Science.gov

Sample records for supporting frequent updates

  1. Research Supports Value of Updated School Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielding, Randall

    2012-01-01

    Two recent peer-reviewed studies support the need to update the traditional school design model that has remained fundamentally unchanged for over a century. In a 2011 study published by the American Educational Research Journal, entitled "Problem-Based Learning in K-12 Education," Clarice Wirkala and Deanna Kuhn document a 200-500…

  2. Research Supports Value of Updated School Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielding, Randall

    2012-01-01

    Two recent peer-reviewed studies support the need to update the traditional school design model that has remained fundamentally unchanged for over a century. In a 2011 study published by the American Educational Research Journal, entitled "Problem-Based Learning in K-12 Education," Clarice Wirkala and Deanna Kuhn document a 200-500…

  3. Truss systems for longwall tailgate support -- Update

    SciTech Connect

    Stankus, J.C.; Guo, S.; Peng, S.S.

    1995-11-01

    At the 13th Conference on Ground Control in Mining, a paper was presented detailing a successful test in which a new truss system was utilized, in lieu of wood cribs, for tailgate support in the Pittsburgh seam (Stankus et al., 1994). Since that time, additional tests using this same truss system in the Pittsburgh and other seams are now complete. Also, several mines are now using trusses for full panel tailgate support with no cribs. Through an extensive instrumentation program, much data and new information has been gained from these tests and the full panel usage. From this data, no only have new concepts pertaining to tailgate support been developed, but also for headgate, pillar configuration, primary and supplemental support. In this paper, an update will be presented summarizing the result of these various tailgates.

  4. [Glossary of bioethics terms frequently used in nutrition support].

    PubMed

    Moreno Villares, J M; Alvarez Hernández, J; Wanden-Berghe Lozano, C; Lozano Fuster, M

    2010-01-01

    Bioethical decisions are present in every clinical decision. Nutrition support participates the same situation. Feeding critically ill patients, etriminal patients or in permanent vegetative status is almost always involved in bioethical dilemmas. A common problem is the confusion in concepts regarding bioethics. This lack of uniformity does not help in the deliberation process. From the Working Group in Bioethics of the Spanish Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Support (SENPE) it has been considered to gather the commonest terms used in our academic area. Each term is accompanied by a definition, a description or a commentary related to its main application.

  5. Rhinocerebral zygomycosis: an increasingly frequent challenge: update and favorable outcomes in two cases.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammed N; Cohen, Donald M; Celestina, Leslie J; Ojha, Junu; Claudio, Reinaldo; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel B

    2007-11-01

    Zygomycosis or mucormycosis is an increasingly frequent life-threatening infection caused by opportunistic fungal organisms of the class Zygomycetes. The pathognomonic feature is the presence of invasive aseptate mycelia that are larger than other filamentous fungi with the hyphae exhibiting right angle and haphazard branching. Usually classified as rhinocerebral, disseminated, and cutaneous types, this classification serves as important predictor of pathogenesis and outcome. These occur mostly in immunosuppressed patients including individuals with diabetes (43% exhibit the rhino-cerebral form) and patients with organ transplants and hematologic malignancies. Without early aggressive treatment, the disease follows a dismal and fatal course. The prognosis has not shown any appreciable change in the past 40 years with a stagnant mortality rate of 44%. We present 2 cases of rhinocerebral zygomycosis (RCZ), in a 58-year-old male and a 63-year-old female; both were poorly controlled diabetic patients with maxillary lesions suggestive of osteomyelitis. The patients were leading a near normal life with minimal discomfort or signs and symptoms of underlying mycosis. Most of the health care professionals treating these patients often overlooked the disease or recommended inadequate therapy. Despite long delays and inadequate initial therapy these patients survived with little outward morbidity. The prognosis for this condition may therefore be considered less dire than previously thought.

  6. 7. Mentor update and support: what do mentors need from an update?

    PubMed

    Phillips, Mari; Marshall, Joyce

    2015-04-01

    Mentorship is the 14th series of 'Midwifery basics' targeted at practising midwives. The aim of these articles is to provide information to raise awareness of the impact of the work of midwives on women's experience, and encourage midwives to seek further information through a series of activities relating to the topic. In this seventh article Mari Phillips and Joyce Marshall consider some of the key issues related to mentor update and support and consider what mentors need from their annual update.

  7. Drug Free Communities Support Program. Prevention Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Administered by the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), in partnership with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the Drug Free Communities Support Program (DFC) is a federal grant program that provides funding to community-based coalitions that organize to prevent youth substance use. Since the…

  8. Life events, social support and sense of coherence among frequent attenders in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Bergh, H; Baigi, A; Fridlund, B; Marklund, B

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this survey was to compare stressful life events, social support and sense of coherence (SOC) between frequent attenders (FAs) and normal attenders (controls) in primary health care. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a primary healthcare centre in the south-west of Sweden. A postal questionnaire was sent to 263 frequent attenders and 703 normal attenders. The questionnaire comprised sociodemographic variables and scales of stressful life events, social support and SOC. The results from the questionnaire were compared between the groups, and the significance of the variables in terms of attendance was tested in a multiple regression analysis. More of the FAs were secondarily single, they had more chronic diseases and were more often living on a sickness/disablement pension than the controls. FAs did not report more stressful life events than the controls nor was their experience of events more negative. Social support was as strong among FAs as among controls, and it had no significant effect on their frequent attendance. FAs had a significantly weaker SOC compared with controls. The variables that significantly influenced frequent attendance were high age [odds ratio (OR) = 1.02], chronic disease (OR = 3.08), sickness/disablement pension (OR = 2.46) and SOC (OR = 0.97). SOC had a significant influence on frequent attendance in primary health care, but stressful life events and social support did not. FAs did not report more stressful life events. However, due to an inadequate coping strategy, indicated by a weak SOC, the life events probably caused them more symptoms and diseases, and thereby a higher consulting frequency.

  9. Advanced integrated life support system update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitley, Phillip E.

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Integrated Life Support System Program (AILSS) is an advanced development effort to integrate the life support and protection requirements using the U.S. Navy's fighter/attack mission as a starting point. The goal of AILSS is to optimally mate protection from altitude, acceleration, chemical/biological agent, thermal environment (hot, cold, and cold water immersion) stress as well as mission enhancement through improved restraint, night vision, and head-mounted reticules and displays to ensure mission capability. The primary emphasis to date has been to establish garment design requirements and tradeoffs for protection. Here the garment and the human interface are treated as a system. Twelve state-off-the-art concepts from government and industry were evaluated for design versus performance. On the basis of a combination of centrifuge, thermal manikin data, thermal modeling, and mobility studies, some key design parameters have been determined. Future efforts will concentrate on the integration of protection through garment design and the use of a single layer, multiple function concept to streamline the garment system.

  10. Advanced integrated life support system update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitley, Phillip E.

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Integrated Life Support System Program (AILSS) is an advanced development effort to integrate the life support and protection requirements using the U.S. Navy's fighter/attack mission as a starting point. The goal of AILSS is to optimally mate protection from altitude, acceleration, chemical/biological agent, thermal environment (hot, cold, and cold water immersion) stress as well as mission enhancement through improved restraint, night vision, and head-mounted reticules and displays to ensure mission capability. The primary emphasis to date has been to establish garment design requirements and tradeoffs for protection. Here the garment and the human interface are treated as a system. Twelve state-off-the-art concepts from government and industry were evaluated for design versus performance. On the basis of a combination of centrifuge, thermal manikin data, thermal modeling, and mobility studies, some key design parameters have been determined. Future efforts will concentrate on the integration of protection through garment design and the use of a single layer, multiple function concept to streamline the garment system.

  11. Update on the Extracorporeal Life Support.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jin-Won

    2015-07-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is a type of cardiopulmonary bypass. It is an artificial means of supplying oxygen and removing CO2 on behalf of damaged lungs while patients are recovering from underlying diseases. Recently, the use of ECLS is rapidly increasing as this machine becomes smaller, less invasive and easier to use. In addition, the improvement of clinicians' technique and outcome is increasing their application to patients with acute respiratory distress. In this regard, the purpose of this review is to introduce the physiological principles, risk factors, and advantages of ECLS, clinical rationale for using ECLS, ventilatory strategy during ECLS, which are still causing different opinions, the weaning from ECLS, and the use of anticoagulant.

  12. The Most Frequently Asked Questions on the Education Rights of Children and Youth in Homeless Situations. Updated September 2016

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffield, Barbara; Julianelle, Patricia; Santos, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This document provides answers to frequently asked questions on the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act and the education rights of children and youth in homeless situations, based on the amendments made by the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015, which took effect on October 1, 2016. The answers are general responses based on federal statutes,…

  13. The Most Frequently Asked Questions on the Education Rights of Children and Youth in Homeless Situations. Updated September 2016

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffield, Barbara; Julianelle, Patricia; Santos, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This document provides answers to frequently asked questions on the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act and the education rights of children and youth in homeless situations, based on the amendments made by the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015, which took effect on October 1, 2016. The answers are general responses based on federal statutes,…

  14. LANDFIRE 2010 - updated data to support wildfire and ecological management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Kurtis J.; Connot, Joel A.; Peterson, Birgit E.; Picotte, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    Wildfire is a global phenomenon that affects human populations and ecosystems. Wildfire effects occur at local to global scales impacting many people in different ways (Figure 1). Ecological concerns due to land use, fragmentation, and climate change impact natural resource use, allocation, and conservation. Access to consistent and current environmental data is a constant challenge, yet necessary for understanding the complexities of wildfire and ecological management. Data products and tools from the LANDFIRE Program help decision-makers to clarify problems and identify possible solutions when managing fires and natural resources. LANDFIRE supports the reduction of risk from wildfire to human lives and property, monitoring of fire danger, prediction of fire behavior on active incidents, and assessment of fire severity and impacts on natural systems [1] [2] [3]. LANDFIRE products are unique in that they are nationally consistent and provide the only complete geospatial dataset describing vegetation and wildland fuel information for the entire U.S. As such, LANDFIRE data are useful for many ecological applications [3]. For example, LANDFIRE data were recently integrated into a decision-support system for resource management and conservation decision-making along the Appalachian Trail. LANDFIRE is a joint effort between the U.S. Department of the Interior Office of Wildland Fire, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service Fire & Aviation Management, and The Nature Conservancy. To date, seven versions of LANDFIRE data have been released, with each successive version improving the quality of the data, adding additional features, and/or updating the time period represented by the data. The latest version, LANDFIRE 2010 (LF 2010), released mid-2013, represents circa 2010 landscape conditions and succeeds LANDFIRE 2008 (LF 2008), which represented circa 2008 landscape conditions. LF 2010 used many of the same processes developed for the LF 2008 effort [3]. Ongoing

  15. Automatically updating predictive modeling workflows support decision-making in drug design.

    PubMed

    Muegge, Ingo; Bentzien, Jörg; Mukherjee, Prasenjit; Hughes, Robert O

    2016-09-01

    Using predictive models for early decision-making in drug discovery has become standard practice. We suggest that model building needs to be automated with minimum input and low technical maintenance requirements. Models perform best when tailored to answering specific compound optimization related questions. If qualitative answers are required, 2-bin classification models are preferred. Integrating predictive modeling results with structural information stimulates better decision making. For in silico models supporting rapid structure-activity relationship cycles the performance deteriorates within weeks. Frequent automated updates of predictive models ensure best predictions. Consensus between multiple modeling approaches increases the prediction confidence. Combining qualified and nonqualified data optimally uses all available information. Dose predictions provide a holistic alternative to multiple individual property predictions for reaching complex decisions.

  16. A frequent splicing mutation and novel missense mutations color the updated mutational spectrum of classic galactosemia in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Ana I; Ramos, Ruben; Gaspar, Ana; Costa, Cláudia; Oliveira, Anabela; Diogo, Luísa; Garcia, Paula; Paiva, Sandra; Martins, Esmeralda; Teles, Elisa Leão; Rodrigues, Esmeralda; Cardoso, M Teresa; Ferreira, Elena; Sequeira, Sílvia; Leite, Margarida; Silva, Maria João; de Almeida, Isabel Tavares; Vicente, João B; Rivera, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficient galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) activity. Patients develop symptoms in the neonatal period, which can be ameliorated by dietary restriction of galactose. Many patients develop long-term complications, with a broad range of clinical symptoms whose pathophysiology is poorly understood. The high allelic heterogeneity of GALT gene that characterizes this disorder is thought to play a determinant role in biochemical and clinical phenotypes. We aimed to characterize the mutational spectrum of GALT deficiency in Portugal and to assess potential genotype-phenotype correlations. Direct sequencing of the GALT gene and in silico analyses were employed to evaluate the impact of uncharacterized mutations upon GALT functionality. Molecular characterization of 42 galactosemic Portuguese patients revealed a mutational spectrum comprising 14 nucleotide substitutions: ten missense, two nonsense and two putative splicing mutations. Sixteen different genotypic combinations were detected, half of the patients being p.Q188R homozygotes. Notably, the second most frequent variation is a splicing mutation. In silico predictions complemented by a close-up on the mutations in the protein structure suggest that uncharacterized missense mutations have cumulative point effects on protein stability, oligomeric state, or substrate binding. One splicing mutation is predicted to cause an alternative splicing event. This study reinforces the difficulty in establishing a genotype-phenotype correlation in classic galactosemia, a monogenic disease whose complex pathogenesis and clinical features emphasize the need to expand the knowledge on this "cloudy" disorder.

  17. Mitochondrial fusion is frequent in skeletal muscle and supports excitation–contraction coupling

    PubMed Central

    Eisner, Verónica; Lenaers, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Genetic targeting experiments indicate a fundamental role for mitochondrial fusion proteins in mammalian physiology. However, owing to the multiple functions of fusion proteins, their related phenotypes are not necessarily caused by altered mitochondrial fusion. Perhaps the biggest mystery is presented by skeletal muscle, where mostly globular-shaped mitochondria are densely packed into the narrow intermyofilamental space, limiting the interorganellar interactions. We show here that mitochondria form local networks and regularly undergo fusion events to share matrix content in skeletal muscle fibers. However, fusion events are less frequent and more stable in the fibers than in nondifferentiated myoblasts. Complementation among muscle mitochondria was suppressed by both in vivo genetic perturbations and chronic alcohol consumption that cause myopathy. An Mfn1-dependent pathway is revealed whereby fusion inhibition weakens the metabolic reserve of mitochondria to cause dysregulation of calcium oscillations during prolonged stimulation. Thus, fusion dynamically connects skeletal muscle mitochondria and its prolonged loss jeopardizes bioenergetics and excitation–contraction coupling, providing a potential pathomechanism contributing to myopathies. PMID:24751540

  18. New Opportunities to Support Student Health under ESSA. Policy Update. Vol. 23, No. 15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fobbs, Erima; Mays, Alexandra; Rayburn, Jack

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of research links student health and academic achievement. The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) recognizes this and calls on states to support student health and wellness and ensure safe, supportive learning environments. This National Association of State Boards of Education (NASBE) Policy Update explains how states can take…

  19. New Opportunities to Support Student Health under ESSA. Policy Update. Vol. 23, No. 15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fobbs, Erima; Mays, Alexandra; Rayburn, Jack

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of research links student health and academic achievement. The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) recognizes this and calls on states to support student health and wellness and ensure safe, supportive learning environments. This National Association of State Boards of Education (NASBE) Policy Update explains how states can take…

  20. Updated Decision Support Tool for the Management of Waste ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Symposium Paper EPA's Office of Research and Development has developed a suite of web-based decision support tools that will assist in the decision making process for the disposal of debris resulting from incidents of national significance.

  1. An Update on NiCE Support for BISON

    SciTech Connect

    McCaskey, Alex; Billings, Jay Jay; Deyton, Jordan H.; Wojtowicz, Anna

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation program (NEAMS) from the Department of Energy s Office of Nuclear Energy has funded the development of a modeling and simulation workflow environment to support the various codes in its nuclear energy scientific computing toolkit. This NEAMS Integrated Computational Environment (NiCE) provides extensible tools and services that enable efficient code execution, input generation, pre-processing visualizations, and post-simulation data analysis and visualization for a large portion of the NEAMS Toolkit. A strong focus for the NiCE development team throughout FY 2015 has been support for the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) and the NEAMS nuclear fuel performance modeling application built on that environment, BISON. There is a strong desire in the program to enable and facilitate the use of BISON throughout nuclear energy research and industry. A primary result of this desire is the need for strong support for BISON in NiCE. This report will detail improvements to NiCE support for BISON. We will present a new and improved interface for interacting with BISON simulations in a variety of ways: (1) improved input model generation, (2) embedded mesh and solution data visualizations, and (3) local and remote BISON simulation launch. We will also show how NiCE has been extended to provide support for BISON code development.

  2. Updated - Research Support Facility (RSF) construction time lapse

    SciTech Connect

    2010-11-16

    Haselden Construction and RNL built the 222,000 square-foot Research Support Facility (RSF) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus. This time lapse video begins on July 23, 2009 and the last shot was taken in June 2010. The building is designed to be a model for sustainable, high-performance building design, and will provide DOE-owned work space for administrative staff who currently occupy leased space in the nearby Denver West Office Park. The engineers and scientists from NREL's Building Technology Program set the energy criteria and the energy design strategies that are making it possible for the RSF to use no more carbon-based energy than is produced by renewables. The RSF was designed by RNL. Stantec Consulting served as the project's engineering, energy modeling and sustainability consultant.

  3. Update to Rev6 ignition designs NIF, with details about support tent in particular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haan, S. W.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Clark, D. S.; Eder, D.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A.; Ho, D.; Jones, O. S.; Kritcher, A.; Lafortune, K.; MacGowan, B. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Milovich, J.; Peterson, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Spears, B. K.; Town, R. P.; Kline, J. L.; Wilson, D. C.; Simakov, A. N.; Yi, S. A.; Nikroo, A.; Huang, H.; Hoover, D.

    2013-10-01

    Ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility will use an indirectly driven spherical implosion to assemble and ignite a mass of DT fuel. Requirements describing the specifics of the experiment and the corresponding expected performance were established several years prior. These requirements include laser features, target fabrication and characterization, and data obtained from pre-ignition experiments. Since those requirements were originally set, various NIF experiments using surrogate targets have motivated updates to the target designs and requirements. A summary of these updates will be presented. Rev6 designs for CH(Si), C(W), and Be(Cu) will be summarized. One particularly significant change regards the thickness of the tent films supporting the capsule, and the presentation will include updated thickness goals and the experimental motivation for the change. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Updates and Overview of Spaceflight Medical Support in Russia and Kazakhstan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chough, Natacha; Pattarini, James; Cole, Richard; Patlach, Robert; Menon, Anil

    2017-01-01

    This panel presents recent updates to and a comprehensive overview of the operational medical support provided to ISS crewmembers in Star City, Russia and Kazakhstan as part of UTMB/KBRwyle's Human Health & Performance contract. With the current Soyuz training flow, physician support is required for nominal training evolutions involving pressure changes or other potential physical risks detailed in this presentation. In addition, full-time physician presence in Star City helps to address the disparity in access to health care in these relatively remote practice areas, while also developing and maintaining relationships with host nation resources. A unique part of standard training in Russia also involves survival training in both winter and water environments; logistic details and medical impacts of each of these training scenarios will be discussed. Following support of a successful training flow, UTMB/KBRwyle's Star City Medical Support Group (SCMSG) is also responsible for configuring medical packs in support of Soyuz launches and landings; we will present the rationale for current pack contents within the context of specific operational needs. With respect to contingency events, the group will describe their preparedness to respond appropriately by activating both local and global resources as necessary, detailing a specialized subset of the group who continually work and update these assets, given changes in international infrastructure and other impacts.

  5. Frequent Urination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Policy Notice of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization and proceeds from Web advertising help support our mission. Mayo Clinic does not ...

  6. Can more appropriate support and services be provided for people who attend the emergency department frequently? National Health Service staff views.

    PubMed

    Ablard, Suzanne; Coates, Elizabeth; Cooper, Cindy; Parry, Glenys; Mason, Suzanne M

    2017-08-31

    Interventions designed to help Emergency Department (ED) staff manage frequent attenders are labour-intensive and only benefit a small sample of frequent attenders. We aimed to use the in-depth knowledge of health professionals with experience of working with ED frequent attenders to understand the challenges of managing this group of patients and their opinions on providing more appropriate support. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with medical and nursing ED staff, mental health liaison nurses and general practitioners (GPs). Interviews covered the following: definitions and experiences of treating frequent attenders and thoughts on alternative service provision. Vignettes of frequent attenders were used to elicit discussions on these topics. Thematic analysis of transcribed interviews was undertaken. Twelve health professionals were interviewed. Three groups of frequent attenders were identified: people with long-term physical conditions, mental health problems and health-related anxiety. Underlying reasons for attendance differed between the groups, highlighting the need for targeted interventions. Suggested interventions included improving self-management of long-term physical conditions; creating a 'go-to' place away from the ED for patients experiencing a mental health crisis; increasing the provision of mental health liaison services; and for patients with health-related anxiety, the role of the GP in the patients' care pathway was emphasised, as were the benefits of providing additional training for ED staff to help identify and support this group. Interventions to address frequent attendance should focus on redirection to and liaison with more appropriate services, located on the hospital site or in the community, tailored to each identified patient group. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Empirical evidence supporting frequent cryptic speciation in epiphyllous liverworts: a case study of the Cololejeunea lanciloba complex.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Heinrichs, Jochen; Zhu, Rui-Liang; Schneider, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Cryptic species are frequently recovered in plant lineages, and considered an important cause for divergent of morphological disparity and species diversity. The identification of cryptic species has important implications for the assessment of conservation needs of species aggregates. The mechanisms and processes of the origin of cryptic species diversity are still poorly understand based on the lack of studies especially in context of environment factors. Here we explored evidence for cryptic species within the epiphyllous liverworts Cololejeunea lanciloba complex based on two loci, the plastid trnL-F region and the nuclear ribosomal ITS region. Several analytic approaches were employed to delimit species based on DNA sequence variation including phylogenetic reconstruction, statistical parsimony networks analysis and two recently introduced species delimitation criteria: Rosenberg's reciprocal monophyly and Rodrigo's randomly distinct. We found evidence for thirteen genetically distinct putative species, each consisting of more than one haplotype, rather than four morphologically-circumscribed species. The results implied that the highly conserved phenotypes are not congruent with the genetic differentiation, contributing to incorrect assessments of the biodiversity of epiphyllous liverworts. We hypothesize that evolution of cryptic species recovered may be caused by selection of traits critical to the survival in epiphyllous habitats combined with limited developmental options designed in the small body.

  8. The association between social support and smoking status in cancer survivors with frequent and infrequent mental distress: results from 10 US states, 2010.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Hermine; Darwish, Sabreen A; Kim, Sun S; Cooley, Mary E

    2016-12-01

    This study examined the association between social support and smoking status among adult cancer survivors, with special emphasis on mental health differences using data from 10 US states. Cross-sectional data from the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Cancer Survivorship module on 8055 cancer survivors were analyzed. Sample weights were applied for the generalization of results to 2.6 million cancer survivors. In 2010, 15.6 % (418,700) were current, 38.4 % (1.03 million) former, and 46.0 % (1.2 million) never smokers. About 18.0 % of cancer survivors reported receiving the lowest level of social support and 12.1 % reported experiencing frequent mental distress in the past 30 days. Participants' mean age at the time of the first cancer diagnosis was 51.0 (standard error (SE) = 0.33) and mean time since their diagnosis was 11.3 years (SE = 0.18). Compared to those with infrequent mental distress, cancer survivors with frequent mental distress were diagnosed at a younger age (45.0 vs. 51.8), more likely to be current smokers (36.8 vs. 12.7 %), and less likely to always receive social support they needed (33.4 vs. 56.3 %). Cancer survivors who received higher levels of social support were less likely to be current smokers than those who received the lowest level of social support they needed. Among cancer survivors who reported frequent mental distress, non-Hispanic blacks were more likely to be current smokers than non-Hispanic whites. Rates of current smokers were lower among cancer survivors who received social support and reported infrequent mental distress. Psychosocial screening may help health care professional identify smokers with frequent mental distress who require more intensive smoking cessation interventions.

  9. An Update on Improvements to NiCE Support for RELAP-7

    SciTech Connect

    McCaskey, Alex; Wojtowicz, Anna; Deyton, Jordan H.; Patterson, Taylor C.; Billings, Jay Jay

    2015-01-01

    The Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) is a framework that facilitates the development of applications that rely on finite-element analysis to solve a coupled, nonlinear system of partial differential equations. RELAP-7 represents an update to the venerable RELAP-5 simulator that is built upon this framework and attempts to model the balance-of-plant concerns in a full nuclear plant. This report details the continued support and integration of RELAP-7 and the NEAMS Integrated Computational Environment (NiCE). RELAP-7 is fully supported by the NiCE due to on-going work to tightly integrate NiCE with the MOOSE framework, and subsequently the applications built upon it. NiCE development throughout the first quarter of FY15 has focused on improvements, bug fixes, and feature additions to existing MOOSE-based application support. Specifically, this report will focus on improvements to the NiCE MOOSE Model Builder, the MOOSE application job launcher, and the 3D Nuclear Plant Viewer. This report also includes a comprehensive tutorial that guides RELAP-7 users through the basic NiCE workflow: from input generation and 3D Plant modeling, to massively parallel job launch and post-simulation data visualization.

  10. Hippocampal-medial prefrontal circuit supports memory updating during learning and post-encoding rest

    PubMed Central

    Schlichting, Margaret L.; Preston, Alison R.

    2015-01-01

    Learning occurs in the context of existing memories. Encountering new information that relates to prior knowledge may trigger integration, whereby established memories are updated to incorporate new content. Here, we provide a critical test of recent theories suggesting hippocampal (HPC) and medial prefrontal (MPFC) involvement in integration, both during and immediately following encoding. Human participants with established memories for a set of initial (AB) associations underwent fMRI scanning during passive rest and encoding of new related (BC) and unrelated (XY) pairs. We show that HPC-MPFC functional coupling during learning was more predictive of trial-by-trial memory for associations related to prior knowledge relative to unrelated associations. Moreover, the degree to which HPC-MPFC functional coupling was enhanced following overlapping encoding was related to memory integration behavior across participants. We observed a dissociation between anterior and posterior MPFC, with integration signatures during post-encoding rest specifically in the posterior subregion. These results highlight the persistence of integration signatures into post-encoding periods, indicating continued processing of interrelated memories during rest. We also interrogated the coherence of white matter tracts to assess the hypothesis that integration behavior would be related to the integrity of the underlying anatomical pathways. Consistent with our predictions, more coherent HPC-MPFC white matter structure was associated with better performance across participants. This HPC-MPFC circuit also interacted with content-sensitive visual cortex during learning and rest, consistent with reinstatement of prior knowledge to enable updating. These results show that the HPC-MPFC circuit supports on- and offline integration of new content into memory. PMID:26608407

  11. Clinical update on fluid therapy and nutritional support in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    DiMagno, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this focused review is to provide a valuable and updated source of information for clinical practice on fluid therapy (FT) and nutritional support in acute pancreatitis (AP). The review encompasses important new clinical information that has become available for understanding and offering these specific treatments since the 2013 publication of two guidelines, both the joint International Association of Pancreatology and American Pancreatic Association and the American College of Gastroenterology. The 2015 Revised Japanese Guideline is discussed selectively. To this end, the review is divided into 7 sections, including timing and cause of mortality; severity classification systems; predicting severity; response to treatment; nutritional support; fluid therapy and steps for further research. In mild AP, begin oral feeding when nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain are improving. In (predicted) severe AP, feeding decisions should commence by 72 h, offering oral feeding if GI symptoms improve or enteral feeding if patients are symptomatic and/or intolerant to orals. All patients should be offered goal-directed FT during the first 6-12 h of presentation. Cautious FT is advised in those age >55 years or with preexisting organ failure or predictors of developing fluid sequestration. Copyright © 2015 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Supporting Documentation for the 2008 Update to the Insulation Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, Therese K

    2008-02-01

    The Insulation Fact Sheet provides consumers for general guidance and recommended insulation levels for their home. This fact sheet has been on-line since 1995 and this update addresses new insulation materials, as well as updated costs for energy and materials.

  13. Updates on the Construction of an Eyeglass-Supported Nasal Prosthesis Using Computer-Aided Design and Rapid Prototyping Technology.

    PubMed

    Ciocca, Leonardo; Tarsitano, Achille; Marchetti, Claudio; Scotti, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to design an updated connection system for an eyeglass-supported nasal prosthesis using rapid prototyping techniques. The substructure was developed with two main endpoints in mind: the connection to the silicone and the connection to the eyeglasses. The mold design was also updated; the mold was composed of various parts, each carefully designed to allow for easy release after silicone processing and to facilitate extraction of the prosthesis without any strain. The approach used in this study enabled perfect transfer of the reciprocal position of the prosthesis with respect to the eyeglasses, from the virtual to the clinical environment. Moreover, the reduction in thickness improved the flexibility of the prosthesis and promoted adaptation to the contours of the skin, even during functional movements. The method described here is a simplified and viable alternative to standard construction techniques for nasal prostheses and offers improved esthetic and functional results when no bone is available for implant-supported prostheses.

  14. Differentially Private Frequent Subgraph Mining

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shengzhi; Xiong, Li; Cheng, Xiang; Xiao, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Mining frequent subgraphs from a collection of input graphs is an important topic in data mining research. However, if the input graphs contain sensitive information, releasing frequent subgraphs may pose considerable threats to individual's privacy. In this paper, we study the problem of frequent subgraph mining (FGM) under the rigorous differential privacy model. We introduce a novel differentially private FGM algorithm, which is referred to as DFG. In this algorithm, we first privately identify frequent subgraphs from input graphs, and then compute the noisy support of each identified frequent subgraph. In particular, to privately identify frequent subgraphs, we present a frequent subgraph identification approach which can improve the utility of frequent subgraph identifications through candidates pruning. Moreover, to compute the noisy support of each identified frequent subgraph, we devise a lattice-based noisy support derivation approach, where a series of methods has been proposed to improve the accuracy of the noisy supports. Through formal privacy analysis, we prove that our DFG algorithm satisfies ε-differential privacy. Extensive experimental results on real datasets show that the DFG algorithm can privately find frequent subgraphs with high data utility. PMID:27616876

  15. Responding to Changes in Building Legislation. Updating Training for the Building Regulations 1985 and Supporting Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Robert; Phillips, Alan

    A project sought to develop a means of updating and retraining those required to comply with Britain's 1985 Building Regulations, which are substantially different from the previous ones in regard to procedures and technical content. The training needs analysis conducted indicated that the new training should be flexible and use practical and…

  16. E-1 Dynamic Fluid-Flow Model Update: EASY/ROCETS Enhancement and Model Development Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Follett, Randolph F.; Taylor, Robert P.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the research conducted to update computer models for dynamic fluid flow simulation of the E-1 test stand subsystems at te NASA John C. Stennis Space Center.Work also involved significant upgrades to the capabilities of EASY/ROCKETS library through the inclusion of the NIST-12 thermodynamic property database and development of new control system modules.

  17. Case management and self-management support for frequent users with chronic disease in primary care: a pragmatic randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Hudon, Catherine; Dubois, Marie-France; Roberge, Pasquale; Loignon, Christine; Tchouaket, Eric; Fortin, Martin; Couture, Eva-Marjorie; Sasseville, Maxime

    2013-02-07

    Chronic diseases represent a major challenge for health care and social services. A number of people with chronic diseases require more services due to characteristics that increase their vulnerability. Given the burden of increasingly vulnerable patients on primary care, a pragmatic intervention in four Family Medicine Groups (primary care practices in Quebec, Canada) has been proposed for individuals with chronic diseases (diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, respiratory diseases, musculoskeletal diseases and/or chronic pain) who are frequent users of hospital services. The intervention combines case management by a nurse with group support meetings encouraging self-management based on the Stanford Chronic Disease Self-Management Program. The goals of this study are to: (1) analyze the implementation of the intervention in the participating practices in order to determine how the various contexts have influenced the implementation and the observed effects; (2) evaluate the proximal (self-efficacy, self-management, health habits, activation and psychological distress) and intermediate (empowerment, quality of life and health care use) effects of the intervention on patients; (3) conduct an economic analysis of the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of the intervention. The analysis of the implementation will be conducted using realistic evaluation and participatory approaches within four categories of stakeholders (Family Medicine Group and health centre management, Family Medicine Group practitioners, patients and their families, health centre or community partners). The data will be obtained through individual and group interviews, project documentation reviews and by documenting the intervention. Evaluation of the effects on patients will be based on a pragmatic randomized before-after experimental design with a delayed intervention control group (six months). Economic analysis will include cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analysis. The integration of a case

  18. Air Quality Modeling Technical Support Document for the Final Cross State Air Pollution Rule Update

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In this technical support document (TSD) we describe the air quality modeling performed to support the final Cross State Air Pollution Rule for the 2008 ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS).

  19. Progesterone luteal support after ovulation induction and intrauterine insemination: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Green, Katherine A; Zolton, Jessica R; Schermerhorn, Sophia M V; Lewis, Terrence D; Healy, Mae W; Terry, Nancy; DeCherney, Alan H; Hill, Micah J

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of progesterone (P) for luteal phase support after ovulation induction (OI) and intrauterine insemination (IUI). An updated systematic review and meta-analysis. Not applicable. Patients undergoing OI-IUI for infertility. Exogenous P luteal support after OI-IUI. Live birth. Eleven trials were identified that met inclusion criteria and constituted 2,842 patients undergoing 4,065 cycles, more than doubling the sample size from the previous meta-analysis. In patients receiving gonadotropins for OI, clinical pregnancy (relative risk [RR] 1.56, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21-2.02) and live birth (RR 1.77, 95% CI 1.30-2.42) were more likely in P supplemented patients. These findings persisted in analysis of live birth per IUI cycle (RR 1.59, 95% CI 1.24-2.04). There were no data on live birth in clomiphene citrate or clomiphene plus gonadotropin cycles. There was no benefit on clinical pregnancy with P support for patients who underwent OI with clomiphene (RR 0.85, 95% CI 0.52-1.41) or clomiphene plus gonadotropins (RR 1.26, 95% CI 0.90-1.76). Progesterone luteal phase support is beneficial to patients undergoing ovulation induction with gonadotropins in IUI cycles. The number needed to treat is 11 patients to have one additional live birth. Progesterone support did not benefit patients undergoing ovulation induction with clomiphene citrate or clomiphene plus gonadotropins. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. The effect of secular trends in the classroom furniture mismatch: support for continuous update of school furniture standards.

    PubMed

    Castellucci, H I; Arezes, P M; Molenbroek, J F M; Viviani, C

    2015-01-01

    In order to create safer schools, the Chilean authorities published a Standard regarding school furniture dimensions. The aims of this study are twofold: to verify the existence of positive secular trend within the Chilean student population and to evaluate the potential mismatch between the anthropometric characteristics and the school furniture dimensions defined by the mentioned standard. The sample consists of 3078 subjects. Eight anthropometric measures were gathered, together with six furniture dimensions from the mentioned standard. There is an average increase for some dimensions within the Chilean student population over the past two decades. Accordingly, almost 18% of the students will find the seat height to be too high. Seat depth will be considered as being too shallow for 42.8% of the students. It can be concluded that the Chilean student population has increased in stature, which supports the need to revise and update the data from the mentioned Standard. Positive secular trend resulted in high levels of mismatch if furniture is selected according to the current Chilean Standard which uses data collected more than 20 years ago. This study shows that school furniture standards need to be updated over time.

  1. Topical fluoride for caries prevention: executive summary of the updated clinical recommendations and supporting systematic review.

    PubMed

    Weyant, Robert J; Tracy, Sharon L; Anselmo, Theresa Tracy; Beltrán-Aguilar, Eugenio D; Donly, Kevin J; Frese, William A; Hujoel, Philippe P; Iafolla, Timothy; Kohn, William; Kumar, Jayanth; Levy, Steven M; Tinanoff, Norman; Wright, J Timothy; Zero, Domenick; Aravamudhan, Krishna; Frantsve-Hawley, Julie; Meyer, Daniel M

    2013-11-01

    A panel of experts convened by the American Dental Association (ADA) Council on Scientific Affairs presents evidence-based clinical recommendations regarding professionally applied and prescription-strength, home-use topical fluoride agents for caries prevention. These recommendations are an update of the 2006 ADA recommendations regarding professionally applied topical fluoride and were developed by using a new process that includes conducting a systematic review of primary studies. The authors conducted a search of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library for clinical trials of professionally applied and prescription-strength topical fluoride agents--including mouthrinses, varnishes, gels, foams and pastes--with caries increment outcomes published in English through October 2012. The panel included 71 trials from 82 articles in its review and assessed the efficacy of various topical fluoride caries-preventive agents. The panel makes recommendations for further research. The panel recommends the following for people at risk of developing dental caries: 2.26 percent fluoride varnish or 1.23 percent fluoride (acidulated phosphate fluoride) gel, or a prescription-strength, home-use 0.05 percent fluoride gel or paste or 0.09 percent fluoride mouthrinse for patients 6 years or older. Only 2.26 percent fluoride varnish is recommended for children younger than 6 years. The strengths of the recommendations for the recommended products varied from "in favor" to "expert opinion for." As part of the evidence-based approach to care, these clinical recommendations should be integrated with the practitioner's professional judgment and the patient's needs and preferences.

  2. Positive Behavior Support: A Proposal for Updating and Refining the Definition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kincaid, Don; Dunlap, Glen; Kern, Lee; Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Bambara, Linda M.; Brown, Fredda; Fox, Lise; Knoster, Timothy P.

    2016-01-01

    Positive behavior support (PBS) has been a dynamic and growing enterprise for more than 25 years. During this period, PBS has expanded applications across a wide range of populations and multiple levels of implementation. As a result, there have been understandable inconsistencies and confusion regarding the definition of PBS. In this essay, we…

  3. The Empirically Supported Status of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: An Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smout, Matthew F.; Hayes, Louise; Atkins, Paul W. B.; Klausen, Jessica; Duguid, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is a transdiagnostic cognitive behavioural therapy that predominantly teaches clients acceptance and mindfulness skills, as well as values clarification and enactment skills. Australian treatment guideline providers have been cautious in recognising ACT as empirically supported. This article reviews evidence…

  4. Positive Behavior Support: A Proposal for Updating and Refining the Definition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kincaid, Don; Dunlap, Glen; Kern, Lee; Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Bambara, Linda M.; Brown, Fredda; Fox, Lise; Knoster, Timothy P.

    2016-01-01

    Positive behavior support (PBS) has been a dynamic and growing enterprise for more than 25 years. During this period, PBS has expanded applications across a wide range of populations and multiple levels of implementation. As a result, there have been understandable inconsistencies and confusion regarding the definition of PBS. In this essay, we…

  5. The Empirically Supported Status of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: An Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smout, Matthew F.; Hayes, Louise; Atkins, Paul W. B.; Klausen, Jessica; Duguid, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is a transdiagnostic cognitive behavioural therapy that predominantly teaches clients acceptance and mindfulness skills, as well as values clarification and enactment skills. Australian treatment guideline providers have been cautious in recognising ACT as empirically supported. This article reviews evidence…

  6. Node 3 Relocation Environmental Control and Life Support System Modification Kit Verification and Updated Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.; Spector, Lawrence N.

    2009-01-01

    Node 1 (Unity) flew to International Space Station (ISS) on Flight 2A. Node 1 was the first module of the United States On-Orbit Segment (USOS) launched to ISS. The Node 1 ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) design featured limited ECLS capability. The main purpose of Node 1 was to provide internal storage by providing four stowage rack locations within the module and to allow docking of multiple modules and a truss segment to it. The ECLS subsystems inside Node 1 were routed through the element prior to launch to allow for easy integration of the attached future elements, particularly the Habitation Module which was planned to be located at the nadir docking port of Node 1. After Node 1 was on-orbit, the Program decided not to launch the Habitation Module and instead, to replace it with Node 3 (Tranquility). In 2007, the Program became concerned with a potential Russian docking port approach issue for the Russian FGB nadir docking port after Node 3 is attached to Node 1. To solve this concern the Program decided to relocate Node 3 from Node 1 nadir to Node 1 port. To support the movement of Node 3 the Program decided to build a modification kit for Node 1, an on-orbit feedthrough leak test device, and new vestibule jumpers to support the ECLS part of the relocation. This paper provides a design overview of the modification kit, a summary of the Node 1 ECLS re-verification to support the Node 3 relocation from Node 1 nadir to Node 1 port, and a status of the ECLS modification kit installation into Node 1.

  7. Node 3 Relocation Environmental Control and Life Support System Modification Kit Verification and Updated Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.; Spector, Lawrence N.

    2009-01-01

    Node 1 (Unity) flew to International Space Station (ISS) on Flight 2A. Node 1 was the first module of the United States On-Orbit Segment (USOS) launched to ISS. The Node 1 ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) design featured limited ECLS capability. The main purpose of Node 1 was to provide internal storage by providing four stowage rack locations within the module and to allow docking of multiple modules and a truss segment to it. The ECLS subsystems inside Node 1 were routed through the element prior to launch to allow for easy integration of the attached future elements, particularly the Habitation Module which was planned to be located at the nadir docking port of Node 1. After Node 1 was on-orbit, the Program decided not to launch the Habitation Module and instead, to replace it with Node 3 (Tranquility). In 2007, the Program became concerned with a potential Russian docking port approach issue for the Russian FGB nadir docking port after Node 3 is attached to Node 1. To solve this concern the Program decided to relocate Node 3 from Node 1 nadir to Node 1 port. To support the movement of Node 3 the Program decided to build a modification kit for Node 1, an on-orbit feedthrough leak test device, and new vestibule jumpers to support the ECLS part of the relocation. This paper provides a design overview of the modification kit, a summary of the Node 1 ECLS re-verification to support the Node 3 relocation from Node 1 nadir to Node 1 port, and a status of the ECLS modification kit installation into Node 1.

  8. Node 3 Relocation Environmental Control and Life Support System Modification Kit Verification and Updated Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.; Spector Lawrence N.

    2010-01-01

    Node 1 (Unity) flew to International Space Station (ISS) on Flight 2A. Node 1 was the first module of the United States On-Orbit Segment (USOS) launched to ISS. The Node 1 ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) design featured limited ECLS capability. The main purpose of Node 1 was to provide internal storage by providing four stowage rack locations within the module and to allow docking of multiple modules and a truss segment to it. The ECLS subsystems inside Node 1 were routed through the element prior to launch to allow for easy integration of the attached future elements, particularly the Habitation Module which was planned to be located at the nadir docking port of Node 1. After Node I was on-orbit, the Program decided not to launch the Habitation Module and instead, to replace it with Node 3 (Tranquility). In 2007, the Program became concerned with a potential Russian docking port approach issue for the Russian FGB nadir docking port after Node 3 is attached to Node 1. To solve this concern the Program decided to relocate Node 3 from Node I nadir to Node 1 port. To support the movement of Node 3 the Program decided to build a modification kit for Node 1, an on-orbit feedthrough leak test device, and new vestibule jumpers to support the ECLS part of the relocation. This paper provides a design overview of the modification kit for Node 1, a summary of the Node 1 ECLS re-verification to support the Node 3 relocation from Node 1 nadir to Node 1 port, and a status of the ECLS modification kit installation into Node 1.

  9. Empirical Evidence Supporting Frequent Cryptic Speciation in Epiphyllous Liverworts: A Case Study of the Cololejeunea lanciloba Complex

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ying; Heinrichs, Jochen; Zhu, Rui-Liang; Schneider, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Cryptic species are frequently recovered in plant lineages, and considered an important cause for divergent of morphological disparity and species diversity. The identification of cryptic species has important implications for the assessment of conservation needs of species aggregates. The mechanisms and processes of the origin of cryptic species diversity are still poorly understand based on the lack of studies especially in context of environment factors. Here we explored evidence for cryptic species within the epiphyllous liverworts Cololejeunea lanciloba complex based on two loci, the plastid trnL-F region and the nuclear ribosomal ITS region. Several analytic approaches were employed to delimit species based on DNA sequence variation including phylogenetic reconstruction, statistical parsimony networks analysis and two recently introduced species delimitation criteria: Rosenberg’s reciprocal monophyly and Rodrigo’s randomly distinct. We found evidence for thirteen genetically distinct putative species, each consisting of more than one haplotype, rather than four morphologically-circumscribed species. The results implied that the highly conserved phenotypes are not congruent with the genetic differentiation, contributing to incorrect assessments of the biodiversity of epiphyllous liverworts. We hypothesize that evolution of cryptic species recovered may be caused by selection of traits critical to the survival in epiphyllous habitats combined with limited developmental options designed in the small body. PMID:24367634

  10. Update on the Ares V to Support Heavy Lift for U.S. Space Exploration Policy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumrall, John P.; Creech, Steve

    2008-01-01

    When NASA's Ares V cargo launch vehicle begins flying late next decade, its capabilities will significantly exceed the 1960s-era Saturn V. It will send more crew and cargo to more places on the lunar surface than Apollo and provide ongoing support to a permanent lunar outpost that will open the Moon to greater exploration, science and adventure than ever before. Moreover, it will restore the United States heavy-lift capability, which can support human and robotic exploration for decades to come. Ares V remains in a pre-design analysis cycle stage pending a planned Authority to Proceed (ATP) in late 2010. Ares V benefits from the decision to draw from heritage hardware and its commonality with the Ares I crew launch vehicle, which completed its preliminary design review (PDR) in September 2008. Most of the work on Ares V to date has been focused on refining the vehicle design through a variety of internal studies. This paper will provide background information on the Ares V evolution, emphasizing the vehicle configuration as it exists today.

  11. An Update on Improvements to NiCE Support for PROTEUS

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Andrew; McCaskey, Alexander J.; Billings, Jay Jay

    2015-09-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program has supported the development of the NEAMS Integrated Computational Environment (NiCE), a modeling and simulation workflow environment that provides services and plugins to facilitate tasks such as code execution, model input construction, visualization, and data analysis. This report details the development of workflows for the reactor core neutronics application, PROTEUS. This advanced neutronics application (primarily developed at Argonne National Laboratory) aims to improve nuclear reactor design and analysis by providing an extensible and massively parallel, finite-element solver for current and advanced reactor fuel neutronics modeling. The integration of PROTEUS-specific tools into NiCE is intended to make the advanced capabilities that PROTEUS provides more accessible to the nuclear energy research and development community. This report will detail the work done to improve existing PROTEUS workflow support in NiCE. We will demonstrate and discuss these improvements, including the development of flexible IO services, an improved interface for input generation, and the addition of advanced Fortran development tools natively in the platform.

  12. Update on the Ares V to support heavy lift for U.S. space exploration policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumrall, John P.; Creech, Steve

    2010-04-01

    When NASA's Ares V cargo launch vehicle (Fig. 1) begins flying late next decade, its capabilities will significantly exceed the 1960s-era Saturn V. It will send more crew and cargo to more places on the lunar surface than Apollo and provide ongoing support to a permanent lunar outpost that will open the Moon to greater exploration, science and adventure than ever before. Moreover, it will restore the United States' heavy-lift capability, which can support human and robotic exploration for decades to come. Ares V remains in a pre-design analysis cycle stage pending a planned Authority to Proceed (ATP) in late 2010. Ares V benefits from the decision to draw from heritage hardware and its commonality with the Ares I crew launch vehicle, which completed its preliminary design review (PDR) in September 2008. Most of the work on Ares V to date has been focused on refining the vehicle design through a variety of internal studies. This paper will provide background information on the Ares V evolution, emphasizing the vehicle configuration as it exists today.

  13. Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal carcinoma: frequent involvement of the left colon and rectum and late-onset presentation supports a universal screening approach.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Douglas J; Brand, Randall E; Hu, Huankai; Bahary, Nathan; Dudley, Beth; Chiosea, Simon I; Nikiforova, Marina N; Pai, Reetesh K

    2013-11-01

    The optimal strategy for screening patients with colorectal carcinoma for Lynch syndrome (LS) is a subject of continued debate in the literature with some advocating universal screening while others arguing for selective screening. We evaluated 1292 colorectal carcinomas for DNA mismatch repair protein abnormalities and identified 150 (11.6%) tumors demonstrating high-levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-H). MSI-H colorectal carcinomas were divided into sporadic (112/1292, 8.7%) and LS/probable LS-associated (38/1292, 2.9%) groups based on BRAF V600E mutation, MLH1 promoter hypermethylation, cancer history, and germline mismatch repair gene mutation. All MSI-H colorectal carcinomas were analyzed for grade, location, and tumor histology. The utility of the revised Bethesda guidelines and published predictive pathology models for MSI-H colorectal carcinomas (PREDICT and MSPath) were evaluated. Left-sided MSI-H colorectal carcinomas were more frequently associated with LS compared with right-sided MSI-H colorectal carcinomas (12/21, 57% versus 26/129, 20%, P = .0008). There was no significant difference in histology between sporadic MSI-H and LS/probable LS-associated colorectal carcinomas except for a slightly higher proportion of sporadic MSI-H tumors demonstrating tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (81% versus 61%, P = .015). Neither pathology predictive model identified all LS-associated colorectal carcinomas (PREDICT: 33/38, 87%; MSPath: 35/38, 92%). 12/117 (10%) MSI-H colorectal carcinomas identified in patients >60 years were LS/probable LS-associated. Our results demonstrate that models of predicting MSI-H fail to identify LS-associated colorectal carcinoma given their reliance on right-sided location. A significant proportion (32%) of LS-associated colorectal carcinoma is identified in patients >60 years. Finally, our results demonstrate similar morphologic features between LS-associated and sporadic MSI-H colorectal carcinomas.

