Science.gov

Sample records for supervoltage radiotherapy

  1. Clinical use of thermoluminescent dosimeters in supervoltage x-ray therapy.

    PubMed

    Bagne, F

    1976-05-01

    A practical method for routine patient dose monitoring when single, multiple, or adjacent fields are irradiated with supervoltage x rays is described. The system uses litium fluoride TL-700 extruded rods in small gelatin capsules. The mode of calculation is described and the experimental data for 33- and 45-MeV energy betatron x rays are presented. An example is given to illustrate the use of this technique (experimental uncertainty, 3%).

  2. Childhood craniopharyngioma: survival, local control, endocrine and neurologic function following radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Danoff, B.F.; Cowchock, F.S.; Kramer, S.

    1983-02-01

    Between 1961 and 1978, 19 patients with a diagnosis of childhood or teenage craniopharyngioma received supervoltage radiotherapy. All patients had previously undergone either partial surgical resection (10 patients), total gross resection (3 patients), or aspiration and biopsy (6 patients). Fourteen patients were treated primarily and five were treated for recurrence. The five-year survival was 73% with a 10-year survival of 64%. Sixteen percent developed a recurrence following radiotherapy. Long term effects were assesed in terms of neurologic, intellectual, psychological and endocrine function. Seventy-nine percent had none or minimal neurologic disability. The mean full scale IQ for the group was 90. There were no additional endocrine deficiencies that could be directly attributed to radiation. Behavioral disorders occurred in 50%. These results are at least comparable, if not superior, to those of surgery.

  3. Supervoltage NDE Techniques for Large Aerospace Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    long hours and with much creativity at the RPI Linac to assemble and commission the scanner and to obtain the results reported herein; all in a period...conventional radiography. Thus, for these large and highly attenuating objects, inovative technical approaches are urgently needed to provide NDE data to

  4. [Radiotherapy of bone metastases].

    PubMed

    Thureau, S; Vieillard, M-H; Supiot, S; Lagrange, J-L

    2016-09-01

    Radiotherapy plays a major role in palliative treatment of bone metastases. Recent developments of stereotactic radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy give the possibility to treat oligometastatic diseases. The objective of this paper is to report indications and treatment modalities of radiotherapy in these situations.

  5. [Radiotherapy of hypopharynx cancers].

    PubMed

    Pointreau, Y; Lafond, C; Trémolières, P; Legouté, F; Servagi-Vernat, S; Giraud, P; Maingon, P; Calais, G; Lapeyre, M

    2016-09-01

    The intensity-modulated radiotherapy is the gold standard in the treatment of hypopharynx cancers. Early T1 and T2 tumours could be treated by exclusive radiotherapy or surgery. For tumours requiring total pharyngolaryngectomy (T2 or T3), induction chemotherapy followed by exclusive radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy are possible. For T4 tumours, surgery must be proposed. The treatment of lymph nodes is based on the initial treatment of the primary tumour. In non-surgical procedure, in case of sequential radiotherapy, curative dose is 70Gy and prophylactic dose is 50Gy. An integrated simultaneous boost radiotherapy is allowed (70Gy in 2Gy per fraction and 56Gy in 1.8Gy per fraction or 70Gy in 2.12Gy per fraction). Postoperatively, radiotherapy is used for locally advanced cancers with dose levels based on pathologic criteria (66Gy for R1 resection, 50 to 54Gy for complete resection). Volume delineation is based on guidelines.

  6. Heavy-ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2000-11-01

    Heavy-ion radiotherapy using high-energy carbon beams has been performed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan. The physical frame works for heavy-ion radiotherapy are established using physical understandings of radiation physics. In order to increase the accuracy of heavy-ion radiotherapy, many physical problems should be solved. Unsolved problems, such as the depth dose distributions, range of heavy-ion in patients and heavy-ion dosimetry in the radiation therapy, are discussed. .

  7. [Radiotherapy of oropharynx carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Servagi Vernat, S; Tochet, F; Vieillevigne, L; Pointreau, Y; Maingon, P; Giraud, P

    2016-09-01

    Indication, doses, technique of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy for oropharynx carcinoma are presented. The recommendations for delineation of the target volumes and organs at risk are detailed.

  8. [Radiotherapy of skin cancers].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Rio, E; Mahé, M-A

    2016-09-01

    The indications of radiotherapy for skin cancers are not clearly defined because of the lack of randomised trials or prospective studies. For basal cell carcinomas, radiotherapy frequently offers a good local control, but a randomized trial showed that surgery is more efficient and less toxic. Indications of radiotherapy are contra-indications of surgery for patients older than 60, non-sclerodermiform histology and occurring in non-sensitive areas. Adjuvant radiotherapy could be proposed to squamous cell carcinomas, in case of poor prognostic factors. Dose of 60 to 70Gy are usually required, and must be modulated to the size of the lesions. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems beneficial for desmoplastic melanomas but not for the other histological types. Prophylactic nodal irradiation (45 to 50Gy), for locally advanced tumours (massive nodal involvement), decreases the locoregional failure rate but do not increase survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy (50 to 56Gy) for Merckel cell carcinomas increases also the local control rate, as demonstrated by meta-analysis and a large epidemiological study. Nodal areas must be included, if there is no surgical exploration (sentinel lymph node dissection). Kaposi sarcomas are radiosensitive and could be treated with relatively low doses (24 to 30Gy). Also, cutaneous lymphomas are good indications for radiotherapy: B lymphomas are electively treated with limited fields. The role of total skin electron therapy for T-lymphomas is still discussed; but palliative radiotherapy is very efficient in case of cutaneous nodules.

  9. [Prostate cancer external beam radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Pommier, P; Latorzeff, I; Chapet, O; Chauvet, B; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    The prostate external beam radiotherapy techniques are described, when irradiating the prostate or after prostatectomy, with and without pelvic lymph nodes. The following parts are presented: indications of radiotherapy, total dose and fractionation, planning CT image acquisition, volume of interest delineation (target volumes and organs at risk) and margins, Intensity modulated radiotherapy planning and corresponding dose-volume constraints, and finally Image guided radiotherapy.

  10. Recruitment in Radiotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeley, T. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Faculty Board of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Royal College of Radiobiologists surveyed the factors thought to influence recruitment into the specialty. Possible factors listed in replies of 36 questionnaires are offered. (LBH)

  11. Recruitment in Radiotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeley, T. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Faculty Board of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Royal College of Radiobiologists surveyed the factors thought to influence recruitment into the specialty. Possible factors listed in replies of 36 questionnaires are offered. (LBH)

  12. Planning a Radiotherapy Department.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, D

    2017-02-01

    The master planning of new radiotherapy facilities requires the input and engagement of a range of highly specialised professionals, both in the construction and health sector. Although radiation protection and safety aspects of radiotherapy services are universal, low and middle income countries are often presented with unique challenges that also need to be considered, e.g. competing needs within the health sector, lack of financial and human resources, environmental factors like poor provision of transport or electrical power, inadequate regulatory infrastructure, etc. Efforts to establish, upgrade or expand radiotherapy services should therefore not only focus on the technology that is appropriate and sustainable, but also be mindful of the need for quality, safety and optimal utilisation of technology. The workflow in a radiotherapy department can be facilitated by strategic placement of the main functional areas into the concept design. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Radiotherapy of larynx cancers].

    PubMed

    Pointreau, Y; Lafond, C; Legouté, F; Trémolières, P; Servagi-Vernat, S; Giraud, P; Maingon, P; Calais, G; Lapeyre, M

    2016-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is the gold standard in the treatment of larynx cancers (except T1 glottic tumour). Early T1 and T2 tumours may be treated by exclusive radiation or surgery. For tumours requiring total laryngectomy (T2 or T3), induction chemotherapy followed by exclusive radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy is possible. For T4 tumour, surgery must be proposed. The treatment of lymph nodes is based on the initial treatment of the primary tumour. In non-surgical procedure, in case of sequential radiotherapy, the curative dose is 70Gy and the prophylactic dose is 50Gy. An integrated simultaneous boost radiotherapy is allowed (70Gy in 2Gy per fraction and 56Gy in 1.8Gy per fraction or 70Gy in 2.12Gy per fraction). Postoperatively, radiotherapy is used in locally advanced cancer with dose levels based on pathologic criteria (66Gy for R1 resection, 50 to 54Gy for complete resection). Volume delineation was based on guidelines.

  14. [Radiotherapy for retroperitoneal sarcomas].

    PubMed

    Sargos, P; Stoeckle, E; Henriques de Figueiredo, B; Antoine, M; Delannes, M; Mervoyer, A; Kantor, G

    2016-10-01

    The management of retroperitoneal sarcoma can be very challenging, and the quality of initial treatment strategy appears to be a crucial prognostic factor. En bloc surgery is currently the standard of care for these rare tumours and perioperative treatments such as chemotherapy or radiotherapy have not been validated yet. However, local-regional relapse constitutes the most common disease course. While adjuvant radiotherapy is less and less common due to gastrointestinal toxicities, preoperative radiation therapy offers numerous advantages and is being evaluated as part of a national multicentre phase II study (TOMOREP trial) and is the subject of a European randomized phase III study (STRASS trial). The objective of this article is to present data on preoperative irradiation in terms of dose, volumes and optimal radiotherapy techniques for the treatment of this rare disease.

  15. Radiotherapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bleehen, N.M.; Cox, J.D.

    1985-05-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of lung cancer was reviewed at a workshop held in Cambridge, England, in June 1984. It was concluded that there was a continuing role for radiation therapy in the primary management of small cell lung cancer, including the loco-regional treatment for patients with limited disease. Radical radiotherapy for patients with non-small cell carcinoma could be curative for a proportion of patients with limited disease. Careful planning and quality control was essential. Palliative radiotherapy provided useful treatment for many other patients. Other related aspects of treatment are also presented.

  16. Innovations in Radiotherapy Technology.

    PubMed

    Feain, I J; Court, L; Palta, J R; Beddar, S; Keall, P

    2017-02-01

    Many low- and middle-income countries, together with remote and low socioeconomic populations within high-income countries, lack the resources and services to deal with cancer. The challenges in upgrading or introducing the necessary services are enormous, from screening and diagnosis to radiotherapy planning/treatment and quality assurance. There are severe shortages not only in equipment, but also in the capacity to train, recruit and retain staff as well as in their ongoing professional development via effective international peer-review and collaboration. Here we describe some examples of emerging technology innovations based on real-time software and cloud-based capabilities that have the potential to redress some of these areas. These include: (i) automatic treatment planning to reduce physics staffing shortages, (ii) real-time image-guided adaptive radiotherapy technologies, (iii) fixed-beam radiotherapy treatment units that use patient (rather than gantry) rotation to reduce infrastructure costs and staff-to-patient ratios, (iv) cloud-based infrastructure programmes to facilitate international collaboration and quality assurance and (v) high dose rate mobile cobalt brachytherapy techniques for intraoperative radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. All rights reserved.

  17. Precision radiotherapy for brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ying; Guo, Zhanwen; Zhang, Haibo; Wang, Ning; Xu, Ying

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Precision radiotherapy plays an important role in the management of brain tumors. This study aimed to identify global research trends in precision radiotherapy for brain tumors using a bibliometric analysis of the Web of Science. DATA RETRIEVAL: We performed a bibliometric analysis of data retrievals for precision radiotherapy for brain tumors containing the key words cerebral tumor, brain tumor, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy, imaging-guided radiotherapy, dose-guided radiotherapy, stereotactic brachytherapy, and stereotactic radiotherapy using the Web of Science. SELECTION CRITERIA: Inclusion criteria: (a) peer-reviewed articles on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors which were published and indexed in the Web of Science; (b) type of articles: original research articles and reviews; (c) year of publication: 2002-2011. Exclusion criteria: (a) articles that required manual searching or telephone access; (b) Corrected papers or book chapters. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: (1) Annual publication output; (2) distribution according to country; (3) distribution according to institution; (4) top cited publications; (5) distribution according to journals; and (6) comparison of study results on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors. RESULTS: The stereotactic radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and imaging-guided radiotherapy are three major methods of precision radiotherapy for brain tumors. There were 260 research articles addressing precision radiotherapy for brain tumors found within the Web of Science. The USA published the most papers on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors, followed by Germany and France. European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, German Cancer Research Center and Heidelberg University were the most prolific research institutes for publications on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors. Among the top 13 research institutes publishing in this field, seven

  18. [Radiotherapy for Graves' ophthalmopathy].

    PubMed

    Kuhnt, T; Müller, A C; Janich, M; Gerlach, R; Hädecke, J; Duncker, G I W; Dunst, J

    2004-11-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) is the most frequent extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease, an autoimmune disorder of the thyroid, whereas the precise pathogenesis still remains unclear. In Hashimoto's thyroiditis the occurrence of proptosis is an extremely rare event. The therapy for middle and severe courses of GO shows in partly disappointing results, although several therapy modalities are possible (glucocorticoid therapy, radiotherapy, antithyroid drug treatment, surgery). All these therapies lead in only 40 - 70 % to an improvement of the pathogenic symptoms. An intensive interdisciplinary cooperation is necessary to satisfy the requirements for the treatment of Graves' ophthalmopathy. As a consequence of the very different results of the few of clinical studies that were accomplished with reference to this topic, treatment by radiotherapy in the management of the disease is presently controversially discussed. In the German-speaking countries the radiotherapy is, however, firmly established as a therapy option in the treatment of the moderate disease classes (class 2-5 according to NO SPECS), especially if diplopia is present. This article describes the sequences, dosages and fractionation schemes as well as the risks and side effects of the radiotherapy. Altogether, radiotherapy is assessed as an effective and sure method. The administration of glucocorticoids can take place before the beginning of or during the radiotherapy. For the success of treatment the correct selection of patients who may possibly profit from a radiotherapy is absolutely essential. By realising that GO proceeds normally over a period of 2-5 years, which is followed by a period of fibrotic alteration, the application of the radiotherapy in the early, active phase is indispensable. A precise explanation for the effects of radiotherapy in treatment of the GO does not exist at present. The determination of the most effective irradiation doses was made from retrospectively evaluated

  19. Radiotherapy for bone pain.

    PubMed Central

    Needham, P R; Mithal, N P; Hoskin, P J

    1994-01-01

    Painful bone metastases are a common problem for cancer patients. Although current evidence supports the use of a single fraction of radiotherapy as the treatment of choice, many radiotherapists, for a variety of reasons, continue to use fractionated regimens. Over one six month period 105 patients received external beam irradiation for painful bone metastases at the Royal London Hospital (RLH). Thirty-one per cent of the patients were aged 70 or over. The treatment of 97 of these patients was assessed. They had a total of 280 sites treated over the course of their disease. Fifty-nine per cent of sites treated received a fractionated course of radiotherapy. Site significantly influenced fractionation. Overall response rates of 82% were achieved. Fractionation did not appear to influence this. Ten patients received large field irradiation. Fifteen patients had five or more sites irradiated, of whom only one received hemibody irradiation. PMID:7523672

  20. Melanoma: Last call for radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Espenel, Sophie; Vallard, Alexis; Rancoule, Chloé; Garcia, Max-Adrien; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Chargari, Cyrus; Deutsch, Eric; Magné, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Melanoma is traditionally considered to be a radioresistant tumor. However, radiotherapy and immunotherapy latest developments might upset this radiobiological dogma. Stereotactic radiotherapy allows high dose per fraction delivery, with high dose rate. More DNA lethal damages, less sublethal damages reparation, endothelial cell apoptosis, and finally clonogenic cell dysfunction are produced, resulting in improved local control. Radiotherapy can also enhance immune responses, inducing neoantigens formation, tumor antigen presentation, and cytokines release. A synergic effect of radiotherapy with immunotherapy is expected, and might lead to abscopal effects. If hadrontherapy biological properties seem able to suppress hypoxia-induced radioresistance and increase biological efficacy, ballistic advantages over photon radiations might also improve radiotherapy outcomes on usually poor prognosis locations. The present review addresses biological and clinical effects of high fraction dose, bystander effect, abscopal effect, and hadrontherapy features in melanoma. Clinical trials results are warranted to establish indications of innovative radiotherapy in melanoma.

  1. Accident prevention in radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, O

    2007-01-01

    In order to prevent accidents in radiotherapy, it is important to learn from accidents that have occurred previously. Lessons learned from a number of accidents are summarised and underlying patterns are looked for in this paper. Accidents can be prevented by applying several safety layers of preventive actions. Categories of these preventive actions are discussed together with specific actions belonging to each category of safety layer. PMID:21614274

  2. [Radiotherapy of bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Riou, O; Chauvet, B; Lagrange, J-L; Martin, P; Llacer Moscardo, C; Charissoux, M; Lauche, O; Aillères, N; Fenoglietto, P; Azria, D

    2016-09-01

    Surgery (radical cystectomy) is the standard treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Radiochemotherapy has risen as an alternative treatment option to surgery as part as organ-sparing combined modality treatment or for patients unfit for surgery. Radiochemotherapy achieves 5-year bladder intact survival of 40 to 65% and 5-year overall survival of 40 to 50% with excellent quality of life. This article introduces the French recommendations for radiotherapy of bladder cancer: indications, exams, technique, dosimetry, delivery and image guidance.

  3. Radiotherapy DICOM packet sniffing.

    PubMed

    Ackerly, T; Gesoand, M; Smith, R

    2008-09-01

    The Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard is meant to allow communication of medical images between equipment provided by different vendors, but when two applications do not interact correctly in a multi-vendor environment it is often first necessary to demonstrate non-compliance of either the sender or the receiver before a resolution to the problem can be progressed. Sometimes the only way to do this is to monitor the network communication between the two applications to find out which one is not complying with the DICOM standard. Packet sniffing is a technique of network traffic analysis by passive observation of all information transiting a point on the network, regardless of the specified sender or receiver. DICOM packet sniffing traps and interprets the network communication between two DICOM applications to determine which is non compliant. This is illustrated with reference to three examples, a radiotherapy planning system unable to receive CT data from a particular CT scanner, a radiotherapy simulator unable to print correctly on a DICOM printer, and a PACS unable to respond when queried about what images it has in its archive by a radiotherapy treatment planning system. Additionally in this work it has been proven that it is feasible to extract DICOM images from the intercepted network data. This process can be applied to determine the cause of a DICOM image being rendered differently by the sender and the receiver.

  4. Imaging in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Van den Berge, D L; De Ridder, M; Storme, G A

    2000-10-01

    Radiotherapy, more then any other treatment modality, relies heavily and often exclusively on medical imaging to determine the extent of disease and the spatial relation between target region and neighbouring healthy tissues. Radically new approaches to radiation delivery are inspired on CT scanning and treat patients in a slice-by-slice fashion using intensity modulated megavoltage fan beams. For quality assurance of complex 3-D dose distributions, MR based 3-D verificative dosimetry on irradiated phantoms has been described. As treatment delivery becomes increasingly refined, the need for accurate target definition increases as well and sophisticated imaging tools like image fusion and 3-D reconstruction are routinely used for treatment planning. While in the past patients were positioned on the treatment machines based exclusively on surface topography and the well-known skin marks, such approach is no longer sufficient for high-accuracy radiotherapy and special imaging tools like on-line portal imaging are used to verify and correct target positioning. Much of these applications rely on digital image processing, transmission and storage, and the development of standards, like DICOM and PACS have greatly contributed to these applications. Digital imaging plays an increasing role in many areas in radiotherapy and has been fundamental in new developments that have demonstrated impact on patient care.

  5. [Radiotherapy for primary lung carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Giraud, P; Lacornerie, T; Mornex, F

    2016-09-01

    Indication, doses, technique of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy, for primary lung carcinoma are presented. The recommendations for delineation of the target volumes and organs at risk are detailed.

  6. [Radiotherapy of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Barillot, I; Azria, D; Belkacémi, Y; Bollet, M; Chauvet, B; Cowen, D; Cutuli, B; Fourquet, A; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Leblanc, M; Mahé, M A

    2016-09-01

    In breast cancer, radiotherapy is an essential component of the treatment. After conservative surgery for an infiltrating carcinoma, radiotherapy must be systematically performed, regardless of the characteristics of the disease, because it decreases the rate of local recurrence and by this way, specific mortality. Partial breast irradiation could not be proposed routinely but only in very selected and informed patients. For ductal carcinoma in situ, adjuvant radiotherapy must be also systematically performed after lumpectomy. After mastectomy, chest wall irradiation is required for pT3-T4 tumours and if there is an axillary nodal involvement, whatever the number of involved lymph nodes. After neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, in case of pN0 disease, chest wall irradiation is recommended if there is a clinically or radiologically T3-T4 or node positive disease before chemotherapy. Axillary irradiation is recommended only if there is no axillary surgical dissection and a positive sentinel lymph node. Supra and infra-clavicular irradiation is advised in case of positive axillary nodes. Internal mammary irradiation must be discussed case by case, according to the benefit/risk ratio (cardiac toxicity). Dose to the chest wall or the breast must be between 45-50Gy with a conventional fractionation. A boost dose over the tumour bed is required if the patient is younger than 60 years old. Hypofractionation (42.5 Gy in 16 fractions, or 41.6 Gy en 13 or 40 Gy en 15) is possible after tumorectomy and if a nodal irradiation is not mandatory. Delineation of the breast, the chest wall and the nodal areas are based on clinical and radiological evaluations. 3D-conformal irradiation is the recommended technique, intensity-modulated radiotherapy must be proposed only in case of specific clinical situations. Respiratory gating could be useful to decrease the cardiac dose. Concomitant administration of chemotherapy in unadvised, but hormonal treatment could be start with

  7. Caring for children undergoing radiotherapy treatment: Swedish radiotherapy nurses' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Gårdling, J; Edwinson Månsson, M; Törnqvist, E; Hallström, I

    2015-12-01

    The aim was to explore radiotherapy nurses' perceptions of their experiences of caring for children undergoing radiotherapy treatment for cancer. Semi-structured interviews of 12 nurses were conducted. The interviews were analysed using a phenomenographical approach. All interviewees were women, and the group's mean age was 49 years. Caring for children during radiotherapy treatment was perceived as a complex task. Their perceptions included views on providing holistic care, creating a sense of security and being committed. Through holistic care the radiotherapy nurses took responsibility regarding care for the child and family, technical aspects of the radiotherapy procedure and the development of their profession. They tried to create a sense of security through individualized information and preparation, through teamwork with the child and family, and regarding anaesthetic personnel (if needed) while balancing the care they gave related to the child, to the family, to anaesthetic personnel, and to their own tasks. The radiotherapy nurses perceived themselves as committed in their care and reported being emotionally affected by sadness, but also joy. By clarifying radiotherapy nurses perceptions of caring for children guidelines can be developed to lessen anxiety and increase the sense of security amongst children undergoing radiotherapy treatment and their family members. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of radiotherapy in the treatment of retinoblastoma upon the developing dentition

    SciTech Connect

    Doline, S.; Needleman, H.L.; Petersen, R.A.; Cassady, J.R.

    1980-03-01

    Two patients who received supervoltage x-ray external beam irradiation for treatment of retinoblastoma by standard techniques showed interference with the root formation of the maxillary deciduous molars and abnormalities of crown and root formation of the permanent maxillary molars. Both patients showed a relative maxillary retrognathism thought to be related to radiation effects on maxillary bone growth. Simulation of lateral radiation portals with subsequent beam shaping using an appropriate block placed in the radiation beam is suggested as a means to eliminate the dental complications of radiation therapy for retinoblastoma.

  9. Demand for radiotherapy in Spain.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, A; Borrás, J M; López-Torrecilla, J; Algara, M; Palacios-Eito, A; Gómez-Caamaño, A; Olay, L; Lara, P C

    2017-02-01

    Assessing the demand for radiotherapy in Spain based on existing evidence to estimate the human resources and equipment needed so that every person in Spain has access to high-quality radiotherapy when they need it. We used data from the European Cancer Observatory on the estimated incidence of cancer in Spain in 2012, along with the evidence-based indications for radiotherapy developed by the Australian CCORE project, to obtain an optimal radiotherapy utilisation proportion (OUP) for each tumour. About 50.5 % of new cancers in Spain require radiotherapy at least once over the course of the disease. Additional demand for these services comes from reradiation therapy and non-melanoma skin cancer. Approximately, 25-30 % of cancer patients with an indication for radiotherapy do not receive it due to factors that include access, patient preference, familiarity with the treatment among physicians, and especially resource shortages, all of which contribute to its underutilisation. Radiotherapy is underused in Spain. The increasing incidence of cancer expected over the next decade and the greater frequency of reradiations necessitate the incorporation of radiotherapy demand into need-based calculations for cancer services planning.

  10. Particle radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Sinoto, Makoto; Matsunobu, Akira; Toyama, Shingo; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Kudo, Sho

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in external beam radiotherapy have allowed us to deliver higher doses to the tumors while decreasing doses to the surrounding tissues. Dose escalation using high-precision radiotherapy has improved the treatment outcomes of prostate cancer. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy has been widely used throughout the world as the most advanced form of photon radiotherapy. In contrast, particle radiotherapy has also been under development, and has been used as an effective and non-invasive radiation modality for prostate and other cancers. Among the particles used in such treatments, protons and carbon ions have the physical advantage that the dose can be focused on the tumor with only minimal exposure of the surrounding normal tissues. Furthermore, carbon ions also have radiobiological advantages that include higher killing effects on intrinsic radio-resistant tumors, hypoxic tumor cells and tumor cells in the G0 or S phase. However, the degree of clinical benefit derived from these theoretical advantages in the treatment of prostate cancer has not been adequately determined. The present article reviews the available literature on the use of particle radiotherapy for prostate cancer as well as the literature on the physical and radiobiological properties of this treatment, and discusses the role and the relative merits of particle radiotherapy compared with current photon-based radiotherapy, with a focus on proton beam therapy and carbon ion radiotherapy.

  11. Bystander effects and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Marín, Alicia; Martín, Margarita; Liñán, Olga; Alvarenga, Felipe; López, Mario; Fernández, Laura; Büchser, David; Cerezo, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are defined as biological effects expressed after irradiation by cells whose nuclei have not been directly irradiated. These effects include DNA damage, chromosomal instability, mutation, and apoptosis. There is considerable evidence that ionizing radiation affects cells located near the site of irradiation, which respond individually and collectively as part of a large interconnected web. These bystander signals can alter the dynamic equilibrium between proliferation, apoptosis, quiescence or differentiation. The aim of this review is to examine the most important biological effects of this phenomenon with regard to areas of major interest in radiotherapy. Such aspects include radiation-induced bystander effects during the cell cycle under hypoxic conditions when administering fractionated modalities or combined radio-chemotherapy. Other relevant aspects include individual variation and genetics in toxicity of bystander factors and normal tissue collateral damage. In advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the high degree of dose conformity to the target volume reduces the dose and, therefore, the risk of complications, to normal tissues. However, significant doses can accumulate out-of-field due to photon scattering and this may impact cellular response in these regions. Protons may offer a solution to reduce out-of-field doses. The bystander effect has numerous associated phenomena, including adaptive response, genomic instability, and abscopal effects. Also, the bystander effect can influence radiation protection and oxidative stress. It is essential that we understand the mechanisms underlying the bystander effect in order to more accurately assess radiation risk and to evaluate protocols for cancer radiotherapy.

  12. Bystander effects and radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Alicia; Martín, Margarita; Liñán, Olga; Alvarenga, Felipe; López, Mario; Fernández, Laura; Büchser, David; Cerezo, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are defined as biological effects expressed after irradiation by cells whose nuclei have not been directly irradiated. These effects include DNA damage, chromosomal instability, mutation, and apoptosis. There is considerable evidence that ionizing radiation affects cells located near the site of irradiation, which respond individually and collectively as part of a large interconnected web. These bystander signals can alter the dynamic equilibrium between proliferation, apoptosis, quiescence or differentiation. The aim of this review is to examine the most important biological effects of this phenomenon with regard to areas of major interest in radiotherapy. Such aspects include radiation-induced bystander effects during the cell cycle under hypoxic conditions when administering fractionated modalities or combined radio-chemotherapy. Other relevant aspects include individual variation and genetics in toxicity of bystander factors and normal tissue collateral damage. In advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the high degree of dose conformity to the target volume reduces the dose and, therefore, the risk of complications, to normal tissues. However, significant doses can accumulate out-of-field due to photon scattering and this may impact cellular response in these regions. Protons may offer a solution to reduce out-of-field doses. The bystander effect has numerous associated phenomena, including adaptive response, genomic instability, and abscopal effects. Also, the bystander effect can influence radiation protection and oxidative stress. It is essential that we understand the mechanisms underlying the bystander effect in order to more accurately assess radiation risk and to evaluate protocols for cancer radiotherapy. PMID:25535579

  13. [Radiotherapy during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Mazeron, R; Barillot, I; Mornex, F; Giraud, P

    2016-09-01

    The diagnostic of cancer during pregnancy is a rare and delicate situation. As the developments of the embryo and the human fetus are extremely sensitive to ionizing radiations, the treatment of these tumors should be discussed. The studies - preclinical and clinical - based mostly on exposure accidents show that subdiaphragmatic treatments are possible during pregnancy. When radiotherapy is used, phantom estimations of the dose to the fetus, confirmed by in vivo measurements are required. Irradiation and imaging techniques should be arranged to decrease as much as possible the dose delivered to the fetus and hold below the threshold of 0.1Gy.

  14. Radiotherapy in the UK

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, S.

    1993-10-09

    What is wrong with radiation treatment in the UK Is it bad practice or merely bad publicity Between 1982 and 1991, 1,000 patients receiving isocentric radiation therapy at the North Staffordshire Royal Infirmary received a substantial underdose of radiation; the clinical report on this incident was published last week. The operator had been using a correction factor for tumor-to-skin distance, unaware that this factor had already been applied by the computer system. Although the report pointed out that it is not surprising that the clinicians were not alerted to the undertreatment, is also noted that there were no resources at the hospital to audit the outcome of radiotherapy.

  15. [Hodgkin's lymphoma and radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Datsenko, P V; Panshin, G A

    2015-01-01

    After a median observation time of 4,5 years, 440 patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma stage I-IV to the Ann Arbor classification were treated with radiotherapy (2200 lymph areas) and ABVD (n=204) or BEACOPP (n=117) or CEA/ABVD (lomustine, etoposide, adriamycine, bleomycine, vinblastine and dacarbacine; n=119) regimens in 1995-2012. Correct allocation of groups with "CR or PR ≥80%" and "PR: 0-79%", after first-line chemotherapy, is extremely important for following RT planning. Adaptation of patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma can take place only after successful treatment, the probability of relapse and fear of repeated courses strongly interfere with this process, especially in the first years after its closure. Duration of remission period, especially in young people, is no less important than the criteria for overall survival. It is impossible to build recommendations for treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma, based only on long-term survival rates. Importance of radiotherapy in reducing the number of relapses is undeniable, so the idea that the development of the role of chemotherapy in the treatment of the ray method Hodgkin's lymphoma gradually becomes secondary is in serious doubt. Our findings suggest the importance of both maintaining a high disease-free survival and reducing long-term complications in designing treatments of Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  16. Fertility impairment in radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kuźba-Kryszak, Tamara; Nowikiewicz, Tomasz; Żyromska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Infertility as a result of antineoplastic therapy is becoming a very important issue due to the growing incidence of neoplastic diseases. Routinely applied antineoplastic treatments and the illness itself lead to fertility disorders. Therapeutic methods used in antineoplastic treatment may cause fertility impairment or sterilization due to permanent damage to reproductive cells. The risk of sterilization depends on the patient's sex, age during therapy, type of neoplasm, radiation dose and treatment area. It is known that chemotherapy and radiotherapy can lead to fertility impairment and the combination of these two gives an additive effect. The aim of this article is to raise the issue of infertility in these patients. It is of growing importance due to the increase in the number of children and young adults who underwent radiotherapy in the past. The progress in antineoplastic therapy improves treatment results, but at the same time requires a deeper look at existential needs of the patient. Reproductive function is an integral element of self-esteem and should be taken into account during therapy planning. PMID:27647982

  17. Imaging in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calandrino, R.; Del Maschio, A.; Cattaneo, G. M.; Castiglioni, I.

    2009-09-01

    The diagnostic methodologies used for the radiotherapy planning have undergone great developments in the last 30 years. Since the 1980s, after the introduction of the CT scanner, the modality for the planning moved beyond the planar 2D assessment to approach a real and more realistic volumetric 3D definition. Consequently the dose distribution, previously obtained by means of an overly simple approximation, became increasingly complex, better tailoring the true shape of the tumour. The final therapeutic improvement has been obtained by a parallel increase in the complexity of the irradiating units: the Linacs for therapy have, in fact, been equipped with a full accessory set capable to modulate the fluence (IMRT) and to check the correct target position continuously during the therapy session (IMRT-IGRT). The multimodal diagnostic approach, which integrates diagnostic information, from images of the patient taken with CT, NMR, PET and US, further improves the data for a biological and topological optimization of the radiotherapy plan and consequently of the dose distribution in the Planning Target Volume. Proteomic and genomic analysis will be the next step in tumour diagnosis. These methods will provide the planners with further information, for a true personalization of the treatment regimen and the assessment of the predictive essays for each tumour and each patient.

  18. [Stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy for brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Tanguy, Ronan; Métellus, Philippe; Mornex, Françoise; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Brain metastases management is still controversial even though many trials are trying to define the respective roles of neurosurgery, whole-brain radiotherapy, single-dose stereotactic radiotherapy and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. In this article, we review data from trials that examine the role of radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in the management of brain metastases.

  19. Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Jayant S; Tobias, Jeffrey S; Baum, Michael; Keshtgar, Mohammed; Joseph, David; Wenz, Frederik; Houghton, Joan; Saunders, Christobel; Corica, Tammy; D'Souza, Derek; Sainsbury, Richard; Massarut, Samuele; Taylor, Irving; Hilaris, Basil

    2004-03-01

    Postoperative radiotherapy, which forms part of breast-conserving therapy, may not need to encompass the whole breast. Apart from the consumption of huge resources and patients' time, postoperative radiotherapy deters many women from receiving the benefits of breast-conserving surgery, forcing them to choose a mastectomy instead. If radiotherapy could be given in the operating theatre immediately after surgery, many of these disadvantages could be overcome. One striking fact about local recurrence after breast-conserving surgery is that most occurs in the area of breast immediately next to the primary tumour; this is despite the finding that two-thirds of mastectomy samples have microscopic tumours distributed throughout the breast, even when radiotherapy is omitted. Thus, only the area adjacent to the tumour may need treatment with radiotherapy. On the basis of this premise, clinical scientists have used new technology to administer radiotherapy to the area at greatest risk of local recurrence, with the aim of completing the whole local treatment in one sitting. In this review, we have elaborated on the rationale and different methods of delivery of intraoperative radiotherapy. If this approach is validated by the results of current randomised trials, it could save time, money, and breasts.

  20. Pituitary radiotherapy for Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Losa, Marco; Picozzi, Piero; Redaelli, Maria Grazia; Laurenzi, Andrea; Mortini, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of choice for Cushing's disease is pituitary surgery. Second-line treatments include repeat pituitary surgery, radiation therapy, medical therapy, and bilateral adrenalectomy. The most used modalities to irradiate patients with Cushing's disease include fractionated radiotherapy and single-dose Gamma Knife. We aim to review the efficacy and safety of radiotherapy in patients with persistent or recurring Cushing's disease. Remission of Cushing's disease after radiotherapy ranges from 42 to 83%. There seems to be no clear difference according to the technique of radiation used. Most patients experience remission of disease within 3 years from treatment, with only few cases reaching normal cortisol secretion after a longer follow-up. Control of tumor growth varies from 93 to 100%. Severe side effects of radiotherapy, such as optic neuropathy and radionecrosis, are uncommon. New-onset hypopituitarism is the most frequent side effect of radiation, occurring in 30-50% of patients treated by fractionated radiotherapy while it has been reported in 11-22% of patients after Gamma Knife. Radiotherapy is an effective second-line treatment in patients with Cushing's disease not cured by surgery. Consideration of the advantages and disadvantages of radiotherapy in comparison with other therapeutic options should always be carried out in the single patient before deciding the second-line therapeutic strategy for persisting or recurring Cushing's disease. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Radiotherapy in Phyllodes Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharan, Balukrishna; Manipadam, Marie Therese; Paul, M J; Backianathan, Selvamani

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Phyllodes Tumour (PT) of the breast is a relatively rare breast neoplasm (<1%) with diverse range of pathology and biological behaviour. Aim To describe the clinical course of PT and to define the role of Radiotherapy (RT) in PT of the breast. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of hospital data of patients with PT presented from 2005 to 2014 was done. Descriptive statistics was used to analyze the results. Simple description of data was done in this study. Age and duration of symptoms were expressed in median and range. Percentages, tables and general discussions were used to understand the meaning of the data analyzed. Results Out of the 98 patients, 92 were eligible for analysis. The median age of presentation was 43 years. A total of 64/92 patients were premenopausal. There was no side predilection for this tumour but 57/92 patients presented as an upper outer quadrant lump. Fifty percent of the patients presented as giant (10 cm) PT. The median duration of symptoms was 12 months (range: 1-168 months). A 60% of patients had Benign (B), 23% had Borderline (BL) and 17% had malignant (M) tumours. The surgical treatment for benign histology included Lumpectomy (L) for 15%, Wide Local Excision (WLE) for 48%, and Simple Mastectomy (SM) for 37%. All BL and M tumours were treated with WLE or SM. There was no recurrence in B and BL group when the margin was ≥1 cm. All non-metastatic M tumours received adjuvant RT irrespective of their margin status. Total 3/16 patients with M developed local recurrence. Total 6/16 M patients had distant metastases (lung or bone). Our median duration of follow up was 20 months (range: 1-120 months). Conclusion Surgical resection with adequate margins (>1 cm) gave excellent local control in B and BL tumours. For patients with BL PT, local radiotherapy is useful, if margins are close or positive even after the best surgical resection. There is a trend towards improved local control with adjuvant radiotherapy for

  2. [Respiratory synchronization and breast radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Mège, A; Ziouèche-Mottet, A; Bodez, V; Garcia, R; Arnaud, A; de Rauglaudre, G; Pourel, N; Chauvet, B

    2016-10-01

    Adjuvant radiation therapy following breast cancer surgery continues to improve locoregional control and overall survival. But the success of highly targeted-conformal radiotherapy such as intensity-modulated techniques, can be compromised by respiratory motion. The intrafraction motion can potentially result in significant under- or overdose, and also expose organs at risk. This article summarizes the respiratory motion and its effects on imaging, dose calculation and dose delivery by radiotherapy for breast cancer. We will review the methods of respiratory synchronization available for breast radiotherapy to minimize the respiratory impact and to spare organs such as heart and lung.

  3. [Task sharing with radiotherapy technicians in image-guided radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Diaz, O; Lorchel, F; Revault, C; Mornex, F

    2013-10-01

    The development of accelerators with on-board imaging systems now allows better target volumes reset at the time of irradiation (image-guided radiotherapy [IGRT]). However, these technological advances in the control of repositioning led to a multiplication of tasks for each actor in radiotherapy and increase the time available for the treatment, whether for radiotherapy technicians or radiation oncologists. As there is currently no explicit regulatory framework governing the use of IGRT, some institutional experiments show that a transfer is possible between radiation oncologists and radiotherapy technicians for on-line verification of image positioning. Initial training for every technical and drafting procedures within institutions will improve audit quality by reducing interindividual variability.

  4. [Hepatic tumors and radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Rio, E; Mornex, F; Peiffert, D; Huertas, A

    2016-09-01

    Recent technological developments led to develop the concept of focused liver radiation therapy. We must distinguish primary and secondary tumors as the indications are restricted and must be discussed as an alternative to surgical or medical treatments. For hepatocellular carcinoma 5 to 10cm (or more), a conformational radiation with or without intensity modulation is performed. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being evaluated and is increasingly proposed as an alternative to radiofrequency ablative treatment for primary or secondary tumors (typically less than 5cm). Tumor (and liver) movements induced by respiratory motions must be taken into account. Strict dosimetric criteria must be met with particular attention to the dose-volume histograms to liver and the hollow organs, including cases of SBRT.

  5. [Radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Maingon, P; Blanchard, P; Bidault, F; Calmels, L

    2016-09-01

    Nasapharyngeal carcinoma is a rare disease. Oftenly, the diagnostic is made for advanced disease. Localized tumors, T1 or T2 NO observed a good prognosis and are locally controlled in more than 90 % of the cases by radiotherapy alone. The standard treatment of locally advanced disease is combined chemoradiation. A special vigilance of fast decrease of the volume of the pathological lymph nodes, sometimes associated to loss of weight might indicate an adaptive dosimetric revision. The treatment of recurrent disease is of great importance. Surgical indications are limited but should be discussed in multidisciplinary tumor board when possible. Surgical nodal sampling has to be proposed for nodal recurrence as well as reirradiation, which could be indicated according to the technical issues.

  6. Radiotherapy Planning using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Maria A; Payne, Geoffrey S

    2016-01-01

    The use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Radiotherapy (RT) planning is rapidly expanding. We review the wide range of image contrast mechanisms available to MRI and the way they are exploited for RT planning. However a number of challenges are also considered: the requirements that MR images are acquired in the RT treatment position, that they are geometrically accurate, that effects of patient motion during the scan are minimised, that tissue markers are clearly demonstrated, that an estimate of electron density can be obtained. These issues are discussed in detail, prior to the consideration of a number of specific clinical applications. This is followed by a brief discussion on the development of real-time MRI-guided RT. PMID:26509844

  7. Radiotherapy on hidradenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lalya, Issam; Hadadi, Khalid; Tazi, El Mehdi; Lalya, Ilham; Bazine, Amine; Andaloussy, Khalid; Elmarjany, Mohamed; Sifat, Hassan; Hassouni, Khalid; Kebdani, Tayeb; Mansouri, Hamid; Benjaafar, Noureddine; Elgueddari, Brahim Khalil

    2011-01-01

    Context: Clear cell Hidradenocarcinoma is a rare carcinoma arising from sweat glands. It is an aggressive tumor that most metastasizes to regional lymph nodes and distant viscera; surgery with safe margins is the mainstay of treatment. Case Report: We report a case of 68-year-old woman who presented with an invasive clear cell hidradenocarcinoma situated in the left parotid area which recurred 5 months after surgery, this recurrence was managed successfully by high-dose irradiation of the tumor bed (66 Gy) and regional lymphatic chains (50 Gy), after a follow-up of more than 15 months, the patient is in good local control without significant toxicity. Conclusion: Post operative radiotherapy allows better local control and should be mandatory when histological features predictive of recurrence are present: positive margins, histology poorly differentiated, perineural invasion, vascular and lymphatic invasion, lymph node involvement, and extracapsular spread. PMID:22540063

  8. Pion radiotherapy at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, S.E.; Smith, A.R.; Zink, S.

    1982-12-01

    Clinical investigations of pi meson radiotherapy were conducted by the Cancer Research and Treatment Center of the University of New Mexico and the Los Alamos National Laboratory from 1974 until 1982. Two hundred and thirty patients have been treated for a variety of locally advanced primary and metastatic neoplasms. One hundred and ninety-six patients have been followed for a minimum of 18 months. Crude survival data range from 11% for unresectable pancreatic carcinoma to 82% for Stages C and D1 adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Acute tolerance of normal tissues is approximately 4500 pion rad in 36 fractions over 7 weeks. Severe chronic reactions have appeared with increasing frequency after doses in excess of 4000 pion rad.

  9. Bone Health and Pelvic Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Higham, C E; Faithfull, S

    2015-11-01

    Survivors who have received pelvic radiotherapy make up many of the long-term cancer population, with therapies for gynaecological, bowel, bladder and prostate malignancies. Individuals who receive radiotherapy to the pelvis as part of their cancer treatment are at risk of insufficiency fractures. Symptoms of insufficiency fractures include pelvic and back pain and immobility, which can affect substantially quality of life. This constellation of symptoms can occur within 2 months of radiotherapy up to 63 months post-treatment, with a median incidence of 6-20 months. As a condition it is under reported and evidence is poor as to the contributing risk factors, causation and best management to improve the patient's bone health and mobility. As radiotherapy advances, chronic symptoms, such as insufficiency fractures, as a consequence of treatment need to be better understood and reviewed. This overview explores the current evidence for the effect of radiotherapy on bone health and insufficiency fractures and identifies what we know and where gaps in our knowledge lie. The overview concludes with the need to take seriously complaints of pelvic pain from patients after pelvic radiotherapy and to investigate and manage these symptoms more effectively. There is a clear need for definitive research in this field to provide the evidence-based guidance much needed in practice.

  10. [Adaptative radiotherapy: The case for MRI-guided radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Maingon, P

    2016-10-01

    The concept of image-guided radiotherapy benefits from the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) associated with different capacities of tissue analyses such as spectroscopy or diffusion analysis. The production of devices allowing the repositioning of patients through MRI represents a strong added value without delivering any additional dose to the patient while the optimization of the adaptative strategies are facilitated by a better contrast of the soft tissues compared to the scanner. The advantages of MRI are well demonstrated for brain tumours, head and neck carcinomas, pelvic tumors, mediastinal malignancies, gastrointestinal tract diseases. Adaptative radiotherapy inaugurates a new area of radiotherapy with different modalities. Several technological solutions are provided or discussed allowing the patients to benefit from thses new technologies as soon as possible.

  11. [Postoperative radiotherapy of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Guérif, S; Latorzeff, I; Lagrange, J-L; Hennequin, C; Supiot, S; Garcia, A; François, P; Soulié, M; Richaud, P; Salomon, L

    2014-10-01

    Between 10 and 40% of patients who have undergone a radical prostatectomy may have a biologic recurrence. Local or distant failure represents the possible patterns of relapse. Patients at high-risk for local relapse have extraprostatic disease, positive surgical margins or seminal vesicles infiltration or high Gleason score at pathology. Three phase-III randomized clinical trials have shown that, for these patients, adjuvant irradiation reduces the risk of tumoral progression without higher toxicity. Salvage radiotherapy for late relapse allows a disease control in 60-70% of the cases. Several research in order to improve the therapeutic ratio of the radiotherapy after prostatectomy are evaluate in the French Groupe d'Étude des Tumeurs Urogénitales (Gétug) and of the French association of urology (Afu). The Gétug-Afu 17 trial will provide answers to the question of the optimal moment for postoperative radiotherapy for pT3-4 R1 pN0 Nx patients, with the objective of comparing an immediate treatment to a differed early treatment initiated at biological recurrence. The Gétug-Afu 22 questions the place of a short hormonetherapy combined with image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in adjuvant situation for a detectable prostate specific antigen (PSA). The implementation of a multicenter quality control within the Gétug-Afu in order to harmonize a modern postoperative radiotherapy will allow the development of a dose escalation IMRT after surgery.

  12. [Head and neck adaptive radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Graff, P; Huger, S; Kirby, N; Pouliot, J

    2013-10-01

    Onboard volumetric imaging systems can provide accurate data of the patient's anatomy during a course of head and neck radiotherapy making it possible to assess the actual delivered dose and to evaluate the dosimetric impact of complex daily positioning variations and gradual anatomic changes such as geometric variations of tumors and normal tissues or shrinkage of external contours. Adaptive radiotherapy is defined as the correction of a patient's treatment planning to adapt for individual variations observed during treatment. Strategies are developed to selectively identify patients that require replanning because of an intolerable dosimetric drift. Automated tools are designed to limit time consumption. Deformable image registration algorithms are the cornerstones of these strategies, but a better understanding of their limits of validity is required before adaptive radiotherapy can be safely introduced to daily practice. Moreover, strict evaluation of the clinical benefits is yet to be proven.

  13. Expanding global access to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Atun, Rifat; Jaffray, David A; Barton, Michael B; Bray, Freddie; Baumann, Michael; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Hanna, Timothy P; Knaul, Felicia M; Lievens, Yolande; Lui, Tracey Y M; Milosevic, Michael; O'Sullivan, Brian; Rodin, Danielle L; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Van Dyk, Jacob; Yap, Mei Ling; Zubizarreta, Eduardo; Gospodarowicz, Mary

    2015-09-01

    Radiotherapy is a critical and inseparable component of comprehensive cancer treatment and care. For many of the most common cancers in low-income and middle-income countries, radiotherapy is essential for effective treatment. In high-income countries, radiotherapy is used in more than half of all cases of cancer to cure localised disease, palliate symptoms, and control disease in incurable cancers. Yet, in planning and building treatment capacity for cancer, radiotherapy is frequently the last resource to be considered. Consequently, worldwide access to radiotherapy is unacceptably low. We present a new body of evidence that quantifies the worldwide coverage of radiotherapy services by country. We show the shortfall in access to radiotherapy by country and globally for 2015-35 based on current and projected need, and show substantial health and economic benefits to investing in radiotherapy. The cost of scaling up radiotherapy in the nominal model in 2015-35 is US$26·6 billion in low-income countries, $62·6 billion in lower-middle-income countries, and $94·8 billion in upper-middle-income countries, which amounts to $184·0 billion across all low-income and middle-income countries. In the efficiency model the costs were lower: $14·1 billion in low-income, $33·3 billion in lower-middle-income, and $49·4 billion in upper-middle-income countries-a total of $96·8 billion. Scale-up of radiotherapy capacity in 2015-35 from current levels could lead to saving of 26·9 million life-years in low-income and middle-income countries over the lifetime of the patients who received treatment. The economic benefits of investment in radiotherapy are very substantial. Using the nominal cost model could produce a net benefit of $278·1 billion in 2015-35 ($265·2 million in low-income countries, $38·5 billion in lower-middle-income countries, and $239·3 billion in upper-middle-income countries). Investment in the efficiency model would produce in the same period an even

  14. Introduction to suspension levels: radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Horton, P; Lillicrap, S; Lamm, I-L; Lehmann, W

    2013-02-01

    In 2007, the European Commission (EC) commissioned a group of experts to undertake the revision of Report Radiation Protection (RP 91) 'Criteria for acceptability of radiological (including radiotherapy) and nuclear medicine installations' written in 1997. The revised draft report was submitted to the EC in 2010, who issued it for public consultation. The EC has commissioned the same group of experts to consider the comments of the public consultation for further improvement of the revised report. The EC intends to publish the final report under its Radiation Report Series as RP 162. This paper describes the background to the selection of the key performance parameters for radiotherapy equipment and sets out the sources of their criteria of acceptability including suspension levels for a wide range of radiotherapy equipment.

  15. Inflammatory Skin Conditions Associated With Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hernández Aragüés, I; Pulido Pérez, A; Suárez Fernández, R

    2017-04-01

    Radiotherapy for cancer is used increasingly. Because skin cells undergo rapid turnover, the ionizing radiation of radiotherapy has collateral effects that are often expressed in inflammatory reactions. Some of these reactions-radiodermatitis and recall phenomenon, for example-are very familiar to dermatologists. Other, less common radiotherapy-associated skin conditions are often underdiagnosed but must also be recognized.

  16. Stereotactic linear accelerator radiotherapy for pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Ajithkumar, Thankama; Brada, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Last decade has seen important advances in radiotherapy technology which combine precise tumor localization with accurate targeted delivery of radiation. This technique of high precision conformal radiotherapy, described as stereotactic radiotherapy or radiosurgery, uses modern linear accelerators available in most radiation oncology departments. The article describes the new technique as applied to the treatment of pituitary adenoma and reviews published clinical results.

  17. Radiotherapy supports protective tumor-specific immunity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anurag; Sharma, Anu; von Boehmer, Lotta; Surace, Laura; Knuth, Alexander; van den Broek, Maries

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an important therapeutic option for the treatment of cancer. Growing evidence indicates that, besides inducing an irreversible DNA damage, radiotherapy promotes tumor-specific immune response, which significantly contribute to therapeutic efficacy. We postulate that radiotherapy activates tumor-associated dendritic cells, thus changing the tolerogenic tumor environment into an immunogenic one. PMID:23264910

  18. Clinical quality standards for radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study The technological progress that is currently being witnessed in the areas of diagnostic imaging, treatment planning systems and therapeutic equipment has caused radiotherapy to become a high-tech and interdisciplinary domain involving staff of various backgrounds. This allows steady improvement in therapy results, but at the same time makes the diagnostic, imaging and therapeutic processes more complex and complicated, requiring every stage of those processes to be planned, organized, controlled and improved so as to assure high quality of services provided. The aim of this paper is to present clinical quality standards for radiotherapy as developed by the author. Material and methods In order to develop the quality standards, a comparative analysis was performed between European and Polish legal acts adopted in the period of 1980-2006 and the universal industrial ISO 9001:2008 standard, defining requirements for quality management systems, and relevant articles published in 1984-2009 were reviewed, including applicable guidelines and recommendations of American, international, European and Polish bodies, such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) on quality assurance and management in radiotherapy. Results As a result, 352 quality standards for radiotherapy were developed and categorized into the following three groups: 1 – organizational standards; 2 – physico-technical standards and 3 – clinical standards. Conclusion Proposed clinical quality standards for radiotherapy can be used by any institution using ionizing radiation for medical purposes. However, standards are of value only if they are implemented, reviewed, audited and improved, and if there is a clear mechanism in place to monitor and address failure to meet agreed standards. PMID:23788854

  19. Second Malignant Neoplasms Following Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanath

    2012-01-01

    More than half of all cancer patients receive radiotherapy as a part of their treatment. With the increasing number of long-term cancer survivors, there is a growing concern about the risk of radiation induced second malignant neoplasm [SMN]. This risk appears to be highest for survivors of childhood cancers. The exact mechanism and dose-response relationship for radiation induced malignancy is not well understood, however, there have been growing efforts to develop strategies for the prevention and mitigation of radiation induced cancers. This review article focuses on the incidence, etiology, and risk factors for SMN in various organs after radiotherapy. PMID:23249860

  20. Metrological Issues in Molecular Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arienzo, Marco; Capogni, Marco; Smyth, Vere; Cox, Maurice; Johansson, Lena; Solc, Jaroslav; Bobin, Christophe; Rabus, Hans; Joulaeizadeh, Leila

    2014-08-01

    The therapeutic effect from molecular radiation therapy (MRT), on both tumour and normal tissue, is determined by the radiation absorbed dose. Recent research indicates that as a consequence of biological variation across patients the absorbed dose can vary, for the same administered activity, by as much as two orders of magnitude. The international collaborative EURAMET-EMRP project "Metrology for molecular radiotherapy (MetroMRT)" is addressing this problem. The overall aim of the project is to develop methods of calibrating and verifying clinical dosimetry in MRT. In the present paper an overview of the metrological issues in molecular radiotherapy is provided.

  1. [Which rules apply to hypofractionated radiotherapy?].

    PubMed

    Supiot, S; Clément-Colmou, K; Paris, F; Corre, I; Chiavassa, S; Delpon, G

    2015-10-01

    Hypofractionated radiotherapy is now more widely prescribed due to improved targeting techniques (intensity modulated radiotherapy, image-guided radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy). Low dose hypofractionated radiotherapy is routinely administered mostly for palliative purposes. High or very high dose hypofractionated irradiation must be delivered according to very strict procedures since every minor deviation can lead to major changes in dose delivery to the tumor volume and organs at risk. Thus, each stage of the processing must be carefully monitored starting from the limitations and the choice of the hypofractionation technique, tumour contouring and dose constraints prescription, planning and finally dose calculation and patient positioning verification.

  2. External radiotherapy in thyroid cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Tubiana, M.; Haddad, E.; Schlumberger, M.; Hill, C.; Rougier, P.; Sarrazin, D.

    1985-05-01

    Surgery is the most effective treatment for thyroid cancer; however, in some subsets of patients, the role of radiotherapy (RT) is important. The main indication for external-beam RT is incomplete surgery. When neoplastic tissue is left behind at surgery, RT must be considered, but only if an experienced surgeon feels that everything that can be done has been done. Generally, in those patients, the neoplastic tissue involves the larynx, trachea, esophagus, blood vessels or mediastinum. Of 539 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer treated at Villejuif, France, until 1976, 97 were treated by external radiotherapy after an incomplete surgical excision. Fifteen years after irradiation, the survival rate is 57% and is approximately 40% at 25 years. The relapse-free survival is lower (39% at 15 years). In patients irradiated with an adequate dose (greater than or equal to 50 Gy) to residual neoplastic tissue after incomplete surgery, the incidence of local recurrence is low (actuarial probability of local recurrence 11% at 15 years versus 23% for patients treated by surgery alone, although the irradiated patients had larger and more extensive tumors). This demonstrates the efficacy of external-beam radiotherapy. The effects of radiotherapy on a residual tumor can be monitored by a serum thyroglobulin assay. With regard to local control of tumors, the effectiveness of radioiodine administration is clearly lower. However, since radioiodine facilitates early detection of distant metastases, a combination of external RT and radioiodine is indicated and is well-tolerated.

  3. Radiotherapy T1 glottic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zablow, A.I.; Erba, P.S.; Sanfillippo, L.J.

    1989-11-01

    From 1970 to 1985, curative radiotherapy was administered to 63 patients with stage I carcinoma of the true vocal cords. Precision radiotherapeutic technique yields cure rates comparable to surgical results. Good voice quality was preserved in a high percentage of patients.

  4. Radiotherapy capacity in European countries: an analysis of the Directory of Radiotherapy Centres (DIRAC) database.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Izewska, Joanna; Anacak, Yavuz; Pynda, Yaroslav; Scalliet, Pierre; Boniol, Mathieu; Autier, Philippe

    2013-02-01

    Radiotherapy is used for cure or palliation in around half of patients with cancer. We analysed data on radiotherapy equipment in 33 European countries registered in the Directory of Radiotherapy Centres (DIRAC) database, managed by the International Atomic Energy Agency. As of July, 2012, Europe had 1286 active radiotherapy centres. The average number of teletherapy machines per radiotherapy centre ranged from 1·2 to 7·0 in different countries. Nordic countries, the UK, the Netherlands, and Slovenia all have large centres with four to ten teletherapy machines. Most western and southern European countries have several small centres with one or two machines, with few larger centres. The fragmentation in radiotherapy services that prevails in many European countries might affect the economic burden of radiotherapy and its quality. Eastern and southeastern European countries need to expand and modernise their radiotherapy equipment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Quality radiotherapy in rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Capirci, C; Amichetti, M; De Renzis, C

    2001-01-01

    The quality of radiotherapy significantly impacts on the results of treatment, in patients with rectal carcinoma, especially in terms of acute and late toxicity. Based on this assumption, the Italian Association of Radiation Oncology (AIRO) formulated a document aimed to define the standards of radiation treatment for rectal carcinomas. Two different levels of standard were described: a first level, considered as "minimal requirement", and a second level, considered as "optimal treatment". A retrospective evaluation, based on a questionnaire, revealed that in 1996, in most Italian Centers, patients affected by rectal carcinoma received radiation treatment within the first level of proposed standards. A subsequent analysis concerned the evaluation of the level of treatments applied in 2000. In this paper the radiotherapy standards proposed by the AIRO are described in the different phases of the radiation treatment.

  6. Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Norman R.; Pigott, Katharine H.; Brew-Graves, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT) as a treatment for breast cancer is a relatively new technique that is designed to be a replacement for whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in selected women suitable for breast-conserving therapy. This article reviews twelve reasons for the use of the technique, with a particular emphasis on targeted intra-operative radiotherapy (TARGIT) which uses X-rays generated from a portable device within the operating theatre immediately after the breast tumour (and surrounding margin of healthy tissue) has been removed. The delivery of a single fraction of radiotherapy directly to the tumour bed at the time of surgery, with the capability of adding EBRT at a later date if required (risk-adaptive technique) is discussed in light of recent results from a large multinational randomised controlled trial comparing TARGIT with EBRT. The technique avoids irradiation of normal tissues such as skin, heart, lungs, ribs and spine, and has been shown to improve cosmetic outcome when compared with EBRT. Beneficial aspects to both institutional and societal economics are discussed, together with evidence demonstrating excellent patient satisfaction and quality of life. There is a discussion of the published evidence regarding the use of IORT twice in the same breast (for new primary cancers) and in patients who would never be considered for EBRT because of their special circumstances (such as the frail, the elderly, or those with collagen vascular disease). Finally, there is a discussion of the role of the TARGIT Academy in developing and sustaining high standards in the use of the technique. PMID:25083504

  7. [Stereotactic radiotherapy for pelvic tumors].

    PubMed

    Mazeron, R; Fumagalli, I

    2014-01-01

    Extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy is booming. The development and spread of dedicated accelerators coupled with efficient methods of repositioning can now allow treatments of mobile lesions with moderate size, with high doses per fraction. Intuitively, except for the prostate, pelvic tumours, often requiring irradiation of regional lymph node drainage, lend little to this type of treatment. However, in some difficult circumstances, such as boost or re-radiation, stereotactic irradiation condition is promising and clinical experiences have already been reported.

  8. Adjuvant and Definitive Radiotherapy for Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sabolch, Aaron; Feng, Mary; Griffith, Kent; Hammer, Gary; Doherty, Gerard; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of both adjuvant and definitive radiotherapy on local control of adrenocortical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed from 58 patients with 64 instances of treatment for adrenocortical carcinoma at the University of Michigan's Multidisciplinary Adrenal Cancer Clinic. Thirty-seven of these instances were for primary disease, whereas the remaining 27 were for recurrent disease. Thirty-eight of the treatment regimens involved surgery alone, 10 surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and 16 definitive radiotherapy for unresectable disease. The effects of patient, tumor, and treatment factors were modeled simultaneously using multiple variable Cox proportional hazards regression for associations with local recurrence, distant recurrence, and overall survival. Results: Local failure occurred in 16 of the 38 instances that involved surgery alone, in 2 of the 10 that consisted of surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and in 1 instance of definitive radiotherapy. Lack of radiotherapy use was associated with 4.7 times the risk of local failure compared with treatment regimens that involved radiotherapy (95% confidence interval, 1.2-19.0; p = 0.030). Conclusions: Radiotherapy seems to significantly lower the risk of local recurrence/progression in patients with adrenocortical carcinoma. Adjuvant radiotherapy should be strongly considered after surgical resection.

  9. Radiotherapy and local control in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Valentini, V; Rosetto, M E; Fares, C; Mantini, G; Salvi, G; Turriziani, A

    1998-01-01

    Recurrence is a stage in the natural history of rectal cancer. Preoperative radiotherapy or postoperative radiochemotherapy lower the rate of recurrence, improving local control. From 1980 to 1997, at the "Divisione di Radioterapia" of the "Università Cattolica del S. Cuore" of Rome 380 patients with rectal cancer of early clinical stage T2-3, candidates for surgery for cure, underwent radiation therapy. 119 patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy (45-50 Gy); 45 patients underwent "sandwich" radiotherapy (45 Gy:27 Gy before and 28 Gy after surgery), of whom 7 were treated with preoperative radiotherapy alone; 145 patients underwent preoperative concomitant radiochemotherapy according to 3 different protocols, radiotherapy (38 Gy) combined with mitomycin C and 5-FU; radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) combined with cisplatin and 5-FU; radiotherapy (45 Gy) combined with 5-FU and folinic acid. 71 patients were treated with preoperative radiotherapy (38 Gy) combined with IORT (10 Gy). Median follow-up was 6 years. Overall local control was 85% at 3 years, 83% at 5 years, 81% at 10 years. The rate of local control at 5 years was: 76% for postoperative radiotherapy, 83% for "sandwich" radiotherapy, 84% for preoperative radiochemotherapy and 93% for preoperative radiotherapy combined with IORT. Local control was shown to be significantly better with preoperative treatment as compared to postoperative treatment (p = 0.02). The incidence of metastases was 35% in the patients with local recurrence and 16% in those with local control. The difference in survival was highly significant in patients with local control as compared to those with local recurrence: at 5 years 87% and 32% respectively. Patients with local control showed a lower incidence of metastasis and a better survival.

  10. [MRI-based radiotherapy planning].

    PubMed

    Largent, A; Nunes, J-C; Lafond, C; Périchon, N; Castelli, J; Rolland, Y; Acosta, O; de Crevoisier, R

    2017-07-06

    MRI-based radiotherapy planning is a topical subject due to the introduction of a new generation of treatment machines combining a linear accelerator and a MRI. One of the issues for introducing MRI in this task is the lack of information to provide tissue density information required for dose calculation. To cope with this issue, two strategies may be distinguished from the literature. Either a synthetic CT scan is generated from the MRI to plan the dose, or a dose is generated from the MRI based on physical underpinnings. Within the first group, three approaches appear: bulk density mapping assign a homogeneous density to different volumes of interest manually defined on a patient MRI; machine learning-based approaches model local relationship between CT and MRI image intensities from multiple data, then applying the model to a new MRI; atlas-based approaches use a co-registered training data set (CT-MRI) which are registered to a new MRI to create a pseudo CT from spatial correspondences in a final fusion step. Within the second group, physics-based approaches aim at computing the dose directly from the hydrogen contained within the tissues, quantified by MRI. Excepting the physics approach, all these methods generate a synthetic CT called "pseudo CT", on which radiotherapy planning will be finally realized. This literature review shows that atlas- and machine learning-based approaches appear more accurate dosimetrically. Bulk density approaches are not appropriate for bone localization. The fastest methods are machine learning and the slowest are atlas-based approaches. The less automatized are bulk density assignation methods. The physical approaches appear very promising methods. Finally, the validation of these methods is crucial for a clinical practice, in particular in the perspective of adaptive radiotherapy delivered by a linear accelerator combined with an MRI scanner. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  11. Radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Giaj-Levra, Niccolò; Sciascia, Savino; Fiorentino, Alba; Fersino, Sergio; Mazzola, Rosario; Ricchetti, Francesco; Roccatello, Dario; Alongi, Filippo

    2016-03-01

    The decision to offer radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases continues to be challenging. Radiotherapy might trigger the onset of connective tissue diseases by increasing the expression of self-antigens, diminishing regulatory T-cell activity, and activating effectors of innate immunity (dendritic cells) through Toll-like receptor-dependent mechanisms, all of which could potentially lead to breaks of immune tolerance. This potential risk has raised some debate among radiation oncologists about whether patients with connective tissue diseases can tolerate radiation as well as people without connective tissue diseases. Because the number of patients with cancer and connective tissue diseases needing radiotherapy will probably increase due to improvements in medical treatment and longer life expectancy, the issue of interactions between radiotherapy and connective tissue diseases needs to be clearer. In this Review, we discuss available data and evidence for patients with connective tissue diseases treated with radiotherapy.

  12. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Kevin M.; Doyle, Barney L.

    1996-01-01

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue.

  13. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for oligometastases.

    PubMed

    Tree, Alison C; Khoo, Vincent S; Eeles, Rosalind A; Ahmed, Merina; Dearnaley, David P; Hawkins, Maria A; Huddart, Robert A; Nutting, Christopher M; Ostler, Peter J; van As, Nicholas J

    2013-01-01

    The management of metastatic solid tumours has historically focused on systemic treatment given with palliative intent. However, radical surgical treatment of oligometastases is now common practice in some settings. The development of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), building on improvements in delivery achieved by intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy, now allows delivery of ablative doses of radiation to extracranial sites. Many non-randomised studies have shown that SBRT for oligometastases is safe and effective, with local control rates of about 80%. Importantly, these studies also suggest that the natural history of the disease is changing, with 2-5 year progression-free survival of about 20%. Although complete cure might be possible in a few patients with oligometastases, the aim of SBRT in this setting is to achieve local control and delay progression, and thereby also postpone the need for further treatment. We review published work showing that SBRT offers durable local control and the potential for progression-free survival in non-liver, non-lung oligometastatic disease at a range of sites. However, to test whether SBRT really does improve progression-free survival, randomised trials will be essential. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L.

    1996-08-20

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue. 25 figs.

  15. Improving postoperative radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Lipman, D; Pieters, B R; De Reijke, Theo M

    2017-10-01

    Prostate cancer has one of the highest incidences in the world, with good curative treatment options like radiotherapy and radical prostatectomy. Unfortunately, about 30% of the patients initially treated with curative intent will develop a recurrence and need adjuvant treatment. Five randomized trials covered the role of postoperative radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy, but there is still a lot of debate about which patients should receive postoperative radiotherapy. Areas covered: This review will give an overview on the available literature concerning post-operative radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy with an emphasis on the five randomized trials. Also, new imaging techniques like prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography (PSMA-PET) and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and the development of biomarkers like genomic classifiers will be discussed in the search for an improved selection of patients who will benefit from postoperative radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy. With new treatment techniques like Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy, toxicity profiles will be kept low. Expert commentary: Patients with biochemical recurrence following radical prostatectomy with an early rise in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) will benefit most from postoperative radiotherapy. In this way, patients with only high risk pathological features can avoid unnecessary treatment and toxicity, and early intervention in progressing patients would not compromise the outcome.

