Science.gov

Sample records for supporting frequent updates

  1. Content-Aware DataGuide with Incremental Index Update using Frequently Used Paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A. K.; Duhan, Neelam; Khattar, Priyanka

    2010-11-01

    Size of the WWW is increasing day by day. Due to the absence of structured data on the Web, it becomes very difficult for information retrieval tools to fully utilize the Web information. As a solution to this problem, XML pages come into play, which provide structural information to the users to some extent. Without efficient indexes, query processing can be quite inefficient due to an exhaustive traversal on XML data. In this paper an improved content-centric approach of Content-Aware DataGuide, which is an indexing technique for XML databases, is being proposed that uses frequently used paths from historical query logs to improve query performance. The index can be updated incrementally according to the changes in query workload and thus, the overhead of reconstruction can be minimized. Frequently used paths are extracted using any Sequential Pattern mining algorithm on subsequent queries in the query workload. After this, the data structures are incrementally updated. This indexing technique proves to be efficient as partial matching queries can be executed efficiently and users can now get the more relevant documents in results.

  2. Research Supports Value of Updated School Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielding, Randall

    2012-01-01

    Two recent peer-reviewed studies support the need to update the traditional school design model that has remained fundamentally unchanged for over a century. In a 2011 study published by the American Educational Research Journal, entitled "Problem-Based Learning in K-12 Education," Clarice Wirkala and Deanna Kuhn document a 200-500 percent…

  3. [Glossary of bioethics terms frequently used in nutrition support].

    PubMed

    Moreno Villares, J M; Alvarez Hernández, J; Wanden-Berghe Lozano, C; Lozano Fuster, M

    2010-01-01

    Bioethical decisions are present in every clinical decision. Nutrition support participates the same situation. Feeding critically ill patients, etriminal patients or in permanent vegetative status is almost always involved in bioethical dilemmas. A common problem is the confusion in concepts regarding bioethics. This lack of uniformity does not help in the deliberation process. From the Working Group in Bioethics of the Spanish Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Support (SENPE) it has been considered to gather the commonest terms used in our academic area. Each term is accompanied by a definition, a description or a commentary related to its main application.

  4. Rhinocerebral zygomycosis: an increasingly frequent challenge: update and favorable outcomes in two cases.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammed N; Cohen, Donald M; Celestina, Leslie J; Ojha, Junu; Claudio, Reinaldo; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel B

    2007-11-01

    Zygomycosis or mucormycosis is an increasingly frequent life-threatening infection caused by opportunistic fungal organisms of the class Zygomycetes. The pathognomonic feature is the presence of invasive aseptate mycelia that are larger than other filamentous fungi with the hyphae exhibiting right angle and haphazard branching. Usually classified as rhinocerebral, disseminated, and cutaneous types, this classification serves as important predictor of pathogenesis and outcome. These occur mostly in immunosuppressed patients including individuals with diabetes (43% exhibit the rhino-cerebral form) and patients with organ transplants and hematologic malignancies. Without early aggressive treatment, the disease follows a dismal and fatal course. The prognosis has not shown any appreciable change in the past 40 years with a stagnant mortality rate of 44%. We present 2 cases of rhinocerebral zygomycosis (RCZ), in a 58-year-old male and a 63-year-old female; both were poorly controlled diabetic patients with maxillary lesions suggestive of osteomyelitis. The patients were leading a near normal life with minimal discomfort or signs and symptoms of underlying mycosis. Most of the health care professionals treating these patients often overlooked the disease or recommended inadequate therapy. Despite long delays and inadequate initial therapy these patients survived with little outward morbidity. The prognosis for this condition may therefore be considered less dire than previously thought.

  5. Drug Free Communities Support Program. Prevention Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Administered by the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), in partnership with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the Drug Free Communities Support Program (DFC) is a federal grant program that provides funding to community-based coalitions that organize to prevent youth substance use. Since the…

  6. A Use Case to Support Precision Medicine for Frequently Hospitalized Older Adults with Polypharmacy

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Manuel; Finkelstein, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Polypharmacy in older adults results in multiple negative clinical consequences including increased risk of hospital readmissions. Precision medicine may provide tools to optimize complex medication regimens however its potential in older adults with polypharmacy is unknown. We carried out pharmacogenetic testing in an older adult with multiple chronic conditions and polypharmacy who was concerned about frequent readmissions despite receiving guideline-concordant care and being adherent to medication regimen. The testing identified patients’ CYP2D6 rapid metabolizer status. This may have resulted in decreased exposure to Carvedilol which was primary drug for CHF management in this patient. Additional nine drug-drug interactions were identified during personalized drug regimen review. We concluded that, though precision medicine has enormous potential in older adults with polypharmacy, the complexity of pharmacogenetic information requires innovative informatics solutions to support optimal workflows, decision support, and medication optimization and management in order to fully utilize its potential in routine clinical care. PMID:27570642

  7. A Use Case to Support Precision Medicine for Frequently Hospitalized Older Adults with Polypharmacy.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Manuel; Finkelstein, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Polypharmacy in older adults results in multiple negative clinical consequences including increased risk of hospital readmissions. Precision medicine may provide tools to optimize complex medication regimens however its potential in older adults with polypharmacy is unknown. We carried out pharmacogenetic testing in an older adult with multiple chronic conditions and polypharmacy who was concerned about frequent readmissions despite receiving guideline-concordant care and being adherent to medication regimen. The testing identified patients' CYP2D6 rapid metabolizer status. This may have resulted in decreased exposure to Carvedilol which was primary drug for CHF management in this patient. Additional nine drug-drug interactions were identified during personalized drug regimen review. We concluded that, though precision medicine has enormous potential in older adults with polypharmacy, the complexity of pharmacogenetic information requires innovative informatics solutions to support optimal workflows, decision support, and medication optimization and management in order to fully utilize its potential in routine clinical care. PMID:27570642

  8. A Use Case to Support Precision Medicine for Frequently Hospitalized Older Adults with Polypharmacy.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Manuel; Finkelstein, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Polypharmacy in older adults results in multiple negative clinical consequences including increased risk of hospital readmissions. Precision medicine may provide tools to optimize complex medication regimens however its potential in older adults with polypharmacy is unknown. We carried out pharmacogenetic testing in an older adult with multiple chronic conditions and polypharmacy who was concerned about frequent readmissions despite receiving guideline-concordant care and being adherent to medication regimen. The testing identified patients' CYP2D6 rapid metabolizer status. This may have resulted in decreased exposure to Carvedilol which was primary drug for CHF management in this patient. Additional nine drug-drug interactions were identified during personalized drug regimen review. We concluded that, though precision medicine has enormous potential in older adults with polypharmacy, the complexity of pharmacogenetic information requires innovative informatics solutions to support optimal workflows, decision support, and medication optimization and management in order to fully utilize its potential in routine clinical care.

  9. Advanced integrated life support system update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitley, Phillip E.

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Integrated Life Support System Program (AILSS) is an advanced development effort to integrate the life support and protection requirements using the U.S. Navy's fighter/attack mission as a starting point. The goal of AILSS is to optimally mate protection from altitude, acceleration, chemical/biological agent, thermal environment (hot, cold, and cold water immersion) stress as well as mission enhancement through improved restraint, night vision, and head-mounted reticules and displays to ensure mission capability. The primary emphasis to date has been to establish garment design requirements and tradeoffs for protection. Here the garment and the human interface are treated as a system. Twelve state-off-the-art concepts from government and industry were evaluated for design versus performance. On the basis of a combination of centrifuge, thermal manikin data, thermal modeling, and mobility studies, some key design parameters have been determined. Future efforts will concentrate on the integration of protection through garment design and the use of a single layer, multiple function concept to streamline the garment system.

  10. 7. Mentor update and support: what do mentors need from an update?

    PubMed

    Phillips, Mari; Marshall, Joyce

    2015-04-01

    Mentorship is the 14th series of 'Midwifery basics' targeted at practising midwives. The aim of these articles is to provide information to raise awareness of the impact of the work of midwives on women's experience, and encourage midwives to seek further information through a series of activities relating to the topic. In this seventh article Mari Phillips and Joyce Marshall consider some of the key issues related to mentor update and support and consider what mentors need from their annual update. PMID:26328467

  11. In Support of Constructivism: Utilizing Rational, Moral and Communicative Frameworks To Address Frequently Posited Criticisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luppicini, Rocci; Schnackenberg, Heidi

    The goal of this paper is to demonstrate how Constructivism in education has failed to address criticisms by re-directing or misdirecting the focus of the debate over whether or not Constructivism is able to give support to a viable theory of instruction. In response, support is given to Constructivism by drawing on rational, moral, and…

  12. LANDFIRE 2010 - updated data to support wildfire and ecological management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Kurtis J.; Connot, Joel A.; Peterson, Birgit E.; Picotte, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    Wildfire is a global phenomenon that affects human populations and ecosystems. Wildfire effects occur at local to global scales impacting many people in different ways (Figure 1). Ecological concerns due to land use, fragmentation, and climate change impact natural resource use, allocation, and conservation. Access to consistent and current environmental data is a constant challenge, yet necessary for understanding the complexities of wildfire and ecological management. Data products and tools from the LANDFIRE Program help decision-makers to clarify problems and identify possible solutions when managing fires and natural resources. LANDFIRE supports the reduction of risk from wildfire to human lives and property, monitoring of fire danger, prediction of fire behavior on active incidents, and assessment of fire severity and impacts on natural systems [1] [2] [3]. LANDFIRE products are unique in that they are nationally consistent and provide the only complete geospatial dataset describing vegetation and wildland fuel information for the entire U.S. As such, LANDFIRE data are useful for many ecological applications [3]. For example, LANDFIRE data were recently integrated into a decision-support system for resource management and conservation decision-making along the Appalachian Trail. LANDFIRE is a joint effort between the U.S. Department of the Interior Office of Wildland Fire, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service Fire & Aviation Management, and The Nature Conservancy. To date, seven versions of LANDFIRE data have been released, with each successive version improving the quality of the data, adding additional features, and/or updating the time period represented by the data. The latest version, LANDFIRE 2010 (LF 2010), released mid-2013, represents circa 2010 landscape conditions and succeeds LANDFIRE 2008 (LF 2008), which represented circa 2008 landscape conditions. LF 2010 used many of the same processes developed for the LF 2008 effort [3]. Ongoing

  13. Automatically updating predictive modeling workflows support decision-making in drug design.

    PubMed

    Muegge, Ingo; Bentzien, Jörg; Mukherjee, Prasenjit; Hughes, Robert O

    2016-09-01

    Using predictive models for early decision-making in drug discovery has become standard practice. We suggest that model building needs to be automated with minimum input and low technical maintenance requirements. Models perform best when tailored to answering specific compound optimization related questions. If qualitative answers are required, 2-bin classification models are preferred. Integrating predictive modeling results with structural information stimulates better decision making. For in silico models supporting rapid structure-activity relationship cycles the performance deteriorates within weeks. Frequent automated updates of predictive models ensure best predictions. Consensus between multiple modeling approaches increases the prediction confidence. Combining qualified and nonqualified data optimally uses all available information. Dose predictions provide a holistic alternative to multiple individual property predictions for reaching complex decisions.

  14. Automatically updating predictive modeling workflows support decision-making in drug design.

    PubMed

    Muegge, Ingo; Bentzien, Jörg; Mukherjee, Prasenjit; Hughes, Robert O

    2016-09-01

    Using predictive models for early decision-making in drug discovery has become standard practice. We suggest that model building needs to be automated with minimum input and low technical maintenance requirements. Models perform best when tailored to answering specific compound optimization related questions. If qualitative answers are required, 2-bin classification models are preferred. Integrating predictive modeling results with structural information stimulates better decision making. For in silico models supporting rapid structure-activity relationship cycles the performance deteriorates within weeks. Frequent automated updates of predictive models ensure best predictions. Consensus between multiple modeling approaches increases the prediction confidence. Combining qualified and nonqualified data optimally uses all available information. Dose predictions provide a holistic alternative to multiple individual property predictions for reaching complex decisions. PMID:27584594

  15. An Update on NiCE Support for BISON

    SciTech Connect

    McCaskey, Alex; Billings, Jay Jay; Deyton, Jordan H.; Wojtowicz, Anna

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation program (NEAMS) from the Department of Energy s Office of Nuclear Energy has funded the development of a modeling and simulation workflow environment to support the various codes in its nuclear energy scientific computing toolkit. This NEAMS Integrated Computational Environment (NiCE) provides extensible tools and services that enable efficient code execution, input generation, pre-processing visualizations, and post-simulation data analysis and visualization for a large portion of the NEAMS Toolkit. A strong focus for the NiCE development team throughout FY 2015 has been support for the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) and the NEAMS nuclear fuel performance modeling application built on that environment, BISON. There is a strong desire in the program to enable and facilitate the use of BISON throughout nuclear energy research and industry. A primary result of this desire is the need for strong support for BISON in NiCE. This report will detail improvements to NiCE support for BISON. We will present a new and improved interface for interacting with BISON simulations in a variety of ways: (1) improved input model generation, (2) embedded mesh and solution data visualizations, and (3) local and remote BISON simulation launch. We will also show how NiCE has been extended to provide support for BISON code development.

  16. Update on Activities of CEOS Disaster Management Support Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, H. M.; Lauritson, L.

    The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) Disaster Management Support Group (DMSG) has supported natural and technological disaster management on a worldwide basis by fostering improved utilization of existing and planned Earth Observation (EO) satellite data. The DMSG has focused on developing and refining recommendations for the application of satellite data to selected hazard areas--drought, earthquake, fire, flood, ice, landslide, oil spill, and volcanic hazards. Particular emphasis was placed on working closely with space agencies, international and regional organizations, and commercial organizations on the implementation of these recommendations. The DMSG is in its last year with its primary focus on documenting its work and migrating on going activities to other fora. With over 300 participants from more than 140 organizations, the DMSG has found strong support among CEOS space agencies and the Integrated Global Observing Strategy (IGOS), as well as an enthusiastic reception from numerous international, regional, and national emergency managers, and distinct interest from the commercial sector. In addition, the group has worked to give full support to the work of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS) in pursuit of decisions taken at UNISPACE III and the United Nations International Strategy on Disaster Reduction (ISDR). In conjunction with the IGOS, several of the DMSG hazards teams (earthquake, landslide, and solid Earth dimensions of volcanoes) are joining in the effort to develop an IGOS Geohazards theme team. Cooperation efforts with organizations such as IGOS, COPUOS, and ISDR will hopefully lead to the pick up of much of the on going DMSG activities. Since the inception of this ad hoc working group and its predecessor project, the DMSG has developed and refined recommendations for the application of satellite data by bringing together experts from eight hazard areas to identify user needs, as well as

  17. Empirical evidence supporting frequent cryptic speciation in epiphyllous liverworts: a case study of the Cololejeunea lanciloba complex.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Heinrichs, Jochen; Zhu, Rui-Liang; Schneider, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Cryptic species are frequently recovered in plant lineages, and considered an important cause for divergent of morphological disparity and species diversity. The identification of cryptic species has important implications for the assessment of conservation needs of species aggregates. The mechanisms and processes of the origin of cryptic species diversity are still poorly understand based on the lack of studies especially in context of environment factors. Here we explored evidence for cryptic species within the epiphyllous liverworts Cololejeunea lanciloba complex based on two loci, the plastid trnL-F region and the nuclear ribosomal ITS region. Several analytic approaches were employed to delimit species based on DNA sequence variation including phylogenetic reconstruction, statistical parsimony networks analysis and two recently introduced species delimitation criteria: Rosenberg's reciprocal monophyly and Rodrigo's randomly distinct. We found evidence for thirteen genetically distinct putative species, each consisting of more than one haplotype, rather than four morphologically-circumscribed species. The results implied that the highly conserved phenotypes are not congruent with the genetic differentiation, contributing to incorrect assessments of the biodiversity of epiphyllous liverworts. We hypothesize that evolution of cryptic species recovered may be caused by selection of traits critical to the survival in epiphyllous habitats combined with limited developmental options designed in the small body.

  18. Updates and Overview of Spaceflight Medical Support in Russia and Kazakhstan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chough, Natacha; Pattarini, James; Cole, Richard; Patlach, Robert; Menon, Anil

    2017-01-01

    This panel presents recent updates to and a comprehensive overview of the operational medical support provided to ISS crewmembers in Star City, Russia and Kazakhstan as part of UTMB/KBRwyle's Human Health & Performance contract. With the current Soyuz training flow, physician support is required for nominal training evolutions involving pressure changes or other potential physical risks detailed in this presentation. In addition, full-time physician presence in Star City helps to address the disparity in access to health care in these relatively remote practice areas, while also developing and maintaining relationships with host nation resources. A unique part of standard training in Russia also involves survival training in both winter and water environments; logistic details and medical impacts of each of these training scenarios will be discussed. Following support of a successful training flow, UTMB/KBRwyle's Star City Medical Support Group (SCMSG) is also responsible for configuring medical packs in support of Soyuz launches and landings; we will present the rationale for current pack contents within the context of specific operational needs. With respect to contingency events, the group will describe their preparedness to respond appropriately by activating both local and global resources as necessary, detailing a specialized subset of the group who continually work and update these assets, given changes in international infrastructure and other impacts.

  19. Medical support of the Sinai Multinational Force and Observers: an update, 2001.

    PubMed

    Rowe, John R

    2003-02-01

    The Multinational Force and Observers is an 11-nation coalition force with the mission of peacekeeping in the Sinai. It commenced operations in 1982 and continues today after two decades of successful enforcement of the 1979 Egyptian-Israeli Treaty of Peace. The fielding of a medical support team for this mission was the first effort of its kind for the U.S. Army Medical Department, resulting in a uniquely organized medical unit. A U.S. Army physician heads the medical team, which includes nine other physicians from six different countries. The team provides health care for the 2,500-person coalition in the remote Sinai desert. This writing compares earlier medical support with that of August 2000 through July 2001 and describes medical conditions and problems encountered during the 12-month tour of duty. This article updates two previous articles on the subject published in Military Medicine in 1983 and 1991. PMID:12636137

  20. An Update on Improvements to NiCE Support for RELAP-7

    SciTech Connect

    McCaskey, Alex; Wojtowicz, Anna; Deyton, Jordan H.; Patterson, Taylor C.; Billings, Jay Jay

    2015-01-01

    The Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) is a framework that facilitates the development of applications that rely on finite-element analysis to solve a coupled, nonlinear system of partial differential equations. RELAP-7 represents an update to the venerable RELAP-5 simulator that is built upon this framework and attempts to model the balance-of-plant concerns in a full nuclear plant. This report details the continued support and integration of RELAP-7 and the NEAMS Integrated Computational Environment (NiCE). RELAP-7 is fully supported by the NiCE due to on-going work to tightly integrate NiCE with the MOOSE framework, and subsequently the applications built upon it. NiCE development throughout the first quarter of FY15 has focused on improvements, bug fixes, and feature additions to existing MOOSE-based application support. Specifically, this report will focus on improvements to the NiCE MOOSE Model Builder, the MOOSE application job launcher, and the 3D Nuclear Plant Viewer. This report also includes a comprehensive tutorial that guides RELAP-7 users through the basic NiCE workflow: from input generation and 3D Plant modeling, to massively parallel job launch and post-simulation data visualization.

  1. Hippocampal-medial prefrontal circuit supports memory updating during learning and post-encoding rest.

    PubMed

    Schlichting, Margaret L; Preston, Alison R

    2016-10-01

    Learning occurs in the context of existing memories. Encountering new information that relates to prior knowledge may trigger integration, whereby established memories are updated to incorporate new content. Here, we provide a critical test of recent theories suggesting hippocampal (HPC) and medial prefrontal (MPFC) involvement in integration, both during and immediately following encoding. Human participants with established memories for a set of initial (AB) associations underwent fMRI scanning during passive rest and encoding of new related (BC) and unrelated (XY) pairs. We show that HPC-MPFC functional coupling during learning was more predictive of trial-by-trial memory for associations related to prior knowledge relative to unrelated associations. Moreover, the degree to which HPC-MPFC functional coupling was enhanced following overlapping encoding was related to memory integration behavior across participants. We observed a dissociation between anterior and posterior MPFC, with integration signatures during post-encoding rest specifically in the posterior subregion. These results highlight the persistence of integration signatures into post-encoding periods, indicating continued processing of interrelated memories during rest. We also interrogated the coherence of white matter tracts to assess the hypothesis that integration behavior would be related to the integrity of the underlying anatomical pathways. Consistent with our predictions, more coherent HPC-MPFC white matter structure was associated with better performance across participants. This HPC-MPFC circuit also interacted with content-sensitive visual cortex during learning and rest, consistent with reinstatement of prior knowledge to enable updating. These results show that the HPC-MPFC circuit supports on- and offline integration of new content into memory. PMID:26608407

  2. Hippocampal-medial prefrontal circuit supports memory updating during learning and post-encoding rest.

    PubMed

    Schlichting, Margaret L; Preston, Alison R

    2016-10-01

    Learning occurs in the context of existing memories. Encountering new information that relates to prior knowledge may trigger integration, whereby established memories are updated to incorporate new content. Here, we provide a critical test of recent theories suggesting hippocampal (HPC) and medial prefrontal (MPFC) involvement in integration, both during and immediately following encoding. Human participants with established memories for a set of initial (AB) associations underwent fMRI scanning during passive rest and encoding of new related (BC) and unrelated (XY) pairs. We show that HPC-MPFC functional coupling during learning was more predictive of trial-by-trial memory for associations related to prior knowledge relative to unrelated associations. Moreover, the degree to which HPC-MPFC functional coupling was enhanced following overlapping encoding was related to memory integration behavior across participants. We observed a dissociation between anterior and posterior MPFC, with integration signatures during post-encoding rest specifically in the posterior subregion. These results highlight the persistence of integration signatures into post-encoding periods, indicating continued processing of interrelated memories during rest. We also interrogated the coherence of white matter tracts to assess the hypothesis that integration behavior would be related to the integrity of the underlying anatomical pathways. Consistent with our predictions, more coherent HPC-MPFC white matter structure was associated with better performance across participants. This HPC-MPFC circuit also interacted with content-sensitive visual cortex during learning and rest, consistent with reinstatement of prior knowledge to enable updating. These results show that the HPC-MPFC circuit supports on- and offline integration of new content into memory.

  3. Differentially Private Frequent Subgraph Mining

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shengzhi; Xiong, Li; Cheng, Xiang; Xiao, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Mining frequent subgraphs from a collection of input graphs is an important topic in data mining research. However, if the input graphs contain sensitive information, releasing frequent subgraphs may pose considerable threats to individual's privacy. In this paper, we study the problem of frequent subgraph mining (FGM) under the rigorous differential privacy model. We introduce a novel differentially private FGM algorithm, which is referred to as DFG. In this algorithm, we first privately identify frequent subgraphs from input graphs, and then compute the noisy support of each identified frequent subgraph. In particular, to privately identify frequent subgraphs, we present a frequent subgraph identification approach which can improve the utility of frequent subgraph identifications through candidates pruning. Moreover, to compute the noisy support of each identified frequent subgraph, we devise a lattice-based noisy support derivation approach, where a series of methods has been proposed to improve the accuracy of the noisy supports. Through formal privacy analysis, we prove that our DFG algorithm satisfies ε-differential privacy. Extensive experimental results on real datasets show that the DFG algorithm can privately find frequent subgraphs with high data utility.

  4. Differentially Private Frequent Subgraph Mining

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shengzhi; Xiong, Li; Cheng, Xiang; Xiao, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Mining frequent subgraphs from a collection of input graphs is an important topic in data mining research. However, if the input graphs contain sensitive information, releasing frequent subgraphs may pose considerable threats to individual's privacy. In this paper, we study the problem of frequent subgraph mining (FGM) under the rigorous differential privacy model. We introduce a novel differentially private FGM algorithm, which is referred to as DFG. In this algorithm, we first privately identify frequent subgraphs from input graphs, and then compute the noisy support of each identified frequent subgraph. In particular, to privately identify frequent subgraphs, we present a frequent subgraph identification approach which can improve the utility of frequent subgraph identifications through candidates pruning. Moreover, to compute the noisy support of each identified frequent subgraph, we devise a lattice-based noisy support derivation approach, where a series of methods has been proposed to improve the accuracy of the noisy supports. Through formal privacy analysis, we prove that our DFG algorithm satisfies ε-differential privacy. Extensive experimental results on real datasets show that the DFG algorithm can privately find frequent subgraphs with high data utility. PMID:27616876

  5. Supporting Documentation for the 2008 Update to the Insulation Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, Therese K

    2008-02-01

    The Insulation Fact Sheet provides consumers for general guidance and recommended insulation levels for their home. This fact sheet has been on-line since 1995 and this update addresses new insulation materials, as well as updated costs for energy and materials.

  6. Updates on the Construction of an Eyeglass-Supported Nasal Prosthesis Using Computer-Aided Design and Rapid Prototyping Technology.

    PubMed

    Ciocca, Leonardo; Tarsitano, Achille; Marchetti, Claudio; Scotti, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to design an updated connection system for an eyeglass-supported nasal prosthesis using rapid prototyping techniques. The substructure was developed with two main endpoints in mind: the connection to the silicone and the connection to the eyeglasses. The mold design was also updated; the mold was composed of various parts, each carefully designed to allow for easy release after silicone processing and to facilitate extraction of the prosthesis without any strain. The approach used in this study enabled perfect transfer of the reciprocal position of the prosthesis with respect to the eyeglasses, from the virtual to the clinical environment. Moreover, the reduction in thickness improved the flexibility of the prosthesis and promoted adaptation to the contours of the skin, even during functional movements. The method described here is a simplified and viable alternative to standard construction techniques for nasal prostheses and offers improved esthetic and functional results when no bone is available for implant-supported prostheses.

  7. E-1 Dynamic Fluid-Flow Model Update: EASY/ROCETS Enhancement and Model Development Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Follett, Randolph F.; Taylor, Robert P.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the research conducted to update computer models for dynamic fluid flow simulation of the E-1 test stand subsystems at te NASA John C. Stennis Space Center.Work also involved significant upgrades to the capabilities of EASY/ROCKETS library through the inclusion of the NIST-12 thermodynamic property database and development of new control system modules.

  8. Responding to Changes in Building Legislation. Updating Training for the Building Regulations 1985 and Supporting Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Robert; Phillips, Alan

    A project sought to develop a means of updating and retraining those required to comply with Britain's 1985 Building Regulations, which are substantially different from the previous ones in regard to procedures and technical content. The training needs analysis conducted indicated that the new training should be flexible and use practical and…

  9. Empirical Evidence Supporting Frequent Cryptic Speciation in Epiphyllous Liverworts: A Case Study of the Cololejeunea lanciloba Complex

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ying; Heinrichs, Jochen; Zhu, Rui-Liang; Schneider, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Cryptic species are frequently recovered in plant lineages, and considered an important cause for divergent of morphological disparity and species diversity. The identification of cryptic species has important implications for the assessment of conservation needs of species aggregates. The mechanisms and processes of the origin of cryptic species diversity are still poorly understand based on the lack of studies especially in context of environment factors. Here we explored evidence for cryptic species within the epiphyllous liverworts Cololejeunea lanciloba complex based on two loci, the plastid trnL-F region and the nuclear ribosomal ITS region. Several analytic approaches were employed to delimit species based on DNA sequence variation including phylogenetic reconstruction, statistical parsimony networks analysis and two recently introduced species delimitation criteria: Rosenberg’s reciprocal monophyly and Rodrigo’s randomly distinct. We found evidence for thirteen genetically distinct putative species, each consisting of more than one haplotype, rather than four morphologically-circumscribed species. The results implied that the highly conserved phenotypes are not congruent with the genetic differentiation, contributing to incorrect assessments of the biodiversity of epiphyllous liverworts. We hypothesize that evolution of cryptic species recovered may be caused by selection of traits critical to the survival in epiphyllous habitats combined with limited developmental options designed in the small body. PMID:24367634

  10. ASTER Urgent Response to the 2006 Eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska: Science and Decision Support Gained From Frequent High-resolution, Satellite Thermal Infrared Imaging of Volcanic Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessels, R. L.; Ramsey, M. S.; Schneider, D. S.; Coombs, M.; Dehn, J.; Realmuto, V. J.

    2006-12-01

    Augustine Volcano, Alaska explosively erupted on January 11, 2006 after nearly eight months of increasing seismicity, deformation, gas emission, and small phreatic explosions. The volcano produced a total of 13 explosive eruptions during the last three weeks of January 2006. A new summit lava dome and two short, blocky lava flows grew during February and March 2006. A series of 7 daytime and 15 nighttime Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) scenes were acquired in response to this new activity. This response was facilitated by a new ASTER Urgent Request Protocol system. The ASTER data provided several significant observations as a part of a much larger suite of real-time or near-real-time data from other satellite (AVHRR, MODIS), airborne (FLIR, visual, gas), and ground-based (seismometers, radiometers) sensors used at the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO). ASTER is well-suited to volcanic observations because of its 15-m to 90-m spatial resolution, its ability to be scheduled and point off-nadir, and its ability to collect visible-near infrared (VNIR) to thermal infrared (TIR) data during both the day and night. Aided by the volcano's high latitude (59.4°N) ASTER was able to provide frequent repeat imaging as short as one day between scenes with an average 6-day repeat during the height of activity. These data provided a time series of high-resolution VNIR, shortwave infrared (SWIR - detects temperatures from about 200°C to > 600°C averaged over a 30-m pixel), and TIR (detects temperatures up to about 100°C averaged over a 90-m pixel) data of the volcano and its eruptive products. Frequent satellite imaging of volcanoes is necessary to record rapid changes in activity and to avoid recurring cloud cover. Of the 22 ASTER scenes acquired between October 30, 2005 and May 30, 2006, the volcano was clear to partly cloudy in 13 scenes. The most useful pre-eruption ASTER Urgent Request image was acquired on December 20. These data

  11. Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal carcinoma: frequent involvement of the left colon and rectum and late-onset presentation supports a universal screening approach.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Douglas J; Brand, Randall E; Hu, Huankai; Bahary, Nathan; Dudley, Beth; Chiosea, Simon I; Nikiforova, Marina N; Pai, Reetesh K

    2013-11-01

    The optimal strategy for screening patients with colorectal carcinoma for Lynch syndrome (LS) is a subject of continued debate in the literature with some advocating universal screening while others arguing for selective screening. We evaluated 1292 colorectal carcinomas for DNA mismatch repair protein abnormalities and identified 150 (11.6%) tumors demonstrating high-levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-H). MSI-H colorectal carcinomas were divided into sporadic (112/1292, 8.7%) and LS/probable LS-associated (38/1292, 2.9%) groups based on BRAF V600E mutation, MLH1 promoter hypermethylation, cancer history, and germline mismatch repair gene mutation. All MSI-H colorectal carcinomas were analyzed for grade, location, and tumor histology. The utility of the revised Bethesda guidelines and published predictive pathology models for MSI-H colorectal carcinomas (PREDICT and MSPath) were evaluated. Left-sided MSI-H colorectal carcinomas were more frequently associated with LS compared with right-sided MSI-H colorectal carcinomas (12/21, 57% versus 26/129, 20%, P = .0008). There was no significant difference in histology between sporadic MSI-H and LS/probable LS-associated colorectal carcinomas except for a slightly higher proportion of sporadic MSI-H tumors demonstrating tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (81% versus 61%, P = .015). Neither pathology predictive model identified all LS-associated colorectal carcinomas (PREDICT: 33/38, 87%; MSPath: 35/38, 92%). 12/117 (10%) MSI-H colorectal carcinomas identified in patients >60 years were LS/probable LS-associated. Our results demonstrate that models of predicting MSI-H fail to identify LS-associated colorectal carcinoma given their reliance on right-sided location. A significant proportion (32%) of LS-associated colorectal carcinoma is identified in patients >60 years. Finally, our results demonstrate similar morphologic features between LS-associated and sporadic MSI-H colorectal carcinomas.

  12. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 Protein Kinase Activity Is Frequently Elevated in Human Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma and Supports Tumour Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    O′Flaherty, Linda; Pardo, Olivier E.; Dzien, Piotr; Phillips, Lois; Morgan, Carys; Pawade, Joya; May, Margaret T.; Sohail, Muhammad; Hetzel, Martin R.; Seckl, Michael J.; Tavaré, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) is a central regulator of cellular metabolism, development and growth. GSK3 activity was thought to oppose tumourigenesis, yet recent studies indicate that it may support tumour growth in some cancer types including in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). We examined the undefined role of GSK3 protein kinase activity in tissue from human NSCLC. Methods The expression and protein kinase activity of GSK3 was determined in 29 fresh frozen samples of human NSCLC and patient-matched normal lung tissue by quantitative immunoassay and western blotting for the phosphorylation of three distinct GSK3 substrates in situ (glycogen synthase, RelA and CRMP-2). The proliferation and sensitivity to the small-molecule GSK3 inhibitor; CHIR99021, of NSCLC cell lines (Hcc193, H1975, PC9 and A549) and non-neoplastic type II pneumocytes was further assessed in adherent culture. Results Expression and protein kinase activity of GSK3 was elevated in 41% of human NSCLC samples when compared to patient-matched control tissue. Phosphorylation of GSK3α/β at the inhibitory S21/9 residue was a poor biomarker for activity in tumour samples. The GSK3 inhibitor, CHIR99021 dose-dependently reduced the proliferation of three NSCLC cell lines yet was ineffective against type II pneumocytes. Conclusion NSCLC tumours with elevated GSK3 protein kinase activity may have evolved dependence on the kinase for sustained growth. Our results provide further important rationale for exploring the use of GSK3 inhibitors in treating NSCLC. PMID:25486534

  13. [Improvements in implantable mechanical circulatory support systems : literature overview and update].

    PubMed

    Krabatsch, T; Schweiger, M; Stepanenko, A; Drews, T; Potapov, E; Pasic, M; Weng, Y; Huebler, M; Hetzer, R

    2011-10-01

    In recent years, ventricular assist devices (VAD) supporting the left (LVAD), the right (RVAD) or both ventricles (BVAD) have rapidly emerged as the standard of care for advanced heart failure patients. Both the numbers and ages of patients in which they are used are rising worldwide, especially when used as a permanent support (bridge to destination, BTD). Due to the continuing lack of donor organs, these devices now represent a viable alternative to bridge patients to transplantation (BTT), with a 1-year survival rate of 86%. BTD, especially in long-term support, might be a valid, and the sole, option for those patients in whom heart transplantation is contraindicated. Patient selection, pre- and intra-operative preparation, as well as the timing of VAD implantation are important factors critical to successful circulatory support. While BTT remains the goal in the majority of patients, the number of permanent VADs (i. e. BTD) is rising significantly. Although explantation of a VAD system as a bridge to recovery (BTR) can be considered in only a small number of patients, it represents a very special part of this therapy modality. PMID:21912911

  14. Positive Behavior Support: A Proposal for Updating and Refining the Definition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kincaid, Don; Dunlap, Glen; Kern, Lee; Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Bambara, Linda M.; Brown, Fredda; Fox, Lise; Knoster, Timothy P.

    2016-01-01

    Positive behavior support (PBS) has been a dynamic and growing enterprise for more than 25 years. During this period, PBS has expanded applications across a wide range of populations and multiple levels of implementation. As a result, there have been understandable inconsistencies and confusion regarding the definition of PBS. In this essay, we…

  15. The Empirically Supported Status of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: An Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smout, Matthew F.; Hayes, Louise; Atkins, Paul W. B.; Klausen, Jessica; Duguid, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is a transdiagnostic cognitive behavioural therapy that predominantly teaches clients acceptance and mindfulness skills, as well as values clarification and enactment skills. Australian treatment guideline providers have been cautious in recognising ACT as empirically supported. This article reviews evidence…

  16. ArrayTrack: a free FDA bioinformatics tool to support emerging biomedical research--an update.

    PubMed

    Xu, Joshua; Kelly, Reagan; Fang, Hong; Tong, Weida

    2010-08-01

    ArrayTrack is a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) bioinformatics tool that has been widely adopted by the research community for genomics studies. It provides an integrated environment for microarray data management, analysis and interpretation. Most of its functionality for statistical, pathway and gene ontology analysis can also be applied independently to data generated by other molecular technologies. ArrayTrack has been undergoing active development and enhancement since its inception in 2001. This review summarises its key functionalities, with emphasis on the most recent extensions in support of the evolving needs of FDA's research programmes. ArrayTrack has added capability to manage, analyse and interpret proteomics and metabolomics data after quantification of peptides and metabolites abundance, respectively. Annotation information about single nucleotide polymorphisms and quantitative trait loci has been integrated to support genetics-related studies. Other extensions have been added to manage and analyse genomics data related to bacterial food-borne pathogens.

  17. Node 3 Relocation Environmental Control and Life Support System Modification Kit Verification and Updated Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.; Spector Lawrence N.

    2010-01-01

    Node 1 (Unity) flew to International Space Station (ISS) on Flight 2A. Node 1 was the first module of the United States On-Orbit Segment (USOS) launched to ISS. The Node 1 ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) design featured limited ECLS capability. The main purpose of Node 1 was to provide internal storage by providing four stowage rack locations within the module and to allow docking of multiple modules and a truss segment to it. The ECLS subsystems inside Node 1 were routed through the element prior to launch to allow for easy integration of the attached future elements, particularly the Habitation Module which was planned to be located at the nadir docking port of Node 1. After Node I was on-orbit, the Program decided not to launch the Habitation Module and instead, to replace it with Node 3 (Tranquility). In 2007, the Program became concerned with a potential Russian docking port approach issue for the Russian FGB nadir docking port after Node 3 is attached to Node 1. To solve this concern the Program decided to relocate Node 3 from Node I nadir to Node 1 port. To support the movement of Node 3 the Program decided to build a modification kit for Node 1, an on-orbit feedthrough leak test device, and new vestibule jumpers to support the ECLS part of the relocation. This paper provides a design overview of the modification kit for Node 1, a summary of the Node 1 ECLS re-verification to support the Node 3 relocation from Node 1 nadir to Node 1 port, and a status of the ECLS modification kit installation into Node 1.

  18. Node 3 Relocation Environmental Control and Life Support System Modification Kit Verification and Updated Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.; Spector, Lawrence N.

    2009-01-01

    Node 1 (Unity) flew to International Space Station (ISS) on Flight 2A. Node 1 was the first module of the United States On-Orbit Segment (USOS) launched to ISS. The Node 1 ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) design featured limited ECLS capability. The main purpose of Node 1 was to provide internal storage by providing four stowage rack locations within the module and to allow docking of multiple modules and a truss segment to it. The ECLS subsystems inside Node 1 were routed through the element prior to launch to allow for easy integration of the attached future elements, particularly the Habitation Module which was planned to be located at the nadir docking port of Node 1. After Node 1 was on-orbit, the Program decided not to launch the Habitation Module and instead, to replace it with Node 3 (Tranquility). In 2007, the Program became concerned with a potential Russian docking port approach issue for the Russian FGB nadir docking port after Node 3 is attached to Node 1. To solve this concern the Program decided to relocate Node 3 from Node 1 nadir to Node 1 port. To support the movement of Node 3 the Program decided to build a modification kit for Node 1, an on-orbit feedthrough leak test device, and new vestibule jumpers to support the ECLS part of the relocation. This paper provides a design overview of the modification kit, a summary of the Node 1 ECLS re-verification to support the Node 3 relocation from Node 1 nadir to Node 1 port, and a status of the ECLS modification kit installation into Node 1.

  19. An Update on Improvements to NiCE Support for PROTEUS

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Andrew; McCaskey, Alexander J.; Billings, Jay Jay

    2015-09-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy s Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program has supported the development of the NEAMS Integrated Computational Environment (NiCE), a modeling and simulation workflow environment that provides services and plugins to facilitate tasks such as code execution, model input construction, visualization, and data analysis. This report details the developement of workflows for the reactor core neutronics application, PROTEUS. This advanced neutronics application (primarily developed at Argonne National Laboratory) aims to improve nuclear reactor design and analysis by providing an extensible and massively parallel, finite-element solver for current and advanced reactor fuel neutronics modeling. The integration of PROTEUS-specific tools into NiCE is intended to make the advanced capabilities that PROTEUS provides more accessible to the nuclear energy research and development community. This report will detail the work done to improve existing PROTEUS workflow support in NiCE. We will demonstrate and discuss these improvements, including the development of flexible IO services, an improved interface for input generation, and the addition of advanced Fortran development tools natively in the platform.

  20. Update on the Ares V to Support Heavy Lift for U.S. Space Exploration Policy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumrall, John P.; Creech, Steve

    2008-01-01

    When NASA's Ares V cargo launch vehicle begins flying late next decade, its capabilities will significantly exceed the 1960s-era Saturn V. It will send more crew and cargo to more places on the lunar surface than Apollo and provide ongoing support to a permanent lunar outpost that will open the Moon to greater exploration, science and adventure than ever before. Moreover, it will restore the United States heavy-lift capability, which can support human and robotic exploration for decades to come. Ares V remains in a pre-design analysis cycle stage pending a planned Authority to Proceed (ATP) in late 2010. Ares V benefits from the decision to draw from heritage hardware and its commonality with the Ares I crew launch vehicle, which completed its preliminary design review (PDR) in September 2008. Most of the work on Ares V to date has been focused on refining the vehicle design through a variety of internal studies. This paper will provide background information on the Ares V evolution, emphasizing the vehicle configuration as it exists today.

  1. [Updates on extracorporeal life support in the world and challenges in Turkey].

    PubMed

    Haydin, Sertaç; Undar, Akif

    2013-09-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is instituted for the management of life threatening pulmonary or cardiac failure (or both), when no other form of treatment has been or is likely to be successful. It has being used in developed countries for many years. ECLS has come into practice for a while in Turkey, in order to ECLS recommendations. However, most of them are postcardiotomy cases. However, this therapeutic option has more indications including its reason that brought it into practice. All equipment of the system has being changed with the developing technology. The aim of this paper is to point out this modality, to introduce equipment, and to give information about organization and management to bring this therapeutic option in Turkey in order.

  2. Update on the Ares V to Support Heavy Lift for U.S. Space Exploration Policy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creech, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The focus of design efforts in the near future will be on the primary Lunar mission. We are currently just beginning to integrate the design functions from the various centers for this mission. We appreciate all thoughts and ideas for different ways to use the Ares V platform. The Ares V can support an order of magnitude more science instrumentation for outer planetary exploration missions. It can also reach outer planets such as Neptune and other high energy insertion destinations. Current Ares V Point-of-Departure (51.00.48) exceeds Saturn mass capability by approx.40%. Ares V Lunar Capabilities Concept Review analysis focused on meeting lunar requirements and developing margin. Ares V is sensitive to Loiter, Attitude, Power, and Altitude requirements in addition to payload performance. LCCR-approved 51.00.48 POD 5.5-segment steel case booster/6 engine core) Ares V can meet current Human Lunar Return requirements with approx.6 mT of Margin. LCCR-approved 51.00.47 option maintained (5 segment HTPB composite case booster/6 engine core) can meet HLR requirement with more than 9 mT Margin. Ares V team is actively reaching out to external organizations during this early concept phase to ensure that the Ares V vehicle can be leveraged for national security, scientific and commercial development needs.

  3. Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support Systems: An Update on Waste Water Reclamation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferner, Kathleen M.

    1994-01-01

    Since the mid-1980's, work has been ongoing In the development of the various environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) for the space station. Part of this effort has been focused on the development of a new subsystem to reclaim waste water that had not been previously required for shuttle missions. Because of the extended manned missions proposed, reclamation of waste water becomes imperative to avoid the weight penalties associated with resupplying a crew's entire water needs for consumption and daily hygiene. Hamilton Standard, under contract to Boeing Aerospace and Electronics, has been designing the water reclamation system for space station use. Since June of 1991, Hamilton Standard has developed a combined water processor capable of reclaiming potable quality water from waste hygiene water, used laundry water, processed urine, Shuttle fuel cell water, humidity condensate and other minor waste water sources. The system was assembled and then tested with over 27,700 pounds of 'real' waste water. During the 1700 hours of system operation required to process this waste water, potable quality water meeting NASA and Boeing specifications was produced. This paper gives a schematic overview of the system, describes the test conditions and test results and outlines the next steps for system development.

  4. An Updated Decision Support Interface: A Tool for Remote Monitoring of Crop Growing Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husak, G. J.; Budde, M. E.; Rowland, J.; Verdin, J. P.; Funk, C. C.; Landsfeld, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    Remote sensing of agroclimatological variables to monitor food production conditions is a critical component of the Famine Early Warning Systems Network portfolio of tools for assessing food security in the developing world. The Decision Support Interface (DSI) seeks to integrate a number of remotely sensed and modeled variables to create a single, simplified portal for analysis of crop growing conditions. The DSI has been reformulated to incorporate more variables and give the user more freedom in exploring the available data. This refinement seeks to transition the DSI from a "first glance" agroclimatic indicator to one better suited for the differentiation of drought events. The DSI performs analysis of variables over primary agricultural zones at the first sub-national administrative level. It uses the spatially averaged rainfall, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), water requirement satisfaction index (WRSI), and actual evapotranspiration (ETa) to identify potential hazards to food security. Presenting this information in a web-based client gives food security analysts and decision makers a lightweight portal for information on crop growing conditions in the region. The crop zones used for the aggregation contain timing information which is critical to the DSI presentation. Rainfall and ETa are accumulated from different points in the crop phenology to identify season-long deficits in rainfall or transpiration that adversely affect the crop-growing conditions. Furthermore, the NDVI and WRSI serve as their own seasonal accumulated measures of growing conditions by capturing vegetation vigor or actual evapotranspiration deficits. The DSI is currently active for major growing regions of sub-Saharan Africa, with intention of expanding to other areas over the coming years.

  5. Financial assistance to states and tribes to support emergency preparedness and response and the safe transportation of hazardous shipments: 1996 Update

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, J.A.; Leyson, J.; Lester, M.K.

    1996-07-01

    This report revises and updates the 1995 report Financial Assistance to States and Tribes to Support Emergency Preparedness and Response and the Safe Transportation of Hazardous Shipments, PNL-10260 (UC-620). The presentation of data and some of the data reported have been changed; these data supersede those presented in the earlier publication. All data have been updated to fiscal year 1995, with the exception of FEMA data that are updated to fiscal year 1994 only. The report identifies and summarizes existing sources of financial assistance to States and Tribes in preparing and responding to transportation emergencies and ensuring the safe transportation of hazardous shipments through their jurisdictions. It is intended for use as an information resource for the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Transportation, Emergency Management, and Analytical Services (EM-76).

  6. Arthritis: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... artritis FAQs Download Spanish Materials Download English Materials Marketing and Support Ambassador Outreach Coordinator’s Guide Person-to- ... to Provider Outreach Provider Outreach Videos Developing a Marketing and Promotion Plan Preparing for Provider Outreach Conducting ...

  7. LANDFIRE 2010—Updates to the national dataset to support improved fire and natural resource management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Kurtis J.; Long, Donald G.; Connot, Joel A.

    2016-01-01

    The Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools (LANDFIRE) 2010 data release provides updated and enhanced vegetation, fuel, and fire regime layers consistently across the United States. The data represent landscape conditions from approximately 2010 and are the latest release in a series of planned updates to maintain currency of LANDFIRE data products. Enhancements to the data products included refinement of urban areas by incorporating the National Land Cover Database 2006 land cover product, refinement of agricultural lands by integrating the National Agriculture Statistics Service 2011 cropland data layer, and improved wetlands delineations using the National Land Cover Database 2006 land cover and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Wetlands Inventory data. Disturbance layers were generated for years 2008 through 2010 using remotely sensed imagery, polygons representing disturbance events submitted by local organizations, and fire mapping program data such as the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity perimeters produced by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Forest Service. Existing vegetation data were updated to account for transitions in disturbed areas and to account for vegetation growth and succession in undisturbed areas. Surface and canopy fuel data were computed from the updated vegetation type, cover, and height and occasionally from potential vegetation. Historical fire frequency and succession classes were also updated. Revised topographic layers were created based on updated elevation data from the National Elevation Dataset. The LANDFIRE program also released a new Web site offering updated content, enhanced usability, and more efficient navigation.

  8. LANDFIRE 2010—Updates to the national dataset to support improved fire and natural resource management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Kurtis J.; Long, Donald G.; Connot, Joel A.

    2016-02-29

    The Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools (LANDFIRE) 2010 data release provides updated and enhanced vegetation, fuel, and fire regime layers consistently across the United States. The data represent landscape conditions from approximately 2010 and are the latest release in a series of planned updates to maintain currency of LANDFIRE data products. Enhancements to the data products included refinement of urban areas by incorporating the National Land Cover Database 2006 land cover product, refinement of agricultural lands by integrating the National Agriculture Statistics Service 2011 cropland data layer, and improved wetlands delineations using the National Land Cover Database 2006 land cover and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Wetlands Inventory data. Disturbance layers were generated for years 2008 through 2010 using remotely sensed imagery, polygons representing disturbance events submitted by local organizations, and fire mapping program data such as the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity perimeters produced by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Forest Service. Existing vegetation data were updated to account for transitions in disturbed areas and to account for vegetation growth and succession in undisturbed areas. Surface and canopy fuel data were computed from the updated vegetation type, cover, and height and occasionally from potential vegetation. Historical fire frequency and succession classes were also updated. Revised topographic layers were created based on updated elevation data from the National Elevation Dataset. The LANDFIRE program also released a new Web site offering updated content, enhanced usability, and more efficient navigation.

  9. Mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke: Consensus statement by ESO-Karolinska Stroke Update 2014/2015, supported by ESO, ESMINT, ESNR and EAN.

    PubMed

    Wahlgren, Nils; Moreira, Tiago; Michel, Patrik; Steiner, Thorsten; Jansen, Olav; Cognard, Christophe; Mattle, Heinrich P; van Zwam, Wim; Holmin, Staffan; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Petersson, Jesper; Caso, Valeria; Hacke, Werner; Mazighi, Mikael; Arnold, Marcel; Fischer, Urs; Szikora, Istvan; Pierot, Laurent; Fiehler, Jens; Gralla, Jan; Fazekas, Franz; Lees, Kennedy R

    2016-01-01

    The original version of this consensus statement on mechanical thrombectomy was approved at the European Stroke Organisation (ESO)-Karolinska Stroke Update conference in Stockholm, 16-18 November 2014. The statement has later, during 2015, been updated with new clinical trials data in accordance with a decision made at the conference. Revisions have been made at a face-to-face meeting during the ESO Winter School in Berne in February, through email exchanges and the final version has then been approved by each society. The recommendations are identical to the original version with evidence level upgraded by 20 February 2015 and confirmed by 15 May 2015. The purpose of the ESO-Karolinska Stroke Update meetings is to provide updates on recent stroke therapy research and to discuss how the results may be implemented into clinical routine. Selected topics are discussed at consensus sessions, for which a consensus statement is prepared and discussed by the participants at the meeting. The statements are advisory to the ESO guidelines committee. This consensus statement includes recommendations on mechanical thrombectomy after acute stroke. The statement is supported by ESO, European Society of Minimally Invasive Neurological Therapy (ESMINT), European Society of Neuroradiology (ESNR), and European Academy of Neurology (EAN).

  10. Results of an intervention for individuals and families with BRCA mutations: a model for providing medical updates and psychosocial support following genetic testing.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, Wendy; Naud, Shelly; Ashikaga, Taka; Colletti, Rose; Wood, Marie

    2007-08-01

    : Providing medical management updates and long-term support to families with hereditary cancer syndromes in rural areas is a challenge. To address this, we designed a one-day retreat for BRCA1/2 carriers in our region. The retreat included educational updates about medical management, genetic privacy and discrimination, and addressed psychological and family issues. Evaluations completed at the conclusion of the retreat were overwhelmingly positive with requests for a similar event in the future. The impact of this retreat on a variety of health behaviors was assessed. Eligible participants completed questionnaires before and 6 months after the retreat. Questionnaires focused on lifestyle, cancer screening and prevention practices, psychological history and distress, decision-making regarding genetic testing, and family communication issues. For individuals who completed both the pre and post retreat questionnaires, one-half made lifestyle changes and nearly two-thirds increased cancer screening, initiated chemoprevention, completed or planned to complete preventative surgery in the future. We conclude that this type of forum provides a valuable opportunity for BRCA carriers and their families to receive updated medical information, share personal experiences, provide and receive support, as well as change health behaviors.