  14. Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient: update. Consensus SEMICYUC-SENPE: neurocritical patient.

    PubMed

    Acosta Escribano, J; Herrero Meseguer, I; Conejero García-Quijada, R

    2011-11-01

    Neurocritical patients require specialized nutritional support due to their intense catabolism and prolonged fasting. The preferred route of nutrient administration is the gastrointestinal route, especially the gastric route. Alternatives are the transpyloric route or mixed enteral-parenteral nutrition if an effective nutritional volume of more than 60% cannot be obtained. Total calorie intake ranges from 20-30 kcal/kg/day, depending on the period of the clinical course, with protein intake higher than 20% of total calories (hyperproteic diet). Nutritional support should be initiated early. The incidence of gastrointestinal complications is generally higher to other critically-ill patients, the most frequent complication being an increase in gastric residual volume. As in other critically-ill patients, glycemia should be closely monitored and maintained below 150 mg/dL.

  15. Geographic patterns of at-risk species: A technical document supporting the USDA Forest Service Interim Update of the 2000 RPA Assessment

    Treesearch

    Curtis H. Flather; Michael S. Knowles; Jason McNees

    2008-01-01

    This technical document supports the Forest Service's requirement to assess the status of renewable natural resources as mandated by the Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act of 1974. It updates past reports on the trends and geographic patterns of species formally listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. We...

  16. Population and harvest trends of big game and small game species: a technical document supporting the USDA Forest Service Interim Update of the 2000 RPA Assessment

    Treesearch

    Curtis H. Flather; Michael S. Knowles; Stephen J. Brady

    2009-01-01

    This technical document supports the Forest Service's requirement to assess the status of renewable natural resources as mandated by the Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act of 1974 (RPA). It updates past reports on national and regional trends in population and harvest estimates for species classified as big game and small game. The trends...

  17. Update on the Ares V to Support Heavy Lift for U.S. Space Exploration Policy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creech, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The focus of design efforts in the near future will be on the primary Lunar mission. We are currently just beginning to integrate the design functions from the various centers for this mission. We appreciate all thoughts and ideas for different ways to use the Ares V platform. The Ares V can support an order of magnitude more science instrumentation for outer planetary exploration missions. It can also reach outer planets such as Neptune and other high energy insertion destinations. Current Ares V Point-of-Departure (51.00.48) exceeds Saturn mass capability by approx.40%. Ares V Lunar Capabilities Concept Review analysis focused on meeting lunar requirements and developing margin. Ares V is sensitive to Loiter, Attitude, Power, and Altitude requirements in addition to payload performance. LCCR-approved 51.00.48 POD 5.5-segment steel case booster/6 engine core) Ares V can meet current Human Lunar Return requirements with approx.6 mT of Margin. LCCR-approved 51.00.47 option maintained (5 segment HTPB composite case booster/6 engine core) can meet HLR requirement with more than 9 mT Margin. Ares V team is actively reaching out to external organizations during this early concept phase to ensure that the Ares V vehicle can be leveraged for national security, scientific and commercial development needs.

  18. Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support Systems: An Update on Waste Water Reclamation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferner, Kathleen M.

    1994-01-01

    Since the mid-1980's, work has been ongoing In the development of the various environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) for the space station. Part of this effort has been focused on the development of a new subsystem to reclaim waste water that had not been previously required for shuttle missions. Because of the extended manned missions proposed, reclamation of waste water becomes imperative to avoid the weight penalties associated with resupplying a crew's entire water needs for consumption and daily hygiene. Hamilton Standard, under contract to Boeing Aerospace and Electronics, has been designing the water reclamation system for space station use. Since June of 1991, Hamilton Standard has developed a combined water processor capable of reclaiming potable quality water from waste hygiene water, used laundry water, processed urine, Shuttle fuel cell water, humidity condensate and other minor waste water sources. The system was assembled and then tested with over 27,700 pounds of 'real' waste water. During the 1700 hours of system operation required to process this waste water, potable quality water meeting NASA and Boeing specifications was produced. This paper gives a schematic overview of the system, describes the test conditions and test results and outlines the next steps for system development.

  19. An Updated Decision Support Interface: A Tool for Remote Monitoring of Crop Growing Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husak, G. J.; Budde, M. E.; Rowland, J.; Verdin, J. P.; Funk, C. C.; Landsfeld, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    Remote sensing of agroclimatological variables to monitor food production conditions is a critical component of the Famine Early Warning Systems Network portfolio of tools for assessing food security in the developing world. The Decision Support Interface (DSI) seeks to integrate a number of remotely sensed and modeled variables to create a single, simplified portal for analysis of crop growing conditions. The DSI has been reformulated to incorporate more variables and give the user more freedom in exploring the available data. This refinement seeks to transition the DSI from a "first glance" agroclimatic indicator to one better suited for the differentiation of drought events. The DSI performs analysis of variables over primary agricultural zones at the first sub-national administrative level. It uses the spatially averaged rainfall, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), water requirement satisfaction index (WRSI), and actual evapotranspiration (ETa) to identify potential hazards to food security. Presenting this information in a web-based client gives food security analysts and decision makers a lightweight portal for information on crop growing conditions in the region. The crop zones used for the aggregation contain timing information which is critical to the DSI presentation. Rainfall and ETa are accumulated from different points in the crop phenology to identify season-long deficits in rainfall or transpiration that adversely affect the crop-growing conditions. Furthermore, the NDVI and WRSI serve as their own seasonal accumulated measures of growing conditions by capturing vegetation vigor or actual evapotranspiration deficits. The DSI is currently active for major growing regions of sub-Saharan Africa, with intention of expanding to other areas over the coming years.

  20. EPA Subaward Frequent Questions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These answers to frequent questions (FQ) are intended to provide information to recipients of EPA financial assistance to help them understand EPA’s interpretations of the Uniform Grant Guidance (UGG) and EPA’s Subaward Policy.

  1. Frequent Questions on Recycling

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a list of frequent questions on recycling, broken down into five categories. These are answers to common questions that EPA has received from press and web inquiries. This list is located on the Reduce, Reuse, Recycle website.

  2. Pertussis Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Prevention Adults Parents-to-be Babies & Children Preteens & Teens Travelers Healthcare Personnel Frequently Asked Questions Photos ... Pregnant Women For Parents of Young Children For Preteens & Teens For Adults For Spanish Speakers Publications Related ...

  3. Financial assistance to states and tribes to support emergency preparedness and response and the safe transportation of hazardous shipments: 1996 Update

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, J.A.; Leyson, J.; Lester, M.K.

    1996-07-01

    This report revises and updates the 1995 report Financial Assistance to States and Tribes to Support Emergency Preparedness and Response and the Safe Transportation of Hazardous Shipments, PNL-10260 (UC-620). The presentation of data and some of the data reported have been changed; these data supersede those presented in the earlier publication. All data have been updated to fiscal year 1995, with the exception of FEMA data that are updated to fiscal year 1994 only. The report identifies and summarizes existing sources of financial assistance to States and Tribes in preparing and responding to transportation emergencies and ensuring the safe transportation of hazardous shipments through their jurisdictions. It is intended for use as an information resource for the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Transportation, Emergency Management, and Analytical Services (EM-76).

  4. An update and further testing of a knowledge-based diagnostic clinical decision support system for musculoskeletal disorders of the shoulder for use in a primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Nicholas

    2014-10-01

    A prototype diagnostic clinical decision support system (CDSS) was developed to assist primary care clinicians (general practitioners) in clinical decision making, aimed at reducing diagnostic errors. The prototype CDSS showed some promise with high levels of validity and reliability; however, issues regarding the underlying Bayesian belief network (BBN), small sample size and use of radiological imaging as a gold standard measure were highlighted that required further investigation before considering clinical testing. The prototype CDSS was reviewed and updated based on computer science literature and expert (orthopaedic consultant) opinion. The updated CDSS was tested by comparing its diagnostic outcome against the diagnosis of 93 case studies as determined by expert opinion combined with arthroscopy findings or radiological imaging. The updated CDSS showed significant high levels of sensitivity (91%), specificity (98%), positive likelihood ratio (53.12) and negative likelihood ratio (0.08) with a kappa value of 0.88 to a confidence level of 99% compared with expert diagnosis combined with arthroscopy findings or radiological imaging. The results suggest that the updated CDSS has addressed the issues highlighted from the initial research while maintaining high levels of validity and reliability. The updated CDSS is now ready for clinical testing. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. LANDFIRE 2010—Updates to the national dataset to support improved fire and natural resource management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Kurtis J.; Long, Donald G.; Connot, Joel A.

    2016-02-29

    The Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools (LANDFIRE) 2010 data release provides updated and enhanced vegetation, fuel, and fire regime layers consistently across the United States. The data represent landscape conditions from approximately 2010 and are the latest release in a series of planned updates to maintain currency of LANDFIRE data products. Enhancements to the data products included refinement of urban areas by incorporating the National Land Cover Database 2006 land cover product, refinement of agricultural lands by integrating the National Agriculture Statistics Service 2011 cropland data layer, and improved wetlands delineations using the National Land Cover Database 2006 land cover and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Wetlands Inventory data. Disturbance layers were generated for years 2008 through 2010 using remotely sensed imagery, polygons representing disturbance events submitted by local organizations, and fire mapping program data such as the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity perimeters produced by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Forest Service. Existing vegetation data were updated to account for transitions in disturbed areas and to account for vegetation growth and succession in undisturbed areas. Surface and canopy fuel data were computed from the updated vegetation type, cover, and height and occasionally from potential vegetation. Historical fire frequency and succession classes were also updated. Revised topographic layers were created based on updated elevation data from the National Elevation Dataset. The LANDFIRE program also released a new Web site offering updated content, enhanced usability, and more efficient navigation.

  6. IC: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources My Profile Login Social Media Twitter YouTube Facebook Pinterest Community ShareThis Google Search Toggle navigation Menu ... ICA’s Online Support Community Virtual Patient Education IC Facebook Community Voices of Hope Blog ICA Support Group ...

  7. Mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke: Consensus statement by ESO-Karolinska Stroke Update 2014/2015, supported by ESO, ESMINT, ESNR and EAN.

    PubMed

    Wahlgren, Nils; Moreira, Tiago; Michel, Patrik; Steiner, Thorsten; Jansen, Olav; Cognard, Christophe; Mattle, Heinrich P; van Zwam, Wim; Holmin, Staffan; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Petersson, Jesper; Caso, Valeria; Hacke, Werner; Mazighi, Mikael; Arnold, Marcel; Fischer, Urs; Szikora, Istvan; Pierot, Laurent; Fiehler, Jens; Gralla, Jan; Fazekas, Franz; Lees, Kennedy R

    2016-01-01

    The original version of this consensus statement on mechanical thrombectomy was approved at the European Stroke Organisation (ESO)-Karolinska Stroke Update conference in Stockholm, 16-18 November 2014. The statement has later, during 2015, been updated with new clinical trials data in accordance with a decision made at the conference. Revisions have been made at a face-to-face meeting during the ESO Winter School in Berne in February, through email exchanges and the final version has then been approved by each society. The recommendations are identical to the original version with evidence level upgraded by 20 February 2015 and confirmed by 15 May 2015. The purpose of the ESO-Karolinska Stroke Update meetings is to provide updates on recent stroke therapy research and to discuss how the results may be implemented into clinical routine. Selected topics are discussed at consensus sessions, for which a consensus statement is prepared and discussed by the participants at the meeting. The statements are advisory to the ESO guidelines committee. This consensus statement includes recommendations on mechanical thrombectomy after acute stroke. The statement is supported by ESO, European Society of Minimally Invasive Neurological Therapy (ESMINT), European Society of Neuroradiology (ESNR), and European Academy of Neurology (EAN). © 2016 World Stroke Organization.

  8. 78 FR 70586 - Technical Support Document: Technical Update of the Social Cost of Carbon for Regulatory Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... and published in the peer-reviewed literature. Recognizing that the models underlying the SCC... the underlying models were updated and used in peer-reviewed literature, and agencies received public... proposed rulemakings since May, and agencies have already received comments that are under review. The...

  9. Forest Resources of the United States, 2012: a technical document supporting the Forest Service 2010 update of the RPA Assessment

    Treesearch

    Sonja N. Oswalt; W. Brad Smith; Patrick D. Miles; Scott A. Pugh

    2014-01-01

    Forest resource statistics from the 2010 Resources Planning Act (RPA) Assessment were updated to provide current information on the Nation's forests as a baseline for the 2015 national assessment. Resource tables present estimates of forest area, volume, mortality, growth, removals, and timber products output in various ways, such as by ownership, region, or State...

  10. Updating of ASME Nuclear Code Case N-201 to Accommodate the Needs of Metallic Core Support Structures for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors Currently in Development

    SciTech Connect

    Mit Basol; John F. Kielb; John F. MuHooly; Kobus Smit

    2007-05-02

    On September 29, 2005, ASME Standards Technology, LLC (ASME ST-LLC) executed a multi-year, cooperative agreement with the United States DOE for the Generation IV Reactor Materials project. The project's objective is to update and expand appropriate materials, construction, and design codes for application in future Generation IV nuclear reactor systems that operate at elevated temperatures. Task 4 was embarked upon in recognition of the large quantity of ongoing reactor designs utilizing high temperature technology. Since Code Case N-201 had not seen a significant revision (except for a minor revision in September, 2006 to change the SA-336 forging reference for 304SS and 316SS to SA-965 in Tables 1.2(a) and 1.2(b), and some minor editorial changes) since December 1994, identifying recommended updates to support the current high temperature Core Support Structure (CSS) designs and potential new designs was important. As anticipated, the Task 4 effort identified a number of Code Case N-201 issues. Items requiring further consideration range from addressing apparent inconsistencies in definitions and certain material properties between CC-N-201 and Subsection NH, to inclusion of additional materials to provide the designer more flexibility of design. Task 4 developed a design parameter survey that requested input from the CSS designers of ongoing high temperature gas cooled reactor metallic core support designs. The responses to the survey provided Task 4 valuable input to identify the design operating parameters and future needs of the CSS designers. Types of materials, metal temperature, time of exposure, design pressure, design life, and fluence levels were included in the Task 4 survey responses. The results of the survey are included in this report. This research proves that additional work must be done to update Code Case N-201. Task 4 activities provide the framework for the Code Case N-201 update and future work to provide input on materials. Candidate

  11. Clinical practice parameters for hemodynamic support of pediatric and neonatal septic shock: 2007 update from the American College of Critical Care Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Brierley, Joe; Carcillo, Joseph A.; Choong, Karen; Cornell, Tim; DeCaen, Allan; Deymann, Andreas; Doctor, Allan; Davis, Alan; Duff, John; Dugas, Marc-Andre; Duncan, Alan; Evans, Barry; Feldman, Jonathan; Felmet, Kathryn; Fisher, Gene; Frankel, Lorry; Jeffries, Howard; Greenwald, Bruce; Gutierrez, Juan; Hall, Mark; Han, Yong Y.; Hanson, James; Hazelzet, Jan; Hernan, Lynn; Kiff, Jane; Kissoon, Niranjan; Kon, Alexander; Irazusta, Jose; Lin, John; Lorts, Angie; Mariscalco, Michelle; Mehta, Renuka; Nadel, Simon; Nguyen, Trung; Nicholson, Carol; Peters, Mark; Okhuysen-Cawley, Regina; Poulton, Tom; Relves, Monica; Rodriguez, Agustin; Rozenfeld, Ranna; Schnitzler, Eduardo; Shanley, Tom; Skache, Sara; Skippen, Peter; Torres, Adalberto; von Dessauer, Bettina; Weingarten, Jacki; Yeh, Timothy; Zaritsky, Arno; Stojadinovic, Bonnie; Zimmerman, Jerry; Zuckerberg, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Background The Institute of Medicine calls for the use of clinical guidelines and practice parameters to promote “best practices” and to improve patient outcomes. Objective 2007 update of the 2002 American College of Critical Care Medicine Clinical Guidelines for Hemodynamic Support of Neonates and Children with Septic Shock. Participants Society of Critical Care Medicine members with special interest in neonatal and pediatric septic shock were identified from general solicitation at the Society of Critical Care Medicine Educational and Scientific Symposia (2001–2006). Methods The Pubmed/MEDLINE literature database (1966–2006) was searched using the keywords and phrases: sepsis, septicemia, septic shock, endotoxemia, persistent pulmonary hypertension, nitric oxide, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), and American College of Critical Care Medicine guidelines. Best practice centers that reported best outcomes were identified and their practices examined as models of care. Using a modified Delphi method, 30 experts graded new literature. Over 30 additional experts then reviewed the updated recommendations. The document was subsequently modified until there was greater than 90% expert consensus. Results The 2002 guidelines were widely disseminated, translated into Spanish and Portuguese, and incorporated into Society of Critical Care Medicine and AHA sanctioned recommendations. Centers that implemented the 2002 guidelines reported best practice outcomes (hospital mortality 1%–3% in previously healthy, and 7%– 10% in chronically ill children). Early use of 2002 guidelines was associated with improved outcome in the community hospital emergency department (number needed to treat = 3.3) and tertiary pediatric intensive care setting (number needed to treat = 3.6); every hour that went by without guideline adherence was associated with a 1.4-fold increased mortality risk. The updated 2007 guidelines continue to recognize an increased likelihood that

  12. Frequently Asked Questions about Nutrition Labeling

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Teaching Gardens Teaching Gardens-See Our Gardens Teaching Gardens Supporters Why We Garden Weight Management Body Mass Index (BMI) Body Mass Index In Adults (BMI Calculator for Adults) Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) ...

  13. An Internet-based intervention for eating disorders consisting of automated computer-tailored feedback with or without supplemented frequent or infrequent support from a coach: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Aardoom, Jiska J; Dingemans, Alexandra E; Spinhoven, Philip; Hakkaart-van Roijen, Leona; Van Furth, Eric F

    2013-10-17

    Several Internet-based interventions for eating disorders have shown their effectiveness. Still, there is a need to refine such interventions given that most existing programs seem to be limited by their static 'one-size-fits-all' approach. 'Featback', an Internet-based intervention for symptoms of eating disorders provides a more individualized approach. It consists of several components (psychoeducation, a fully automated monitoring and feedback system, and support from a coach), which can be matched to participants' needs and preferences. Until now, it is unclear whether online self-help interventions for eating disorders with support are more effective than those without. The aims of the current study are i) to examine the relative effectiveness of (the different components of) Featback; ii) to examine predictors, moderators and mediators of intervention responses; iii) to report on practical experiences with Featback; and iv) to examine the cost-effectiveness of Featback. Individuals aged 16 years or older, with mild to severe eating disorder symptoms will be randomized to one of the four study conditions. In condition one, participants receive the basic version of Featback, consisting of psychoeducation and a fully automated monitoring and feedback system. In conditions two and three, participants receive the basic version of Featback supplemented with the possibility of infrequent (weekly) or frequent (three times a week) e-mail, chat, or Skype support from a coach, respectively. The fourth condition is a waiting list control condition. Participants are assessed at baseline, post-intervention (8 weeks), and at 3- and 6-month follow-up (the latter except for participants in the waiting list control condition). Primary outcome measures are disordered eating behaviors and attitudes. Secondary outcome measures are (eating disorder-related) quality of life, self-stigma of seeking help, self-esteem, mastery and support, symptoms of depression and anxiety

  14. Space shuttle engineering and operations support: Study of the effects of multiple ground updates on the accuracy of the onboard state vector with IMU only navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, R.

    1977-01-01

    There are six cases considered: (1) no updates made during the flight, (2) one ground update in the vertical components only at the first practice separation minus 15 minutes, (3) one ground update in all components at the first practice separation minus 5 minutes, (4) updates 2 and 3 applied successively, (5) Case 4 plus an update in all components at the second separation attempt minus 3 minutes, and (6) one ground update at first separation attempt minus 5 minutes and a second update at second separation minus two minutes. The mission control simulation program, GROPER, was run using as radar input a tape containing radar derived state vectors for the trajectory.

  15. Frequently Asked Questions about Rotavirus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Humanitarian Award Maxwell Finland Award for Scientific Achievement John P. Utz Leadership Award Dr. Charles Mérieux Award ... Frequent, watery diarrhea (often foul-smelling, green or brown) Frequent vomiting Fever Abdominal pain The following are ...

  16. Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment Tutorial Installation of Software for Watershed Modeling in Support of QMRA - Updated 2017

    EPA Science Inventory

    This tutorial provides instructions for accessing, retrieving, and downloading the following software to install on a host computer in support of Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) modeling: • QMRA Installation • SDMProjectBuilder (which includes the Mi...

  17. Frequent Itemset Hiding Algorithm Using Frequent Pattern Tree Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alnatsheh, Rami

    2012-01-01

    A problem that has been the focus of much recent research in privacy preserving data-mining is the frequent itemset hiding (FIH) problem. Identifying itemsets that appear together frequently in customer transactions is a common task in association rule mining. Organizations that share data with business partners may consider some of the frequent…

  18. Frequent Itemset Hiding Algorithm Using Frequent Pattern Tree Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alnatsheh, Rami

    2012-01-01

    A problem that has been the focus of much recent research in privacy preserving data-mining is the frequent itemset hiding (FIH) problem. Identifying itemsets that appear together frequently in customer transactions is a common task in association rule mining. Organizations that share data with business partners may consider some of the frequent…

  19. Five-Year Progress Update on the Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Anstey, Erica H.; MacGowan, Carol A.; Allen, Jessica A.

    2016-01-01

    In 2011, Surgeon General Regina Benjamin issued a Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding (Call to Action) in an effort to mobilize families, communities, clinicians, healthcare systems, and employers to take action to improve support for breastfeeding. The Call to Action identified 20 key action steps to address society-wide breastfeeding barriers in six areas: mothers and families, communities, healthcare, employment, research, and public health infrastructure. This report highlights major federal activities that show progress toward answering the Call to Action in the first 5 years since its launch. PMID:27463691

  20. The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2016 update

    PubMed Central

    Speir, Matthew L.; Zweig, Ann S.; Rosenbloom, Kate R.; Raney, Brian J.; Paten, Benedict; Nejad, Parisa; Lee, Brian T.; Learned, Katrina; Karolchik, Donna; Hinrichs, Angie S.; Heitner, Steve; Harte, Rachel A.; Haeussler, Maximilian; Guruvadoo, Luvina; Fujita, Pauline A.; Eisenhart, Christopher; Diekhans, Mark; Clawson, Hiram; Casper, Jonathan; Barber, Galt P.; Haussler, David; Kuhn, Robert M.; Kent, W. James

    2016-01-01

    For the past 15 years, the UCSC Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu/) has served the international research community by offering an integrated platform for viewing and analyzing information from a large database of genome assemblies and their associated annotations. The UCSC Genome Browser has been under continuous development since its inception with new data sets and software features added frequently. Some release highlights of this year include new and updated genome browsers for various assemblies, including bonobo and zebrafish; new gene annotation sets; improvements to track and assembly hub support; and a new interactive tool, the “Data Integrator”, for intersecting data from multiple tracks. We have greatly expanded the data sets available on the most recent human assembly, hg38/GRCh38, to include updated gene prediction sets from GENCODE, more phenotype- and disease-associated variants from ClinVar and ClinGen, more genomic regulatory data, and a new multiple genome alignment. PMID:26590259

  1. The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2016 update.

    PubMed

    Speir, Matthew L; Zweig, Ann S; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Raney, Brian J; Paten, Benedict; Nejad, Parisa; Lee, Brian T; Learned, Katrina; Karolchik, Donna; Hinrichs, Angie S; Heitner, Steve; Harte, Rachel A; Haeussler, Maximilian; Guruvadoo, Luvina; Fujita, Pauline A; Eisenhart, Christopher; Diekhans, Mark; Clawson, Hiram; Casper, Jonathan; Barber, Galt P; Haussler, David; Kuhn, Robert M; Kent, W James

    2016-01-04

    For the past 15 years, the UCSC Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu/) has served the international research community by offering an integrated platform for viewing and analyzing information from a large database of genome assemblies and their associated annotations. The UCSC Genome Browser has been under continuous development since its inception with new data sets and software features added frequently. Some release highlights of this year include new and updated genome browsers for various assemblies, including bonobo and zebrafish; new gene annotation sets; improvements to track and assembly hub support; and a new interactive tool, the "Data Integrator", for intersecting data from multiple tracks. We have greatly expanded the data sets available on the most recent human assembly, hg38/GRCh38, to include updated gene prediction sets from GENCODE, more phenotype- and disease-associated variants from ClinVar and ClinGen, more genomic regulatory data, and a new multiple genome alignment.

  2. SEI: An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peach, Lewis L., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An update on the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) is given in viewgraph form. Topics covered include the key prerequisites of human exploration, project planning, Mars and lunar explorations, supporting technologies, near-term strategies for SEI, human support elements, and Space Station Freedom SEI accommodations.

  3. Treatment of Anthrax Disease Frequently Asked Questions

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Young, Joan E.; Lesperance, Ann M.; Malone, John D.

    2010-05-14

    This document provides a summary of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on the treatment of anthrax disease caused by a wide-area release of Bacillus anthracis spores as an act bioterrorism. These FAQs are intended to provide the public health and medical community, as well as others, with guidance and communications to support the response and long-term recovery from an anthrax event.

  4. An update on finances and financial support for medical students in Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Sayampanathan, Andrew Arjun; Tan, Yeong Tze Wilnard; Fong, Jie Ming Nigel; Koh, Yun Qing; Ng, Chew Lip; Mohan, Niraj; Jang, Jin Hao Justin; Tambyah, Paul Anantharajah

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Increasing financial challenges have resulted in great debt among medical graduates worldwide. In Singapore, more scholarships and bursaries have been disbursed in recent years to support students who are financially challenged. We aimed to study the financial status of medical students in National University of Singapore (NUS) Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine (i.e. NUS Medicine), Singapore, and the financial support available to them. METHODS A cross-sectional quantitative study was performed. Surveys were distributed and completed by medical students of NUS Medicine. Information regarding household income, financial assistance, monthly allowance and expense, and concurrent occupations was collected. We compared our findings with the results of a similar study performed in 2007 and national income data. RESULTS A total of 956 (66.2%) out of 1,445 medical students completed the survey. 19.5% and 58.5% of respondents came from households with monthly incomes < SGD 3,000 and > SGD 7,000, respectively. 20.6% of students had loans, 18.9% had scholarships and bursaries, and 14.4% worked to support themselves. CONCLUSION Medical school fees have risen by more than 50% over the past ten years. Our study found that there were increases in the proportion of students from both the lower- and higher-income segments, with proportionally fewer students from the middle-income segment. A large number of students were working and/or had some form of financial support. More should be done to meet the needs of financially challenged medical students to ensure equal access to quality medical education. PMID:27516114

  5. Reproductive mode evolution in lizards revisited: updated analyses examining geographic, climatic and phylogenetic effects support the cold-climate hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Watson, C M; Makowsky, R; Bagley, J C

    2014-12-01

    Viviparity, the bearing of live young, has evolved well over 100 times among squamate reptiles. This reproductive strategy is hypothesized to allow maternal control of the foetus' thermal environment and thereby to increase the fitness of the parents and offspring. Two hypotheses have been posited to explain this phenomenon: (i) the cold-climate hypothesis (CCH), which advocates low temperatures as the primary selective force; and (ii) the maternal manipulation hypothesis (MMH), which advocates temperature variability as the primary selective force. Here, we investigate whether climatic and geographic variables associated with the CCH vs. the MMH best explain the current geographical distributions of viviparity in lizards while incorporating recent advances in comparative methods, squamate phylogenetics and geospatial analysis. To do this, we compared nonphylogenetic and phylogenetic models predicting viviparity based on point-of-capture data from 20,994 museum specimens representing 215 lizard species in conjunction with spatially explicit bioclimatic and geographic (elevation and latitude) data layers. The database we analysed emphasized Nearctic lizards from three species-rich genera (Phrynosoma, Plestiodon and Sceloporus); however, we additionally analysed a less substantial, but worldwide sample of species to verify the universality of our Nearctic results. We found that maximum temperature of the warmest month (and, less commonly, elevation and maximum temperature of the driest quarter) was frequently the best predictor of viviparity and showed an association consistent with the CCH. Our results strongly favour the CCH over the MMH in explaining lizard reproductive mode evolution.

  6. Evidence supporting primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases with statins: Gaps between updated clinical results and actual practice.

    PubMed

    Bruckert, Eric; Ferrières, Jean

    2014-03-01

    The use of pharmacological lipid-lowering intervention in individuals with hypercholesterolaemia and known cardiovascular disease or diabetes/chronic kidney disease is well established. Current European Society of Cardiology guidelines recommend immediate initiation of drugs in adjunct to lifestyle intervention in these patients at high or very high cardiovascular risk. In these clinical settings, statins are generally chosen as the first-choice drug intervention, in consideration of the robust evidence showing a reduction in all-cause mortality and major adverse cardiac events (MACE). In contrast, primary prevention with statins, even in the subset of patients at high-risk of cardiovascular events, is not well implemented. This might be related to a lack of public awareness regarding the actual risk associated with prolonged exposure to high concentrations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and uncertainties in the clinical evidence coming from the earliest trials in this patient subset. However, recent observational studies suggest that lowering LDL-C earlier in life and for a longer duration can substantially decrease the burden of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Moreover, results from recent well-conducted large meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials showed that primary prevention with statins reduced all-cause mortality by 14% and MACE by > 20% - findings similar to those observed for the use of statins in secondary prevention. Recently published American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology guidelines on the treatment of blood cholesterol emphasize that primary prevention using high-dose statins in individuals with LDL-C ≥ 190 mg/dL induces a benefit in atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk reduction that clearly exceeds the potential for adverse effects. We aim in this review to discuss the new data that advocate the use of statins in primary prevention earlier and more frequently, putting the efficacy evidence into

  7. Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient: update. Consensus SEMICYUC-SENPE: obese patient.

    PubMed

    Mesejo, A; Sánchez Álvarez, C; Arboleda Sánchez, J A

    2011-11-01

    As a response to metabolic stress, obese critically-ill patients have the same risk of nutritional deficiency as the non-obese and can develop protein-energy malnutrition with accelerated loss of muscle mass. The primary aim of nutritional support in these patients should be to minimize loss of lean mass and accurately evaluate energy expenditure. However, routinely used formulae can overestimate calorie requirements if the patient's actual weight is used. Consequently, the use of adjusted or ideal weight is recommended with these formulae, although indirect calorimetry is the method of choice. Controversy surrounds the question of whether a strict nutritional support criterion, adjusted to the patient's requirements, should be applied or whether a certain degree of hyponutrition should be allowed. Current evidence suggested that hypocaloric nutrition can improve results, partly due to a lower rate of infectious complications and better control of hyperglycemia. Therefore, hypocaloric and hyperproteic nutrition, whether enteral or parenteral, should be standard practice in the nutritional support of critically-ill obese patients when not contraindicated. Widely accepted recommendations consist of no more than 60-70% of requirements or administration of 11-14 kcal/kg current body weight/day or 22-25 kcal/kg ideal weight/day, with 2-2.5 g/kg ideal weight/day of proteins. In a broad sense, hypocaloric-hyperprotein regimens can be considered specific to obese critically-ill patients, although the complications related to comorbidities in these patients may require other therapeutic possibilities to be considered, with specific nutrients for hyperglycemia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and sepsis. However, there are no prospective randomized trials with this type of nutrition in this specific population subgroup and the available data are drawn from the general population of critically-ill patients. Consequently, caution should be exercised when

  8. IMPACTING POPULATION CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH THROUGH A COMMUNITY-BASED PRACTICE NETWORK: UPDATE ON AN ASH-SUPPORTED COLLABORATIVE

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Brent M.; Laken, Marilyn A.; Wagner, C. Shaun; Mack, Sheryl S.; Seymour-Edwards, Kim; Dodson, John; Zhao, Yumin; Lackland, Daniel T.

    2011-01-01

    The Hypertension Initiative began in 1999 to help transition South Carolina from a leader in cardiovascular disease (CVD) to a model of heart and vascular health. Goals were to reduce heart disease and stroke 50% by promoting healthy lifestyles and access to effective care and medications. Continuing medical education was used to train providers, encourage physicians to become American Society of Hypertension (ASH) certified Hypertension Specialists and recruit practices into the community-based practice network (CBPN). Practice data audit with provider specific feedback is a key quality improvement tool. With ASH support, the CBPN has grown to 197 practices with ~1.6 million patients (~700,000 hypertensives). Clinical data are obtained from electronic health records and quarterly provider feedback reports generated. Hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes control rose and South Carolina improved from 51st to 35th in CVD mortality from 1995 to 2006. The Hypertension Initiative expanded to the Outpatient Quality Improvement Network to encompass comparative effectiveness research and other chronic diseases. Lessons learned include: trust enables success, addressing practice priorities powers participation, infrastructure support must be multilateral, strategic planning identifies opportunities and pitfalls. A collaborative practice network is attainable that produces positive, sustainable, and growing impacts on cardiovascular and other chronic diseases. PMID:21806763

  9. Impacting population cardiovascular health through a community-based practice network: update on an ASH-supported collaborative.

    PubMed

    Egan, Brent M; Laken, Marilyn A; Shaun Wagner, C; Mack, Sheryl S; Seymour-Edwards, Kim; Dodson, John; Zhao, Yumin; Lackland, Daniel T

    2011-08-01

    The Hypertension Initiative began in 1999 to help transition South Carolina from a leader in cardiovascular disease (CVD) to a model of heart and vascular health. Goals were to reduce heart disease and stroke by 50% by promoting healthy lifestyles and access to effective care and medications. Continuing medical education was used to train providers, encourage physicians to become American Society of Hypertension (ASH)-certified hypertension specialists and recruit practices into the community-based practice network (CBPN). Practice data audit with provider specific feedback is a key quality improvement tool. With ASH support, the CBPN has grown to 197 practices with approximately 1.6 million patients (approximately 700,000 hypertensives). Clinical data are obtained from electronic health records and quarterly provider feedback reports are generated. Hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes control rose and South Carolina's ranking improved from 51st to 35th in CVD mortality from 1995 to 2006. The Hypertension Initiative expanded to the Outpatient Quality Improvement Network (O'QUIN) to encompass comparative effectiveness research and other chronic diseases. Lessons learned include: trust enables success, addressing practice priorities powers participation, infrastructure support must be multilateral, and strategic planning identifies opportunities and pitfalls. A collaborative practice network is attainable that produces positive, sustainable, and growing impacts on cardiovascular and other chronic diseases.

  10. Emergency Neurological Life Support: Third Edition, Updates in the Approach to Early Management of a Neurological Emergency.

    PubMed

    O'Phelan, Kristine H; Miller, Chad M

    2017-09-14

    Emergency Neurologic Life Support (ENLS) is an educational program designed to provide users advisory instructions regarding management for the first few hours of a neurologic emergency. The content of the course is divided into 14 modules, each addressing a distinct category of neurological injury. The course is appropriate for practitioners and providers from various backgrounds who work in environments of variable medical complexity. The focus of ENLS is centered on a standardized treatment algorithm, checklists, to guide early patient care, and a structured format for communication of findings and concerns to other healthcare professionals. Certification and training in ENLS is hosted by the Neurocritical Care Society. This document introduces the concept of ENLS and describes revisions that constitute the third version.

  11. LGBT Caregiving: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... FCA - A A + A You are here Home LGBT Caregiving: Frequently Asked Questions Order this publication Printer- ... service or organization is open to working with LGBT families? Kudos to you for managing to “go ...

  12. Climate Leadership Awards Frequent Questions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Provides answers to frequently asked questions regarding the Climate Leadership Awards, sponsored by EPA's Center for Corporate Climate Leadership with co-sponsorship from the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions and The Climate Registry.

  13. Frequent Questions About Universal Waste

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Frequent questions such as Who is affected by the universal waste regulations? What is “mercury-containing equipment”? How are waste batteries managed under universal waste? How are waste pesticides managed under universal waste?

  14. Frequently cited journals in forensic psychology.

    PubMed

    Black, Steve

    2012-02-01

    Works cited in six forensic psychology journals published 2008-2010 were counted to identify the most frequently cited journals. The sample of works cited (N = 21,776) was not a definitive ranked list of important journals in forensic psychology, but was large enough to indicate high-impact journals. The list of frequently cited publications included more general psychiatry and psychology journals than titles specific to forensic psychology. The implications of the proportion of general versus specific titles for collections supporting research in forensic psychology were discussed.

  15. Description and status update on GELLO: a proposed standardized object-oriented expression language for clinical decision support.

    PubMed

    Sordo, Margarita; Boxwala, Aziz A; Ogunyemi, Omolola; Greenes, Robert A

    2004-01-01

    A major obstacle to sharing computable clinical knowledge is the lack of a common language for specifying expressions and criteria. Such a language could be used to specify decision criteria, formulae, and constraints on data and action. Al-though the Arden Syntax addresses this problem for clinical rules, its generalization to HL7's object-oriented data model is limited. The GELLO Expression language is an object-oriented language used for expressing logical conditions and computations in the GLIF3 (GuideLine Interchange Format, v. 3) guideline modeling language. It has been further developed under the auspices of the HL7 Clinical Decision Support Technical Committee, as a proposed HL7 standard., GELLO is based on the Object Constraint Language (OCL), because it is vendor-independent, object-oriented, and side-effect-free. GELLO expects an object-oriented data model. Although choice of model is arbitrary, standardization is facilitated by ensuring that the data model is compatible with the HL7 Reference Information Model (RIM).

  16. Multiscale satellite and spatial information and analysis framework in support of a large-area forest monitoring and inventory update.

    PubMed

    Wulder, Michael A; White, Joanne C; Gillis, Mark D; Walsworth, Nick; Hansen, Matthew C; Potapov, Peter

    2010-11-01

    Many countries undertake a national forest inventory to enable statistically valid monitoring in support of national and international reporting of forest conditions and change. Canada's National Forest Inventory (NFI) program is designed to operate on a 10-year remeasurement cycle, with an interim report produced at the 5-year mid-point. The NFI is a sample-based inventory, with approximately 18,850 2×2-km photo plots across the country, distributed on a 20×20-km grid of sample points; these photo plots are the primary data source for the NFI. Capacity to provide annual monitoring information is required to keep policy and decision makers apprised of current forest conditions. In this study, we implemented a multistage monitoring framework and used a Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) change product to successfully identify 78% of the changes in forest cover area that were captured with a Landsat change detection approach. Of the NFI photo plots that were identified by both the Landsat and MODIS approaches as having changes in forest cover, the proportion of change area within the plots was similar (R2=0.78). Approximately 70% of the Landsat-derived change events occupied less than 40% of a single MODIS pixel, and more than 90% of the change events of this size were successfully detected with the MODIS product. Finally, MODIS estimates of the proportion of forest cover change at the NFI photo plot level were comparable to change estimates for the ecoregions as a whole (R2=0.95). High-temporal, low-spatial resolution imagery such as MODIS, in combination with other remotely sensed data sources, can provide information on disturbance events within a national forest inventory remeasurement cycle, thereby satisfying the interim information needs of policy and decision makers as well as the requirements of national and international reporting commitments.

  17. Update on EPA's ToxCast program: providing high throughput decision support tools for chemical risk management.

    PubMed

    Kavlock, Robert; Chandler, Kelly; Houck, Keith; Hunter, Sid; Judson, Richard; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Knudsen, Thomas; Martin, Matt; Padilla, Stephanie; Reif, David; Richard, Ann; Rotroff, Daniel; Sipes, Nisha; Dix, David

    2012-07-16

    The field of toxicology is on the cusp of a major transformation in how the safety and hazard of chemicals are evaluated for potential effects on human health and the environment. Brought on by the recognition of the limitations of the current paradigm in terms of cost, time, and throughput, combined with the ever increasing power of modern biological tools to probe mechanisms of chemical-biological interactions at finer and finer resolutions, 21st century toxicology is rapidly taking shape. A key element of the new approach is a focus on the molecular and cellular pathways that are the targets of chemical interactions. By understanding toxicity in this manner, we begin to learn how chemicals cause toxicity, as opposed to merely what diseases or health effects they might cause. This deeper understanding leads to increasing confidence in identifying which populations might be at risk, significant susceptibility factors, and key influences on the shape of the dose-response curve. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) initiated the ToxCast, or "toxicity forecaster", program 5 years ago to gain understanding of the strengths and limitations of the new approach by starting to test relatively large numbers (hundreds) of chemicals against an equally large number of biological assays. Using computational approaches, the EPA is building decision support tools based on ToxCast in vitro screening results to help prioritize chemicals for further investigation, as well as developing predictive models for a number of health outcomes. This perspective provides a summary of the initial, proof of concept, Phase I of ToxCast that has laid the groundwork for the next phases and future directions of the program.

  18. Contemplative Pedagogy: Frequently Asked Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coburn, Tom; Grace, Fran; Klein, Anne Carolyn; Komjathy, Louis; Roth, Harold; Simmer-Brown, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Contemplative Pedagogy is a new and sometimes controversial pedagogical practice. Faculty often have basic questions about how to implement the pedagogy in their classrooms, in addition to questions that challenge the educational value and appropriateness of the practice. Assembled here are the most frequently asked questions about Contemplative…

  19. Frequently Asked Questions about Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Frequently Asked Questions About Immunizations KidsHealth > For Parents > ...

  20. The Most Frequent English Homonyms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parent, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This article distinguishes homonymy, homophony, homography and polysemy, and provides a list of the most frequent homonyms using corpus-derived data. For most of the homonyms, the most common meaning accounts for 90% or more of the total uses of the form. The pedagogical and research implications of these findings are discussed. (Contains 5…

  1. NASA Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-08

    "NASA Update" program with NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver and NASA Acting Asistant Administrator for Public Affairs Bob Jacobs as moderator, NASA Headquarters, Thursday, April 8, 2010 in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. DSSTOX PROJECT UPDATE: SUPPORTING IMPROVED ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DSSTox is serving as a source of high quality structure-annotated toxicity and EPA data files for the new Aggregated Computational Toxicology Resource (ACToR) data repository, under development within the EPA NCCT, which will house in an integrated platform multiple domains of toxicologically relevant data. DSSTox is serving as a source of high quality structure-annotated toxicity and EPA data files for the new Aggregated Computational Toxicology Resource (ACToR) data repository, under development within the EPA NCCT, which will house in an integrated platform multiple domains of toxicologically relevant data.

  3. Generalization for Frequent Subgraph Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inokuchi, Akihiro; Washio, Takashi; Motoda, Hiroshi

    Data mining to derive frequent subgraphs from a dataset of general graphs has high computational complexity because it includes the explosively combinatorial search for candidate subgraphs and subgraph isomorphism matching. Although some approaches have been proposed to derive characteristic patterns from graph structured data, they limit the graphs to be searched within a specific class. In this paper, we propose an approach to conduct a complete search of various classes of frequent subgraphs in a massive dataset of labeled graphs within practical time. The power of our approach comes from the algebraic representation of graphs, its associated operations and well-organized bias constraints to limit the search space efficiently. Its performance has been evaluated through real world datasets, and the high scalability of our approach has been confirmed with respect to the amount of data and the computation time.

  4. NASA Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-15

    NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver listens as NASA Administrator Charles Bolden answers a question during a NASA Update on Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2011, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Bolden and Garver took the time discuss the agency’s fiscal year 2012 budget request and to take questions from employees. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. NASA Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-15

    NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden Jr., answers questions during a NASA Update on, Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2011, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Bolden, NASA's 12th Administrator and NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver took the time discuss the agency’s fiscal year 2012 budget request and to take questions from employees. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. NASA Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-20

    NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden Jr. left, and Deputy Administrator Lori Garver are seen during their first NASA Update,Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Bolden, NASA's 12th Administrator and Garver took the time to introduce themselves and outline their vision for the agency going forward. No questions were taken during the session. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. NASA Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-20

    NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden Jr. speaks during his first NASA Update,Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Bolden, NASA's 12th Administrator, was joined by Deputy Administrator Lori Garver where they took the time to introduce themselves and outline their vision for the agency going forward. No questions were taken during the session. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. NASA Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-15

    NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden Jr., and Deputy Administrator Lori Garver deliver a NASA Update on, Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2011, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Bolden, NASA's 12th Administrator and Garver took the time discuss the agency’s fiscal year 2012 budget request and to take questions from employees. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. NASA Update.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-15

    NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver answers questions during a NASA Update on, Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2011, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Garver and NASA Administrator Charles Bolden took the time discuss the agency’s fiscal year 2012 budget request and to take questions from employees. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. NASA Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-15

    NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for the Office of Communications Bob Jacobs moderates the NASA Update program, Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2011 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. NASA's 12th Administrator Charles Bolden and Deputy Administrator Lori Garver took the time discuss the agency’s fiscal year 2012 budget request and to take questions from employees. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Update '98.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mock, Karen R.

    1998-01-01

    Updates cases and issues previously discussed in this regular column on human rights in Canada, including racism and anti-Semitism, laws on hate crimes, hate sites on the World Wide Web, the use of the "free speech" defense by hate groups, and legal challenges to antiracist groups by individuals criticized by them. (DSK)

  12. Update '98.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mock, Karen R.

    1998-01-01

    Updates cases and issues previously discussed in this regular column on human rights in Canada, including racism and anti-Semitism, laws on hate crimes, hate sites on the World Wide Web, the use of the "free speech" defense by hate groups, and legal challenges to antiracist groups by individuals criticized by them. (DSK)

  13. Working Memory Updating as a Predictor of Academic Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lechuga, M. Teresa; Pelegrina, Santiago; Pelaez, Jose L.; Martin-Puga, M. Eva; Justicia, M. Jose

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence supporting the importance of executive functions, and specifically working memory updating (WMU), for children's academic achievement. This study aimed to assess the specific contribution of updating to the prediction of academic performance. Two updating tasks, which included different updating components, were…

  14. Working Memory Updating as a Predictor of Academic Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lechuga, M. Teresa; Pelegrina, Santiago; Pelaez, Jose L.; Martin-Puga, M. Eva; Justicia, M. Jose

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence supporting the importance of executive functions, and specifically working memory updating (WMU), for children's academic achievement. This study aimed to assess the specific contribution of updating to the prediction of academic performance. Two updating tasks, which included different updating components, were…

  15. Statistical review: frequently given comments.

    PubMed

    Lydersen, Stian

    2015-02-01

    From 2006 to 2014, I have carried out approximately 200 statistical reviews of manuscripts for ARD. My most frequent review comments concern the following: 1. Report how missing data were handled. 2. Limit the number of covariates in regression analyses. 3. Do not use stepwise selection of covariates. 4. Use analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) to adjust for baseline values in randomised controlled trials. 5. Do not use ANCOVA to adjust for baseline values in observational studies. 6. Dichotomising a continuous variable: a bad idea. 7. Student's t test is better than non-parametric tests. 8. Do not use Yates' continuity correction. 9. Mean (SD) is also relevant for non-normally distributed data. 10. Report estimate, CI and (possibly) p value-in that order of importance. 11. Post hoc power calculations-do not do it. 12. Do not test for baseline imbalances in a randomised controlled trial. 13. Report actual p values with 2 digits, maximum 3 decimals. 14. Format for reporting CIs. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Fault Tolerant Frequent Pattern Mining

    SciTech Connect

    Shohdy, Sameh; Vishnu, Abhinav; Agrawal, Gagan

    2016-12-19

    FP-Growth algorithm is a Frequent Pattern Mining (FPM) algorithm that has been extensively used to study correlations and patterns in large scale datasets. While several researchers have designed distributed memory FP-Growth algorithms, it is pivotal to consider fault tolerant FP-Growth, which can address the increasing fault rates in large scale systems. In this work, we propose a novel parallel, algorithm-level fault-tolerant FP-Growth algorithm. We leverage algorithmic properties and MPI advanced features to guarantee an O(1) space complexity, achieved by using the dataset memory space itself for checkpointing. We also propose a recovery algorithm that can use in-memory and disk-based checkpointing, though in many cases the recovery can be completed without any disk access, and incurring no memory overhead for checkpointing. We evaluate our FT algorithm on a large scale InfiniBand cluster with several large datasets using up to 2K cores. Our evaluation demonstrates excellent efficiency for checkpointing and recovery in comparison to the disk-based approach. We have also observed 20x average speed-up in comparison to Spark, establishing that a well designed algorithm can easily outperform a solution based on a general fault-tolerant programming model.