  16. Predictors for trismus in patients receiving radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    van der Geer, S Joyce; Kamstra, Jolanda I; Roodenburg, Jan L N; van Leeuwen, Marianne; Reintsema, Harry; Langendijk, Johannes A; Dijkstra, Pieter U

    2016-11-01

    Trismus, a restricted mouth opening in head and neck cancer patients may be caused by tumor infiltration in masticatory muscles, radiation-induced fibrosis or scarring after surgery. It may impede oral functioning severely. The aims of our study were to determine: (1) the incidence of trismus at various time points; and (2) the patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics that predict the development of trismus after radiotherapy in head and neck cancer patients using a large database (n = 641). Maximal mouth opening was measured prior to and 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, and 48 months after radiotherapy. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were analyzed as potential predictors for trismus using a multivariable logistic regression analysis. At six months after radiotherapy, 28.1% of the patients without trismus prior to radiotherapy developed trismus for the first time. At subsequent time points the incidence declined. Over a total period of 48 months after radiotherapy, the incidence of trismus was 3.6 per 10 person years at risk. Patients who had tumors located in the oral cavity, oropharynx or nasopharynx, and the salivary glands or ear, and who had a longer overall treatment time of radiotherapy, were more likely to develop trismus in the first six months after radiotherapy. Maximal mouth opening was a predictor for developing trismus at all time points. Incidence of trismus is 3.6 per 10 person years at risk. Tumor localization and overall treatment time of radiotherapy are predictors for developing trismus the first six months after radiotherapy. Maximal mouth opening is a significant predictor for developing trismus at all time points. Regular measurements of maximal mouth opening are needed to predict trismus.

  17. Radiotherapy in patients with cardiac pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Last, A

    1998-01-01

    Patients with permanent cardiac pacemakers occasionally require radiotherapy. Therapeutic irradiation may cause pacemakers to malfunction due to the effects of ionizing radiation or electromagnetic interference. Modern pacemakers, using complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry, differ from older bipolar semiconductor devices both in their sensitivity to damage and the types of malfunction observed. The mechanisms and types of radiotherapy-induced pacemaker malfunction are described and in vitro and in vivo studies of pacemaker irradiation are reviewed. Some simple precautions are recommended during the planning and administration of radiotherapy to minimize the risk of harm to patients with pacemakers.

  18. Radiogenomics and radiotherapy response modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Naqa, Issam; Kerns, Sarah L.; Coates, James; Luo, Yi; Speers, Corey; West, Catharine M. L.; Rosenstein, Barry S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2017-08-01

    Advances in patient-specific information and biotechnology have contributed to a new era of computational medicine. Radiogenomics has emerged as a new field that investigates the role of genetics in treatment response to radiation therapy. Radiation oncology is currently attempting to embrace these recent advances and add to its rich history by maintaining its prominent role as a quantitative leader in oncologic response modeling. Here, we provide an overview of radiogenomics starting with genotyping, data aggregation, and application of different modeling approaches based on modifying traditional radiobiological methods or application of advanced machine learning techniques. We highlight the current status and potential for this new field to reshape the landscape of outcome modeling in radiotherapy and drive future advances in computational oncology.

  19. [Radiotherapy of benign intracranial tumors].

    PubMed

    Delannes, M; Latorzeff, I; Chand, M E; Huchet, A; Dupin, C; Colin, P

    2016-09-01

    Most of the benign intracranial tumors are meningiomas, vestibular schwannomas, pituitary adenomas, craniopharyngiomas, and glomus tumors. Some of them grow very slowly, and can be observed without specific treatment, especially if they are asymptomatic. Symptomatic or growing tumors are treated by surgery, which is the reference treatment. When surgery is not possible, due to the location of the lesion, or general conditions, radiotherapy can be applied, as it is if there is a postoperative growing residual tumor, or a local relapse. Indications have to be discussed in polydisciplinary meetings, with precise evaluation of the benefit and risks of the treatments. The techniques to be used are the most modern ones, as multimodal imaging and image-guided radiation therapy. Stereotactic treatments, using fractionated or single doses depending on the size or the location of the tumors, are commonly realized, to avoid as much a possible the occurrence of late side effects.

  20. Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Contessa, Joseph N.; Griffith, Kent A.; Wolff, Elizabeth; Ensminger, William; Zalupski, Mark; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNTs) are rare malignant neoplasms considered to be resistant to radiotherapy (RT), although data on efficacy are scarce. We reviewed our institutional experience to further delineate the role of RT for patients with PNTs. Methods and Materials: Between 1986 and 2006, 36 patients with PNTs were treated with RT to 49 sites. Of these 36 patients, 23 had radiographic follow-up data, which were used to determine the tumor response rate and freedom from local progression. Long-term toxicity was graded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Results: The overall response rate to RT was 39% (13% complete response, 26% partial response, 56% stable disease, and 4% progressive disease). A significant difference in the freedom from local progression between the groups receiving either greater than or less than the median 2 Gy/fraction biologically equivalent dose of 49.6 Gy was found, with all radiographic progression occurring in patients who had received <=32 Gy. The actuarial 3-year local freedom from progression rate was 49%. Palliation was achieved in 90% of patients, with either improvement or resolution of symptoms after RT. Of 35 patients, 33 had metastatic disease at their referral for RT, and the median overall survival for this patient population was 2 years. Three long-term Grade 3 or greater toxicities were recorded. Conclusion: RT is an effective modality for achieving local control in patients with PNTs. RT produces high rates of symptomatic palliation and freedom from local progression. Prospective trials of radiotherapy for PNTs are warranted.

  1. Intraoperative Radiotherapy in Childhood Malignant Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Sohail R.; Haddy, Theresa B.; Ashayeri, Ebrahim; Goldson, Alfred L.

    1984-01-01

    A 12-year-old black male patient with glioblastoma multiforme was treated with intraoperative radiotherapy followed by conventional external beam radiation and chemotherapy. The authors' clinical experience with these therapeutic measures is discussed. PMID:6330375

  2. Heavy particle radiotherapy: prospects and pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Faju, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    The use of heavy particles in radiotherapy of tumor volumes is examined. Particles considered are protons, helium ions, heavy ions, negative pions, and fast neutrons. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed. (ACR)

  3. Imaging Instrumentation and Techniques for Precision Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parodi, Katia; Parodi, Katia; Thieke, Christian; Thieke, Christian

    Over the last decade, several technological advances have considerably improved the achievable precision of dose delivery in radiation therapy. Clinical exploitation of the superior tumor-dose conformality offered by modern radiotherapy techniques like intensity-modulated radiotherapy and ion beam therapy requires morphological and functional assessment of the tumor during the entire therapy chain from treatment planning to beam application and treatment response evaluation. This chapter will address the main rationale and role of imaging in state-of-the-art external beam radiotherapy. Moreover, it will present the status of novel imaging instrumentation and techniques being nowadays introduced in clinical use or still under development for image guidance and, ultimately, dose guidance of precision radiotherapy.

  4. [Conformal radiotherapy for vertebral bone metastasis].

    PubMed

    Faivre, J C; Py, J F; Vogin, G; Martinage, G; Salleron, J; Royer, P; Grandgirard, N; Pasquier, D; Thureau, S

    2016-10-01

    Analgesic external beam radiation therapy is a standard of care for patients with uncomplicated painful bone metastases and/or prevention of bone complications. In case of fracture risk, radiation therapy is performed after surgery in a consolidation of an analgesic purpose and stabilizing osteosynthesis. Radiotherapy is mandatory after vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty. Spinal cord compression - the only emergency in radiation therapy - is indicated postoperatively either exclusively for non surgical indication. Analgesic re-irradiation is possible in the case of insufficient response or recurrent pain after radiotherapy. Metabolic radiation, bisphosphonates or denosumab do not dissuade external radiation therapy for pain relief. Systemic oncological treatments can be suspended with a period of wash out given the risk of radiosensitization or recall phenomenon. Better yet, the intensity modulated radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy can be part of a curative strategy for oligometastatic patients and suggest new treatment prospects.

  5. [Radiotherapy of carcinoma of the salivary glands].

    PubMed

    Servagi-Vernat, S; Tochet, F

    2016-09-01

    Indication, doses, and technique of radiotherapy for salivary glands carcinoma are presented, and the contribution of neutrons and carbon ions. The recommendations for delineation of the target volumes and organs at risk are detailed.

  6. Historical aspects of heavy ion radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, M.R.

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents historical developments of heavy-ion radiotherapy including discussion of HILAC and HIMAC and discussion of cooperation between Japan and the United States, along with personal reflections.

  7. Intracranial aneurysm formation after radiotherapy for medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kamide, Tomoya; Mohri, Masanao; Misaki, Kouichi; Uchiyama, Naoyuki; Nakada, Mitsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The development of an intracranial aneurysm after radiotherapy is rare but secondary effect of cranial irradiation in a primary disease treatment. Case Description: The patient was a 17-year-old male adolescent who was diagnosed as having a posterior fossa medulloblastoma when he was 8 years old. He had undergone tumor resection with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. A distal posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm was identified by magnetic resonance imaging 8 years after radiotherapy and grew rapidly throughout the next 1 year. The patient underwent microsurgical clipping and was discharged without deficit. Conclusion: This experience demonstrates that physicians caring for patients who have undergone intracranial radiotherapy should carefully consider the possibility of an aneurysmal formation when conducting follow-up imaging. PMID:27999713

  8. Pontine calcification following radiotherapy: CT demonstration.

    PubMed

    Price, D B; Hotson, G C; Loh, J P

    1988-01-01

    Development of pontine calcifications following radiation therapy for suprasellar tumors is described in two patients, 5 and 9 years old. Post-radiotherapy brain calcifications are rare in the brain stem.

  9. Blisters - an unusual effect during radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Höller, U; Schubert, T; Budach, V; Trefzer, U; Beyer, M

    2013-11-01

    The skin reaction to radiation is regularly monitored in order to detect enhanced radiosensitivity of the patient, unexpected interactions (e.g. with drugs) or any inadvertent overdosage. It is important to distinguish secondary disease from radiation reaction to provide adequate treatment and to avoid unnecessary discontinuation of radiotherapy. A case of bullous eruption or blisters during radiotherapy of the breast is presented. Differential diagnoses bullous pemphigoid, pemphigus vulgaris, and bullous impetigo are discussed and treatment described.

  10. [Radiotherapy for small cell lung carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Pourel, N

    2016-10-01

    Radiotherapy for small cell lung carcinoma has known significant improvements over the past 10 years especially through routine use of PET-CT in the initial work-up and contouring before treatment. Prophylactic cranial irradiation remains a standard of care for locally advanced disease and is a subject of controversy for metastatic disease. A new indication for thoracic radiotherapy may soon arise for metastatic disease, still confirmation studies are ongoing.

  11. Radiotherapy in the treatment of vertebral hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Faria, S.L.; Schlupp, W.R.; Chiminazzo, H. Jr.

    1985-02-01

    Symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas are not common. Although radiotherapy has been used as treatment, the data are sparse concerning total dose, fractionation and results. The authors report nine patients with vertebral hemangioma treated with 3000-4000 rad, 200 rad/day, 5 fractions per week, followed from 6 to 62 months. Seventy-seven percent had complete or almost complete disappearance of the symptoms. Radiotherapy schedules are discussed.

  12. Stereotactic multiple are radiotherapy. IV--Haemangioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, P R; Chakrabarti, K B; Doughty, D; Plowman, P N

    1997-04-01

    Our initial experience in the treatment of haemangioblastoma using conventional external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy (radiosurgery), by the linear accelerator method, is reported. Six haemangioblastomas in five patients were treated with a mean follow-up of 40 months (range 14-60). Five haemangioblastomas in four patients were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy, where four showed complete radiological response and the fifth was static. Neurological symptoms and signs improved in those patients. The sixth haemangioblastoma was situated close to the pituitary and optic chiasm, and was treated with conventionally fractionated external beam radiotherapy. The lesion showed partial response. No complications were noted in this patient group. This series complements and extends the relatively sparse published literature demonstrating that radiotherapy is an effective option for treating haemangioblastomas. Radiosurgery often lends itself particularly well to these discrete lesions allowing highly focused treatment. For patients with multiple and metachronous cerebellar haemangioblastomas as part of the von Hipple-Lindau syndrome, the data support a policy of conventionally fractionated external beam radiotherapy to the whole cerebellum of 50-55 Gy followed, after a period of time, by radiosurgery to persisting lesions (patients 3 and 4).

  13. Radiotherapy for Vestibular Schwannomas: A Critical Review

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Erin S.; Suh, John H.

    2011-03-15

    Vestibular schwannomas are slow-growing tumors of the myelin-forming cells that cover cranial nerve VIII. The treatment options for patients with vestibular schwannoma include active observation, surgical management, and radiotherapy. However, the optimal treatment choice remains controversial. We have reviewed the available data and summarized the radiotherapeutic options, including single-session stereotactic radiosurgery, fractionated conventional radiotherapy, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, and proton beam therapy. The comparisons of the various radiotherapy modalities have been based on single-institution experiences, which have shown excellent tumor control rates of 91-100%. Both stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy have successfully improved cranial nerve V and VII preservation to >95%. The mixed data regarding the ideal hearing preservation therapy, inherent biases in patient selection, and differences in outcome analysis have made the comparison across radiotherapeutic modalities difficult. Early experience using proton therapy for vestibular schwannoma treatment demonstrated local control rates of 84-100% but disappointing hearing preservation rates of 33-42%. Efforts to improve radiotherapy delivery will focus on refined dosimetry with the goal of reducing the dose to the critical structures. As future randomized trials are unlikely, we suggest regimented pre- and post-treatment assessments, including validated evaluations of cranial nerves V, VII, and VIII, and quality of life assessments with long-term prospective follow-up. The results from such trials will enhance the understanding of therapy outcomes and improve our ability to inform patients.

  14. [Radiotherapy for breast cancer and pacemaker].

    PubMed

    Menard, J; Campana, F; Kirov, K M; Bollet, M-A; Dendale, R; Fournier-Bidoz, N; Marchand, V; Mazal, A; Estève, M; Fourquet, A; Kirova, Y M

    2011-06-01

    Patients with permanent cardiac pacemakers occasionally require radiotherapy. Therapeutic irradiation may cause pacemakers to malfunction due to the effects of ionizing radiation or electromagnetic interference. We studied the breast cancer patients who needed breast and/or chest wall and lymph node irradiation to assess the feasibility and tolerance in this population of patients. From November 2008 to December 2009, more than 900 patients received radiotherapy for their breast cancer in our department using megavoltage linear accelerator (X 4-6 MV and electrons). Among them, seven patients were with permanent pacemaker. All patients have been treated to the breast and chest wall and/or lymph nodes. Total dose to breast and/or chest wall was 50 Gy/25 fractions and 46 Gy/23 fractions to lymph nodes. Patients who underwent conserving surgery followed by breast irradiation were boosted when indicated to tumour bed with 16 Gy/8 fractions. All patients were monitored everyday in presence of radiation oncologist to follow the function of their pacemaker. All pacemakers were controlled before and after radiotherapy by the patients' cardiologist. Seven patients were referred in our department for postoperative breast cancer radiotherapy. Among them, only one patient was declined for radiotherapy and underwent mastectomy without radiotherapy. In four cases the pacemaker was repositioned before the beginning of radiotherapy. Six patients, aged between 48 and 84 years underwent irradiation for their breast cancer. Four patients were treated with conserving surgery followed by breast radiotherapy and two with mastectomy followed by chest wall and internal mammary chain, supra- and infra-clavicular lymph node irradiation. The dose to the pacemaker generator was kept below 2 Gy. There was no pacemaker dysfunction observed during the radiotherapy. The multidisciplinary work with position change of the pacemaker before radiotherapy and everyday monitoring permitted the safe

  15. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, Eirik; Søvik, Åste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Øyvind S.; Rune Olsen, Dag

    2006-10-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO2-related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO2-related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure (fields

  16. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Testicular Seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, Richard B.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Beard, Clair J.

    2012-07-15

    Virtually all patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are cured regardless of postorchiectomy management. For patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, late toxicity is a major concern. However, toxicity may be limited by radiotherapy techniques that minimize radiation exposure of healthy normal tissues. This article is an evidence-based review that provides radiotherapy treatment planning recommendations for testicular seminoma. The minority of Stage I patients who choose adjuvant treatment over surveillance may be considered for (1) para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy in 10 fractions, or (2) carboplatin chemotherapy consisting of area under the curve, AUC = 7 Multiplication-Sign 1-2 cycles. Two-dimensional radiotherapy based on bony anatomy is a simple and effective treatment for Stage IIA or IIB testicular seminoma. Centers with expertise in vascular and nodal anatomy may consider use of anteroposterior-posteroanterior fields based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy instead. For modified dog-leg fields delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions, clinical studies support placement of the inferior border at the top of the acetabulum. Clinical and nodal mapping studies support placement of the superior border of all radiotherapy fields at the top of the T12 vertebral body. For Stage IIA and IIB patients, an anteroposterior-posteroanterior boost is then delivered to the adenopathy with a 2-cm margin to the block edge. The boost dose consists of 10 Gy in 5 fractions for Stage IIA and 16 Gy in 8 fractions for Stage IIB. Alternatively, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy for 3 cycles or etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for 4 cycles may be delivered to Stage IIA or IIB patients (e.g., if they have a horseshoe kidney, inflammatory bowel disease, or a history of radiotherapy).

  17. Modelling and simulation of radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, Norman F.

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, models are described which have been developed to model both the way in which a population of cells respond to radiation and the way in which a population of patients respond to radiotherapy to assist the conduct of clinical trials in silico. Population balance techniques have been used to simulate the age distribution of tumour cells in the cell cycle. Sensitivity to radiation is not constant round the cell cycle and a single fraction of radiation changes the age distribution. Careful timing of further fractions of radiation can be used to maximize the damage delivered to the tumour while minimizing damage to normal tissue. However, tumour modelling does not necessarily predict patient outcome. A separate model has been established to predict the course of a brain cancer called glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The model considers the growth of the tumour and its effect on the normal brain. A simple representation is included of the health status of the patient and hence the type of treatment offered. It is concluded that although these and similar models have a long way yet to be developed, they are beginning to have an impact on the development of clinical practice.

  18. A systematic review of antiproton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Martin-Immanuel; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Wilkens, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Antiprotons have been proposed as possible particles for radiotherapy; over the past years, the renewed interest in the potential biomedical relevance led to an increased research activity. It is the aim of this review to deliver a comprehensive overview regarding the evidence accumulated so far, analysing the background and depicting the current status of antiprotons in radiotherapy. A literature search has been conducted, including major scientific and commercial databases. All articles and a number of relevant conference abstracts published in the respective field have been included in this systematic review. The physical basis of antiproton radiotherapy is complex; however, the characterisation of the energy deposition profile supports its potential use in radiotherapy. Also the dosimetry improved considerably over the past few years. Regarding the biological properties, data on the effects on cells are presented; however, definite conclusions regarding the relative biological effectiveness cannot be made at the moment and radiobiological evidence of enhanced effectiveness remains scarce. In addition, there is new evidence supporting the potential imaging properties, for example for online dose verification. Clinical settings which might profit from the use of antiprotons have been further tracked. Judging from the evidence available so far, clinical constellations requiring optimal sparing in the entrance region of the beam and re-irradiations might profit most from antiproton radiotherapy. While several open questions remain to be answered, first steps towards a thorough characterisation of this interesting modality have been made.

  19. A systematic review of antiproton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Martin-Immanuel; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Wilkens, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Antiprotons have been proposed as possible particles for radiotherapy; over the past years, the renewed interest in the potential biomedical relevance led to an increased research activity. It is the aim of this review to deliver a comprehensive overview regarding the evidence accumulated so far, analysing the background and depicting the current status of antiprotons in radiotherapy. A literature search has been conducted, including major scientific and commercial databases. All articles and a number of relevant conference abstracts published in the respective field have been included in this systematic review. The physical basis of antiproton radiotherapy is complex; however, the characterisation of the energy deposition profile supports its potential use in radiotherapy. Also the dosimetry improved considerably over the past few years. Regarding the biological properties, data on the effects on cells are presented; however, definite conclusions regarding the relative biological effectiveness cannot be made at the moment and radiobiological evidence of enhanced effectiveness remains scarce. In addition, there is new evidence supporting the potential imaging properties, for example for online dose verification. Clinical settings which might profit from the use of antiprotons have been further tracked. Judging from the evidence available so far, clinical constellations requiring optimal sparing in the entrance region of the beam and re-irradiations might profit most from antiproton radiotherapy. While several open questions remain to be answered, first steps towards a thorough characterisation of this interesting modality have been made.

  20. Fiducial marker guided prostate radiotherapy: a review.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Angela G M; Jain, Suneil; Hounsell, Alan R; O'Sullivan, Joe M

    2016-12-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) is an essential tool in the accurate delivery of modern radiotherapy techniques. Prostate radiotherapy positioned using skin marks or bony anatomy may be adequate for delivering a relatively homogeneous whole-pelvic radiotherapy dose, but these surrogates are not reliable when using reduced margins, dose escalation or hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Fiducial markers (FMs) for prostate IGRT have been in use since the 1990s. They require surgical implantation and provide a surrogate for the position of the prostate gland. A variety of FMs are available and they can be used in a number of ways. This review aimed to establish the evidence for using prostate FMs in terms of feasibility, implantation procedures, types of FMs used, FM migration, imaging modalities used and the clinical impact of FMs. A search strategy was defined and a literature search was carried out in Medline. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied, which resulted in 50 articles being included in this review. The evidence demonstrates that FMs provide a more accurate surrogate for the position of the prostate than either external skin marks or bony anatomy. A combination of FM alignment and soft-tissue analysis is currently the most effective and widely available approach to ensuring accuracy in prostate IGRT. FM implantation is safe and well tolerated. FM migration is possible but minimal. Standardization of all techniques and procedures in relation to the use of prostate FMs is required. Finally, a clinical trial investigating a non-surgical alternative to prostate FMs is introduced.

  1. A dose comparison of proton radiotherapy and photon radiotherapy for pediatric brain tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. Y.; Cho, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of photon radiotherapy and to compare the dose of treatment planning between proton radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for pediatric brain tumor patients. This study was conducted in five pediatric brain tumor patients who underwent craniospinal irradiation treatment from October 2013 to April 2014 in the hospital. The study compared organs at risk (OARs) by assessing the dose distribution of normal tissue from the proton plan and 3D-CRT. Furthermore, this study assessed the treatment plans by looking at the homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI). As a result, the study revealed OARs due to the small volume proton radiotherapy dose distribution in the normal tissue. Also, by comparing HI and CI between the 3D-CRT and proton radiotherapy plan, the study found that the dose of proton radiotherapy plan was homogenized. When conducting 3D-CRT and proton radiotherapy in a dose-volume histogram comparison, the dose of distribution turned out to be low. Consequently, proton radiotherapy is used for protecting the normal tissue, and is used in tumor tissue as a homogenized dose for effective treatment.

  2. Postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer : Morbidity of local-only or local-plus-pelvic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Waldstein, Cora; Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard; Widder, Joachim; Goldner, Gregor

    2017-09-19

    The aim of this work was to characterise actuarial incidence and prevalence of early and late side effects of local versus pelvic three-dimensional conformal postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Based on a risk-adapted protocol, 575 patients received either local (n = 447) or local-plus-pelvic (n = 128) radiotherapy. Gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) side effects (≥grade 2 RTOG/EORTC criteria) were prospectively assessed. Maximum morbidity, actuarial incidence rate, and prevalence rates were compared between the two groups. For local radiotherapy, median follow-up was 68 months, and the mean dose was 66.7 Gy. In pelvic radiotherapy, the median follow-up was 49 months, and the mean local and pelvic doses were 66.9 and 48.3 Gy respectively. Early GI side effects ≥ G2 were detected in 26% and 42% of patients respectively (p < 0.001). Late GI adverse events were detected in 14% in both groups (p = 0.77). The 5‑year actuarial incidence rates were 14% and 14%, while the prevalence rates were 2% and 0% respectively. Early GU ≥ G2 side effects were detected in 15% and 16% (p = 0.96), while late GU morbidity was detected in 18% and 24% (p = 0.001). The 5‑year actuarial incidence rates were 16% and 35% (p = 0.001), while the respective prevalence rates were 6% and 8%. Despite the low prevalence of side effects, postoperative pelvic radiotherapy results in significant increases in the actuarial incidence of early GI and late GU morbidity using a conventional 4‑field box radiotherapy technique. Advanced treatment techniques like intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) should therefore be considered in pelvic radiotherapy to potentially reduce these side effects.

  3. Oral verrucous carcinoma. Treatment with radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, M.K.; Sankaranarayanan, R.; Padmanabhan, T.K.; Madhu, C.S.

    1988-02-01

    Fifty-two cases of oral verrucous carcinoma treated with radiotherapy at the Regional Cancer Centre, Trivandrum, Kerala, India in 1982 were evaluated to determine the distribution within the oral cavity, clinical extent, and effectiveness of radiotherapy in controlling the disease. The most common site was the buccal mucosa. Fifty percent of the patients had clinically negative regional lymph nodes and 33% were in earlier stages (T1, T2, N0, and M0). The overall 3-year no evidence of disease (NED) survival rate was 44%. The 3-year NED survival rate with radium implant was 86%. We cannot comment on anaplastic transformation after radiotherapy because our treatment failures have not been subjected for biopsy concerning this matter. Because the results are comparable with those of well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, we think that the treatment policies advocated for oral squamous cell carcinoma are also applicable to oral verrucous carcinoma.

  4. [Good practice of image-guided radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Créhange, G; Castelli, J; Lafond, C; Delpon, G

    2015-10-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) aims to take into account the anatomical variations occurring during the course of radiotherapy, by direct or indirect visualization of the target volume followed by a corrective action. The movements of the target, or at least the set-up errors are corrected by moving the treatment table, corresponding to the simplest and most validated IGRT modality in a standard practice. The deformations of the target volume and organs at risk are however much more common, and unfortunately much more complicated to consider, requiring multiple planning before or during the treatment, corresponding to the adaptive radiotherapy strategies. The planning target volume must be carefully chosen according to these anatomic variations. This article reviews the modalities of IGRT, standard or under evaluation, according to the different tumour sites. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  5. Operations experience at the Bevalac radiotherapy facility

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.; Criswell, T.L.; Howard, J.; Chu, W.T.; Singh, R.P.; Geller, D.; Nyman, M.

    1981-03-01

    During the first years of Bevalac operation the biomedical effort concentrated on radiobiology work, laying the foundation for patient radiotherapy. A dedicated radiotherapy area was created in 1978, and in 1979 full-scale patient treatment was begun. As of now over 500 treatments with carbon, neon and argon beams have been delivered to about 50 patients, some as boosts from other modalities and some as complete heavy ion treatments. Up to 12 patients per day have been treated in this facility. Continuing efforts in refining techniques and operating procedures are increasing efficiency and accuracy of treatments, and are contributing to the alleviation of scheduling difficulties caused by the unique requirements of radiotherapy with human patients.

  6. Differences in breast tissue oxygenation following radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dornfeld, Ken; Gessert, Charles E; Renier, Colleen M; McNaney, David D; Urias, Rodolfo E; Knowles, Denise M; Beauduy, Jean L; Widell, Sherry L; McDonald, Bonita L

    2011-08-01

    Tissue perfusion and oxygenation changes following radiotherapy may result from and/or contribute to the toxicity of treatment. Breast tissue oxygenation levels were determined in the treated and non-treated breast 1 year after radiotherapy for breast conserving treatment. Transcutaneous oxygenation varied between subjects in both treated and non-treated breast. Subjects without diabetes mellitus (n=16) had an average oxygenation level of 64.8 ± 19.9mmHg in the irradiated breast and an average of 72.3 ± 18.1mmHg (p=0.018) at the corresponding location in the control breast. Patients with diabetes (n=4) showed a different oxygenation pattern, with lower oxygenation levels in control tissue and no decrease in the irradiated breast. This study suggests oxygenation levels in normal tissues vary between patients and may respond differently after radiotherapy.

  7. Assessment of post-radiotherapy salivary glands

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, S C H; Wu, V W C; Kwong, D L W; Ying, M T C

    2011-01-01

    Salivary glands are usually irradiated during radiotherapy for head and neck cancers, which can lead to radiation-induced damage. Radiation-induced xerostomia (oral dryness) is the most common post-radiotherapy complication for head and neck cancer patients and can reduce the patient’s quality of life. Accurate and efficient salivary gland assessment methods provide a better understanding of the cause and degree of xerostomia, and may help in patient management. At present, there are different methods for the assessment of salivary gland hypofunction; however, none of them are considered to be standard procedure. This article reviews the value of common methods in the assessment of post-radiotherapy salivary glands. PMID:21511748

  8. One hundred years of radiotherapy in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Dincer, M; Kuter, S

    2001-10-01

    The study and practice of radiology in Turkey began in 1897, only 2 years after the discovery of X-rays. A simple X-ray machine was constructed in Istanbul, consisting of a Crookes tube, a Ruhmkorff coil, and a home-made battery. This machine was first used on wounded soldiers, for diagnostic purposes. The first report of X-rays being used therapeutically in Turkey was published in a national journal in 1904. By 1933, the most up-to-date radiotherapy equipment of the time had been installed in every major city in the country. Innovative radiotherapy techniques, such as rotational treatment, were also being tried in 1930s. Today, there are 45 radiotherapy centres in Turkey, and 400 radiation oncologists and 80 medical physicists practise there.

  9. Radiotherapy-induced hypopituitarism: a review.

    PubMed

    Sathyapalan, Thozhukat; Dixit, Sanjay

    2012-05-01

    Hypopituitarism is a disorder caused by impaired hormonal secretions from the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Radiotherapy is the most common cause of iatrogenic hypopituitarism. The hypothalamic-pituitary axis inadvertently gets irradiated in patients receiving prophylactic cranial radiotherapy for leukemia, total body irradiation and radiotherapy for intracranial, base skull, sinonasal and nasopharyngeal tumors. Radiation-induced hypopituitarism (RIH) is insidious, progressive and largely nonreversible. Mostly, RIH involves one hypothalamic-pituitary axis; however, multiple hormonal axes deficiency starts developing at higher doses. Although the clinical effects of the hypopituitarism are more profound in children and young adults, its implications in older adults are being increasingly recognized. The risk continues to persist or increase up to 10 years following radiation exposure. The clinical management of hypopituitarism is challenging both for the patients and healthcare providers. Here we have reviewed the scale of the problem, the risk factors and the management of RIH.

  10. [Recent developments in radiotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Seong, Jinsil

    2004-12-01

    With the accumulation of clinical experiences, the efficacy of radiotherapy has been recognized in management scheme for HCC. While hepatologists are beginning to show less reluctance for applying radiotherapy to the treatment of HCC, it is necessary that the hepatologists be informed of the rapid developments in technical strategy for radiation oncology. Recent advances in several technologies have opened a new era in radiation oncology. Modern imaging technologies can provide a 3-dimensional model of patient's anatomy, and this allows radiation oncologists to identify accurate tumor volumes as well as the tumors' relationship with the adjacent normal tissues. Moreover, the development of the computer-controlled multileaf collimator systems now enables physicians to perform precise beam shaping and to modulate the radiation dose distribution. A combination of these systems, 3-DCRT, is rapidly replacing the more conventional 2-D radiotherapy. 3-DCRT has evolved into a more sophisticated technology, intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). In IMRT, with the powerful computer-aided optimization process, the radiation dose can be delivered to the target using highly complex isodose profiles. This new technology has been further developed into IGRT, which combines the CT-images scanning system and radiation equipments into one hardware package, and this system is currently ready for clinical application. In parallel with the radiation technologies described above, the strategy of stereotactic radiation has evolved from the conventional linear accelerator-based system to a gammaknife, and more recently, to a cyberknife. These systems are primarily based on the concept of radiosurgery. Currently, various radiation technologies have been adopted for the radiotherapy of HCC. In this article, each strategy will be discussed as well as the indications for radiotherapy and the radiation-related complications.

  11. Meningioma after radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, M; Rosenstein, M; Figura, J H

    1999-08-01

    The most common second primary tumors after treatment of childhood Hodgkin's disease are leukemia, lymphoma, breast cancer, soft tissue sarcoma, and thyroid cancer. Although intracranial meningioma has been reported after radiotherapy to the scalp for benign conditions and for intracranial primary brain tumors, this appears to be an extremely rare sequelae of treatment for Hodgkin's disease. The authors describe a 15-year-old boy who underwent radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease and in whom a meningioma developed in the posterior fossa 27 years later.

  12. Pelvic radiotherapy and sexual function in women

    PubMed Central

    Froeding, Ligita Paskeviciute

    2015-01-01

    Background During the past decade there has been considerable progress in developing new radiation methods for cancer treatment. Pelvic radiotherapy constitutes the primary or (neo) adjuvant treatment of many pelvic cancers e.g., locally advanced cervical and rectal cancer. There is an increasing focus on late effects and an increasing awareness that patient reported outcomes (PROs) i.e., patient assessment of physical, social, psychological, and sexual functioning provides the most valid information on the effects of cancer treatment. Following cure of cancer allow survivors focus on quality of life (QOL) issues; sexual functioning has proved to be one of the most important aspects of concern in long-term survivors. Methods An updated literature search in PubMed was performed on pelvic radiotherapy and female sexual functioning/dysfunction. Studies on gynaecological, urological and gastrointestinal cancers were included. The focus was on the period from 2010 to 2014, on studies using PROs, on potential randomized controlled trials (RCTs) where female sexual dysfunction (FSD) at least constituted a secondary outcome, and on studies reporting from modern radiotherapy modalities. Results The literature search revealed a few RCTs with FSD evaluated as a PRO and being a secondary outcome measure in endometrial and in rectal cancer patients. Very limited information could be extracted regarding FSD in bladder, vulva, and anal cancer patients. The literature before and after 2010 confirms that pelvic radiotherapy, independent on modality, increases the risk significantly for FSD both compared to data from age-matched healthy control women and compared to data on patients treated by surgery only. There was only very limited data available on modern radiotherapy modalities. These are awaited during the next five years. Several newer studies confirm that health care professionals are still reluctant to discuss treatment induced sexual dysfunction with patients. Conclusions

  13. Radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei

    2013-03-15

    Radiotherapy is an indispensible part of the management of all stages of breast cancer. In this article, the common indications for radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer (stages 0, I, and II) are reviewed, including whole-breast radiotherapy as part of breast-conserving treatment for early invasive breast cancer and pre-invasive disease of ductal carcinoma in situ, post-mastectomy radiotherapy, locoregional radiotherapy, and partial breast irradiation. Key clinical studies that underpin our current practice are discussed briefly.

  14. The Leicester radiotherapy bite block: an aid to head and neck radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hollows, P; Hayter, J P; Vasanthan, S

    2001-02-01

    We describe the construction of a custom-made bite block to be used during external beam radiotherapy to the oral cavity. The bite block is made with standard maxillofacial prosthetic techniques and materials. The design allows accurate and reproducible positioning of the perioral tissues to aid planning of radiotherapy and treatment. The compressibility of this device improves comfort for the patient, while it is in use.

  15. [Stereotactic body radiotherapy for liver tumors: State of the art].

    PubMed

    Riou, O; Azria, D; Mornex, F

    2017-09-06

    Thanks to the improvement in radiotherapy physics, biology, computing and imaging, patients presenting with liver tumors can be efficiently treated by radiation. Radiotherapy has been included in liver tumors treatment guidelines at all disease stages. Liver stereotactic radiotherapy has to be preferred to standard fractionated radiotherapy whenever possible, as potentially more efficient because of higher biological equivalent dose. Liver stereotactic radiotherapy planning and delivery require extensive experience and optimal treatment quality at every step, thus limiting its availability to specialized centres. Multicentre studies are difficult to develop due to a large technical heterogeneity. Respiratory management, image guidance and immobilization are considerations as important as machine type. The use of multimodal planning imaging is compulsory to achieve expected contouring quality. Treatment efficacy is difficult to assess following liver stereotactic radiotherapy, but local control is high and toxicity unusual. As a consequence, liver stereotactic radiotherapy is part of multimodal and multidisciplinary management of liver tumors. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  16. Post-radiotherapy hypothyroidism in dogs treated for thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Amores-Fuster, I; Cripps, P; Blackwood, L

    2017-03-01

    Hypothyroidism is a common adverse event after head and neck radiotherapy in human medicine, but uncommonly reported in canine patients. Records of 21 dogs with histologically or cytologically confirmed thyroid carcinoma receiving definitive or hypofractionated radiotherapy were reviewed. Nine cases received 48 Gy in 12 fractions, 10 received 36 Gy in 4 fractions and 2 received 32 Gy in 4 fractions. Seventeen cases had radiotherapy in a post-operative setting. Ten cases developed hypothyroidism (47.6%) after radiotherapy. The development of hypothyroidism was not associated with the radiotherapy protocol used. Median time to diagnosis of hypothyroidism was 6 months (range, 1-13 months). Hypothyroidism is a common side effect following radiotherapy for thyroid carcinomas. Monitoring of thyroid function following radiotherapy is recommended. No specific risk factors have been identified.

  17. Breast Cancer Patients’ Experience of External-Beam Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schnur, Julie B.; Ouellette, Suzanne C.; Bovbjerg, Dana H.; Montgomery, Guy H.

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a critical component of treatment for the majority of women with breast cancer, particularly those who receive breast conserving surgery. Although medically beneficial, radiotherapy can take a physical and psychological toll on patients. However, little is known about the specific thoughts and feelings experienced by women undergoing breast cancer radiotherapy. Therefore, the study aim was to use qualitative research methods to develop an understanding of these thoughts and feelings based on 180 diary entries, completed during radiotherapy by 15 women with Stage 0-III breast cancer. Thematic analysis identified four primary participant concerns: (a) a preoccupation with time; (b) fantasies (both optimistic and pessimistic) about life following radiotherapy; (c) the toll their side-effect experience takes on their self-esteem; and (d) feeling mystified by radiotherapy. These themes are consistent with previous literature on illness and identity. These findings have implications for the treatment and care of women undergoing breast cancer radiotherapy. PMID:19380502

  18. [Hopes of high dose-rate radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Fouillade, Charles; Favaudon, Vincent; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Romeo, Paul-Henri; Bourhis, Jean; Verrelle, Pierre; Devauchelle, Patrick; Patriarca, Annalisa; Heinrich, Sophie; Mazal, Alejandro; Dutreix, Marie

    2017-04-01

    In this review, we present the synthesis of the newly acquired knowledge concerning high dose-rate irradiations and the hopes that these new radiotherapy modalities give rise to. The results were presented at a recent symposium on the subject. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  19. Radiotherapy for inverted papilloma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Levendag, P C; Annyas, A A; Escajadillo, J R; Elema, J D

    1984-06-01

    Inverted papilloma is an infrequent tumour of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses associated with controversy. The incidence of carcinoma in situ associated with inverted papilloma, has not been very well documented until now. Therefore, we present a case report characterized by an aggressive clinical behaviour, treated by extensive surgery and ultimately controlled by radiotherapy.

  20. Gold Nanoparticle Hyperthermia Reduces Radiotherapy Dose

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lynn; Slatkin, Daniel N.; Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Vadas, Timothy M.; Smilowitz, Henry M.

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles can absorb near infrared light, resulting in heating and ablation of tumors. Gold nanoparticles have also been used for enhancing the dose of X-rays in tumors during radiotherapy. The combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy is synergistic, importantly allowing a reduction in X-ray dose with improved therapeutic results. Here we intratumorally infused small 15 nm gold nanoparticles engineered to be transformed from infrared-transparent to infrared-absorptive by the tumor, which were then heated by infrared followed by X-ray treatment. Synergy was studied using a very radioresistant subcutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCCVII) in mice. It was found that the dose required to control 50% of the tumors, normally 55 Gy, could be reduced to <15 Gy (a factor of >3.7). Gold nanoparticles therefore provide a method to combine hyperthermia and radiotherapy to drastically reduce the X-ray radiation needed, thus sparing normal tissue, reducing the side effects, and making radiotherapy more effective. PMID:24990355

  1. Integer programming for improving radiotherapy treatment efficiency.

    PubMed

    Lv, Ming; Li, Yi; Kou, Bo; Zhou, Zhili

    2017-01-01

    Patients received by radiotherapy departments are diverse and may be diagnosed with different cancers. Therefore, they need different radiotherapy treatment plans and thus have different needs for medical resources. This research aims to explore the best method of scheduling the admission of patients receiving radiotherapy so as to reduce patient loss and maximize the usage efficiency of service resources. A mix integer programming (MIP) model integrated with special features of radiotherapy is constructed. The data used here is based on the historical data collected and we propose an exact method to solve the MIP model. Compared with the traditional First Come First Served (FCFS) method, the new method has boosted patient admission as well as the usage of linear accelerators (LINAC) and beds. The integer programming model can be used to describe the complex problem of scheduling radio-receiving patients, to identify the bottleneck resources that hinder patient admission, and to obtain the optimal LINAC-bed radio under the current data conditions. Different management strategies can be implemented by adjusting the settings of the MIP model. The computational results can serve as a reference for the policy-makers in decision making.

  2. Results of radiotherapy for Peyronie's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Niewald, Marcus . E-mail: ramnie@uniklinikum-saarland.de; Wenzlawowicz, Knut v.; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Wisser, Lothar; Derouet, Harry; Ruebe, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively review the results of radiotherapy for Peyronie's disease. Patients and Methods: In the time interval 1983-2000, 154 patients in our clinic were irradiated for Peyronie's disease. Of those, 101 had at least one complete follow-up data set and are the subject of this study. In the majority of patients, penis deviation was between 30 and 50{sup o}, there were one or two indurated foci with a diameter between 5 and 15 mm. Pain was recorded in 48/92 patients. Seventy-two of the 101 patients received radiotherapy with a total dose of 30 Gy, and 25 received 36 Gy in daily fractions of 2.0 Gy. The remaining patients received the following dosage: 34 Gy (1 patient), 38-40 Gy (3 patients). Mean duration of follow-up was 5 years. Results: The best results ever at any time during follow-up were an improvement of deviation in 47%, reduction of number of foci in 32%, reduction of size of foci in 49%, and less induration in 52%. Approximately 50% reported pain relief after radiotherapy. There were 28 patients with mild acute dermatitis and only 4 patients with mild urethritis. There were no long-term side effects. Conclusion: Our results compare well with those of other studies in the literature. In our patient cohort, radiotherapy was an effective therapy option with only very rare and mild side effects.

  3. TOPICAL REVIEW Dosimetry for ion beam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karger, Christian P.; Jäkel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2010-11-01

    Recently, ion beam radiotherapy (including protons as well as heavier ions) gained considerable interest. Although ion beam radiotherapy requires dose prescription in terms of iso-effective dose (referring to an iso-effective photon dose), absorbed dose is still required as an operative quantity to control beam delivery, to characterize the beam dosimetrically and to verify dose delivery. This paper reviews current methods and standards to determine absorbed dose to water in ion beam radiotherapy, including (i) the detectors used to measure absorbed dose, (ii) dosimetry under reference conditions and (iii) dosimetry under non-reference conditions. Due to the LET dependence of the response of films and solid-state detectors, dosimetric measurements are mostly based on ion chambers. While a primary standard for ion beam radiotherapy still remains to be established, ion chamber dosimetry under reference conditions is based on similar protocols as for photons and electrons although the involved uncertainty is larger than for photon beams. For non-reference conditions, dose measurements in tissue-equivalent materials may also be necessary. Regarding the atomic numbers of the composites of tissue-equivalent phantoms, special requirements have to be fulfilled for ion beams. Methods for calibrating the beam monitor depend on whether passive or active beam delivery techniques are used. QA measurements are comparable to conventional radiotherapy; however, dose verification is usually single field rather than treatment plan based. Dose verification for active beam delivery techniques requires the use of multi-channel dosimetry systems to check the compliance of measured and calculated dose for a representative sample of measurement points. Although methods for ion beam dosimetry have been established, there is still room for developments. This includes improvement of the dosimetric accuracy as well as development of more efficient measurement techniques.

  4. Neo-adjuvant radiotherapy in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Glimelius, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    In rectal cancer treatment, attention has focused on the local primary tumour and the regional tumour cell deposits to diminish the risk of a loco-regional recurrence. Several large randomized trials have also shown that combinations of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy have markedly reduced the risk of a loco-regional recurrence, but this has not yet had any major influence on overall survival. The best results have been achieved when the radiotherapy has been given preoperatively. Preoperative radiotherapy improves loco-regional control even when surgery has been optimized to improve lateral clearance, i.e., when a total mesorectal excision has been performed. The relative reduction is then 50%-70%. The value of radiotherapy has not been tested in combination with more extensive surgery including lateral lymph node clearance, as practised in some Asian countries. Many details about how the radiotherapy is performed are still open for discussion, and practice varies between countries. A highly fractionated radiation schedule (5 Gy × 5), proven efficacious in many trials, has gained much popularity in some countries, whereas a conventionally fractionated regimen (1.8-2.0 Gy × 25-28), often combined with chemotherapy, is used in other countries. The additional therapy adds morbidity to the morbidity that surgery causes, and should therefore be administered only when the risk of loco-regional recurrence is sufficiently high. The best integration of the weakest modality, to date the drugs (conventional cytotoxics and biologicals) is not known. A new generation of trials exploring the best sequence of treatments is required. Furthermore, there is a great need to develop predictors of response, so that treatment can be further individualized and not solely based upon clinical factors and anatomic imaging. PMID:24379566

  5. Technical advances in external radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Chul; Kang, Min Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy techniques have substantially improved in the last two decades. After the introduction of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, radiotherapy has been increasingly used for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Currently, more advanced techniques, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR), and charged particle therapy, are used for the treatment of HCC. IMRT can escalate the tumor dose while sparing the normal tissue even though the tumor is large or located near critical organs. SABR can deliver a very high radiation dose to small HCCs in a few fractions, leading to high local control rates of 84%-100%. Various advanced imaging modalities are used for radiotherapy planning and delivery to improve the precision of radiotherapy. These advanced techniques enable the delivery of high dose radiotherapy for early to advanced HCCs without increasing the radiation-induced toxicities. However, as there have been no effective tools for the prediction of the response to radiotherapy or recurrences within or outside the radiation field, future studies should focus on selecting the patients who will benefit from radiotherapy. PMID:27621577

  6. [Nutritional assistance to patients during radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Dias, M C; Nadalin, W; Baxter, Y C; Faintuch, J; Waitzberg, D L; Maculevicius, J

    1996-01-01

    With the aim of assessing the possible benefits of nutritional therapy, 140 patients were prospectively studied during radiotherapy of the head and neck (81%) and esophageal cancer (19%). Mean age was 56.0 (17-80), with 114 males and 26 females. Duration of both nutrition and radiotherapy was 78.0 +/- 45 days. Tube feeding was the primary modality in 50.7% of the population, and oral regimens in the remaining 49.3%, but associations between the methods were also used. Enteral diets were supplied under the supervision of a specialized tem for home alimentation (PROSNED). Compliance to the program was 100%, and a lymphocyte count diminished along this period (1933 +/- 1033 vs 1265 +/- 688, p. 0.001). A subjective improvement was reported by 84% of the population, and total calorie intake, that was below 60% of estimated needs in 100% of the cases initially, significantly improved to just 40% inadequate at the end of the observations. Radiotherapy was associated with mucositis in 21% of the patients, taste changes in 79%, xerostomy in 81%, anorexia in 66% and odinophagia in 59%. In the individuals selected for enteral feeding, side-effects were represented by technical problems (20%) and gastrointestinal disorders (13%). All patients completed the nutritional support program and there was no mortality in this series. It is concluded that; 1) Early nutritional support during radiotherapy was able to maintain or improve the nutritional status; 2) Tube feeding, alone or in combination with oral diets, was indicated whenever appropriate and contributed to fulfillment of the energy requirements; 3) Reduction of total lymphocytes could not be prevented by the mentioned therapy; 4) Complications of enteral alimentation were mild and affected a small proportion of the population; 5) Troubles induced by radiotherapy were as frequent as expected, and tended to disturb the intake of food; 6) The compliance to the therapeutic plan was excellent and can be attributed to the

  7. Perianal Paget disease treated definitively with radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mann, J; Lavaf, A; Tejwani, A; Ross, P; Ashamalla, H

    2012-12-01

    Extramammary Paget disease (empd) is a relatively rare cutaneous disorder described as an apocrine gland tumour occurring in both a benign and a malignant form with metastatic potential. The areas of the body affected are the vulva, perianal region, penis, scrotum, perineum, and axilla, all of which contain apocrine glands. When empd affects the perianal region, it is called perianal Paget disease (ppd). All forms of empd, including ppd, are typically treated by wide surgical excision. Perianal Paget disease usually occurs later in life in patients who are often poor surgical candidates, but the available literature is scarce regarding other treatment modalities, including definitive radiotherapy. We contend that ppd can be safely and effectively treated with radiotherapy, and here, we present the case of a 75-year-old woman with ppd who was successfully so treated. A brief review of the literature concerning the diagnosis, natural history, and treatment of ppd is also included.

  8. [Radiotherapy as primary treatment for chemodectoma?].

    PubMed

    Verniers, D; Van Limbergen, E; Leysen, J; Ostyn, F; Segers, A

    1990-01-01

    Chemodectomas are slowly growing tumours originating in the chemoreceptor bodies. The diagnosis is based on typical clinical symptoms and radiological investigation. CT scanning with contrast enhancement permits to establish diagnosis in most cases and gives a correct idea of tumour size, tumour extension, displacement of arteries and bone destruction. Small tympanic chemodectomas are successfully managed by surgery, without causing additional cranial nerve palsies. Surgery of larger lesions is frequently followed by a high percentage of local recurrence (greater than 50%) and important morbidity (neurologic sequelae). Our present series confirms that these tumours can successfully be treated by radiotherapy. Persisting local control rates can be obtained in more than 90% of cases with moderate doses (45-50 Gy in 5 weeks) of carefully planned radiotherapy.

  9. [Difficult situations in radiotherapy: agitated adult patients].

    PubMed

    Noël, S; Noël, G

    2013-10-01

    The causes of agitation in adult patients are numerous. Agitation may cause difficulty or impossibility to initiate the radiotherapy technique but also can lead to accidents harmful to patients. However, the decision to not irradiate agitated patients may lead to a loss of curability chance or chance to palliate symptoms. Before taking such a decision, thinking about the possibilities available to calm the patient should be undertaken with the patient and the referring practitioners to attempt to make this therapy if it is considered major in the management of cancer. In all cases, current adaptations of radiotherapy should be used to deliver an effective radiation of a suitable time and safely. It is notable that the medical literature is extremely rare on this subject. Copyright © 2013 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. [Radiotherapy and targeted therapy/immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Antoni, D; Bockel, S; Deutsch, E; Mornex, F

    2016-10-01

    Thanks to recent advances achieved in oncologic systemic and local ablative treatment, the treatments become more and more efficient in term of local control and overall survival. Thus, the targeted therapies, immunotherapy or stereotactic radiotherapy have modified the management of patients, especially in case of oligometastatic disease. Many questions are raised by these innovations, particularly the diagnosis and management of new side effects or that of the combination of these different treatments, depending on the type of primary tumor. Fundamental data are available, while clinical data are still limited. Ongoing trials should help to clarify the clinical management protocols. This manuscript is a review of the combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy/immunotherapy.

  11. Second cancers following radiotherapy for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, R.E.

    1997-03-01

    The study of second cancer risk after radiotherapy provides a unique opportunity to study carcinogenesis since large groups of humans are deliberately exposed to substantial doses of radiation in order to cure disease. Detailed radiotherapy records for cancer patients allow precise quantification of organ dose, and population-based cancer registries are frequently available to provide access to large groups of patients who are closely followed for long periods. Moreover, cancer patients treated with surgery alone (no radiation) are frequently available to serve as a non-irradiated comparison group. New information can be provided on relatively insensitive organs, and low dose exposures in the range of scientific interest are received by organs outside the radiation treatment fields. This paper will review several recently completed studies that characterize the risk of radiation-induced second cancers. Emphasis will be given to studies providing new information on the dose-response relationship of radiation-induced leukemia, breast cancer and lung cancer.

  12. Postoperative stereotactic body radiotherapy for spinal metastases.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Majed; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Myrehaug, Sten; Maralani, Pejman; Heyn, Chris; Soliman, Hany; Lee, Young; Ruschin, Mark; Da Costa, Leodante; Yang, Victor; Campbell, Mikki; Sahgal, Arjun

    2017-09-01

    Spine is a common site of metastases in cancer patients. Spine surgery is indicated for select patients, typically those with mechanical instability and/or malignant epidural spinal cord (or cauda equina) compression. Although post-operative conventional palliative external beam radiation therapy has been the standard of care, technical improvements in radiation planning and image-guided radiotherapy have allowed for the application of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to the spine. Spine SBRT is intended to ablate residual tumor and optimize local control by delivering several fold greater biologically effective doses. Early clinical experience of postoperative spinal SBRT report encouraging results in terms of safety and efficacy. In this review, we summarize the clinical and technical aspects pertinent to a safe and effective practice of postoperative SBRT for spinal metastases.

  13. Complications of surgery for radiotherapy skin damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, R.

    1982-08-01

    Complications of modern surgery for radiotherapy skin damage reviewed in 28 patients who had 42 operations. Thin split-thickness skin grafts for ulcer treatment had a 100 percent complication rate, defined as the need for further surgery. Local flaps, whether delayed or not, also had a high rate of complications. Myocutaneous flaps for ulcers had a 43 percent complication rate, with viable flaps lifting off radiated wound beds. Only myocutaneous flaps for breast reconstruction and omental flaps with skin grafts and Marlex mesh had no complications. The deeper tissue penetration of modern radiotherapy techniques may make skin grafts and flaps less useful. In reconstruction of radiation ulcers, omental flaps and myocutaneous flaps are especially useful, particularly if the radiation damage can be fully excised. The pull of gravity appears detrimental to myocutaneous flap healing and, if possible, should be avoided by flap design.

  14. Proton Radiotherapy for Solid Tumors of Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Shane E.; McBride, Sean M.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing efficacy of pediatric cancer therapy over the past four decades has produced many long-term survivors that now struggle with serious treatment related morbidities affecting their quality of life. Radiation therapy is responsible for a significant proportion of these late effects, but a relatively new and emerging modality, proton radiotherapy hold great promise to drastically reduce these treatment related late effects in long term survivors by sparing dose to normal tissues. Dosimetric studies of proton radiotherapy compared with best available photon based treatment show significant dose sparing to developing normal tissues. Furthermore, clinical data are now emerging that begin to quantify the benefit in decreased late treatment effects while maintaining excellent cancer control rates. PMID:22417062

  15. Status of radiotherapy in a multidisciplinary cancer board.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Mayumi; Nemoto, Kenji; Miwa, Misako; Ohta, Ibuki; Nomiya, Takuma; Yamakawa, Mayumi; Itho, Yuriko; Fukui, Tadahisa; Yoshioka, Takashi

    2014-03-01

    Multidisciplinary cancer boards (CBs) for making cancer treatment decisions have become popular in many countries; however, the status of radiotherapy in CBs and the influence of CBs on radiotherapy decisions have not been studied. To clarify these issues, we reviewed the minutes of our CBs from February 2010 to March 2012, and we classified planned treatments discussed at the CBs into five categories and analyzed decisions concerning radiotherapy in each category. The fraction of cases for which radiotherapy was recommended was 536/757 (71%). These cases included 478 cases (63%) for which radiation therapy was planned and four cases (0.5%) for which radiation therapy was unexpectedly recommended. On the other hand, radiation therapy was canceled in 21 cases (4%) for which radiation therapy had been planned. This study showed that radiotherapy was discussed in many cases at CBs and that CBs have a great influence on decisions concerning radiotherapy.

  16. Radiotherapy in Dupuytren's disease: a systematic review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Kadhum, M; Smock, E; Khan, A; Fleming, A

    2017-09-01

    Radiotherapy has been advocated as an alternative treatment in early Dupuytren's disease. We have systematically reviewed the evidence on the use of radiotherapy in Dupuytren's disease. Only six articles met a minimum set standard, five of which were retrospective cohort studies and one a randomized controlled study. A total of 770 Dupuytren's hands, nearly all with Tubiana stage 0-1 disease, were irradiated with an average 30 Gy. Disease regression ranged from 0%-56%, stability from 14%-98% and progression from 2%-86%. Salvage surgery was successful in all cases of disease progression post-radiotherapy. There were no reports of adverse wound healing problems associated with such surgery or radiotherapy-associated malignancy. On balance, radiotherapy should be considered an unproven treatment for early Dupuytren's disease due to a scarce evidence base and unknown long-term adverse effects. Well-designed randomized controlled studies are required to confirm the benefits of radiotherapy treatment. II.

  17. Pelvic Fractures After Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schmeler, Kathleen M.; Jhingran, Anuja; Iyer, Revathy B.; Sun, Charlotte C.; Eifel, Patricia J.; Soliman, Pamela T.; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Frumovitz, Michael; Bodurka, Diane C.; Sood, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The incidence of pelvic fractures and associated risk factors was determined in women treated with curative-intent radiotherapy for cervical cancer. METHODS The records of 516 women treated with curative-intent radiotherapy for cervical cancer between 2001 and 2006 at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center were reviewed. Among these, 300 patients had at least 1 post-treatment computed tomography scan or magnetic resonance imaging study available for review, and they comprised our study population. All imaging studies were re-reviewed by a single radiologist to evaluate for fractures. RESULTS Pelvic fractures were noted in 29 of 300 patients (9.7%). Fracture sites included sacrum (n = 24; 83%), sacrum and pubis (n = 3; 10%), iliac crest (n = 1; 3%), and sacrum and acetabulum (n = 1; 3%). Thirteen patients (45%) were symptomatic, with pain being the most common presenting symptom. The median time from the completion of radiotherapy to the detection of fractures on imaging studies was 14.1 months (range, 2.1–63.1 months), with 38% of patients diagnosed within 1 year and 83% diagnosed within 2 years of completing therapy. The median age of the patients at diagnosis was higher in the women who developed a fracture compared with the women who did not (56.5 years vs 46.7 years; P = .04). A higher number of women with a fracture were postmenopausal (62% vs 37%; P = .03). The median body mass index was lower in the women who had a fracture (26.0 kg/m2 vs 28.0 kg/m2; P = .03). CONCLUSIONS Pelvic fractures were detected in a substantial proportion of women after radiotherapy for cervical cancer. Bone mineral density screening and pharmacologic intervention should be considered in these women. PMID:20052724

  18. Targeting Radiotherapy to Cancer by Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is an alternative method of radiation treatment which uses a tumor-seeking agent carrying a radioactive atom to deposits of tumor, wherever in the body they may be located. Recent experimental data signifies promise for the amalgamation of gene transfer with radionuclide targeting. This review encompasses aspects of the integration of gene manipulation and targeted radiotherapy, highlighting the possibilities of gene transfer to assist the targeting of cancer with low molecular weight radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:12721515

  19. Radiotherapy equipment--purchase or lease?

    PubMed

    Nisbet, A; Ward, A

    2001-08-01

    Against a background of increasing demand for radiotherapy equipment, this study was undertaken to investigate options for equipment procurement, in particular to compare purchase with lease. The perceived advantages of lease are that equipment can be acquired within budget and cashflow constraints, with relatively low amounts of cash leaving the NHS in the first year, avoiding the necessity of capitalizing the equipment and providing protection against the risk of obsolescence associated with high technology equipment. The perceived disadvantages of leasing are that the Trust does not own the equipment, leasing can be more expensive in revenue terms, the tender process is extended and there may be lease conditions to be met, which may be costly and/or restrictive. There are also a number of technical considerations involved in the leasing of radiotherapy equipment that influence the financial analysis and practical operation of the radiotherapy service. The technical considerations include servicing and planned preventative maintenance, upgrades, spare parts, subsequent purchase of "add ons", modification of equipment, research and development work, commencement of the lease period, return of equipment at the end of the lease period and negotiations at the end of the lease period. A study from Raigmore Hospital, Inverness is described, which involves the procurement of new, state-of-the-art radiotherapy equipment. This provides an overview of the procurement process, including a summary of the advantages and disadvantages of leasing, with the figures from the financial analysis presented and explained. In addition, a detailed description is given of the technical considerations to be taken into account in the financial analysis and negotiation of any lease contract.

  20. Hypothyroidism After Radiotherapy for Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.-H.; Wang, H-M.; Chen, Hellen Hi-Wen; Lin, C.-Y.; Chen, Eric Yen-Chao; Fan, K.-H.; Huang, S.-F.; Chen, I-How; Liao, C.-T.; Cheng, Ann-Joy; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the long-term incidence and possible predictive factors for posttreatment hypothyroidism in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Four hundred and eight sequential NPC patients who had received regular annual thyroid hormone surveys prospectively after radiotherapy were included in this study. Median patient age was 47.3 years, and 286 patients were male. Thyroid function was prospectively evaluated by measuring thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and serum free thyroxine (FT4) levels. Low FT4 levels indicated clinical hypothyroidism in this study. Results: With a median follow-up of 4.3 years (range, 0.54-19.7 years), the incidence of low FT4 level was 5.3%, 9.0%, and 19.1% at 3, 5, and 10 years after radiotherapy, respectively. Hypothyroidism was more common with early T stage (p = 0.044), female sex (p = 0.037), and three-dimensional conformal therapy with the altered fractionation technique (p = 0.005) after univariate analysis. N stage, chemotherapy, reirradiation, and neck electron boost did not affect the incidence of hypothyroidism. Younger age and conformal therapy were significant factors that determined clinical hypothyroidism after multivariate analysis. Overall, patients presented with a low FT4 level about 1 year after presenting with an elevated TSH level. Conclusion: Among our study group of NPC patients, 19.1% experienced clinical hypothyroidism by 10 years after treatment. Younger age and conformal therapy increased the risk of hypothyroidism. We suggest routine evaluation of thyroid function in NPC patients after radiotherapy. The impact of pituitary injury should be also considered.

  1. Current concepts on imaging in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lecchi, Michela; Fossati, Piero; Elisei, Federica; Orecchia, Roberto; Lucignani, Giovanni

    2008-04-01

    New high-precision radiotherapy (RT) techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or hadrontherapy, allow better dose distribution within the target and spare a larger portion of normal tissue than conventional RT. These techniques require accurate tumour volume delineation and intrinsic characterization, as well as verification of target localisation and monitoring of organ motion and response assessment during treatment. These tasks are strongly dependent on imaging technologies. Among these, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasonography (US) and positron emission tomography (PET) have been applied in high-precision RT. For tumour volume delineation and characterization, PET has brought an additional dimension to the management of cancer patients by allowing the incorporation of crucial functional and molecular images in RT treatment planning, i.e. direct evaluation of tumour metabolism, cell proliferation, apoptosis, hypoxia and angiogenesis. The combination of PET and CT in a single imaging system (PET/CT) to obtain a fused anatomical and functional dataset is now emerging as a promising tool in radiotherapy departments for delineation of tumour volumes and optimization of treatment plans. Another exciting new area is image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), which focuses on the potential benefit of advanced imaging and image registration to improve precision, daily target localization and monitoring during treatment, thus reducing morbidity and potentially allowing the safe delivery of higher doses. The variety of IGRT systems is rapidly expanding, including cone beam CT and US. This article examines the increasing role of imaging techniques in the entire process of high-precision radiotherapy.

  2. Adaptive Radiotherapy for an Uncommon Chloroma

    PubMed Central

    Majdoul, Soufya; Colson-Durand, Laurianne; To, Nu Hanh; Belkacemi, Yazid

    2016-01-01

    Granulocytic sarcomas, also referred to as chloromas or myeloid sarcomas, are extramedullary neoplasms that are composed of immature myeloid cells. This uncommon disease is known to be radiosensitive. However, the total dose and dose per fraction are not standardized. In addition, during the course of radiation therapy, significant reduction of the tumor is usually obtained. Thus, target volume reduction may require an intermediate radiotherapy plan evaluation for an adaptive treatment. A second plan at mid-dose is highly recommended. PMID:27920690

  3. Low-Dose Radiotherapy in Indolent Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Rossier, Christine; Schick, Ulrike; Miralbell, Raymond; Mirimanoff, Rene O.; Weber, Damien C.; Ozsahin, Mahmut

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the response rate, duration of response, and overall survival after low-dose involved-field radiotherapy in patients with recurrent low-grade lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Methods and Materials: Forty-three (24 women, 19 men) consecutive patients with indolent lymphoma or CLL were treated with a total dose of 4 Gy (2 x 2 Gy) using 6- 18-MV photons. The median age was 73 years (range, 39-88). Radiotherapy was given either after (n = 32; 75%) or before (n = 11; 25%) chemotherapy. The median time from diagnosis was 48 months (range, 1-249). The median follow-up period was 20 months (range, 1-56). Results: The overall response rate was 90%. Twelve patients (28%) had a complete response, 15 (35%) had a partial response, 11 (26%) had stable disease, and 5 (11%) had progressive disease. The median overall survival for patients with a positive response (complete response/partial response/stable disease) was 41 months; for patients with progressive disease it was 6 months (p = 0.001). The median time to in-field progression was 21 months (range, 0-24), and the median time to out-field progression was 8 months (range, 0-40). The 3-year in-field control was 92% in patients with complete response (median was not reached). The median time to in-field progression was 9 months (range, 0.5-24) in patients with partial response and 6 months (range, 0.6-6) in those with stable disease (p < 0.05). Younger age, positive response to radiotherapy, and no previous chemotherapy were the best factors influencing the outcome. Conclusions: Low-dose involved-field radiotherapy is an effective treatment in the management of patients with recurrent low-grade lymphoma or CLL.

  4. Radiation transport in a radiotherapy room

    SciTech Connect

    Agosteo, S.; Para, A.F.; Maggioni, B.

    1995-01-01

    The photoneutron dose equivalent in a linac radio-therapy room and its entrance maze was investigated by means of Monte Carlo simulations under different conditions. Particularly, the effect of neutron absorbers and moderator layers placed on the maze walls was considered. The contribution of prompt gamma rays emitted in absorption reactions of thermal neutrons was also taken into account. The simulation results are compared with some experimental measurements in the therapy room and in the maze. 13 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Glioblastoma multiforme after radiotherapy for acromegaly

    SciTech Connect

    Piatt, J.H. Jr.; Blue, J.M.; Schold, S.C. Jr.; Burger, P.C.

    1983-07-01

    A case of glioblastoma multiforme that occurred 14 years after radiotherapy for acromegaly is presented. The striking correspondence between the anatomy of the tumor and the geometry of the radiation ports is suggestive of a causal relationship. Previously reported cases of radiation-associated glioma are reviewed, and a brief appraisal of the evidence for induction of these lesions by radiation is presented. The differentiation of radiation-associated neoplasms from radionecrosis is also discussed.

  6. Radiation hepatitis following moving strip radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Feigen, M.; Lavrin, L.; Mameghan, H.; Peters, L.

    1983-03-01

    A 71 year-old woman developed acute veno-occlusive disease of the liver after receiving moving strip radiotherapy to the whole abdomen according to the Toronto technique for carcinoma of the ovary. The dose of 22.5 Gy in 10 fractions to the liver is compared with other regimens which have produced this complication, and factors which may have sensitized the liver to irradiation are considered.

  7. Postoperative radiotherapy in the management of keloids

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal, Claudia C; Ibarra, Carla M; Arbulo, Douglas L; Russo, Moisés N; Solé, Claudio P

    2016-01-01

    Background The high recurrence rate following keloid resection has generated interest in adjuvant treatments for this disease. Objective This study assesses keloid recurrence when treated with surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods Retrospective analysis of resected keloids in patients referred to a Chilean radiation oncology centre between 2006 and 2013. Local recurrence was defined as new tissue growth on the surgical scar margin. Results Around103 keloids were analysed in 63 patients treated with 15 Gy in three fraction radiotherapy which was initiated on the same day as the surgery (75% of cases). The median keloid diameter was 6 cm; the most common site was thoracic (22%); the most common cause was prior surgery (35%); 37% caused symptoms, and several (47%) had received prior treatment with corticosteroids (32%), or surgery (30%). The median follow-up was three years, and 94% of recurrences occurred during the first year following treatment. Uni and multivariate analyses showed that an absence of symptoms was a protective factor for recurrence (OR: 0.24), while the time interval from onset to treatment with surgery plus radiotherapy >4.2 years was a risk factor (OR: 2.23). The first year recurrence rate was 32% and stabilised at 32% by the second year with no recurrences after 15 months. Conclusions The combination of surgery and radiotherapy proved to be a good therapeutic alternative in the management of keloids. Our results are similar to those described in the literature for a dose of 15 Gy. Given these results, our centre will implement a new dose escalation protocol to improve future outcomes. PMID:27994646

  8. The role of radiotherapy in veterinary practice.

    PubMed

    Owen, L N

    1975-11-01

    It is common knowledge today that cancer is by no means an incurable disease and therefore it is no longer necessary to propose euthanasia for all inoperable cases of malignant neoplasia. The veterinary surgeon has a duty to inform his client of current methods of treatment, particularly radiotherapy, which may possibly provide a cure or prolong life without pain for several months. This article outlines the availability and usefulness of this important line of treatment.