  11. Updating of ASME Nuclear Code Case N-201 to Accommodate the Needs of Metallic Core Support Structures for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors Currently in Development

    SciTech Connect

    Mit Basol; John F. Kielb; John F. MuHooly; Kobus Smit

    2007-05-02

    On September 29, 2005, ASME Standards Technology, LLC (ASME ST-LLC) executed a multi-year, cooperative agreement with the United States DOE for the Generation IV Reactor Materials project. The project's objective is to update and expand appropriate materials, construction, and design codes for application in future Generation IV nuclear reactor systems that operate at elevated temperatures. Task 4 was embarked upon in recognition of the large quantity of ongoing reactor designs utilizing high temperature technology. Since Code Case N-201 had not seen a significant revision (except for a minor revision in September, 2006 to change the SA-336 forging reference for 304SS and 316SS to SA-965 in Tables 1.2(a) and 1.2(b), and some minor editorial changes) since December 1994, identifying recommended updates to support the current high temperature Core Support Structure (CSS) designs and potential new designs was important. As anticipated, the Task 4 effort identified a number of Code Case N-201 issues. Items requiring further consideration range from addressing apparent inconsistencies in definitions and certain material properties between CC-N-201 and Subsection NH, to inclusion of additional materials to provide the designer more flexibility of design. Task 4 developed a design parameter survey that requested input from the CSS designers of ongoing high temperature gas cooled reactor metallic core support designs. The responses to the survey provided Task 4 valuable input to identify the design operating parameters and future needs of the CSS designers. Types of materials, metal temperature, time of exposure, design pressure, design life, and fluence levels were included in the Task 4 survey responses. The results of the survey are included in this report. This research proves that additional work must be done to update Code Case N-201. Task 4 activities provide the framework for the Code Case N-201 update and future work to provide input on materials. Candidate

  12. 78 FR 70586 - Technical Support Document: Technical Update of the Social Cost of Carbon for Regulatory Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ...-impact-analysis.pdf . The Social Cost of Carbon (SCC) is used to estimate the value to society of... estimates using three peer reviewed integrated assessment models and provides updated values of the SCC that reflect minor technical corrections to the estimates released in May of this year. OMB requests...

  13. Clinical practice parameters for hemodynamic support of pediatric and neonatal septic shock: 2007 update from the American College of Critical Care Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Brierley, Joe; Carcillo, Joseph A.; Choong, Karen; Cornell, Tim; DeCaen, Allan; Deymann, Andreas; Doctor, Allan; Davis, Alan; Duff, John; Dugas, Marc-Andre; Duncan, Alan; Evans, Barry; Feldman, Jonathan; Felmet, Kathryn; Fisher, Gene; Frankel, Lorry; Jeffries, Howard; Greenwald, Bruce; Gutierrez, Juan; Hall, Mark; Han, Yong Y.; Hanson, James; Hazelzet, Jan; Hernan, Lynn; Kiff, Jane; Kissoon, Niranjan; Kon, Alexander; Irazusta, Jose; Lin, John; Lorts, Angie; Mariscalco, Michelle; Mehta, Renuka; Nadel, Simon; Nguyen, Trung; Nicholson, Carol; Peters, Mark; Okhuysen-Cawley, Regina; Poulton, Tom; Relves, Monica; Rodriguez, Agustin; Rozenfeld, Ranna; Schnitzler, Eduardo; Shanley, Tom; Skache, Sara; Skippen, Peter; Torres, Adalberto; von Dessauer, Bettina; Weingarten, Jacki; Yeh, Timothy; Zaritsky, Arno; Stojadinovic, Bonnie; Zimmerman, Jerry; Zuckerberg, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Background The Institute of Medicine calls for the use of clinical guidelines and practice parameters to promote “best practices” and to improve patient outcomes. Objective 2007 update of the 2002 American College of Critical Care Medicine Clinical Guidelines for Hemodynamic Support of Neonates and Children with Septic Shock. Participants Society of Critical Care Medicine members with special interest in neonatal and pediatric septic shock were identified from general solicitation at the Society of Critical Care Medicine Educational and Scientific Symposia (2001–2006). Methods The Pubmed/MEDLINE literature database (1966–2006) was searched using the keywords and phrases: sepsis, septicemia, septic shock, endotoxemia, persistent pulmonary hypertension, nitric oxide, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), and American College of Critical Care Medicine guidelines. Best practice centers that reported best outcomes were identified and their practices examined as models of care. Using a modified Delphi method, 30 experts graded new literature. Over 30 additional experts then reviewed the updated recommendations. The document was subsequently modified until there was greater than 90% expert consensus. Results The 2002 guidelines were widely disseminated, translated into Spanish and Portuguese, and incorporated into Society of Critical Care Medicine and AHA sanctioned recommendations. Centers that implemented the 2002 guidelines reported best practice outcomes (hospital mortality 1%–3% in previously healthy, and 7%– 10% in chronically ill children). Early use of 2002 guidelines was associated with improved outcome in the community hospital emergency department (number needed to treat = 3.3) and tertiary pediatric intensive care setting (number needed to treat = 3.6); every hour that went by without guideline adherence was associated with a 1.4-fold increased mortality risk. The updated 2007 guidelines continue to recognize an increased likelihood that

  14. Frequent Itemset Hiding Algorithm Using Frequent Pattern Tree Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alnatsheh, Rami

    2012-01-01

    A problem that has been the focus of much recent research in privacy preserving data-mining is the frequent itemset hiding (FIH) problem. Identifying itemsets that appear together frequently in customer transactions is a common task in association rule mining. Organizations that share data with business partners may consider some of the frequent…

  15. Space shuttle engineering and operations support: Study of the effects of multiple ground updates on the accuracy of the onboard state vector with IMU only navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, R.

    1977-01-01

    There are six cases considered: (1) no updates made during the flight, (2) one ground update in the vertical components only at the first practice separation minus 15 minutes, (3) one ground update in all components at the first practice separation minus 5 minutes, (4) updates 2 and 3 applied successively, (5) Case 4 plus an update in all components at the second separation attempt minus 3 minutes, and (6) one ground update at first separation attempt minus 5 minutes and a second update at second separation minus two minutes. The mission control simulation program, GROPER, was run using as radar input a tape containing radar derived state vectors for the trajectory.

  16. Treatment of Anthrax Disease Frequently Asked Questions

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Young, Joan E.; Lesperance, Ann M.; Malone, John D.

    2010-05-14

    This document provides a summary of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on the treatment of anthrax disease caused by a wide-area release of Bacillus anthracis spores as an act bioterrorism. These FAQs are intended to provide the public health and medical community, as well as others, with guidance and communications to support the response and long-term recovery from an anthrax event.

  17. Effect of the tobacco price support program on cigarette consumption in the United States: an updated model.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, P; Husten, C; Giovino, G

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the direct effect of the tobacco price support program on domestic cigarette consumption. METHODS: We developed an economic model of demand and supply of US tobacco to estimate how much the price support program increases the price of tobacco. We calculated the resultant increase in cigarette prices from the change in the tobacco price and the quantity of domestic tobacco contained in US cigarettes. We then assessed the reduction in cigarette consumption attributable to the price support program by applying the estimated increase in the cigarette price to assumed price elasticities of demand for cigarettes. RESULTS: We estimated that the tobacco price support program increased the price of tobacco leaf by $0.36 per pound. This higher tobacco price translates to a $0.01 increase in the price of a pack of cigarettes and an estimated 0.21% reduction in cigarette consumption. CONCLUSION: Because the tobacco price support program increases the price of cigarettes minimally, its potential health benefit is likely to be small. The adverse political effect of the tobacco program might substantially outweigh the potential direct benefit of the program on cigarette consumption. PMID:10800423

  18. Luteal-phase support in assisted reproduction treatment: real-life practices reported worldwide by an updated website-based survey.

    PubMed

    Vaisbuch, Edi; de Ziegler, Dominique; Leong, Milton; Weissman, Ariel; Shoham, Zeev

    2014-03-01

    An updated worldwide web-based survey assessed the real-life clinical practices regarding luteal-phase supplementation (LPS) in assisted reproduction. This survey looked for changes since a former survey conducted nearly 3years earlier. The survey questions were: If you support the luteal phase, when do you start the regimen you are using?; Which agent/route is your treatment of choice to support the luteal phase?; If you use vaginal progesterone, which formulation do you use?; and How long you continue progesterone supplementation if the patient conceived? Data were obtained from 408 centres (82 countries) representing 284,600 IVF cycles/year. The findings were: (i) most practitioners (80% of cycles) start LPS on the day of egg collection; (ii) in >90%, a vaginal progesterone product is used (77% as a single agent and 17% in combination with i.m. progesterone), while human chorionic gonadotrophin as a single agent for LPS is not being used at all; and (iii) in 72% of cycles, LPS is administered until 8-10weeks' gestation or beyond. When compared with the initial survey, the results of this survey are encouraging as there is a clear shift towards a more unified and evidence-based approach to LPS in IVF cycles. This updated worldwide web-based survey assessed the actual real-life clinical practices regarding luteal-phase supplementation (LPS) in assisted reproduction. Specifically, this survey looked for changes since an initial survey conducted nearly 3years earlier. The survey included the following questions: If you support the luteal phase, when do you start the regimen you are using?; Which agent/route is your treatment of choice to support the luteal phase?; If you use vaginal progesterone, which formulation do you use?; and How long you continue progesterone supplementation if the patient conceived? Data from 408 centres in 82 countries representing a total of 284,600 IVF cycles/year were included. Most practitioners (80% of cycles) start LPS on the day of

  19. [Meningococcal disease: frequently asked questions].

    PubMed

    Cofré, José

    2012-12-01

    On account of an increase of serogroup W135 meningococcal disease (M.D.) observed in Santiago, Chile, during last two years the medical community has experienced an avidity to update their knowledge about M.D. treatment and its prevention. In a queries and answers mode, the following topics on M.D. are presented: nasopharyngeal carriage and its importance, immunity and protection against the disease, reasons to choice ceftriaxone as the first line antibiotic in treatment, rationality and indications of chemoprophylaxis, fundamentals and advantages of conjugate vaccines, its indications, schedules, contraindications and decisions making in public health. PMID:23412036

  20. Reproductive mode evolution in lizards revisited: updated analyses examining geographic, climatic and phylogenetic effects support the cold-climate hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Watson, C M; Makowsky, R; Bagley, J C

    2014-12-01

    Viviparity, the bearing of live young, has evolved well over 100 times among squamate reptiles. This reproductive strategy is hypothesized to allow maternal control of the foetus' thermal environment and thereby to increase the fitness of the parents and offspring. Two hypotheses have been posited to explain this phenomenon: (i) the cold-climate hypothesis (CCH), which advocates low temperatures as the primary selective force; and (ii) the maternal manipulation hypothesis (MMH), which advocates temperature variability as the primary selective force. Here, we investigate whether climatic and geographic variables associated with the CCH vs. the MMH best explain the current geographical distributions of viviparity in lizards while incorporating recent advances in comparative methods, squamate phylogenetics and geospatial analysis. To do this, we compared nonphylogenetic and phylogenetic models predicting viviparity based on point-of-capture data from 20,994 museum specimens representing 215 lizard species in conjunction with spatially explicit bioclimatic and geographic (elevation and latitude) data layers. The database we analysed emphasized Nearctic lizards from three species-rich genera (Phrynosoma, Plestiodon and Sceloporus); however, we additionally analysed a less substantial, but worldwide sample of species to verify the universality of our Nearctic results. We found that maximum temperature of the warmest month (and, less commonly, elevation and maximum temperature of the driest quarter) was frequently the best predictor of viviparity and showed an association consistent with the CCH. Our results strongly favour the CCH over the MMH in explaining lizard reproductive mode evolution. PMID:25365910

  1. Reproductive mode evolution in lizards revisited: updated analyses examining geographic, climatic and phylogenetic effects support the cold-climate hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Watson, C M; Makowsky, R; Bagley, J C

    2014-12-01

    Viviparity, the bearing of live young, has evolved well over 100 times among squamate reptiles. This reproductive strategy is hypothesized to allow maternal control of the foetus' thermal environment and thereby to increase the fitness of the parents and offspring. Two hypotheses have been posited to explain this phenomenon: (i) the cold-climate hypothesis (CCH), which advocates low temperatures as the primary selective force; and (ii) the maternal manipulation hypothesis (MMH), which advocates temperature variability as the primary selective force. Here, we investigate whether climatic and geographic variables associated with the CCH vs. the MMH best explain the current geographical distributions of viviparity in lizards while incorporating recent advances in comparative methods, squamate phylogenetics and geospatial analysis. To do this, we compared nonphylogenetic and phylogenetic models predicting viviparity based on point-of-capture data from 20,994 museum specimens representing 215 lizard species in conjunction with spatially explicit bioclimatic and geographic (elevation and latitude) data layers. The database we analysed emphasized Nearctic lizards from three species-rich genera (Phrynosoma, Plestiodon and Sceloporus); however, we additionally analysed a less substantial, but worldwide sample of species to verify the universality of our Nearctic results. We found that maximum temperature of the warmest month (and, less commonly, elevation and maximum temperature of the driest quarter) was frequently the best predictor of viviparity and showed an association consistent with the CCH. Our results strongly favour the CCH over the MMH in explaining lizard reproductive mode evolution.

  2. The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2016 update.

    PubMed

    Speir, Matthew L; Zweig, Ann S; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Raney, Brian J; Paten, Benedict; Nejad, Parisa; Lee, Brian T; Learned, Katrina; Karolchik, Donna; Hinrichs, Angie S; Heitner, Steve; Harte, Rachel A; Haeussler, Maximilian; Guruvadoo, Luvina; Fujita, Pauline A; Eisenhart, Christopher; Diekhans, Mark; Clawson, Hiram; Casper, Jonathan; Barber, Galt P; Haussler, David; Kuhn, Robert M; Kent, W James

    2016-01-01

    For the past 15 years, the UCSC Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu/) has served the international research community by offering an integrated platform for viewing and analyzing information from a large database of genome assemblies and their associated annotations. The UCSC Genome Browser has been under continuous development since its inception with new data sets and software features added frequently. Some release highlights of this year include new and updated genome browsers for various assemblies, including bonobo and zebrafish; new gene annotation sets; improvements to track and assembly hub support; and a new interactive tool, the "Data Integrator", for intersecting data from multiple tracks. We have greatly expanded the data sets available on the most recent human assembly, hg38/GRCh38, to include updated gene prediction sets from GENCODE, more phenotype- and disease-associated variants from ClinVar and ClinGen, more genomic regulatory data, and a new multiple genome alignment.

  3. The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2016 update.

    PubMed

    Speir, Matthew L; Zweig, Ann S; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Raney, Brian J; Paten, Benedict; Nejad, Parisa; Lee, Brian T; Learned, Katrina; Karolchik, Donna; Hinrichs, Angie S; Heitner, Steve; Harte, Rachel A; Haeussler, Maximilian; Guruvadoo, Luvina; Fujita, Pauline A; Eisenhart, Christopher; Diekhans, Mark; Clawson, Hiram; Casper, Jonathan; Barber, Galt P; Haussler, David; Kuhn, Robert M; Kent, W James

    2016-01-01

    For the past 15 years, the UCSC Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu/) has served the international research community by offering an integrated platform for viewing and analyzing information from a large database of genome assemblies and their associated annotations. The UCSC Genome Browser has been under continuous development since its inception with new data sets and software features added frequently. Some release highlights of this year include new and updated genome browsers for various assemblies, including bonobo and zebrafish; new gene annotation sets; improvements to track and assembly hub support; and a new interactive tool, the "Data Integrator", for intersecting data from multiple tracks. We have greatly expanded the data sets available on the most recent human assembly, hg38/GRCh38, to include updated gene prediction sets from GENCODE, more phenotype- and disease-associated variants from ClinVar and ClinGen, more genomic regulatory data, and a new multiple genome alignment. PMID:26590259

  4. Evidence supporting primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases with statins: Gaps between updated clinical results and actual practice.

    PubMed

    Bruckert, Eric; Ferrières, Jean

    2014-03-01

    The use of pharmacological lipid-lowering intervention in individuals with hypercholesterolaemia and known cardiovascular disease or diabetes/chronic kidney disease is well established. Current European Society of Cardiology guidelines recommend immediate initiation of drugs in adjunct to lifestyle intervention in these patients at high or very high cardiovascular risk. In these clinical settings, statins are generally chosen as the first-choice drug intervention, in consideration of the robust evidence showing a reduction in all-cause mortality and major adverse cardiac events (MACE). In contrast, primary prevention with statins, even in the subset of patients at high-risk of cardiovascular events, is not well implemented. This might be related to a lack of public awareness regarding the actual risk associated with prolonged exposure to high concentrations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and uncertainties in the clinical evidence coming from the earliest trials in this patient subset. However, recent observational studies suggest that lowering LDL-C earlier in life and for a longer duration can substantially decrease the burden of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Moreover, results from recent well-conducted large meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials showed that primary prevention with statins reduced all-cause mortality by 14% and MACE by > 20% - findings similar to those observed for the use of statins in secondary prevention. Recently published American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology guidelines on the treatment of blood cholesterol emphasize that primary prevention using high-dose statins in individuals with LDL-C ≥ 190 mg/dL induces a benefit in atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk reduction that clearly exceeds the potential for adverse effects. We aim in this review to discuss the new data that advocate the use of statins in primary prevention earlier and more frequently, putting the efficacy evidence into

  5. IMPACTING POPULATION CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH THROUGH A COMMUNITY-BASED PRACTICE NETWORK: UPDATE ON AN ASH-SUPPORTED COLLABORATIVE

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Brent M.; Laken, Marilyn A.; Wagner, C. Shaun; Mack, Sheryl S.; Seymour-Edwards, Kim; Dodson, John; Zhao, Yumin; Lackland, Daniel T.

    2011-01-01

    The Hypertension Initiative began in 1999 to help transition South Carolina from a leader in cardiovascular disease (CVD) to a model of heart and vascular health. Goals were to reduce heart disease and stroke 50% by promoting healthy lifestyles and access to effective care and medications. Continuing medical education was used to train providers, encourage physicians to become American Society of Hypertension (ASH) certified Hypertension Specialists and recruit practices into the community-based practice network (CBPN). Practice data audit with provider specific feedback is a key quality improvement tool. With ASH support, the CBPN has grown to 197 practices with ~1.6 million patients (~700,000 hypertensives). Clinical data are obtained from electronic health records and quarterly provider feedback reports generated. Hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes control rose and South Carolina improved from 51st to 35th in CVD mortality from 1995 to 2006. The Hypertension Initiative expanded to the Outpatient Quality Improvement Network to encompass comparative effectiveness research and other chronic diseases. Lessons learned include: trust enables success, addressing practice priorities powers participation, infrastructure support must be multilateral, strategic planning identifies opportunities and pitfalls. A collaborative practice network is attainable that produces positive, sustainable, and growing impacts on cardiovascular and other chronic diseases. PMID:21806763

  6. Description and status update on GELLO: a proposed standardized object-oriented expression language for clinical decision support.

    PubMed

    Sordo, Margarita; Boxwala, Aziz A; Ogunyemi, Omolola; Greenes, Robert A

    2004-01-01

    A major obstacle to sharing computable clinical knowledge is the lack of a common language for specifying expressions and criteria. Such a language could be used to specify decision criteria, formulae, and constraints on data and action. Al-though the Arden Syntax addresses this problem for clinical rules, its generalization to HL7's object-oriented data model is limited. The GELLO Expression language is an object-oriented language used for expressing logical conditions and computations in the GLIF3 (GuideLine Interchange Format, v. 3) guideline modeling language. It has been further developed under the auspices of the HL7 Clinical Decision Support Technical Committee, as a proposed HL7 standard., GELLO is based on the Object Constraint Language (OCL), because it is vendor-independent, object-oriented, and side-effect-free. GELLO expects an object-oriented data model. Although choice of model is arbitrary, standardization is facilitated by ensuring that the data model is compatible with the HL7 Reference Information Model (RIM).

  7. Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient: update. Consensus SEMICYUC-SENPE: gastrointestinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Álvarez, C; Zabarte Martínez de Aguirre, M; Bordejé Laguna, L

    2011-11-01

    Gastrointestinal surgery and critical illness place tremendous stress on the body, resulting in a series of metabolic changes that may lead to severe malnutrition, which in turn can increase postsurgical complications and morbidity and mortality and prolong the hospital length of stay. In these patients, parenteral nutrition is the most widely used form of nutritional support, but administration of enteral nutrition early in the postoperative period is effective and well tolerated, reducing infectious complications, improving wound healing and reducing length of hospital stay. Calorie-protein requirements do not differ from those in other critically-ill patients and depend on the patient's underlying process and degree of metabolic stress. In patients intolerant to enteral nutrition, especially if the intolerance is due to increased gastric residual volume, prokinetic agents can be used to optimize calorie intake. When proximal sutures are used, tubes allowing early jejunal feeding should be used. Pharmaconutrition is indicated in these patients, who benefit from enteral administration of arginine, omega 3 and RNA, as well as parenteral glutamine supplementation. Parenteral nutrition should be started in patients with absolute contraindication for use of the gastrointestinal tract or as complementary nutrition if adequate energy intake is not achieved through the enteral route.

  8. SEI: An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peach, Lewis L., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An update on the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) is given in viewgraph form. Topics covered include the key prerequisites of human exploration, project planning, Mars and lunar explorations, supporting technologies, near-term strategies for SEI, human support elements, and Space Station Freedom SEI accommodations.

  9. Multiscale satellite and spatial information and analysis framework in support of a large-area forest monitoring and inventory update.

    PubMed

    Wulder, Michael A; White, Joanne C; Gillis, Mark D; Walsworth, Nick; Hansen, Matthew C; Potapov, Peter

    2010-11-01

    Many countries undertake a national forest inventory to enable statistically valid monitoring in support of national and international reporting of forest conditions and change. Canada's National Forest Inventory (NFI) program is designed to operate on a 10-year remeasurement cycle, with an interim report produced at the 5-year mid-point. The NFI is a sample-based inventory, with approximately 18,850 2×2-km photo plots across the country, distributed on a 20×20-km grid of sample points; these photo plots are the primary data source for the NFI. Capacity to provide annual monitoring information is required to keep policy and decision makers apprised of current forest conditions. In this study, we implemented a multistage monitoring framework and used a Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) change product to successfully identify 78% of the changes in forest cover area that were captured with a Landsat change detection approach. Of the NFI photo plots that were identified by both the Landsat and MODIS approaches as having changes in forest cover, the proportion of change area within the plots was similar (R2=0.78). Approximately 70% of the Landsat-derived change events occupied less than 40% of a single MODIS pixel, and more than 90% of the change events of this size were successfully detected with the MODIS product. Finally, MODIS estimates of the proportion of forest cover change at the NFI photo plot level were comparable to change estimates for the ecoregions as a whole (R2=0.95). High-temporal, low-spatial resolution imagery such as MODIS, in combination with other remotely sensed data sources, can provide information on disturbance events within a national forest inventory remeasurement cycle, thereby satisfying the interim information needs of policy and decision makers as well as the requirements of national and international reporting commitments.

  10. [Osmolality of frequently consumed beverages].

    PubMed

    Dini, Elizabeth; De Abreu, Jorge; López, Emeris

    2004-12-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the osmolality of beverages frequently consumed by children and adolescents due to the scarce information available in our country. The samples were grouped as follows: milks; refreshments; beverages based on fruits, vegetables, cereals, and tubers; sport drinks; energizing drinks; oral rehydrating solutions; reconstituted drinks and infusions. A vapor pressure digital osmometer was used, five samples of each beverage from different lots were analyzed. Four osmolality determinations were made on each sample and the average of such values was calculated. When the variation coefficient of the osmolality measurements of the five samples was higher than 10%, five additional samples were analyzed. As many samples as possible were used with breast milk in the time period of the study. Osmolality averages, standard deviation, and the osmolality confidence intervals (95% reliability) were calculated. The osmolality (mmol/kg) of breast milk and that of cow milk were between 273 and 389; refreshments, white, black and flavored colas, and malts ranged between 479-811; and soda and light drinks: 44-62; fresh fruit and commercial drinks (coconut, peach, apple, orange, pear, pineapple, grape, plum, tamarind): 257-1152 and light juices: 274; sports beverages: 367; energizing drinks: 740; drinks based on vegetables and cereals: 213-516; oral rehydrating solutions: 236-397; reconstituted drinks: 145; infusions: 25. Beverages with adequate osmolality levels for children were: milks, light refreshments, soda, fresh and light juices, oral rehydrating, soy, and reconstituted drinks and infusions.

  11. [Osmolality of frequently consumed beverages].

    PubMed

    Dini, Elizabeth; De Abreu, Jorge; López, Emeris

    2004-12-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the osmolality of beverages frequently consumed by children and adolescents due to the scarce information available in our country. The samples were grouped as follows: milks; refreshments; beverages based on fruits, vegetables, cereals, and tubers; sport drinks; energizing drinks; oral rehydrating solutions; reconstituted drinks and infusions. A vapor pressure digital osmometer was used, five samples of each beverage from different lots were analyzed. Four osmolality determinations were made on each sample and the average of such values was calculated. When the variation coefficient of the osmolality measurements of the five samples was higher than 10%, five additional samples were analyzed. As many samples as possible were used with breast milk in the time period of the study. Osmolality averages, standard deviation, and the osmolality confidence intervals (95% reliability) were calculated. The osmolality (mmol/kg) of breast milk and that of cow milk were between 273 and 389; refreshments, white, black and flavored colas, and malts ranged between 479-811; and soda and light drinks: 44-62; fresh fruit and commercial drinks (coconut, peach, apple, orange, pear, pineapple, grape, plum, tamarind): 257-1152 and light juices: 274; sports beverages: 367; energizing drinks: 740; drinks based on vegetables and cereals: 213-516; oral rehydrating solutions: 236-397; reconstituted drinks: 145; infusions: 25. Beverages with adequate osmolality levels for children were: milks, light refreshments, soda, fresh and light juices, oral rehydrating, soy, and reconstituted drinks and infusions. PMID:15602899

  12. Legislative update.

    PubMed

    1999-04-01

    Updates are presented from nine States on HIV-related legislation. Legislative topics include HIV case surveillance, testing, corrections, safety of health-care workers, HIV status notification, the definition of disability, viatical settlements, and confidentiality breaches. PMID:11366638

  13. Focus Group Study Exploring Factors Related to Frequent Sickness Absence

    PubMed Central

    van Rhenen, Willem

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Research investigating frequent sickness absence (3 or more episodes per year) is scarce and qualitative research from the perspective of frequent absentees themselves is lacking. The aim of the current study is to explore awareness, determinants of and solutions to frequent sickness absence from the perspective of frequent absentees themselves. Methods We performed a qualitative study of 3 focus group discussions involving a total of 15 frequent absentees. Focus group discussions were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Results were analyzed with the Graneheim method using the Job Demands Resources (JD–R) model as theoretical framework. Results Many participants were not aware of their frequent sickness absence and the risk of future long-term sickness absence. As determinants, participants mentioned job demands, job resources, home demands, poor health, chronic illness, unhealthy lifestyles, and diminished feeling of responsibility to attend work in cases of low job resources. Managing these factors and improving communication (skills) were regarded as solutions to reduce frequent sickness absence. Conclusions The JD–R model provided a framework for determinants of and solutions to frequent sickness absence. Additional determinants were poor health, chronic illness, unhealthy lifestyles, and diminished feeling of responsibility to attend work in cases of low job resources. Frequent sickness absence should be regarded as a signal that something is wrong. Managers, supervisors, and occupational health care providers should advise and support frequent absentees to accommodate job demands, increase both job and personal resources, and improve health rather than express disapproval of frequent sickness absence and apply pressure regarding work attendance. PMID:26872050

  14. Frequent Subgraph Discovery in Large Attributed Streaming Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Abhik; Holder, Larry; Choudhury, Sutanay

    2014-08-13

    The problem of finding frequent subgraphs in large dynamic graphs has so far only consid- ered a dynamic graph as being represented by a series of static snapshots taken at various points in time. This representation of a dynamic graph does not lend itself well to real time processing of real world graphs like social networks or internet traffic which consist of a stream of nodes and edges. In this paper we propose an algorithm that discovers the frequent subgraphs present in a graph represented by a stream of labeled nodes and edges. Our algorithm is efficient and consists of tunable parameters that can be tuned by the user to get interesting patterns from various kinds of graph data. In our model updates to the graph arrive in the form of batches which contain new nodes and edges. Our algorithm con- tinuously reports the frequent subgraphs that are estimated to be found in the entire graph as each batch arrives. We evaluate our system using 5 large dynamic graph datasets: the Hetrec 2011 challenge data, Twitter, DBLP and two synthetic. We evaluate our approach against two popular large graph miners, i.e., SUBDUE and GERM. Our experimental re- sults show that we can find the same frequent subgraphs as a non-incremental approach applied to snapshot graphs, and in less time.

  15. Working Memory Updating as a Predictor of Academic Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lechuga, M. Teresa; Pelegrina, Santiago; Pelaez, Jose L.; Martin-Puga, M. Eva; Justicia, M. Jose

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence supporting the importance of executive functions, and specifically working memory updating (WMU), for children's academic achievement. This study aimed to assess the specific contribution of updating to the prediction of academic performance. Two updating tasks, which included different updating components, were…

  16. Update '98.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mock, Karen R.

    1998-01-01

    Updates cases and issues previously discussed in this regular column on human rights in Canada, including racism and anti-Semitism, laws on hate crimes, hate sites on the World Wide Web, the use of the "free speech" defense by hate groups, and legal challenges to antiracist groups by individuals criticized by them. (DSK)

  17. Memory Updating and Mental Arithmetic

    PubMed Central

    Han, Cheng-Ching; Yang, Tsung-Han; Lin, Chia-Yuan; Yen, Nai-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Is domain-general memory updating ability predictive of calculation skills or are such skills better predicted by the capacity for updating specifically numerical information? Here, we used multidigit mental multiplication (MMM) as a measure for calculating skill as this operation requires the accurate maintenance and updating of information in addition to skills needed for arithmetic more generally. In Experiment 1, we found that only individual differences with regard to a task updating numerical information following addition (MUcalc) could predict the performance of MMM, perhaps owing to common elements between the task and MMM. In Experiment 2, new updating tasks were designed to clarify this: a spatial updating task with no numbers, a numerical task with no calculation, and a word task. The results showed that both MUcalc and the spatial task were able to predict the performance of MMM but only with the more difficult problems, while other updating tasks did not predict performance. It is concluded that relevant processes involved in updating the contents of working memory support mental arithmetic in adults. PMID:26869971

  18. Memory Updating and Mental Arithmetic.

    PubMed

    Han, Cheng-Ching; Yang, Tsung-Han; Lin, Chia-Yuan; Yen, Nai-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Is domain-general memory updating ability predictive of calculation skills or are such skills better predicted by the capacity for updating specifically numerical information? Here, we used multidigit mental multiplication (MMM) as a measure for calculating skill as this operation requires the accurate maintenance and updating of information in addition to skills needed for arithmetic more generally. In Experiment 1, we found that only individual differences with regard to a task updating numerical information following addition (MUcalc) could predict the performance of MMM, perhaps owing to common elements between the task and MMM. In Experiment 2, new updating tasks were designed to clarify this: a spatial updating task with no numbers, a numerical task with no calculation, and a word task. The results showed that both MUcalc and the spatial task were able to predict the performance of MMM but only with the more difficult problems, while other updating tasks did not predict performance. It is concluded that relevant processes involved in updating the contents of working memory support mental arithmetic in adults. PMID:26869971

  19. Response of sensitive behaviors to frequent measurement.

    PubMed

    Axinn, William G; Jennings, Elyse A; Couper, Mick P

    2015-01-01

    We study the influence of frequent survey measurement on behavior. Widespread access to the Internet has made important breakthroughs in frequent measurement possible-potentially revolutionizing social science measurement of processes that change quickly over time. One key concern about using such frequent measurement is that it may influence the behavior being studied. We investigate this possibility using both a population-based experiment with random assignment to participation in a weekly journal for twelve months (versus no journal) and a large-scale, population-based, journal-keeping study with weekly measurement for 30 months. Results reveal few of the measured behaviors are correlated with assignment to frequent measurement. Theoretical reasoning regarding the likely behavioral response to frequent measurement correctly predicts domains most vulnerable to this possibility. Overall, however, we found little evidence of behavioral response to frequent measurement.

  20. Response of Sensitive Behaviors to Frequent Measurement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We study the influence of frequent survey measurement on behavior. Widespread access to the Internet has made important breakthroughs in frequent measurement possible—potentially revolutionizing social science measurement of processes that change quickly over time. One key concern about using such frequent measurement is that it may influence the behavior being studied. We investigate this possibility using both a population-based experiment with random assignment to participation in a weekly journal for twelve months (versus no journal) and a large scale population-based journal-keeping study with weekly measurement for 30 months. Results reveal few of the measured behaviors are correlated with assignment to frequent measurement. Theoretical reasoning regarding the likely behavioral response to frequent measurement correctly predicts domains most vulnerable to this possibility. Overall, however, we found little evidence of behavioral response to frequent measurement. PMID:25432599

  1. DSS command software update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinnett, W. G.

    1980-01-01

    The modifications, additions, and testing results for a version of the Deep Space Station command software, generated for support of the Voyager Saturn encounter, are discussed. The software update requirements included efforts to: (1) recode portions of the software to permit recovery of approximately 2000 words of memory; (2) correct five Voyager Ground data System liens; (3) provide capability to automatically turn off the command processor assembly local printer during periods of low activity; and (4) correct anomalies existing in the software.

  2. 75 FR 31794 - Information Sheet Guidance for Sponsors, Clinical Investigators, and IRBs; Frequently Asked...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-04

    ... FR 5861), which describes FDA's intention to update the process for developing, issuing, and making... Guidances as needed. In the Federal Register of July 29, 2008 (73 FR 43940), FDA announced the availability... Investigators, and IRBs; Frequently Asked Questions--Statement of Investigator (Form FDA 1572);...

  3. 77 FR 19077 - Adoption of Updated EDGAR Filer Manual

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... GAAP and 2012 Mutual Fund Risk/Return Summary Taxonomies; to support period field validation updates... concerning XBRL Taxonomies update contact Walter Hamscher, at (202) 551-5397; in the Division of Trading and... updated to support the US GAAP 2012 Taxonomy and Mutual Fund Risk/Return Summary 2012 Taxonomy. Please...

  4. Recent advances in emergency life support.

    PubMed

    Dries, David J; Sample, Mary Anne

    2002-03-01

    With additional international input, recent changes in emergency life support are reflected in updated guidelines for Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) from the American Heart Association and new technology in the arena of vascular access and emergency airway management. These changes will expand nurses' ability to provide advanced levels of care, even in the prehospital situation, and represent a more rigorous evidence-based approach than ever before. As early morbidity and mortality in emergency situations are frequently associated with complications associated with airway management and vascular access, recent development in these areas are reviewed along with evolution in ACLS guidelines. PMID:11818257

  5. Colloid update.

    PubMed

    Argalious, Maged Y

    2012-01-01

    This update aims to provide an evidence based review of natural and synthetic colloids with a special emphasis on the various generations of the synthetic colloid hydroxyethyl starch. The effect of 1(st), 2(nd) and 3(rd) generation hetastarches on bleeding, coagulopathy, acute kidney injury and mortality will be discussed. The results of randomised controlled trials addressing morbidity and mortality outcomes of colloid versus crystalloid resuscitation in critically ill patients will be described. In addition, the rationale and evidence behind early goal directed fluid therapy (EGDFT) including a practical approach to assessment of dynamic measures of fluid responsiveness will be presented.

  6. Rhabdomyolysis updated

    PubMed Central

    Efstratiadis, G; Voulgaridou, A; Nikiforou, D; Kyventidis, A; Kourkouni, E; Vergoulas, G

    2007-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis constitutes a common cause of acute renal failure and presents paramount interest. A large variety of causes with different pathogenetic mechanisms can involve skeletal muscles resulting in rhabdomyolysis with or without acute renal failure. Crush syndrome, one of the most common causes of rhabdomyolysis presents increased clinical interest, particularly in areas often involved by earthquakes, such as Greece and Turkey. Drug abusers are another sensitive group of young patients prone to rhabdomyolysis, which attracts the clinical interest of a variety of medical specialties. We herein review the evidence extracted from updated literature concerning the data related to pathogenetic mechanisms and pathophysiology as well as the management of this interesting syndrome. PMID:19582207

  7. Frequently Asked Questions about Digital Mammography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Information (MQSA) Frequently Asked Questions About Digital Mammography Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... mammography exams, such as DBT? What is digital mammography? Full field digital mammography (FFDM, also known simply ...

  8. Frequently Asked Questions (Palliative Care: Conversations Matter)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Questions Frequently Asked Questions: What is pediatric palliative care? Pediatric palliative (pal-lee-uh-tiv) care is ... for patients and families. Who provides pediatric palliative care? Every palliative care team is different. The team ...

  9. Head Lice: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

  10. Head Lice: Treatment Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

  11. Body Lice Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

  12. Frequently Asked Questions about Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... used on this page Frequently Asked Questions About Genetic Disorders What are genetic disorders? A genetic disorder is a disease caused ... significant risk of developing the disease. . Geneticists group genetic disorders into three categories: Monogenetic disorders are caused ...

  13. Frequently Asked Questions about Genetic Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... sobre las pruebas genéticas Frequently Asked Questions About Genetic Testing What is genetic testing? What can I ... find more information about genetic testing? What is genetic testing? Genetic testing uses laboratory methods to look ...

  14. Frequent patterns mining in multiple biological sequences.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Liu, Wei

    2013-10-01

    Existing algorithms for mining frequent patterns in multiple biosequences may generate multiple projected databases and short candidate patterns, which can increase computation time and memory requirement. In order to overcome such shortcomings, we propose a fast and efficient algorithm for mining frequent patterns in multiple biological sequences (MSPM). We first present the concept of a primary pattern, which can be extended to form larger patterns in the sequence. To detect frequent primary patterns, a prefix tree is constructed. Based on this prefix tree, a pattern-extending approach is also presented to mine frequent patterns without producing a large number of irrelevant candidate patterns. The experimental results show that the MSPM algorithm can achieve not only faster speed, but also higher quality results as compared with other methods. PMID:24034736

  15. Women and Diabetes: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A A Listen En Español Women and Diabetes: Frequently Asked Questions Why are women with diabetes ... 08-book-sabores-de-cuba.html More from diabetes.org Shopdiabetes.org: Take the Guesswork out of ...

  16. Levetiracetam: Probably Associated Diurnal Frequent Urination.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jun; Zou, Li-Ping; Shi, Xiu-Yu; Hu, Lin-Yan; Pang, Ling-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Diurnal frequent urination is a common condition in elementary school children who are especially at risk for associated somatic and behavioral problems. Levetiracetam (LEV) is a broad-spectrum antiepileptic drug that has been used in both partial and generalized seizures and less commonly adverse effects including psychiatric and behavioral problems. Diurnal frequent urination is not a well-known adverse effect of LEV. Here, we reported 2 pediatric cases with epilepsy that developed diurnal frequent urination after LEV administration. Case 1 was a 6-year-old male patient who presented urinary frequency and urgency in the daytime since the third day after LEV was given as adjunctive therapy. Symptoms increased accompanied by the raised dosage of LEV. Laboratory tests and auxiliary examinations did not found evidence of organic disease. Diurnal frequent urination due to LEV was suspected, and then the drug was discontinued. As expected, his frequency of urination returned to normal levels. Another 13-year-old female patient got similar clinical manifestations after oral LEV monotherapy and the symptoms became aggravated while in stress state. Since the most common causes of frequent micturition had been ruled out, the patient was considered to be diagnosed with LEV-associated psychogenic frequent urination. The dosage of LEV was reduced to one-third, and the frequency of urination was reduced by 60%. Both patients got the Naranjo score of 6, which indicated that LEV was a "probable" cause of diurnal frequent urination. Although a definite causal link between LEV and diurnal urinary frequency in the 2 cases remains to be established, we argue that diurnal frequent urination associated with LEV deserves clinician's attention. PMID:26938751

  17. Model updating of damped structures using FRF data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, R. M.; Zhu, J.

    2006-11-01

    Due to the important contribution of damping on structural vibration, model updating of damped structures becomes significant and remains an issue in most model updating methods developed to date. In this paper, the frequency response function(FRF) method, which is one of the most frequently referenced model updating methods, has been further developed to identify damping matrices of structural systems, as well as mass and stiffness matrices. In order to overcome the problem of complexity of measured FRF and modal data, complex updating formulations using FRF data to identify damping coefficients have been established for the cases of proportional damping and general non-proportional damping. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed complex FRF updating method, numerical simulations based on the GARTEUR structure with structural damping have been presented. The updated results have shown that the complex FRF updating method can be used to derive accurate updated mass and stiffness modelling errors and system damping matrices.

  18. Document Update and Compare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoch, C. F.; Caldwell, D. C.; Caldwell, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    Document Update and Compare programs provide simple computerized documentmaintenance system on Data General NOVA 840 computer. Document Update program allows user to update document either by batch or terminal input. Documents are modified and lists of modifications printed out.

  19. Predictability of persistent frequent attendance: a historic 3-year cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Frans ThM; Brouwer, Henk J; van Weert, Henk CP; Schene, Aart H; ter Riet, Gerben

    2009-01-01

    Background Few patients who attend GP consultations frequently continue to do so long term. While transient frequent attendance may be readily explicable, persistent frequent attendance often is not. It increases GPs' workload while reducing work satisfaction. It is neither reasonable, nor efficient to target diagnostic assessment and intervention at transient frequent attenders. Aim To develop a prediction rule for selecting persistent frequent attenders, using readily available information from GPs' electronic medical records. Design of study A historic 3-year cohort study. Method Data of 28 860 adult patients from 2003 to 2005 were examined. Frequent attenders were patients whose attendance rate ranked in the (age- and sex-adjusted) top 10% during 1 year (1-year frequent attenders) or 3 years (persistent frequent attenders). Bootstrapped multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to determine which predictors contained information on persistent frequent attendance. Results Of 3045 1-year frequent attenders, 470 (15.4%) became persistent frequent attenders. The prediction rule could update this prior probability to 3.3% (lowest value) or 43.3% (highest value). However, the 10th and 90th centiles of the posterior probability distribution were 7.4% and 26.3% respectively, indicating that the model performs modestly. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.67 (95% confidence limits 0.64 and 0.69). Conclusion Among 1-year frequent attenders, six out of seven are transient frequent attenders. With the present indicators, the rule developed performs modestly in selecting those more likely to become persistent frequent attenders. PMID:19192367

  20. [Pharmacovigilance update].

    PubMed

    Diezi, Léonore; Renard, Delphine; Rothuizen, Laura E; Livio, Françoise

    2014-01-15

    The main pharmacovigilance updates in 2013 are reviewed. Nitrofurantoin: lower efficacy and an increased risk of adverse events when creatinine clearance is below 60 ml/min. Dabigatran: contraindicated in patients with mechanical heart valves. Azithromycin: QT prolongation and increased risk of death. Zolpidem: towards a lower dosage. Roflumilast: avoid in patients known or at risk for mood disorders. Retigabine: indication restricted to last-line use and new monitoring requirements after reports of pigment changes in retina and other tissues. Telaprevir and rituximab: severe mucocutaneous reactions. Fingolimod: rare cases of progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy. Tolvaptan: potential for hepatotoxicity. Nicotinic acid/laropiprant: suspension of marketing authorization as benefits no longer outweigh risks. PMID:24558915

  1. Fathers Can Support Breastfeeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... System Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Fathers Supporting Breastfeeding Last Published: 05/26/2016 Email Updates Click ... in each of the materials. FATHERS CAN SUPPORT BREASTFEEDING Poster - FNS 354 Be a Part of the ...

  2. Auditory Training with Frequent Communication Partners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tye-Murray, Nancy; Spehar, Brent; Sommers, Mitchell; Barcroft, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Individuals with hearing loss engage in auditory training to improve their speech recognition. They typically practice listening to utterances spoken by unfamiliar talkers but never to utterances spoken by their most frequent communication partner (FCP)--speech they most likely desire to recognize--under the assumption that familiarity…

  3. How Frequently Are Elementary Students Writing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunflower, Cherlyn; Crawford, Leslie W.

    A study examined elementary school writing instruction to determine (1) how frequently students are writing, (2) when in the curriculum writing occurs, and (3) in what forms the writing occurs. Data were collected in 75 elementary classrooms in 25 midwestern schools during a 15-day period. The data deviated little from what D. Graves reported in…

  4. Frequent Collaborative Quiz Taking and Conceptual Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rezaei, Ali R.

    2015-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study reports on the effectiveness of three assessment strategies for students' performance. The primary goal was to determine whether there are any improvements in students' conceptual learning when a frequent (weekly) quiz is used for grading purposes compared to using midterm and final examinations only. Another goal was…

  5. Supporting Students in Close Reading. From the College and Career Ready Standards to Teaching and Learning in the Classroom: A Series of Resources for Teachers. Updated February 2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Barbara; Chang, Sandy; Heritage, Margaret; Tobiason, Glory; Herman, Joan

    2015-01-01

    This resource is part of a series produced by the Center for Standards and Assessment Implementation (CSAI) to assist teachers and those who support teachers to plan teaching and learning from College and Career Ready Standards (CCRS) for all students, including students with disabilities, English learners, academically at-risk students, students…

  6. EPA DSSTox and ToxCast Project Updates: Generating New Data and Linkages in Support of Public Toxico-Cheminformatics Efforts

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s National Center for Computational Toxicology is generating data and capabilities to support a new paradigm for toxicity screening and prediction. The DSSTox project is improving public access to quality structure-annotated chemical toxicity information in less summarized fo...

  7. Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient: update. Consensus SEMICYUC-SENPE: liver failure and liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Montejo González, J C; Mesejo, A; Bonet Saris, A

    2011-11-01

    Patients with liver failure have a high prevalence of malnutrition, which is related to metabolic abnormalities due to the liver disease, reduced nutrient intake and alterations in digestive function, among other factors. In general, in patients with liver failure, metabolic and nutritional support should aim to provide adequate nutrient intake and, at the same time, to contribute to patients' recovery through control or reversal of metabolic alterations. In critically-ill patients with liver failure, current knowledge indicates that the organ failure is not the main factor to be considered when choosing the nutritional regimen. As in other critically-ill patients, the enteral route should be used whenever possible. The composition of the nutritional formula should be adapted to the patient's metabolic stress. Despite the physiopathological basis classically described by some authors who consider amino acid imbalance to be a triggering factor and key element in maintaining encephalopathy, there are insufficient data to recommend "specific" solutions (branched-chain amino acid-enriched with low aromatic amino acids) as part of nutritional support in patients with acute liver failure. In patients undergoing liver transplantation, nutrient intake should be started early in the postoperative period through transpyloric access. Prevention of the hepatic alterations associated with nutritional support should also be considered in distinct clinical scenarios. PMID:22411515

  8. Interim Control Strategy for the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Sewage Treatment Facility Disposal Pond - Two-year Update

    SciTech Connect

    L. V. Street

    2007-04-01

    The Idaho Cleanup Project has prepared this interim control strategy for the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office pursuant to DOE Order 5400.5, Chapter 11.3e (1) to support continued discharges to the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Sewage Treatment Facility Disposal Pond. In compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, a 2-year review of the Interim Control Strategy document has been completed. This submittal documents the required review of the April 2005 Interim Control Strategy. The Idaho Cleanup Project's recommendation is unchanged from the original recommendation. The Interim Control Strategy evaluates three alternatives: (1) re-route the discharge outlet to an uncontaminated area of the TSF-07; (2) construct a new discharge pond; or (3) no action based on justification for continued use. Evaluation of Alternatives 1 and 2 are based on the estimated cost and implementation timeframe weighed against either alternative's minimal increase in protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Evaluation of Alternative 3, continued use of the TSF-07 Disposal Pond under current effluent controls, is based on an analysis of four points: - Record of Decision controls will protect workers and the public - Risk of increased contamination is low - Discharge water will be eliminated in the foreseeable future - Risk of contamination spread is acceptable. The Idaho Cleanup Project recommends Alternative 3, no action other than continued implementation of existing controls and continued deactivation, decontamination, and dismantlement efforts at the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility.

  9. An Update of the Ground Testing of the Li-ion Batteries in Support of JPL's 2003 Mars Exploration Rover Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Ewell, R. C.; Whitcanack, L. D.; Surampudi, S.; Puglia, F.; Gitzendanner, R.

    2006-01-01

    In early 2004, JPL successfully landed two Rovers, named Spirit and Opportunity, on the surface of Mars after traveling > 300 million miles over a 6-7 month period. In order to operate for extended duration (>9 months), both Rovers are equipped with rechargeable Lithium-ion batteries, which have enabled operation for over 854 and 834 Sols of operation, respectively, to date. Given that the batteries were required to support the mission for 90 Sols of operation by design, it is significant that the batteries have demonstrated over a nine fold increase in life over mission objectives. In addition to supporting the surface operations in conjunction with a triple-junction deployable solar arrays, the batteries were designed to aid in the launch and the EDL pyros, and allow for anomalies during cruise. In summary, the requirements of the Lithium-ion battery include the ability to provide power at least 90 sols on the surface of Mars, operate over a wide temperature range (-20 C to +30 C), withstand long storage periods (e.g., cruise period), operate in an inverted orientation, and support high current pulses (e.g., firing pyro events). In order to determine the viability of meeting these requirements, ground testing was performed on a Rover Battery Assembly Unit (RBAU), consisting of two 8-cell 10 Ah lithium-ion batteries connected in parallel. The RBAU upon which the performance testing was performed is nearly identical to the batteries incorporated into the two Rovers currently on Mars. The testing includes, (a) performing initial characterization tests (discharge capacity at different temperatures), (b) simulating the launch conditions, (c) simulating the cruise phase conditions (including trajectory correction maneuvers), (d) simulating the entry, decent, and landing (EDL) pulse load profile (required to support the pyros) (e) simulating the Mars surface operation mission simulation conditions, as well as, (f) assessing capacity loss and impedance characteristics as

  10. Understanding those who seek frequent psychiatric hospitalizations.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Phyllis; Kirkpatrick, Helen

    2002-02-01

    In the period after deinstitutionalization, there has been a rise in hospital readmission rates. It is estimated that the readmission rate for individuals who are frequent users of psychiatric inpatient services is approximately 40% to 50% within 1 year of hospital discharge. Attempts to determine predictors of recidivism have identified multiple variables, some of which are mutually contradictory. Furthermore, comparison among studies is difficult given methodological and theoretical limitations. Despite such issues, however, one consistent predictor of frequent rehospitalization is a person's history of past psychiatric hospital admissions. It seems that those who have shown a pattern of seeking inpatient services in the past tend to repeat this treatment-seeking behavior. The aim of this report is to critically examine some of the predictors of rehospitalization. A better understanding of those who engage in the persistent pattern of seeking inpatient services may assist nurses in planning care that is more suited for their needs. PMID:11877602

  11. Early illness recognition using frequent motif discovery.

    PubMed

    Hajihashemi, Zahra; Popescu, Mihail

    2015-08-01

    Living alone in their own residence, older adults are at risk for late assessment of physical or cognitive changes due to many factors such as their impression that such changes are simply a normal part of aging or their reluctance to admit to a problem. This paper describes an early illness recognition framework using sensor network technology to identify the health trajectory of older adults reflected in patterns of day-today activities. Describing the behavior of older adults could help clinicians to identify those at the greatest risk for functional decline and adverse events. The proposed framework, denoted as Abnormal Frequent Activity Pattern (AFAP), is based on the identification of known past abnormal frequent activities in current sensor data. More specifically, AFAP declares a day abnormal when past frequent abnormal behavior patterns, not found during normal days, are discovered in the current activity data. While AFAP requires the labeling of past days as normal/abnormal, it doesn't need specific activity identification. Frequent activity patterns (FAP) are found using MEME, a bioinformatics motif detection algorithm. To validate our approach, we used data obtained from TigerPlace, an aging in place community situated in Columbia, MO, where apartments are equipped with sensor networks (motion, bed and depth sensors). A retrospective multiple case study (N=3) design was used to quantify the in-home older adult's daily routines, over a period of two weeks. Within-person variability of routine activities may be used as a new predictor in the study of health trajectories of older adults. PMID:26737096

  12. Recommendations on frequently encountered relief requests

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, R.S.; Ransom, C.B.

    1992-09-01

    This paper is based on the review of a large database of requests for relief from enservice testing (1ST) requirements for pumps and valves. From the review, the paper identifies areas where enhancements to either the relief request process or the applicable test codes can improve IST of pumps and valves. Certain types of requests occur frequently. The paper examines some frequent requests and considers possible changes to the requirements to determine if the frequent requests can be eliminated. Recommended changes and their bases will be discussed. IST of safety-related pumps and valves at commercial nuclear power plants is done according to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code), Section XI. Because of the design and function of some safety systems in nuclear plants, performing Code testing of certain pumps and valves is impractical or a hardship without a compensating increase in the level of safety. Deviations from the Code are allowed by law, as reviewed and approved by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), through the relief request process. Because of similarities in plant design and system function, many problems encountered in testing components are similar from plant to plant. Likewise, there are often common problems associated with test methods or equipment. Therefore, many relief requests received by the NRC from various plants are similar. Identifying and addressing the root causes for these common requests will greatly improve IST.

  13. Recommendations on frequently encountered relief requests

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, R.S.; Ransom, C.B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper is based on the review of a large database of requests for relief from enservice testing (1ST) requirements for pumps and valves. From the review, the paper identifies areas where enhancements to either the relief request process or the applicable test codes can improve IST of pumps and valves. Certain types of requests occur frequently. The paper examines some frequent requests and considers possible changes to the requirements to determine if the frequent requests can be eliminated. Recommended changes and their bases will be discussed. IST of safety-related pumps and valves at commercial nuclear power plants is done according to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code), Section XI. Because of the design and function of some safety systems in nuclear plants, performing Code testing of certain pumps and valves is impractical or a hardship without a compensating increase in the level of safety. Deviations from the Code are allowed by law, as reviewed and approved by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), through the relief request process. Because of similarities in plant design and system function, many problems encountered in testing components are similar from plant to plant. Likewise, there are often common problems associated with test methods or equipment. Therefore, many relief requests received by the NRC from various plants are similar. Identifying and addressing the root causes for these common requests will greatly improve IST.