  17. Memory Updating and Mental Arithmetic

    PubMed Central

    Han, Cheng-Ching; Yang, Tsung-Han; Lin, Chia-Yuan; Yen, Nai-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Is domain-general memory updating ability predictive of calculation skills or are such skills better predicted by the capacity for updating specifically numerical information? Here, we used multidigit mental multiplication (MMM) as a measure for calculating skill as this operation requires the accurate maintenance and updating of information in addition to skills needed for arithmetic more generally. In Experiment 1, we found that only individual differences with regard to a task updating numerical information following addition (MUcalc) could predict the performance of MMM, perhaps owing to common elements between the task and MMM. In Experiment 2, new updating tasks were designed to clarify this: a spatial updating task with no numbers, a numerical task with no calculation, and a word task. The results showed that both MUcalc and the spatial task were able to predict the performance of MMM but only with the more difficult problems, while other updating tasks did not predict performance. It is concluded that relevant processes involved in updating the contents of working memory support mental arithmetic in adults. PMID:26869971

  18. NASA Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-20

    NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver, right, looks on as NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden Jr. speaks during his first NASA Update,Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Bolden, NASA's 12th Administrator and Garver took the time to introduce themselves and outline their vision for the agency going forward. No questions were taken during the session. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. NASA Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-20

    Alan Ladwig, Senior Advisor to the NASA Administrator, introduces Administrator Charles F. Bolden Jr. and Deputy Administrator Lori Garver at a NASA Update,Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Bolden, the agency's 12th Administrator and Garver took the time to introduce themselves and outline their vision for the agency going forward. No questions were taken during the session. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. NASA Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-20

    NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver, second right on stage, speaks as NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden Jr. looks on during a NASA Update,Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Bolden, NASA's 12th Administrator and Garver took the time to introduce themselves and outline their vision for the agency going forward. No questions were taken during the session. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. NASA Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-20

    NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden Jr. is seen through a television camera monitor during his first NASA Update,Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Bolden, NASA's 12th Administrator, was joined by Deputy Administrator Lori Garver where they took the time to introduce themselves and outline their vision for the agency going forward. No questions were taken during the session. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. NASA Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-20

    NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden Jr. left on stage, speaks during his first NASA Update as Deputy Administrator Lori Garver looks on at right,Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Bolden, NASA's 12th Administrator and Garver took the time to introduce themselves and outline their vision for the agency going forward. No questions were taken during the session. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. NASA Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-20

    NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden Jr. left, speaks during his first NASA Update as Deputy Administrator Lori Garver looks on,Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Bolden, NASA's 12th Administrator and Garver took the time to introduce themselves and outline their vision for the agency going forward. No questions were taken during the session. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. NASA Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-20

    NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver makes a point as she speaks during a NASA Update with Administrator Charles F. Bolden Jr.,Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Bolden, NASA's 12th Administrator and Garver took the time to introduce themselves and outline their vision for the agency going forward. No questions were taken during the session. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. NASA Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-20

    NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden Jr., left on stage, speaks during his first NASA Update as Deputy Administrator Lori Garver looks on at right,Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Bolden, NASA's 12th Administrator and Garver took the time to introduce themselves and outline their vision for the agency going forward. No questions were taken during the session. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. NASA Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-20

    NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden Jr. is seen on a television camera monitor while speaking at his first NASA Update,Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Bolden, NASA's 12th Administrator, was joined by Deputy Administrator Lori Garver where they took the time to introduce themselves and outline their vision for the agency going forward. No questions were taken during the session. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. NASA Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-20

    NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden Jr., left on stage, speaks during his first NASA Update as Deputy Administrator Lori Garver looks on,Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Bolden, NASA's 12th Administrator and Garver took the time to introduce themselves and outline their vision for the agency going forward. No questions were taken during the session. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. NASA Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-20

    Alan Ladwig, senior advisor to the NASA Administator, far left, makes a point as he introduces NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden Jr. and Deputy Administrator Lori Garver at a NASA Update,Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Bolden, NASA's 12th Administrator and Garver took the time to introduce themselves and outline their vision for the agency going forward. No questions were taken during the session. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. 77 FR 19077 - Adoption of Updated EDGAR Filer Manual

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... GAAP and 2012 Mutual Fund Risk/Return Summary Taxonomies; to support period field validation updates... concerning XBRL Taxonomies update contact Walter Hamscher, at (202) 551-5397; in the Division of Trading and... updated to support the US GAAP 2012 Taxonomy and Mutual Fund Risk/Return Summary 2012 Taxonomy. Please see...

  10. Colloid update.

    PubMed

    Argalious, Maged Y

    2012-01-01

    This update aims to provide an evidence based review of natural and synthetic colloids with a special emphasis on the various generations of the synthetic colloid hydroxyethyl starch. The effect of 1(st), 2(nd) and 3(rd) generation hetastarches on bleeding, coagulopathy, acute kidney injury and mortality will be discussed. The results of randomised controlled trials addressing morbidity and mortality outcomes of colloid versus crystalloid resuscitation in critically ill patients will be described. In addition, the rationale and evidence behind early goal directed fluid therapy (EGDFT) including a practical approach to assessment of dynamic measures of fluid responsiveness will be presented.

  11. NXE pellicle: development update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouns, Derk; Bendiksen, Aage; Broman, Par; Casimiri, Eric; Colsters, Paul; de Graaf, Dennis; Harrold, Hilary; Hennus, Piet; Janssen, Paul; Kramer, Ronald; Kruizinga, Matthias; Kuntzel, Henk; Lafarre, Raymond; Mancuso, Andrea; Ockwell, David; Smith, Daniel; van de Weg, David; Wiley, Jim

    2016-09-01

    ASML introduced the NXE pellicle concept, a removable pellicle solution that is compatible with current and future patterned mask inspection methods. We will present results of how we have taken the idea from concept to a demonstrated solution enabling the use of EUV pellicle by the industry for high volume manufacturing. We will update on the development of the next generation of pellicle films with higher power capability. Further, we will provide an update on top level requirements for pellicles and external interface requirements needed to support NXE pellicle adoption at a mask shop. Finally, we will present ASML's pellicle handling equipment to enable pellicle use at mask shops and our NXE pellicle roadmap outlining future improvements.

  12. Head Lice: Malathion Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... with a second application of the same medication. Warnings and Precautions: Malathion may cause stinging, especially if ... Page last updated: September 2, 2015 Content source: Global Health – Division of Parasitic Diseases Email Recommend Tweet ...

  13. RESRAD update

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.; Cheng, J.J.; Zielen, A.J.; Jones, L.G.; LePoire, D.J.; Wang, Y.Y. ); Yuan, Y.C. ); Loureiro, C.O. . Escola de Engenharia); Wallo, A. III; Peterson, H. . Offic

    1993-01-01

    A microcomputer program called RESRAD, which implements a pathway analysis method for radiological risk assessment, was developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 1989. This program is used to derive allowable residual concentrations of radionuclides in soil and to predict effective dose equivalents and excess cancer incidence risks incurred by an individual exposed to radioactive materials. Since its development, the RESRAD code has been adopted by DOE in Order 5400.5 for the derivation of soil cleanup criteria and dose calculations, and it has been used widely by DOE, other agencies, and their contractors. The original models used by ANL to develop RESRAD were initially developed as part of a DOE effort that began in the early 1980s and involved most of the national laboratories and DOE program offices. The RESRAD code is continuously improved and updated to incorporate comments from users and new features that ease the interaction with users and increase the code's capability and flexibility. The DOE Offices of Environmental Guidance and Environmental Restoration also provide periodic guidance regarding any significant changes to the code. The RESRAD update, Version 5.0, has substantial improvements in many aspects compared with the last version released in 1989.

  14. RESRAD update

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.; Cheng, J.J.; Zielen, A.J.; Jones, L.G.; LePoire, D.J.; Wang, Y.Y.; Yuan, Y.C.; Loureiro, C.O.; Wallo, A. III; Peterson, H.; H Williams, W.A.

    1993-05-01

    A microcomputer program called RESRAD, which implements a pathway analysis method for radiological risk assessment, was developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 1989. This program is used to derive allowable residual concentrations of radionuclides in soil and to predict effective dose equivalents and excess cancer incidence risks incurred by an individual exposed to radioactive materials. Since its development, the RESRAD code has been adopted by DOE in Order 5400.5 for the derivation of soil cleanup criteria and dose calculations, and it has been used widely by DOE, other agencies, and their contractors. The original models used by ANL to develop RESRAD were initially developed as part of a DOE effort that began in the early 1980s and involved most of the national laboratories and DOE program offices. The RESRAD code is continuously improved and updated to incorporate comments from users and new features that ease the interaction with users and increase the code`s capability and flexibility. The DOE Offices of Environmental Guidance and Environmental Restoration also provide periodic guidance regarding any significant changes to the code. The RESRAD update, Version 5.0, has substantial improvements in many aspects compared with the last version released in 1989.

  15. Document Update and Compare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoch, C. F.; Caldwell, D. C.; Caldwell, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    Document Update and Compare programs provide simple computerized documentmaintenance system on Data General NOVA 840 computer. Document Update program allows user to update document either by batch or terminal input. Documents are modified and lists of modifications printed out.

  16. Frequently Asked Questions about Bunion Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... A | Print | Share Frequently Asked Questions About Bunion Surgery Here are some frequently asked questions (FAQs) and ... best for you. 5. How can I avoid surgery? Sometimes observation of the bunion is all that ...

  17. Frequent Subgraph Discovery in Large Attributed Streaming Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Abhik; Holder, Larry; Choudhury, Sutanay

    2014-08-13

    The problem of finding frequent subgraphs in large dynamic graphs has so far only consid- ered a dynamic graph as being represented by a series of static snapshots taken at various points in time. This representation of a dynamic graph does not lend itself well to real time processing of real world graphs like social networks or internet traffic which consist of a stream of nodes and edges. In this paper we propose an algorithm that discovers the frequent subgraphs present in a graph represented by a stream of labeled nodes and edges. Our algorithm is efficient and consists of tunable parameters that can be tuned by the user to get interesting patterns from various kinds of graph data. In our model updates to the graph arrive in the form of batches which contain new nodes and edges. Our algorithm con- tinuously reports the frequent subgraphs that are estimated to be found in the entire graph as each batch arrives. We evaluate our system using 5 large dynamic graph datasets: the Hetrec 2011 challenge data, Twitter, DBLP and two synthetic. We evaluate our approach against two popular large graph miners, i.e., SUBDUE and GERM. Our experimental re- sults show that we can find the same frequent subgraphs as a non-incremental approach applied to snapshot graphs, and in less time.

  18. Exploration Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Delores Beasley, NASA Public Affairs, introduces the panel who consist of: Scott "Doc" Horowitz, Associate Administrator of Exploration Systems from NASA Headquarters; Jeff Henley, Constellation Program Manager from NASA Johnson Space Flight Center; and Steve Cook, Manager Exploration Launch Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Scott Horowitz presents a short video entitled, "Ares Launching the Future". He further explains how NASA personnel came up with the name of Ares and where the name Ares was derived. Jeff Henley, updates the Constellation program and Steve Cook presents two slide presentations detailing the Ares l crew launch vehicle and Ares 5 cargo launch vehicle. A short question and answer period from the news media follows.

  19. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Grau Carmona, T; López Martínez, J; Vila García, B

    2011-11-01

    Severe acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation is one of the most frequent reasons for admission to the intensive care unit. Among the most frequent causes for admission are exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and acute respiratory failure with acute lung injury (ALI) or with criteria of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). These patients have a high risk of malnutrition due to the underlying disease, their altered catabolism and the use of mechanical ventilation. Consequently, nutritional evaluation and the use of specialized nutritional support are required. This support should alleviate the catabolic effects of the disease, avoid calorie overload and, in selected patients, to use omega-3 fatty acid- and antioxidant-enriched diets, which could improve outcome. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Medicina Intensiva, Critica y Unidades Coronarias (SEMICYUC) and Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. NLM extramural program: frequently asked questions.

    PubMed Central

    Zink, S; Illes, J; Vannier, M W

    1996-01-01

    New and aspiring investigators often ask the same questions of experts as proposals are formulated, written, and submitted to the National Library of Medicine (NLM) for peer review. The NLM's Division of Extramural Programs (EP) provides support to medical libraries, academic medical centers, individuals, and industry through numerous types of grants and contracts. A complex set of processes and procedures is in place and is familiar to established and funded researchers, but to few others. A collection of frequently asked questions (FAQ) and their answers on these issues has been prepared by the Biomedical Library Review Committee (BLRC), a standing advisory group to the NLM that meets three times a year to review and score proposals. The BLRC and two experts on National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants and contracts compiled their advice in an electronic FAQ that has been edited and abridged as an introduction to NLM EP for investigators from medical library science, informatics, and biotechnology. The BLRC expects that if new investigators are able to avoid common mistakes and misconceptions, their proposals will improve in quality and they will be able to spend their time more effectively in proposal preparation. Images PMID:8826620

  1. Auditory Training With Frequent Communication Partners

    PubMed Central

    Spehar, Brent; Sommers, Mitchell; Barcroft, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Individuals with hearing loss engage in auditory training to improve their speech recognition. They typically practice listening to utterances spoken by unfamiliar talkers but never to utterances spoken by their most frequent communication partner (FCP)—speech they most likely desire to recognize—under the assumption that familiarity with the FCP's speech limits potential gains. This study determined whether auditory training with the speech of an individual's FCP, in this case their spouse, would lead to enhanced recognition of their spouse's speech. Method Ten couples completed a 6-week computerized auditory training program in which the spouse recorded the stimuli and the participant (partner with hearing loss) completed auditory training that presented recordings of their spouse. Results Training led participants to better discriminate their FCP's speech. Responses on the Client Oriented Scale of Improvement (Dillon, James, & Ginis, 1997) indicated subjectively that training reduced participants' communication difficulties. Peformance on a word identification task did not change. Conclusions Results suggest that auditory training might improve the ability of older participants with hearing loss to recognize the speech of their spouse and might improve communication interactions between couples. The results support a task-appropriate processing framework of learning, which assumes that human learning depends on the degree of similarity between training tasks and desired outcomes. PMID:27567016

  2. Response of Sensitive Behaviors to Frequent Measurement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We study the influence of frequent survey measurement on behavior. Widespread access to the Internet has made important breakthroughs in frequent measurement possible—potentially revolutionizing social science measurement of processes that change quickly over time. One key concern about using such frequent measurement is that it may influence the behavior being studied. We investigate this possibility using both a population-based experiment with random assignment to participation in a weekly journal for twelve months (versus no journal) and a large scale population-based journal-keeping study with weekly measurement for 30 months. Results reveal few of the measured behaviors are correlated with assignment to frequent measurement. Theoretical reasoning regarding the likely behavioral response to frequent measurement correctly predicts domains most vulnerable to this possibility. Overall, however, we found little evidence of behavioral response to frequent measurement. PMID:25432599

  3. Response of sensitive behaviors to frequent measurement.

    PubMed

    Axinn, William G; Jennings, Elyse A; Couper, Mick P

    2015-01-01

    We study the influence of frequent survey measurement on behavior. Widespread access to the Internet has made important breakthroughs in frequent measurement possible-potentially revolutionizing social science measurement of processes that change quickly over time. One key concern about using such frequent measurement is that it may influence the behavior being studied. We investigate this possibility using both a population-based experiment with random assignment to participation in a weekly journal for twelve months (versus no journal) and a large-scale, population-based, journal-keeping study with weekly measurement for 30 months. Results reveal few of the measured behaviors are correlated with assignment to frequent measurement. Theoretical reasoning regarding the likely behavioral response to frequent measurement correctly predicts domains most vulnerable to this possibility. Overall, however, we found little evidence of behavioral response to frequent measurement.

  4. Recent advances in perioperative anesthetic management update in the perioperative support of patients with septic shock and the effect on outcomes.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Aaron; Wurm, Ellen; Pickett, Patrick; Hata, J Steven

    2012-01-01

    Septic shock during the perioperative period imparts significant challenges for anesthetic management. There is increasing support for standardization of care using evidence-based, international consensus guidelines, such as the Surviving Sepsis Campaign. This review will highlight practices in the supportive management relevant to the perioperative care of patients with severe sepsis or septic shock and their effect on clinical outcomes. It will address the epidemiological data of sepsis, the diagnostic criteria, and the role of routine, goal-directed hemodynamic resuscitation. Furthermore, it will review other options for support, including antibiotics, intensive insulin therapy, and intensive care sedation in this high risk patient population.

  5. An Efficient Algorithm for Discovering Frequent Subgraphs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-25

    Over the years, frequent itemset discovery algorithms have been used to find interesting patterns in various application areas. However, as data ... mining techniques are being increasingly applied to non-traditional domains, existing frequent pattern discovery approach cannot be used. This is because

  6. Washington Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelstein, Fritz; Larock, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The main federal support for school modernization comes via the Qualified Zone Academy Board (QZAB) program, which helps districts raise funds and offers low-income schools freedom from bond and loan interest. The Better Classroom Act of 2003 proposes to extend the QZAB program by promoting new school construction. Two other bills currently before…

  7. HDF Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pourmal, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The HDF Group maintains and evolves HDF software used by NASA ESDIS program to manage remote sense data. In this talk we will discuss new features of HDF (Virtual Datasets, Single writerMultiple reader access, Community supported HDF5 compression filters) that address storage and IO performance requirements of the applications that work with the ESDIS data products.

  8. EPA DSSTox and ToxCast Project Updates: Generating New Data and Linkages in Support of Public Toxico-Cheminformatics Efforts

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s National Center for Computational Toxicology is generating data and capabilities to support a new paradigm for toxicity screening and prediction. The DSSTox project is improving public access to quality structure-annotated chemical toxicity information in less summarized fo...

  9. EPA DSSTox and ToxCast Project Updates: Generating New Data and Linkages in Support of Public Toxico-Cheminformatics Efforts

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s National Center for Computational Toxicology is generating data and capabilities to support a new paradigm for toxicity screening and prediction. The DSSTox project is improving public access to quality structure-annotated chemical toxicity information in less summarized fo...

  10. Arctic Planning: DOD Expects to Play a Supporting Role to Other Federal Agencies and Has Efforts Under Way to Address Capability Needs and Update Plans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    example, in 2014 DOD tested a new communication system— the Mobile User Objective System—that is intended to provide a secure, ultra -high-frequency...national security needs, stating that DOD does not anticipate a need to begin construction of additional bases or a deepwater port in Alaska before 2020.b...in Nome, Alaska, to support a deepwater port. Page 21 GAO-15-566 Arctic Planning Capability need Actions taken by the Department of

  11. Interim Control Strategy for the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Sewage Treatment Facility Disposal Pond - Two-year Update

    SciTech Connect

    L. V. Street

    2007-04-01

    The Idaho Cleanup Project has prepared this interim control strategy for the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office pursuant to DOE Order 5400.5, Chapter 11.3e (1) to support continued discharges to the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Sewage Treatment Facility Disposal Pond. In compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, a 2-year review of the Interim Control Strategy document has been completed. This submittal documents the required review of the April 2005 Interim Control Strategy. The Idaho Cleanup Project's recommendation is unchanged from the original recommendation. The Interim Control Strategy evaluates three alternatives: (1) re-route the discharge outlet to an uncontaminated area of the TSF-07; (2) construct a new discharge pond; or (3) no action based on justification for continued use. Evaluation of Alternatives 1 and 2 are based on the estimated cost and implementation timeframe weighed against either alternative's minimal increase in protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Evaluation of Alternative 3, continued use of the TSF-07 Disposal Pond under current effluent controls, is based on an analysis of four points: - Record of Decision controls will protect workers and the public - Risk of increased contamination is low - Discharge water will be eliminated in the foreseeable future - Risk of contamination spread is acceptable. The Idaho Cleanup Project recommends Alternative 3, no action other than continued implementation of existing controls and continued deactivation, decontamination, and dismantlement efforts at the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility.

  12. Interim Exceptional Events Rule Frequently Asked Questions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Air agencies and other stakeholders have raised technical questions and issues related to implementation since the EPA promulgated the EER. This Question and Answer (Q&A) document is intended to respond to some of these frequently asked questions.

  13. Regional Screening Levels Frequent Questions (June 2017)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Regional Screening Level RSL frequently asked question FAQ page provides risk assessors answers to common questions about the preliminary remediation goal PRG risk based concentration RBC and risk calculator for the assessment of human Health.

  14. Frequently Asked Questions about Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... used on this page Frequently Asked Questions About Genetic Disorders What are genetic disorders? A genetic disorder is a disease caused ... significant risk of developing the disease. . Geneticists group genetic disorders into three categories: Monogenetic disorders are caused ...

  15. Frequently Asked Questions about Genetic Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... sobre las pruebas genéticas Frequently Asked Questions About Genetic Testing What is genetic testing? What can I ... find more information about genetic testing? What is genetic testing? Genetic testing uses laboratory methods to look ...

  16. Frequently Asked Questions (Palliative Care: Conversations Matter)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Questions Frequently Asked Questions: What is pediatric palliative care? Pediatric palliative (pal-lee-uh-tiv) care is ... for patients and families. Who provides pediatric palliative care? Every palliative care team is different. The team ...

  17. Body Lice Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

  18. Regional Screening Levels Frequent Questions (May 2016)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Regional Screening Level RSL frequently asked question FAQ page provides risk assessors answers to common questions about the preliminary remediation goal PRG risk based concentration RBC and risk calculator for the assessment of human Health.

  19. An Update of the Ground Testing of the Li-ion Batteries in Support of JPL's 2003 Mars Exploration Rover Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Ewell, R. C.; Whitcanack, L. D.; Surampudi, S.; Puglia, F.; Gitzendanner, R.

    2006-01-01

    In early 2004, JPL successfully landed two Rovers, named Spirit and Opportunity, on the surface of Mars after traveling > 300 million miles over a 6-7 month period. In order to operate for extended duration (>9 months), both Rovers are equipped with rechargeable Lithium-ion batteries, which have enabled operation for over 854 and 834 Sols of operation, respectively, to date. Given that the batteries were required to support the mission for 90 Sols of operation by design, it is significant that the batteries have demonstrated over a nine fold increase in life over mission objectives. In addition to supporting the surface operations in conjunction with a triple-junction deployable solar arrays, the batteries were designed to aid in the launch and the EDL pyros, and allow for anomalies during cruise. In summary, the requirements of the Lithium-ion battery include the ability to provide power at least 90 sols on the surface of Mars, operate over a wide temperature range (-20 C to +30 C), withstand long storage periods (e.g., cruise period), operate in an inverted orientation, and support high current pulses (e.g., firing pyro events). In order to determine the viability of meeting these requirements, ground testing was performed on a Rover Battery Assembly Unit (RBAU), consisting of two 8-cell 10 Ah lithium-ion batteries connected in parallel. The RBAU upon which the performance testing was performed is nearly identical to the batteries incorporated into the two Rovers currently on Mars. The testing includes, (a) performing initial characterization tests (discharge capacity at different temperatures), (b) simulating the launch conditions, (c) simulating the cruise phase conditions (including trajectory correction maneuvers), (d) simulating the entry, decent, and landing (EDL) pulse load profile (required to support the pyros) (e) simulating the Mars surface operation mission simulation conditions, as well as, (f) assessing capacity loss and impedance characteristics as

  20. An Update of the Ground Testing of the Li-ion Batteries in Support of JPL's 2003 Mars Exploration Rover Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Ewell, R. C.; Whitcanack, L. D.; Surampudi, S.; Puglia, F.; Gitzendanner, R.

    2006-01-01

    In early 2004, JPL successfully landed two Rovers, named Spirit and Opportunity, on the surface of Mars after traveling > 300 million miles over a 6-7 month period. In order to operate for extended duration (>9 months), both Rovers are equipped with rechargeable Lithium-ion batteries, which have enabled operation for over 854 and 834 Sols of operation, respectively, to date. Given that the batteries were required to support the mission for 90 Sols of operation by design, it is significant that the batteries have demonstrated over a nine fold increase in life over mission objectives. In addition to supporting the surface operations in conjunction with a triple-junction deployable solar arrays, the batteries were designed to aid in the launch and the EDL pyros, and allow for anomalies during cruise. In summary, the requirements of the Lithium-ion battery include the ability to provide power at least 90 sols on the surface of Mars, operate over a wide temperature range (-20 C to +30 C), withstand long storage periods (e.g., cruise period), operate in an inverted orientation, and support high current pulses (e.g., firing pyro events). In order to determine the viability of meeting these requirements, ground testing was performed on a Rover Battery Assembly Unit (RBAU), consisting of two 8-cell 10 Ah lithium-ion batteries connected in parallel. The RBAU upon which the performance testing was performed is nearly identical to the batteries incorporated into the two Rovers currently on Mars. The testing includes, (a) performing initial characterization tests (discharge capacity at different temperatures), (b) simulating the launch conditions, (c) simulating the cruise phase conditions (including trajectory correction maneuvers), (d) simulating the entry, decent, and landing (EDL) pulse load profile (required to support the pyros) (e) simulating the Mars surface operation mission simulation conditions, as well as, (f) assessing capacity loss and impedance characteristics as

  1. Motherisk Update

    PubMed Central

    Mazzotta, Paolo; Gupta, Abhya; Maltepe, Caroline; Koren, Gideon; Magee, Laura

    1998-01-01

    QUESTION Some of my pregnant patients have trouble functioning because of morning sickness. In particular, they are afraid to take medications. They end up losing weight, quitting work, and dropping out of other activities. What can I do to allay their fears? ANSWER Women often benefit from knowing that they are not alone in having this problem, that morning sickness typically does not harm a fetus, and that safe therapies are available. Psychological and medical support is very important. Other causes of nausea and vomiting must always be ruled out. The Motherisk Program has a clinic and hot-line line for patients with severe morning sickness. PMID:9678272

  2. Development of a frequent heartburn index.

    PubMed

    Stull, Donald E; van Hanswijck de Jonge, Patricia; Houghton, Katherine; Kocun, Christopher; Sandor, David W

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study is to develop and validate a brief instrument for the measurement of overall psychosocial impact of frequent heartburn (heartburn experienced 2+ times weekly) in the general U.S. population, yielding a single, composite score. Item reduction and psychometric analyses of an existing Frequent Heartburn (FHB) Survey, a 52-item, 13-domain, patient-reported outcomes (PRO) survey assessing the impact of frequent heartburn on psychosocial quality of life. Item reduction resulted in 9 items from the original FHB Survey measuring all domains. All retained items in this full Frequent Heartburn Index (FHBI-Full) had moderate to strong factor loadings on the underlying factor (range: 0.66-0.85) and acceptable overall model fit (CFI = 0.93, SRMR = 0.04). Coefficient alpha was 0.92. A shorter FHBI (FHBI-Brief) was created that excludes the two employment-related items. The FHBI-Brief had a coefficient alpha of 0.90. Both FHBI versions have good psychometric properties and capture a full range of psychosocial effects of frequent heartburn. Normed national scores for the FHBI are available against which an individual can compare their own FHBI score. The FHBI-Full and FHBI-Brief show promise as PRO instruments that may help individuals and clinicians better understand the effect of frequent heartburn on psychosocial functioning.

  3. [Retinoblastoma update].

    PubMed

    Aerts, I; Lumbroso-Le Rouic, L; Gauthier-Villars, M; Brisse, H; Doz, F

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular malignancy of infancy with an incidence of 1/15,000 births. Sixty percent of retinoblastomas are unilateral, with a median age at diagnosis of 2 years, and in most cases they are not hereditary. Retinoblastoma is bilateral in 40% of cases, with an earlier median age at diagnosis of 1 year. All bilateral and multifocal unilateral forms are hereditary and are part of a genetic cancer predisposition syndrome. All children with a bilateral or familial form, and 10-15% of children with a unilateral form, constitutionally carry an RB1 gene mutation. The two most frequent symptoms at diagnosis are leukocoria and strabismus. Diagnosis is made by fundoscopy, with ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contributing both to diagnosis and assessment of the extension of the disease. Treatment of patients with retinoblastoma must take into account the various aspects of the disease (unilateral/bilateral, size, location), the risks for vision, and the possible hereditary nature of the disease. The main prognostic aspects are still early detection and adapted coverage by a multidisciplinary, highly specialized team. Enucleation is still often necessary in unilateral disease; the decision for adjuvant treatment is made according to the histological risk factors. The most important recent therapeutic advances concern conservative treatment, which is proposed for at least one of the two eyes in most bilateral cases: laser alone or in combination with chemotherapy, cryotherapy, or brachytherapy. Recently, the development of new conservative techniques of treatment, such as intra-arterial selective chemotherapy perfusion and intravitreal injections, aims at preserving visual function in these children and decreasing the number of enucleations and the need for external beam radiotherapy. The vital prognosis related to retinoblastoma is now excellent in industrialized countries, but long-term survival is still related to the

  4. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): neurocritical patient].

    PubMed

    Acosta Escribano, J; Herrero Meseguer, I; Conejero García-Quijada, R

    2011-11-01

    Neurocritical patients require specialized nutritional support due to their intense catabolism and prolonged fasting. The preferred route of nutrient administration is the gastrointestinal route, especially the gastric route. Alternatives are the transpyloric route or mixed enteral-parenteral nutrition if an effective nutritional volume of more than 60% cannot be obtained. Total calore intake ranges from 20-30 kcal/kg/day, depending on the period of the clinical course, with protein intake higher than 20% of total calories (hyperproteic diet). Nutritional support should be initiated early. The incidence of gastrointestinal complications is generally higher to other critically-ill patients, the most frequent complication being an increase in gastric residual volume. As in other critically-ill patients, glycemia should be closely monitored and maintained below 150 mg/dL. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Medicina Intensiva, Critica y Unidades Coronarias (SEMICYUC) and Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. The hyperactive child: an update.

    PubMed

    Myers, D A; Claman, L; Oldham, D G; Waller, D A; Crumley, F E; Hebeler, J R; Pearson, G T; Shadid, L G

    1989-03-01

    The physician is uniquely qualified to manage the multiple facets of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. This clinically oriented update reviews the current state of the art regarding diagnosis and management of hyperactive children. Three case reports emphasize the wide variation of clinical problems presented by this frequently occurring disorder of childhood. Epidemiology, differential diagnosis, associated features, neurobiologic mechanisms, treatment, long-term outcome, and attention-deficit disorder in adults are addressed. Although medication is an important tool in the treatment of this condition, follow-up studies confirm the importance of a multimodal treatment approach.

  6. Spatially explicit modeling of annual and seasonal habitat for greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in Nevada and Northeastern California—An updated decision-support tool for management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, Peter S.; Casazza, Michael L.; Brussee, Brianne E.; Ricca, Mark A.; Gustafson, K. Benjamin; Sanchez-Chopitea, Erika; Mauch, Kimberly; Niell, Lara; Gardner, Scott; Espinosa, Shawn; Delehanty, David J.

    2016-05-20

    Successful adaptive management hinges largely upon integrating new and improved sources of information as they become available. As a timely example of this tenet, we updated a management decision support tool that was previously developed for greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus, hereinafter referred to as “sage-grouse”) populations in Nevada and California. Specifically, recently developed spatially explicit habitat maps derived from empirical data played a key role in the conservation of this species facing listing under the Endangered Species Act. This report provides an updated process for mapping relative habitat suitability and management categories for sage-grouse in Nevada and northeastern California (Coates and others, 2014, 2016). These updates include: (1) adding radio and GPS telemetry locations from sage-grouse monitored at multiple sites during 2014 to the original location dataset beginning in 1998; (2) integrating output from high resolution maps (1–2 m2) of sagebrush and pinyon-juniper cover as covariates in resource selection models; (3) modifying the spatial extent of the analyses to match newly available vegetation layers; (4) explicit modeling of relative habitat suitability during three seasons (spring, summer, winter) that corresponded to critical life history periods for sage-grouse (breeding, brood-rearing, over-wintering); (5) accounting for differences in habitat availability between more mesic sagebrush steppe communities in the northern part of the study area and drier Great Basin sagebrush in more southerly regions by categorizing continuous region-wide surfaces of habitat suitability index (HSI) with independent locations falling within two hydrological zones; (6) integrating the three seasonal maps into a composite map of annual relative habitat suitability; (7) deriving updated land management categories based on previously determined cut-points for intersections of habitat suitability and an updated index of sage

  7. Updating Situation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwaan, Rolf A.; Madden, Carol J.

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined how situation models are updated during text comprehension. If comprehenders keep track of the evolving situation, they should update their models such that the most current information, the here and now, is more available than outdated information. Contrary to this updating hypothesis, E. J. O'Brien, M. L. Rizzella, J. E.…

  8. Update in adrenocortical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fassnacht, Martin; Kroiss, Matthias; Allolio, Bruno

    2013-12-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is an orphan malignancy that has attracted increasing attention during the last decade. Here we provide an update on advances in the field since our last review published in this journal in 2006. The Wnt/β-catenin pathway and IGF-2 signaling have been confirmed as frequently altered signaling pathways in ACC, but recent data suggest that they are probably not sufficient for malignant transformation. Thus, major players in the pathogenesis are still unknown. For diagnostic workup, comprehensive hormonal assessment and detailed imaging are required because in most ACCs, evidence for autonomous steroid secretion can be found and computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (if necessary, combined with functional imaging) can differentiate benign from malignant adrenocortical tumors. Surgery is potentially curative in localized tumors. Thus, we recommend a complete resection including lymphadenectomy by an expert surgeon. The pathology report should demonstrate the adrenocortical origin of the lesion (eg, by steroidogenic factor 1 staining) and provide Weiss score, resection status, and quantitation of the proliferation marker Ki67 to guide further treatment. Even after complete surgery, recurrence is frequent and adjuvant mitotane treatment improves outcome, but uncertainty exists as to whether all patients benefit from this therapy. In advanced ACC, mitotane is still the standard of care. Based on the FIRM-ACT trial, mitotane plus etoposide, doxorubicin, and cisplatin is now the established first-line cytotoxic therapy. However, most patients will experience progress and require salvage therapies. Thus, new treatment concepts are urgently needed. The ongoing international efforts including comprehensive "-omic approaches" and next-generation sequencing will improve our understanding of the pathogenesis and hopefully lead to better therapies.

  9. Update on thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Benvenga, S

    2008-05-01

    With over 2 000 articles published on thyroid cancer between January 1, 2006 and September 10, 2007 it is difficult to offer an updated and complete review on this malignancy. Thus, I elected to summarize papers published in 2007 on topics frequently overlooked in other reviews or books, and papers that are likely to be followed by interesting developments. Papers include: 1) the accuracy and currency of websites on thyroid cancer; 2) the detection of the V600E BRAF mutation in very small papillary thyroid cancers that are detected histologically; 3) the relationship between thyroid cancer and Hashimoto's thyroiditis or hepatitis C virus, an association that appears to be nonrandom; 4) the not negligible frequency of coexistence of thyroid cancer with primary hyperparathyroidism; 5) the value of ultrasound elastography of thyroid nodules in distinguishing malignant form benign lesions; 6) the value of percutaneous ethanol injection in the treatment of thyroid or nodal recurrences of thyroid cancer; 7) the relatively benign course of intrathyroid metastases from renal cell carcinoma; 8) the exceedingly rare thyroid paraganglioma, though the rate of reports has increased recently; and 9) the increase in serum calcitonin caused by chronic alcoholism, an increase that cannot be reversed by three weeks of alcohol weaning.

  10. Furnace alloys update

    SciTech Connect

    Vervalin, C.H.

    1984-12-01

    The principal share of the cast heat resistant alloy market has long been held by HK-40, a 25Cr/20Ni steel with an average carbon content of 0.40 percent. HK-40 alloy has done a commendable job, especially after its limitations in the various processes were better understood, by designers and operators alike. Presently, and in the future, the materials performance demands of new reformers, ethylene pyrolysis, coal gasification, iron ore reduction and other thermally intensive processes will require alloy capabilities frequently beyond those of HK-40. This article presents an update of the capabilities and limitations of HK-40 and describes a group of higher nickel 25Cr/35Ni alloys of the HP-base, mostly modified by various additions such as columbian, tungsten, titanium, zirconium, cobalt, chromium, molybdenum, silicon and/or aluminum. A number of these alloys are proprietary. Data on the 24Cr/24Ni and 30Cr/30Ni alloys are presented as they have proven, reliable performance at an economical price.

  11. Plate Boundary Observatory East Region Update and Status: Supporting New Science Through Enhanced Telemetry, Monument Evaluation, and Continued Operations and Maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmann, S. T.

    2012-12-01

    The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) - East Region consists of 280 continuously operating GPS sites in a region that extends from the western border of California to the East Coast of the U.S. We present a number of highlights from the operations and maintenance (O&M) of the network in FY2012. One goal for 2012 was to replace poorly performing stations and another was to fill in some of the gaps in the eastern region of PBO. Accordingly, new GPS sites were installed at several locations across the mid-west, including in Wisconsin and South Dakota. CAYU, a GPS station at Cayuga College, New York also was incorporated into the PBO data flow to replace the poorly performing PBO station, LOZ1. UNAVCO now manages over 20 PBO GPS stations east of the Rocky Mountains, including 2 GPS stations installed in November 2011 as part of an NSF-funded RAPID project to the study of the post-rupture crustal relaxation resulting from the M5.8 Mineral, VA earthquake. PBO engineers also are constructing two additional monuments at five existing PBO sites to compare the performance of different monument types in different geological and tectonic settings. In addition, PBO engineers are upgrading GPS stations in Colorado and New Mexico, which comprise the semi-permanent Rio Grande Rift GPS network, and which have been downloaded manually for over 6 years, to cellular data communications. Lastly, engineers from the PBO-East region continued to support special projects from EarthScope-funded PIs, including Dr. Kristine Larson, who is advancing the use of GPS multipath observations to estimate snow depth (PBO H20) and vegetation growth. In summary, the PBO East Region sub-network state of health remained consistently above 97% throughout 2012, a testament to network hardening completed during the last three years of PBO O&M.

  12. Minimum Hamiltonian Ascent Trajectory Evaluation (MASTRE) program (update to automatic flight trajectory design, performance prediction, and vehicle sizing for support of Shuttle and Shuttle derived vehicles) engineering manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, J. T.

    1993-04-01

    The Minimum Hamiltonian Ascent Trajectory Evaluation (MASTRE) program and its predecessors, the ROBOT and the RAGMOP programs, have had a long history of supporting MSFC in the simulation of space boosters for the purpose of performance evaluation. The ROBOT program was used in the simulation of the Saturn 1B and Saturn 5 vehicles in the 1960's and provided the first utilization of the minimum Hamiltonian (or min-H) methodology and the steepest ascent technique to solve the optimum trajectory problem. The advent of the Space Shuttle in the 1970's and its complex airplane design required a redesign of the trajectory simulation code since aerodynamic flight and controllability were required for proper simulation. The RAGMOP program was the first attempt to incorporate the complex equations of the Space Shuttle into an optimization tool by using an optimization method based on steepest ascent techniques (but without the min-H methodology). Development of the complex partial derivatives associated with the Space Shuttle configuration and using techniques from the RAGMOP program, the ROBOT program was redesigned to incorporate these additional complexities. This redesign created the MASTRE program, which was referred to as the Minimum Hamiltonian Ascent Shuttle TRajectory Evaluation program at that time. Unique to this program were first-stage (or booster) nonlinear aerodynamics, upper-stage linear aerodynamics, engine control via moment balance, liquid and solid thrust forces, variable liquid throttling to maintain constant acceleration limits, and a total upgrade of the equations used in the forward and backward integration segments of the program. This modification of the MASTRE code has been used to simulate the new space vehicles associated with the National Launch Systems (NLS). Although not as complicated as the Space Shuttle, the simulation and analysis of the NLS vehicles required additional modifications to the MASTRE program in the areas of providing

  13. Minimum Hamiltonian Ascent Trajectory Evaluation (MASTRE) program (update to automatic flight trajectory design, performance prediction, and vehicle sizing for support of Shuttle and Shuttle derived vehicles) engineering manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    The Minimum Hamiltonian Ascent Trajectory Evaluation (MASTRE) program and its predecessors, the ROBOT and the RAGMOP programs, have had a long history of supporting MSFC in the simulation of space boosters for the purpose of performance evaluation. The ROBOT program was used in the simulation of the Saturn 1B and Saturn 5 vehicles in the 1960's and provided the first utilization of the minimum Hamiltonian (or min-H) methodology and the steepest ascent technique to solve the optimum trajectory problem. The advent of the Space Shuttle in the 1970's and its complex airplane design required a redesign of the trajectory simulation code since aerodynamic flight and controllability were required for proper simulation. The RAGMOP program was the first attempt to incorporate the complex equations of the Space Shuttle into an optimization tool by using an optimization method based on steepest ascent techniques (but without the min-H methodology). Development of the complex partial derivatives associated with the Space Shuttle configuration and using techniques from the RAGMOP program, the ROBOT program was redesigned to incorporate these additional complexities. This redesign created the MASTRE program, which was referred to as the Minimum Hamiltonian Ascent Shuttle TRajectory Evaluation program at that time. Unique to this program were first-stage (or booster) nonlinear aerodynamics, upper-stage linear aerodynamics, engine control via moment balance, liquid and solid thrust forces, variable liquid throttling to maintain constant acceleration limits, and a total upgrade of the equations used in the forward and backward integration segments of the program. This modification of the MASTRE code has been used to simulate the new space vehicles associated with the National Launch Systems (NLS). Although not as complicated as the Space Shuttle, the simulation and analysis of the NLS vehicles required additional modifications to the MASTRE program in the areas of providing

  14. [Frequent mistakes in English medical papers (I)].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng-ai; Xu, Jin; Song, Jian-wu

    2003-02-01

    In this article, we attempt to grammatically classify the mistakes that frequently appear in the English medical papers written by Chinese, for the purpose of drawing attention on these avoidable mistakes from the authors to improve their medical paper writing in English.

  15. Auditory Training with Frequent Communication Partners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tye-Murray, Nancy; Spehar, Brent; Sommers, Mitchell; Barcroft, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Individuals with hearing loss engage in auditory training to improve their speech recognition. They typically practice listening to utterances spoken by unfamiliar talkers but never to utterances spoken by their most frequent communication partner (FCP)--speech they most likely desire to recognize--under the assumption that familiarity…

  16. Frequent Collaborative Quiz Taking and Conceptual Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rezaei, Ali R.

    2015-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study reports on the effectiveness of three assessment strategies for students' performance. The primary goal was to determine whether there are any improvements in students' conceptual learning when a frequent (weekly) quiz is used for grading purposes compared to using midterm and final examinations only. Another goal was…

  17. Auditory Training with Frequent Communication Partners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tye-Murray, Nancy; Spehar, Brent; Sommers, Mitchell; Barcroft, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Individuals with hearing loss engage in auditory training to improve their speech recognition. They typically practice listening to utterances spoken by unfamiliar talkers but never to utterances spoken by their most frequent communication partner (FCP)--speech they most likely desire to recognize--under the assumption that familiarity…

  18. How Frequently Are Elementary Students Writing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunflower, Cherlyn; Crawford, Leslie W.

    A study examined elementary school writing instruction to determine (1) how frequently students are writing, (2) when in the curriculum writing occurs, and (3) in what forms the writing occurs. Data were collected in 75 elementary classrooms in 25 midwestern schools during a 15-day period. The data deviated little from what D. Graves reported in…

  19. a Bottom-Up Geosptial Data Update Mechanism for Spatial Data Infrastructure Updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, W.; Zhu, X.; Liu, Y.

    2012-08-01

    Currently, the top-down spatial data update mechanism has made a big progress and it is wildly applied in many SDI (spatial data infrastructure). However, this mechanism still has some issues. For example, the update schedule is limited by the professional department's project, usually which is too long for the end-user; the data form collection to public cost too much time and energy for professional department; the details of geospatial information does not provide sufficient attribute, etc. Thus, how to deal with the problems has become the effective shortcut. Emerging Internet technology, 3S technique and geographic information knowledge which is popular in the public promote the booming development of geoscience in volunteered geospatial information. Volunteered geospatial information is the current "hotspot", which attracts many researchers to study its data quality and credibility, accuracy, sustainability, social benefit, application and so on. In addition to this, a few scholars also pay attention to the value of VGI to support the SDI updating. And on that basis, this paper presents a bottom-up update mechanism form VGI to SDI, which includes the processes of match homonymous elements between VGI and SDI vector data , change data detection, SDI spatial database update and new data product publication to end-users. Then, the proposed updating cycle is deeply discussed about the feasibility of which can detect the changed elements in time and shorten the update period, provide more accurate geometry and attribute data for spatial data infrastructure and support update propagation.

  20. Is racecadotril effective for acute diarrhea in children? -First update.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Josefina; Cifuentes, Lorena

    2016-05-06

    This article updates the December 2015 Living FRISBEE (Living FRISBEE: Living FRIendly Summary of the Body of Evidence using Epistemonikos), based on the detection of two systematic reviews not identified in the previous version. Gastroenteritis or acute watery diarrhea is usually a self-limited disease, but it is still associated to substantial healthcare costs and remains a frequent demand for medical care. Racecadotril, an intestinal enkephalinase inhibitor, has been used as treatment because it would decrease the duration of acute diarrhea and fluid loss. However there is still no evidence supporting its routine use. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified five systematic reviews including nine randomized trials relevant for our question. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded racecadotril probably reduces the duration of acute diarrhea in pediatric patients, without increasing adverse effects.

  1. ADAS Update and Maintainability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2000, both the National Weather Service Melbourne (NWS MLB) and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) have used a local data integration system (LOIS) as part of their forecast and warning operations. The original LOIS was developed by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in 1998 (Manobianco and Case 1998) and has undergone subsequent improvements. Each has benefited from three-dimensional (3-D) analyses that are delivered to forecasters every 15 minutes across the peninsula of Florida. The intent is to generate products that enhance short-range weather forecasts issued in support of NWS MLB and SMG operational requirements within East Central Florida. The current LDIS uses the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (AD AS) package as its core, which integrates a wide variety of national, regional, and local observational data sets. It assimilates all available real-time data within its domain and is run at a finer spatial and temporal resolution than current national or regional-scale analysis packages. As such, it provides local forecasters with a more comprehensive understanding of evolving fine-scale weather features. Over the years, the LDIS has become problematic to maintain since it depends on AMU-developed shell scripts that were written for an earlier version of the ADAS software. The goals of this task were to update the NWS MLB/SMG LDIS with the latest version of ADAS, incorporate new sources of observational data, and upgrade and modify the AMU-developed shell scripts written to govern the system. In addition, the previously developed ADAS graphical user interface (GUI) was updated. Operationally, these upgrades will result in more accurate depictions of the current local environment to help with short-range weather forecasting applications, while also offering an improved initialization for local versions of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model used by both groups.

  2. Situation model updating in young and older adults: Global versus incremental mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Heather R; Zacks, Jeffrey M

    2015-06-01

    Readers construct mental models of situations described by text. Activity in narrative text is dynamic, so readers must frequently update their situation models when dimensions of the situation change. Updating can be incremental, such that a change leads to updating just the dimension that changed, or global, such that the entire model is updated. Here, we asked whether older and young adults make differential use of incremental and global updating. Participants read narratives containing changes in characters and spatial location and responded to recognition probes throughout the texts. Responses were slower when probes followed a change, suggesting that situation models were updated at changes. When either dimension changed, responses to probes for both dimensions were slowed; this provides evidence for global updating. Moreover, older adults showed stronger evidence of global updating than did young adults. One possibility is that older adults perform more global updating to offset reduced ability to manipulate information in working memory.

  3. Situation Model Updating in Young and Older Adults: Global versus Incremental Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Heather R.; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Readers construct mental models of situations described by text. Activity in narrative text is dynamic, so readers must frequently update their situation models when dimensions of the situation change. Updating can be incremental, such that a change leads to updating just the dimension that changed, or global, such that the entire model is updated. Here, we asked whether older and young adults make differential use of incremental and global updating. Participants read narratives containing changes in characters and spatial location and responded to recognition probes throughout the texts. Responses were slower when probes followed a change, suggesting that situation models were updated at changes. When either dimension changed, responses to probes for both dimensions were slowed; this provides evidence for global updating. Moreover, older adults showed stronger evidence of global updating than did young adults. One possibility is that older adults perform more global updating to offset reduced ability to manipulate information in working memory. PMID:25938248

  4. SNTEMP (In)frequently asked questions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholow, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Here, you will find a series of questions and answers resulting from many years of technical assistance with SNTEMP and SSTEMP. These (in)frequently asked questions are presented here so that you may get a feel for the range of questions posed, learn from the questions and their 'answers,' and share in the discussions if you wish. I certainly didn't answer all the questions, nor do I feel like I've got the only answer for them all.