  9. Radiotherapy in the treatment of postoperative chylothorax

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chylothorax is characterized by the presence of chyle in the pleural cavity. The healing rate of non-operative treatment varies enormously; the maximum success rate in series is 70%. We investigate the efficacy and outcomes of radiotherapy for postoperative chylothorax. Methods Chylothorax was identified based on the quantity and quality of the drainage fluid. Radiation was indicated if the daily chyle flow exceeded 450 ml after complete cessation of oral intake. Radiotherapy consisted of opposed isocentric portals to the mediastinum using 15 MV photon beams from a linear accelerator, a single dose of 1–1.5 Gy, and a maximum of five fractions per week. The radiation target area was the anatomical region between TH3 and TH10 depending on the localization of the resected lobe. The mean doses of the ionizing energy was 8.5 Gy ± 3.5 Gy. Results The median start date of the radiation was the fourth day after chylothorax diagnosis. The patients’ mediastinum was radiated an average of six times. Radiotherapy, in combination with dietary restrictions, was successful in all patients. The median time between the end of the radiation and the removal of the chest tube was one day. One patient underwent wound healing by secondary intention. The median time between the end of radiation and discharge was three days, and the overall hospital stay between the chylothorax diagnosis and discharge was 18 days (range: 11–30 days). After a follow-up of six months, no patient experienced chylothorax recurrence. Conclusions Our results suggest that radiotherapy in combination with dietary restriction in the treatment of postoperative chylothorax is very safe, rapid and successful. This novel interventional procedure can obviate repeat major thoracic surgery and shorten hospital stays and could be the first choice in the treatment of postthoracotomy chylothorax. PMID:23566741

  10. Partial breast radiotherapy with simple teletherapy techniques.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Gábor; Újhidy, Dóra; Együd, Zsófia; Kiscsatári, Laura; Marosi, Gusztáv; Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Varga, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    A prospective pilot study of partial breast irradiation (PBI) with conventional vs hypofractionated schedules was set out. The study aimed to determine efficacy, acute and late side effects, and the preference of photon vs electron irradiation based on individual features. Patients were enrolled according to internationally accepted guidelines on PBI. Conformal radiotherapy plans were generated with both photon and electron beams, and the preferred technique based on dose homogeneity and the radiation exposure of healthy tissues was applied. For electron dose verification, a special phantom was constructed. Patients were randomized for fractionation schedules of 25 × 2 vs 13 × 3Gy. Skin and breast changes were registered at the time of and ≥1 year after the completion of radiotherapy. Dose homogeneity was better with photons. If the tumor bed was located in the inner quadrants, electron beam gave superior results regarding conformity and sparing of organ at risk (OAR). If the tumor was situated in the lateral quadrants, conformity was better with photons. A depth of the tumor bed ≥3.0cm predicted the superiority of photon irradiation (odds ratio [OR] = 23.6, 95% CI: 5.2 to 107.5, p < 0.001) with >90% sensitivity and specificity. After a median follow-up of 39 months, among 72 irradiated cases, 1 local relapse out of the tumor bed was detected. Acute radiodermatitis of grade I to II, hyperpigmentation, and telangiectasia developed ≥1 year after radiotherapy, exclusively after electron beam radiotherapy. The choice of electrons or photons for PBI should be based on tumor bed location; the used methods are efficient and feasible.

  11. Partial breast radiotherapy with simple teletherapy techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Fekete, Gábor; Újhidy, Dóra; Együd, Zsófia; Kiscsatári, Laura; Marosi, Gusztáv; Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Varga, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    A prospective pilot study of partial breast irradiation (PBI) with conventional vs hypofractionated schedules was set out. The study aimed to determine efficacy, acute and late side effects, and the preference of photon vs electron irradiation based on individual features. Patients were enrolled according to internationally accepted guidelines on PBI. Conformal radiotherapy plans were generated with both photon and electron beams, and the preferred technique based on dose homogeneity and the radiation exposure of healthy tissues was applied. For electron dose verification, a special phantom was constructed. Patients were randomized for fractionation schedules of 25 × 2 vs 13 × 3 Gy. Skin and breast changes were registered at the time of and ≥1 year after the completion of radiotherapy. Dose homogeneity was better with photons. If the tumor bed was located in the inner quadrants, electron beam gave superior results regarding conformity and sparing of organ at risk (OAR). If the tumor was situated in the lateral quadrants, conformity was better with photons. A depth of the tumor bed ≥3.0 cm predicted the superiority of photon irradiation (odds ratio [OR] = 23.6, 95% CI: 5.2 to 107.5, p < 0.001) with >90% sensitivity and specificity. After a median follow-up of 39 months, among 72 irradiated cases, 1 local relapse out of the tumor bed was detected. Acute radiodermatitis of grade I to II, hyperpigmentation, and telangiectasia developed ≥1 year after radiotherapy, exclusively after electron beam radiotherapy. The choice of electrons or photons for PBI should be based on tumor bed location; the used methods are efficient and feasible.

  12. Medical treatment for biochemical relapse after radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Quero, L; Hennequin, C

    2014-10-01

    This article's purpose was to review the medical data justifying the use of a medical treatment for biochemical relapse after external beam radiotherapy. The MEDLINE database was searched to identify relevant information with the following medical subject headings: "prostate cancer", "radiotherapy" and "biochemical relapse". Prognostic factors affecting the overall survival of patients with a biochemical relapse after external beam radiotherapy have been identified: short prostate specific antigen (PSA)-doubling time (< 12 months), high PSA value (> 10 ng/mL) and short interval between treatment and biochemical relapse (< 18 months). If a second local treatment is not feasible, timing to initiate a salvage medical treatment is not defined. Particularly, randomized trials did not demonstrate a significant benefit of an early initiation of androgen deprivation treatment. Some retrospective studies suggest that an early androgen deprivation is justified if poor prognostic factors are found. However, if an androgen deprivation treatment is prescribed, intermittent schedule is non-inferior to a continuous administration and seems to offer a better quality of life. Many non-hormonal treatments have also been evaluated in this setting: only 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors could be proposed in some specific situations. In conclusion, the judicious use of a medical treatment for biochemical relapse is still debated. Given the natural history of this clinical situation, a simple surveillance is justified in many cases.

  13. Proton beam radiotherapy of iris melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Damato, Bertil . E-mail: Bertil@damato.co.uk; Kacperek, Andrzej; Chopra, Mona; Sheen, Martin A.; Campbell, Ian R.; Errington, R. Douglas

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: To report on outcomes after proton beam radiotherapy of iris melanoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2004, 88 patients with iris melanoma received proton beam radiotherapy, with 53.1 Gy in 4 fractions. Results: The patients had a mean age of 52 years and a median follow-up of 2.7 years. The tumors had a median diameter of 4.3 mm, involving more than 2 clock hours of iris in 32% of patients and more than 2 hours of angle in 27%. The ciliary body was involved in 20%. Cataract was present in 13 patients before treatment and subsequently developed in another 18. Cataract had a 4-year rate of 63% and by Cox analysis was related to age (p = 0.05), initial visual loss (p < 0.0001), iris involvement (p < 0.0001), and tumor thickness (p < 0.0001). Glaucoma was present before treatment in 13 patients and developed after treatment in another 3. Three eyes were enucleated, all because of recurrence, which had an actuarial 4-year rate of 3.3% (95% CI 0-8.0%). Conclusions: Proton beam radiotherapy of iris melanoma is well tolerated, the main problems being radiation-cataract, which was treatable, and preexisting glaucoma, which in several patients was difficult to control.

  14. Anal Cancer: An Examination of Radiotherapy Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Lim, Faye

    2011-04-01

    The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9811, ACCORD-03, and ACT II Phase III trials in anal cancer showed no benefit for cisplatin-based induction and maintenance chemotherapy, or radiation dose-escalation >59 Gy. This review examines the efficacy and toxicity of chemoradiation (CRT) in anal cancer, and discusses potential alternative radiotherapy strategies. The evidence for the review was compiled from randomized and nonrandomized trials of radiation therapy and CRT. A total of 103 retrospective/observational studies, 4 Phase I/II studies, 16 Phase II prospective studies, 2 randomized Phase II studies, and 6 Phase III trials of radiotherapy or chemoradiation were identified. There are no meta-analyses based on individual patient data. A 'one-size-fits-all' approach for all stages of anal cancer is inappropriate. Early T1 tumors are probably currently overtreated, whereas T3/T4 lesions might merit escalation of treatment. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy or the integration of biological therapy may play a role in future.

  15. Functional MRI for radiotherapy of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jenghwa; Narayana, Ashwatha

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we review the applications of functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for target delineation and critical organ avoidance for brain radiotherapy. In this article we distinguish functional MRI from brain functional MRI (fMRI). Functional MRI includes magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), perfusion MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and brain fMRI. These functional MRI modalities can provide unique metabolic, pathological and physiological information that are not available in anatomic MRI and can potentially improve the treatment outcomes of brain tumors. For example, both choline (Cho) to N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and Cho to creatine (Cr) ratios from MRSI increase with increasing tumor malignancy and can be used to grade gliomas. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) measurements from dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (DSC MRI) are superior to conventional contrast-enhanced MRI in predicting tumor biology and may be even superior to pathologic assessment in predicting patient clinical outcomes. Brain fMRI can help identify and avoid functionally critical areas when constructing treatment plans for brain radiotherapy. In the past, functional MRI measurements have not been routinely used in a clinical arena due to the experimental nature of these imaging modalities. As these methods become more commonly used and effective image co-registration algorithms become available, integration of functional MRI into the treatment process of brain radiotherapy now appears to be clinically feasible, at least in major medical centers.

  16. [Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia following radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Petit, Sandrine; Lortholary, Alain; Troussier, Jacques; Tuchais, Claude

    2005-04-09

    Pulmonary complications of radiotherapy are rare, but bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) is observed in 2.5% of cases. It can develop after radiation treatment of breast cancer as well as, more rarely, lung cancer, sarcoma, Hodgkin's disease or malignant thymoma. Ten months after radiotherapy for breast cancer, a 52 year-old woman developed migratory alveolar opacities outside the radiation field. Their improvement with corticosteroid treatment led to the diagnosis of BOOP. BOOP, which resembles infectious pneumonia, can develop 2-7 months after the end of radiotherapy and is seen especially in women aged 50-60 years with fever and coughs resistant to antibiotics. Dyspnea is far rarer. Imaging reveals patchy infiltrates with widespread bilateral, mobile lesions extended over and above the radiation field. Biopsy is required to confirm diagnosis; sections, which may or may not come from the radiation field, reveal the nonspecific granulomatous alveolar infiltrates typical of BOOP. Other causes should be eliminated (toxic, immune, iatrogenic or even idiopathic infection and recurrent early neoplastic relapse). Association with hormone therapy does not influence the course of BOOP. Outcome with corticosteroid treatment is excellent.

  17. Gold nanoparticle hyperthermia reduces radiotherapy dose.

    PubMed

    Hainfeld, James F; Lin, Lynn; Slatkin, Daniel N; Avraham Dilmanian, F; Vadas, Timothy M; Smilowitz, Henry M

    2014-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles can absorb near infrared light, resulting in heating and ablation of tumors. Gold nanoparticles have also been used for enhancing the X-ray dose to tumors. The combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy is synergistic, importantly allowing a reduction in X-ray dose with improved therapeutic results. Here we intratumorally infused small 15 nm gold nanoparticles engineered to be transformed from infrared-transparent to infrared-absorptive by the tumor, then heated by infrared followed by X-ray treatment. Synergy was studied using a very radioresistant subcutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCCVII) in mice. It was found that the dose required to control 50% of the tumors, normally 55 Gy, could be reduced to <15 Gy (a factor of >3.7). Gold nanoparticles therefore provide a method to combine hyperthermia and radiotherapy to drastically reduce the X-ray radiation needed, thus sparing normal tissue, reducing side effects, and making radiotherapy more effective. Gold nanoparticles are known to enhance the efficacy of X-ray in tumor irradiation resulting in tumor heating and ablation. They also absorb near infrared light. This dual property was studied using a very radioresistant subcutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in mice, demonstrating that the dose required to control 50% of the tumors could be reduced by a factor of > 3.7, paving the way to potential future clinical applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Personalized radiotherapy: concepts, biomarkers and trial design.

    PubMed

    Ree, A H; Redalen, K R

    2015-07-01

    In the past decade, and pointing onwards to the immediate future, clinical radiotherapy has undergone considerable developments, essentially including technological advances to sculpt radiation delivery, the demonstration of the benefit of adding concomitant cytotoxic agents to radiotherapy for a range of tumour types and, intriguingly, the increasing integration of targeted therapeutics for biological optimization of radiation effects. Recent molecular and imaging insights into radiobiology will provide a unique opportunity for rational patient treatment, enabling the parallel design of next-generation trials that formally examine the therapeutic outcome of adding targeted drugs to radiation, together with the critically important assessment of radiation volume and dose-limiting treatment toxicities. In considering the use of systemic agents with presumed radiosensitizing activity, this may also include the identification of molecular, metabolic and imaging markers of treatment response and tolerability, and will need particular attention on patient eligibility. In addition to providing an overview of clinical biomarker studies relevant for personalized radiotherapy, this communication will highlight principles in addressing clinical evaluation of combined-modality-targeted therapeutics and radiation. The increasing number of translational studies that bridge large-scale omics sciences with quality-assured phenomics end points-given the imperative development of open-source data repositories to allow investigators the access to the complex data sets-will enable radiation oncology to continue to position itself with the highest level of evidence within existing clinical practice.

  19. Personalized radiotherapy: concepts, biomarkers and trial design

    PubMed Central

    Redalen, K R

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, and pointing onwards to the immediate future, clinical radiotherapy has undergone considerable developments, essentially including technological advances to sculpt radiation delivery, the demonstration of the benefit of adding concomitant cytotoxic agents to radiotherapy for a range of tumour types and, intriguingly, the increasing integration of targeted therapeutics for biological optimization of radiation effects. Recent molecular and imaging insights into radiobiology will provide a unique opportunity for rational patient treatment, enabling the parallel design of next-generation trials that formally examine the therapeutic outcome of adding targeted drugs to radiation, together with the critically important assessment of radiation volume and dose-limiting treatment toxicities. In considering the use of systemic agents with presumed radiosensitizing activity, this may also include the identification of molecular, metabolic and imaging markers of treatment response and tolerability, and will need particular attention on patient eligibility. In addition to providing an overview of clinical biomarker studies relevant for personalized radiotherapy, this communication will highlight principles in addressing clinical evaluation of combined-modality-targeted therapeutics and radiation. The increasing number of translational studies that bridge large-scale omics sciences with quality-assured phenomics end points—given the imperative development of open-source data repositories to allow investigators the access to the complex data sets—will enable radiation oncology to continue to position itself with the highest level of evidence within existing clinical practice. PMID:25989697

  20. Single crystal diamond detector for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirru, F.; Kisielewicz, K.; Nowak, T.; Marczewska, B.

    2010-07-01

    The new generation of synthetic diamonds grown as a CVD single crystal on a high pressure high temperature substrate offers a wide range of applications. In particular, because of the near tissue equivalence and its small size (good spatial resolution), CVD single crystal diamond finds applicability in radiotherapy as a dosemeter of ionizing radiation. In this paper we report the electrical and dosimetric properties of a new diamond detector which was fabricated at IFJ based on a single crystal detector-grade CVD diamond provided with a novel contact metallization. Diamond properties were assessed at IFJ using a Theratron 680E therapeutic 60Co gamma rays unit and at COOK with 6 and 18 MV x-rays Varian Clinac CL2300 C/D accelerator. The new dosemeter showed high electric and dosimetric performances: low value of dark current, high current at the level of some nanoamperes during irradiation, very fast dynamic response with a rise time amounting to parts of a second, good stability and repeatability of the current and linearity of the detector signal at different dose and dose rate levels typically applied in radiotherapy. The results confirm the potential applicability of diamond material as a dosemeter for applications in radiotherapy.

  1. Big Data Analytics for Prostate Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Coates, James; Souhami, Luis; El Naqa, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a first-line treatment option for localized prostate cancer and radiation-induced normal tissue damage are often the main limiting factor for modern radiotherapy regimens. Conversely, under-dosing of target volumes in an attempt to spare adjacent healthy tissues limits the likelihood of achieving local, long-term control. Thus, the ability to generate personalized data-driven risk profiles for radiotherapy outcomes would provide valuable prognostic information to help guide both clinicians and patients alike. Big data applied to radiation oncology promises to deliver better understanding of outcomes by harvesting and integrating heterogeneous data types, including patient-specific clinical parameters, treatment-related dose-volume metrics, and biological risk factors. When taken together, such variables make up the basis for a multi-dimensional space (the "RadoncSpace") in which the presented modeling techniques search in order to identify significant predictors. Herein, we review outcome modeling and big data-mining techniques for both tumor control and radiotherapy-induced normal tissue effects. We apply many of the presented modeling approaches onto a cohort of hypofractionated prostate cancer patients taking into account different data types and a large heterogeneous mix of physical and biological parameters. Cross-validation techniques are also reviewed for the refinement of the proposed framework architecture and checking individual model performance. We conclude by considering advanced modeling techniques that borrow concepts from big data analytics, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, before discussing the potential future impact of systems radiobiology approaches.

  2. Sacral plexus injury after radiotherapy for carcinoma of cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Stryker, J.A.; Sommerville, K.; Perez, R.; Velkley, D.E. )

    1990-10-01

    A 42-year-old woman developed lower extremity weakness and sensory loss 1 year after external and intracavitary radiotherapy for Stage IB carcinoma of cervix. She has been followed for 5 years posttreatment, and the neurologic abnormalities have persisted, but no evidence of recurrent carcinoma has been found. We believe this to be a rare case of sacral plexus radiculopathy developing as a late complication after radiotherapy. Suggestions are made for improving the radiotherapy technique to prevent this complication in future cases.

  3. Errors in radiotherapy: motivation for development of new radiotherapy quality assurance paradigms.

    PubMed

    Fraass, Benedick A

    2008-01-01

    Modern radiotherapy practice has rapidly evolved during the past decade, making use of many highly complex and/or automated processes for planning and delivery, including new techniques, like intensity-modulated radiotherapy driven by inverse planning optimization methods, or near real-time image-guided adaptive therapy based on fluoroscopic or tomographic imaging on the treatment machine. In spite of the modern technology, or potentially because of it in some instances, errors and other problems continue to have a significant impact on the field. This report reviews example errors and problems, discusses some of the quality assurance issues that these types of problems raise, and motivates the development of more modern and sophisticated approaches to assure quality for our clinical radiotherapy treatment methods.

  4. Radical hysterectomy with adjuvant radiotherapy versus radical radiotherapy for FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to compare treatment outcomes for Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IIB cervical carcinoma patients receiving radical surgery followed by adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy versus radical radiotherapy. Methods Medical records of FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer patients treated between July 2008 and December 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 148 patients underwent radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy (surgery-based group). These patients were compared with 290 patients that received radical radiotherapy alone (RT-based group). Recurrence rates, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), local control rates, and treatment-related complications were compared for these two groups. Results Similar rates of recurrence (16.89% vs. 12.41%, p = 0.200), PFS (log-rank, p = 0.211), OS (log-rank, p = 0.347), and local control rates (log-rank, p = 0.668) were observed for the surgery-based group and the RT-based group, respectively. Moreover, the incidence of acute grade 3–4 gastrointestinal reactions and late grade 3–4 lower limb lymphedema were significantly higher for the surgery-based group versus the RT-based group. Cox multivariate analyses found no significant difference in survival outcome between the two groups, and tumor diameter and histopathology were identified as significant prognostic factors for OS. Conclusions Radical radiotherapy was associated with fewer treatment-related complications and achieved comparable survival outcomes for patients with FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer compared to radical hysterectomy followed by postoperative radiotherapy. PMID:24495453

  5. Genome-wide transcription responses to synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sprung, Carl N; Yang, Yuqing; Forrester, Helen B; Li, Jason; Zaitseva, Marina; Cann, Leonie; Restall, Tina; Anderson, Robin L; Crosbie, Jeffrey C; Rogers, Peter A W

    2012-10-01

    The majority of cancer patients achieve benefit from radiotherapy. A significant limitation of radiotherapy is its relatively low therapeutic index, defined as the maximum radiation dose that causes acceptable normal tissue damage to the minimum dose required to achieve tumor control. Recently, a new radiotherapy modality using synchrotron-generated X-ray microbeam radiotherapy has been demonstrated in animal models to ablate tumors with concurrent sparing of normal tissue. Very little work has been undertaken into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that differentiate microbeam radiotherapy from broad beam. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the whole genome transcriptional response of in vivo microbeam radiotherapy versus broad beam irradiated tumors. We hypothesized that gene expression changes after microbeam radiotherapy are different from those seen after broad beam. We found that in EMT6.5 tumors at 4-48 h postirradiation, microbeam radiotherapy differentially regulates a number of genes, including major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen gene family members, and other immunity-related genes including Ciita, Ifng, Cxcl1, Cxcl9, Indo and Ubd when compared to broad beam. Our findings demonstrate molecular differences in the tumor response to microbeam versus broad beam irradiation and these differences provide insight into the underlying mechanisms of microbeam radiotherapy and broad beam.

  6. Biomarkers for DNA DSB inhibitors and radiotherapy clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Stanley K; Olive, Peggy L; Bristow, Robert G

    2008-09-01

    Major technical advances in radiotherapy, including IMRT and image-guided radiotherapy, have allowed for improved physical precision and increased dose delivery to the tumor, with better sparing of surrounding normal tissue. The development of inhibitors of the sensing and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is exciting and could be combined with precise radiotherapy targeting to improve local control following radiotherapy. However, caution must be exercised in order that DSB inhibitors are combined with radiotherapy in such a manner as to preserve the therapeutic ratio by exploiting repair deficiencies in malignant cells over that of normal cells. In this review, we discuss the rationale and current approaches to targeting DSB sensing and repair pathways in combined modality with radiotherapy. We also describe potential biomarkers that could be useful in detecting functional inhibition of DSB repair in a patient's tissues during clinical radiotherapy trials. Finally, we examine a number of issues relating to the use of DSB-inhibiting molecular agents and radiotherapy in the context of the tumor microenvironment, effects on normal tissues and the optimal timing and duration of the agent in relation to fractionated radiotherapy.

  7. Proton Radiotherapy for Liver Tumors: Dosimetric Advantages Over Photon Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaochun Krishnan, Sunil; Zhang Xiaodong; Dong Lei; Briere, Tina; Crane, Christopher H.; Martel, Mary; Gillin, Michael; Mohan, Radhe; Beddar, Sam

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to dosimetrically investigate the advantages of proton radiotherapy over photon radiotherapy for liver tumors. The proton plan and the photon plan were designed using commercial treatment planning systems. The treatment target dose conformity and heterogeneity and dose-volume analyses of normal structures were compared between proton and photon radiotherapy for 9 patients with liver tumors. Proton radiotherapy delivered a more conformal target dose with slightly less homogeneity when compared with photon radiotherapy. Protons significantly reduced the fractional volume of liver receiving dose greater or equal to 30 Gy (V{sub 30}) and the mean liver dose. The stomach and duodenal V{sub 45} were significantly lower with the use of proton radiotherapy. The V{sub 40} and V{sub 50} of the heart and the maximum spinal cord dose were also significantly lower with the use of proton radiotherapy. Protons were better able to spare one kidney completely and deliver less dose to one (generally the left) kidney than photons. The mean dose to the total body and most critical structures was significantly decreased using protons when compared to corresponding photon plans. In conclusion, our study suggests the dosimetric benefits of proton radiotherapy over photon radiotherapy. These dosimetric advantages of proton plans may permit further dose escalation with lower risk of complications.

  8. Dysphagia after radiotherapy: state of the art and prevention.

    PubMed

    Servagi-Vernat, S; Ali, D; Roubieu, C; Durdux, C; Laccourreye, O; Giraud, P

    2015-02-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy after surgery or exclusive radiotherapy, with or without concurrent chemotherapy is a valuable treatment option in the great majority of patients with head and neck cancer. Recent technical progress in radiotherapy has resulted in a decreased incidence of xerostomia. Another common toxicity of radiotherapy is dysphagia, which alters the nutritional status and quality of life of patients in remission. The objective of this review is to describe the physiology of swallowing function, the pathophysiology of radiation-induced dysphagia and the various strategies currently available to prevent this complication.

  9. Dynamic targeting image-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huntzinger, Calvin; Munro, Peter; Johnson, Scott; Miettinen, Mika; Zankowski, Corey; Ahlstrom, Greg; Glettig, Reto; Filliberti, Reto; Kaissl, Wolfgang; Kamber, Martin; Amstutz, Martin; Bouchet, Lionel; Klebanov, Dan; Mostafavi, Hassan; Stark, Richard

    2006-07-01

    Volumetric imaging and planning for 3-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) have highlighted the need to the oncology community to better understand the geometric uncertainties inherent in the radiotherapy delivery process, including setup error (interfraction) as well as organ motion during treatment (intrafraction). This has ushered in the development of emerging technologies and clinical processes, collectively referred to as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The goal of IGRT is to provide the tools needed to manage both inter- and intrafraction motion to improve the accuracy of treatment delivery. Like IMRT, IGRT is a process involving all steps in the radiotherapy treatment process, including patient immobilization, computed tomogaphy (CT) simulation, treatment planning, plan verification, patient setup verification and correction, delivery, and quality assurance. The technology and capability of the Dynamic Targeting{sup TM} IGRT system developed by Varian Medical Systems is presented. The core of this system is a Clinac (registered) or Trilogy{sup TM} accelerator equipped with a gantry-mounted imaging system known as the On-Board Imager{sup TM} (OBI). This includes a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray source, an amorphous silicon kV digital image detector, and 2 robotic arms that independently position the kV source and imager orthogonal to the treatment beam. A similar robotic arm positions the PortalVision{sup TM} megavoltage (MV) portal digital image detector, allowing both to be used in concert. The system is designed to support a variety of imaging modalities. The following applications and how they fit in the overall clinical process are described: kV and MV planar radiographic imaging for patient repositioning, kV volumetric cone beam CT imaging for patient repositioning, and kV planar fluoroscopic imaging for gating verification. Achieving image-guided motion management throughout the radiation oncology process

  10. Chest wall desmoid tumours treated with definitive radiotherapy: a plan comparison of 3D conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Ng, Diana; Lee, James; Stalley, Paul; Hong, Angela

    2016-03-02

    Definitive radiotherapy is often used for chest wall desmoid tumours due to size or anatomical location. The delivery of radiotherapy is challenging due to the large size and constraints of normal surrounding structures. We compared the dosimetry of 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) to evaluate the best treatment option. Ten consecutive patients with inoperable chest wall desmoid tumours (PTV range 416-4549 cm(3)) were selected. For each patient, 3DCRT, IMRT and VMAT plans were generated and the Conformity Index (CI), organ at risk (OAR) doses and monitor unit (MU) were evaluated. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare dose delivered to both target and OARs. The mean number of fields for 3DCRT and IMRT were 6.3 ± 2.1, 7.2 ± 1.8. The mean number of arcs for VMAT was 3.7 ± 1.1. The mean conformity index of VMAT (0.98 ± 0.14) was similar to that of IMRT (1.03 ± 0.13), both of which were significantly better than 3DCRT (1.35 ± 0.20; p = 0.005). The mean dose to lung was significantly higher for 3DCRT (11.9Gy ± 7.9) compared to IMRT (9.4Gy ± 5.4, p = 0.014) and VMAT (8.9Gy ± 4.5, p = 0.017). For the 3 females, the low dose regions in the ipsilateral breast for VMAT were generally less with VMAT. IMRT plans required 1427 ± 532 MU per fraction which was almost 4-fold higher than 3DCRT (313 ± 112, P = 0.005). Compared to IMRT, VMAT plans required 60 % less MU (570 ± 285, P = 0.005). For inoperable chest wall desmoid tumours, VMAT delivered equivalent target coverage when compared to IMRT but required 60 % less MU. Both VMAT and IMRT were superior to 3DCRT in terms of better PTV coverage and sparing of lung tissue.

  11. Palliative radiotherapy practice within Western European countries: impact of the radiotherapy financing system?

    PubMed

    Lievens, Y; Van den Bogaert, W; Rijnders, A; Kutcher, G; Kesteloot, K

    2000-09-01

    To analyze the reimbursement modalities for radiotherapy in the different Western European countries, as well as to investigate if these differences have an impact on the palliative radiotherapy practice for bone metastases. A questionnaire was sent to 565 radiotherapy centres included in the 1997 ESTRO directory. In this questionnaire the reimbursement strategy applied in the different centres was assessed, with respect to the use of a budget (departmental or hospital budget), case payment and/or fee-for-service reimbursement. The differences were analyzed according to country and to type and size of the radiotherapy centre. A total of 170 centres (86% of the responders) returned the questionnaire. Most frequent is budget reimbursement: some form of budget reimbursement is found in 69% of the centres, whereas 46% of the centres are partly reimbursed through fee-for-service and 35% through case payment. The larger the department, the more frequent the reimbursement through a budget or a case payment system and the less the importance of fee-for-service reimbursement (chi(2): P=0.0012; logit: P=0.0055). Whereas private centres are almost equally reimbursed by fee-for-service financing as by budget or case payment, radiotherapy departments in university hospitals receive the largest part of their financial resources through a budget or by case payment (83%) (chi(2): P=0.002; logit: P=0.0073). A correlation between the country and the radiotherapy reimbursement system was also demonstrated (P=0.002), radiotherapy centres in Spain, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom being almost entirely reimbursed through a budget and/or case payment and centres in Germany and Switzerland mostly through a fee-for-service system. In budget and case payment financing lower total number of fractions and lower total dose (chi(2): P=0.003; logit: P=0.0120) as well as less shielding blocks (chi(2): P=0.003; logit: P=0.0066) are used. A same tendency is found for the use of isodose

  12. Effectiveness of Radiotherapy for Elderly Patients With Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Jacob; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Chinnaiyan, Prakash; Yu, Hsiang-Hsuan Michael

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy plays a central role in the definitive treatment of glioblastoma. However, the optimal management of elderly patients with glioblastoma remains controversial, as the relative benefit in this patient population is unclear. To better understand the role that radiation plays in the treatment of glioblastoma in the elderly, we analyzed factors influencing patient survival using a large population-based registry. Methods and Materials: A total of 2,836 patients more than 70 years of age diagnosed with glioblastoma between 1993 and 2005 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry. Demographic and clinical variables used in the analysis included gender, ethnicity, tumor size, age at diagnosis, surgery, and radiotherapy. Cancer-specific survival and overall survival were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed using Cox regression. Results: Radiotherapy was administered in 64% of these patients, and surgery was performed in 68%. Among 2,836 patients, 46% received surgery and radiotherapy, 22% underwent surgery only, 18% underwent radiotherapy only, and 14% did not undergo either treatment. The median survival for patients who underwent surgery and radiotherapy was 8 months. The median survival for patients who underwent radiotherapy only was 4 months, and for patients who underwent surgery only was 3 months. Those who received neither surgery nor radiotherapy had a median survival of 2 months (p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that radiotherapy significantly improved cancer-specific survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.43, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.38-0.49) after adjusting for surgery, tumor size, gender, ethnicity, and age at diagnosis. Other factors associated with Cancer-specific survival included surgery, tumor size, age at diagnosis, and ethnicity. Analysis using overall survival as the endpoint yielded very similar results. Conclusions: Elderly

  13. External beam radiotherapy for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Omar; Elsayed, Zeinab

    2017-03-07

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common liver neoplasm, the sixth most common cancer worldwide, and the third most common cause of cancer mortality. Moreover, its incidence has increased dramatically in the past decade. While surgical resection and liver transplantation are the main curative treatments, only around 20% of people with early hepatocellular carcinoma may benefit from these therapies. Current treatment options for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma include various ablative and transarterial therapies in addition to the drug sorafenib. To assess the benefits and harms of external beam radiotherapy in the management of localised unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. We searched the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (OvidSP), Embase (OvidSP), Science Citation Index Expanded (Web of Science), and clinicaltrials.gov registry. We also checked reference lists of primary original studies and review articles manually for further related articles (cross-references) up to October 6, 2016. Eligible studies included all randomised clinical trials comparing external beam radiotherapy either as a monotherapy or in combination with other systemic or locoregional therapies versus placebo, no treatment, or other systemic or locoregional therapies for people with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We used a random-effects model as well as a fixed-effect model meta-analysis but in case of discrepancy between the two models (e.g. one giving a significant intervention effect, the other no significant intervention effect), we reported both results; otherwise, we reported only the results from the fixed-effect model meta-analysis. We assessed risk of bias of the included trials using predefined risk of bias domains; assessed risks of random errors with Trial Sequential Analysis; and

  14. Children Undergoing Radiotherapy: Swedish Parents' Experiences and Suggestions for Improvement.

    PubMed

    Ångström-Brännström, Charlotte; Engvall, Gunn; Mullaney, Tara; Nilsson, Kristina; Wickart-Johansson, Gun; Svärd, Anna-Maja; Nyholm, Tufve; Lindh, Jack; Lindh, Viveca

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 300 children, from 0 to 18 years old, are diagnosed with cancer in Sweden every year. Of these children, 80-90 of them undergo radiotherapy treatment for their cancer. Although radiotherapy is an encounter with advanced technology, few studies have investigated the child's and the parent's view of the procedure. As part of an ongoing multicenter study aimed to improve patient preparation and the care environment in pediatric radiotherapy, this article reports the findings from interviews with parents at baseline. The aim of the present study was twofold: to describe parents' experience when their child undergoes radiotherapy treatment, and to report parents' suggestions for improvements during radiotherapy for their children. Sixteen mothers and sixteen fathers of children between 2-16 years old with various cancer diagnoses were interviewed. Data were analyzed using content analysis. The findings showed that cancer and treatment turns people's lives upside down, affecting the entire family. Further, the parents experience the child's suffering and must cope with intense feelings. Radiotherapy treatment includes preparation by skilled and empathetic staff. The parents gradually find that they can deal with the process; and lastly, parents have suggestions for improvements during the radiotherapy treatment. An overarching theme emerged: that despair gradually turns to a sense of security, with a sustained focus on and close interaction with the child. In conclusion, an extreme burden was experienced around the start of radiotherapy, though parents gradually coped with the process.

  15. Children Undergoing Radiotherapy: Swedish Parents’ Experiences and Suggestions for Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Mullaney, Tara; Nilsson, Kristina; Wickart-Johansson, Gun; Svärd, Anna-Maja; Nyholm, Tufve; Lindh, Jack; Lindh, Viveca

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 300 children, from 0 to 18 years old, are diagnosed with cancer in Sweden every year. Of these children, 80–90 of them undergo radiotherapy treatment for their cancer. Although radiotherapy is an encounter with advanced technology, few studies have investigated the child’s and the parent’s view of the procedure. As part of an ongoing multicenter study aimed to improve patient preparation and the care environment in pediatric radiotherapy, this article reports the findings from interviews with parents at baseline. The aim of the present study was twofold: to describe parents’ experience when their child undergoes radiotherapy treatment, and to report parents’ suggestions for improvements during radiotherapy for their children. Sixteen mothers and sixteen fathers of children between 2–16 years old with various cancer diagnoses were interviewed. Data were analyzed using content analysis. The findings showed that cancer and treatment turns people’s lives upside down, affecting the entire family. Further, the parents experience the child’s suffering and must cope with intense feelings. Radiotherapy treatment includes preparation by skilled and empathetic staff. The parents gradually find that they can deal with the process; and lastly, parents have suggestions for improvements during the radiotherapy treatment. An overarching theme emerged: that despair gradually turns to a sense of security, with a sustained focus on and close interaction with the child. In conclusion, an extreme burden was experienced around the start of radiotherapy, though parents gradually coped with the process. PMID:26509449

  16. Optimal radiotherapy utilisation rate in developing countries: An IAEA study.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Barton, Michael; Mackillop, William; Fidarova, Elena; Cordero, Lisbeth; Yarney, Joel; Lim, Gerard; Abad, Anthony; Cernea, Valentin; Stojanovic-Rundic, Suzana; Strojan, Primoz; Kobachi, Lotfi; Quarneti, Aldo

    2015-07-01

    Optimal radiotherapy utilisation rate (RTU) is the proportion of all cancer cases that should receive radiotherapy. Optimal RTU was estimated for 9 Middle Income Countries as part of a larger IAEA project to better understand RTU and stage distribution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Updates on clinical studies of selenium supplementation in radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To establish guidelines for the selenium supplementation in radiotherapy we assessed the benefits and risks of selenium supplementation in radiotherapy. Clinical studies on the use of selenium in radiotherapy were searched in the PubMed electronic database in January 2013. Sixteen clinical studies were identified among the 167 articles selected in the initial search. Ten articles were observational studies, and the other 6 articles reported studies on the effects of selenium supplementation in patients with cancer who underwent radiotherapy. The studies were conducted worldwide including European, American and Asian countries between 1987 and 2012. Plasma, serum or whole blood selenium levels were common parameters used to assess the effects of radiotherapy and the selenium supplementation status. Selenium supplementation improved the general conditions of the patients, improved their quality of life and reduced the side effects of radiotherapy. At the dose of selenium used in these studies (200–500 μg/day), selenium supplementation did not reduce the effectiveness of radiotherapy, and no toxicities were reported. Selenium supplementation may offer specific benefits for several types of cancer patients who undergo radiotherapy. Because high-dose selenium and long-term supplementation may be unsafe due to selenium toxicity, more evidence-based information and additional research are needed to ensure the therapeutic benefits of selenium supplementation. PMID:24885670

  18. Presternal soft tissue calcifications following mediastinal radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Vainright, J.R.; Diaconis, J.N.; Haney, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    A patient is described in whom dense calcifications developed in the presternal soft tissues of the chest four years after mediastinal radiotherapy. This is believed to represent dystrophic calcification in previously normal but incidentally radiated tissues following standard dose radiotherapy to the mediastinum for stage IIA Hodgkin's disease.

  19. Radiotherapy and breast reconstruction: oncology, cosmesis and complications

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Mark W

    2012-01-01

    Breast reconstruction plays a highly important role in the management of patients with breast cancer, from a psycho-social and sexual stand-point. Given that immediate breast reconstruction does not impair the oncologic safety of breast cancer management, with no increase in local recurrence rates, and no delays in the initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy, the need to balance cosmesis in reconstruction with the oncologic needs of breast cancer patients is no more evident than in the discussion of radiotherapy. Radiotherapy is essential adjuvant therapy in the treatment of breast cancer, with the use of adjuvant radiotherapy widely shown to reduce local recurrence after both partial and total mastectomy and shown to prolong both disease-free and overall survival in patients with nodal disease. In the setting of breast reconstruction, the effects of radiotherapy are potentially two-fold, with consideration required of the impact of breast reconstruction on the administration of and the initiation of radiotherapy, as well as the effects of radiotherapy on operative complications and cosmetic outcome following immediate breast reconstruction. The current editorial piece aims to analyze this balance, contrasting both autologous and implant-based reconstruction. The literature is still evolving as to the relative role of autologous vs. alloplastic reconstruction in the setting of radiotherapy, and the more recent introduction of acellular dermal matrix and other compounds further complicate the evidence. Fat grafting and evolving techniques in breast reconstruction will herald new discussions on this front. PMID:25083434

  20. Updates on clinical studies of selenium supplementation in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Puspitasari, Irma M; Abdulah, Rizky; Yamazaki, Chiho; Kameo, Satomi; Nakano, Takashi; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2014-05-29

    To establish guidelines for the selenium supplementation in radiotherapy we assessed the benefits and risks of selenium supplementation in radiotherapy. Clinical studies on the use of selenium in radiotherapy were searched in the PubMed electronic database in January 2013. Sixteen clinical studies were identified among the 167 articles selected in the initial search. Ten articles were observational studies, and the other 6 articles reported studies on the effects of selenium supplementation in patients with cancer who underwent radiotherapy. The studies were conducted worldwide including European, American and Asian countries between 1987 and 2012. Plasma, serum or whole blood selenium levels were common parameters used to assess the effects of radiotherapy and the selenium supplementation status. Selenium supplementation improved the general conditions of the patients, improved their quality of life and reduced the side effects of radiotherapy. At the dose of selenium used in these studies (200-500 μg/day), selenium supplementation did not reduce the effectiveness of radiotherapy, and no toxicities were reported. Selenium supplementation may offer specific benefits for several types of cancer patients who undergo radiotherapy. Because high-dose selenium and long-term supplementation may be unsafe due to selenium toxicity, more evidence-based information and additional research are needed to ensure the therapeutic benefits of selenium supplementation.

  1. Dosimetry audit of radiotherapy treatment planning systems.

    PubMed

    Bulski, Wojciech; Chełmiński, Krzysztof; Rostkowska, Joanna

    2015-07-01

    In radiotherapy Treatment Planning Systems (TPS) various calculation algorithms are used. The accuracy of dose calculations has to be verified. Numerous phantom types, detectors and measurement methodologies are proposed to verify the TPS calculations with dosimetric measurements. A heterogeneous slab phantom has been designed within a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) of the IAEA. The heterogeneous phantom was developed in the frame of the IAEA CRP. The phantom consists of frame slabs made with polystyrene and exchangeable inhomogeneity slabs equivalent to bone or lung tissue. Special inserts allow to position thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) capsules within the polystyrene slabs below the bone or lung equivalent slabs and also within the lung equivalent material. Additionally, there are inserts that allow to position films or ionisation chamber in the phantom. Ten Polish radiotherapy centres (of 30 in total) were audited during on-site visits. Six different TPSs and five calculation algorithms were examined in the presence of inhomogeneities. Generally, most of the results from TLD were within 5 % tolerance. Differences between doses calculated by TPSs and measured with TLD did not exceed 4 % for bone and polystyrene equivalent materials. Under the lung equivalent material, on the beam axis the differences were lower than 5 %, whereas inside the lung equivalent material, off the beam axis, in some cases they were of around 7 %. The TLD results were confirmed with the ionisation chamber measurements. The comparison results of the calculations and the measurements allow to detect limitations of TPS calculation algorithms. The audits performed with the use of heterogeneous phantom and TLD seem to be an effective tool for detecting the limitations in the TPS performance or beam configuration errors at audited radiotherapy departments.

  2. Understanding Radiotherapy-Induced Second Cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, David

    2007-03-01

    There is increasing concern regarding radiation-related second-cancer risks in long-term radiotherapy survivors, and a corresponding need to be able to predict cancer risks at high radiation doses. While cancer risks at moderately low radiation doses are reasonably understood from A-bomb survivor studies, there is much more uncertainty at the high doses used in radiotherapy. It has generally been assumed that cancer induction decreases rapidly at high doses due to cell killing. However, most recent studies of radiation-induced second cancers in the lung and breast, covering a very wide range of doses, contradict this assumption. A likely resolution of this disagreement comes from considering cellular repopulation during and after radiation exposure. Repopulation / proliferation with a significant number radiation-induced pre-malignant cells, tends to counteract the effect of cell killing, and keeps the induced cancer risks higher at high doses. We describe and apply a biologically based, minimally parameterized model of dose-dependent cancer risks, incorporating carcinogenic effects, cell killing and, additionally, proliferation / repopulation effects. The situation is somewhat different for radiation-induced leukemia, as repopulation via the blood stream tends to be with cells that originated father away from the treatment volume than is the case for solid second cancers, thus containing a smaller proportion of radiation-damaged cells. The model predictions agree well with recent data on second cancer risks, both for radiation-induced solid cancers and for radiation-induced leukemias. Incorporating repopulation effects provides both a mechanistic understanding of cancer risks at high doses, as well as providing a practical methodology for predicting, and therefore potentially minimizing, cancer risks in organs exposed to high radiation doses during radiotherapy.

  3. Clinical Applications of 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralbell, Raymond

    Although a significant improvement in cancer cure (i.e. 20% increment) has been obtained in the last 2-3 decades, 30-40% of patients still fail locally after curative radiotherapy. In order to improve local tumor control rates with radiotherapy high doses to the tumor volume are frequently necessary. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT) is used to denote a spectrum of radiation planning and delivery techniques that rely on three-dimensional imaging to define the target (tumor) and to distinguish it from normal tissues. Modern, high-precision radiotherapy (RT) techniques are needed in order to implement the goal of optimal tumor destruction delivering minimal dose to the non-target normal tissues. A better target definition is nowadays possible with contemporary imaging (computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography) and image registration technology. A highly precise dose distributions can be obtained with optimal 3-D CRT treatment delivery techniques such as stereotactic RT, intensity modulated RT (IMRT), or protontherapy (the latter allowing for in-depth conformation). Patient daily set-up repositioning and internal organ immobilization systems are necessary before considering to undertake any of the above mentioned high-precision treatment approaches. Prostate cancer, brain tumors, and base of skull malignancies are among the sites most benefitting of dose escalation approaches. Nevertheless, a significant dose reduction to the normal tissues in the vicinity of the irradiated tumor also achievable with optimal 3-D CRT may also be a major issue in the treatment of pediatric tumors in order to preserve growth, normal development, and to reduce the risk of developing radiation induced diseases such as cancer or endocrinologic disorders.

  4. Our intraoperative boost radiotherapy experience and applications

    PubMed Central

    Günay, Semra; Alan, Ömür; Yalçın, Orhan; Türkmen, Aygen; Dizdar, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To present our experience since November 2013, and case selection criteria for intraoperative boost radiotherapy (IObRT) that significantly reduces the local recurrence rate after breast conserving surgery in patients with breast cancer. Material and Methods: Patients who were suitable for IObRT were identified within the group of patients who were selected for breast conserving surgery at our breast council. A MOBETRON (mobile linear accelerator for IObRT) was used for IObRt during surgery. Results: Patients younger than 60 years old with <3 cm invasive ductal cancer in one focus (or two foci within 2 cm), with a histologic grade of 2–3, and a high possibility of local recurrence were admitted for IObRT application. Informed consent was obtained from all participants. Lumpectomy and sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed and advancement flaps were prepared according to the size and inclination of the conus following evaluation of tumor size and surgical margins by pathology. Distance to the thoracic wall was measured, and a radiation oncologist and radiation physicist calculated the required dose. Anesthesia was regulated with slower ventilation frequency, without causing hypoxia. The skin and incision edges were protected, the field was radiated (with 6 MeV electron beam of 10 Gy) and the incision was closed. In our cases, there were no major postoperative surgical or early radiotherapy related complications. Conclusion: The completion of another stage of local therapy with IObRT during surgery positively effects sequencing of other treatments like chemotherapy, hormonotherapy and radiotherapy, if required. IObRT increases disease free and overall survival, as well as quality of life in breast cancer patients. PMID:26985156

  5. Big Data Analytics for Prostate Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Coates, James; Souhami, Luis; El Naqa, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a first-line treatment option for localized prostate cancer and radiation-induced normal tissue damage are often the main limiting factor for modern radiotherapy regimens. Conversely, under-dosing of target volumes in an attempt to spare adjacent healthy tissues limits the likelihood of achieving local, long-term control. Thus, the ability to generate personalized data-driven risk profiles for radiotherapy outcomes would provide valuable prognostic information to help guide both clinicians and patients alike. Big data applied to radiation oncology promises to deliver better understanding of outcomes by harvesting and integrating heterogeneous data types, including patient-specific clinical parameters, treatment-related dose–volume metrics, and biological risk factors. When taken together, such variables make up the basis for a multi-dimensional space (the “RadoncSpace”) in which the presented modeling techniques search in order to identify significant predictors. Herein, we review outcome modeling and big data-mining techniques for both tumor control and radiotherapy-induced normal tissue effects. We apply many of the presented modeling approaches onto a cohort of hypofractionated prostate cancer patients taking into account different data types and a large heterogeneous mix of physical and biological parameters. Cross-validation techniques are also reviewed for the refinement of the proposed framework architecture and checking individual model performance. We conclude by considering advanced modeling techniques that borrow concepts from big data analytics, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, before discussing the potential future impact of systems radiobiology approaches. PMID:27379211

  6. Surgery Followed by Radiotherapy Versus Radiotherapy Alone for Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression From Unfavorable Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Huttenlocher, Stefan; Bajrovic, Amira; Karstens, Johann H.; Adamietz, Irenaeus A.; Kazic, Nadja; Rudat, Volker; Schild, Steven E.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Despite a previously published randomized trial, controversy exists regarding the benefit of adding surgery to radiotherapy for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). It is thought that patients with MSCC from relatively radioresistant tumors or tumors associated with poor functional outcome after radiotherapy alone may benefit from surgery. This study focuses on these tumors. Methods and Materials: Data from 67 patients receiving surgery plus radiotherapy (S+RT) were matched to 134 patients (1:2) receiving radiotherapy alone (RT). Groups were matched for 10 factors and compared for motor function, ambulatory status, local control, and survival. Additional separate matched-pair analyses were performed for patients receiving direct decompressive surgery plus stabilization of involved vertebrae (DDSS) and patients receiving laminectomy (LE). Results: Improvement of motor function occurred in 22% of patients after S+RT and 16% after RT (p = 0.25). Posttreatment ambulatory rates were 67% and 61%, respectively (p = 0.68). Of nonambulatory patients, 29% and 19% (p = 0.53) regained ambulatory status. One-year local control rates were 85% and 89% (p = 0.87). One-year survival rates were 38% and 24% (p = 0.20). The matched-pair analysis of patients receiving LE showed no significant differences between both therapies. In the matched-pair analysis of patients receiving DDSS, improvement of motor function occurred more often after DDSS+RT than RT (28% vs. 19%, p = 0.024). Posttreatment ambulatory rates were 86% and 67% (p = 0.30); 45% and 18% of patients regained ambulatory status (p = 0.29). Conclusions: Patients with MSCC from an unfavorable primary tumor appeared to benefit from DDSS but not LE when added to radiotherapy in terms of improved functional outcome.

  7. [Quality and safety management for radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Pourel, N; Meyrieux, C; Perrin, B

    2016-09-01

    Quality and safety management have been implemented for many years in healthcare structures (hospitals treating cancer, private radiotherapy centres). Their structure and formalization have improved progressively over time. These recommendations aim at describing the link between quality and safety management through its organization scheme based on quality-safety policy, process approach, document management and quality measurement. Dedicated tools, such as experience feedback, a priori risk mapping, to-do-lists and check-lists are shown as examples and recommended as routine practice. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Breast Molecular Profiling and Radiotherapy Considerations.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Omar; Haffty, Bruce G

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has seen major changes in the management of breast cancer. Heterogeneity regarding histology, therapeutic response, dissemination patterns, and patient outcome is evident. Molecular profiling provides an accurate tool to predict treatment outcome compared with classical clinicopathologic features. The genomic profiling unveiled the heterogeneity of breast cancer and identified distinct biologic subtypes. These advanced techniques were integrated into the clinical management; predicting systemic therapy benefit and overall survival. Utilizing genotyping to guide locoregional management decisions needs further characterization. In this chapter we will review available data on molecular classification of breast cancer, their association with locoregional outcome, their radiobiological properties and radiotherapy considerations.

  9. State of the art of radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Pilar; Olmedo, Eugenia

    2013-06-01

    Locally advanced or stage III disease accounts for ~30% of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which means only in the United States, more than 50,000 new patients each year. Stage III is a very heterogeneous disease, the management of patients is complex and several conditions (performance status, weight loss, comorbidities, characteristics of nodal involvement or resectability) must be considered before selecting the best treatment, which in most cases is chemotherapy (CT) and radiotherapy (RT). In this article, we will review key changes in the management of unresectable stage III during the last decades. Also we will highlight some challenges and areas of active research.

  10. Intestinal lymphangiectasia secondary to radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, S.S.; Dundas, S.; Holdsworth, C.D.

    1987-08-01

    We report a case of intestinal lymphangiectasia secondary to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The patient also had small bowel bacterial overgrowth and pancreatic insufficiency. Lymphatic ectasia as a histological feature has been described previously in association with postradiotherapy malabsorption, but radiation-induced lymphangiectasia producing clinical manifestations has hitherto not been reported. Replacement of dietary long-chain fats with medium-chain triglycerides, pancreatic enzyme supplements, and a short course of oxytetracycline, resulted in dramatic clinical improvement. The possibility of intestinal lymphangiectasia should be borne in mind in patients with postradiotherapy malabsorption. A low serum albumin and lymphocyte count should draw attention to this possibility.

  11. Basic immunology of antibody targeted radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. . E-mail: jwong@coh.org

    2006-10-01

    Antibody targeted radiotherapy brings an important new treatment modality to Radiation oncology clinic. Radiation dose to tumor and normal tissues are determined by a complex interplay of antibody, antigen, tumor, radionuclide, and host-related factors. A basic understanding of these immunologic and physiologic factors is important to optimally utilize this therapy in the clinic. Preclinical and clinical studies need to be continued to broaden our understanding and to develop new strategies to further improve the efficacy of this promising form of targeted therapy.

  12. Characteristics of in vivo radiotherapy dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Edwards, C R; Mountford, P J

    2009-11-01

    The recent discussion and debate about the use of in vivo dosimetry as a routine component of the radiotherapy treatment process has not included the limitations introduced by the physical characteristics of the detectors. Although a robust calibration procedure will ensure acceptable uncertainties in the measurements of tumour dose, further work is required to confirm the accuracy of critical organ measurements with a diode or a thermoluminescent dosemeter outside the main field owing to limitations caused by a non-uniform X-ray energy response of the detector, differences between the X-ray energy spectrum inside and outside the main field, and contaminating electrons.

  13. Oral mucositis. A complication of radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, C.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Oral mucositis is a complication of head and neck radiotherapy. It is understood what causes the inflammation and what biological tissue changes occur, however, a definite cure for oral mucositis has not yet been found. Supportive treatments, analgesics, antimicrobials and anti-inflammatory agents have been prescribed, none of which has been a thorough measure of treatment. An effective cure for oral mucositis is still in the midst of scientific research. In the interim local palliative treatments will help to alleviate the patients', debilitating symptoms.

  14. Ichthyosiform scaling secondary to megavoltage radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, E.V. )

    1991-07-01

    Acquired ichthyosis is a rare dermatosis associated with a number of malignancies. Side effects seen on the skin secondary to megavoltage radiotherapy are uncommon but may include fine dry desquamation and tanning. The authors present a case of ichthyosiform scaling limited to the radiation fields in a patient treated for brain metastases of a primary small cell lung carcinoma. The reader is reminded that side effects of megavoltage treatment do occur on the skin. A brief review of these effects is included. 5 references.

  15. Radiotherapy changes of the pediatric hip

    SciTech Connect

    Libshitz, H.I.; Edeiken, B.S.

    1981-09-01

    Significant radiation-induced abnormalities (aseptic necrosis of the femoral heads, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, radiation-induced sarcoma) were identified in eight of 44 patients aged 16 years or younger at the time of radiotherapy and followed for at least 3 years. The incidence is 18% in the entire group and 25% (8/32) if only patients with radiographs of the hips 3 or more years after therapy are considered. The first evidence of abnormality developed 13 years after irradiation in one patient. The need for long term follow-up of therapeutically irradiated children is stressed.

  16. Particle radiotherapy with carbon ion beams

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy offers superior dose conformity in the treatment of deep-seated malignant tumours compared with conventional X-ray therapy. In addition, carbon ion beams have a higher relative biological effectiveness compared with protons or X-ray beams. The algorithm of treatment planning and beam delivery system is tailored to the individual parameters of the patient. The present article reviews the available literatures for various disease sites including the head and neck, skull base, lung, liver, prostate, bone and soft tissues and pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer as well as physical and biological properties. PMID:23497542

  17. Image-Guided Radiotherapy and -Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer. PMID:25853092

  18. Image-guided radiotherapy and -brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer.

  19. Contribution of FDOPA PET to radiotherapy planning for advanced glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowson, Nicholas; Fay, Michael; Thomas, Paul; Jeffree, Rosalind; McDowall, Robert; Winter, Craig; Coulthard, Alan; Smith, Jye; Gal, Yaniv; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Salvado, Olivier; Crozier, Stuart; Rose, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Despite radical treatment with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, advanced gliomas recur within months. Geographic misses in radiotherapy planning may play a role in this seemingly ineluctable recurrence. Planning is typically performed on post-contrast MRIs, which are known to underreport tumour volume relative to FDOPA PET scans. FDOPA PET fused with contrast enhanced MRI has demonstrated greater sensitivity and specificity than MRI alone. One sign of potential misses would be differences between gross target volumes (GTVs) defined using MRI alone and when fused with PET. This work examined whether such a discrepancy may occur. Materials and Methods: For six patients, a 75 minute PET scan using 3,4-dihydroxy-6-18F-fluoro-L-phynel-alanine (18F-FDOPA) was taken within 2 days of gadolinium enhanced MRI scans. In addition to standard radiotherapy planning by an experienced radiotherapy oncologist, a second gross target volume (GTV) was defined by an experienced nuclear medicine specialist for fused PET and MRI, while blinded to the radiotherapy plans. The volumes from standard radiotherapy planning were compared to the PET defined GTV. Results: The comparison indicated radiotherapy planning would change in several cases if FDOPA PET data was available. PET-defined contours were external to 95% prescribed dose for several patients. However, due to the radiotherapy margins, the discrepancies were relatively small in size and all received a dose of 50 Gray or more. Conclusions: Given the limited size of the discrepancies it is uncertain that geographic misses played a major role in patient outcome. Even so, the existence of discrepancies indicates that FDOPA PET could assist in better defining margins when planning radiotherapy for advanced glioma, which could be important for highly conformal radiotherapy plans.

  20. Cardiac Side-effects From Breast Cancer Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Taylor, C W; Kirby, A M

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer radiotherapy reduces the risk of cancer recurrence and death. However, it usually involves some radiation exposure of the heart and analyses of randomised trials have shown that it can increase the risk of heart disease. Estimates of the absolute risks of radiation-related heart disease are needed to help oncologists plan each individual woman's treatment. The risk for an individual woman varies according to her estimated cardiac radiation dose and her background risk of ischaemic heart disease in the absence of radiotherapy. When it is known, this risk can then be compared with the absolute benefit of the radiotherapy. At present, many UK cancer centres are already giving radiotherapy with mean heart doses of less than 3 Gy and for most women the benefits of the radiotherapy will probably far outweigh the risks. Technical approaches to minimising heart dose in breast cancer radiotherapy include optimisation of beam angles, use of multileaf collimator shielding, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, treatment in a prone position, treatment in deep inspiration (including the use of breath-hold and gating techniques), proton therapy and partial breast irradiation. The multileaf collimator is suitable for many women with upper pole left breast cancers, but for women with central or lower pole cancers, breath-holding techniques are now recommended in national UK guidelines. Ongoing work aims to identify ways of irradiating pan-regional lymph nodes that are effective, involve minimal exposure of organs at risk and are feasible to plan, deliver and verify. These will probably include wide tangent-based field-in-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy or arc radiotherapy techniques in combination with deep inspiratory breath-hold, and proton beam irradiation for women who have a high predicted heart dose from intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

  1. Cataractogenesis after Cobalt-60 eye plaque radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kleineidam, M.; Augsburger, J.J. ); Hernandez, C.; Glennon, P.; Brady, L.W. )

    1993-07-15

    This study was designed to estimate the actuarial incidence of typical postirradiation cataracts and to identify prognostic factors related to their development in melanoma-containing eyes treated by Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy. A special interest was the impact of calculated radiation dose and dose-rate to the lens. The authors evaluated the actuarial occurrence of post-irradiation cataract in 365 patients with primary posterior uveal melanoma treated by Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy between 1976 and 1986. Only 22% (S.E. = 4.6%) of the patients who received a total dose of 6 to 20 Gy at the center of the lens developed a visually significant cataract attributable to the radiation within 5 years after treatment. Using multivariate Cox proportional hazards modeling, the authors identified thickness of the tumor, location of the tumor's anterior margin relative to the equatorward and the ora serrata, and diameter of the eye plaque used as the best combination of covariables for predicting length of time until development of cataract. Surprisingly, the dose of radiation delivered to the lens, which was strongly correlated to all of these covariables, was not a significant predictive factor in multivariate analysis. The results suggest that success of efforts to decrease the occurrence rate of post-irradiation cataracts by better treatment planning might be limited in patients with posterior uveal melanoma. 21 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. In vivo dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mijnheer, Ben; Beddar, Sam; Izewska, Joanna; Reft, Chester

    2013-07-01

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) is in use in external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to detect major errors, to assess clinically relevant differences between planned and delivered dose, to record dose received by individual patients, and to fulfill legal requirements. After discussing briefly the main characteristics of the most commonly applied IVD systems, the clinical experience of IVD during EBRT will be summarized. Advancement of the traditional aspects of in vivo dosimetry as well as the development of currently available and newly emerging noninterventional technologies are required for large-scale implementation of IVD in EBRT. These new technologies include the development of electronic portal imaging devices for 2D and 3D patient dosimetry during advanced treatment techniques, such as IMRT and VMAT, and the use of IVD in proton and ion radiotherapy by measuring the decay of radiation-induced radionuclides. In the final analysis, we will show in this Vision 20∕20 paper that in addition to regulatory compliance and reimbursement issues, the rationale for in vivo measurements is to provide an accurate and independent verification of the overall treatment procedure. It will enable the identification of potential errors in dose calculation, data transfer, dose delivery, patient setup, and changes in patient anatomy. It is the authors' opinion that all treatments with curative intent should be verified through in vivo dose measurements in combination with pretreatment checks.

  3. Dose masking feature for BNCT radiotherapy planning

    DOEpatents

    Cook, Jeremy L.; Wessol, Daniel E.; Wheeler, Floyd J.

    2000-01-01

    A system for displaying an accurate model of isodoses to be used in radiotherapy so that appropriate planning can be performed prior to actual treatment on a patient. The nature of the simulation of the radiotherapy planning for BNCT and Fast Neutron Therapy, etc., requires that the doses be computed in the entire volume. The "entire volume" includes the patient and beam geometries as well as the air spaces in between. Isodoses derived from the computed doses will therefore extend into the air regions between the patient and beam geometries and thus depict the unrealistic possibility that radiation deposition occurs in regions containing no physical media. This problem is solved by computing the doses for the entire geometry and then masking the physical and air regions along with the isodose contours superimposed over the patient image at the corresponding plane. The user is thus able to mask out (remove) the contour lines from the unwanted areas of the image by selecting the appropriate contour masking region from the raster image.

  4. [Antalgic radiotherapy in lumbosacral carcinomatous neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Russi, E G; Gaeta, M; Pergolizzi, S; Settineri, N; Frosina, P; De Renzis, C

    1994-06-01

    Lumbosacral carcinomatous neuropathy (LCN) may be caused by infiltration or compression of the lumbosacral plexi and nerves from intrapelvic or paraaortic neoplasms. The authors submitted 23 patients complaining of LCN with CT documented intrapelvic or paraaortic tumors to palliative radiotherapy. Megavoltage external beam irradiation was administered using a 6-MV linear accelerator. Treatment field sizes ranged from 56 cm2 to 235 cm2 (mean: 150.54 cm2) and encompassed only the site where the disease involved the lumbosacral plexus or its branches. > or = 3 Gy/day fractions were used. Twenty-one of 22 assessable patients (95.4%) obtained LCN pain relief; 19 (86.3%) obtained complete LCN pain relief. The median time to pain progression (TPP) was 150 days (range: 39-510 days). The median survival was 165 days. Seven patients were LCN pain-free at death. Two patients are alive and LCN pain-free. The remaining 12 patients had recurrent LCN pain: four of them were reirradiated at the site of previous neuropathy and only two had partial relief again. The authors conclude that it is advisable to submit to palliative radiotherapy the inoperable disseminated and/or recurrent cancer patients complaining of LCN, to use large fractions not to occupy the extant time of their already short life-expectancy, and to design small fields to avoid acute side-effects.

  5. Fractionated radiotherapy and radiosurgery of intracranial meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Biau, J; Khalil, T; Verrelle, P; Lemaire, J-J

    2015-06-19

    This review focuses on the role of radiosurgery and fractionated radiotherapy in the management of intracranial meningiomas, which are the most common benign intracranial tumors. Whenever feasible, surgery remains a cornerstone of treatment in effective health care treatment where modern radiotherapy plays an important role. Irradiation can be proposed as first-line treatment, as adjuvant treatment, or as a second-line treatment after recurrence. Stereotactic radiosurgery consists of delivering, a high-dose of radiation with high precision, to the tumor in a single-fraction with a minimal exposure of surrounding healthy tissue. Stereotactic radiosurgery, especially with the gamma knife technique, has reached a high level of success for the treatment of intracranial meningiomas with excellent local control and low morbidity. However, stereotactic radiosurgery is limited by tumor size,<3-4cm, and location, i.e. reasonable distance from the organs at risk. Fractionated radiation therapy is an interesting alternative (5 to 6weeks treatment time) for large inoperable tumors. The results of fractionated radiation therapy seem encouraging as regards both local control and morbidity although long-term prospective studies are still needed.

  6. In vivo dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mijnheer, Ben; Beddar, Sam; Izewska, Joanna; Reft, Chester

    2013-07-15

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) is in use in external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to detect major errors, to assess clinically relevant differences between planned and delivered dose, to record dose received by individual patients, and to fulfill legal requirements. After discussing briefly the main characteristics of the most commonly applied IVD systems, the clinical experience of IVD during EBRT will be summarized. Advancement of the traditional aspects of in vivo dosimetry as well as the development of currently available and newly emerging noninterventional technologies are required for large-scale implementation of IVD in EBRT. These new technologies include the development of electronic portal imaging devices for 2D and 3D patient dosimetry during advanced treatment techniques, such as IMRT and VMAT, and the use of IVD in proton and ion radiotherapy by measuring the decay of radiation-induced radionuclides. In the final analysis, we will show in this Vision 20/20 paper that in addition to regulatory compliance and reimbursement issues, the rationale for in vivo measurements is to provide an accurate and independent verification of the overall treatment procedure. It will enable the identification of potential errors in dose calculation, data transfer, dose delivery, patient setup, and changes in patient anatomy. It is the authors' opinion that all treatments with curative intent should be verified through in vivo dose measurements in combination with pretreatment checks.

  7. Cerebral aneurysms following radiotherapy for medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, P.J.; Sung, J.H.

    1989-04-01

    Three patients, two males and one female aged 21, 14, and 31 years, respectively, developed cerebral saccular aneurysms several years after undergoing radiotherapy for cerebellar medulloblastoma at 2, 5, and 14 years of age, respectively. Following surgery, all three received combined cobalt-60 irradiation and intrathecal colloidal radioactive gold (/sup 198/Au) therapy, and died from rupture of the aneurysm 19, 9, and 17 years after the radiotherapy, respectively. Autopsy examination revealed no recurrence of the medulloblastoma, but widespread radiation-induced vasculopathy was found at the base of the brain and in the spinal cord, and saccular aneurysms arose from the posterior cerebral arteries at the basal cistern or choroidal fissure. The aneurysms differed from the ordinary saccular aneurysms of congenital type in their location and histological features. Their locations corresponded to the areas where intrathecally administered colloidal /sup 198/Au is likely to pool, and they originated directly from a segment of the artery rather than from a branching site as in congenital saccular aneurysms. It is, therefore, concluded that the aneurysms in these three patients were most likely radiation-induced.

  8. Radiotherapy dosimetry using a commercial OSL system

    SciTech Connect

    Viamonte, A.; Rosa, L. A. R. da; Buckley, L. A.; Cherpak, A.; Cygler, J. E.

    2008-04-15

    A commercial optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) system developed for radiation protection dosimetry by Landauer, Inc., the InLight microStar reader, was tested for dosimetry procedures in radiotherapy. The system uses carbon-doped aluminum oxide, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C, as a radiation detector material. Using this OSL system, a percent depth dose curve for {sup 60}Co gamma radiation was measured in solid water. Field size and SSD dependences of the detector response were also evaluated. The dose response relationship was investigated between 25 and 400 cGy. The decay of the response with time following irradiation and the energy dependence of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C OSL detectors were also measured. The results obtained using OSL dosimeters show good agreement with ionization chamber and diode measurements carried out under the same conditions. Reproducibility studies show that the response of the OSL system to repeated exposures is 2.5% (1sd), indicating a real possibility of applying the Landauer OSL commercial system for radiotherapy dosimetric procedures.

  9. Liver-Directed Radiotherapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Florence K.; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Zhu, Andrew X.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) continues to increase world-wide. Many patients present with advanced disease with extensive local tumor or vascular invasion and are not candidates for traditionally curative therapies such as orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) or resection. Radiotherapy (RT) was historically limited by its inability to deliver a tumoricidal dose; however, modern RT techniques have prompted renewed interest in the use of liver-directed RT to treat patients with primary hepatic malignancies. Summary The aim of this review was to discuss the use of external beam RT in the treatment of HCC, with particular focus on the use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We review the intricacies of SBRT treatment planning and delivery. Liver-directed RT involves accurate target identification, precise and reproducible patient immobilization, and assessment of target and organ motion. We also summarize the published data on liver-directed RT, and demonstrate that it is associated with excellent local control and survival rates, particularly in patients who are not candidates for OLT or resection. Key Messages Modern liver-directed RT is safe and effective for the treatment of HCC, particularly in patients who are not candidates for OLT or resection. Liver-directed RT, including SBRT, depends on accurate target identification, precise and reproducible patient immobilization, and assessment of target and organ motion. Further prospective studies are needed to fully delineate the role of liver-directed RT in the treatment of HCC. PMID:27493895

  10. [Exclusive radiotherapy in stage III esophageal cancer].