  14. HITRAN2008 and Current Updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, Laurence; Gordon, Iouli

    2010-05-01

    The current edition of the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic database1 appeared in 2008. In the intervening period to the present, there have been several important updates. The archived database, as described in the HITRAN paper, is available at a public ftp site, while critical updates are posted in the HITRAN website (www.cfa.harvard.edu/hitran/updates.html). An international committee meets at least once per year and discusses the many issues involved in improving the database. These issues encompass not only acquisition of new data (both experimental and theoretical), but validation, new directions, etc. In this presentation, we review highlight some of the successes of the current edition of HITRAN. We also discuss new directions. This effort has been supported by the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) program, under the grant NAG5-13534.

  15. Improving User Notification on Frequently Changing HPC Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Fuson, Christopher B; Renaud, William A

    2016-01-01

    Today s HPC centers user environments can be very complex. Centers often contain multiple large complicated computational systems each with their own user environment. Changes to a system s environment can be very impactful; however, a center s user environment is, in one-way or another, frequently changing. Because of this, it is vital for centers to notify users of change. For users, untracked changes can be costly, resulting in unnecessary debug time as well as wasting valuable compute allocations and research time. Communicating frequent change to diverse user communities is a common and ongoing task for HPC centers. This paper will cover the OLCF s current processes and methods used to communicate change to users of the center s large Cray systems and supporting resources. The paper will share lessons learned and goals as well as practices, tools, and methods used to continually improve and reach members of the OLCF user community.

  16. HDF Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pourmal, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The HDF Group maintains and evolves HDF software used by NASA ESDIS program to manage remote sense data. In this talk we will discuss new features of HDF (Virtual Datasets, Single writerMultiple reader access, Community supported HDF5 compression filters) that address storage and IO performance requirements of the applications that work with the ESDIS data products.

  17. Spatially explicit modeling of annual and seasonal habitat for greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in Nevada and Northeastern California—An updated decision-support tool for management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, Peter S.; Casazza, Michael L.; Brussee, Brianne E.; Ricca, Mark A.; Gustafson, K. Benjamin; Sanchez-chopitea, Erika; Mauch, Kimberly; Niell, Lara; Gardner, Scott; Espinosa, Shawn; Delehanty, David J.

    2016-05-20

    Successful adaptive management hinges largely upon integrating new and improved sources of information as they become available. As a timely example of this tenet, we updated a management decision support tool that was previously developed for greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus, hereinafter referred to as “sage-grouse”) populations in Nevada and California. Specifically, recently developed spatially explicit habitat maps derived from empirical data played a key role in the conservation of this species facing listing under the Endangered Species Act. This report provides an updated process for mapping relative habitat suitability and management categories for sage-grouse in Nevada and northeastern California (Coates and others, 2014, 2016). These updates include: (1) adding radio and GPS telemetry locations from sage-grouse monitored at multiple sites during 2014 to the original location dataset beginning in 1998; (2) integrating output from high resolution maps (1–2 m2) of sagebrush and pinyon-juniper cover as covariates in resource selection models; (3) modifying the spatial extent of the analyses to match newly available vegetation layers; (4) explicit modeling of relative habitat suitability during three seasons (spring, summer, winter) that corresponded to critical life history periods for sage-grouse (breeding, brood-rearing, over-wintering); (5) accounting for differences in habitat availability between more mesic sagebrush steppe communities in the northern part of the study area and drier Great Basin sagebrush in more southerly regions by categorizing continuous region-wide surfaces of habitat suitability index (HSI) with independent locations falling within two hydrological zones; (6) integrating the three seasonal maps into a composite map of annual relative habitat suitability; (7) deriving updated land management categories based on previously determined cut-points for intersections of habitat suitability and an updated index of sage

  18. Spatially explicit modeling of annual and seasonal habitat for greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in Nevada and Northeastern California—An updated decision-support tool for management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, Peter S.; Casazza, Michael L.; Brussee, Brianne E.; Ricca, Mark A.; Gustafson, K. Benjamin; Sanchez-chopitea, Erika; Mauch, Kimberly; Niell, Lara; Gardner, Scott; Espinosa, Shawn; Delehanty, David J.

    2016-05-20

    Successful adaptive management hinges largely upon integrating new and improved sources of information as they become available. As a timely example of this tenet, we updated a management decision support tool that was previously developed for greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus, hereinafter referred to as “sage-grouse”) populations in Nevada and California. Specifically, recently developed spatially explicit habitat maps derived from empirical data played a key role in the conservation of this species facing listing under the Endangered Species Act. This report provides an updated process for mapping relative habitat suitability and management categories for sage-grouse in Nevada and northeastern California (Coates and others, 2014, 2016). These updates include: (1) adding radio and GPS telemetry locations from sage-grouse monitored at multiple sites during 2014 to the original location dataset beginning in 1998; (2) integrating output from high resolution maps (1–2 m2) of sagebrush and pinyon-juniper cover as covariates in resource selection models; (3) modifying the spatial extent of the analyses to match newly available vegetation layers; (4) explicit modeling of relative habitat suitability during three seasons (spring, summer, winter) that corresponded to critical life history periods for sage-grouse (breeding, brood-rearing, over-wintering); (5) accounting for differences in habitat availability between more mesic sagebrush steppe communities in the northern part of the study area and drier Great Basin sagebrush in more southerly regions by categorizing continuous region-wide surfaces of habitat suitability index (HSI) with independent locations falling within two hydrological zones; (6) integrating the three seasonal maps into a composite map of annual relative habitat suitability; (7) deriving updated land management categories based on previously determined cut-points for intersections of habitat suitability and an updated index of sage

  19. Frequent video game players resist perceptual interference.

    PubMed

    Berard, Aaron V; Cain, Matthew S; Watanabe, Takeo; Sasaki, Yuka

    2015-01-01

    Playing certain types of video games for a long time can improve a wide range of mental processes, from visual acuity to cognitive control. Frequent gamers have also displayed generalized improvements in perceptual learning. In the Texture Discrimination Task (TDT), a widely used perceptual learning paradigm, participants report the orientation of a target embedded in a field of lines and demonstrate robust over-night improvement. However, changing the orientation of the background lines midway through TDT training interferes with overnight improvements in overall performance on TDT. Interestingly, prior research has suggested that this effect will not occur if a one-hour break is allowed in between the changes. These results have suggested that after training is over, it may take some time for learning to become stabilized and resilient against interference. Here, we tested whether frequent gamers have faster stabilization of perceptual learning compared to non-gamers and examined the effect of daily video game playing on interference of training of TDT with one background orientation on perceptual learning of TDT with a different background orientation. As a result, we found that non-gamers showed overnight performance improvement only on one background orientation, replicating previous results with the interference in TDT. In contrast, frequent gamers demonstrated overnight improvements in performance with both background orientations, suggesting that they are better able to overcome interference in perceptual learning. This resistance to interference suggests that video game playing not only enhances the amplitude and speed of perceptual learning but also leads to faster and/or more robust stabilization of perceptual learning.

  20. Defining frequent attendance in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Frans TM; Mohrs, Jacob J; Beem, Ellen E; Bindels, Patrick JE; van Weert, Henk CPM

    2008-01-01

    Background General practitioners (GPs) or researchers sometimes need to identify frequent attenders (FAs) in order to screen them for unidentified problems and to test specific interventions. We wanted to assess different methods for selecting FAs to identify the most feasible and effective one for use in a general (group) practice. Methods In the second Dutch National Survey of General Practice, data were collected on 375 899 persons registered with 104 practices. Frequent attendance is defined as the top 3% and 10% of enlisted patients in each one-year age-sex group measured during the study year. We used these two selections as our reference standard. We also selected the top 3% and 10% FAs (90 and 97 percentile) based on four selection methods of diminishing preciseness. We compared the test characteristics of these four methods. Results Of all enlisted patients, 24 % did not consult the practice during the study year. The mean number of contacts in the top 10% FAs increased in men from 5.8 (age 15–24 years) to 17.5 (age 64–75 years) and in women from 9.7 to 19.8. In the top 3% of FAs, contacts increased in men from 9.2 to 24.5 and in women from 14 to 27.8. The selection of FAs becomes more precise when smaller age classes are used. All selection methods show acceptable results (kappa 0.849 – 0.942) except the three group method. Conclusion To correctly identify frequent attenders in general practice, we recommend dividing patients into at least three age groups per sex. PMID:18412954

  1. Minimum Hamiltonian Ascent Trajectory Evaluation (MASTRE) program (update to automatic flight trajectory design, performance prediction, and vehicle sizing for support of Shuttle and Shuttle derived vehicles) engineering manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    The Minimum Hamiltonian Ascent Trajectory Evaluation (MASTRE) program and its predecessors, the ROBOT and the RAGMOP programs, have had a long history of supporting MSFC in the simulation of space boosters for the purpose of performance evaluation. The ROBOT program was used in the simulation of the Saturn 1B and Saturn 5 vehicles in the 1960's and provided the first utilization of the minimum Hamiltonian (or min-H) methodology and the steepest ascent technique to solve the optimum trajectory problem. The advent of the Space Shuttle in the 1970's and its complex airplane design required a redesign of the trajectory simulation code since aerodynamic flight and controllability were required for proper simulation. The RAGMOP program was the first attempt to incorporate the complex equations of the Space Shuttle into an optimization tool by using an optimization method based on steepest ascent techniques (but without the min-H methodology). Development of the complex partial derivatives associated with the Space Shuttle configuration and using techniques from the RAGMOP program, the ROBOT program was redesigned to incorporate these additional complexities. This redesign created the MASTRE program, which was referred to as the Minimum Hamiltonian Ascent Shuttle TRajectory Evaluation program at that time. Unique to this program were first-stage (or booster) nonlinear aerodynamics, upper-stage linear aerodynamics, engine control via moment balance, liquid and solid thrust forces, variable liquid throttling to maintain constant acceleration limits, and a total upgrade of the equations used in the forward and backward integration segments of the program. This modification of the MASTRE code has been used to simulate the new space vehicles associated with the National Launch Systems (NLS). Although not as complicated as the Space Shuttle, the simulation and analysis of the NLS vehicles required additional modifications to the MASTRE program in the areas of providing

  2. Plate Boundary Observatory East Region Update and Status: Supporting New Science Through Enhanced Telemetry, Monument Evaluation, and Continued Operations and Maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmann, S. T.

    2012-12-01

    The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) - East Region consists of 280 continuously operating GPS sites in a region that extends from the western border of California to the East Coast of the U.S. We present a number of highlights from the operations and maintenance (O&M) of the network in FY2012. One goal for 2012 was to replace poorly performing stations and another was to fill in some of the gaps in the eastern region of PBO. Accordingly, new GPS sites were installed at several locations across the mid-west, including in Wisconsin and South Dakota. CAYU, a GPS station at Cayuga College, New York also was incorporated into the PBO data flow to replace the poorly performing PBO station, LOZ1. UNAVCO now manages over 20 PBO GPS stations east of the Rocky Mountains, including 2 GPS stations installed in November 2011 as part of an NSF-funded RAPID project to the study of the post-rupture crustal relaxation resulting from the M5.8 Mineral, VA earthquake. PBO engineers also are constructing two additional monuments at five existing PBO sites to compare the performance of different monument types in different geological and tectonic settings. In addition, PBO engineers are upgrading GPS stations in Colorado and New Mexico, which comprise the semi-permanent Rio Grande Rift GPS network, and which have been downloaded manually for over 6 years, to cellular data communications. Lastly, engineers from the PBO-East region continued to support special projects from EarthScope-funded PIs, including Dr. Kristine Larson, who is advancing the use of GPS multipath observations to estimate snow depth (PBO H20) and vegetation growth. In summary, the PBO East Region sub-network state of health remained consistently above 97% throughout 2012, a testament to network hardening completed during the last three years of PBO O&M.

  3. [Pica during pregnancy: a frequently underestimated problem].

    PubMed

    López, Laura Beatriz; Ortega Soler, Carlos Rafael; de Portela, María Luz Pita Martín

    2004-03-01

    Pica is the compulsive intake of non-nutritive substances such as earth, clay, chalk, soap and ice. The most common forms of pica are geophagia or the intake of earth and pagophagia or the intake of ice. The description of this peculiar phenomenon dates back to the Greco-Roman civilization. Its prevalence during pregnancy is generally underestimated. Published data reveal a prevalence of between 8% and 65%. Investigations from Latin America indicate a prevalence of 23% to 44%. It is not clear yet which are the causes that predispose to pica, but they are frequently associated with anemia or iron deficiency during pregnancy. Its diagnosis, which only consists in questioning pregnant women, is generally omitted during prenatal care, probably because health professionals have no knowledge about this disorder. The identification of pica in pregnant women could contribute to the detection of a risk group where it is necessary to implement strategies as regards both the evaluation and the nutritional education.

  4. Frequently asked questions in hypoxia research

    PubMed Central

    Wenger, Roland H; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan; Scholz, Carsten C; Marti, Hugo H; Hoogewijs, David

    2015-01-01

    “What is the O2 concentration in a normoxic cell culture incubator?” This and other frequently asked questions in hypoxia research will be answered in this review. Our intention is to give a simple introduction to the physics of gases that would be helpful for newcomers to the field of hypoxia research. We will provide background knowledge about questions often asked, but without straightforward answers. What is O2 concentration, and what is O2 partial pressure? What is normoxia, and what is hypoxia? How much O2 is experienced by a cell residing in a culture dish in vitro vs in a tissue in vivo? By the way, the O2 concentration in a normoxic incubator is 18.6%, rather than 20.9% or 20%, as commonly stated in research publications. And this is strictly only valid for incubators at sea level. PMID:27774480

  5. Legislative update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arctic Research And Policy Act, H.R. 2292 (Young, R-Alaska) and S. 373 (Murkowski, R-Alaska), would provide comprehensive national policy dealing with national needs and objectives in Arctic and would provide a centralized system for collection and retrieval of scientific data, establish priorities, and provide financial support for basic and applied scientific research. Senate version created a 5-person Arctic Science Council to establish policy and a 9-member commission to make research grants. Also authorized $25 million per year for 5 years. House Science and Technology Committee reported a new version that would establish a 6-member Arctic Research Commission responsible for developing policy and advising government agencies. Passed June 27, 1983 Reported Nov. 10, 1983

  6. [Pharmacovigilance update].

    PubMed

    Livio, F; Ivanyuk, A; Biollaz, J; Rothuizen, L; Buclin, T

    2010-01-20

    Main pharmacovigilance signals and alerts issued in 2009 are reviewed. Efalizumab was withdrawn from the market due to increased risks, including progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and questionable efficacy. New cases of PML are still being reported with rituximab and natalizumab. Rare cases of pure red cell aplasia have been observed with mycophenate. Gastrointestinal perforation, severe skin rashes and various ocular disorders have been reported during erlotinib use. Severe skin rashes have been related to etravirine. Acute renal failure and pancreatitis can occur with exenatide. A link between sitagliptin and pancreatitis is suspected. Raised concerns of causality between insuline glargine and malignant tumors are not supported by strong evidence. Proton pump inhibitors seem to blunt clopidogrel benefit. Aliskiren can cause angioedema. PMID:20170031

  7. Is racecadotril effective for acute diarrhea in children? -First update.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Josefina; Cifuentes, Lorena

    2016-05-06

    This article updates the December 2015 Living FRISBEE (Living FRISBEE: Living FRIendly Summary of the Body of Evidence using Epistemonikos), based on the detection of two systematic reviews not identified in the previous version. Gastroenteritis or acute watery diarrhea is usually a self-limited disease, but it is still associated to substantial healthcare costs and remains a frequent demand for medical care. Racecadotril, an intestinal enkephalinase inhibitor, has been used as treatment because it would decrease the duration of acute diarrhea and fluid loss. However there is still no evidence supporting its routine use. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified five systematic reviews including nine randomized trials relevant for our question. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded racecadotril probably reduces the duration of acute diarrhea in pediatric patients, without increasing adverse effects.

  8. Is racecadotril effective for acute diarrhea in children? -First update.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Josefina; Cifuentes, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    This article updates the December 2015 Living FRISBEE (Living FRISBEE: Living FRIendly Summary of the Body of Evidence using Epistemonikos), based on the detection of two systematic reviews not identified in the previous version. Gastroenteritis or acute watery diarrhea is usually a self-limited disease, but it is still associated to substantial healthcare costs and remains a frequent demand for medical care. Racecadotril, an intestinal enkephalinase inhibitor, has been used as treatment because it would decrease the duration of acute diarrhea and fluid loss. However there is still no evidence supporting its routine use. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified five systematic reviews including nine randomized trials relevant for our question. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded racecadotril probably reduces the duration of acute diarrhea in pediatric patients, without increasing adverse effects. PMID:26731112

  9. Updating representations of temporal intervals.

    PubMed

    Danckert, James; Anderson, Britt

    2015-12-01

    Effectively engaging with the world depends on accurate representations of the regularities that make up that world-what we call mental models. The success of any mental model depends on the ability to adapt to changes-to 'update' the model. In prior work, we have shown that damage to the right hemisphere of the brain impairs the ability to update mental models across a range of tasks. Given the disparate nature of the tasks we have employed in this prior work (i.e. statistical learning, language acquisition, position priming, perceptual ambiguity, strategic game play), we propose that a cognitive module important for updating mental representations should be generic, in the sense that it is invoked across multiple cognitive and perceptual domains. To date, the majority of our tasks have been visual in nature. Given the ubiquity and import of temporal information in sensory experience, we examined the ability to build and update mental models of time. We had healthy individuals complete a temporal prediction task in which intervals were initially drawn from one temporal range before an unannounced switch to a different range of intervals. Separate groups had the second range of intervals switch to one that contained either longer or shorter intervals than the first range. Both groups showed significant positive correlations between perceptual and prediction accuracy. While each group updated mental models of temporal intervals, those exposed to shorter intervals did so more efficiently. Our results support the notion of generic capacity to update regularities in the environment-in this instance based on temporal information. The task developed here is well suited to investigations in neurological patients and in neuroimaging settings.

  10. Updating representations of temporal intervals.

    PubMed

    Danckert, James; Anderson, Britt

    2015-12-01

    Effectively engaging with the world depends on accurate representations of the regularities that make up that world-what we call mental models. The success of any mental model depends on the ability to adapt to changes-to 'update' the model. In prior work, we have shown that damage to the right hemisphere of the brain impairs the ability to update mental models across a range of tasks. Given the disparate nature of the tasks we have employed in this prior work (i.e. statistical learning, language acquisition, position priming, perceptual ambiguity, strategic game play), we propose that a cognitive module important for updating mental representations should be generic, in the sense that it is invoked across multiple cognitive and perceptual domains. To date, the majority of our tasks have been visual in nature. Given the ubiquity and import of temporal information in sensory experience, we examined the ability to build and update mental models of time. We had healthy individuals complete a temporal prediction task in which intervals were initially drawn from one temporal range before an unannounced switch to a different range of intervals. Separate groups had the second range of intervals switch to one that contained either longer or shorter intervals than the first range. Both groups showed significant positive correlations between perceptual and prediction accuracy. While each group updated mental models of temporal intervals, those exposed to shorter intervals did so more efficiently. Our results support the notion of generic capacity to update regularities in the environment-in this instance based on temporal information. The task developed here is well suited to investigations in neurological patients and in neuroimaging settings. PMID:26303026

  11. Substance use treatment barriers for patients with frequent hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Raven, Maria C; Carrier, Emily R; Lee, Joshua; Billings, John C; Marr, Mollie; Gourevitch, Marc N

    2010-01-01

    Substance use (SU) disorders adversely impact health status and contribute to inappropriate health services use. This qualitative study sought to determine SU-related factors contributing to repeated hospitalizations and to identify opportunities for preventive interventions. Fifty Medicaid-insured inpatients identified by a validated statistical algorithm as being at high-risk for frequent hospitalizations were interviewed at an urban public hospital. Patient drug/alcohol history, experiences with medical, psychiatric and addiction treatment, and social factors contributing to readmission were evaluated. Three themes related to SU and frequent hospitalizations emerged: (a) barriers during hospitalization to planning long-term treatment and follow-up, (b) use of the hospital as a temporary solution to housing/family problems, and (c) unsuccessful SU aftercare following discharge. These data indicate that homelessness, brief lengths of stay complicating discharge planning, patient ambivalence regarding long-term treatment, and inadequate detox-to-rehab transfer resources compromise substance-using patients' likelihood of avoiding repeat hospitalization. Intervention targets included supportive housing, detox-to-rehab transportation, and postdischarge patient support.

  12. Psychoneuroimmunology update.

    PubMed

    Kemeny, M E; Gruenewald, T L

    1999-01-01

    Psychoneuroimmunology is the scientific field that investigates linkages between the brain, behavior, and the immune system and the implications of these linkages for physical health and disease. Recent evidence suggests that both naturalistic and laboratory stressors can alter enumerative and functional aspects of the human immune system. Chronic stress may increase vulnerability to infectious disease; however, the role of stress in the course of inflammatory bowel disease remains unclear. Because there are large individual differences in psychological response to stress, it is important to consider the role of cognitive and affective responses to stress. Depression has been associated with functional immune decrements and immune overactivation. Cognitive states such as perceived control, views of the self, and views of the future have been associated with immune parameters and health in some studies. Very few controlled clinical trials have been conducted to determine if psychosocial interventions can impact the immune system and the progression of medical conditions. There is suggestive evidence for the health benefits of relaxation training, cognitive-behavioral stress management, and support groups; but, there is little research on many other psychosocial interventions in widespread use for medical conditions. An evidence-based discussion of this research literature with interested patients may help them make informed decisions regarding adjunctive treatments.

  13. Marginal Entropion: A Frequently Overlooked Eyelid Malposition

    PubMed Central

    Erdoğan, Mustafa; Karadeniz Uğurlu, Şeyda

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the clinical findings and outcomes of surgical treatment in patients with marginal entropion. Materials and Methods: Patients with impairment of the natural square-shaped eyelid margin morphology, anterior migration of mucocutaneous junction and mild lid inversion toward the ocular surface were diagnosed as having marginal entropion. Patients with shortened fornices, cicatricial changes or subconjunctival fibrosis were excluded. Demographic characteristics, ophthalmologic examination findings, surgical procedures and follow-up data were evaluated retrospectively. Results: Twelve eyes of 11 patients were included in the study. Median age was 73 years (range, 49-84 years). All cases presented with signs of meibomianitis and were treated preoperatively with oral doxycycline and topical corticosteroids. Tarsal fracture procedure was performed for correction of lid malposition. In all patients, lid malposition was corrected and ocular irritation findings had regressed. No recurrences were observed in the follow-up period of mean 10 months (range, 5-16 months). Conclusion: Marginal entropion is a common malposition that is frequently misdiagnosed as trichiasis and is overlooked. Complications secondary to misdiagnosis can be avoided and a normal lid position achieved when the correct diagnosis is made. PMID:27800233

  14. Situation model updating in young and older adults: Global versus incremental mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Heather R; Zacks, Jeffrey M

    2015-06-01

    Readers construct mental models of situations described by text. Activity in narrative text is dynamic, so readers must frequently update their situation models when dimensions of the situation change. Updating can be incremental, such that a change leads to updating just the dimension that changed, or global, such that the entire model is updated. Here, we asked whether older and young adults make differential use of incremental and global updating. Participants read narratives containing changes in characters and spatial location and responded to recognition probes throughout the texts. Responses were slower when probes followed a change, suggesting that situation models were updated at changes. When either dimension changed, responses to probes for both dimensions were slowed; this provides evidence for global updating. Moreover, older adults showed stronger evidence of global updating than did young adults. One possibility is that older adults perform more global updating to offset reduced ability to manipulate information in working memory.

  15. Situation Model Updating in Young and Older Adults: Global versus Incremental Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Heather R.; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Readers construct mental models of situations described by text. Activity in narrative text is dynamic, so readers must frequently update their situation models when dimensions of the situation change. Updating can be incremental, such that a change leads to updating just the dimension that changed, or global, such that the entire model is updated. Here, we asked whether older and young adults make differential use of incremental and global updating. Participants read narratives containing changes in characters and spatial location and responded to recognition probes throughout the texts. Responses were slower when probes followed a change, suggesting that situation models were updated at changes. When either dimension changed, responses to probes for both dimensions were slowed; this provides evidence for global updating. Moreover, older adults showed stronger evidence of global updating than did young adults. One possibility is that older adults perform more global updating to offset reduced ability to manipulate information in working memory. PMID:25938248

  16. a Bottom-Up Geosptial Data Update Mechanism for Spatial Data Infrastructure Updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, W.; Zhu, X.; Liu, Y.

    2012-08-01

    Currently, the top-down spatial data update mechanism has made a big progress and it is wildly applied in many SDI (spatial data infrastructure). However, this mechanism still has some issues. For example, the update schedule is limited by the professional department's project, usually which is too long for the end-user; the data form collection to public cost too much time and energy for professional department; the details of geospatial information does not provide sufficient attribute, etc. Thus, how to deal with the problems has become the effective shortcut. Emerging Internet technology, 3S technique and geographic information knowledge which is popular in the public promote the booming development of geoscience in volunteered geospatial information. Volunteered geospatial information is the current "hotspot", which attracts many researchers to study its data quality and credibility, accuracy, sustainability, social benefit, application and so on. In addition to this, a few scholars also pay attention to the value of VGI to support the SDI updating. And on that basis, this paper presents a bottom-up update mechanism form VGI to SDI, which includes the processes of match homonymous elements between VGI and SDI vector data , change data detection, SDI spatial database update and new data product publication to end-users. Then, the proposed updating cycle is deeply discussed about the feasibility of which can detect the changed elements in time and shorten the update period, provide more accurate geometry and attribute data for spatial data infrastructure and support update propagation.

  17. ADAS Update and Maintainability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2000, both the National Weather Service Melbourne (NWS MLB) and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) have used a local data integration system (LOIS) as part of their forecast and warning operations. The original LOIS was developed by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in 1998 (Manobianco and Case 1998) and has undergone subsequent improvements. Each has benefited from three-dimensional (3-D) analyses that are delivered to forecasters every 15 minutes across the peninsula of Florida. The intent is to generate products that enhance short-range weather forecasts issued in support of NWS MLB and SMG operational requirements within East Central Florida. The current LDIS uses the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (AD AS) package as its core, which integrates a wide variety of national, regional, and local observational data sets. It assimilates all available real-time data within its domain and is run at a finer spatial and temporal resolution than current national or regional-scale analysis packages. As such, it provides local forecasters with a more comprehensive understanding of evolving fine-scale weather features. Over the years, the LDIS has become problematic to maintain since it depends on AMU-developed shell scripts that were written for an earlier version of the ADAS software. The goals of this task were to update the NWS MLB/SMG LDIS with the latest version of ADAS, incorporate new sources of observational data, and upgrade and modify the AMU-developed shell scripts written to govern the system. In addition, the previously developed ADAS graphical user interface (GUI) was updated. Operationally, these upgrades will result in more accurate depictions of the current local environment to help with short-range weather forecasting applications, while also offering an improved initialization for local versions of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model used by both groups.

  18. The Effect of Frequent Hemodialysis on Nutrition and Body Composition: Frequent Hemodialysis Network Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kaysen, George A.; Greene, Tom; Larive, Brett; Mehta, Ravindra, L.; Lindsay, Robert; Depner, Tom A.; Hall, Yoshio N.; Daugirdas, John T.; Chertow, Glenn M.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of frequency of hemodialysis on nutritional status by analyzing the data in the Frequent Hemodialysis Network Trial. We compared changes in albumin, body weight and composition among 245 patients randomized to 6- or 3-times per week in-center hemodialysis (Daily Trial) and 87 patients randomized to 6-times per week nocturnal or 3-times per week conventional hemodialysis, performed largely at home (Nocturnal Trial). In the Daily Trial, there were no significant differences between groups in changes in serum albumin or the equilibrated protein catabolic rate by 12 months. There was a significant relative decrease in pre-dialysis body weight of 1.5 ± 0.2 kg in the 6 times per week group at one month, but this significantly rebounded by 1.3 ± 0.5 kg over the remaining 11 months. Extracellular water decreased in the 6 times per week compared to the 3 per week hemodialysis group. There were no significant between-group differences in phase angle, intracellular water or body cell mass. In the Nocturnal Trial, there were no significant between-group differences in any study parameter. Any gain in “dry” body weight corresponded to increased adiposity rather than muscle mass but was not statistically significant. Thus, frequent in-center hemodialysis reduced extracellular water but did not increase serum albumin or body cell mass while frequent nocturnal hemodialysis yielded no net effect on parameters of nutritional status or body composition. PMID:22456602

  19. Learning from failure in health care: frequent opportunities, pervasive barriers.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, A C

    2004-12-01

    The notion that hospitals and medical practices should learn from failures, both their own and others', has obvious appeal. Yet, healthcare organisations that systematically and effectively learn from the failures that occur in the care delivery process, especially from small mistakes and problems rather than from consequential adverse events, are rare. This article explores pervasive barriers embedded in healthcare's organisational systems that make shared or organisational learning from failure difficult and then recommends strategies for overcoming these barriers to learning from failure, emphasising the critical role of leadership. Firstly, leaders must create a compelling vision that motivates and communicates urgency for change; secondly, leaders must work to create an environment of psychological safety that fosters open reporting, active questioning, and frequent sharing of insights and concerns; and thirdly, case study research on one hospital's organisational learning initiative suggests that leaders can empower and support team learning throughout their organisations as a way of identifying, analysing, and removing hazards that threaten patient safety.

  20. Treatment of Warts in Children: An Update.

    PubMed

    Gerlero, P; Hernández-Martín, Á

    2016-09-01

    Warts are among the most common skin infections in children. Although numerous treatment options are available, none are completely effective in a single session. Treatment is particularly complicated in children, not only because certain treatments are poorly tolerated, but also because parents frequently have unrealistic expectations. In this article, we offer an update on the treatments available for warts, focusing specifically on pediatric patients. We do not discuss treatments for oral and anogenital warts.

  1. ISS Update: Suitport

    NASA Video Gallery

    ISS Update commentator Lynnette Madison interviews Mallory Jennings, Suitport Human Testing Lead, about making spacewalks easier and more efficient with the Suitport. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @...

  2. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Perioperative Nutritional, Metabolic, and Nonsurgical Support of the Bariatric Surgery Patient—2013 Update: Cosponsored by American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, The Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery*

    PubMed Central

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE-TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues. PMID:23529939

  3. CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR THE PERIOPERATIVE NUTRITIONAL, METABOLIC, AND NONSURGICAL SUPPORT OF THE BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENT—2013 UPDATE: COSPONSORED BY AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, THE OBESITY SOCIETY, AND AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR METABOLIC & BARIATRIC SURGERY★

    PubMed Central

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, M. Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE- TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues. PMID:23529351

  4. Research Results and Information Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    Research Results Monsoon behavior balanced by glaciers Research Discovers Frequent Mutations of Chromatin Significant Progress in Water Photochemistry Research Structural signature in amorphous alloy formation and plastic deformation The neural basis of Drosophila larval light/darkness preference Important roles of brain-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase and ceramide metabolism in leptin hypothalamic control of feeding Integrin activation and internalization on soft ECM as a mechanism of induction of stem cell differentiation by ECM elasticity Determination of electron pairing symmetry of iron-based superconductor FeSe Long-Range Topological Order in Metallic Glass Information Update List of Projects Jointly Funded by NSFC and CNRS in 2011 List of Projects Jointly Funded by NSFC and ESRC in 2011 List of Projects Jointly Funded by NSFC and RS in 2011 List of Projects Jointly Funded by NSFC and RSE in 2011 Funding of Major Program Projects in 2010 Funding of Key Program Projects in 2010

  5. Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Update

    PubMed Central

    Teerlink, John R; Alburikan, Khalid; Metra, Marco; Rodgers, Jo E

    2015-01-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) continues to increase in prevalence and is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity including frequent hospitalizations. The American Heart Association is predicting that more than eight million Americans will have heart failure by 2030 and that the total direct costs associated with the disease will rise from $21 billion in 2012 to $70 billion in 2030. The increase in the prevalence and cost of HF is primarily the result of shifting demographics and a growing population. Although many large, randomized, controlled clinical trials have been conducted in patients with chronic heart failure, it was not until recently that a growing number of studies began to address the management of ADHF. It is the intent of this review to update the clinician regarding the evaluation and optimal management of ADHF. PMID:24251454

  6. Genomics and Health Impact Update

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genomics in Practice Newborn Screening Pharmacogenomics Reproductive Health Tools and Databases About the Genomics & Health Impact Update The Office of Public Health Genomics provides updated and credible ...

  7. Zika Virus Infection and Zika Fever: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Updated: 25 March 2016 ABOUT ZIKA What is Zika virus infection? Zika virus infection is caused by the ... possible to characterize the disease better. How is Zika virus transmitted? Zika virus is transmitted to people through ...

  8. Updated Trends in Materials' Outgassing Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosecrans, Glenn; Mlucciacciaro, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the trends in materials' outgassing. The work utilized a database of reports to identify common outgassing chemical species from flight hardware, spacecraft, and ground support equipment (GSE). This work updates an earlier work that reported on chemical analysis from 1970-1978.

  9. Hypersensitivity and vaccines: an update.

    PubMed

    Barbaud, Annick; Deschildre, Antoine; Waton, Julie; Raison-Peyron, Nadia; Tréchot, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Allergic reactions to vaccines can be classified as sensitivity to one of the vaccine components, pseudo-allergic reactions, often after hyperimmunization, and exacerbation of atopic symptoms or vasculitis. Pseudo-allergic reactions, some possibly due to hyperimmunization, are probably more common than true allergies. Atopic reactions should not be confused with the "flash" phenomenon, defined as an exacerbation of an allergic reaction due to a reduction in the allergic reactivity threshold following the vaccine injection. BCGitis occurs frequently, and for this reason, guidelines for Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) have been modified. The vaccine is now reserved for people at risk of exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This review provides an update on the vaccination modalities for people allergic to eggs, on the assessment that should be performed when a reaction occurs due to tetanus vaccination, on the urticaria after hepatitis vaccination, on an aluminum granuloma, which is more and more frequent in young children, and vasculitis after flu vaccination and BCGitis. The side effects associated with new, recently released vaccines, such as anti-influenza A H1N1 or anti-human papilloma virus (HPV) will also be presented.

  10. Hypersensitivity and vaccines: an update.

    PubMed

    Barbaud, Annick; Deschildre, Antoine; Waton, Julie; Raison-Peyron, Nadia; Tréchot, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Allergic reactions to vaccines can be classified as sensitivity to one of the vaccine components, pseudo-allergic reactions, often after hyperimmunization, and exacerbation of atopic symptoms or vasculitis. Pseudo-allergic reactions, some possibly due to hyperimmunization, are probably more common than true allergies. Atopic reactions should not be confused with the "flash" phenomenon, defined as an exacerbation of an allergic reaction due to a reduction in the allergic reactivity threshold following the vaccine injection. BCGitis occurs frequently, and for this reason, guidelines for Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) have been modified. The vaccine is now reserved for people at risk of exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This review provides an update on the vaccination modalities for people allergic to eggs, on the assessment that should be performed when a reaction occurs due to tetanus vaccination, on the urticaria after hepatitis vaccination, on an aluminum granuloma, which is more and more frequent in young children, and vasculitis after flu vaccination and BCGitis. The side effects associated with new, recently released vaccines, such as anti-influenza A H1N1 or anti-human papilloma virus (HPV) will also be presented. PMID:23238161

  11. ISS Update: Suitport Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    ISS Update commentator Lynnette Madison interviews Joel Maganza, Test Director, about thermal vacuum chambers and unmanned and human-testing with the Suitport. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Jo...

  12. ISS Update: NEEMO 16

    NASA Video Gallery

    ISS Update commentator Josh Byerly interviews astronaut Stan Love about the NEEMO 16 mission from Aquarius Base. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Johnson and include the hashtag #askStation. For ...

  13. ACS Updates Environmental Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes a new publication of a report prepared by the American Chemical Society's Committee on Environmental Improvement. This is a new version that updates a 1969 report and contains additional material and expanded recommendations. (GA)

  14. Learning from failure in health care: frequent opportunities, pervasive barriers.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, A C

    2004-12-01

    The notion that hospitals and medical practices should learn from failures, both their own and others', has obvious appeal. Yet, healthcare organisations that systematically and effectively learn from the failures that occur in the care delivery process, especially from small mistakes and problems rather than from consequential adverse events, are rare. This article explores pervasive barriers embedded in healthcare's organisational systems that make shared or organisational learning from failure difficult and then recommends strategies for overcoming these barriers to learning from failure, emphasising the critical role of leadership. Firstly, leaders must create a compelling vision that motivates and communicates urgency for change; secondly, leaders must work to create an environment of psychological safety that fosters open reporting, active questioning, and frequent sharing of insights and concerns; and thirdly, case study research on one hospital's organisational learning initiative suggests that leaders can empower and support team learning throughout their organisations as a way of identifying, analysing, and removing hazards that threaten patient safety. PMID:15576689

  15. Learning from failure in health care: frequent opportunities, pervasive barriers

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, A

    2004-01-01

    The notion that hospitals and medical practices should learn from failures, both their own and others', has obvious appeal. Yet, healthcare organisations that systematically and effectively learn from the failures that occur in the care delivery process, especially from small mistakes and problems rather than from consequential adverse events, are rare. This article explores pervasive barriers embedded in healthcare's organisational systems that make shared or organisational learning from failure difficult and then recommends strategies for overcoming these barriers to learning from failure, emphasising the critical role of leadership. Firstly, leaders must create a compelling vision that motivates and communicates urgency for change; secondly, leaders must work to create an environment of psychological safety that fosters open reporting, active questioning, and frequent sharing of insights and concerns; and thirdly, case study research on one hospital's organisational learning initiative suggests that leaders can empower and support team learning throughout their organisations as a way of identifying, analysing, and removing hazards that threaten patient safety. PMID:15576689

  16. Effects of Frequent Hemodialysis on Perceived Caregiver Burden in the Frequent Hemodialysis Network Trials

    PubMed Central

    Larive, Brett; Hall, Yoshio; Kimmel, Paul L.; Kliger, Alan S.; Levin, Nathan; Kurella Tamura, Manjula; Chertow, Glenn M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Patients receiving hemodialysis often perceive their caregivers are overburdened. We hypothesize that increasing hemodialysis frequency would result in higher patient perceptions of burden on their unpaid caregivers. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In two separate trials, 245 patients were randomized to receive in-center daily hemodialysis (6 days/week) or conventional hemodialysis (3 days/week) while 87 patients were randomized to receive home nocturnal hemodialysis (6 nights/week) or home conventional hemodialysis for 12 months. Changes in overall mean scores over time in the 10-question Cousineau perceived burden scale were compared. Results In total, 173 of 245 (70%) and 80 of 87 (92%) randomized patients in the Daily and Nocturnal Trials, respectively, reported having an unpaid caregiver at baseline or during follow-up. Relative to in-center conventional dialysis, the 12-month change in mean perceived burden score with in-center daily hemodialysis was −2.1 (95% confidence interval, −9.4 to +5.3; P=0.58). Relative to home conventional dialysis, the 12-month change in mean perceived burden score with home nocturnal dialysis was +6.1 (95% confidence interval, −0.8 to +13.1; P=0.08). After multiple imputation for missing data in the Nocturnal Trial, the relative difference between home nocturnal and home conventional hemodialysis was +9.4 (95% confidence interval, +0.55 to +18.3; P=0.04). In the Nocturnal Trial, changes in perceived burden were inversely correlated with adherence to dialysis treatments (Pearson r=−0.35; P=0.02). Conclusion Relative to conventional hemodialysis, in-center daily hemodialysis did not result in higher perceptions of caregiver burden. There was a trend to higher perceived caregiver burden among patients randomized to home nocturnal hemodialysis. These findings may have implications for the adoption of and adherence to frequent nocturnal hemodialysis. PMID:24721892

  17. Pain in IBD Patients: Very Frequent and Frequently Insufficiently Taken into Account

    PubMed Central

    Ak, Melike; Müller-Mottet, Séverine; Scharl, Sylvie; Biedermann, Luc; Fournier, Nicolas; Frei, Pascal; Pittet, Valerie; Scharl, Michael; Fried, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Pain is a common symptom related to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In addition to abdominal pain, pain can also be an extraintestinal manifestation of IBD. Pain treatment is challenging and a substantial part of IBD patients are treated with opioids. Therefore, a better knowledge on pain symptoms is crucial for a better therapeutic approach to this clinical problem. Methods Patients of the Swiss IBD Cohort Study (SIBDCS) (n = 2152) received a questionnaire regarding pain intensity, pain localization and impact of pain on daily life and social activities. Furthermore, the questionnaire investigated the use of pain-specific medication. Results A vast majority of patients (71%) experienced pain during the disease course. For a substantial part of patients (49% in UC and 55% in CD) pain is a longstanding problem (>5 years). Pain in UC was of shorter duration compared to CD (p < 0.01). Abdominal pain (59.5%) and back pain (38.3%) were the main pain localizations. 67% of patients took pain medication; 24% received no pain treatment. The general quality of life was significantly lower in patients suffering of pain compared to those without pain (38 vs. 77; (-100 very bad; 100 very good) p<0.0001). Conclusions Prevalence of pain is high in patients of the SIBDCS. It is a longstanding problem for the majority of the patients affected. Pain was found to be undertreated in the SIBDCS and was significantly associated with health-related quality of life. Thus, an increased awareness is mandatory to address this frequent complication in the course of IBD. PMID:27332879

  18. Environmental regulatory update table

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.J.; Langston, M.E.; Tucker, C.S.; Reed, R.M.

    1987-06-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  19. Frequent visitors to psychiatric emergency services: staff attitudes and temporal patterns.

    PubMed

    Arfken, Cynthia; Zeman, Lori Lackman; Yeager, Lindsay; Mischel, Edward; Amirsadri, Alireza

    2002-11-01

    Providing quality psychiatric emergency services is becoming more difficult as utilization rates soar, especially by individuals who are frequent visitors. To address this issue, a staff survey and analysis of admission patterns were conducted. Staff were more likely to believe that frequent visitors sought care because they had difficulty accessing alternative services, had basic needs unmet, were substance abusers, wanted inpatient admission, and were noncompliant with treatment plans. The 1999 temporal admission pattern documented that frequent visitors' admissions were higher during the first week of the month and inclement weather. Surprisingly, the infrequent visitors' admissions also were higher during the first week of the month. Together, these findings suggest that, in this urban location, frequent visitors are disadvantaged individuals lacking support and alternative treatment settings who use psychiatric emergency services to meet basic needs.

  20. Risk factors for frequent falls in people with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Paul, Serene S; Allen, Natalie E; Sherrington, Cathie; Heller, Gillian; Fung, Victor S C; Close, Jacqueline C T; Lord, Stephen R; Canning, Colleen G

    2014-01-01

    Fall frequency varies among individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). We aimed to determine whether risk factors that distinguish PD fallers from non-fallers are influenced by frequent falls. 205 people with PD participated in a 6-month prospective study. Factors in previously published fall risk models were analyzed for their associations with fall rates and frequent fallers. Fall history, freezing and impaired reactive balance were associated with fall rates and the proportion of frequent fallers (p < 0.05). These models were highly accurate in discriminating frequent fallers (area under curve 0.84-0.87). Interventions to manage freezing and reduce balance impairment may reduce fall frequency.

  1. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior: a Status Update.

    PubMed

    Luke, Molli M; Carr, James E

    2015-10-01

    We analyzed past volumes of The Analysis of Verbal Behavior (TAVB) to provide a comprehensive status update after 30 years of publication. Data on TAVB's content, frequent contributors, and scholarly impact suggest a healthy state of the journal. PMID:27606209

  2. [Poor school performance: an updated review].

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Cláudia Machado; Gurgel-Giannetti, Juliana

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to develop a comprehensive review on the issue of poor school performance for professionals in both health and education areas. It discusses current aspects of education, learning and the main conditions involved in underachievement. It also presents updated data on key aspects of neurobiology, epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, comorbidities and diagnosis, early intervention and treatment of the major pathologies comprised. It is a comprehensive, non-systematic literature review on learning, school performance, learning disorders (dyslexia, dyscalculia and dysgraphia), attention deficit / hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and developmental coordination disorder (DCD). Poor school performance is a frequent problem faced by our children, causing serious emotional, social and economic issues. An updated view of the subject facilitates clinical reasoning, accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:21390464

  3. Frequently Asked Questions: IDEA Early Childhood--Disclosure Avoidance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for IDEA Early Childhood Data Systems (DaSy), 2014

    2014-01-01

    This 2014 document is an adaptation of the 2012 release of "Frequently Asked Questions--Disclosure Avoidance" intended for K-12 audiences. Presented here in the form of responses to frequently asked questions (FAQs) are suggestions intended to provide guidance to IDEA Part C early intervention and Part B 619 preschool special education…

  4. Examining Student Responses to Frequent Bullying: A Latent Class Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waasdorp, Tracy Evian; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2011-01-01

    Bullying is a major concern in schools, yet there has been limited research examining the ways in which students respond to frequent victimization by their peers. The current study explored whether there are discrete groups of children who display similar patterns of responses to frequent bullying. We also examined the associations between the…

  5. An update on bisphosphonates.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Stanley B

    2004-02-01

    Over the past 15 years, bisphosphonates have been demonstrated as effective therapy for the treatment of osteoporosis based on their ability to suppress bone turnover resulting in increased bone mineral content and increased bone strength. The mechanism of action at the cellular level has been identified, and the more potent nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates clearly have reduced the risk of vertebral and nonvertebral fractures in patients with osteoporosis. Future use of these therapies is evolving to less frequent administration, and the interaction with anabolic therapies is presently being defined. Data to date support long-term safety with bisphosphonates in small numbers of patients treated for 5 to 10 years, and continued vigilant follow-up of the post-marketing experience will be necessary to determine if sustained bone turnover suppression is associated with rare musculoskeletal adverse events. Further development of bisphosphonates as adjunctive therapy to reduce bone metastases is in progress, and trials evaluating bisphosphonates as a structure modifying agent in osteoarthritis are nearing completion. PMID:14713403

  6. Diabetes update: population management.

    PubMed

    Erlich, Deborah R; Slawson, David C; Shaughnessy, Allen

    2013-05-01

    To optimally care for diabetes patients, physicians must adopt a systematic approach to managing the entire panel. At the heart of excellent care is a multidisciplinary health care team working in a patient-centered environment. Options to supplement traditional office visits include shared medical appointments (ie, group visits), patient self-management education, and social media for patient support and education. Educating patients about diabetes is associated with more frequent recommended screening, improved objective measures, cost savings, and improved short-term quality of life, especially when behavioral goal setting is incorporated. Participation in a nurse-led diabetes management program or an outreach program is associated with reduced health care costs and increased receipt of recommended screening and testing for patients with diabetes; implementation of an electronic database or registry system also is associated with these benefits. Some studies show that these interventions are associated with improvements in A1c; however, outcomes data are limited. Formats for group visits vary. Evidence suggests that patients with diabetes who participate in a group education program have lower A1c levels, improved lipid profiles, higher quality of life scores, and improved knowledge about diabetes and problem-solving ability.

  7. Online updating of synthetic vision system databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, Philippe

    In aviation, synthetic vision systems render artificial views of the world (using a database of the world and pose information) to support navigation and situational awareness in low visibility conditions. The database needs to be periodically updated to ensure its consistency with reality, since it reflects at best a nominal state of the environment. This thesis presents an approach for automatically updating the geometry of synthetic vision system databases and 3D models in general. The approach is novel in that it profits from all of the available prior information: intrinsic/extrinsic camera parameters and geometry of the world. Geometric inconsistencies (or anomalies) between the model and reality are quickly localized; this localization serves to significantly reduce the complexity of the updating problem. Given a geometric model of the world, a sample image and known camera motion, a predicted image can be generated based on a differential approach. Model locations where predictions do not match observations are assumed to be incorrect. The updating is then cast as an optimization problem where differences between observations and predictions are minimized. To cope with system uncertainties, a mechanism that automatically infers their impact on prediction validity is derived. This method not only renders the anomaly detection process robust but also prevents the overfitting of the data. The updating framework is examined at first using synthetic data and further tested in both a laboratory environment and using a helicopter in flight. Experimental results show that the algorithm is effective and robust across different operating conditions.

  8. Predicting frequent COPD exacerbations using primary care data

    PubMed Central

    Kerkhof, Marjan; Freeman, Daryl; Jones, Rupert; Chisholm, Alison; Price, David B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Acute COPD exacerbations account for much of the rising disability and costs associated with COPD, but data on predictive risk factors are limited. The goal of the current study was to develop a robust, clinically based model to predict frequent exacerbation risk. Patients and methods Patients identified from the Optimum Patient Care Research Database (OPCRD) with a diagnostic code for COPD and a forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity ratio <0.7 were included in this historical follow-up study if they were ≥40 years old and had data encompassing the year before (predictor year) and year after (outcome year) study index date. The data set contained potential risk factors including demographic, clinical, and comorbid variables. Following univariable analysis, predictors of two or more exacerbations were fed into a stepwise multivariable logistic regression. Sensitivity analyses were conducted for subpopulations of patients without any asthma diagnosis ever and those with questionnaire data on symptoms and smoking pack-years. The full predictive model was validated against 1 year of prospective OPCRD data. Results The full data set contained 16,565 patients (53% male, median age 70 years), including 9,393 patients without any recorded asthma and 3,713 patients with questionnaire data. The full model retained eleven variables that significantly predicted two or more exacerbations, of which the number of exacerbations in the preceding year had the strongest association; others included height, age, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and several comorbid conditions. Significant predictors not previously identified included eosinophilia and COPD Assessment Test score. The predictive ability of the full model (C statistic 0.751) changed little when applied to the validation data set (n=2,713; C statistic 0.735). Results of the sensitivity analyses supported the main findings. Conclusion Patients at risk of exacerbation can be identified

  9. Answers to frequently asked questions about cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    This question-and-answer report provides answers in nontechnical language to frequently asked questions about the status of cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. The answers update information first prepared in 1981, shortly after the cleanup got under way. Since then, a variety of important developments in the cleanup has occurred. The information in the report should be read in conjunction with NUREG 1060, a discussion of increased occupational exposure estimates for the cleanup. The questions and answers in this report cover purpose and community involvement, decontamination of water and reactor, fuel removal, radwaste transport, environmental impact, social and economic effects, worker exposures and safety, radiation monitoring, potential for accidents, and schedule and funding.

  10. Personalized privacy-preserving frequent itemset mining using randomized response.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chongjing; Fu, Yan; Zhou, Junlin; Gao, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Frequent itemset mining is the important first step of association rule mining, which discovers interesting patterns from the massive data. There are increasing concerns about the privacy problem in the frequent itemset mining. Some works have been proposed to handle this kind of problem. In this paper, we introduce a personalized privacy problem, in which different attributes may need different privacy levels protection. To solve this problem, we give a personalized privacy-preserving method by using the randomized response technique. By providing different privacy levels for different attributes, this method can get a higher accuracy on frequent itemset mining than the traditional method providing the same privacy level. Finally, our experimental results show that our method can have better results on the frequent itemset mining while preserving personalized privacy.

  11. 78 FR 72122 - Draft Emergency Preparedness Frequently Asked Questions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Draft Emergency Preparedness Frequently Asked Questions AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... development and maintenance of emergency preparedness program elements. The NRC is publishing...

  12. Frequently Asked Questions about Cell Phones and Your Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Procedures Radiation in Everyday Objects Air Travel Airport Security Screening Building Materials Cigarette Smoking and Radiation Frequently Asked Questions about Cell Phones and Your Health Ultraviolet Radiation Wearable Computers and Wearable Technology Radiation in Nature Radon in ...

  13. Frequent Travelers and Rate of Spread of Epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Neil M.; Anderson, Roy M.

    2007-01-01

    A small proportion of air travelers make disproportionately more journeys than the rest of travelers. They also tend to interact predominantly with other frequent travelers in hotels and airport lounges. This group has the potential to accelerate global spread of infectious respiratory diseases. Using an epidemiologic model, we simulated exportation of cases from severe acute respiratory syndrome–like and influenza-like epidemics in a population for which a small proportion travel more frequently than the rest. Our simulations show that frequent travelers accelerate international spread of epidemics only if they are infected early in an outbreak and the outbreak does not expand rapidly. If the epidemic growth rate is high, as is likely for pandemic influenza, heterogeneities in travel are frequently overwhelmed by the large number of infected persons in the majority population and the resulting high probability that some of these persons will take an international flight. PMID:18252097

  14. Unsupervised mining of frequent tags for clinical eligibility text indexing.

    PubMed

    Miotto, Riccardo; Weng, Chunhua

    2013-12-01

    Clinical text, such as clinical trial eligibility criteria, is largely underused in state-of-the-art medical search engines due to difficulties of accurate parsing. This paper proposes a novel methodology to derive a semantic index for clinical eligibility documents based on a controlled vocabulary of frequent tags, which are automatically mined from the text. We applied this method to eligibility criteria on ClinicalTrials.gov and report that frequent tags (1) define an effective and efficient index of clinical trials and (2) are unlikely to grow radically when the repository increases. We proposed to apply the semantic index to filter clinical trial search results and we concluded that frequent tags reduce the result space more efficiently than an uncontrolled set of UMLS concepts. Overall, unsupervised mining of frequent tags from clinical text leads to an effective semantic index for the clinical eligibility documents and promotes their computational reuse.