  5. Childhood adversity and frequent medical consultations.

    PubMed

    Fiddler, Maggie; Jackson, Judy; Kapur, Navneet; Wells, Adrian; Creed, Francis

    2004-01-01

    We assessed possible psychological mediators of the relationship between childhood adversity and frequent medical consultations among new outpatients at neurology, cardiology, and gastroenterology clinics. We assessed whether these differed in patients with and without organic disease that explained their symptoms. At first clinic visit we recorded Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS--anxiety and depression subscale scores), Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ--four subscales: consequences, cure, identity, timeline), Health Anxiety Questionnaire (total score), and Symptom Amplification Scale (total score). Subjects were divided into two groups according to whether they had experienced any type of childhood adversity using the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Schedule. Outcome was the (log) number of medical consultations for 12 months before and 6 months after the index clinic visits. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine mediators; this was performed separately for patients with symptoms explained and not explained by organic disease. One-hundred and twenty-nine patients (61% response) were interviewed. Fifty-two (40.3%) had experienced childhood adversity; they made a median of 16 doctor visits compared with 10 for those without adversity (adjusted P=.026). IPQ identity score (number of symptoms attributed to the illness) and HAD depression scores were significantly associated with both childhood adversity and number of medical consultations and these variables acted as mediators between childhood adversity and frequency of consultation in the multiple regression analyses. This association was limited to patients with medically unexplained symptoms and was mediated by IPQ Identity Score (number of symptoms attributed to the patient's illness) and HAD depression score. Sexual abuse and overt neglect were the adversities most closely associated with frequent consultations. In patients with medically unexplained symptoms the association

  6. Frequent users of the pediatric emergency department.

    PubMed

    Seguin, Jade; Osmanlliu, Esli; Zhang, Xun; Clavel, Virginie; Eisman, Harley; Rodrigues, Robert; Oskoui, Maryam

    2017-04-06

    Emergency department (ED) crowding is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Its etiology is multifactorial, and frequent ED use (defined as more or equal to five visits per year) is a major contributor to high patient volumes. Our primary objective is to characterize the frequent user population. Our secondary objective is to examine risk factors for frequent emergency use. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of pediatric emergency department (PED) visits at the Montreal Children's Hospital using the Système Informatique Urgence (SIURGE), electronic medical record database. We analysed the relation between patient's characteristics and the number of PED visits over a 1-year period following the index visit. Patients totalling 52,088 accounted for 94,155 visits. Of those, 2,474 (4.7%) patients had five and more recurrent visits and accounted for 16.6% (15,612 visits) of the total PED visits. Lower level of acuity at index visit (odds ratio [OR] 0.85) was associated with a lower number of recurrent visits. Lower socioeconomic status (social deprivation index OR 1.09, material deprivation index OR 1.08) was associated with a higher number of recurrent visits. Asthma (OR 1.57); infectious ear, nose, and sinus disorders (OR 1.33); and other respiratory disorders (OR 1.56) were independently associated with a higher incidence of a recurrent visit within the year following the first visit. Our study is the first Canadian study to assess risk factors of frequent pediatric emergency use. The identified risk factors and diagnoses highlight the need for future evidence-based, targeted innovative research evaluating strategies to minimize ED crowding, to improve health outcomes and to improve patient satisfaction.

  7. Sentences Generation by Frequent Parsing Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Takashi; Miura, Takao; Shioya, Isamu

    We propose a sophisticated approach to generate sentences from syntax trees. Users are assumed to give their intent in text or equivalent ones (such as syntax trees). Here we generate standard sentences by examining how the syntax structure consist of frequent structures and how they are constructed. We examine corpus in some domains to extract elementary syntax structures appeared in the corpus as well as standard sentences using the trees.

  8. Spatial patterns of frequent floods in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneeberger, Klaus; Rössler, Ole; Weingartner, Rolf

    2017-04-01

    Information about the spatial characteristics of high and extreme streamflow is often needed for an accurate analysis of flood risk and effective co-ordination of flood related activities, such as flood defence planning. In this study we analyse the spatial dependence of frequent floods in Switzerland across different scales. Firstly, we determine the average length of high and extreme flow events for 56 runoff time series of Swiss rivers. Secondly, a dependence measure expressing the probability that streamflow peaks are as high as peaks at a conditional site is used to describe and map the spatial extend of joint occurrence of frequent floods across Switzerland. Thirdly, we apply a cluster analysis to identify groups of sites that are likely to react similarly in terms of joint occurrence of high flow events. The results indicate that a time interval with a length of 3 days seems to be most appropriate to characterise the average length of high streamflow events across spatial scales. In the main Swiss basins, high and extreme streamflows were found to be asymptotically independent. In contrast, at the meso-scale distinct flood regions, which react similarly in terms of occurrence of frequent flood, were found. The knowledge about these regions can help to optimise flood defence planning or to estimate regional flood risk properly.

  9. Diesel Engine Technology Update

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    AFWAL-TR-87-20 54 83-021-DET DIESEL ENGINE TECHNOLOGY UPDATE Kaupert, Andrew W., Lt. Col. USAFR Air Force Reserves Detroit Detachment 2 Ann Arbor, MI...nn AFR OH 45433-6563 63723F 3139 1 01 01 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) DIESEL ENGINE TECHNOLOGY UPDATE 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Kaupert...methodology for technology prediction. The objective of the present report is to update the technology transfer/ 0 development status of diesel engine

  10. ISS Update: Suitport

    NASA Image and Video Library

    ISS Update commentator Lynnette Madison interviews Mallory Jennings, Suitport Human Testing Lead, about making spacewalks easier and more efficient with the Suitport. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @...

  11. Frequent video game players resist perceptual interference.

    PubMed

    Berard, Aaron V; Cain, Matthew S; Watanabe, Takeo; Sasaki, Yuka

    2015-01-01

    Playing certain types of video games for a long time can improve a wide range of mental processes, from visual acuity to cognitive control. Frequent gamers have also displayed generalized improvements in perceptual learning. In the Texture Discrimination Task (TDT), a widely used perceptual learning paradigm, participants report the orientation of a target embedded in a field of lines and demonstrate robust over-night improvement. However, changing the orientation of the background lines midway through TDT training interferes with overnight improvements in overall performance on TDT. Interestingly, prior research has suggested that this effect will not occur if a one-hour break is allowed in between the changes. These results have suggested that after training is over, it may take some time for learning to become stabilized and resilient against interference. Here, we tested whether frequent gamers have faster stabilization of perceptual learning compared to non-gamers and examined the effect of daily video game playing on interference of training of TDT with one background orientation on perceptual learning of TDT with a different background orientation. As a result, we found that non-gamers showed overnight performance improvement only on one background orientation, replicating previous results with the interference in TDT. In contrast, frequent gamers demonstrated overnight improvements in performance with both background orientations, suggesting that they are better able to overcome interference in perceptual learning. This resistance to interference suggests that video game playing not only enhances the amplitude and speed of perceptual learning but also leads to faster and/or more robust stabilization of perceptual learning.

  12. Improving User Notification on Frequently Changing HPC Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Fuson, Christopher B; Renaud, William A

    2016-01-01

    Today s HPC centers user environments can be very complex. Centers often contain multiple large complicated computational systems each with their own user environment. Changes to a system s environment can be very impactful; however, a center s user environment is, in one-way or another, frequently changing. Because of this, it is vital for centers to notify users of change. For users, untracked changes can be costly, resulting in unnecessary debug time as well as wasting valuable compute allocations and research time. Communicating frequent change to diverse user communities is a common and ongoing task for HPC centers. This paper will cover the OLCF s current processes and methods used to communicate change to users of the center s large Cray systems and supporting resources. The paper will share lessons learned and goals as well as practices, tools, and methods used to continually improve and reach members of the OLCF user community.

  13. Prader-Willi Syndrome: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... use of positive behavior management and support. Stay up-to-date with PWSA (USA) news! Let's Save and Transform Lives! Email Address First Name Last Name Sign Up Get Involved About Prader-Willi Syndrome Donate Today ...

  14. Hypertriglyceridemia is Frequent in Endometrial Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Hirasawa, Akira; Makita, Kazuya; Akahane, Tomoko; Yokota, Megumi; Yamagami, Wataru; Banno, Kouji; Susumu, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    Objective Previous studies have reported an association between endometrial cancer and the risk of metabolic syndrome; however, the pattern of endometrial cancer-associated dyslipidemia is not well understood. The standard therapy for endometrial cancer is total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Premenopausal bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy may cause adverse events, including dyslipidemia. Gynecologists have to care dyslipidemia in endometrial cancer survivors at cancer follow-up clinic. Methods This study included 693 patients who had undergone bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and included 412 women with incident endometrial cancer and 281 controls. We divided the patients into two categories according to whether they had a premenopausal or postmenopausal bilateral oophorectomy. Serum lipid levels were measured and statistically analyzed. Results Hypertriglyceridemia was statistically more frequent in patients who had undergone bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy both before and after menopause than in the corresponding non-endometrial cancer controls. High levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and a high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio were statistically more frequent in patients who had undergone bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy before menopause than in non-endometrial cancer controls. Conclusions Our report highlights the importance of the relationship between endometrial cancer and lipid metabolism, which may aid in preventing cerebrovascular or cardiovascular diseases due to dyslipidemia and improving the quality of life in endometrial cancer survivors. PMID:23999769

  15. Country Update: Israel 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marar, Marianne Maurice

    2005-01-01

    Country Updates is a new section of "Intercultural Education." Starting in "Intercultural Education," Volume 16 No. 5, this column will focus on recent developments during the last two to three years in the field of intercultural education in one particular country. These updates can include recent policy decisions, the main…

  16. An updated rate-of-spread clock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolaks, Jeremy; Grabner, Keith W.; Hartman, George; Cutter, Bruce E.; Loewenstein, Edward F.

    2005-01-01

    Several years ago, Blank and Simard (1983) described an electronic timer, frequently referred to as a rate-of-spread (ROS) clock—a relatively simple instrument used in measuring fire spread. Although other techniques for measuring rate of spread are available (such as data loggers), the basic ROS clock remains a valuable and relatively inexpensive tool. However, several items described in the original article have changed. Therefore, we are describing an updated version of the ROS clock.

  17. Frequently asked questions about global modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letellier, Christophe; Aguirre, Luis A.; Freitas, U. S.

    2009-06-01

    When a global model is attempted from experimental data, some preprocessing might be required. Therefore it is only natural to wonder what kind of effects the preprocessing might have on the modeling procedure. This concern is manifested in the form of recurrent frequently asked questions, such as "how does the preprocessing affect the underlying dynamics?" This paper aims at providing answers to important questions related to (i) data interpolation, (ii) data smoothing, (iii) data-estimated derivatives, (iv) model structure selection, and (v) model validation. The answers provided will hopefully remove some of those doubts and one shall be more confident not only on global modeling but also on various data analyses which may be also dependent on data preprocessing.

  18. Frequently asked questions in hypoxia research

    PubMed Central

    Wenger, Roland H; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan; Scholz, Carsten C; Marti, Hugo H; Hoogewijs, David

    2015-01-01

    “What is the O2 concentration in a normoxic cell culture incubator?” This and other frequently asked questions in hypoxia research will be answered in this review. Our intention is to give a simple introduction to the physics of gases that would be helpful for newcomers to the field of hypoxia research. We will provide background knowledge about questions often asked, but without straightforward answers. What is O2 concentration, and what is O2 partial pressure? What is normoxia, and what is hypoxia? How much O2 is experienced by a cell residing in a culture dish in vitro vs in a tissue in vivo? By the way, the O2 concentration in a normoxic incubator is 18.6%, rather than 20.9% or 20%, as commonly stated in research publications. And this is strictly only valid for incubators at sea level. PMID:27774480

  19. Frequent Major Changing: Extrinsic and Intrinsic Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firmin, Michael W.; MacKillop, Lisa M.

    2008-01-01

    Twenty undergraduates participated in individual, semi-structured interviews concerning their decisions to change majors. We found three common extrinsic and three intrinsic factors related to their decisions. Extrinsic factors included parents who were supportive but not meaningfully directive, lack of familial external guidance, and lack of…

  20. CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR THE PERIOPERATIVE NUTRITIONAL, METABOLIC, AND NONSURGICAL SUPPORT OF THE BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENT—2013 UPDATE: COSPONSORED BY AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, THE OBESITY SOCIETY, AND AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR METABOLIC & BARIATRIC SURGERY★

    PubMed Central

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, M. Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE- TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues. PMID:23529351

  1. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Perioperative Nutritional, Metabolic, and Nonsurgical Support of the Bariatric Surgery Patient—2013 Update: Cosponsored by American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, The Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery*

    PubMed Central

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE-TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues. PMID:23529939

  2. MACFP: Maximal Approximate Consecutive Frequent Pattern Mining under Edit Distance

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jingbo; Peng, Jian; Han, Jiawei

    2017-01-01

    Consecutive pattern mining aiming at finding sequential patterns substrings, is a special case of frequent pattern mining and has been played a crucial role in many real world applications, especially in biological sequence analysis, time series analysis, and network log mining. Approximations, including insertions, deletions, and substitutions, between strings are widely used in biological sequence comparisons. However, most existing string pattern mining methods only consider hamming distance without insertions/deletions (indels). Little attention has been paid to the general approximate consecutive frequent pattern mining under edit distance, potentially due to the high computational complexity, particularly on DNA sequences with billions of base pairs. In this paper, we introduce an efficient solution to this problem. We first formulate the Maximal Approximate Consecutive Frequent Pattern Mining (MACFP) problem that identifies substring patterns under edit distance in a long query sequence. Then, we propose a novel algorithm with linear time complexity to check whether the support of a substring pattern is above a predefined threshold in the query sequence, thus greatly reducing the computational complexity of MACFP. With this fast decision algorithm, we can efficiently solve the original pattern discovery problem with several indexing and searching techniques. Comprehensive experiments on sequence pattern analysis and a study on cancer genomics application demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our algorithm, compared to several existing methods. PMID:28174677

  3. Research Results and Information Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    Research Results Monsoon behavior balanced by glaciers Research Discovers Frequent Mutations of Chromatin Significant Progress in Water Photochemistry Research Structural signature in amorphous alloy formation and plastic deformation The neural basis of Drosophila larval light/darkness preference Important roles of brain-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase and ceramide metabolism in leptin hypothalamic control of feeding Integrin activation and internalization on soft ECM as a mechanism of induction of stem cell differentiation by ECM elasticity Determination of electron pairing symmetry of iron-based superconductor FeSe Long-Range Topological Order in Metallic Glass Information Update List of Projects Jointly Funded by NSFC and CNRS in 2011 List of Projects Jointly Funded by NSFC and ESRC in 2011 List of Projects Jointly Funded by NSFC and RS in 2011 List of Projects Jointly Funded by NSFC and RSE in 2011 Funding of Major Program Projects in 2010 Funding of Key Program Projects in 2010

  4. Q2/Q3 2016 Solar Industry Update

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, David; Boff, Daniel; Margolis, Robert

    2016-10-11

    This technical presentation provides an update on the major trends that occurred in the solar industry in the Q2 and Q3 of 2016. Major topics of focus include global and U.S. supply and demand, module and system price, investment trends and business models, and updates on U.S. government programs supporting the solar industry.

  5. Q3/Q4 2016 Solar Industry Update

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, David; Boff, Daniel; Margolis, Robert

    2016-12-21

    This technical presentation provides an update on the major trends that occurred in the solar industry in the Q3 and Q4 of 2016. Major topics of focus include global and U.S. supply and demand, module and system price, investment trends and business models, and updates on U.S. government programs supporting the solar industry.

  6. The female condom: frequently asked questions.

    PubMed

    1995-09-01

    Frequently asked questions about the female condom include questions about its effectiveness as a contraceptive, which is as high as the other barrier methods and can approach 95% with perfect use. Its effectiveness in preventing transmission of sexually transmitted diseases and HIV infection is speculative but promising because the condom material is impermeable to the causative agents. The female condom is safe to use except by people who are sensitive to polyurethane or silicone. The condom is made in one size and has a closed inner ring and an open outer ring (which remains outside of the vagina during use). The condoms are prelubricated, and additional water-based lubrication can be used. The accepted shelf life of the female condom in the US is two years, but this may be extended. The female condom is impervious to normal changes in temperature, altitude, and humidity; however, it can be ripped by a sharp object such as a fingernail or jewelry. The female condom can be used with other nonbarrier methods but should not be used in conjunction with a male condom or in the presence of a tampon. Pregnant or menstruating women and women of any age can safely use the device, and it can be inserted several hours prior to use. Studies have shown that many women like the device and would recommend it to others.

  7. Nature of frequent deletions in CEBPA.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Ota; Kostecka, Arnost; Provaznikova, Dana; Krasna, Blazena; Brezinova, Jana; Filkukova, Jitka; Kotlin, Roman; Kouba, Michal; Kobylka, Petr; Neuwirtova, Radana; Jonasova, Anna; Caniga, Miroslav; Schwarz, Jiri; Markova, Jana; Maaloufova, Jacqueline; Sponerova, Dana; Novakova, Ludmila; Cermak, Jaroslav

    2009-01-01

    C/EBPalpha (CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha) belongs to the family of leucine zipper transcription factors and is necessary for transcriptional control of granulocyte, adipocyte and hepatocyte differentiation, glucose metabolism and lung development. C/EBPalpha is encoded by an intronless gene. CEBPA mutations cause a myeloid differentiation block and were detected in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients. In this study we identified in 41 individuals from 824 screened individuals (290 AML patients, 382 MDS patients, 56 NHL patients and 96 healthy individuals) a single class of 23 deletions in CEBPA gene which involved a direct repeat of at least 2 bp. These mutations are characterised by the loss of one of two same repeats at the ends of deleted sequence. Three most frequent repeats included in these deletions in CEBPA gene are CGCGAG (493-498_865-870), GCCAAGCAGC (508-517_907-916) and GG (486-487_885-886), all according to GenBank accession no. NM_004364.2. A mechanism for deletion formation between two repetitive sequences can be recombination events in the repair process. Double-stranded cut in DNA can initiate these recombination events of adjacent DNA sequences.

  8. The effect of frequent hemodialysis on self-reported sleep quality: Frequent Hemodialysis Network Trials.

    PubMed

    Unruh, Mark L; Larive, Brett; Eggers, Paul W; Garg, Amit X; Gassman, Jennifer J; Finkelstein, Fredric O; Kimmel, Paul L; Chertow, Glenn M

    2016-06-01

    Many patients who receive maintenance hemodialysis experience poor sleep. Uncontrolled studies suggest frequent hemodialysis improves sleep quality, which is a strong motivation for some patients to undertake the treatment. We studied the effects of frequent in-center ('daily') and nocturnal home hemodialysis on self-reported sleep quality in two randomized trials. Participants were randomly assigned to frequent (six times per week) or conventional (three times per week) hemodialysis in the Frequent Hemodialysis Network Daily (n = 245) and Nocturnal (n = 87) Trials. We used the Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Problems Index II (SPI II), a validated and reliable instrument in patients with end-stage renal disease, to measure self-reported sleep quality. The SPI II is scored from 0-100, with a higher value indicating poorer quality of sleep. A mean relative decline in SPI II would suggest improved sleep quality. The primary sleep outcome was the change in the SPI II score over 12 months. In the Daily Trial, after adjustment for baseline SPI II, subjects randomized to frequent as compared with conventional in-center hemodialysis experienced a 4.2 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.4-8.0] point adjusted mean relative decline in SPI II at 4 months and a 2.6 (95% CI -2.3-7.5) point adjusted mean relative decline at 12 months. In the Nocturnal Trial, subjects randomized to frequent nocturnal as compared with conventional home hemodialysis experienced 2.9 (95% CI -3.4-9.3) and 4.5 (95% CI -3.2-12.2) point mean relative declines at Months 4 and 12, respectively. Although a possible benefit of frequent in-center hemodialysis was observed at 4 months, neither frequent in-center hemodialysis nor home nocturnal hemodialysis demonstrated significant improvements in self-reported sleep quality compared with conventional hemodialysis at 12 months. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public

  9. Updated Trends in Materials' Outgassing Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosecrans, Glenn; Mlucciacciaro, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the trends in materials' outgassing. The work utilized a database of reports to identify common outgassing chemical species from flight hardware, spacecraft, and ground support equipment (GSE). This work updates an earlier work that reported on chemical analysis from 1970-1978.

  10. Copyright Updates for K-12 Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wendell G.

    2016-01-01

    Copyright concerns continue to bedevil K-12 librarians, who are often called upon to act as the copyright officers in public schools. This article describes recent copyright developments of concern to these librarians in three areas: a recent court case involving a university library, pending legislation supported by ALA, and a regulatory update.…

  11. Copyright Updates for K-12 Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wendell G.

    2016-01-01

    Copyright concerns continue to bedevil K-12 librarians, who are often called upon to act as the copyright officers in public schools. This article describes recent copyright developments of concern to these librarians in three areas: a recent court case involving a university library, pending legislation supported by ALA, and a regulatory update.…

  12. Veterinary medicines: product update.

    PubMed

    2014-04-05

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues.

  13. Veterinary medicines: product update.

    PubMed

    2014-03-01

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues.

  14. Veterinary medicines: product update.

    PubMed

    2014-08-02

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues.

  15. Veterinary medicines: product update.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues.

  16. Veterinary medicines: product update.

    PubMed

    2014-09-06

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK, and on other relevant issues.

  17. Veterinary medicines update.

    PubMed

    2017-03-11

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues.

  18. USDA Gin Lab Updates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This presentation provides an update to ginning industry stakeholders on current research efforts ongoing at the three USDA ARS ginning laboratories in Lubbock, TX, Stoneville, MS, and Mesilla Park, NM....

  19. ISS Update: Suitport Testing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    ISS Update commentator Lynnette Madison interviews Joel Maganza, Test Director, about thermal vacuum chambers and unmanned and human-testing with the Suitport. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Jo...

  20. ACS Updates Environmental Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes a new publication of a report prepared by the American Chemical Society's Committee on Environmental Improvement. This is a new version that updates a 1969 report and contains additional material and expanded recommendations. (GA)

  1. Red Hill Updates

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This and other periodic updates are intended to keep the public informed on major progress being made to protect public health and the environment at the Red Hill Underground Fuel Storage Facility in Hawaii.

  2. Michael Griffin Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-04-13

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin delivers remarks during a NASA Update program at NASA Headquarters, Thursday, April 14, 2005, in Washington after being sworn in earlier that morning as NASA's 11th Administrator. Photo Credit: (NASA/Heidi Fancher)

  3. Michael Griffin Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-04-13

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin delivers remarks during a NASA Update program at NASA Headquarters, Thursday, April 14, 2005, in Washington after being sworn in earlier that morning as NASA's 11th Administrator. Photo Credit: (NASA/Renee Bouchard)

  4. ISS Update: NEEMO 16

    NASA Image and Video Library

    ISS Update commentator Josh Byerly interviews astronaut Stan Love about the NEEMO 16 mission from Aquarius Base. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Johnson and include the hashtag #askStation. For ...

  5. Center Director's Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-01

    In the Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit facility at the Kennedy Space Center's Visitor Complex, center director Bob Cabana, in the center background, speaks to guests as he updates community leaders on current and future activities at the space center.

  6. Updated Coronal Equilibrium Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryans, Paul; Badnell, N. R.; Gorczyca, T. W.; Laming, J. M.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Savin, D. W.

    2006-06-01

    Reliably interpreting solar spectra requires accurate ionization balance calculations. However, much of the atomic data needed for these calculations have not been generated using modern theoretical methods and are often highly suspect. This translates directly into the reliability of the collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) calculations. We make use of state-of-the-art calculations of dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients for the hydrogenic through Na-like ions of all elements from He through to Zn. We also make use of state-of-the-art radiative recombination (RR) rate coefficient calculations for the bar e through Na-like ions of all elements from H to Zn. Here we present improved CIE calculations for temperatures from 1e4 to 1e9 K using our data and the recommended electron impact ionization data of Mazzotta et al. (1998, A&AS, 133, 403) for elements up through Ni and Mazzotta (private communication) for Cu and Zn. DR and RR data for ionization stages that have not been updated are also taken from these two additional sources. We compare our calculated fractional ionic abundances using these data with those presented by Mazzotta et al. for all elements from H to Ni. The differences in peak fractional abundance are up to 60%. We also compare with the fractional ionic abundances for Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Fe, and Ni derived from the modern DR calculations of Gu (2003a, ApJ, 590, 1131; 2004, ApJ, 153, 389) for the H-like through Na-like ions, and the RR calculations of Gu (2003b, ApJ, 589, 1085) for the bare through F-like ions. These results are in better agreement with our work, with differences in peak fractional abundance of less than 10%. This work was supported in part by the NASA Solar SR&T and LWS programs, theOffice of Naval Research, and PPARC.

  7. Hypersensitivity and vaccines: an update.

    PubMed

    Barbaud, Annick; Deschildre, Antoine; Waton, Julie; Raison-Peyron, Nadia; Tréchot, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Allergic reactions to vaccines can be classified as sensitivity to one of the vaccine components, pseudo-allergic reactions, often after hyperimmunization, and exacerbation of atopic symptoms or vasculitis. Pseudo-allergic reactions, some possibly due to hyperimmunization, are probably more common than true allergies. Atopic reactions should not be confused with the "flash" phenomenon, defined as an exacerbation of an allergic reaction due to a reduction in the allergic reactivity threshold following the vaccine injection. BCGitis occurs frequently, and for this reason, guidelines for Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) have been modified. The vaccine is now reserved for people at risk of exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This review provides an update on the vaccination modalities for people allergic to eggs, on the assessment that should be performed when a reaction occurs due to tetanus vaccination, on the urticaria after hepatitis vaccination, on an aluminum granuloma, which is more and more frequent in young children, and vasculitis after flu vaccination and BCGitis. The side effects associated with new, recently released vaccines, such as anti-influenza A H1N1 or anti-human papilloma virus (HPV) will also be presented.

  8. The effect of frequent hemodialysis on nutrition and body composition: frequent Hemodialysis Network Trial.

    PubMed

    Kaysen, George A; Greene, Tom; Larive, Brett; Mehta, Ravindra L; Lindsay, Robert M; Depner, Tom A; Hall, Yoshio N; Daugirdas, John T; Chertow, Glenn M

    2012-07-01

    We investigated the effects of frequency of hemodialysis on nutritional status by analyzing the data in the Frequent Hemodialysis Network Trial. We compared changes in albumin, body weight, and composition among 245 patients randomized to six or three times per week in-center hemodialysis (Daily Trial) and 87 patients randomized to six times per week nocturnal or three times per week conventional hemodialysis, performed largely at home (Nocturnal Trial). In the Daily Trial, there were no significant differences between groups in changes in serum albumin or the equilibrated protein catabolic rate by 12 months. There was a significant relative decrease in predialysis body weight of 1.5 ± 0.2 kg in the six times per week group at 1 month, but this significantly rebounded by 1.3 ± 0.5 kg over the remaining 11 months. Extracellular water (ECW) decreased in the six times per week compared with the three per week hemodialysis group. There were no significant between-group differences in phase angle, intracellular water, or body cell mass (BCM). In the Nocturnal Trial, there were no significant between-group differences in any study parameter. Any gain in 'dry' body weight corresponded to increased adiposity rather than muscle mass but was not statistically significant. Thus, frequent in-center hemodialysis reduced ECW but did not increase serum albumin or BCM while frequent nocturnal hemodialysis yielded no net effect on parameters of nutritional status or body composition.

  9. The Effect of Frequent Hemodialysis on Nutrition and Body Composition: Frequent Hemodialysis Network Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kaysen, George A.; Greene, Tom; Larive, Brett; Mehta, Ravindra, L.; Lindsay, Robert; Depner, Tom A.; Hall, Yoshio N.; Daugirdas, John T.; Chertow, Glenn M.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of frequency of hemodialysis on nutritional status by analyzing the data in the Frequent Hemodialysis Network Trial. We compared changes in albumin, body weight and composition among 245 patients randomized to 6- or 3-times per week in-center hemodialysis (Daily Trial) and 87 patients randomized to 6-times per week nocturnal or 3-times per week conventional hemodialysis, performed largely at home (Nocturnal Trial). In the Daily Trial, there were no significant differences between groups in changes in serum albumin or the equilibrated protein catabolic rate by 12 months. There was a significant relative decrease in pre-dialysis body weight of 1.5 ± 0.2 kg in the 6 times per week group at one month, but this significantly rebounded by 1.3 ± 0.5 kg over the remaining 11 months. Extracellular water decreased in the 6 times per week compared to the 3 per week hemodialysis group. There were no significant between-group differences in phase angle, intracellular water or body cell mass. In the Nocturnal Trial, there were no significant between-group differences in any study parameter. Any gain in “dry” body weight corresponded to increased adiposity rather than muscle mass but was not statistically significant. Thus, frequent in-center hemodialysis reduced extracellular water but did not increase serum albumin or body cell mass while frequent nocturnal hemodialysis yielded no net effect on parameters of nutritional status or body composition. PMID:22456602

  10. The effects of frequent nocturnal home hemodialysis: the Frequent Hemodialysis Network Nocturnal Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rocco, Michael V.; Lockridge, Robert S.; Beck, Gerald J.; Eggers, Paul W.; Gassman, Jennifer J.; Greene, Tom; Larive, Brett; Chan, Christopher T.; Chertow, Glenn M.; Copland, Michael; Hoy, Christopher D.; Lindsay, Robert M.; Levin, Nathan W.; Ornt, Daniel B.; Pierratos, Andreas; Pipkin, Mary F.; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Stokes, John B.; Unruh, Mark L.; Star, Robert A.; Kliger, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Prior small studies have shown multiple benefits of frequent nocturnal hemodialysis compared to conventional three times per week treatments. To study this further, we randomized 87 patients to three times per week conventional hemodialysis or to nocturnal hemodialysis six times per week, all with single-use high-flux dialyzers. The 45 patients in the frequent nocturnal arm had a 1.82-fold higher mean weekly stdKt/Vurea, a 1.74-fold higher average number of treatments per week, and a 2.45-fold higher average weekly treatment time than the 42 patients in the conventional arm. We did not find a significant effect of nocturnal hemodialysis for either of the two coprimary outcomes (death or left ventricular mass (measured by MRI) with a hazard ratio of 0.68, or of death or RAND Physical Health Composite with a hazard ratio of 0.91). Possible explanations for the left ventricular mass result include limited sample size and patient characteristics. Secondary outcomes included cognitive performance, self-reported depression, laboratory markers of nutrition, mineral metabolism and anemia, blood pressure and rates of hospitalization, and vascular access interventions. Patients in the nocturnal arm had improved control of hyperphosphatemia and hypertension, but no significant benefit among the other main secondary outcomes. There was a trend for increased vascular access events in the nocturnal arm. Thus, we were unable to demonstrate a definitive benefit of more frequent nocturnal hemodialysis for either coprimary outcome. PMID:21775973

  11. The effects of frequent nocturnal home hemodialysis: the Frequent Hemodialysis Network Nocturnal Trial.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Michael V; Lockridge, Robert S; Beck, Gerald J; Eggers, Paul W; Gassman, Jennifer J; Greene, Tom; Larive, Brett; Chan, Christopher T; Chertow, Glenn M; Copland, Michael; Hoy, Christopher D; Lindsay, Robert M; Levin, Nathan W; Ornt, Daniel B; Pierratos, Andreas; Pipkin, Mary F; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Stokes, John B; Unruh, Mark L; Star, Robert A; Kliger, Alan S; Kliger, A; Eggers, P; Briggs, J; Hostetter, T; Narva, A; Star, R; Augustine, B; Mohr, P; Beck, G; Fu, Z; Gassman, J; Greene, T; Daugirdas, J; Hunsicker, L; Larive, B; Li, M; Mackrell, J; Wiggins, K; Sherer, S; Weiss, B; Rajagopalan, S; Sanz, J; Dellagrottaglie, S; Kariisa, M; Tran, T; West, J; Unruh, M; Keene, R; Schlarb, J; Chan, C; McGrath-Chong, M; Frome, R; Higgins, H; Ke, S; Mandaci, O; Owens, C; Snell, C; Eknoyan, G; Appel, L; Cheung, A; Derse, A; Kramer, C; Geller, N; Grimm, R; Henderson, L; Prichard, S; Roecker, E; Rocco, M; Miller, B; Riley, J; Schuessler, R; Lockridge, R; Pipkin, M; Peterson, C; Hoy, C; Fensterer, A; Steigerwald, D; Stokes, J; Somers, D; Hilkin, A; Lilli, K; Wallace, W; Franzwa, B; Waterman, E; Chan, C; McGrath-Chong, M; Copland, M; Levin, A; Sioson, L; Cabezon, E; Kwan, S; Roger, D; Lindsay, R; Suri, R; Champagne, J; Bullas, R; Garg, A; Mazzorato, A; Spanner, E; Rocco, M; Burkart, J; Moossavi, S; Mauck, V; Kaufman, T; Pierratos, A; Chan, W; Regozo, K; Kwok, S

    2011-11-01

    Prior small studies have shown multiple benefits of frequent nocturnal hemodialysis compared to conventional three times per week treatments. To study this further, we randomized 87 patients to three times per week conventional hemodialysis or to nocturnal hemodialysis six times per week, all with single-use high-flux dialyzers. The 45 patients in the frequent nocturnal arm had a 1.82-fold higher mean weekly stdKt/V(urea), a 1.74-fold higher average number of treatments per week, and a 2.45-fold higher average weekly treatment time than the 42 patients in the conventional arm. We did not find a significant effect of nocturnal hemodialysis for either of the two coprimary outcomes (death or left ventricular mass (measured by MRI) with a hazard ratio of 0.68, or of death or RAND Physical Health Composite with a hazard ratio of 0.91). Possible explanations for the left ventricular mass result include limited sample size and patient characteristics. Secondary outcomes included cognitive performance, self-reported depression, laboratory markers of nutrition, mineral metabolism and anemia, blood pressure and rates of hospitalization, and vascular access interventions. Patients in the nocturnal arm had improved control of hyperphosphatemia and hypertension, but no significant benefit among the other main secondary outcomes. There was a trend for increased vascular access events in the nocturnal arm. Thus, we were unable to demonstrate a definitive benefit of more frequent nocturnal hemodialysis for either coprimary outcome.

  12. Frequent Rain Observation From Geostationary Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzarri, B.; Gomas Science Team

    The target 3-h observing cycle of GPM will meet requirements from Global NWP and, to a large extent, Regional NWP; and be supportive of VIS/IR-derived rain estimates from geostationary satellites for the purpose of Nowcasting. MW rain observation from geostationary orbit at, say, 15 min intervals, would fully meet Regional NWP requirements and have greatest impact on Nowcasting: but this implies either unprac- tically large antennas or unacceptably coarse resolution. Concepts to overcome this problem have been developed in the US within the study called GEM (Geostationary Microwave Observatory), and now there is in Europe a proposal for a demonstration satellite submitted to ESA as GOMAS (Geostationary Observatory for Microwave Atmospheric Sounding). To overcome the problem of resolution, use of Sub-mm fre- quencies is envisaged: e.g., at 425 GHz, a 10-km resolution at nadir would require a 3-m antenna. The observing principle is based on the use of absorption bands of oxygen (54, 118 and 425 GHz) and of water vapour (183 and 380 GHz). Narrow- bandwidths channels are implemented (for a total of about 40 in the five bands) so as to observe the full profile of temperature and water vapour. Profiles from different bands are differently affected by liquid and ice water of different drop size, and fi- nally by precipitation. Simultaneous retrieval of temperature/humidity profiles, cloud liquid/ice water (total-columns and gross profile) and precipitation rate is in principle possible, and partially demonstrated by several airborne MW/Sub-mm instruments. To transfer this demonstrations in the geostationary orbit, the problem of radiometric sensitivity (additional to that one of the antenna size) has to be solved. With current technology, it is feasible to get sufficient accuracy if scan is limited to about 1/12 of the Earth disk, which is sufficient to abundantly cover Europe, the Mediterranean and Eastern Atlantic. The imaged area can be moved everywhere within the disk

  13. Multiple Sclerosis: An Update.

    PubMed

    Faguy, Kathryn

    2016-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common disabling neurologic condition in young adults and imposes high financial and quality of life costs on patients, their families, and society. Yet, developments in the battle against MS include new treatments to slow its progression and updated diagnostic criteria that can accelerate diagnosis and effective treatment. This article offers a review and update on the disease, focusing on risk factors and possible causes, symptoms, forms of MS, diagnostic criteria and tools, and the expanding array of approved treatments. It also reports on the skyrocketing cost of MS drugs, misdiagnosis, and special patient populations with MS.

  14. BI-RADS update.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Cecilia L

    2014-05-01

    The updated American College of Radiology (ACR) Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) has been newly released. This article summarizes the changes and updates that have been made to BI-RADS. The goal of the revised edition continues to be the same: to improve clarification in image interpretation, maintain reporting standardization, and simplify the monitoring of outcomes. The new BI-RADS also introduces new terminology to provide a more universal lexicon across all 3 imaging modalities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [2013 vulvodynia update].

    PubMed

    de Belilovsky, C

    2013-09-01

    Provoked vestibulodynia represents the most frequent cause of dyspareunia before menopause. Vulvodynia's pain and burning sensations are related to neuropathic pain and associated to various degrees of vulvar mucosal hypersensitivity (mostly in the vestibular area), pelvic floor muscles dysfunction, a disorder of general perception of pain and/or various complex regional pain syndromes such as fibromyalgia, glossodynia, painful bladder syndrome (interstitial cystitis)… Vaginal infections such as candidiasis and vaginosis are important trigger and risk factors. Women suffering from vulvodynia are often described as vulnerable, pessimistic, developing feelings of guilt towards their partner. They tend to be hyper vigilant to their pain and develop catastrophizing reactions (rumination, magnification and helplessness) and avoidance/escape behaviors (fear-avoidance model). Diagnosis is based on medical history, clinical examination (Q-tip test) and exclusion of vaginitis. Treatment consists of a multidisciplinary approach involving topical therapies (emollients, anesthetics, hormonotherapy if necessary), pelvic floor physiotherapy with electromyographic biofeedback, drug treatment of pain with antidepressants (amitriptyline…) or anticonvulsants (pregabaline…) and a psychosexual support.

  16. Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) and International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) collaborative update of CANMAT guidelines for the management of patients with bipolar disorder: update 2009.

    PubMed

    Yatham, Lakshmi N; Kennedy, Sidney H; Schaffer, Ayal; Parikh, Sagar V; Beaulieu, Serge; O'Donovan, Claire; MacQueen, Glenda; McIntyre, Roger S; Sharma, Verinder; Ravindran, Arun; Young, L Trevor; Young, Allan H; Alda, Martin; Milev, Roumen; Vieta, Eduard; Calabrese, Joseph R; Berk, Michael; Ha, Kyooseob; Kapczinski, Flávio

    2009-05-01

    The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) published guidelines for the management of bipolar disorder in 2005, with a 2007 update. This second update, in conjunction with the International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD), reviews new evidence and is designed to be used in conjunction with the previous publications. The recommendations for the management of acute mania remain mostly unchanged. Lithium, valproate, and several atypical antipsychotics continue to be first-line treatments for acute mania. Tamoxifen is now suggested as a third-line augmentation option. The combination of olanzapine and carbamazepine is not recommended. For the management of bipolar depression, lithium, lamotrigine, and quetiapine monotherapy, olanzapine plus selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), and lithium or divalproex plus SSRI/bupropion remain first-line options. New data support the use of adjunctive modafinil as a second-line option, but also indicate that aripiprazole should not be used as monotherapy for bipolar depression. Lithium, lamotrigine, valproate, and olanzapine continue to be first-line options for maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder. New data support the use of quetiapine monotherapy and adjunctive therapy for the prevention of manic and depressive events, aripiprazole monotherapy for the prevention of manic events, and risperidone long-acting injection monotherapy and adjunctive therapy, and adjunctive ziprasidone for the prevention of mood events. Bipolar II disorder is frequently overlooked in treatment guidelines, but has an important clinical impact on patients' lives. This update provides an expanded look at bipolar II disorder.

  17. Valence-Dependent Belief Updating: Computational Validation

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmanovic, Bojana; Rigoux, Lionel

    2017-01-01

    learning was superior to the Bayesian approach. The computational validation of valence-dependent belief updating represents a novel support for a genuine optimism bias in human belief formation. Moreover, the precise control of relevant cognitive variables justifies the conclusion that the motivation to adopt the most favorable self-referential conclusions biases human judgments. PMID:28706499

  18. Valence-Dependent Belief Updating: Computational Validation.

    PubMed

    Kuzmanovic, Bojana; Rigoux, Lionel

    2017-01-01

    learning was superior to the Bayesian approach. The computational validation of valence-dependent belief updating represents a novel support for a genuine optimism bias in human belief formation. Moreover, the precise control of relevant cognitive variables justifies the conclusion that the motivation to adopt the most favorable self-referential conclusions biases human judgments.

  19. Accountability Update, March 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Higher Education Coordinating Board, Olympia.

    This report provides the Washington State legislature, the Governor, and other interested parties with an update on the accountability performance of each of the state's public baccalaureate institutions (Central Washington University, Eastern Washington University, Evergreen State College, Washington State University, Western Washington…

  20. Supreme Court Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Kelley R.

    2009-01-01

    "Chief Justice Flubs Oath." "Justice Ginsburg Has Cancer Surgery." At the start of this year, those were the news headlines about the U.S. Supreme Court. But January 2009 also brought news about key education cases--one resolved and two others on the docket--of which school administrators should take particular note. The Supreme Court updates on…

  1. Updating Older Fume Hoods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, G. Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Provides information on updating older fume hoods. Areas addressed include: (1) adjustment of the hood's back baffle; (2) hood air leakage; (3) light level; (4) hood location in relation to room traffic and room air; and (5) establishing and maintaining hood performance. (JN)

  2. Updated seismic solar model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziembowski, W. A.; Goode, Philip R.; Pamyatnykh, A. A.; Sienkiewicz, R.

    1995-05-01

    Recently released low-l solar oscillation data from the BISON network are combined with BBSO data to obtain an updated solar seismic model of the Sun's interior. For the core, the solar seismic model from the new data is more consistent with the current standard solar models than our earlier seismic model. An astrophysical solution to the solar neutrino problem fades away.

  3. Updating: Learning versus Supposing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Jiaying; Crupi, Vincenzo; Tentori, Katya; Fitelson, Branden; Osherson, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Bayesian orthodoxy posits a tight relationship between conditional probability and updating. Namely, the probability of an event "A" after learning "B" should equal the conditional probability of "A" given "B" prior to learning "B". We examine whether ordinary judgment conforms to the orthodox view. In three experiments we found substantial…

  4. Solar System Montage Updated

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-03

    This is an updated montage of planetary images taken by spacecraft managed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA. Included are from top to bottom images of Mercury, Venus, Earth and Moon, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune.

  5. Technology Update-87

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    The five papers in this issue of Technology Update reflect improvements in equipment reliability, inspection techniques, data storage techniques, and production technology - all aimed at reducing process variations. Each paper represents an achievement by our technical staff that allows Mound to make more effective use of our resources. A separate abstract has been prepared for one of the papers.

  6. Update: Biological Nitrogen Fixation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Alan; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Updates knowledge on nitrogen fixation, indicating that investigation of free-living nitrogen-fixing organisms is proving useful in understanding bacterial partners and is expected to lead to development of more effective symbioses. Specific areas considered include biochemistry/genetics, synthesis control, proteins and enzymes, symbiotic systems,…

  7. "Southwest Strategy" update

    Treesearch

    Steve Kluge

    1999-01-01

    The Southwest Strategy is an effort by federal agencies to work with each other, the public, and tribal, state, and local agencies to maintain and restore the cultural, economic, and environmental quality of life in Arizona and New Mexico. This update explains the strategy and its progress to date.

  8. Supreme Court Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Kelley R.

    2009-01-01

    "Chief Justice Flubs Oath." "Justice Ginsburg Has Cancer Surgery." At the start of this year, those were the news headlines about the U.S. Supreme Court. But January 2009 also brought news about key education cases--one resolved and two others on the docket--of which school administrators should take particular note. The Supreme Court updates on…

  9. Updating Older Fume Hoods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, G. Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Provides information on updating older fume hoods. Areas addressed include: (1) adjustment of the hood's back baffle; (2) hood air leakage; (3) light level; (4) hood location in relation to room traffic and room air; and (5) establishing and maintaining hood performance. (JN)

  10. Year 2000 Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Frances M.

    1994-01-01

    Presents an update on the Year 2000 objectives for the nation that establish targets in 22 priority areas. The article offers information from a study on exercise by the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports, reviews Healthy People 2000 data, and lists Year 2000 physical activity and fitness objectives. (SM)

  11. Constellation Program Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right, listens to a question during a NASA Update outlining responsibilities of the NASA centers associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration on Wednesday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. COPPER RESEARCH UPDATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides an update and overview of new research results and remaining research needs with respect to copper corrosion control issues. The topics to be covered include: occurrence of elevated copper release in systems that meet the Action Level; impact of water c...

  13. Center Director's Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-01

    In the Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit facility at the Kennedy Space Center's Visitor Complex, guests get a close-up look at a plant growth experiment similar to one aboard the International Space Station. This followed a presentation by center director Bob Cabana who updated community leaders on current and future activities at the space center.

  14. Community Update, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Julie, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document consists of nine issues (covering January through December 1999) of the newsletter "Community Update," containing articles on community and family involvement in education. Article topics include: new programs to help students prepare for college early; Vice President Al Gore announced the first-ever national Hispanic Education…

  15. Constellation Program Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Dean Acosta, NASA Deputy Assistant Administrator and Press Secretary, left, moderates a NASA Update with NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, second from left, Scott J. Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right, on Wednesday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Constellation Program Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Dean Acosta, NASA Deputy Assistant Administrator and Press Secretary, left, moderates a NASA Update with NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, Scott J. Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right, on Wednesday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Constellation Program Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin addresses NASA employees and members of the media about the responsibilities of the NASA centers associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration during a NASA Update on Wednesday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Cultural practices updates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cultural practice updates from 2013 included the effects of shredding in spring, residue management, periodic flooding, no-till fertilizer applications, and billet planting on cane tonnage and sugar yield. Shredding, whether high or low, had little impacts in 2013. However, burning following shreddi...

  19. Stereo Science Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-13

    Toni Galvin, principal investigator, Plasma and Superthermal Ion Composition instrument at the University of New Hampshire makes a comment during a Science Update on the STEREO mission at NASA Headquarters in Washington, Tuesday, April 14, 2009. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  20. Updating: Learning versus Supposing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Jiaying; Crupi, Vincenzo; Tentori, Katya; Fitelson, Branden; Osherson, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Bayesian orthodoxy posits a tight relationship between conditional probability and updating. Namely, the probability of an event "A" after learning "B" should equal the conditional probability of "A" given "B" prior to learning "B". We examine whether ordinary judgment conforms to the orthodox view. In three experiments we found substantial…

  1. Southern Horticultural Lab Update

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This publication is a new quarterly update for members of the Mississippi Nursery and Landscape Association that is published quarterly in their association newsletter. Two other versions of this newsletter are being submitted to the Louisiana Nursery and Landscape Association (LALNLA) and the Alaba...

  2. Special Education Law Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    1989-01-01

    Due to an error made in printing Professor Zirkel's "Special Education Law; Recent Developments" in Volume 48 (October 13, 1988), these updates to the article are printed. Citations are organized under the following major sections: (1) diagnosis and placement; (2) treatment issues; (3) financial issues; and (4) gifted students. (MLF)

  3. Community Update, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Nicole, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document consists of 10 issues (covering January through December 2000) of the newsletter, "Community Update," which features articles on community and family involvement in education. In addition to the articles, each issue (except the Special Issue) includes a preview of the month's Satellite Town Meeting; events and information…

  4. Stereo Science Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-13

    Angelo Vourlidas, project scientist, Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation, at the Naval Research Laboratory, makes a comment during a Science Update on the STEREO mission at NASA Headquarters in Washington, Tuesday, April 14, 2009. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  5. Stereo Science Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-13

    Michael Kaiser, project scientist, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) at Goddard Space Flight Center, makes a comment during a Science Update on the STEREO mission at NASA Headquarters in Washington, Tuesday, April 14, 2009. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  6. Stereo Science Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-13

    Angelo Vourlidas, project scientist, Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation, at the Naval Research Laboratory makes a comment during a Science Update on the STEREO mission at NASA Headquarters in Washington, Tuesday, April 14, 2009. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  7. Treatment of Warts in Children: An Update.