    PubMed

    Tombolini, V; Banelli, E; Cavaceppi, P; Donato, V; Montagna, A; Raffetto, N; Santarelli, M; Vitturini, A

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the report is to evaluate the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of stage III esophageal carcinoma and to analyze the influence of site, extension, grade of dysphagia and histology on local control and survival. Twenty males and 6 females were submitted to external beam therapy with 4-6 MV X-rays and received 60-70 Gy in fractions of 180 cGY to 200 cGy per day, 5 days a week. Radiation therapy technique was two posterior oblique portals and a single anterior field at 100 cm SAD. After 4500 cGy portals were coned down, holding the spinal cord dose below 4500 cGy. Global response to therapy was 73.1%. Median survival was 11 months. The 2-year survival rate was 12.5% in patients with lesions smaller than 5 cm and 5.5% for those with lesions greater than 5 cm. Patients with grade 2 dysphagia had a median survival of 16 months, those with grade 1, 11 months and 2 patients with grade 0, 4 and 9 months. In all patients mild to moderate esophagitis was observed. Two patients developed esophagotracheal fistula. Exclusively radiotherapy cannot be considered the treatment of choice in III stage patients. Primary chemoradiotherapy may emerge as the treatment of choice for cancer of the esophagus.

  11. Uses of megavoltage digital tomosynthesis in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Vikren

    With the advent of intensity modulated radiotherapy, radiation treatment plans are becoming more conformal to the tumor with the decreasing margins. It is therefore of prime importance that the patient be positioned correctly prior to treatment. Therefore, image guided treatment is necessary for intensity modulated radiotherapy plans to be implemented successfully. Current advanced imaging devices require costly hardware and software upgrade, and radiation imaging solutions, such as cone beam computed tomography, may introduce extra radiation dose to the patient in order to acquire better quality images. Thus, there is a need to extend current existing imaging device ability and functions while reducing cost and radiation dose. Existing electronic portal imaging devices can be used to generate computed tomography-like tomograms through projection images acquired over a small angle using the technique of cone-beam digital tomosynthesis. Since it uses a fraction of the images required for computed tomography reconstruction, use of this technique correspondingly delivers only a fraction of the imaging dose to the patient. Furthermore, cone-beam digital tomosynthesis can be offered as a software-only solution as long as a portal imaging device is available. In this study, the feasibility of performing digital tomosynthesis using individually-acquired megavoltage images from a charge coupled device-based electronic portal imaging device was investigated. Three digital tomosynthesis reconstruction algorithms, the shift-and-add, filtered back-projection, and simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique, were compared considering the final image quality and radiation dose during imaging. A software platform, DART, was created using a combination of the Matlab and C++ languages. The platform allows for the registration of a reference Cone Beam Digital Tomosynthesis (CBDT) image against a daily acquired set to determine how to shift the patient prior to treatment. Finally

  12. Monte Carlo dose calculations in advanced radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Karl Kenneth

    The remarkable accuracy of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation algorithms has led to the widely accepted view that these methods should and will play a central role in the radiotherapy treatment verification and planning of the future. The advantages of using MC clinically are particularly evident for radiation fields passing through inhomogeneities, such as lung and air cavities, and for small fields, including those used in today's advanced intensity modulated radiotherapy techniques. Many investigators have reported significant dosimetric differences between MC and conventional dose calculations in such complex situations, and have demonstrated experimentally the unmatched ability of MC calculations in modeling charged particle disequilibrium. The advantages of using MC dose calculations do come at a cost. The nature of MC dose calculations require a highly detailed, in-depth representation of the physical system (accelerator head geometry/composition, anatomical patient geometry/composition and particle interaction physics) to allow accurate modeling of external beam radiation therapy treatments. To perform such simulations is computationally demanding and has only recently become feasible within mainstream radiotherapy practices. In addition, the output of the accelerator head simulation can be highly sensitive to inaccuracies within a model that may not be known with sufficient detail. The goal of this dissertation is to both improve and advance the implementation of MC dose calculations in modern external beam radiotherapy. To begin, a novel method is proposed to fine-tune the output of an accelerator model to better represent the measured output. In this method an intensity distribution of the electron beam incident on the model is inferred by employing a simulated annealing algorithm. The method allows an investigation of arbitrary electron beam intensity distributions and is not restricted to the commonly assumed Gaussian intensity. In a second component of

  13. Bladder filling variation during conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sithamparam, S.; Ahmad, R.; Sabarudin, A.; Othman, Z.; Ismail, M.

    2017-05-01

    Conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer is associated with small bowel toxicity mainly diarrhea. Treating patients with a full bladder is one of the practical solutions to reduce small bowel toxicity. Previous studies on prostate and cervix cancer patients revealed that maintaining consistent bladder volume throughout radiotherapy treatment is challenging. The aim of this study was to measure bladder volume variation throughout radiotherapy treatment. This study also measured the association between bladder volume changes and diarrhea. Twenty two rectal cancer patients were recruited prospectively. Patients were planned for treatment with full bladder following departmental bladder filling protocol and the planning bladder volume was measured during CT-simulation. During radiotherapy, the bladder volume was measured weekly using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and compared to planning bladder volume. Incidence and severity of diarrhea were recorded during the weekly patient review. There was a negative time trend for bladder volume throughout five weeks treatment. The mean bladder volume decreased 18 % from 123 mL (SD 54 mL) during CT-simulation to 101 mL (SD 71 mL) on the 5th week of radiotherapy, but the decrease is not statistically significant. However, there was a large variation of bladder volume within each patient during treatment. This study showed an association between changes of bladder volume and diarrhea (P = 0.045). In conclusion bladder volume reduced throughout radiotherapy treatment for conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer and there was a large variation of bladder volume within patients.

  14. Radiotherapy enhances laser palliation of malignant dysphagia: a randomised study.

    PubMed Central

    Sargeant, I R; Tobias, J S; Blackman, G; Thorpe, S; Glover, J R; Bown, S G

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: A major drawback of laser endoscopy in the palliation of malignant dysphagia is the need for repeated treatments. This study was designed to test whether external beam radiotherapy would reduce the necessity for repeated laser therapy. PATIENTS/METHODS: Sixty seven patients with inoperable oesophageal or gastric cardia cancers and satisfactory swallowing after initial laser recanalisation were randomised to palliative external beam radiotherapy (30 Gy in 10 fractions) or no radiotherapy. All patients underwent a 'check' endoscopy five weeks after initial recanalisation and were subsequently reendoscoped only for recurrent dysphagia, which occurred in 59 patients. RESULTS: Dysphagia was relieved equally well in both groups and the improvement was maintained with further endoscopic treatment. The initial dysphagia controlled interval and the duration between procedures required to maintain lifelong palliation (treatment interval) increased from five to nine weeks (median) in the radiotherapy group (p < 0.01 both parameters). Radiotherapy was well tolerated in all but three patients. One perforation occurred and two fistulae opened after dilatation in patients who received radiotherapy. CONCLUSION: Additional radiotherapy reduces the necessity for therapeutic endoscopy for a patient's remaining life. It has an important role in relatively well patients who are likely to survive long enough to benefit. PMID:9135526

  15. Laryngeal sensation and pharyngeal delay time after (chemo)radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Maruo, Takashi; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Ozawa, Kikuko; Hiramatsu, Mariko; Suzuki, Atsushi; Nishio, Naoki; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the association between changes in laryngeal sensation and initiation of swallowing reflex or swallowing function before and after (chemo)radiotherapy. A prospective study was conducted in a tertiary referral university hospital. Thirteen patients who received (chemo)radiotherapy for treatment of laryngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer were included. Laryngeal sensation was evaluated at the tip of the epiglottis before and 1, 3 months, and 1 year after (chemo)radiotherapy. Videofluoroscopy was performed at the same time. Quantitative determinations included changes in laryngeal sensation, computed analysis of pharyngeal delay time, the distance and velocity of hyoid bone movement during the phase of hyoid excursion, and pharyngeal residue rate (the proportion of the bolus that was left as residue in the pharynx at the first swallow). Laryngeal sensation significantly deteriorated 1 month after (chemo)radiotherapy, but there was a tendency to return to pretreatment levels 1 year after treatment. Neither pharyngeal delay time nor displacement of the hyoid bone changed significantly before and after (chemo)radiotherapy. In addition, there was no significant difference in the mean velocity of hyoid bone movement and the amount of stasis in the pharynx at the first swallow before and after (chemo)radiotherapy. After (chemo)radiotherapy, laryngeal sensation deteriorated. But, in this study, videofluoroscopy showed that swallowing reflex and function were maintained.

  16. Improving radiotherapy in cancer treatment: Promises and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Helen H.W.; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2017-01-01

    Effective radiotherapy for cancer has relied on the promise of maximally eradicating tumor cells while minimally killing normal cells. Technological advancement has provided state-of-the-art instrumentation that enables delivery of radiotherapy with great precision to tumor lesions with substantial reduced injury to normal tissues. Moreover, better understanding of radiobiology, particularly the mechanisms of radiation sensitivity and resistance in tumor lesions and toxicity in normal tissues, has improved the treatment efficacy of radiotherapy. Previous mechanism-based studies have identified many cellular targets that can affect radiation sensitivity, notably reactive oxygen species, DNA-damaging response signals, and tumor microenvironments. Several radiation sensitizers and protectors have been developed and clinically evaluated; however, many of these results are inconclusive, indicating that improvement remains needed. In this era of personalized medicine in which patients’ genetic variations, transcriptome and proteomics, tumor metabolism and microenvironment, and tumor immunity are available. These new developments have provided opportunity for new target discovery. Several radiotherapy sensitivity-associated “gene signatures” have been reported although clinical validations are needed. Recently, several immune modifiers have been shown to associate with improved radiotherapy in preclinical models and in early clinical trials. Combination of radiotherapy and immunocheckpoint blockade has shown promising results especially in targeting metastatic tumors through abscopal response. In this article, we succinctly review recent advancements in the areas of mechanism-driven targets and exploitation of new targets from current radio-oncogenomic and radiation-immunotherapeutic approaches that bear clinical implications for improving the treatment efficacy of radiotherapy.

  17. Challenge and Hope in Radiotherapy of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most critical global health issues. With frequent association of viral liver disease, HCC is highly complex, harboring both cancer and chronic liver disease. The tumor stage and underlying liver function are both major determinants of the treatment selection as well as prognosis in HCC patients, thus allowing no more than a 20% chance for potentially curative therapies. Radiotherapy technology has been evolved remarkably during the past decade, and radiation can be precisely delivered, thereby permitting higher doses to the tumour and reduced doses to surrounding normal tissues. There has been increasing interest in the merits of radiotherapy in HCC over the past few years, as indicated by a Pub Med search. Radiotherapy has been used as the definitive therapy with curative intent in early stage tumours. It has been used also in combination with TACE for intermediate stage tumours. In locally advanced tumours, radiotherapy has been combined with systemic agents. Despite its efficacy, radiotherapy has not yet been incorporated into the standard management guidelines of HCC. The lack of high evidence level data, especially randomized controlled trials, has posed an obstacle in including radiotherapy into the routine treatment schema of HCC. Therefore, well-designed prospective studies are strongly recommended using developing technology for radiotherapy alone or combination therapies. Also, many issues such as the optimal dose-fractionation, intra- or extrahepatic metastasis after radiotherapy, and radiation-induced hepatic dysfunction remain to be solved. In this review, current status of radiotherapy for HCC will be discussed with regard to technical consideration and combination strategy. The limitation and future perspectives will also be discussed. PMID:19881961

  18. Cerebral necrosis after 25Gy radiotherapy in childhood followed 28 years later by 54Gy radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Koot, Radboud W; Stalpers, Lukas J A; Aronica, Eleonora; Andries Bosch, D

    2007-09-01

    The development of brain necrosis is life-long risk of repeat radiation therapy, even after a long time interval and a moderate radiation dose. We report on a 34-year-old patient who had prophylactic cranial irradiation with 25Gy and adjuvant chemotherapy in childhood for leukaemia and in adulthood, 28 years later, therapeutic radiotherapy with 54Gy for an atypical (WHO grade II) meningioma. About 2 years later he developed a contrast-enhancing lesion on MRI-scan that was indicative of a tumor according to a thallium-201 ((201)Tl) SPECT scan. Histopathology of the operated contrast-enhancing lesion showed extensive radionecrosis. Radiation necrosis is a small but serious risk after repeat radiation therapy, even after a very long-term interval, the delivery of small fractions and an average cumulative total dose. Patients undergoing repeat radiotherapy therefore need to be followed life-long for potential late radiation toxicity.

  19. Long-Term Breast Cancer Patient Outcomes After Adjuvant Radiotherapy Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy or Conventional Tangential Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jen-Fu; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Lin, Chun-Shu; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Chen, Chang-Ming; Lo, Cheng-Hsiang; Fan, Chao-Yueh; Tsao, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Wen-Yen

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the article is to analyze breast cancer patient clinical outcomes after long-term follow-up using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or conventional tangential radiotherapy (cRT). We retrospectively reviewed patients with stage 0-III breast cancer who received breast conserving therapy between April 2004 and December 2007. Of the 234 patients, 103 (44%) were treated with IMRT and 131 (56%) were treated with cRT. A total prescription dose of 45 to 50 Gy (1.8-2 Gy per fraction) was delivered to the whole breast. A 14 Gy boost dose was delivered in 7 fractions. The median follow-up was 8.2 years. Five of 131 (3.8%) cRT-treated patients and 2 of 103 (1.9%) IMRT-treated patients had loco-regional failure. The 8-year loco-regional failure-free survival rates were 96.7% and 97.6% (P = 0.393) in the cRT and IMRT groups, respectively, whereas the 8-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 91.2% and 93.1%, respectively (P = 0.243). Patients treated with IMRT developed ≥ grade 2 acute dermatitis less frequently than patients treated with cRT (40.8% vs 56.5%; P = 0.017). There were no differences in late toxicity. IMRT reduces ≥ grade 2 acute skin toxicity. Local control, DFS, and overall survival were equivalent with IMRT and cRT. IMRT can be considered a standard technique for breast cancer treatment.

  20. Comparison of "sandwich chemo-radiotherapy" and six cycles of chemotherapy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with stage IIIC endometrial cancer: a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Nasuh Utku; Yavas, Guler; Yavas, Cagdas; Ata, Ozlem; Yılmaz, Setenay Arzu; Celik, Cetin

    2013-10-01

    To compare "sandwich chemo-radiotherapy" with six cycles of chemotherapy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy with respect to tolerability and acute toxicity. Twenty-five women with surgically staged IIIC endometrial cancer were included. Treatment consisted of either three cycles of paclitaxel (175 mg/m²) and carboplatin (AUC 6) on a q21-day schedule followed by irradiation (45-50.4 Gy) or six cycles of the same chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. Acute toxicity related to either chemotherapy or radiotherapy was evaluated. Median age was 61.5 years (range 36-83 years). Eleven patients had sandwich chemo-radiotherapy, and the other 14 patients had 6 cycles of chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. Three out of the five patients who could not complete all the cycles in the sandwich chemo-radiotherapy group had pelvic and para-aortic radiotherapy. Acute radiotherapy related grade 1-2 gastrointestinal system (GIS) and genitourinary system (GUS) toxicities were observed in 72.8 and 63.6 % of patients, respectively, for sandwich group. Undesired treatment breaks in the course of radiotherapy were observed in six patients for sandwich chemo-radiotherapy and in one patient receiving six cycles of chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. All the patients who had undesired treatment breaks in the sandwich chemo-radiotherapy group had pelvic and para-aortic radiotherapy. Sandwich chemo-radiotherapy seems to be more toxic particularly for patients who had pelvic and para-aortic irradiation. Therefore, it might be more convenient to delay radiotherapy after six cycles of chemotherapy for patients with the indication of pelvic para-aortic radiotherapy.

  1. Excellent Local Control With Stereotactic Radiotherapy Boost After External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Wendy; Loo, Billy W.; Goffinet, Don R.; Chang, Steven D.; Adler, John R.; Pinto, Harlan A.; Fee, Willard E.; Kaplan, Michael J.; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To determine long-term outcomes in patients receiving stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) as a boost after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: Eight-two patients received an SRT boost after EBRT between September 1992 and July 2006. Nine patients had T1, 30 had T2, 12 had T3, and 31 had T4 tumors. Sixteen patients had Stage II, 19 had Stage III, and 47 had Stage IV disease. Patients received 66 Gy of EBRT followed by a single-fraction SRT boost of 7-15 Gy, delivered 2-6 weeks after EBRT. Seventy patients also received cisplatin-based chemotherapy delivered concurrently with and adjuvant to radiotherapy. Results: At a median follow-up of 40.7 months (range, 6.5-144.2 months) for living patients, there was only 1 local failure in a patient with a T4 tumor. At 5 years, the freedom from local relapse rate was 98%, freedom from nodal relapse 83%, freedom from distant metastasis 68%, freedom from any relapse 67%, and overall survival 69%. Late toxicity included radiation-related retinopathy in 3, carotid aneurysm in 1, and radiographic temporal lobe necrosis in 10 patients, of whom 2 patients were symptomatic with seizures. Of 10 patients with temporal lobe necrosis, 9 had T4 tumors. Conclusion: Stereotactic radiotherapy boost after EBRT provides excellent local control for patients with NPC. Improved target delineation and dose homogeneity of radiation delivery for both EBRT and SRT is important to avoid long-term complications. Better systemic therapies for distant control are needed.

  2. Virtual reality training for radiotherapy becomes a reality.

    PubMed

    Phillips, R; Ward, J W; Page, L; Grau, C; Bojen, A; Hall, J; Nielsen, K; Nordentoft, V; Beavis, A W

    2008-01-01

    A report in 2007 to the UK Government identified a crisis in England for training staff and students for the radiotherapy treatment of cancer. The Hull authors have developed an immersive life size virtual environment of a radiotherapy treatment room, known as VERT, to address this problem. VERT provides the trainee with models, simulation, enhanced visualization and training aids for treatment of virtual patients in a virtual treatment room. In 2007 immersive VERT systems for radiotherapy training were established for training purposes at the University Aarhus Hospital (Denmark) and the Birmingham City University (UK). This paper reports on early evaluations of VERT by these two institutions.

  3. Synergistic Effects of Gold Nanocages in Hyperthermia and Radiotherapy Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ai-wei; Guo, Wei-hua; Qi, Ya-fei; Wang, Jian-zhen; Ma, Xiang-xing; Yu, De-xin

    2016-06-01

    Gold nanocages (GNCs) are a promising material that not only converts near infrared (NIR) light to heat for the ablation of tumors but also acts as a radiosensitizer. The combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy has a synergistic effect that can lead to significant tumor cell necrosis. In the current study, we synthesized GNCs that offered the combined effects of hyperthermia and radiotherapy. This combination strategy resulted in increased tumor cell apoptosis and significant tumor tissue necrosis. We propose that GNCs can be used for clinical treatment and to potentially overcome resistance to radiotherapy by clearly increasing the antitumor effect.

  4. [Endocrine function following cranial radiotherapy of neoplasms in children].

    PubMed

    Couselo Sánchez, J M; Fernández Bujía, M L; Pombo Arias, M; Devesa Múgiga, J; Tojo Sierra, R; Peña Guitán, J

    1984-01-01

    The effect of radiotherapy upon the diencephalo-hypophyseal axis was studied in 14 children that had received cranial radio-therapy (2,400 to 6,000 R) to treat different intracranial tumors. Several hormones were evaluated between 2 months and 3 years after radiotherapy was performed. 35.7 per 100 of the patients were deficient in growth hormone, 37.5 per 100 showed an alteration of prolactin secretion, and 28 per 100 an abnormal response to thyroid-stimulating hormone.

  5. Brain necrosis after radiotherapy for primary intracerebral tumor.

    PubMed

    Hohwieler, M L; Lo, T C; Silverman, M L; Freidberg, S R

    1986-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a standard postoperative treatment for cerebral glioma. We have observed the onset of symptoms related to brain necrosis, as opposed to recurrent tumor, in surviving patients. This has been manifest as dementia with a computed tomographic pattern of low density in the frontal lobe uninvolved with tumor, but within the field of radiotherapy. Two patients presented with mass lesions also unrelated to recurrent tumor. We question the necessity of full brain irradiation and suggest that radiotherapy techniques be altered to target the tumor and not encompass the entire brain.

  6. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Sinonasal Cancer: Improved Outcome Compared to Conventional Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dirix, Piet; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Jorissen, Mark; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Nuyts, Sandra

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical outcome and toxicity of postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2008, 40 patients with cancer of the paranasal sinuses (n = 34) or nasal cavity (n = 6) received postoperative IMRT to a dose of 60 Gy (n = 21) or 66 Gy (n = 19). Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with that of a previous patient group (n = 41) who were also postoperatively treated to the same doses but with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy without intensity modulation, from 1992 to 2002. Results: Median follow-up was 30 months (range, 4-74 months). Two-year local control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 76%, 89%, and 72%, respectively. Compared to the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment, IMRT resulted in significantly improved disease-free survival (60% vs. 72%; p = 0.02). No grade 3 or 4 toxicity was reported in the IMRT group, either acute or chronic. The use of IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of acute as well as late side effects, especially regarding skin toxicity, mucositis, xerostomia, and dry-eye syndrome. Conclusions: Postoperative IMRT for sinonasal cancer significantly improves disease-free survival and reduces acute as well as late toxicity. Consequently, IMRT should be considered the standard treatment modality for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses.

  7. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy significantly reduces xerostomia compared with conventional radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Braam, Petra M. . E-mail: P.M.Braam@umcutrecht.nl; Terhaard, Chris H.J. M.D.; Roesink, Judith M.; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Xerostomia is a severe complication after radiotherapy for oropharyngeal cancer, as the salivary glands are in close proximity with the primary tumor. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) offers theoretical advantages for normal tissue sparing. A Phase II study was conducted to determine the value of IMRT for salivary output preservation compared with conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 56 patients with oropharyngeal cancer were prospectively evaluated. Of these, 30 patients were treated with IMRT and 26 with CRT. Stimulated parotid salivary flow was measured before, 6 weeks, and 6 months after treatment. A complication was defined as a stimulated parotid flow rate <25% of the preradiotherapy flow rate. Results: The mean dose to the parotid glands was 48.1 Gy (SD 14 Gy) for CRT and 33.7 Gy (SD 10 Gy) for IMRT (p < 0.005). The mean parotid flow ratio 6 weeks and 6 months after treatment was respectively 41% and 64% for IMRT and respectively 11% and 18% for CRT. As a result, 6 weeks after treatment, the number of parotid flow complications was significantly lower after IMRT (55%) than after CRT (87%) (p = 0.002). The number of complications 6 months after treatment was 56% for IMRT and 81% for CRT (p = 0.04). Conclusions: IMRT significantly reduces the number of parotid flow complications for patients with oropharyngeal cancer.

  8. Adjuvant radiotherapy for endometrial cancer--a comparative review of radiotherapy technique with acute toxicity.

    PubMed

    Koh, Y V; Tang, J I; Choo, B A; Koh, M S; Lee, K M

    2014-01-01

    The addition of pelvic radiotherapy to brachytherapy (EBRT-BT) in early-stage endometrial cancer is controversial and may cause unnecessary toxicity. The incidence of acute toxicity of EBRT-BT will have an impact on clinical decision and patient compliance but is currently poorly understood. This study compares the acute toxicities of EBRT-BT versus BT alone. Seventy-nine patients with FIGO Stage IA-II endometrial cancer who underwent adjuvant radiotherapy, (EBRT-BT or BT alone) from 2001 to 2011 were included in the study. Medical records of these patients were reviewed retrospectively and toxicity graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4.0. Patients were followed up for at least three months post-treatment to assess resolution of toxicity. The mean age of the study group was 60.6 years. Median follow-up was four years. Forty patients received EBRT-BT. There was a 37% increase in Grade 1-3 diarrhea with the addition of pelvic radiotherapy (OR 18.67, p < 0.0005) and a 34% increase in lethargy (p < 0.0005). There was also an increased occurrence of genitourinary and skin toxicities. Two patients in the EBRT-BT group required hospitalisation for severe diarrhea and three patients were unable to complete the treatment. All acute toxicities had resolved by three months post treatment. EBRT-BT causes significantly more acute toxicities compared to BT alone. Patients should be informed of this during counselling.

  9. Incidence of radiation toxicity in cervical cancer and endometrial cancer patients treated with radiotherapy alone versus adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Roszak, Andrzej; Wareńczak-Florczak, Żaneta; Bratos, Krystyna; Milecki, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Aim The study was made to evaluate early and late toxicity in a diversified group of patients receiving definitive or adjuvant radiotherapy in terms of clinical diagnosis and treatment methods. Background Radiotherapy is a standard way of treatment in cervical and endometrial cancer patients, both as definitive and adjuvant therapy. But every radiation treatment may be involved with toxicity. Materials and methods A detailed analysis was performed of 263 patients with gynaecological cancer treated with definitive (90 patients with cervical cancer received radiochemotherapy or radiotherapy exclusively) and adjuvant radiotherapy (38 with cervical and 135 with endometrial cancer). Results Acute reactions were found in 51.3% and late reactions were found in 14.8% of patients. It was stated that early (p < 0.007) and late (p < 0.003) post radiation reaction appear more frequently in women treated with definitive than adjuvant radiotherapy. The analysis of the whole group revealed higher rate of toxicity, both early and late, in the gastrointestinal tract than in the urinary system (p < 0.004). Comparing the subgroups, it was found that intestinal reactions occurred more frequently in the definitive radiotherapy group than in the adjuvant one. The occurrence of side effects was associated with the prolongation of total irradiation time due to necessary interruptions of radiotherapy. The comparison of the subgroups showed that interruptions occurred more frequently in patients receiving definitive rather than adjuvant radiotherapy (17.7–2.9%). Conclusions Definitive radiotherapy compared with adjuvant treatment may by associated with higher percentage of side effects caused by dose of therapy and correlation with chemotherapy. PMID:24377035

  10. The future of heavy ion radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jäkel, Oliver; Karger, Christian P.; Debus, Jürgen

    2008-12-15

    Currently, there is an increasing interest in heavy ion radiotherapy (RT) and a number of new facilities are being installed in Europe and Japan. This development is accompanied by intensive technical, physical, and clinical research. The authors identify six research fields where progress is likely and propose a thesis on the expected achievements for each of the fields: (1) Synchrotrons with active energy variation and three-dimensional beam scanning will be the standard in ion beam RT. (2) Common standards for precise measurement, prescription, and reporting of dose will be available. (3) Intensity-modulated particle therapy will be state-of-the-art. (4) Time-adaptive treatments of moving targets will be feasible. (5) Therapeutic effectiveness of heavy ions will be known for the most important indications while cost effectiveness will remain to be shown. (6) The potential of high-linear energy transfer radiation will be known. The rationale for each of these theses is described.

  11. TOPICAL REVIEW: Anatomical imaging for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Philip M.

    2008-06-01

    The goal of radiation therapy is to achieve maximal therapeutic benefit expressed in terms of a high probability of local control of disease with minimal side effects. Physically this often equates to the delivery of a high dose of radiation to the tumour or target region whilst maintaining an acceptably low dose to other tissues, particularly those adjacent to the target. Techniques such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic radiosurgery and computer planned brachytherapy provide the means to calculate the radiation dose delivery to achieve the desired dose distribution. Imaging is an essential tool in all state of the art planning and delivery techniques: (i) to enable planning of the desired treatment, (ii) to verify the treatment is delivered as planned and (iii) to follow-up treatment outcome to monitor that the treatment has had the desired effect. Clinical imaging techniques can be loosely classified into anatomic methods which measure the basic physical characteristics of tissue such as their density and biological imaging techniques which measure functional characteristics such as metabolism. In this review we consider anatomical imaging techniques. Biological imaging is considered in another article. Anatomical imaging is generally used for goals (i) and (ii) above. Computed tomography (CT) has been the mainstay of anatomical treatment planning for many years, enabling some delineation of soft tissue as well as radiation attenuation estimation for dose prediction. Magnetic resonance imaging is fast becoming widespread alongside CT, enabling superior soft-tissue visualization. Traditionally scanning for treatment planning has relied on the use of a single snapshot scan. Recent years have seen the development of techniques such as 4D CT and adaptive radiotherapy (ART). In 4D CT raw data are encoded with phase information and reconstructed to yield a set of scans detailing motion through the breathing, or cardiac, cycle. In ART a set of

  12. Radiotherapy Dose Fractionation under Parameter Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, Matt; Kim, Daero; Keller, Harald

    2011-11-30

    In radiotherapy, radiation is directed to damage a tumor while avoiding surrounding healthy tissue. Tradeoffs ensue because dose cannot be exactly shaped to the tumor. It is particularly important to ensure that sensitive biological structures near the tumor are not damaged more than a certain amount. Biological tissue is known to have a nonlinear response to incident radiation. The linear quadratic dose response model, which requires the specification of two clinically and experimentally observed response coefficients, is commonly used to model this effect. This model yields an optimization problem giving two different types of optimal dose sequences (fractionation schedules). Which fractionation schedule is preferred depends on the response coefficients. These coefficients are uncertainly known and may differ from patient to patient. Because of this not only the expected outcomes but also the uncertainty around these outcomes are important, and it might not be prudent to select the strategy with the best expected outcome.

  13. Nanoscale radiotherapy with hafnium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Maggiorella, Laurence; Barouch, Gilles; Devaux, Corinne; Pottier, Agnès; Deutsch, Eric; Bourhis, Jean; Borghi, Elsa; Levy, Laurent

    2012-09-01

    There is considerable interest in approaches that could improve the therapeutic window of radiotherapy. In this study, hafnium oxide nanoparticles were designed that concentrate in tumor cells to achieve intracellular high-energy dose deposit. Conventional methods were used, implemented in different ways, to explore interactions of these high-atomic-number nanoparticles and ionizing radiation with biological systems. Using the Monte Carlo simulation, these nanoparticles, when exposed to high-energy photons, were shown to demonstrate an approximately ninefold radiation dose enhancement compared with water. Importantly, the nanoparticles show satisfactory dispersion and persistence within the tumor and they form clusters in the cytoplasm of cancer cells. Marked antitumor activity is demonstrated in human cancer models. Safety is similar in treated and control animals as demonstrated by a broad program of toxicology evaluation. These findings, supported by good tolerance, provide the basis for developing this new type of nanoparticle as a promising anticancer approach in human patients.

  14. The future of heavy ion radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jäkel, Oliver; Karger, Christian P; Debus, Jürgen

    2008-12-01

    Currently, there is an increasing interest in heavy ion radiotherapy (RT) and a number of new facilities are being installed in Europe and Japan. This development is accompanied by intensive technical, physical, and clinical research. The authors identify six research fields where progress is likely and propose a thesis on the expected achievements for each of the fields: (1) Synchrotrons with active energy variation and three-dimensional beam scanning will be the standard in ion beam RT. (2) Common standards for precise measurement, prescription, and reporting of dose will be available. (3) Intensity-modulated particle therapy will be state-of-the-art. (4) Time-adaptive treatments of moving targets will be feasible. (5) Therapeutic effectiveness of heavy ions will be known for the most important indications while cost effectiveness will remain to be shown. (6) The potential of high-linear energy transfer radiation will be known. The rationale for each of these theses is described.

  15. Emerging applications of stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lo, Simon S; Loblaw, Andrew; Chang, Eric L; Mayr, Nina A; Teh, Bin S; Huang, Zhibin; Yao, Min; Ellis, Rodney J; Biswas, Tithi; Sohn, Jason W; Machtay, Mitchell; Sahgal, Arjun

    2014-05-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been used extensively in patients with lung, liver and spinal tumors, and the treatment outcomes are very favorable. For certain conditions such as medically inoperable stage I non-small-cell lung cancer, liver and lung oligometastases, primary liver cancer and spinal metastases, SBRT is regarded as one of the standard therapies. In the recent years, the use of SBRT has been extended to other disease conditions and sites such as recurrent head and neck cancer, renal cell carcinoma, prostate cancer, adrenal metastasis, pancreatic cancer, gynecological malignancies, spinal cord compression, breast cancer, and stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer. Preliminary data in the literature show promising results but the follow-up intervals are short for most studies. This paper will provide an overview of these emerging applications.

  16. Proton beam radiotherapy of uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Damato, Bertil; Kacperek, Andrzej; Errington, Doug; Heimann, Heinrich

    2013-01-01

    Proton beam radiotherapy of uveal melanoma can be administered as primary treatment, as salvage therapy for recurrent tumor, and as neoadjuvant therapy prior to surgical resection. The physical properties of proton beams make it possible to deliver high-doses of radiation to the tumor with relative sparing of adjacent tissues. This form of therapy is effective for a wider range of uveal melanoma than any other modality, providing exceptionally-high rates of local tumor control. This is particularly the case with diffuse iris melanomas, many of which are unresectable. The chances of survival, ocular conservation, visual preservation and avoidance of iatrogenic morbidity depend greatly on the tumor size, location and extent. When treating any side-effects and/or complications, it is helpful to consider whether these are the result of collateral damage or persistence of the irradiated tumor (‘toxic tumor syndrome’). PMID:24227980

  17. Compact Electronic Gamma Source For Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A. X.; Antolak, A. J.; Raber, T. N.; Morse, D. H.; Leung, K.-N.

    2011-06-01

    A compact mono-energetic gamma source is being developed to replace the radiological sources used in radiotherapy and other medical instruments. The electronic gamma source utilizes low-energy nuclear reactions to generate gammas in the 0.5 to 1.0 MeV energy range. Independent control of the ion current and energy is achieved by decoupling the RF-driven ion source and pyroelectric crystal-based acceleration systems The ions are accelerated to voltages above 100 keV and bombard a reaction target to produce gammas. Thermal management of the pyroelectric crystal-based accelerator is achieved by convective dielectric fluid flow around the crystal. This approach provides better temperature uniformity in the crystal and higher dielectric strength for suppressing voltage breakdown and enabling faster thermal cycling rates.

  18. [Radiotherapy phase I trials' methodology: Features].

    PubMed

    Rivoirard, R; Vallard, A; Langrand-Escure, J; Guy, J-B; Ben Mrad, M; Yaoxiong, X; Diao, P; Méry, B; Pigne, G; Rancoule, C; Magné, N

    2016-12-01

    In clinical research, biostatistical methods allow the rigorous analysis of data collection and should be defined from the trial design to obtain the appropriate experimental approach. Thus, if the main purpose of phase I is to determine the dose to use during phase II, methodology should be finely adjusted to experimental treatment(s). Today, the methodology for chemotherapy and targeted therapy is well known. For radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy phase I trials, the primary endpoint must reflect both effectiveness and potential treatment toxicities. Methodology should probably be complex to limit failures in the following phases. However, there are very few data about methodology design in the literature. The present study focuses on these particular trials and their characteristics. It should help to raise existing methodological patterns shortcomings in order to propose new and better-suited designs.

  19. Radiotherapy and Antiangiogenic TM in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohamed K; Miller, Meredith W; Taylor, Jeremy; Gill, Navkiranjit K; Dick, Robert D; Van Golen, Kenneth; Brewer, George J; Merajver, Sofia D

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Tetrathiomolybdate (TM) is a potent nontoxic orally delivered copper complexing agent under development for the last several years for the treatment of Wilson's disease. It has been shown to block angiogenesis in primary and metastatic tumors. Therefore, the combination of cytotoxic radiotherapy (RT) and antiangiogenic TM could target both the existing tumor and the tumor microvasculature in a comprehensive strategy. Using a Lewis lung high metastatic (LLHM) carcinoma mouse tumor model, we demonstrate that the combination of TM and RT is more effective than either used as monotherapy. We also show that their therapeutic effects are additive, with no additional toxicity. We show that TM has no significant cytotoxicity in vitro against LLHM tumor cells, further supporting the antiangiogenic mechanism for its action. PMID:11896571

  20. High-LET charged particle radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R. . Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Div. California Univ., San Francisco, CA . Dept. of Radiation Oncology)

    1991-07-01

    The Department of Radiation Oncology at UCSF Medical Center and the Radiation Oncology Department at UC Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory have been evaluating the use of high LET charged particle radiotherapy in a Phase 1--2 research trial ongoing since 1979. In this clinical trail, 239 patients have received at least 10 Gy (physical) minimum tumor dose with neon ions, meaning that at least one-half of their total treatment was given with high-LET charged particle therapy. Ninety-one patients received all of their therapy with neon ions. Of the 239 patients irradiated, target sites included lesions in the skin, subcutaneous tissues, head and neck such as paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx and salivary glands (major and minor), skull base and juxtaspinal area, GI tract including esophagus, pancreas and biliary tract, prostate, lung, soft tissue and bone. Analysis of these patients has been carried out with a minimum followup period of 2 years.

  1. High-LET charged particle radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R. |

    1991-07-01

    The Department of Radiation Oncology at UCSF Medical Center and the Radiation Oncology Department at UC Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory have been evaluating the use of high LET charged particle radiotherapy in a Phase 1--2 research trial ongoing since 1979. In this clinical trail, 239 patients have received at least 10 Gy (physical) minimum tumor dose with neon ions, meaning that at least one-half of their total treatment was given with high-LET charged particle therapy. Ninety-one patients received all of their therapy with neon ions. Of the 239 patients irradiated, target sites included lesions in the skin, subcutaneous tissues, head and neck such as paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx and salivary glands (major and minor), skull base and juxtaspinal area, GI tract including esophagus, pancreas and biliary tract, prostate, lung, soft tissue and bone. Analysis of these patients has been carried out with a minimum followup period of 2 years.

  2. Breast cellulitis after conservative surgery and radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rescigno, J.; McCormick, B.; Brown, A.E.; Myskowski, P.L. )

    1994-04-30

    Cellulitis is a previously unreported complication of conservative surgery and radiation therapy for early stage breast cancer. Patients who presented with breast cellulitis after conservative therapy are described. Eleven patients that developed cellulitis of the breast over a 38-month period of observation are the subject of this report. Clinical characteristics of patients with cellulitis and their treatment and outcome are reported. Potential patient and treatment-related correlates for the development of cellulitis are analyzed. The risk of cellulitis persists years after initial breast cancer therapy. The clinical course of the patients was variable: some patients required aggressive, long-duration antibiotic therapy, while others had rapid resolution with antibiotics. Three patients suffered from multiple episodes of cellulitis. Patients with breast cancer treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy are at risk for breast cellulitis. Systematic characterization of cases of cellulitis may provide insight into diagnosis, prevention, and more effective therapy for this uncommon complication. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Abelson, Jonathan A.; Murphy, James D.; Minn, Ann Yuriko; Chung, Melody; Fisher, George A.; Ford, James M.; Kunz, Pamela; Norton, Jeffrey A.; Visser, Brendan C.; Poultsides, George A.; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To report the outcomes and toxicities in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with IMRT between 2003 and 2008. Of these 47 patients, 29 were treated adjuvantly and 18 definitively. All received concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. The treatment plans were optimized such that 95% of the planning target volume received the prescription dose. The median delivered dose for the adjuvant and definitive patients was 50.4 and 54.0 Gy, respectively. Results: The median age at diagnosis was 63.9 years. For adjuvant patients, the 1- and 2-year overall survival rate was 79% and 40%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year recurrence-free survival rate was 58% and 17%, respectively. The local-regional control rate at 1 and 2 years was 92% and 80%, respectively. For definitive patients, the 1-year overall survival, recurrence-free survival, and local-regional control rate was 24%, 16%, and 64%, respectively. Four patients developed Grade 3 or greater acute toxicity (9%) and four developed Grade 3 late toxicity (9%). Conclusions: Survival for patients with pancreatic cancer remains poor. A small percentage of adjuvant patients have durable disease control, and with improved therapies, this proportion will increase. Systemic therapy offers the greatest opportunity. The present results have demonstrated that IMRT is well tolerated. Compared with those who received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in previously reported prospective clinical trials, patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma treated with IMRT in our series had improved acute toxicity.

  4. Use of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy in Older Women

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Benjamin D. Haffty, Bruce G.; Smith, Grace L.; Hurria, Arti; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Gross, Cary P.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Clinical trials and guidelines published between 1997 and 2001 concluded that postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) improves overall survival for women with high-risk breast cancer. However, the effect of these findings on current practice is not known. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare cohort, we sought to characterize the adoption of PMRT from 1992 to 2002 and identify risk factors for PMRT omission among high-risk older patients. Methods and Materials: We identified 28,973 women aged {>=}66 years who had been treated with mastectomy for invasive breast cancer between 1992 and 2002. Trends in the adoption of PMRT for low- (T1-T2N0), intermediate- (T1-T2N1), and high- (T3-T4 and/or N2-N3) risk patients were characterized using a Monte Carlo permutation algorithm. Multivariate logistic regression identified the risk factors for PMRT omission and calculated the adjusted use rates. Results: Postmastectomy radiotherapy use increased gradually and consistently for low-risk (+2.16%/y) and intermediate-risk (+7.20%/y) patients throughout the study interval. In contrast, PMRT use for high-risk patients increased sharply between 1996 and 1997 (+30.99%/y), but subsequently stabilized. Between 1998 and 2002, only 53% of high-risk patients received PMRT. The risk factors for PMRT omission included advanced age, moderate to severe comorbidity, smaller tumor size, fewer positive lymph nodes, and geographic region, with adjusted use rates ranging from 63.5% in San Francisco to 44.9% in Connecticut. Conclusion: Among the high-risk patients, PMRT use increased sharply in 1997 after the initial clinical trial publication. Despite subsequent guidelines recommending the use of PMRT, no further increase in PMRT use has occurred, and nearly 50% of high-risk patients still do not receive PMRT.

  5. Statistical process control for radiotherapy quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Pawlicki, Todd; Whitaker, Matthew; Boyer, Arthur L

    2005-09-01

    Every quality assurance process uncovers random and systematic errors. These errors typically consist of many small random errors and a very few number of large errors that dominate the result. Quality assurance practices in radiotherapy do not adequately differentiate between these two sources of error. The ability to separate these types of errors would allow the dominant source(s) of error to be efficiently detected and addressed. In this work, statistical process control is applied to quality assurance in radiotherapy for the purpose of setting action thresholds that differentiate between random and systematic errors. The theoretical development and implementation of process behavior charts are described. We report on a pilot project is which these techniques are applied to daily output and flatness/symmetry quality assurance for a 10 MV photon beam in our department. This clinical case was followed over 52 days. As part of our investigation, we found that action thresholds set using process behavior charts were able to identify systematic changes in our daily quality assurance process. This is in contrast to action thresholds set using the standard deviation, which did not identify the same systematic changes in the process. The process behavior thresholds calculated from a subset of the data detected a 2% change in the process whereas with a standard deviation calculation, no change was detected. Medical physicists must make decisions on quality assurance data as it is acquired. Process behavior charts help decide when to take action and when to acquire more data before making a change in the process.

  6. Targeted Radiotherapy of Estrogen Receptor Positive Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan Rajagopalan

    2006-08-31

    The overall objectives of the proposal were to develop estrogen receptor (ER) binding small molecule radiopharmaceuticals for targeted radiotherapy of ER positive (ER+) tumors. In particular, this proposal focused on embedding a {sup 186,188}Re or a {sup 32}P radionuclide into an estrogen steroidal framework by isosteric substitution such that the resulting structure is topologically similar to the estrogen (estrogen mimic). The estrogen mimic molecules expected to bind to the ER and exhibit biodistribution akin to that of native estrogen due to structural mimicry. It is anticipated that the {sup 186,188}Re- or a {sup 32}P-containing estrogen mimics will be useful for targeted molecular radiotherapy of ER+ tumors. It is well established that the in vivo target tissue uptake of estrogen like steroidal molecules is related to the binding of the steroids to sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). SHBG is important in the uptake of estrogens and testosterone in target tissues by SHBG receptors on the cell surface. However, hitherto the design of estrogen like small molecule radiopharmaceuticals was focused on optimizing ER binding characteristics without emphasis on SHBG binding properties. Consequently, even the molecules with good ER affinity in vitro, performed poorly in biodistribution studies. Based on molecular modeling studies the proposal focused on developing estrogen mimics 1-3 which were topologically similar to native estrogens, and form hydrogen bonds in ER and SHBG in the same manner as those of native estrogens. To this end the technical objectives of the proposal focused on synthesizing the rhenium-estrone and estradiol mimics 1 and 2 respectively, and phosphorous estradiol mimic 3 and to assess their stability and in vitro binding characteristics to ER and SHBG.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Postprostatectomy Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Sefrova, Jana; Odrazka, Karel; Paluska, Petr; Belobradek, Zdenek; Brodak, Milos; Dolezel, Martin; Prosvic, Petr; Macingova, Zuzana; Vosmik, Milan; Hoffmann, Petr; Louda, Miroslav; Nejedla, Anna

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in prostate bed treatment planning could influence definition of the clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk. Methods and Materials: A total of 21 consecutive patients referred for prostate bed radiotherapy were included in the present retrospective study. The CTV was delineated according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer recommendations on computed tomography (CT) and T{sub 1}-weighted (T{sub 1}w) and T{sub 2}-weighted (T{sub 2}w) MRI. The CTV magnitude, agreement, and spatial differences were evaluated on the planning CT scan after registration with the MRI scans. Results: The CTV was significantly reduced on the T{sub 1}w and T{sub 2}w MRI scans (13% and 9%, respectively) compared with the CT scans. The urinary bladder was drawn smaller on the CT scans and the rectum was smaller on the MRI scans. On T{sub 1}w MRI, the rectum and urinary bladder were delineated larger than on T{sub 2}w MRI. Minimal agreement was observed between the CT and T{sub 2}w images. The main spatial differences were measured in the superior and superolateral directions in which the CTV on the MRI scans was 1.8-2.9 mm smaller. In the posterior and inferior border, no difference was seen between the CT and T{sub 1}w MRI scans. On the T{sub 2}w MRI scans, the CTV was larger in these directions (by 1.3 and 1.7 mm, respectively). Conclusions: The use of MRI in postprostatectomy radiotherapy planning resulted in a reduction of the CTV. The main differences were found in the superior part of the prostate bed. We believe T{sub 2}w MRI enables more precise definition of prostate bed CTV than conventional planning CT.

  8. Can automation in radiotherapy reduce costs?

    PubMed

    Massaccesi, Mariangela; Corti, Michele; Azario, Luigi; Balducci, Mario; Ferro, Milena; Mantini, Giovanna; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Computerized automation is likely to play an increasingly important role in radiotherapy. The objective of this study was to report the results of the first part of a program to implement a model for economical evaluation based on micro-costing method. To test the efficacy of the model, the financial impact of the introduction of an automation tool was estimated. A single- and multi-center validation of the model by a prospective collection of data is planned as the second step of the program. The model was implemented by using an interactive spreadsheet (Microsoft Excel, 2010). The variables to be included were identified across three components: productivity, staff, and equipment. To calculate staff requirements, the workflow of Gemelli ART center was mapped out and relevant workload measures were defined. Profit and loss, productivity and staffing were identified as significant outcomes. Results were presented in terms of earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT). Three different scenarios were hypothesized: baseline situation at Gemelli ART (scenario 1); reduction by 2 minutes of the average duration of treatment fractions (scenario 2); and increased incidence of advanced treatment modalities (scenario 3). By using the model, predicted EBIT values for each scenario were calculated across a period of eight years (from 2015 to 2022). For both scenarios 2 and 3 costs are expected to slightly increase as compared to baseline situation that is particularly due to a little increase in clinical personnel costs. However, in both cases EBIT values are more favorable than baseline situation (EBIT values: scenario 1, 27%, scenario 2, 30%, scenario 3, 28% of revenues). A model based on a micro-costing method was able to estimate the financial consequences of the introduction of an automation tool in our radiotherapy department. A prospective collection of data at Gemelli ART and in a consortium of centers is currently under way to prospectively validate the model.

  9. [Conformal radiotherapy in nasopharyngeal cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Alieva, S B; Tkachev, S I; Kaledin, R R; Galdiyants, R A; Zaderenko, I A; Rotobelskaya, L E

    2015-01-01

    The paper is aimed at the determination of the efficiency of various technologies of conformal radiotherapy for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The study included 56 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the nasopharynx treated with conformal radiotherapy. 3D-CRT was performed for 28 patients, IMRT--22 patients, RapidArc--6 patients. Dosimetric parameters were determined for planned volumes and organs at risk. TD on high-risk areas was 70Gy, intermediate-risk zones 60-66Gy and low-risk areas 50-56 Gy. There were determined session duration of exposure and the number of monitor units to evaluate the efficiency of treatment. Average (Dmean), maximum (Dmax) and the minimum (Dmin) dose for RapidArc, IMRT and 3D-CRT on PTV amounted to 70.2 Gy, 69.1 Gy and 70.7 Gy; 76.2 Gy, 76.1 Gy and 77Gr; 48.8, 54.4 and 46,6Gr respectively. Compared with IMRT and 3R-CRT RapidArc reduce Dmean in the brainstem and optic nerves by 14.1% and 23%; 12.2% and 25% respectively. The average number of MU (monitor unit) with RapidArc, IMRT and 3D-CRT was 357, 1386 and 870. The average session time of irradiation was: with RapidArc, IMRT and 3D-CRT--300, 900 and 480 seconds. Compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT average treatment time and the number of monitor units in RapidArc were reduced by 74%, 42% and 67%, 47%. Thus RapidArc and IMRT technologies allow getting a better dose distribution in the irradiated volume, compared with 3 D-CRT on homogeneity and conformity. RapidArc technique reduces the pressure on the critical organs, diminishes exposure to the session and a number of MU.

  10. Applications of synchrotron X-rays to radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blattmann, H.; Gebbers, J.-O.; Bräuer-Krisch, E.; Bravin, A.; Le Duc, G.; Burkard, W.; Di Michiel, M.; Djonov, V.; Slatkin, D. N.; Stepanek, J.; Laissue, J. A.

    2005-08-01

    Radiotherapy is among the most useful treatments of cancer. Penetrating radiation (ionizing particles or bremsstrahlung photons) is aimed toward the tumor-bearing target, gradually delivering as high radiation to it as is usefully suppressive of tumor growth, yet tolerated by normal vital tissues inevitably irradiated with the tumor. The high collimation and dose rate of synchrotron X-ray beams, even when monochromatized, favor radiotherapy. Photon activation therapy, tomotherapy, microbeam radiation therapy, and radiosurgery mediated by synchrotron wigglers are conceptually promising for difficult tumors. Radiotherapy of malignant brain tumors in rats has been encouraging, but suitable beam lines exist at only a few research facilities and much basic work must be done before the promise of synchrotron-based radiotherapy can be realized clinically.

  11. [Clinical to planning target volume margins in prostate cancer radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Ramiandrisoa, F; Duvergé, L; Castelli, J; Nguyen, T D; Servagi-Vernat, S; de Crevoisier, R

    2016-10-01

    The knowledge of inter- and intrafraction motion and deformations of the intrapelvic target volumes (prostate, seminal vesicles, prostatectomy bed and lymph nodes) as well as the main organs at risk (bladder and rectum) allow to define rational clinical to planning target volume margins, depending on the different radiotherapy techniques and their uncertainties. In case of image-guided radiotherapy, prostate margins and seminal vesicles margins can be between 5 and 10mm. The margins around the prostatectomy bed vary from 10 to 15mm and those around the lymph node clinical target volume between 7 and 10mm. Stereotactic body radiotherapy allows lower margins, which are 3 to 5mm around the prostate. Image-guided and stereotactic body radiotherapy with adequate margins allow finally moderate or extreme hypofractionation.

  12. Evaluation of air photoactivation at linear accelerators for radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tana, Luigi; Ciolini, Riccardo; Ciuffardi, Eva; Romei, Chiara; d'Errico, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    High-energy x-rays produced by radiotherapy accelerators operating at potentials above 10 MV may activate the air via (γ, n) reactions with both oxygen and nitrogen. While the activation products are relatively short-lived, personnel entering the accelerator room may inhale some radioactive air, which warrants internal dosimetry assessments. This work illustrates a method based on the use of ammonium nitrate solutions for the evaluation of photon-induced air activation and for the estimate of internal doses to radiotherapy personnel. Air activation and internal dosimetry assessments based on our method are presented for some widespread radiotherapy linear accelerator models. Our results indicate that the equivalent dose to the lungs of radiotherapy personnel is negligible for beam energies below 18 MeV.

  13. Combining Radiotherapy and Immunotherapy to Target Survivin in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    1-0114 TITLE: Combining radiotherapy and immunotherapy to target survivin in prostate cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dorthe Schaue...radiotherapy and immunotherapy to target survivin in prostate cancer . 5b. GRANT NUMBER PC060403 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER DORTHE...cells to examine the vaccination responses to human survivin epitopes and to other clinically relevant human prostate cancer associated antigens

  14. [Radiotherapy and implantable medical device: example of infusion pumps].

    PubMed

    Abrous-Anane, S; Benhassine, S; Lopez, S; Cristina, K; Mazeron, J-J

    2013-12-01

    Indication for radiotherapy is often questioned for patients equipped with implantable medical devices like infusion pumps as the radiation tolerance is poor or not known. We report here on the case of a patient who we treated with pelvic radiotherapy for cervical cancer and who had an infusion pump in iliac fossa. We conducted a series of tests on five identical pumps that insured that the treatment protocol is harmless to the implanted device.

  15. Stereotactic body radiotherapy in lung cancer: an update *

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Cintra Vita; Ferreira, Paula Pratti Rodrigues; de Moraes, Fabio Ynoe; Neves, Wellington Furtado Pimenta; Gadia, Rafael; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Abstract For early-stage lung cancer, the treatment of choice is surgery. In patients who are not surgical candidates or are unwilling to undergo surgery, radiotherapy is the principal treatment option. Here, we review stereotactic body radiotherapy, a technique that has produced quite promising results in such patients and should be the treatment of choice, if available. We also present the major indications, technical aspects, results, and special situations related to the technique. PMID:26398758

  16. Implementing radiotherapy in Africa: Focus on the needs in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Kamanzi, J-B; Adeduntan, R; Antoni, D; Musafiri, S; Noël, G

    2016-05-01

    Cancer care is a concern in low- and middle-income countries. The needs of structure to treat patients are huge. Because of the cost of radiotherapy, and the need for highly specialized workers, providing radiation therapy in these nations is a challenge. However, some solutions exist that can dramatically improve future care. In this article, we reviewed the plight of cancer treatment organization in Africa, and more specifically, the status of radiotherapy needs and concerns within Rwanda.

  17. Patterns of practice in palliative radiotherapy in Africa - case revisited.

    PubMed

    Jeremic, B; Vanderpuye, V; Abdel-Wahab, S; Gaye, P; Kochbati, L; Diwani, M; Emwula, P; Oro, B; Lishimpi, K; Kigula-Mugambe, J; Dawotola, D; Wondemagegnehu, T; Nyongesa, C; Oumar, N; El-Omrani, A; Shuman, T; Langenhoven, L; Fourie, L

    2014-06-01

    To investigate patterns of practice in palliative radiotherapy in Africa. Fifteen centres in Africa provided detailed information about radiotherapy in both metastatic and locally advanced disease via a questionnaire. Information included general information (institution status, equipment, staff, patient number), radiotherapy and other treatment characteristics in bone metastasis, brain metastasis, metastatic spinal cord compression, lung and liver metastasis, as well as locally advanced tumours. The number of patients annually seen/treated ranged from 285 to 5000. Breast, cervix, head and neck, gastrointestinal and prostate cancer were the top five cancers overall. Eight (53%) institutions were without linear accelerators, four (27%) had a single one, whereas one institution each had two, three and four linear accelerators. The number of cobalt machines ranged from 0 to 2 (median 1). Most centres still prefer to use fractionated radiotherapy regimens over single-fraction regimens in bone metastasis, although most centres are now using single-fraction radiotherapy in retreatments. Radiotherapy in brain metastasis and metastatic spinal cord compression mostly conform to worldwide standards. Lung and liver metastases are rarely irradiated, largely as a consequence of the lack of modern radiotherapy technology. Locally advanced disease in various tumour sites was mostly palliated, in agreement with current evidence-based practices. African countries still lack adequate staffing and equipment to adequately address their clinical burden, being palliative in most cases. Emphasis should also be made on more rationally using existing capacities by using more of the single-fraction radiotherapy regimens, especially in bone metastasis. Copyright © 2014 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiochromic Film Dosimetry and its Applications in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Matthew; Metcalfe, Peter

    2011-05-05

    Radiochromic film can be a fast and inexpensive means for performing accurate quantitative radiation dosimetry. The development of new radiochromic compositions that have greater dose sensitivity and fewer environmental dependencies has led to an ever increasing use of the film in radiotherapy applications. In this report the various physical and dosimetric properties of radiochromic film are presented and the strategies to adequately manage these properties when using radiochromic film for radiotherapy applications are discussed.

  19. PET/CT and radiotherapy in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    De Jong, I J; De Haan, T D; Wiegman, E M; Van Den Bergh, A C M; Pruim, J; Breeuwsma, A J

    2010-10-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the corner stone treatments for patients with prostate cancer. Especially for locally advanced tumors radiotherapy +/- adjuvant androgen deprivation treatment is standard of care. This brings up the need for accurate assessment of extra prostatic tumor growth and/or the presence of nodal metastases for selection of the optimal radiation dose and treatment volume. Morphological imaging like transrectal ultra sound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are routinely used but are limited in their accuracy in detecting extra prostatic extension and nodal metastases. In this article we present a structured review of the literature on positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and radiotherapy in prostate cancer patients with emphasis on: 1) the pretreatment assessment of extra prostatic tumor extension, nodal and distant metastases; 2) the intraprostatic tumor characterization and radiotherapy treatment planning; and 3) treatment evaluation and the use of PET/CT in guidance of salvage treatment. PET/CT is not an appropriate imaging technique for accurate T-staging of prostate cancer prior to radiotherapy. Although macroscopic disease beyond the prostatic capsule and into the periprostatic fat or in seminal vesicle is often accurately detected, the microscopic extension of prostate cancer remains undetected. Choline PET/CT holds a great potential as a single step diagnostic procedure of lymph nodes and skeleton, which could facilitate radiotherapy treatment planning. At present the use of PET/CT for treatment planning in radiotherapy is still experimental. Choline PET based tumor delineation is not yet standardized and different segmentation-algorithms are under study. However, dose escalation using dose-painting is feasible with only limited increases of the doses to the bladder and rectum wall. PET/CT using either acetate or choline is able to detect recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy but stratification of patients

  20. Radiation-induced heart disease in lung cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Yang, Chengwen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Ping; Deng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD), which affects the patients’ prognosis with both acute and late side effects, has been published extensively in the radiotherapy of breast cancer, lymphoma and other benign diseases. Studies on RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy, however, are less extensive and clear even though the patients with lung cancer are delivered with higher doses to the heart during radiation treatment. Methods: In this article, after extensive literature search and analysis, we reviewed the current evidence on RIHD in lung cancer patients after their radiation treatments and investigated the potential risk factors for RIHD as compared to other types of cancers. Result: Cardiac toxicity has been found highly relevant in lung cancer radiotherapy. So far, the crude incidence of cardiac complications in the lung cancer patients after radiotherapy has been up to 33%. Conclusion: The dose to the heart, the lobar location of tumor, the treatment modality, the history of heart and pulmonary disease and smoking were considered as potential risk factors for RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy. As treatment techniques improve over the time with better prognosis for lung cancer survivors, an improved prediction model can be established to further reduce the cardiac toxicity in lung cancer radiotherapy. PMID:27741117

  1. Successful radiotherapy for repeated recurrent uterine clear cell adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Iwashita, Ayumi; Takei, Yuji; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki; Sato, Naoto; Saito, Koyomi; Suzuki, Mitsuaki; Nakazawa, Masanori

    2015-12-01

    Uterine clear cell adenocarcinoma (UCCA) is rare and resistant to treatment. We report a UCCA patient who responded to radiotherapy on each relapse. The first relapse was detected in the vaginal wall after the first course of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Radiotherapy was conducted. Recurrent tumors were detected in the left lung after 5 months and in the right lung after 8 months. Partial resection of the lungs was performed. After 5 months, relapse was detected in the left pulmonary apex. Stereotactic radiotherapy was conducted. After 7 months, relapse was detected in the left pulmonary apex outside the irradiation field, and stereotactic radiotherapy was performed. During the subsequent 36-month follow-up, there has been no relapse. Although UCCA is resistant to treatment, radiotherapy is effective in some cases, as demonstrated in this patient. Even when relapse is repeated, radiotherapy may be considered as a treatment option if the recurrent focus is localized. © 2015 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  2. Pectoral stretching program for women undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, T S; Kilbreath, S L; Refshauge, K M; Pendlebury, S C; Beith, J M; Lee, M J

    2007-05-01

    Surgery and radiotherapy commonly cause adverse musculoskeletal problems, particularly loss of strength and range of motion, in the upper quadrant of breast cancer patients. Few well-designed studies have investigated whether these impairments can be prevented. Stretching is an effective technique for increasing range of motion, hence the aim of this study was to investigate whether a stretching program reduced acute musculoskeletal impairments in patients undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer. Sixty-four women were recruited prior to commencement of radiotherapy following breast cancer surgery. Participants were randomised to either a control or stretch group. Participants in both groups were reviewed by the physical therapist on a weekly basis for approximately 6 weeks, and were given general information about skin care and lymphedema. The control group received no advice about exercise. The stretch group received instruction on low-load, prolonged pectoral stretches, which were to be performed daily and were checked at weekly visits. Shoulder range of motion, strength, arm circumference, and quality of life measurements were taken prior to, and at completion of radiotherapy, and at 7 months after radiotherapy. There was no difference in any outcome between groups. Breast symptoms increased for both groups during radiotherapy, without loss of strength or range of movement. The incidence of lymphedema during the study was low for both groups and did not differ between groups. The pectoral stretching program did not influence the outcomes measured because the symptoms reported by patients were not a consequence of contracture.

  3. Treatment of ameloblastoma and ameloblastic carcinoma with radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, William R; Werning, John W; Kaye, Frederic J; Mendenhall, William M

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to report our institutional experience using radiotherapy in the treatment of ameloblastoma and ameloblastic carcinoma. Three patients with ameloblastoma and 3 patients with ameloblastic carcinoma were treated with radiotherapy alone (2 patients) or surgery and postoperative radiotherapy (4 patients) at the University of Florida between 1973 and 2007. Follow-up ranged from 4.0 to 13.1 years with a median of 7.8 years. Radiotherapy complications were scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Local control was achieved in 4 of the 6 patients. One patient treated with RT alone for an unresectable ameloblastoma developed a local recurrence and metastases in both the cervical lymph nodes and lungs, but had excellent response to dual BRAF/MEK inhibition with dabrafenib and trametinib. Another patient treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy for an ameloblastic carcinoma recurred locally without metastasis, but was not salvaged. No significant treatment-related complications were observed. For patients with local recurrence or inadequate margins after surgery, adjuvant radiotherapy provides the potential for disease control. In the setting of metastatic disease, targeted therapies may provide an additional opportunity for salvage.

  4. Radiotherapy in Glioblastoma: the Past, the Present and the Future.

    PubMed

    Gzell, C; Back, M; Wheeler, H; Bailey, D; Foote, M

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this review is to explore the changing utility of radiotherapy in the treatment of patients with glioblastoma over the past 60 years. Together with surgery, radiotherapy has always been the cornerstone of treatment of glioblastoma, but techniques have significantly advanced over this time. The exploration of early two-dimensional techniques, investigation of dose escalation, concomitant chemotherapy and modern techniques, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image-guided radiotherapy, and volumetric-modulated arc therapy will be covered. In addition, current controversies including decreasing margin size, re-irradiation, treatment of elderly patients, and novel imaging tracers will be discussed. Future directions including immunotherapy and tumour treating fields are examined. Radiotherapy-based treatments cannot rely solely on advances in chemotherapy or immunotherapy to improve the overall survival of patients with glioblastoma. Radiation oncology needs to continue to develop and improve the delivery, target definition, and dose of radiotherapy to these patients to improve their survival and the toxicity associated with treatment.

  5. Results of radiotherapy in non round cell spinal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kraiwattanapong, Chaiwat; Buranapanitkit, Boonsin; Kiriratnikom, Theerasan

    2004-03-01

    Spinal metastases are commonly encountered by physicians in a variety of clinical fields. There are some controversies in choice of treatment between surgery and radiotherapy. This report is a study of the outcomes of radiotherapy for metastatic nonround cell tumors of the spine. Medical records and films of 31 patients who were treated with radiotherapy at Songklanakarind Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. The most common primary tumors were prostate and breast. One patient had spinal metastases from malignant serous cystadenoma of the fallopian tube of which no previous report has been published. This patient had excellent results after radiotherapy. Back and neck pain were the primary symptoms of the patients, while motor or sensory deficits (or both) were found in 58 per cent of the cases. Seven patients had neurological recovery and 18 patients had pain relief after radiotherapy. Cause of compression is the only factor effecting the result from univariate and multivariate analysis. Spinal cord compressed by a tumor had a better recovery than those which were compressed by a bony fragment or intervertebral disc. The authors concluded that radiotherapy remains a good treatment for patient with non round cell spinal metastasis. Cause of spinal cord compression is the only factor predicting the result of treatment.

  6. Complete response of myeloid sarcoma with cardiac involvement to radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Chi; Yao, Ming; Chen, Yu-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of intracardiac myeloid sarcoma (MS) of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and who responds completely well to low-dose radiotherapy. This 19-year-old young man initially presented with AML and received standard chemotherapy followed by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, he developed intracardiac isolated MS relapse with the presentation of exertional dyspnea and superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome 3 years later. He then received radiotherapy with 24 Gy at a 12 daily fractions using forward “field in field” intensity modulated radiotherapy technique. He dramatically had improved clinical symptoms, and complete remission was achieved one month after completing radiotherapy. Our result is in line with anecdotal case reports showed that radiotherapy with 15 Gy in 10 fractions or with 24 Gy in 12 fractions resulted in good response and less toxicity of 2 cases of MS with cardiac involvement. These results indicate that a modest radiotherapy dose, 24 Gy, achieves good local control of MS with cardiac involvement. PMID:27293853

  7. Nutritional consequences of the radiotherapy of head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chencharick, J.D.; Mossman, K.L.

    1983-03-01

    Nutrition-related complications of radiotherapy were evaluated in 74 head and neck cancer patients. Subjective changes of mouth dryness, taste, dysphagia, appetite, and food preferences were determined by questionnaire before and at weekly intervals during curative radiotherapy. Changes in body weight during therapy were also recorded. In addition, 24-hour dietary histories were taken from eight patients at the beginning and end of treatment. Results of the study indicate that patients were subjectively aware of nutritional problems prior to therapy and that therapy exacerbated these problems. As many as 25% of the patients experienced oral complications such as taste loss and/or dry mouth prior to initiation of radiotherapy. By the end of radiotherapy, over 80% of the patients were aware of oral and nutritional problems. Patients had an average weight loss of 5 kg prior to therapy; this loss of weight did not change during therapy. Diet histories of eight patients indicate significant caloric deficiencies early and late in radiotherapy. The oral and nutritional problems experienced by patients, even prior to therapy, support the idea that nutritional evaluation and maintenance are important not only during therapy, but prior to radiotherapy as well. Nutritional evaluation should be made a routine, integral part of therapy for every cancer patient.

  8. Monte Carlo role in radiobiological modelling of radiotherapy outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Naqa, Issam; Pater, Piotr; Seuntjens, Jan

    2012-06-01

    Radiobiological models are essential components of modern radiotherapy. They are increasingly applied to optimize and evaluate the quality of different treatment planning modalities. They are frequently used in designing new radiotherapy clinical trials by estimating the expected therapeutic ratio of new protocols. In radiobiology, the therapeutic ratio is estimated from the expected gain in tumour control probability (TCP) to the risk of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). However, estimates of TCP/NTCP are currently based on the deterministic and simplistic linear-quadratic formalism with limited prediction power when applied prospectively. Given the complex and stochastic nature of the physical, chemical and biological interactions associated with spatial and temporal radiation induced effects in living tissues, it is conjectured that methods based on Monte Carlo (MC) analysis may provide better estimates of TCP/NTCP for radiotherapy treatment planning and trial design. Indeed, over the past few decades, methods based on MC have demonstrated superior performance for accurate simulation of radiation transport, tumour growth and particle track structures; however, successful application of modelling radiobiological response and outcomes in radiotherapy is still hampered with several challenges. In this review, we provide an overview of some of the main techniques used in radiobiological modelling for radiotherapy, with focus on the MC role as a promising computational vehicle. We highlight the current challenges, issues and future potentials of the MC approach towards a comprehensive systems-based framework in radiobiological modelling for radiotherapy.

  9. Image-guided radiotherapy: from current concept to future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Jaffray, David A

    2012-12-01

    Radiotherapy is a highly effective, targeted therapy for the management of cancer. Technological innovations have enabled the direct integration of imaging technology into the radiation treatment device to increase the precision and accuracy of radiation delivery. As well as addressing a clinical need to better control the placement of the dose within the body, image-guided radiotherapy has enabled innovators in the field to accelerate their exploration of a number of different paradigms of radiation delivery, including toxicity reduction, dose escalation, hypofractionation, voxelization, and adaptation. Although these approaches are already innovative trends in radiation oncology, it is anticipated that they will work synergistically with other innovations in cancer management (including biomarker strategies, novel systemic and local therapies) as part of the broader goal of personalized cancer medicine. This Review discusses the rationale for adopting image-guidance approaches in radiotherapy, and the technology for achieving precision and accuracy in the context of different paradigms within the evolving radiation oncology practice. It also examines exciting advances in radiotherapy technology that suggest a convergence of radiotherapy practice in which patient-specific radiotherapy treatment courses are one of the most personalized forms of intervention in cancer medicine.