  15. 223. FREQUENTLY REPRODUCED VIEW OF GWMP SHOWING VARIABLE WIDTH MEDIANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    223. FREQUENTLY REPRODUCED VIEW OF GWMP SHOWING VARIABLE WIDTH MEDIANS WITH INDEPENDENT ALIGNMENTS FROM KEY BRIDGE LOOKING NORTHWEST, 1953. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  16. Personalized Privacy-Preserving Frequent Itemset Mining Using Randomized Response

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chongjing; Fu, Yan; Zhou, Junlin; Gao, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Frequent itemset mining is the important first step of association rule mining, which discovers interesting patterns from the massive data. There are increasing concerns about the privacy problem in the frequent itemset mining. Some works have been proposed to handle this kind of problem. In this paper, we introduce a personalized privacy problem, in which different attributes may need different privacy levels protection. To solve this problem, we give a personalized privacy-preserving method by using the randomized response technique. By providing different privacy levels for different attributes, this method can get a higher accuracy on frequent itemset mining than the traditional method providing the same privacy level. Finally, our experimental results show that our method can have better results on the frequent itemset mining while preserving personalized privacy. PMID:25143989

  17. Enumerating all maximal frequent subtrees in collections of phylogenetic trees

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A common problem in phylogenetic analysis is to identify frequent patterns in a collection of phylogenetic trees. The goal is, roughly, to find a subset of the species (taxa) on which all or some significant subset of the trees agree. One popular method to do so is through maximum agreement subtrees (MASTs). MASTs are also used, among other things, as a metric for comparing phylogenetic trees, computing congruence indices and to identify horizontal gene transfer events. Results We give algorithms and experimental results for two approaches to identify common patterns in a collection of phylogenetic trees, one based on agreement subtrees, called maximal agreement subtrees, the other on frequent subtrees, called maximal frequent subtrees. These approaches can return subtrees on larger sets of taxa than MASTs, and can reveal new common phylogenetic relationships not present in either MASTs or the majority rule tree (a popular consensus method). Our current implementation is available on the web at https://code.google.com/p/mfst-miner/. Conclusions Our computational results confirm that maximal agreement subtrees and all maximal frequent subtrees can reveal a more complete phylogenetic picture of the common patterns in collections of phylogenetic trees than maximum agreement subtrees; they are also often more resolved than the majority rule tree. Further, our experiments show that enumerating maximal frequent subtrees is considerably more practical than enumerating ordinary (not necessarily maximal) frequent subtrees. PMID:25061474

  18. Con: Frequent haemodialysis for all chronic haemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Labriola, Laura; Morelle, Johann; Jadoul, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Frequent haemodialysis (HD) regimens have been proposed with the aim to improve survival and other important patient outcomes. They indeed avoid the long interdialytic interval and have been associated with some proven benefits, i.e. an improvement in blood pressure and phosphataemia control, a reduction in left ventricular mass and lower ultrafiltration rates. However, the actual impact of frequent HD regimens on survival is, at best, inconclusive and, at worse, harmful, and remains uncertain regarding nutritional status and anaemia control. Moreover, the higher rates of vascular access complications and more rapid development of anuria with frequent HD regimens are worrying. Frequent HD also considerably increases the burden for patients and their caregivers, logistics and costs, especially with in-centre frequent schedules. In our opinion, before increasing HD frequency, a number of underused strategies summarized in our review and able to improve patient tolerance and/or HD dose should be tested first, taking into account patient's characteristics and life expectancy. Frequent HD schedules should be reserved for selected cases, only after all other available options have failed. PMID:25538159

  19. The AGTSR consortium: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Fant, D.B.; Golan, L.P.

    1995-12-31

    The Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research program is a nationwide consortium dedicated to advancing land-based gas turbine systems for improving future power generation capability. It directly supports the technology-research arm of the ATS program and targets industry- defined research needs in the areas of combustion, heat transfer, materials, aerodynamics, controls, alternative fuels, and advanced cycles. It is organized to enhance U.S. competitiveness through close collaboration with universities, government, and industry at the R&D level. AGTSR is just finishing its third year of operation; it is scheduled to continue past the year 2000. This update reviews the AGTSR triad, which consists of university/industry R&D activities, technology transfer programs, and trial student programs.

  20. Updating Martin's global extinction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Richard

    2008-12-01

    Australia has been cited as a weak link in anthropogenic models of megafauna extinction, but recent work suggests instead that the evidence for rapid extinction shortly after human arrival is robust. The global model is revisited, based on the contention that late Pleistocene megafauna extinctions took place rapidly on islands, and some islands (such as Australia and the Americas) are much larger than others. Modern dating methods are increasingly able to refine chronologies, and careful scrutiny suggests that hundreds of dates should be deleted from archives. An updated summary of results from New Zealand, North America and Australia is presented, with a brief discussion on why temperate refugia offering protection from climate change ultimately did not work, strongly supporting the global extinction hypothesis pioneered by Paul Martin.

  1. Updating: Learning versus Supposing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Jiaying; Crupi, Vincenzo; Tentori, Katya; Fitelson, Branden; Osherson, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Bayesian orthodoxy posits a tight relationship between conditional probability and updating. Namely, the probability of an event "A" after learning "B" should equal the conditional probability of "A" given "B" prior to learning "B". We examine whether ordinary judgment conforms to the orthodox view. In three experiments we found substantial…

  2. ''Smart Gun'' Technology Update

    SciTech Connect

    WIRSBINSKI, JOHN W.

    2001-11-01

    This report is an update to previous ''smart gun'' work and the corresponding report that were completed in 1996. It incorporates some new terminology and expanded definitions. This effort is the product of an open source look at what has happened to the ''smart gun'' technology landscape since the 1996 report was published.

  3. Updated opal opacities

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesias, C.A.; Rogers, F.J.

    1996-06-01

    The reexamination of astrophysical opacities has eliminated gross discrepancies between a variety of observations and theoretical calculations; thus allowing for more detailed tests of stellar models. A number of such studies indicate that model results are sensitive to modest changes in the opacity. Consequently, it is desirable to update available opacity databases with recent improvements in physics, refinements of element abundance, and other such factors affecting the results. Updated OPAL Rosseland mean opacities are presented. The new results have incorporated improvements in the physics and numerical procedures as well as corrections. The main opacity changes are increases of as much as 20{percent} for Population I stars due to the explicit inclusion of 19 metals (compared to 12 metals in the earlier calculations) with the other modifications introducing opacity changes smaller than 10{percent}. In addition, the temperature and density range covered by the updated opacity tables has been extended. As before, the tables allow accurate interpolation in density and temperature as well as hydrogen, helium, carbon, oxygen, and metal mass fractions. Although a specific metal composition is emphasized, opacity tables for different metal distributions can be made readily available. The updated opacities are compared to other work. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Astronomical Society.}

  4. Veterinary medicines update.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues. PMID:27365238

  5. Veterinary medicines update.

    PubMed

    2016-06-11

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues. PMID:27288166

  6. Veterinary medicines update.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues. PMID:27493045

  7. Supreme Court Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Kelley R.

    2009-01-01

    "Chief Justice Flubs Oath." "Justice Ginsburg Has Cancer Surgery." At the start of this year, those were the news headlines about the U.S. Supreme Court. But January 2009 also brought news about key education cases--one resolved and two others on the docket--of which school administrators should take particular note. The Supreme Court updates on…

  8. Community Update, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Nicole, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document consists of 10 issues (covering January through December 2000) of the newsletter, "Community Update," which features articles on community and family involvement in education. In addition to the articles, each issue (except the Special Issue) includes a preview of the month's Satellite Town Meeting; events and information discussed…

  9. Updating Older Fume Hoods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, G. Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Provides information on updating older fume hoods. Areas addressed include: (1) adjustment of the hood's back baffle; (2) hood air leakage; (3) light level; (4) hood location in relation to room traffic and room air; and (5) establishing and maintaining hood performance. (JN)

  10. Veterinary medicines update.

    PubMed

    2016-09-10

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues. PMID:27609956

  11. Veterinary medicines update.

    PubMed

    2016-10-01

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues. PMID:27687269

  12. Update: Biological Nitrogen Fixation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Alan; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Updates knowledge on nitrogen fixation, indicating that investigation of free-living nitrogen-fixing organisms is proving useful in understanding bacterial partners and is expected to lead to development of more effective symbioses. Specific areas considered include biochemistry/genetics, synthesis control, proteins and enzymes, symbiotic systems,…

  13. Technology Update-87

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    The five papers in this issue of Technology Update reflect improvements in equipment reliability, inspection techniques, data storage techniques, and production technology - all aimed at reducing process variations. Each paper represents an achievement by our technical staff that allows Mound to make more effective use of our resources. A separate abstract has been prepared for one of the papers.

  14. Investigation of appropriate sanitization frequency for rodent caging accessories: evidence supporting less-frequent cleaning.

    PubMed

    Schondelmeyer, Curtis W; Dillehay, Dirck L; Webb, Sonji K; Huerkamp, Michael J; Mook, Deborah M; Pullium, Jennifer K

    2006-11-01

    The Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals states that sanitization of caging accessories (for example, filter tops and wire-bar lids) should be done every 2 wk. In this study we tested the hypothesis that organic contamination measured by the presence of ATP associated with organic material (measured with luciferase test swabs) and the number of bacterial colony-forming units (as determined by use of replicate organism detection and counting plates) on caging accessories did not differ significantly at 2 wk versus several months of use. The study evaluated 4 groups: mouse and rat ventilated and static wire-bar cages with or without filter tops (n = 10 per group). The cages were evaluated at several time points from 2 wk to 6 mo. For every cage type, ATP levels did not differ significantly between 14 and 90 d and, in most cases, between 14 and 180 d. In addition the number of bacterial colonies did not differ significantly between 14 and 120 d (and, in some cases, between 14 and 180 d). This study provides data relevant to establishing a validated frequency for sanitization of rodent caging accessories while controlling, and potentially decreasing, costs associated with sanitization.

  15. Sensorimotor recovery following spaceflight may be due to frequent square-wave saccadic intrusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, Millard; Somers, Jeffrey T.; Leigh, R. John; Krnavek, Jody M.; Kornilova, Ludmila; Kozlovskaya, Inessa; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Paloski, William H.

    2004-01-01

    Square-wave jerks (SWJs) are small, involuntary saccades that disrupt steady fixation. We report the case of an astronaut (approximately 140 d on orbit) who showed frequent SWJs, especially postflight, but who showed no impairment of vision or decrement of postflight performance. These data support the view that SWJs do not impair vision because they are paired movements, consisting of a small saccade away from the fixation position followed, within 200 ms, by a corrective saccade that brings the eye back on target. Since many returning astronauts show a decrement of dynamic visual function during postflight locomotion, it seems possible that frequent SWJs improved this astronaut's visual function by providing postsaccadic enhancement of visual fixation, which aided postflight performance. Certainly, frequent SWJs did not impair performance in this astronaut, who had no other neurological disorder.

  16. Amiodarone-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity – A Frequently Missed Complication

    PubMed Central

    Sweidan, Alexander J.; Singh, Navneet K.; Dang, Natasha; Lam, Vinh; Datta, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Amiodarone is often used in the suppression of tachyarrhythmias. One of the more serious adverse effects includes amiodarone pulmonary toxicity (APT). Several pulmonary diseases can manifest including interstitial pneumonitis, organizing pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, pulmonary nodules or masses, and pleural effusion. Incidence of APT varies from 5–15% and is correlated to dosage, age of the patient, and preexisting lung disease. DESCRIPTION A 56-year-old male with a past medical history of coronary artery disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was admitted for a coronary artery bypass graft. Post-operatively, the patient was admitted to the ICU for ventilator management and continued to receive his home dose of amiodarone 400 mg orally twice daily, which he had been taking for the past 3 months. The patient was found to be hypoxemic with a PaO2 52 mmHg and bilateral infiltrates on chest x-ray. Patient also complained of new onset dyspnea. Physical exam found bilateral rhonchi with bibasilar crackles and subcutaneous emphysema along the left anterior chest wall. Daily chest x-rays showed worsening of bilateral interstitial infiltrates and pleural effusions. A chest high-resolution computed tomography on post-operative day 3 showed extensive and severe bilateral ground glass opacities. APT was suspected and amiodarone was discontinued. A course of oral prednisone without antibiotics was initiated, and after one week of treatment the chest film cleared, the PaO2 value normalized and dyspnea resolved. DISCUSSION APT occurs via cytotoxic T cells and indirectly by immunological reaction. Typically the lungs manifest a diffuse interstitial pneumonitis with varying degrees of fibrosis. Infiltrates with a ‘ground-glass’ appearance appreciated on HRCT are more definitive than chest x-ray. Pulmonary nodules can be seen, frequently in the upper lobes. These are postulated to be accumulations of

  17. Health information exchange improves identification of frequent emergency department users.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Jason S; Johnson, Sarah A; Angiollilo, John; Fleischman, William; Onyile, Arit; Kuperman, Gilad

    2013-12-01

    We hypothesized that using communitywide data from a health information exchange (HIE) could improve the ability to identify frequent emergency department (ED) users-those with four or more ED visits in thirty days-by allowing ED use to be measured across unaffiliated hospitals. When we analyzed HIE-wide data instead of site-specific data, we identified 20.3 percent more frequent ED users (5,756 versus 4,785) and 16.0 percent more visits by them to the ED (53,031 versus 45,771). Additionally, we found that 28.8 percent of frequent ED users visited multiple EDs during the twelve-month study period, versus 3.0 percent of all ED users. All three differences were significant ($$p ). An improved ability to identify frequent ED users allows better targeting of case management and other services that can improve frequent ED users' health and reduce their use of costly emergency medical services.

  18. The Rikers Island Hot Spotters: Defining the Needs of the Most Frequently Incarcerated

    PubMed Central

    Kaba, Fatos; Rosner, Zachary; Vise, Allison; Weiss, David; Brittner, Mindy; Skerker, Molly; Dickey, Nathaniel; Venters, Homer

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We used “hot spotting” to characterize the persons most frequently admitted to the New York City jail system in 2013. Methods. We used our Correctional Health Services electronic health record to identify 800 patients admitted in 2013 who returned most since November 2008. We compared them to a randomly selected control group of 800 others admitted in 2013, by using descriptive statistics and cross-tabulations, including data through December 2014. Results. The frequently incarcerated individuals had a median of 21 incarcerations (median duration 11 days), representing 18 713 admissions and $129 million in custody and health costs versus $38 million for the controls. The frequently incarcerated were significantly older (42 vs 35 years), and more likely to have serious mental illness (19% vs 8.5%) and homelessness (51.5% vs 14.7%) in their record. Significant substance use was highly prevalent (96.9% vs 55.6%). Most top criminal charges (88.7%) for the frequently incarcerated were misdemeanors; assault charges were less common (2.8% vs 10.4%). Conclusions. Frequently incarcerated persons have chronic mental health and substance use problems, their charges are generally minor, and incarceration is costly. Tailored supportive housing is likely to be less costly and improve outcomes. PMID:26378829

  19. Process capability measurement of frequent replacement spherical soft contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Young, G; Lewis, Y; Coleman, S; Hunt, C

    1999-01-01

    Frequent replacement soft contact lenses must have good reproducibility in order to avoid clinical problems arising from manufacturing variations in lens parameters. This study assessed the actual and potential process capability of eight frequent replacement lenses (monthly or 2-weekly replacement) in relation to back vertex power, back optic zone radius, total diameter and centre thickness. Twenty-four lenses in three powers (-1.00, -3.00, -6.00 D) were measured for eight frequent replacement lenses: Acuvue, Acuvue 2, Biomedics 55, Encore, Focus, Optima FW, Soflens 66, Surevue. In general, the lenses showed adequate reproducibility in respect of those parameters likely to affect lens fit, namely back optic zone radius, total diameter and centre thickness. The process capability results showed some variation in reproducibility of BVP between lens types and between lens powers. Process capability was found to be a useful measure of contact lens reproducibility. PMID:16303417

  20. Welcome back? Frequent attenders to a pediatric primary care center.

    PubMed

    Klein, Melissa; Vaughn, Lisa M; Baker, Raymond C; Taylor, Trisha

    2011-09-01

    This study examines frequent attenders of a pediatric primary care clinic at a large urban children's hospital--who they are and their reasons for frequent attendance to the clinic. The literature suggests that some visits by frequent attenders may not be medically necessary, and these additional appointments may impair others' access to medical care within the same system. The key to eliminating excessive primary care visits is to determine if it is a problem in the primary care practice (quantify the problem), explore the reasons for the visits (from the patients' perspective), and then provide educational interventions that address the various causes for the extra visits and encourage the use of available resources, either ancillary services in the practice itself or resources and agencies available in the community (e.g. social service, legal aid).

  1. Predictors for frequent esophageal dilations of benign peptic strictures.

    PubMed

    Agnew, S R; Pandya, S P; Reynolds, R P; Preiksaitis, H G

    1996-05-01

    Recurrence of esophageal peptic stricture necessitating repeated dilation treatments remains a problem for many patients despite optimal acid suppressive therapy. The factors associated with frequent relapses are poorly understood. We studied retrospectively a population of 58 patients with benign peptic strictures and dysphagia treated by esophageal dilation and followed for 66.5 +/- 6.7 months. Data was collected for age, sex, heartburn, weight loss, esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus, number of dilation treatments during the first year of follow-up, frequency and number of subsequent dilation treatments, type of dilator used, and history of other concurrent treatments. Patients who lacked heartburn (P = 0.007) or who reported a history of weight loss (P = 0.006) at the time of their initial presentation required more frequent dilations during the first year of follow-up. The mean number of dilations in year 1 was 6.2 +/- 0.9 for patients lacking heartburn versus 3.2 +/- 0.5 for patients with heartburn (P = 0.004), and 9.0 +/- 1.8 for patients who reported weight loss versus 4.1 +/- 0.5 (P = 0.006) for those who did not. The patients requiring frequent treatment during their first year also required frequent subsequent dilations because of stricture recurrence (P < 0.0001). We did not demonstrate any relationship between the other factors studied and treatment frequency. These observations suggest that patients who require frequent retreatment for recurrent peptic stricture are more likely to provide a history of weight loss and less likely to complain of heartburn at initial presentation. The pattern of frequent repeat dilation for recurrent peptic strictures is established during the first year of follow-up.

  2. Frequent rhabdomyolysis in anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jung-Ah; Lee, Soon-Tae; Kim, Tae-Joon; Moon, Jangsup; Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Byun, Jung-Ick; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Jung, Ki-Young; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical presentation and provocation factors of rhabdomyolysis in anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Among the 16 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis in our institutional cohort, nine patients had elevated CK enzyme levels and clinical evidence of rhabdomyolysis. Rhabdomyolysis was more frequent after immunotherapy. The use of dopamine receptor blocker (DRB) increased the risk of rhabdomyolysis. None of the patients without rhabdomyolysis received DRBs. Rhabdomyolysis is a frequent complication in anti-NMDAR encephalitis and more common after immunotherapy and the use of DRBs increases the risk. Therefore, DRBs should be administered carefully in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:27609293

  3. Bumper 3 Update for IADC Protection Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Nagy, Kornel; Hyde, Jim

    2016-01-01

    The Bumper code has been the standard in use by NASA and contractors to perform meteoroid/debris risk assessments since 1990. It has undergone extensive revisions and updates [NASA JSC HITF website; Christiansen et al., 1992, 1997]. NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) has applied BUMPER to risk assessments for Space Station, Shuttle, Mir, Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMU) space suits, and other spacecraft (e.g., LDEF, Iridium, TDRS, and Hubble Space Telescope). Bumper continues to be updated with changes in the ballistic limit equations describing failure threshold of various spacecraft components, as well as changes in the meteoroid and debris environment models. Significant efforts are expended to validate Bumper and benchmark it to other meteoroid/debris risk assessment codes. Bumper 3 is a refactored version of Bumper II. The structure of the code was extensively modified to improve maintenance, performance and flexibility. The architecture was changed to separate the frequently updated ballistic limit equations from the relatively stable common core functions of the program. These updates allow NASA to produce specific editions of the Bumper 3 that are tailored for specific customer requirements. The core consists of common code necessary to process the Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris (MMOD) environment models, assess shadowing and calculate MMOD risk. The library of target response subroutines includes a board range of different types of MMOD shield ballistic limit equations as well as equations describing damage to various spacecraft subsystems or hardware (thermal protection materials, windows, radiators, solar arrays, cables, etc.). The core and library of ballistic response subroutines are maintained under configuration control. A change in the core will affect all editions of the code, whereas a change in one or more of the response subroutines will affect all editions of the code that contain the particular response subroutines which are modified. Note

  4. Sequence History Update Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanampompan, Teerapat; Gladden, Roy; Fisher, Forest; DelGuercio, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The Sequence History Update Tool performs Web-based sequence statistics archiving for Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Using a single UNIX command, the software takes advantage of sequencing conventions to automatically extract the needed statistics from multiple files. This information is then used to populate a PHP database, which is then seamlessly formatted into a dynamic Web page. This tool replaces a previous tedious and error-prone process of manually editing HTML code to construct a Web-based table. Because the tool manages all of the statistics gathering and file delivery to and from multiple data sources spread across multiple servers, there is also a considerable time and effort savings. With the use of The Sequence History Update Tool what previously took minutes is now done in less than 30 seconds, and now provides a more accurate archival record of the sequence commanding for MRO.

  5. Sensors, Update 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Fedder, Gary K.; Korvink, Jan G.

    2003-04-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Each volume is divided into three sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  6. Sensors, Update 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Göpel, Wolfgang; Hesse, Joachim

    2001-02-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Each volume is divided into three sections: Sensor Technology reviews highlights in applied and basic research, while Sensor Applications covers new or improved applications of sensors, and Sensor Markets provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be invaluable to scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  7. Sensors, Update 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Göpel, Wolfgang; Hesse, Joachim

    1996-10-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Furthermore, the sensor market as well as peripheral aspects such as standards are covered. Each volume is divided into four sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  8. Sensors, Update 11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Fedder, Gary K.; Korvink, Jan G.

    2003-03-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field, presenting the current highlights of sensor and related microelectromechanical systems technology. Coverage includes most recent developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles based on micro- and nanotechnology. Each volume is divided into three sections: Sensor Technology reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications covers new or improved applications of sensors and Sensor Markets provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update is of must-have value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  9. Sensors, Update 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Göpel, Wolfgang; Hesse, Joachim

    1996-12-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Treatments include current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Furthermore, the sensor market as well as peripheral aspects such as standards are covered. Each volume is divided into four sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides an overview of suppliers and market trends for a particular section, and Sensor Standards, reviews recent legislation and requirements for sensors. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  10. Sensors, Update 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Fedder, Gary K.; Korvink, Jan G.

    2002-04-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Each volume is divided into three sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  11. Sensors, Update 9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Göpel, Wolfgang; Hesse, Joachim

    2001-10-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Each volume is divided into three sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  12. SIM-Lite Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Discussion focus on: SIM-Lite Instrument Update - 6m baseline, 50cm, approximately 900M cost; Technology Update - Systematic errors and floor; SIM-Lite terrestrial planet discovery capability; Double blind multiple planet study summary; and the changing landscape of exoplanet science and the role of SIM-Lite. Slides include technology to flight component engineering; instrumental systematic errors; ultra deep search for Earth clones; double blind test, astrometric detection of Earths in multiplanet systems; the current era of exoplanet science and where SIM-Lite fits in; the next frontier and where SIM-Lite fits in, why SIM is unique in discovering Earths; imaging planet status is uncertain without masses and ages; SIM role in establishing how planetary systems form and evolve; and SIM probes of broad planet mass range around young stars.

  13. SLC classification: an update.

    PubMed

    Schlessinger, A; Yee, S W; Sali, A; Giacomini, K M

    2013-07-01

    The 386 human SLC superfamily members are diverse in sequence, structure, and function. Using sequence similarity, we previously classified the SLC superfamily members and identified relationships among families. With the recent determination of new SLC structures and identification of previously unknown human SLC families, an update of our previous classification is timely. Here, we comprehensively compare the SLC sequences and structures and discuss the applicability of structure-based ligand discovery to key SLC members.

  14. Should we do early and frequent charcoal hemoperfusion in phenytoin toxicity?

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Jyoti Narayan; Gurjar, Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Phenytoin toxicity or adverse drug reaction is common due to its narrow therapeutic window. Mild and moderate toxicity require supportive care and enteral activated charcoal. In severe toxicity, charcoal hemoperfusion (CHP) have been shown to decrease serum phenytoin half-life and early recovery. Here, we report two cases with phenytoin toxicity who showed marked clinical improvement after early and frequent CHP treatment. PMID:27076716

  15. How Documentalists Update SIMBAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buga, M.; Bot, C.; Brouty, M.; Bruneau, C.; Brunet, C.; Cambresy, L.; Eisele, A.; Genova, F.; Lesteven, S.; Loup, C.; Neuville, M.; Oberto, A.; Ochsenbein, F.; Perret, E.; Siebert, A.; Son, E.; Vannier, P.; Vollmer, B.; Vonflie, P.; Wenger, M.; Woelfel, F.

    2015-04-01

    The Strasbourg astronomical Data Center (CDS) was created in 1972 and has had a major role in astronomy for more than forty years. CDS develops a service called SIMBAD that provides basic data, cross-identifications, bibliography, and measurements for astronomical objects outside the solar system. It brings to the scientific community an added value to content which is updated daily by a team of documentalists working together in close collaboration with astronomers and IT specialists. We explain how the CDS staff updates SIMBAD with object citations in the main astronomical journals, as well as with astronomical data and measurements. We also explain how the identification is made between the objects found in the literature and those already existing in SIMBAD. We show the steps followed by the documentalist team to update the database using different tools developed at CDS, like the sky visualizer Aladin, and the large catalogues and survey database VizieR. As a direct result of this teamwork, SIMBAD integrates almost 10.000 bibliographic references per year. The service receives more than 400.000 queries per day.

  16. 75 FR 76482 - Notice of Web Availability and Opportunity for Public Comment on Updated Guidance for the Section...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... the Section 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly and Section 811 Supportive Housing for Persons With... of a draft notice updating HUD's guidance for the Section 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly...

  17. Frequent Absences? Help Students Keep up, Not Drop out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butts, Patricia H.

    2009-01-01

    Absenteeism, which is increasing at an alarming rate, is becoming the gateway to dropping out of school altogether. One way to combat this trend is for educators to implement strategies and interventions for students returning from frequent absences in an effort to keep their make-up workload feasible and to help them maintain their grades.…

  18. Hit List: Frequently Challenged Books for Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monks, Merri M.; Pistolis, Donna Reidy

    This book presents descriptions of 26 young adult titles that have been frequent targets of censorship attempts. Each entry provides an annotation for the book in question; examples of recent challenges; citations to reviews of the book and background articles; a list of awards garnered by the book or its author; references about the author;…

  19. Fraternity Membership & Frequent Drinking. NBER Working Paper No. 16291

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSimone, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Reinforcing earlier findings from other data, college senior fraternity/sorority members are more likely to consume alcohol frequently. Large reductions in estimates upon controlling for time spent partying, and to a lesser extent cigarette use and intramural sports involvement, suggest considerable unobserved heterogeneity in the relationship.…

  20. Demystifying the Electoral College: 12 Frequently Asked Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, Tiffany

    2012-01-01

    As the presidential election of 2012 draws closer, Americans will witness a resurgence of references to the Electoral College in news reports. Here, "Looking at the Law" hopes to demystify the Electoral College, and refresh many social studies memories--just in time for the next election--with some frequently asked questions about electing the…

  1. Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPC): Frequently Asked Questions

    SciTech Connect

    2012-11-01

    An ESPC is a working relationship between a Federal agency and an energy service company (ESCO). The ESCO conducts a comprehensive energy audit for the Federal facility and identifies improvements to save energy. The following sections present a number of frequently asked questions from ESPC end-users and stakeholders.

  2. Ban the Book Report: Promoting Frequent and Enthusiastic Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Graham

    2012-01-01

    Teachers recognize that frequent independent reading increases student knowledge on a wide range of topics, enhances vocabulary, and improves comprehension. "Ban the Book Report" inspires teachers to go beyond narrow and analytical book reports by exploring the potential of book talks, alternate book covers, identifying features of informational…

  3. Frequently Asked Questions: Common Core State Standards Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Common Core State Standards Initiative, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The document provides answers to some of the frequently asked questions about the Common Core State Standards, from how they were developed to what they mean for states and local communities. The questions are organized into the following categories: (1) Overview; (2) Process; (3) Implementation and Future Work; and (4) Content and Quality of the…

  4. Frequent Errors in Chinese EFL Learners' Topic-Based Writings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhan, Huifang

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigated a large number of errors found in the topic-based writings of Chinese EFL learners, especially provided an analysis on frequent errors, to find useful pedagogical implications for English grammar teaching and writing instruction in Chinese EFL setting. Students' topic-based writings were examined by the author. The findings…

  5. Pharmacodynamics of Memantine: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Rammes, G; Danysz, W; Parsons, C.G

    2008-01-01

    Memantine received marketing authorization from the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products (EMEA) for the treatment of moderately severe to severe Alzheimer´s disease (AD) in Europe on 17th May 2002 and shortly thereafter was also approved by the FDA for use in the same indication in the USA. Memantine is a moderate affinity, uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist with strong voltage-dependency and fast kinetics. Due to this mechanism of action (MOA), there is a wealth of other possible therapeutic indications for memantine and numerous preclinical data in animal models support this assumption. This review is intended to provide an update on preclinical studies on the pharmacodynamics of memantine, with an additional focus on animal models of diseases aside from the approved indication. For most studies prior to 1999, the reader is referred to a previous review [196]. In general, since 1999, considerable additional preclinical evidence has accumulated supporting the use of memantine in AD (both symptomatic and neuroprotective). In addition, there has been further confirmation of the MOA of memantine as an uncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist and essentially no data contradicting our understanding of the benign side effect profile of memantine. PMID:19305788

  6. Potential barrier mimicking frequent location measurements in quantum Zeno dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porras, Miguel A.; Gonzalo, Isabel; Luis, Alfredo

    2016-04-01

    We show that quantum Zeno dynamics can be mimicked by the isolated evolution of an unobserved system in an effective potential. Monitoring frequently whether a particle remains in a region of space leads to the same wave-packet dynamics as placing the region on top of a potential barrier and letting the particle evolve on its own, without external couplings. We focus on very frequent but not continuous observation so that the particle abandons the initial region with some finite probability. The height of the barrier relative to the surroundings for a high frequency ν of the observations being mimicked is found numerically to be h ν /2 , where h is Planck's constant.

  7. Evidence for frequent incest in a cooperatively breeding mammal.

    PubMed

    Nichols, H J; Cant, M A; Hoffman, J I; Sanderson, J L

    2014-12-01

    As breeding between relatives often results in inbreeding depression, inbreeding avoidance is widespread in the animal kingdom. However, inbreeding avoidance may entail fitness costs. For example, dispersal away from relatives may reduce survival. How these conflicting selection pressures are resolved is challenging to investigate, but theoretical models predict that inbreeding should occur frequently in some systems. Despite this, few studies have found evidence of regular incest in mammals, even in social species where relatives are spatio-temporally clustered and opportunities for inbreeding frequently arise. We used genetic parentage assignments together with relatedness data to quantify inbreeding rates in a wild population of banded mongooses, a cooperatively breeding carnivore. We show that females regularly conceive to close relatives, including fathers and brothers. We suggest that the costs of inbreeding avoidance may sometimes outweigh the benefits, even in cooperatively breeding species where strong within-group incest avoidance is considered to be the norm.

  8. Frequent urination and Depo-Provera. Ask the experts.

    PubMed

    Kaunitz, A; Nelson, A; Wysocki, S; Schnare, S

    1998-12-01

    This "Ask the Experts" column addresses two concerns related to use of Depo-Provera. The first question relates to the clinical significance of frequent urination. Two of the three experts assert that frequent urination in a Depo-Provera user is unlikely to be related to method use; urinary tract infection and diabetes are more probable causes. The third notes that hypoestrogenicity could be a factor and suggests examination of the vagina for atrophy, which could cause the tissue around the urethra to become atrophic. The second question addresses techniques for confirming menopause in Depo-Provera users. The experts concur that measurement of follicle-stimulating hormone in perimenopausal Depo-Provera users lacks predictive value. Recommended, instead, is continuation of Depo-Provera with supplemental estrogen until the woman is in her mid-50s. At that time, conventional hormone replacement therapy can be initiated.

  9. Updated Conceptual Cost Estimating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    16-page report discusses development and use of NASA TR-1508, the Kennedy Space Center Aerospace Construction Price Book for preparing conceptual, budget, funding, cost-estimating, and preliminary cost-engineering reports. Updated annually from 1974 through 1985 with actual bid prices and government estimates. Includes labor and material quantities and prices with contractor and subcontractor markups for buildings, facilities, and systems at Kennedy Space Center. While data pertains to aerospace facilities, format and cost-estimating techniques guide estimation of costs in other construction applications.

  10. [Update Chagas disease].

    PubMed

    Molina, Israel; Salvador, Fernando; Sánchez-Montalvá, Adrián

    2016-02-01

    The constant migration flows have favored the presence of people with Chagas disease in regions traditionally regarded as non-endemic, such as North America, Europe, Asia and Oceania. This has forced both health authorities and professionals to be updated in order to respond to such a demand for assistance. Recent years have led to significant progress in the field of diagnosis and treatment of Chagas disease, one of the most neglected tropical diseases. Recent clinical trials are providing new evidence that makes the management of these patients, a constant challenge for the professionals involved. Innovative diagnostic tools and therapeutic regimens, allow us to face the future of Chagas disease with optimism.

  11. Updates in pediatric endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Kamboj, Manmohan K

    2013-04-01

    There are rapid advances being made in the field of medicine! New research continues to investigate etiopathogenic mechanisms underlying many endocrine disorders, new tests to facilitate diagnosis, and newer treatment options. The discussion in this article focuses on a few of the important concerns in adolescent endocrinology and highlights some recent concepts that are important for the physicians taking care of these adolescents. This article also includes a brief update on diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2, obesity, and polycystic ovarian syndrome; new thoughts and controversies about vitamin D and current management of the common thyroid disorders; adrenal insufficiency; and concerns with disorders of puberty in adolescents.

  12. Fuel Cell Handbook update

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, W.R.; Hirschenhofer, J.H.; Engleman, R.R. Jr.; Stauffer, D.B.

    1993-11-01

    The objective of this work was to update the 1988 version of DOE`s Fuel Cell Handbook. Significant developments in the various fuel cell technologies required revisions to reflect state-of-the-art configurations and performance. The theoretical presentation was refined in order to make the handbook more useful to both the casual reader and fuel cell or systems analyst. In order to further emphasize the practical application of fuel cell technologies, the system integration information was expanded. In addition, practical elements, such as suggestions and guidelines to approximate fuel cell performance, were provided.

  13. SCROD: An Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, J.; Musienko, Y.; McCauley, T.; Paul, T.; Reucroft, S.; Swain, J.

    We give an update on the most recent design of the "School Cosmic Ray Outreach Detector'' (SCROD) using pixellated Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes and scintillating tiles with wavelength shifting fibers as detectors. This technology offers very high levels of robustness at low cost. Voltages and currents are also so low as to reduce shock hazard to zero, and there are no fragile glass or vacuum-containing components. Plans are underway to make a very large-scale deployment of such detectors as part of a major outreach project.

  14. Handling Dynamic Weights in Weighted Frequent Pattern Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Chowdhury Farhan; Tanbeer, Syed Khairuzzaman; Jeong, Byeong-Soo; Lee, Young-Koo

    Even though weighted frequent pattern (WFP) mining is more effective than traditional frequent pattern mining because it can consider different semantic significances (weights) of items, existing WFP algorithms assume that each item has a fixed weight. But in real world scenarios, the weight (price or significance) of an item can vary with time. Reflecting these changes in item weight is necessary in several mining applications, such as retail market data analysis and web click stream analysis. In this paper, we introduce the concept of a dynamic weight for each item, and propose an algorithm, DWFPM (dynamic weighted frequent pattern mining), that makes use of this concept. Our algorithm can address situations where the weight (price or significance) of an item varies dynamically. It exploits a pattern growth mining technique to avoid the level-wise candidate set generation-and-test methodology. Furthermore, it requires only one database scan, so it is eligible for use in stream data mining. An extensive performance analysis shows that our algorithm is efficient and scalable for WFP mining using dynamic weights.

  15. Frequent DPH3 promoter mutations in skin cancers.

    PubMed

    Denisova, Evgeniya; Heidenreich, Barbara; Nagore, Eduardo; Rachakonda, P Sivaramakrishna; Hosen, Ismail; Akrap, Ivana; Traves, Víctor; García-Casado, Zaida; López-Guerrero, José Antonio; Requena, Celia; Sanmartin, Onofre; Serra-Guillén, Carlos; Llombart, Beatriz; Guillén, Carlos; Ferrando, Jose; Gimeno, Enrique; Nordheim, Alfred; Hemminki, Kari; Kumar, Rajiv

    2015-11-01

    Recent reports suggested frequent occurrence of cancer associated somatic mutations within regulatory elements of the genome. Based on initial exome sequencing of 21 melanomas, we report frequent somatic mutations in skin cancers in a bidirectional promoter of diphthamide biosynthesis 3 (DPH3) and oxidoreductase NAD-binding domain containing 1 (OXNAD1) genes. The UV-signature mutations occurred at sites adjacent and within a binding motif for E-twenty six/ternary complex factors (Ets/TCF), at -8 and -9 bp from DPH3 transcription start site. Follow up screening of 586 different skin lesions showed that the DPH3 promoter mutations were present in melanocytic nevi (2/114; 2%), melanoma (30/304; 10%), basal cell carcinoma of skin (BCC; 57/137; 42%) and squamous cell carcinoma of skin (SCC; 12/31; 39%). Reporter assays carried out in one melanoma cell line for DPH3 and OXNAD1 orientations showed statistically significant increased promoter activity due to -8/-9CC > TT tandem mutations; although, no effect of the mutations on DPH3 and OXNAD1 transcription in tumors was observed. The results from this study show occurrence of frequent somatic non-coding mutations adjacent to a pre-existing binding site for Ets transcription factors within the directional promoter of DPH3 and OXNAD1 genes in three major skin cancers. The detected mutations displayed typical UV signature; however, the functionality of the mutations remains to be determined. PMID:26416425

  16. Frequent DPH3 promoter mutations in skin cancers

    PubMed Central

    Denisova, Evgeniya; Heidenreich, Barbara; Nagore, Eduardo; Rachakonda, P. Sivaramakrishna; Hosen, Ismail; Akrap, Ivana; Traves, Víctor; García-Casado, Zaida; López-Guerrero, José Antonio; Requena, Celia; Sanmartin, Onofre; Serra-Guillén, Carlos; Llombart, Beatriz; Guillén, Carlos; Ferrando, Jose; Gimeno, Enrique; Nordheim, Alfred; Hemminki, Kari; Kumar, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports suggested frequent occurrence of cancer associated somatic mutations within regulatory elements of the genome. Based on initial exome sequencing of 21 melanomas, we report frequent somatic mutations in skin cancers in a bidirectional promoter of diphthamide biosynthesis 3 (DPH3) and oxidoreductase NAD-binding domain containing 1 (OXNAD1) genes. The UV-signature mutations occurred at sites adjacent and within a binding motif for E-twenty six/ternary complex factors (Ets/TCF), at −8 and −9 bp from DPH3 transcription start site. Follow up screening of 586 different skin lesions showed that the DPH3 promoter mutations were present in melanocytic nevi (2/114; 2%), melanoma (30/304; 10%), basal cell carcinoma of skin (BCC; 57/137; 42%) and squamous cell carcinoma of skin (SCC; 12/31; 39%). Reporter assays carried out in one melanoma cell line for DPH3 and OXNAD1 orientations showed statistically significant increased promoter activity due to −8/−9CC > TT tandem mutations; although, no effect of the mutations on DPH3 and OXNAD1 transcription in tumors was observed. The results from this study show occurrence of frequent somatic non-coding mutations adjacent to a pre-existing binding site for Ets transcription factors within the directional promoter of DPH3 and OXNAD1 genes in three major skin cancers. The detected mutations displayed typical UV signature; however, the functionality of the mutations remains to be determined. PMID:26416425

  17. [FREQUENTLY USED VEGETABLE OILS IN SOUTH AMERICA: FEATURES AND PROPERTIES].

    PubMed

    Durán Agüero, Samuel; Torres García, Jairo; Sanhueza Catalán, Julio

    2015-07-01

    In recent decades, the consumption of vegetable oils has increased in our society, being an important part of the diet worldwide. South America is a major producer of an important variety of vegetable oils. The composition of vegetable oils is not standard as it varies greatly in the amount of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, and particularly in the amounts of omega-6 and omega-3, which are associated with the source either plant species, seed, plant or fruit, providing different nutritional benefits. The purpose of this article is to review and update the data and evidence about the consumption of oils produced and commercialized in South America, such as soybean oil, corn, palm, sunflower, canola and olive oils, and also to determine health effects from studies related with the topic.

  18. Prediction of Risk Factors of Frequent Relapse Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jahan, I; Hanif, M; Ali, M A; Hoque, M M

    2015-10-01

    This case control study was aimed to identify the predictive risk factors for frequent relapse idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS) and conducted in Sir Salimullah Medical College & Mitford Hospital, Dhaka and at Renal and Dialysis Unit of Dhaka Shishu Hospital and Bangladesh Institute of Child Health (BICH), Dhaka, from January 2006 to December 2006. We examined retrospectively the clinical course of fifty cases of frequent relapse nephrotic syndrome (FRNS) as cases and fifty cases of infrequent relapse nephrotic syndrome (IRNS) as control who met the predefined enrollment criteria, followed for at least one year after initial onset of disease. After enrollment following parameters were studied as predictors of frequent relapse: i) Socio-demographic variables: age, sex, socio-economic condition, number of living room ii) Disease related variables i.e. age of onset, duration of illness, frequency of relapse within the 1st year, regimen of initial steroid therapy, total cumulative dose of steroid for remission, day of remission after starting steroid, association with atopy and infection, concomitant upper respiratory illness iii) Biochemical and pathological variables (at the time of initial attack) i.e. Serum albumin, serum cholesterol, blood urea, 24 hours urinary protein, serum creatinine, complete blood count, urine RBC, urine pus cell, urine culture. The test statistics used to analyses the data were descriptive statistics, Chi-square probability test, Student's t-test and Binary logistic regression analysis for Odds ratio. Both univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that age of onset (P<0.001, OR=0.9, 95% CI=0.85-0.95), poor socioeconomic status (P<0.034, OR=0.5.8, 95% CI=1.14-29.5) and low serum albumin level at the time of initial presentation (P<0.022, OR=0.8, 95% CI=0.65-0.97) were independent predictors of frequent relapse nephrotic syndrome. In conclusion, we demonstrated that age at onset, poor socioeconomic condition and low

  19. Development of the updated system of city underground pipelines based on Visual Studio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianxiong; Zhu, Yun; Li, Xiangdong

    2009-10-01

    Our city has owned the integrated pipeline network management system with ArcGIS Engine 9.1 as the bottom development platform and with Oracle9i as basic database for storaging data. In this system, ArcGIS SDE9.1 is applied as the spatial data engine, and the system was a synthetic management software developed with Visual Studio visualization procedures development tools. As the pipeline update function of the system has the phenomenon of slower update and even sometimes the data lost, to ensure the underground pipeline data can real-time be updated conveniently and frequently, and the actuality and integrity of the underground pipeline data, we have increased a new update module in the system developed and researched by ourselves. The module has the powerful data update function, and can realize the function of inputting and outputting and rapid update volume of data. The new developed module adopts Visual Studio visualization procedures development tools, and uses access as the basic database to storage data. We can edit the graphics in AutoCAD software, and realize the database update using link between the graphics and the system. Practice shows that the update module has good compatibility with the original system, reliable and high update efficient of the database.

  20. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): patient with sepsis].

    PubMed

    Ortiz Leyba, C; Montejo González, J C; Vaquerizo Alonso, C

    2011-11-01

    Nutritional metabolic management, together with other treatment and support measures used, is one of the mainstays of the treatment of septic patients. Nutritional support should be started early, after initial life support measures, to avoid the consequences of malnutrition, to provide adequate nutritional intake and to prevent the development of secondary complications such as superinfection or multiorgan failure. As in other critically-ill patients, when the enteral route cannot be used to ensure calorie-protein requirements, the association of parenteral nutrition has been shown to be safe in this subgroup of patients. Studies evaluating the effect of specific pharmaconutrients in septic patients are scarce and are insufficient to allow recommendations to be made. To date, enteral diets with a mixture of substrates with distinct pharmaconutrient properties do not seem to be superior to standard diets in altering the course of sepsis, although equally there is no evidence that these diets are harmful. There is insufficient evidence to recommend the use of glutamine in septic patients receiving parenteral nutrition. However, given the good results and absence of glutamine-related adverse effects in the various studies performed in the general population of critically-ill patients, these patients could benefit from the use of this substance. Routine use of omega-3 fatty acids cannot be recommended until further evidence has been gathered, although the use of lipid emulsions with a high omega-6 fatty acid content should be avoided. Septic patients should receive an adequate supply of essential trace elements and vitamins. Further studies are required before the use of high-dose selenium can be recommended.

  1. Working Memory Updating Latency Reflects the Cost of Switching between Maintenance and Updating Modes of Operation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Yoav; Oberauer, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Updating and maintenance of information are 2 conflicting demands on working memory (WM). We examined the time required to update WM (updating latency) as a function of the sequence of updated and not-updated items within a list. Participants held a list of items in WM and updated a variable subset of them in each trial. Four experiments that vary…

  2. Genomic aberrations frequently alter chromatin regulatory genes in chordoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Zehir, Ahmet; Nafa, Khedoudja; Zhou, Nengyi; Berger, Michael F; Casanova, Jacklyn; Sadowska, Justyna; Lu, Chao; Allis, C David; Gounder, Mrinal; Chandhanayingyong, Chandhanarat; Ladanyi, Marc; Boland, Patrick J; Hameed, Meera

    2016-07-01

    Chordoma is a rare primary bone neoplasm that is resistant to standard chemotherapies. Despite aggressive surgical management, local recurrence and metastasis is not uncommon. To identify the specific genetic aberrations that play key roles in chordoma pathogenesis, we utilized a genome-wide high-resolution SNP-array and next generation sequencing (NGS)-based molecular profiling platform to study 24 patient samples with typical histopathologic features of chordoma. Matching normal tissues were available for 16 samples. SNP-array analysis revealed nonrandom copy number losses across the genome, frequently involving 3, 9p, 1p, 14, 10, and 13. In contrast, copy number gain is uncommon in chordomas. Two minimum deleted regions were observed on 3p within a ∼8 Mb segment at 3p21.1-p21.31, which overlaps SETD2, BAP1 and PBRM1. The minimum deleted region on 9p was mapped to CDKN2A locus at 9p21.3, and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A was detected in 5/22 chordomas (∼23%). NGS-based molecular profiling demonstrated an extremely low level of mutation rate in chordomas, with an average of 0.5 mutations per sample for the 16 cases with matched normal. When the mutated genes were grouped based on molecular functions, many of the mutation events (∼40%) were found in chromatin regulatory genes. The combined copy number and mutation profiling revealed that SETD2 is the single gene affected most frequently in chordomas, either by deletion or by mutations. Our study demonstrated that chordoma belongs to the C-class (copy number changes) tumors whose oncogenic signature is non-random multiple copy number losses across the genome and genomic aberrations frequently alter chromatin regulatory genes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Genomic Aberrations Frequently Alter Chromatin Regulatory Genes in Chordoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Zehir, Ahmet; Nafa, Khedoudja; Zhou, Nengyi; Berger, Michael F.; Casanova, Jacklyn; Sadowska, Justyna; Lu, Chao; Allis, C. David; Gounder, Mrinal; Chandhanayingyong, Chandhanarat; Ladanyi, Marc; Boland, Patrick J; Hameed, Meera

    2016-01-01

    Chordoma is a rare primary bone neoplasm that is resistant to standard chemotherapies. Despite aggressive surgical management, local recurrence and metastasis is not uncommon. To identify the specific genetic aberrations that play key roles in chordoma pathogenesis, we utilized a genome-wide high-resolution SNP-array and next generation sequencing (NGS)-based molecular profiling platform to study 24 patient samples with typical histopathologic features of chordoma. Matching normal tissues were available for 16 samples. SNP-array analysis revealed nonrandom copy number losses across the genome, frequently involving 3, 9p, 1p, 14, 10, and 13. In contrast, copy number gain is uncommon in chordomas. Two minimum deleted regions were observed on 3p within a ~8 Mb segment at 3p21.1–p21.31, which overlaps SETD2, BAP1 and PBRM1. The minimum deleted region on 9p was mapped to CDKN2A locus at 9p21.3, and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A was detected in 5/22 chordomas (~23%). NGS-based molecular profiling demonstrated an extremely low level of mutation rate in chordomas, with an average of 0.5 mutations per sample for the 16 cases with matched normal. When the mutated genes were grouped based on molecular functions, many of the mutation events (~40%) were found in chromatin regulatory genes. The combined copy number and mutation profiling revealed that SETD2 is the single gene affected most frequently in chordomas, either by deletion or by mutations. Our study demonstrated that chordoma belongs to the C-class (copy number changes) tumors whose oncogenic signature is non-random multiple copy number losses across the genome and genomic aberrations frequently alter chromatin regulatory genes. PMID:27072194

  4. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Presenting with Compulsions to Urinate Frequently.

    PubMed

    Jiwanmall, Stephen Amarjeet; Kattula, Dheeraj

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common psychiatric disorder which is easily recognized. However, sometimes patients of OCD present in such an atypical presentation of symptoms and a pathway to care involving multiple specialities. We report a case of a girl who had consulted several physicians and a urologist for frequent micturition, who was treated as a case of OCD after clarifying the compulsive nature of her symptom. There was significant improvement in her condition following 8 weeks of treatment with 200 mg of Sertraline and behaviour therapy. PMID:27570353

  5. Performance analysis of FDDI network under frequent bidding requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neo, L. K.; Cheng, T. H.; Subramanian, K. R.; Dubey, V. K.

    1993-05-01

    A new bidding scheme is described for the fiber distributed data interface (FDDI). An analysis is presented for the throughput performance of an FDDI network under the assumption of heavy load, which allows the target token rotation time (TTRT) to be bid for and adjusted frequently as and when the access time requirements of synchronous traffic change. Our results show that better throughput performance is achievable under the new bidding scheme. It is also observed that although re-bidding is desirable, escalating and uncontrolled bidding intensity may incur undue overheads that results in unacceptable throughput degradation.

  6. Retention Indices for Frequently Reported Compounds of Plant Essential Oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babushok, V. I.; Linstrom, P. J.; Zenkevich, I. G.

    2011-12-01

    Gas chromatographic retention indices were evaluated for 505 frequently reported plant essential oil components using a large retention index database. Retention data are presented for three types of commonly used stationary phases: dimethyl silicone (nonpolar), dimethyl silicone with 5% phenyl groups (slightly polar), and polyethylene glycol (polar) stationary phases. The evaluations are based on the treatment of multiple measurements with the number of data records ranging from about 5 to 800 per compound. Data analysis was limited to temperature programmed conditions. The data reported include the average and median values of retention index with standard deviations and confidence intervals.

  7. Updates Technologies of Media Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Whether as status notifications in news feeds or interactive prompts in online video services, updates punctuate the background routines of media by bringing a variety of changes to the attention of users. In this dissertation I argue that updates rationalize media change by making previously obscure actions of users and movements of technologies…

  8. Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Management update.

    PubMed

    Al-Banji, Muradi H; Zahr, Doaa K; Jan, Mohammed M

    2015-07-01

    Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) is a severe pediatric epilepsy syndrome characterized by mixed seizures, cognitive decline, and generalized slow (<3 Hz) spike wave discharges on electroencephalography. Atonic seizures result in dangerous drop attacks with risks of injury and impairment of the quality of life. The seizures are frequently resistant to multiple antiepileptic (AED) drugs. Newer AEDs, such as rufinamide, are now available. When multiple AED trials fail, non-pharmacological treatments such as the ketogenic diet, vagus nerve stimulation, and epilepsy surgery, should be considered. The aim of this review is to present an updated outline of LGS and the available treatments. Although the prognosis for complete seizure control remains poor, the addition of newer therapies provides an improved hope for some of these patients and their families. Further long term randomized controlled trials are required to compare different therapeutic interventions in terms of efficacy and tolerability. PMID:26166587

  9. [Recommendations for palivizumab use. Update 2015].