    PubMed

    Gerlero, P; Hernández-Martín, Á

    2016-09-01

    Warts are among the most common skin infections in children. Although numerous treatment options are available, none are completely effective in a single session. Treatment is particularly complicated in children, not only because certain treatments are poorly tolerated, but also because parents frequently have unrealistic expectations. In this article, we offer an update on the treatments available for warts, focusing specifically on pediatric patients. We do not discuss treatments for oral and anogenital warts. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. [Frequent attenders in Primary Health Care Centres and frequent attenders in Emergency Departments].

    PubMed

    Fernández Alonso, Cesáreo; Aguilar Mulet, Juan Mariano; Romero Pareja, Rodolfo; Rivas García, Arístides; Fuentes Ferrer, Manuel Enrique; González Armengol, Juan Jorge

    2017-06-10

    To identify predictors of frequent attenders (HF) in Primary Health Care (PHC) centres in a sample of frequent attenders (HF) in Emergency Departments (ED). This was an observational, retrospective, multicentre cohort study. The HF patients were selected from patients seen in the ED between January 1 and December 31, 2013. Setting Patients were recruited from 17 public hospitals of the Community of Madrid, Spain. Variables on the index visit to the ED were collected. The sample was analysed in terms of being or not being an HF user in PHC. An HF user is considered a patient who made at least 10 visits in each level of care for a year. A total of 1284 HF patients were included. An analysis was performed on 423 (32.9%) HF users in ED with 16 (12-25) visits to PHC vs. 861 (67.1%) non-HF users in ED, with 4 (2-6) visits to PHC. Independent predictors of HF in PHC: over 65 years (OR: 1.51; 95% CI: 1.07-2.13; P=.019), cognitive impairment (OR: 1.63; 95% CI: 1.01-2.65; P=.049), taking >3 drugs (OR: 1.56; 95% CI: 1.06-2.30; P=.025), and living in the community vs. nursing home or homeless (OR: 3.05; 95% CI: 1.14-8.16; P=.026). Among HF patients in the ED, the fact that of being over 65 years, taking 3or more drugs, suffering cognitive impairment, and living in the community, are also considered to be predictors of HF in PHC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. The AGTSR consortium: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Fant, D.B.; Golan, L.P.

    1995-12-31

    The Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research program is a nationwide consortium dedicated to advancing land-based gas turbine systems for improving future power generation capability. It directly supports the technology-research arm of the ATS program and targets industry- defined research needs in the areas of combustion, heat transfer, materials, aerodynamics, controls, alternative fuels, and advanced cycles. It is organized to enhance U.S. competitiveness through close collaboration with universities, government, and industry at the R&D level. AGTSR is just finishing its third year of operation; it is scheduled to continue past the year 2000. This update reviews the AGTSR triad, which consists of university/industry R&D activities, technology transfer programs, and trial student programs.

  10. Updating Martin's global extinction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Richard

    2008-12-01

    Australia has been cited as a weak link in anthropogenic models of megafauna extinction, but recent work suggests instead that the evidence for rapid extinction shortly after human arrival is robust. The global model is revisited, based on the contention that late Pleistocene megafauna extinctions took place rapidly on islands, and some islands (such as Australia and the Americas) are much larger than others. Modern dating methods are increasingly able to refine chronologies, and careful scrutiny suggests that hundreds of dates should be deleted from archives. An updated summary of results from New Zealand, North America and Australia is presented, with a brief discussion on why temperate refugia offering protection from climate change ultimately did not work, strongly supporting the global extinction hypothesis pioneered by Paul Martin.

  11. Guidance for updating clinical practice guidelines: a systematic review of methodological handbooks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Updating clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) is a crucial process for maintaining the validity of recommendations. Methodological handbooks should provide guidance on both developing and updating CPGs. However, little is known about the updating guidance provided by these handbooks. Methods We conducted a systematic review to identify and describe the updating guidance provided by CPG methodological handbooks and included handbooks that provide updating guidance for CPGs. We searched in the Guidelines International Network library, US National Guidelines Clearinghouse and MEDLINE (PubMed) from 1966 to September 2013. Two authors independently selected the handbooks and extracted the data. We used descriptive statistics to analyze the extracted data and conducted a narrative synthesis. Results We included 35 handbooks. Most handbooks (97.1%) focus mainly on developing CPGs, including variable degrees of information about updating. Guidance on identifying new evidence and the methodology of assessing the need for an update is described in 11 (31.4%) and eight handbooks (22.8%), respectively. The period of time between two updates is described in 25 handbooks (71.4%), two to three years being the most frequent (40.0%). The majority of handbooks do not provide guidance for the literature search, evidence selection, assessment, synthesis, and external review of the updating process. Conclusions Guidance for updating CPGs is poorly described in methodological handbooks. This guidance should be more rigorous and explicit. This could lead to a more optimal updating process, and, ultimately to valid trustworthy guidelines. PMID:24383701

  12. Guidance for updating clinical practice guidelines: a systematic review of methodological handbooks.

    PubMed

    Vernooij, Robin W M; Sanabria, Andrea Juliana; Solà, Ivan; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Martínez García, Laura

    2014-01-02

    Updating clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) is a crucial process for maintaining the validity of recommendations. Methodological handbooks should provide guidance on both developing and updating CPGs. However, little is known about the updating guidance provided by these handbooks. We conducted a systematic review to identify and describe the updating guidance provided by CPG methodological handbooks and included handbooks that provide updating guidance for CPGs. We searched in the Guidelines International Network library, US National Guidelines Clearinghouse and MEDLINE (PubMed) from 1966 to September 2013. Two authors independently selected the handbooks and extracted the data. We used descriptive statistics to analyze the extracted data and conducted a narrative synthesis. We included 35 handbooks. Most handbooks (97.1%) focus mainly on developing CPGs, including variable degrees of information about updating. Guidance on identifying new evidence and the methodology of assessing the need for an update is described in 11 (31.4%) and eight handbooks (22.8%), respectively. The period of time between two updates is described in 25 handbooks (71.4%), two to three years being the most frequent (40.0%). The majority of handbooks do not provide guidance for the literature search, evidence selection, assessment, synthesis, and external review of the updating process. Guidance for updating CPGs is poorly described in methodological handbooks. This guidance should be more rigorous and explicit. This could lead to a more optimal updating process, and, ultimately to valid trustworthy guidelines.

  13. Frequent callers to crisis helplines: who are they and why do they call?

    PubMed

    Spittal, Matthew J; Fedyszyn, Izabela; Middleton, Aves; Bassilios, Bridget; Gunn, Jane; Woodward, Alan; Pirkis, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Frequent callers present a challenge for crisis helplines, which strive to achieve optimal outcomes for all callers within finite resources. This study aimed to describe frequent callers to Lifeline (the largest crisis helpline in Australia) and compare them with non-frequent callers, with a view to furthering knowledge about models of service delivery that might meet the needs of frequent callers. Lifeline provided an anonymous dataset on calls made between December 2011 and May 2013. We assumed calls from the same (encrypted) phone number were made by the same person, and aggregated call level data up to the person level. Individuals who made 0.667 calls per day in any period from 1 week to the full 549 days for which we had data (i.e. 4.7 calls in 7 days, 20 calls in 30 days, 40 calls in 60 days, etc.) were regarded as frequent callers. Our analysis dataset included 411,725 calls made by 98,174 individuals, 2594 (2.6%) of whom met our definition of frequent callers. We identified a number of predictors of being a frequent caller, including being male or transgender, and never having been married. The odds increased with age until 55-64 years, and then declined. Suicidality, self-harm, mental health issues, crime, child protection and domestic violence issues all predicted being a frequent caller. Collectively, frequent callers have a significant impact on crisis lines, and solutions need to be found for responding to them that are in everybody's best interests (i.e. the frequent callers themselves, other callers, telephone crisis supporters who staff crisis lines, and those who manage crisis lines). In striking this balance, the complex and multiple needs of frequent callers must be taken into account. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  14. SIM-Lite Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Discussion focus on: SIM-Lite Instrument Update - 6m baseline, 50cm, approximately 900M cost; Technology Update - Systematic errors and floor; SIM-Lite terrestrial planet discovery capability; Double blind multiple planet study summary; and the changing landscape of exoplanet science and the role of SIM-Lite. Slides include technology to flight component engineering; instrumental systematic errors; ultra deep search for Earth clones; double blind test, astrometric detection of Earths in multiplanet systems; the current era of exoplanet science and where SIM-Lite fits in; the next frontier and where SIM-Lite fits in, why SIM is unique in discovering Earths; imaging planet status is uncertain without masses and ages; SIM role in establishing how planetary systems form and evolve; and SIM probes of broad planet mass range around young stars.

  15. Sensors, Update 9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Göpel, Wolfgang; Hesse, Joachim

    2001-10-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Each volume is divided into three sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  16. Sensors, Update 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Göpel, Wolfgang; Hesse, Joachim

    1996-10-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Furthermore, the sensor market as well as peripheral aspects such as standards are covered. Each volume is divided into four sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  17. Sensors, Update 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Fedder, Gary K.; Korvink, Jan G.

    2002-04-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Each volume is divided into three sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  18. Sensors, Update 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Göpel, Wolfgang; Hesse, Joachim

    1996-12-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Treatments include current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Furthermore, the sensor market as well as peripheral aspects such as standards are covered. Each volume is divided into four sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides an overview of suppliers and market trends for a particular section, and Sensor Standards, reviews recent legislation and requirements for sensors. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  19. Sensors, Update 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Fedder, Gary K.; Korvink, Jan G.

    2003-04-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Each volume is divided into three sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  20. Sensors, Update 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Göpel, Wolfgang; Hesse, Joachim

    2001-02-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Each volume is divided into three sections: Sensor Technology reviews highlights in applied and basic research, while Sensor Applications covers new or improved applications of sensors, and Sensor Markets provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be invaluable to scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  1. SIM-Lite Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Discussion focus on: SIM-Lite Instrument Update - 6m baseline, 50cm, approximately 900M cost; Technology Update - Systematic errors and floor; SIM-Lite terrestrial planet discovery capability; Double blind multiple planet study summary; and the changing landscape of exoplanet science and the role of SIM-Lite. Slides include technology to flight component engineering; instrumental systematic errors; ultra deep search for Earth clones; double blind test, astrometric detection of Earths in multiplanet systems; the current era of exoplanet science and where SIM-Lite fits in; the next frontier and where SIM-Lite fits in, why SIM is unique in discovering Earths; imaging planet status is uncertain without masses and ages; SIM role in establishing how planetary systems form and evolve; and SIM probes of broad planet mass range around young stars.

  2. Sequence History Update Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanampompan, Teerapat; Gladden, Roy; Fisher, Forest; DelGuercio, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The Sequence History Update Tool performs Web-based sequence statistics archiving for Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Using a single UNIX command, the software takes advantage of sequencing conventions to automatically extract the needed statistics from multiple files. This information is then used to populate a PHP database, which is then seamlessly formatted into a dynamic Web page. This tool replaces a previous tedious and error-prone process of manually editing HTML code to construct a Web-based table. Because the tool manages all of the statistics gathering and file delivery to and from multiple data sources spread across multiple servers, there is also a considerable time and effort savings. With the use of The Sequence History Update Tool what previously took minutes is now done in less than 30 seconds, and now provides a more accurate archival record of the sequence commanding for MRO.

  3. Battlefield Acupuncture: Update

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    ACUPUNCTURE UPDATE 3 4C FIG. 3. Near-infrared spectroscopic measurements during electrical stimulation of battlefield acupuncture points in a 35-year-old fe...However, we have demonstrated for the first time that electric stimulation of the Battlefield Acupuncture points using an electric current, (1 mA), a...Battlefield Acupuncture points leads to dis- tinctive, reproducible changes in brain function. Perhaps comparatively small electric currents lead to similar

  4. Pain in IBD Patients: Very Frequent and Frequently Insufficiently Taken into Account

    PubMed Central

    Ak, Melike; Müller-Mottet, Séverine; Scharl, Sylvie; Biedermann, Luc; Fournier, Nicolas; Frei, Pascal; Pittet, Valerie; Scharl, Michael; Fried, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Pain is a common symptom related to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In addition to abdominal pain, pain can also be an extraintestinal manifestation of IBD. Pain treatment is challenging and a substantial part of IBD patients are treated with opioids. Therefore, a better knowledge on pain symptoms is crucial for a better therapeutic approach to this clinical problem. Methods Patients of the Swiss IBD Cohort Study (SIBDCS) (n = 2152) received a questionnaire regarding pain intensity, pain localization and impact of pain on daily life and social activities. Furthermore, the questionnaire investigated the use of pain-specific medication. Results A vast majority of patients (71%) experienced pain during the disease course. For a substantial part of patients (49% in UC and 55% in CD) pain is a longstanding problem (>5 years). Pain in UC was of shorter duration compared to CD (p < 0.01). Abdominal pain (59.5%) and back pain (38.3%) were the main pain localizations. 67% of patients took pain medication; 24% received no pain treatment. The general quality of life was significantly lower in patients suffering of pain compared to those without pain (38 vs. 77; (-100 very bad; 100 very good) p<0.0001). Conclusions Prevalence of pain is high in patients of the SIBDCS. It is a longstanding problem for the majority of the patients affected. Pain was found to be undertreated in the SIBDCS and was significantly associated with health-related quality of life. Thus, an increased awareness is mandatory to address this frequent complication in the course of IBD. PMID:27332879

  5. Asteroid Redirect Mission Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Dr. Holdren (left), Administrator Bolden (center) and Dr. Michele Gates (right) discuss the ARM mission during a live NASA TV briefing. Behind them is a mockup of robotic capture module for the Asteroid Redirect Mission. More info: Asteroid Redirect Mission Update – On Sept. 14, 2016, NASA provided an update on the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) and how it contributes to the agency’s journey to Mars and protection of Earth. The presentation took place in the Robotic Operations Center at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Assistant to the President for Science and Technology Dr. John P. Holdren, NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and NASA’s ARM Program Director, Dr. Michele Gates discussed the latest update regarding the mission. They explained the mission’s scientific and technological benefits and how ARM will demonstrate technology for defending Earth from potentially hazardous asteroids. The briefing aired live on NASA TV and the agency’s website. For more information about ARM go to www.nasa.gov/arm. Credit: NASA/Goddard/Debbie Mccallum NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  6. Asteroid Redirect Mission Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Dr. Holdren (left), Administrator Bolden (center) and Dr. Michele Gates (right) discuss the ARM mission during a live NASA TV briefing. Behind them is a mockup of robotic capture module for the Asteroid Redirect Mission. More info: Asteroid Redirect Mission Update – On Sept. 14, 2016, NASA provided an update on the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) and how it contributes to the agency’s journey to Mars and protection of Earth. The presentation took place in the Robotic Operations Center at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Assistant to the President for Science and Technology Dr. John P. Holdren, NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and NASA’s ARM Program Director, Dr. Michele Gates discussed the latest update regarding the mission. They explained the mission’s scientific and technological benefits and how ARM will demonstrate technology for defending Earth from potentially hazardous asteroids. The briefing aired live on NASA TV and the agency’s website. For more information about ARM go to www.nasa.gov/arm. Credit: NASA/Goddard/Peter Sooy NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  7. How Documentalists Update SIMBAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buga, M.; Bot, C.; Brouty, M.; Bruneau, C.; Brunet, C.; Cambresy, L.; Eisele, A.; Genova, F.; Lesteven, S.; Loup, C.; Neuville, M.; Oberto, A.; Ochsenbein, F.; Perret, E.; Siebert, A.; Son, E.; Vannier, P.; Vollmer, B.; Vonflie, P.; Wenger, M.; Woelfel, F.

    2015-04-01

    The Strasbourg astronomical Data Center (CDS) was created in 1972 and has had a major role in astronomy for more than forty years. CDS develops a service called SIMBAD that provides basic data, cross-identifications, bibliography, and measurements for astronomical objects outside the solar system. It brings to the scientific community an added value to content which is updated daily by a team of documentalists working together in close collaboration with astronomers and IT specialists. We explain how the CDS staff updates SIMBAD with object citations in the main astronomical journals, as well as with astronomical data and measurements. We also explain how the identification is made between the objects found in the literature and those already existing in SIMBAD. We show the steps followed by the documentalist team to update the database using different tools developed at CDS, like the sky visualizer Aladin, and the large catalogues and survey database VizieR. As a direct result of this teamwork, SIMBAD integrates almost 10.000 bibliographic references per year. The service receives more than 400.000 queries per day.

  8. Epidemiologic analysis of an urban, public emergency department's frequent users.

    PubMed

    Mandelberg, J H; Kuhn, R E; Kohn, M A

    2000-06-01

    To determine how the demographic, clinical, and utilization characteristics of emergency department (ED) frequent users differ from those of other ED patients. A cross-sectional and retrospective cohort study was performed using a database of all 348,858 visits to the San Francisco General Hospital ED during a five-year period (July 1, 1993, to June 30, 1998). A "frequent user" visited the ED five or more times in a 12-month period. Frequent users constituted 3.9% of ED patients but accounted for 20.5% of ED visits. The relative risk (RR) of frequent use was high among patients who were homeless (RR = 4.5), African American (RR = 1.8), and Medi-Cal sponsored (RR = 2.1). Frequent users were more likely to be seen for alcohol withdrawal (RR = 4.4), alcohol dependence (RR = 3.4), and alcohol intoxication (RR = 2.4). Frequent users were also more likely to visit for exacerbations of chronic conditions, including sickle cell anemia (RR = 8.0), renal failure (RR = 3.6), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (RR = 3.3). They were less likely to visit for all forms of trauma (RR = 0.43). Survival analysis showed that only 38% of frequent users for one year remained frequent users the next year. However, 56% of frequent users for two consecutive years remained frequent users in the third year. Frequent use of the ED reflects the urban social problems of homelessness, poverty, alcohol abuse, and chronic illness. Frequent use of the ED shows a high rate of decline from one year to the next. This rate of decline slows after the first year and suggests the existence of a smaller group of chronic frequent users.

  9. Learning from failure in health care: frequent opportunities, pervasive barriers

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, A

    2004-01-01

    The notion that hospitals and medical practices should learn from failures, both their own and others', has obvious appeal. Yet, healthcare organisations that systematically and effectively learn from the failures that occur in the care delivery process, especially from small mistakes and problems rather than from consequential adverse events, are rare. This article explores pervasive barriers embedded in healthcare's organisational systems that make shared or organisational learning from failure difficult and then recommends strategies for overcoming these barriers to learning from failure, emphasising the critical role of leadership. Firstly, leaders must create a compelling vision that motivates and communicates urgency for change; secondly, leaders must work to create an environment of psychological safety that fosters open reporting, active questioning, and frequent sharing of insights and concerns; and thirdly, case study research on one hospital's organisational learning initiative suggests that leaders can empower and support team learning throughout their organisations as a way of identifying, analysing, and removing hazards that threaten patient safety. PMID:15576689

  10. Accelerated hypofractionated breast radiotherapy: FAQs (frequently asked questions) and facts.

    PubMed

    Montero, Angel; Sanz, Xavier; Hernanz, Raul; Cabrera, Dolores; Arenas, Meritxell; Bayo, Eloisa; Moreno, Ferran; Algara, Manel

    2014-08-01

    The demand for breast cancer care has increased as cancer treatment innovations have proliferated. Adjuvant radiotherapy to the breast is considered to be part of the standard treatment in breast cancer. The role of radiotherapy in terms of reducing loco-regional recurrence and increased survival after conservative surgery, and also after a mastectomy in selected cases, has been previously shown in several randomized trials. Patterns of radiotherapy commonly used for breast cancer comprise a period of approximately five weeks, frequently with the addition of an additional 1-1.5 weeks of a radiation boost to the primary tumour area. In last years, there has been a renewed interest in hypofractionated and accelerated radiotherapy schedules that reduce the overall treatment time to barely three weeks, leading to an improvement in quality of life for patients and also optimizing workload of radiation oncology departments. However, despite the existing evidence supporting the use of hypofractionated treatment regimens, their widespread is still far from complete. Many questions have generated resistance among clinical oncologists for their regular use. The aim of this review is to answer those questions that may arise with the use of moderate hypofractionation in breast cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Recommendations of diagnosis and treatment of pleural effusion. Update.

    PubMed

    Villena Garrido, Victoria; Cases Viedma, Enrique; Fernández Villar, Alberto; de Pablo Gafas, Alicia; Pérez Rodríguez, Esteban; Porcel Pérez, José Manuel; Rodríguez Panadero, Francisco; Ruiz Martínez, Carlos; Salvatierra Velázquez, Angel; Valdés Cuadrado, Luis

    2014-06-01

    Although during the last few years there have been several important changes in the diagnostic or therapeutic methods, pleural effusion is still one of the diseases that the respiratory specialist have to evaluate frequently. The aim of this paper is to update the knowledge about pleural effusions, rather than to review the causes of pleural diseases exhaustively. These recommendations have a longer extension for the subjects with a direct clinical usefulness, but a slight update of other pleural diseases has been also included. Among the main scientific advantages are included the thoracic ultrasonography, the intrapleural fibrinolytics, the pleurodesis agents, or the new pleural drainages techniques.

  12. Cross-State Air Pollution Rule Update Allowance Allocation Final Rule TSD

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Technical Support Document (TSD) provides information that supports EPA’s determination of unit-level allocations for existing and new units under the final Cross-State Air Pollution Rule Update.

  13. Bumper 3 Update for IADC Protection Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Nagy, Kornel; Hyde, Jim

    2016-01-01

    The Bumper code has been the standard in use by NASA and contractors to perform meteoroid/debris risk assessments since 1990. It has undergone extensive revisions and updates [NASA JSC HITF website; Christiansen et al., 1992, 1997]. NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) has applied BUMPER to risk assessments for Space Station, Shuttle, Mir, Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMU) space suits, and other spacecraft (e.g., LDEF, Iridium, TDRS, and Hubble Space Telescope). Bumper continues to be updated with changes in the ballistic limit equations describing failure threshold of various spacecraft components, as well as changes in the meteoroid and debris environment models. Significant efforts are expended to validate Bumper and benchmark it to other meteoroid/debris risk assessment codes. Bumper 3 is a refactored version of Bumper II. The structure of the code was extensively modified to improve maintenance, performance and flexibility. The architecture was changed to separate the frequently updated ballistic limit equations from the relatively stable common core functions of the program. These updates allow NASA to produce specific editions of the Bumper 3 that are tailored for specific customer requirements. The core consists of common code necessary to process the Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris (MMOD) environment models, assess shadowing and calculate MMOD risk. The library of target response subroutines includes a board range of different types of MMOD shield ballistic limit equations as well as equations describing damage to various spacecraft subsystems or hardware (thermal protection materials, windows, radiators, solar arrays, cables, etc.). The core and library of ballistic response subroutines are maintained under configuration control. A change in the core will affect all editions of the code, whereas a change in one or more of the response subroutines will affect all editions of the code that contain the particular response subroutines which are modified. Note

  14. Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act frequently asked questions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    One stop shop for Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act (FFATA) questions. This frequently asked document will assist with Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act (FFATA) related questions.

  15. Perceived quality of social relations and frequent drunkenness: a cross-sectional study of Spanish adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kjærulff, Thora M; Rivera, Francisco; Jiménez-Iglesias, Antonia; Moreno, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine, for female and male students separately, whether perceived quality of relationships with peers and parents and relations in school predict self-reported frequent drunkenness among Spanish adolescents. The Spanish data from the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Study (HBSC) 2010 survey were used including 1177 female and 1126 male students aged between 15 and 16 years. For both genders, students reporting low school satisfaction had increased odds of frequent drunkenness. Among females, low and medium levels of classmate support were associated with decreased odds of frequent drunkenness, whereas low perceived maternal knowledge as well as medium and low satisfaction with the family increased odds of being frequently drunk. The proportion of male students reporting medium satisfaction with friendships had significantly lower odds of frequent drunkenness compared with those with high level of satisfaction with friendships. We found different associations between perceived quality of social relations and frequent drunkenness among male and female students. Results showed that social relations seemed to better predictors of frequent drunkenness among female than male students and that other factors than social relations may contribute to explain excessive alcohol use among Spanish adolescents. © The Author 2014. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  16. Pharmacodynamics of Memantine: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Rammes, G; Danysz, W; Parsons, C.G

    2008-01-01

    Memantine received marketing authorization from the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products (EMEA) for the treatment of moderately severe to severe Alzheimer´s disease (AD) in Europe on 17th May 2002 and shortly thereafter was also approved by the FDA for use in the same indication in the USA. Memantine is a moderate affinity, uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist with strong voltage-dependency and fast kinetics. Due to this mechanism of action (MOA), there is a wealth of other possible therapeutic indications for memantine and numerous preclinical data in animal models support this assumption. This review is intended to provide an update on preclinical studies on the pharmacodynamics of memantine, with an additional focus on animal models of diseases aside from the approved indication. For most studies prior to 1999, the reader is referred to a previous review [196]. In general, since 1999, considerable additional preclinical evidence has accumulated supporting the use of memantine in AD (both symptomatic and neuroprotective). In addition, there has been further confirmation of the MOA of memantine as an uncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist and essentially no data contradicting our understanding of the benign side effect profile of memantine. PMID:19305788

  17. Frequently Asked Questions for Parents of Children with PH

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meet-Up Registration Patient-to-Patient Support Line Grupos de Apoyo PHA PHriends Patient-to-Patient Support ... Meet-Up Registration Patient-to-Patient Support Line Grupos de Apoyo PHA PHriends Patient-to-Patient Support ...

  18. Update in women's health.

    PubMed

    Ganschow, Pamela S; Jacobs, Elizabeth A; Mackinnon, Jennifer; Charney, Pamela

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this clinical update is to summarize articles and guidelines published in the last year with the potential to change current clinical practice as it relates to women's health. We used two independent search strategies to identify articles relevant to women's health published between March 1, 2007 and February 29, 2008. First, we reviewed the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and journal indices from the ACP Journal Club, Annals of Internal Medicine, Archives of Internal Medicine, British Medical Journal, Circulation, Diabetes, JAMA, JGIM, Journal of Women's Health, Lancet, NEJM, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Women's Health Journal Watch. Second, we performed a MEDLINE search using the medical subject heading term "sex factors." The authors, who all have clinical and/or research experience in the area of women's health, reviewed all article titles, abstracts, and, when indicated, full publications. We excluded articles related to obstetrical aspects of women's health focusing on those relevant to general internists. We had two acceptance criteria, scientific rigor and potential to impact women's health. We also identified new and/or updated women's health guidelines released during the same time period. We identified over 250 publications with potential relevance to women's health. Forty-six articles were selected for presentation as part of the Clinical Update, and nine were selected for a more detailed discussion in this paper. Evidence-based women's health guidelines are listed in Table 1. Table 1 Important Women's Health Guidelines in 2007-2008: New or Updated Topic Issuing organization Updated recommendations and comments Mammography screening in women 40-4917 ACP Individualized risk assessment and informed decision making should be used to guide decisions about mammography screening in this age group. To aid in the risk assessment, a discussion of the risk factors, which if present in a woman in her 40s increases her risk to above that of an

  19. 75 FR 76482 - Notice of Web Availability and Opportunity for Public Comment on Updated Guidance for the Section...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... the Section 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly and Section 811 Supportive Housing for Persons With... of a draft notice updating HUD's guidance for the Section 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly...

  20. Clinical review: Neuromonitoring - an update

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Critically ill patients are frequently at risk of neurological dysfunction as a result of primary neurological conditions or secondary insults. Determining which aspects of brain function are affected and how best to manage the neurological dysfunction can often be difficult and is complicated by the limited information that can be gained from clinical examination in such patients and the effects of therapies, notably sedation, on neurological function. Methods to measure and monitor brain function have evolved considerably in recent years and now play an important role in the evaluation and management of patients with brain injury. Importantly, no single technique is ideal for all patients and different variables will need to be monitored in different patients; in many patients, a combination of monitoring techniques will be needed. Although clinical studies support the physiologic feasibility and biologic plausibility of management based on information from various monitors, data supporting this concept from randomized trials are still required. PMID:23320763

  1. Asteroid Redirect Mission Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Dr. Holdren (center) operates a robotic arm within the Robotic Operations Center (ROC) as roboticist Justin Brannan (left) describes the ROC’s simulation capabilities. Christyl Johnson, Deputy Center Director for Technology and Research Investments at Goddard (right), observes the demonstration. Within the ROC's black walls, NASA is testing technologies and operational procedures for science and exploration missions, including the Restore-L satellite servicing mission and the Asteroid Redirect Mission. More info: Asteroid Redirect Mission Update – On Sept. 14, 2016, NASA provided an update on the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) and how it contributes to the agency’s journey to Mars and protection of Earth. The presentation took place in the Robotic Operations Center at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Assistant to the President for Science and Technology Dr. John P. Holdren, NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and NASA’s ARM Program Director, Dr. Michele Gates discussed the latest update regarding the mission. They explained the mission’s scientific and technological benefits and how ARM will demonstrate technology for defending Earth from potentially hazardous asteroids. The briefing aired live on NASA TV and the agency’s website. For more information about ARM go to www.nasa.gov/arm. Credit: NASA/Goddard/Debbie Mccallum NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  2. Asteroid Redirect Mission Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Benjamin Reed, deputy program manager of NASA’s Satellite Servicing Capabilities Office, shows Dr. Holdren the technologies that NASA is developing for the Restore-L satellite servicing mission. NASA will launch the Restore-L servicer in 2020 to refuel a live satellite and demonstrate that a suite of satellite-servicing technologies are operational. More info: Asteroid Redirect Mission Update – On Sept. 14, 2016, NASA provided an update on the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) and how it contributes to the agency’s journey to Mars and protection of Earth. The presentation took place in the Robotic Operations Center at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Assistant to the President for Science and Technology Dr. John P. Holdren, NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and NASA’s ARM Program Director, Dr. Michele Gates discussed the latest update regarding the mission. They explained the mission’s scientific and technological benefits and how ARM will demonstrate technology for defending Earth from potentially hazardous asteroids. The briefing aired live on NASA TV and the agency’s website. For more information about ARM go to www.nasa.gov/arm. Credit: NASA/Goddard/Debbie Mccallum NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  3. Asteroid Redirect Mission Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Benjamin Reed (right), deputy program manager of NASA’s Satellite Servicing Capabilities Office, shows Dr. Holdren the technologies that NASA is developing for the Restore-L satellite servicing mission. NASA will launch the Restore-L servicer in 2020 to refuel a live satellite and demonstrate that a suite of satellite-servicing technologies are operational. More info: Asteroid Redirect Mission Update – On Sept. 14, 2016, NASA provided an update on the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) and how it contributes to the agency’s journey to Mars and protection of Earth. The presentation took place in the Robotic Operations Center at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Assistant to the President for Science and Technology Dr. John P. Holdren, NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and NASA’s ARM Program Director, Dr. Michele Gates discussed the latest update regarding the mission. They explained the mission’s scientific and technological benefits and how ARM will demonstrate technology for defending Earth from potentially hazardous asteroids. The briefing aired live on NASA TV and the agency’s website. For more information about ARM go to www.nasa.gov/arm. Credit: NASA/Goddard/Debbie Mccallum NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  4. Iron deficiency in frequent and first time female blood donors.

    PubMed

    Boulahriss, M; Benchemsi, N

    2008-12-01

    Blood donation has a marked influence on the body iron stores especially in female blood donors. Iron deficiency anaemia is an important limiting factor for the number of donations in female regular blood donors. This study was conducted to evaluate the frequency of iron deficiency and relevant factors in frequent and first time female blood donors at Casablanca blood transfusion centre, Morocco. Between November 2005 and April 2006, twenty-one female first time and twenty-one frequent female blood donors were selected randomly. In frequent blood donors, only females with at least 10 donations were included. Haemoglobin concentration. serum ferritin, serum iron and total transferrine binding capacity were measured and analysed. The results of haemoglobin concentration, serum ferritin, serum iron were significant lower in frequent female blood donors when compared with the results of same parameters in first time female blood donors. The results show that the frequency of iron deficiency in frequent female blood donors is 43% and in the first time female blood donors is 14%. Iron deficiency is very common in regular female blood donors at Casablanca's transfusion centre. Frequent blood donation has marked influence on the body iron stores in frequent female blood donors. It is therefore recommended that blood transfusion centres focused on maintaining iron balance by measuring serum ferritin and total transferrine binding capacity in frequent female blood donors. They have also to educate the donors about iron supplementation and yearly ferritin checking.

  5. Frequently Asked Questions: IDEA Early Childhood--Disclosure Avoidance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for IDEA Early Childhood Data Systems (DaSy), 2014

    2014-01-01

    This 2014 document is an adaptation of the 2012 release of "Frequently Asked Questions--Disclosure Avoidance" intended for K-12 audiences. Presented here in the form of responses to frequently asked questions (FAQs) are suggestions intended to provide guidance to IDEA Part C early intervention and Part B 619 preschool special education…

  6. Frequently Asked Questions: IDEA Early Childhood--Disclosure Avoidance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for IDEA Early Childhood Data Systems (DaSy), 2014

    2014-01-01

    This 2014 document is an adaptation of the 2012 release of "Frequently Asked Questions--Disclosure Avoidance" intended for K-12 audiences. Presented here in the form of responses to frequently asked questions (FAQs) are suggestions intended to provide guidance to IDEA Part C early intervention and Part B 619 preschool special education…

  7. Update on blepharospasm

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, Mark; Evinger, Craig; Jankovic, Joseph; Stacy, Mark

    2008-01-01

    This review updates understanding and research on blepharospasm, a subtype of focal dystonia. Topics covered include clinical aspects, pathology, pathophysiology, animal models, dry eye, photophobia, epidemiology, genetics, and treatment. Blepharospasm should be differentiated from apraxia of eyelid opening. New insights into pathology and pathophysiology are derived from different types of imaging, including magnetic resonance studies. Physiologic studies indicate increased plasticity and trigeminal sensitization. While botulinum neurotoxin injections are the mainstay of therapy, other therapies are on the horizon. GLOSSARY BFMDRS = Burke-Fahn-Marsden dystonia rating scale; BoNT = botulinum neurotoxin; DBS = deep brain stimulation; DTI = diffusion tensor imaging; FDG = 18fluorodeoxyglucose; VBM = voxel-based morphometry. PMID:18852443

  8. Fuel Cell Handbook update

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, W.R.; Hirschenhofer, J.H.; Engleman, R.R. Jr.; Stauffer, D.B.

    1993-11-01

    The objective of this work was to update the 1988 version of DOE`s Fuel Cell Handbook. Significant developments in the various fuel cell technologies required revisions to reflect state-of-the-art configurations and performance. The theoretical presentation was refined in order to make the handbook more useful to both the casual reader and fuel cell or systems analyst. In order to further emphasize the practical application of fuel cell technologies, the system integration information was expanded. In addition, practical elements, such as suggestions and guidelines to approximate fuel cell performance, were provided.

  9. Updating: learning versus supposing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiaying; Crupi, Vincenzo; Tentori, Katya; Fitelson, Branden; Osherson, Daniel

    2012-09-01

    Bayesian orthodoxy posits a tight relationship between conditional probability and updating. Namely, the probability of an event A after learning B should equal the conditional probability of A given B prior to learning B. We examine whether ordinary judgment conforms to the orthodox view. In three experiments we found substantial differences between the conditional probability of an event A supposing an event B compared to the probability of A after having learned B. Specifically, supposing B appears to have less impact on the credibility of A than learning that B is true.

  10. Update on equine allergies.

    PubMed

    Fadok, Valerie A

    2013-12-01

    Horses develop many skin and respiratory disorders that have been attributed to allergy. These disorders include pruritic skin diseases, recurrent urticaria, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, and reactive airway disease. Allergen-specific IgE has been detected in these horses, and allergen-specific immunotherapy is used to ameliorate clinical signs. The best understood atopic disease in horses is insect hypersensitivity, but the goal of effective treatment with allergen-specific immunotherapy remains elusive. In this review, updates in pathogenesis of allergic states and a brief mention of the new data on what is known in humans and dogs and how that relates to equine allergic disorders are discussed.

  11. Constellation Program Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin is seen through a television camera at a NASA Update announcing to NASA employees and members of the media the responsibilities of the NASA centers associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration on Wednesday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Griffin was joined by Scott J. Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right. Dean Acosta, NASA Deputy Assistant Administrator and Press Secretary, far left, moderates the program. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Updated Conceptual Cost Estimating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    16-page report discusses development and use of NASA TR-1508, the Kennedy Space Center Aerospace Construction Price Book for preparing conceptual, budget, funding, cost-estimating, and preliminary cost-engineering reports. Updated annually from 1974 through 1985 with actual bid prices and government estimates. Includes labor and material quantities and prices with contractor and subcontractor markups for buildings, facilities, and systems at Kennedy Space Center. While data pertains to aerospace facilities, format and cost-estimating techniques guide estimation of costs in other construction applications.

  13. Stereo Science Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-13

    Michael Kaiser, project scientist, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) at Goddard Space Flight Center, left, makes a point during a Science Update on the STEREO mission at NASA Headquarters in Washington, Tuesday, April 14, 2009, as Angelo Vourlidas, project scientist, Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation, at the Naval Research Laboratory, Toni Galvin, principal investigator, Plasma and Superthermal Ion Composition instrument at the University of New Hampshire and Madhulika Guhathkurta, STEREO program scientist, right, look on. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  14. Stereo Science Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-13

    Angelo Vourlidas, project scientist, Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation, at the Naval Research Laboratory, second from left, makes a comment during a Science Update on the STEREO mission at NASA Headquarters in Washington, Tuesday, April 14, 2009, as Michael Kaiser, project scientist, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) at Goddard Space Flight Center, left, Toni Galvin, principal investigator, Plasma and Superthermal Ion Composition instrument at the University of New Hampshire and Madhulika Guhathakurta, STEREO program scientist, right, look on. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  15. Stereo Science Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-13

    Michael Kaiser, project scientist, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) at Goddard Space Flight Center, left, makes a comment during a Science Update on the STEREO mission at NASA Headquarters in Washington, Tuesday, April 14, 2009, as Angelo Vourlidas, project scientist, Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation, at the Naval Research Laboratory, second from left, Toni Galvin, principal investigator, Plasma and Superthermal Ion Composition instrument at the University of New Hampshire and Madhulika Guhathakurta, STEREO program scientist, right, look on. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  16. FRISSMiner: Mining Frequent Graph Sequence Patterns Induced by Vertices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inokuchi, Akihiro; Washio, Takashi

    The mining of a complete set of frequent subgraphs from labeled graph data has been studied extensively. Furthermore, much attention has recently been paid to frequent pattern mining from graph sequences (dynamic graphs or evolving graphs). In this paper, we define a novel subgraph subsequence class called an “induced subgraph subsequence” to enable the efficient mining of a complete set of frequent patterns from graph sequences containing large graphs and long sequences. We also propose an efficient method for mining frequent patterns, called “FRISSs (Frequent Relevant, and Induced Subgraph Subsequences)”, from graph sequences. The fundamental performance of the method is evaluated using artificial datasets, and its practicality is confirmed through experiments using a real-world dataset.

  17. Predicting frequent COPD exacerbations using primary care data.

    PubMed

    Kerkhof, Marjan; Freeman, Daryl; Jones, Rupert; Chisholm, Alison; Price, David B

    2015-01-01

    Acute COPD exacerbations account for much of the rising disability and costs associated with COPD, but data on predictive risk factors are limited. The goal of the current study was to develop a robust, clinically based model to predict frequent exacerbation risk. Patients identified from the Optimum Patient Care Research Database (OPCRD) with a diagnostic code for COPD and a forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity ratio <0.7 were included in this historical follow-up study if they were ≥40 years old and had data encompassing the year before (predictor year) and year after (outcome year) study index date. The data set contained potential risk factors including demographic, clinical, and comorbid variables. Following univariable analysis, predictors of two or more exacerbations were fed into a stepwise multivariable logistic regression. Sensitivity analyses were conducted for subpopulations of patients without any asthma diagnosis ever and those with questionnaire data on symptoms and smoking pack-years. The full predictive model was validated against 1 year of prospective OPCRD data. The full data set contained 16,565 patients (53% male, median age 70 years), including 9,393 patients without any recorded asthma and 3,713 patients with questionnaire data. The full model retained eleven variables that significantly predicted two or more exacerbations, of which the number of exacerbations in the preceding year had the strongest association; others included height, age, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and several comorbid conditions. Significant predictors not previously identified included eosinophilia and COPD Assessment Test score. The predictive ability of the full model (C statistic 0.751) changed little when applied to the validation data set (n=2,713; C statistic 0.735). Results of the sensitivity analyses supported the main findings. Patients at risk of exacerbation can be identified from routinely available, computerized primary care

  18. Predicting frequent COPD exacerbations using primary care data

    PubMed Central

    Kerkhof, Marjan; Freeman, Daryl; Jones, Rupert; Chisholm, Alison; Price, David B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Acute COPD exacerbations account for much of the rising disability and costs associated with COPD, but data on predictive risk factors are limited. The goal of the current study was to develop a robust, clinically based model to predict frequent exacerbation risk. Patients and methods Patients identified from the Optimum Patient Care Research Database (OPCRD) with a diagnostic code for COPD and a forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity ratio <0.7 were included in this historical follow-up study if they were ≥40 years old and had data encompassing the year before (predictor year) and year after (outcome year) study index date. The data set contained potential risk factors including demographic, clinical, and comorbid variables. Following univariable analysis, predictors of two or more exacerbations were fed into a stepwise multivariable logistic regression. Sensitivity analyses were conducted for subpopulations of patients without any asthma diagnosis ever and those with questionnaire data on symptoms and smoking pack-years. The full predictive model was validated against 1 year of prospective OPCRD data. Results The full data set contained 16,565 patients (53% male, median age 70 years), including 9,393 patients without any recorded asthma and 3,713 patients with questionnaire data. The full model retained eleven variables that significantly predicted two or more exacerbations, of which the number of exacerbations in the preceding year had the strongest association; others included height, age, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and several comorbid conditions. Significant predictors not previously identified included eosinophilia and COPD Assessment Test score. The predictive ability of the full model (C statistic 0.751) changed little when applied to the validation data set (n=2,713; C statistic 0.735). Results of the sensitivity analyses supported the main findings. Conclusion Patients at risk of exacerbation can be identified

  19. Finding neural assemblies with frequent item set mining

    PubMed Central

    Picado-Muiño, David; Borgelt, Christian; Berger, Denise; Gerstein, George; Grün, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    Cell assemblies, defined as groups of neurons exhibiting precise spike coordination, were proposed as a model of network processing in the cortex. Fortunately, in recent years considerable progress has been made in multi-electrode recordings, which enable recording massively parallel spike trains of hundred(s) of neurons simultaneously. However, due to the challenges inherent in multivariate approaches, most studies in favor of cortical cell assemblies still resorted to analyzing pairwise interactions. However, to recover the underlying correlation structures, higher-order correlations need to be identified directly. Inspired by the Accretion method proposed by Gerstein et al. (1978) we propose a new assembly detection method based on frequent item set mining (FIM). In contrast to Accretion, FIM searches effectively and without redundancy for individual spike patterns that exceed a given support threshold. We study different search methods, with which the space of potential cell assemblies may be explored, as well as different test statistics and subset conditions with which candidate assemblies may be assessed and filtered. It turns out that a core challenge of cell assembly detection is the problem of multiple testing, which causes a large number of false discoveries. Unfortunately, criteria that address individual candidate assemblies and try to assess them with statistical tests and/or subset conditions do not help much to tackle this problem. The core idea of our new method is that in order to cope with the multiple testing problem one has to shift the focus of statistical testing from specific assemblies (consisting of a specific set of neurons) to spike patterns of a certain size (i.e., with a certain number of neurons). This significantly reduces the number of necessary tests, thus alleviating the multiple testing problem. We demonstrate that our method is able to reliably suppress false discoveries, while it is still very sensitive in discovering

  20. Answers to frequently asked questions about cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    This question-and-answer report provides answers in nontechnical language to frequently asked questions about the status of cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. The answers update information first prepared in 1981, shortly after the cleanup got under way. Since then, a variety of important developments in the cleanup has occurred. The information in the report should be read in conjunction with NUREG 1060, a discussion of increased occupational exposure estimates for the cleanup. The questions and answers in this report cover purpose and community involvement, decontamination of water and reactor, fuel removal, radwaste transport, environmental impact, social and economic effects, worker exposures and safety, radiation monitoring, potential for accidents, and schedule and funding.

  1. Update in geriatric medicine.

    PubMed

    Cayea, Danelle; Eckstrom, Elizabeth; Christmas, Colleen

    2012-03-01

    With an aging population, internists will provide care to a growing number of older adults, a population at risk of developing multiple chronic medical conditions and geriatric syndromes. For this update in geriatric medicine, we highlight recent key articles focused on preventive strategies and lifestyle changes that reduce the burden of disease and functional decline in older adults. We identified English-language articles published between March 1, 2010 and March 31, 2011 by review of the contents of major geriatrics/general medicine journals and journal watch services including: New England Journal of Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, Journal of the American Medical Association, Lancet, Archives of Internal Medicine, British Medical Journal, Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, and the Journals of Gerontology. We also reviewed updates to the Cochrane database of systematic reviews and articles highlighted by the ACP Journal Club and Journal Watch. Inclusion criteria included (1) randomized controlled trials, (2) conditions exclusive or common to older adults, and (3) commonly seen in generalist practices. After abstract review, each author selected five articles, and these were reviewed again by all authors. Through multiple discussions, consensus was reached on the final articles selected for inclusion based on their quality and potential to improve the health of older patients cared for by generalists.

  2. Titan's gravity: An update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, D.; Iess, L.; Racioppa, P.; Armstrong, J. W.; Lunine, J. I.; Stevenson, D. J.; Tortora, P.

    2016-12-01

    Since its arrival at Saturn in 2004, Cassini performed nine flybys devoted to the determination of Titan's gravity field and its tidal variations. The last gravity flyby of the mission (T122) took place on Aug. 10, 2016. We will present an updated gravity solution, based on all available data. These include also an additional flyby (T110, March 2015, primarily devoted to the imaging Titan's north polar lakes) carried out with the low gain antenna. This flyby was particularly valuable because closest approach occurred at high latitude (75°N), over an area not previously sampled. Published gravity results (Iess et al., 2012) indicated that Titan is subject to large eccentricity tides in response to Saturn's time varying forcing field. The magnitude of the response quadrupole field, controlled by the Love number k2, was used to infer the existence of an internal ocean. The new gravity field determination provides a better estimate of k2, to a level of a few percent. In addition to a full 3x3 field, the new solution includes also higher degree and order harmonic coefficients (such as J4) and offers an improved map of gravity anomalies. The updated geoid and its associated uncertainty could be used to refine the gravity-altimetry correlative analysis and for improved interpretation of radar altimetric data.

  3. Bloom filter based frequent patterns mining over data streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, JunShan; Kuang, Zhufang; Yang, Guogui

    2013-03-01

    A data streams synopses structure FPCBF, which is based on bloom filter, is proposed in this paper. Each unit of vector BF[e] in FPCBF is a two-tuples. The transactions insert operation (InsertTran) and 1-frequent patterns pregeneration operation (PreGenFP) is defined. Then, A data streams frequent patterns mining algorithm BFFPM which is based on FPCBF is proposed in this paper. The BFFPM algorithm contains two parts: 1-frequent patterns generation and r-frequent patterns generation. The problem of computing the 1-frequent patterns generation is transformed into the problem of computing the longest common sub-sequence α i LCS of k setting identifier sequence in BF[e] in FPCBF. In the same way, the problem of computing the r-frequent patterns generation is transformed into the problem of computing the longest common sub-sequence LCS r , which is the longest common sequence of the identifier sequence α i LCS ,…, i r LCS α + of r items. The IBM synthesizes data generation which output customers shopping a data are adopted as experiment data. The FPCBF algorithm not only has high precision for mining frequent patterns, but also has low memory requirement

  4. Frequent exacerbators--a distinct phenotype of severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Kupczyk, M; ten Brinke, A; Sterk, P J; Bel, E H; Papi, A; Chanez, P; Nizankowska-Mogilnicka, E; Gjomarkaj, M; Gaga, M; Brusselle, G; Dahlén, B; Dahlén, S-E

    2014-02-01

    Exacerbations represent a major source of morbidity and mortality in asthma and are a prominent feature of poorly controlled, difficult-to-treat disease. The goal of our study was to provide a detailed characterization of the frequent exacerbator phenotype and to identify risk factors associated with frequent and seasonal exacerbations. Ninety-three severe asthmatics (SA) and 76 mild-to-moderate patients (MA) were screened and prospectively followed up for 1 year (NCT00555607). Medical history, baseline clinical data and biomarkers were used to assess risk factors for frequent exacerbations. During the study, 104 exacerbations were recorded in the SA group and 18 in the MA. Frequent exacerbators were characterized by use of higher doses of inhaled (1700 vs. 800 μg) and oral (6.7 vs. 1.7 mg) glucocorticosteroids, worse asthma control (ACQ score 2.3 vs. 1.4), lower quality of life (SGRQ score 48.5 vs. 33.3), higher sputum eosinophils (25.7% vs. 8.2%) and a more rapid decline in FEV1 /FVC ratio (-0.07 vs. -0.01 ΔFEV1 /FVC, frequent vs. non-frequent, respectively, P < 0.05). Exhaled NO > 45 p.p.b. and a history of smoking were associated with an increased risk of frequent exacerbations (odds ratios: 4.32 and 2.90 respectively). We were able to distinguish and characterize a subphenotype of asthma subjects--frequent exacerbators--who are significantly more prone to exacerbations. Patients with FeNO > 45 p.p.b. and a history of smoking are at increased risk of frequent exacerbations and require careful monitoring in clinical practice. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Frequent callers to telephone helplines: new evidence and a new service model.