  10. Time, space and technology in radiotherapy departments: how do these factors impact on patients' experiences of radiotherapy?

    PubMed

    Merchant, S; O'Connor, M; Halkett, G

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapists (RTs) plan and deliver radiotherapy treatment for patients diagnosed with cancer. They need to communicate regularly with their patients and may have a role to play in reducing patient anxiety and distress. The objectives were to explore how the environment of radiotherapy departments supports or inhibits communication generally and information giving and supportive care provision in particular. An ethnographic approach was used to gather rich descriptive data through observations and interviews conducted in two Australian radiotherapy centres. Time, space and a technology driven culture was found to negatively affect the quality of interaction that occurred between RTs and their patients. This research has shown design/modification of spaces is needed in the radiotherapy environment to reflect a patient care centred culture and to enhance opportunities for RTs to provide supportive care for their patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Anthony; Johnson, Nick; Kitchener, Henry C; Lawrie, Theresa A

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 2, 2007. The role of radiotherapy (both pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and vaginal intracavity brachytherapy (VBT)) in stage I endometrial cancer following hysterectomy remains controversial. Objectives To assess the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery for stage I endometrial cancer. Search methods We searched The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Specialised Register to end-2005 for the original review, and extended the search to January 2012 for the update. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared post-operative adjuvant radiotherapy (either EBRTor VBT, or both) versus no radiotherapy or VBT in women with stage I endometrial cancer. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trials and extracted data to a specifically designed data collection form. The primary outcome was overall survival. Secondary outcomes were endometrial cancer-related deaths, locoregional recurrence and distant recurrence. Meta-analyses were performed using Cochrane Review Manager Software 5.1. Main results We included eight trials. Seven trials (3628 women) compared EBRT with no EBRT (or VBT), and one trial (645 women) compared VBTwith no additional treatment. We considered six of the eight trials to be of a high quality. Time-to-event data were not available for all trials and all outcomes. EBRT (with or without VBT) compared with no EBRT (or VBT alone) for stage I endometrial carcinoma significantly reduced locoregional recurrence (time-to-event data: five trials, 2965 women; Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.36, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.25 to 0.52; and dichotomous data: seven trials, 3628 women; Risk Ratio (RR) 0.33, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.47). This reduced risk of locoregional recurrence did not translate into improved overall survival (time-to-event data: five trials, 2

  12. Adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Kong, Anthony; Johnson, Nick; Kitchener, Henry C; Lawrie, Theresa A

    2012-03-14

    This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 2, 2007. The role of radiotherapy (both pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and vaginal intracavity brachytherapy (VBT)) in stage I endometrial cancer following hysterectomy remains controversial. To assess the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery for stage I endometrial cancer. We searched The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Specialised Register to end-2005 for the original review, and extended the search to January 2012 for the update. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared post-operative adjuvant radiotherapy (either EBRT or VBT, or both) versus no radiotherapy or VBT in women with stage I endometrial cancer. Two review authors independently assessed trials and extracted data to a specifically designed data collection form. The primary outcome was overall survival. Secondary outcomes were endometrial cancer-related deaths, locoregional recurrence and distant recurrence. Meta-analyses were performed using Cochrane Review Manager Software 5.1. We included eight trials. Seven trials (3628 women) compared EBRT with no EBRT (or VBT), and one trial (645 women) compared VBT with no additional treatment. We considered six of the eight trials to be of a high quality. Time-to-event data were not available for all trials and all outcomes.EBRT (with or without VBT) compared with no EBRT (or VBT alone) for stage I endometrial carcinoma significantly reduced locoregional recurrence (time-to-event data: five trials, 2965 women; Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.36, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.25 to 0.52; and dichotomous data: seven trials, 3628 women; Risk Ratio (RR) 0.33, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.47). This reduced risk of locoregional recurrence did not translate into improved overall survival (time-to-event data: five trials, 2,965 women; HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.82 to 1.20; and dichotomous data: seven trials, 3628 women; RR 0

  13. Adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Kong, Anthony; Johnson, Nick; Kitchener, Henry C; Lawrie, Theresa A

    2012-04-18

    This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 2, 2007. The role of radiotherapy (both pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and vaginal intracavity brachytherapy (VBT)) in stage I endometrial cancer following hysterectomy remains controversial. To assess the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery for stage I endometrial cancer. We searched The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Specialised Register to end-2005 for the original review, and extended the search to January 2012 for the update. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared post-operative adjuvant radiotherapy (either EBRTor VBT, or both) versus no radiotherapy or VBT in women with stage I endometrial cancer. Two review authors independently assessed trials and extracted data to a specifically designed data collection form. The primary outcome was overall survival. Secondary outcomes were endometrial cancer-related deaths, locoregional recurrence and distant recurrence. Meta-analyses were performed using Cochrane Review Manager Software 5.1. We included eight trials. Seven trials (3628 women) compared EBRT with no EBRT (or VBT), and one trial (645 women) compared VBTwith no additional treatment. We considered six of the eight trials to be of a high quality. Time-to-event data were not available for all trials and all outcomes.EBRT (with or without VBT) compared with no EBRT (or VBT alone) for stage I endometrial carcinoma significantly reduced locoregional recurrence (time-to-event data: five trials, 2965 women; Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.36, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.25 to 0.52; and dichotomous data: seven trials, 3628 women; Risk Ratio (RR) 0.33, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.47). This reduced risk of locoregional recurrence did not translate into improved overall survival (time-to-event data: five trials, 2,965 women; HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.82 to1.20; and dichotomous data: seven trials, 3628 women; RR 0.98, 95

  14. DEGRO practical guidelines: radiotherapy of breast cancer III--radiotherapy of the lymphatic pathways.

    PubMed

    Sautter-Bihl, M-L; Sedlmayer, F; Budach, W; Dunst, J; Feyer, P; Fietkau, R; Fussl, C; Haase, W; Harms, W; Piroth, M D; Souchon, R; Wenz, F; Sauer, R

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to update the practical guidelines for adjuvant radiotherapy of the regional lymphatics of breast cancer published in 2008 by the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO). A comprehensive survey of the literature concerning regional nodal irradiation (RNI) was performed using the following search terms: "breast cancer", "radiotherapy", "regional node irradiation". Recent randomized trials were analyzed for outcome as well as for differences in target definition. Field arrangements in the different studies were reproduced and superimposed on CT slices with individually contoured node areas. Moreover, data from recently published meta-analyses and guidelines of international breast cancer societies, yielding new aspects compared to 2008, provided the basis for defining recommendations according to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. In addition to the more general statements of the German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines updated in 2012, this paper addresses indications, targeting, and techniques of radiotherapy of the lymphatic pathways after surgery for breast cancer. International guidelines reveal substantial differences regarding indications for RNI. Patients with 1-3 positive nodes seem to profit from RNI compared to whole breast (WBI) or chest wall irradiation alone, both with regard to locoregional control and disease-free survival. Irradiation of the regional lymphatics including axillary, supraclavicular, and internal mammary nodes provided a small but significant survival benefit in recent randomized trials and one meta-analysis. Lymph node irradiation yields comparable tumor control in comparison to axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), while reducing the rate of lymph edema. Data concerning the impact of 1-2 macroscopically affected sentinel node (SN) or microscopic metastases on prognosis are conflicting. Recent data suggest that the current restrictive use of RNI should be

  15. Cost-effectiveness of surgery plus radiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone for metastatic epidural spinal cord compression

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Kenneth C.; Nosyk, Bohdan; Fisher, Charles G.; Dvorak, Marcel; Patchell, Roy A.; Regine, William F.; Loblaw, Andrew; Bansback, Nick; Guh, Daphne; Sun, Huiying; Anis, Aslam . E-mail: aslam.anis@ubc.ca

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: A recent randomized clinical trial has demonstrated that direct decompressive surgery plus radiotherapy was superior to radiotherapy alone for the treatment of metastatic epidural spinal cord compression. The current study compared the cost-effectiveness of the two approaches. Methods and Materials: In the original clinical trial, clinical effectiveness was measured by ambulation and survival time until death. In this study, an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis was performed from a societal perspective. Costs related to treatment and posttreatment care were estimated and extended to the lifetime of the cohort. Weibull regression was applied to extrapolate outcomes in the presence of censored clinical effectiveness data. Results: From a societal perspective, the baseline incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was found to be $60 per additional day of ambulation (all costs in 2003 Canadian dollars). Using probabilistic sensitivity analysis, 50% of all generated ICERs were lower than $57, and 95% were lower than $242 per additional day of ambulation. This analysis had a 95% CI of -$72.74 to 309.44, meaning that this intervention ranged from a financial savings of $72.74 to a cost of $309.44 per additional day of ambulation. Using survival as the measure of effectiveness resulted in an ICER of $30,940 per life-year gained. Conclusions: We found strong evidence that treatment of metastatic epidural spinal cord compression with surgery in addition to radiotherapy is cost-effective both in terms of cost per additional day of ambulation, and cost per life-year gained.

  16. Vaginal dilator therapy for women receiving pelvic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Miles, Tracie; Johnson, Nick

    2014-09-08

    Vaginal dilation therapy is advocated after pelvic radiotherapy to prevent stenosis (abnormal narrowing of the vagina), but can be uncomfortable and psychologically distressing. To assess the benefits and harms of different types of vaginal dilation methods offered to women treated by pelvic radiotherapy for cancer. Searches included the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2013, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1950 to June week 2, 2013), EMBASE (1980 to 2013 week 24) and CINAHL (1982 to 2013). Comparative data of any type, which evaluated dilation or penetration of the vagina after pelvic radiotherapy treatment for cancer. Two review authors independently assessed whether potentially relevant studies met the inclusion criteria. We found no trials and therefore analysed no data. We identified no studies for inclusion in the original review or for this update. However, we felt that some studies that were excluded warranted discussion. These included one randomised trial (RCT), which showed no improvement in sexual scores associated with encouraging women to practise dilation therapy; a recent small RCT that did not show any advantage to dilation over vibration therapy during radiotherapy; two non-randomised comparative studies; and five correlation studies. One of these showed that objective measurements of vaginal elasticity and length were not linked to dilation during radiotherapy, but the study lacked power. One study showed that women who dilated tolerated a larger dilator, but the risk of objectivity and bias with historical controls was high. Another study showed that the vaginal measurements increased in length by a mean of 3 cm after dilation was introduced 6 to 10 weeks after radiotherapy, but there was no control group; another case series showed the opposite. Three recent studies showed less stenosis associated with prophylactic dilation after radiotherapy. One small case series suggested that dilation years after radiotherapy might restore the

  17. Intermediate-fraction neoadjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Tiancheng; Gu, Jin; Li, Ming; Du, Changzheng

    2013-04-01

    In China, standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy has not been well accepted, not only because of financial constraints but also because of the poorly-tolerated long duration of the regimen. The current study aimed to evaluate the impact of a modified neoadjuvant radiation regimen on the prognosis of rectal cancer patients in China. This was a nonrandomized cohort study evaluating outcomes of patients who chose to undergo preoperative radiotherapy compared with those who chose not to undergo preoperative radiotherapy (controls). The study was carried out in Peking University Cancer Hospital, a tertiary care cancer center in China. Records of patients with locally advanced, mid-to-low rectal cancer who underwent total mesorectal excision at Peking University Cancer Hospital from 2001 through 2005 were analyzed in this study. Patients who chose preoperative radiotherapy received a total dose of 30 Gy delivered in 10 once-daily fractions of 3.0 Gy each, with at least a 14-day delay of surgery after delivery of the last fraction. Tumor downstaging was evaluated. Local recurrence, distant metastases, and disease-free and overall survival were analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method. A total of 101 patients accepted and 162 patients declined the modified preoperative radiotherapy regimen. Of the 101 patients receiving preoperative radiotherapy, 5 (5%) had a complete response, and 50 (50%) achieved TNM downstaging. The local recurrence rate was 5% with preoperative radiotherapy and 18% in the control groups (p = 0.02). Within the preoperative radiotherapy group, 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were significantly higher in patients with T-, N-, or TNM-downstaging than in patients without downstaging. Evaluation of literature reports indicated that clinical safety and effectiveness of the modified protocol are comparable to results of standard neoadjuvant procedures. The allocation to study groups was not randomized, and patient self-selection may

  18. New Methods for Targeted Alpha Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, J. David

    2014-03-01

    Targeted radiotherapies based on alpha emitters are a promising alternative to beta emitting radionuclides. Because of their much shorter range, targeted α-radiotherapy (TAT) agents have great potential for application to small, disseminated tumors and micro metastases and treatment of hematological malignancies consisting of individual, circulating neoplastic cells. A promising approach to TAT is the use of the in vivo α-generator radionuclides 223 = 11.4 d) and 225Ac 1/2 = 10.0 d). In addition to their longer half-lives, these two isotopes have the potential of dramatically increasing the therapeutic efficacy of TAT as they each emit four α particles in their decay chain. This principle has recently been exploited in the development of Xofigo®, the first TAT agent approved for clinical use by the U.S. FDA. Xofigo, formulated as 223RaCl2, is used for treatment of metastatic bone cancer in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer. TAT with 223Ra works, however, only in the case of bone cancer because radium, as a chemical analogue of calcium, efficiently targets bone. In order to bring the benefits of TAT with 223Ra or 225Ac to other tumor types, a new delivery method must be devised. Retaining the in vivo α generator radionuclides at the target site through the decay process is one of the major challenges associated with the development of TAT. Because the recoil energy of the daughter radionuclides from the α-emission is ~ 100 keV - a value which is four orders of magnitude greater than the energy of a covalent bond - the daughters will not remain bound to the bioconjugate at the targeting site. Various approaches have been attempted to achieve retention of the α-generator daughter radionuclides at the target site, including incorporation of the in vivo generator into liposomes and fullerenes. Unfortunately, to date single wall liposomes and fullerenes are able to retain less than 10% of the daughter radionuclides. We have recently demonstrated that a

  19. Concomitant use of radiotherapy and two topoisomerase inhibitors to treat adult T-cell leukemia with a radiotherapy-resistant bulky disease: a case series.

    PubMed

    Obama, Kosuke

    2014-01-01

    Concomitant chemoradiotherapy is established as the standard treatment to improve the prognosis of several types of solid tumor, but has not been the general practice for hematological malignancies. Here, I report two cases of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) with a radiotherapy-resistant bulky disease treated with concomitant radiotherapy and two topoisomerase inhibitors: etoposide (VP-16) and irinotecan (CPT-11). Patient 1 was a 78-year-old man with chemotherapy-resistant inguinal bulky mass. Radiotherapy (total 40 Gy) for this inguinal lesion was started; however, the bulky disease was found to be resistant to radiotherapy and progressed. VP-16 and CPT-11 were administered in addition to radiotherapy (after a total of 20 Gy of radiotherapy). Patient 2 was a 71-year-old man with a solitary bulky mass in left cervical lesion. Various previous chemotherapy and radiotherapy approaches had not been able to control the disease. Six months after first radiotherapy, the bulky disease rapidly progressed with the occurrence of pain. Second radiotherapy (30 Gy) was started with simultaneous administration of CPT-11 and VP-16. In both cases, the bulky disease gradually regressed and completely disappeared by the end of radiotherapy. Thus, flexible adaptation of concomitant chemoradiotherapy including two topoisomerase inhibitors may offer a potential therapeutic option for radiotherapy-resistant bulky diseases, even in hematological malignancies.

  20. Waiting time for radiotherapy in women with cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Maria Isabel; Azevedo e Silva, Gulnar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the waiting time for radiotherapy for patients with cervical cancer. METHODS This descriptive study was conducted with 342 cervical cancer cases that were referred to primary radiotherapy, in the Baixada Fluminense region, RJ, Southeastern Brazil, from October 1995 to August 2010. The waiting time was calculated using the recommended 60-day deadline as a parameter to obtaining the first cancer treatment and considering the date at which the diagnosis was confirmed, the date of first oncological consultation and date when the radiotherapy began. Median and proportional comparisons were made using the Kruskal Wallis and Chi-square tests. RESULTS Most of the women (72.2%) began their radiotherapy within 60 days from the diagnostic confirmation date. The median of this total waiting time was 41 days. This median worsened over the time period, going from 11 days (1995-1996) to 64 days (2009-2010). The median interval between the diagnostic confirmation and the first oncological consultation was 33 days, and between the first oncological consultation and the first radiotherapy session was four days. The median waiting time differed significantly (p = 0.003) according to different stages of the tumor, reaching 56 days, 35 days and 30 days for women whose cancers were classified up to IIA; from IIB to IIIB, and IVA-IVB, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Despite most of the women having had access to radiotherapy within the recommended 60 days, the implementation of procedures to define the stage of the tumor and to reestablish clinical conditions took a large part of this time, showing that at least one of these intervals needs to be improved. Even though the waiting times were ideal for all patients, the most advanced cases were quickly treated, which suggests that access to radiotherapy by women with cervical cancer has been reached with equity. PMID:26786473

  1. Radiotherapy physics research in the UK: challenges and proposed solutions

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, R I; Burnet, N G; Green, S; Illidge, T M; Staffurth, J N

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the Clinical and Translational Radiotherapy Research Working Group (CTRad) of the National Cancer Research Institute brought together UK radiotherapy physics leaders for a think tank meeting. Following a format that CTRad had previously and successfully used with clinical oncologists, 23 departments were asked to complete a pre-meeting evaluation of their radiotherapy physics research infrastructure and the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats within their own centre. These departments were brought together with the CTRad Executive Group and research funders to discuss the current state of radiotherapy physics research, perceived barriers and possible solutions. In this Commentary, we summarise the submitted materials, presentations and discussions from the meeting and propose an action plan. It is clear that there are challenges in both funding and staffing of radiotherapy physics research. Programme and project funding streams sometimes struggle to cater for physics-led work, and increased representation on research funding bodies would be valuable. Career paths for academic radiotherapy physicists need to be examined and an academic training route identified within Modernising Scientific Careers; the introduction of formal job plans may allow greater protection of research time, and should be considered. Improved access to research facilities, including research linear accelerators, would enhance research activity and pass on developments to patients more quickly; research infrastructure could be benchmarked against centres in the UK and abroad. UK National Health Service departments wishing to undertake radiotherapy research, with its attendant added value for patients, need to develop a strategy with their partner higher education institution, and collaboration between departments may provide enhanced opportunities for funded research. PMID:22972972

  2. Further Radiobiologic Modeling of Palliative Radiotherapy: Use of Virtual Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Bleddyn Dale, Roger G.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To study duration of response in palliative radiotherapy in a population of tumors. Methods and Materials: Models of dynamic changes in cell number with time were used to develop a function for the remission time (T{sub rem}) after palliative radiotherapy: T{sub rem}=(BED)/K -t{sub 1}(1+({alpha}.K)/z ), where BED is the biologically effective dose, t{sub 1} the duration of symptoms (i.e., the time between the onset of symptoms and the initiation of radiotherapy), K the daily BED repopulation equivalent, {alpha} the linear radiosensitivity parameter in the linear-quadratic model, and z the tumor regression rate. Results: Simulations of clinical trials show marked variations in remission statistics depending on the tumor characteristics and are highly compatible with the results of clinical trials. Dose escalation produces both a higher proportion and extended duration of remissions, especially in tumors with high {alpha}/{beta} ratios and K values, but the predicted dose responses of acute and late side effects show that caution is necessary. The prospect of using particle beam therapy to reduce normal tissue radiation exposures or using hypoxic sensitizers to improve the tumor cell kill might significantly improve the results of palliative radiotherapy in carefully selected patients and could also be used for safer palliative re-treatments in patients with the potential for prolonged survival. The effect of tumor heterogeneity in determining palliative responses probably exceeds that in radical radiotherapy; as few as 100 patients in each treatment arm produce statistically unreliable results. Conclusions: Virtual trials of palliative radiotherapy can be useful to test the effects of competing schedules and better determine future strategies, including improved design of clinical trials as well as combinations of radiotherapy with other anticancer modalities.

  3. Radiotherapy physics research in the UK: challenges and proposed solutions.

    PubMed

    Mackay, R I; Burnet, N G; Green, S; Illidge, T M; Staffurth, J N

    2012-10-01

    In 2011, the Clinical and Translational Radiotherapy Research Working Group (CTRad) of the National Cancer Research Institute brought together UK radiotherapy physics leaders for a think tank meeting. Following a format that CTRad had previously and successfully used with clinical oncologists, 23 departments were asked to complete a pre-meeting evaluation of their radiotherapy physics research infrastructure and the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats within their own centre. These departments were brought together with the CTRad Executive Group and research funders to discuss the current state of radiotherapy physics research, perceived barriers and possible solutions. In this Commentary, we summarise the submitted materials, presentations and discussions from the meeting and propose an action plan. It is clear that there are challenges in both funding and staffing of radiotherapy physics research. Programme and project funding streams sometimes struggle to cater for physics-led work, and increased representation on research funding bodies would be valuable. Career paths for academic radiotherapy physicists need to be examined and an academic training route identified within Modernising Scientific Careers; the introduction of formal job plans may allow greater protection of research time, and should be considered. Improved access to research facilities, including research linear accelerators, would enhance research activity and pass on developments to patients more quickly; research infrastructure could be benchmarked against centres in the UK and abroad. UK National Health Service departments wishing to undertake radiotherapy research, with its attendant added value for patients, need to develop a strategy with their partner higher education institution, and collaboration between departments may provide enhanced opportunities for funded research.

  4. Prognostic significance of Livin expression in nasopharyngeal carcinoma after radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, A-H; He, A-B; Tong, W-X; Peng, X-L; Tian, Q; Wang, H; Li, X-G; Xu, H-L

    2016-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate the expression levels of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein Livin in nasopharyngeal cancer tissues and its prognostic significance in nasopharyngeal carcinoma after radiotherapy. A total of 83 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma who received radiotherapy were enrolled in this study from January 2008 to October 2010. Livin expression in nasopharynx pathological specimens extracted from patients was detected by immunohistochemistry. A Kaplan-Meier analysis was conducted to explore the effects of clinicopathological features and Livin expression on the overall survival and progression-free survival of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and explore its prognosis relevance after radiotherapy. Of the 83 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma, the overall Livin positive expression rate was 65.1% (54 patients), and the overall response rate of radiotherapy was 81.9% (68 patients). Significant differences in radiotherapy efficacy were found between patients who did not express Livin and those who did (P<0.05). The Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that Livin expression, high clinical staging, cervical lymph node metastasis, high T-staging and high N-staging were significantly correlated with a decrease in the overall survival of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (all P<0.05). A Cox multivariate survival analysis showed that Livin expression, clinical staging and N-staging were independent risk factors for the overall survival of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with radiation (all P<0.05). Furthermore, Livin expression and clinical staging were independent risk factors for the progression-free survival of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma once radiotherapy was introduced (all P<0.05). Expression of Livin, an inhibitor of apoptosis proteins, may be closely linked with poor prognosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma post-radiotherapy and hence it may be a new therapeutic target in the treatment of the disease

  5. Development of three-dimensional radiotherapy techniques in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Charlotte E.

    Radiotherapy following conservation surgery decreases local relapse and death from breast cancer. Currently, the challenge is to minimise the morbidity caused by this treatment without losing efficacy. Despite many advances in radiation techniques in other sites of the body, the majority of breast cancer patients are still planned and treated using 2-dimensional simple radiotherapy techniques. In addition, breast irradiation currently consumes 30% of the UK's radiotherapy workload. Therefore, any change to more complex treatment should be of proven benefit. The primary objective of this research is to develop and evaluate novel radiotherapy techniques to decrease irradiation of normal structures and improve localisation of the tumour bed. I have developed a forward-planned intensity modulated (IMRT) breast radiotherapy technique, which has shown improved dosimetry results compared to standard breast radiotherapy. Subsequently, I have developed and implemented a phase III randomised controlled breast IMRT trial. This National Cancer Research Network adopted trial will answer an important question regarding the clinical benefit of breast IMRT. It will provide DNA samples linked with high quality clinical outcome data, for a national translational radiogenomics study investigating variation in normal tissue toxicity. Thus, patients with significant late normal tissue side effects despite good dose homogeneity will provide the best model for finding differences due to underlying genetics. I evaluated a novel technique using high definition free-hand 3-dimensional (3D) ultrasound in a phantom study, and the results suggested that this is an accurate and reproducible method for tumour bed localisation. I then compared recognised methods of tumour bed localisation with the 3D ultrasound method in a clinical study. The 3D ultrasound technique appeared to accurately represent the shape and spatial position of the tumour cavity. This tumour bed localisation research

  6. Chemically enhanced radiotherapy: visions for the future

    PubMed Central

    Susheela, Sridhar P.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is an important part of cancer management, with more than a third of all cancer cures being attributable to RT. Despite the advances in RT over the past century, the overall outcomes in a majority of malignancies are still unsatisfactory. There has been a constant endeavor to enhance the outcome of RT, and this has been in the form of altered fractionation, oxymimetic radiosensitizers, the use of concurrent chemotherapy, anti-angiogenic therapy and anti-growth factor receptor targeted therapies. This article presents a vision for the future, with emphasis upon emerging prospects which could enhance RT outcomes. Positive speculations regarding the use of immunological aspects, the use of nanoscale technology and the adoption of metronomic concurrent chemotherapy have been presented. Also, the potential with the use of low dose hyperradiosensitivity in enhancing chemotherapy outcomes too has been discussed. In this era of evidence based clinical practise, there exists a strong obsession towards the ‘present’ with ‘contempt towards the future’. Accepting the shortcomings of the existing modalities, there must be a strong zeal towards discovering better methodologies to enhance radiotherapeutic outcomes for the sake of a better future. PMID:26904574

  7. Leukemia following radiotherapy for uterine bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Inskip, P.D.; Monson, R.R.; Wagoner, J.K.; Stovall, M.; Davis, F.G.; Kleinerman, R.A.; Boice, J.D. Jr. )

    1990-05-01

    Mortality due to leukemia among 4483 women treated with radiation to control uterine bleeding between 1925 and 1965 was twice as high as expected based on U.S. population rates (standardized mortality ratio (SMR) = 2.0; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.4 to 2.8). Women were followed for an average of 26.4 years. Relative risk was highest 2 to 5 years after treatment (SMR = 8.1) and among women over 55 years at irradiation (SMR = 5.8). The usual method of treatment was intrauterine radium. Average radiation dose to active bone marrow was estimated on the basis of original radiotherapy records (median, 53 cGy). A linear dose-response model provided an adequate fit to the data. The average excess relative risk was 1.9% per cGy (95% CI: 0.8 to 3.2), and the average absolute risk was 2.6 excess leukemia deaths per million women per year per cGy (95% CI: 0.9 to 4.8). Chronic myeloid leukemia predominated during the first 15 years following exposure, whereas acute leukemias and chronic lymphatic leukemia were most common thereafter. The radiation doses experienced during treatment of benign gynecologic disease appear to result in greater leukemia risk per cGy average marrow dose than the considerably higher doses used to treat malignant disease, perhaps because of a decreased likelihood of killing potentially leukemic cells.

  8. Hypnotherapy in radiotherapy patients: A randomized trial

    SciTech Connect

    Stalpers, Lukas J.A. . E-mail: l.stalpers@amc.uva.nl; Costa, Hanna C. da; Merbis, Merijn A.E.; Fortuin, Andries A.; Muller, Martin J.; Dam, Frits van

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: To determine whether hypnotherapy reduces anxiety and improves the quality of life in cancer patients undergoing curative radiotherapy (RT). Methods and materials: After providing written informed consent, 69 patients were randomized between standard curative RT alone (36 controls) and RT plus hypnotherapy (33 patients). Patients in the hypnotherapy group received hypnotherapy at the intake, before RT simulation, before the first RT session, and halfway between the RT course. Anxiety was evaluated by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory DY-1 form at six points. Quality of life was measured by the Rand Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Health Survey (SF-36) at five points. Additionally, patients answered a questionnaire to evaluate their experience and the possible benefits of this research project. Results: No statistically significant difference was found in anxiety or quality of life between the hypnotherapy and control groups. However, significantly more patients in the hypnotherapy group indicated an improvement in mental (p < 0.05) and overall (p < 0.05) well-being. Conclusion: Hypnotherapy did not reduce anxiety or improve the quality of life in cancer patients undergoing curative RT. The absence of statistically significant differences between the two groups contrasts with the hypnotherapy patients' own sense of mental and overall well-being, which was significantly greater after hypnotherapy. It cannot be excluded that the extra attention by the hypnotherapist was responsible for this beneficial effect in the hypnotherapy group. An attention-only control group would be necessary to control for this effect.

  9. [Hypofractionation and radiotherapy: "the eternal return"].

    PubMed

    Cosset, J-M; Mornex, F; Eschwège, F

    2013-10-01

    Hypofractionation is not a new idea in radiotherapy. The use of a few high-dose fractions has been proposed by some pioneers of our specialty in the early years of the 20th century. Hypofractionation then reappeared several times in the next decades, based on successive radiobiological concepts, a number of them having been shown to be wrong. The nominal single dose (NSD), for example, so fashionable in the 1970's, dramatically underestimated the late toxicity of the high-dose fractions. Consequently, the NSD was directly responsible for a significant increase of the incidence and of the severity of late complications in large cohorts of patients. The linear-quadratic model (LQ) unequivocally improved our understanding of fractionation sensitivity, but one has to keep in mind its limitations, both in the areas of low and high doses per fraction. For more than a decade, prostate cancer has been the subject of fierce discussions about its sensitivity to fractionation. A number of studies have suggested an unusually low (for a malignant tumor) alpha/beta ratio. However, the available data do not allow a precise evaluation of this ratio; "very low" (1.5 Gy), with an advantage of hypofractionation in terms of local control? Or simply "low" (3-4 Gy), only allowing a reduction of the total number of fractions (with a dose adequately reduced)? While waiting for complementary data, it is advised to remain very careful when modifying the classical schemes towards hypofractionation.

  10. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Oligometastatic Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Norihisa, Yoshiki; Nagata, Yasushi Takayama, Kenji; Matsuo, Yukinori; Sakamoto, Takashi; Sakamoto, Masato; Mizowaki, Takashi; Yano, Shinsuke; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: Since 1998, we have treated primary and oligometastatic lung tumors with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). The term 'oligometastasis' is used to indicate a small number of metastases limited to an organ. We evaluated our clinical experience of SBRT for oligometastatic lung tumors. Methods and Materials: A total of 34 patients with oligometastatic lung tumors were included in this study. The primary involved organs were the lung (n = 15), colorectum (n = 9), head and neck (n = 5), kidney (n = 3), breast (n = 1), and bone (n = 1). Five to seven, noncoplanar, static 6-MV photon beams were used to deliver 48 Gy (n = 18) or 60 Gy (n = 16) at the isocenter, with 12 Gy/fraction within 4-18 days (median, 12 days). Results: The overall survival rate, local relapse-free rate, and progression-free rate at 2 years was 84.3%, 90.0%, and 34.8%, respectively. No local progression was observed in tumors irradiated with 60 Gy. SBRT-related pulmonary toxicities were observed in 4 (12%) Grade 2 cases and 1 (3%) Grade 3 case. Patients with a longer disease-free interval had a greater overall survival rate. Conclusion: The clinical result of SBRT for oligometastatic lung tumors in our institute was comparable to that after surgical metastasectomy; thus, SBRT could be an effective treatment of pulmonary oligometastases.

  11. Overview of Carbon-ion Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2017-01-01

    The outcome of radiotherapy depends on potential efficiency of accelerators and their related accessories. In charged particle therapy before the 1990s, accelerators that were primarily installed for physics research had been shared, which however had limited flexibility for clinical use. Therapy-dedicated facility was first constructed at Loma Linda University for PBT in 1990 and at NIRS for CIRT in 1993. Currently, there are more than 56 facilities for PBT, 6 for CIRT, and 6 for PBT/CIRT, and even more facilities are under construction or active planning. CIRT has beneficial property for cancer therapy because, as compared with photon therapy, it offers superior dose distributions by exhibiting a Bragg peak in the body and, as compared with PBT, it has higher radiobiological effectiveness. The number of potential candidates for charged particle therapy is estimated to range from 0.018% to 0.035% of all irradiated cancer patients. In CIRT at NIRS, Japan, more than 9,000 patients have been treated with promising results in non-SCC tumors and photon-resistant types of tumors at various sites. It is of note that in CIRT a significant reduction in overall treatment time and fractions has been successfully achieved.

  12. Second cancers following radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinerman, R.A.; Curtis, R.E.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Flannery, J.T.; Fraumeni, J.F. Jr.

    1982-11-01

    Incidence of second primary cancers was evaluated in 7,127 women with invasive cancer of the cervix uteri, diagnosed between 1935 and 1978, and followed up to 38 years (average, 8.9 yr) in Connecticut. Among 5,997 women treated with radiation, 449 developed second primary cancers compared with 313 expected (relative risk . 1.4) on the basis of rates from the Connecticut Tumor Registry. Excess incidence was noticeable 15 years or more after radiotherapy and attributed mostly to cancers of sites in or near the radiation field, especially the bladder, kidneys, rectum, corpus uteri, and ovaries. No excess was found for these sites among the 1,130 nonirradiated women. The ratio of observed to expected cancers for these sites did not vary appreciably by age at irradiation. The data suggested that high-dose pelvic irradiation was associated with increase in cancers of the bladder, kidneys, rectum, ovaries, corpus uteri, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma but, apparently, not leukemia, Hodgkin's disease, breast cancer, or colon cancer.

  13. [Prostate localization systems for prostate radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Lagrange, J-L; Messai, T; M'Barek, B; Lefkopoulos, D

    2006-11-01

    The development of sophisticated conformal radiation therapy techniques for prostate cancer, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy, implies precise and accurate targeting. Inter- and intrafraction prostate motion can be significant and should be characterized, unless the target volume may occasionally be missed. Indeed, bony landmark-based portal imaging does not provide the positional information for soft-tissue targets (prostate and seminal vesicles) or critical organs (rectum and bladder). In this article, we describe various prostate localization systems used before or during the fraction: rectal balloon, intraprostatic fiducials, ultrasound-based localization, integrated CT/linear accelerator system, megavoltage or kilovoltage cone-beam CT, Calypso 4D localization system tomotherapy, Cyberknife and Exactrac X-Ray 6D. The clinical benefit in using such prostate localization tools is not proven by randomized studies and the feasibility has just been established for some of these techniques. Nevertheless, these systems should improve local control by a more accurate delivery of an increased prescribed dose in a reduced planning target volume.

  14. [Radiotherapy in benign diseases: Morbus Peyronie].

    PubMed

    Meineke, Viktor; Uebler, Christian; Köhn, Frank-Michael; Hofmann, Heidelore; Cordes, Nils; Ring, Johannes; Vogt, Hermann-Josef

    2003-03-01

    The induratio penis plastica (IPP) or the so-called Morbus Peyronie is a burdening disease for patients with three main symptoms, induration, deviation and pain. The etiology of this fibrosing and plaque forming disease is largely unknown up to now. The presented data refer to a retrospective univariant examination of 67 patients, which have been treated for IPP with soft X-rays in the Dermatological Clinic of the Technical University of Munich between 1990 and 1995. The aim of the study was to examine, how far a progression of the disease can be stopped with soft X-rays and how the pain symptomatic is reduced. In 58 of 67 examined patients (86.6%) a progression of the disease could be stopped. 25 out of 67 patients (37.3%) complained of pain before therapy. This symptomatic mostly improved totally in 21 patients (84% of the patients with pain). A complete or partial dissolution of the indurations was to be noticed in 41 of 70 indurations (58.6%). In 23 of 60 patients (38.3%) an improvement or totally regression of the deviation was observed. It could be shown that therapeutic outcome significantly correlates to a shorter duration of anamnesis (p < 0.05), smaller plaque size (p < 0.025) and a tendency to lower age of the patients. Radiotherapy of Morbus Peyronie is extremely effective and has a low rate of side effects.

  15. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Facial Nerve Schwannomas

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wenyin; Jain, Varsha; Kim, Hyun; Champ, Colin; Jain, Gaurav; Farrell, Christopher; Andrews, David W.; Judy, Kevin; Liu, Haisong; Artz, Gregory; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Evans, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Data on the clinical course of irradiated facial nerve schwannomas (FNS) are lacking. We evaluated fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for FNS. Methods Eight consecutive patients with FNS treated at our institution between 1998 and 2011 were included. Patients were treated with FSRT to a median dose of 50.4 Gy (range: 46.8–54 Gy) in 1.8 or 2.0 Gy fractions. We report the radiographic response, symptom control, and toxicity associated with FSRT for FNS. Results The median follow-up time was 43 months (range: 10–75 months). All patients presented with symptoms including pain, tinnitus, facial asymmetry, diplopia, and hearing loss. The median tumor volume was 1.57 cc. On the most recent follow-up imaging, five patients were noted to have stable tumor size; three patients had a net reduction in tumor volume. Additionally, six patients had improvement in clinical symptoms, one patient had stable clinical findings, and one patient had worsened House-Brackmann grade due to cystic degeneration. Conclusion FSRT treatment of FNS results in excellent control of growth and symptoms with a small rate of radiation toxicity. Given the importance of maintaining facial nerve function, FSRT could be considered as a primary management modality for enlarging or symptomatic FNS. PMID:26949592

  16. Present Status of Radiotherapy in Clinical Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duehmke, Eckhart

    Aims of radiation oncology are cure from malignant diseases and - at the same time preservation of anatomy (e.g. female breast, uterus, prostate) and organ functions (e.g. brain, eye, voice, sphincter ani). At present, methods and results of clinical radiotherapy (RT) are based on experiences with natural history and radiobiology of malignant tumors in properly defined situations as well as on technical developments since World War II in geometrical and biological treatment planning in teletherapy and brachytherapy. Radiobiological research revealed tolerance limits of healthy tissues to be respected, effective total treatment doses of high cure probability depending on histology and tumor volume, and - more recently - altered fractionation schemes to be adapted to specific growth fractions and intrinsic radiosensitivities of clonogenic tumor cells. In addition, Biological Response Modifiers (BRM), such as cis-platinum, oxygen and hyperthermia may steepen cell survival curves of hypoxic tumor cells, others - such as tetrachiordekaoxid (TCDO) - may enhance repair of normal tissues. Computer assisted techniques in geometrical RT-planning based on individual healthy and pathologic anatomy (CT, MRT) provide high precision RT for well defined brain lesions by using dedicated linear accelerators (Stereotaxy). CT-based individual tissue compensators help with homogenization of distorted dose distributions in magna field irradiation for malignant lymphomas and with total body irradiation (TBI) before allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, e.g. for leukemia. RT with fast neutrons, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), RT with protons and heavy ions need to be tested in randomized trials before implementation into clinical routine.

  17. [Radiotherapy in pelvic recurrences of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Morganti, A G; Santoni, R; Osti, M F

    2001-01-01

    Patients with locally recurrent rectal carcinoma have an unfavourable prognosis for the high incidence of distant metastases, the infrequent feasibility of radical surgical resection, and, in these last cases, the high incidence of re-recurrences. Based on the low resectability rate of pelvic recurrences, the clear impact of tumor diameter on resectability and outcome, and the documented possibility to achieve a significant tumor downstaging and downsizing with the use of concurrent chemoradiation, it is evident that the most promising treatment several authors have considered concurrent chemoradiation followed, if feasible, by radical resection. Furthermore, based on the high local and distant failure rate after surgery, the utilization of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) and adjuvant chemotherapy seems justified. Some published comparisons between patients treated with and without IORT seems to suggest the possible improvement in both local control and survival in these patients. Particularly interesting issues in this field are: 1) the definition of the most effective treatment modality (both in terms of radiation dose, fractionation and techniques, and drugs to be used concurrently to radiotherapy); 2) the analysis of the prognostic impact of several factors, with the aim of designing and validating staging systems of local rectal recurrences; 3) the possibility to treat with relatively high doses also patients previously irradiated on the pelvis.

  18. Hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Koulis, Theodora A; Phan, Tien; Olivotto, Ivo A

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is an important part of breast cancer management but the dose and fractionation schedules used are variable. A total of 50 Gy in 25 daily fractions delivered over 5 weeks is often considered the “standard” adjuvant RT prescription. Hypofractionated regimes such as 42.5 Gy in 16 daily fractions or 40 Gy in 15 daily fractions following breast-conserving surgery have proven to be equally effective and achieve similar or better cosmetic and normal tissue outcomes for both invasive and in situ diseases and when treating the regional nodes. Hypofractionation is more convenient for patients and less costly. However, certain patients at higher risk of RT late effects may benefit from a less intense, even more extended fractionation schedule. This review describes the indications for whole breast hypofractionated adjuvant RT for patients with breast cancer following breast-conserving surgery and proposes that hypofractionation should be the new “standard” for adjuvant breast cancer RT. PMID:26604820

  19. Online Adaptive Replanning Method for Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ahunbay, Ergun E.; Peng Cheng; Holmes, Shannon; Godley, Andrew; Lawton, Colleen; Li, X. Allen

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To report the application of an adaptive replanning technique for prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT), consisting of two steps: (1) segment aperture morphing (SAM), and (2) segment weight optimization (SWO), to account for interfraction variations. Methods and Materials: The new 'SAM+SWO' scheme was retroactively applied to the daily CT images acquired for 10 prostate cancer patients on a linear accelerator and CT-on-Rails combination during the course of RT. Doses generated by the SAM+SWO scheme based on the daily CT images were compared with doses generated after patient repositioning using the current planning target volume (PTV) margin (5 mm, 3 mm toward rectum) and a reduced margin (2 mm), along with full reoptimization scans based on the daily CT images to evaluate dosimetry benefits. Results: For all cases studied, the online replanning method provided significantly better target coverage when compared with repositioning with reduced PTV (13% increase in minimum prostate dose) and improved organ sparing when compared with repositioning with regular PTV (13% decrease in the generalized equivalent uniform dose of rectum). The time required to complete the online replanning process was 6 {+-} 2 minutes. Conclusion: The proposed online replanning method can be used to account for interfraction variations for prostate RT with a practically acceptable time frame (5-10 min) and with significant dosimetric benefits. On the basis of this study, the developed online replanning scheme is being implemented in the clinic for prostate RT.

  20. Steroid requirements during radiotherapy for malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Marantidou, Athina; Levy, Christine; Duquesne, Alyette; Ursu, Renata; Bailon, Olivier; Coman, Irene; Belin, Catherine; Carpentier, Antoine F

    2010-10-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is the standard treatment for high-grade gliomas. However, toxicity may develop during RT, such as brain edema or worsening of neurological symptoms. Surprisingly, no dedicated study had focused on steroid requirements during RT in adult patients with malignant gliomas. We evaluated prospectively all patients with malignant gliomas treated by RT in a single center from July 2006 to May 2009. Age, sex, initial Karnofsky performance status (KPS), tumor localization and histology, type of surgical resection, clinical target volume, total dose and duration of RT, concomitant treatment with temozolomide, and steroid dosage during RT and at 1 and 3 months after RT were recorded in all patients. Most of the 80 patients (70%) were already taking steroids before RT. Half of them (55%) required initiation or further steroids increase during RT. The median time to steroid increase was 8 days. Only 13% of patients remained free of steroids during RT, and the mean maximal dosage of prednisone was 55 ± 48 mg. At 3 months after RT, 29% of patients were free of steroids, and the mean prednisone dosage was 32 ± 50 mg. Unresected tumors and initial KPS ≤80% were the only variables associated with higher steroid requirements on multivariate analysis. In our series, almost all patients required steroids during RT. Poor initial KPS and biopsy were associated with higher steroid requirements.

  1. [Influence of radiotherapy on lymphocyte subpopulations].

    PubMed

    Ceschia, T; Beorchia, A; Guglielmi, R; Mandoliti, G; Fongione, S; Cereghini, M; Tonutti, E; Sala, P G; Pizzi, G

    1991-04-01

    The authors investigated the effects of radiation therapy on the immune system by studying lymphocyte subsets and other parameters in 32 patients undergoing radiation therapy for solid cancer. With monoclonal antibody techniques, we studied both T- and B-lymphocytes; cell suspensions were analyzed by means of a Facs Spectrum III Ortho (Ortho-Diagnostic) unit. The first control was performed right after the beginning of radiotherapy, when the dose to the patients was 50 Gy or higher. The second control was performed at 40 Gy because all patients received this dose. 30% of the patients exhibited lymphopenia from the beginning of the study; at 40 Gy the number of T-lymphocytes was low and helper/suppressor ratio was altered. A variable response of B-cells was observed, although all patients exhibited restoration of normal values at 6 months. Four patients only suffered from side-effects: a patient with tongue cancer presented oral mycosis, and a woman--treated for breast cancer--presented vaginal mycosis. Two cases of cystitis were also observed, after 18 Gy, in patients with uterine carcinoma undergoing pelvic irradiation. Disease progression was observed in 2 patients with head and neck cancer, while 3 patients died from lung cancer progression. Another one, with head and neck cancer, died because of heart failure.

  2. Radiotherapy treatments using Tsallis entropy statistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D, Rodríguez-Pérez; O, Sotolongo-Grau; O, Sotolongo-Costa; C, Antoranz J.

    2014-03-01

    Several radiobiological models mimic the biologic effect of one single radiation dose on a living tissue. However, the actual fractionated radiotherapy requires accounting for a new magnitude, i.e., time. Here, we explore the biological consequences posed by the mathematical prolongation of a previous single radiation model to fractionated treatment. The survival fraction is obtained, together with the equivalent physical dose, in terms of a time dependent factor (similar to a repair coefficient) describing the tissue trend to recovering its radioresistance. The model describes how dose fractions add up to obtain the equivalent dose and how the repair coefficient poses a limit to reach an equivalent dose equal to the critical one that would completely annihilate the tumor. On the other hand, the surrounding healthy tissue is a limiting factor to treatment planning. This tissue has its own repair coefficient and thus should limit the equivalent dose of a treatment. Depending on the repair coefficient and the critical dose of each tissue, unexpected results (failure to fully remove the tumor) can be obtained. To illustrate these results and predictions, some realistic example calculations will be performed using parameter values within actual clinical ranges. In conclusion, the model warns about treatment limitations and proposes ways to overcome them.

  3. System Toward Automation in Radiotherapy Treatment: START

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Andrew Y. S.; Tsoi, Kenneth Y. P.

    1994-10-01

    START is a new automation system invented for nasopharyngeal carcinoma treatment. A laser scanner system capable of non-contact digitization of 3D surface is used to digitize the contours of the patient's face, shoulder and special landmark reference features of the patient. These features are stored in the computer in 3D digitized format. The digitized facial features with traced landmark reference features are used for fabrication of a true sized wood-particle laminates mould by a computer numerical controlled milling system. A Cobex mask is formed on this mould by using vacuum forming technique. With an image analysis and computer aided design system, the X-ray film with treatment window marked is traced automatically and converted to match the prescanned 3D information. A computer controlled 6-axis robot can precisely mark out the required areas on the Cobex cast for treatment. Finally, the patient receives radiotherapy treatment with the Cobex case as a positioning registration device. The new system will replace the manual procedure with better patient comfort, higher efficiency and enhanced accuracy.

  4. Clinical advantages of carbon-ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujii, Hirohiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Baba, Masayuki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirotoshi; Kato, Shingo; Yamada, Shigeru; Yasuda, Shigeo; Yanagi, Takeshi; Kato, Hiroyuki; Hara, Ryusuke; Yamamoto, Naotaka; Mizoe, Junetsu

    2008-07-01

    Carbon-ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) possesses physical and biological advantages. It was started at NIRS in 1994 using the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC); since then more than 50 protocol studies have been conducted on almost 4000 patients with a variety of tumors. Clinical experiences have demonstrated that C-ion RT is effective in such regions as the head and neck, skull base, lung, liver, prostate, bone and soft tissues, and pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer, as well as for histological types including adenocarcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, malignant melanoma and various types of sarcomas, against which photon therapy could be less effective. Furthermore, when compared with photon and proton RT, a significant reduction of overall treatment time and fractions has been accomplished without enhancing toxicities. Currently, the number of irradiation sessions per patient averages 13 fractions spread over approximately three weeks. This means that in a carbon therapy facility a larger number of patients than is possible with other modalities can be treated over the same period of time.

  5. [The effect of radiotherapy on the antitumor immune response. Possibilities to combine radiotherapy with immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Lumniczky, Katalin; Sáfrány, Géza

    2016-03-02

    The past three decades of immunology research led to a drastic increase in the knowledge of antitumor immune response mechanisms and in parallel to a rapid development in various antitumor immune therapy strategies. This will most probably result in the implementation of immunotherapeutic protocols within the standard anticancer regimens in a very near future. Though, it is obvious that combination of immunotherapy with traditional anticancer treatment modalities will only be legitimate if the combination has at least an additive, or perhaps a synergistic effect. The similarly dynamic progress in the radiobiological knowledge proved that ionizing radiation does not have a general immune suppressing effect, as it has been thought for decades, but might possess certain immune stimulatory effects, as well. It is also known by now that local irradiation due to its out-of-field effects has systemic immune modulatory capacity, too. In the light of all these novel findings the optimal combination between antitumor immunotherapy and radiotherapy has become an increasing option. The first part of the present review summarizes the main antitumor mechanisms that can be influenced by ionizing radiation, and the second part attempts to provide a comprehensive overview of those antitumor immunotherapeutic modalities that are currently being used in combination with radiotherapy in preclinical and/or clinical trials for the treatment of various tumors.

  6. Effect of intensity-modulated radiotherapy versus two-dimensional conventional radiotherapy alone in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    OuYang, Pu-Yun; Shi, Dingbo; Sun, Rui; Zhu, Yu-Jia; Xiao, Yao; Zhang, Lu-Ning; Zhang, Xu-Hui; Chen, Ze-Ying; Lan, Xiao-Wen; Tang, Jie; Gao, Yuan-Hong; Ma, Jun; Deng, Wuguo; Xie, Fang-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background Albeit intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is currently the recommended radiation technique in treating nasopharyngeal carcinoma, the effect of IMRT versus two-dimensional conventional radiotherapy (2DCRT) alone is still contradictory. Results In the original unmatched cohort of 1198 patients, IMRT obtained comparable 5-year overall survival (OS) (91.3% vs 87.1%, P = 0.120), locoregional relapse-free survival (LRFS) (92.3% vs 90.4%, P = 0.221) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) (92.9% vs 92.1%, P = 0.901) to 2DCRT. In the propensity-matched cohort of 604 patients, no significant survival differences were observed between the two arms (5-year OS 90.9% vs 90.5%, P = 0.655; LRFS 92.5% vs 92.4%, P = 0.866; DMFS 92.5% vs 92.9%, P = 0.384). In multivariate analysis, IMRT did not significantly lower the risk of death, locoregional relapse or distant metastasis, irrespective of tumor stage. Methods Overall, 1198 patients who underwent IMRT (316 patients) or 2DCRT (882 patients) without any chemotherapy was retrospectively analyzed. Patients in both arms were matched at equal ratio using propensity-score matching method. OS, LRFS and DMFS were assessed with Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test and Cox regression. Conclusions In this propensity-matched study, IMRT showed no survival advantage over 2DCRT alone in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. PMID:27058901

  7. Modeling the Risk of Secondary Malignancies after Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    In developed countries, more than half of all cancer patients receive radiotherapy at some stage in the management of their disease. However, a radiation-induced secondary malignancy can be the price of success if the primary cancer is cured or at least controlled. Therefore, there is increasing concern regarding radiation-related second cancer risks in long-term radiotherapy survivors and a corresponding need to be able to predict cancer risks at high radiation doses. Of particular interest are second cancer risk estimates for new radiation treatment modalities such as intensity modulated radiotherapy, intensity modulated arc-therapy, proton and heavy ion radiotherapy. The long term risks from such modern radiotherapy treatment techniques have not yet been determined and are unlikely to become apparent for many years, due to the long latency time for solid tumor induction. Most information on the dose-response of radiation-induced cancer is derived from data on the A-bomb survivors who were exposed to γ-rays and neutrons. Since, for radiation protection purposes, the dose span of main interest is between zero and one Gy, the analysis of the A-bomb survivors is usually focused on this range. With increasing cure rates, estimates of cancer risk for doses larger than one Gy are becoming more important for radiotherapy patients. Therefore in this review, emphasis was placed on doses relevant for radiotherapy with respect to radiation induced solid cancer. Simple radiation protection models should be used only with extreme care for risk estimates in radiotherapy, since they are developed exclusively for low dose. When applied to scatter radiation, such models can predict only a fraction of observed second malignancies. Better semi-empirical models include the effect of dose fractionation and represent the dose-response relationships more accurately. The involved uncertainties are still huge for most of the organs and tissues. A major reason for this is that the

  8. [The need for a paradigm shift in radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Mayer, Árpád; Katona, Csilla; Farkas, Róbert; Póti, Zsuzsa

    2015-11-01

    The status and indications of radiotherapy have significantly changed in the past decade because novel techniques, radiobiological research and major advances in informatics have made better local control possible. Using supplemented marking of the target volume with computer tomography based other image-making methods adapted made it possible to define the tumor and intact surrounding tissues more precisely. With novel radiotherapy techniques the dosage of the homogenity and the covering in the target volume can be raised optimally, especially with intensity modulated arc radiotherapy (volumetric modulated arc therapy) without causing radiation injury or damage to intact surrounding tissues. Furthermore, with novel techniques and target volume marking, new indications have appeared in clinical practice and besides stereotactic radiotherapy for intracranial metastases, the extracranial so-called oligometastic conditions can be maintained close to a curative state (or in remission) for many years. Among these, perhaps the most striking is the stereotactic radiotherapy treatment of liver, lung and spinal cord metastases in one or more fractions, for which the indispensable condition is the image or respiratory guided technique.

  9. [Location of radiotherapy centers: an exploratory geographic analysis for Belgium].

    PubMed

    Cotteels, C; Peeters, D; Coucke, P A; Thomas, I

    2012-10-01

    The distance between the patient's home and a radiotherapy department may represent a hurdle for the patient and influence treatment choice. Therefore, it is necessary to check whether the geographical distribution of radiotherapy centers is in accordance with cancer incidence, taking also into account the cost of travelling to the radiotherapy department. The objective of this study is double; first, to map the current locations of radiotherapy centers across the country and second, to evaluate the observed spatial disparities with appropriate tools. A model of operational research (P-median) is used to suggest the optimal locations and allocations and to compare them with the current situation. This is an exploratory study with simple inputs. It helps to better understand the current geographical distribution of radiotherapy centers in Belgium as well as its possible limitations. RESULTS-CONCLUSION: It appears that the current situation is on the average acceptable in terms of accessibility to the service and that the method presents huge potentialities for decision making so as to yield a spatial system that is both efficient and equitable. Copyright © 2012 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Melatonin protects rats from radiotherapy-induced small intestine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Gil, Beatriz; Moneim, Ahmed E Abdel; Ortiz, Francisco; Shen, Ying-Qiang; Soto-Mercado, Viviana; Mendivil-Perez, Miguel; Guerra-Librero, Ana; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; Molina-Navarro, María M; García-Verdugo, José M; Sayed, Ramy K A; Florido, Javier; Luna, Juan D; López, Luis Carlos; Escames, Germaine

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity is among the most prevalent dose-limiting toxicities following radiotherapy. Prevention of radiation enteropathy requires protection of the small intestine. However, despite the prevalence and burden of this pathology, there are currently no effective treatments for radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity, and this pathology remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the changes induced in the rat small intestine after external irradiation of the tongue, and to explore the potential radio-protective effects of melatonin gel. Male Wistar rats were subjected to irradiation of their tongues with an X-Ray YXLON Y.Tu 320-D03 irradiator, receiving a dose of 7.5 Gy/day for 5 days. For 21 days post-irradiation, rats were treated with 45 mg/day melatonin gel or vehicle, by local application into their mouths. Our results showed that mitochondrial oxidative stress, bioenergetic impairment, and subsequent NLRP3 inflammasome activation were involved in the development of radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity. Oral treatment with melatonin gel had a protective effect in the small intestine, which was associated with mitochondrial protection and, consequently, with a reduced inflammatory response, blunting the NF-κB/NLRP3 inflammasome signaling activation. Thus, rats treated with melatonin gel showed reduced intestinal apoptosis, relieving mucosal dysfunction and facilitating intestinal mucosa recovery. Our findings suggest that oral treatment with melatonin gel may be a potential preventive therapy for radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity in cancer patients.

  11. Melatonin protects rats from radiotherapy-induced small intestine toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Gil, Beatriz; Moneim, Ahmed E. Abdel; Ortiz, Francisco; Shen, Ying-Qiang; Soto-Mercado, Viviana; Mendivil-Perez, Miguel; Guerra-Librero, Ana; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; Molina-Navarro, María M.; García-Verdugo, José M.; Sayed, Ramy K. A.; Florido, Javier; Luna, Juan D.; López, Luis Carlos; Escames, Germaine

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity is among the most prevalent dose-limiting toxicities following radiotherapy. Prevention of radiation enteropathy requires protection of the small intestine. However, despite the prevalence and burden of this pathology, there are currently no effective treatments for radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity, and this pathology remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the changes induced in the rat small intestine after external irradiation of the tongue, and to explore the potential radio-protective effects of melatonin gel. Male Wistar rats were subjected to irradiation of their tongues with an X-Ray YXLON Y.Tu 320-D03 irradiator, receiving a dose of 7.5 Gy/day for 5 days. For 21 days post-irradiation, rats were treated with 45 mg/day melatonin gel or vehicle, by local application into their mouths. Our results showed that mitochondrial oxidative stress, bioenergetic impairment, and subsequent NLRP3 inflammasome activation were involved in the development of radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity. Oral treatment with melatonin gel had a protective effect in the small intestine, which was associated with mitochondrial protection and, consequently, with a reduced inflammatory response, blunting the NF-κB/NLRP3 inflammasome signaling activation. Thus, rats treated with melatonin gel showed reduced intestinal apoptosis, relieving mucosal dysfunction and facilitating intestinal mucosa recovery. Our findings suggest that oral treatment with melatonin gel may be a potential preventive therapy for radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity in cancer patients. PMID:28403142

  12. [Integration of the radiotherapy irradiation planning in the digital workflow].

    PubMed

    Röhner, F; Schmucker, M; Henne, K; Momm, F; Bruggmoser, G; Grosu, A-L; Frommhold, H; Heinemann, F E

    2013-02-01

    At the Clinic of Radiotherapy at the University Hospital Freiburg, all relevant workflow is paperless. After implementing the Operating Schedule System (OSS) as a framework, all processes are being implemented into the departmental system MOSAIQ. Designing a digital workflow for radiotherapy irradiation planning is a large challenge, it requires interdisciplinary expertise and therefore the interfaces between the professions also have to be interdisciplinary. For every single step of radiotherapy irradiation planning, distinct responsibilities have to be defined and documented. All aspects of digital storage, backup and long-term availability of data were considered and have already been realized during the OSS project. After an analysis of the complete workflow and the statutory requirements, a detailed project plan was designed. In an interdisciplinary workgroup, problems were discussed and a detailed flowchart was developed. The new functionalities were implemented in a testing environment by the Clinical and Administrative IT Department (CAI). After extensive tests they were integrated into the new modular department system. The Clinic of Radiotherapy succeeded in realizing a completely digital workflow for radiotherapy irradiation planning. During the testing phase, our digital workflow was examined and afterwards was approved by the responsible authority.

  13. Combination chemotherapy and radiotherapy in non-Hodgkin's lymphomata.

    PubMed Central

    Bonadonna, G.; De Lena, M.; Lattuada, A.; Milani, F.; Monfardini, S.; Beretta, G.

    1975-01-01

    The results obtained with intensive chemotherapy and intensive chemotherapy plus radiotherapy in non-Hodgkin's lymphomata are reported. A quintuple drug regimen (mechloretamine, adriamycin, bleomycin, vincristine and prednisone) in histiocytic lymphomata (Stage III and IV) yielded complete remissions in 53% and complete plus partial remissions in 77%. These figures were 44% and 64% respectively in lymphocytic lymphoma. In Stage III complete responders after combination chemotherapy were subsequently irradiated (involved field irradiation). The median duration of complete remission after completion of radiotherapy was 9-5 months in histiocytic and 12-0 months in lymphocytic lymphomata. At 2 years actuarial survival in Stage III and IV was better in patients with the lymphocytic type and with nodular pattern than with histiocytic and diffuse patterns. A more recent trial compares, in Stage IV patients, cyclophosphamide, vincristine and prednisone (CVP) versus adriamycin, bleomycin and prednisone (ABP). Although the number of evaluable patients is still limited, there appears to be no difference in the response rate between CVP and ABP. In Stages I and II, 6 cycles of CVP were given as adjuvant treatment after radiotherapy. At the present moment, there is no statistical difference in the relapse rate between the group of patients treated with radiotherapy alone and that with radiotherapy plus CVP. PMID:52367

  14. Improved outcome of nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with conventional radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Palazzi, Mauro . E-mail: mauro.palazzi@istitutotumori.mi.it; Guzzo, Marco; Tomatis, Stefano Ph.D.; Cerrotta, Annamaria; Potepan, Paolo; Quattrone, Pasquale; Cantu, Giulio

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: To describe the outcome of patients with nonmetastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with conventional radiotherapy at a single institution. Methods and materials: From 1990 to 1999, 171 consecutive patients with NPC were treated with conventional (two-dimensional) radiotherapy. Tumor histology was undifferentiated in 82% of cases. Tumor-node-metastasis Stage (American Joint Committee on Cancer/International Union Against Cancer 1997 system) was I in 6%, II in 36%, III in 22%, and IV in 36% of patients. Mean total radiation dose was 68.4 Gy. Chemotherapy was given to 62% of the patients. The median follow-up for surviving patients was 6.3 years (range, 3.1-13.1 years). Results: The 5-year overall survival, disease-specific survival, and disease-free survival rates were 72%, 74%, and 62%, respectively. The 5-year local, regional, and distant control rates were 84%, 80%, and 83% respectively. Late effects of radiotherapy were prospectively recorded in 100 patients surviving without relapse; 44% of these patients had Grade 3 xerostomia, 33% had Grade 3 dental damage, and 11% had Grade 3 hearing loss. Conclusions: This analysis shows an improved outcome for patients treated from 1990 to 1999 compared with earlier retrospective series, despite the use of two-dimensional radiotherapy. Late toxicity, however, was substantial with conventional radiotherapy.

  15. Low-dose prophylactic craniospinal radiotherapy for intracranial germinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenfeld, Gordon O.; Amdur, Robert J. . E-mail: amdurrj@ufl.edu; Schmalfuss, Ilona M.; Morris, Christopher G.; Keole, Sameer R.; Mendenhall, William M.; Marcus, Robert B.

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes of patients with localized intracranial germinoma treated with low-dose craniospinal irradiation (CSI) followed by a boost to the ventricular system and primary site. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one patients had pathologically confirmed intracranial germinoma and no spine metastases. Low-dose CSI was administered in 29 patients: usually 21 Gy of CSI, 9.0 Gy of ventricular boost, and a 19.5-Gy tumor boost, all at 1.5 Gy per fraction. Our neuroradiologist recorded three-dimensional tumor size on magnetic resonance images before, during, and after radiotherapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 7.0 years, 29 of 31 patients (94%) are disease free. One failure had nongerminomatous histology; the initial diagnosis was a sampling error. Of 3 patients who did not receive CSI, 1 died. No patient developed myelopathy, visual deficits, dementia, or skeletal growth problems. In locally controlled patients, tumor response according to magnetic resonance scan was nearly complete within 6 months after radiotherapy. Conclusions: Radiotherapy alone with low-dose prophylactic CSI cures almost all patients with localized intracranial germinoma. Complications are rare when the daily dose of radiotherapy is limited to 1.5 Gy and the total CSI dose to 21 Gy. Patients without a near-complete response to radiotherapy should undergo resection to rule out a nongerminomatous element.

  16. Optimization approaches for planning external beam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozbasi, Halil Ozan

    Cancer begins when cells grow out of control as a result of damage to their DNA. These abnormal cells can invade healthy tissue and form tumors in various parts of the body. Chemotherapy, immunotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy are the most common treatment methods for cancer. According to American Cancer Society about half of the cancer patients receive a form of radiation therapy at some stage. External beam radiotherapy is delivered from outside the body and aimed at cancer cells to damage their DNA making them unable to divide and reproduce. The beams travel through the body and may damage nearby healthy tissue unless carefully planned. Therefore, the goal of treatment plan optimization is to find the best system parameters to deliver sufficient dose to target structures while avoiding damage to healthy tissue. This thesis investigates optimization approaches for two external beam radiation therapy techniques: Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) and Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). We develop automated treatment planning technology for IMRT that produces several high-quality treatment plans satisfying provided clinical requirements in a single invocation and without human guidance. A novel bi-criteria scoring based beam selection algorithm is part of the planning system and produces better plans compared to those produced using a well-known scoring-based algorithm. Our algorithm is very efficient and finds the beam configuration at least ten times faster than an exact integer programming approach. Solution times range from 2 minutes to 15 minutes which is clinically acceptable. With certain cancers, especially lung cancer, a patient's anatomy changes during treatment. These anatomical changes need to be considered in treatment planning. Fortunately, recent advances in imaging technology can provide multiple images of the treatment region taken at different points of the breathing cycle, and deformable image registration algorithms can

  17. Radiotherapy issues in elderly breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kunkler, Ian

    2012-12-01

    Breast cancer in the elderly is a rising health care challenge. Under-treatment is common. While the proportion of older patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is rising, the proportion undergoing breast-conserving surgery without irradiation has also risen. The evidence base for loco-regional treatment is limited, reflecting the historical exclusion of older patients from randomised trials. The 2011 Oxford overview shows that the risk of first recurrence is halved in all age groups by adjuvant RT after breast-conserving surgery, although the absolute benefit in older 'low-risk' patients is small. There is level 1 evidence that a breast boost after breast-conserving surgery and whole-breast irradiation reduces local recurrence in older as in younger women, although in the former the absolute reduction is modest. Partial breast irradiation (external beam or intraoperative or postoperative brachytherapy) is potentially an attractive option for older patients, but the evidence base is insufficient to recommend it routinely. Similarly, shortened (hypofractionated) dose fraction schedules may be more convenient for older patients and are supported by level 1 evidence. There remains uncertainty about whether there is a subgroup of older low-risk patients in whom postoperative RT can be omitted after breast-conserving surgery. Biomarkers of 'low risk' are needed to refine the selection of patients for the omission of adjuvant RT. The role of postmastectomy irradiation is well established for 'high-risk' patients but uncertain in the intermediate-risk category of patients with 1-3 involved axillary nodes or node-negative patients with other risk factors where its role is investigational.

  18. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Andolino, David L.; Johnson, Cynthia S.; Maluccio, Mary; Kwo, Paul; Tector, A. Joseph; Zook, Jennifer; Johnstone, Peter A.S.; Cardenes, Higinia R.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for the treatment of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2009, 60 patients with liver-confined HCC were treated with SBRT at the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center: 36 Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) Class A and 24 CTP Class B. The median number of fractions, dose per fraction, and total dose, was 3, 14 Gy, and 44 Gy, respectively, for those with CTP Class A cirrhosis and 5, 8 Gy, and 40 Gy, respectively, for those with CTP Class B. Treatment was delivered via 6 to 12 beams and in nearly all cases was prescribed to the 80% isodose line. The records of all patients were reviewed, and treatment response was scored according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors v1.1. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0. Local control (LC), time to progression (TTP), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated according to the method of Kaplan and Meier. Results: The median follow-up time was 27 months, and the median tumor diameter was 3.2 cm. The 2-year LC, PFS, and OS were 90%, 48%, and 67%, respectively, with median TTP of 47.8 months. Subsequently, 23 patients underwent transplant, with a median time to transplant of 7 months. There were no {>=}Grade 3 nonhematologic toxicities. Thirteen percent of patients experienced an increase in hematologic/hepatic dysfunction greater than 1 grade, and 20% experienced progression in CTP class within 3 months of treatment. Conclusions: SBRT is a safe, effective, noninvasive option for patients with HCC {<=}6 cm. As such, SBRT should be considered when bridging to transplant or as definitive therapy for those ineligible for transplant.