    PubMed

    Fernández Jonusas, Silvia; Albas Maubett, Deleys; Satragno, Daniela; Cattaino, Adriana; Martin Alonso, Margarita; Rubio, Cecilia; Nieto, Ricardo

    2016-02-01

    This recommendation updates the Argentinean Pediatrics' Neonatal Committee (CEFEN) ones published in 2007. The respiratory syncytial virus is the most frequent agent for lower respiratory infection. Tiny premature, bronchopulmonary dysplasia and significant hemodynamic congenital heart disease babies are the most vulnerable populations. Palivizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody against respiratory syncytial virus used in the cold season. These recommendations are based on the scientific review of the literature published up to date. We reinforce the importance of general prevention measures like hand hygiene and family education among others. During the predominant season of respiratory syncytial virus in our country (April to September) a monthly dose of intramuscular 15 mg/kg of palivizumab is recommended. The safety and effectiveness has been proved as well as a reduction in the hospitalizations rates. In addition, epidemiological data of previous years are provided here.

  10. Updates in the management of gout.

    PubMed

    Keith, Michael P; Gilliland, William R

    2007-03-01

    The majority of patients with gout are cared for by primary care physicians. Although both the physician and patient may easily recognize the acute arthritis of gout, errors in selecting the most appropriate medication and proper dose are common. The clinical stages of gout include asymptomatic hyperuricemia, intermittent gouty arthritis, and chronic tophaceous gout. Treatment of gout is usually considered after the first attack of arthritis, typically podagra. The aims of treatment are to alleviate the pain and inflammation associated with acute attacks, prevent future attacks, and decrease uric acid levels. Confusion frequently arises because certain medications such as colchicine may have dual purposes: to treat an acute attack and to suppress future attacks. The purpose of this management update is to provide practical advice about prescribing the proper medication considering both treatment goals and patient comorbidities.

  11. Updated Outcomes of Prophylactic Femoral Fixation.

    PubMed

    Kreul, Sarah M; Sorger, Joel I; Rajamanickam, Victoria P; Heiner, John P

    2016-01-01

    Despite an increasing number of patients with metastatic bone disease (MBD), minimal data exist regarding outcomes of patients undergoing prophylactic femoral fixation for MBD when compared with other frequently performed orthopedic operations, such as hemiarthroplasty of the femur. The authors performed a retrospective database review evaluating these procedures due to similar operative times and patient populations and also reviewed common comorbidities such as body mass index (BMI). The goal was to provide updated results of prophylactic femoral fixation and evaluate whether certain patient risk factors (eg, BMI) altered 30-day survival for patients with MBD. The authors reviewed 1849 patients with and without MBD treated by prophylactic fixation and hemiarthroplasty from 2006 to 2011 identified in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. There were no significant differences in complications between patients undergoing surgical treatment for impending or actual femoral fracture. In addition, there were no differences between the 217 patients with MBD in either the hemiarthroplasty or prophylactic fixation groups because the rate of death within 30 days postoperatively was 5.56% and 3.30%, respectively (P=.526). When comparing BMI, obese patients had higher rates of wound infection, and underweight patients were more likely to develop pneumonia or die within 30 days postoperatively. Patients with impending femur fractures benefit from prophylactic fixation and perform as well in the short term as patients undergoing hemiarthroplasty. Certain BMI categories (underweight or obese) contributed to poorer outcomes. These findings provide updated information for discussing risks and benefits with surgical candidates.

  12. Gender dysphoria update.

    PubMed

    Beemer, B R

    1996-04-01

    Concepts of sexuality and gender identity are undergoing re-examination in society. Recent media attention has intensified interest in the area, although reliable information is sometimes lacking. Gender dysphoria, and its extreme form, transsexualism, frequently brings sufferers into contact with psychiatric, social, and mental health professionals, and surgical caregivers. Treatment of these patients often represents a challenge on many levels. Some guidelines for this care are outlined.

  13. When working memory updating requires updating: analysis of serial position in a running memory task.

    PubMed

    Botto, Marta; Basso, Demis; Ferrari, Marcella; Palladino, Paola

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate updating in working memory (WM), analyzing the effects of task demand and memory resources on serial position curve (SPC), in a running memory task with slow pace presentation and a probed recognition procedure. These task conditions were supposed to produce an easier WM updating task, which may allow evidencing whether the task is performed through an active or a passive updating. Serial position curves were compared in conditions of high or low memory load, and with or without interference of a secondary (prospective memory, PM) task. With either a high WM load, or a high PM load, results showed a SPC with both primacy and recency effects, indicating the use of an active strategy. When resources were taken up by both PM task and high WM demand the usual pattern with only recency effect was obtained. Taken together, these findings support the ideas that 1--people can effectively update WM, and 2--the performance is dependent on both memory and executive resource availability.

  14. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): nutritional assessment].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Santana, S; Arboleda Sánchez, J A; Abilés, J

    2011-11-01

    Current parameters to assess nutritional status in critically-ill patients are useful to evaluate nutritional status prior to admission to the intensive care unit. However, these parameters are of little utility once the patient's nutritional status has been altered by the acute process and its treatment. Changes in water distribution affect anthropometric variables and biochemical biomarkers, which in turn are affected by synthesis and degradation processes. Increased plasma levels of prealbumin and retinol -proteins with a short half-life- can indicate adequate response to nutritional support, while reduced levels of these proteins indicate further metabolic stress. The parameters used in functional assessment, such as those employed to assess muscular or immune function, are often altered by drugs or the presence of infection or polyneuropathy. However, some parameters can be used to monitor metabolic response and refeeding or can aid prognostic evaluation.

  15. Getting into hot water: sick guppies frequent warmer thermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Ryan S; Reynolds, Michael; James, Joanna; Williams, Chris; Mohammed, Azad; Ramsubhag, Adesh; van Oosterhout, Cock; Cable, Jo

    2016-07-01

    Ectotherms depend on the environmental temperature for thermoregulation and exploit thermal regimes that optimise physiological functioning. They may also frequent warmer conditions to up-regulate their immune response against parasite infection and/or impede parasite development. This adaptive response, known as 'behavioural fever', has been documented in various taxa including insects, reptiles and fish, but only in response to endoparasite infections. Here, a choice chamber experiment was used to investigate the thermal preferences of a tropical freshwater fish, the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata), when infected with a common helminth ectoparasite Gyrodactylus turnbulli, in female-only and mixed-sex shoals. The temperature tolerance of G. turnbulli was also investigated by monitoring parasite population trajectories on guppies maintained at a continuous 18, 24 or 32 °C. Regardless of shoal composition, infected fish frequented the 32 °C choice chamber more often than when uninfected, significantly increasing their mean temperature preference. Parasites maintained continuously at 32 °C decreased to extinction within 3 days, whereas mean parasite abundance increased on hosts incubated at 18 and 24 °C. We show for the first time that gyrodactylid-infected fish have a preference for warmer waters and speculate that sick fish exploit the upper thermal tolerances of their parasites to self medicate. PMID:26965895

  16. Getting into hot water: sick guppies frequent warmer thermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Ryan S; Reynolds, Michael; James, Joanna; Williams, Chris; Mohammed, Azad; Ramsubhag, Adesh; van Oosterhout, Cock; Cable, Jo

    2016-07-01

    Ectotherms depend on the environmental temperature for thermoregulation and exploit thermal regimes that optimise physiological functioning. They may also frequent warmer conditions to up-regulate their immune response against parasite infection and/or impede parasite development. This adaptive response, known as 'behavioural fever', has been documented in various taxa including insects, reptiles and fish, but only in response to endoparasite infections. Here, a choice chamber experiment was used to investigate the thermal preferences of a tropical freshwater fish, the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata), when infected with a common helminth ectoparasite Gyrodactylus turnbulli, in female-only and mixed-sex shoals. The temperature tolerance of G. turnbulli was also investigated by monitoring parasite population trajectories on guppies maintained at a continuous 18, 24 or 32 °C. Regardless of shoal composition, infected fish frequented the 32 °C choice chamber more often than when uninfected, significantly increasing their mean temperature preference. Parasites maintained continuously at 32 °C decreased to extinction within 3 days, whereas mean parasite abundance increased on hosts incubated at 18 and 24 °C. We show for the first time that gyrodactylid-infected fish have a preference for warmer waters and speculate that sick fish exploit the upper thermal tolerances of their parasites to self medicate.

  17. Infant and perinatal pulmonary hypoplasia frequently associated with brainstem hypodevelopment.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, Giulia; Mingrone, Rosaria; Lavezzi, Anna M; Matturri, Luigi

    2009-04-01

    Recent anatomo-pathological studies have revealed a frequent associated hypoplasia of both arcuate nucleus and lungs in stillbirths. The purpose of this study is to analyze the lung and brainstem development in sudden unexplained perinatal death and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). A total of 51 cases were investigated. A complete autopsy was performed in each case. Anatomo-pathologic examination of the central autonomic nervous system included an in-depth study on histological serial sections of the brains where the main structures participating in control of the vital functions are located. The stage of lung development was evaluated by macroscopic and microscopic criteria. In 52.9% of cases, a pulmonary hypoplasia was detected. The pulmonary hypoplasia was significantly more frequent in the SIDS group compared to the sudden perinatal unexplained death groups (p < 0.05). In 72.5% of cases, histological examination of the brainstem on serial sections showed hypodevelopment of the brainstem nuclei, particularly hypoplasia, of the arcuate nucleus (60.8%). In 47.1% of cases, pulmonary hypoplasia was associated with brainstem hypodevelopment. PMID:19288128

  18. Flies developed smaller cells when temperature fluctuated more frequently.

    PubMed

    Czarnoleski, Marcin; Dragosz-Kluska, Dominika; Angilletta, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Changes in cell size might be an important component of adaptation to thermal heterogeneity. Although Drosophila melanogaster develops smaller cells at fluctuating temperatures, we do not know whether this response depends on the frequency or amplitude of thermal change. In a laboratory experiment, we exposed flies to either frequent or infrequent fluctuations between 17 and 27 °C, while controlling the total exposure to each temperature. Flies emerged from these treatments with similar body sizes, but flies at more frequent fluctuations emerged earlier and had smaller epidermal cells for a given body size. Tissue built from small cells has more nuclei for transcription, shorter distances between cell compartments, and a larger surface area for transport across membranes. Therefore, we hypothesize that physiological effects of small cells reduce lags in metabolic activity and enhance performance of flies during warming. For plasticity of cell size to confer a fitness advantage, this hypothetical benefit must outweigh the cost of maintaining a greater area of plasma membrane.

  19. Common Pharmacophore Identification Using Frequent Clique Detection Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Podolyan, Yevgeniy; Karypis, George

    2008-01-01

    The knowledge of a pharmacophore, or the 3D arrangement of features in the biologically active molecule that is responsible for its pharmacological activity, can help in the search and design of a new or better drug acting upon the same or related target. In this paper we describe two new algorithms based on the frequent clique detection in the molecular graphs. The first algorithm mines all frequent cliques that are present in at least one of the conformers of each (or a portion of all) molecules. The second algorithm exploits the similarities among the different conformers of the same molecule and achieves an order of magnitude performance speedup compared to the first algorithm. Both algorithms are guaranteed to find all common pharmacophores in the dataset, which is confirmed by the validation on the set of molecules for which pharmacophores have been determined experimentally. In addition, these algorithms are able to scale to datasets with arbitrarily large number of conformers per molecule and identify multiple ligand binding modes or multiple binding sites of the target. PMID:19072298

  20. Parapharyngeal abscess is frequently associated with concomitant peritonsillar abscess.

    PubMed

    Klug, Tejs Ehlers; Fischer, Anne Sophie Lind; Antonsen, Christine; Rusan, Maria; Eskildsen, Helle; Ovesen, Therese

    2014-06-01

    To characterize patients with parapharyngeal abscess admitted to a Danish tertiary care centre and evaluate our management. This is a retrospective chart review. All records of patients with parapharyngeal abscess admitted to the Ear-Nose-Throat Department at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, from January 2001 through December 2011 were reviewed. In total, 63 patients (41 males), aged 4-89 years (median, 45 years) were included in the study. The mean annual incidence of parapharyngeal abscess was 0.9 cases/100,000 population. Thirty-three (52%) patients had concomitant peritonsillar abscess. In two patients the parapharyngeal abscess was accompanied by necrotizing fasciitis. The most frequent surgical approach used was intrapharyngeal incision in combination with tonsillectomy. The most commonly used antibiotic regimen was benzylpenicillin plus metronidazole. Seven (13%) patients returned to the operating theatre due to post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage or insufficient abscess drainage. Tonsillectomy and internal incision of the abscess in combination with a narrow-spectrum intravenous penicillin and metronidazole is a safe and efficient approach for managing parapharyngeal abscesses. This approach, however, carries a relatively high complication rate, requiring close surveillance in the early post-operative period. This is especially true for parapharyngeal abscess patients without peritonsillar abscess. In our series, these patients were more ill, more likely to experience complications, require intensive care, intubation, and tracheotomy, than parapharyngeal abscess patients with concurrent peritonsillar abscess. The frequent co-existence of parapharyngeal abscess and peritonsillar abscess favours careful consideration of addition of tonsillectomy to intrapharyngeal incision. PMID:23982668

  1. Finding Frequent Closed Itemsets in Sliding Window in Linear Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junbo; Zhou, Bo; Chen, Lu; Wang, Xinyu; Ding, Yiqun

    One of the most well-studied problems in data mining is computing the collection of frequent itemsets in large transactional databases. Since the introduction of the famous Apriori algorithm [14], many others have been proposed to find the frequent itemsets. Among such algorithms, the approach of mining closed itemsets has raised much interest in data mining community. The algorithms taking this approach include TITANIC [8], CLOSET+[6], DCI-Closed [4], FCI-Stream [3], GC-Tree [15], TGC-Tree [16] etc. Among these algorithms, FCI-Stream, GC-Tree and TGC-Tree are online algorithms work under sliding window environments. By the performance evaluation in [16], GC-Tree [15] is the fastest one. In this paper, an improved algorithm based on GC-Tree is proposed, the computational complexity of which is proved to be a linear combination of the average transaction size and the average closed itemset size. The algorithm is based on the essential theorem presented in Sect. 4.2. Empirically, the new algorithm is several orders of magnitude faster than the state of art algorithm, GC-Tree.

  2. Stormwater harvesting and WSUD frequent flow management: a compatibility analysis.

    PubMed

    Brodie, I

    2012-01-01

    Harvesting stormwater from urban catchments provides a supplementary water resource and, due to the physical abstraction of polluted water, also leads to environmental benefits. These benefits include the reduction of frequent ecosystem disturbance during small storms and less waterway erosion; hydrological impacts which are currently addressed by Water Sensitive Urban Design guidelines for stormwater frequent flow management (FFM). Although FFM and stormwater harvesting share the same store-release behaviour, they have a very different underlying basis to their design and operation. This paper explores the level of compatibility between these two systems and hence the potential for their integration. It was found by water balance analysis that the harvesting storage required to maximise most yields is similar to the recommended storage volume for FFM. This analysis was performed for a temperate-climate location in South East Queensland under historically low rainfalls. Environmental benefits associated with runoff quantity and pollutant load reductions are highest when the capture storage is rapidly emptied after storms. PMID:22744693

  3. Promiscuous 2-aminothiazoles (PrATs): a frequent hitting scaffold.

    PubMed

    Devine, Shane M; Mulcair, Mark D; Debono, Cael O; Leung, Eleanor W W; Nissink, J Willem M; Lim, San Sui; Chandrashekaran, Indu R; Vazirani, Mansha; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Simpson, Jamie S; Baell, Jonathan B; Scammells, Peter J; Norton, Raymond S; Scanlon, Martin J

    2015-02-12

    We have identified a class of molecules, known as 2-aminothiazoles (2-ATs), as frequent-hitting fragments in biophysical binding assays. This was exemplified by 4-phenylthiazol-2-amine being identified as a hit in 14/14 screens against a diverse range of protein targets, suggesting that this scaffold is a poor starting point for fragment-based drug discovery. This prompted us to analyze this scaffold in the context of an academic fragment library used for fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) and two larger compound libraries used for high-throughput screening (HTS). This analysis revealed that such "promiscuous 2-aminothiazoles" (PrATs) behaved as frequent hitters under both FBDD and HTS settings, although the problem was more pronounced in the fragment-based studies. As 2-ATs are present in known drugs, they cannot necessarily be deemed undesirable, but the combination of their promiscuity and difficulties associated with optimizing them into a lead compound makes them, in our opinion, poor scaffolds for fragment libraries. PMID:25559643

  4. Perinatal neuroprotection update

    PubMed Central

    Jelin, Angie C.; Salmeen, Kirsten; Gano, Dawn; Burd, Irina; Thiet, Mari-Paule

    2016-01-01

    Antepartum, intrapartum, and neonatal events can result in a spectrum of long-term neurological sequelae, including cerebral palsy, cognitive delay, schizophrenia, and autism spectrum disorders [1]. Advances in obstetrical and neonatal care have led to survival at earlier gestational ages and consequently increasing numbers of periviable infants who are at significant risk for long-term neurological deficits. Therefore, efforts to decrease and prevent cerebral insults attempt not only to decrease preterm delivery but also to improve neurological outcomes in infants delivered preterm. We recently published a comprehensive review addressing the impacts of magnesium sulfate, therapeutic hypothermia, delayed cord clamping, infections, and prevention of preterm delivery on the modification of neurological risk [2]. In this review, we will briefly provide updates to the aforementioned topics as well as an expansion on avoidance of toxin and infections, specifically the Zika virus. PMID:27606053

  5. ILRS Website Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Carey E.; Torrence, Mark H.; Pollack, Nathan H.; Tyahla, Lori J.

    2013-01-01

    The ILRS website, http://ilrs.gsfc.nasa.gov, is the central source of information for all aspects of the service. The website provides information on the organization and operation of the ILRS and descriptions of ILRS components data, and products. Furthermore, the website provides an entry point to the archive of these data products available through the data centers. Links are provided to extensive information on the ILRS network stations including performance assesments and data quality evaluations. Descriptions of suported satellite missions (current, future, and past) are provided to aid in station acquisition and data analysis. The website was reently redesigned. Content was reviewed during the update process, ensuring information is current and useful. This poster will provide specific examples of key sections, applicaitons, and webpages.

  6. Updating the Read Codes

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, David; Comp, Dip; Schulz, Erich; Brown, Philip; Price, Colin

    1997-01-01

    Abstract The Read Codes are a hierarchically-arranged controlled clinical vocabulary introduced in the early 1980s and now consisting of three maintained versions of differing complexity. The code sets are dynamic, and are updated quarterly in response to requests from users including clinicians in both primary and secondary care, software suppliers, and advice from a network of specialist healthcare professionals. The codes' continual evolution of content, both across and within versions, highlights tensions between different users and uses of coded clinical data. Internal processes, external interactions and new structural features implemented by the NHS Centre for Coding and Classification (NHSCCC) for user interactive maintenance of the Read Codes are described, and over 2000 items of user feedback episodes received over a 15-month period are analysed. PMID:9391934

  7. Macrofouling control technology update

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, J.L.; Armor, A.F.

    1996-12-31

    Macrofouling of condenser systems with debris, fish, clams, barnacles, mussels, algae, and other marine organisms can significantly affect power plant availability and performance. Typical difficulties include increased condenser back pressure due to reduced cooling-water flow, malfunctioning of on-line tube-cleaning equipment, and accelerated corrosion and erosion of tubing. In some severe cases, condenser back pressure increased to a point that the turbine had to be tripped. In 1981 EPRI initiated a research project to develop utility industry guidelines for reducing macrofouling problems. In 1987 EPRI published the Guidelines on Macrofouling Control Technology. Since then significant progress has been made by EPRI, utility members, equipment manufacturers, and others. The purpose of this paper is to update the macrofouling control technology. Control technology covered will include thermal treatment, mechanical removal devices, antifouling coatings, and chemical treatment.

  8. Perinatal neuroprotection update

    PubMed Central

    Jelin, Angie C.; Salmeen, Kirsten; Gano, Dawn; Burd, Irina; Thiet, Mari-Paule

    2016-01-01

    Antepartum, intrapartum, and neonatal events can result in a spectrum of long-term neurological sequelae, including cerebral palsy, cognitive delay, schizophrenia, and autism spectrum disorders [1]. Advances in obstetrical and neonatal care have led to survival at earlier gestational ages and consequently increasing numbers of periviable infants who are at significant risk for long-term neurological deficits. Therefore, efforts to decrease and prevent cerebral insults attempt not only to decrease preterm delivery but also to improve neurological outcomes in infants delivered preterm. We recently published a comprehensive review addressing the impacts of magnesium sulfate, therapeutic hypothermia, delayed cord clamping, infections, and prevention of preterm delivery on the modification of neurological risk [2]. In this review, we will briefly provide updates to the aforementioned topics as well as an expansion on avoidance of toxin and infections, specifically the Zika virus.

  9. Perinatal neuroprotection update.

    PubMed

    Jelin, Angie C; Salmeen, Kirsten; Gano, Dawn; Burd, Irina; Thiet, Mari-Paule

    2016-01-01

    Antepartum, intrapartum, and neonatal events can result in a spectrum of long-term neurological sequelae, including cerebral palsy, cognitive delay, schizophrenia, and autism spectrum disorders [1]. Advances in obstetrical and neonatal care have led to survival at earlier gestational ages and consequently increasing numbers of periviable infants who are at significant risk for long-term neurological deficits. Therefore, efforts to decrease and prevent cerebral insults attempt not only to decrease preterm delivery but also to improve neurological outcomes in infants delivered preterm. We recently published a comprehensive review addressing the impacts of magnesium sulfate, therapeutic hypothermia, delayed cord clamping, infections, and prevention of preterm delivery on the modification of neurological risk [2]. In this review, we will briefly provide updates to the aforementioned topics as well as an expansion on avoidance of toxin and infections, specifically the Zika virus. PMID:27606053

  10. Neurocritical care update.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    This update comprises six important topics under neurocritical care that require reevaluation. For post-cardiac arrest brain injury, the evaluation of the injury and its corresponding therapy, including temperature modulation, is required. Analgosedation for target temperature management is an essential strategy to prevent shivering and minimizes endogenous stress induced by catecholamine surges. For severe traumatic brain injury, the diverse effects of therapeutic hypothermia depend on the complicated pathophysiology of the condition. Continuous electroencephalogram monitoring is an essential tool for detecting nonconvulsive status epilepticus in the intensive care unit (ICU). Neurocritical care, including advanced hemodynamic monitoring, is a fundamental approach for delayed cerebral ischemia following subarachnoid hemorrhage. We must be mindful of the high percentage of ICU patients who may develop sepsis-associated brain dysfunction. PMID:27239312

  11. Dengue: an update.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, María G; Kourí, Gustavo

    2002-01-01

    This review is an update of dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) based on international and Cuban experience. We describe the virus characteristics and risk factors for dengue and DHF, and compare incidence and the case fatality rates in endemic regions (southeast Asia, western Pacific, and the Americas). The clinical picture and the pathogenesis of the severe disease are explained. We also discuss the viral, individual, and environmental factors that determine severe disease. Much more research is necessary to clarify these mechanisms. Also reviewed are methods for viral isolation and the serological, immunohistochemical, and molecular methods applied in the diagnosis of the disease. We describe the status of vaccine development and emphasise that the only alternative that we have today to control the disease is through control of its vector Aedes aegypti.

  12. [Coronary intervention. 2012 update].

    PubMed

    Rittger, H; Arnold, M; Schmid, M; Zimmermann, S; Daniel, W G

    2012-03-01

    In-stent restenosis and stent thrombosis are still the main topics of any update on coronary intervention. One of the challenging issues in the past year lay in answering the question of whether the data on first-generation drug-eluting stents are still relevant in the light of newer stent designs and drugs. Other issues include new strategies in antiplatelet therapy, treatment of in-stent restenosis, particularly drug-eluting stent restenosis, treatment of multivessel and left-main disease, as well as the latest developments in bioresorbable polymers and "scaffolds". In the light of demographic changes, the main challenge for the interventional community is to build an evidence base for the adequate treatment of elderly patients in order to resolve uncertainties in the treatment of this challenging patient group. PMID:22382138

  13. International Space Station (ISS) Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU) Utilization Plan Assessment Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez-Pellerano, Amri; Iannello, Christopher J.; Wollack, Edward J.; Wright, Kenneth H.; Garrett, Henry B.; Ging, Andrew T.; Katz, Ira; Keith, R. Lloyd; Minow, Joseph I.; Willis, Emily M.; Schneider, Todd A.; Whittlesey, Albert C.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) received a request to support the Assessment of the International Space Station (ISS) Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU) Utilization Update. The NESC conducted an earlier assessment of the use of the PCU in 2009. This document contains the outcome of the assessment update.

  14. An update of input instructions to TEMOD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The theory and operation of a FORTRAN 4 computer code, designated as TEMOD, used to calcuate tubular thermoelectric generator performance is described in WANL-TME-1906. The original version of TEMOD was developed in 1969. A description is given of additions to the mathematical model and an update of the input instructions to the code. Although the basic mathematical model described in WANL-TME-1906 has remained unchanged, a substantial number of input/output options were added to allow completion of module performance parametrics as required in support of the compact thermoelectric converter system technology program.

  15. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) feasibility study update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alff, W. H.; Banderman, L. W.

    1983-01-01

    In 1982 a workshop was held to refine the science rationale for large deployable reflectors (LDR) and develop technology requirements that support the science rationale. At the end of the workshop, a set of LDR consensus systems requirements was established. The subject study was undertaken to update the initial LDR study using the new systems requirements. The study included mirror materials selection and configuration, thermal analysis, structural concept definition and analysis, dynamic control analysis and recommendations for further study. The primary emphasis was on the dynamic controls requirements and the sophistication of the controls system needed to meet LDR performance goals.

  16. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Update: A Brief (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, S.; Keller, J.; McDade, M.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is an update on the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) for the AWEA Wind Project Operations, Maintenance & Reliability Seminar. GRC accomplishments are: (1) Failure database software deployed - partners see business value for themselves and customers; (2) Designed, built, instrumented, and tested two gearboxes - (a) Generated unprecedented public domain test data from both field testing and dynamometer testing, (b) Different responses from 'identical' gearboxes, (c) Demonstrated importance of non-torque loading and modeling approach; and (3) Active collaborative, with wide industry support, leveraging DOE funding - Modeling round robin and Condition Monitoring round robin.

  17. An overview of procedures for updating structural mathematical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, O.; Stavrinidis, C.

    An overview of recent studies funded by the European Space Agency (ESA) in the field of error localization and updating structural mathematical models is presented together with planned future activities. This includes the evaluation of the functionally of different error localization and updating methods with several academic examples using simulated test data and examples employing real test results. With simulated test data, the investigated procedures lead to updated models which are good to excellent as long as the inaccuracy of the measured eigenfrequencies remain reasonable and the corrected regions (sub-domains, defined design parameter set) closely coincide with the effectively erroneous regions (consistent updating). The updated model is improved towards the correct test model, so that its eigenfrequencies and mode shapes converge to the measured ones and the dynamic behavior of the model is improved in and, in the case of parametric updating, is also outside the observed frequency range. Even with inconsistent definition of design parameters or corrected subdomains, the procedures can give good indications to error sources. For identification of dynamic masses, a versatile force measurement device design for spacecraft testing is presented. It allows the measurement of interface forces with high accuracy between spacecraft and support structure and might lead to further improvement of modal identification procedures.

  18. Epidemiology of frequent attenders: a 3-year historic cohort study comparing attendance, morbidity and prescriptions of one-year and persistent frequent attenders

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Frans ThM; Brouwer, Henk J; ter Riet, Gerben; van Weert, Henk CP

    2009-01-01

    Background General Practitioners spend a disproportionate amount of time on frequent attenders. So far, trials on the effect of interventions on frequent attenders have shown negative results. However, these trials were conducted in short-term frequent attenders. It would be more reasonable to target intervention at persistent frequent attenders. Typical characteristics of persistent frequent attenders, as opposed to 1-year frequent attenders and non-frequent attenders, may generate hypotheses regarding modifiable factors on which new randomized trials may be designed. Methods We used the data of all 28,860 adult patients from 5 primary healthcare centers. Frequent attenders were patients whose attendance rate ranked in the (age and sex adjusted) top 10 percent during 1 year (1-year frequent attenders) or 3 years (persistent frequent attenders). All other patients on the register over the 3-year period were referred to as non-frequent attenders. The lists of medical problems coded by the GP using the International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC) were used to assess morbidity. First, we determined which proportion of 1-year frequent attenders was still a frequent attender during the next two consecutive years and calculated the GPs' workload for these patients. Second, we compared morbidity and number of prescriptions for non-frequent attenders, 1-year frequent attenders and persistent frequent attenders. Results Of all 1-year frequent attenders, 15.4% became a persistent frequent attender equal to 1.6% of all patients. The 1-year frequent attenders (3,045; 10.6%) were responsible for 39% of the face-to-face consultations; the 470 patients who would become persistent frequent attenders (1.6%) were responsible for 8% of all consultations in 2003. Persistent frequent attenders presented more social problems, more psychiatric problems and medically unexplained physical symptoms, but also more chronic somatic diseases (especially diabetes). They received more

  19. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): cardiac patient].

    PubMed

    Jiménez Jiménez, F J; Cervera Montes, M; Blesa Malpica, A L

    2011-11-01

    Patients with cardiac disease can develop two types of malnutrition: cardiac cachexia, which appears in chronic congestive heart failure, and malnutrition due to the complications of cardiac surgery or any other type of surgery in patients with heart disease. Early enteral nutrition should be attempted if the oral route cannot be used. When cardiac function is severely compromised, enteral nutrition is feasible, but supplementation with parenteral nutrition is sometimes required. Sustained hyperglycemia in the first 24 hours in patients admitted for acute coronary syndrome, whether diabetic or not, is a poor prognostic factor for 30-day mortality. In critically-ill cardiac patients with stable hemodynamic failure, nutritional support of 20-25 kcal/kg/day is effective in maintaining adequate nutritional status. Protein intake should be 1.2*-1.5 g/kg/day. Routine polymeric or high protein formulae should be used, according to the patient's prior nutritional status, with sodium and volume restriction according to the patient's clinical situation. The major energy source for myocytes is glutamine, through conversion to glutamate, which also protects the myocardial cell from ischemia in critical situations. Administration of 1 g/ day of omega-3 (EPA+DHA) in the form of fish oil can prevent sudden death in the treatment of acute coronary syndrome and can also help to reduce hospital admission for cardiovascular events in patients with chronic heart failure.

  20. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): gastrointestinal surgery].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Álvarez, C; Zabarte Martínez de Aguirre, M; Bordejé Laguna, L

    2011-11-01

    Gastrointestinal surgery and critical illness place tremendous stress on the body, resulting in a series of metabolic changes that may lead to severe malnutrition, which in turn can increase postsurgical complications and morbidity and mortality and prolong the hospital length of stay. In these patients, parenteral nutrition is the most widely used form of nutritional support, but administration of enteral nutrition early in the postoperative period is effective and well tolerated, reducing infectious complications, improving wound healing and reducing length of hospital stay. Calorie-protein requirements do not differ from those in other critically-ill patients and depend on the patient's underlying process and degree of metabolic stress. In patients intolerant to enteral nutrition, especially if the intolerance is due to increased gastric residual volume, prokinetic agents can be used to optimize calorie intake. When proximal sutures are used, tubes allowing early jejunal feeding should be used. Pharmaconutrition is indicated in these patients, who benefit from enteral administration of arginine, omega 3 and RNA, as well as parenteral glutamine supplementation. Parenteral nutrition should be started in patients with absolute contraindication for use of the gastrointestinal tract or as complementary nutrition if adequate energy intake is not achieved through the enteral route.

  1. Practical Approaches for Mining Frequent Patterns in Molecular Datasets.

    PubMed

    Naulaerts, Stefan; Moens, Sandy; Engelen, Kristof; Berghe, Wim Vanden; Goethals, Bart; Laukens, Kris; Meysman, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Pattern detection is an inherent task in the analysis and interpretation of complex and continuously accumulating biological data. Numerous itemset mining algorithms have been developed in the last decade to efficiently detect specific pattern classes in data. Although many of these have proven their value for addressing bioinformatics problems, several factors still slow down promising algorithms from gaining popularity in the life science community. Many of these issues stem from the low user-friendliness of these tools and the complexity of their output, which is often large, static, and consequently hard to interpret. Here, we apply three software implementations on common bioinformatics problems and illustrate some of the advantages and disadvantages of each, as well as inherent pitfalls of biological data mining. Frequent itemset mining exists in many different flavors, and users should decide their software choice based on their research question, programming proficiency, and added value of extra features. PMID:27168722

  2. Practical Approaches for Mining Frequent Patterns in Molecular Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Naulaerts, Stefan; Moens, Sandy; Engelen, Kristof; Berghe, Wim Vanden; Goethals, Bart; Laukens, Kris; Meysman, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Pattern detection is an inherent task in the analysis and interpretation of complex and continuously accumulating biological data. Numerous itemset mining algorithms have been developed in the last decade to efficiently detect specific pattern classes in data. Although many of these have proven their value for addressing bioinformatics problems, several factors still slow down promising algorithms from gaining popularity in the life science community. Many of these issues stem from the low user-friendliness of these tools and the complexity of their output, which is often large, static, and consequently hard to interpret. Here, we apply three software implementations on common bioinformatics problems and illustrate some of the advantages and disadvantages of each, as well as inherent pitfalls of biological data mining. Frequent itemset mining exists in many different flavors, and users should decide their software choice based on their research question, programming proficiency, and added value of extra features. PMID:27168722

  3. Frequent mutations in chromatin-remodeling genes in pulmonary carcinoids

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xin; Sun, Ruping; Ozretić, Luka; Seidal, Danila; Zander, Thomas; Leenders, Frauke; George, Julie; Müller, Christian; Dahmen, Ilona; Pinther, Berit; Bosco, Graziella; Konrad, Kathryn; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Schneider, Peter M; Bogus, Magdalena; Soltermann, Alex; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Helland, Åslaug; Solberg, Steinar; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Ansén, Sascha; Stoelben, Erich; Wright, Gavin M.; Russell, Prudence; Wainer, Zoe; Solomon, Benjamin; Field, John K; Hyde, Russell; Davies, Michael PA.; Heukamp, Lukas C; Petersen, Iver; Perner, Sven; Lovly, Christine; Cappuzzo, Federico; Travis, William D; Wolf, Jürgen; Vingron, Martin; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Haas, Stefan A.; Buettner, Reinhard; Thomas, Roman K

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary carcinoids are rare neuroendocrine tumors of the lung. The molecular alterations underlying the pathogenesis of these tumors have not been systematically studied so far. Here we perform gene copy number analysis (n=54), genome/exome (n=44) and transcriptome (n=69) sequencing of pulmonary carcinoids and observe frequent mutations in chromatin-remodeling genes. Covalent histone modifiers and subunits of the SWI/SNF complex are mutated in 40% and 22.2% of the cases respectively, with MEN1, PSIP1 and ARID1A being recurrently affected. In contrast to small-cell lung cancer and large-cell neuroendocrine tumors, TP53 and RB1 mutations are rare events, suggesting that pulmonary carcinoids are not early progenitor lesions of the highly aggressive lung neuroendocrine tumors but arise through independent cellular mechanisms. These data also suggest that inactivation of chromatin remodeling genes is sufficient to drive transformation in pulmonary carcinoids. PMID:24670920

  4. Consequences of Frequent Hemodialysis: Comparison to Conventional Hemodialysis and Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, John B.

    2011-01-01

    The average life expectancy of a person on hemodialysis is less than 3 years and hasn't changed in 20 years. The Hemodialysis (HEMO) trial, a randomized trial to determine whether increasing urea removal to the maximum practical degree through a 3-times-a-week schedule, showed no difference in mortality in the treatment and control groups. Investigators speculated that the increment in functional waste removal in the HEMO study was too small to produce improvements in mortality. To test this hypothesis, the NIDDK funded the Frequent Hemodialysis Network, a consortium of centers testing whether patients randomized to intensive dialysis would demonstrate improved (reduced) left ventricular LV mass and quality of life. The trial has two arms: the daily (in-center) and the home (nocturnal) arms. Each arm has patients randomized to conventional dialysis or 6 days (or nights) of dialysis. The results of the HEMO trial will be reported in the fall of 2010. PMID:21686215

  5. Frequent yawning as an initial signal of fever relief.

    PubMed

    Gallup, Andrew C; Gallup, Jacqueline Aliotta

    2013-12-01

    Research suggests that yawning provides a brain cooling function in homeotherms, and that excessive yawning may be a useful diagnostic indicator of abnormal thermoregulation in humans. Accordingly, the frequency of yawning should increase during instances of hyperthermia, but not fever (i.e., pyrexia), since this represents an elevation in the homeostatic set point rather than thermoregulatory failure. To our knowledge, no research has investigated the association between yawning frequency and fever in humans. Here we present the hypothesis that frequent yawning could be used as an initial signal for fever relief, either through the effectiveness of antipyretics or the natural break of a fever. Applications of this research include the improved behavioral monitoring of patients.

  6. Personality Profiles and Frequent Heavy Drinking in Young Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Bethany C.; Zhang, Minqiang; Lanza, Stephanie T.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies examining the link between personality and alcohol use have adopted a comprehensive modeling framework to take into account individuals’ profiles across multiple personality traits. In this study, latent profile analysis (LPA) was applied to a national sample of young adults in the United States to identify subgroups defined by their profiles of mean scores on the Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness personality factors. Personality profiles were then used to predict heavy drinking. Five profiles were identified: Reserved, Rigid, Confident, Ordinary, and Resilient. Compared to individuals in the Ordinary profile, those with Reserved and Resilient profiles were at increased risk of frequent heavy drinking. These findings suggest which comprehensive personality profiles may place individuals at risk for problematic alcohol-related outcomes. PMID:25892836

  7. Frequent gene conversion between human red and green opsin genes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Z; Hewett-Emmett, D; Li, W H

    1998-04-01

    To study the evolution of human X-linked red and green opsin genes, genomic sequences in large regions of the two genes were compared. The divergences in introns 3, 4, and 5 and the 3' flanking sequence of the two genes are significantly lower than those in exons 4 and 5. The homogenization mechanism of introns and the 3' flanking sequence of human red and green opsin genes is probably gene conversion, which also occurred in exons 1 and 6. At least one gene conversion event occurred in each of three regions (1, 3, and 5) in the sequences compared. In conclusion, gene conversion has occurred frequently between human red and green opsin genes, but exons 2, 3, 4, and 5 have been maintained distinct between the two genes by natural selection.

  8. Cariogenicity of frequent aspartame and sorbitol rinsing in laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Lout, R K; Messer, L B; Soberay, A; Kajander, K; Rudney, J

    1988-01-01

    The cariogenicity of frequent rinsings with aspartame and sorbitol was studied in the rat caries model with animals randomly assigned to four oral rinse groups (16 rats/group): 0.05% aspartame, 20% sorbitol, deionized distilled water, and 20% sucrose; all solutions at pH 3.0. After rinsing five times daily for 21 days, mandibular molars were scored for caries. Smooth surface, proximal and morsal caries scores did not differ significantly between groups. Moderate dentinal sulcal caries for the sucrose group was significantly greater than in the aspartame, sorbitol, and water groups (p less than 0.05). Rinsing with 0.05% aspartame (similar in pH and concentration to that found in carbonated beverages) or sorbitol did not potentiate caries activity.

  9. A multidisciplinary team case management approach reduces the burden of frequent asthma admissions

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Hannah; Davis, Jenny; Evans, Sian; Flower, Laura; Tan, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Up to 10% of asthmatics have “difficult asthma”; however, they account for 80% of asthma-related expenditure and run the highest risk of acute severe exacerbations. An estimated 75% of admissions for asthma are avoidable. Guidelines advise that these patients be managed by an experienced specialist multidisciplinary team (MDT). We aimed to assess the impact of a case management strategy delivered via specialist MDTs on acute healthcare utilisation of patients with frequent asthma admissions. An MDT (consultant, specialist nurse, physiotherapist and psychologist) case management strategy was introduced in 2010 at University Hospital Southampton Foundation Trust (Southampton, UK) to support patients with frequent asthma admissions during admission and then in clinic. To assess efficacy, we systematically searched the hospital database for patients acutely admitted for asthma on two or more occasions in 2010, 2011 and 2012. Data were collected retrospectively covering patient demographics, admission details, asthma severity and comorbidity. From 2010 to 2012, 84 patients were admitted on two or more occasions per year (80% female, mean body mass index 31 kg·m−2 and 55% psychological comorbidity). After introducing an MDT approach repeat asthma admissions fell by 33% from 127 in 2010 to 84 in 2012 (p=0.0004). In addition, bed days fell by 52% from 895 in 2010 to 430 in 2010 (p=0.015). An MDT case management approach significantly reduces hospitalisation in difficult asthma patients with prior frequent admission. PMID:27730207

  10. ISS Update: SpaceX Dragon Launch Update

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Office commentator Pat Ryan talks with Mike Horkachuck, NASA Project Executive for SpaceX, for an update on the SpaceX Dragon's next launch attempt scheduled for Tuesday at 3:44...

  11. Building Principal Pipelines: A Strategy to Strengthen Education Leadership. Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syed, Sarosh

    2015-01-01

    School leadership is second only to teaching among school influences on student success, according to research. So what can a school district do to produce a large and steady supply of top-notch school principals--and support their effective supervision? This Wallace Update describes two related Wallace Foundation initiatives seeking answers to…

  12. 75 FR 55965 - Adoption of Updated EDGAR Filer Manual

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... revisions to the Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis, and Retrieval System (EDGAR) Filer Manual to reflect updates to the EDGAR system. The revisions are being made primarily to support the electronic filing of Form N-MFP (Monthly Schedule of Portfolio Holdings of Money Market Funds) and any amendments to...

  13. Mass Deacidification: An Update on Possibilities and Limitations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porck, Henk J.

    This report provides an update of the possibilities and limitations of currently available mass deacidification methods, focusing on the major developments in research and application of the main operational systems. This study is intended primarily to support the development of a well-considered preservation policy by librarians and archivists,…

  14. A Case Study of Private Schools in Kibera: An Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Pauline; Tooley, James

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an update on our earlier paper on the introduction by the Kenyan government in 2003 of free primary education (FPE), and its impact on low-fee private schools. First, published papers that have used our contribution as a springboard for discussion are critically reviewed. The argument and supporting evidence that the poor are…

  15. Order Effects in Belief Updating: The Belief-Adjustment Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogarth, Robin M.; Einhorn, Hillel J.

    1992-01-01

    A theory of the updating of beliefs over time is presented that explicitly accounts for order-effect phenomena as arising from the interaction of information-processing strategies and task characteristics. The belief-adjustment model is supported by 5 experiments involving 192 adult subjects. (SLD)

  16. Neural dissociations between meaningful and mere inconsistency in impression updating.

    PubMed

    Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Todorov, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Recent neuroimaging work has identified a network of regions that work in concert to update impressions of other people, particularly in response to inconsistent behavior. However, the specific functional contributions of these regions to the updating process remain unclear. Using fMRI, we tested whether increases in activity triggered by inconsistent behavior reflect changes in the stored representations of other people in response to behavioral inconsistency, or merely a response to the inconsistency itself. Participants encountered a series of individuals whose behavior either changed in an attributionally meaningful fashion or was merely inconsistent with the immediately preceding behavior. We observed that left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC) and left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) were preferentially recruited in response to unexpected, immoral behavior, whereas a separate set of regions (including dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex and temporoparietal junction/inferior parietal lobule) was preferentially recruited in response to more mundane inconsistencies in behavior. These results shed light on the distributed systems supporting impression updating. Specifically, while many regions supporting updating may primarily respond to moment-to-moment changes in behavior, a subset of regions (e.g. vlPFC and IFG) may contribute to updating person representations in response to trait-relevant changes in behavior.

  17. Neural dissociations between meaningful and mere inconsistency in impression updating.

    PubMed

    Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Todorov, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Recent neuroimaging work has identified a network of regions that work in concert to update impressions of other people, particularly in response to inconsistent behavior. However, the specific functional contributions of these regions to the updating process remain unclear. Using fMRI, we tested whether increases in activity triggered by inconsistent behavior reflect changes in the stored representations of other people in response to behavioral inconsistency, or merely a response to the inconsistency itself. Participants encountered a series of individuals whose behavior either changed in an attributionally meaningful fashion or was merely inconsistent with the immediately preceding behavior. We observed that left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC) and left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) were preferentially recruited in response to unexpected, immoral behavior, whereas a separate set of regions (including dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex and temporoparietal junction/inferior parietal lobule) was preferentially recruited in response to more mundane inconsistencies in behavior. These results shed light on the distributed systems supporting impression updating. Specifically, while many regions supporting updating may primarily respond to moment-to-moment changes in behavior, a subset of regions (e.g. vlPFC and IFG) may contribute to updating person representations in response to trait-relevant changes in behavior. PMID:27217118

  18. Distributed computing support program`s databases

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Amy

    1996-05-01

    The Distributed Computing Support Program (DCSP) is the current system for keeping track of computer hardware maintenance throughout the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. DCSP consists of four separate Ingres databases each with their own support files. The process of updating and revising the support files, to make the business process more efficient is described in this paper.

  19. Infectious panniculitides: an update.

    PubMed

    Perasole, A

    2013-08-01

    Very few areas in the realm of diagnostic dermatopathology may be so challenging both for the dermatologist and the histopathologist as are those related to panniculitis, because of their frequent overlapping microscopical patterns and uncertain etiology. Classically, a dicotomic taxonomy key has been proposed according the prevalent involvement of subcutaneous septa or lobules of the inflammation, presence or absence of vasculitis and type of vessel involved, but exceptions to this approach do occur and overlapping forms are sometimes encountered. Infectious panniculitides have also been traditionally approached according to this schema, and their microscopic diagnosis may be even more complex when the causative agent is unknown and underrepresented in the specimen. Many types of pathogens are capable to evoke protean clinical manifestations, which range from organism-specific to aspecific pictures. For this reason a tissue biopsy is always mandatory to ascertain the type of lesion and differentiate an infectious process from its many other mimickers essentially represented by reactive-based panniculitides. Recognition of morphologic changes which characterize distinct infections in the subcutis often needs a complete clinical history, physical examination and laboratory studies, especially when few microorganisms if any are found. This review will be focussed on the pathophysiology of the adipose tissue in relation to immunity and mechanisms of host reaction. The most frequent infectious panniculitides will then be discussed with special reference to their microscopic pictures, to provide clues to their specific diagnosis and the use of immunohistochemistry and molecular biology techniques as ancillary techniques. PMID:23900164

  20. Sporotrichosis: an update.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, A; Vázquez-González, D

    2010-10-01

    Sporotrichosis is the most frequent and worldwide distributed subcutaneous mycoses. The aim of this article is to review the most recent aspects of sporotrichosis about its epidemiology, etiologic agents, mycologic characteristics, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment. The causative agents of sporotrichosis belong to five well defined species of dimorphic fungi of the called Sporothrix schenckii complex. Sporotrichosis and its etiologic agents have specific endemic areas, but it is possible to find epidemics of the disease in practically every continent, the entrance via is cutaneous due to the inoculation of the fungi into the skin after a traumatism and less frequent due to respiratory way. Clinical manifestations are widely variable, with important involvement of the skin and the superficial lymphatic system, but also with affection of the mucosa and some organs like lungs, bones and joints. Nowadays sporotrichosis is considered a true zoonosis with important changes related to the endemic areas and the ecologic features of the causative pathogens. The therapy of choice is the potassium iodide (KI), but other alternatives are itraconazole, terbinafine, thermotherapy and in severe cases amphotericin B. The importance of the recognition of the clinical manifestations of the disease in some non-endemic areas helps to challenge the diagnosis and give an accurate therapy.

  1. Distal esophageal spasm: an update.

    PubMed

    Achem, Sami R; Gerson, Lauren B

    2013-09-01

    Distal esophageal spasm (DES) is an esophageal motility disorder that presents clinically with chest pain and/or dysphagia and is defined manometrically as simultaneous contractions in the distal (smooth muscle) esophagus in ≥20% of wet swallows (and amplitude contraction of ≥30 mmHg) alternating with normal peristalsis. With the introduction of high resolution esophageal pressure topography (EPT) in 2000, the definition of DES was modified. The Chicago classification proposed that the defining criteria for DES using EPT should be the presence of at least two premature contractions (distal latency<4.5 s) in a context of normal EGJ relaxation. The etiology of DES remains insufficiently understood, but evidence links nitric oxide (NO) deficiency as a culprit resulting in a disordered neural inhibition. GERD frequently coexists in DES, and its role in the pathogenesis of symptoms needs further evaluation. There is some evidence from small series that DES can progress to achalasia. Treatment remains challenging due in part to lack of randomized placebo-controlled trials. Current treatment agents include nitrates (both short and long acting), calcium-channel blockers, anticholinergic agents, 5-phosphodiesterase inhibitors, visceral analgesics (tricyclic agents or SSRI), and esophageal dilation. Acid suppression therapy is frequently used, but clinical outcome trials to support this approach are not available. Injection of botulinum toxin in the distal esophagus may be effective, but further data regarding the development of post-injection gastroesophageal reflux need to be assessed. Heller myotomy combined with fundoplication remains an alternative for the rare refractory patient. Preliminary studies suggest that the newly developed endoscopic technique of per oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) may also be an alternative treatment modality. PMID:23892829

  2. Update in Internal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    López-Jiménez, Francisco; Brito, Máximo; Aude, Y. Wady; Scheinberg, Phillip; Kaplan, Mariana; Dixon, Denise A.; Schneiderman, Neil; Trejo, Jorge F.; López-Salazar, Luis Humberto; Ramírez-Barba, Ector Jaime; Kalil, Roberto; Ortiz, Carmen; Goyos, José; Buenaño, Alvaro; Kottiech, Samer; Lamas, Gervasio A.

    2009-01-01

    More than 500,000 new medical articles are published every year and available time to keep updated is scarcer every day. Nowadays, the task of selecting useful, consistent, and relevant information for clinicians is a priority in many major medical journals. This review has the aim of gathering the results of the most important findings in clinical medicine in the last few years. It is focused on results from randomized clinical trials and well-designed observational research. Findings were included preferentially if they showed solid results, and we avoided as much as possible including only preliminary data, or results that included only non-clinical outcomes. Some of the most relevant findings reported here include the significant benefit of statins in patients with coronary artery disease even with mean cholesterol level. It also provides a substantial review of the most significant trials assessing the effectiveness of IIb/IIIa receptor blockers. In gastroenterology many advances have been made in the H. pylori eradication, and the finding that the cure of H. pylori infection may be followed by gastroesophageal reflux disease. Some new antivirals have shown encouraging results in patients with chronic hepatitis. In the infectious disease arena, the late breaking trials in anti-retroviral disease are discussed, as well as the new trends regarding antibiotic resistance. This review approaches also the role of leukotriene modifiers in the treatment of asthma and discusses the benefit of using methylprednisolone in patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome, among many other advances in internal medicine. PMID:11068074

  3. Updated Integrated Mission Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dauro, Vincent A., Sr.

    2003-01-01

    Integrated Mission Program (IMP) is a computer program for simulating spacecraft missions around the Earth, Moon, Mars, and/or other large bodies. IMP solves the differential equations of motion by use of a Runge-Kutta numerical-integration algorithm. Users control missions through selection from a large menu of events and maneuvers. Mission profiles, time lines, propellant requirements, feasibility analyses, and perturbation analyses can be computed quickly and accurately. A prior version of IMP, written in FORTRAN 77, was reported in Program Simulates Spacecraft Missions (MFS-28606), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 17, No. 4 (April 1993), page 60. The present version, written in double-precision Lahey FORTRAN 90, incorporates a number of improvements over the prior version. Some of the improvements modernize the code to take advantage of today's greater central-processing-unit speeds. Other improvements render the code more modular; provide additional input, output, and debugging capabilities; and add to the variety of maneuvers, events, and means of propulsion that can be simulated. The IMP user manuals (of which there are now ten, each addressing a different aspect of the code and its use) have been updated accordingly.

  4. Advanced Stirling Convertor Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, J. Gary; Carroll, Cliff; Matejczyk, Dan; Penswick, L. B.; Soendker, E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on the 88 We Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) currently being developed under Phase II of a NASA NRA program for possible use in advanced high specific power radioisotope space power systems. An early developmental unit, the Frequency Test Bed (FTB) which was built and tested in Phase I demonstrated 36% efficiency. The ASC-1 currently being developed under Phase II, uses a high temperature heater head to allow for operation at 850 °C and is expected to have an efficiency approaching 40% (based on AC electrical out) at a temperature ratio of 3.1. The final lightweight ASC-2 convertor to be developed in Phase III is expected to have a mass of approximately 1 kg. The implementation of the ASC would allow for much higher specific power radioisotope power systems, requiring significantly less radioisotope fuel than current systems. The first run of the ASC-1 occurred in September 2005, and full temperature operation was achieved in early October 2005. Presented is an update on progress on the ASC program as well as the plans for future development. Also presented are efforts being performed to ensure the ASC has the required long life already demonstrated in free-piston Stirling cryocoolers.

  5. Update on PISCES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Don; Hamm, Dustin; Kubena, Brian; Weaver, Jonathan K.

