions. The decay of neutral pions produced in nucleon-nucleon interactions between accelerated hadrons and interstellar gas provides a reasonable explanation for the gamma-ray spectrum.

  3. UNRAVELING THE ORIGIN OF OVERIONIZED PLASMA IN THE GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT W49B

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Laura A.; Castro, Daniel; Pearson, Sarah; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Slane, Patrick O.; Smith, Randall K.

    2013-11-10

    Recent observations have shown several supernova remnants (SNRs) have overionized plasmas, where ions are stripped of more electrons than they would be if in equilibrium with the electron temperature. Rapid electron cooling is necessary to produce this situation, yet the physical origin of that cooling remains uncertain. To assess the cooling scenario responsible for overionization, in this paper we identify and map the overionized plasma in the Galactic SNR W49B based on a 220 ks Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer observation. We performed a spatially resolved spectroscopic analysis, measuring the electron temperature by modeling the continuum and comparing it to the temperature given by the flux ratio of the He-like and H-like lines of sulfur and argon. Using these results, we find that W49B is overionized in the west, with a gradient of overionization increasing from east to west. As the ejecta expansion is impeded by molecular material in the east but not in the west, our overionization maps suggest the dominant cooling mechanism is adiabatic expansion of the hot plasma.

  4. N49: THE FIRST ROBUST DISCOVERY OF RECOMBINING PLASMA IN AN EXTRA GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Katsuji; Yamaguchi, Hiroya

    2015-07-20

    Recent discoveries of recombining plasmas (RPs) in supernova remnants (SNRs) have dramatically changed our understanding of SNR evolution. To date, a dozen RP SNRs have been identified in the Galaxy. Here, we present Suzaku deep observations of four SNRs in the LMC, namely, N49, N49B, N23, and DEM L71, for accurate determination of their plasma states. Our uniform analysis reveals that of these SNRs, only N49 is in the recombining state, which is the first robust discovery of an RP from an extra-galactic SNR. Given that RPs have only been identified in core-collapse SNRs, our results strongly suggest a massive star origin for this SNR. On the other hand, no clear evidence of an RP is confirmed in N23, for which detection of recombination lines and continua was previously claimed. Comparing the physical properties of the RP SNRs identified so far, we find that all of them can be categorized into the “mixed-morphology” class, interacting with surrounding molecular clouds. This might be a key to determining the formation mechanisms of RPs.

  5. Image of the Vela Supernova Remnant Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Like the Crab Nebula, the Vela Supernova Remnant has a radio pulsar at its center. In this image taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2/Einstein Observatory, the pulsar appears as a point source surrounded by weak and diffused emissions of x-rays. HEAO-2's computer processing system was able to record and display the total number of x-ray photons (a tiny bundle of radiant energy used as the fundamental unit of electromagnetic radiation) on a scale along the margin of the picture. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978.

  6. Image of the Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This x-ray photograph of the Supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, taken with the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) 2/Einstein Observatory, shows that the regions with fast moving knots of material in the expanding shell are bright and clear. A faint x-ray halo, just outside the bright shell, is interpreted as a shock wave moving ahead of the expanding debris. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978.

  7. SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS OF THE NON-THERMAL SUPERNOVA REMNANT HESS J1731-347

    SciTech Connect

    Bamba, Aya; Yamazaki, Ryo; Puehlhofer, Gerd; Klochkov, Dmitry; Acero, Fabio; Li Zhiyuan; Horns, Dieter; Kosack, Karl

    2012-09-10

    A detailed analysis of the non-thermal X-ray emission from the northwestern and southern parts of the supernova remnant (SNR) HESS J1731-347 with Suzaku is presented. The shell portions covered by the observations emit hard and lineless X-rays. The spectrum can be reproduced by a simple absorbed power-law model with a photon index {Gamma} of 1.8-2.7 and an absorption column density N{sub H} of (1.0-2.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}. These quantities change significantly from region to region; the northwestern part of the SNR has the hardest and most absorbed spectrum. The western part of the X-ray shell has a smaller curvature than the northwestern and southern shell segments. A comparison of the X-ray morphology to the very high energy gamma-ray and radio images was performed. The efficiency of the electron acceleration and the emission mechanism in each portion of the shell are discussed. Thermal X-ray emission from the SNR was searched for but could not be detected at a significant level.

  8. Supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae with Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eger, Peter

    2015-08-01

    The observation of very-high-energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) gamma rays is an excellent tool to study the most energetic and violent environments in the Galaxy. This energy range is only accessible with ground-based instruments such as Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) that reconstruct the energy and direction of the primary gamma ray by observing the Cherenkov light from the induced extended air showers in Earths atmosphere. The main goals of Galactic VHE gamma-ray science are the identification of individual sources of cosmic rays (CRs), such as supernova remnants (SNRs), and the study of other extreme astrophysical objects at the highest energies, such as gamma-ray binaries and pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). One of the main challenges is the discrimination between leptonic and hadronic gamma-ray production channels. To that end, the gamma-ray signal from each individual source needs to be brought into context with the multi-wavelength environment of the astrophysical object in question, particularly with observations tracing the density of the surrounding interstellar medium, or synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons. In this review presented at the European Cosmic Ray Symposium 2014 (ECRS2014), the most recent developments in the field of Galactic VHE gamma-ray science are highlighted, with particular emphasis on SNRs and PWNe.