  19. Predicting radiotherapy outcomes using statistical learning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Naqa, Issam; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Hope, Andrew J.; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2009-09-01

    Radiotherapy outcomes are determined by complex interactions between treatment, anatomical and patient-related variables. A common obstacle to building maximally predictive outcome models for clinical practice is the failure to capture potential complexity of heterogeneous variable interactions and applicability beyond institutional data. We describe a statistical learning methodology that can automatically screen for nonlinear relations among prognostic variables and generalize to unseen data before. In this work, several types of linear and nonlinear kernels to generate interaction terms and approximate the treatment-response function are evaluated. Examples of institutional datasets of esophagitis, pneumonitis and xerostomia endpoints were used. Furthermore, an independent RTOG dataset was used for 'generalizabilty' validation. We formulated the discrimination between risk groups as a supervised learning problem. The distribution of patient groups was initially analyzed using principle components analysis (PCA) to uncover potential nonlinear behavior. The performance of the different methods was evaluated using bivariate correlations and actuarial analysis. Over-fitting was controlled via cross-validation resampling. Our results suggest that a modified support vector machine (SVM) kernel method provided superior performance on leave-one-out testing compared to logistic regression and neural networks in cases where the data exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA. For instance, in prediction of esophagitis and pneumonitis endpoints, which exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA, the method provided 21% and 60% improvements, respectively. Furthermore, evaluation on the independent pneumonitis RTOG dataset demonstrated good generalizabilty beyond institutional data in contrast with other models. This indicates that the prediction of treatment response can be improved by utilizing nonlinear kernel methods for discovering important nonlinear interactions among model

  20. Radiotherapy- and Chemotherapy-Induced Myelodysplasia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li-Min; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Liang, Ji-An; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study explored which kinds of cancer are related to a higher incidence of subsequent myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) after radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT). We performed a nested case–control study by using data from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance (NHI) system. The case group included cancer patients who developed MDS. For the control group, 4 cancer patients without MDS were frequency-matched with each MDS case by age, sex, year of cancer diagnosis, and MDS index year. A multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted, and odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated. Overall, cancer patients who received RT or CT exhibited secondary MDS more frequently than did those who did not (RT: OR = 1.53; 95% CI = 1.33–1.77; CT: OR = 1.51; 95% CI = 1.25–1.82). Analysis by cancer site showed that RT increased the risk of MDS for patients with stomach, colorectal, liver, breast, endometrial, prostate, and kidney cancers. By contrast, CT was more likely to increase the risk of MDS for patients with lung, endometrial, and cervical cancers. Further analysis revealed that RT and CT seemed to have a positive interaction. The major limitation of this study was the lack of certain essential data in the NHI Research Database, such as data regarding cancer stage and treatment dose details. This population-based nested case–control study determined that RT and CT predisposed patients in Taiwan to the development of MDS. This effect was more prominent when both modalities were used. PMID:25929909

  1. Predicting radiotherapy outcomes using statistical learning techniques*

    PubMed Central

    El Naqa, Issam; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Lindsay, Patricia E; Hope, Andrew J; Deasy, Joseph O

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy outcomes are determined by complex interactions between treatment, anatomical and patient-related variables. A common obstacle to building maximally predictive outcome models for clinical practice is the failure to capture potential complexity of heterogeneous variable interactions and applicability beyond institutional data. We describe a statistical learning methodology that can automatically screen for nonlinear relations among prognostic variables and generalize to unseen data before. In this work, several types of linear and nonlinear kernels to generate interaction terms and approximate the treatment-response function are evaluated. Examples of institutional datasets of esophagitis, pneumonitis and xerostomia endpoints were used. Furthermore, an independent RTOG dataset was used for ‘generalizabilty’ validation. We formulated the discrimination between risk groups as a supervised learning problem. The distribution of patient groups was initially analyzed using principle components analysis (PCA) to uncover potential nonlinear behavior. The performance of the different methods was evaluated using bivariate correlations and actuarial analysis. Over-fitting was controlled via cross-validation resampling. Our results suggest that a modified support vector machine (SVM) kernel method provided superior performance on leave-one-out testing compared to logistic regression and neural networks in cases where the data exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA. For instance, in prediction of esophagitis and pneumonitis endpoints, which exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA, the method provided 21% and 60% improvements, respectively. Furthermore, evaluation on the independent pneumonitis RTOG dataset demonstrated good generalizabilty beyond institutional data in contrast with other models. This indicates that the prediction of treatment response can be improved by utilizing nonlinear kernel methods for discovering important nonlinear interactions among model

  2. Carbon ion radiotherapy of skull base chondrosarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz-Ertner, Daniela . E-mail: Daniela.Ertner@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Nikoghosyan, Anna; Hof, Holger; Didinger, Bernd; Combs, Stephanie E.; Jaekel, Oliver; Karger, Christian P.; Edler, Lutz; Debus, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness and toxicity of carbon ion radiotherapy in chondrosarcomas of the skull base. Patients and Methods: Between November 1998 and September 2005, 54 patients with low-grade and intermediate-grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base have been treated with carbon ion radiation therapy (RT) using the raster scan technique at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, Germany. All patients had gross residual tumors after surgery. Median total dose was 60 CGE (weekly fractionation 7 x 3.0 CGE). All patients were followed prospectively in regular intervals after treatment. Local control and overall survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria (CTCAE v.3.0) and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) score. Results: Median follow-up was 33 months (range, 3-84 months). Only 2 patients developed local recurrences. The actuarial local control rates were 96.2% and 89.8% at 3 and 4 years; overall survival was 98.2%at 5 years. Only 1 patient developed a mucositis CTCAE Grade 3; the remaining patients did not develop any acute toxicities >CTCAE Grade 2. Five patients developed minor late toxicities (RTOG/EORTC Grades 1-2), including bilateral cataract (n = 1), sensory hearing loss (n = 1), a reduction of growth hormone (n = 1), and asymptomatic radiation-induced white matter changes of the adjacent temporal lobe (n = 2). Grade 3 late toxicity occurred in 1 patient (1.9%) only. Conclusions: Carbon ion RT is an effective treatment for low- and intermediate-grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base offering high local control rates with low toxicity.

  3. Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Unresectable Retroperitoneal Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Serizawa, Itsuko; Kagei, Kenji; Kamada, Tadashi; Imai, Reiko; Sugahara, Shinji; Okada, Tohru; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Ito, Hisao; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the applicability of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for unresectable retroperitoneal sarcomas with regard to normal tissue morbidity and local tumor control. Methods and Materials: From May 1997 to February 2006, 24 patients (17 male and 7 female) with unresectable retroperitoneal sarcoma received CIRT. Age ranged from 16 to 77 years (median, 48.6 years). Of the patients, 16 had primary disease and 8 recurrent disease. Histologic diagnoses were as follows: malignant fibrous histiocytoma in 6, liposarcoma in 3, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in 3, Ewing/primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) in 2, and miscellaneous in 10 patients. The histologic grades were as follows: Grade 3 in 15, Grade 2-3 in 2, Grade 2 in 3, and unknown in 4. Clinical target volumes ranged between 57 cm{sup 3} and 1,194 cm{sup 3} (median 525 cm{sup 3}). The delivered carbon ion dose ranged from 52.8 to 73.6 GyE in 16 fixed fractions over 4 weeks. Results: The median follow-up was 36 months (range, 6-143 months). The overall survival rates at 2 and 5 years were 75% and 50%, respectively. The local control rates at 2 and 5 years were 77% and 69%. No complications of the gastrointestinal tract were encountered. No other toxicity greater than Grade 2 was observed. Conclusions: Use of CIRT is suggested to be effective and safe for retroperitoneal sarcomas. The results obtained with CIRT were a good overall survival rate and local control, notwithstanding the fact that most patients were not eligible for surgical resection and had high-grade sarcomas.

  4. CERR: a computational environment for radiotherapy research.

    PubMed

    Deasy, Joseph O; Blanco, Angel I; Clark, Vanessa H

    2003-05-01

    A software environment is described, called the computational environment for radiotherapy research (CERR, pronounced "sir"). CERR partially addresses four broad needs in treatment planning research: (a) it provides a convenient and powerful software environment to develop and prototype treatment planning concepts, (b) it serves as a software integration environment to combine treatment planning software written in multiple languages (MATLAB, FORTRAN, C/C++, JAVA, etc.), together with treatment plan information (computed tomography scans, outlined structures, dose distributions, digital films, etc.), (c) it provides the ability to extract treatment plans from disparate planning systems using the widely available AAPM/RTOG archiving mechanism, and (d) it provides a convenient and powerful tool for sharing and reproducing treatment planning research results. The functional components currently being distributed, including source code, include: (1) an import program which converts the widely available AAPM/RTOG treatment planning format into a MATLAB cell-array data object, facilitating manipulation; (2) viewers which display axial, coronal, and sagittal computed tomography images, structure contours, digital films, and isodose lines or dose colorwash, (3) a suite of contouring tools to edit and/or create anatomical structures, (4) dose-volume and dose-surface histogram calculation and display tools, and (5) various predefined commands. CERR allows the user to retrieve any AAPM/RTOG key word information about the treatment plan archive. The code is relatively self-describing, because it relies on MATLAB structure field name definitions based on the AAPM/RTOG standard. New structure field names can be added dynamically or permanently. New components of arbitrary data type can be stored and accessed without disturbing system operation. CERR has been applied to aid research in dose-volume-outcome modeling, Monte Carlo dose calculation, and treatment planning optimization

  5. Spinal Cord Tolerance for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sahgal, Arjun; Ma Lijun; Gibbs, Iris; Gerszten, Peter C.; Ryu, Sam; Soltys, Scott; Weinberg, Vivian; Wong Shun; Chang, Eric; Fowler, Jack; Larson, David A.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric data are reported for five cases of radiation-induced myelopathy after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to spinal tumors. Analysis per the biologically effective dose (BED) model was performed. Methods and Materials: Five patients with radiation myelopathy were compared to a subset of 19 patients with no radiation myelopathy post-SBRT. In all patients, the thecal sac was contoured to represent the spinal cord, and doses to the maximum point, 0.1-, 1-, 2-, and 5-cc volumes, were analyzed. The mean normalized 2-Gy-equivalent BEDs (nBEDs), calculated using an alpha/beta value of 2 for late toxicity with units Gy 2/2, were compared using the t test and analysis of variance test. Results: Radiation myelopathy was observed at the maximum point with doses of 25.6 Gy in two fractions, 30.9 Gy in three fractions, and 14.8, 13.1, and 10.6 Gy in one fraction. Overall, there was a significant interaction between patient subsets and volume based on the nBED (p = 0.0003). Given individual volumes, a significant difference was observed for the mean maximum point nBED (p = 0.01). Conclusions: The maximum point dose should be respected for spine SBRT. For single-fraction SBRT 10 Gy to a maximum point is safe, and up to five fractions an nBED of 30 to 35 Gy 2/2 to the thecal sac also poses a low risk of radiation myelopathy.

  6. Predicting radiotherapy outcomes using statistical learning techniques.

    PubMed

    El Naqa, Issam; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Lindsay, Patricia E; Hope, Andrew J; Deasy, Joseph O

    2009-09-21

    Radiotherapy outcomes are determined by complex interactions between treatment, anatomical and patient-related variables. A common obstacle to building maximally predictive outcome models for clinical practice is the failure to capture potential complexity of heterogeneous variable interactions and applicability beyond institutional data. We describe a statistical learning methodology that can automatically screen for nonlinear relations among prognostic variables and generalize to unseen data before. In this work, several types of linear and nonlinear kernels to generate interaction terms and approximate the treatment-response function are evaluated. Examples of institutional datasets of esophagitis, pneumonitis and xerostomia endpoints were used. Furthermore, an independent RTOG dataset was used for 'generalizabilty' validation. We formulated the discrimination between risk groups as a supervised learning problem. The distribution of patient groups was initially analyzed using principle components analysis (PCA) to uncover potential nonlinear behavior. The performance of the different methods was evaluated using bivariate correlations and actuarial analysis. Over-fitting was controlled via cross-validation resampling. Our results suggest that a modified support vector machine (SVM) kernel method provided superior performance on leave-one-out testing compared to logistic regression and neural networks in cases where the data exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA. For instance, in prediction of esophagitis and pneumonitis endpoints, which exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA, the method provided 21% and 60% improvements, respectively. Furthermore, evaluation on the independent pneumonitis RTOG dataset demonstrated good generalizabilty beyond institutional data in contrast with other models. This indicates that the prediction of treatment response can be improved by utilizing nonlinear kernel methods for discovering important nonlinear interactions among model

  7. Comparison of Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy, Adaptive Radiotherapy, Proton Radiotherapy, and Adaptive Proton Radiotherapy for Treatment of Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Charles B.; Ly, David; Dan, Tu D.; Ondos, John; Ning, Holly; Belard, Arnaud; O'Connell, John; Miller, Robert W.; Simone, Nicole L.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Various radiotherapy planning methods for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) have been proposed to decrease normal tissue toxicity. We compare IMRT, adaptive IMRT, proton therapy (IMPT), and adaptive IMPT for SCCHN. Materials and Methods Initial and re-simulation CT images from 10 consecutive patients with SCCHN were used to quantify dosimetric differences between photon and proton therapy. Contouring was performed on both CTs, and plans (n=40 plans) and dose volume histograms were generated. Results The mean GTV volume decreased 53.4% with re-simulation. All plans provided comparable PTV coverage. Compared with IMRT, adaptive IMRT significantly reduced the maximum dose to the mandible (p=0.020) and mean doses to the contralateral parotid gland (p=0.049) and larynx (p=0.049). Compared with IMRT and adaptive IMRT, IMPT significantly lower the maximum doses to the spinal cord (p<0.002 for both) and brainstem (p<0.002 for both) and mean doses to the larynx (p<0.002 for both) and ipsilateral (p=0.004 IMRT, p=0.050 adaptive) and contralateral (p<0.002 IMRT, p=0.010 adaptive) parotid glands. Adaptive IMPT significantly reduced doses to all critical structures compared with IMRT and adaptive IMRT and several critical structures compared with non-adaptive IMPT. Conclusions Although adaptive IMRT reduced dose to several normal structures compared with standard IMRT, non-adaptive proton therapy had a more favorable dosimetric profile than IMRT or adaptive IMRT and may obviate the need for adaptive planning. Protons allowed significant sparing of the spinal cord, parotid glands, larynx, and brainstem and should be considered for SCCHN to decrease normal tissue toxicity while still providing optimal tumor coverage. PMID:21663988

  8. Comparison of intensity-modulated radiotherapy, adaptive radiotherapy, proton radiotherapy, and adaptive proton radiotherapy for treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Simone, Charles B; Ly, David; Dan, Tu D; Ondos, John; Ning, Holly; Belard, Arnaud; O'Connell, John; Miller, Robert W; Simone, Nicole L

    2011-12-01

    Various radiotherapy planning methods for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) have been proposed to decrease normal tissue toxicity. We compare IMRT, adaptive IMRT, proton therapy (IMPT), and adaptive IMPT for SCCHN. Initial and re-simulation CT images from 10 consecutive patients with SCCHN were used to quantify dosimetric differences between photon and proton therapy. Contouring was performed on both CTs, and plans (n=40 plans) and dose-volume histograms were generated. The mean GTV volume decreased 53.4% with re-simulation. All plans provided comparable PTV coverage. Compared with IMRT, adaptive IMRT significantly reduced the maximum dose to the mandible (p=0.020) and mean doses to the contralateral parotid gland (p=0.049) and larynx (p=0.049). Compared with IMRT and adaptive IMRT, IMPT significantly lowered the maximum doses to the spinal cord (p<0.002 for both) and brainstem (p<0.002 for both) and mean doses to the larynx (p<0.002 for both) and ipsilateral (p=0.004 IMRT, p=0.050 adaptive) and contralateral (p<0.002 IMRT, p=0.010 adaptive) parotid glands. Adaptive IMPT significantly reduced doses to all critical structures compared with IMRT and adaptive IMRT and several critical structures compared with non-adaptive IMPT. Although adaptive IMRT reduced dose to several normal structures compared with standard IMRT, non-adaptive proton therapy had a more favorable dosimetric profile than IMRT or adaptive IMRT and may obviate the need for adaptive planning. Protons allowed significant sparing of the spinal cord, parotid glands, larynx, and brainstem and should be considered for SCCHN to decrease normal tissue toxicity while still providing optimal tumor coverage. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy for Vestibular Schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerwaard, Frank J. Meijer, Otto W.M.; Hoorn, Elles A.P. van der; Verbakel, Wilko; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (RapidArc [RA]), a novel approach allowing for rapid treatment delivery, for the treatment of vestibular schwannoma (VS). Methods and Materials: The RA plans were generated for a small (0.5 cm{sup 3}), intermediate (2.8 cm{sup 3}), and large (14.8 cm{sup 3}) VS. The prescription dose was 12.5 Gy to the encompassing 80% isodose. The RA plans were compared with conventional radiosurgery plans using both a single dynamic conformal arc (1DCA) and five noncoplanar dynamic conformal arcs (5DCA). Conformity indices (CI) and dose-volume histograms of critical organs were compared. The RA plan for the medium-sized VS was measured in a phantom using Gafchromic EBT films and compared with calculated dose distributions. Results: The RA planning was completed within 30 min in all cases, and calculated treatment delivery time (after patient setup) was 5 min vs. 20 min for 5DCA. A superior CI was achieved with RA, with a substantial decrease in low-dose irradiation of the normal brain achieved relative to 5DCA plans. Maximum doses to critical organs were similar for RA and 5DCA but were higher for 1DCA. Film measurements showed the differences between calculated and measured doses to be smaller than 1.5% in the high-dose area and smaller than 3% in the low-dose area. Conclusion: The RA plans consistently achieved a higher CI and decrease in areas of low-dose irradiation. This, together with shorter treatment delivery times, has led to RA replacing our conventional five-arc radiosurgery technique for VS.

  10. Pattern of radiotherapy care in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Hadjieva, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The paper reveals the changing pattern of Bulgarian Radiotherapy (RT) care after the successful implementation of 15 projects for 100 million euro under the European Regional Development Fund in Operational Programme for Regional Development 2007-2013. The project enables a total one-step modernization of 14 Bulgarian RT Centres and creation of a new one. At the end of the Programme (mid 2015), 16 new Linacs and 2 modern cobalt machines will be available together with 11 virtual CT simulators, 5 CT simulators, 1 MRI and 1 PET CT for RT planning and all dosimetry facilities needed. Such a modernization has moved Bulgarian RT forward, with 2.7 MV units per one million of population (MV/mln.inh) in comparison with 0.9 MV/mln.inh in 2012. Guild of Bulgarian Radiotherapists includes 70 doctors, 46 physicists and 10 engineers, together with 118 RTTs and 114 nurses and they all have treated 16,447 patients in 2013. Major problems are inadequate reimbursement from the monopolistic Health Insurance Fund (900 euro for 3D conformal RT and 1500 euro for IMRT); fragmentation of RT care with 1-2 MV units per Centre; no payment for patient travel expenses; need for quick and profound education of 26% of doctors and 46% of physicists without RT license, along with continuous education for all others; and resource for 5000-9000 more patients to be treated yearly by RT in order to reach 45-50% from current service of 32%. After 15 years of struggle of RT experts, finally the pattern of Bulgarian RT care at 2014-2015 is approaching the level of modern European RT.

  11. Carotid artery disease after head and neck radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Thalhammer, Christoph; Husmann, Marc; Glanzmann, Christoph; Studer, Gabriela; Amann-Vesti, Beatrice R

    2015-01-01

    Radiation induced atherosclerosis of the carotid artery is a clinically relevant late complication after head and neck radiotherapy. Improved long-term survival after multimodality therapy in neck malignancies result in an increased risk of carotid artery disease in patients after radiotherapy (RT). This review focuses on the current knowledge of occlusive carotid disease after head and neck radiotherapy and highlights the exceeding morphologic post-radiation vessel wall pathologies. More severe and extensive carotid artery atherosclerosis with plaque in all segments including the common carotid artery is a frequent finding after RT. Therefore, colour coded duplex ultrasound surveillance in patients after head and neck RT is recommended. Some histopathological studies indicate differences to “classical” atherosclerosis, and pathogenesis of chronic radiation vasculopathy is still under discussion.

  12. An electromechanical, patient positioning system for head and neck radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ostyn, Mark; Dwyer, Thomas; Miller, Matthew; King, Paden; Sacks, Rachel; Cruikshank, Ross; Rosario, Melvin; Martinez, Daniel; Kim, Siyong; Yeo, Woon-Hong

    2017-09-05

    In cancer treatment with radiation, accurate patient setup is critical for proper dose delivery. Improper arrangement can lead to disease recurrence, permanent organ damage, or lack of disease control. While current immobilization equipment often helps for patient positioning, manual adjustment is required, involving iterative, time-consuming steps. Here, we present an electromechanical robotic system for improving patient setup in radiotherapy, specifically targeting head and neck cancer. This positioning system offers six degrees of freedom for a variety of applications in radiation oncology. An analytical calculation of inverse kinematics serves as fundamental criteria to design the system. Computational mechanical modeling and experimental study of radiotherapy compatibility and x-ray-based imaging demonstrates the device feasibility and reliability to be used in radiotherapy. An absolute positioning accuracy test in a clinical treatment room supports the clinical feasibility of the system.

  13. Could Radiotherapy Effectiveness Be Enhanced by Electromagnetic Field Treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Artacho-Cordón; del Mar, Salinas-Asensio María; Irene, Calvente; Sandra, Ríos-Arrabal; Josefa, León; Elisa, Román-Marinetto; Nicolás, Olea; Isabel, Núñez María

    2013-01-01

    One of the main goals in radiobiology research is to enhance radiotherapy effectiveness without provoking any increase in toxicity. In this context, it has been proposed that electromagnetic fields (EMFs), known to be modulators of proliferation rate, enhancers of apoptosis and inductors of genotoxicity, might control tumor recruitment and, thus, provide therapeutic benefits. Scientific evidence shows that the effects of ionizing radiation on cellular compartments and functions are strengthened by EMF. Although little is known about the potential role of EMFs in radiotherapy (RT), the radiosensitizing effect of EMFs described in the literature could support their use to improve radiation effectiveness. Thus, we hypothesized that EMF exposure might enhance the ionizing radiation effect on tumor cells, improving the effects of RT. The aim of this paper is to review reports of the effects of EMFs in biological systems and their potential therapeutic benefits in radiotherapy. PMID:23867611

  14. Radiotherapy for extramammary Paget disease of the anogenital region.

    PubMed

    Dilmé-Carreras, Elisabet; Iglesias-Sancho, Maribel; Márquez-Balbás, Gemma; Sola-Ortigosa, Joaquín; Umbert-Millet, Pablo

    2011-07-01

    Extramammary Paget disease is a rare condition that most commonly affects the anogenital region in the elderly. The treatment of choice has been surgical excision of the affected area with adequate depth and lateral margins, criteria that cannot always be fulfilled, especially when the vulva, anal canal, or penis are involved. More recently radiotherapy has been suggested as a suitable treatment when surgical excision or other modalities are not appropriate. We report a case of anogenital extramammary Paget disease and the clinical response to treatment with radiotherapy. The aim of this article is to review relevant aspects of radiotherapy as a first-choice curative treatment in specific situations of anogenital extramammary Paget disease in situ.

  15. Imaging practices and radiation doses from imaging in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Siiskonen, Teemu; Kaijaluoto, Sampsa; Florea, Tudor

    2017-03-25

    Modern radiotherapy treatments require frequent imaging for accurate patient positioning relative to the therapeutic radiation beam. Imaging practices in five Finnish radiotherapy clinics were assessed and discussed from the patient dose optimization point of view. The results show that imaging strategies are not jointly established and variations exist. The organ absorbed doses depend on imaging technique and imaging frequency. In particular, organ doses from the cone beam computed tomography can have very large variations (a factor of 10-50 in breast imaging and factor of 5 in prostate imaging). The cumulative imaging organ dose from the treatment can vary by a factor of ten or more for the same treatment, depending on the chosen technique and imaging frequency. Awareness and optimization of the imaging dose in image-guided radiotherapy should be strengthened.

  16. An electromechanical, patient positioning system for head and neck radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostyn, Mark; Dwyer, Thomas; Miller, Matthew; King, Paden; Sacks, Rachel; Cruikshank, Ross; Rosario, Melvin; Martinez, Daniel; Kim, Siyong; Yeo, Woon-Hong

    2017-09-01

    In cancer treatment with radiation, accurate patient setup is critical for proper dose delivery. Improper arrangement can lead to disease recurrence, permanent organ damage, or lack of disease control. While current immobilization equipment often helps for patient positioning, manual adjustment is required, involving iterative, time-consuming steps. Here, we present an electromechanical robotic system for improving patient setup in radiotherapy, specifically targeting head and neck cancer. This positioning system offers six degrees of freedom for a variety of applications in radiation oncology. An analytical calculation of inverse kinematics serves as fundamental criteria to design the system. Computational mechanical modeling and experimental study of radiotherapy compatibility and x-ray-based imaging demonstrates the device feasibility and reliability to be used in radiotherapy. An absolute positioning accuracy test in a clinical treatment room supports the clinical feasibility of the system.

  17. Oncocytic Schneiderian Papilloma of the Sinonasal Tract Treated With Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ju Wan; Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Jeong Hong; Kim, Gwi Eon

    2016-01-01

    A 66-year-old man visited the ophthalmology department due to epiphora and was subsequently diagnosed with oncocytic schneiderian papilloma. Surgical removal was recommended to the patient; however, he refused this option. Therefore, a radiation of 64 gray (Gy) was administered in 32 daily doses (2 Gy daily) over 45 days using intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Four months after radiotherapy, the tumor had disappeared. Two years postradiotherapy, the patient was healthy, without tumor recurrence or the development of orbital complications. The authors suggest that radiotherapy could be an adjuvant or definite treatment modality for patients of oncocytic schneiderian papilloma unsuitable for complete surgical removal, or those associated with a high risk of surgery-related complications.

  18. Prostaglandin inhibitor and radiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Pillsbury, H.C. III; Webster, W.P.; Rosenman, J.

    1986-05-01

    Radiotherapy is the usual mode of treatment for unresectable head and neck cancer. To improve cure rates, extend survival, and reduce morbidity, we use accelerated hyperfractionation radiotherapy and an adjuvant drug to inhibit prostaglandin synthesis. In this study, 19 patients received 300 rad/day of radiotherapy in two equally divided doses to a total dose averaging 6,200 rad. Either indomethacin, 25 mg, or placebo was given four times a day in a double-blind fashion during therapy. Radiation mucositis was graded as 0 to 4+; pain, nutritional status, and tumor status were monitored daily and recorded biweekly. Evaluation of the data showed delayed mucositis in the experimental group for grades 1 to 3, with a significant difference at grade 3 compared with controls. The significance of a long-term comparison of cure rates would be doubtful considering the heterogeneity of the primary sites and regional disease in this group coupled with the small size of our study.

  19. Radiotherapy of metastatic seminoma in the dog. Case reports

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, R.K.; Walker, M.; Legendre, A.M.; vanEe, R.T.; Gompf, R.E.

    1988-04-01

    Four dogs with metastatic seminoma were treated with cesium 137 teleradiotherapy. Minimum total tumor dose ranged from 17 to 40 gray (Gy) and was usually given through bilateral opposing sublumbar ports in eight to ten fractions, with three fractions given weekly. The tumor regressed in all four dogs. The first dog (case 1) was free of tumor and died of non-tumor related causes at 57 months. The second dog (case 2) was free of tumor but was euthanatized at 37 months for a limb fracture. The third dog (case 3) was euthanatized for undertermined pulmonary disease 43 months after radiotherapy. The fourth dog (case 4) was euthanatized 6 months following radiotherapy because of transitional cell carcinoma and renal failure. No evidence of seminoma was found at necropsy. Radiotherapy was shown to be effective treatment for seminoma with regional metastasis.

  20. Graves disease with ophthalmopathy following radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, D.R.; Fleming, B.J.

    1984-12-01

    The number of patients achieving long-term survival following neck irradiation for Hodgkin's disease and other malignancies is increasing. Paralleling this increase in survivors is the development of late complications of the therapy itself. Eleven patients have previously been reported who developed Graves ophthalmopathy 18 months to seven years after receiving neck radiotherapy for nonthyroidal malignancies. The seven patients who had HLA typing were all HLA-B8 negative, despite the reported association of the HLA-B8 antigen with Graves disease. A patient who is HLA-B8 positive who developed Graves ophthalmopathy and hyperthyroidism nine years after receiving mantle radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease is reported. It is recommended that Graves disease be included among the thyroid diseases that receive consideration during follow-up of patients who have received mantle radiotherapy.

  1. Endometrial adenocarcinoma, adjuvant radiotherapy tailored to prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, J H; Hoekstra, C J; van Putten, W L; Tjokrowardojo, A J; Koper, P C

    1990-02-01

    The optimal adjuvant radiotherapy for surgically treated endometrial cancer has not yet been defined. We report on 389 patients treated between 1970 and 1985 with adjuvant radiotherapy. The treatment was tailored to the known prognostic factors: myometrial invasion and grade of differentiation of the tumor. Ten-year overall survival was 67%, 10-year relapse-free survival 77%; 23% relapse, of which 21% distant and 6% locoregional relapse. In a multivariate analysis, stage (pT), grade, and myometrial invasion were prognostic factors. The number of locoregional failures was very small (n = 23). This small number, the fact that radiation treatment was tailored to prognostic factors, and the absence of a nontreated control group precluded an analysis of the effect of the adjuvant irradiation. Large randomized studies with a control (no treatment) arm should be performed to determine the value of adjuvant radiotherapy.

  2. Role of additional radiotherapy in advanced stages of Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, J H; Coleman, C N; Fischer, R I; Lister, T A; Diehl, V

    1992-09-01

    Although radiotherapy is widely used as additional treatment following chemotherapy, its precise role has never been clearly proven. Relapses tend to occur in previously involved bulky sites. Non-randomized studies may suggest a positive effect of the addition of radiotherapy. This effect however, might also be caused by selection. Randomized studies have not resulted in a survival advantage for the patients treated with additional radiotherapy compared to no further treatment or additional chemotherapy. The SWOG study 7808 suggest a 20% benefit in remission duration for the nodular sclerosis histology subgroup. Definitive conclusions have to wait for more mature results of randomized studies including the ongoing EORTC study and the possibility to perform an overview of all studies.

  3. Dose factor entry and display tool for BNCT radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Wessol, Daniel E.; Wheeler, Floyd J.; Cook, Jeremy L.

    1999-01-01

    A system for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) radiotherapy planning where a biological distribution is calculated using a combination of conversion factors and a previously calculated physical distribution. Conversion factors are presented in a graphical spreadsheet so that a planner can easily view and modify the conversion factors. For radiotherapy in multi-component modalities, such as Fast-Neutron and BNCT, it is necessary to combine each conversion factor component to form an effective dose which is used in radiotherapy planning and evaluation. The Dose Factor Entry and Display System is designed to facilitate planner entry of appropriate conversion factors in a straightforward manner for each component. The effective isodose is then immediately computed and displayed over the appropriate background (e.g. digitized image).

  4. Radiotherapy-induced skin reactions: assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Glover, Deborah; Harmer, Victoria

    Radiotherapy, the use of high-energy rays to either kill cancer cells or treat some benign tumours, is undoubtedly a positive intervention. However, as the primary mode of action in radiotherapy treatment is the killing of cells to prevent replication, other non-cancerous cells may be affected. For example, up to 85% of patients will experience some form of skin reaction, which will range from local erythema to moist desquamation. Such reactions are not only distressing and painful for the patient, if severe enough, they may warrant a halt in treatment. This article outlines the aims and nature of radiotherapy, and then discusses the aetiology of skin reactions, risk factors for reaction, and assessment tools. Management interventions will also be shown, with emphasis on silicone dressings.

  5. Role of hypofractionated radiotherapy in breast locoregional radiation.

    PubMed

    Caudrelier, J-M; Truong, P T

    2015-06-01

    Long-term results of randomised trials have confirmed the safety and efficacy of hypofractionated radiotherapy using approximately 2.6 Gy per fraction to lower total doses of 40-42.6 Gy delivered over 3 weeks, for postoperative treatment of early breast cancer. In these trials, hypofractionated radiotherapy was predominantly used for breast only treatment, while there are fewer trials that specifically examined hypofractionated radiotherapy to the breast plus regional nodes. Hypofractionated locoregional radiation is considered a standard of care in the United Kingdom and in some parts of Canada. We aim to review the radiobiology and normal tissue effects of hypofractionated locoregional radiation and to summarize available published clinical experiences using this treatment strategy as adjuvant therapy after breast conserving surgery or mastectomy for women with early breast cancer.

  6. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy. When to call it quits.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Geoff; Currow, David

    2002-02-01

    Patients diagnosed with cancer are often treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy with curative intent. The transition from curative to palliative intent involves re-evaluation of treatment, and has to take into account the attitudes, beliefs and life aims of the patient. To discuss the difficulties in determining when to cease chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with advanced cancer. The concept of treatment evaluation using a 'burden versus benefit' paradigm is discussed. Treatment aims must be in concordance with those of the patient, which are often couched in functional terms or linked to future significant life events. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can offer patients in the palliative phase of cancer illness, benefits in terms of relief of symptoms and meaningful prolongation of life, and should be considered in appropriate circumstances.

  7. Cytogenetic, clinical, and cytologic characteristics of radiotherapy-related leukemias

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, P.; Pedersen-Bjergaard, J.

    1988-04-01

    From 1978 to 1985, we observed eight cases of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia or preleukemia, three cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and three cases of chronic myeloid leukemia in patients previously treated exclusively with radiotherapy for other tumor types. The latent period from administration of radiotherapy to development of leukemia varied between 12 and 243 months. Clonal chromosome aberrations reported previously as characteristic of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia following therapy with alkylating agents were observed in three of the eight patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (5q- and -7) and in two of the three patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (-7 and 12p-). All three patients with radiotherapy-related chronic myeloid leukemia presented a t(9;22)(q34;q11). The results suggest that cytogenetic characteristics may reflect the etiology in radiation-induced acute leukemias, whereas radiation-related chronic myeloid leukemia does not seem to differ chromosomally from de novo cases of the disease.

  8. The role of radiotherapy in multimodal treatment of pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal carcinoma is one of the most lethal malignancies, but in recent years a number of positive developments have occurred in the management of pancreatic carcinoma. This article aims to give an overview of the current knowledge regarding the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The results of meta-analyses, phase III-studies, and phase II-studies using chemoradiotherapy and chemotherapy for resectable and non-resectable PDAC were reviewed. The use of radiotherapy is discussed in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings as well as in the locally advanced situation. Whenever possible, radiotherapy should be performed as simultaneous chemoradiotherapy. Patients with PDAC should be offered entry into clinical trials to identify optimal treatment results. PMID:20615227

  9. Radiotherapy-induced concomitant coronary artery stenosis and mitral valve disease.

    PubMed

    Akboga, Mehmet Kadri; Akyel, Ahmet; Sahinarslan, Asife; Cengel, Atiye

    2014-04-01

    Radiotherapy is extensively used in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease. One of its untoward effects is on heart. Coronary arteries and heart valves can be adversely affected from radiotherapy. However, co-existence of both conditions is very rare. In this report, we present a patient with Hodgkin's disease who developed both coronary artery stenosis and severe mitral valve regurgitation after radiotherapy.

  10. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer: how much does it really cost?

    PubMed

    Lievens, Yolande; Obyn, Caroline; Mertens, Anne-Sophie; Van Halewyck, Dries; Hulstaert, Frank

    2015-03-01

    Despite the lack of randomized evidence, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being accepted as superior to conventional radiotherapy for patients with T1-2N0 non-small-cell lung cancer in the periphery of the lung and unfit or unwilling to undergo surgery. To introduce SBRT in a system of coverage with evidence development, a correct financing had to be determined. A time-driven activity-based costing model for radiotherapy was developed. Resource cost calculation of all radiotherapy treatments, standard and innovative, was conducted in 10 Belgian radiotherapy centers in the second half of 2012. The average cost of lung SBRT across the 10 centers (6221&OV0556;) is in the range of the average costs of standard fractionated 3D-conformal radiotherapy (5919&OV0556;) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (7379&OV0556;) for lung cancer. Hypofractionated 3D-conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy schemes are less costly (3993&OV0556; respectively 4730&OV0556;). The SBRT cost increases with the number of fractions and is highly dependent of personnel and equipment use. SBRT cost varies more by centre than conventional radiotherapy cost, reflecting different technologies, stages in the learning curve and a lack of clear guidance in this field. Time-driven activity-based costing of radiotherapy is feasible in a multicentre setup, resulting in real-life resource costs that can form the basis for correct reimbursement schemes, supporting an early yet controlled introduction of innovative radiotherapy techniques in clinical practice.

  11. Randomized comparisons of radiotherapy and nitrosoureas for the treatment of malignant glioma after surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, M.D.; Green, S.B.; Byar, D.P.

    1980-12-04

    Within three weeks of definitive surgical intervention, 467 patients with histologically proved malignant glioma were randomized to receive one of four treatment regimens: semustine (MeCCNU), radiotherapy, carmustine (BCNU) plus radiotherapy, or semustine plus radiotherapy. We analyzed the data for the total randomized population and for the 358 patients in whom the initial protocol specifications were met (the valid study group). Observed toxicity included acceptable skin reactions secondary to radiotherapy and reversible leukopenia and thrombocytopenia due to chemotherapy. Radiotherapy used alone or in combination with a nitrosourea significantly improved survival in comparison with semustine alone. The group receiving carmustine plus radiotherapy had the best survival, but the difference in survival between the groups receiving carmustine plus radiotherapy and semustine plus radiotherapy was not statistically significant. The combination of carmustine plus radiotherapy produced a modest benefit in long-term (18-month) survival as compared with radiotherapy alone, although the difference between survival curves was not significant at the 0.05 level. This study suggests that it is best to use radiotherapy in the post-surgical treatment of malignant glioma and to continue the search for an effective chemotherapeutic regimen to use in addition to radiotherapy.

  12. Integral dose in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, R; Xu, S; Jiang, W; Xie, C; Wang, J

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate the integral dose to organs at risk (OARs), normal tissue and the whole body in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy for whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) in postoperative endometrial cancer patients. We selected 10 patients with endometrial cancer undergoing postoperative WPRT. Plans of 6MV-3DCRT, 18MV-3DCRT, 6MV-IMRT, 18MV-IMRT and helical tomotherapy were developed for each patient. The integral doses to OARs, normal tissue and the whole body were compared. Compared with 3DCRT, both IMRT and helical tomotherapy significantly improved dose conformity and the integral doses to OARs (8.8-29.9%, P<0.05). Compared with 6MV-3DCRT, IMRT resulted in 13.2 and 11.0% lower integral doses to normal tissue and the whole body, respectively (P=0.00), whereas no significant difference was found with helical tomotherapy. Compared directly with IMRT, helical tomotherapy reduced the integral doses to the rectum and bladder. However, the integral doses to normal tissue were 13.9 and 17.1% higher than 6MV-IMRT and 18MV-IMRT plans, respectively (P=0.00); the integral doses to pelvic bones also slightly increased with helical tomotherapy. The use of 18MV resulted in 5.8 and 2.7% lower integral doses to normal tissue and 4.8 and 2.1% lower integral doses to the whole body in the 3DCRT and IMRT plans, respectively (P=0.00). Results show that IMRT and helical tomotherapy offer better conformity and lower integral doses to OARs for postoperative WPRT of endometrial cancers compared with 3DCRT. The integral doses to normal tissue and the whole body were significantly lower with IMRT, whereas no significant difference was found with helical tomotherapy compared with 6MV-3DCRT. Compared directly with IMRT, helical tomotherapy further reduced the integral doses to the rectum and bladder, at the expense of a slightly higher integral dose to pelvic bones and normal tissue. The use of 18MV improved the

  13. [Spinal stereotactic body radiotherapy: French assessment in 2016].

    PubMed

    Pougnet, I; Jaegle, E; Garcia, R; Tessier, F; Faivre, J C; Louvel, G; Gross, E; Gonzague, L; Benchalal, M; Ducteil, A; Supiot, S; Autret, D; Clavier, J B; Mirabel, X; Bellière, A; Wdowczyk, D; Heymann, S; Barillot, I; de La Lande, B; Passerat, V; Sunyach, M P; Lipinski, F; Thibouw, D; Guichard, F; Chauvet, B; Thariat, J; Arnaud, A

    2017-06-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy to vertebral column remains uncommon practice and only relevant in selected group of patients. The main objective of the study was to describe the current state of medical practices of stereotactic body radiotherapy to vertebral column in France in 2016 and to assess the diversity of practices to identify areas for improvement and establish a common database set for this technique. A questionnaire was written with contribution of a medical physicist, a radiation oncologist, an information technologist and a radiotherapy resident. The questionnaire was distributed online to a radiation oncologists and a medical physicists partner of selected French radiotherapy specialized centres that provide stereotactic body radiotherapy to vertebral metastasis from April to June 2016. The questionnaire surveyed the following topics: patients' selection, simulation, targeted volume and organs at risk delineation, prescription, dosimetric implementation and image guidance. A total of 31 centres were surveyed. Seventy eight per cent of centres (n=21) completed the questionnaire. The "ideal" patient for spine stereotactic radiotherapy according to these institutions has a good performance status, a long life expectancy, controlled primary tumour with oligometastatic spread. The most prescribed protocol was 30Gy in three fractions. For clinical target volume delineation, about two thirds of centres used the International Spine Radiosurgery Consortium (ISRC) recommendations (Noël G et al.,2006). This study identified some consistency of practices in some aspects despite the lack of consensus guidelines. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to establish consensus of planning and treatment. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Mathematical Modeling of Cancer Immunotherapy and Its Synergy with Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Serre, Raphael; Benzekry, Sebastien; Padovani, Laetitia; Meille, Christophe; André, Nicolas; Ciccolini, Joseph; Barlesi, Fabrice; Muracciole, Xavier; Barbolosi, Dominique

    2016-09-01

    Combining radiotherapy with immune checkpoint blockade may offer considerable therapeutic impact if the immunosuppressive nature of the tumor microenvironment (TME) can be relieved. In this study, we used mathematical models, which can illustrate the potential synergism between immune checkpoint inhibitors and radiotherapy. A discrete-time pharmacodynamic model of the combination of radiotherapy with inhibitors of the PD1-PDL1 axis and/or the CTLA4 pathway is described. This mathematical framework describes how a growing tumor first elicits and then inhibits an antitumor immune response. This antitumor immune response is described by a primary and a secondary (or memory) response. The primary immune response appears first and is inhibited by the PD1-PDL1 axis, whereas the secondary immune response happens next and is inhibited by the CTLA4 pathway. The effects of irradiation are described by a modified version of the linear-quadratic model. This modeling offers an explanation for the reported biphasic relationship between the size of a tumor and its immunogenicity, as measured by the abscopal effect (an off-target immune response). Furthermore, it explains why discontinuing immunotherapy may result in either tumor recurrence or a durably sustained response. Finally, it describes how synchronizing immunotherapy and radiotherapy can produce synergies. The ability of the model to forecast pharmacodynamic endpoints was validated retrospectively by checking that it could describe data from experimental studies, which investigated the combination of radiotherapy with immune checkpoint inhibitors. In summary, a model such as this could be further used as a simulation tool to facilitate decision making about optimal scheduling of immunotherapy with radiotherapy and perhaps other types of anticancer therapies. Cancer Res; 76(17); 4931-40. ©2016 AACR.

  15. [Radiation induced lung injuries secondary to radiotherapy for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Toma, Claudia Lucia; Ciprut, Tudor; Bugarin, Svetlana; Roşca, Dorina; Bogdan, Miron Alexandru

    2011-01-01

    Modern radiotherapy decreased the number and severity of the effects of irradiation on the lung. Yet, the increased cancer incidence makes the related radiation injuries to remain actual, radiotherapy being frequently used in cancer treatment. Aim of the study consists in analysis of the radiological pattern of radiation induced lung disease due to radiotherapy for breast cancer. Sixty-eight female patients were evaluated for clinical and radiological suspicion of radiation pneumonitis after radiotherapy for breast cancer between 2001 and 2009 in "Marius Nasta" Institute of Pneumophtiziology, Bucharest. The following procedures were performed: medical history, physical examination, chest radiography and CT-scan (in a subgroup of 27 patients). Radiotherapy toxicity was evaluated based on the RTOG/EORTC (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer) classification and radiological lesions based on Arriagada classification. Fifty patients (73.5%) were symptomatic (fever, dry cough, dyspnea, chest pain, fatigability), the other 18 were asymptomatic. Symptoms were mild to moderate corresponding to grade 1 (27 patients, 39.7%) or grade 2 (23 patients, 33.8%) according to RTOG/EORTC scale. All patients had radiological lesions: 25 patients (36.7%) had grade 2 lesions (linear opacities), 25 patients (36.7%) had grade 3 lesions (patchy opacities) and 18 patients (26.5%) had grade 4 lesions (dense opacities), according to Arriagada classification. Symptoms were more frequent in patients with extensive lesions on chest radiography. CT-scan, performed in 27 patients, showed more accurate images. Chest radiography remains the simplest method in screening for radiation pneumonitis and monitoring its outcome. Adverse effects secondary to radiotherapy are usually mild and self-limited, and the most difficult task remains the differential diagnosis with infections and cancer relapse.

  16. Oral cancer: Current role of radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shao-Hui; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2013-03-01

    The term oral cavity cancer (OSCC) constitutes cancers of the mucosal surfaces of the lips, floor of mouth, oral tongue, buccal mucosa, lower and upper gingiva, hard palate and retromolar trigone. Treatment approaches for OSCC include single management with surgery, radiotherapy [external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and/or brachytherapy], as well as adjuvant systemic therapy (chemotherapy and/or target agents); various combinations of these modalities may also be used depending on the disease presentation and pathological findings. The selection of sole or combined modality is based on various considerations that include disease control probability, the anticipated functional and cosmetic outcomes, tumor resectability, patient general condition, and availability of resources and expertise. For resectable OSCC, the mainstay of treatment is surgery, though same practitioners may advocate for the use of radiotherapy alone in selected "early" disease presentations or combined with chemotherapy in more locally advanced stage disease. In general, the latter is more commonly reserved for cases where surgery may be problematic. Thus, primary radiotherapy ± chemotherapy is usually reserved for patients unable to tolerate or who are otherwise unsuited for surgery. On the other hand, brachytherapy may be considered as a sole modality for early small primary tumor. It also has a role as an adjuvant to surgery in the setting of inadequate pathologically assessed resection margins, as does postoperative external beam radiotherapy ± chemotherapy, which is usually reserved for those with unfavorable pathological features. Brachytherapy can also be especially useful in the re-irradiation setting for persistent or recurrent disease or for a second primary arising within a previous radiation field. Biological agents targeting the epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) have emerged as a potential modality in combination with radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy and are currently under

  17. Secondary malignancy following radiotherapy for thyroid eye disease.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Christopher C; Chang, Eun Hae; Al-Kharazi, Khalid; Pickles, Tom

    2016-01-01

    To describe the first case of a secondary meningioma in a patient after radiation treatment for thyroid eye disease (TED). Secondarily to identify any additional cases of secondary malignancy resulting from radiotherapy for thyroid eye disease from our institutional experience. Thyroid eye disease (TED) is a self-limiting auto-immune disorder causing expansion of orbital soft tissue from deposition of glycosaminoglycans and collagen, leading to significant cosmetic and functional morbidity. Established management options for TED include: glucocorticosteroids, orbital radiotherapy, and surgical orbital decompression. Two large series on radiotherapy for TED have been reported without any cases of secondary malignancy. The case of a patient with visual failure, found to have a sphenoid wing meningioma after previous TED radiotherapy is described. We then reviewed 575 patients with at least 3-year follow-up receiving radiotherapy for TED at British Columbia Cancer Agency to identify other possible secondary malignancies. The patient had postoperative improvement in her vision without any identified complications. Three additional cases of hematologic malignancy were identified. The calculated risk in our population of developing a radiation-induced meningioma after TED with at least 3 years of follow-up of is 0.17% (1/575); with hematopoetic malignancies the risk for secondary malignancy is 0.7% (4/575). Our calculated risk for secondary malignancy (0.17%, 0.7%) is similar to the reported theoretical risk published in the literature (0.3-1.2%). There is real risk for the development of a secondary malignancy after radiotherapy treatment of TED and treatment options should include consideration for this potential.

  18. Mechanisms of injury to normal tissue after radiotherapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Hubenak, Justin R; Zhang, Qixu; Branch, Cynthia D; Kronowitz, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of radiotherapy for cancer have been well documented for many years, but many patients treated with radiation develop adverse effects. This study analyzed the current research into the biological basis of radiotherapy-induced normal tissue damage. Using the PubMed and EMBASE databases, articles on adverse effects of radiotherapy on normal tissue published from January of 2005 through May of 2012 were identified. Their abstracts were reviewed for information relevant to radiotherapy-induced DNA damage and DNA repair. Articles in the reference lists that seemed relevant were reviewed with no limitations on publication date. Of 1751 publications, 1729 were eliminated because they did not address fundamental biology or were duplicates. The 22 included articles revealed that many adverse effects are driven by chronic oxidative stress affecting the nuclear function of DNA repair mechanisms. Among normal cells undergoing replication, cells in S phase are most radioresistant because of overexpression of DNA repair enzymes, while cells in M phase are especially radiosensitive. Cancer cells exhibit increased radiosensitivity, leading to accumulation of irreparable DNA lesions and cell death. Irradiated cells have an indirect effect on the cell cycle and survival of cocultured nonirradiated cells. Method of irradiation and linear energy transfer to cancer cells versus bystander cells are shown to have an effect on cell survival. Radiotherapy-induced increases in reactive oxygen species in irradiated cells may signal healthy cells by increasing metabolic stress and creating DNA lesions. The side effects of radiotherapy and bystander cell signaling may have a larger impact than previously acknowledged.

  19. Patterns of care of radiotherapy in México

    PubMed Central

    Poitevin-Chacón, Adela; Hinojosa-Gómez, José

    2012-01-01

    Aim This survey is performed to learn about the structure of radiotherapy in México. Background Radiation oncology practice is increasing because of the higher incidence of cancer. There is no published data about radiotherapy in México. Materials and methods A questionnaire was sent to the 83 registered centers in the database of the Mexican regulatory agency. One out of the 32 states has no radiotherapy. 27 centers from 14 states provided their answers. Results 829 patients are treated annually with any radiotherapy modality in each center. Two centers have one cobalt machine, 7 have a cobalt and a linac and 10 have more than one linac. Five centers use 2D planning systems, 22 use 3D; 9, conventional simulators; 22, CT based simulation, and 1 center has no simulation. Most of the centers verify beams with films, electronic portal image devices and cone beam CTs are also used. Intensity modulated and image guided radiotherapy are performed in 5 states. Breast, prostate, cervix, lung, rectum and head and neck cancer are the six most common locations. There are 45 public and 38 private centers, 2 dedicated to children. Two gamma knife units, 5 Novalis systems, 1 tomotherapy and 2 cyberknife machines are working. All centers have at least one radiation oncologist, one physicist and one radiotherapist. Conclusions Definitive conclusions cannot be drawn from this limited feedback due to a low participation of centers. This survey about radiotherapy in Mexico shows the heterogeneity of equipment as well as medical and technical staff in the whole country. PMID:24416531

  20. Adjuvant radiotherapy for locally advanced upper tract urothelial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yun-Ching; Chang, Ying-Hsu; Chiu, Kuo-Hsiung; Shindel, Alan W.; Lai, Chia-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    There is relatively little literature on adjuvant radiotherapy after radical nephroureterectomy with bladder cuff excision (RNU) for patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). This study was designed to determine the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy for patients with pT3N0M0 UTUC. We retrospectively reviewed 198 patients treated with RNU between December 2001 and January 2015. Postoperative radiotherapy was administered in 40 (20.2%) of patients. Patients who received radiotherapy were younger than those that did not (65.2 vs. 70.5 years, p = 0.023). With median follow up of 29.1 months, Kaplan-Meier analysis with the log-rank test demonstrated no significant differences between those omitting vs receiving adjuvant radiotherapy in regards to 2-year rates of overall survival (72.0% vs. 73.4%, p = 0.979), cancer-specific survival (73.2% vs. 75.3%, p = 0.844), and recurrence-free survival (61.2% vs. 66.3%, p = 0.742). However, in multivariable analysis with Cox regression, young age, absence of chronic kidney disease, negative lymphovascular invasion, negative surgical margin, and adjuvant chemotherapy were also associated with better cancer-specific survival. In conclusion, adjuvant radiotherapy did not offer any significant benefit in terms of overall, cancer-specific, and recurrence-free survivals in patients with pT3N0M0 UTUC after RNU. More effective systemic adjuvant chemotherapy is necessary to improve the outcome of these patients. PMID:27910890

  1. Unilateral Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Tonsil Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chronowski, Gregory M.; Garden, Adam S.; Morrison, William H.; Frank, Steven J.; Schwartz, David L.; Shah, Shalin J.; Beadle, Beth M.; Gunn, G. Brandon; Kupferman, Michael E.; Ang, Kian K.; Rosenthal, David I.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To assess, through a retrospective review, clinical outcomes of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil treated at the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center with unilateral radiotherapy techniques that irradiate the involved tonsil region and ipsilateral neck only. Methods and Materials: Of 901 patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil treated with radiotherapy at our institution, we identified 102 that were treated using unilateral radiotherapy techniques. All patients had their primary site of disease restricted to the tonsillar fossa or anterior pillar, with <1 cm involvement of the soft palate. Patients had TX (n = 17 patients), T1 (n = 52), or T2 (n = 33) disease, with Nx (n = 3), N0 (n = 33), N1 (n = 23), N2a (n = 21), or N2b (n = 22) neck disease. Results: Sixty-one patients (60%) underwent diagnostic tonsillectomy before radiotherapy. Twenty-seven patients (26%) underwent excision of a cervical lymph node or neck dissection before radiotherapy. Median follow-up for surviving patients was 38 months. Locoregional control at the primary site and ipsilateral neck was 100%. Two patients experienced contralateral nodal recurrence (2%). The 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 95% and 96%, respectively. The 5-year freedom from contralateral nodal recurrence rate was 96%. Nine patients required feeding tubes during therapy. Of the 2 patients with contralateral recurrence, 1 experienced an isolated neck recurrence and was salvaged with contralateral neck dissection only and remains alive and free of disease. The other patient presented with a contralateral base of tongue tumor and involved cervical lymph node, which may have represented a second primary tumor, and died of disease. Conclusions: Unilateral radiotherapy for patients with TX-T2, N0-N2b primary tonsil carcinoma results in high rates of disease control, with low rates of contralateral nodal failure and a low incidence of acute toxicity

  2. The Tumour Microenvironment after Radiotherapy: Mechanisms of Resistance and Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Holly E.; Paget, James T. E.; Khan, Aadil A.; Harrington, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays a central part in curing cancer. For decades, most research on improving treatment outcomes has focussed on modulating radiation-induced biological effects on cancer cells. Recently, we have better understood that components within the tumour microenvironment have pivotal roles in determining treatment outcomes. In this Review, we describe vascular, stromal and immunological changes induced in the tumour microenvironment by irradiation and discuss how they may promote radioresistance and tumour recurrence. Subsequently, we highlight how this knowledge is guiding the development of new treatment paradigms in which biologically targeted agents will be combined with radiotherapy. PMID:26105538

  3. The use of antioxidants in radiotherapy-induced skin toxicity.

    PubMed

    Amber, Kyle T; Shiman, Michael I; Badiavas, Evangelos V

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced skin damage is one of the most common complications of radiotherapy. In order to combat these side effects, patients often turn to alternative therapies, which often include antioxidants. Antioxidants such as those in the polyphenol chemical class, xanthine derivatives, tocepherol, sucralfate, and ascorbate have been studied for their use in either preventing or treating radiotherapy-induced skin damage. Apart from their known role as free radical scavengers, some of these antioxidants appear to alter cytokine release affecting cutaneous and systemic changes. We review the role of antioxidants in treating and preventing radiation-induced skin damage as well as the possible complications of using such therapy.

  4. [Implementation of "never events" checklists in a radiotherapy information system].

    PubMed

    Brusadin, G; Bour, M S; Deutsch, E; Kouchit, N; Corbin, S; Lefkopoulos, D

    2017-08-18

    In order to reduce the incidence of major accidents during external radiotherapy treatment, "never events" checklists have been incorporated into the "record and verify" system. This article details this process. Prospects for improvement are also proposed, including a peer-to-peer audit on the use of checklists and the availability of the radiotherapy information system manufacturer to collaborate in this process to secure the patients' journey. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. A new fixation aid for the radiotherapy of eye tumors.

    PubMed

    Buchgeister, Markus; Grisanti, Salvatore; Süsskind, Daniela; Bamberg, Michael; Paulsen, Frank

    2007-12-01

    A modified swim goggle holding a light spot as an optical guide for actively aligning the eye in a reproducible orientation has been constructed to perform radiotherapy of ocular tumors. This device is compatible with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging systems. Image fusion of these data sets yielded clinically acceptable results. The reproducibility of the eye's positioning is tested by repeated CT. The eye's alignment during radiotherapy is monitored by an infrared TV camera with individual markings of the eye's position on the TV-monitor screen. From 2003-2006, 50 patients were treated with this fixation aid by radiosurgery with good patient compliance.

  6. Cryptogenic organizing pneumonia after radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Akita, Kenji; Ikawa, Aiko; Shimizu, Shigeki; Tsuboi, Kazuya; Ishihara, Kazuhiro; Sato, Shigeki; Ueda, Ryuzo

    2005-01-01

    We report a case of lasting fever and cough with pulmonary infiltrates progressing 4 months after adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery for breast cancer. Chest radiography and computed tomography demonstrated alveolar opacities outside the irradiated pulmonary area. Laboratory data revealed neutrophilia and increased levels of C-reactive protein. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid displayed increased lymphocyte counts, and transbronchial lung biopsy revealed histological patterns compatible with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP). Corticosteroid therapy resulted in marked clinical improvement. From the histological and clinical findings, this case was judged to be a case of COP induced after radiotherapy for breast cancer, similar to those reported recently.

  7. [Current strategies in radiotherapy for cervical and endometrial carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Titova, V A; Kharchenko, N V; Dobrovol'skaia, N Iu; Kreĭnina, Iu M

    2009-01-01

    We used combinations of taxan-based neoadjuvant and adjuvant full-dose chemotherapy and aggressive combined radiotherapy including clinical target volume extension, increased total dosage, hyperthermia, cryo- and local chemotherapy as radiosensitizers, for treatment of invasive and locally-advanced breast cancer or endometrial carcinoma with poor prognosis. 3D-ultrasound/CT/MRI--based designing of radiotherapy and monitoring of dynamic definition of target volume and "high risk volume" in organs at risk in cases of tumor progression was an indispensable measure. As a result, no local recurrence was reported in 73% for 36 months.

  8. Status of carbon-ion radiotherapy facilities in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Atsushi

    2013-05-01

    Carbon-ion radiotherapy has large physical and biological advantages, and clinical results performed by HIMAC at NIRS awaken a deep interest. Several hospital-specified facilities are recently under commissioning or construction in Japan. Carbon-ion radiotherapy is based on the advanced technology in wide various fields. In order to promote this treatment method to the daily treatment, constant cooperative efforts by public and private organizations are necessary, i.e. providing of abundant clinical data, technology transfer, personnel training, organizing of the specialists' network, and so on. The present status and future prospects in Japan are reported.

  9. Genetics and genomics of radiotherapy toxicity: towards prediction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy is involved in many curative treatments of cancer; millions of survivors live with the consequences of treatment, and toxicity in a minority limits the radiation doses that can be safely prescribed to the majority. Radiogenomics is the whole genome application of radiogenetics, which studies the influence of genetic variation on radiation response. Work in the area focuses on uncovering the underlying genetic causes of individual variation in sensitivity to radiation, which is important for effective, safe treatment. In this review, we highlight recent advances in radiotherapy and discuss results from four genome-wide studies of radiotoxicity. PMID:21861849

  10. Radia2: A new tool for radiotherapy verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovejero, M. C.; Vega-Leal, A. Pérez; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Abou-Haidar, Z.; Bocci, A.; Gallardo, M. I.; Espino, J. M.; Álvarez, M. A. G.; Quesada, J. M.; Arráns, R.

    2013-06-01

    Radiotherapy is nowadays a proven technique in cancer treatments. Within the evolution of radiotherapy treatments towards more complex techniques, the need of new dosimetric methods for treatment verifications has appeared. In order to reach an improved dosimetric method, a collaboration was started to transfer knowledge from nuclear reaction instrumentation to medical applications, involving several departments from the University of Seville, Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA), the Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena and the company Inabensa. The first prototype, patent pending [2], gave very promising results. Currently, a critical review is being carried out to create an improved system.

  11. Bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia: a consequence of breast radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fahim, Ahmed; Campbell, Anne P; Hart, Simon Paul

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe a case of 51-year-old woman who presented with breathlessness following radiotherapy for breast carcinoma. A chest radiograph and thoracic CT scan revealed extensive airspace consolidation affecting right upper and lower lobes. A trans-bronchial biopsy revealed evidence of foamy macrophages and fibroblastic plugs within alveoli, consistent with organising pneumonia. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed evidence of antiepithelial antibodies. Gradual but complete resolution occurred without any specific treatment. This case highlights the importance of considering radiation induced bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia in the context of parenchymal shadowing following radiotherapy. Although corticosteroids are widely recommended for treatment, this case illustrates that organising pneumonia may resolve spontaneously. PMID:22665870

  12. Bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia: a consequence of breast radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fahim, Ahmed; Campbell, Anne P; Hart, Simon Paul

    2012-01-18

    The authors describe a case of 51-year-old woman who presented with breathlessness following radiotherapy for breast carcinoma. A chest radiograph and thoracic CT scan revealed extensive airspace consolidation affecting right upper and lower lobes. A trans-bronchial biopsy revealed evidence of foamy macrophages and fibroblastic plugs within alveoli, consistent with organising pneumonia. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed evidence of antiepithelial antibodies. Gradual but complete resolution occurred without any specific treatment. This case highlights the importance of considering radiation induced bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia in the context of parenchymal shadowing following radiotherapy. Although corticosteroids are widely recommended for treatment, this case illustrates that organising pneumonia may resolve spontaneously.

  13. A new fixation aid for the radiotherapy of eye tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Buchgeister, Markus; Grisanti, Salvatore; Suesskind, Daniela; Bamberg, Michael; Paulsen, Frank

    2007-12-15

    A modified swim goggle holding a light spot as an optical guide for actively aligning the eye in a reproducible orientation has been constructed to perform radiotherapy of ocular tumors. This device is compatible with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging systems. Image fusion of these data sets yielded clinically acceptable results. The reproducibility of the eye's positioning is tested by repeated CT. The eye's alignment during radiotherapy is monitored by an infrared TV camera with individual markings of the eye's position on the TV-monitor screen. From 2003-2006, 50 patients were treated with this fixation aid by radiosurgery with good patient compliance.

  14. Radiation-Induced Cancers From Modern Radiotherapy Techniques: Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jinsung; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Se Byeong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare secondary cancer risk resulting from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton therapy in patients with prostate and head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy in the scattering mode were planned for 5 prostate caner patients and 5 head-and-neck cancer patients. The secondary doses during irradiation were measured using ion chamber and CR-39 detectors for IMRT and proton therapy, respectively. Organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risk was estimated by applying organ equivalent dose to dose distributions. Results: The average secondary doses of proton therapy for prostate cancer patients, measured 20-60cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.4 mSv/Gy to 0.1 mSv/Gy. The average secondary doses of IMRT for prostate patients, however, ranged between 3 mSv/Gy and 1 mSv/Gy, approximately one order of magnitude higher than for proton therapy. Although the average secondary doses of IMRT were higher than those of proton therapy for head-and-neck cancers, these differences were not significant. Organ equivalent dose calculations showed that, for prostate cancer patients, the risk of secondary cancers in out-of-field organs, such as the stomach, lungs, and thyroid, was at least 5 times higher for IMRT than for proton therapy, whereas the difference was lower for head-and-neck cancer patients. Conclusions: Comparisons of organ-specific organ equivalent dose showed that the estimated secondary cancer risk using scattering mode in proton therapy is either significantly lower than the cases in IMRT treatment or, at least, does not exceed the risk induced by conventional IMRT treatment.

  15. Infrastructure of radiotherapy in Spain: a minimal standard of radiotherapy resources.

    PubMed

    Esco, R; Palacios, A; Pardo, J; Biete, A; Carceller, J A; Veiras, C; Vazquez, G

    2003-06-01

    To assess the state of our specialty, the Spanish Society of Radiotherapy and Oncology ordered a survey of all Spanish services of radiation oncology. In June 1999, the Society ordered an analysis of the state of radiation oncology. It created a survey that was sent to all radiotherapy units in Spain. A database was created in which 230 variables were analyzed. Eighty-four centers were analyzed, and 157 external beam irradiation, megavoltage units were counted, of which 67 were cobalt units and 90 were linear accelerators. The cobalt units worked an average of 11.4 h daily and the linear accelerators 11.6 h. The number of patients/unit/y was 472 for the cobalt units and 442 for the linear accelerators. The number of patients by physician and year was 179. Each center received a mean of 958 new patients annually. The average between the reception and start of treatment was 25.52 days (maximum 60), and it was estimated that only 38.1% of cancers were irradiated. The number of radiation oncologists working was 392. Spain has a deficit of 297 radiation oncologists. There is a need for 44 MV units and for the replacement of 67 cobalt units. The present lack of units has had an impact on palliative treatment, which has resulted in pharmacy costs. As long as these instrumental deficiencies are not solved, waiting lists will continue to be inherent to the system. There are also important staff deficiencies, in that about 297 radiation oncologists would be needed to cover the needs.

  16. Large Cohort Dose-Volume Response Analysis of Parotid Gland Function After Radiotherapy: Intensity-Modulated Versus Conventional Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dijkema, Tim Terhaard, Chris H.J.; Roesink, Judith M.; Braam, Petra M.; Gils, Carla H. van; Moerland, Marinus A.; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To compare parotid gland dose-volume response relationships in a large cohort of patients treated with intensity-modulated (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Methods and materials: A total of 221 patients (64 treated with IMRT, 157 with CRT) with various head-and-neck malignancies were prospectively evaluated. The distribution of tumor subsites in both groups was unbalanced. Stimulated parotid flow rates were measured before and 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year after radiotherapy. Parotid gland dose-volume histograms were derived from computed tomography-based treatment planning. The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model proposed by Lyman was fit to the data. A complication was defined as stimulated parotid flow ratio <25% of the pretreatment flow rate. The relative risk of complications was determined for IMRT vs. CRT and adjusted for the mean parotid gland dose using Poisson regression modeling. Results: One year after radiotherapy, NTCP curves for IMRT and CRT were comparable with a TD{sub 50} (uniform dose leading to a 50% complication probability) of 38 and 40 Gy, respectively. Until 6 months after RT, corrected for mean dose, different complication probabilities existed for IMRT vs. CRT. The relative risk of a complication for IMRT vs. CRT after 6 weeks was 1.42 (95% CI 1.21-1.67), after 6 months 1.41 (95% CI; 1.12-1.77), and at 1 year 1.21 (95% CI 0.87-1.68), after correcting for mean dose. Conclusions: One year after radiotherapy, no difference existed in the mean dose-based NTCP curves for IMRT and CRT. Early after radiotherapy (up to 6 months) mean dose based (Lyman) models failed to fully describe the effects of radiotherapy on the parotid glands.