    2010-01-01

    An updated version of the Platform Independent Software Components for the Exploration of Space (PISCES) software library is available. A previous version was reported in Library for Developing Spacecraft-Mission-Planning Software (MSC-22983), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 7 (July 2001), page 52. To recapitulate: This software provides for Web-based, collaborative development of computer programs for planning trajectories and trajectory- related aspects of spacecraft-mission design. The library was built using state-of-the-art object-oriented concepts and software-development methodologies. The components of PISCES include Java-language application programs arranged in a hierarchy of classes that facilitates the reuse of the components. As its full name suggests, the PISCES library affords platform-independence: The Java language makes it possible to use the classes and application programs with a Java virtual machine, which is available in most Web-browser programs. Another advantage is expandability: Object orientation facilitates expansion of the library through creation of a new class. Improvements in the library since the previous version include development of orbital-maneuver- planning and rendezvous-launch-window application programs, enhancement of capabilities for propagation of orbits, and development of a desktop user interface.

  6. [Emergency departments--2016 update].

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, M; Brokmann, J C; Gräff, I; Kumle, B; Wilke, P; Gries, A

    2016-04-01

    Acute medical care in hospital emergency departments has experienced rapid development in recent years and gained increasing importance not only from a professional medical point of view but also from an economic and health policy perspective. The present article therefore provides an update on the situation of emergency departments in Germany. Care in emergency departments is provided with an increasing tendency to patients of all ages presenting with varying primary symptoms, complaints, illnesses and injury patterns. In the process, patients reach the emergency department by various routes and structural provision. Cross-sectional communication and cooperation, prioritization and organization of emergency management and especially medical staff qualifications increasingly play a decisive role in this process. The range of necessary knowledge and skills far exceeds the scope of prehospital medical emergency care and the working environment differs substantially. In addition to existing structural and economic problems, the latest developments, as well as future proposals for the design of in-hospital emergency medical care in interdisciplinary emergency departments are described.

  7. Dali server update

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Liisa; Laakso, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    The Dali server (http://ekhidna2.biocenter.helsinki.fi/dali) is a network service for comparing protein structures in 3D. In favourable cases, comparing 3D structures may reveal biologically interesting similarities that are not detectable by comparing sequences. The Dali server has been running in various places for over 20 years and is used routinely by crystallographers on newly solved structures. The latest update of the server provides enhanced analytics for the study of sequence and structure conservation. The server performs three types of structure comparisons: (i) Protein Data Bank (PDB) search compares one query structure against those in the PDB and returns a list of similar structures; (ii) pairwise comparison compares one query structure against a list of structures specified by the user; and (iii) all against all structure comparison returns a structural similarity matrix, a dendrogram and a multidimensional scaling projection of a set of structures specified by the user. Structural superimpositions are visualized using the Java-free WebGL viewer PV. The structural alignment view is enhanced by sequence similarity searches against Uniprot. The combined structure-sequence alignment information is compressed to a stack of aligned sequence logos. In the stack, each structure is structurally aligned to the query protein and represented by a sequence logo. PMID:27131377

  8. Dali server update.

    PubMed

    Holm, Liisa; Laakso, Laura M

    2016-07-01

    The Dali server (http://ekhidna2.biocenter.helsinki.fi/dali) is a network service for comparing protein structures in 3D. In favourable cases, comparing 3D structures may reveal biologically interesting similarities that are not detectable by comparing sequences. The Dali server has been running in various places for over 20 years and is used routinely by crystallographers on newly solved structures. The latest update of the server provides enhanced analytics for the study of sequence and structure conservation. The server performs three types of structure comparisons: (i) Protein Data Bank (PDB) search compares one query structure against those in the PDB and returns a list of similar structures; (ii) pairwise comparison compares one query structure against a list of structures specified by the user; and (iii) all against all structure comparison returns a structural similarity matrix, a dendrogram and a multidimensional scaling projection of a set of structures specified by the user. Structural superimpositions are visualized using the Java-free WebGL viewer PV. The structural alignment view is enhanced by sequence similarity searches against Uniprot. The combined structure-sequence alignment information is compressed to a stack of aligned sequence logos. In the stack, each structure is structurally aligned to the query protein and represented by a sequence logo.

  9. Atypical parkinsonism: an update

    PubMed Central

    Stamelou, Maria; Hoeglinger, Guenter U.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review This update discusses novel aspects on genetics, diagnosis, and treatments of atypical parkinsonism published over the past 2 years. Recent findings A genome-wide association study identified new genetic risk factors for progressive supranuclear palsy and new genetic conditions presenting with atypical parkinsonism have been described. The clinical criteria for diagnosis of corticobasal degeneration have been revised, and for progressive supranuclear palsy are under revision. Novel molecular techniques to identify possible biomarkers, as in other neurodegenerative disorders, have started being studied on atypical parkinsonian conditions, and although preliminary results seem promising, further studies are urgently warranted. Therapeutic trials based on disease-specific targets have shown no clinical improvement. Summary The knowledge obtained recently on atypical parkinsonian conditions points out the major deficits in this field. With the expanding phenotypical spectrum of atypical parkinsonian conditions, the early identification of patients has become difficult. The inability of conventional methods to identify these disorders earlier and better than clinicians, and the recent failure of promising therapeutic compounds, highlight the fact that the lack of biomarkers is probably the greatest limitation for developing treatments for these disorders. Thus, current and future research in this direction will be crucial. PMID:23812308

  10. [Eosinophilic esophagitis: update 2012].

    PubMed

    Jo, Yunju

    2012-07-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) with adults, as a new disease emerging during the last decade, is a clinicopathologic disorder of the esophagus characterized by a dense esophageal eosinophilic infiltration and typical esophageal symptoms. As numerous studies about EoE had been reported during last several years, updated consensus of EoE was reported in July 2011. The conceptual definition of EoE is coming. EoE is defined as a chronic, immune/antigen-mediated esophageal disease characterized clinically by symptoms related to esophageal dysfunction and histologically by eosinophil-predominat inflammation. Other important addition is genotyping feature that implicates thymic stromal lymphopoietin genes or filagrrin as EoE susceptibility genes. The majority of patients has the concurrent allergic disease, especially food or aeroallergen sensitization. Main therapeutic options include topical steroids and dietary modification. Recent issues of EoE include a new concept for proton pump inhibitor-responsive esophageal eosinophilia that it should be excluded to diagnose EoE.

  11. Respiratory Conditions Update: Asthma.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Timothy A

    2016-09-01

    Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by chronic airway inflammation and variable expiratory airflow limitation. Related clinical features include wheezing, dyspnea, chest tightness, and cough that worsens at night or in the early morning, and that varies over time and in intensity. A finding of variable expiratory airflow limitation on spirometry confirms the diagnosis. A forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity ratio less than the level predicted for the patient's age is suggestive of airflow limitation. Variability also must be confirmed. Updated guidelines recommend control-based management administered in a stepwise manner, with goals of achieving symptom control and minimizing the risks of exacerbations, future fixed airway limitation, and adverse effects of therapy. There is good evidence for the effectiveness of asthma education and self-management plans. Short-acting bronchodilators should be used as needed for symptom relief, with the addition of an inhaled corticosteroid early as maintenance therapy if symptoms are not well controlled. If asthma remains uncontrolled despite therapy, patients should be referred for more specialized treatment. Biomarkers, biologic drugs, and endoscopic treatments are being studied in the management of severe asthma, and ongoing research may determine which patients might benefit most from these emerging therapies. PMID:27576231

  12. The X-33 Program Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, Charlie

    2000-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the X-33 program update, including details on program objectives and plans, the X-33 configuration, technologies used, and X-33 assembly and test status.

  13. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Update (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, S.

    2013-10-01

    This presentation was given at the Sandia Reliability Workshop in August 2013 and provides information on current statistics, a status update, next steps, and other reliability research and development activities related to the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative.

  14. ISS Update: Transit of Venus

    NASA Video Gallery

    ISS Update commentator Brandi Dean interviews Mario Runco, NASA astronaut, about Venus's transit across the sun on June 5, 2012. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Johnson and include the hashtag #...

  15. Email Updates: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/listserv.html Email Updates To use the sharing features on this ... view your email history or unsubscribe. Prevent MedlinePlus emails from being marked as "spam" or "junk" To ...

  16. Updated Principle of Corresponding States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Amotz, Dor; Gift, Alan D.; Levine, R. D.

    2004-01-01

    The rule of corresponding states, which shows the connection between the thermodynamic properties of various liquids is re-examined. The overall likeness is observed by using an updated scaling technique of Lennard-Jones corresponding states (LJ-CS).

  17. Frequently asked questions about family medicine in India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raman

    2016-01-01

    Family medicine (FM) is an independent and distinct medical specialty in the developed countries such as USA, UK, Australia, and Canada since 1960s. FM teaching is imparted at undergraduate and postgraduate levels in countries such as Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. Family practice is the practicing vocation of the majority doctors in India. The practitioners of FM include general practitioners, family physicians, FM specialists, and medical officers in the public sector. Medical students are largely unaware about FM career as this concept is not introduced at MBBS level. Faculty and senior doctors from other disciplines are also not able to answer the queries related to FM as they themselves also have gone through the same education system for last three decades, largely unexposed to the concept of academic family medicine. This article is a compilation of frequently asked questions, and their appropriate responses, presented here to dispel myths and misinformation about FM specialty. The answers are deliberated upon by Dr. Raman Kumar the founder president of the Academy of Family Physicians of India and the chief editor of the Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care. This article was originally published as an interview in Docplexus, a popular online network and website for medical doctors in November 2015.

  18. Smartphone gaming and frequent use pattern associated with smartphone addiction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Hao; Lin, Sheng-Hsuan; Pan, Yuan-Chien; Lin, Yu-Hsuan

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors of smartphone addiction in high school students.A total of 880 adolescents were recruited from a vocational high school in Taiwan in January 2014 to complete a set of questionnaires, including the 10-item Smartphone Addiction Inventory, Chen Internet Addiction Scale, and a survey of content and patterns of personal smartphone use. Of those recruited, 689 students (646 male) aged 14 to 21 and who owned a smartphone completed the questionnaire. Multiple linear regression models were used to determine the variables associated with smartphone addiction.Smartphone gaming and frequent smartphone use were associated with smartphone addiction. Furthermore, both the smartphone gaming-predominant and gaming with multiple-applications groups showed a similar association with smartphone addiction. Gender, duration of owning a smartphone, and substance use were not associated with smartphone addiction.Our findings suggest that smartphone use patterns should be part of specific measures to prevent and intervene in cases of excessive smartphone use. PMID:27428191

  19. Salt tolerance evolves more frequently in C4 grass lineages.

    PubMed

    Bromham, L; Bennett, T H

    2014-03-01

    Salt tolerance has evolved many times in the grass family, and yet few cereal crops are salt tolerant. Why has it been so difficult to develop crops tolerant of saline soils when salt tolerance has evolved so frequently in nature? One possible explanation is that some grass lineages have traits that predispose them to developing salt tolerance and that without these background traits, salt tolerance is harder to achieve. One candidate background trait is photosynthetic pathway, which has also been remarkably labile in grasses. At least 22 independent origins of the C4 photosynthetic pathway have been suggested to occur within the grass family. It is possible that the evolution of C4 photosynthesis aids exploitation of saline environments, because it reduces transpiration, increases water-use efficiency and limits the uptake of toxic ions. But the observed link between the evolution of C4 photosynthesis and salt tolerance could simply be due to biases in phylogenetic distribution of halophytes or C4 species. Here, we use a phylogenetic analysis to investigate the association between photosynthetic pathway and salt tolerance in the grass family Poaceae. We find that salt tolerance is significantly more likely to occur in lineages with C4 photosynthesis than in C3 lineages. We discuss the possible links between C4 photosynthesis and salt tolerance and consider the limitations of inferring the direction of causality of this relationship.

  20. Tetrasomic Recombination Is Surprisingly Frequent in Allotetraploid Arachis

    PubMed Central

    Leal-Bertioli, Soraya; Shirasawa, Kenta; Abernathy, Brian; Moretzsohn, Marcio; Chavarro, Carolina; Clevenger, Josh; Ozias-Akins, Peggy; Jackson, Scott; Bertioli, David

    2015-01-01

    Arachis hypogaea L. (cultivated peanut) is an allotetraploid (2n = 4x = 40) with an AABB genome type. Based on cytogenetic studies it has been assumed that peanut and wild-derived induced AABB allotetraploids have classic allotetraploid genetic behavior with diploid-like disomic recombination only between homologous chromosomes, at the exclusion of recombination between homeologous chromosomes. Using this assumption, numerous linkage map and quantitative trait loci studies have been carried out. Here, with a systematic analysis of genotyping and gene expression data, we show that this assumption is not entirely valid. In fact, autotetraploid-like tetrasomic recombination is surprisingly frequent in recombinant inbred lines generated from a cross of cultivated peanut and an induced allotetraploid derived from peanut’s most probable ancestral species. We suggest that a better, more predictive genetic model for peanut is that of a “segmental allotetraploid” with partly disomic, partly tetrasomic genetic behavior. This intermediate genetic behavior has probably had a previously overseen, but significant, impact on the genome and genetics of cultivated peanut. PMID:25701284

  1. FREQUENT SPIN REORIENTATION OF GALAXIES DUE TO LOCAL INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Cen, Renyue

    2014-04-10

    We study the evolution of angular momenta of M {sub *} = 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} M {sub ☉} galaxies utilizing large-scale ultra-high resolution cosmological hydrodynamic simulations and find that the spin of the stellar component changes direction frequently because of interactions with nearby systems, such as major mergers, minor mergers, significant gas inflows, and torques. The rate and nature of change of spin direction cannot be accounted for by large-scale tidal torques, because the rates of the latter fall short by orders of magnitude and because the apparent random swings of the spin direction are inconsistent with the alignment by linear density field. The implications for galaxy formation as well as the intrinsic alignment of galaxies are profound. Assuming the large-scale tidal field is the sole alignment agent, a new picture emerging is that intrinsic alignment of galaxies would be a balance between slow large-scale coherent torquing and fast spin reorientation by local interactions. What is still open is whether other processes, such as feeding galaxies with gas and stars along filaments or sheets, introduce coherence for spin directions of galaxies along the respective structures.

  2. Frequently asked questions about family medicine in India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raman

    2016-01-01

    Family medicine (FM) is an independent and distinct medical specialty in the developed countries such as USA, UK, Australia, and Canada since 1960s. FM teaching is imparted at undergraduate and postgraduate levels in countries such as Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. Family practice is the practicing vocation of the majority doctors in India. The practitioners of FM include general practitioners, family physicians, FM specialists, and medical officers in the public sector. Medical students are largely unaware about FM career as this concept is not introduced at MBBS level. Faculty and senior doctors from other disciplines are also not able to answer the queries related to FM as they themselves also have gone through the same education system for last three decades, largely unexposed to the concept of academic family medicine. This article is a compilation of frequently asked questions, and their appropriate responses, presented here to dispel myths and misinformation about FM specialty. The answers are deliberated upon by Dr. Raman Kumar the founder president of the Academy of Family Physicians of India and the chief editor of the Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care. This article was originally published as an interview in Docplexus, a popular online network and website for medical doctors in November 2015. PMID:27453835

  3. Frequently asked questions about family medicine in India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raman

    2016-01-01

    Family medicine (FM) is an independent and distinct medical specialty in the developed countries such as USA, UK, Australia, and Canada since 1960s. FM teaching is imparted at undergraduate and postgraduate levels in countries such as Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. Family practice is the practicing vocation of the majority doctors in India. The practitioners of FM include general practitioners, family physicians, FM specialists, and medical officers in the public sector. Medical students are largely unaware about FM career as this concept is not introduced at MBBS level. Faculty and senior doctors from other disciplines are also not able to answer the queries related to FM as they themselves also have gone through the same education system for last three decades, largely unexposed to the concept of academic family medicine. This article is a compilation of frequently asked questions, and their appropriate responses, presented here to dispel myths and misinformation about FM specialty. The answers are deliberated upon by Dr. Raman Kumar the founder president of the Academy of Family Physicians of India and the chief editor of the Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care. This article was originally published as an interview in Docplexus, a popular online network and website for medical doctors in November 2015. PMID:27453835

  4. Smartphone gaming and frequent use pattern associated with smartphone addiction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Hao; Lin, Sheng-Hsuan; Pan, Yuan-Chien; Lin, Yu-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors of smartphone addiction in high school students. A total of 880 adolescents were recruited from a vocational high school in Taiwan in January 2014 to complete a set of questionnaires, including the 10-item Smartphone Addiction Inventory, Chen Internet Addiction Scale, and a survey of content and patterns of personal smartphone use. Of those recruited, 689 students (646 male) aged 14 to 21 and who owned a smartphone completed the questionnaire. Multiple linear regression models were used to determine the variables associated with smartphone addiction. Smartphone gaming and frequent smartphone use were associated with smartphone addiction. Furthermore, both the smartphone gaming-predominant and gaming with multiple-applications groups showed a similar association with smartphone addiction. Gender, duration of owning a smartphone, and substance use were not associated with smartphone addiction. Our findings suggest that smartphone use patterns should be part of specific measures to prevent and intervene in cases of excessive smartphone use. PMID:27428191

  5. Gnathostomiasis in a patient who frequently consumes sushi.

    PubMed

    Jarell, Abel D; Dans, Michael J; Elston, Dirk M; Mathison, Blaine A; Ruben, Beth S

    2011-12-01

    A 45-year-old woman presented for evaluation of a solitary pruritic nodule on the abdomen that suddenly appeared 3 weeks before. She was healthy without a significant medical history, travel history, exposures, medications, or pets. She reported that she consumed sushi at least weekly in the city of San Francisco. A punch biopsy revealed a superficial and deep perivascular and interstitial infiltrates consisting of lymphocytes, plasma cells, and many eosinophils. Most notably, there was a parasite centered in the reticular dermis with prominent lateral chords, a well-developed muscular esophagus, and an intestine that contained a brush border and multinucleate cells. Evaluation of these histological sections by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention determined the parasite to be a nematode of the genus Gnathostoma. The patient underwent a systemic work-up for gnathostomiasis, including imaging, and no other abnormalities were found. She completed a 3-week course of albendazole and has remained asymptomatic since the biopsy of her abdominal lesion. Although gnathostomiasis is often a systemic illness, this patient did well with apparently only localized cutaneous disease. Gnathostomiasis should be considered in patients who present with nonspecific papules and nodules, especially when there is a history of frequent consumption of raw fish.

  6. Tetrasomic recombination is surprisingly frequent in allotetraploid Arachis.

    PubMed

    Leal-Bertioli, Soraya; Shirasawa, Kenta; Abernathy, Brian; Moretzsohn, Marcio; Chavarro, Carolina; Clevenger, Josh; Ozias-Akins, Peggy; Jackson, Scott; Bertioli, David

    2015-04-01

    Arachis hypogaea L. (cultivated peanut) is an allotetraploid (2n = 4x = 40) with an AABB genome type. Based on cytogenetic studies it has been assumed that peanut and wild-derived induced AABB allotetraploids have classic allotetraploid genetic behavior with diploid-like disomic recombination only between homologous chromosomes, at the exclusion of recombination between homeologous chromosomes. Using this assumption, numerous linkage map and quantitative trait loci studies have been carried out. Here, with a systematic analysis of genotyping and gene expression data, we show that this assumption is not entirely valid. In fact, autotetraploid-like tetrasomic recombination is surprisingly frequent in recombinant inbred lines generated from a cross of cultivated peanut and an induced allotetraploid derived from peanut's most probable ancestral species. We suggest that a better, more predictive genetic model for peanut is that of a "segmental allotetraploid" with partly disomic, partly tetrasomic genetic behavior. This intermediate genetic behavior has probably had a previously overseen, but significant, impact on the genome and genetics of cultivated peanut.

  7. Evidence and Implications of Frequent Fires in Ancient Shrub Tundra

    SciTech Connect

    Higuera, P E; Brubaker, L B; Anderson, P M; Brown, T A; Kennedy, A T; Hu, F S

    2008-03-06

    Understanding feedbacks between terrestrial and atmospheric systems is vital for predicting the consequences of global change, particularly in the rapidly changing Arctic. Fire is a key process in this context, but the consequences of altered fire regimes in tundra ecosystems are rarely considered, largely because tundra fires occur infrequently on the modern landscape. We present paleoecological data that indicate frequent tundra fires in northcentral Alaska between 14,000 and 10,000 years ago. Charcoal and pollen from lake sediments reveal that ancient birchdominated shrub tundra burned as often as modern boreal forests in the region, every 144 years on average (+/- 90 s.d.; n = 44). Although paleoclimate interpretations and data from modern tundra fires suggest that increased burning was aided by low effective moisture, vegetation cover clearly played a critical role in facilitating the paleo-fires by creating an abundance of fine fuels. These records suggest that greater fire activity will likely accompany temperature-related increases in shrub-dominated tundra predicted for the 21st century and beyond. Increased tundra burning will have broad impacts on physical and biological systems as well as land-atmosphere interactions in the Arctic, including the potential to release stored organic carbon to the atmosphere.

  8. Chest Pain: The Need to Consider Less Frequent Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Anabela; Carvalho, Sofia; Cunha, Joana; Lima, Ana R.; Moreira, J. Ilídio; Faria, Trigo

    2016-01-01

    Chest pain is one of the most frequent patient's complaints. The commonest underlying causes are well known, but, sometimes, in some clinical scenarios, it is necessary to consider other diagnoses. We report a case of a 68-year-old Caucasian male, chronically hypertensive, who complained of recurrent episodes of chest pain and fever with elevated acute phase reactants. The first investigation was negative for some of the most likely diagnosis and he quickly improved with anti-inflammatory drugs. Over a few months, his symptoms continued to recur periodically, his hypertension was aggravated, and he developed headaches and lower limbs claudication. After a temporal artery biopsy that was negative for vasculitis, he underwent a positron emission tomography suggestive of Takayasu Arteritis. Takayasu Arteritis is a rare chronic granulomatous vasculitis of the aorta and its first-order branches affecting mostly females up to 50 years old. Chest pain is experienced by >40% of the patients and results from the inflammation of the aorta, pulmonary artery, or coronaries. PMID:27034853

  9. An interval model updating strategy using interval response surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Sheng-En; Zhang, Qiu-Hu; Ren, Wei-Xin

    2015-08-01

    Stochastic model updating provides an effective way of handling uncertainties existing in real-world structures. In general, probabilistic theories, fuzzy mathematics or interval analyses are involved in the solution of inverse problems. However in practice, probability distributions or membership functions of structural parameters are often unavailable due to insufficient information of a structure. At this moment an interval model updating procedure shows its superiority in the aspect of problem simplification since only the upper and lower bounds of parameters and responses are sought. To this end, this study develops a new concept of interval response surface models for the purpose of efficiently implementing the interval model updating procedure. The frequent interval overestimation due to the use of interval arithmetic can be maximally avoided leading to accurate estimation of parameter intervals. Meanwhile, the establishment of an interval inverse problem is highly simplified, accompanied by a saving of computational costs. By this means a relatively simple and cost-efficient interval updating process can be achieved. Lastly, the feasibility and reliability of the developed method have been verified against a numerical mass-spring system and also against a set of experimentally tested steel plates.

  10. Modes of Fatty Acid Desaturation in Cyanobacteria: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Los, Dmitry A.; Mironov, Kirill S.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid composition of individual species of cyanobacteria is conserved and it may be used as a phylogenetic marker. The previously proposed classification system was based solely on biochemical data. Today, new genomic data are available, which support a need to update a previously postulated FA-based classification of cyanobacteria. These changes are necessary in order to adjust and synchronize biochemical, physiological and genomic data, which may help to establish an adequate comprehensive taxonomic system for cyanobacteria in the future. Here, we propose an update to the classification system of cyanobacteria based on their fatty acid composition. PMID:25809965

  11. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis: an update.

    PubMed

    Lucendo, Alfredo J; Arias, Angel

    2012-09-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) is characterized by dense eosinophilic inflammation of one or several digestive tract sections. The symptoms include abdominal pain, weight loss, vomiting and diarrhea. Biopsy samples taken during endoscopic examination allows the diagnosis of the disease. An infiltration of >30 eosinophils per high-power field in at least five high-power fields, exhibiting signs of eosinophilic degranulation and extending to the muscularis mucosa or submucosa are all histological indications of EGE. EGE is traditionally classified into three forms depending on the depth of inflammation in the wall (mucosal, muscular or serosal). This, together with the digestive tract segments involved, determines the clinical presentation. The natural history of EGE includes three different evolutionary patterns, since patients may suffer a single outbreak, a recurrent course or even chronic disease. Corticosteroids are the most frequently used therapy for EGE; dietary treatments should be also considered. Surgery has been limited to solving obstruction and small bowel perforation.

  12. Endocarditis 2014: an update.

    PubMed

    Thanavaro, Kristin L; Nixon, J V Ian

    2014-01-01

    The epidemiology of infective endocarditis is changing due to a number of factors, including more frequent and varied antibiotic use, the emergence of resistant microorganisms, and an increase in the implantation of cardiovascular devices. This review outlines and consolidates the most recent guidelines, including the 2007 and 2010 AHA/ACC guidelines and scientific statements for the prevention and management of infective endocarditis and for the management of cardiovascular device infections. The evidence-based guidelines, including the 2009 HRS consensus document, for the treatment of patients with cardiovascular device-related infections are also reviewed. Only patients with prosthetic valves, patients with prior endocarditis, cardiac transplant patients with a valvulopathy, and certain congenital heart disease patients now require endocarditis prophylaxis. There is an increasing incidence of cardiovascular device-related infections due to the higher frequency of implanted devices and higher morbidity and mortality rates in older patients.

  13. Tourette's Disorder: Genetic Update, Neurological Correlates, and Evidence-Based Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, LeAdelle

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an update of the search for genetic markers related to Tourette's Disorder. The probable neurophysiology of the disorder is reviewed. Frequently prescribed medications are related to the probable biological bases of the disorder. Behavioral interventions and assessment tools are examined. It is concluded that evidence based…

  14. CREME96 Update/Replacement Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Jim H.

    2007-01-01

    This talk concerns the plans to update the CREME96 model that is currently available on the WWW. The talk states the reasons for updating C REME. It describes the updates that are planned, including the single event prediction paradigm, the method of radiation transport through the spacecraft to the electronic component of interest and the planned updates to models for the space radiation environment. It also revi ews user suggestions received do date for the update.

  15. [Adherence to chronic medication: also a frequent problem in Belgium!].

    PubMed

    Liekens, S; Hulshagen, L; Dethier, M; Laekeman, G; Foulon, V

    2013-12-01

    Medication adherence in chronic conditions such as asthma, type 2 diabetes, heart failure, HIV and cancer appears to be a frequent problem. However, the literature on adherence in patients who use inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), oral hypoglycemic agents, drugs for heart failure, antiretrovirals or oral chemotherapy, contains little or no relevant data for Belgium. In the context of a Master thesis in Pharmaceutical care at KU Leuven, a quantitative study was performed to determine the prevalence of adherence to chronic medication in Belgium. This retrospective, cross-sectional study used a database containing refill data of a regional pharmacists' association (KLAV). Out of the 603 pharmacies affiliated with this association, all 50 pharmacies where HIV medication was delivered, were selected. Dispensing data from the selected pharmacies were collected from 01/07/2008 to 31/12/2009 for five pathologies, i.e.; asthma, type 2 diabetes, heart failure, HIV and cancer. Adherence (TT) was calculated with the Medication Refill Adherence (MRA) method. In order to determine whether there were associations between age, gender, drug class and adherence, Chi-square tests were used. Compared with the other patients, cancer patients were the most adherent in taking their drugs (median adherence rate = 88%). In addition, this was the only group in which the median adherence rate was above the set limit of 80%. The patients who were prescribed inhaled corticosteroids were the least adherent (median adherence rate = 38%). More than 50% of patients with asthma/COPD, heart failure and diabetes were classified as "under-users". Furthermore, the results showed a significant association within asthma patients between gender and adherence. In asthma, type 2 diabetes, heart failure and HIV patients there was a significant relationship between age and adherence and drug class and adherence. As the current study has some limitations, the results should be handled with caution. Nevertheless

  16. Frequent transmission of immunodeficiency viruses among bobcats and pumas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franklin, S.P.; Troyer, J.L.; TerWee, J.A.; Lyren, L.M.; Boyce, W.M.; Riley, S.P.D.; Roelke, M.E.; Crooks, K.R.; VandeWoude, S.

    2007-01-01

    With the exception of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which emerged in humans after cross-species transmissions of simian immunodeficiency viruses from nonhuman primates, immunodeficiency viruses of the family Lentiviridae represent species-specific viruses that rarely cross species barriers to infect new hosts. Among the Felidae, numerous immunodeficiency-like lentiviruses have been documented, but only a few cross-species transmissions have been recorded, and these have not been perpetuated in the recipient species. Lentivirus seroprevalence was determined for 79 bobcats (Lynx rufus) and 31 pumas (Puma concolor) from well-defined populations in Southern California. Partial genomic sequences were subsequently obtained from 18 and 12 seropositive bobcats and pumas, respectively. Genotypes were analyzed for phylogenic relatedness and genotypic composition among the study set and archived feline lentivirus sequences. This investigation of feline immunodeficiency virus infection in bobcats and pumas of Southern California provides evidence that cross-species infection has occurred frequently among these animals. The data suggest that transmission has occurred in multiple locations and are most consistent with the spread of the virus from bobcats to pumas. Although the ultimate causes remain unknown, these transmission events may occur as a result of puma predation on bobcats, a situation similar to that which fostered transmission of HIV to humans, and likely represent the emergence of a lentivirus with relaxed barriers to cross-species transmission. This unusual observation provides a valuable opportunity to evaluate the ecological, behavioral, and molecular conditions that favor repeated transmissions and persistence of lentivirus between species. Copyright ?? 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. A population model of chaparral vegetation response to frequent wildfires.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Timothy A; Johns, Garrett; Jiang, Wancen; Yang, Lucie

    2013-12-01

    The recent increase in wildfire frequency in the Santa Monica Mountains (SMM) may substantially impact plant community structure. Species of Chaparral shrubs represent the dominant vegetation type in the SMM. These species can be divided into three life history types according to their response to wildfires. Nonsprouting species are completely killed by fire and reproduce by seeds that germinate in response to a fire cue, obligate sprouting species survive by resprouting from dormant buds in a root crown because their seeds are destroyed by fire, and facultative sprouting species recover after fire both by seeds and resprouts. Based on these assumptions, we developed a set of nonlinear difference equations to model each life history type. These models can be used to predict species survivorship under varying fire return intervals. For example, frequent fires can lead to localized extinction of nonsprouting species such as Ceanothus megacarpus while several facultative sprouting species such as Ceanothus spinosus and Malosma (Rhus) laurina will persist as documented by a longitudinal study in a biological preserve in the SMM. We estimated appropriate parameter values for several chaparral species using 25 years of data and explored parameter relationships that lead to equilibrium populations. We conclude by looking at the survival strategies of these three species of chaparral shrubs under varying fire return intervals and predict changes in plant community structure under fire intervals of short return. In particular, our model predicts that an average fire return interval of greater than 12 years is required for 50 % of the initial Ceanothus megacarpus population and 25 % of the initial Ceanothus spinosus population to survive. In contrast, we predict that the Malosma laurina population will have 90 % survivorship for an average fire return interval of at least 6 years.

  18. Frequent chromosomal gains in recurrent juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Ulf-Rüdiger; Brieger, Jürgen; Gosepath, Jan; Wierzbicka, Magorzata; Sokolov, Maxim; Roth, Yehudah; Szyfter, Witold; Bittinger, Fernando; Mann, Wolf J

    2007-06-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a rare benign tumor, mostly affecting adolescent males. Some patients develop recurrences after surgery independently of completeness of removal. Only very limited data concerning underlying chromosomal changes are available. We therefore analyzed samples of 22 JNAs, including six recurrences, with comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). Additionally, quantitative image cytometry was used for measurement of DNA aneuploidy in representative samples. Of the 13 primary JNAs without later recurrence, DNA gains were identified on autosomes in only two samples. Four patients with one or two recurrences were included in the study; for one of these, no material of the primary tumor was available for analysis. Looking at autosomes, two of the three available primaries displayed multiple gains; in one of those, two additional losses were observed. Multiple gains were detected in two of the four first recurrences, but none in the two second recurrences. Across all 22 samples, gains occurred in more than one sample on chromosomes arms 1p, 9q, 10q, 12q, 16p, 16q, 17q, 19p, 19q, 20q, and 22q. Losses were found in a single case exclusively on chromosome 4. Sex chromosomes were frequently affected in both primary tumors and recurrences. There was no correlation among tumor staging, age, and DNA amplification. No DNA aneuploidy was detected, a finding in accordance with the generally benign characteristics of JNAs. Our observations suggest that in JNA the activation of oncogenes is more likely than the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Autosomal gains in the primary tumor should be further evaluated as markers for a potentially increased risk of recurrence after surgical removal in this entity.

  19. Frequent underwater volcanism in the central Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebscher, C.; Ruhnau, M.; Dehghani, G. A.

    2012-04-01

    The extinction of the Minoan culture in the mid second millennium BCE is a well known consequence of the Plinian eruption of Thera volcano (Santorini Island). Santorini is a member of the South Aegean arc forming a chain from the Gulf of Saronikos (Susaki, Egina, Poros, Methana) at West, to an area close to the Anatolian coast at East (Kos, Nisyros and minor islands), through the central part (Milos and Santorini island groups). Underwater volcanic activity was manifested historically only once. During 1649-1650 CE the Kolumbo underwater volcano evolved about 8 km northeast of Santorini. As a consequence of this eruption volcanic ash covered the entire Aegean area and a hazardous tsunami was triggered. Here we show by means of reflection seismic and magnetic data that underwater volcanism occurred more frequently in the central Aegean Sea than previously assumed. Seismic data show that Kolumbo constitutes of five vertically stacked cones of pyroclastic sediment plus at least four smaller cones on the flank of the volcano. The formation of Kolumbo started synchronous with Santorini Island. The entire volume of the Kolumbo pyroclastic cones is estimated to more than 15 cubic-kilometers. Several small-scale cones have been detected in the Anyhdros Basin some km north-east of Kolumbo, being previously interpreted as mud volcanoes by other authors. However, the similarity of seismic and magnetic signatures of these cones and Kolumbo strongly suggest that these cones were also created by underwater volcanism. Volcanic cones, Kolumbo and Santorini are situated along a NE-SW striking graben system that evolved during five extensional tectonic pulses in the Pliocene.

  20. A last updating evolution model for online social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Zhan; Xia, Zhengyou; Wang, Jiandong; Zhang, Chengcui

    2013-05-01

    As information technology has advanced, people are turning to electronic media more frequently for communication, and social relationships are increasingly found on online channels. However, there is very limited knowledge about the actual evolution of the online social networks. In this paper, we propose and study a novel evolution network model with the new concept of “last updating time”, which exists in many real-life online social networks. The last updating evolution network model can maintain the robustness of scale-free networks and can improve the network reliance against intentional attacks. What is more, we also found that it has the “small-world effect”, which is the inherent property of most social networks. Simulation experiment based on this model show that the results and the real-life data are consistent, which means that our model is valid.

  1. UCbase 2.0: ultraconserved sequences database (2014 update).

    PubMed

    Lomonaco, Vincenzo; Martoglia, Riccardo; Mandreoli, Federica; Anderlucci, Laura; Emmett, Warren; Bicciato, Silvio; Taccioli, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    UCbase 2.0 (http://ucbase.unimore.it) is an update, extension and evolution of UCbase, a Web tool dedicated to the analysis of ultraconserved sequences (UCRs). UCRs are 481 sequences >200 bases sharing 100% identity among human, mouse and rat genomes. They are frequently located in genomic regions known to be involved in cancer or differentially expressed in human leukemias and carcinomas. UCbase 2.0 is a platform-independent Web resource that includes the updated version of the human genome annotation (hg19), information linking disorders to chromosomal coordinates based on the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine classification, a query tool to search for Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and a new text box to directly interrogate the database using a MySQL interface. To facilitate the interactive visual interpretation of UCR chromosomal positioning, UCbase 2.0 now includes a graph visualization interface directly linked to UCSC genome browser. Database URL: http://ucbase.unimore.it.

  2. Updated NGNP Fuel Acquisition Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    David Petti; Tim Abram; Richard Hobbins; Jim Kendall

    2010-12-01

    A Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) fuel acquisition strategy was first established in 2007. In that report, a detailed technical assessment of potential fuel vendors for the first core of NGNP was conducted by an independent group of international experts based on input from the three major reactor vendor teams. Part of the assessment included an evaluation of the credibility of each option, along with a cost and schedule to implement each strategy compared with the schedule and throughput needs of the NGNP project. While credible options were identified based on the conditions in place at the time, many changes in the assumptions underlying the strategy and in externalities that have occurred in the interim requiring that the options be re-evaluated. This document presents an update to that strategy based on current capabilities for fuel fabrication as well as fuel performance and qualification testing worldwide. In light of the recent Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) project closure, the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel development and qualification program needs to support both pebble and prismatic options under the NGNP project. A number of assumptions were established that formed a context for the evaluation. Of these, the most important are: • Based on logistics associated with the on-going engineering design activities, vendor teams would start preliminary design in October 2012 and complete in May 2014. A decision on reactor type will be made following preliminary design, with the decision process assumed to be completed in January 2015. Thus, no fuel decision (pebble or prismatic) will be made in the near term. • Activities necessary for both pebble and prismatic fuel qualification will be conducted in parallel until a fuel form selection is made. As such, process development, fuel fabrication, irradiation, and testing for pebble and prismatic options should not negatively influence each other during the period prior to a decision on reactor type

  3. DOE interpretations Guide to OSH standards. Update to the Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-31

    Reflecting Secretary O`Leary`s focus on occupational safety and health, the Office of Occupational Safety is pleased to provide you with the latest update to the DOE Interpretations Guide to OSH Standards. This Guide was developed in cooperation with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which continued its support during this last revision by facilitating access to the interpretations found on the OSHA Computerized Information System (OCIS). This March 31, 1994 update contains 123 formal interpretation letters written by OSHA. As a result of the unique requests received by the 1-800 Response Line, this update also contains 38 interpretations developed by DOE. This new occupational safety and health information adds still more important guidance to the four volume reference set that you presently have in your possession.

  4. DOE interpretations Guide to OSH standards. Update to the Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-31

    Reflecting Secretary O`Leary`s focus on occupational safety and health, the Office of Occupational Safety is pleased to provide you with the latest update to the DOE Interpretations Guide to OSH Standards. This Guide was developed in cooperation with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which continued its support during this last revision by facilitating access to the interpretations found on the OSHA Computerized Information System (OCIS). This March 31, 1994 update contains 123 formal interpretation letters written OSHA. As a result of the unique requests received by the 1-800 Response Line, this update also contains 38 interpretations developed by DOE. This new occupational safety and health information adds still more important guidance to the four volume reference set that you presently have in your possession.

  5. DOE interpretations Guide to OSH standards. Update to the Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-31

    Reflecting Secretary O`Leary`s focus on occupational safety and health, the Office of Occupational Safety is pleased to provide you with the latest update to the DOE Interpretations Guide to OSH Standards. This Guide was developed in cooperation with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which continued it`s support during this last revision by facilitating access to the interpretations found on the OSHA Computerized Information System (OCIS). This March 31, 1994 update contains 123 formal in letter written by OSHA. As a result of the unique requests received by the 1-800 Response Line, this update also contains 38 interpretations developed by DOE. This new occupational safety and health information adds still more important guidance to the four volume reference set that you presently have in your possession.

  6. A web-services architecture designed for intermittent connectivity to support medical response to disasters.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steve; Griswold, William; Lenert, Leslie A

    2005-01-01

    To support mobile computing systems for first responders at mass casualty sites, as part of the WIISARD (Wireless Internet Information System for Medical Response in Disasters) project, we have developed a data architecture to gracefully handle an environment with frequent network failure and, multiple writers that also supports rapid dissemination of updates that could be critical to the safety of responders. This is accomplished by allowing for a subset of the overall information available in a disaster scene to be cached locally on a responder's device and locally modified with or without network access. When the network is available, the local subset of the model is automatically synchronized with a server that contains the full model, and conflicts are resolved. When changes from a device are committed, the changes are instantly sent to any connected devices where the local subset would be modified by the changes. PMID:16779191

  7. Oncology legislative update.

    PubMed

    Holmes, H

    2000-11-01

    This article reviews current legislative and regulatory issues of importance to the oncology community. Topics include patient protection, Medicare support of clinical trials, research data protection, the Medical Innovation Tax Credit, National Cancer Institute appropriations, and medical record privacy issues. Other topics discussed included funding for stem-cell research, genetic therapy oversight, and coverage for uninsured patients.

  8. Childhood acute leukemias are frequent in Mexico City: descriptive epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Worldwide, acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer. It is particularly common in the Hispanic populations residing in the United States, Costa Rica, and Mexico City. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of acute leukemia in children who were diagnosed and treated in public hospitals in Mexico City. Methods Included in this study were those children, under 15 years of age and residents of Mexico City, who were diagnosed in 2006 and 2007 with leukemia, as determined by using the International Classification of Childhood Cancer. The average annual incidence rates (AAIR), and the standardized average annual incidence rates (SAAIR) per million children were calculated. We calculated crude, age- and sex-specific incidence rates and adjusted for age by the direct method with the world population as standard. We determined if there were a correlation between the incidence of acute leukemias in the various boroughs of Mexico City and either the number of agricultural hectares, the average number of persons per household, or the municipal human development index for Mexico (used as a reference of socio-economic level). Results Although a total of 610 new cases of leukemia were registered during 2006-2007, only 228 fit the criteria for inclusion in this study. The overall SAAIR was 57.6 per million children (95% CI, 46.9-68.3); acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was the most frequent type of leukemia, constituting 85.1% of the cases (SAAIR: 49.5 per million), followed by acute myeloblastic leukemia at 12.3% (SAAIR: 6.9 per million), and chronic myeloid leukemia at 1.7% (SAAIR: 0.9 per million). The 1-4 years age group had the highest SAAIR for ALL (77.7 per million). For cases of ALL, 73.2% had precursor B-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR: 35.8 per million) and 12.4% had T-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR 6.3 per million). The peak ages for ALL were 2-6 years and 8-10 years. More than half the children (58.8%) were classified as high

  9. [Neurofibromatosis: the most frequent hereditary tumor predisposition syndrome].

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Katharina

    2005-06-01

    With an incidence of one in 3000 to 4000 individuals, neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most common autosomal dominant genetic diseases and very likely the most frequent disorder with increased cancer risk. Approximately fifty percent of all patients are familial cases and the remaining half consists of sporadic cases with no affected parent. The hallmark clinical features present in over 90% of all patients are café-au-lait spots and neurofibromas. However, the disorder should not be underestimated as a "mere cosmetic problem", since NF1 patients are at increased risk to also develop malignant tumours, such as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNST), juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia (JMML), optic glioma and pheochomocytoma. Renovascular disease represents an additional risk factor for NF1 patients. The NF1 gene is a classic example for a tumour suppressor gene. It functions as a negative regulator of the protooncogene Ras. This function explains well its involvement in tumour formation. During the last 15 years, since the cloning of the gene, enormous progress has been made towards a better understanding of the natural history of the disorder. However, it cannot be said if and when a cure of the disorder will be possible. Great advantages have been achieved in the monitoring and management of several NF1 complications, for instance in the treatment of tibia pseudarthrosis and optic gliomas. Owing to the technical improvements of the approaches applied to identify NF1-mutations molecular-genetic testing with high mutation detection rates may help nowadays in patients in which the clinical diagnosis may not readily be established, such as in young children or atypical cases. A greater awareness of the complications and the different expression forms of NF1 and NF2 on the part of all types of physicians will further help to offer all patients adequate and timely counselling and treatment. The establishment of multi-disciplinary counselling and

  10. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Elizabeth M; Hiatt, Jonathan R; Zarrinpar, Ali

    2015-02-01

    As the most common cause of acute liver failure (ALF) in the USA and UK, acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity remains a significant public health concern and common indication for emergent liver transplantation. This problem is largely attributable to acetaminophen combination products frequently prescribed by physicians and other healthcare professionals, with unintentional and chronic overdose accounting for over 50 % of cases of acetaminophen-related ALF. Treatment with N-acetylcysteine can effectively reduce progression to ALF if given early after an acute overdose; however, liver transplantation is the only routinely used life-saving therapy once ALF has developed. With the rapid course of acetaminophen-related ALF and limited supply of donor livers, early and accurate diagnosis of patients that will require transplantation for survival is crucial. Efforts in developing novel treatments for acetaminophen-induced ALF are directed toward bridging patients to recovery. These include auxiliary, artificial, and bioartificial support systems. This review outlines the most recent developments in diagnosis and management of acetaminophen-induced ALF.

  11. NSF FY1982 update: Support for basic research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    When the Appropriation Committees of the House of Representatives and the Senate meet in conference this month, discussion of the Astronomical, Atmospheric, Earth, and Ocean Sciences (AAEO) sections of the National Science Foundation (NSF) will be limited. Both the House and the Senate committees made some slight increases to the Office of Management and Budget requests, and the program by program agreement between the two was unusual.The House appropriation bill, H.R. 4034, provides $70 million over the administration request of $1033.5 million. Of the increase, $44.9 million was added in the area of research and related activities and $25.1 million for science and engineering education.

  12. Spatial updating in area LIP is independent of saccade direction.

    PubMed

    Heiser, Laura M; Colby, Carol L

    2006-05-01

    We explore the world around us by making rapid eye movements to objects of interest. Remarkably, these eye movements go unnoticed, and we perceive the world as stable. Spatial updating is one of the neural mechanisms that contributes to this perception of spatial constancy. Previous studies in macaque lateral intraparietal cortex (area LIP) have shown that individual neurons update, or "remap," the locations of salient visual stimuli at the time of an eye movement. The existence of remapping implies that neurons have access to visual information from regions far beyond the classically defined receptive field. We hypothesized that neurons have access to information located anywhere in the visual field. We tested this by recording the activity of LIP neurons while systematically varying the direction in which a stimulus location must be updated. Our primary finding is that individual neurons remap stimulus traces in multiple directions, indicating that LIP neurons have access to information throughout the visual field. At the population level, stimulus traces are updated in conjunction with all saccade directions, even when we consider direction as a function of receptive field location. These results show that spatial updating in LIP is effectively independent of saccade direction. Our findings support the hypothesis that the activity of LIP neurons contributes to the maintenance of spatial constancy throughout the visual field. PMID:16291805

  13. Updated Electronic Testbed System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Kevin L.

    2001-01-01

    updated Electronic Testbed System.

  14. Web Site Development Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul, Hameed

    2016-01-01

    This summer I assisted the RPT Program Office in developing a design plan to update their existing website to current NASA web standards. The finished website is intended for the general public, specifically potential customers interested in learning about NASA's chemical rocket test facility capabilities and test assignment process. The goal of the website is to give the public insight about the purpose and function of the RPT Program. Working on this project gave me the opportunity to learn skills necessary for effective project management. The RPT Program Office manages numerous facilities so they are required to travel often to other sites for meetings throughout the year. Maneuvering around the travel schedule of the office and the workload priority of the IT Department proved to be quite the challenge. I overcame the travel schedule of the office by frequently communicating and checking in with my mentor via email and telephone.

  15. Tourette Syndrome: Update

    PubMed Central

    HALLETT, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome is a disorder characterized by tics. It typically begins in childhood and often improves in adult life. Tics are best described as voluntary movements made automatically so that volition is not ordinarily appreciated. There is frequently an urge, sometimes in the form of a specific sensory feeling (sensory tic), that precedes the tic. Patients say that they make the tic in order to reduce the urge, although shortly after the tic, the urge recurs. The sensory feeling may arise due to defective sensory habituation. Since tics relieve the urge, this can be considered rewarding, and repetition of this behavior may perpetuate the tic as a habit. Tourette Syndrome affects boys more than girls and is associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder. Although Tourette Syndrome often appears to be autosomal recessive in inheritance, it has been difficult to find any abnormal genes. There is a loss of inhibition in these patients and recent studies show abnormalities in brain GABA. Certainly there is also an abnormality in dopamine function and dopamine blocking agents are effective therapy. In severe drug-refractory patients, deep brain stimulation can be effective. PMID:25604739

  16. Internet - a nuclear update

    SciTech Connect

    Slone, B.J. III; Richardson, C.E.; Buck, B.L.

    1994-12-31

    Although the connection rate is slow, new nuclear utility Internet connections are being made. However, the rate of information exchange has not grown. To expedite connections, individuals are obtaining their own Internet accounts to support job-related and personal needs. The nuclear industry should increase its use of Internet to share information and access information from on-line servers. A coordinated industry effort should be made to expedite additional utility connections and provide a server system for information exchange.

  17. Effective treatment with rituximab for the maintenance of remission in frequently relapsing minimal change disease

    PubMed Central

    Shendi, Ali M.; Salama, Alan D.; Khosravi, Maryam; Connolly, John O.; Trompeter, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aim Treatment of frequently relapsing or steroid‐dependent minimal change disease (MCD) in children and adults remains challenging. Glucocorticoids and/or other immunosuppressive agents are the mainstay of treatment, but patients often experience toxicity from prolonged exposure and may either become treatment dependent and/or resistant. Increasing evidence suggests that rituximab (RTX) can be a useful alternative to standard immunosuppression and allow withdrawal of maintenance immunosuppressants; however, data on optimal treatment regimens, long‐term efficacy and safety are still limited. Methods We undertook a prospective study of RTX to allow immunosuppression minimization in 15 young adults with frequently relapsing or steroid‐dependent, biopsy‐proven MCD. All patients were in remission at the start of treatment and on a calcineurin inhibitor. Two doses of RTX (1 gr) were given 6 months apart. A subset of patients also received an additional dose 12 months later, in order to examine the benefit of re‐treatment. Biochemical and clinical parameters were monitored over an extended follow‐up period of up to 43 months. Results Median steroid‐free survival after RTX was 25 months (range 4–34). Mean relapse frequency decreased from 2.60 ± 0.28 to 0.4 ± 0.19 (P < 0.001) after RTX. Seven relapses occurred, five of which (71%) when CD19 counts were greater than 100 µ. Immunoglobulin levels remained unchanged, and no major side effects were observed throughout the follow‐up period. Conclusions Rituximab therapy is effective at maintaining prolonged steroid‐free remission and reducing relapse frequency in this group of patients. Our study lends further support for the role of RTX in the treatment of patients with frequently relapsing or steroid‐dependent MCD. PMID:26860320

  18. An update on the management of chronic lumbar discogenic pain.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2015-09-01

    Lumbar degenerative disc disease without disc herniation, also known as discogenic pain, is an elusive diagnosis of chronic low back pain. Lumbar provocation discography and fusion surgery have been frequently utilized for several decades as the gold standards for the diagnosis and treatment of symptomatic lumbar discogenic pain, though controversial, based on conjecture, rather than evidence. In addition to lumbar fusion, various other operative and nonoperative modalities of treatments are available in managing chronic lumbar discogenic pain. This review provides an updated assessment of the management of chronic lumbar discogenic pain with a critical look at the many modalities of treatments that are currently available. PMID:26255722

  19. Inpatient capsule endoscopy leads to frequent incomplete small bowel examinations

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, Cemal; Losurdo, John; Brown, Michael D; Oosterveen, Scott; Rahimi, Robert; Keshavarzian, Ali; Bozorgnia, Leila; Mutlu, Ece

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To examine the predictive factors of capsule endoscopy (CE) completion rate (CECR) including the effect of inpatient and outpatient status. METHODS: We identified 355 consecutive patients who completed CE at Rush University Medical Center between March 2003 and October 2005. Subjects for CE had either nothing by mouth or clear liquids for the afternoon and evening of the day before the procedure. CE exams were reviewed by two physicians who were unaware of the study hypotheses. After retrospective analysis, 21 cases were excluded due to capsule malfunction, prior gastric surgery, endoscopic capsule placement or insufficient data. Of the remaining 334 exams [264 out-patient (OP), 70 in-patient (IP)], CE indications, findings, location of the patients [IP vs OP and intensive care unit (ICU) vs general medical floor (GMF)] and gastrointestinal transit times were analyzed. Statistical analysis was completed using SPSS version 17 (Chicago, IL). Chi-square, t test or fisher exact-tests were used as appropriate. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify variables associated with incomplete CE exams. RESULTS: The mean age for the entire study population was 54.7 years. Sixty-one percent of the study population was female, and gender was not different between IPs vs OPs (P = 0.07). The overall incomplete CECR was 14% in our study. Overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGB) was significantly more common for the IP CE (P = 0.0001), while abdominal pain and assessment of IBD were more frequent indications for the OP CE exams (P = 0.002 and P = 0.01, respectively). Occult OGB was the most common indication and arteriovenous malformations were the most common finding both in the IPs and OPs. The capsule did not enter the small bowel (SB) in 6/70 IPs and 8/264 OPs (P = 0.04). The capsule never reached the cecum in 31.4% (22/70) of IP vs 9.5% (25/ 264) of OP examinations (P < 0.001). The mean gastric transit time (GTT) was delayed in IPs compared to

  20. Update on local allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Altıntoprak, Niyazi; Kar, Murat; Bayar Muluk, Nuray; Oktemer, Tugba; Ipci, Kagan; Birdane, Leman; Aricigil, Mitat; Senturk, Mehmet; Bafaqeeh, Sameer Ali; Cingi, Cemal

    2016-08-01

    We here provide an update on the literature regarding local allergic rhinitis (LAR). In reviewing LAR, we have included an updated definition, classifications, mechanisms, comorbidities, and recommendations for diagnosis and treatment for LAR, as well as the defined research areas for future evidence-based studies. LAR is a localised nasal allergic response in the absence of systemic atopy characterised by local production of specific IgE (sIgE) antibodies, a TH2 pattern of mucosal cell infiltration during natural exposure to aeroallergens, and a positive nasal allergen provocation test response, with the release of inflammatory mediators. The localised allergic response of LAR is an important topic for the study of allergies. This review provides an update on the current knowledge of LAR. PMID:27368453

  1. Simulating the effects of frequent fire on southern california coastal shrublands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Syphard, A.D.; Franklin, J.; Keeley, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    Fire disturbance is a primary agent of change in the mediterranean-climate chaparral shrublands of southern California, USA. However, fire frequency has been steadily increasing in coastal regions due to ignitions at the growing wildland-urban interface. Although chaparral is resilient to a range of fire frequencies, successively short intervals between fires can threaten the persistence of some species, and the effects may differ according to plant functional type. California shrublands support high levels of biological diversity, including many endangered and endemic species. Therefore, it is important to understand the long-term effects of altered fire regimes on these communities. A spatially explicit simulation model of landscape disturbance and succession (LANDIS) was used to predict the effects of frequent fire on the distribution of dominant plant functional types in a study area administered by the National Park Service. Shrubs dependent on fire-cued seed germination were most sensitive to frequent fire and lost substantial cover to other functional types, including drought-deciduous subshrubs that typify coastal sage scrub and nonnative annual grasses. Shrubs that resprout were favored by higher fire frequencies and gained in extent under these treatments. Due to this potential for vegetation change, caution is advised against the widespread use of prescribed fire in the region. ?? 2006 by the Ecological Society of America.