  9. Recombining plasma in the gamma-ray-emitting mixed-morphology supernova remnant 3C 391

    SciTech Connect

    Ergin, T.; Sezer, A.; Saha, L.; Majumdar, P.; Chatterjee, A.; Bayirli, A.; Ercan, E. N.

    2014-07-20

    A group of middle-aged mixed-morphology (MM) supernova remnants (SNRs) interacting with molecular clouds (MCs) has been discovered to be strong GeV gamma-ray emitters by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope (Fermi-LAT). The recent observations of the Suzaku X-ray satellite have revealed that some of these interacting gamma-ray-emitting SNRs, such as IC443, W49B, W44, and G359.1-0.5, have overionized plasmas. 3C 391 (G31.9+0.0) is another Galactic MM SNR interacting with MCs. It was observed in GeV gamma rays by Fermi-LAT as well as in the 0.3-10.0 keV X-ray band by Suzaku. In this work, 3C 391 was detected in GeV gamma rays with a significance of ∼18σ and we showed that the GeV emission is point-like in nature. The GeV gamma-ray spectrum was shown to be best explained by the decay of neutral pions assuming that the protons follow a broken power-law distribution. We revealed radiative recombination structures of silicon and sulfur from 3C 391 using Suzaku data. In this paper, we discuss the possible origin of this type of radiative plasma and hadronic gamma rays.

  10. A Study of the Non-Thermal X-ray Emission of Shell-Type Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Glenn E.

    2004-01-01

    The term of the forth year of the award is the period from March 15, 2003 to March 14, 2004. During this year, Dr. Thomas Pannuti, who had been performing most of the analyses, made a transition to a new position at Caltech. As of September 2003, Dr. Michael Stage began performing most of the analyses. Dr. Stage has begun constructing a detailed catalog of the spatial and spectral properties of young supernova remnants as described in sections 1 and 4 of the proposal. Specifically, he has focused on the analysis of Chandra ACIS data. The exquisite spatial resolution of the Chandra telescope and the modest spectral resolution of the CCDs make these data ideal. Dr. Stage has developed a standard set of procedures to reduce the data, generate telescope and detector response libraries and handle instrumental and celestial background subtraction. He has also adapted some existing code to automate spectral extraction and fitting. This code enables us to analyze the spectra of tens of thousands of small subregions of supernova remnants. Dr. Stage has recently applied this process to ACIS data for the supernova remnants Cas A and Kepler. The results include maps of the fitted parameters, such as individual line intensities and centroids (i.e. Doppler shifts), the electron temperature, and the absorption column density. These maps are more accurate than simple energy-cut images because it is difficult (and sometimes impossible) to cleanly separate the line emission from the underlying continuum (especially at low energies). It is now possible to identify the locations at which emission from each element is produced. Some of the elements are seen to be layered. The electron temperature maps demonstrate that the outer edges of Cas A and Kepler are very hot with weak lines. This emission is almost certainly synchrotron dominated. Therefore, not only are the maps interesting in and of themselves, but they also provide an unbiased means of easily identifying features in the

  11. Diffusive propagation of cosmic rays from supernova remnants in the Galaxy. II: anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Blasi, Pasquale; Amato, Elena E-mail: amato@arcetri.astro.it

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effects of stochasticity in the spatial and temporal distribution of supernova remnants on the anisotropy of cosmic rays observed at Earth. The calculations are carried out for different choices of the diffusion coefficient D(E) experienced by cosmic rays during propagation in the Galaxy. The propagation and spallation of nuclei (with charge 1 ≤ Z ≤ 26) are taken into account. At high energies (E > 1 TeV) we assume that D(E)∝(E/Z){sup δ}, with δ = 1/3 and δ = 0.6 being the reference scenarios. The large scale distribution of supernova remnants in the Galaxy is modeled following the distribution of pulsars with and without accounting for the spiral structure of the Galaxy. Our calculations allow us to determine the contribution to anisotropy resulting from both the large scale distribution of SNRs in the Galaxy and the random distribution of the nearest remnants. The naive expectation that the anisotropy amplitude scales as δ{sub A}∝D(E) is shown to be a wild oversimplification of reality which does not reflect in the predicted anisotropy for any realistic distribution of the sources. The fluctuations in the anisotropy pattern are dominated by nearby sources, so that predicting or explaining the observed anisotropy amplitude and phase becomes