  17. Radiotherapy and chemoradiation after surgery for early cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Linda; Siu, Shing Shun N; Luesley, David; Bryant, Andrew; Dickinson, Heather O

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review first published in Issue 4, 2009. There is an ongoing debate about the indications for, and value of, adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy after radical surgery in women with early cervical cancer. Certain combinations of pathological risk factors are thought to represent sufficient risk for recurrence, that they justify the use of postoperative pelvic radiotherapy, though this has never been shown to improve overall survival, and use of more than one type of treatment (surgery and radiotherapy) increases the risks of side effects and complications. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of adjuvant therapies (radiotherapy, chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy, chemoradiation) after radical hysterectomy for early-stage cervical cancer (FIGO stages IB1, IB2 or IIA). Search methods For the original review, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Issue 4, 2008. The Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, MEDLINE (January 1950 to November 2008), EMBASE (1950 to November 2008). We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. For this update, we extended the database searches to September 2011 and searched the MetaRegister for ongoing trials. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared adjuvant therapies (radiotherapy, chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy, or chemoradiation) with no radiotherapy or chemoradiation, in women with a confirmed histological diagnosis of early cervical cancer who had undergone radical hysterectomy and dissection of the pelvic lymph nodes. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Information on grade 3 and 4 adverse events was collected from the trials. Results were pooled using random-effects meta-analyses. Main results Two RCTs

  18. Enhancing radiotherapy for lung cancer using immunoadjuvants delivered in situ from new design radiotherapy biomaterials: a preclinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yao; Yasmin-Karim, Sayeda; Moreau, Michele; Sinha, Neeharika; Sajo, Erno; Ngwa, Wilfred

    2016-12-01

    Studies show that radiotherapy of a primary tumor in combination with immunoadjuvants (IA) can result in increased survival or immune-mediated regression of metastasis outside the radiation field, a phenomenon known as abscopal effect. However, toxicities due to repeated systematic administration of IA have been shown to be a major obstacle in clinical trials. To minimize the toxicities and prime a more potent immune response, Ngwa et al have proposed that inert radiotherapy biomaterials such as fiducials could be upgraded to multifunctional ones loaded with IA for in situ delivery directly into the tumor sub-volume at no additional inconvenience to patients. In this preliminary study, the potential of such an approach is investigated for lung cancer using anti-CD40 antibody. First the benefit of using the anti-CD40 delivered in situ to enhance radiotherapy was tested in mice with subcutaneous tumors generated with the Lewis Lung cancer cell line LL/2 (LLC-1). The tumors were implanted on both flanks of the mice to simulate metastasis. Tumors on one flank were treated with and without anti-CD40 and the survival benefits compared. An experimentally determined in vivo diffusion coefficient for nanoparticles was then employed to estimate the time for achieving intratumoral distribution of the needed minimal concentrations of anti-CD40 nanoparticles if released from a multifuntional radiotherapy biomaterials. The studies show that the use of anti-CD40 significantly enhanced radiotherapy effect, slowing the growth of the treated and untreated tumors, and increasing survival. Meanwhile our calculations indicate that for a 2-4 cm tumor and 7 mg g-1 IA concentrations, it would take 4.4-17.4 d, respectively, following burst release, for the required concentration of IA nanoparticles to accumulate throughout the tumor during image-guided radiotherapy. The distribution of IA could be customized as a function of loading concentrations or nanoparticle size to fit current

  19. Stereotactic radiotherapy of meningiomas compressing optical pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, Klaus-Detlef . E-mail: khamm@erfurt.helios-kliniken.de; Henzel, Martin; Gross, Markus W.; Surber, Gunnar; Kleinert, Gabriele; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Microsurgical resection is usually the treatment of choice for meningiomas, especially for those that compress the optical pathways. However, in many cases of skull-base meningiomas a high risk of neurological deficits and recurrences exist in cases where the complete tumor removal was not possible. In such cases (fractionated) stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) can offer an alternative treatment option. We evaluated the local control rate, symptomatology, and toxicity. Patients and Methods: Between 1997 and 2003, 183 patients with skull-base meningiomas were treated with SRT, among them were 65 patients with meningiomas that compressed optical pathways (64 benign, 1 atypical). Of these 65 cases, 20 were treated with SRT only, 27 were subtotally resected before SRT, and 18 underwent multiple tumor resections before SRT. We investigated the results until 2005, with a median follow-up of 45 months (range, 22-83 months). The tumor volume (TV = gross tumor volume) ranged from 0.61 to 90.20 cc (mean, 18.9 cc). Because of the risk of new visual disturbances, the dose per fraction was either 2 or 1.8 Gy for all patients, to a total dose of 50 to 60 Gy. Results: The overall survival and the progression-free survival rates for 5 years were assessed to 100% in this patient group. To date, no progression for these meningiomas have been observed. Quantitatively, tumor shrinkage of more than 20%, or more than 2 mm in diameter, was proved in 35 of the 65 cases after SRT. In 29 of the 65 patients, at least 1 of the symptoms improved. On application of the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC), acute toxicity (Grade 3) was seen in 1 case (worsening of conjunctivitis). Another 2 patients developed late toxicity by LENT-SOMA score, 1 x Grade 1 and 1 x Grade 3 (field of vision loss). Conclusion: As a low-risk and effective treatment option for tumor control, SRT with 1.8 to 2.0 Gy per fraction can also be recommended in case of meningiomas that compress optical pathways. An

  20. Collision prediction software for radiotherapy treatments.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Laura; Pearson, Erik A; Pelizzari, Charles A

    2015-11-01

    This work presents a method of collision predictions for external beam radiotherapy using surface imaging. The present methodology focuses on collision prediction during treatment simulation to evaluate the clearance of a patient's treatment position and allow for its modification if necessary. A Kinect camera (Microsoft, Redmond, WA) is used to scan the patient and immobilization devices in the treatment position at the simulator. The surface is reconstructed using the skanect software (Occipital, Inc., San Francisco, CA). The treatment isocenter is marked using simulated orthogonal lasers projected on the surface scan. The point cloud of this surface is then shifted to isocenter and converted from Cartesian to cylindrical coordinates. A slab models the treatment couch. A cylinder with a radius equal to the normal distance from isocenter to the collimator plate, and a height defined by the collimator diameter is used to estimate collisions. Points within the cylinder clear through a full gantry rotation with the treatment couch at 0°, while points outside of it collide. The angles of collision are reported. This methodology was experimentally verified using a mannequin positioned in an alpha cradle with both arms up. A planning CT scan of the mannequin was performed, two isocenters were marked in pinnacle, and this information was exported to AlignRT (VisionRT, London, UK)--a surface imaging system for patient positioning. This was used to ensure accurate positioning of the mannequin in the treatment room, when available. Collision calculations were performed for the two treatment isocenters and the results compared to the collisions detected the room. The accuracy of the Kinect-Skanect surface was evaluated by comparing it to the external surface of the planning CT scan. Experimental verification results showed that the predicted angles of collision matched those recorded in the room within 0.5°, in most cases (largest deviation -1.2°). The accuracy study for

  1. Spatially fractionated radiotherapy (GRID) using helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Penagaricano, Jose; Yan, Yulong; Liang, Xiaoying; Morrill, Steven; Griffin, Robert J; Corry, Peter; Ratanatharathorn, Vaneerat

    2016-01-08

    Spatially fractionated radiotherapy (GRID) was designed to treat large tumors while sparing skin, and it is usually delivered with a linear accelerator using a commercially available block or multileaf collimator (LINAC-GRID). For deep-seated (skin to tumor distance (> 8 cm)) tumors, it is always a challenge to achieve adequate tumor dose coverage. A novel method to perform GRID treatment using helical tomotherapy (HT-GRID) was developed at our institution. Our approach allows treating patients by generating a patient-specific virtual GRID block (software-generated) and using IMRT technique to optimize the treatment plan. Here, we report our initial clinical experience using HT-GRID, and dosimetric comparison results between HT-GRID and LINAC-GRID. This study evaluates 10 previously treated patients who had deep-seated bulky tumors with complex geometries. Five of these patients were treated with HT-GRID and replanned with LINAC-GRID for comparison. Similarly, five other patients were treated with LINAC-GRID and replanned with HT-GRID for comparison. The prescription was set such that the maximum dose to the GTV is 20 Gy in a single fraction. Dosimetric parameters compared included: mean GTV dose (DGTV mean), GTV dose inhomogeneity (valley-to-peak dose ratio (VPR)), normal tissue doses (DNmean), and other organs-at-risk (OARs) doses. In addition, equivalent uniform doses (EUD) for both GTV and normal tissue were evaluated. In summary, HT-GRID technique is patient-specific, and allows adjustment of the GRID pattern to match different tumor sizes and shapes when they are deep-seated and cannot be adequately treated with LINAC-GRID. HT-GRID delivers a higher DGTV mean, EUD, and VPR compared to LINAC-GRID. HT-GRID delivers a higher DNmean and lower EUD for normal tissue compared to LINAC-GRID. HT-GRID plans also have more options for tumors with complex anatomical relationships between the GTV and the avoidance OARs (abutment or close proximity).

  2. Collision prediction software for radiotherapy treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, Laura; Pearson, Erik A.; Pelizzari, Charles A.

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: This work presents a method of collision predictions for external beam radiotherapy using surface imaging. The present methodology focuses on collision prediction during treatment simulation to evaluate the clearance of a patient’s treatment position and allow for its modification if necessary. Methods: A Kinect camera (Microsoft, Redmond, WA) is used to scan the patient and immobilization devices in the treatment position at the simulator. The surface is reconstructed using the SKANECT software (Occipital, Inc., San Francisco, CA). The treatment isocenter is marked using simulated orthogonal lasers projected on the surface scan. The point cloud of this surface is then shifted to isocenter and converted from Cartesian to cylindrical coordinates. A slab models the treatment couch. A cylinder with a radius equal to the normal distance from isocenter to the collimator plate, and a height defined by the collimator diameter is used to estimate collisions. Points within the cylinder clear through a full gantry rotation with the treatment couch at 0° , while points outside of it collide. The angles of collision are reported. This methodology was experimentally verified using a mannequin positioned in an alpha cradle with both arms up. A planning CT scan of the mannequin was performed, two isocenters were marked in PINNACLE, and this information was exported to AlignRT (VisionRT, London, UK)—a surface imaging system for patient positioning. This was used to ensure accurate positioning of the mannequin in the treatment room, when available. Collision calculations were performed for the two treatment isocenters and the results compared to the collisions detected the room. The accuracy of the Kinect-Skanect surface was evaluated by comparing it to the external surface of the planning CT scan. Results: Experimental verification results showed that the predicted angles of collision matched those recorded in the room within 0.5°, in most cases (largest deviation

  3. Tomographic Imaging on a Cobalt Radiotherapy Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Matthew Brendon

    Cancer is a global problem, and many people in low-income countries do not have access to the treatment options, such as radiation therapy, that are available in wealthy countries. Where radiation therapy is available, it is often delivered using older Co-60 equipment that has not been updated to modern standards. Previous research has indicated that an updated Co-60 radiation therapy machine could deliver treatments that are equivalent to those performed with modern linear accelerators. Among the key features of these modern treatments is a tightly conformal dose distribution-- the radiation dose is shaped in three dimensions to closely match the tumour, with minimal irradiation of surrounding normal tissues. Very accurate alignment of the patient in the beam is therefore necessary to avoid missing the tumour, so all modern radiotherapy machines include imaging systems to verify the patient's position before treatment. Imaging with the treatment beam is relatively cost-effective, as it avoids the need for a second radiation source and the associated control systems. The dose rate from a Co-60 therapy source, though, is more than an order of magnitude too high to use for computed tomography (CT) imaging of a patient. Digital tomosynthesis (DT), a limited-arc imaging method that can be thought of as a hybrid of CT and conventional radiography, allows some of the three-dimensional selectivity of CT but with shorter imaging times and a five- to fifteen-fold reduction in dose. In the present work, a prototype Co-60 DT imaging system was developed and characterized. A class of clinically useful Co-60 DT protocols has been identified, based on the filtered backprojection algorithm originally designed for CT, with images acquired over a relatively small arc. Parts of the reconstruction algorithm must be modified for the DT case, and a way to reduce the beam intensity will be necessary to reduce the imaging dose to acceptable levels. Some additional study is required to

  4. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Might Increase Pneumonitis Risk Relative to Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Patients Receiving Combined Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy: A Modeling Study of Dose Dumping

    SciTech Connect

    Vogelius, Ivan S.; Westerly, David C.; Cannon, George M.; Mackie, Thomas R.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Sugie, Chikao; Bentzen, Soren M.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To model the possible interaction between cytotoxic chemotherapy and the radiation dose distribution with respect to the risk of radiation pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 18 non-small-cell lung cancer patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy at the University of Wisconsin were selected for the present modeling study. Three treatment plans were considered: the delivered tomotherapy plans; a three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan; and a fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan. The IMRT and 3D-CRT plans were generated specifically for the present study. The plans were optimized without adjusting for the chemotherapy effect. The effect of chemotherapy was modeled as an independent cell killing process by considering a uniform chemotherapy equivalent radiation dose added to all voxels of the organ at risk. The risk of radiation pneumonitis was estimated for all plans using the Lyman and the critical volume models. Results: For radiotherapy alone, the critical volume model predicts that the two IMRT plans are associated with a lower risk of radiation pneumonitis than the 3D-CRT plan. However, when the chemotherapy equivalent radiation dose exceeds a certain threshold, the radiation pneumonitis risk after IMRT is greater than after 3D-CRT. This threshold dose is in the range estimated from clinical chemoradiotherapy data sets. Conclusions: Cytotoxic chemotherapy might affect the relative merit of competing radiotherapy plans. More work is needed to improve our understanding of the interaction between chemotherapy and the radiation dose distribution in clinical settings.

  5. A fuzzy convolution model for radiobiologically optimized radiotherapy margins.

    PubMed

    Mzenda, Bongile; Hosseini-Ashrafi, Mir; Gegov, Alex; Brown, David J

    2010-06-07

    In this study we investigate the use of a new knowledge-based fuzzy logic technique to derive radiotherapy margins based on radiotherapy uncertainties and their radiobiological effects. The main radiotherapy uncertainties considered and used to build the model were delineation, set-up and organ motion-induced errors. The radiobiological effects of these combined errors, in terms of prostate tumour control probability and rectal normal tissue complication probability, were used to formulate the rule base and membership functions for a Sugeno type fuzzy system linking the error effect to the treatment margin. The defuzzified output was optimized by convolving it with a Gaussian convolution kernel to give a uniformly varying transfer function which was used to calculate the required treatment margins. The margin derived using the fuzzy technique showed good agreement compared to current prostate margins based on the commonly used margin formulation proposed by van Herk et al (2000 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 47 1121-35), and has nonlinear variation above combined errors of 5 mm standard deviation. The derived margin is on average 0.5 mm bigger than currently used margins in the region of small treatment uncertainties where margin reduction would be applicable. The new margin was applied in an intensity modulated radiotherapy prostate treatment planning example where margin reduction and a dose escalation regime were implemented, and by inducing equivalent treatment uncertainties, the resulting target and organs at risk doses were found to compare well to results obtained using currently recommended margins.

  6. A review of update clinical results of carbon ion radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tsujii, Hirohiko; Kamada, Tadashi

    2012-08-01

    Among various types of ion species, carbon ions are considered to have the most balanced, optimal properties in terms of possessing physically and biologically effective dose localization in the body. This is due to the fact that when compared with photon beams, carbon ion beams offer improved dose distribution, leading to the concentration of the sufficient dose within a target volume while minimizing the dose in the surrounding normal tissues. In addition, carbon ions, being heavier than protons, provide a higher biological effectiveness, which increases with depth, reaching the maximum at the end of the beam's range. This is practically an ideal property from the standpoint of cancer radiotherapy. Clinical studies have been carried out in the world to confirm the efficacy of carbon ions against a variety of tumors as well as to develop effective techniques for delivering an efficient dose to the tumor. Through clinical experiences of carbon ion radiotherapy at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences and Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, a significant reduction in the overall treatment time with acceptable toxicities has been obtained in almost all types of tumors. This means that carbon ion radiotherapy has meanwhile achieved for itself a solid place in general practice. This review describes clinical results of carbon ion radiotherapy together with physical, biological and technological aspects of carbon ions.

  7. The side-effects of head and neck tumors radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Skiba-Tatarska, Marta; Kusa-Podkańska, Marta; Surtel, Anna; Wysokińska-Miszczuk, Joanna

    2016-07-29

    Radiotherapy of head and neck tumours causes numerous complications in the oral cavity. The most frequent side effects are: mucositis, osteoradionecrosis, hypogeusia or dysgeusia, xerostomia, dental caries, dentinal hypersensitivity. It is recomended to prevent, reduce or relieve these complications in the oral cavity.

  8. Tumor hypoxia and reoxygenation: the yin and yang for radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Beom-Ju; Kim, Jeongwoo; Jeong, Hoibin; Bok, Seoyeon; Kim, Young-Eun; Ahn, G-One

    2016-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia, a common feature occurring in nearly all human solid tumors is a major contributing factor for failures of anticancer therapies. Because ionizing radiation depends heavily on the presence of molecular oxygen to produce cytotoxic effect, the negative impact of tumor hypoxia had long been recognized. In this review, we will highlight some of the past attempts to overcome tumor hypoxia including hypoxic radiosensitizers and hypoxia-selective cytotoxin. Although they were (still are) a very clever idea, they lacked clinical efficacy largely because of ‘reoxygenation’ phenomenon occurring in the conventional low dose hyperfractionation radiotherapy prevented proper activation of these compounds. Recent meta-analysis and imaging studies do however indicate that there may be a significant clinical benefit in lowering the locoregional failures by using these compounds. Latest technological advancement in radiotherapy has allowed to deliver high doses of radiation conformally to the tumor volume. Although this technology has brought superb clinical responses for many types of cancer, recent modeling studies have predicted that tumor hypoxia is even more serious because ‘reoxygenation’ is low thereby leaving a large portion of hypoxic tumor cells behind. Wouldn’t it be then reasonable to combine hypoxic radiosensitizers and/or hypoxia-selective cytotoxin with the latest radiotherapy? We will provide some preclinical and clinical evidence to support this idea hoping to revamp an enthusiasm for hypoxic radiosensitizers or hypoxia-selective cytotoxins as an adjunct therapy for radiotherapy. PMID:28030900

  9. Human mesenchymal stem cells enhance the systemic effects of radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    de Araújo Farias, Virgínea; O'Valle, Francisco; Lerma, Borja Alonso; Ruiz de Almodóvar, Carmen; López-Peñalver, Jesús J; Nieto, Ana; Santos, Ana; Fernández, Beatriz Irene; Guerra-Librero, Ana; Ruiz-Ruiz, María Carmen; Guirado, Damián; Schmidt, Thomas; Oliver, Francisco Javier; Ruiz de Almodóvar, José Mariano

    2015-10-13

    The outcome of radiotherapy treatment might be further improved by a better understanding of individual variations in tumor radiosensitivity and normal tissue reactions, including the bystander effect. For many tumors, however, a definitive cure cannot be achieved, despite the availablity of more and more effective cancer treatments. Therefore, any improvement in the efficacy of radiotherapy will undoubtedly benefit a significant number of patients. Many experimental studies measure a bystander component of tumor cell death after radiotherapy, which highlights the importance of confirming these observations in a preclinical situation. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been investigated for use in the treatment of cancers as they are able to both preferentially home onto tumors and become incorporated into their stroma. This process increases after radiation therapy. In our study we show that in vitro MSCs, when activated with a low dose of radiation, are a source of anti-tumor cytokines that decrease the proliferative activity of tumor cells, producing a potent cytotoxic synergistic effect on tumor cells. In vivo administration of unirradiated mesenchymal cells together with radiation leads to an increased efficacy of radiotherapy, thus leading to an enhancement of short and long range bystander effects on primary-irradiated tumors and distant-non-irradiated tumors. Our experiments indicate an increased cell loss rate and the decrease in the tumor cell proliferation activity as the major mechanisms underlying the delayed tumor growth and are a strong indicator of the synergistic effect between RT and MSC when they are applied together for tumor treatment in this model.

  10. Insufficiency Fractures After Pelvic Radiotherapy in Patients With Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Igdem, Sefik; Alco, Guel; Ercan, Tuelay; Barlan, Metin; Ganiyusufoglu, Kuersat; Unalan, Buelent; Turkan, Sedat; Okkan, Sait

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the incidence, predisposing factors, and clinical characteristics of insufficiency fractures (IF) in patients with prostate cancer, who received pelvic radiotherapy as part of their definitive treatment. Methods and Materials: The charts of 134 prostate cancer patients, who were treated with pelvic radiotherapy between 1998 and 2007 were retrospectively reviewed. IF was diagnosed by bone scan and/or CT and/or MRI. The cumulative incidence of symptomatic IF was estimated by actuarial methods. Results: Eight patients were identified with symptomatic IF after a median follow-up period of 68 months (range, 12-116 months). The 5-year cumulative incidence of symptomatic IF was 6.8%. All patients presented with lower back pain. Insufficiency fracture developed at a median time of 20 months after the end of radiotherapy and was managed conservatively without any need for hospitalization. Three patients were thought to have metastatic disease because of increased uptake in their bone scans. However, subsequent CT and MR imaging revealed characteristic changes of IF, avoiding any further intervention. No predisposing factors for development of IF could be identified. Conclusions: Pelvic IF is a rare complication of pelvic radiotherapy in prostate cancer. Knowledge of pelvic IF is essential to rule out metastatic disease and prevent unnecessary treatment, especially in a patient cohort with high-risk features for distant spread.

  11. A new plan quality index for dose painting radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Yang-Kyun; Park, Soyeon; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Kim, Siyong

    2014-07-08

    Dose painting radiotherapy is considered a promising radiotherapy technology that enables more targeted dose delivery to tumor rich regions while saving critical normal tissues. Obviously, dose painting planning would be more complicated and hard to be evaluated with current plan quality index systems that were developed under the paradigm of uniform dose prescription. In this study, we introduce a new plan quality index, named "index of achievement (IOA)" that assesses how close the planned dose distribution is to the prescribed one in a dose painting radiotherapy plan. By using voxel-based comparison between planned and prescribed dose distributions in its formulation, the index allows for a single-value evaluation regardless of the number of prescribed dose levels, which cannot be achieved with the conventional indices such as conventional homogeneity index. Benchmark calculations using patient data demonstrated feasibility of the index not only for contour-based dose painting plans, but also for dose painting by numbers plans. Also, it was shown that there is strong correlation between the new index and conventional indices, which indicates a potential of the new index as an alternative to conventional ones in general radiotherapy plan evaluation.

  12. Second primary tumors following radiotherapy for childhood cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, M.M. )

    1990-11-01

    Among a cohort of 9,279 survivors of childhood neoplasms other than retinoblastoma treated in Britain before 1980, the cumulative risk of a second primary tumor (SPT) by 25 years from 3-year survival was 3.7%. This corresponds to about five times the number expected from rates of cancer occurring in the general population. In the absence of both radiotherapy and chemotherapy, there was four times the expected number of subsequent cancers. The risk of an SPT associated with radiotherapy but not chemotherapy and both radiotherapy and chemotherapy were 6 and 9 times that expected, respectively. There is evidence that radiotherapy was involved in the development of many of the SPT's observed. However, case-control investigations are required to examine the relationship between relative risk of an SPT and therapy in detail. Secondary leukemia appears to occur more frequently among more recently diagnosed children with cancer. It is important to continue to monitor the occurrence of SPT's with a view to identifying the least carcinogenic therapies that are consistent with not compromising survival prospects.

  13. Clinical analysis of cholangiocarcinoma patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nantajit, Danupon; Trirussapanich, Pornwaree; Rojwatkarnjana, Sunanta; Soonklang, Kamonwan; Pattaranutraporn, Poompis; Laebua, Kanyanee; Chamchod, Sasikarn

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) or bile duct cancer is a rare cancer type in developed countries, while its prevalence is increased in southeast Asia, affecting ~33.4 men and ~12.3 women per 100,000 individuals. CCA is one of the most lethal types of cancer. Neo-adjuvant and adjuvant therapies have been shown to have limited efficacy in improving the overall prognosis of patients. Radiotherapy has been reported to prolong the survival times of patients with certain characteristics. The present study retrospectively evaluated the medical records and follow-up data from 27 CCA patients who received radiotherapy at Chulabhorn Hospital (Bangkok, Thailand) between 2008 and 2014. A total of 14 patients underwent surgery followed by adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Of the 27 CCA patients, 14 had intrahepatic CCA, 2 had extrahepatic CCA and 11 had hilar CCA. The 2-year survival rate was 40.7%. Tumor resectability, clinical symptoms and the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score were found to be indicative of patient prognosis. In addition, the planning target volume and biologically effective radiotherapy dose were of prognostic value; however, initial treatment response was ambiguous in predicting survival time. The findings of the present study suggested that the currently used radiotherapy protocols for CCA may require modification to improve their efficacy. PMID:28105359

  14. [New technologies: needs and challenges in radiotherapy in Latin America].

    PubMed

    Castellanos, María Esperanza

    2006-01-01

    The cumulative experience gathered over more than a century of practice of radiotherapy has demonstrated the latter's importance not only for the palliative treatment of a fraction of cancer cases, but mainly for the curative treatment of an even greater proportion of such cases. In light of the changes in technology, the ever-increasing access developing countries to such technology, and its current coverage in Latin America, any efforts in this area should be aimed at improving the quality of the radiotherapy services and centers that are already in place. This involves developing their technological assets to the fullest, expanding their services, and complying with the minimum quality requirements established for second-level facilities. Each center should be equipped to carry out all stages of the radiotherapy process, from simulation through treatment verification and patient follow-up, with a high level of quality (level 2). To achieve this, it should possess the necessary technology and properly-trained staff that are required for the purpose. Collaborative efforts in the Region should also prioritize helping countries implement national treatment standards for all stages of the radiotherapy process and promoting the implementation of validated quality assurance programs.

  15. Accelerated hypofractionated breast radiotherapy: FAQs (frequently asked questions) and facts.

    PubMed

    Montero, Angel; Sanz, Xavier; Hernanz, Raul; Cabrera, Dolores; Arenas, Meritxell; Bayo, Eloisa; Moreno, Ferran; Algara, Manel

    2014-08-01

    The demand for breast cancer care has increased as cancer treatment innovations have proliferated. Adjuvant radiotherapy to the breast is considered to be part of the standard treatment in breast cancer. The role of radiotherapy in terms of reducing loco-regional recurrence and increased survival after conservative surgery, and also after a mastectomy in selected cases, has been previously shown in several randomized trials. Patterns of radiotherapy commonly used for breast cancer comprise a period of approximately five weeks, frequently with the addition of an additional 1-1.5 weeks of a radiation boost to the primary tumour area. In last years, there has been a renewed interest in hypofractionated and accelerated radiotherapy schedules that reduce the overall treatment time to barely three weeks, leading to an improvement in quality of life for patients and also optimizing workload of radiation oncology departments. However, despite the existing evidence supporting the use of hypofractionated treatment regimens, their widespread is still far from complete. Many questions have generated resistance among clinical oncologists for their regular use. The aim of this review is to answer those questions that may arise with the use of moderate hypofractionation in breast cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. INEEL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report for 2002

    SciTech Connect

    J. R. Venhuizen

    2003-05-01

    This report summarizes the activities and major accomplishments for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2002. Topics covered include computational dosimetry and treatment planning software development, medical neutron source development and characterization, and boron analytical chemistry.

  17. INEEL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    2003-05-23

    This report summarizes the activities and major accomplishments for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2002. Topics covered include computational dosimetry and treatment planning software development, medical neutron source development and characterization, and boron analytical chemistry.

  18. Technical Advances and Pitfalls in Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Parvathaneni, Upendra; Laramore, George E.; Liao, Jay J.

    2012-01-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) is the standard of care in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) based on level 1 evidence. Technical advances in radiotherapy have revolutionized the treatment of HNSCC, with the most tangible gain being a reduction in long term morbidity. However, these benefits come with a serious and sobering price. Today, there is a greater chance of missing the target/tumor due to uncertainties in target volume definition by the clinician that is demanded by the highly conformal planning process involved with IMRT. Unless this is urgently addressed, our patients would be better served with the historically practiced non conformal radiotherapy, than IMRT which promises lesser morbidity. Image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) ensures the level of set up accuracy warranted to deliver a highly conformal treatment plan and should be utilized with IMRT, where feasible. Proton therapy has a theoretical physical advantage over photon therapy due to a lack of “exit dose”. However, clinical data supporting the routine use of this technology for HNSCC are currently sparse. The purpose of this article is to review the literature, discuss the salient issues and make recommendations that address the gaps in knowledge. PMID:22701482

  19. [New techniques and potential benefits for radiotherapy of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, L; Doré, M; Giraud, P

    2014-10-01

    Radiotherapy is used for inoperable lung cancers, sometimes in association with chemotherapy. Outcomes of conventional radiotherapy are disappointing. New techniques improve adaptation to tumour volume, decrease normal tissue irradiation and lead to increasing tumour dose with the opportunity for improved survival. With intensity-modulated radiation therapy, isodoses can conform to complex volumes. It is widely used and seems to be indicated in locally advanced stages. Its dosimetric improvements have been demonstrated but outcomes are still heterogeneous. Stereotactic radiotherapy allows treatment of small volumes with many narrow beams. Dedicated devices or appropriate equipment on classical devices are needed. In early stages, its efficacy is comparable to surgery with an acceptable toxicity. Endobronchial brachytherapy could be used for early stages with specific criteria. Hadrontherapy is still experimental regarding lung cancer. Hadrons have physical properties leading to very accurate dose distribution. In the rare published studies, toxicities are roughly lower than others techniques but for early stages its effectiveness is not better than stereotactic radiotherapy. These techniques are optimized by metabolic imaging which precisely defines the target volume and assesses the therapeutic response; image-guided radiation therapy which allows a more accurate patient set up and by respiratory tracking or gating which takes account of tumour respiratory motions.

  20. [Care of Merkel cell carcinoma and role of the radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Rehailia-Blanchard, Amel; Pigné, Grégoire; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Vallard, Alexis; El Meddeb Hamrouni, Anis; Rancoule, Chloé; Magné, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare neuro-endocrine tumor of skin with a poor prognosis. Data available in literature are scarce. Current treatment for locoregional disease is based on combined treatment by surgery and radiotherapy. However these treatments are controversial. The aim of the present review is to sum up the different available studies and to compare national and international guidelines.

  1. Velopharyngeal and choanal stenosis after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Jalal; Tan, Teck Soon; Chong, Aun Wee; Narayanan, Prepageran; Omar, Rahmat

    2013-06-01

    Choanal stenosis is a well recognized late complication of radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. However velopharyngeal stenosis post radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma is rare. We present here a case of bilateral choanal stenosis and velopharyngeal stenosis in a patient treated with radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. A 58-year-old woman presented to our otolaryngology clinic with a one year history of nasal obstruction. She was diagnosed to have nasopharyngeal carcinoma 12 years ago for which she received radiotherapy. Clinical examination revealed bilateral choanal stenosis and velopharyngeal stenosis. Treatment of choanal stenosis and velopharyngeal stenosis is challenging due to high incidence of recurrence and patients frequently require multiple procedures. The patient underwent a transnasal endoscopic excision of velopharyngeal scar tissue and widening of posterior choana using Surgitron®, mitomycin-C applied topically to the surgical wound and bilateral stenting under general anesthesia. The stents were kept for two weeks, and 3 years post operation velopharyngeal aperture and posterior choana remained patent. As illustrated in this case velopharyngeal stenosis can occur after radiotheraphy and should not be overlooked. Combine modality of transnasal endoscopic excision of velopharyngeal scar tissue, widening of choanal stenosis with Surgitron® followed by the application of mitomycin-C and stenting has been shown to be an effective option. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Radiotherapy for Extramedullary Plasmacytoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Creach, Kimberly M.; Foote, Robert L. Neben-Wittich, Michelle A.; Kyle, Robert A.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To define the effectiveness of radiotherapy in the treatment of patients with extramedullary plasmacytoma of the head and neck (EMPHN). Methods and Materials: We searched the Mayo Clinic Rochester Department of Radiation Oncology electronic Tumor Registry and identified 18 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of solitary EMPHN. Sixteen patients were treated with radiotherapy at initial diagnosis and 2 received salvage radiotherapy for local failure after surgery. Median dose administered was 50.4 Gy. Median follow-up was 6.8 years. Results: One patient (6%) developed a marginal recurrence 12 months after treatment. Six patients (33%) developed multiple myeloma (2 patients) or plasmacytomas at distant sites (4 patients) at a median of 3.1 years after diagnosis (range, 0.02 to 9.6 years). Median and 5- and 10-year overall survival rates from the date of diagnosis are 12.5 years, 88%, and 55%, respectively. Two patients (11%) developed a radiation-induced malignancy at 6.5 and 6.9 years after treatment. Conclusions: Radiotherapy provides excellent local and regional tumor control and survival in patients with EMPHN. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of presumed radiation-induced malignancy in this patient population.

  3. Second neoplasms following radiotherapy or chemotherapy for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Penn, I.

    1982-02-01

    While radiotherapy and antineoplastic chemotherapy often control malignancies they may, paradoxically, cause new cancers to develop as long-term complications. Although almost any type of neoplasm can occur, radiation-induced malignancies are most likely to affect the myelopoietic tissues and the thyroid gland. The former tissues are also most frequently involved by chemotherapy. The combination of intensive radiotherapy and intensive chemotherapy is particularly leukemogenic. Acute myeloid leukemia has occurred with increased frequency following treatment of Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma, ovarian cancer, polycythemia vera, carcinoma of the thyroid gland, and carcinoma of the breast. Radiation-induced malignancies usually occur in the field of irradiation. Tumors developing in an irradiated field include a substantial number of soft tissue sarcomas or osteosarcomas. There is a 20-fold increase of second cancers following treatment of childhood malignancies, mostly sarcomas of bone and soft tissues, but including leukemia, and carcinomas of the thyroid gland, skin, and breast. The latent period between radiotherapy and the appearance of a second cancer ranges from 2 years to several decades, often being 10-15 years. With chemotherapy the mean latent period is shorter, approximately 4 years. The mechanism of oncogenesis by radiotherapy or chemotherapy is poorly understood and probably involves a complex interplay of somatic mutation, co-oncogenic effects, depression of host immunity, stimulation of cellular proliferation, and genetic susceptibility.

  4. Xeroderma pigmentosum and medulloblastoma: chromosomal damage to lymphocytes during radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gianneli, F.; Avery, J.; Polani, P.E.; Terrell, C.; Giammusso, V.

    1981-10-01

    The effects of radiotherapy on a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) of complementation group C and medulloblastoma are reported. His lymphocytes showed no x-ray-induced chromatid damage, but unstable chromosomal aberrations increased throughout the course of radiotherapy as observed also in two other children (patients 2 and 3) with a similar tumor. Such damage was more dependent on spinal than cranial irradiation, lowest in the XP patient and highest in patient 3. Interindividual differences seemed largely due to the relative volume of body irradiated, but the damage in patient 3 remained relatively high even after accounting for such a factor. A maximum of 36, 68, and 77% of lymphocytes had aberrations in the XP and patients 2 and 3, respectively, but chromosomal damage did not show a Poisson distribution and indicated admixture of irradiated and nonirradiated cells. The relative frequency of the irradiated cells was estimated and seemed proportional to the ratios of the average irradiated field to the total body area. The XP patient showed no preferential loss of highly damaged cells and seemed not to suffer excessive chromosomal damage; he had a normal clinical response to and a favorable outcome of radiotherapy. These findings reduce anxiety on the use of radiotherapy in XP patients or at least in those of group C.

  5. Increased stomach cancer risk following radiotherapy for testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Hauptmann, M; Fossa, S D; Stovall, M; van Leeuwen, F E; Johannesen, T B; Rajaraman, P; Gilbert, E S; Smith, S A; Weathers, R E; Aleman, B M P; Andersson, M; Curtis, R E; Dores, G M; Fraumeni, J F; Hall, P; Holowaty, E J; Joensuu, H; Kaijser, M; Kleinerman, R A; Langmark, F; Lynch, C F; Pukkala, E; Storm, H H; Vaalavirta, L; van den Belt-Dusebout, A W; Travis, L B; Morton, L M

    2015-01-06

    Abdominal radiotherapy for testicular cancer (TC) increases risk for second stomach cancer, although data on the radiation dose-response relationship are sparse. In a cohort of 22,269 5-year TC survivors diagnosed during 1959-1987, doses to stomach subsites were estimated for 92 patients who developed stomach cancer and 180 matched controls. Chemotherapy details were recorded. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using logistic regression. Cumulative incidence of second primary stomach cancer was 1.45% at 30 years after TC diagnosis. The TC survivors who received radiotherapy (87 (95%) cases, 151 (84%) controls) had a 5.9-fold (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-20.7) increased risk of stomach cancer. Risk increased with increasing stomach dose (P-trend<0.001), with an OR of 20.5 (3.7-114.3) for ⩾50.0 Gy compared with <10 Gy. Radiation-related risks remained elevated ⩾20 years after exposure (P<0.001). Risk after any chemotherapy was not elevated (OR=1.1; 95% CI 0.5-2.5; 14 cases and 23 controls). Radiotherapy for TC involving parts of the stomach increased gastric cancer risk for several decades, with the highest risks after stomach doses of ⩾30 Gy. Clinicians should be aware of these excesses when previously irradiated TC survivors present with gastrointestinal symptoms and when any radiotherapy is considered in newly diagnosed TC patients.

  6. Protons and more: state of the art in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hoskin, Peter J; Bhattacharya, Indrani S

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of modern radiotherapy is to deliver a precise high dose of radiation which will result in reproductive death of the cells. Radiation should transverse within the tumour volume whilst minimising damage to surrounding normal tissue. Overall 40% of cancers which are cured will have received radiotherapy. Current state of the art treatment will incorporate cross-sectional imaging and multiple high energy X-ray beams in processes called intensity modulated radiotherapy and image guided radiotherapy. Brachytherapy enables very high radiation doses to be delivered by the direct passage of a radiation source through or within the tumour volume and similar results can be achieved using rotational stereotactic X-ray beam techniques. Protons have the characteristics of particle beams which deposit their energy in a finite fixed peak at depth in tissue with no dose beyond this point - the Bragg peak. This has advantages in certain sites such as the spine adjacent to the spinal cord and particularly in children when the overall volume of tissue receiving radiation can be minimised. © 2014 Royal College of Physicians.

  7. The cost of radiotherapy in a decade of technology evolution.

    PubMed

    Van de Werf, Evelyn; Verstraete, Jan; Lievens, Yolande

    2012-01-01

    To quantify changes in radiotherapy costs occurring in a decade of medical-technological evolution. The activity-based costing (ABC) model of the University Hospitals Leuven (UHL) radiotherapy (RT) department was adapted to current RT standards. It allocated actual resource costs to the treatments based on the departmental work-flow and patient mix in 2009. A benchmark with the former model analyzed the cost increases related to changes in RT infrastructure and practice over 10 years. A considerable increase in total RT costs was observed, resulting from higher capital investments (96%) and personnel cost (103%), the latter dominating the total picture. Treatment delivery remains the most costly activity, boosted by the cost of improved quality assurance (QA), 23% of total product costs, coming along with more advanced RT techniques. Hence, cost increases at the product level are most obvious for complex treatments, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), representing cost increases ranging between 38% and 88% compared to conformal approaches. The ABC model provides insight into the financial consequences of evolving technology and practice. Such data are a mandatory first step in our strive to prove RT cost-effectiveness and thus support optimal reimbursement and provision of radiotherapy departments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A new lead-free radiation shielding material for radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yue, Kun; Luo, Wenyun; Dong, Xiaoqing; Wang, Chuanshan; Wu, Guohua; Jiang, Mawei; Zha, Yuanzi

    2009-02-01

    Lead has recently been recognised as a source of environmental pollution, including the lead used for radiation shielding in radiotherapy. The bremsstrahlung radiation caused by the interaction between the electron beam and lead may reduce the accuracy of radiotherapy. To avoid the use of lead, a new material composed of tungsten and hydrogenated styrene-butadiene-styrene copolymer is studied with the Monte Carlo (MC) method and experiment in this paper. The component of the material is chosen after simulation with the MC method and the practical measurement is taken to validate the shielding ability of the material. The result shows that the shielding ability of the new material is good enough to fulfill the requirement for application in radiotherapy. Compared with lead alloy, the present new material is so flexible that can be easily customized into arbitrary shapes. Moreover, the material is environmentally friendly and can be recycled conveniently. Therefore, the material can be used as an effective lead substitute for shielding against electron beams in radiotherapy.

  9. Cardiac Toxicity after Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Myths and Facts.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Mirko; Pahl, René; Huber, Karen; Eilf, Kirsten; Dunst, Juergen

    2015-04-01

    Radiotherapy is an important component in the multidisciplinary treatment of breast cancer. In recent years, the cardiac risks of radiation have been discussed several times. This problem has long been known and resolved from the radiotherapeutic point of view. The current data is briefly described here.

  10. Polypharmacy in Older Patients ≥70 Years Receiving Palliative Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nieder, Carsten; Mannsăker, Bărd; Pawinski, Adam; Haukland, Ellinor

    2017-02-01

    Many older cancer patients receive five or more daily medications (polypharmacy). The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of polypharmacy in older patients undergoing palliative radiotherapy and its influence on the risk of being unable to complete the prescribed number of fractions, as well as the 30-day mortality and overall survival. Retrospective review of 289 patients aged 70 years or older. The median and mean Charlson comorbidity index (11) was 2, ranging between 0-7 (presently treated cancer not included). The median and mean number of daily medications was 7, ranging between 0-18. Only 27% of patients used less than 5 daily medications. Corticosteroids were used by 59% of the patients and opioid analgesics by 55%. Comorbidity, but also symptom severity, as indexed by pain medication, correlated significantly with the prevalence of polypharmacy. In multivariate analysis, neither polypharmacy nor use of corticosteroids or opioid analgesics influenced overall survival. No trends were seen for 30-day mortality or failure to complete radiotherapy. Polypharmacy is a common phenomenon in older patients receiving palliative radiotherapy and it does not predict adverse radiotherapy outcomes. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  11. Response of lymphangiectasis to radiotherapy. [X-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Kurczynski, E.; Horwitz, S.J.

    1981-07-15

    A 14-year-old girl with lymphangiectasis of the skull causing rapid extensive destruction of the left orbit, zygoma, mandible, sphenoid, and occiput underwent radiotherapy with 2000 rad to the entire skull, mandible, and upper cervical vertebrae. Three years later, progression of the disease has ceased, and the involved bone is slowly remineralizing.

  12. Genome damage in testicular seminoma patients seven years after radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fucic, Aleksandra; Gamulin, Marija; Katic, Jelena; Milic, Mirta; Druzhinin, Vladimir; Grgić, Mislav

    2013-11-01

    Testicular seminoma cancer incidence has significantly increased over the last few decades, and although it is successfully treated by radiotherapy, long-term health risks are still unclear. The aim of the study was to show long-term genome damage in patients with seminoma after radiotherapy. Chromosome aberration (CA) and micronucleus (MN) assays seven years after radiotherapy with a total dose of 25 Gy were conducted in 10 testicular seminoma patients aged 23-49 years and results were compared with 10 healthy control subjects matched for age and smoking status. Although mean CA frequency did not deviate from control values, significantly increased frequencies of dicentrics, double minutes, and ring chromosomes were detected in seminoma patients. MN frequency in binuclear lymphocytes of patients was similar to controls (4.60/1000 vs. 5.82/1000, respectively). Significantly higher MN frequency was detected in mononuclear lymphocytes of patients than in controls (2.55/1000 vs. 0.73/1000, respectively). Average percentage of centromere-positive MN was 62.6% in seminoma patients. This study shows the persistence of unstable CA in seminoma patients seven years after radiotherapy and the relevance of long-term follow up. MN frequency in mononuclear lymphocytes was shown to be relevant biomarker of long-term genome damage.

  13. Hypothyroidism after radiotherapy for patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Hiroyuki; Saitou, Hideyuki; Mizutari, Kunio; Takata, Yasunori; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2007-01-01

    We report on 2 cases of hypothyroidism presenting clinical symptoms that occurred after radiotherapy for cancer of the head and neck and on the results of estimating thyroid function in patients with head and neck cancer who received radiotherapy. The first patient underwent total laryngectomy for laryngeal cancer without sacrificing the thyroid gland and partial gastrectomy for gastric cancer. Radiotherapy of the neck was carried out postoperatively. Two years later, the patient developed chest pain; pericardial effusion was detected, leading to a diagnosis of myxedema caused by hypothyroidism. The second patient received radiotherapy alone for laryngeal cancer. Two months later, low serum sodium concentration and anemia were detected in this patient. The cause of these changes was subsequently found to be hypothyroidism. Based on our experience with these 2 cases, we measured thyroid function in 35 patients who had undergone neck radiation for head and neck cancer at our hospital over the past 10 years. Hypothyroidism was observed in 13 of the 35 patients (37%). The prevalence of hypothyroidism was 46% (6/13) for patients treated with both radiation and surgery, as compared with 32% (7/22) for those who received radiation alone. The risk factors responsible for hypothyroidism were not evident from the statistical analysis of these cases. We believe that thyroid function should be evaluated periodically in patients who have undergone neck radiation because it is often difficult to diagnose hypothyroidism only from clinical symptoms.

  14. X-ray volume imaging in bladder radiotherapy verification

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Ann M. . E-mail: amhenry@doctors.net.uk; Stratford, Julia; McCarthy, Claire; Davies, Julie; Sykes, Jonathan R.; Amer, Ali; Marchant, Tom; Cowan, Richard; Wylie, James; Logue, John; Livsey, Jacqueline; Khoo, Vincent S.; Moore, Chris; Price, Pat

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the clinical utility of X-ray volume imaging (XVI) for verification of bladder radiotherapy and to quantify geometric error in bladder radiotherapy delivery. Methods and Materials: Twenty subjects undergoing conformal bladder radiotherapy were recruited. X-ray volume images and electronic portal images (EPIs) were acquired for the first 5 fractions and then once weekly. X-ray volume images were co-registered with the planning computed tomography scan and clinical target volume coverage assessed in three dimensions (3D). Interfraction bladder volume change was described by quantifying changes in bladder volume with time. Bony setup errors were compared from both XVI and EPI. Results: The bladder boundary was clearly visible on coronal XVI views in nearly all images, allowing accurate 3D treatment verification. In 93.5% of imaged fractions, the clinical target volume was within the planning target volume. Most subjects displayed consistent bladder volumes, but 25% displayed changes that could be predicted from the first three XVIs. Bony setup errors were similar whether calculated from XVI or EPI. Conclusions: Coronal XVI can be used to verify 3D bladder radiotherapy delivery. Image-guided interventions to reduce geographic miss and normal tissue toxicity are feasible with this technology.

  15. INL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report 2004

    SciTech Connect

    James Venhuizen

    2005-06-01

    This report summarizes the activities and major accomplishments for the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2004. Topics covered include boron analysis in biological samples, computational dosimetry and treatment planning software development, medical neutron source development and characterization, and collaborative dosimetry studies at the RA-1 facility in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

  16. A Review of Update Clinical Results of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tsujii, Hirohiko; Kamada, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Among various types of ion species, carbon ions are considered to have the most balanced, optimal properties in terms of possessing physically and biologically effective dose localization in the body. This is due to the fact that when compared with photon beams, carbon ion beams offer improved dose distribution, leading to the concentration of the sufficient dose within a target volume while minimizing the dose in the surrounding normal tissues. In addition, carbon ions, being heavier than protons, provide a higher biological effectiveness, which increases with depth, reaching the maximum at the end of the beam's range. This is practically an ideal property from the standpoint of cancer radiotherapy. Clinical studies have been carried out in the world to confirm the efficacy of carbon ions against a variety of tumors as well as to develop effective techniques for delivering an efficient dose to the tumor. Through clinical experiences of carbon ion radiotherapy at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences and Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, a significant reduction in the overall treatment time with acceptable toxicities has been obtained in almost all types of tumors. This means that carbon ion radiotherapy has meanwhile achieved for itself a solid place in general practice. This review describes clinical results of carbon ion radiotherapy together with physical, biological and technological aspects of carbon ions. PMID:22798685

  17. Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Gastric Cancer: A Dosimetric Comparison of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, Tomotherapy (registered) and Conventional Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Dahele, Max; Skinner, Matthew; Schultz, Brenda; Cardoso, Marlene; Bell, Chris; Ung, Yee C.

    2010-07-01

    Some patients with gastric cancer benefit from post-operative chemo-radiotherapy, but adequately irradiating the planning target volume (PTV) whilst avoiding organs at risk (OAR) can be difficult. We evaluate 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT), conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy (TT). TT, 2 and 5-field (F) CRT and IMRT treatment plans with the same PTV coverage were generated for 5 patients and compared. Median values are reported. The volume of left/right kidney receiving at least 20Gy (V20) was 57/51% and 51/60% for 2 and 5F-CRT, and 28/14% for TT and 27/19% for IMRT. The volume of liver receiving at least 30Gy (V30) was 45% and 62% for 2 and 5F-CRT, and 37% for TT and 35% for IMRT. With TT, 98% of the PTV received 95-105% of the prescribed dose, compared with 45%, 34% and 28% for 2F-CRT, 5F-CRT and IMRT respectively. Using conventional metrics, conventional IMRT can achieve comparable PTV coverage and OAR sparing to TT, but at the expense of PTV dose heterogeneity. Both irradiate large volumes of normal tissue to low doses. Additional studies are needed to demonstrate the clinical impact of these technologies.

  18. Vaginal dilator therapy for women receiving pelvic radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Tracie; Johnson, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Background Many vaginal dilator therapy guidelines advocate routine vaginal dilation during and after pelvic radiotherapy to prevent stenosis (abnormal narrowing of the vagina). The UK Gynaecological Oncology Nurse Forum recommend dilation “three times weekly for an indefinite time period”. The UK patient charity Cancer Backup advises using vaginal dilators from two to eight weeks after the end of radiotherapy treatment. Australian guidelines recommend dilation after brachytherapy “as soon as is comfortably possible” and “certainly within four weeks and to continue for three years or indefinitely if possible”. However, dilation is intrusive, uses health resources and can be psychologically distressing. It has also caused rare but very serious damage to the rectum. Objectives To review the benefits and harms of vaginal dilation therapy associated with pelvic radiotherapy for cancer. Search methods Searches included the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 4), MEDLINE (1950 to 2008), EMBASE (1980 to 2008) and CINAHL (1982 to 2008). Selection criteria Any comparative randomised controlled trials (RCT) or data of any type which compared dilation or penetration of the vagina after pelvic radiotherapy treatment for cancer. Data collection and analysis The review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. We analysed the mean difference in sexual function scores and the risk ratio for non-compliance at six weeks and three months in single trial analyses. No trials met the inclusion criteria. Main results Dilation during or immediately after radiotherapy can, in rare cases, cause damage and there is no persuasive evidence from any study to demonstrate that it prevents stenosis. Data from one RCT showed no improvement in sexual scores in women who were encouraged to practice dilation. Two case series and one comparative study using historical controls suggest that dilation might be

  19. Bayesian network models for error detection in radiotherapy plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalet, Alan M.; Gennari, John H.; Ford, Eric C.; Phillips, Mark H.

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to design and develop a probabilistic network for detecting errors in radiotherapy plans for use at the time of initial plan verification. Our group has initiated a multi-pronged approach to reduce these errors. We report on our development of Bayesian models of radiotherapy plans. Bayesian networks consist of joint probability distributions that define the probability of one event, given some set of other known information. Using the networks, we find the probability of obtaining certain radiotherapy parameters, given a set of initial clinical information. A low probability in a propagated network then corresponds to potential errors to be flagged for investigation. To build our networks we first interviewed medical physicists and other domain experts to identify the relevant radiotherapy concepts and their associated interdependencies and to construct a network topology. Next, to populate the network’s conditional probability tables, we used the Hugin Expert software to learn parameter distributions from a subset of de-identified data derived from a radiation oncology based clinical information database system. These data represent 4990 unique prescription cases over a 5 year period. Under test case scenarios with approximately 1.5% introduced error rates, network performance produced areas under the ROC curve of 0.88, 0.98, and 0.89 for the lung, brain and female breast cancer error detection networks, respectively. Comparison of the brain network to human experts performance (AUC of 0.90 ± 0.01) shows the Bayes network model performs better than domain experts under the same test conditions. Our results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of comprehensive probabilistic models as part of decision support systems for improved detection of errors in initial radiotherapy plan verification procedures.

  20. Bayesian network models for error detection in radiotherapy plans.

    PubMed

    Kalet, Alan M; Gennari, John H; Ford, Eric C; Phillips, Mark H

    2015-04-07

    The purpose of this study is to design and develop a probabilistic network for detecting errors in radiotherapy plans for use at the time of initial plan verification. Our group has initiated a multi-pronged approach to reduce these errors. We report on our development of Bayesian models of radiotherapy plans. Bayesian networks consist of joint probability distributions that define the probability of one event, given some set of other known information. Using the networks, we find the probability of obtaining certain radiotherapy parameters, given a set of initial clinical information. A low probability in a propagated network then corresponds to potential errors to be flagged for investigation. To build our networks we first interviewed medical physicists and other domain experts to identify the relevant radiotherapy concepts and their associated interdependencies and to construct a network topology. Next, to populate the network's conditional probability tables, we used the Hugin Expert software to learn parameter distributions from a subset of de-identified data derived from a radiation oncology based clinical information database system. These data represent 4990 unique prescription cases over a 5 year period. Under test case scenarios with approximately 1.5% introduced error rates, network performance produced areas under the ROC curve of 0.88, 0.98, and 0.89 for the lung, brain and female breast cancer error detection networks, respectively. Comparison of the brain network to human experts performance (AUC of 0.90 ± 0.01) shows the Bayes network model performs better than domain experts under the same test conditions. Our results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of comprehensive probabilistic models as part of decision support systems for improved detection of errors in initial radiotherapy plan verification procedures.

  1. Proton Radiotherapy for Parameningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma: Clinical Outcomes and Late Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Stephanie K.; Kozak, Kevin R.; Friedmann, Alison M.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Adams, Judith; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Liebsch, Norbert J.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcome and late side effect profile of proton radiotherapy in the treatment of children with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PM-RMS). Methods and Materials: Seventeen consecutive children with PM-RMS were treated with proton radiotherapy at Massachusetts General Hospital between 1996 and 2005. We reviewed the medical records of all patients and asked referring physicians to report specific side effects of interest. Results: Median patient age at diagnosis was 3.4 years (range, 0.4-17.6). Embryonal (n = 11), alveolar (n = 4), and undifferentiated (n = 2) histologies were represented. Ten patients (59%) had intracranial extension. Median prescribed dose was 50.4 cobalt gray equivalents (GyRBE) (range, 50.4-56.0 GyRBE) delivered in 1.8-2.0-GyRBE daily fractions. Median follow-up was 5.0 years for survivors. The 5-year failure-free survival estimate was 59% (95% confidence interval, 33-79%), and overall survival estimate was 64% (95% confidence interval, 37-82%). Among the 7 patients who failed, sites of first recurrence were local only (n = 2), regional only (n = 2), distant only (n = 2), and local and distant (n = 1). Late effects related to proton radiotherapy in the 10 recurrence-free patients (median follow-up, 5 years) include failure to maintain height velocity (n = 3), endocrinopathies (n = 2), mild facial hypoplasia (n = 7), failure of permanent tooth eruption (n = 3), dental caries (n = 5), and chronic nasal/sinus congestion (n = 2). Conclusions: Proton radiotherapy for patients with PM-RMS yields tumor control and survival comparable to that in historical controls with similar poor prognostic factors. Furthermore, rates of late effects from proton radiotherapy compare favorably to published reports of photon-treated cohorts.

  2. Radiotherapy and "new" drugs-new side effects?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Targeted drugs have augmented the cancer treatment armamentarium. Based on the molecular specificity, it was initially believed that these drugs had significantly less side effects. However, currently it is accepted that all of these agents have their specific side effects. Based on the given multimodal approach, special emphasis has to be placed on putative interactions of conventional cytostatic drugs, targeted agents and other modalities. The interaction of targeted drugs with radiation harbours special risks, since the awareness for interactions and even synergistic toxicities is lacking. At present, only limited is data available regarding combinations of targeted drugs and radiotherapy. This review gives an overview on the current knowledge on such combined treatments. Materials and methods Using the following MESH headings and combinations of these terms pubmed database was searched: Radiotherapy AND cetuximab/trastuzumab/panitumumab/nimotuzumab, bevacizumab, sunitinib/sorafenib/lapatinib/gefitinib/erlotinib/sirolimus, thalidomide/lenalidomide as well as erythropoietin. For citation crosscheck the ISI web of science database was used employing the same search terms. Results Several classes of targeted substances may be distinguished: Small molecules including kinase inhibitors and specific inhibitors, antibodies, and anti-angiogenic agents. Combination of these agents with radiotherapy may lead to specific toxicities or negatively influence the efficacy of RT. Though there is only little information on the interaction of molecular targeted radiation and radiotherapy in clinical settings, several critical incidents are reported. Conclusions The addition of molecular targeted drugs to conventional radiotherapy outside of approved regimens or clinical trials warrants a careful consideration especially when used in conjunction in hypo-fractionated regimens. Clinical trials are urgently needed in order to address the open question in regard

  3. Leaf sequencing and dosimetric verification in intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agazaryan, Nzhde

    Although sophisticated means to calculate and deliver intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) have been developed by many groups, methods to verify the delivery, as well as definitions of acceptability of a treatment in terms of these measurements are the most problematic at this stage of advancement of IMRT. Present intensity modulated radiotherapy systems fail to account for many dosimetric characteristics of the delivery system. In this dissertation, a dosimetrically based leaf sequencing algorithm is developed and implemented for multileaf collimated intensity modulated radiotherapy. The dosimetric considerations are investigated and are shown to significantly improve the outcome in terms of an agreement between desired and delivered radiation dose distributions. Subsequently, a system for determining the desirability of a produced intensity modulated radiotherapy plan in terms of deliverability of calculated profiles with the use of a multileaf collimator is developed. Three deliverability scoring indices are defined to evaluate the deliverability of the profiles. Gradient Index (GI) is a measure of the complexity of the profile in terms of gradients. Baseline Index (BI) is the fraction of the profile that is planned to get lower than the minimum level of transmission radiation. Cumulative Monitor Unit Index (CMUI) is the ratio of the cumulative monitor units (CMU) required for obtaining the desired profile to an average dose level in the profile. The dosimetric investigations of the deliverability scoring indices are presented, showing a clear correlation between scoring indices and dosimetric accuracy. Finally, materials and methods are developed for verification of intensity modulated radiotherapy. Dosimetric verification starts from investigations of the developed leaf sequencing algorithm, then extends to dosimetric verification in terms of deliverability, and lastly, dosimetric verification of complete clinical IMRT plans is performed.

  4. Does breast composition influence late adverse effects in breast radiotherapy?

    PubMed

    Juneja, Prabhjot; Bonora, Maria; Haviland, Joanne S; Harris, Emma; Evans, Phil; Somaiah, Navita

    2016-04-01

    Large breast size is associated with increased risk of late adverse effects after surgery and radiotherapy for early breast cancer. It is hypothesised that effects of radiotherapy on adipose tissue are responsible for some of the effects seen. In this study, the association of breast composition with late effects was investigated along with other breast features such as fibroglandular tissue distribution, seroma and scar. The patient dataset comprised of 18 cases with changes in breast appearance at 2 years follow-up post-radiotherapy and 36 controls with no changes, from patients entered into the FAST-Pilot and UK FAST trials at The Royal Marsden. Breast composition, fibroglandular tissue distribution, seroma and scar were assessed on planning CT scan images and compared using univariate analysis. The association of all features with late-adverse effect was tested using logistic regression (adjusting for confounding factors) and matched analysis was performed using conditional logistic regression. In univariate analyses, no statistically significant differences were found between cases and controls in terms of breast features studied. A statistically significant association (p < 0.05) between amount of seroma and change in photographic breast appearance was found in unmatched and matched logistic regression analyses with odds ratio (95% CI) of 3.44 (1.28-9.21) and 2.57 (1.05-6.25), respectively. A significant association was found between seroma and late-adverse effects after radiotherapy although no significant associations were noted with breast composition in this study. Therefore, the cause for large breast size as a risk factor for late effects after surgery and optimally planned radiotherapy remains unresolved. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Survival and Symptom Relief after Palliative Radiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Julia; Kup, Philipp Günther; Nieder, Carsten; Khosrawipour, Veria; Bühler, Helmut; Adamietz, Irenäus A; Fakhrian, Khashayar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the 6-months dysphagia-free survival, improvement in swallowing function, complication rate, and overall survival in patients with incurable esophageal cancer treated with palliative radiotherapy. We retrospectively reviewed data from 139 patients (median age 72 years) with advanced/recurrent incurable esophageal cancer, who were referred to 3 German radiation oncology centers for palliative radiotherapy between 1994 and 2014. Radiotherapy consisted of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with 30 - 40.5 Gy/2.5 - 3 Gy per fraction, brachytherapy alone (BT) with 15 - 25 Gy/5 - 7Gy per fraction/weekly and EBRT + BT (30 - 40.5 Gy plus 10 - 14 Gy with BT) in 65, 46, and 28 patients, respectively. Dysphagia-free survival (Dy-PFS) was defined as the time to worsening of dysphagia for at least one point, a new loco-regional failure or death of any cause. Median follow-up time was 6 months (range 1-6 months). Subjective symptom relief was achieved in 72 % of patients with median response duration of 5 months. The 1-year survival rate was 30%. The 6-months Dy-PFS time for the whole group was 73 ± 4%. The 6-months Dy-PFS was 90 ± 4% after EBRT, 92 ± 5% after EBRT + BT and 37 ± 7% after BT, respectively (p<0.001). Five patients lived for more than 2 years, all of them were treated with EBRT ± BT. Ulceration, fistula and stricture developed in 3, 6 and 7 patients, respectively. Radiotherapy leads to symptom improvement in the majority of patients with advanced incurable esophageal cancer. The present results favor EBRT ± BT over BT alone. Due to the retrospective nature of this study, imbalances in baseline characteristics might have contributed to this finding, and further trials appear necessary.

  6. Radiotherapy for diffuse brainstem glioma in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin; Fang, Yuan; Hui, Xuhui; Jv, Yan; You, Chao

    2016-06-27

    Diffuse brainstem glioma is a devastating disease with very poor prognosis. The most commonly used radiological treatment is conventional fractionated radiation. So far, there is no meta-analysis or systematic review available that assesses the benefits or harms of radiation in people with diffuse brainstem glioma. To assess the effects of conventional fractionated radiotherapy (with or without chemotherapy) versus other therapies (including different radiotherapy techniques) for newly diagnosed diffuse brainstem gliomas in children and young adults aged 0 to 21 years. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE/PubMed, and EMBASE to 19 August 2015. We scanned conference proceedings from the International Society for Paediatric Oncology (SIOP), International Symposium on Paediatric Neuro-Oncology (ISPNO), Society of Neuro-Oncology (SNO), and European Association of Neuro-Oncology (EANO) from 1 January 2010 to 19 August 2015. We searched trial registers including the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN) Register, the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), and the register of the National Institutes of Health to 19 August 2015. We imposed no language restrictions. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-randomised trials (QRCTs), or controlled clinical trials (CCTs) that compared conventional fractionated radiotherapy (with or without chemotherapy) versus other therapies (including different radiotherapy techniques) for newly diagnosed diffuse brainstem glioma in children and young adults aged 0 to 21 years. Two review authors independently screened studies for inclusion, extracted data, assessed the risk of bias in each eligible trial, and conducted GRADE assessment of included studies. We resolved disagreements through discussion. We performed analyses according to the guidelines of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of

  7. Clinical Experience With Image-Guided Radiotherapy in an Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Charles E.; Tallhamer, Michael M.S.; Johnson, Tim; Hunter, Kari C.M.D.; Howell, Kathryn; Kercher, Jane; Widener, Jodi; Kaske, Terese; Paul, Devchand; Sedlacek, Scot; Carter, Dennis L.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of fiducial markers for the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in an accelerated partial breast intensity modulated radiotherapy protocol. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients consented to an institutional review board approved protocol of accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy with fiducial marker placement and treatment with IGRT. Patients (1 patient with bilateral breast cancer; 20 total breasts) underwent ultrasound guided implantation of three 1.2- x 3-mm gold markers placed around the surgical cavity. For each patient, table shifts (inferior/superior, right/left lateral, and anterior/posterior) and minimum, maximum, mean error with standard deviation were recorded for each of the 10 BID treatments. The dose contribution of daily orthogonal films was also examined. Results: All IGRT patients underwent successful marker placement. In all, 200 IGRT treatment sessions were performed. The average vector displacement was 4 mm (range, 2-7 mm). The average superior/inferior shift was 2 mm (range, 0-5 mm), the average lateral shift was 2 mm (range, 1-4 mm), and the average anterior/posterior shift was 3 mm (range, 1 5 mm). Conclusions: This study shows that the use of IGRT can be successfully used in an accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy protocol. The authors believe that this technique has increased daily treatment accuracy and permitted reduction in the margin added to the clinical target volume to form the planning target volume.

  8. Intraoperative Radiotherapy Versus Whole-Breast External Beam Radiotherapy in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Zhou, Zhirui; Mei, Xin; Yang, Zhaozhi; Ma, Jinli; Chen, Xingxing; Wang, Junqi; Liu, Guangyu; Yu, Xiaoli; Guo, Xiaomao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There has not been a clear answer about the efficacy of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for women with early-stage breast cancer. The aim of this meta-analysis was to summarize the available evidence comparing the efficacy and safety of IORT with those of whole-breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for women with early-stage breast cancer. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library were searched up to October 2014. Two authors independently conducted the literature selection and data extraction. Studies that compared IORT with whole-breast EBRT were included in the systematic review. IORT was defined as a single dose of irradiation to the tumor bed during breast-conserving surgery rather than whole-breast irradiation. Qualities of RCTs were evaluated according to the PEDro scale. Qualities of non-RCTs were evaluated according to the Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies (MINORS). The risk ratios (RRs) of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence, overall mortality, breast cancer mortality, non-breast cancer mortality, and distant metastasis were pooled using a random-effects model. Four studies with 5415 patients were included in this meta-analysis, including 2 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 2 non-RCTs. Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was significantly higher in patients with IORT compared to those with whole-breast EBRT (RR 2.83, 95% CI 1.23–6.51), but with significant heterogeneity (I2 = 58.5%, P = 0.065). Comparing IORT with whole-breast EBRT, the pooled RRs for overall mortality, breast cancer mortality, non-breast cancer mortality, and distant metastasis were 0.88 (95% CI: 0.66–1.17), 1.20 (95% CI: 0.77–1.86), 0.76 (95% CI: 0.44–1.31), and 0.95 (95% CI: 0.61–1.49), respectively. IORT had a significantly higher risk of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence than whole-breast EBRT. Overall mortality did not differ significantly. IORT should be used in conjunction with the prudent selection of

  9. SU-E-J-206: Adaptive Radiotherapy for Gynecological Malignancies with MRIGuided Cobolt-60 Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, J; Kamrava, M; Agazaryan, N; Cao, M; Low, D; Thomas, D; Yang, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Even in the IMRT era, bowel toxicity and bone marrow irradiation remain concerns with pelvic irradiation. We examine the potential gain from an adaptive radiotherapy workflow for post-operative gynecological patients treated to pelvic targets including lymph nodes using MRI-guided Co-60 radiation therapy. Methods: An adaptive workflow was developed with the intent of minimizing time overhead of adaptive planning. A pilot study was performed using retrospectively analyzed images from one patient’s treatment. The patient’s treated plan was created using conventional PTV margins. Adaptive treatment was simulated on the patient’s first three fractions. The daily PTV was created by removing non-target tissue, including bone, muscle and bowel, from the initial PTV based on the daily MRI. The number of beams, beam angles, and optimization parameters were kept constant, and the plan was re-optimized. Normal tissue contours were not adjusted for the re-optimization, but were adjusted for evaluation of plan quality. Plan quality was evaluated based on PTV coverage and normal tissue DVH points per treatment protocol. Bowel was contoured as the entire bowel bag per protocol at our institution. Pelvic bone marrow was contoured per RTOG protocol 1203. Results: For the clinically treated plan, the volume of bowel receiving 45 Gy was 380 cc, 53% of the rectum received 30 Gy, 35% of the bladder received 45 Gy, and 28% of the pelvic bone marrow received 40 Gy. For the adaptive plans, the volume of bowel receiving 45 Gy was 175–201 cc, 55–62% of the rectum received 30 Gy, 21– 27% of the bladder received 45 Gy, and 13–17% of the pelvic bone marrow received 40 Gy. Conclusion: Adaptive planning led to a large reduction of bowel and bone marrow dose in this pilot study. Further study of on-line adaptive techniques for the radiotherapy of pelvic lymph nodes is warranted. Dr. Low is a member of the scientific advisory board of ViewRay, Inc.

  10. Clinical results of a pilot study on stereovision-guided stereotactic radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Shidong; Kleinberg, Lawrence R; Rigamonti, Daniele; Wharam, Moody D; Rashid, Abdul; Jackson, Juan; Djajaputra, David; He, Shenjen; Creasey, Tunisia; DeWeese, Theodore L

    2010-12-01

    Real-time stereovision-guidance has been introduced for efficient and convenient fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR) and image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This first pilot study is to clinically evaluate its accuracy and precision as well as impact on treatment doses. Sixty-one FSR patients wearing stereotactic masks (SMs) and nine IMRT patients wearing flexible masks (FMs), were accrued. Daily target reposition was initially based-on biplane-radiographs and then adjusted in six degrees of freedom under real-time stereovision guidance. Mean and standard deviation of the head displacements measured the accuracy and precision. Head positions during beam-on times were measured with real-time stereovisions and used for determination of delivered doses. Accuracy ± ± precision in direction with the largest errors shows improvement from 0.4 ± 2.3 mm to 0.0 ± 1.0 mm in the inferior-to-superior direction for patients wearing SM or from 0.8 ± 4.3 mm to 0.4 ± 1.7 mm in the posterior-to-anterior direction for patients wearing FM. The image-guidance increases target volume coverage by >30% for small lesions. Over half of head position errors could be removed from the stereovision-guidance. Importantly, the technique allows us to check head position during beam-on time and makes it possible for having frameless head refixation without tight masks.