    PubMed

    Pirkis, Jane; Middleton, Aves; Bassilios, Bridget; Harris, Meredith; Spittal, Matthew J; Fedszyn, Izabela; Chondros, Patty; Gunn, Jane

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a program of work designed to inform a service model to address a challenge for telephone helplines, namely frequent callers. We conducted a systematic literature review and four empirical studies that drew on different data sources-(a) routinely collected calls data from Lifeline, Australia's largest telephone helpline; (b) data from surveys/interviews with Lifeline frequent callers; (c) data from the Diagnosis, Management and Outcomes of Depression in Primary Care (diamond) study; and (d) data from Australia's National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing. Frequent callers represent 3 % of callers but make 60 % of calls. They are isolated and have few social supports but are not "time wasters"; they have major mental and physical health problems and are often in crisis. They make use of other services for their mental health problems. The circumstances under which they use telephone helplines vary, but current service models reinforce their calling behaviour. The findings point to a service model that might better serve the needs of both frequent callers and other callers. The model involves offering frequent callers an integrated, tailored service in which they are allocated a dedicated and specially trained telephone crisis supporter (TCS), and given set calling times. It also involves promoting better linkages between telephone helplines and other services that provide mental health care, particularly general practitioners (GPs) and other primary care providers. The next step is to refine and test the model.

  6. Working Memory Updating Latency Reflects the Cost of Switching between Maintenance and Updating Modes of Operation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Yoav; Oberauer, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Updating and maintenance of information are 2 conflicting demands on working memory (WM). We examined the time required to update WM (updating latency) as a function of the sequence of updated and not-updated items within a list. Participants held a list of items in WM and updated a variable subset of them in each trial. Four experiments that vary…

  7. The association between frequent alcohol drinking and opioid consumption after abdominal surgery: A retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Kao, Sheng-Chin; Tsai, Hsin-I; Cheng, Chih-Wen; Lin, Ta-Wei; Chen, Chien-Chuan; Lin, Chia-Shiang

    2017-01-01

    It is perceived that patients with a history of frequent alcohol consumption require more opioids for postoperative pain control and experience less postoperative nausea and vomiting than patients without such a history. However, there is scarce evidence supporting this notion. The aim of this study was to assess association between frequent alcohol consumption and opioid requirement for postoperative pain control and occurrence of postoperative nausea and vomiting. The medical records for 4143 patients using intravenous patient-control analgesia with opioids after abdominal surgery between January 2010 and September 2013 were obtained, and associations were sought between the cumulative opioid consumption (in intravenous morphine equivalence) per body weight (mg/kg) in the first 2 days after abdominal operation and several demographic and clinical variables by multiple regression analysis. The association between the occurrence of postoperative nausea and vomiting and several demographic and clinical variables was also sought by multiple logistic regression analysis. Frequent alcohol drinking, among other previously reported factors, was associated with increased opioid consumption for postoperative pain control (p < 0.001). The estimate effect of frequent alcohol drinking was 0.117 mg/kg. Frequent alcohol drinking was also associated with decreased risks of postoperative nausea (odds ratio = 0.59, p = 0.003) and vomiting (odds ratio = 0.49, p = 0.026). Frequent alcohol drinking was associated with increased opioid consumption for postoperative pain control and decreased risks of postoperative nausea and vomiting after abdominal surgery.

  8. The association between frequent alcohol drinking and opioid consumption after abdominal surgery: A retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hsin-I; Cheng, Chih-Wen; Lin, Ta-Wei; Chen, Chien-Chuan; Lin, Chia-Shiang

    2017-01-01

    Aims It is perceived that patients with a history of frequent alcohol consumption require more opioids for postoperative pain control and experience less postoperative nausea and vomiting than patients without such a history. However, there is scarce evidence supporting this notion. The aim of this study was to assess association between frequent alcohol consumption and opioid requirement for postoperative pain control and occurrence of postoperative nausea and vomiting. Methods The medical records for 4143 patients using intravenous patient-control analgesia with opioids after abdominal surgery between January 2010 and September 2013 were obtained, and associations were sought between the cumulative opioid consumption (in intravenous morphine equivalence) per body weight (mg/kg) in the first 2 days after abdominal operation and several demographic and clinical variables by multiple regression analysis. The association between the occurrence of postoperative nausea and vomiting and several demographic and clinical variables was also sought by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results Frequent alcohol drinking, among other previously reported factors, was associated with increased opioid consumption for postoperative pain control (p < 0.001). The estimate effect of frequent alcohol drinking was 0.117 mg/kg. Frequent alcohol drinking was also associated with decreased risks of postoperative nausea (odds ratio = 0.59, p = 0.003) and vomiting (odds ratio = 0.49, p = 0.026). Conclusions Frequent alcohol drinking was associated with increased opioid consumption for postoperative pain control and decreased risks of postoperative nausea and vomiting after abdominal surgery. PMID:28301483

  9. Updates Technologies of Media Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Whether as status notifications in news feeds or interactive prompts in online video services, updates punctuate the background routines of media by bringing a variety of changes to the attention of users. In this dissertation I argue that updates rationalize media change by making previously obscure actions of users and movements of technologies…

  10. Updates Technologies of Media Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Whether as status notifications in news feeds or interactive prompts in online video services, updates punctuate the background routines of media by bringing a variety of changes to the attention of users. In this dissertation I argue that updates rationalize media change by making previously obscure actions of users and movements of technologies…

  11. Development of the updated system of city underground pipelines based on Visual Studio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianxiong; Zhu, Yun; Li, Xiangdong

    2009-10-01

    Our city has owned the integrated pipeline network management system with ArcGIS Engine 9.1 as the bottom development platform and with Oracle9i as basic database for storaging data. In this system, ArcGIS SDE9.1 is applied as the spatial data engine, and the system was a synthetic management software developed with Visual Studio visualization procedures development tools. As the pipeline update function of the system has the phenomenon of slower update and even sometimes the data lost, to ensure the underground pipeline data can real-time be updated conveniently and frequently, and the actuality and integrity of the underground pipeline data, we have increased a new update module in the system developed and researched by ourselves. The module has the powerful data update function, and can realize the function of inputting and outputting and rapid update volume of data. The new developed module adopts Visual Studio visualization procedures development tools, and uses access as the basic database to storage data. We can edit the graphics in AutoCAD software, and realize the database update using link between the graphics and the system. Practice shows that the update module has good compatibility with the original system, reliable and high update efficient of the database.

  12. Multipurpose Grants to States and Tribes Frequent Questions PDF version

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These are frequently asked questions about the grant guidance to states and tribes for FY 2016 multipurpose grant funding. EPA will add additional questions and answers as more questions come into the agency.

  13. Frequently Asked Questions about Energy Savings Plus Health

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Energy Savings Plus Health Guide equips school districts to integrate indoor air quality protections into school energy efficiency retrofits and other building upgrade projects. This page asks and answers Frequently-Asked Questions.

  14. Frequent Questions about the Delisting Risk Assessment Software (DRAS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Frequent technical questions such Surface Impoundment Requires Corrections, How Do I Assess Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) or Leachability in a Liquid Waste Sample?, Aggregate Hazard Index and Cancer Risk Output Table Correction.

  15. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Local Foods, Local Places

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Answers to frequently asked questions about EPA's Local Foods, Local Places planning assistance program to help communities revitalize downtowns, create economic opportunities, and improve access to healthy food by promoting local foods.

  16. Frequent Travelers and Rate of Spread of Epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Neil M.; Anderson, Roy M.

    2007-01-01

    A small proportion of air travelers make disproportionately more journeys than the rest of travelers. They also tend to interact predominantly with other frequent travelers in hotels and airport lounges. This group has the potential to accelerate global spread of infectious respiratory diseases. Using an epidemiologic model, we simulated exportation of cases from severe acute respiratory syndrome–like and influenza-like epidemics in a population for which a small proportion travel more frequently than the rest. Our simulations show that frequent travelers accelerate international spread of epidemics only if they are infected early in an outbreak and the outbreak does not expand rapidly. If the epidemic growth rate is high, as is likely for pandemic influenza, heterogeneities in travel are frequently overwhelmed by the large number of infected persons in the majority population and the resulting high probability that some of these persons will take an international flight. PMID:18252097

  17. Frequently Asked Questions about Cell Phones and Your Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Calendar Employment Frequently Asked Questions about Cell Phones and Your Health Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... cell phones and your health. Can using a cell phone cause cancer? There is no scientific evidence ...

  18. Personalized Privacy-Preserving Frequent Itemset Mining Using Randomized Response

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chongjing; Fu, Yan; Zhou, Junlin; Gao, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Frequent itemset mining is the important first step of association rule mining, which discovers interesting patterns from the massive data. There are increasing concerns about the privacy problem in the frequent itemset mining. Some works have been proposed to handle this kind of problem. In this paper, we introduce a personalized privacy problem, in which different attributes may need different privacy levels protection. To solve this problem, we give a personalized privacy-preserving method by using the randomized response technique. By providing different privacy levels for different attributes, this method can get a higher accuracy on frequent itemset mining than the traditional method providing the same privacy level. Finally, our experimental results show that our method can have better results on the frequent itemset mining while preserving personalized privacy. PMID:25143989

  19. Unsupervised mining of frequent tags for clinical eligibility text indexing.

    PubMed

    Miotto, Riccardo; Weng, Chunhua

    2013-12-01

    Clinical text, such as clinical trial eligibility criteria, is largely underused in state-of-the-art medical search engines due to difficulties of accurate parsing. This paper proposes a novel methodology to derive a semantic index for clinical eligibility documents based on a controlled vocabulary of frequent tags, which are automatically mined from the text. We applied this method to eligibility criteria on ClinicalTrials.gov and report that frequent tags (1) define an effective and efficient index of clinical trials and (2) are unlikely to grow radically when the repository increases. We proposed to apply the semantic index to filter clinical trial search results and we concluded that frequent tags reduce the result space more efficiently than an uncontrolled set of UMLS concepts. Overall, unsupervised mining of frequent tags from clinical text leads to an effective semantic index for the clinical eligibility documents and promotes their computational reuse. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Weight stigma in frequent exercisers: Overt, demeaning and condescending.

    PubMed

    Flint, Stuart W; Reale, Sophie

    2016-07-04

    The aim of this study was to qualitatively examine weight stigma in individuals who exercise frequently. In total, six focus groups, comprising 30 participants aged 18-25 years, were conducted using convenience sampling. All participants were frequent exercisers. Five themes emerged in the data with participants discussing bullying, the consequences of obesity, causes of obesity, lack of willpower and interventions to reduce obesity. This study is the first qualitative examination of weight stigmatisation in frequent exercisers, where the beliefs reported by focus group participants suggest that frequent exercisers stigmatise, discriminate and dehumanise obese people. Future research to examine the impact of weight stigma on exercise motivation and behaviour of obese people appears warranted.

  1. Personalized privacy-preserving frequent itemset mining using randomized response.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chongjing; Fu, Yan; Zhou, Junlin; Gao, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Frequent itemset mining is the important first step of association rule mining, which discovers interesting patterns from the massive data. There are increasing concerns about the privacy problem in the frequent itemset mining. Some works have been proposed to handle this kind of problem. In this paper, we introduce a personalized privacy problem, in which different attributes may need different privacy levels protection. To solve this problem, we give a personalized privacy-preserving method by using the randomized response technique. By providing different privacy levels for different attributes, this method can get a higher accuracy on frequent itemset mining than the traditional method providing the same privacy level. Finally, our experimental results show that our method can have better results on the frequent itemset mining while preserving personalized privacy.

  2. Ask a Periodontist (Frequently Asked Questions about Gum Disease)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Periodontist Ask a Periodontist Search our question database Do you have a question about periodontal health ... teeth and gums? Search our frequently asked questions database or browse the full list of topics . [expand ...

  3. Subdue: Compression-Based Frequent Pattern Discovery in Graph Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Kuramochi and G. Karypis. An efficient algorithm for discovering frequent subgraphs. IEEE Trans. Knowl. Data Eng., 16(9):1038–1051, 2004 . [11] M. Kuramochi...and G. Karypis. Finding frequent patterns in a large sparse graph. In SDM, 2004 . [12] T. Matsuda, T. Horiuchi, H. Motoda, and T. Washio. Extension of...graph-based induction for general graph structured data. In PAKDD , pages 420–431, 2000. [13] M. Mukherjee and L. B. Holder. Graph-based data mining for

  4. Predicting frequent ED use by people with epilepsy with health information exchange data.

    PubMed

    Grinspan, Zachary M; Shapiro, Jason S; Abramson, Erika L; Hooker, Giles; Kaushal, Rainu; Kern, Lisa M

    2015-09-22

    To describe (1) the predictability of frequent emergency department (ED) use (a marker of inadequate disease control and/or poor access to care), and (2) the demographics, comorbidities, and use of health services of frequent ED users, among people with epilepsy. We obtained demographics, comorbidities, and 2 years of encounter data for 8,041 people with epilepsy from a health information exchange in New York City. Using a retrospective cohort design, we explored bivariate relationships between baseline characteristics (year 1) and subsequent frequent ED use (year 2). We then built, evaluated, and compared predictive models to identify frequent ED users (≥4 visits year 2), using multiple techniques (logistic regression, lasso, elastic net, CART [classification and regression trees], Random Forests, AdaBoost, support vector machines). We selected a final model based on performance and simplicity. People with epilepsy who, in year 1, were adults (rather than children or seniors), male, Manhattan residents, frequent users of health services, users of multiple health systems, or had medical, neurologic, or psychiatric comorbidities, were more likely to frequently use the ED in year 2. Predictive techniques identified frequent ED visitors with good positive predictive value (approximately 70%) but poor sensitivity (approximately 20%). A simple strategy, selecting individuals with 11+ ED visits in year 1, performed as well as more sophisticated models. People with epilepsy with 11+ ED visits in a year are at highest risk of continued frequent ED use and may benefit from targeted intervention to avoid preventable ED visits. Future work should focus on improving the sensitivity of predictions. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. CONSULTATION ON UPDATED METHODOLOGY FOR ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) expects to publish the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) committee's report (BEIR VII) on risks from ionizing radiation exposures in calendar year 2005. The committee is expected to have analyzed the most recent epidemiology from the important exposed cohorts and to have factored in any changes resulting from the updated analysis of dosimetry for the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. To the extent practical, the Committee will also consider any relevant radiobiological data, including those from the Department of Energy's low dose effects research program. Based on their evaluation of relevant information, the Committee is then expected to propose a set of models for estimating risks from low-dose ionizing radiation. ORIA will review the BEIR VII report and consider revisions to the Agency's methodology for estimating cancer risks from exposure to ionizing radiation in light of this report and other relevant information. This will be the subject of the Consultation. This project supports a major risk management initiative to improve the basis on which radiation risk decisions are made. This project, funded by several Federal Agencies, reflects an attempt to characterize risks where there are substantial uncertainties. The outcome will improve our ability to assess risks well into the future and will strengthen EPAs overall capability for assessing and managing radiation risks. the BEIR VII report is funde

  6. CONSULTATION ON UPDATED METHODOLOGY FOR ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) expects to publish the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) committee's report (BEIR VII) on risks from ionizing radiation exposures in calendar year 2005. The committee is expected to have analyzed the most recent epidemiology from the important exposed cohorts and to have factored in any changes resulting from the updated analysis of dosimetry for the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. To the extent practical, the Committee will also consider any relevant radiobiological data, including those from the Department of Energy's low dose effects research program. Based on their evaluation of relevant information, the Committee is then expected to propose a set of models for estimating risks from low-dose ionizing radiation. ORIA will review the BEIR VII report and consider revisions to the Agency's methodology for estimating cancer risks from exposure to ionizing radiation in light of this report and other relevant information. This will be the subject of the Consultation. This project supports a major risk management initiative to improve the basis on which radiation risk decisions are made. This project, funded by several Federal Agencies, reflects an attempt to characterize risks where there are substantial uncertainties. The outcome will improve our ability to assess risks well into the future and will strengthen EPAs overall capability for assessing and managing radiation risks. the BEIR VII report is funde

  7. Frequent cocaine users and their use of treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Gfroerer, J C; Brodsky, M D

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Despite decreases in the number of cocaine users since 1985, the consequences of cocaine use continue to rise. This paper provides descriptive data on frequent cocaine users that will help to explain these diverging trends and enable treatment planners to better predict the types of cocaine users who are likely to seek treatment. METHODS. Data from the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse were used to study the characteristics of frequent cocaine users since 1985. The 1991 data were used to compare frequent users with infrequent users and nonusers. RESULTS. Since 1985, frequent cocaine users have become older. In 1991, they were likely to be unemployed (32.4%), unmarried (82.3%), and without health insurance (39.4%). Most were cigarette smokers (86.8%) and marijuana users (88.4%), and 32.0% reported getting drunk weekly. Criminal behavior was more likely among frequent cocaine users than among frequent cocaine users than among infrequent users and nonusers. Almost a third (30.0%) reported drug abuse treatment experience in the past year. CONCLUSIONS. Despite the recent decreases in overall prevalence of cocaine use, the need for treatment of cocaine abusers will continue. Treatment must address multiple problems that occur in conjunction with cocaine abuse. PMID:8342725

  8. Predictors of frequent oral analgesic use in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Esha das; Tee, Huey Shin; Sakthiswary, Rajalingham

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The main objective of this study was to determine the predictors of frequent oral analgesic use among Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) patients who were prescribed with the above medication on an ‘as-needed’ basis. Methods: Patients with RA were recruited consecutively from the Rheumatology outpatient clinics in this cross-sectional study. The sociodemographic data, frequency of oral analgesic intake, Patient Global Assessment (PGA) scores and HAQ (Health Assessment Questionnaire) scores were determined by interviewing the subjects. Subjects were divided into 2 groups; frequent users (3 days and above in a week) and less frequent users (less than 3 days in a week). Results: In a total of 112 subjects, 39 (34.8%) were frequent analgesic users. Both the HAQ and PGA scores were significantly higher among the frequent users (p<0.05). Using multivariate analysis, the HAQ scores (p=0.015, odds ratio 3.161 [95% confidence interval of 1.246-8.015]) and PGA scores (p=0.039 odds ratio 1.291 [95% confidence interval of 1.012-1.646]) were found to be independent predictors of frequent analgesic use. Conclusions: Our study confirms that the frequency of analgesic intake in Rheumatoid Arthritis has a significant relationship with patient-reported functional capacity and well being. PMID:25225510

  9. Enumerating all maximal frequent subtrees in collections of phylogenetic trees

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A common problem in phylogenetic analysis is to identify frequent patterns in a collection of phylogenetic trees. The goal is, roughly, to find a subset of the species (taxa) on which all or some significant subset of the trees agree. One popular method to do so is through maximum agreement subtrees (MASTs). MASTs are also used, among other things, as a metric for comparing phylogenetic trees, computing congruence indices and to identify horizontal gene transfer events. Results We give algorithms and experimental results for two approaches to identify common patterns in a collection of phylogenetic trees, one based on agreement subtrees, called maximal agreement subtrees, the other on frequent subtrees, called maximal frequent subtrees. These approaches can return subtrees on larger sets of taxa than MASTs, and can reveal new common phylogenetic relationships not present in either MASTs or the majority rule tree (a popular consensus method). Our current implementation is available on the web at https://code.google.com/p/mfst-miner/. Conclusions Our computational results confirm that maximal agreement subtrees and all maximal frequent subtrees can reveal a more complete phylogenetic picture of the common patterns in collections of phylogenetic trees than maximum agreement subtrees; they are also often more resolved than the majority rule tree. Further, our experiments show that enumerating maximal frequent subtrees is considerably more practical than enumerating ordinary (not necessarily maximal) frequent subtrees. PMID:25061474

  10. Update in urethral stents.

    PubMed

    Bahouth, Z; Meyer, G; Yildiz, G; Nativ, O; Moskovitz, B

    2016-10-01

    Urethral stents were first introduced in 1988, and since then, they have undergone significant improvements. However, they did not gain a wide popularity and their use is limited to a small number of centers around the world. Urethral stents can be used in the entire urethra and for various and diverse indications. In the anterior urethra, it can be used to treat urethral strictures. In the prostatic urethra, they can be used for the treatment of prostatic obstruction, including benign, malignant and iatrogenic prostatic obstruction. Moreover, although not widely used, it can be also applied for the treatment of posterior urethral stricture and bladder neck contracture, usually resulting in urinary incontinence and the need for subsequent procedures. Our main experience are with Allium urethral stents, and as such, we provide the latest updates in urethral stents with special emphasis on the various types of Allium urethral stents: bulbar, prostatic and bladder neck stents.

  11. Update: nail unit dermatopathology.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Campbell L; Rubin, Adam I

    2012-01-01

    Nail unit dermatopathology is a growing field filled with many challenges. Many advances in this field have been made in the last 5 years. This review article provides an update on new information and studies published in that period of time. We divided these works into different sections, including clinical and pathologic challenges in diagnosis and treatment of nail disorders, nail unit biopsy and processing techniques, normal nail unit histology, nail plate structural and growth pathology, metabolic disease, inflammatory conditions, onychomycosis, benign growths, malignant growths, and dyschromias. Specific highlights include advances in the marking and orientation of nail unit biopsies for improved histologic interpretation, improved nail plate softening techniques, new methods for histologic evaluation of onychomycosis, descriptions of newly described benign growths unique to the nail unit, and the morphologic and immunohistochemical distinction between benign and malignant pigmented lesions of the nail unit.

  12. Updates in ophthalmic pathology.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Pia R; Grossniklaus, Hans E

    2017-05-01

    Ophthalmic pathology has a long history and rich heritage in the field of ophthalmology. This review article highlights updates in ophthalmic pathology that have developed significantly through the years because of the efforts of committed individuals and the confluence of technology such as molecular biology and digital pathology. This is an exciting period in the history of ocular pathology, with cutting-edge techniques paving the way for new developments in diagnostics, therapeutics, and research. Collaborations between ocular oncologists and pathologists allow for improved and comprehensive patient care. Ophthalmic pathology continues to be a relevant specialty that is important in the understanding and clinical management of ocular disease, education of eye care providers, and overall advancement of the field.

  13. Primary immunodeficiencies: 2009 update

    PubMed Central

    Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Fischer, Alain; Geha, Raif. S.; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Chapel, Helen; Conley, Mary Ellen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Etzioni, Amos; Hammartröm, Lennart; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Ochs, Hans D.; Puck, Jennifer; Roifman, Chaim; Seger, Reinhard; Wedgwood, Josiah

    2009-01-01

    More than 50 years after Ogdeon Bruton’s discovery of congenital agammaglobulinemia, human primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) continue to unravel novel molecular and cellular mechanisms that govern development and function of the human immune system. This report provides the updated classification of PIDs, that has been compiled by the International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS) Expert Committee of Primary Immunodeficiencies after its biannual meeting, in Dublin (Ireland) in June 2009. Since the appearance of the last classification in 2007, novel forms of PID have been discovered, and additional pathophysiology mechanisms that account for PID in humans have been unraveled. Careful analysis and prompt recognition of these disorders is essential to prompt effective forms of treatment and thus to improve survival and quality of life in patients affected with PIDs. PMID:20004777

  14. Amblyopia update: new treatments.

    PubMed

    Vagge, Aldo; Nelson, Leonard B

    2016-09-01

    This review article is an update on the current treatments for amblyopia. In particular, the authors focus on the concepts of brain plasticity and their implications for novel treatment strategies for both children and adults affected by amblyopia. A variety of strategies has been developed to treat amblyopia in children and adults. New evidence on the pathogenesis of amblyopia has been obtained both in animal models and in clinical trials. Mainly, these studies have challenged the classical concept that amblyopia becomes untreatable after the 'end' of the sensitive or critical period of visual development, because of a lack of sufficient plasticity in the adult brain. New treatments for amblyopia in children and adults are desirable and should be encouraged. However, further studies should be completed before such therapies are widely accepted into clinical practice.

  15. LDEF environment modeling updates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Tim; Rantanen, Ray; Whitaker, Ann F.

    1995-01-01

    An updated gas dynamics model for gas interactions around the LDEF is presented that includes improved scattering algorithms. The primary improvement is more accurate predictions of surface fluxes in the wake region. The code used is the Integrated Spacecraft Environments Model (ISEM). Additionally, initial results of a detailed ISEM prediction model of the Solar Array Passive LDEF Experiment (SAMPLE), A0171, is presented. This model includes details of the A0171 geometry and outgassing characteristics of the many surfaces on the experiment. The detailed model includes the multiple scattering that exists between the ambient atmosphere, LDEF outgassing, and atomic oxygen erosion products. Predictions are made for gas densities, surface fluxes and deposition at three different time periods of the LDEF mission.

  16. Perinatal neuroprotection update

    PubMed Central

    Jelin, Angie C.; Salmeen, Kirsten; Gano, Dawn; Burd, Irina; Thiet, Mari-Paule

    2016-01-01

    Antepartum, intrapartum, and neonatal events can result in a spectrum of long-term neurological sequelae, including cerebral palsy, cognitive delay, schizophrenia, and autism spectrum disorders [1]. Advances in obstetrical and neonatal care have led to survival at earlier gestational ages and consequently increasing numbers of periviable infants who are at significant risk for long-term neurological deficits. Therefore, efforts to decrease and prevent cerebral insults attempt not only to decrease preterm delivery but also to improve neurological outcomes in infants delivered preterm. We recently published a comprehensive review addressing the impacts of magnesium sulfate, therapeutic hypothermia, delayed cord clamping, infections, and prevention of preterm delivery on the modification of neurological risk [2]. In this review, we will briefly provide updates to the aforementioned topics as well as an expansion on avoidance of toxin and infections, specifically the Zika virus. PMID:27606053

  17. ILRS Website Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Carey E.; Torrence, Mark H.; Pollack, Nathan H.; Tyahla, Lori J.

    2013-01-01

    The ILRS website, http://ilrs.gsfc.nasa.gov, is the central source of information for all aspects of the service. The website provides information on the organization and operation of the ILRS and descriptions of ILRS components data, and products. Furthermore, the website provides an entry point to the archive of these data products available through the data centers. Links are provided to extensive information on the ILRS network stations including performance assesments and data quality evaluations. Descriptions of suported satellite missions (current, future, and past) are provided to aid in station acquisition and data analysis. The website was reently redesigned. Content was reviewed during the update process, ensuring information is current and useful. This poster will provide specific examples of key sections, applicaitons, and webpages.

  18. Macrofouling control technology update

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, J.L.; Armor, A.F.

    1996-12-31

    Macrofouling of condenser systems with debris, fish, clams, barnacles, mussels, algae, and other marine organisms can significantly affect power plant availability and performance. Typical difficulties include increased condenser back pressure due to reduced cooling-water flow, malfunctioning of on-line tube-cleaning equipment, and accelerated corrosion and erosion of tubing. In some severe cases, condenser back pressure increased to a point that the turbine had to be tripped. In 1981 EPRI initiated a research project to develop utility industry guidelines for reducing macrofouling problems. In 1987 EPRI published the Guidelines on Macrofouling Control Technology. Since then significant progress has been made by EPRI, utility members, equipment manufacturers, and others. The purpose of this paper is to update the macrofouling control technology. Control technology covered will include thermal treatment, mechanical removal devices, antifouling coatings, and chemical treatment.

  19. Toxoplasmosis – An update

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Veena; Ichhpujani, R L

    2011-01-01

    Toxplasmosis is an important zoonotic disease caused by protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. The disease affects one-third of the total world population. Transmission of the disease is mainly by ingestion of food or water contaminated with oocysts. Congenital toxoplasmosis occurs from the transplacental passage of the parasite from mother to fetus. In most adults it does not cause serious illness, but it can cause blindness and mental retardation in congenitally infected children, and it is a devastating disease in immunocompromised individuals. Diagnosis of toxoplasmosis can be established by the direct detection of the parasite or by serological methods. The most commonly used and effective therapeutic regimen is the combination of pyrimethamine with sulfadiazine and folinic acid. This article provides an overview and update on transmission, diagnosis, management, and prevention of toxoplasmosis. PMID:23508064

  20. Amiodarone-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity – A Frequently Missed Complication

    PubMed Central

    Sweidan, Alexander J.; Singh, Navneet K.; Dang, Natasha; Lam, Vinh; Datta, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Amiodarone is often used in the suppression of tachyarrhythmias. One of the more serious adverse effects includes amiodarone pulmonary toxicity (APT). Several pulmonary diseases can manifest including interstitial pneumonitis, organizing pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, pulmonary nodules or masses, and pleural effusion. Incidence of APT varies from 5–15% and is correlated to dosage, age of the patient, and preexisting lung disease. DESCRIPTION A 56-year-old male with a past medical history of coronary artery disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was admitted for a coronary artery bypass graft. Post-operatively, the patient was admitted to the ICU for ventilator management and continued to receive his home dose of amiodarone 400 mg orally twice daily, which he had been taking for the past 3 months. The patient was found to be hypoxemic with a PaO2 52 mmHg and bilateral infiltrates on chest x-ray. Patient also complained of new onset dyspnea. Physical exam found bilateral rhonchi with bibasilar crackles and subcutaneous emphysema along the left anterior chest wall. Daily chest x-rays showed worsening of bilateral interstitial infiltrates and pleural effusions. A chest high-resolution computed tomography on post-operative day 3 showed extensive and severe bilateral ground glass opacities. APT was suspected and amiodarone was discontinued. A course of oral prednisone without antibiotics was initiated, and after one week of treatment the chest film cleared, the PaO2 value normalized and dyspnea resolved. DISCUSSION APT occurs via cytotoxic T cells and indirectly by immunological reaction. Typically the lungs manifest a diffuse interstitial pneumonitis with varying degrees of fibrosis. Infiltrates with a ‘ground-glass’ appearance appreciated on HRCT are more definitive than chest x-ray. Pulmonary nodules can be seen, frequently in the upper lobes. These are postulated to be accumulations of

  1. [Urinary fistula: update].

    PubMed

    Allona Almagro, A; Sanz Migueláñez, J L; Pérez Sanz, P; Pozo Mengual, B; Navío Niño, S

    2002-01-01

    The urinary fistulas are not a frequent problem in our urological rutinary work, being the vesicovaginal ones the most common. However, it will be necessary to know them to be able to diagnose and treat them in the best way. In this article we classificate the different urinary fistulas (uro-gynecologicals, uro-vasculars, uro-cutaneous and entero-urinarys), explaining the possible etiologies and the correct management.

  2. [Recommendations for palivizumab use. Update 2015].

    PubMed

    Fernández Jonusas, Silvia; Albas Maubett, Deleys; Satragno, Daniela; Cattaino, Adriana; Martin Alonso, Margarita; Rubio, Cecilia; Nieto, Ricardo

    2016-02-01

    This recommendation updates the Argentinean Pediatrics' Neonatal Committee (CEFEN) ones published in 2007. The respiratory syncytial virus is the most frequent agent for lower respiratory infection. Tiny premature, bronchopulmonary dysplasia and significant hemodynamic congenital heart disease babies are the most vulnerable populations. Palivizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody against respiratory syncytial virus used in the cold season. These recommendations are based on the scientific review of the literature published up to date. We reinforce the importance of general prevention measures like hand hygiene and family education among others. During the predominant season of respiratory syncytial virus in our country (April to September) a monthly dose of intramuscular 15 mg/kg of palivizumab is recommended. The safety and effectiveness has been proved as well as a reduction in the hospitalizations rates. In addition, epidemiological data of previous years are provided here.

  3. Sweet Syndrome: A Review and Update.

    PubMed

    Villarreal-Villarreal, C D; Ocampo-Candiani, J; Villarreal-Martínez, A

    2016-06-01

    Sweet syndrome is the most representative entity of febrile neutrophilic dermatoses. It typically presents in patients with pirexya, neutrophilia, painful tender erytomatous papules, nodules and plaques often distributed asymmetrically. Frequent sites include the face, neck and upper extremities. Affected sites show a characteristical neutrophilic infiltrate in the upper dermis. Its etiology remains elucidated, but it seems that can be mediated by a hypersensitivity reaction in which cytokines, followed by infiltration of neutrophils, may be involved. Systemic corticosteroids are the first-line of treatment in most cases. We present a concise review of the pathogenesis, classification, diagnosis and treatment update of this entity. Copyright © 2015 AEDV. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Focus on emotion as a catalyst of memory updating during reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Stein, Maria; Rohde, Kristina Barbara; Henke, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    We share the idea of Lane et al. that successful psychotherapy exerts its effects through memory reconsolidation. To support it, we add further evidence that a behavioral interference may trigger memory update during reconsolidation. Furthermore, we propose that - in addition to replacing maladaptive emotions - new emotions experienced in the therapeutic process catalyze reconsolidation of the updated memory structure.

  5. International Space Station (ISS) Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU) Utilization Plan Assessment Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez-Pellerano, Amri; Iannello, Christopher J.; Wollack, Edward J.; Wright, Kenneth H.; Garrett, Henry B.; Ging, Andrew T.; Katz, Ira; Keith, R. Lloyd; Minow, Joseph I.; Willis, Emily M.; Schneider, Todd A.; Whittlesey, Albert C.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) received a request to support the Assessment of the International Space Station (ISS) Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU) Utilization Update. The NESC conducted an earlier assessment of the use of the PCU in 2009. This document contains the outcome of the assessment update.

  6. Sensorimotor recovery following spaceflight may be due to frequent square-wave saccadic intrusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, Millard; Somers, Jeffrey T.; Leigh, R. John; Krnavek, Jody M.; Kornilova, Ludmila; Kozlovskaya, Inessa; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Paloski, William H.

    2004-01-01

    Square-wave jerks (SWJs) are small, involuntary saccades that disrupt steady fixation. We report the case of an astronaut (approximately 140 d on orbit) who showed frequent SWJs, especially postflight, but who showed no impairment of vision or decrement of postflight performance. These data support the view that SWJs do not impair vision because they are paired movements, consisting of a small saccade away from the fixation position followed, within 200 ms, by a corrective saccade that brings the eye back on target. Since many returning astronauts show a decrement of dynamic visual function during postflight locomotion, it seems possible that frequent SWJs improved this astronaut's visual function by providing postsaccadic enhancement of visual fixation, which aided postflight performance. Certainly, frequent SWJs did not impair performance in this astronaut, who had no other neurological disorder.

  7. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Update: A Brief (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, S.; Keller, J.; McDade, M.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is an update on the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) for the AWEA Wind Project Operations, Maintenance & Reliability Seminar. GRC accomplishments are: (1) Failure database software deployed - partners see business value for themselves and customers; (2) Designed, built, instrumented, and tested two gearboxes - (a) Generated unprecedented public domain test data from both field testing and dynamometer testing, (b) Different responses from 'identical' gearboxes, (c) Demonstrated importance of non-torque loading and modeling approach; and (3) Active collaborative, with wide industry support, leveraging DOE funding - Modeling round robin and Condition Monitoring round robin.

  8. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) feasibility study update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alff, W. H.; Banderman, L. W.

    1983-01-01

    In 1982 a workshop was held to refine the science rationale for large deployable reflectors (LDR) and develop technology requirements that support the science rationale. At the end of the workshop, a set of LDR consensus systems requirements was established. The subject study was undertaken to update the initial LDR study using the new systems requirements. The study included mirror materials selection and configuration, thermal analysis, structural concept definition and analysis, dynamic control analysis and recommendations for further study. The primary emphasis was on the dynamic controls requirements and the sophistication of the controls system needed to meet LDR performance goals.

  9. An update of input instructions to TEMOD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The theory and operation of a FORTRAN 4 computer code, designated as TEMOD, used to calcuate tubular thermoelectric generator performance is described in WANL-TME-1906. The original version of TEMOD was developed in 1969. A description is given of additions to the mathematical model and an update of the input instructions to the code. Although the basic mathematical model described in WANL-TME-1906 has remained unchanged, a substantial number of input/output options were added to allow completion of module performance parametrics as required in support of the compact thermoelectric converter system technology program.

  10. A primer to frequent itemset mining for bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Naulaerts, Stefan; Meysman, Pieter; Bittremieux, Wout; Vu, Trung Nghia; Vanden Berghe, Wim; Goethals, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, pattern mining techniques have become an integral part of many bioinformatics solutions. Frequent itemset mining is a popular group of pattern mining techniques designed to identify elements that frequently co-occur. An archetypical example is the identification of products that often end up together in the same shopping basket in supermarket transactions. A number of algorithms have been developed to address variations of this computationally non-trivial problem. Frequent itemset mining techniques are able to efficiently capture the characteristics of (complex) data and succinctly summarize it. Owing to these and other interesting properties, these techniques have proven their value in biological data analysis. Nevertheless, information about the bioinformatics applications of these techniques remains scattered. In this primer, we introduce frequent itemset mining and their derived association rules for life scientists. We give an overview of various algorithms, and illustrate how they can be used in several real-life bioinformatics application domains. We end with a discussion of the future potential and open challenges for frequent itemset mining in the life sciences. PMID:24162173

  11. A primer to frequent itemset mining for bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Naulaerts, Stefan; Meysman, Pieter; Bittremieux, Wout; Vu, Trung Nghia; Vanden Berghe, Wim; Goethals, Bart; Laukens, Kris

    2015-03-01

    Over the past two decades, pattern mining techniques have become an integral part of many bioinformatics solutions. Frequent itemset mining is a popular group of pattern mining techniques designed to identify elements that frequently co-occur. An archetypical example is the identification of products that often end up together in the same shopping basket in supermarket transactions. A number of algorithms have been developed to address variations of this computationally non-trivial problem. Frequent itemset mining techniques are able to efficiently capture the characteristics of (complex) data and succinctly summarize it. Owing to these and other interesting properties, these techniques have proven their value in biological data analysis. Nevertheless, information about the bioinformatics applications of these techniques remains scattered. In this primer, we introduce frequent itemset mining and their derived association rules for life scientists. We give an overview of various algorithms, and illustrate how they can be used in several real-life bioinformatics application domains. We end with a discussion of the future potential and open challenges for frequent itemset mining in the life sciences.

  12. ISS Update: SpaceX Dragon Launch Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA Public Affairs Office commentator Pat Ryan talks with Mike Horkachuck, NASA Project Executive for SpaceX, for an update on the SpaceX Dragon's next launch attempt scheduled for Tuesday at 3:44...

  13. Frequent hemorrhagic lesions in cerebral toxoplasmosis in AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Bhagavati, Satyakam; Choi, Jan

    2009-04-01

    Cerebral toxoplasmosis is a frequent complication in immunosuppressed patients such as AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). Frequently, lesions are located deep in the brain which are inaccessible for biopsy making rapid diagnosis dependent on accurate interpretation of neuroimaging findings. The commonest cranial CT findings reported in toxoplasmosis are ring enhancing hypodense lesions in basal ganglia or cortical gray matter. Hemorrhage has only rarely been described and is usually seen following antitoxoplasma treatment. We reviewed the records of 11 AIDS patients with cerebral toxoplasmosis and found multiple hemorrhagic cerebral, cerebellar, or brain stem lesions in 7 of 11 patients. Six patients had hemorrhage at the time of initial clinical presentation and one developed hemorrhage following 2 weeks of antitoxoplasma treatment. We conclude that hemorrhagic lesions are frequently found on cranial MRI scans in cerebral toxoplasmosis. AIDS patients presenting with hemorrhagic cerebral lesions should be considered for a trial of presumptive antitoxoplasma treatment.

  14. Psychosocial correlates of frequent indoor tanning among adolescent boys.

    PubMed

    Blashill, Aaron J

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the current study was to assess psychosocial correlates (i.e., perceived weight, weight control strategies, substance use, and victimization) of frequent indoor tanning in adolescent boys-a group at high risk for developing skin cancer. Participants (N=7,907) were drawn from a nationally representative sample of adolescent boys attending high school in the United States. Binary logistic regression revealed that extreme weight control strategies, particularly steroid use (odds ratio=3.67) and compensatory vomiting (odds ratio=2.34), along with substance use and victimization, were significantly related to frequent indoor tanning. These results highlight the role of appearance-changing, and health-risk behaviors in the context of frequent indoor tanning. Skin cancer prevention interventions may benefit from adopting approaches that integrate the treatment of body dissatisfaction and subsequent maladaptive behaviors.

  15. Characteristics of Medicaid enrollees with frequent ED use.

    PubMed

    Capp, Roberta; Rosenthal, Marjorie S; Desai, Mayur M; Kelley, Lauren; Borgstrom, Christopher; Cobbs-Lomax, Darcey L; Simonette, Peggy; Spatz, Erica S

    2013-09-01

    Medicaid enrollees are disproportionately represented among patients with frequent Emergency Department (ED) visits, yet prior studies investigating frequent ED users have focused on patients with all insurance types. This was a single center, retrospective study of Medicaid-insured frequent ED users (defined as ≥4 ED visits/year not resulting in hospital admission) to assess patients' sociodemographic and clinical characteristics and evaluate differences in these characteristics by frequency of use (4-6, 7-17, and ≥18 ED visits). Twelve percent (n = 1619) of Medicaid enrollees who visited the ED during the 1-year study period were frequent ED users, accounting for 38% of all ED visits (n = 10,337). Most frequent ED users (n = 1165, 72%) had 4-6 visits; 416 (26%) had 7-17 visits, and 38 (2%) had ≥18 visits. Overall, 67% had a primary care provider and 56% had at least one chronic medical condition. The most common ED diagnosis among patients with 4-6 visits was abdominal pain (7%); among patients with 7-17 and ≥18 ED visits, the most common diagnosis was alcohol-related disorders (11% and 36%, respectively). Compared with those who had 4-6 visits, patients with ≥18 visits were more likely to be homeless (7% vs 42%, P < .05) and suffer from alcohol abuse (15% vs 42%, P < .05). One out of 8 Medicaid enrollees who visited the ED had ≥4 visits in a year. Efforts to reduce frequent ED use should focus on reducing barriers to accessing primary care. More tailored interventions are needed to meet the complex needs of adults with ≥18 visits per year. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Frequent pediatric emergency department use in infancy and early childhood.

    PubMed

    Cabey, Whitney V; MacNeill, Emily; White, Lindsey N; James Norton, H; Mitchell, Alice M

    2014-10-01

    To define the threshold and population factors associated with pediatric emergency department (PED) use above the norm during the first 36 months of life. We conducted a cross-sectional study of children born between 2003 and 2006, treated in a single PED within the first 36 months of life. Exclusion criteria included out-of-county residence or history of abuse or neglect. The primary outcome, frequent PED use, was defined by the 90th percentile for PED visits per patient. Multivariate analysis was used to identify factors associated with frequent PED use. A total of 41,912 visits occurred for 16,664 patients during the study. Pediatric ED use skewed heavily toward less than 2 visits per patient (median, 2; range, 1-39; interquartile range, 2). The threshold for frequent PED use was 5 or more visits per patient and occurred for 14% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 13%-15%) of patients. Most visits were coded with low acuity International Classifications of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification codes. The following factors were strongly associated with frequent PED use: lack of primary care physician (odds ratio [OR], 6.03; 95% CI, 5.39%-6.80%; P < 0.0001), non private insurance (OR, 3.64; 95% CI, 2.99%-4.46%; P<0.0001), and history of inpatient admission (OR, 3.09; 95% CI, 1.66%-2.24%; P < 0.0001). Leaving without being seen, black race, Hispanic ethnicity, and residence in a poverty-associated zip code were also significantly associated, but less strongly predictive of, frequent PED use. The threshold for frequent PED use was more than 5 visits per patient within the first 36 months of life. Further study is needed to better define this population and develop targeted interventions to ensure care provision occurs in the ideal setting.

  17. Frequent attendance in family practice and common mental disorders in an open access health care system.

    PubMed

    Norton, Joanna; David, Michel; de Roquefeuil, Guilhem; Boulenger, Jean-Philippe; Car, Josip; Ritchie, Karen; Mann, Anthony

    2012-06-01

    Frequent attenders in family practice are known to have higher rates of mental disorder. However little is known about specific psychiatric disorders and whether this behavior extends to specialist services, in an open access fee-for-service health care system. 1060 patients from 46 family practices completed the Patient Health Questionnaire and the Client Service Receipt Inventory. During the consultation, family practitioners blind to the questionnaire responses rated the severity of mental health and physical disorders. The 10% of patients with the highest number of 6-month consultations in six age and sex stratified groups were defined as frequent attenders. After adjustments for sociodemographic variables, physical health and other psychiatric diagnoses, patients with a somatoform disorder were more likely to be frequent attenders, with an odds ratio of 2.3 (95% CI: 1.3-3.8, p=.002). When adjusting for confounders, among the four psychiatric diagnoses investigated only somatoform disorders remain significantly associated with frequent attendance. Physical health and chronic disease were no longer associated with frequent attendance which does not support the hypothesis that in an open access fee-for-service system, patients will consult for a wider range of health problems. Greater investigation into unexplained somatic symptoms could help reduce the frequency of attendance in both primary and secondary care, as this behaviour appears to be a general health-seeking drive than extends beyond family practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Differentially Private Frequent Sequence Mining via Sampling-based Candidate Pruning

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shengzhi; Cheng, Xiang; Li, Zhengyi; Xiong, Li

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the problem of mining frequent sequences under the rigorous differential privacy model. We explore the possibility of designing a differentially private frequent sequence mining (FSM) algorithm which can achieve both high data utility and a high degree of privacy. We found, in differentially private FSM, the amount of required noise is proportionate to the number of candidate sequences. If we could effectively reduce the number of unpromising candidate sequences, the utility and privacy tradeoff can be significantly improved. To this end, by leveraging a sampling-based candidate pruning technique, we propose a novel differentially private FSM algorithm, which is referred to as PFS2. The core of our algorithm is to utilize sample databases to further prune the candidate sequences generated based on the downward closure property. In particular, we use the noisy local support of candidate sequences in the sample databases to estimate which sequences are potentially frequent. To improve the accuracy of such private estimations, a sequence shrinking method is proposed to enforce the length constraint on the sample databases. Moreover, to decrease the probability of misestimating frequent sequences as infrequent, a threshold relaxation method is proposed to relax the user-specified threshold for the sample databases. Through formal privacy analysis, we show that our PFS2 algorithm is ε-differentially private. Extensive experiments on real datasets illustrate that our PFS2 algorithm can privately find frequent sequences with high accuracy. PMID:26973430

  19. The Rikers Island Hot Spotters: Defining the Needs of the Most Frequently Incarcerated

    PubMed Central

    Kaba, Fatos; Rosner, Zachary; Vise, Allison; Weiss, David; Brittner, Mindy; Skerker, Molly; Dickey, Nathaniel; Venters, Homer

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We used “hot spotting” to characterize the persons most frequently admitted to the New York City jail system in 2013. Methods. We used our Correctional Health Services electronic health record to identify 800 patients admitted in 2013 who returned most since November 2008. We compared them to a randomly selected control group of 800 others admitted in 2013, by using descriptive statistics and cross-tabulations, including data through December 2014. Results. The frequently incarcerated individuals had a median of 21 incarcerations (median duration 11 days), representing 18 713 admissions and $129 million in custody and health costs versus $38 million for the controls. The frequently incarcerated were significantly older (42 vs 35 years), and more likely to have serious mental illness (19% vs 8.5%) and homelessness (51.5% vs 14.7%) in their record. Significant substance use was highly prevalent (96.9% vs 55.6%). Most top criminal charges (88.7%) for the frequently incarcerated were misdemeanors; assault charges were less common (2.8% vs 10.4%). Conclusions. Frequently incarcerated persons have chronic mental health and substance use problems, their charges are generally minor, and incarceration is costly. Tailored supportive housing is likely to be less costly and improve outcomes. PMID:26378829

  20. Vancomycin levels are frequently subtherapeutic during continuous venovenous hemodialysis (CVVHD).

    PubMed

    Wilson, F Perry; Berns, Jeffrey S

    2012-04-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is frequently used in the intensive care setting for the treatment of acute kidney injury. Dosing guidelines for many commonly used antibiotics were established during intermittent dialysis or in studies examining CRRT at lower blood and dialysis flow rates than are used in common practice. Herein we present data demonstrating frequent subtherapeutic levels of vancomycin in a population of patients on CRRT. Nephrology trainees should be educated as to the risks of under-dosing antibiotics in this population.