  2. Large Scale Frequent Pattern Mining using MPI One-Sided Model

    SciTech Connect

    Vishnu, Abhinav; Agarwal, Khushbu

    2015-09-08

    In this paper, we propose a work-stealing runtime --- Library for Work Stealing LibWS --- using MPI one-sided model for designing scalable FP-Growth --- {\\em de facto} frequent pattern mining algorithm --- on large scale systems. LibWS provides locality efficient and highly scalable work-stealing techniques for load balancing on a variety of data distributions. We also propose a novel communication algorithm for FP-growth data exchange phase, which reduces the communication complexity from state-of-the-art O(p) to O(f + p/f) for p processes and f frequent attributed-ids. FP-Growth is implemented using LibWS and evaluated on several work distributions and support counts. An experimental evaluation of the FP-Growth on LibWS using 4096 processes on an InfiniBand Cluster demonstrates excellent efficiency for several work distributions (87\\% efficiency for Power-law and 91% for Poisson). The proposed distributed FP-Tree merging algorithm provides 38x communication speedup on 4096 cores.

  3. Tube support

    DOEpatents

    Mullinax, Jerry L.

    1988-01-01

    A tube support for supporting horizontal tubes from an inclined vertical support tube passing between the horizontal tubes. A support button is welded to the vertical support tube. Two clamping bars or plates, the lower edges of one bearing on the support button, are removably bolted to the inclined vertical tube. The clamping bars provide upper and lower surface support for the horizontal tubes.

  4. A frequent phenotype for paediatric sleep apnoea: short lingual frenulum

    PubMed Central

    Huseni, Shehlanoor; Lo, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    A short lingual frenulum has been associated with difficulties in sucking, swallowing and speech. The oral dysfunction induced by a short lingual frenulum can lead to oral-facial dysmorphosis, which decreases the size of upper airway support. Such progressive change increases the risk of upper airway collapsibility during sleep. Clinical investigation of the oral cavity was conducted as a part of a clinical evaluation of children suspected of having sleep disordered breathing (SDB) based on complaints, symptoms and signs. Systematic polysomnographic evaluation followed the clinical examination. A retrospective analysis of 150 successively seen children suspected of having SDB was performed, in addition to a comparison of the findings between children with and without short lingual frenula. Among the children, two groups of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) were found: 1) absence of adenotonsils enlargement and short frenula (n=63); and 2) normal frenula and enlarged adenotonsils (n=87). Children in the first group had significantly more abnormal oral anatomy findings, and a positive family of short frenulum and SDB was documented in at least one direct family member in 60 cases. A short lingual frenulum left untreated at birth is associated with OSAS at later age, and a systematic screening for the syndrome should be conducted when this anatomical abnormality is recognised. PMID:27730205

  5. Updated treatment algorithm of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Galiè, Nazzareno; Corris, Paul A; Frost, Adaani; Girgis, Reda E; Granton, John; Jing, Zhi Cheng; Klepetko, Walter; McGoon, Michael D; McLaughlin, Vallerie V; Preston, Ioana R; Rubin, Lewis J; Sandoval, Julio; Seeger, Werner; Keogh, Anne

    2013-12-24

    The demands on a pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) treatment algorithm are multiple and in some ways conflicting. The treatment algorithm usually includes different types of recommendations with varying degrees of scientific evidence. In addition, the algorithm is required to be comprehensive but not too complex, informative yet simple and straightforward. The type of information in the treatment algorithm are heterogeneous including clinical, hemodynamic, medical, interventional, pharmacological and regulatory recommendations. Stakeholders (or users) including physicians from various specialties and with variable expertise in PAH, nurses, patients and patients' associations, healthcare providers, regulatory agencies and industry are often interested in the PAH treatment algorithm for different reasons. These are the considerable challenges faced when proposing appropriate updates to the current evidence-based treatment algorithm.The current treatment algorithm may be divided into 3 main areas: 1) general measures, supportive therapy, referral strategy, acute vasoreactivity testing and chronic treatment with calcium channel blockers; 2) initial therapy with approved PAH drugs; and 3) clinical response to the initial therapy, combination therapy, balloon atrial septostomy, and lung transplantation. All three sections will be revisited highlighting information newly available in the past 5 years and proposing updates where appropriate. The European Society of Cardiology grades of recommendation and levels of evidence will be adopted to rank the proposed treatments. PMID:24355643

  6. [Preoperative fasting guidelines: an update].

    PubMed

    López Muñoz, A C; Busto Aguirreurreta, N; Tomás Braulio, J

    2015-03-01

    Anesthesiology societies have issued various guidelines on preoperative fasting since 1990, not only to decrease the incidence of lung aspiration and anesthetic morbidity, but also to increase patient comfort prior to anesthesia. Some of these societies have been updating their guidelines, as such that, since 2010, we now have 2 evidence-based preoperative fasting guidelines available. In this article, an attempt is made to review these updated guidelines, as well as the current instructions for more controversial patients such as infants, the obese, and a particular type of ophthalmic surgery.

  7. Event-related brain potentials in selective listening to frequent and rare stimuli.

    PubMed

    Alho, K; Lavikainen, J; Reinikainen, K; Sams, M; Näätänen, R

    1990-01-01

    Our previous event-related brain potential (ERP) results suggest that during selective listening, relevant stimuli are selected for further processing by comparing each stimulus to an "attentional trace," a neuronal representation of the physical features of the relevant stimuli that distinguish them from the irrelevant stimuli. This comparison process is reflected by the early component of the processing negativity (PN), which is largest and longest to the relevant stimuli (perfectly matching with the trace). In the present study, the subjects selectively listened to designated tone stimuli which randomly appeared among irrelevant tones of a different pitch. The probability of relevant stimuli in a block was varied. The processing negativity elicited by relevant stimuli was smaller the less frequent they were. The results support the attentional-trace theory of selective attention, which proposes that, in addition to active maintenance, the trace also depends on the rate of sensory reinforcement provided by the relevant stimuli.

  8. Organic cofactors participated more frequently than transition metals in redox reactions of primitive proteins.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong-Fang; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2008-08-01

    Protein redox reactions are one of the most basic and important biochemical actions. As amino acids are weak redox mediators, most protein redox functions are undertaken by protein cofactors, which include organic ligands and transition metal ions. Since both kinds of redox cofactors were available in the pre-protein RNA world, it is challenging to explore which one was more involved in redox processes of primitive proteins? In this paper, using an examination of the redox cofactor usage of putative ancient proteins, we infer that organic ligands participated more frequently than transition metals in redox reactions of primitive proteins, at least as protein cofactors. This is further supported by the relative abundance of amino acids in the primordial world. Supplementary material for this article can be found on the BioEssays website.

  9. Forecast Mekong: 2011 update

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turnipseed, D. Phil

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary R. Clinton joined with the Foreign Ministers of Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam in launching the Lower Mekong Initiative to enhance U.S. engagement with the Lower Mekong countries in the areas of environment, health, education, and infrastructure. Part of the Lower Mekong Initiative, the U.S. Geological Survey's Forecast Mekong project is engaging the United States in scientific research relevant to environmental issues in the Lower Mekong River countries and is staying the course in support of the Mekong Nations with a suite of new projects for 2011.

  10. Sustainability Base Construction Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewhinney, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Construction of the new Sustainability Base Collaborative support facility, expected to become the highest performing building in the federal government continues at NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, Calif. The new building is designed to achieve a platinum rating under the leadership in Energy and Environment Design (LEED) new construction standards for environmentally sustainable construction developed by the U. S. Green Building Council, Washington, D. C. When completed by the end of 2011, the $20.6 million building will feature near zero net energy consumption, use 90 percent less potable water than conventionally build buildings of equivalent size, and will result in reduced building maintenance costs.

  11. UPDATE: Applications of Research in Music Education. UPDATE Yearbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowman & Littlefield Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The Fall 2004 and Spring 2005 issues of "UPDATE: Applications of Research in Music Education," in one print volume, presents hard facts and statistical data in a style that can be easily understood and appreciated by music researchers, teachers, graduates, and undergraduates alike. Includes advice to first-year music teachers, instrument…

  12. Statistical evaluation of synchronous spike patterns extracted by frequent item set mining

    PubMed Central

    Torre, Emiliano; Picado-Muiño, David; Denker, Michael; Borgelt, Christian; Grün, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    We recently proposed frequent itemset mining (FIM) as a method to perform an optimized search for patterns of synchronous spikes (item sets) in massively parallel spike trains. This search outputs the occurrence count (support) of individual patterns that are not trivially explained by the counts of any superset (closed frequent item sets). The number of patterns found by FIM makes direct statistical tests infeasible due to severe multiple testing. To overcome this issue, we proposed to test the significance not of individual patterns, but instead of their signatures, defined as the pairs of pattern size z and support c. Here, we derive in detail a statistical test for the significance of the signatures under the null hypothesis of full independence (pattern spectrum filtering, PSF) by means of surrogate data. As a result, injected spike patterns that mimic assembly activity are well detected, yielding a low false negative rate. However, this approach is prone to additionally classify patterns resulting from chance overlap of real assembly activity and background spiking as significant. These patterns represent false positives with respect to the null hypothesis of having one assembly of given signature embedded in otherwise independent spiking activity. We propose the additional method of pattern set reduction (PSR) to remove these false positives by conditional filtering. By employing stochastic simulations of parallel spike trains with correlated activity in form of injected spike synchrony in subsets of the neurons, we demonstrate for a range of parameter settings that the analysis scheme composed of FIM, PSF and PSR allows to reliably detect active assemblies in massively parallel spike trains. PMID:24167487

  13. Knowledge structure representation and automated updates in intelligent information management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corey, Stephen; Carnahan, Richard S., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A continuing effort to apply rapid prototyping and Artificial Intelligence techniques to problems associated with projected Space Station-era information management systems is examined. In particular, timely updating of the various databases and knowledge structures within the proposed intelligent information management system (IIMS) is critical to support decision making processes. Because of the significantly large amounts of data entering the IIMS on a daily basis, information updates will need to be automatically performed with some systems requiring that data be incorporated and made available to users within a few hours. Meeting these demands depends first, on the design and implementation of information structures that are easily modified and expanded, and second, on the incorporation of intelligent automated update techniques that will allow meaningful information relationships to be established. Potential techniques are studied for developing such an automated update capability and IIMS update requirements are examined in light of results obtained from the IIMS prototyping effort.

  14. [Gout management: an update].

    PubMed

    Ankli, Barbara; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Gout is the most frequent arthritis worldwide. Despite progress in therapeutic options the majority of gout patients are still insufficiently treated. International guidelines (ACR, EULAR, 3e initiative) clearly specify treatment targets: keep the patient flare-free and maintain a low urate serum level (< 360 µmol/l). The treat to target strategy includes therapy of flares, urate lowering treatment (ULT) and prophylaxis of flares. Evolution of gout guidelines over several years shows a broader indication for ULT, mandatory prophylaxis of flares during the initiation of ULT over several months and an earlier start of ULT in patients with flares as soon as symptoms have diminished. Colchicine is the preferred specific flare treatment, Caution has to be taken especially in patients with kidney disease, patients with hepatic dysfunction or in patients with interacting comedication. Low dose oral colchicine is nowadays the standard flare treatment. NSAIDs and prednisone are valuable alternatives. Interleukin-1 blockers offer a quick resolution of flares and may be an option in patients with chronic gout and severe kidney disease. Xanthinoxidase inhibitors (XOI) are the mainstay of ULT, with allopurinol still being the preferred XOI. The recently approved XOI febuxostat is eliminated mostly by the liver and can induce a faster lowering of urate. Uricosuric drugs such as probenecid are recommended in patients with sufficient renal function in whom the treatment goals cannot be reached with XOI. In Switzerland, only the two gout-lowering drugs allopurinol and probenecid are available, which reduces the therapeutic possibilities. Treatment success is often hampered by malcompliance. Recent guidelines stress the importance of patient education to ameliorate compliance. Comorbidities such as metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular and kidney disease are often found in gout patients. Patients with severe kidney disease are the most difficult to treat: the choice of

  15. [Gout management: an update].

    PubMed

    Ankli, Barbara; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Gout is the most frequent arthritis worldwide. Despite progress in therapeutic options the majority of gout patients are still insufficiently treated. International guidelines (ACR, EULAR, 3e initiative) clearly specify treatment targets: keep the patient flare-free and maintain a low urate serum level (< 360 µmol/l). The treat to target strategy includes therapy of flares, urate lowering treatment (ULT) and prophylaxis of flares. Evolution of gout guidelines over several years shows a broader indication for ULT, mandatory prophylaxis of flares during the initiation of ULT over several months and an earlier start of ULT in patients with flares as soon as symptoms have diminished. Colchicine is the preferred specific flare treatment, Caution has to be taken especially in patients with kidney disease, patients with hepatic dysfunction or in patients with interacting comedication. Low dose oral colchicine is nowadays the standard flare treatment. NSAIDs and prednisone are valuable alternatives. Interleukin-1 blockers offer a quick resolution of flares and may be an option in patients with chronic gout and severe kidney disease. Xanthinoxidase inhibitors (XOI) are the mainstay of ULT, with allopurinol still being the preferred XOI. The recently approved XOI febuxostat is eliminated mostly by the liver and can induce a faster lowering of urate. Uricosuric drugs such as probenecid are recommended in patients with sufficient renal function in whom the treatment goals cannot be reached with XOI. In Switzerland, only the two gout-lowering drugs allopurinol and probenecid are available, which reduces the therapeutic possibilities. Treatment success is often hampered by malcompliance. Recent guidelines stress the importance of patient education to ameliorate compliance. Comorbidities such as metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular and kidney disease are often found in gout patients. Patients with severe kidney disease are the most difficult to treat: the choice of

  16. 'Informal' learning to support breastfeeding: local problems and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Stephen; Renfrew, Mary J; McFadden, Alison

    2006-10-01

    This study explored 'informal' learning opportunities in three health economies, both for National Health Service (NHS) staff and lay people wishing to promote and support breastfeeding and for new mothers wishing to breastfeed. The word 'informal' indicates local learning opportunities that are not part of recognized academic or professional training courses. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 31 key informants, including health visitors, midwives, infant feeding advisers, Sure Start personnel, voluntary organization representatives, Strategic Health Authority representatives, senior nurses and trainers. The results were analysed thematically. In each site, there were regular training events for NHS staff to acquire or update knowledge and skills. Training was provided by a small number of enthusiasts. Midwives and health visitors were the groups who attend most frequently, although many find it difficult to make time. Although many training events were multidisciplinary, few doctors appeared to attend. Individual staff also used additional learning opportunities, e.g. other courses, conferences, web-based learning, and training by voluntary organizations. Services offered to lay people by the NHS, Sure Start and voluntary organizations included parentcraft, antenatal and post-natal classes, breastfeeding support groups, 'baby cafés' and telephone counselling. Interviewees' organizations did not have a specific breastfeeding strategy, although action groups were trying to take the agenda forward. Local opportunities were over-dependent on individual champions working in relative isolation, and support is needed from local health economies for the facilitation of coordination and networking. PMID:16999768

  17. A Machine-Portable CDC UPDATE Emulator.

    SciTech Connect

    THOMAS,; HAILL, A.

    1987-09-01

    Version 01 UPEML is a machine-portable CDC UPDATE emulation program. It is capable of emulating a significant subset of the standard CDC UPDATE functions, including program library creation and subsequent modification.

  18. 75 FR 70124 - Product List Update

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... publication of the product lists in the Federal Register on August 31, 2010 (75 FR 53216), the following... Commission order. The referenced policy assumes periodic updates. The updates are identified in the body...

  19. CDC Updates Zika Guidelines for Pregnant Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160052.html CDC Updates Zika Guidelines for Pregnant Women Any sex partner, male ... News) -- U.S. health officials on Monday updated their Zika virus guidelines, saying that pregnant women could contract ...

  20. RELAP-7 Development Updates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hongbin; Zhao, Haihua; Gleicher, Frederick Nathan; DeHart, Mark David; Zou, Ling; Andrs, David; Martineau, Richard Charles

    2015-09-01

    RELAP-7 is a nuclear systems safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory, and is the next generation tool in the RELAP reactor safety/systems analysis application series. RELAP-7 development began in 2011 to support the Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program. The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical methods, and physical models in order to provide capabilities needed for the RISMC methodology and to support nuclear power safety analysis. The code is being developed based on Idaho National Laboratory’s modern scientific software development framework – MOOSE (the Multi-Physics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment). The initial development goal of the RELAP-7 approach focused primarily on the development of an implicit algorithm capable of strong (nonlinear) coupling of the dependent hydrodynamic variables contained in the 1-D/2-D flow models with the various 0-D system reactor components that compose various boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor nuclear power plants (NPPs). During Fiscal Year (FY) 2015, the RELAP-7 code has been further improved with expanded capability to support boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor NPPs analysis. The accumulator model has been developed. The code has also been coupled with other MOOSE-based applications such as neutronics code RattleSnake and fuel performance code BISON to perform multiphysics analysis. A major design requirement for the implicit algorithm in RELAP-7 is that it is capable of second-order discretization accuracy in both space and time, which eliminates the traditional first-order approximation errors. The second-order temporal is achieved by a second-order backward temporal difference, and the one-dimensional second-order accurate spatial discretization

  1. Strategies for monitoring and updating clinical practice guidelines: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Scientific knowledge is in constant change. The flow of new information requires a frequent re-evaluation of the available research results. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are not exempted from this phenomenon and need to be kept updated to maintain the validity of their recommendations. The objective of our review is to systematically identify, describe and assess strategies for monitoring and updating CPGs. Study design and setting We conducted a systematic review of studies evaluating one or more methods of updating (with or without monitoring) CPGs or recommendations. We searched MEDLINE (PubMed) and The Cochrane Methodology Register (The Cochrane Library) from 1966 to June 2012. Additionally, we hand-searched reference lists of the included studies and the Guidelines International Network book of abstracts. If necessary, we contacted study authors to obtain additional information. Results We included a total of eight studies. Four evaluated if CPGs were out of date, three updated CPGs, and one continuously monitored and updated CPGs. The most detailed reported phase of the process was the identification of new evidence. As opposed to studies updating guidelines, studies evaluating if CPGs were out of date applied restricted searches. Only one study compared a restricted versus an exhaustive search suggesting that a restricted search is sufficient to assess recommendations’ Validity. One study analyzed the survival time of CPGs and suggested that these should be reassessed every three years. Conclusions There is limited evidence about the optimal strategies for monitoring and updating clinical practice guidelines. A restricted search is likely to be sufficient to monitor new evidence and assess the need to update, however, more information is needed about the timing and type of search. Only the exhaustive search strategy has been assessed for the update of CPGs. The development and evaluation of more efficient strategies is needed to improve

  2. Renal Ablation Update

    PubMed Central

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity–focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  3. INHERITED NEUROPATHIES: CLINICAL OVERVIEW AND UPDATE

    PubMed Central

    KLEIN, CHRISTOPHER J.; DUAN, XIAOHUI; SHY, MICHAEL E.

    2014-01-01

    Inherited neuropathy is a group of common neurologic disorders with heterogeneous clinical presentations and genetic causes. Detailed neuromuscular evaluations, including nerve conduction studies, laboratory testing, and histopathologic examination, can assist in identification of the inherited component beyond family history. Genetic testing increasingly enables definitive diagnosis of specific inherited neuropathies. Diagnosis, however, is often complex, and neurologic disability may have both genetic and acquired components in individual patients. The decision of which genetic test to order or whether to order genetic tests is often complicated, and the strategies to maximize the value of testing are evolving. Apart from rare inherited metabolic neuropathies, treatment approaches remain largely supportive. We provide a clinical update of the various types of inherited neuropathies, their differential diagnoses, and distinguishing clinical features (where available). A framework is provided for clinical evaluations, including the inheritance assessment, electrophysiologic examinations, and specific genetic tests. PMID:23801417

  4. Hubble Space Telescope Battery Capacity Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollandsworth, Roger; Armantrout, Jon; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.

    2007-01-01

    Orbital battery performance for the Hubble Space Telescope is discussed and battery life is predicted which supports decision to replace orbital batteries by 2009-2010 timeframe. Ground characterization testing of cells from the replacement battery build is discussed, with comparison of data from battery capacity characterization with cell studies of Cycle Life and 60% Stress Test at the Naval Weapons Surface Center (NWSC)-Crane, and cell Cycle Life testing at the Marshal Space Flight Center (MSFC). The contents of this presentation includes an update to the performance of the on-orbit batteries, as well as a discussion of the HST Service Mission 4 (SM4) batteries manufactured in 1996 and activated in 2000, and a second set of SM4 backup replacement batteries which began manufacture Jan 11, 2007, with delivery scheduled for July 2008.

  5. Progress Update: Stack Project Complete

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Progress update from the Savannah River Site. The 75 foot 293 F Stack, built for plutonium production, was cut down to size in order to prevent injury or release of toxic material if the structure were to collapse due to harsh weather.

  6. Community Update, 1997-1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Julie, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This document consists of 10 issues of the newsletter "Community Update," containing articles on community and family involvement in education. Article topics include: preparing America's future teachers; reports on satellite town meetings; E-rate (education rate) discounts for telecommunications services in schools and libraries; President…

  7. A Mathematics Software Database Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, R. S.; Smith, David A.

    1987-01-01

    Contains an update of an earlier listing of software for mathematics instruction at the college level. Topics are: advanced mathematics, algebra, calculus, differential equations, discrete mathematics, equation solving, general mathematics, geometry, linear and matrix algebra, logic, statistics and probability, and trigonometry. (PK)

  8. NUHOMS{reg_sign} update

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, N.

    1995-12-31

    NUHOMS{reg_sign} is the dry spent fuel storage and transportation technology selected to date by the majority of commercial nuclear utilities. The author first gives a system overview of the NUHOMS{reg_sign}. Next she discusses the project status and licensing status. She closes with an update of the multi-purpose canister.

  9. Task Group 9 Update (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Bosco, N.

    2014-04-01

    This presentation is a brief update of IEC TC82 QA Task Force, Group 9. Presented is an outline of the recently submitted New Work Item Proposal (NWIP) for a Comparative Thermal Cycling Test for CPV Modules to Differentiate Thermal Fatigue Durability.

  10. Competitive Electricity Prices: An Update

    EIA Publications

    1998-01-01

    Illustrates a third impact of the move to competitive generation pricing -- the narrowing of the range of prices across regions of the country. This feature article updates information in Electricity Prices in a Competitive Environment: Marginal Cost Pricing of Generation Services and Financial Status of Electric Utilities.

  11. Updating the Behavior Engineering Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chevalier, Roger

    2003-01-01

    Considers Thomas Gilbert's Behavior Engineering Model as a tool for systematically identifying barriers to individual and organizational performance. Includes a detailed case study and a performance aid that incorporates gap analysis, cause analysis, and force field analysis to update the original model. (Author/LRW)

  12. Energy Education Materials Bibliography - Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Energy Agency, St. Paul.

    Presented is an updated version of a previous bibliography prepared by the Minnesota State Energy Agency. The materials included in this document are indexed according to grade level and according to whether they are background materials or classroom activities. Each of the items listed were evaluated and included into either the "A" list or the…

  13. Teacher Testing--An Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence M.

    1988-01-01

    State directors of teacher certification and testing provided updated data (reports, press clippings, manuals, legislative hearings, and validity studies) in April 1987 describing their testing programs and the latest passing rates. Twenty-seven states have admissions testing programs, and 44 have certification testing programs. It is unclear…

  14. NACRE Update and Extension Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Masayuki; Arai, Koji; Arnould, Marcel; Takahashi, Kohji; Utsunomiya, Hiroaki

    2006-04-01

    NACRE, the `nuclear astrophysics compilation of reaction rates', has been widely utilized in stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis studies since its publication in 1999. We describe here the current status of a Konan-Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) joint project that aims at its update and extension.

  15. Early Childhood Update, Fall 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmerly, Lynn, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This newsletter provides a periodic update on the activities of the Early Childhood Research Working Group (ECRWG), organized in early 1995 by the U.S. Department of Education and other federal government departments and agencies to promote interagency cooperation and public-private partnerships in early childhood research. This edition contains…

  16. Censorship in Massachusetts: An Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, L. B.; O'Brien, Jane E.

    This report updates a 1979 article from the Bay State Librarian about censorship in Massachusetts libraries from 1966 through 1975. Compiled using data from the American Library Association's Office of Intellectual Freedom (OIF), the report provides information about censorship attempts and actions between 1976 and 1982. The definition of…

  17. Community Update, 1998-1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Julie, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document consists of ten issues of the newsletter "Community Update," containing articles on community and family involvement in education. Article topics include: a college education is necessary and possible; math and science study points out problems and positive solutions; the "America Reads Challenge"; meeting the Department of…

  18. National Educators' Workshop: Update 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, James E.; Freeman, Ginger L.; Jacobs, James; Parkin, Don M.

    1997-01-01

    This document contains a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the National Educators' Workshop: Update 96, held at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico on October 27-30, 1996. The experiments related to the nature and properties of engineering materials and provided information to assist in teaching about materials in the education community.

  19. Progress Update: Stack Project Complete

    ScienceCinema

    Cody, Tom

    2016-07-12

    Progress update from the Savannah River Site. The 75 foot 293 F Stack, built for plutonium production, was cut down to size in order to prevent injury or release of toxic material if the structure were to collapse due to harsh weather.

  20. Anterior cruciate ligament - updating article.

    PubMed

    Luzo, Marcus Vinicius Malheiros; Franciozi, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira; Rezende, Fernando Cury; Gracitelli, Guilherme Conforto; Debieux, Pedro; Cohen, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    This updating article on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has the aim of addressing some of the most interesting current topics in this field. Within this stratified approach, it contains the following sections: ACL remnant; anterolateral ligament and combined intra and extra-articular reconstruction; fixation devices; and ACL femoral tunnel creation techniques. PMID:27517015

  1. Vitamin E: Textbooks Require Updating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azzi, Angelo; Zingg, Jean-Marc

    2005-01-01

    Vitamin E was discovered in 1922, but in more than 60 years many new findings have added to the early one. However, its description in many textbooks has not been proportionally updated. The result is an inaccurate, incomplete, and often incorrect description of the function of this vitamin. In some other textbooks, vitamin E is absolutely…

  2. National Drug Control Strategy. Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of National Drug Control Policy, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The first National Drug Control Strategy set ambitious two and five-year performance based goals: (1) to lower the rate of drug use by 10 percent over 2 years among both youth and adults; and (2) to lower the rate by 25 percent over 5 years. The chapters in this updated version are keyed to the strategies three priorities: (1) Stopping Use Before…

  3. NACRE Update and Extension Project

    SciTech Connect

    Aikawa, Masayuki; Arnould, Marcel; Takahashi, Kohji; Arai, Koji; Utsunomiya, Hiroaki

    2006-04-26

    NACRE, the 'nuclear astrophysics compilation of reaction rates', has been widely utilized in stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis studies since its publication in 1999. We describe here the current status of a Konan-Universite Libre de Brussels (ULB) joint project that aims at its update and extension.

  4. Wind turbine reliability database update.

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Valerie A.; Hill, Roger Ray; Stinebaugh, Jennifer A.; Veers, Paul S.

    2009-03-01

    This report documents the status of the Sandia National Laboratories' Wind Plant Reliability Database. Included in this report are updates on the form and contents of the Database, which stems from a fivestep process of data partnerships, data definition and transfer, data formatting and normalization, analysis, and reporting. Selected observations are also reported.

  5. Deductive Updating Is Not Bayesian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markovits, Henry; Brisson, Janie; de Chantal, Pier-Luc

    2015-01-01

    One of the major debates concerning the nature of inferential reasoning is between counterexample-based theories such as mental model theory and probabilistic theories. This study looks at conclusion updating after the addition of statistical information to examine the hypothesis that deductive reasoning cannot be explained by probabilistic…

  6. Austin Community College Benchmarking Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin Community Coll., TX. Office of Institutional Effectiveness.

    Austin Community College contracted with MGT of America, Inc. in spring 1999 to develop a peer and benchmark (best) practices analysis on key indicators. These indicators were updated in spring 2002 using data from eight Texas community colleges and four non-Texas institutions that represent large, comprehensive, urban community colleges, similar…

  7. Anterior cruciate ligament - updating article.

    PubMed

    Luzo, Marcus Vinicius Malheiros; Franciozi, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira; Rezende, Fernando Cury; Gracitelli, Guilherme Conforto; Debieux, Pedro; Cohen, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    This updating article on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has the aim of addressing some of the most interesting current topics in this field. Within this stratified approach, it contains the following sections: ACL remnant; anterolateral ligament and combined intra and extra-articular reconstruction; fixation devices; and ACL femoral tunnel creation techniques.

  8. Capital update factor: a new era approaches.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, P L

    1993-02-01

    The Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) has constructed a preliminary model of a new capital update method which is consistent with the framework being developed to refine the update method for PPS operating costs. HCFA's eventual goal is to develop a single update framework for operating and capital costs. Initial results suggest that adopting the new capital update method would reduce capital payments substantially, which might intensify creditor's concerns about extending loans to hospitals.

  9. Alcohol Consumption and Obesity: An Update.

    PubMed

    Traversy, Gregory; Chaput, Jean-Philippe

    2015-03-01

    Recreational alcohol intake is a widespread activity globally and alcohol energy (7 kcal/g) can be a contributing factor to weight gain if not compensated for. Given that both excessive alcohol intake and obesity are of public health interest, the present paper provides an update on the association between alcohol consumption and body weight. In general, recent prospective studies show that light-to-moderate alcohol intake is not associated with adiposity gain while heavy drinking is more consistently related to weight gain. Experimental evidence is also mixed and suggests that moderate intake of alcohol does not lead to weight gain over short follow-up periods. However, many factors can explain the conflicting findings and a better characterization of individuals more likely to gain weight as a result of alcohol consumption is needed. In particular, individuals who frequently drink moderate amounts of alcohol may enjoy a healthier lifestyle in general that may protect them from weight gain. In conclusion, despite the important limitations of current studies, it is reasonable to say that alcohol intake may be a risk factor for obesity in some individuals, likely based on a multitude of factors, some of which are discussed herein.

  10. Abu Dhabi Basemap Update Using the LiDAR Mobile Mapping Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshaiba, Omar; Amparo Núñez-Andrés, M.; Lantada, Nieves

    2016-04-01

    Mobile LiDAR system provides a new technology which can be used to update geospatial information by direct and rapid data collection. This technology is faster than the traditional survey ways and has lower cost. Abu Dhabi Municipal System aims to update its geospatial system frequently as the government entities have invested heavily in GIS technology and geospatial data to meet the repaid growth in the infrastructure and construction projects in recent years. The Emirate of Abu Dhabi has witnessed a huge growth in infrastructure and construction projects in recent years. Therefore, it is necessary to develop and update its basemap system frequently to meet their own organizational needs. Currently, the traditional ways are used to update basemap system such as human surveyors, GPS receivers and controller (GPS assigned computer). Then the surveyed data are downloaded, edited and reviewed manually before it is merged to the basemap system. Traditional surveying ways may not be applicable in some conditions such as; bad weather, difficult topographic area and boundary area. This paper presents a proposed methodology which uses the Mobile LiDAR system to update basemap in Abu Dhabi by using daily transactions services. It aims to use and integrate the mobile LiDAR technology into the municipality's daily workflow such that it becomes the new standard cost efficiency operating procedure for updating the base-map in Abu Dhabi Municipal System. On another note, the paper will demonstrate the results of the innovated workflow for the base-map update using the mobile LiDAR point cloud and few processing algorithms.

  11. Standards update -- 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.D.

    1995-12-31

    What a year this has been! Not since 1986, when SGML was being finished, has there been so much activity in the SGML world. In ISO, there are new standards being completed and old ones (some of which are not really all that old) being revised. As you`ll be hearing, there is lots of SGML activity in the applications world--particularly on the Internet--and that`s causing other kinds of standards activity. WG8 divides its work into five ``Rapporteur Groups`` (or ``RGs``) for DSSSL, Font Description and Interchange, SGML, SPDL, and Hypermedia Languages. Since interest is in DSSSL, SGML, and Hypermedia Languages, the author only mentions that the other groups have been active, too. The Fronts group has been doing amendments to its standards, ISO/IEC 9541 and ISO/IEC 10036. The Fronts groups has been active in providing support for ISO/IEC 10646, the massive character coding standard that has drawn a lot of attention in the SGML world. The SPDL group has at long last finished its standard, the Standard Page Description Language (ISO/IEC 10180) and is about to publish it. More detailed discussions are given for activity in SGML, DSSSL, and Hypermedia Languages.

  12. PACE Status Update

    SciTech Connect

    M., Zimring,; Hoffman, I.; Fuller, M.

    2010-08-11

    The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) regulates Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and the 12 Federal Home Loan Banks (the government-sponsored enterprises - GSEs). On July 6, 2010, FHFA and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) concluded that Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) programs 'present significant safety and soundness concerns' to the housing finance industry. This statement came after a year of discussions with state and federal agencies in which PACE, a novel mechanism for financing energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements, has gone from receiving support from the White House, canonization as one of Scientific American's 'World Changing Ideas' and legislative adoption in 24 states to questionable relevance, at least in the residential sector. Whether PACE resumes its expansion as an innovative tool for financing energy efficiency and clean generation depends on outcomes in each of the three branches of government - discussions on a PACE pilot phase among federal agencies, litigation in federal court, and legislation in Congress - all highly uncertain. This policy brief addresses the practical impacts of these possible outcomes on existing and emerging PACE programs across the United States and potential paths forward.

  13. Heidrun concrete TLP: Update

    SciTech Connect

    Munkejord, T.

    1995-10-01

    This paper gives a summary of the Heidrun substructure including tethers and foundations. The focus will although be on the concrete substructure. The Heidrun Field is located in 345 m water depth in the northern part of the Haltenbanken area, approximately 100N miles from the west coast of mid-Norway. The field is developed by means of a concrete Tension Leg Platform (TLP) by Conoco Norway Inc. The TLP will be moored by 16 steel tethers, arranged in groups of four per corner, which secure the substructure (hull) to the concrete foundations. A general view of the TLP is shown. The Heidrun TLP will be the northern most located platform in the North Sea when installed at Haltenbanken in 1995. Norwegian Contractors a.s (NC) is undertaking the Engineering, Procurement, Construction and Installation (EPCI) contract for the Heidrun TLP substructure. This comprises the complete delivery of the hull with two module support beams (MSB), including all mechanical outfitting. Furthermore, NC will perform all marine operations related to the substructure. For the concrete foundations NC has performed the detailed engineering work and has been responsible for the two to field and installation of the foundations.

  14. Update on massive transfusion.

    PubMed

    Pham, H P; Shaz, B H

    2013-12-01

    Massive haemorrhage requires massive transfusion (MT) to maintain adequate circulation and haemostasis. For optimal management of massively bleeding patients, regardless of aetiology (trauma, obstetrical, surgical), effective preparation and communication between transfusion and other laboratory services and clinical teams are essential. A well-defined MT protocol is a valuable tool to delineate how blood products are ordered, prepared, and delivered; determine laboratory algorithms to use as transfusion guidelines; and outline duties and facilitate communication between involved personnel. In MT patients, it is crucial to practice damage control resuscitation and to administer blood products early in the resuscitation. Trauma patients are often admitted with early trauma-induced coagulopathy (ETIC), which is associated with mortality; the aetiology of ETIC is likely multifactorial. Current data support that trauma patients treated with higher ratios of plasma and platelet to red blood cell transfusions have improved outcomes, but further clinical investigation is needed. Additionally, tranexamic acid has been shown to decrease the mortality in trauma patients requiring MT. Greater use of cryoprecipitate or fibrinogen concentrate might be beneficial in MT patients from obstetrical causes. The risks and benefits for other therapies (prothrombin complex concentrate, recombinant activated factor VII, or whole blood) are not clearly defined in MT patients. Throughout the resuscitation, the patient should be closely monitored and both metabolic and coagulation abnormalities corrected. Further studies are needed to clarify the optimal ratios of blood products, treatment based on underlying clinical disorder, use of alternative therapies, and integration of laboratory testing results in the management of massively bleeding patients.

  15. Update on Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Arvanitakis, Zoe

    2013-01-01

    Background Frontotemporal dementia has recently been recognized as a common cause of young-onset dementia. Objective To review the current approach to the clinical evaluation, understanding of pathophysiology, and management of frontotemporal dementia. Results Two main clinical presentations are: 1) behavioral, with impulsive behaviors and disinhibition, change in personality such as apathy and indifference, and poor judgment, and 2) language, with a non-fluent aphasia with anomia (primary progressive aphasia), or a fluent aphasia with early loss of word meaning (semantic dementia). The differential diagnosis includes other neurodegenerative dementias, vascular and other conditions affecting the brain, and psychiatric diseases. Investigations, including neuropsychological testing, and structural and functional brain imaging, may help support the diagnosis. Recent advances in understanding the pathophysiology have suggested that most cases have underlying ubiquitin-positive inclusions, while some have tau-positive inclusions. Genetic mutations, particularly on chromosome 17 in the tau or progranulin genes, have been identified. Management includes a trial of symptomatic medications and a multi-faceted approach, including environmental modification and long-term care planning. Conclusion Medical researchers studying frontotemporal dementia aim to identify disease-modifying drugs and, ultimately, a cure for this devastating disease. PMID:20065792

  16. Leak detection, monitoring, and mitigation technology trade study update

    SciTech Connect

    HERTZEL, J.S.

    1998-11-10

    This document is a revision and update to the initial report that describes various leak detection, monitoring, and mitigation (LDMM) technologies that can be used to support the retrieval of waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) at the Hanford Site. This revision focuses on the improvements in the technical performance of previously identified and useful technologies, and it introduces new technologies that might prove to be useful.

  17. Relapsing Polychondritis: an Update on Pathogenesis, Clinical Features, Diagnostic Tools, and Therapeutic Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Antonio; Sota, Jurgen; Rigante, Donato; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Molinaro, Francesco; Messina, Mario; Iannone, Florenzo; Cantarini, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis is a rare multisystemic disease widely accepted as a complex autoimmune disorder affecting proteoglycan-rich structures and cartilaginous tissues, especially the auricular pinna, cartilage of the nose, tracheobronchial tree, eyes, and heart's connective components. The clinical spectrum may vary from intermittent inflammatory episodes leading to unesthetic structural deformities to life-threatening cardiopulmonary manifestations, such as airway collapse and valvular regurgitation. The frequent association with other rheumatologic and hematologic disorders has been extensively reported over time, contributing to define its complexity at a diagnostic and also therapeutic level. Diagnosis of relapsing polychondritis is mainly based on clinical clues, while laboratory data have only a supportive contribution. Conversely, radiology is showing a relevant role in estimating the rate of systemic involvement as well as disease activity. The present review is aimed at providing an update on scientific data reported during the last 3 years about relapsing polychondritis in terms of pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, and new treatment options. PMID:26711694

  18. Updates to the High-Redshift Supernovae in the SCP Union Compilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, David; Aldering, G. S.; Amanullah, R.; Barbary, K. H.; Bruce, A.; Dawson, K. S.; Doi, M.; Fakhouri, H.; Fruchter, A. S.; Goobar, A.; Huang, X.; Ihara, Y.; Kim, A. G.; Kowalski, M.; Krechmer, E.; Lidman, C.; Linder, E.; Meyers, J.; Morokuma, T.; Nordin, J.; Perlmutter, S.; Rykoff, E. S.; Saunders, C.; Spadafora, A. L.; Suzuki, N.; Takanashi, N.; Yasuda, N.; Cosmology Project, Supernova

    2013-01-01

    Building on the work presented in Amanullah et al. (ApJ, 2010) and Suzuki et al. (ApJ, 2012), adding new z > 1 supernovae discovered in ground-based work and a new analysis of existing HST SNe, we present an updated high-redshift dataset. We update the SCP Union compilation with this and other recent datasets and present updated cosmological fits. This work has been supported by the Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy (through contract DE-AC02-05CH11231), and in part by NASA through grants associated with HST-GO-10496.

  19. Which Are the Most Frequently Used Outcome Instruments in Studies on Total Ankle Arthroplasty?

    PubMed Central

    Impellizzeri, Franco M.; Rippstein, Pascal F.

    2009-01-01

    The number of studies reporting on outcomes after total ankle arthroplasty is continuously increasing. As the use of valid outcome measures represents the cornerstone for successful clinical research, we aimed to identify the most frequently used outcome instruments in ankle arthroplasty studies and to analyze the evidence to support their use in terms of different quality criteria. A systematic review of the literature identified 15 outcome instruments reported in 79 original studies. The most commonly used measures were the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hindfoot score (n = 41), the Kofoed ankle score (n = 21), a visual analog scale assessing pain (n = 15), and the generic SF-36 (n = 6). Eight additional instruments were used only once or twice. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society and Kofoed instruments include a clinical examination and score up to 100 points. Evidence to support their use in terms of validity, reliability, responsiveness, and interpretability is limited, raising the question whether their use is justified. Self-reported questionnaires related to ankle osteoarthritis or arthroplasty are rather disregarded in the current literature, and only the Foot Function Index is associated with evidence in terms of the above-mentioned quality criteria. Future research is warranted to improve the outcome assessment after total ankle arthroplasty. PMID:19672670

  20. 78 FR 49271 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Frequently Asked Questions About Medical Foods; Second Edition...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Frequently Asked Questions About Medical Foods; Second Edition; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... guidance for industry entitled ``Frequently Asked Questions About Medical Foods; Second Edition.''...

  1. Characteristics of Frequently Cited Articles Related to Children's Emotional/Behavioral Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, H. Lee; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Identifies frequently cited journal articles on children's emotional/behavioral disorders. Describes characteristics (e.g., funding source, research design, statistical method) of frequently cited articles and compares them to randomly selected articles. Discusses implications. (Author/ABL)

  2. 75 FR 6064 - Draft Emergency Action Level Frequently Asked Questions; Request for Comment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ...) frequently asked question (FAQ). This EALFAQ will be used to provide clarification of endorsed Nuclear Energy... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Draft Emergency Action Level Frequently Asked Questions; Request for Comment AGENCY:...

  3. Update on prenatal care.

    PubMed

    Zolotor, Adam J; Carlough, Martha C

    2014-02-01

    Many elements of routine prenatal care are based on tradition and lack a firm evidence base; however, some elements are supported by more rigorous studies. Correct dating of the pregnancy is critical to prevent unnecessary inductions and to allow for accurate treatment of preterm labor. Physicians should recommend folic acid supplementation to all women as early as possible, preferably before conception, to reduce the risk of neural tube defects. Administration of Rho(D) immune globulin markedly decreases the risk of alloimmunization in an RhD-negative woman carrying an RhD-positive fetus. Screening and treatment for iron deficiency anemia can reduce the risks of preterm labor, intrauterine growth retardation, and perinatal depression. Testing for aneuploidy and neural tube defects should be offered to all pregnant women with a discussion of the risks and benefits. Specific genetic testing should be based on the family histories of the patient and her partner. Physicians should recommend that pregnant women receive a vaccination for influenza, be screened for asymptomatic bacteriuria, and be tested for sexually transmitted infections. Testing for group B streptococcus should be performed between 35 and 37 weeks' gestation. If test results are positive or the patient has a history of group B streptococcus bacteriuria during pregnancy, intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis should be administered to reduce the risk of infection in the infant. Intramuscular or vaginal progesterone should be considered in women with a history of spontaneous preterm labor, preterm premature rupture of membranes, or shortened cervical length (less than 2.5 cm). Screening for diabetes should be offered using a universal or a risk-based approach. Women at risk of preeclampsia should be offered low-dose aspirin prophylaxis, as well as calcium supplementation if dietary calcium intake is low. Induction of labor may be considered between 41 and 42 weeks' gestation. PMID:24506122

  4. Update on Autoimmune Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Vergani, Diego; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), a liver disorder affecting both children and adults, is characterized by inflammatory liver histology, elevated transaminase levels, circulating nonorganspecific autoantibodies, and increased levels of immunoglobulin G, in the absence of a known etiology. Two types of AIH are recognized according to seropositivity: smooth muscle antibody and/or antinuclear antibody define AIH type 1 and antibodies to liver-kidney microsome type 1 and/or liver cytosol type 1 define AIH type 2. AIH type 1 affects both adults and children, while AIH type 2 is mainly a paediatric disease, though it does occasionally affects young adults. AIH should be considered during the diagnostic workup of any patient with increased liver enzyme levels. AIH is exquisitely responsive to immunosuppressive treatment with prednisolone with or without azathioprine, with symptom free long-term survival for the majority of patients. For those who do not respond to standard treatment, or who are difficult-to-treat, mycophenolate mofetil and, in the absence of a response, calcineurin inhibitors should be tried in addition to steroids. The pathogenesis of AIH is not fully understood, although there is mounting evidence that genetic susceptibility, molecular mimicry and impaired immunoregulatory networks contribute to the initiation and perpetuation of the autoimmune attack. Liver damage is thought to be mediated primarily by CD4 T-cells, although recent studies support the involvement of diverse populations, including Th17 cells. A deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of AIH is likely to contribute to the development of novel treatments, such as the adoptive transfer of autologous expanded antigenspecific regulatory T-cells, which ultimately aim at restoring tolerance to liver-derived antigens. PMID:26357634

  5. Frequent Users of Pornography. A Population Based Epidemiological Study of Swedish Male Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svedin, Carl Goran; Akerman, Ingrid; Priebe, Gisela

    2011-01-01

    Frequent use of pornography has not been sufficiently studied before. In a Swedish survey 2015 male students aged 18 years participated. A group of frequent users of pornography (N = 200, 10.5%) were studied with respect to background and psychosocial correlates. The frequent users had a more positive attitude to pornography, were more often…

  6. NASA UAS Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeffrey Ervin; Mulac, Brenda Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Last year may prove to be a pivotal year for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) arena, especially in relation to routine UAS access to airspace as NASA accepted an invitation to join the UAS Executive Committee (UAS ExCom). The UAS ExCom is a multi-agency, Federal executive-level committee comprised of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Defense (DoD), Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and NASA with the goals to: 1) Coordinate and align efforts between key Federal Government agencies to achieve routine safe federal public UAS operations in the National Airspace System (NAS); 2) Coordinate and prioritize technical, procedural, regulatory, and policy solutions needed to deliver incremental capabilities; 3) Develop a plan to accommodate the larger stakeholder community at the appropriate time; and 4) Resolve conflicts between Federal Government agencies (FAA, DoD, DHS, and NASA), related to the above goals. The committee was formed in recognition of the need of UAS operated by these agencies to access to the National Airspace System (NAS) to support operational, training, development and research requirements. In order to meet that need, technical, procedural, regulatory, and policy solutions are required to deliver incremental capabilities leading to routine access. The formation of the UAS ExCom is significant in that it represents a tangible commitment by FAA senior leadership to address the UAS access challenge. While the focus of the ExCom is government owned and operated UAS, civil UAS operations are bound to benefit by the progress made in achieving routine access for government UAS. As the UAS ExCom was forming, NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate began to show renewed interest in UAS, particularly in relation to the future state of the air transportation system under the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). NASA made funding from the American

  7. Update on Allergy Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    This article summarizes and provides commentary regarding guidelines on the administration of immunotherapy (IT) for allergic airway disease. Recent investigations have provided important insights into the immunologic mechanism of IT and the prominent role of interleukin-10-producing regulatory T lymphocytes. The most important aspect of successful IT is the administration of an appropriate dose of an extract containing a sufficient concentration of the relevant allergen. This is largely possible now only with standardized extracts. When the major allergen content of successful IT extracts was quantified, efficacy was demonstrated across a surprisingly narrow concentration range (approximately 5-24 μg per injection), irrespective of the extract. This presumably reflects the concentration of an antigen that drives an immune response toward tolerance. It may be predicted that as major allergen content is quantified in currently nonstandardized extracts, effective IT will also be achieved by administering a dose in this range, in contrast to current practices involving fairly arbitrary dosing decisions. With the availability of nonsedating antihistamines, intranasal corticosteroids, and the leukotriene modifiers, inadequate pharmacologic response or intolerable side effects are less commonly the major indications for starting IT for allergic rhinitis (AR). However, with the recognition that a relatively short course (3-5 years) of IT can provide long-term immunomodulation and clinical benefit, a desire to avoid long-term pharmacotherapy and the associated high costs may be the primary indication for IT in AR cases. While evidence overwhelmingly supports the beneficial influences of IT in asthma cases, the positioning of IT for this disorder is not established. The observed prevention of asthma in children who have AR is intriguing, but further studies are required to assess the extent to which the prevalence and severity of chronic asthma will be reduced when these

  8. Teratogen update: methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Hyoun, Sara C; Običan, Sarah G; Scialli, Anthony R

    2012-04-01

    reports and series provides support for pulmonary atresia, craniosynostosis, and limb deficiencies as reported more often than expected in methotrexate-exposed children. Denominator-based data will be welcome to better define elements of a methotrexate embryopathy and possibly to distinguish an early exposure syndrome from anomalies traditionally associated with methotrexate exposure.

  9. Acute ischemic stroke update.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kathleen; Orr, Sean; Briand, Mary; Piazza, Carolyn; Veydt, Annita; McCoy, Stacey

    2010-05-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the United States and is the number one cause of long-term disability. Legislative mandates, largely the result of the American Heart Association, American Stroke Association, and Brain Attack Coalition working cooperatively, have resulted in nationwide standardization of care for patients who experience a stroke. Transport to a skilled facility that can provide optimal care, including immediate treatment to halt or reverse the damage caused by stroke, must occur swiftly. Admission to a certified stroke center is recommended for improving outcomes. Most strokes are ischemic in nature. Acute ischemic stroke is a heterogeneous group of vascular diseases, which makes targeted treatment challenging. To provide a thorough review of the literature since the 2007 acute ischemic stroke guidelines were developed, we performed a search of the MEDLINE database (January 1, 2004-July 1, 2009) for relevant English-language studies. Results (through July 1, 2009) from clinical trials included in the Internet Stroke Center registry were also accessed. Results from several pivotal studies have contributed to our knowledge of stroke. Additional data support the efficacy and safety of intravenous alteplase, the standard of care for acute ischemic stroke since 1995. Due to these study results, the American Stroke Association changed its recommendation to extend the time window for administration of intravenous alteplase from within 3 hours to 4.5 hours of symptom onset; this recommendation enables many more patients to receive the drug. Other findings included clinically useful biomarkers, the role of inflammation and infection, an expanded role for placement of intracranial stents, a reduced role for urgent carotid endarterectomy, alternative treatments for large-vessel disease, identification of nontraditional risk factors, including risk factors for women, and newly published pediatric stroke guidelines. In addition, new devices for

  10. Source Update Capture in Information Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashish, Naveen; Kulkarni, Deepak; Wang, Yao

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present strategies for successfully capturing updates at Web sources. Web-based information agents provide integrated access to autonomous Web sources that can get updated. For many information agent applications we are interested in knowing when a Web source to which the application provides access, has been updated. We may also be interested in capturing all the updates at a Web source over a period of time i.e., detecting the updates and, for each update retrieving and storing the new version of data. Previous work on update and change detection by polling does not adequately address this problem. We present strategies for intelligently polling a Web source for efficiently capturing changes at the source.

  11. Parameterization of Damage in Reinforced Concrete Structures Using Model Updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ABDEL WAHAB, M. M.; DE ROECK, G.; PEETERS, B.