  11. Clinical Results of a Pilot Study on Stereovision-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy and Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shidong; Kleinberg, Lawrence R.; Rigamonti, Daniele; Wharam, Moody D.; Rashid, Abdul; Jackson, Juan; Djajaputra, David; He, Shenjen; Creasey, Tunisia; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2011-01-01

    Real-time stereovision-guidance has been introduced for efficient and convenient fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR) and image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This first pilot study is to clinically evaluate its accuracy and precision as well as impact on treatment doses. Sixty-one FSR patients wearing stereotactic masks (SMs) and nine IMRT patients wearing flexible masks (FMs), were accrued. Daily target reposition was initially based-on biplane-radiographs and then adjusted in six degrees of freedom under real-time stereovision guidance. Mean and standard deviation of the head displacements measured the accuracy and precision. Head positions during beam-on times were measured with real-time stereovisions and used for determination of delivered doses. Accuracy ± precision in direction with the largest errors shows improvement from 0.4 ± 2.3 mm to 0.0 ± 1.0 mm in the inferior-to-superior direction for patients wearing SM or from 0.8 ± 4.3 mm to 0.4 ± 1.7 mm in the posterior-to-anterior direction for patients wearing FM. The image-guidance increases target volume coverage by >30% for small lesions. Over half of head position errors could be removed from the stereovision-guidance. Importantly, the technique allows us to check head position during beam-on time and makes it possible for having frameless head refixation without tight masks. PMID:21070083

  12. Recommendations for the use of radiotherapy in nodal lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Hoskin, P J; Díez, P; Williams, M; Lucraft, H; Bayne, M

    2013-01-01

    These guidelines have been developed to define the use of radiotherapy for lymphoma in the current era of combined modality treatment taking into account increasing concern over the late side-effects associated with previous radiotherapy. The role of reduced volume and reduced doses is addressed, integrating modern imaging with three-dimensional planning and advanced techniques of treatment delivery. Both wide-field and involved-field techniques have now been supplanted by the use of defined volumes based on node involvement shown on computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and applying the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements concepts of gross tumour volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV). The planning of lymphoma patients for radical radiotherapy should now be based upon contrast enhanced 3 mm contiguous CT with three-dimensional definition of volumes using the convention of GTV, CTV and PTV. The involved-site radiotherapy concept defines the CTV based on the PET-defined pre-chemotherapy sites of involvement with an expansion in the cranio-caudal direction of lymphatic spread by 1.5 cm, constrained to tissue planes such as bone, muscle and air cavities. The margin allows for uncertainties in PET resolution, image registration and changes in patient positioning and shape. There is increasing evidence in both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma that traditional doses are higher than necessary for disease control and related to the incidence of late effects. No more than 30 Gy for Hodgkin and aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 24 Gy for indolent lymphomas is recommended; lower doses of 20 Gy in combination therapy for early-stage low-risk Hodgkin lymphoma may be sufficient. As yet there are no large datasets validating the use of involved-site radiotherapy; these will emerge from the current generation of clinical trials. Radiotherapy remains the most effective single

  13. Are quality indicators for radiotherapy useful in the evaluation of service efficacy in a new based radiotherapy institution?

    PubMed

    Gabriele, Pietro; Malinverni, Giuseppe; Bona, Cristina; Manfredi, Manuela; Delmastro, Elena; Gatti, Marco; Penduzzu, Giovanni; Baiotto, Barbara; Stasi, Michele

    2006-01-01

    A number of documents assess the need for quality assurance in radiotherapy, which must be constantly monitored and possibly improved. In this regard, a system that confirms the quality of a department has been suggested and quality indicators have been used to improve the quality of the service. The National Health Service (Istituto Superiore di Sanità) approved a National Research Project to increase the quality of radiotherapy. The aim of the present study was to analyze the practical feasibility and efficacy of the quality indicators elaborated by the National Health Service study group in a radiotherapy unit. The voluntary accredited program was carried out by the Radiotherapy Department of IRCC in Candiolo from June to August 2002. We analyzed 8 of the 13 indicators according to the National Health Service Project. For this purpose, 133 consecutive patients treated in our Unit were analyzed, and the results are reported according to the appropriate indicator (number of staff related to patients treated, waiting list, case history accuracy, multidisciplinary approach, number of treatment plans performed by CT, number of fields per fraction, number of portal imaging performed per overall treatment, and patient satisfaction). The number of professional staff related to the number of patients treated was easy to calculate and it could be the basis for further evaluation. The overall waiting time was 55.4 days, and it changed for different radiotherapy goals. We obtained 80% conformity in case-history accuracy. The number of multidisciplinary consultations performed ranged between 50% and 100%. The number of CT plans was about 1.6 +/- 0.9 plans per patient. The mean number of fields performed per day and per patient is 3.5 +/- 1.7 and was in agreement with the fact that more than 50% of treatments in our Center were performed with conformal radiotherapy. An average of 16.7 +/- 10.0 portal imaging per case was performed. The percentage of patient satisfaction with

  14. Dosimetric comparison of postoperative whole pelvic radiotherapy for endometrial cancer using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruijie; Xu, Shouping; Jiang, Weijuan; Wang, Junjie; Xie, Chuanbin

    2010-01-01

    The use of Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and Helical tomotherapy (HT) is increasing in gynecological cancer patients. No published studies have performed a dosimetric evaluation of whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) using HT for postoperative endometrial cancer. The purpose of this study was to perform a direct dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), IMRT and HT plans for WPRT in postoperative endometrial cancer patients, and to evaluate the integral dose to organs at risk (OARs) and normal tissue. We selected ten patients with endometrial cancer undergoing postoperative WPRT. Plans for 3D-CRT, IMRT and HT were developed for each patient. All plans were normalized to deliver 50 Gy to 95% of the PTV. The dosimetry and integral dose to OARs and normal tissue were compared. The significance of differences was tested using a paired two-tailed Student t-test. IMRT were superior to 3D-CRT in dose conformity (conformity index: 0.87 vs. 0.61, p = 0.00) and integral dose to OARs and normal tissue, although a greater volume of normal tissue receiving dose below 10 Gy was observed. The results were similar in HT except that the integral dose to normal tissue increased slightly. Compared directly with IMRT, HT showed better dose homogeneity and lower integral dose to rectum and bladder, but the integral dose to pelvic bones and normal tissue slightly increased. In postoperative WPRT of endometrial cancer, IMRT and HT result in better conformity and lower integral dose to OARs compared with 3D-CRT. The integral dose to normal tissue did not increase significantly in IMRT, although a greater volume of normal tissue is irradiated to the dose below 10 Gy. HT further improves the dose homogeneity and integral dose to rectum and bladder, at the expense of a slightly higher integral dose to pelvic bones and normal tissue.

  15. Imaging tumour motion for radiotherapy planning using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Plathow, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Novel technology has made dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of lung motion and lung tumour mobility during continuous respiration feasible. This might be beneficial for planning of radiotherapy of lung tumours, especially when using high precision techniques. This paper describes the recent developments to analyze and visualize pulmonary nodules during continuous respiration using MRI. Besides recent dynamic two-dimensional approaches to quantify motion of pulmonary nodules during respiration novel three-dimensional techniques are presented. Beyond good correlation to pulmonary function tests MRI also provides regional information about differences between tumour-bearing and non-tumour bearing lung and the restrictive effects of radiotherapy as well as the compensation by the contralateral lung. PMID:17114068

  16. Radiotherapy Dose-Volume Effects on Salivary Gland Function

    SciTech Connect

    Deasy, Joseph O.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Marks, Lawrence; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Nam, Jiho; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2010-03-01

    Publications relating parotid dose-volume characteristics to radiotherapy-induced salivary toxicity were reviewed. Late salivary dysfunction has been correlated to the mean parotid gland dose, with recovery occurring with time. Severe xerostomia (defined as long-term salivary function of <25% of baseline) is usually avoided if at least one parotid gland is spared to a mean dose of less than {approx}20 Gy or if both glands are spared to less than {approx}25 Gy (mean dose). For complex, partial-volume RT patterns (e.g., intensity-modulated radiotherapy), each parotid mean dose should be kept as low as possible, consistent with the desired clinical target volume coverage. A lower parotid mean dose usually results in better function. Submandibular gland sparing also significantly decreases the risk of xerostomia. The currently available predictive models are imprecise, and additional study is required to identify more accurate models of xerostomia risk.

  17. Immobilization in stereotactic radiotherapy: the head and neck localizer frame.

    PubMed

    Fairclough-Tompa, L; Larsen, T; Jaywant, S M

    2001-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy refers to multiple daily fractions of radiation, over days or weeks of treatment, with the patient in a relocatable stereotactic frame. The linear accelerator-based, couch-mounted system from Radionics utilizes the Gill-Thomas-Cosman (GTC) frame and the new Tarbell-Loeffler-Cosman (TLC) pediatric frame for accurate positioning reproducibility. Radionics has now made available the Head and Neck Localizer (HNL) frame to be used with its XPlan treatment planning system and the mini multileaf collimator (MMLC). This will extend the overall capability of stereotactic radiotherapy to the treatment of head and neck cancers. However, with no data available on the HNL frame, a study is being undertaken to assess the accuracy in patient position reproducibility using the frame. This report provides the preliminary findings of comparing depth-helmet readings with radiographic data, together with recommended modifications to the frame.

  18. The potential effectiveness of nanoparticles as radio sensitizers for radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Babaei, Mohammad; Ganjalikhani, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Application of nanoparticles as radio sensitizer is a promising field to improve efficiency of radiotherapy. Methods: This study was conducted to review nano radio sensitizers. PubMed, Ovid Medline, Science Direct, Scopus, ISI web of knowledge, and Springer databases were searched from 2000 to May 2013 to identify relevant studies. Search was restricted to English language. Results: We included any study that evaluated nanoparticles, volunteer of radio enhancement at radiotherapy on animals or cell lines. Nanoparticles can increase radio sensitivity of tumor cells. This effect was shown in vivo and in vitro, at kilovltage or megavoltage energies, in 24 reviewed studies. Focus of studies was on gold nanoparticles. Radio sensitizing effects of nanoparticles depend on nanoparticles’ size, type, concentration, intracellular localization, used irradiation energy and tested cell line. Conclusion: Literature suggests potency of nanoparticles for increasing cell radio sensitivity. Reviewed results are promising and warrant future clinical trials. PMID:24790894

  19. [CUDA-based fast dose calculation in radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianliang; Liu, Cao; Hou, Qing

    2011-10-01

    Dose calculation plays a key role in treatment planning of radiotherapy. Algorithms for dose calculation require high accuracy and computational efficiency. Finite size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm is a method commonly adopted in the treatment planning system for radiotherapy. However, improvement on its computational efficiency is still desirable for such purpose as real time treatment planning. In this paper, we present an implementation of the FSPB, by which the most time-consuming parts in the algorithm are parallelized and ported on graphic processing unit (GPU). Compared with the FSPB completely running on central processing unit (CPU), the GPU-implemented FSPB can speed up the dose calculation for 25-35 times on a low price GPU (Geforce GT320) and for 55-100 times on a Tesla C1060, indicating that the GPU-implemented FSPB can provide fast enough dose calculations for real-time treatment planning.

  20. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: current strategies and future development

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as the standard treatment for medically inoperable early-staged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The local control rate after SBRT is over 90%. Some forms of tumour motion management and image-guided radiation delivery techniques are the prerequisites for fulfilment of its goal to deliver a high radiation dose to the tumour target without overdosing surrounding normal tissues. In this review, the current strategies of tumour motion management will be discussed, followed by an overview of various image-guided radiotherapy (RT) systems and devices available for clinical practice. Besides medically inoperable stage I NSCLC, SBRT has also been widely adopted for treatment of oligometastasis involving the lungs. Its possible applications in various other cancer illnesses are under extensive exploration. The progress of SBRT is critically technology-dependent. With advancement of technology, the ideal of personalised, effective and yet safe SBRT is already on the horizon. PMID:27606082

  1. Hypofractionated adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy: progress and prospects.

    PubMed

    Yarnold, John; Haviland, Joanne

    2010-11-01

    Published results of randomised trials involving >7000 women confirm the safety and efficacy of hypofractionated schedules of adjuvant radiotherapy for women with early breast cancer using fraction sizes between 2 and 3 Gy assuming appropriate downward adjustments to total dose. Unnecessary concerns relating to heart tolerance, suboptimal dose distribution and duration of follow up need not discourage the routine adoption of 15- or 16-fraction schedules in women treated by breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer. Regardless of fractionation regimen, dose escalation to the index quadrant in high risk subgroups will result in a greater relative increase in late adverse effects than tumour control, a therapeutic disadvantage that can only be overcome by exploiting a marked dose-volume effect. A 15-fraction schedule of whole breast radiotherapy is unlikely to represent the lower limits of hypofractionation, and the preliminary results of a 5-fraction regimen are encouraging.

  2. [Conformal radiotherapy of prostatic cancer: a general review].

    PubMed

    Chauvet, B; Oozeer, R; Bey, P; Pontvert, D; Bolla, M

    1999-01-01

    Recent progress in radiotherapeutic management of localized prostate cancer is reviewed. Clinical aspects--including dose-effect beyond 70 Gy, relative role of conformal radiation therapy techniques and of early hormonal treatment--are discussed as well as technical components--including patient immobilization, organ motion, prostate contouring, beam arrangement, 3-D treatment planning and portal imaging. The local control and biological relapse-free survival rates appear to be improved by high dose conformal radiotherapy from 20 to 30% for patients with intermediate and high risk of relapse. A benefit of overall survival is expected but not yet demonstrated. Late reactions, especially the rectal toxicity, remain moderate despite the dose escalation. However, conformal radiotherapy demands a high precision at all steps of the procedure.

  3. Cryptogenic organizing pneumonia after radiotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of fever, dyspnea, respiratory failure and migratory, recurrent and bilateral lung opacities 4 months after radiotherapy and hormone therapy following surgery for breast cancer. Computerized tomography (CT) scans showed infiltrates outside the radiation fields. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed lymphocytic alveolitis, whereas laboratory analysis demonstrated a mild systemic inflammation. Systemic steroids resulted in clinical and radiological improvement, but a disease relapse was evident at withdrawal of therapy, with definitive clinical and radiological normalization after a second cycle of therapy. This is a case of cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) (previously known as bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia) primed by radiotherapy, as in previously reported cases. It is extremely important to be aware of the possibility of this complication, in order to optimize radiation and hormone treatment of breast cancer. PMID:22958364

  4. Carbon Beam Radio-Therapy and Research Activities at HIMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Mitsutaka

    2007-05-01

    Radio-therapy with carbon ion beam has been carried out since 1994 at HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba) in NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences). Now, many types of tumors can be treated with carbon beam with excellent local controls of the tumors. Stimulated with good clinical results, requirement of the dedicated compact facility for carbon beam radio-therapy is increased. To realize this requirement, design study of the facility and the R&D's of the key components in this design are promoted by NIRS. According successful results of these activities, the dedicated compact facility will be realized in Gunma University. In this facility, the established irradiation method is expected to use, which is passive irradiation method with wobbler magnets and ridge filter. In this presentation, above R&D's will be presented together with clinical results and basic research activities at HIMAC.

  5. Particle Accelerators for Radiotherapy:. Present Status and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciszewski, Wieslaw; Scharf, Waldemar

    2004-07-01

    The paper describes the development of the application of particle accelerators in the treatment of cancer diseases over the past fifty years. Special emphasis is put on the routine application of conventional electron accelerators delivering electron and photon beams. This is the largest group of devices for radiotherapy (over 7500 machines operating worldwide). The number of patients reaches 5 million per year. The medical electron linacs have recently undergone considerable modifications of construction, in particular the systems of radiation field shaping. Contemporary accelerators for radiotherapy are equipped with multi-leaf collimators (MLC) which, in conjunction with IMRT (Intensity Modulation Radiation Therapy) technique and special system of therapy planning, assure considerably higher precision, effectiveness and quality of treatment.

  6. Low Dose, Low Energy 3d Image Guidance during Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. J.; Marchant, T.; Amer, A.; Sharrock, P.; Price, P.; Burton, D.

    2006-04-01

    Patient kilo-voltage X-ray cone beam volumetric imaging for radiotherapy was first demonstrated on an Elekta Synergy mega-voltage X-ray linear accelerator. Subsequently low dose, reduced profile reconstruction imaging was shown to be practical for 3D geometric setup registration to pre-treatment planning images without compromising registration accuracy. Reconstruction from X-ray profiles gathered between treatment beam deliveries was also introduced. The innovation of zonal cone beam imaging promises significantly reduced doses to patients and improved soft tissue contrast in the tumour target zone. These developments coincided with the first dynamic 3D monitoring of continuous body topology changes in patients, at the moment of irradiation, using a laser interferometer. They signal the arrival of low dose, low energy 3D image guidance during radiotherapy itself.

  7. Radiotherapy combined with surgery as treatment for advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Perches, R D; Lobaton, A T; Garcia, M C

    1983-12-01

    Experience obtained in a group of 44 patients with advanced cervical cancer is reported here. In this study, patients with residual cancer underwent laparotomy eight weeks after one or two different radiotherapy protocols. Sixty-eight percent of patients underwent radical surgery, 85% of patients pelvic exenterations, and 15% radical hysterectomies. In 27% of patients, no evidence of residual cancer was found in surgical specimens. Radical surgery was well tolerated, and one-third of patients were free of disease for one year or more. Control of disease was obtained in 50% of pelvic exenterations and in 60% of radical hysterectomies, regardless of prognosis, clinical stage or radiotherapy scheme. Although results show an improvement of up to 22% when comparing this to other more conventional treatments, we have concluded that we must obtain a wider experience in order to support our findings.

  8. New developments in intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy for metastases.

    PubMed

    Pinkham, M B; Whitfield, G A; Brada, M

    2015-05-01

    Brain metastases are common and the prognosis for patients with multiple brain metastases treated with whole brain radiotherapy is limited. As systemic disease control continues to improve, the expectations of radiotherapy for brain metastases are growing. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) as a high precision localised irradiation given in a single fraction prolongs survival in patients with a single brain metastasis and functional independence in those with up to three brain metastases. SRS technology has become commonplace and is available in many radiation oncology and neurosurgery departments. With increasing use there is a need for appropriate patient selection, refinement of dose-fractionation and safe integration of SRS with other treatment modalities. We review the evidence for current practice and new developments in the field, with a specific focus on patient-relevant outcomes.

  9. Radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation using cloud computing technology.

    PubMed

    Poole, C M; Cornelius, I; Trapp, J V; Langton, C M

    2012-12-01

    Cloud computing allows for vast computational resources to be leveraged quickly and easily in bursts as and when required. Here we describe a technique that allows for Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculations to be performed using GEANT4 and executed in the cloud, with relative simulation cost and completion time evaluated as a function of machine count. As expected, simulation completion time decreases as 1/n for n parallel machines, and relative simulation cost is found to be optimal where n is a factor of the total simulation time in hours. Using the technique, we demonstrate the potential usefulness of cloud computing as a solution for rapid Monte Carlo simulation for radiotherapy dose calculation without the need for dedicated local computer hardware as a proof of principal.

  10. [Clinical analysis of postoperative radiotherapy for stage I endometrial cancer].

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Shen, W; Wang, J

    1998-05-01

    To evaluate the role and complications of adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I endometrial cancer after surgery. From May, 1986 to December, 1995, 20 patients with stage I endometrial cancer received total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy(TAH/BSO), and additional pelvic lymph node dissection in 5 cases. Most of the patients received radio therapy in 2-4 weeks after surgery. The radiation fields included pelvic lymph nodes with a total dose of 40-50 Gy. All the patients had survived for 10 years. Only one patient developed distant metastases. Acute radiation reaction was observed in all patients. Late radiation-induced damage occured in six patients and was severe in two. Postoperative radiotherapy in the management of stage I endometrial cancer is beneficial for the controal of local recurrence but has relatively high frequency of late radiation injury.

  11. Radiotherapy of spontaneous fibrous connective-tissue sarcomas in animals.

    PubMed

    Hilmas, D E; Gillette, E L

    1976-02-01

    The clinical records and follow-up data obtained over 13 years on the results of radiotherapy of spontaneous fibrous connective-tissue sarcomas in dogs, cats, and horses were reviewed. The results obtained from the treatment of fibrosarcomas and sarcoids of horses indicated that radiation administered with 60Co is important in the medical and surgical management of these tumors. Fibrous connective-tissue sarcomas in horses were radioresponsive. When radiotherapy was applied postoperatively, the probability of a 2-year cure approached 50% for all prescribed radiation doses of less than 2,000 to greater than 4,000 rads. If radiation doses of 4,500-6,000 rads were used, a 2-year cure rate may approach or exceed 60%.

  12. Effects of intensity-modulated radiotherapy on human oral microflora.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zi-Yang; Tang, Zi-Sheng; Yan, Chao; Jiang, Yun-Tao; Ma, Rui; Liu, Zheng; Huang, Zheng-Wei

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate changes in the biodiversity of the oral microflora of patients with head and neck cancer treated with postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Pooled dental plaque samples were collected during the radiation treatment from patients receiving IMRT (n = 13) and CRT (n = 12). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to analyze the temporal variation of these plaque samples. The stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow rates were also compared between IMRT and CRT patients. Reductions in the severity of hyposalivation were observed in IMRT patients compared with CRT patients. We also observed that the temporal stability of the oral ecosystem was significantly higher in the IMRT group (69.96 ± 7.82%) than in the CRT group (51.98 ± 10.45%) (P < 0.05). The findings of the present study suggest that IMRT is more conducive to maintaining the relative stability of the oral ecosystem than CRT.

  13. Technical aspects of internet-based knowledge presentation in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lütttgau, A; Bendl, R

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional radiotherapy planning is a complex and time-consuming optimization process which requires much experience. To simplify and to speed up the process of treatment planning as well as to exchange experience and therapeutic knowledge, the department of Medical Physics at the German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ) in Heidelberg is developing an Internet-based 3D Radiotherapy planning and Information System (IRIS). IRIS designed internet-based client-server application, implemented using Java, CORBA and PVM. The concept of IRIS combines the functionality of an interactive tutorial with a discussion forum, teleconferencing tool and an atlas of dose distributions. Furthermore an integral knowledge-based system provides automatically generated, preoptimized treatment plans. This paper explains the technical design of the system and gives an overview of experiences gained by the technical realization of a first prototype using currently available internet technology. The prototype is currently running for testing in the intranet of DKFZ.

  14. Generalized Morphea following Radiotherapy for an Intracranial Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Balegar, Shrenik; Mishra, Dharmendra Kumar; Chatterjee, Sagarika; Kumari, Shweta; Tiwary, Anup Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Morphea is a localized scleroderma variety which can be circumscribed or generalized and is characterized by sclerotic plaques developing on trunk and limbs. Surgery and radiation have been implicated as etiological factors for the development of morphea. Majority of the radiation-induced morphea cases have occurred in patients with breast cancer. The affected areas have been generally restricted to the area of radiation and nearby surrounding area in most of the reported cases. We hereby report a case of a 27-year-old male who developed radiation-induced progressive generalized morphea after getting radiotherapy for an intracranial tumor. His condition improved after dexamethasone-cyclophosphamide pulse therapy. With increased incidence of cancer worldwide and radiotherapy as a modality of treatment, it is imperative to follow the patient and look for the development of morphea which itself is a debilitating disease. PMID:27688464

  15. Generalized Morphea following Radiotherapy for an Intracranial Tumor.

    PubMed

    Balegar, Shrenik; Mishra, Dharmendra Kumar; Chatterjee, Sagarika; Kumari, Shweta; Tiwary, Anup Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Morphea is a localized scleroderma variety which can be circumscribed or generalized and is characterized by sclerotic plaques developing on trunk and limbs. Surgery and radiation have been implicated as etiological factors for the development of morphea. Majority of the radiation-induced morphea cases have occurred in patients with breast cancer. The affected areas have been generally restricted to the area of radiation and nearby surrounding area in most of the reported cases. We hereby report a case of a 27-year-old male who developed radiation-induced progressive generalized morphea after getting radiotherapy for an intracranial tumor. His condition improved after dexamethasone-cyclophosphamide pulse therapy. With increased incidence of cancer worldwide and radiotherapy as a modality of treatment, it is imperative to follow the patient and look for the development of morphea which itself is a debilitating disease.

  16. [Current Status and Prospects on PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    18F-FDG is a most popular radiopharmaceutical for tumor diagnosis in the world. In addition, 11C-methionine, 18F-FLT and 11C-choline have been used to compensate for drawbacks of 18F-FDG. Now, novel radiopharmaceuticals are required to estimate or predict therapeutic efficacy because we have many strategies to treat tumors. Radiotherapy which damage DNA by producing free radicals is commonly used to treat various types of tumors. Hypoxia is closely associated with resistance to chemo- and/or radiotherapy and is a common feature of solid tumors. Recently, understanding of tumor hypoxia in oncology has led to development of radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging. This review provides an overview of PET radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging and 18F-FBPA which is used for boron neutron capture therapy.

  17. Postoperative radiotherapy for residual tumor of primary mediastinal carcinoid teratoma

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Lingli; Sun, Lan; Zhou, Yu; Gong, Youling; Xue, Jianxin; Gao, Jun; Lu, You

    2013-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman had presented with dry cough for 2 months. Thoracic computed tomography (CT) scan showed a 12 cm × 8 cm ×5 cm mass in the anterior mediastinum. Due to intimately involving the aortic arch, tumor was removed incompletely. Residual tumor remained approximate 2 cm × 3 cm × 4 cm. Histologic diagnosis was a mature cystic teratoma containing a carcinoid. Subsequently, radiotherapy (RT) was administrated on residual tumor for a total dose of 50 Gy at 2 Gy/d fraction in 25 fractions. At 2-year follow-up, the patient had stable disease. In conclusion, adjuvant radiotherapy with 50 Gy is an effective approach for residual tumor of mediastinal carcinoid teratoma. PMID:23585961

  18. Methods and computer readable medium for improved radiotherapy dosimetry planning

    DOEpatents

    Wessol, Daniel E.; Frandsen, Michael W.; Wheeler, Floyd J.; Nigg, David W.

    2005-11-15

    Methods and computer readable media are disclosed for ultimately developing a dosimetry plan for a treatment volume irradiated during radiation therapy with a radiation source concentrated internally within a patient or incident from an external beam. The dosimetry plan is available in near "real-time" because of the novel geometric model construction of the treatment volume which in turn allows for rapid calculations to be performed for simulated movements of particles along particle tracks therethrough. The particles are exemplary representations of alpha, beta or gamma emissions emanating from an internal radiation source during various radiotherapies, such as brachytherapy or targeted radionuclide therapy, or they are exemplary representations of high-energy photons, electrons, protons or other ionizing particles incident on the treatment volume from an external source. In a preferred embodiment, a medical image of a treatment volume irradiated during radiotherapy having a plurality of pixels of information is obtained.

  19. Newer positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals for radiotherapy planning: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has changed cancer imaging in the last decade, for better. It can be employed for radiation treatment planning of different cancers with improved accuracy and outcomes as compared to conventional imaging methods. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose remains the most widely used though relatively non-specific cancer imaging PET tracer. A wide array of newer PET radiopharmaceuticals has been developed for targeted imaging of different cancers. PET-CT with such new PET radiopharmaceuticals has also been used for radiotherapy planning with encouraging results. In the present review we have briefly outlined the role of PET-CT with newer radiopharmaceuticals for radiotherapy planning and briefly reviewed the available literature in this regard. PMID:26904575

  20. Radiotherapy and immune checkpoint blockades: a snapshot in 2016

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Taeryool; Kim, In Ah

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint blockades including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), programmed death-1 (PD-1), and programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) have been emerged as a promising anticancer therapy. Several immune checkpoint blockades have been approved by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and have shown notable success in clinical trials for patients with advanced melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer. Radiotherapy is a promising combination partner of immune checkpoint blockades due to its potent pro-immune effect. This review will cover the current issue and the future perspectives for combined with radiotherapy and immune checkpoint blockades based upon the available preclinical and clinical data. PMID:28030901

  1. Treatment of cervical carcinoma by total hysterectomy and postoperative external irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, C.; Yiogarakis, D.; Pappas, J.; Keramopoulos, A.

    1980-07-01

    The survival rates of 36 patients with early cervical carcinoma who had undergone total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingoophorectomy (THBSO) were compared to the survival rates of 41 patients who were subjected to the radical operation. As an integral part of their therapy both groups postoperatively received adequate doses of external beam supervoltage irradiation. Satisfactory results were obtained in both groups of patients. According to these results THBSO followed by postoperative radiotherapy is adequate treatment for early cervical carcinoma. In comparison to the radical operation or curietherapy alone this type of treatment has the advantage of requiring less surgical or radiotherapeutic expertise; it probably is associated with less morbidity.

  2. Clinical application of multimodality imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan Yang; Zhe, Hong

    2013-12-11

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of rectal cancer. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy are mainstay techniques of radiotherapy for rectal cancer. However, the success of these techniques is heavily reliant on accurate target delineation and treatment planning. Computed tomography simulation is a cornerstone of rectal cancer radiotherapy, but there are limitations, such as poor soft-tissue contrast between pelvic structures and partial volume effects. Magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) can overcome these limitations and provide additional information for rectal cancer treatment planning. PET can also reduce the interobserver variation in the definition of rectal tumor volume. However, there is a long way to go before these image modalities are routinely used in the clinical setting. This review summarizes the most promising studies on clinical applications of multimodality imaging in target delineation and treatment planning for rectal cancer radiotherapy.

  3. Biological dose volume histograms during conformal hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koukourakis, Michael I.; Abatzoglou, Ioannis; Touloupidis, Stavros; Manavis, Ioannis

    2007-01-15

    Radiobiological data suggest that prostate cancer has a low {alpha}/{beta} ratio. Large radiotherapy fractions may, therefore, prove more efficacious than standard radiotherapy, while radiotherapy acceleration should further improve control rates. This study describes the radiobiology of a conformal hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy scheme for the treatment of high risk prostate cancer. Anteroposterior fields to the pelvis deliver a daily dose of 2.7 Gy, while lateral fields confined to the prostate and seminal vesicles deliver an additional daily dose of 0.7 Gy. Radiotherapy is accomplished within 19 days (15 fractions). Dose volume histograms, calculated for tissue specific {alpha}/{beta} ratios and time factors, predict a high biological dose to the prostate and seminal vesicles (77-93 Gy). The biological dose to normal pelvic tissues is maintained at standard levels. Radiobiological dosimetry suggests that, using hypofractionated and accelerated radiotherapy, high biological radiation dose can be given to the prostate without overdosing normal tissues.

  4. Complement is a central mediator of radiotherapy-induced tumor-specific immunity and clinical response.

    PubMed

    Surace, Laura; Lysenko, Veronika; Fontana, Andrea Orlando; Cecconi, Virginia; Janssen, Hans; Bicvic, Antonela; Okoniewski, Michal; Pruschy, Martin; Dummer, Reinhard; Neefjes, Jacques; Knuth, Alexander; Gupta, Anurag; van den Broek, Maries

    2015-04-21

    Radiotherapy induces DNA damage and cell death, but recent data suggest that concomitant immune stimulation is an integral part of the therapeutic action of ionizing radiation. It is poorly understood how radiotherapy supports tumor-specific immunity. Here we report that radiotherapy induced tumor cell death and transiently activated complement both in murine and human tumors. The local production of pro-inflammatory anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a was crucial to the tumor response to radiotherapy and concomitant stimulation of tumor-specific immunity. Dexamethasone, a drug frequently given during radiotherapy, limited complement activation and the anti-tumor effects of the immune system. Overall, our findings indicate that anaphylatoxins are key players in radiotherapy-induced tumor-specific immunity and the ensuing clinical responses.

  5. An unusual case of foreskin phimosis after radiotherapy for rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nair, R G; Bensadoun, R-J; Oberholzer, T; Gopalan, V; Young, S C; Joubert, W

    2012-01-01

    Phimosis of the foreskin after radiotherapy for rectal carcinoma is extremely rare and has previously been described only once (2006) in the English-language literature. Combination chemo/radiotherapy is currently the treatment of choice and widely used in the management of various pelvic malignancies. In this report, we describe a rare complication on male genitalia following the radiotherapy for lower rectal cancers. Few days following the completion of radiotherapy, patient developed phimosis of the foreskin, which was successfully treated medically without the need for circumcision. Radiotherapy can bring a great risk of injury to anorectum and its adjacent structures. Risk of phimosis should be considered under the current radiation guidelines and we support the concept of using penile shielding for all radiotherapy procedures in colorectal carcinoma patients. Copyright © 2012 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiotherapy for breast cancer: The predictable consequences of an unmet need.

    PubMed

    Rodin, Danielle; Knaul, Felicia M; Lui, Tracey Y; Gospodarowicz, Mary

    2016-10-01

    Radiotherapy has had a transformative impact on the treatment of breast cancer, but is unavailable to the majority of breast cancer patients in low- and middle-income countries. In these settings, where many women present with advanced disease at an age when they are often the primary caregiver for their families, the lack of access to radiotherapy is particularly devastating. Until recently, this disparity has been largely neglected in the medical literature and it had been difficult to convince governments, industry, and policymakers of the importance of investing in radiotherapy, as well as broader cancer control strategies, in low-resource settings. The Lancet Radiotherapy Commission report published in 2015 challenged many assumptions about the affordability of radiotherapy treatment. Data from the Commission is presented here to support radiotherapy investment for breast cancer and discuss how the morbidity and premature mortality among adult women caused by breast cancer has a huge detrimental effect on both the health sector and the economy.

  7. Japanese structure survey of high-precision radiotherapy in 2012 based on institutional questionnaire about the patterns of care.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Natsuo; Kodaira, Takeshi; Teshima, Teruki; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Kumazaki, Yu; Yamauchi, Chikako; Toita, Takafumi; Uno, Takashi; Sumi, Minako; Onishi, Hiroshi; Kenjo, Masahiro; Nakamura, Katsumasa

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify operational situations, treatment planning and processes, quality assurance and quality control with relevance to stereotactic radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and image-guided radiotherapy in Japan. We adopted 109 items as the quality indicators of high-precision radiotherapy to prepare a questionnaire. In April 2012, we started to publicly open the questionnaire on the website, requesting every institution with radiotherapy machines for response. The response ratio was 62.1% (490 out of 789 institutions responded). Two or more radiotherapy technologists per linear accelerator managed linear accelerator operation in ∼90% of the responded institutions while medical physicists/radiotherapy quality managers were engaged in the operation in only 64.9% of the institutions. Radiotherapy certified nurses also worked in only 18.4% of the institutions. The ratios of the institutions equipped for stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumor, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and image-guided radiotherapy were 43.3, 32.6 and 46.8%, respectively. In intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning, radiation oncologists were usually responsible for delineation while medical physicists/radiotherapy quality managers or radiotherapy technologists set up beam in 33.3% of the institutions. The median time required for quality assurance of intensity-modulated radiotherapy at any site of brain, head and neck and prostate was 4 h. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy quality assurance activity had to be started after clinical hours in >60% of the institutions. This study clarified one major issue in the current high-precision radiotherapy in Japan. A manpower shortage should be corrected for high-precision radiotherapy, especially in the area relevant to quality assurance/quality control. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. The Emerging Role of Carbon-Ion Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ebner, Daniel K.; Kamada, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-ion radiotherapy (CIRT) has progressed rapidly in technological delivery, indications, and efficacy. Owing to a focused dose distribution in addition to high linear energy transfer and subsequently high relative biological effect, CIRT is uniquely able to target otherwise untreatable hypoxic and radioresistant disease while opening the door for substantially hypofractionated treatment of normal and radiosensitive disease. CIRT has increasingly garnered international attention and is nearing the tipping point for international adoption. PMID:27376030

  9. Clinical exuberance of classic Kaposi's sarcoma and response to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Jeniffer Muñoz; Alves, Natália Ribeiro de Magalhães; Medeiros, Paula Mota; Azulay-Abulafia, Luna; Alves, Maria de Fátima Guimarães Scotelaro; Gripp, Alexandre Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a multicentric vascular neoplasm, with cutaneous and extracutaneous involvement. Different clinical and epidemiological variants have been identified. The classic form is manifested mainly in elderly men with indolent and long-term evolution, with lesions localized primarily in the lower extremities. We present two cases of classic Kaposi's sarcoma (CKS) in two female patients with extensive, exuberant skin involvement and rapid evolution, with good response to radiotherapy.

  10. Changes in breast radiotherapy: prone positioning and hypofractionation.

    PubMed

    Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Maisonet, Olivier; Formenti, Silvia C

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer management has drastically changed since the 1990s. Many patients with breast cancer now can opt to conserve their breast through a lumpectomy and radiation (breast conservation therapy), rather than a full mastectomy. Advances in the techniques of delivery and length of breast radiotherapy have been rapidly evolving. This article attempts to summarize some of those changes for nurses caring for patients with breast cancer during radiation therapy.

  11. MR Imaging Based Treatment Planning for Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    Ma C, Paskalev K, Jacob R, Chen L, Feigenberg S, Movsas B. Feasibility study for clinical implementation of dose hypofractionation with IMRT for...from or supported in part by this grant: NIH R01 (PI: Wang L): Improving treatment accuracy for hypofractionated SRT (submitted in Oct. 2004...E E K et al 2003 Evidence for efficacy without increased toxicity of hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma: early results of a Phase

  12. MR Imaging Based Treatment Planning for Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    image- guided stereotactic localization in the hypofractionated treatment of lung cancer. Int. J. Rad. Oncol. Bio. Phys. 66: 738-747, 2006. Chapters...L, Ma C. Benefit of 3D image-guided stereotactic localization in the hypofractionated treatment of lung cancer. Proc. Medical Physics, 33(6), 1993...9. Amer AM, Mott J, Mackay RI, et al. Prediction of the benefits from dose-escalated hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy for

  13. Human mesenchymal stem cells enhance the systemic effects of radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo Farias, Virgínea; O'Valle, Francisco; Lerma, Borja Alonso; Ruiz de Almodóvar, Carmen; López-Peñalver, Jesús J.; Nieto, Ana; Santos, Ana; Fernández, Beatriz Irene; Guerra-Librero, Ana; Ruiz-Ruiz, María Carmen; Guirado, Damián; Schmidt, Thomas; Oliver, Francisco Javier; Ruiz de Almodóvar, José Mariano

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of radiotherapy treatment might be further improved by a better understanding of individual variations in tumor radiosensitivity and normal tissue reactions, including the bystander effect. For many tumors, however, a definitive cure cannot be achieved, despite the availablity of more and more effective cancer treatments. Therefore, any improvement in the efficacy of radiotherapy will undoubtedly benefit a significant number of patients. Many experimental studies measure a bystander component of tumor cell death after radiotherapy, which highlights the importance of confirming these observations in a preclinical situation. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been investigated for use in the treatment of cancers as they are able to both preferentially home onto tumors and become incorporated into their stroma. This process increases after radiation therapy. In our study we show that in vitro MSCs, when activated with a low dose of radiation, are a source of anti-tumor cytokines that decrease the proliferative activity of tumor cells, producing a potent cytotoxic synergistic effect on tumor cells. In vivo administration of unirradiated mesenchymal cells together with radiation leads to an increased efficacy of radiotherapy, thus leading to an enhancement of short and long range bystander effects on primary-irradiated tumors and distant-non-irradiated tumors. Our experiments indicate an increased cell loss rate and the decrease in the tumor cell proliferation activity as the major mechanisms underlying the delayed tumor growth and are a strong indicator of the synergistic effect between RT and MSC when they are applied together for tumor treatment in this model. PMID:26378036

  14. Interstitial radiotherapy with Ir192 in vulvar cancer.

    PubMed

    Carlino, G; Parisi, S; Montemaggi, P; Pastore, G

    1984-01-01

    Radical surgical intervention is not always possible in vulvar tumours, particularly in infiltrating forms of paraurethral locations. In our case-series, the supplementary performance of Curietherapy, particularly with Radium substitutes (Iridium 192) and following the afterloading method, has enabled us not only to obtain long disease-free periods but also, coupled with the "large volume" of External Radiotherapy, to master forms exceeding the surgical action scope.

  15. Second Malignant Neoplasms and Cardiovascular Disease Following Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Andrea K.; Allan, James M.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Kennedy, Ann R.; Xu, X. George; Purdy, James A.; Applegate, Kimberly; Yahalom, Joachim; Constine, Louis S.; Gilbert, Ethel S.; Boice, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are among the most serious and life-threatening late adverse effects experienced by the growing number of cancer survivors worldwide and are due in part to radiotherapy. The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) convened an expert scientific committee to critically and comprehensively review associations between radiotherapy and SMNs and CVD, taking into account radiobiology; genomics; treatment (ie, radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy and other therapies); type of radiation; and quantitative considerations (ie, dose–response relationships). Major conclusions of the NCRP include: 1) the relevance of older technologies for current risk assessment when organ-specific absorbed dose and the appropriate relative biological effectiveness are taken into account and 2) the identification of critical research needs with regard to newer radiation modalities, dose–response relationships, and genetic susceptibility. Recommendation for research priorities and infrastructural requirements include 1) long-term large-scale follow-up of extant cancer survivors and prospectively treated patients to characterize risks of SMNs and CVD in terms of radiation dose and type; 2) biological sample collection to integrate epidemiological studies with molecular and genetic evaluations; 3) investigation of interactions between radiotherapy and other potential confounding factors, such as age, sex, race, tobacco and alcohol use, dietary intake, energy balance, and other cofactors, as well as genetic susceptibility; 4) focusing on adolescent and young adult cancer survivors, given the sparse research in this population; and 5) construction of comprehensive risk prediction models for SMNs and CVD to permit the development of follow-up guidelines and prevention and intervention strategies. PMID:22312134

  16. Contrast enhancement of high-energy radiotherapy films.

    PubMed

    Reinstein, L E; Orton, C G

    1979-11-01

    An order-of-magnitude improvment in the contrast of high-energy localization and verification films has been achieved through the application of a simple, inexpensive, contrast enhancement technique. The method involves making reversal contact "prints" of the original film onto ordinary X-ray fi-m with equipment commonly available in any radiotherapy department. This results in "gamma multiplication". The theory as well as several applications of this effect are presented.

  17. Hypofractionation Regimens for Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Large Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Jiankui; Wang, Jian Z. Lo, Simon; Grecula, John C.; Ammirati, Mario; Montebello, Joseph F.; Zhang Hualin; Gupta, Nilendu; Yuh, William T.C.; Mayr, Nina A.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate equivalent regimens for hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT) for brain tumor treatment and to provide dose-escalation guidance to maximize the tumor control within the normal brain tolerance. Methods and Materials: The linear-quadratic model, including the effect of nonuniform dose distributions, was used to evaluate the HSRT regimens. The {alpha}/{beta} ratio was estimated using the Gammaknife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS) and whole-brain radiotherapy experience for large brain tumors. The HSRT regimens were derived using two methods: (1) an equivalent tumor control approach, which matches the whole-brain radiotherapy experience for many fractions and merges it with the GKSRS data for few fractions; and (2) a normal-tissue tolerance approach, which takes advantages of the dose conformity and fractionation of HSRT to approach the maximal dose tolerance of the normal brain. Results: A plausible {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 12 Gy for brain tumor and a volume parameter n of 0.23 for normal brain were derived from the GKSRS and whole-brain radiotherapy data. The HSRT prescription regimens for the isoeffect of tumor irradiation were calculated. The normal-brain equivalent uniform dose decreased as the number of fractions increased, because of the advantage of fractionation. The regimens for potential dose escalation of HSRT within the limits of normal-brain tolerance were derived. Conclusions: The designed hypofractionated regimens could be used as a preliminary guide for HSRT dose prescription for large brain tumors to mimic the GKSRS experience and for dose escalation trials. Clinical studies are necessary to further tune the model parameters and validate these regimens.

  18. Nimotuzumab in combination with radiotherapy in high grade glioma patients

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Maria Teresa; Miranda, Nederlay; Jorrín, Eugenia; Chon, Ivonne; Marinello, Jorge Juan; Alert, José; Lorenzo-Luaces, Patricia; Crombet, Tania

    2014-01-01

    Nimotuzumab, a humanized antibody targeting epidermal growth factor receptor, has potent anti-proliferative, anti-angiogenic, and pro-apoptotic effects in vitro and in vivo. It also reduces the number of radio-resistant CD133+ glioma stem cells. The antibody has been extensively evaluated in patients with advanced head and neck, glioma, lung, esophageal, pancreatic, and gastric cancer. In this single institution experience, 35 patients with anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) or glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) were treated with irradiation and 200 mg doses of nimotuzumab. The first 6 doses were administered weekly, together with radiotherapy, and then treatment continued every 21 days until 1 year. The median number of doses was 12, and the median cumulative dose was thus 2400 mg of nimotuzumab. The most frequent treatment-related toxicities were increase in liver function tests, fever, nausea, anorexia, asthenia, dizziness, and tremors. These adverse reactions were classified as mild and moderate. The median survival time was 12.4 mo or 27.0 mo for patients with GBM or AA patients, respectively, who received curative-intent radiotherapy in combination with the antibody. The survival time of a matched population treated at the same hospital with irradiation alone was decreased (median 8.0 and 12.2 mo for GBM and AA patients, respectively) compared with that of the patients who received nimotuzumab and curative-intent radiotherapy. We have thus confirmed that nimotuzumab is a very well-tolerated drug, lacking cumulative toxicity after maintenance doses. This study, in a poor prognosis population, validates the previous data of survival gain after combining nimotuzumab and radiotherapy, in newly diagnosed high-grade glioma patients. PMID:24521695

  19. Image-guided radiotherapy and motion management in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this review, image guidance and motion management in radiotherapy for lung cancer is discussed. Motion characteristics of lung tumours and image guidance techniques to obtain motion information are elaborated. Possibilities for management of image guidance and motion in the various steps of the treatment chain are explained, including imaging techniques and beam delivery techniques. Clinical studies using different motion management techniques are reviewed, and finally future directions for image guidance and motion management are outlined. PMID:25955231

  20. Clinical commissioning of online seed matching protocol for prostate radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Duffton, A; McNee, S; Muirhead, R; Alhasso, A

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to clinically commission an online seed matching image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) protocol using modern hardware/software for patients undergoing prostate radiotherapy. An essential constraint was to achieve this within a busy centre without reducing patient throughput, which had been reported with other techniques. Methods 45 patients had 3 fiducial markers inserted into the prostate and were imaged daily using kilovoltage orthogonal images with online correction applied before treatment. A total of 1612 image pairs were acquired and analysed to identify interfractional motion, seed migration and interobserver variability, and assess ease of use. Results This method of IGRT was implemented successfully in our centre with no impact on treatment times and patient throughput. Systematic (Σ) interfractional set-up errors were 2.2, 2.7 and 3.9 mm in right–left (RL), superoinferior (SI) and anteroposterior (AP) directions, respectively. Random (σ) interfractional set-up errors were 3.2 (RL), 3.7 (SI) and 5.7 mm (AP). There were significant differences between patients. Seed migration and interobserver variability were not significant issues. Conclusions The described technique is facilitated by the advanced imaging system, allowing a fast and effective method of correcting set-up errors before treatment. Extended implementation of this technique has improved treatment delivery to the majority of our prostate radiotherapy patients. The measurement of interfractional motion in this study is potentially valuable for margin reduction in intensity-modulated radiotherapy/volumetric arc therapy. Advances in knowledge This technique can be used within treatment time constraints, benefiting large numbers of patients by helping to avoid geographical miss and potentially reducing toxicity to organs at risk. PMID:23175493

  1. a Liquid Ionization Chamber as Monitor in Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berghöfer, Th.; Engler, J.; Milke, J. M.; Hörandel, J. R.; Hartmann, G. H.

    2006-04-01

    First measurements with a prototype liquid ionization chamber are described to be applied as an online-monitor for intensity modulated radiotherapy. The detector consists of 480 individual electronic channels which allow parallel read-out of radiation induced currents at frequencies exceeding 10 Hz. Dose gradients in the direction of leaf movement of a multileaf collimator have been measured and a reconstruction method for individual leaf positions has been developed. The achieved reconstruction accuracy will be described.

  2. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy with High Energy Photon and Hadron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelfke, U.

    2004-07-01

    This short contribution will briefly describe the basic concepts of intensity modulated radiation therapy with high energy photons (IMRT) and charged particle beams (IMPT). Dose delivery and optimization strategies like the `Inverse Planning' approach will be explained for both radiation modalities and their potential advantages are demonstrated for characteristic clinical examples. Finally, future development like image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and adaptive radiation therapy, based on functional imaging methods, will be introduced.

  3. [Radiotherapy for localized gastric and orbital MALT lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Quéro, L; Hennequin, C; Amorim, S; Guillerm, S; Ruskoné-Fourmestraux, A; Thieblemont, C

    2016-10-01

    Primary gastric and orbital MALT lymphomas are both low grade (indolent) B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Traditionally, these tumors are radiosensitive and have a good prognosis. In localized orbital and stages IE-IIE gastric MALT lymphomas without Helicobacter pylori infection or in case of persistent H. pylori infection after eradication therapy, several retrospective studies have shown that radiotherapy was an effective and well-tolerated treatment.

  4. [Automated delivery of codes for charge in radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Sauer, Michael; Volz, Steffen; Hall, Markus; Röhner, Fred; Frommhold, Hermann; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Heinemann, Felix

    2010-07-01

    For the medical billing of Radiotherapy every fraction has to be encoded, including date and time of all administered treatments. With fractions averaging 30 per patient and about 2,500 new patients every year the number of Radiotherapy codes reaches an amount of 70,000 and more. Therefore, an automated proceeding for transferring and processing therapy codes has been developed at the Department of Radiotherapy Freiburg, Germany. This is a joint project of the Department of Radiotherapy, the Administration Department, and the Central IT Department of the University Hospital of Freiburg. The project consists of several modules whose collaboration makes the projected automated transfer of treatment codes possible. The first step is to extract the data from the department's Clinical Information System (MOSAIQ). These data are transmitted to the Central IT Department via an HL7 interface, where a check for corresponding hospitalization data is performed. In the further processing of the data, a matching table plays an important role allowing the transformation of a treatment code into a valid medical billing code. In a last step, the data are transferred to the medical billing system. After assembling and implementing the particular modules successfully, a first beta test was launched. In order to test the modules separately as well as the interaction of the components, extensive tests were performed during March 2006. Soon it became clear that the tested procedure worked efficiently and accurately. In April 2006, a pilot project with a few qualities of treatment (e.g., computed tomography, simulation) was put into practice. Since October 2006, nearly all Radiation Therapy codes (approximately 75,000) are being transferred to the comprehensive Hospital Information System (HIS) automatically in a daily routine.

  5. Hypofractionated External-Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cho, L. Chinsoo; Timmerman, Robert; Kavanagh, Brian

    2013-01-01

    There are radiobiological rationales supporting hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer. The recent advancements in treatment planning and delivery allow sophisticated radiation treatments to take advantage of the differences in radiobiology of prostate cancer and the surrounding normal tissues. The preliminary results from clinical studies indicate that abbreviated fractionation programs can result in successful treatment of localized prostate cancer without escalation of late toxicity. PMID:23533777

  6. Early Hypofractionated Salvage Radiotherapy for Post-Prostatectomy Biochemical Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Kruser, Tim J.; Jarrard, David F.; Graf, Andrew K.; Hedican, Sean P.; Paolone, David R.; Wegenke, John D.; Liu, Glenn; Geye, Heather M.; Ritter, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Post-prostatectomy adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy, when using standard fractionation, requires 6.5–8 weeks of treatment. We report on the safety and efficacy of an expedited radiotherapy course for salvage prostate radiotherapy. Methods A total of 108 consecutive patients were treated with salvage radiation therapy to 65 Gy in 26 fractions of 2.5 Gy. Median follow-up was 32.4 months. Median pre-salvage PSA was 0.44 (0.05–9.50). Eighteen patients (17%) received androgen deprivation following surgery or concurrently with radiation. Results The actuarial freedom from biochemical failure for the entire group at 4 years was 67% +/− 5.3%. An identical 67% control rate was seen at 5 years for the first 50 enrolled patients whose median followup was longer at 43 months. One acute grade 3 GU toxicity occurred, with no acute grade 3 GI and no late grade 3 toxicities observed. On univariate analysis, higher Gleason score (p=0.006), PSA doubling time ≤ 12 months (p=0.03), perineural invasion (p=0.06), and negative margins (p=0.06) showed association with unsuccessful salvage. On multivariate analysis, higher Gleason score (p=0.057) and negative margins (p=0.088) retained an association with biochemical failure. Conclusions Hypofractionated radiotherapy (65 Gy in 2.5 Gy fractions in about 5 weeks) reduces the length of treatment by from 1–1/2 to 3 weeks relative to other treatment schedules commonly employed, produces low rates of loxicity, and demonstrates encouraging efficacy at 4 – 5 years. Hypofractionation may provide a convenient, resource efficient and well-tolerated salvage approach for the estimated 20–35,000 US men per year experiencing biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy. PMID:21656740

  7. Increased stomach cancer risk following radiotherapy for testicular cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hauptmann, M; Fossa, S D; Stovall, M; van Leeuwen, F E; Johannesen, T B; Rajaraman, P; Gilbert, E S; Smith, S A; Weathers, R E; Aleman, B M P; Andersson, M; Curtis, R E; Dores, G M; Fraumeni, J F; Hall, P; Holowaty, E J; Joensuu, H; Kaijser, M; Kleinerman, R A; Langmark, F; Lynch, C F; Pukkala, E; Storm, H H; Vaalavirta, L; van den Belt-Dusebout, A W; Travis, L B; Morton, L M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Abdominal radiotherapy for testicular cancer (TC) increases risk for second stomach cancer, although data on the radiation dose–response relationship are sparse. Methods: In a cohort of 22 269 5-year TC survivors diagnosed during 1959–1987, doses to stomach subsites were estimated for 92 patients who developed stomach cancer and 180 matched controls. Chemotherapy details were recorded. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using logistic regression. Results: Cumulative incidence of second primary stomach cancer was 1.45% at 30 years after TC diagnosis. The TC survivors who received radiotherapy (87 (95%) cases, 151 (84%) controls) had a 5.9-fold (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7–20.7) increased risk of stomach cancer. Risk increased with increasing stomach dose (P-trend<0.001), with an OR of 20.5 (3.7–114.3) for ⩾50.0 Gy compared with <10 Gy. Radiation-related risks remained elevated ⩾20 years after exposure (P<0.001). Risk after any chemotherapy was not elevated (OR=1.1; 95% CI 0.5–2.5; 14 cases and 23 controls). Conclusions: Radiotherapy for TC involving parts of the stomach increased gastric cancer risk for several decades, with the highest risks after stomach doses of ⩾30 Gy. Clinicians should be aware of these excesses when previously irradiated TC survivors present with gastrointestinal symptoms and when any radiotherapy is considered in newly diagnosed TC patients. PMID:25349972

  8. More Ions for Radiotherapy: About Treatment Planning and Track Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, M.

    2017-03-01

    In the recent years, irradiation with swift light ions - from protons up to oxygen -has become an established method in tumour radiotherapy.A prerequisite for successful treatment is the sufficient knowledge of physical and radiobiological processes down to the microscopic or even nanoscopic scale. This report summarizes recent developments. In particular the application of ions other than protons and carbon will be addressed, as well as modelling approaches on the nanoscale.

  9. Hypofractionation regimens for stereotactic radiotherapy for large brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jiankui; Wang, Jian Z; Lo, Simon; Grecula, John C; Ammirati, Mario; Montebello, Joseph F; Zhang, Hualin; Gupta, Nilendu; Yuh, William T C; Mayr, Nina A

    2008-10-01

    To investigate equivalent regimens for hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT) for brain tumor treatment and to provide dose-escalation guidance to maximize the tumor control within the normal brain tolerance. The linear-quadratic model, including the effect of nonuniform dose distributions, was used to evaluate the HSRT regimens. The alpha/beta ratio was estimated using the Gammaknife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS) and whole-brain radiotherapy experience for large brain tumors. The HSRT regimens were derived using two methods: (1) an equivalent tumor control approach, which matches the whole-brain radiotherapy experience for many fractions and merges it with the GKSRS data for few fractions; and (2) a normal-tissue tolerance approach, which takes advantages of the dose conformity and fractionation of HSRT to approach the maximal dose tolerance of the normal brain. A plausible alpha/beta ratio of 12 Gy for brain tumor and a volume parameter n of 0.23 for normal brain were derived from the GKSRS and whole-brain radiotherapy data. The HSRT prescription regimens for the isoeffect of tumor irradiation were calculated. The normal-brain equivalent uniform dose decreased as the number of fractions increased, because of the advantage of fractionation. The regimens for potential dose escalation of HSRT within the limits of normal-brain tolerance were derived. The designed hypofractionated regimens could be used as a preliminary guide for HSRT dose prescription for large brain tumors to mimic the GKSRS experience and for dose escalation trials. Clinical studies are necessary to further tune the model parameters and validate these regimens.

  10. Rapid onset of cutaneous angiosarcoma after radiotherapy for breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Otis, C.N.; Peschel, R.; McKhann, C.; Merino, M.J.; Duray, P.H.

    1986-06-01

    Malignant neoplasms known to develop following external beam radiation include squamous cell carcinoma, osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, mixed mullerian tumors, malignant schwannoma, myelogenous leukemia and angiosarcoma. Latency periods of many years characterize the onset of these tumors following the exposure. Cutaneous angiosarcoma following radiotherapy for breast carcinoma has been rarely documented, occurring up to 13 years postirradiation. Two cases of this entity are reported occurring 37 months postradiotherapy at the site of mastectomy performed for mammary duct carcinoma.

  11. Prospects for antibody-targeted radiotherapy of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wheldon, T.E.; O'Donoghue, J.A.; Epenetos, A.A.

    1986-09-06

    In this series of letters, the prospects for antibody-targeted radiotherapy of cancer are reviewed. Issues discussed include modelling, especially in connection with purging tumour cells from bone marrow as part of leukemia treatment, and the application of models to regional intracavity instillation (e.g. ovarian cancer), the distribution of radioactivity throughout the tumour mass and the tumour volume doubling time. (U.K.).

  12. The Efficacy of Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Orbital Pseudotumor

    SciTech Connect

    Matthiesen, Chance; Bogardus, Carl; Thompson, J. Spencer; Farris, Bradley; Hildebrand, Lloyd; Wilkes, Byron; Syzek, Elizabeth; Algan, Ozer; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Herman, Terence

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To review institutional outcomes for patients treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for orbital pseudotumor. Methods and Materials: This is a single-institution retrospective review of 20 orbits in 16 patients diagnosed with orbital pseudotumor that received EBRT at the University of Oklahoma, Department of Radiation Oncology. Treated patients had a median follow-up of 16.5 months. Results: Fifteen patients (93.7%) were initially treated with corticosteroids. Eight had recurrence after steroid cessation, six were unable to taper corticosteroids completely or partially, and one experienced progression of symptoms despite corticosteroid therapy. Fourteen patients (87.5%) initially responded to radiotherapy indicated by clinical improvement of preradiation symptoms and/or tapering of corticosteroid dose. Mean EBRT dose was 20 Gy (range, 14-30 Gy). Thirteen patients (81.2%) continued to improve after radiation therapy. Patient outcomes were complete cessation of corticosteroid therapy in nine patients (56.3%) and reduced corticosteroid dose in four patients (25%). Radiotherapy did not achieve long-term control for three patients (18.7%), who still required preradiation corticosteroid dosages. Three patients received retreatment(s) of four orbits, of which two patients achieved long-term symptom control without corticosteroid dependence. One patient received retreatment to an orbit three times, achieving long-term control without corticosteroid dependence. No significant late effects have been observed in retreated patients. Conclusions: Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for acute symptomatic improvement and long-term control of orbital pseudotumor. Orbital retreatment can be of clinical benefit, without apparent increase in morbidity, when initial irradiation fails to achieve complete response.

  13. Predictors of Radiotherapy Induced Bone Injury (RIBI) after stereotactic lung radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify clinical and dosimetric factors associated with radiotherapy induced bone injury (RIBI) following stereotactic lung radiotherapy. Methods Inoperable patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer, treated with SBRT, who received 54 or 60 Gy in 3 fractions, and had a minimum of 6 months follow up were reviewed. Archived treatment plans were retrieved, ribs delineated individually and treatment plans re-computed using heterogeneity correction. Clinical and dosimetric factors were evaluated for their association with rib fracture using logistic regression analysis; a dose-event curve and nomogram were created. Results 46 consecutive patients treated between Oct 2004 and Dec 2008 with median follow-up 25 months (m) (range 6 – 51 m) were eligible. 41 fractured ribs were detected in 17 patients; median time to fracture was 21 m (range 7 – 40 m). The mean maximum point dose in non-fractured ribs (n = 1054) was 10.5 Gy ± 10.2 Gy, this was higher in fractured ribs (n = 41) 48.5 Gy ± 24.3 Gy (p < 0.0001). On univariate analysis, age, dose to 0.5 cc of the ribs (D0.5), and the volume of the rib receiving at least 25 Gy (V25), were significantly associated with RIBI. As D0.5 and V25 were cross-correlated (Spearman correlation coefficient: 0.57, p < 0.001), we selected D0.5 as a representative dose parameter. On multivariate analysis, age (odds ratio: 1.121, 95% CI: 1.04 – 1.21, p = 0.003), female gender (odds ratio: 4.43, 95% CI: 1.68 – 11.68, p = 0.003), and rib D0.5 (odds ratio: 1.0009, 95% CI: 1.0007 – 1.001, p < 0.0001) were significantly associated with rib fracture. Using D0.5, a dose-event curve was constructed estimating risk of fracture from dose at the median follow up of 25 months after treatment. In our cohort, a 50% risk of rib fracture was associated with a D0.5 of 60 Gy. Conclusions Dosimetric and clinical factors contribute to

  14. Improving external beam radiotherapy by combination with internal irradiation.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, A; Koi, L; Zöphel, K; Sihver, W; Kotzerke, J; Baumann, M; Krause, M

    2015-07-01

    The efficacy of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is dose dependent, but the dose that can be applied to solid tumour lesions is limited by the sensitivity of the surrounding tissue. The combination of EBRT with systemically applied radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is a promising approach to increase efficacy of radiotherapy. Toxicities of both treatment modalities of this combination of internal and external radiotherapy (CIERT) are not additive, as different organs at risk are in target. However, advantages of both single treatments are combined, for example, precise high dose delivery to the bulk tumour via standard EBRT, which can be increased by addition of RIT, and potential targeting of micrometastases by RIT. Eventually, theragnostic radionuclide pairs can be used to predict uptake of the radiotherapeutic drug prior to and during therapy and find individual patients who may benefit from this treatment. This review aims to highlight the outcome of pre-clinical studies on CIERT and resultant questions for translation into the clinic. Few clinical data are available until now and reasons as well as challenges for clinical implementation are discussed.

  15. Heel spur radiotherapy and radiation carcinogenesis risk estimation.

    PubMed

    Surenkok, Serdar; Dirican, Bahar; Beyzadeoglu, Murat; Oysul, Kaan

    2006-10-01

    Radiotherapy is a nonsurgical alternative therapy of painful heel spur patients. Nonetheless, cancer induction is the most important somatic effect of ionizing radiation. This study was designed to evaluate the carcinogenesis risk factor in benign painful heel spur patients treated by radiotherapy. Between 1974 and 1999, a total of 20 patients received mean 8.16 Gy total irradiation dose in two fractions. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD(100)) were placed on multiple phantom sites in vivo within the irradiated volume to verify irradiation accuracy and carcinogenesis risk factor calculation. The 20 still-alive patients, who had a minimum 5-year and maximum 29-year follow-up (mean 11.9 years), have been evaluated by carcinogenic radiation risk factor on the basis of tissue weighting factors as defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 60. Reasonable pain relief has been obtained in all 20 patients. The calculated mean carcinogenesis risk factor is 1.3% for radiation portals in the whole group, and no secondary cancer has been clinically observed. Radiotherapy is an effective treatment modality for relieving pain in calcaneal spur patients. The estimated secondary cancer risk factor for irradiation of this benign lesion is not as high as was feared.

  16. Energy Modulated Photon Radiotherapy: A Monte Carlo Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Feng, Yuanming; Ming, Xin

    2016-01-01

    A novel treatment modality termed energy modulated photon radiotherapy (EMXRT) was investigated. The first step of EMXRT was to determine beam energy for each gantry angle/anatomy configuration from a pool of photon energy beams (2 to 10 MV) with a newly developed energy selector. An inverse planning system using gradient search algorithm was then employed to optimize photon beam intensity of various beam energies based on presimulated Monte Carlo pencil beam dose distributions in patient anatomy. Finally, 3D dose distributions in six patients of different tumor sites were simulated with Monte Carlo method and compared between EMXRT plans and clinical IMRT plans. Compared to current IMRT technique, the proposed EMXRT method could offer a better paradigm for the radiotherapy of lung cancers and pediatric brain tumors in terms of normal tissue sparing and integral dose. For prostate, head and neck, spine, and thyroid lesions, the EMXRT plans were generally comparable to the IMRT plans. Our feasibility study indicated that lower energy (<6 MV) photon beams could be considered in modern radiotherapy treatment planning to achieve a more personalized care for individual patient with dosimetric gains. PMID:26977413

  17. Radiotherapy Adapted to Spatial and Temporal Variability in Tumor Hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Sovik, Aste; Malinen, Eirik . E-mail: emalinen@fys.uio.no; Skogmo, Hege K.; Bentzen, Soren M.; Bruland, Oyvind S.; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility and clinical potential of adapting radiotherapy to temporal and spatial variations in tumor oxygenation. Methods and Materials: Repeated dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance (DCEMR) images were taken of a canine sarcoma during the course of fractionated radiation therapy. The tumor contrast enhancement was assumed to represent the oxygen distribution. The IMRT plans were retrospectively adapted to the DCEMR images by employing tumor dose redistribution. Optimized nonuniform tumor dose distributions were calculated and compared with a uniform dose distribution delivering the same integral dose to the tumor. Clinical outcome was estimated from tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) modeling. Results: The biologically adapted treatment was found to give a substantial increase in TCP compared with conventional radiotherapy, even when only pretreatment images were used as basis for the treatment planning. The TCP was further increased by repeated replanning during the course of treatment, and replanning twice a week was found to give near optimal TCP. Random errors in patient positioning were found to give a small decrease in TCP, whereas systematic errors were found to reduce TCP substantially. NTCP for the adapted treatment was similar to or lower than for the conventional treatment, both for parallel and serial normal tissue structures. Conclusion: Biologically adapted radiotherapy is estimated to improve treatment outcome of tumors having spatial and temporal variations in radiosensitivity.

  18. Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Ewing's Sarcoma: Initial Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Rombi, Barbara; DeLaney, Thomas F.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Huang, Mary S.; Ebb, David H.; Liebsch, Norbert J.; Raskin, Kevin A.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Marcus, Karen J.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy (PT) has been prescribed similarly to photon radiotherapy to achieve comparable disease control rates at comparable doses. The chief advantage of protons in this setting is to reduce acute and late toxicities by decreasing the amount of normal tissue irradiated. We report the preliminary clinical outcomes including late effects on our pediatric Ewing's sarcoma patients treated with PT at the Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center at Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MA). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective review of the medical records of 30 children with Ewing's sarcoma who were treated with PT between April 2003 and April 2009. Results: A total of 14 male and 16 female patients with tumors in several anatomic sites were treated with PT at a median age of 10 years. The median dose was 54 Gy (relative biological effectiveness) with a median follow-up of 38.4 months. The 3-year actuarial rates of event-free survival, local control, and overall survival were 60%, 86%, and 89%, respectively. PT was acutely well tolerated, with mostly mild-to-moderate skin reactions. At the time of writing, the only serious late effects have been four hematologic malignancies, which are known risks of topoisomerase and anthracyline exposure. Conclusions: Proton radiotherapy was well tolerated, with few adverse events. Longer follow-up is needed to more fully assess tumor control and late effects, but the preliminary results are encouraging.

  19. Improving external beam radiotherapy by combination with internal irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Koi, L; Zöphel, K; Sihver, W; Kotzerke, J; Baumann, M; Krause, M

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is dose dependent, but the dose that can be applied to solid tumour lesions is limited by the sensitivity of the surrounding tissue. The combination of EBRT with systemically applied radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is a promising approach to increase efficacy of radiotherapy. Toxicities of both treatment modalities of this combination of internal and external radiotherapy (CIERT) are not additive, as different organs at risk are in target. However, advantages of both single treatments are combined, for example, precise high dose delivery to the bulk tumour via standard EBRT, which can be increased by addition of RIT, and potential targeting of micrometastases by RIT. Eventually, theragnostic radionuclide pairs can be used to predict uptake of the radiotherapeutic drug prior to and during therapy and find individual patients who may benefit from this treatment. This review aims to highlight the outcome of pre-clinical studies on CIERT and resultant questions for translation into the clinic. Few clinical data are available until now and reasons as well as challenges for clinical implementation are discussed. PMID:25782328

  20. Characteristic evaluation of photoneutron in radiotherapy room using MCNPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, E.-T.; Kim, J.-H.; Kim, C.-S.; Kang, S.-S.

    2015-08-01

    Linear accelerators are now playing a pivotal role in radiotherapy and high energy photon beams of a strength exceeding 8 MV have recently been mainly used. However, when using high energy photons, neutron contamination due to photonuclear reaction develops. This study focused on the dose distribution of photoneutrons emitted from a linear accelerator using Monte Carlo MCNPX code. MCNPX was used to simulate transportation of photoneutrons in the linear accelerator and the entire space of the radiotherapy room and is useful for calculating the flux, spectrum and absorbed dose. As result of the simulation, we could know that the neutron absorbed dose was as less as negligible when comparing to the photon absorbed dose in radiotherapy room. And it was found that the photoneutron flux increased substantially starting from 10 MV while the absorbed dose rose sharply between 10 MV and 12 MV. It was observed that although the ratio of thermal neutrons to fast neutrons was not altered as the energy increased, it was found that as the distance from the source increased the ratio of thermal neutrons rose markedly.