  1. Frequent rhabdomyolysis in anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jung-Ah; Lee, Soon-Tae; Kim, Tae-Joon; Moon, Jangsup; Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Byun, Jung-Ick; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Jung, Ki-Young; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical presentation and provocation factors of rhabdomyolysis in anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Among the 16 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis in our institutional cohort, nine patients had elevated CK enzyme levels and clinical evidence of rhabdomyolysis. Rhabdomyolysis was more frequent after immunotherapy. The use of dopamine receptor blocker (DRB) increased the risk of rhabdomyolysis. None of the patients without rhabdomyolysis received DRBs. Rhabdomyolysis is a frequent complication in anti-NMDAR encephalitis and more common after immunotherapy and the use of DRBs increases the risk. Therefore, DRBs should be administered carefully in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis.

  2. Frequently used medicinal plants in Baja California Norte.

    PubMed

    Winkelman, M

    1986-11-01

    Herbalists in Baja California Norte, Mexico, were interviewed to determine the ailments and diseases most frequently treated with 22 commonly used medicinal plants. Those diseases which were most frequently mentioned by the herbalists provided the focus for initial assessments. The phytochemistry of the medicinal plants was determined from published research, and the likelihood of successful treatment of diseases was assessed by determining the known pharmacological actions of the plant constituents. Most of the plants contained substances which had recognized pharmacological effects in the treatment of the diseases being treated by the herbalists.

  3. Neural dissociations between meaningful and mere inconsistency in impression updating.

    PubMed

    Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Todorov, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Recent neuroimaging work has identified a network of regions that work in concert to update impressions of other people, particularly in response to inconsistent behavior. However, the specific functional contributions of these regions to the updating process remain unclear. Using fMRI, we tested whether increases in activity triggered by inconsistent behavior reflect changes in the stored representations of other people in response to behavioral inconsistency, or merely a response to the inconsistency itself. Participants encountered a series of individuals whose behavior either changed in an attributionally meaningful fashion or was merely inconsistent with the immediately preceding behavior. We observed that left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC) and left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) were preferentially recruited in response to unexpected, immoral behavior, whereas a separate set of regions (including dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex and temporoparietal junction/inferior parietal lobule) was preferentially recruited in response to more mundane inconsistencies in behavior. These results shed light on the distributed systems supporting impression updating. Specifically, while many regions supporting updating may primarily respond to moment-to-moment changes in behavior, a subset of regions (e.g. vlPFC and IFG) may contribute to updating person representations in response to trait-relevant changes in behavior.

  4. Neural dissociations between meaningful and mere inconsistency in impression updating

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging work has identified a network of regions that work in concert to update impressions of other people, particularly in response to inconsistent behavior. However, the specific functional contributions of these regions to the updating process remain unclear. Using fMRI, we tested whether increases in activity triggered by inconsistent behavior reflect changes in the stored representations of other people in response to behavioral inconsistency, or merely a response to the inconsistency itself. Participants encountered a series of individuals whose behavior either changed in an attributionally meaningful fashion or was merely inconsistent with the immediately preceding behavior. We observed that left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC) and left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) were preferentially recruited in response to unexpected, immoral behavior, whereas a separate set of regions (including dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex and temporoparietal junction/inferior parietal lobule) was preferentially recruited in response to more mundane inconsistencies in behavior. These results shed light on the distributed systems supporting impression updating. Specifically, while many regions supporting updating may primarily respond to moment-to-moment changes in behavior, a subset of regions (e.g. vlPFC and IFG) may contribute to updating person representations in response to trait-relevant changes in behavior. PMID:27217118

  5. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): acute renal failure].

    PubMed

    López Martínez, J; Sánchez-Izquierdo Riera, J A; Jiménez Jiménez, F J

    2011-11-01

    Nutritional support in acute renal failure must take into account the patient's catabolism and the treatment of the renal failure. Hypermetabolic failure is common in these patients, requiring continuous renal replacement therapy or daily hemodialysis. In patients with normal catabolism (urea nitrogen below 10 g/day) and preserved diuresis, conservative treatment can be attempted. In these patients, relatively hypoproteic nutritional support is essential, using proteins with high biological value and limiting fluid and electrolyte intake according to the patient's individual requirements. Micronutrient intake should be adjusted, the only buffering agent used being bicarbonate. Limitations on fluid, electrolyte and nitrogen intake no longer apply when extrarenal clearance techniques are used but intake of these substances should be modified according to the type of clearance. Depending on their hemofiltration flow, continuous renal replacement systems require high daily nitrogen intake, which can sometimes reach 2.5 g protein/kg. The amount of volume replacement can induce energy overload and therefore the use of glucose-free replacement fluids and glucose-free dialysis or a glucose concentration of 1 g/L, with bicarbonate as a buffer, is recommended. Monitoring of electrolyte levels (especially those of phosphorus, potassium and magnesium) and of micronutrients is essential and administration of these substances should be individually-tailored.

  6. Fluoroquinolone toxicities. An update.

    PubMed

    Lietman, P S

    1995-01-01

    The main types of adverse effects associated with quinolones are uncommon and reversible and vary in frequency among different agents. Phototoxicity appears more frequent with lomefloxacin than with some other quinolones. Three mechanisms have been proposed to explain the neurotoxic effects, including rare proconvulsant activity, associated with quinolone therapy. Arthropathy remains a dilemma for paediatricians deciding whether to use quinolones in growing children. Importantly, the experience with temafloxacin, which has now been withdrawn from the market, emphasises the need for thorough postmarketing surveillance. Nonetheless, it should be remembered that the fluoroquinolones as a group are effective and very well tolerated antimicrobial drugs.

  7. [Microscopic colitis: update 2014].

    PubMed

    Burgmann, Konstantin; Fraga, Montserrat; Schoepfer, Alain M; Yun, Pu

    2014-09-03

    Microscopic colitis, which includes lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis, represents a frequent cause of chronic watery diarrhea especially in the elderly population. Several medications, such as nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, proton pump inhibitors or antidepressants, as well as cigarette smoking have been recognized as risk factors for microscopic colitis. The diagnosis of microscopic colitis is based on a macroscopically normal ileo-colonoscopy and several biopsies from the entire colon, which demonstrate the pathognomonic histopathologic findings. Therapy is mainly based on the use of budesonide. Other medications, such as mesalazine, cholestyramine and bismuth, have been evaluated as well but the evidence is less solid.

  8. Glyconanoparticles-an update.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gangliang

    2013-02-01

    This review summarized the progress of glyconanoparticles in the aspects of types, synthesis, and applications for recent five years. A major challenge in the development of Au glyconanoparticles for the study of cellular interactions is to span the cellular membrane, which is used for the drug delivery. A majority of glyco-functionalized quantum dots have been utilized as fluorescent probes for biolabeling, imaging and biosensing. Recently, magnetic nanoparticles have been more frequently used in biomedical applications. The application of these new multivalent systems of glyconanoparticles is to mainly study carbohydrate-mediated interactions, which opens the new field in glycobiology.

  9. Update on Parasomnias

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, Fredric; Doghramji, Karl

    2006-01-01

    Parasomnias, defined as undesirable behavioral, physiological, or experiential events that accompany sleep, are common in the general population. As a rule, they occur more frequently in children than in adults with the exception of REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), which is more common in men over 50. No longer considered to be invariably a sign of psychopathology, parasomnias are currently understood as clinical phenomena that arise as brain transitions between REM sleep, non-REM sleep, and wakefulness. This paper presents a clinical approach to diagnosing and treating parasomnias in the general population and in psychiatric patients. PMID:20975819

  10. A Case Study of Private Schools in Kibera: An Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Pauline; Tooley, James

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an update on our earlier paper on the introduction by the Kenyan government in 2003 of free primary education (FPE), and its impact on low-fee private schools. First, published papers that have used our contribution as a springboard for discussion are critically reviewed. The argument and supporting evidence that the poor are…

  11. Australia’s National Security: A Defence Update 2003

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Australia’s response to the Bali bombing 13 Bastille Middle East Forward deployment of personnel in support of UN efforts to disarm Iraq Operation Operation... Bastille Operation Operation Citadel report.p65 21/2/03, 8:5427 DEFENCE UPDATE 200328 D PS N O V 01 0/ 02 report.p65 21/2/03, 8:5428

  12. United States Department of Education Update, June 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linton, John

    2005-01-01

    In this update, Linton discusses the role of educational programs within correctional institutions. These programs normally receive varying degrees of support from state to state, but two exceptions are the federally administered Life Skills for State and Local Prisoners Program and the Grants to States for Workplace and Community Transition…

  13. A Case Study of Private Schools in Kibera: An Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Pauline; Tooley, James

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an update on our earlier paper on the introduction by the Kenyan government in 2003 of free primary education (FPE), and its impact on low-fee private schools. First, published papers that have used our contribution as a springboard for discussion are critically reviewed. The argument and supporting evidence that the poor are…

  14. Building Principal Pipelines: A Strategy to Strengthen Education Leadership. Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syed, Sarosh

    2015-01-01

    School leadership is second only to teaching among school influences on student success, according to research. So what can a school district do to produce a large and steady supply of top-notch school principals--and support their effective supervision? This Wallace Update describes two related Wallace Foundation initiatives seeking answers to…

  15. 77 FR 54806 - Adoption of Updated EDGAR Filer Manual

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ... XBRL Taxonomies; remove the OMB expiration date from Form TA-1, TA-2, TA-W, 25-NSE; and request of... Division of Risk, Strategy, and Financial Innovation for questions concerning XBRL Taxonomies contact... Form 13H will be updated. EDGAR will no longer support US GAAP Taxonomy 1.0, US Financial Reporting...

  16. Building Principal Pipelines: A Strategy to Strengthen Education Leadership. Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syed, Sarosh

    2015-01-01

    School leadership is second only to teaching among school influences on student success, according to research. So what can a school district do to produce a large and steady supply of top-notch school principals--and support their effective supervision? This Wallace Update describes two related Wallace Foundation initiatives seeking answers to…

  17. [Frequent visitors to psychiatric emergency service: Demographical and clinical analysis].

    PubMed

    Schmoll, S; Boyer, L; Henry, J-M; Belzeaux, R

    2015-04-01

    Frequent visitors of psychiatric emergency wards are an important health care problem. Previous studies underlined that 2 % to 9 % of patients induce 15 % to 33 % of total clinical activity. Those patients have chronic and severe mental illness such as schizophrenia, associated with social and financial difficulties. The aim of this study was to describe demographic and clinical characteristics of frequent visitors to a psychiatric emergency ward in a French Academic hospital over 6years in comparison to non-frequent visitors. The study is based on a retrospective review of the psychiatric emergency wards' administrative and medical computer databases; data that included demographic, financial, clinical, and management information. During this 6-year study, the psychiatric ward recorded 16,754 care episodes for 8800 different patients. We compared frequent visitors with other visitors using univariate and multivariate analyses. Frequent visitors were defined by a number of visits greater than 2 of the mean standard deviation. Two percent of patients (n=192) had nine or more visits during the period. These patients caused 21 % of the total number of the visits. In the univariate analysis, the most significant reasons for referral in frequent visitors versus others (P<0.001) were: more frequent anxiety (37.6 % vs. 32.1 %), less frequent disruptive behavior (8.4 % vs. 12.9 %), depression (7.8 % vs. 17.2 %) and suicide attempt (4.5 % vs. 11.1 %). Factors associated with frequent visitors (P<0.001), after including all significant or confounding variables (multivariate analysis), were: schizophrenia and schizophrenia spectrum disorders (OR=29.5, IC: 11.4-76), DSM-IV cluster B personality disorders (OR=5.5, IC: 3.6-8.4), mental and behavioral disorders due to psychoactive substance use (OR=4.6, IC: 3.1-7), financial assistance through social government programs (OR range: 9.1-2.4, all significant) and being homeless (OR=2.7, IC: 1.8-4). Factors associated with non-frequent

  18. [Emergency departments--2016 update].

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, M; Brokmann, J C; Gräff, I; Kumle, B; Wilke, P; Gries, A

    2016-04-01

    Acute medical care in hospital emergency departments has experienced rapid development in recent years and gained increasing importance not only from a professional medical point of view but also from an economic and health policy perspective. The present article therefore provides an update on the situation of emergency departments in Germany. Care in emergency departments is provided with an increasing tendency to patients of all ages presenting with varying primary symptoms, complaints, illnesses and injury patterns. In the process, patients reach the emergency department by various routes and structural provision. Cross-sectional communication and cooperation, prioritization and organization of emergency management and especially medical staff qualifications increasingly play a decisive role in this process. The range of necessary knowledge and skills far exceeds the scope of prehospital medical emergency care and the working environment differs substantially. In addition to existing structural and economic problems, the latest developments, as well as future proposals for the design of in-hospital emergency medical care in interdisciplinary emergency departments are described.

  19. Radiometric Navigation Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nettles, James L.; Witsmeer, A. James; Wilt, Robert E.

    1980-12-01

    Boeing Aerospace Company (BAC) of Seattle, Washington and Sperry Microwave Electronics of Clearwater, Florida have developed a multiple-beam radiometric navigation update system. This paper describes the system design, flight test program, and preliminary results. The system was designed and its performance evaluated using analytically derived formulas for performance measures and detailed Monte Carlo simulations. As a result BAC recommended a five or seven fixed beam radiometer. Sperry built a seven-beam, 35 GHz radiometer which BAC flight tested in 1979 to demonstrate its effectiveness over a variety of test scenes under various environmental conditions. Four scenes were selected for the flight test varying from land-water to highly forested regions. Preliminary analysis of the flight test results confirm the expected performance improvement over the single-fixed-beam system tested in 1975. This approach to a terrain sensing millimeter wave radiometer would be applicable to low altitude penetrating aircraft. The system is low cost, with no moving parts; low volume, requiring only a single receiver with small wide-beam antennas; and stealthy, being completely passive. Radiometry can also be complementary to todays terrain correlation approach since flat areas usually contain a maximum of cultural features; where one system works poorly the other works well. This test program provides a data base for studying a wide variety of pattern matching and correlation algorithms, with and without attitude compensation, and using various subsets of the full seven-beam combination.

  20. Update in Internal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    López-Jiménez, Francisco; Brito, Máximo; Aude, Y. Wady; Scheinberg, Phillip; Kaplan, Mariana; Dixon, Denise A.; Schneiderman, Neil; Trejo, Jorge F.; López-Salazar, Luis Humberto; Ramírez-Barba, Ector Jaime; Kalil, Roberto; Ortiz, Carmen; Goyos, José; Buenaño, Alvaro; Kottiech, Samer; Lamas, Gervasio A.

    2009-01-01

    More than 500,000 new medical articles are published every year and available time to keep updated is scarcer every day. Nowadays, the task of selecting useful, consistent, and relevant information for clinicians is a priority in many major medical journals. This review has the aim of gathering the results of the most important findings in clinical medicine in the last few years. It is focused on results from randomized clinical trials and well-designed observational research. Findings were included preferentially if they showed solid results, and we avoided as much as possible including only preliminary data, or results that included only non-clinical outcomes. Some of the most relevant findings reported here include the significant benefit of statins in patients with coronary artery disease even with mean cholesterol level. It also provides a substantial review of the most significant trials assessing the effectiveness of IIb/IIIa receptor blockers. In gastroenterology many advances have been made in the H. pylori eradication, and the finding that the cure of H. pylori infection may be followed by gastroesophageal reflux disease. Some new antivirals have shown encouraging results in patients with chronic hepatitis. In the infectious disease arena, the late breaking trials in anti-retroviral disease are discussed, as well as the new trends regarding antibiotic resistance. This review approaches also the role of leukotriene modifiers in the treatment of asthma and discusses the benefit of using methylprednisolone in patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome, among many other advances in internal medicine. PMID:11068074

  1. Updates of pathologic myopia.

    PubMed

    Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko; Lai, Timothy Y Y; Lai, Chi-Chun; Cheung, Chiu Ming Gemmy

    2016-05-01

    Complications from pathologic myopia are a major cause of visual impairment and blindness, especially in east Asia. The eyes with pathologic myopia may develop loss of the best-corrected vision due to various pathologies in the macula, peripheral retina and the optic nerve. Despite its importance, the definition of pathologic myopia has been inconsistent. The refractive error or axial length alone often does not adequately reflect the 'pathologic myopia'. Posterior staphyloma, which is a hallmark lesion of pathologic myopia, can occur also in non-highly myopic eyes. Recently a revised classification system for myopic maculopathy has been proposed to standardize the definition among epidemiological studies. In this META-PM (meta analyses of pathologic myopia) study classification, pathologic myopia was defined as the eyes having chorioretinal atrophy equal to or more severe than diffuse atrophy. In addition, the advent of new imaging technologies such as optical coherence tomography (OCT) and three dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D MRI) has enabled the detailed observation of various pathologies specific to pathologic myopia. New therapeutic approaches including intravitreal injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents and the advance of vitreoretinal surgeries have greatly improved the prognosis of patients with pathologic myopia. The purpose of this review article is to provide an update on topics related to the field of pathologic myopia, and to outline the remaining issues which need to be solved in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Dali server update.

    PubMed

    Holm, Liisa; Laakso, Laura M

    2016-07-08

    The Dali server (http://ekhidna2.biocenter.helsinki.fi/dali) is a network service for comparing protein structures in 3D. In favourable cases, comparing 3D structures may reveal biologically interesting similarities that are not detectable by comparing sequences. The Dali server has been running in various places for over 20 years and is used routinely by crystallographers on newly solved structures. The latest update of the server provides enhanced analytics for the study of sequence and structure conservation. The server performs three types of structure comparisons: (i) Protein Data Bank (PDB) search compares one query structure against those in the PDB and returns a list of similar structures; (ii) pairwise comparison compares one query structure against a list of structures specified by the user; and (iii) all against all structure comparison returns a structural similarity matrix, a dendrogram and a multidimensional scaling projection of a set of structures specified by the user. Structural superimpositions are visualized using the Java-free WebGL viewer PV. The structural alignment view is enhanced by sequence similarity searches against Uniprot. The combined structure-sequence alignment information is compressed to a stack of aligned sequence logos. In the stack, each structure is structurally aligned to the query protein and represented by a sequence logo.

  3. Tetraplegia Management Update.

    PubMed

    Fridén, Jan; Gohritz, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Tetraplegia is a profound impairment of mobility manifesting as a paralysis of all 4 extremities owing to cervical spinal cord injury. The purpose of this article is to provide an update and analyze current management, treatment options, and outcomes of surgical reconstruction of arm and hand function. Surgical restoration of elbow and wrist extension or handgrip has tremendous potential to improve autonomy, mobility, and critical abilities, for example, eating, personal care, and self-catheterization and productive work in at least 70% of tetraplegic patients. Tendon and nerve transfers, tenodeses, and joint stabilizations reliably enable improved arm and hand usability, reduce muscle imbalance and pain in spasticity, and prevent joint contractures. One-stage combined procedures have proven considerable advantages over traditional multistage approaches. Immediate activation of transferred muscles reduces the risk of adhesions, facilitates relearning, avoids adverse effects of immobilization, and enhances functional recovery. Transfer of axillary, musculocutaneous, and radial nerve fascicles from above the spinal cord injury are effective and promising options to enhance motor outcome and sensory protection, especially in groups with limited resources. Improved communication between medical disciplines, therapists, patients, and their relatives should help that more individuals can benefit from these advances and could empower many thousands tetraplegic individuals "to take life into their own hands" and live more independently.

  4. Clinical update: hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tram T

    2007-07-01

    Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) remains a global health problem, with disproportionately high prevalence rates approaching 10-15% in the Asian population worldwide and in Asian immigrants in the United States. Chronic infection complications, including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, occur in 1 5-40% of infected individuals, and important recent data from the REVEAL study have suggested that, independent of other factors, high viral replication may impact long-term disease outcomes. More recent recognition of parameters for defining normal transaminases may also affect decision-making for therapy initiation. Recently, new treatment options have been effective at viral suppression, with lower rates of viral resistance compared to lamivudine. Currently, therapies for hepatitis B treatment include interferon, lamivudine, adefovir, entecavir, and telbivudine. Treatment considerations need to take into account therapy duration and risks, specifically the development of viral resistance. Recently updated guidelines and algorithms use viral replication, alanine aminotransferase levels, and severity of histologic disease as the determining factors for treatment. Therapy length is dependent on hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) seroconversion in HBeAg-positive CHB patients. In patients with the precore/basal core promoter HBeAg-negative CHB, the treatment goal is continued viral suppression. Future options, including new oral agents, therapeutic vaccines, and combination therapies, require further study.

  5. Update on PISCES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Don; Hamm, Dustin; Kubena, Brian; Weaver, Jonathan K.

    2010-01-01

    An updated version of the Platform Independent Software Components for the Exploration of Space (PISCES) software library is available. A previous version was reported in Library for Developing Spacecraft-Mission-Planning Software (MSC-22983), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 7 (July 2001), page 52. To recapitulate: This software provides for Web-based, collaborative development of computer programs for planning trajectories and trajectory- related aspects of spacecraft-mission design. The library was built using state-of-the-art object-oriented concepts and software-development methodologies. The components of PISCES include Java-language application programs arranged in a hierarchy of classes that facilitates the reuse of the components. As its full name suggests, the PISCES library affords platform-independence: The Java language makes it possible to use the classes and application programs with a Java virtual machine, which is available in most Web-browser programs. Another advantage is expandability: Object orientation facilitates expansion of the library through creation of a new class. Improvements in the library since the previous version include development of orbital-maneuver- planning and rendezvous-launch-window application programs, enhancement of capabilities for propagation of orbits, and development of a desktop user interface.

  6. Dali server update

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Liisa; Laakso, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    The Dali server (http://ekhidna2.biocenter.helsinki.fi/dali) is a network service for comparing protein structures in 3D. In favourable cases, comparing 3D structures may reveal biologically interesting similarities that are not detectable by comparing sequences. The Dali server has been running in various places for over 20 years and is used routinely by crystallographers on newly solved structures. The latest update of the server provides enhanced analytics for the study of sequence and structure conservation. The server performs three types of structure comparisons: (i) Protein Data Bank (PDB) search compares one query structure against those in the PDB and returns a list of similar structures; (ii) pairwise comparison compares one query structure against a list of structures specified by the user; and (iii) all against all structure comparison returns a structural similarity matrix, a dendrogram and a multidimensional scaling projection of a set of structures specified by the user. Structural superimpositions are visualized using the Java-free WebGL viewer PV. The structural alignment view is enhanced by sequence similarity searches against Uniprot. The combined structure-sequence alignment information is compressed to a stack of aligned sequence logos. In the stack, each structure is structurally aligned to the query protein and represented by a sequence logo. PMID:27131377

  7. Epidemiology of urolithiasis: an update

    PubMed Central

    Trinchieri, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Background & Aim. Changing socio-economic conditions generated changes in the prevalence, incidence and distribution for age, sex and type of urolithiasis in terms of both the site and the chemical-physical composition of the calculi. In the latter part of the 20th century the prevalence of upper urinary tract stones was increasing in Western countries whereas endemic infantile bladder stone disease was fairly widespread in huge areas of developing countries. The aim of this paper was to update previous epidemiological reports of urolithiasis by reviewing the more recent literature. Methods. Citations were extracted using PubMed database from January 2003 through December 2007 on the basis of the key words epidemiology AND urinary calculi. Results. An increase in the prevalence and incidence of urolithiasis was described in Germany whereas data from the United States were contradictory with stone disease rates increased only for women with a change of male-to-female ratio. Prevalence figures of stone disease observed in some developing country in tropical regions were similar to rates of Western countries with incidence of renal colic particularly high in warm months. African Americans had a reduced risk of stone disease compared to other racial groups but in renal stone patients all racial groups demonstrated a similarity in the incidence of underlying metabolic abnormalities. Upper urinary tract stones in children were associated more frequently with metabolic disturbances rather than with urinary tract anomalies and infection. Endemic childhood bladder stones are still present in some developing countries. Dietary risk factors for stone disease were shown different by age and sex. In particular in younger women dietary calcium, phytate and fluid intake were associated with a reduced risk of stone formation whereas animal protein and sucrose increased the risk of stone incidence. In older adults there was no association between dietary calcium and stone formation

  8. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Update (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, S.; Keller, J.; Glinsky, C.

    2013-10-01

    This presentation was given at the Sandia Reliability Workshop in August 2013 and provides information on current statistics, a status update, next steps, and other reliability research and development activities related to the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative.

  9. ISS Update: Transit of Venus

    NASA Image and Video Library

    ISS Update commentator Brandi Dean interviews Mario Runco, NASA astronaut, about Venus's transit across the sun on June 5, 2012. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Johnson and include the hashtag #...

  10. Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Update `92

    SciTech Connect

    Rosing, M.; Balka, L.; Chojnacki, E.; Gai, W.; Ho, C.; Konecny, R.; Power, J.; Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.

    1992-09-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) is an experiment designed to test various ideas related to wakefield technology. Construction is now underway for a 100 nC electron beam in December of 1992. This report updates this progress.

  11. Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Update '92

    SciTech Connect

    Rosing, M.; Balka, L.; Chojnacki, E.; Gai, W.; Ho, C.; Konecny, R.; Power, J.; Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.

    1992-01-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) is an experiment designed to test various ideas related to wakefield technology. Construction is now underway for a 100 nC electron beam in December of 1992. This report updates this progress.

  12. Email Updates: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... unsubscribe. Prevent MedlinePlus emails from being marked as "spam" or "junk" To ensure that MedlinePlus email updates ... com to your email address book, adjust your spam settings, or follow the instructions from your email ...

  13. The X-33 Program Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, Charlie

    2000-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the X-33 program update, including details on program objectives and plans, the X-33 configuration, technologies used, and X-33 assembly and test status.

  14. Updated Principle of Corresponding States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Amotz, Dor; Gift, Alan D.; Levine, R. D.

    2004-01-01

    The rule of corresponding states, which shows the connection between the thermodynamic properties of various liquids is re-examined. The overall likeness is observed by using an updated scaling technique of Lennard-Jones corresponding states (LJ-CS).

  15. 40 CFR 55.12 - Consistency updates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Consistency updates. 55.12 Section 55...) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF AIR REGULATIONS § 55.12 Consistency updates. (a) The Administrator will update... to update part 55 accordingly. (c) Consistency reviews triggered by receipt of an NOI. Upon...

  16. 77 FR 13198 - Product List Update

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ...] Product List Update AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Commission is... adopted in a recent Commission order. The referenced policy assumes periodic updates. The updates are... these updates. DATES: Effective Date: March 6, 2012. Applicability Dates: February 23, 2012...

  17. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically ill-patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): obese patient].

    PubMed

    Mesejo, A; Sánchez Álvarez, C; Arboleda Sánchez, J A

    2011-11-01

    As a response to metabolic stress, obese critically-ill patients have the same risk of nutritional deficiency as the non-obese and can develop protein-energy malnutrition with accelerated loss of muscle mass. The primary aim of nutritional support in these patients should be to minimize loss of lean mass and accurately evaluate energy expenditure. However, routinely-used formulae can overestimate calorie requirements if the patient's actual weight is used. Consequently, the use of adjusted or ideal weight is recommended with these formulae, although indirect calorimetry is the method of choice. Controversy surrounds the question of whether a strict nutritional support criterion, adjusted to the patient's requirements, should be applied or whether a certain degree of hyponutrition should be allowed. Current evidence suggested that hypocaloric nutrition can improve results, partly due to a lower rate of infectious complications and better control of hyperglycemia. Therefore, hypocaloric and hyperproteic nutrition, whether enteral or parenteral, should be standard practice in the nutritional support of critically-ill obese patients when not contraindicated. Widely accepted recommendations consist of no more than 60-70% of requirements or administration of 11-14 kcal/kg current body weight/day or 22-25 kcal/kg ideal weight/day, with 2-2.5 g/kg ideal weight/day of proteins. In a broad sense, hypocaloric-hyperprotein regimens can be considered specific to obese critically-ill patients, although the complications related to comorbidities in these patients may require other therapeutic possibilities to be considered, with specific nutrients for hyperglycemia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and sepsis. However, there are no prospective randomized trials with this type of nutrition in this specific population subgroup and the available data are drawn from the general population of critically-ill patients. Consequently, caution should be exercised when

  18. Ban the Book Report: Promoting Frequent and Enthusiastic Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Graham

    2012-01-01

    Teachers recognize that frequent independent reading increases student knowledge on a wide range of topics, enhances vocabulary, and improves comprehension. "Ban the Book Report" inspires teachers to go beyond narrow and analytical book reports by exploring the potential of book talks, alternate book covers, identifying features of informational…

  19. The Most Frequently Used Self-Report Instruments in Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWine, Sue; Pearson, Judy C.

    To provide an assessment of current instruments being used by communication scholars, investigators examined and identified the most frequently used instruments that had been published in the past five years in the nine major speech communication journals. Each article was examined for the identification of the instruments used, constructs…

  20. Ban the Book Report: Promoting Frequent and Enthusiastic Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Graham

    2012-01-01

    Teachers recognize that frequent independent reading increases student knowledge on a wide range of topics, enhances vocabulary, and improves comprehension. "Ban the Book Report" inspires teachers to go beyond narrow and analytical book reports by exploring the potential of book talks, alternate book covers, identifying features of informational…

  1. Anaphora in Basal Reader Selections: How Frequently Do They Occur?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, James F.

    To determine how frequently various forms of anaphora appear in materials written for children, 1,000-word excerpts were analyzed from the second, fourth, and sixth grade texts of four basal reader series. The basal programs consisted of the "Ginn Reading Program," the "Houghton Mifflin Reading Program,""Scott, Foresman…

  2. Gallium accumulation in the stomach. A frequent incidental finding

    SciTech Connect

    MacMahon, H.; Vyborny, C.; Sephardari, S.; Kirchner, P.; Ryan, J.

    1985-10-01

    Accumulation of tracer by the stomach is a frequent incidental occurrence on gallium scans. Gastric concentration of Ga-67 equal to or greater than that seen in the liver was observed in approximately 10% of patients in a large series. Although a few of these patients had known or subsequently demonstrated gastric pathologic conditions, most had no clinically or radiographically identifiable gastric disease.

  3. Fraternity Membership & Frequent Drinking. NBER Working Paper No. 16291

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSimone, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Reinforcing earlier findings from other data, college senior fraternity/sorority members are more likely to consume alcohol frequently. Large reductions in estimates upon controlling for time spent partying, and to a lesser extent cigarette use and intramural sports involvement, suggest considerable unobserved heterogeneity in the relationship.…

  4. Perfusion MRI: The Five Most Frequently Asked Clinical Questions

    PubMed Central

    Essig, Marco; Nguyen, Thanh Binh; Shiroishi, Mark S.; Saake, Marc; Provenzale, James M.; Enterline, David S.; Anzalone, Nicoletta; Dörfler, Arnd; Rovira, Àlex; Wintermark, Max; Law, Meng

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This article addresses questions that radiologists frequently ask when planning, performing, processing, and interpreting MRI perfusion studies in CNS imaging. CONCLUSION Perfusion MRI is a promising tool in assessing stroke, brain tumors, and neurodegenerative diseases. Most of the impediments that have limited the use of perfusion MRI can be overcome to allow integration of these methods into modern neuroimaging protocols. PMID:23971482

  5. Hit List: Frequently Challenged Books for Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monks, Merri M.; Pistolis, Donna Reidy

    This book presents descriptions of 26 young adult titles that have been frequent targets of censorship attempts. Each entry provides an annotation for the book in question; examples of recent challenges; citations to reviews of the book and background articles; a list of awards garnered by the book or its author; references about the author;…

  6. Demystifying the Electoral College: 12 Frequently Asked Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, Tiffany

    2012-01-01

    As the presidential election of 2012 draws closer, Americans will witness a resurgence of references to the Electoral College in news reports. Here, "Looking at the Law" hopes to demystify the Electoral College, and refresh many social studies memories--just in time for the next election--with some frequently asked questions about electing the…

  7. Frequently Asked Questions: Common Core State Standards Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Common Core State Standards Initiative, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The document provides answers to some of the frequently asked questions about the Common Core State Standards, from how they were developed to what they mean for states and local communities. The questions are organized into the following categories: (1) Overview; (2) Process; (3) Implementation and Future Work; and (4) Content and Quality of the…

  8. Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPC): Frequently Asked Questions

    SciTech Connect

    2012-11-01

    An ESPC is a working relationship between a Federal agency and an energy service company (ESCO). The ESCO conducts a comprehensive energy audit for the Federal facility and identifies improvements to save energy. The following sections present a number of frequently asked questions from ESPC end-users and stakeholders.

  9. Frequent Absences? Help Students Keep up, Not Drop out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butts, Patricia H.

    2009-01-01

    Absenteeism, which is increasing at an alarming rate, is becoming the gateway to dropping out of school altogether. One way to combat this trend is for educators to implement strategies and interventions for students returning from frequent absences in an effort to keep their make-up workload feasible and to help them maintain their grades.…

  10. Frequent visitors at the psychiatric emergency room - A literature review.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Manuela

    2017-03-29

    Frequent visitors at the psychiatric emergency room (PER) constitute a small subgroup of patients, yet they are responsible for a disproportionate number of visits and thus claim considerable resources. Their needs are often left unmet and their repetitive visits reflect their dissatisfaction as well as that of PERs' staff. Motivated by these dilemmas, this study systematically reviews the literature about frequent visitors at PER and seeks to answer two questions: What characterizes frequent visitors at PER in the literature? and What characterizes PER in the literature? Based on 29 studies, this paper offers answers to the two questions based on a strength weakness opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis. The results of the review and subsequent analysis of the literature revealed the multiplicity and complexity of frequent visitors' characteristics and how they appear to converge. Commonalities were more difficult to identify in PER characteristics. In some cases, this happened because the characteristics were poorly described or were context specific. As a result, it was not easy to compare the studies on PER. Based on SWOT and the findings of the analysis, the paper proposes new venues of research and suggests how the field of mental health might develop by taking into account its opportunities and threats.

  11. Hit List: Frequently Challenged Books for Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monks, Merri M.; Pistolis, Donna Reidy

    This book presents descriptions of 26 young adult titles that have been frequent targets of censorship attempts. Each entry provides an annotation for the book in question; examples of recent challenges; citations to reviews of the book and background articles; a list of awards garnered by the book or its author; references about the author;…

  12. Use of contraception among US women with frequent mental distress.

    PubMed

    Farr, Sherry L; Curtis, Kathryn M; Robbins, Cheryl L; Zapata, Lauren B; Dietz, Patricia M

    2011-02-01

    This study examines whether a woman's mental health is associated with use of contraception. We used national data from 2004 and 2006 to calculate the prevalence of contraceptive use among women with frequent mental distress. We examined associations among mental distress and permanent contraception and any highly or moderately effective, reversible contraceptive method. Women with (86%) and without (87%) frequent mental distress reported using contraception, but contraceptive type varied by mental distress and income. Among women who use contraception, those with frequent mental distress had 1.4 times higher odds (95% CI: 1.2-1.6) of using permanent contraception. Among lower income women who use reversible contraception, those with frequent mental distress had lower odds of using highly [adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=0.5, 95% CI: 0.4-0.8] and moderately (aOR=0.6, 95% CI: 0.4-0.9) effective methods than less effective methods. Contraceptive providers should consider mental health when providing counseling about contraception. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Frequent Errors in Chinese EFL Learners' Topic-Based Writings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhan, Huifang

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigated a large number of errors found in the topic-based writings of Chinese EFL learners, especially provided an analysis on frequent errors, to find useful pedagogical implications for English grammar teaching and writing instruction in Chinese EFL setting. Students' topic-based writings were examined by the author. The findings…

  14. Frequent Absences? Help Students Keep up, Not Drop out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butts, Patricia H.

    2009-01-01

    Absenteeism, which is increasing at an alarming rate, is becoming the gateway to dropping out of school altogether. One way to combat this trend is for educators to implement strategies and interventions for students returning from frequent absences in an effort to keep their make-up workload feasible and to help them maintain their grades.…

  15. Less Frequently Taught Languages: Basic Information and Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conwell, Marilyn; And Others

    The following articles are presented in the section of the Northeast Conference Report on less frequently taught languages: (1) "American Sign Language," by M. Conwell and A. Nelson; (2) "Chinese," by D. Gidman; (3) "Japanese," by J. P. Berwald and T. Phipps; (4) "Latin," by M. Cleary; (5) "Portuguese," by R. Pedro Carvalho; and (6) "Russian," by…

  16. The Most Frequently Listed Courses in the Undergraduate Psychology Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Baron; McCann, Lee I.

    1999-01-01

    Explores the most frequently listed undergraduate psychology courses for four institutional types by analyzing 400 college catalogs. Reports that some segmentation continues in the research methodology and developmental areas, the balance of natural and social science courses appear stable, and there are no signs of a change toward vocationalism.…

  17. Frequent Visitors to the School Nurse: The School Psychologist's Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, James F.; Sweeney, Dorothy D.

    School psychologists are increasingly expected to become more involved in health related issues. It has been suggested that the frequent visitor to the school nurse (FVSN) is often the student with a high need for security, nurturance, and attachment to an adult at school. This paper focuses on children and adolescents who do not have a chronic…

  18. Fraternity Membership & Frequent Drinking. NBER Working Paper No. 16291

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSimone, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Reinforcing earlier findings from other data, college senior fraternity/sorority members are more likely to consume alcohol frequently. Large reductions in estimates upon controlling for time spent partying, and to a lesser extent cigarette use and intramural sports involvement, suggest considerable unobserved heterogeneity in the relationship.…

  19. Frequently asked questions in direct pulp capping of permanent teeth.

    PubMed

    Mouawad, Stéphanie; Artine, Simon; Hajjar, Pétra; McConnell, Robert; Fahd, Jean-Claude; Sabbagh, Joseph

    2014-05-01

    Direct pulp capping is a proven method of preserving tooth vitality of a mature permanent tooth in cases of pulp exposures. The indications for this treatment, treatment modalities and materials are discussed in this paper. This paper answers many of the frequently asked questions by general practitioners, dental students and specialists about direct pulp capping.

  20. Anaphora in Basal Reader Selections: How Frequently Do They Occur?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, James F.

    To determine how frequently various forms of anaphora appear in materials written for children, 1,000-word excerpts were analyzed from the second, fourth, and sixth grade texts of four basal reader series. The basal programs consisted of the "Ginn Reading Program," the "Houghton Mifflin Reading Program,""Scott, Foresman…

  1. Sporotrichosis: an update.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, A; Vázquez-González, D

    2010-10-01

    Sporotrichosis is the most frequent and worldwide distributed subcutaneous mycoses. The aim of this article is to review the most recent aspects of sporotrichosis about its epidemiology, etiologic agents, mycologic characteristics, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment. The causative agents of sporotrichosis belong to five well defined species of dimorphic fungi of the called Sporothrix schenckii complex. Sporotrichosis and its etiologic agents have specific endemic areas, but it is possible to find epidemics of the disease in practically every continent, the entrance via is cutaneous due to the inoculation of the fungi into the skin after a traumatism and less frequent due to respiratory way. Clinical manifestations are widely variable, with important involvement of the skin and the superficial lymphatic system, but also with affection of the mucosa and some organs like lungs, bones and joints. Nowadays sporotrichosis is considered a true zoonosis with important changes related to the endemic areas and the ecologic features of the causative pathogens. The therapy of choice is the potassium iodide (KI), but other alternatives are itraconazole, terbinafine, thermotherapy and in severe cases amphotericin B. The importance of the recognition of the clinical manifestations of the disease in some non-endemic areas helps to challenge the diagnosis and give an accurate therapy.

  2. Understanding women's hesitancy to undergo less frequent cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Gerend, Mary A; Shepherd, Melissa A; Kaltz, Emily A; Davis, Whitney J; Shepherd, Janet E

    2017-02-01

    Inappropriate cervical cancer screening (e.g., screening too often) can result in unnecessary medical procedures, treatment, and psychological distress. To balance the benefits and harms, cervical cancer screening guidelines were recently modified in favor of less frequent screening (i.e., every 3 to 5 years). This study investigated women's acceptance of less frequent cervical cancer screening and their primary concerns about extending the screening interval beyond one year. A national sample of 376 U.S. women ages 21-65 completed an online survey in 2014. Predictors of willingness to get a Pap test every 3 to 5 years were identified using logistic regression. We also examined perceived consequences of less frequent screening. Over two thirds were willing to undergo less frequent screening if it was recommended by their healthcare provider. Nevertheless, nearly 20% expressed discomfort with less frequent screening and 45% were either in opposition or unsure whether they would be comfortable replacing Pap testing with primary HPV testing. Women whose most recent Pap test was (vs. was not) within the past year and women who ever (vs. never) had an abnormal Pap test were less willing to extend the screening interval. Additionally, women who typically saw an obstetrician/gynecologist or nurse practitioner for their Pap test (vs. a family physician) were less accepting of the guidelines. Hesitancy about the longer screening interval appears to stem from concern about developing cancer between screenings. Findings contribute to the growing body of research on cancer overscreening and may inform interventions for improving adherence to cancer screening guidelines.

  3. CREME96 Update/Replacement Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Jim H.

    2007-01-01

    This talk concerns the plans to update the CREME96 model that is currently available on the WWW. The talk states the reasons for updating C REME. It describes the updates that are planned, including the single event prediction paradigm, the method of radiation transport through the spacecraft to the electronic component of interest and the planned updates to models for the space radiation environment. It also revi ews user suggestions received do date for the update.

  4. NPOESS Field Terminal Updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckmann, G.; Route, G.

    2009-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Defense (DoD), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation weather and environmental satellite system; the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). NPOESS replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) managed by the DoD. The NPOESS satellites carry a suite of sensors that collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The ground data processing segment for NPOESS is the Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS), developed by Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems. The IDPS processes NPOESS satellite data to provide environmental data products (aka, Environmental Data Records or EDRs) to NOAA and DoD processing centers operated by the United States government. The IDPS will process EDRs beginning with the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) and continuing through the lifetime of the NPOESS system. IDPS also provides the software and requirements for the Field Terminal Segment (FTS). NPOESS provides support to deployed field terminals by providing mission data in the Low Rate and High Rate downlinks (LRD/HRD), mission support data needed to generate EDRs and decryption keys needed to decrypt mission data during Selective data Encryption (SDE). Mission support data consists of globally relevant data, geographically constrained data, and two line element sets. NPOESS provides these mission support data via the Internet accessible Mission Support Data Server and HRD/LRD downlinks. This presentation will illustrate and describe the NPOESS capabilities in support of Field Terminal users. This discussion will include the mission support data available to Field Terminal users, content of the direct broadcast HRD and LRD

  5. Update on selenoprotein biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bulteau, Anne-Laure; Chavatte, Laurent

    2015-10-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element that is incorporated in the small but vital family of proteins, namely the selenoproteins, as the selenocysteine amino acid residue. In humans, 25 selenoprotein genes have been characterized. The most remarkable trait of selenoprotein biosynthesis is the cotranslational insertion of selenocysteine by the recoding of a UGA codon, normally decoded as a stop signal. In eukaryotes, a set of dedicated cis- and trans-acting factors have been identified as well as a variety of regulatory mechanisms, factors, or elements that control the selenoprotein expression at the level of the UGA-selenocysteine recoding process, offering a fascinating playground in the field of translational control. It appeared that the central players are two RNA molecules: the selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) element within selenoprotein mRNA and the selenocysteine-tRNA([Ser]Sec); and their interacting partners. After a couple of decades, despite many advances in the field and the discovery of many essential and regulatory components, the precise mechanism of UGA-selenocysteine recoding remains elusive and more complex than anticipated, with many layers of control. This review offers an update of selenoproteome biosynthesis and regulation in eukaryotes. The regulation of selenoproteins in response to a variety of pathophysiological conditions and cellular stressors, including selenium levels, oxidative stress, replicative senescence, or cancer, awaits further detailed investigation. Clearly, the efficiency of UGA-selenocysteine recoding is the limiting stage of selenoprotein synthesis. The sequence of events leading Sec-tRNA([Ser]Sec) delivery to ribosomal A site awaits further analysis, notably at the level of a three-dimensional structure.

  6. Psoriatic arthritis update.

    PubMed

    Mease, Philip

    2006-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is an inflammatory arthritis occurring in up to 30% of patients with psoriasis. Its clear distinction from rheumatoid arthritis has been described clinically, genetically, and immunohistologically. Updated classification criteria have been recently derived from a large international study. Key pathophysiologic cellular processes are being elucidated, increasing our understanding of potential targets of therapy. Therapies that target cells, such as activated T cells, and proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), are rational to pursue. Outcome measures have been "borrowed" from rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis studies. A variety of domains are assessed including joints, skin, enthesium, dactylitis, spine, function, quality of life, and imaging assessment of disease activity and damage. The performance qualities of outcome measures in these various domains is being evaluated by the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA), and improved measures are being developed and validated specifically for psoriatic arthritis. Traditional therapies for psoriatic arthritis have included nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, oral immunomodulatory drugs, topical creams, and light therapy. These therapies have been helpful in controlling both musculoskeletal and dermatologic aspects of the disease, but they may not be fully effective in all disease domains, may eventually show diminished benefit, and may produce treatment-limiting toxicities. In the past several years, use of biologic agents has generally yielded greater benefit across more domains, yielding significant and enduring benefits for clinical manifestations, function, and quality of life, and especially with the anti-TNF agents, inhibition of structural damage. Adverse effects with these agents can be significant but are usually manageable. Cost is also significant, but cost-effectiveness analysis is demonstrating reasonable

  7. [FREQUENTLY USED VEGETABLE OILS IN SOUTH AMERICA: FEATURES AND PROPERTIES].

    PubMed

    Durán Agüero, Samuel; Torres García, Jairo; Sanhueza Catalán, Julio

    2015-07-01

    In recent decades, the consumption of vegetable oils has increased in our society, being an important part of the diet worldwide. South America is a major producer of an important variety of vegetable oils. The composition of vegetable oils is not standard as it varies greatly in the amount of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, and particularly in the amounts of omega-6 and omega-3, which are associated with the source either plant species, seed, plant or fruit, providing different nutritional benefits. The purpose of this article is to review and update the data and evidence about the consumption of oils produced and commercialized in South America, such as soybean oil, corn, palm, sunflower, canola and olive oils, and also to determine health effects from studies related with the topic.

  8. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically ill-patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): severe acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Bordejé Laguna, L; Lorencio Cárdenas, C; Acosta Escribano, J

    2011-11-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) causes local and systemic complications leading to high catabolic, hypermetabolic and hyperdynamic stress states with marked morbidity and mortality. In the last decade, nutritional support has become a key element in the treatment of SAP. Thus, specialized nutrition is indicated from admission, with enteral nutrition being preferred to parenteral nutrition. Enteral nutrition should be initiated early using infusion through the jejunum beyond the ligament of Treitz to minimize pancreatic stress. There are no specific studies that establish the type of diet to be used but experts recommend the use of polymeric diets. Parenteral nutrition, without a specific formula, is indicated in patients with SAP who are intolerant to enteral nutrition or when the clinical signs of pancreatitis are exacerbated or aggravated by enteral nutrition. Even so, a minimal level of enteral infusion should be maintained to preserve the trophic effect of the intestinal mucosa. In the last few years, several studies of the administration of immunomodulatory diets in patients with SAP have been carried out to demonstrate their effects on the course of the disease. However, there are few clear recommendations on the prognostic benefits of pharmaconutrient enriched diets in these patients. There is substantial scientific evidence suggesting that the only clear indication for pharmaconutrition in patients with SAP is parenteral glutamine administration, which is recommended by all clinical guidelines with distinct grades of evidence.

  9. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): gastrointestinal surgery].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Álvarez, C; Zabarte Martínez de Aguirre, M; Bordejé Laguna, L

    2011-11-01

    Gastrointestinal surgery and critical illness place tremendous stress on the body, resulting in a series of metabolic changes that may lead to severe malnutrition, which in turn can increase postsurgical complications and morbidity and mortality and prolong the hospital length of stay. In these patients, parenteral nutrition is the most widely used form of nutritional support, but administration of enteral nutrition early in the postoperative period is effective and well tolerated, reducing infectious complications, improving wound healing and reducing length of hospital stay. Calorie-protein requirements do not differ from those in other critically-ill patients and depend on the patient's underlying process and degree of metabolic stress. In patients intolerant to enteral nutrition, especially if the intolerance is due to increased gastric residual volume, prokinetic agents can be used to optimize calorie intake. When proximal sutures are used, tubes allowing early jejunal feeding should be used. Pharmaconutrition is indicated in these patients, who benefit from enteral administration of arginine, omega 3 and RNA, as well as parenteral glutamine supplementation. Parenteral nutrition should be started in patients with absolute contraindication for use of the gastrointestinal tract or as complementary nutrition if adequate energy intake is not achieved through the enteral route.