    1999-12-01

    This paper describes the application of finite element model updating to reinforced concrete beams in order to detect and quantify damage. Three simply supported beams are considered in this study: two of them are subjected to a single concentrated load while the third one to two concentrated loads. The static loading system is applied in different steps up to failure so that dynamic measurements can be carried out after each load step. The measured modal parameters are used afterwards to update a finite element model in order to localize and to quantify the damage. The updating algorithm is based on the sensitivity approach in which the discrepancies between the analytical and experimental modal data are minimized in an iterative manner. A new concept for damage parametrization is introduced. A damage function characterized by three parameters is proposed. In such a function, only three parameters are used to describe the damage pattern of the reinforced concrete beams. These parameters are related to the bending stiffness of the beams and updated so that the measured natural frequencies are reproduced. The results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed technique to quantify the damage pattern.

  12. Linking online gaming and addictive behavior: converging evidence for a general reward deficiency in frequent online gamers.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Tim; Notebaert, Karolien Hilde; Dresler, Thomas; Kowarsch, Linda; Reif, Andreas; Fallgatter, Andreas J

    2014-01-01

    Millions of people regularly play so-called massively multiplayer online role playing games (MMORPGs). Recently, it has been argued that MMORPG overuse is becoming a significant health problem worldwide. Symptoms such as tolerance, withdrawal, and craving have been described. Based on behavioral, resting state, and task-related neuroimaging data, we test whether frequent players of the MMORPG "World of Warcraft" (WoW) - similar to drug addicts and individuals with an increased risk for addictions - show a generally deficient reward system. In frequent players of the MMORPG "World of Warcraft" (WoW-players) and in a control group of non-gamers we assessed (1) trait sensitivity to reward (SR), (2) BOLD responses during monetary reward processing in the ventral striatum, and (3) ventral-striatal resting-state dynamics. We found a decreased neural activation in the ventral striatum during the anticipation of both small and large monetary rewards. Additionally, we show generally altered neurodynamics in this region independent of any specific task for WoW players (resting state). On the behavioral level, we found differences in trait SR, suggesting that the reward processing deficiencies found in this study are not a consequence of gaming, but predisposed to it. These findings empirically support a direct link between frequent online gaming and the broad field of behavioral and drug addiction research, thus opening new avenues for clinical interventions in addicted gamers and potentially improving the assessment of addiction-risk in the vast population of frequent gamers.

  13. The Cassini Live Update Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandermey, Nancy; Ray, Trina; Wallis, Brad; Roumeliotis, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The Cassini orbiter is an international science mission to the Saturnian system with 12 science instruments onboard. The Cassini spacecraft lacks a scan platform, which means the entire spacecraft must be rotated to control pointing of any one instrument's boresight. The resulting complex sequences of commands are built beginning many months before execution onboard. Late ephemeris updates from improved navigation data (i.e. after an orbital trim maneuver) often result in pointing commands in the sequence no longer being accurate enough to obtain the desired science observation. This paper will provide an overview of how Cassini uses live updates to address this potential loss of data, including the software developed for this process.

  14. Updated Overview of STIS Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Michael A.; Proffitt, C. R.; Aloisi, A.; Dixon, W. V.; Goudfrooij, P.; Lennon, D.; Osten, R.; Bohlin, R. C.; Niemi, S.; Bostroem, A.; Gull, T.; Lindler, D.; Woodgate, B. E.; Zheng, W.; Pascucci, I.; York, B.

    2010-05-01

    The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph was installed during Hubble Servicing Mission 2 in 1997 and operated until a malfunction in 2004. It was repaired during Servicing Mission 4 (SM4) in 2009, and has successfully operated since then. Many of the characteristics of the instrument have changed over time, and we present here an update on its current performance based on the latest Cycle 17 calibration observations. Of special note is the continuing slow decline of the NUV MAMA dark current, which had been found to be unexpectedly high after SM4. We will also discuss changes in the echelle blaze function, provide updates on the sensitivity of all STIS modes, and discuss changes in the CCD detector's dark current, hot pixels, flat fields, and other performance characteristics.

  15. Overview of the NSI User Support Office (NSI USO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Lenore A.

    1991-01-01

    Overview of the NSI User Support Office is presented in the form of view graphs. The following subject areas are covered: hot line for user questions; NSI data base updates; on-line services via NSI NIC; and toolkit distribution.

  16. Post-16 update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-11-01

    (Post-16 Initiative) Engineering Physics? Many A-level physics students do not go on to study physics. For them physics is a support subject, either just for fun or just for the grade. Where physics is a lead subject some students go on to study physics but many more go on to study engineering. So can we deliberately give some aspects of an A-level course an engineering flavour? Electromagnetism would seem a good place to start. There is a clear `physics' route into this topic, a microscopic forces and fields view of the situation. But do our students really need to look at it this way? All electromagnetic machines are linked magnetic and electric circuits. The design idea is to link these circuits as closely as possible. The electric circuits must be as good as possible, with a high conductivity. The magnetic circuits must be as good as possible, with high permeance. Conductivity depends on area/length. So does permeance. The goodness of an electromagnetic machine (how good it is at its job, which is linking electric and magnetic circuits) scales as the square of its linear dimensions. That means small electromagnetic machines are harder to make, and so the very smallest nanomotors are electrostatic. None of this is new, but many teachers are uncomfortable with it. We are thinking like physicists. Many of our students are not. They deserve us to take the trouble every now and again to encourage them to think a bit differently about a topic, to look at practical ways of discussing design and to give their course an engineering flavour. Philip Britton Coursework in A-level Physics The criteria for the new AS and A-levels have provided the teams developing the specifications with an opportunity to think creatively about how internal assessment is used within post-16 physics courses. Teachers may be concerned that allowing 30% of the marks to be internally assessed will create a burden for them. However, it is possible to look at this in a much more positive light

  17. An Update on AGU Publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilst, Rob; Hanson, Brooks

    2013-07-01

    In the past year, AGU publishing has undergone substantial change, and we realize that this has caused some anxiety and concern among you, our members. As the start of a regular Eos series on issues in scientific publishing in general and AGU's content in particular, we provide here an overview and update of recent developments, with an emphasis on the partnership between AGU and Wiley. Topical entries, for instance on open access, will be published later.

  18. MEMS Stirling Cooler Development Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Wesolek, Danielle

    2003-01-01

    This presentation provides an update on the effort to build and test a prototype unit of the patented MEMS Stirling cooler concept. A micro-scale regenerator has been fabricated by Polar Thermal Technologies and is currently being integrated into a Stirling cycle simulator at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. A discussion of the analysis, design, assembly, and test plans for the prototype will be presented.

  19. Update on Banned Substances 2013

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Kenneth P.; Rainbow, Catherine R.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Doping has been pervasive throughout the history of athletic competitions and has only recently been regulated by organizations such as the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), US Anti-Doping Agency (USADA), and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). These regulatory bodies were created to preserve fair play and maintain the safety of the participants. Their updated 2013 lists of banned substances and practices include a variety of drugs and practices that could cause harm to an athlete or give one an unfair competitive advantage. Evidence Acquisition: Published websites for the WADA, USADA, and NCAA were investigated. These governing bodies update and publish their lists annually. Results: The WADA, USADA, and NCAA monitor anabolic steroids, hormones, growth factors, β-agonists, hormone and metabolic modulators, masking agents, street drugs, manipulation of blood and blood components, chemical and physical manipulation, gene doping, stimulants, narcotics, glucocorticosteroids, and β-blockers. Some substances may be used by athletes but require formal exemption. The WADA has also recently created a category of nonapproved substances that have yet to be identified to curb athletes from experimenting with new doping agents. Conclusion: The lists of banned substances and practices per the WADA, USADA, and NCAA are in place to ensure the integrity of sports and maintain safe competition. Health care providers who work with athletes under the jurisdiction of these organizations should review updated lists of banned substances when prescribing medications. PMID:24427415

  20. Assessment of a method to detect signals for updating systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    was Kappa = 0.74. Conclusions These results provide some support for the validity of a surveillance system for detecting signals indicating when a systematic review needs updating. PMID:24529068

  1. Post-16 update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-09-01

    Institute of Physics post-16 initiative, shaping the future Physics education based in IT - sorry ICT! Which, of course, makes for a nifty headline, but as is so often the case with neat slogans, little else. Two formative questions: What, in another decade, will the government of the day call `What you lot should be doing with computers'? and What, of the many things that currently exercise our intellects, will there be anything special to say about in a decade, concerning the use of computers in the teaching of physics? Advancing Physics represents some attempts to come to grips with the second of the two questions above. The first is left to a higher wisdom. In thinking about learning, what can we do with the huge processing power, increasingly available in smaller and less obtrusive packages? What will we do that helps people learn physics, both tomorrow and in 2009? Here are a few suggestions based on development work so far. Wide, reliable and shared access to well ordered learning resources. We have created a CD-ROM, with versions for both student and teacher, that provides a wide range of resources. These do not teach, but do provide. A commitment to allowing a course to evolve and adapt. Electronic publication puts the costs into origination, and not into publication and distribution. A website allows for the community of users to contribute. E-mail networks support individuals and propagate good practice. You can create and explore your own microworlds. The interactive nature of models, and the crafted relationships between the models and the natural world give an insight into the creative imaginary worlds of the physicist. The unreasonable, but pleasurable, success of mathematics in describing the natural world can come to the fore. Measurements that were not possible before are now possible. What was previously indirect, and inaccessible, now becomes a direct measurement, making relationships transparent in new and fruitful ways. The dichotomy between

  2. Post-16 update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-03-01

    characteristics of particular functions. Modelling tools allow teachers or students to build models or more simply to create animations to demonstrate the properties of mathematical entities such as vectors. Graphical calculators mean that all students can have cheap access to such tools and it may be that some of the analytical mathematical tools we hold so dear are obsolete. Other issues are discussed in the booklet and were aired at the ASE conference: the situation in HE, the approach to mathematics taken by the Salters Horners approach, ways to introduce special functions such as exponentials, ways of thinking about the relationships between variables as expressed in equations. Many practical suggestions are made in the booklet about how we can help and support students and, most importantly, how we can communicate to them some of the beauty and pleasure of Physics in Mathematical Mood. Simon Carson A perspective on apparatus The effective deployment of apparatus is one technique available in physics that does not exist in some other areas of teaching. We should capitalize on this. Apparatus is a tool that can be used to enable thinking and learning. There are a number of purposes to be served by the effective use of apparatus. It is no more likely that apparatus will `teach' any more than nature `teaches' physics in the first place. Discussion and the creative interpretation of observation are both necessary to the sense-making process. Apparatus must be chosen with these opportunities in mind. In a demonstration we are trying to persuade students that the world behaves in a particular way. An attempt is being made to persuade students that a particular conception of the world is worth considering and that this conception is a fruitful and truthful picture of the world. Apparatus chosen for this purpose must have clear links between what is to be measured and the representations of that measurement. The art of demonstration is very much like a magician's show, in that it

  3. The universal tree of life: an update.

    PubMed

    Forterre, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Biologists used to draw schematic "universal" trees of life as metaphors illustrating the history of life. It is indeed a priori possible to construct an organismal tree connecting the three major domains of ribosome encoding organisms: Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya, since they originated by cell division from LUCA. Several universal trees based on ribosomal RNA sequence comparisons proposed at the end of the last century are still widely used, although some of their main features have been challenged by subsequent analyses. Several authors have proposed to replace the traditional universal tree with a ring of life, whereas others have proposed more recently to include viruses as new domains. These proposals are misleading, suggesting that endosymbiosis can modify the shape of a tree or that viruses originated from the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). I propose here an updated version of Woese's universal tree that includes several rootings for each domain and internal branching within domains that are supported by recent phylogenomic analyses of domain specific proteins. The tree is rooted between Bacteria and Arkarya, a new name proposed for the clade grouping Archaea and Eukarya. A consensus version, in which each of the three domains is unrooted, and a version in which eukaryotes emerged within archaea are also presented. This last scenario assumes the transformation of a modern domain into another, a controversial evolutionary pathway. Viruses are not indicated in these trees but are intrinsically present because they infect the tree from its roots to its leaves. Finally, I present a detailed tree of the domain Archaea, proposing the sub-phylum neo-Euryarchaeota for the monophyletic group of euryarchaeota containing DNA gyrase. These trees, that will be easily updated as new data become available, could be useful to discuss controversial scenarios regarding early life evolution. PMID:26257711

  4. B Plant cleanout and stabilization program update

    SciTech Connect

    Gehrke, J.W.

    1994-09-29

    The B Plant Cleanout and Stabilization Program Update FY1993 committed to an annual update document. The Cleanout and Stabilization Program (CSP) plan, Reference 1, remains as the best source of detailed discussion of CSP work and continues to be valid. The CSP presented a five year plan that left a number of plant systems operational to support WESF (Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility) capsule storage. It is now apparent that the transition of B Plant to a long-term surveillance and maintenance mode (LTS and M) will be necessary to complete B Plant deactivation. To accomplish the LTS and M mode for B Plant, WESF will need to be physically isolated to allow stand alone operation for many years beyond the anticipated B Plant deactivation. B Plant has processed large quantities (> 100 megacuries) of cesium-137 and strontium-90. Residual radioactive contamination from this processing is in many forms and locations in B Plant. The plant design incorporates many features for radiological containment and confinement and systems to prevent the exposure of plant personnel and the public to excessive radiation. To minimize or reduce the radiological hazard wherever possible this program includes activities in four areas: Prevent Migration of Contamination; Stabilize Major Radioactive Source Terms; characterize Radioactive Source Terms; and Reduce Radiation Dose Rates. This document will describe work that is need to meet current goals and objectives and work that has changed, been completed, ore redirected. A systems engineering approach to defining this mission was initiated in FY1994 that will also be addressed in this document.

  5. The universal tree of life: an update

    PubMed Central

    Forterre, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Biologists used to draw schematic “universal” trees of life as metaphors illustrating the history of life. It is indeed a priori possible to construct an organismal tree connecting the three major domains of ribosome encoding organisms: Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya, since they originated by cell division from LUCA. Several universal trees based on ribosomal RNA sequence comparisons proposed at the end of the last century are still widely used, although some of their main features have been challenged by subsequent analyses. Several authors have proposed to replace the traditional universal tree with a ring of life, whereas others have proposed more recently to include viruses as new domains. These proposals are misleading, suggesting that endosymbiosis can modify the shape of a tree or that viruses originated from the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). I propose here an updated version of Woese’s universal tree that includes several rootings for each domain and internal branching within domains that are supported by recent phylogenomic analyses of domain specific proteins. The tree is rooted between Bacteria and Arkarya, a new name proposed for the clade grouping Archaea and Eukarya. A consensus version, in which each of the three domains is unrooted, and a version in which eukaryotes emerged within archaea are also presented. This last scenario assumes the transformation of a modern domain into another, a controversial evolutionary pathway. Viruses are not indicated in these trees but are intrinsically present because they infect the tree from its roots to its leaves. Finally, I present a detailed tree of the domain Archaea, proposing the sub-phylum neo-Euryarchaeota for the monophyletic group of euryarchaeota containing DNA gyrase. These trees, that will be easily updated as new data become available, could be useful to discuss controversial scenarios regarding early life evolution. PMID:26257711

  6. Tech Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beem, Kate

    2002-01-01

    Discusses technology-support issues, including staff training, cost, and outsourcing. Describes how various school districts manage technology-support services. Features the Technology Support Index, developed by the International Society for Technology in Education, to gauge the operation of school district technology-support programs. (PKP)

  7. Model updating of rotor systems by using Nonlinear least square optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, A. K.; Dewangan, P.; Sarangi, M.

    2016-07-01

    Mathematical models of structure or machineries are always different from the existing physical system, because the approach of numerical predictions to the behavior of a physical system is limited by the assumptions used in the development of the mathematical model. Model updating is, therefore necessary so that updated model should replicate the physical system. This work focuses on the model updating of rotor systems at various speeds as well as at different modes of vibration. Support bearing characteristics severely influence the dynamics of rotor systems like turbines, compressors, pumps, electrical machines, machine tool spindles etc. Therefore bearing parameters (stiffness and damping) are considered to be updating parameters. A finite element model of rotor systems is developed using Timoshenko beam element. Unbalance response in time domain and frequency response function have been calculated by numerical techniques, and compared with the experimental data to update the FE-model of rotor systems. An algorithm, based on unbalance response in time domain is proposed for updating the rotor systems at different running speeds of rotor. An attempt has been made to define Unbalance response assurance criterion (URAC) to check the degree of correlation between updated FE model and physical model.

  8. Carriage of Multidrug Resistant Bacteria on Frequently Contacted Surfaces and Hands of Health Care Workers

    PubMed Central

    Visalachy, Sowndarya; Kopula, Sridharan Sathyamoorthy; Sekar, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Maximal contact between the patients and Health Care Workers (HCWs) happens in the Intensive Care Units (ICU). Control of nosocomial infections requires compliance with hand hygiene and contamination free surfaces. Aim To determine the colonization of potential pathogens in the hands of HCWs and frequent contacted environmental surfaces. Materials and Methods A cross sectional study was conducted between September 2012 and May 2013 at Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Hospital. A total of 327 samples were collected using Glove juice technique from hands and swabs from frequently contacted surfaces. A sum of 157 samples were collected by glove juice technique from the hands of HCWs which included Consultants (20), Internees (3), Residents (10), Staff nurse (102) and support staff (22). A total of 170 samples were collected through swabbing which included frequently touched surfaces of apron and dress (140 which included 10 consultants, 3 internees, 9 Residents, 101 Staff nurse and 17 support staff), 9 door handle, 4 key board, 12 tap handles and 5 monitors. The samples were inoculated into Blood agar, Chocolate agar and Mac-Conkey agar plates and incubated at 370C aerobically. The plates showing growth were further processed to identify the organisms by Gram staining and biochemical reactions. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was done for the isolates by Kirby-baur disc diffusion method as per CLSI guidelines. Results Out of the 157 hand sampling done by glove juice method 67(42.7%) of them showed growth and 90(57.3%) showed no growth. The potential pathogens grown were 13 (8.3%), consisting of Methicillin Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) 6(3.8%), Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) 2(1.3%), Pseudomonas spp 4(2.6%) and Acenitobacter spp 1 (0.6%). The MRSA was seen in Consultant 1(5%; n=20) and Staff nurse 1(0.9%; n= 102). Among the 140 sampling from the dress of HCWs growth was observed in 69(49.3%) and growth was absent in 71

  9. Crew and life support: ECLSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, G.

    1984-02-01

    The schedule NASA has proposed has four main elements. The focal point of all the life support activity is demonstrator for the initial space station. The demonstrator is composed of items that are ready for Phase C and D development. Technical options are scheduled during the early years to provide alternatives because the capability to substitute must be maintained. Growth technology and supporting research and technology (SR&T) will continue throughout the program life, and as new items emerge, the space station capability will be updated.

  10. Updating knowledge bases with disjunctive information

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yan; Foo, Norman Y.

    1996-12-31

    It is well known that the minimal change principle was widely used in knowledge base updates. However, recent research has shown that conventional minimal change methods, eg. the PMA, are generally problematic for updating knowledge bases with disjunctive information. In this paper, we propose two different approaches to deal with this problem - one is called the minimal change with exceptions (MCE), the other is called the minimal change with maximal disjunctive inclusions (MCD). The first method is syntax-based, while the second is model-theoretic. We show that these two approaches are equivalent for propositional knowledge base updates, and the second method is also appropriate for first order knowledge base updates. We then prove that our new update approaches still satisfy the standard Katsuno and Mendelzon`s update postulates.

  11. Experimental model updating using frequency response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yu; Liu, Xi; Dong, Xinjun; Wang, Yang; Pu, Qianhui

    2016-04-01

    In order to obtain a finite element (FE) model that can more accurately describe structural behaviors, experimental data measured from the actual structure can be used to update the FE model. The process is known as FE model updating. In this paper, a frequency response function (FRF)-based model updating approach is presented. The approach attempts to minimize the difference between analytical and experimental FRFs, while the experimental FRFs are calculated using simultaneously measured dynamic excitation and corresponding structural responses. In this study, the FRF-based model updating method is validated through laboratory experiments on a four-story shear-frame structure. To obtain the experimental FRFs, shake table tests and impact hammer tests are performed. The FRF-based model updating method is shown to successfully update the stiffness, mass and damping parameters of the four-story structure, so that the analytical and experimental FRFs match well with each other.

  12. LSAT[R] Scores of Economics Majors: The 2008-9 Class Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieswiadomy, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Using 1994-95 and 2002-3 data, the author (1998, 2006) has found that economics majors scored well on the LSAT[R]. These results are frequently posted on university Web sites by economics (and other) departments. The author, who updates the previous studies by using current 2007-8 law school applicants for the 2008-9 class of students entering law…

  13. Disturbed dreaming and sleep quality: altered sleep architecture in subjects with frequent nightmares.

    PubMed

    Simor, Péter; Horváth, Klára; Gombos, Ferenc; Takács, Krisztina P; Bódizs, Róbert

    2012-12-01

    Nightmares are intense, emotionally negative mental experiences that usually occur during late-night sleep and result in abrupt awakenings. Questionnaire-based studies have shown that nightmares are related to impaired sleep quality; however, the polysomnographic profile of nightmare subjects has been only scarcely investigated. We investigated the sleep architecture of 17 individuals with frequent nightmares and 23 control subjects based on polysomnographic recordings of a second night spent in the laboratory after an adaptation night. Nightmare subjects in comparison with control subjects were characterized by impaired sleep architecture, as reflected by reduced sleep efficiency, increased wakefulness, a reduced amount of slow wave sleep, and increased nocturnal awakenings, especially from Stage 2 sleep. While these differences were independent of the effects of waking psychopathology, nightmare subjects also exhibited longer durations of REM sleep that was mediated by heightened negative affect. Our results support that nightmares are related to altered sleep architecture, showing impaired sleep continuity and emotion-related increase in REM propensity.

  14. Comparative effectiveness and cost-effectiveness analyses frequently agree on value.

    PubMed

    Glick, Henry A; McElligott, Sean; Pauly, Mark V; Willke, Richard J; Bergquist, Henry; Doshi, Jalpa; Fleisher, Lee A; Kinosian, Bruce; Perfetto, Eleanor; Polsky, Daniel E; Schwartz, J Sanford

    2015-05-01

    The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, known as PCORI, was established by Congress as part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to promote evidence-based treatment. Provisions of the ACA prohibit the use of a cost-effectiveness analysis threshold and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) in PCORI comparative effectiveness studies, which has been understood as a prohibition on support for PCORI's conducting conventional cost-effectiveness analyses. This constraint complicates evidence-based choices where incremental improvements in outcomes are achieved at increased costs of care. How frequently this limitation inhibits efficient cost containment, also a goal of the ACA, depends on how often more effective treatment is not cost-effective relative to less effective treatment. We examined the largest database of studies of comparisons of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness to see how often there is disagreement between the more effective treatment and the cost-effective treatment, for various thresholds that may define good value. We found that under the benchmark assumption, disagreement between the two types of analyses occurs in 19 percent of cases. Disagreement is more likely to occur if a treatment intervention is musculoskeletal and less likely to occur if it is surgical or involves secondary prevention, or if the study was funded by a pharmaceutical company. PMID:25941282

  15. Comparative effectiveness and cost-effectiveness analyses frequently agree on value.

    PubMed

    Glick, Henry A; McElligott, Sean; Pauly, Mark V; Willke, Richard J; Bergquist, Henry; Doshi, Jalpa; Fleisher, Lee A; Kinosian, Bruce; Perfetto, Eleanor; Polsky, Daniel E; Schwartz, J Sanford

    2015-05-01

    The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, known as PCORI, was established by Congress as part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to promote evidence-based treatment. Provisions of the ACA prohibit the use of a cost-effectiveness analysis threshold and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) in PCORI comparative effectiveness studies, which has been understood as a prohibition on support for PCORI's conducting conventional cost-effectiveness analyses. This constraint complicates evidence-based choices where incremental improvements in outcomes are achieved at increased costs of care. How frequently this limitation inhibits efficient cost containment, also a goal of the ACA, depends on how often more effective treatment is not cost-effective relative to less effective treatment. We examined the largest database of studies of comparisons of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness to see how often there is disagreement between the more effective treatment and the cost-effective treatment, for various thresholds that may define good value. We found that under the benchmark assumption, disagreement between the two types of analyses occurs in 19 percent of cases. Disagreement is more likely to occur if a treatment intervention is musculoskeletal and less likely to occur if it is surgical or involves secondary prevention, or if the study was funded by a pharmaceutical company.

  16. Predictors of Frequent Recourse to Health Professionals by People With Severe Mental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fleury, Marie-Josée; Grenier, Guy; Bamvita, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Based on Andersen’s behavioural model, our study sought to determine predictors and blocks of factors that could explain why people with severe mental disorders (SMDs) more often seek the services of health professionals. Methods: This longitudinal study involved 292 users with SMDs located in Le Sud-Ouest, the southwest borough of Montreal. Data were collected from participants’ medical records and through 7 questionnaires. Using Andersen’s Behavioral Model of Health Services Use, independent variables were divided into 3 classes—predisposing factors, enabling factors, and need factors—and were introduced in this order in a hierarchical logistic model. Results: Among 292 users, 110 (37.7%) were frequent users who consulted about one health professional every 3 days. Participants who were more likely to call on health professionals were single and older, depended on welfare as their main source of income, lived in supervised housing, suffered from schizophrenia, schizophrenia spectrum disorders, and adjustment disorders, and, marginally, exhibited multiple mental disorders. Conclusion: Mental health services could promote strategies to overcome the reluctance of younger people to seek professional services. Professionals should pay close attention to subsidiary conditions, such as adjustment disorders, from which people with SMDs may suffer. Interventions to improve the socioeconomic condition of unemployed people with SMDs may help to reduce health care service use among that clientele. Programs such as supported employment should be tailored and enhanced for people receiving welfare to decrease stigmatization and improve job market integration. PMID:25886658

  17. Application of Gap-Constraints Given Sequential Frequent Pattern Mining for Protein Function Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeon Ah; Kim, Taewook; Li, Meijing; Shon, Ho Sun; Park, Jeong Seok; Ryu, Keun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Predicting protein function from the protein–protein interaction network is challenging due to its complexity and huge scale of protein interaction process along with inconsistent pattern. Previously proposed methods such as neighbor counting, network analysis, and graph pattern mining has predicted functions by calculating the rules and probability of patterns inside network. Although these methods have shown good prediction, difficulty still exists in searching several functions that are exceptional from simple rules and patterns as a result of not considering the inconsistent aspect of the interaction network. Methods In this article, we propose a novel approach using the sequential pattern mining method with gap-constraints. To overcome the inconsistency problem, we suggest frequent functional patterns to include every possible functional sequence—including patterns for which search is limited by the structure of connection or level of neighborhood layer. We also constructed a tree-graph with the most crucial interaction information of the target protein, and generated candidate sets to assign by sequential pattern mining allowing gaps. Results The parameters of pattern length, maximum gaps, and minimum support were given to find the best setting for the most accurate prediction. The highest accuracy rate was 0.972, which showed better results than the simple neighbor counting approach and link-based approach. Conclusion The results comparison with other approaches has confirmed that the proposed approach could reach more function candidates that previous methods could not obtain. PMID:25938021

  18. Update on systemic lupus erythematosus pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Iozza, Irene; Cianci, Stefano; Di Natale, Angela; Garofalo, Giovanna; Giacobbe, Anna Maria; Giorgio, Elsa; De Oronzo, Maria Antonietta; Politi, Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    Women with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) still face significant risks when embarking on a pregnancy. Improvements in the field of pathophysiology, in diagnosis and a greater number of therapeutic options in the treatment of SLE, have made the medical community regard these patients with less trepidation. Despite these advances, however, the risk of significant morbidity to both the mother and the fetus still exists. The interaction of lupus and pregnancy is very complex: the consensus is that pregnancy can worsen the lupus disease process, even if this is not predictable, and pregnancy can mimic the clinical manifestations of lupus, particularly preeclampsia/eclampsia. More specifically, pregnancy is associated in 50 to 60% of cases with a clinical flare manifesting as renalor hematological symptoms. Severe flares are uncommon (10%) and the risk of maternal death is now2 to 3%. The risk of the fetus remains high, however with increased risk of spontaneous fetal wastage and premature births, by 4.8 and 6.8 times, respectively. It is well documented that antiphospholipid syndrome and antiphospholipid antibodies are strongly associated with fetal wastage. Low-dose aspirin orheparin improves fetal outcome in these cases. Timing a pregnancy to coincide with a period of disease quiescence for at least 6 months strongly increases the chances for a healthy and uneventful pregnancy for both mother and baby. Close surveillance, with monitoring of blood pressure, proteinuria and placental blood flow by doppler studies helps the early diagnosis and treatment of complications such as preeclampsia andfoetal distress. Women with SLE frequently need treatment throughout pregnancy based on hydroxychloroquine, lowdose steroids and azathioprine. This update, based on previous available literature, should inform rheumatologists, obstetricians and neonatologists who guide patients in their reproductive decisions. PMID:22439065

  19. Tone-dependent error diffusion based on an updated blue-noise model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Yik-Hing; Chan, Yuk-Hee

    2016-01-01

    The conventional blue-noise model that specifies the desired noise characteristics of an ideal halftone has been updated recently, and simulation results showed that the updated model can serve as a better guideline for developing halftone algorithms. At the moment, only a feature-preserving multiscale error diffusion-based algorithm was developed based on the updated noise model. As the algorithm does not support real-time applications, a tone-dependent error diffusion (TDED) algorithm is developed based on the updated noise model. To support the proposed TDED algorithm, we optimize a diffusion filter and a quantizer threshold for each possible input gray level based on the updated noise model, such that the algorithm can adapt its diffusion filter and quantizer according to the input intensity value of a pixel to produce a halftone. Simulation results showed that the proposed TDED algorithm can successfully produce halftones bearing the desired noise characteristics as specified by the updated noise model. As a consequence, it provides better performance than conventional error diffusion-based algorithms in terms of various measures including radially averaged power spectrum density and anisotropy. When processing real images, it can eliminate directional artifacts, regular structure patterns, and unintended sharpening effects in its halftoning outputs.

  20. Frequent users of pornography. A population based epidemiological study of Swedish male adolescents.

    PubMed

    Svedin, Carl Göran; Akerman, Ingrid; Priebe, Gisela

    2011-08-01

    Frequent use of pornography has not been sufficiently studied before. In a Swedish survey 2015 male students aged 18 years participated. A group of frequent users of pornography (N = 200, 10.5%) were studied with respect to background and psychosocial correlates. The frequent users had a more positive attitude to pornography, were more often "turned on" viewing pornography and viewed more often advanced forms of pornography. Frequent use was also associated with many problem behaviours. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that frequent users of pornography were more likely to be living in a large city, consuming alcohol more often, having greater sexual desire and had more often sold sex than other boys of the same age. High frequent viewing of pornography may be seen as a problematic behaviour that needs more attention from both parents and teachers and also to be addressed in clinical interviews.

  1. Updated systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing low- versus high-dose rituximab for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bredemeier, Markus; Campos, Guilherme G; de Oliveira, Fernando K

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to update a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing low- (2 × 500 or 1 × 1000 mg) and high-dose (2 × 1000 mg) rituximab (RTX) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), considering the recent emergence of new evidence. The systematic literature review searching for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was updated to November 6, 2014 using the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science databases, and hand searching. The primary outcomes were the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for 20 % improvement (ACR20), ACR50, and ACR70 responses and the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) at 24 and 48/52 weeks. The secondary outcomes were change in Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) score, change in the radiographic modified Total Sharp Score (mTSS), levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG), and adverse events. In total, seven RCTs were identified, including two new full publication versions and one abstract of RCTs. There were no significant differences in the primary outcomes and change in HAQ, although the mean change in mTSS was 0.25 units (95 % CI, 0.01 to 0.49; P = 0.04) higher in low-dose group at week 52. Two RCTs did not demonstrate difference between the RTX regimens for maintaining clinical response (obtained initially using high-dose RTX) in anti-TNF-experienced patients. IgG levels were significantly higher (P ≤ 0.02), and first infusion reactions were less frequent in the low-dose group (P = 0.02). Our updated results further support the similar efficacy of both RTX regimens in different subsets of RA patients, demonstrating a better clinical and laboratory safety profile of the low-dose scheme.

  2. Updated Opacity Project radiative accelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaton, M. J.

    2007-11-01

    Updated data for the calculation of radiative accelerations, grad, referred to as OP 2005, have been made generally available on the Web. They differ from the earlier 1997 OP data mainly in the inclusion of contributions from inner-shell processes. The frequency resolution used for OP 2005 is shown to be satisfactory except for extreme cases of low concentrations and low densities. The 2005 data are in reasonably good agreement with results from OPAL, given by Richer et al. in graphical form, for a model with Teff = 104 and log (R) = -3. They are in less good agreement with OPAL results of Turcotte et al. for the solar radiative interior.

  3. Big bang nucleosynthesis: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.

    2013-07-23

    An update on the standard model of big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is presented. With the value of the baryon-tophoton ratio determined to high precision by WMAP, standard BBN is a parameter-free theory. In this context, the theoretical prediction for the abundances of D, {sup 4}He, and {sup 7}Li is discussed and compared to their observational determination. While concordance for D and {sup 4}He is satisfactory, the prediction for {sup 7}Li exceeds the observational determination by a factor of about four. Possible solutions to this problem are discussed.

  4. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update

    PubMed Central

    Sehrawat, Nidhi; Bansal, Kalpana; Chopra, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Special and medically compromised patients present a unique population that challenges the dentist’s skill and knowledge. Providing oral care to people with cerebral palsy (CP) requires adaptation of the skills we use everyday. In fact, most people with mild or moderate forms of CP can be treated successfully in the general practice setting. This article is to review various dental considerations and management of a CP patient. How to cite this article: Sehrawat N, Marwaha M, Bansal K, Chopra R. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):109-118. PMID:25356010

  5. Air-quality-model update

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.; Walton, J.J.

    1982-01-15

    The Livermore Regional Air Quality Model (LIRAQ) has been updated and improved. This report describes the changes that have been made in chemistry, species treatment, and boundary conditions. The results of smog chamber simulations that were used to verify the chemistry as well as simulations of the entire air quality model for two prototype days in the Bay Area are reported. The results for the prototype day simulations are preliminary due to the need for improvement in meteorology fields, but they show the dependence and sensitivity of high hour ozone to changes in selected boundary and initial conditions.

  6. Current Updates on Choanal Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Kelvin M.

    2015-01-01

    Choanal atresia (CA) is a relatively uncommon but well-recognized condition characterized by the anatomical closure of the posterior choanae in the nasal cavity. Since the original description back in the early eighteenth century, there have been controversies regarding its exact pathogenesis, the optimal surgical approach, and the use of adjunct treatments such as post-surgical stenting and anti-neoplastic agents, despite of abundant literature available. The emergence and development of new technologies play a significant role in the management of this condition. This review provides a comprehensive clinical update on CA and identifies areas for future study based on the existing available literature. PMID:26106591

  7. Frequent users of emergency department services: gaps in knowledge and a proposed research agenda.

    PubMed

    Pines, Jesse M; Asplin, Brent R; Kaji, Amy H; Lowe, Robert A; Magid, David J; Raven, Maria; Weber, Ellen J; Yealy, Donald M

    2011-06-01

    Frequent use of emergency department (ED) services is often perceived to be a potentially preventable misuse of resources. The underlying assumption is that similar and more appropriate care can be delivered outside of EDs at a lower cost. To reduce costs and incentivize more appropriate use of services, there have been efforts to design interventions to transition health care utilization of frequent users from EDs to other settings such as outpatient clinics. Many of these efforts have succeeded in smaller trials, but wider use remains elusive for varying reasons. There are also some fundamental problems with the assumption that all or even the majority of frequent ED use is misuse and invoking reasons for that excessive use. These tenuous assumptions become evident when frequent users as a group are compared to less frequent users. Specifically, frequent users tend to have high levels of frequent ED use, have a higher severity of illness, be older, have fewer personal resources, be chronically ill, present for pain-related complaints, and have government insurance (Medicare or Medicaid). Because of the unique characteristics of the population of frequent users, we propose a research agenda that aims to increase the understanding of frequent ED use, by: 1) creating an accepted categorization system for frequent users, 2) predicting which patients are at risk for becoming or remaining frequent users, 3) implementing both ED- and non-ED-based interventions, and 4) conducting qualitative studies of frequent ED users to explore reasons and identify factors that are subject to intervention and explore specific differences among populations by condition, such as mental illness and heart failure. PMID:21676051

  8. ISS Update: Burning and Suppression of Solids

    NASA Video Gallery

    ISS Update Commentator Pat Ryan interviews Paul Ferkul, Principal Investigator for the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS) experiment, about performing combustion experiments in microgravity. ...

  9. Risk Assessment Update: Russian Segment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric; Lear, Dana; Hyde, James; Bjorkman, Michael; Hoffman, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    BUMPER-II version 1.95j source code was provided to RSC-E- and Khrunichev at January 2012 MMOD TIM in Moscow. MEMCxP and ORDEM 3.0 environments implemented as external data files. NASA provided a sample ORDEM 3.0 g."key" & "daf" environment file set for demonstration and benchmarking BUMPER -II v1.95j installation at the Jan-12 TIM. ORDEM 3.0 has been completed and is currently in beta testing. NASA will provide a preliminary set of ORDEM 3.0 ".key" & ".daf" environment files for the years 2012 through 2028. Bumper output files produced using the new ORDEM 3.0 data files are intended for internal use only, not for requirements verification. Output files will contain these words ORDEM FILE DESCRIPTION = PRELIMINARY VERSION: not for production. The projectile density term in many BUMPER-II ballistic limit equations will need to be updated. Cube demo scripts and output files delivered at the Jan-12 TIM have been updated for the new ORDEM 3.0 data files. Risk assessment results based on ORDEM 3.0 and MEM will be presented for the Russian Segment (RS) of ISS.

  10. An Update on Planet Nine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Whats the news coming from the research world on the search for Planet Nine? Read on for an update from a few of the latest studies.Artists illustration of Planet Nine, a hypothesized Neptune-sized planet orbiting in the distant reaches of our solar system. [Caltech/Robert Hurt]What is Planet Nine?In January of this year, Caltech researchers Konstantin Batygin and Mike Brown presented evidence of a distant ninth planet in our solar system. They predicted this planet to be of a mass and volume consistent with a super-Earth, orbiting on a highly eccentric pathwith a period of tens of thousands of years.Since Batygin and Browns prediction, scientists have been hunting for further signs of Planet Nine. Though we havent yet discovered an object matching its description, we have come up with new strategies for finding it, we set some constraints on where it might be, and we made some interesting theoretical predictions about its properties.Visualizations of the resonant orbits of the four longest-period Kuiper belt objects, depicted in a frame rotating with the mean angular velocity of Planet Nine. Planet Nines position is on the right (with the trace of possible eccentric orbits e=0.17 and e=0.4 indicated in red). [Malhotra et al 2016]Here are some of the newest constraints on Planet Nine from studies published just within the past two weeks.Resonant OrbitsRenu Malhotra (University of Arizonas Lunar and Planetary Laboratory) and collaborators present further evidence of the shaping of solar system orbits by the hypothetical Planet Nine. The authors point out that the four longest-period Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) have orbital periods close to integer ratios with each other. Could it be that these outer KBOs have become locked into resonant orbits with a distant, massive body?The authors find that a distant planet orbiting with a period of ~17,117 years and a semimajor axis ~665 AU would have N/1 and N/2 period ratios with these four objects. If this is correct, it

  11. An Update on Planet Nine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Whats the news coming from the research world on the search for Planet Nine? Read on for an update from a few of the latest studies.Artists illustration of Planet Nine, a hypothesized Neptune-sized planet orbiting in the distant reaches of our solar system. [Caltech/Robert Hurt]What is Planet Nine?In January of this year, Caltech researchers Konstantin Batygin and Mike Brown presented evidence of a distant ninth planet in our solar system. They predicted this planet to be of a mass and volume consistent with a super-Earth, orbiting on a highly eccentric pathwith a period of tens of thousands of years.Since Batygin and Browns prediction, scientists have been hunting for further signs of Planet Nine. Though we havent yet discovered an object matching its description, we have come up with new strategies for finding it, we set some constraints on where it might be, and we made some interesting theoretical predictions about its properties.Visualizations of the resonant orbits of the four longest-period Kuiper belt objects, depicted in a frame rotating with the mean angular velocity of Planet Nine. Planet Nines position is on the right (with the trace of possible eccentric orbits e=0.17 and e=0.4 indicated in red). [Malhotra et al 2016]Here are some of the newest constraints on Planet Nine from studies published just within the past two weeks.Resonant OrbitsRenu Malhotra (University of Arizonas Lunar and Planetary Laboratory) and collaborators present further evidence of the shaping of solar system orbits by the hypothetical Planet Nine. The authors point out that the four longest-period Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) have orbital periods close to integer ratios with each other. Could it be that these outer KBOs have become locked into resonant orbits with a distant, massive body?The authors find that a distant planet orbiting with a period of ~17,117 years and a semimajor axis ~665 AU would have N/1 and N/2 period ratios with these four objects. If this is correct, it

  12. Autonomy Support for Online Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Eunbae; Pate, Joseph A.; Cozart, Deanna

    2015-01-01

    Despite the rapid growth of online learning in higher education, the dropout rates for online courses has reached 50 percent. Lack of student engagement rank as a critical reason for frequent online course dropout. This article discusses autonomy support as a strategy to enhance online students' intrinsic motivation and engagement. Drawing from…

  13. Acute Intermittent Porphyria in Argentina: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Cerbino, Gabriela Nora; Gerez, Esther Noemí; Varela, Laura Sabina; Melito, Viviana Alicia; Parera, Victoria Estela; Rossetti, María Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Porphyrias are a group of metabolic diseases that arise from deficiencies in the heme biosynthetic pathway. A partial deficiency in hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS) produces a hepatic disorder named Acute Intermittent Porphyria (AIP); the acute porphyria is more frequent in Argentina. In this paper we review the results obtained for 101 Argentinean AIP families and 6 AIP families from foreign neighbour countries studied at molecular level at Centro de Investigaciones sobre Porfirinas y Porfirias (CIPYP). Thirty-five different mutations were found, of which 14 were described for the first time in our population. The most prevalent type of mutations was the missense mutations (43%) followed by splice defects (26%) and small deletions (20%). An odd case of a double heterozygous presentation of AIP in a foreign family from Paraguay is discussed. Moreover, it can be noted that 38 new families were found carrying the most frequent mutation in Argentina (p.G111R), increasing to 55.66% the prevalence of this genetic change in our population and adding further support to our previous hypothesis of a founder effect for this mutation in Argentina. Identification of patients with an overt AIP is important because treatment depends on an accurate diagnosis, but more critical is the identification of asymptomatic relatives to avoid acute attacks which may progress to death. PMID:26075277

  14. Acute intermittent porphyria in Argentina: an update.

    PubMed

    Cerbino, Gabriela Nora; Gerez, Esther Noemí; Varela, Laura Sabina; Melito, Viviana Alicia; Parera, Victoria Estela; Batlle, Alcira; Rossetti, María Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Porphyrias are a group of metabolic diseases that arise from deficiencies in the heme biosynthetic pathway. A partial deficiency in hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS) produces a hepatic disorder named Acute Intermittent Porphyria (AIP); the acute porphyria is more frequent in Argentina. In this paper we review the results obtained for 101 Argentinean AIP families and 6 AIP families from foreign neighbour countries studied at molecular level at Centro de Investigaciones sobre Porfirinas y Porfirias (CIPYP). Thirty-five different mutations were found, of which 14 were described for the first time in our population. The most prevalent type of mutations was the missense mutations (43%) followed by splice defects (26%) and small deletions (20%). An odd case of a double heterozygous presentation of AIP in a foreign family from Paraguay is discussed. Moreover, it can be noted that 38 new families were found carrying the most frequent mutation in Argentina (p.G111R), increasing to 55.66% the prevalence of this genetic change in our population and adding further support to our previous hypothesis of a founder effect for this mutation in Argentina. Identification of patients with an overt AIP is important because treatment depends on an accurate diagnosis, but more critical is the identification of asymptomatic relatives to avoid acute attacks which may progress to death.

  15. The effect of ageing on recollection: the role of the binding updating process.

    PubMed

    Boujut, Arnaud; Clarys, David

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to highlight the underlying process responsible for the age-related deficit in recollection. Through two experiments using the Remember-Know-Guess procedure (Gardiner, J. M., & Richardson-Klavehn, A. [2000]. Remembering and knowing. In The Oxford handbook of memory (pp. 229-244). New York, NY: Oxford University Press) in recognition, we manipulated the opportunity to update bindings between target items and their encoding context, in young and older adults. In the first experiment we impaired the binding updating process during the encoding of items, while in the second we supported this process. The results indicated that the "Remember" responses in the younger group were specifically reduced by the impairment of the binding updating process (Exp. 1), suggesting that this ability is useful for them to encode a specific episode. Conversely, only the "Remember" responses in the older group were improved in accuracy by supporting the binding updating process (Exp. 2), suggesting that their weakness in this ability is the source of their failure to improve the accuracy of their memories. The overall results support the hypothesis that the age-related decline in episodic memory is partly due to a greater vulnerability to interference on bindings, impairing the ability to update content-context bindings as and when events occur. PMID:27560656

  16. Longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, David

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for the selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. The Development Plan (DP) for this analysis is given in Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials (CRWMS M and O 1999a). The objective of this analysis is to update the previous analysis (CRWMS M and O 2000a) to account for related changes in the Ground Control System Description Document (CRWMS M and O 2000b), the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (CRWMS M and O 1999b), and in environmental conditions, and to provide updated information on candidate ground support materials.

  17. EPAct Alternative Fuel Transporation Program - State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets: Frequently Asked Questions

    SciTech Connect

    2010-03-01

    Factsheet answering frequently asked questions about the U.S. Department of Energy's Alternative Fuel Transportation Program (the Program) that implements provisions of Titles III–V of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct). Answers to questions that are frequently asked about the Program by managers of state government and alternative fuel provider fleets are provided in the factsheet.

  18. Reliability of Frequent Retrospective Behavior Ratings for Elementary School Students with EBD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Mack D.; Vannest, Kimberly; Davis, John; Davis, Cole; Parker, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This study is a preliminary examination of the reliability of frequent retrospective teacher behavior ratings. Frequent retrospective behavior ratings are an approach for creating scales that can be used to monitor individual behavioral progress. In this study, the approach is used to progress monitor behavioral individualized education plan goals…

  19. The Effect of Frequent Quizzes on Short- and Long-Term Academic Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geist, James R.; Soehren, Stephen E.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined effects of frequent quizzes on dental student performance in a course on introductory radiology. Results indicated the group (N=36) with frequent quizzes performed significantly better than the control group (n=35) on midterm and final examinations (but not post-tests), and assessed course content and instructor more…

  20. Frequent Visitors: Somatization in School-Age Children and Implications for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Robin Adair; Bergren, Martha Dewey; Matthews, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    There is a gap in the nursing literature regarding children who frequently visit school nurses' offices with recurrent unexplained physical symptoms. A review of the scientific health literature was undertaken to examine the clinical presentation, associated variables, and implications for school nurses regarding children who are frequent school…

  1. The Hazards Data Distribution System update

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Brenda K.; Lamb, Rynn M.

    2010-01-01

    After a major disaster, a satellite image or a collection of aerial photographs of the event is frequently the fastest, most effective way to determine its scope and severity. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Emergency Operations Portal provides emergency first responders and support personnel with easy access to imagery and geospatial data, geospatial Web services, and a digital library focused on emergency operations. Imagery and geospatial data are accessed through the Hazards Data Distribution System (HDDS). HDDS historically provided data access and delivery services through nongraphical interfaces that allow emergency response personnel to select and obtain pre-event baseline data and (or) event/disaster response data. First responders are able to access full-resolution GeoTIFF images or JPEG images at medium- and low-quality compressions through ftp downloads. USGS HDDS home page: http://hdds.usgs.gov/hdds2/

  2. Neuromyelitis Optica-AQP4: an update.

    PubMed

    Benavente, Emilio; Paira, Sergio

    2011-12-01

    Devic disease (neuromyelitis optica [NMO]) is an idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating and necrotizing disease characterized by optic neuritis and transverse myelitis, either simultaneously or in isolation. NMO is often idiopathic but may also be associated with systemic autoimmune disease. The prognosis of NMO is severe, especially in those with early and recurrent relapses. MRI studies have revealed that most frequently, there is a long spinal cord lesion that extends through three or more vertebral segments in length. NMO-IgG is the first antibody marker for any inflammatory central nervous system disorder and is both sensitive and specific for NMO. The identification of NMO-IgG in patients with recurrent optic neuritis or longitudinally extensive myelitis and its ability to predict subsequent relapse support the concept of a spectrum of NMO disorders. Treatment in the acute phase includes intravenous steroids and plasma exchange therapy. Immunosuppressive agents are recommended for the prophylaxis of relapses. PMID:21922173

  3. Census in Schools Educator Update, May 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Census Bureau, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The "Census in Schools Educator Update" is sent to educators and educational organizations periodically to keep them informed about current and upcoming census data and to provide ideas about how to use data in the classroom. This issue of the "Census in Schools Educator Update" newsletter focuses on the following topics: (1) 2010 Census: The…

  4. 40 CFR 68.190 - Updates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Updates. 68.190 Section 68.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Risk Management Plan § 68.190 Updates. (a) The owner or operator...

  5. 40 CFR 68.190 - Updates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Updates. 68.190 Section 68.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Risk Management Plan § 68.190 Updates. (a) The owner or operator...

  6. 40 CFR 68.190 - Updates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Updates. 68.190 Section 68.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Risk Management Plan § 68.190 Updates. (a) The owner or operator...

  7. 40 CFR 55.12 - Consistency updates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Consistency updates. 55.12 Section 55.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF AIR REGULATIONS § 55.12 Consistency updates. (a) The Administrator will...

  8. Better Plants Progress Update Fall 2013

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-09-23

    This Progress Update summarizes the significant energy saving achievements and cumulative cost savings made by these industry leaders from 2010-2012. The update also shares the plans and priorities over the next year for the Better Plants Program to continue to advance energy efficiency in the industrial sector.

  9. Census in Schools Educator Update, February 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Census Bureau, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The "Census in Schools Educator Update" is sent to educators and educational organizations periodically to keep them informed about current and upcoming census data and to provide ideas about how to use data in the classroom. This issue of the "Census in Schools Educator Update" newsletter includes the following items: (1) Have You Seen the Census…

  10. 75 FR 17641 - Updating Fire Safety Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Parts 17 and 59 RIN 2900-AN57 Updating Fire Safety Standards AGENCY: Department of Veterans..., including standards for fire safety and heating and cooling systems. The proposed amendments would help.... Comments should indicate that they are submitted in response to ``RIN 2900-AN57--Updating Fire...

  11. 77 FR 41258 - FOIA Fee Schedule Update

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... Proposed FOIA Fee Schedule, 77 FR 32433. No comments were received in response to that notice, and the... Schedule Update went into effect on July 29, 2011. 76 FR 43819. Board Action Accordingly, the Board issues... SAFETY BOARD 10 CFR Part 1703 FOIA Fee Schedule Update AGENCY: Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety...

  12. Part C Updates. 11th Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danaher, Joan; Goode, Sue; Lazara, Alex

    2010-01-01

    "Part C Updates" is a compilation of information on various aspects of the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). This is the eleventh volume in a series of compilations, which included two editions of Part H Updates, the former name of the program.…

  13. Part C Updates: 9th Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danaher, Joan; Goode, Sue; Lazara, Alex

    2007-01-01

    "Part C Updates" is a compilation of information on various aspects of the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). This is the ninth volume in a series of compilations, which included two editions of Part H Updates, the former name of the program.…

  14. 40 CFR 68.190 - Updates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Updates. 68.190 Section 68.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Risk Management Plan § 68.190 Updates. (a) The owner or operator...

  15. 1 CFR 8.3 - Periodic updating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Periodic updating. 8.3 Section 8.3 General... the intent and purpose of the Administrative Committee as stated in § 8.1. (b) Staggered publication... before the “As of” date. Thus, each title updated as of July 1 each year will reflect all...

  16. 1 CFR 8.3 - Periodic updating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Periodic updating. 8.3 Section 8.3 General... the intent and purpose of the Administrative Committee as stated in § 8.1. (b) Staggered publication... before the “As of” date. Thus, each title updated as of July 1 each year will reflect all...

  17. 1 CFR 8.3 - Periodic updating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Periodic updating. 8.3 Section 8.3 General... the intent and purpose of the Administrative Committee as stated in § 8.1. (b) Staggered publication... before the “As of” date. Thus, each title updated as of July 1 each year will reflect all...

  18. 10 CFR 26.57 - Authorization update.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Authorization update. 26.57 Section 26.57 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.57 Authorization update. (a) Before granting authorization to an individual whose authorization has been interrupted...

  19. Census in Schools Educator Update, June 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Census Bureau, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The "Census in Schools Educator Update" is sent to educators and educational organizations periodically to keep them informed about current and upcoming census data and to provide ideas about how to use data in the classroom. This issue of the "Census in Schools Educator Update" newsletter focuses on the following topics: (1) 2010 Census; (2)…

  20. 10 CFR 26.57 - Authorization update.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Authorization update. 26.57 Section 26.57 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.57 Authorization update. (a) Before granting authorization to an individual whose authorization has been interrupted...