  10. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): nutritional assessment].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Santana, S; Arboleda Sánchez, J A; Abilés, J

    2011-11-01

    Current parameters to assess nutritional status in critically-ill patients are useful to evaluate nutritional status prior to admission to the intensive care unit. However, these parameters are of little utility once the patient's nutritional status has been altered by the acute process and its treatment. Changes in water distribution affect anthropometric variables and biochemical biomarkers, which in turn are affected by synthesis and degradation processes. Increased plasma levels of prealbumin and retinol -proteins with a short half-life- can indicate adequate response to nutritional support, while reduced levels of these proteins indicate further metabolic stress. The parameters used in functional assessment, such as those employed to assess muscular or immune function, are often altered by drugs or the presence of infection or polyneuropathy. However, some parameters can be used to monitor metabolic response and refeeding or can aid prognostic evaluation. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Medicina Intensiva, Critica y Unidades Coronarias (SEMICYUC) and Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Paroxysmal hemicrania: an update.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Sanjay; Patell, Rushad

    2014-04-01

    Paroxysmal hemicrania (PH) is an underreported and underdiagnosed primary headache disorder. It usually begins in the third or fourth decade of life. The recent observations indicate that it is equally prevalent in both males and females. PH is characterized by severe, strictly unilateral head pain attacks that occur in association with ipsilateral autonomic features. The attacks in PH are shorter and more frequent compared with cluster headache (CH) but otherwise PH and CH have similar clinical features. The hallmark of PH is the absolute cessation of the headache with indomethacin. However, a range of drugs may show partial to complete relief in certain groups of patients. Neuromodulatory procedures, such as greater occipital nerve blockade, blockade of sphenopalatine ganglion and neurostimulation of the posterior hypothalamus, are reserved for refractory PH.

  12. Endocarditis 2014: an update.

    PubMed

    Thanavaro, Kristin L; Nixon, J V Ian

    2014-01-01

    The epidemiology of infective endocarditis is changing due to a number of factors, including more frequent and varied antibiotic use, the emergence of resistant microorganisms, and an increase in the implantation of cardiovascular devices. This review outlines and consolidates the most recent guidelines, including the 2007 and 2010 AHA/ACC guidelines and scientific statements for the prevention and management of infective endocarditis and for the management of cardiovascular device infections. The evidence-based guidelines, including the 2009 HRS consensus document, for the treatment of patients with cardiovascular device-related infections are also reviewed. Only patients with prosthetic valves, patients with prior endocarditis, cardiac transplant patients with a valvulopathy, and certain congenital heart disease patients now require endocarditis prophylaxis. There is an increasing incidence of cardiovascular device-related infections due to the higher frequency of implanted devices and higher morbidity and mortality rates in older patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Distal esophageal spasm: an update.

    PubMed

    Achem, Sami R; Gerson, Lauren B

    2013-09-01

    Distal esophageal spasm (DES) is an esophageal motility disorder that presents clinically with chest pain and/or dysphagia and is defined manometrically as simultaneous contractions in the distal (smooth muscle) esophagus in ≥20% of wet swallows (and amplitude contraction of ≥30 mmHg) alternating with normal peristalsis. With the introduction of high resolution esophageal pressure topography (EPT) in 2000, the definition of DES was modified. The Chicago classification proposed that the defining criteria for DES using EPT should be the presence of at least two premature contractions (distal latency<4.5 s) in a context of normal EGJ relaxation. The etiology of DES remains insufficiently understood, but evidence links nitric oxide (NO) deficiency as a culprit resulting in a disordered neural inhibition. GERD frequently coexists in DES, and its role in the pathogenesis of symptoms needs further evaluation. There is some evidence from small series that DES can progress to achalasia. Treatment remains challenging due in part to lack of randomized placebo-controlled trials. Current treatment agents include nitrates (both short and long acting), calcium-channel blockers, anticholinergic agents, 5-phosphodiesterase inhibitors, visceral analgesics (tricyclic agents or SSRI), and esophageal dilation. Acid suppression therapy is frequently used, but clinical outcome trials to support this approach are not available. Injection of botulinum toxin in the distal esophagus may be effective, but further data regarding the development of post-injection gastroesophageal reflux need to be assessed. Heller myotomy combined with fundoplication remains an alternative for the rare refractory patient. Preliminary studies suggest that the newly developed endoscopic technique of per oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) may also be an alternative treatment modality.

  14. Satellite image based methods for fuels maps updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Benito, Alfonso; Hernandez-Leal, Pedro A.; Arbelo, Manuel; Gonzalez-Calvo, Alejandro; Moreno-Ruiz, Jose A.; Garcia-Lazaro, Jose R.

    2016-10-01

    Regular updating of fuels maps is important for forest fire management. Nevertheless complex and time consuming field work is usually necessary for this purpose, which prevents a more frequent update. That is why the assessment of the usefulness of satellite data and the development of remote sensing techniques that enable the automatic updating of these maps, is of vital interest. In this work, we have tested the use of the spectral bands of OLI (Operational Land Imager) sensor on board Landsat 8 satellite, for updating the fuels map of El Hierro Island (Spain). From previously digitized map, a set of 200 reference plots for different fuel types was created. A 50% of the plots were randomly used as a training set and the rest were considered for validation. Six supervised and 2 unsupervised classification methods were applied, considering two levels of detail. A first level with only 5 classes (Meadow, Brushwood, Undergrowth canopy cover >50%, Undergrowth canopy cover <15%, and Xeric formations), and the second one containing 19 fuel types. The level 1 classification methods yielded an overall accuracy ranging from 44% for Parellelepided to an 84% for Maximun Likelihood. Meanwhile, level 2 results showed at best, an unacceptable overall accuracy of 34%, which prevents the use of this data for such a detailed characterization. Anyway it has been demonstrated that in some conditions, images of medium spatial resolution, like Landsat 8-OLI, could be a valid tool for an automatic upgrade of fuels maps, minimizing costs and complementing traditional methodologies.

  15. An Update on the CDDIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Carey; Michael, Patrick; Dube, Maurice P.; Pollack, N.

    2012-01-01

    The Crustal Dynamics Data Inforn1ation System (CoorS) supports data archiving and distribution activities for the space geodesy and geodynamics community. The main objectives of the system are to store space geodesy and geodynamics related data products in a central data bank, to maintain infom1ation about the archival of these data, and to disseminate these data and information in a timely mam1er to a global scientific research community. The archive consists of GNSS, laser ranging, VLBI, and OORIS data sets and products derived from these data. The coors is one of NASA's Earth Observing System Oata and Infom1ation System (EOSorS) distributed data centers; EOSOIS data centers serve a diverse user community and are tasked to provide facilities to search and access science data and products. The coors data system and its archive have become increasingly important to many national and international science communities, in pal1icular several of the operational services within the International Association of Geodesy (lAG) and its project the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS), including the International OORIS Service (IDS), the International GNSS Service (IGS), the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS), the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS), and the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS). The coors has recently expanded its archive to supp011 the IGS Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX). The archive now contains daily and hourly 3D-second and subhourly I-second data from an additional 35+ stations in RINEX V3 fOm1at. The coors will soon install an Ntrip broadcast relay to support the activities of the IGS Real-Time Pilot Project (RTPP) and the future Real-Time IGS Service. The coors has also developed a new web-based application to aid users in data discovery, both within the current community and beyond. To enable this data discovery application, the CDDIS is currently implementing modifications to the metadata extracted from

  16. Updated NGNP Fuel Acquisition Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    David Petti; Tim Abram; Richard Hobbins; Jim Kendall

    2010-12-01

    A Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) fuel acquisition strategy was first established in 2007. In that report, a detailed technical assessment of potential fuel vendors for the first core of NGNP was conducted by an independent group of international experts based on input from the three major reactor vendor teams. Part of the assessment included an evaluation of the credibility of each option, along with a cost and schedule to implement each strategy compared with the schedule and throughput needs of the NGNP project. While credible options were identified based on the conditions in place at the time, many changes in the assumptions underlying the strategy and in externalities that have occurred in the interim requiring that the options be re-evaluated. This document presents an update to that strategy based on current capabilities for fuel fabrication as well as fuel performance and qualification testing worldwide. In light of the recent Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) project closure, the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel development and qualification program needs to support both pebble and prismatic options under the NGNP project. A number of assumptions were established that formed a context for the evaluation. Of these, the most important are: • Based on logistics associated with the on-going engineering design activities, vendor teams would start preliminary design in October 2012 and complete in May 2014. A decision on reactor type will be made following preliminary design, with the decision process assumed to be completed in January 2015. Thus, no fuel decision (pebble or prismatic) will be made in the near term. • Activities necessary for both pebble and prismatic fuel qualification will be conducted in parallel until a fuel form selection is made. As such, process development, fuel fabrication, irradiation, and testing for pebble and prismatic options should not negatively influence each other during the period prior to a decision on reactor type

  17. Oral side-effects of the most frequently prescribed drugs.

    PubMed

    Smith, R G; Burtner, A P

    1994-01-01

    Oral side-effects and their respective prevalence rates for the 200 most frequently prescribed drugs for 1992, as measured by IMS America's National Prescription Audit is reviewed. Accounting for duplication due to brand and generic name listings, the actual number of different medications covered was 131. The results of this review are presented in a table and include the oral side-effects and prevalences as reported in the literature. The three most frequent side-effects encountered with these medications were xerostomia (80.5%), dysgeusia (47.5%), and stomatitis (33.9%). The included table should fill the need for a ready reference for dentists in monitoring and counseling patients regarding the potential oral side-effects of the medications.

  18. Evidence for frequent incest in a cooperatively breeding mammal

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, H. J.; Cant, M. A.; Hoffman, J. I.; Sanderson, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    As breeding between relatives often results in inbreeding depression, inbreeding avoidance is widespread in the animal kingdom. However, inbreeding avoidance may entail fitness costs. For example, dispersal away from relatives may reduce survival. How these conflicting selection pressures are resolved is challenging to investigate, but theoretical models predict that inbreeding should occur frequently in some systems. Despite this, few studies have found evidence of regular incest in mammals, even in social species where relatives are spatio-temporally clustered and opportunities for inbreeding frequently arise. We used genetic parentage assignments together with relatedness data to quantify inbreeding rates in a wild population of banded mongooses, a cooperatively breeding carnivore. We show that females regularly conceive to close relatives, including fathers and brothers. We suggest that the costs of inbreeding avoidance may sometimes outweigh the benefits, even in cooperatively breeding species where strong within-group incest avoidance is considered to be the norm. PMID:25540153

  19. Evidence for frequent incest in a cooperatively breeding mammal.

    PubMed

    Nichols, H J; Cant, M A; Hoffman, J I; Sanderson, J L

    2014-12-01

    As breeding between relatives often results in inbreeding depression, inbreeding avoidance is widespread in the animal kingdom. However, inbreeding avoidance may entail fitness costs. For example, dispersal away from relatives may reduce survival. How these conflicting selection pressures are resolved is challenging to investigate, but theoretical models predict that inbreeding should occur frequently in some systems. Despite this, few studies have found evidence of regular incest in mammals, even in social species where relatives are spatio-temporally clustered and opportunities for inbreeding frequently arise. We used genetic parentage assignments together with relatedness data to quantify inbreeding rates in a wild population of banded mongooses, a cooperatively breeding carnivore. We show that females regularly conceive to close relatives, including fathers and brothers. We suggest that the costs of inbreeding avoidance may sometimes outweigh the benefits, even in cooperatively breeding species where strong within-group incest avoidance is considered to be the norm.

  20. REM Sleep Theta Changes in Frequent Nightmare Recallers.

    PubMed

    Marquis, Louis-Philippe; Paquette, Tyna; Blanchette-Carrière, Cloé; Dumel, Gaëlle; Nielsen, Tore

    2017-09-01

    To replicate and expand upon past research by evaluating sleep and wake electroencephalographic spectral activity in samples of frequent nightmare (NM) recallers and healthy controls. Computation of spectral activity for sleep (non-REM and REM) and wake electroencephalogram recordings from 18 frequent NM recallers and 15 control participants. There was higher "slow-theta" (2-5 Hz) for NM recallers than for controls during wake, non-REM sleep and REM sleep. Differences were clearest for frontal and central derivations and for REM sleep cycles 2-4. There was also higher beta activity during NREM sleep for NM recallers. Findings partially replicate past research by demonstrating higher relative "slow-theta" (3-4Hz) for NM recallers than for controls. Findings are consistent with a neurocognitive model of nightmares that stipulates cross-state anomalies in emotion processing in NM-prone individuals.

  1. The 100 most frequently cited articles in ophthalmology journals.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Norio; Nakao, Kumiko; Isashiki, Yasushi; Ohba, Ayako

    2007-07-01

    We screened 46 ophthalmology journals to identify the most frequently cited articles using the Science Citation Index Expanded (1975 to 2006). The 100 most-cited articles were published in 13 journals, most in the Archives of Ophthalmology (n = 30), followed by Ophthalmology (n = 27) and the American Journal of Ophthalmology (n = 11), and originated from 10 countries, led by the United States (n = 86). The topics covered by these classic articles included epidemiology of age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma, description of new diseases including cytomegalovirus retinitis, optical coherence tomography, hypotensive medications in glaucoma, laser photocoagulation to treat diabetic retinopathy and subfoveal choroidal neovascularization, photorefractive surgery, and vitrectomy to treat idiopathic macular hole. The most frequently cited articles provide a historical perspective in the scientific advancement of ophthalmology during the last 3 decades.

  2. Nurse practitioner prescribing practices: the most frequently prescribed medications.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Thomas; Cashin, Andrew; Stuart, Meg; Browne, Graeme; Dunn, Sandra V

    2013-07-01

    To explore which medications Australian nurse practitioners most frequently prescribe. Although nurse practitioners in Australia have prescriptive authority, little is known about which specific medications nurse practitioners are prescribing and how frequently they do so. Descriptive electronic survey. A total of 209 nurse practitioners reported current prescribing practices. Medications reported were categorised according to the Australian Medicines Handbook major drug classifications and frequencies presented. Seventy-eight per cent of respondents reported prescribing medications as part of their Nurse Practitioner practice. In total, participants reported prescribing 234 separate medications from most Australian Medicines Handbook major drug classifications. Medications from the classification anti-infective drugs were most frequently prescribed followed by medications from analgesic, psychotropic, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, genitourinary and gastrointestinal classifications. The majority of nurse practitioners in Australia prescribe medications in their clinical practice, although the proportion of nurse practitioners prescribing has not changed significantly in the past four years. The medications prescribed are comparable with those most frequently prescribed by all prescribers in Australia and highlight the diversity in scope of practice among nurse practitioners. Findings highlight the importance of Nurse Practitioner's a capacity to prescribe wide variety of medications, especially in practice areas such acute, primary and emergency care. The unique role nurse practitioners in relation to management of patients with infective processes and patients requiring pain relief is highlighted. Insight into current Nurse Practitioner prescribing trends informs future Nurse Practitioner curricular and future continuing education programmes. Findings give unique insight for future service planning, especially service providers considering introducing nurse

  3. Perfusion MRI: The Five Most Frequently Asked Technical Questions

    PubMed Central

    Essig, Marco; Shiroishi, Mark S.; Nguyen, Thanh Binh; Saake, Marc; Provenzale, James M.; Enterline, David; Anzalone, Nicoletta; Dörfler, Arnd; Rovira, Àlex; Wintermark, Max; Law, Meng

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This and its companion article address the 10 most frequently asked questions that radiologists face when planning, performing, processing, and interpreting different MR perfusion studies in CNS imaging. CONCLUSION Perfusion MRI is a promising tool in assessing stroke, brain tumors, and patients with neurodegenerative diseases. Most of the impediments that have limited the use of perfusion MRI can be overcome to allow integration of these methods into modern neuroimaging protocols. PMID:23255738

  4. Handling Dynamic Weights in Weighted Frequent Pattern Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Chowdhury Farhan; Tanbeer, Syed Khairuzzaman; Jeong, Byeong-Soo; Lee, Young-Koo

    Even though weighted frequent pattern (WFP) mining is more effective than traditional frequent pattern mining because it can consider different semantic significances (weights) of items, existing WFP algorithms assume that each item has a fixed weight. But in real world scenarios, the weight (price or significance) of an item can vary with time. Reflecting these changes in item weight is necessary in several mining applications, such as retail market data analysis and web click stream analysis. In this paper, we introduce the concept of a dynamic weight for each item, and propose an algorithm, DWFPM (dynamic weighted frequent pattern mining), that makes use of this concept. Our algorithm can address situations where the weight (price or significance) of an item varies dynamically. It exploits a pattern growth mining technique to avoid the level-wise candidate set generation-and-test methodology. Furthermore, it requires only one database scan, so it is eligible for use in stream data mining. An extensive performance analysis shows that our algorithm is efficient and scalable for WFP mining using dynamic weights.

  5. Visualizing frequent patterns in large multivariate time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, M.; Marwah, M.; Janetzko, H.; Sharma, R.; Keim, D. A.; Dayal, U.; Patnaik, D.; Ramakrishnan, N.

    2011-01-01

    The detection of previously unknown, frequently occurring patterns in time series, often called motifs, has been recognized as an important task. However, it is difficult to discover and visualize these motifs as their numbers increase, especially in large multivariate time series. To find frequent motifs, we use several temporal data mining and event encoding techniques to cluster and convert a multivariate time series to a sequence of events. Then we quantify the efficiency of the discovered motifs by linking them with a performance metric. To visualize frequent patterns in a large time series with potentially hundreds of nested motifs on a single display, we introduce three novel visual analytics methods: (1) motif layout, using colored rectangles for visualizing the occurrences and hierarchical relationships of motifs in a multivariate time series, (2) motif distortion, for enlarging or shrinking motifs as appropriate for easy analysis and (3) motif merging, to combine a number of identical adjacent motif instances without cluttering the display. Analysts can interactively optimize the degree of distortion and merging to get the best possible view. A specific motif (e.g., the most efficient or least efficient motif) can be quickly detected from a large time series for further investigation. We have applied these methods to two real-world data sets: data center cooling and oil well production. The results provide important new insights into the recurring patterns.

  6. Frequent dieting among adolescents: psychosocial and health behavior correlates.

    PubMed Central

    French, S A; Story, M; Downes, B; Resnick, M D; Blum, R W

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The present study examined correlates of frequent dieting in 33,393 adolescents. It was hypothesized that frequent dieting would be correlated with negative psychosocial and health behavior outcomes. METHODS. A comprehensive, school-based health behavior survey was administered in 1987 to public school students in grades 7 through 12 in Minnesota. Students self-reported dieting behavior; substance use; suicidal, sexual, and delinquent behavior; family and peer concerns; sick days; and abuse history. Differences on psychosocial and health behavior risk factors by dieting frequency and by purging status were assessed with multivariate logistic regression, with body mass index and demographic variables controlled. RESULTS. Dieting frequency was associated with history of binge eating (females: odds ratio [OR] = 1.46, males: OR = 1.53); poor body image (females: OR = 0.56, males: OR = 0.63); lower connectedness to others (females: OR = 0.79); greater alcohol use (females: OR = 1.17); and greater tobacco use (females: OR = 1.08). Purging status was independently associated with negative risk factors in both males and females. CONCLUSIONS. These findings suggest that frequent dieting efforts in adolescents should not be viewed in isolation, but rather in the broader context of health and risk-taking behaviors. PMID:7733431

  7. Qualitative assessment of pica experienced by frequent blood donors.

    PubMed

    Chansky, Melanie C; King, Melissa R; Bialkowski, Walter; Bryant, Barbara J; Kiss, Joseph E; D'Andrea, Pam; Cable, Ritchard G; Spencer, Bryan R; Mast, Alan E

    2017-04-01

    Pica, the compulsive consumption of ice or other nonnutritious substances, is associated with iron deficiency, a common negative consequence of frequent blood donation. Because of this, blood donors, such as those participating in the Strategies to Reduce Iron Deficiency (STRIDE) study, are an ideal population to explore pica and iron deficiency. STRIDE was a 2-year intervention trial to assess the effectiveness of iron supplementation for mitigating iron deficiency in frequent blood donors. Subjects completed baseline and follow-up questionnaires that included questions about pica symptoms. In-depth telephone interviews were conducted with 14 of these subjects reporting pica symptoms and eight presumed controls (casual ice chewers) to gain a deeper understanding of pica symptoms and their impact on daily life and to make a final determination on the presence of pica. Pica was confirmed in five of the 14 subjects reporting symptoms and in two of eight controls. Outcome misclassification based on the questionnaire was attributed to inadequate assessment of several pica symptoms identified during the interview. Comparison of subjects' repeated quantitative iron measurements taken throughout STRIDE with subjects' final adjudicated pica status revealed a positive relationship between development of pica and worsening iron status; the opposite was found in those whose pica symptoms resolved. Continued refinement of pica symptom questions will allow for rapid and accurate detection of pica in frequent blood donors and confirmation of successful treatment with iron supplements. © 2016 AABB.

  8. Osteoporosis is less frequent in endometrial cancer survivors with hypertriglyceridemia.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, Akira; Makita, Kazuya; Akahane, Tomoko; Yamagami, Wataru; Makabe, Takeshi; Yokota, Megumi; Horiba, Yuko; Ogawa, Mariko; Yanamoto, Shigehisa; Deshimaru, Rhota; Tominaga, Eiichiro; Banno, Kouji; Susumu, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported an association between dyslipidemia and endometrial cancers. Osteoporosis is also reported to relate with some cancers. A common etiologic event has been proposed between dyslipidemia and osteoporosis. However, the pattern of interrelationships among dyslipidemia, osteoporosis and endometrial cancer is not well understood. To improve the quality of life of endometrial cancer survivors, these relationships should be determined. This study included 179 Japanese menopausal women who underwent bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, including 114 women with incident endometrial cancer and 65 without endometrial cancer. The women were categorized according to dyslipidemia status. Bone mineral density was measured and compared between groups. Osteoporosis was statistically more frequent in women with hypertriglyceridemia who did not have endometrial cancer. In contrast, osteoporosis was statistically less frequent in women with hypertriglyceridemia who had endometrial cancer. In this cross-sectional study in a Japanese population, osteoporosis was associated with hypertriglyceridemia in post-menopausal women without endometrial cancer, but was less frequent in endometrial cancer survivors with hypertriglyceridemia.

  9. GPS Modernization Update

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Navigation Satellite System ( GNSS ) performance Spectrum Allocation and Sharing Initiatives Fully support the allocation and sharing of spectrum through...reallocation or sharing with IMT • Various US agencies and international GNSS providers share this interest to help protect GPS International Spectrum...domestically, internationally and with Industry to simultaneously protect GNSS services and release spectrum for mobile services GPS Summary

  10. Update on Teacher Absenteeism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Peggy Gordon

    1982-01-01

    Data on teacher absenteeism in the U.S. as a whole as well as in specific states and districts indicate that the problem is serious and growing. A review of research findings on more than 15 factors affecting teacher absenteeism shows that time of year, levels of faculty agreement and community support, teacher interdependence, and requirements…

  11. Update on Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hochstadt, John Webster

    1994-01-01

    Gift planning is increasing in Canada's colleges and universities to offset effects of retrenchment. New annuity vehicles and the emergence of university Crown Foundations offer tax breaks that support private giving to institutions. In addition, a simplified process for gifts is anticipated. (MSE)

  12. BEVALAC operation's update

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Information is given on the operation and improvement of the BEVALAC, and about some of the supporting facilities, such as the electronics pool and a living/working facility at the accelerator. The status is given of an upgraded local injector, five individual beam lines, and the Plastic Ball Detector. (LEW)

  13. Civil Support Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    incorporated into the joint dictionary . The new DODD 3025.1 will supersede the existing version, and the definitions of military support to civil...authorities and military assistance to civil authorities will be eliminated from the joint dictionary . When updated, National Guard Regulation 500-1 will...maps, specific local information).  Recreation and tourism center (source for maps and specific, local information).  Chief medical examiner

  14. Integrated Logistics Support Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-03

    achievable values of logis- for improved supportability tics and R&M parameters Technological Opportunities CONCEPT (LSA Task 204) EXPLORATION o Define...the award will be Manager identifies and defines what logis- based. In contrast, competitive proposals tics considerations should be addressed in...expandable? b. Software (1) Will diagnostic software changes be possible? (2) Will the organizacional structure allow for continuing software update? (3

  15. DOE interpretations Guide to OSH standards. Update to the Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-31

    Reflecting Secretary O`Leary`s focus on occupational safety and health, the Office of Occupational Safety is pleased to provide you with the latest update to the DOE Interpretations Guide to OSH Standards. This Guide was developed in cooperation with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which continued it`s support during this last revision by facilitating access to the interpretations found on the OSHA Computerized Information System (OCIS). This March 31, 1994 update contains 123 formal in letter written by OSHA. As a result of the unique requests received by the 1-800 Response Line, this update also contains 38 interpretations developed by DOE. This new occupational safety and health information adds still more important guidance to the four volume reference set that you presently have in your possession.

  16. DOE interpretations Guide to OSH standards. Update to the Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-31

    Reflecting Secretary O`Leary`s focus on occupational safety and health, the Office of Occupational Safety is pleased to provide you with the latest update to the DOE Interpretations Guide to OSH Standards. This Guide was developed in cooperation with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which continued its support during this last revision by facilitating access to the interpretations found on the OSHA Computerized Information System (OCIS). This March 31, 1994 update contains 123 formal interpretation letters written by OSHA. As a result of the unique requests received by the 1-800 Response Line, this update also contains 38 interpretations developed by DOE. This new occupational safety and health information adds still more important guidance to the four volume reference set that you presently have in your possession.

  17. DOE interpretations Guide to OSH standards. Update to the Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-31

    Reflecting Secretary O`Leary`s focus on occupational safety and health, the Office of Occupational Safety is pleased to provide you with the latest update to the DOE Interpretations Guide to OSH Standards. This Guide was developed in cooperation with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which continued its support during this last revision by facilitating access to the interpretations found on the OSHA Computerized Information System (OCIS). This March 31, 1994 update contains 123 formal interpretation letters written OSHA. As a result of the unique requests received by the 1-800 Response Line, this update also contains 38 interpretations developed by DOE. This new occupational safety and health information adds still more important guidance to the four volume reference set that you presently have in your possession.

  18. Updated Electronic Testbed System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Kevin L.

    2001-01-01

    updated Electronic Testbed System.

  19. VIIP 2017 Clinical Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarver, William

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: NASA's Space Medicine community knowledge regarding the "Vision Impairment Intracranial Pressure", or VIIP.has been evolving over time.. Various measures of occupational health related to this condition had to be determined and then plans/processes put into place. The most robust of these processes were inititated in 2010. This presentation will provide a clinic update of the astronaut occupational health data related to VIIP. METHODS: NASA and its international partners require its astronauts to undergo routine health measures deemed important to monitoring VIIP. The concern is that the spaceflight environment aboard ISS could cause some astronauts to have physiologic changes detrimental to either ongoing mission operations or long-term health related to the ocular system and possibly the CNS. Specific medical tests include but are not limited to brain/orbit MRI (NASA unique protocol), OCT, fundoscopy and ocular ultrasound. Measures are taken prior to spaceflight, in-flight and post-flight. Measures to be reported include incidence of disc edema, globe flattening, choroidal folds, ONSD and change in refractive error. RESULTS: 73 ISS astronauts have been evaluated at least partially for VIIP related measures. Of these individuals, approximately 1 in 7 have experienced disc edema. The prevalence of the other findings is more complicated as the medical testing has changed over time. Overall, 26 separate individuals have experienced at least one of the findings NASA has associated with VIIP Another confounding factor is most of the astronauts have prior spaceflight experience at the time of the "pre-flight" testing. DISCUSSION: In 2010 NASA and its US operating segment (USOS) partners (CSA, ESA and JAXA) began routine occupational monitoring and data collection for most VIIP related changes. Interpretation of that data is extremely challenging for several reasons. For example, the determination of disc edema is the most complete finding as we have had

  20. Data update in a land information network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, Robin C.

    1988-01-01

    The on-going update of data exchanged in a land information network is examined. In the past, major developments have been undertaken to enable the exchange of data between land information systems. A model of a land information network and the data update process have been developed. Based on these, a functional description of the database and software to perform data updating is presented. A prototype of the data update process was implemented using the ARC/INFO geographic information system. This was used to test four approaches to data updating, i.e., bulk, block, incremental, and alert updates. A bulk update is performed by replacing a complete file with an updated file. A block update requires that the data set be partitioned into blocks. When an update occurs, only the blocks which are affected need to be transferred. An incremental update approach records each feature which is added or deleted and transmits only the features needed to update the copy of the file. An alert is a marker indicating that an update has occurred. It can be placed in a file to warn a user that if he is active in an area containing markers, updated data is available. The four approaches have been tested using a cadastral data set.

  1. Saccadic updating of object orientation for grasping movements.

    PubMed

    Selen, L P J; Medendorp, W P

    2011-04-22

    Reach and grasp movements are a fundamental part of our daily interactions with the environment. This spatially-guided behavior is often directed to memorized objects because of intervening eye movements that caused them to disappear from sight. How does the brain store and maintain the spatial representations of objects for future reach and grasp movements? We had subjects (n=8) make reach and two-digit grasp movements to memorized objects, briefly presented before an intervening saccade. Grasp errors, characterizing the spatial representation of object orientation, depended on current gaze position, with and without intervening saccade. This suggests that the orientation information of the object is coded and updated relative to gaze during intervening saccades, and that the grasp errors arose after the updating stage, during the later transformations involved in grasping. The pattern of reach errors also revealed a gaze-centered updating of object location, consistent with previous literature on updating of single-point targets. Furthermore, grasp and reach errors correlated strongly, but their relationship had a non-unity slope, which may suggest that the gaze-centered spatial updates were made in separate channels. Finally, the errors of the two digits were strongly correlated, supporting the notion that these were not controlled independently to form the grip in these experimental conditions. Taken together, our results suggest that the visuomotor system dynamically represents the short-term memory of location and orientation information for reach-and-grasp movements.

  2. Finite element modelling and updating of a lively footbridge: The complete process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Živanović, Stana; Pavic, Aleksandar; Reynolds, Paul

    2007-03-01

    The finite element (FE) model updating technology was originally developed in the aerospace and mechanical engineering disciplines to automatically update numerical models of structures to match their experimentally measured counterparts. The process of updating identifies the drawbacks in the FE modelling and the updated FE model could be used to produce more reliable results in further dynamic analysis. In the last decade, the updating technology has been introduced into civil structural engineering. It can serve as an advanced tool for getting reliable modal properties of large structures. The updating process has four key phases: initial FE modelling, modal testing, manual model tuning and automatic updating (conducted using specialist software). However, the published literature does not connect well these phases, although this is crucial when implementing the updating technology. This paper therefore aims to clarify the importance of this linking and to describe the complete model updating process as applicable in civil structural engineering. The complete process consisting the four phases is outlined and brief theory is presented as appropriate. Then, the procedure is implemented on a lively steel box girder footbridge. It was found that even a very detailed initial FE model underestimated the natural frequencies of all seven experimentally identified modes of vibration, with the maximum error being almost 30%. Manual FE model tuning by trial and error found that flexible supports in the longitudinal direction should be introduced at the girder ends to improve correlation between the measured and FE-calculated modes. This significantly reduced the maximum frequency error to only 4%. It was demonstrated that only then could the FE model be automatically updated in a meaningful way. The automatic updating was successfully conducted by updating 22 uncertain structural parameters. Finally, a physical interpretation of all parameter changes is discussed. This

  3. Mapping the functional landscape of frequent phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) genotypes promotes personalised medicine in phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Danecka, Marta K; Woidy, Mathias; Zschocke, Johannes; Feillet, François; Muntau, Ania C; Gersting, Søren W

    2015-03-01

    In phenylketonuria, genetic heterogeneity, frequent compound heterozygosity, and the lack of functional data for phenylalanine hydroxylase genotypes hamper reliable phenotype prediction and individualised treatment. A literature search revealed 690 different phenylalanine hydroxylase genotypes in 3066 phenylketonuria patients from Europe and the Middle East. We determined phenylalanine hydroxylase function of 30 frequent homozygous and compound heterozygous genotypes covering 55% of the study population, generated activity landscapes, and assessed the phenylalanine hydroxylase working range in the metabolic (phenylalanine) and therapeutic (tetrahydrobiopterin) space. Shared patterns in genotype-specific functional landscapes were linked to biochemical and pharmacological phenotypes, where (1) residual activity below 3.5% was associated with classical phenylketonuria unresponsive to pharmacological treatment; (2) lack of defined peak activity induced loss of response to tetrahydrobiopterin; (3) a higher cofactor need was linked to inconsistent clinical phenotypes and low rates of tetrahydrobiopterin response; and (4) residual activity above 5%, a defined peak of activity, and a normal cofactor need were associated with pharmacologically treatable mild phenotypes. In addition, we provide a web application for retrieving country-specific information on genotypes and genotype-specific phenylalanine hydroxylase function that warrants continuous extension, updates, and research on demand. The combination of genotype-specific functional analyses with biochemical, clinical, and therapeutic data of individual patients may serve as a powerful tool to enable phenotype prediction and to establish personalised medicine strategies for dietary regimens and pharmacological treatment in phenylketonuria. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. UCbase 2.0: ultraconserved sequences database (2014 update)

    PubMed Central

    Lomonaco, Vincenzo; Martoglia, Riccardo; Mandreoli, Federica; Anderlucci, Laura; Emmett, Warren; Bicciato, Silvio; Taccioli, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    UCbase 2.0 (http://ucbase.unimore.it) is an update, extension and evolution of UCbase, a Web tool dedicated to the analysis of ultraconserved sequences (UCRs). UCRs are 481 sequences >200 bases sharing 100% identity among human, mouse and rat genomes. They are frequently located in genomic regions known to be involved in cancer or differentially expressed in human leukemias and carcinomas. UCbase 2.0 is a platform-independent Web resource that includes the updated version of the human genome annotation (hg19), information linking disorders to chromosomal coordinates based on the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine classification, a query tool to search for Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and a new text box to directly interrogate the database using a MySQL interface. To facilitate the interactive visual interpretation of UCR chromosomal positioning, UCbase 2.0 now includes a graph visualization interface directly linked to UCSC genome browser. Database URL: http://ucbase.unimore.it PMID:24951797

  5. A last updating evolution model for online social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Zhan; Xia, Zhengyou; Wang, Jiandong; Zhang, Chengcui

    2013-05-01

    As information technology has advanced, people are turning to electronic media more frequently for communication, and social relationships are increasingly found on online channels. However, there is very limited knowledge about the actual evolution of the online social networks. In this paper, we propose and study a novel evolution network model with the new concept of “last updating time”, which exists in many real-life online social networks. The last updating evolution network model can maintain the robustness of scale-free networks and can improve the network reliance against intentional attacks. What is more, we also found that it has the “small-world effect”, which is the inherent property of most social networks. Simulation experiment based on this model show that the results and the real-life data are consistent, which means that our model is valid.

  6. Pertussis immunization: an update

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Lon G

    1997-01-01

    A segment of chiropractic has historically opposed the practice of immunization. This opposition has been based on historical and philosophical precedent, but with little support from the scientific literature. Pertussis immunization has successfully controlled a disease with a prior history of high childhood morbidity. An evaluation of the literature fails to find supporting evidence that whole-cell pertussis vaccine causes SIDS, asthma, or encephalopathy. Countries who discontinued pertussis immunization experienced a return of the disease, and in every case pertussis immunization has been reinstated. The recent successful clinical trials and subsequent approval of an acellular pertussis vaccine should reduce the local reactions and discomfort sometimes experienced with the whole-cell product. In view of the considerable scientific evidence for the desirability and efficacy of pertussis immunization, chiropractic should encourage patient participation in this worthwhile public health service.

  7. MU-SPIN Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, James, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Current goals are to: (1) Strengthen the science and engineering capabilities of MU-SPIN institutions in research and education via computer networks; (2) Involve and prepare minority institutions and principal investigators to successfully participate in competitive research and education processes via computer networks; and (3) Develop training and education mechanisms to support, sustain and evolve the institutional network infrastructure, thereby generating a better, prepared pool of candidates to contribute to NASA's missions.

  8. Mycotoxin analysis: an update.

    PubMed

    Krska, Rudolf; Schubert-Ullrich, Patricia; Molinelli, Alexandra; Sulyok, Michael; MacDonald, Susan; Crews, Colin

    2008-02-01

    Mycotoxin contamination of cereals and related products used for feed can cause intoxication, especially in farm animals. Therefore, efficient analytical tools for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of toxic fungal metabolites in feed are required. Current methods usually include an extraction step, a clean-up step to reduce or eliminate unwanted co-extracted matrix components and a separation step with suitably specific detection ability. Quantitative methods of analysis for most mycotoxins use immunoaffinity clean-up with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation in combination with UV and/or fluorescence detection. Screening of samples contaminated with mycotoxins is frequently performed by thin layer chromatography (TLC), which yields qualitative or semi-quantitative results. Nowadays, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) are often used for rapid screening. A number of promising methods, such as fluorescence polarization immunoassays, dipsticks, and even newer methods such as biosensors and non-invasive techniques based on infrared spectroscopy, have shown great potential for mycotoxin analysis. Currently, there is a strong trend towards the use of multi-mycotoxin methods for the simultaneous analysis of several of the important Fusarium mycotoxins, which is best achieved by LC-MS/MS (liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry). This review focuses on recent developments in the determination of mycotoxins with a special emphasis on LC-MS/MS and emerging rapid methods.

  9. Rett Syndrome -- an update.

    PubMed

    Jellinger, K A

    2003-06-01

    Rett syndrome is a progressive, usually sporadic and rarely familial, disabling neurodevelopmental disorder with onset in early childhood presenting clinically with mental retardation, behavioral changes, late movement disturbances, loss of speech and hand skills, ataxia, apraxia, irregular breathing with hyperventilation while awake, and frequent seizures. It occurs almost exclusively in females with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 10-22000 births and is considered a manifestation of defective brain maturation caused by dominant mutation of the MeCP2 gene encoding the transcriptional repressor methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 related to the Xq28 locus. Although many different mutations of this protein are being studied in humans and in mice, the molecular pathogenesis of this disorder remains unclear. Electroencephalography is abnormal in the final stages of the syndrome. Neuroimaging showing brain atrophy may be required for differential diagnosis that includes neurodegenerative and metabolic disorders. Neuropathology shows decreased brain growth and reduced size of individual neurons, with thinned dendrites in some cortical layers and abnormalities in substantia nigra (decreased neuromelanin content), suggestive of deficient synaptogenic development, probably starting before birth. Neurometabolic changes include reduced levels of dopamine, serotonin, noradrenalin, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), nerve growth factors, endorphines, glutamate, and other amino acids and their receptor levels in brain. Current treatment includes symptomatic, anticonvulsive and physiotherapy.

  10. Tourette Syndrome: Update

    PubMed Central

    HALLETT, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome is a disorder characterized by tics. It typically begins in childhood and often improves in adult life. Tics are best described as voluntary movements made automatically so that volition is not ordinarily appreciated. There is frequently an urge, sometimes in the form of a specific sensory feeling (sensory tic), that precedes the tic. Patients say that they make the tic in order to reduce the urge, although shortly after the tic, the urge recurs. The sensory feeling may arise due to defective sensory habituation. Since tics relieve the urge, this can be considered rewarding, and repetition of this behavior may perpetuate the tic as a habit. Tourette Syndrome affects boys more than girls and is associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder. Although Tourette Syndrome often appears to be autosomal recessive in inheritance, it has been difficult to find any abnormal genes. There is a loss of inhibition in these patients and recent studies show abnormalities in brain GABA. Certainly there is also an abnormality in dopamine function and dopamine blocking agents are effective therapy. In severe drug-refractory patients, deep brain stimulation can be effective. PMID:25604739

  11. Immunology Update: New Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Starr, S Paul

    2016-11-01

    A new 9-valent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is effective against more cancer-causing HPV types than previous vaccines. HPV vaccine series started with previous vaccines can be completed with the 9-valent vaccine. Two new influenza vaccines are available for adults 65 years and older: a high-dose vaccine and an enhanced adjuvant vaccine. These elicit stronger antibody responses than standard-dose vaccines. Current guidelines specify no preference for the new versus standard-dose vaccines. Two new group B meningococcal vaccines are intended for use during outbreaks and for patients with asplenia, complement deficiencies, frequent occupational meningococcus exposure, or for patients who desire protection from type B meningococcus. These are not substitutes for the quadrivalent vaccine already in use. For pneumococcus, new recommendations state that 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) should be administered to patients 65 years and older, followed at least 1 year later by the polyvalent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23). For patients ages 19 to 64 years with immunocompromise and not previously vaccinated against pneumococcus, administration of these two vaccines should be separated by at least 8 weeks. Rotavirus vaccine is standard for infants at age 2 months. Also, there is a new cholera vaccine approved for use in the United States. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  12. [An update on measles].

    PubMed

    Caseris, M; Burdet, C; Lepeule, R; Houhou, N; Yeni, P; Yazdanpanah, Y; Joly, V

    2015-05-01

    Measles is a highly contagious infectious disease, which needs more than 95% worldwide vaccination coverage of 2 doses to be eradicated. Despite an important involvement of the WHO for massive immunization, goals have not bean reached, and outbreaks can occur at any time in many countries, including Western Europe. In France, 22,000 cases were identified between 2009 and 2011, mainly in infants and young adults, which are not or not enough vaccinated (one dose). In 2012, even though the number of cases has drastically decreased, the outbreak is still going on, especially in South of France. That is why every clinician needs to be concerned about the clinical manifestations of the disease, and its complications. Besides a febrile rash, measles is often responsible of pneumonia and biologic hepatitis in adults. Hepatitis does not seem frequent in children. Clinicians need to be aware of specific complications, like encephalitis in case of cellular immunodepression, high risk of pneumonia in pregnant women. In patients previously vaccinated, incidence of complications is the same but patients are not contagious. Even if measles diagnosis is clinical, blood confirmation by serology is recommended in France when possible. Outcome is mainly favourable, but measles is not well-tolerated with high levels of hospitalisation even without any complication. Vaccination is the only way to protect against it.

  13. Tourette Syndrome: Update.

    PubMed

    Hallett, Mark

    2015-08-01

    Tourette Syndrome is a disorder characterized by tics. It typically begins in childhood and often improves in adult life. Tics are best described as voluntary movements made automatically so that volition is not ordinarily appreciated. There is frequently an urge, sometimes in the form of a specific sensory feeling (sensory tic), that precedes the tic. Patients say that they make the tic in order to reduce the urge, although shortly after the tic, the urge recurs. The sensory feeling may arise due to defective sensory habituation. Since tics relieve the urge, this can be considered rewarding, and repetition of this behavior may perpetuate the tic as a habit. Tourette Syndrome affects boys more than girls and is associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder. Although Tourette Syndrome often appears to be autosomal recessive in inheritance, it has been difficult to find any abnormal genes. There is a loss of inhibition in these patients and recent studies show abnormalities in brain GABA. Certainly there is also an abnormality in dopamine function and dopamine blocking agents are effective therapy. In severe drug-refractory patients, deep brain stimulation can be effective. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Meningomylocele: An update

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, R.; Agrawal, S.

    2007-01-01

    Therapy-resistant overactivity of detrusor or small capacity and poor compliance, will usually need to be treated by bladder augmentation. Ileal or colonic patches are used frequently for augmenting the bladder, with either intestinal segment appearing to be equally useful. Stomach is rarely used because of the associated complications, but it is the only available intestinal segment for patients with impaired renal function. Concerns regarding long-term effects of associated metabolic acidosis, including abnormalities in linear growth and bone metabolism are misplaced. Ureterocystoplasty offers an attractive urothelium-preserving alternative, avoiding the metabolic complications, mucus production and cancer risk of heterotopic epithelium associated with enterocystoplasty. Though ideal for patients with dilated ureter and nonfunctioning kidney, in patients with functioning kidney it carries added risks associated with transuretero-ureterostomy, mainly obstruction. Ureteral dilatation in meningomyelocele patients is avoidable with proper follow-up and treatment. Therefore they rarely should be candidates for this operation. Alternative urothelium-preserving techniques, such as auto augmentation and seromuscular cystoplasty, have not proven to be as successful as standard augmentation with intestinal segment. Work is in progress on various bioengineering techniques to culture and combine bladder cells in tissue culture for regeneration. Early efforts are exciting, but preliminary. PMID:19675798

  15. Update on local allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Altıntoprak, Niyazi; Kar, Murat; Bayar Muluk, Nuray; Oktemer, Tugba; Ipci, Kagan; Birdane, Leman; Aricigil, Mitat; Senturk, Mehmet; Bafaqeeh, Sameer Ali; Cingi, Cemal

    2016-08-01

    We here provide an update on the literature regarding local allergic rhinitis (LAR). In reviewing LAR, we have included an updated definition, classifications, mechanisms, comorbidities, and recommendations for diagnosis and treatment for LAR, as well as the defined research areas for future evidence-based studies. LAR is a localised nasal allergic response in the absence of systemic atopy characterised by local production of specific IgE (sIgE) antibodies, a TH2 pattern of mucosal cell infiltration during natural exposure to aeroallergens, and a positive nasal allergen provocation test response, with the release of inflammatory mediators. The localised allergic response of LAR is an important topic for the study of allergies. This review provides an update on the current knowledge of LAR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Kennedy Space Center Director Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Community leaders, business executives, educators, and state and local government leaders were updated on NASA Kennedy Space Center programs and accomplishments during Center Director Bob Cabana’s Center Director Update at the Debus Center at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. An attendee talks with Trent Smith, program manager, and Tammy Belk, a program specialist, at the ISS Ground Processing and Research Office display. Attendees talked with Cabana and other senior Kennedy managers and visited displays featuring updates on Kennedy programs and projects, including International Space Station, Commercial Crew, Ground System Development and Operations, Launch Services, Center Planning and Development, Technology, KSC Swamp Works and NASA Education. The morning concluded with a tour of the new Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit at the visitor complex. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

  17. Kennedy Space Center Director Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Community leaders, business executives, educators, and state and local government leaders were updated on NASA Kennedy Space Center programs and accomplishments during KSC Center Director Bob Cabana’s Center Director Update at the Debus Center at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Attendees talked with Cabana and other senior Kennedy managers and visited displays featuring updates on Kennedy programs and projects, including International Space Station, Commercial Crew, Ground System Development and Operations, Launch Services, Center Planning and Development, Technology, KSC Swamp Works and NASA Education. The morning concluded with a tour of the new Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit at the visitor complex. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

  18. Kennedy Space Center Director Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Community leaders, business executives, educators, and state and local government leaders were updated on NASA Kennedy Space Center programs and accomplishments during Center Director Bob Cabana’s Center Director Update at the Debus Center at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Attendees talked with Cabana and other senior Kennedy managers and visited displays featuring updates on Kennedy programs and projects, including International Space Station, Commercial Crew, Ground System Development and Operations, Launch Services, Center Planning and Development, Technology, KSC Swamp Works and NASA Education. The morning concluded with a tour of the new Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit at the visitor complex. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

  19. Kennedy Space Center Director Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Community leaders, business executives, educators, and state and local government leaders were updated on NASA Kennedy Space Center programs and accomplishments during Center Director Bob Cabana’s Center Director Update at the Debus Center at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Rob Mueller, a senior technologist, talks to an attendee about Kennedy’s Swamp Works Laboratory. Attendees talked with Cabana and other senior Kennedy managers and visited displays featuring updates on Kennedy programs and projects, including International Space Station, Commercial Crew, Ground System Development and Operations, Launch Services, Center Planning and Development, Technology, KSC Swamp Works and NASA Education. The morning concluded with a tour of the new Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit at the visitor complex. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

  20. Kennedy Space Center Director Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Community leaders, business executives, educators, and state and local government leaders were updated on NASA Kennedy Space Center programs and accomplishments during Center Director Bob Cabana’s Center Director Update at the Debus Center at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Rob Mueller, senior technologist, talks with attendees at the Swamp Works display. Attendees talked with Cabana and other senior Kennedy managers and visited displays featuring updates on Kennedy programs and projects, including International Space Station, Commercial Crew, Ground System Development and Operations, Launch Services, Center Planning and Development, Technology, KSC Swamp Works and NASA Education. The morning concluded with a tour of the new Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit at the visitor complex. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper