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Sample records for suppressing advanced glycation

  1. Reactive immunization suppresses advanced glycation and mitigates diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Shcheglova, Tatiana; Makker, Sudesh; Tramontano, Alfonso

    2009-05-01

    Agents that inhibit glycation end products by reducing the carbonyl load from glycation and glycoxidation are an emerging pharmacologic approach to treat complications of diabetes. We previously demonstrated that antibodies generated to the glycoprotein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) can cross-link with reactive carbonyl residues on protein conjugates. Here, we immunized streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats with KLH to assess the capacity of the elicited antibodies to intercept carbonyl residues on glycated proteins and to mitigate glycation-related pathology. Compared with diabetic rats immunized with adjuvant alone, KLH-immunized diabetic rats had decreased levels of glycated peptides in sera and demonstrated a reduction in albuminuria, proteinuria, deposition of glycation end products in the kidney, and histologic damage. In vitro, low molecular weight glycated peptides from rat serum reacted with anti-KLH antibodies at a faster rate than normal IgG and selectively modified the lambda chains. The reaction products contained peptide sequences from type I collagen alpha chain, albumin, and LDL receptor-related protein. These adduction reactions were inhibited by free KLH and by reduction of glycated peptides with borohydride. In summary, these results suggest that inherent reactivity of Ig light chains provides a natural mechanism for the removal of cytotoxic glycation products. This reactivity can be augmented by glycoprotein-specific reactive immunization, a potential biopharmaceutical approach to glycation-related pathology.

  2. Receptor for advanced glycation end products inhibits proliferation in osteoblast through suppression of Wnt, PI3K and ERK signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guofeng; Xu, Jingren; Li, Zengchun

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAGE overexpression suppresses cell proliferation in MC3T3-E1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAGE overexpression decreases Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAGE overexpression decreases ERK and PI3K signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Wnt signaling abolishes PI3K signaling restored by RAGE blockade. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Wnt signaling abolishes ERK signaling restored by RAGE blockade. -- Abstract: Expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays a crucial role in bone metabolism. However, the role of RAGE in the control of osteoblast proliferation is not yet evaluated. In the present study, we demonstrate that RAGE overexpression inhibits osteoblast proliferation in vitro. The negative regulation of RAGE on cell proliferation results from suppression of Wnt, PI3K and ERK signaling, and is restored by RAGE neutralizing antibody. Prevention of Wnt signaling using Sfrp1 or DKK1 rescues RAGE-decreased PI3K and ERK signaling and cell proliferation, indicating that the altered cell growth in RAGE overexpressing cells is in part secondary to alterations in Wnt signaling. Consistently, RAGE overexpression inhibits the expression of Wnt targets cyclin D1 and c-myc, which is partially reversed by RAGE blockade. Overall, these results suggest that RAGE inhibits osteoblast proliferation via suppression of Wnt, PI3K and ERK signaling, which provides novel mechanisms by which RAGE regulates osteoblast growth.

  3. Advanced glycation end products

    PubMed Central

    Gkogkolou, Paraskevi; Böhm, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Aging is the progressive accumulation of damage to an organism over time leading to disease and death. Aging research has been very intensive in the last years aiming at characterizing the pathophysiology of aging and finding possibilities to fight age-related diseases. Various theories of aging have been proposed. In the last years advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have received particular attention in this context. AGEs are formed in high amounts in diabetes but also in the physiological organism during aging. They have been etiologically implicated in numerous diabetes- and age-related diseases. Strategies inhibiting AGE accumulation and signaling seem to possess a therapeutic potential in these pathologies. However, still little is known on the precise role of AGEs during skin aging. In this review the existing literature on AGEs and skin aging will be reviewed. In addition, existing and potential anti-AGE strategies that may be beneficial on skin aging will be discussed. PMID:23467327

  4. Linagliptin blocks renal damage in type 1 diabetic rats by suppressing advanced glycation end products-receptor axis.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, S; Matsui, T; Takeuchi, M; Yamagishi, S-I

    2014-09-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) play a role in diabetic nephropathy. We have recently found that linagliptin, an inhibitor of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) suppresses the AGE-induced oxidative stress generation and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) gene expression in endothelial cells. However, whether linagliptin could have beneficial effects on experimental diabetic nephropathy in a glucose-lowering independent manner remains unknown. To address the issue, this study examined the effects of linagliptin on renal damage in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Serum levels of DPP-4 were significantly elevated in diabetic rats compared with control rats. Although linagliptin treatment for 2 weeks did not improve hyperglycemia in diabetic rats, linagliptin significantly reduced AGEs levels, RAGE gene expression, and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, a marker of oxidative stress in the kidney of diabetic rats. Furthermore, linagliptin significantly reduced albuminuria, renal ICAM-1 mRNA levels, and lymphocyte infiltration into the glomeruli of diabetic rats. Our present study suggests that linagliptin could exert beneficial effects on diabetic nephropathy partly by blocking the AGE-RAGE-evoked oxidative stress generation in the kidney of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Inhibition of DPP-4 by linagliptin might be a promising strategy for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  5. Advanced glycation end products suppress lysyl oxidase and induce bone collagen degradation in a rat model of renal osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Chiharu; Uto, Kenta; Honda, Kazuho; Kato, Yoshiharu; Oda, Hideaki

    2013-11-01

    Renal osteodystrophy (ROD) is a major problem in patients with renal insufficiency. The present study was designed to elucidate the role of bone collagen changes and osteoblast differentiation in a rat model of ROD pathogenesis induced by adenine. Typical characteristics of renal failure, including increased serum urea nitrogen, creatinine, inorganic phosphorus, and intact parathyroid hormone levels, and decreased serum calcium and 1,25(OH)2D3 levels, were observed in adenine-induced rats. Micro-computed tomography analysis of the femur in adenine-induced rats showed decreased bone mineral density and osteoporotic changes, confirmed by the three-point bending test. The cancellous bone histomorphometric parameters of the tibia showed increased osteoblast number, decreased osteoclast surface with peritrabecular fibrosis, and increased osteoid tissue, indicating a severe mineralization disorder similar to clinical ROD. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed irregular alignment and increased diameter of bone collagen fibrils in adenine-induced rats. Protein expression analysis showed greater accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in peritrabecular osteoblasts of adenine-induced rats than in the controls. In contrast, suppressed expression of runt-related transcription factor 2, alkaline phosphatase, secreted phosphoprotein 1 (Spp1), and lysyl oxidase (Lox) mRNA levels, particularly the amount of active LOX protein, were observed. In in-vitro experiments, mineralizing MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells stimulated with AGE-modified bovine serum albumin had attenuated the expression of Spp1 mRNA levels and active LOX protein, with a decrease in extracellular nodules of mineralization. These observations provide clues to ROD pathogenesis, as they indicate that the suppression of osteoblast differentiation and decreased active LOX protein associated with accumulation of AGEs in osteoblasts caused structural abnormalities of bone collagen fibrils and

  6. Scopoletin protects against methylglyoxal-induced hyperglycemia and insulin resistance mediated by suppression of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) generation and anti-glycation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Chang; Wu, Shinn-Chih; Xu, Kun-Di; Liao, Bo-Chieh; Wu, Jia-Feng; Cheng, An-Sheng

    2015-02-09

    Recently, several types of foods and drinks, including coffee, cream, and cake, have been found to result in high methylglyoxal (MG) levels in the plasma, thus causing both nutritional and health concerns. MG can be metabolized by phase-II enzymes in liver through the positive regulation of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). In this study, we investigated the ability of scopoletin (SP) to protect against MG-induced hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. Recently, SP was shown to be a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activator to elevate insulin sensitivity. We investigated the effects of oral administration of SP on the metabolic, biochemical, and molecular abnormalities characteristic of type 2 diabetes in MG-treated Wistar rats to understand the potential mechanism of scopoletin for diabetes protection. Our results suggested that SP activated Nrf2 by Ser40 phosphorylation, resulting in the metabolism of MG into d-lactic acid and the inhibition of AGEs generation, which reduced the accumulation of AGEs in the livers of MG-induced rats. In this manner, SP improved the results of the oral glucose tolerance test and dyslipidemia. Moreover, SP also increased the plasma translocation of glucose transporter-2 and promoted Akt phosphorylation caused by insulin treatment in MG-treated FL83B hepatocytes. In contrast, SP effectively suppressed protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) expression, thereby alleviating insulin resistance. These findings suggest that SP acts as an anti-glycation and anti-diabetic agent, and thus has therapeutic potential for the prevention of diabetes.

  7. Hyperglycemia and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) suppress the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Chu; Chen, Chen-Yu; Chang, Geen-Dong; Chen, Ting-Huan; Chen, Woan-Ling; Wen, Hui-Chin; Huang, Chih-Yang; Chang, Chung-Ho

    2017-08-15

    Aging is characterized by mild hyperglycemia and accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Effects of chronic exposure to hyperglycemia or AGEs on the adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes remain unclear. We examined the chronic effect of AGEs and high glucose on the differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells by culturing 3T3-L1 cells in the presence of AGEs or 25 mM glucose for 1 month. Chronic incubation of 3T3-L1 cells with AGEs or high glucose blocked their differentiation into mature adipocytes as evidenced by reduced levels of adipocyte markers such as accumulated oil droplets, GPDH, aP2, adiponectin and of adipogenesis regulators PPARγ and C/EBPα. Levels or activities of Src, PDK1, Akt, and NF-κB were higher in AGEs- and high glucose-treated cells than those in 3T3-L1 cells. Levels of Bcl-2 were elevated in AGEs- and high glucose-treated cells, and were attenuated by inhibitors of PI3-kinase, Akt and NF-κB. Moreover, adipogenesis was attenuated in 3T3-L1 cells stably expressing Bcl-2 or YAP. These results suggest that chronic AGEs and high glucose treatments up-regulate Bcl-2 and YAP via the Akt-NF-κB pathway and impair adipogenesis.

  8. Hyperglycemia and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) suppress the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Geen-Dong; Chen, Ting-Huan; Chen, Woan-Ling; Wen, Hui-Chin; Huang, Chih-Yang; Chang, Chung-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Aging is characterized by mild hyperglycemia and accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Effects of chronic exposure to hyperglycemia or AGEs on the adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes remain unclear. We examined the chronic effect of AGEs and high glucose on the differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells by culturing 3T3-L1 cells in the presence of AGEs or 25 mM glucose for 1 month. Chronic incubation of 3T3-L1 cells with AGEs or high glucose blocked their differentiation into mature adipocytes as evidenced by reduced levels of adipocyte markers such as accumulated oil droplets, GPDH, aP2, adiponectin and of adipogenesis regulators PPARγ and C/EBPα. Levels or activities of Src, PDK1, Akt, and NF-κB were higher in AGEs- and high glucose-treated cells than those in 3T3-L1 cells. Levels of Bcl-2 were elevated in AGEs- and high glucose-treated cells, and were attenuated by inhibitors of PI3-kinase, Akt and NF-κB. Moreover, adipogenesis was attenuated in 3T3-L1 cells stably expressing Bcl-2 or YAP. These results suggest that chronic AGEs and high glucose treatments up-regulate Bcl-2 and YAP via the Akt-NF-κB pathway and impair adipogenesis.

  9. Metformin Inhibits Advanced Glycation End Products-Induced Inflammatory Response in Murine Macrophages Partly through AMPK Activation and RAGE/NFκB Pathway Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhong'e; Tang, Yong; Chen, Chengjun; Lu, Yi; Liu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are major inflammatory mediators in diabetes, affecting atherosclerosis progression via macrophages. Metformin slows diabetic atherosclerosis progression through mechanisms that remain to be fully elucidated. The present study of murine bone marrow derived macrophages showed that (1) AGEs enhanced proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)) mRNA expression, RAGE expression, and NFκB activation; (2) metformin pretreatment inhibited AGEs effects and AGEs-induced cluster designation 86 (CD86) (M1 marker) expression, while promoting CD206 (M2 marker) surface expression and anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) mRNA expression; and (3) the AMPK inhibitor, Compound C, attenuated metformin effects. In conclusion, metformin inhibits AGEs-induced inflammatory response in murine macrophages partly through AMPK activation and RAGE/NFκB pathway suppression. PMID:27761470

  10. Metformin Inhibits Advanced Glycation End Products-Induced Inflammatory Response in Murine Macrophages Partly through AMPK Activation and RAGE/NFκB Pathway Suppression.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhong'e; Tang, Yong; Jin, Xian; Chen, Chengjun; Lu, Yi; Liu, Liang; Shen, Chengxing

    2016-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are major inflammatory mediators in diabetes, affecting atherosclerosis progression via macrophages. Metformin slows diabetic atherosclerosis progression through mechanisms that remain to be fully elucidated. The present study of murine bone marrow derived macrophages showed that (1) AGEs enhanced proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)) mRNA expression, RAGE expression, and NFκB activation; (2) metformin pretreatment inhibited AGEs effects and AGEs-induced cluster designation 86 (CD86) (M1 marker) expression, while promoting CD206 (M2 marker) surface expression and anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) mRNA expression; and (3) the AMPK inhibitor, Compound C, attenuated metformin effects. In conclusion, metformin inhibits AGEs-induced inflammatory response in murine macrophages partly through AMPK activation and RAGE/NFκB pathway suppression.

  11. Injury of cortical neurons is caused by the advanced glycation end products-mediated pathway☆

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Ying; Zhang, Xu; Song, Xiangfu; Lv, Zhongwen; Hou, Lingling; Li, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products lead to cell apoptosis, and cause cell death by increasing endoplasmic reticulum stress. Advanced glycation end products alone may also directly cause damage to tissues and cells, but the precise mechanism remains unknown. This study used primary cultures of rat cerebral cortex neurons, and treated cells with different concentrations of glycation end products (50, 100, 200, 400 mg/L), and with an antibody for the receptor of advanced glycation end products before and after treatment with advanced glycation end products. The results showed that with increasing concentrations of glycation end products, free radical content increased in neurons, and the number of apoptotic cells increased in a dose-dependent manner. Before and after treatment of advanced glycation end products, the addition of the antibody against advanced glycation end-products markedly reduced hydroxyl free radicals, malondialdehyde levels, and inhibited cell apoptosis. This result indicated that the antibody for receptor of advanced glycation end-products in neurons from the rat cerebral cortex can reduce glycation end product-induced oxidative stress damage by suppressing glycation end product receptors. Overall, our study confirms that the advanced glycation end products-advanced glycation end products receptor pathway may be the main signaling pathway leading to neuronal damage. PMID:25206382

  12. DNA aptamer raised against advanced glycation end products (AGEs) improves glycemic control and decreases adipocyte size in fructose-fed rats by suppressing AGE-RAGE axis.

    PubMed

    Ojima, A; Matsui, T; Nakamura, N; Higashimoto, Y; Ueda, S; Fukami, K; Okuda, S; Yamagishi, S

    2015-04-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) decrease adiponectin expression and suppress insulin signaling in cultured adipocytes through the interaction with a receptor for AGEs (RAGE) via oxidative stress generation. We have recently found that high-affinity DNA aptamer directed against AGE (AGE-aptamer) prevents the progression of experimental diabetic nephropathy by blocking the harmful actions of AGEs in the kidney. This study examined the effects of AGE-aptamer on adipocyte remodeling, AGE-RAGE-oxidative stress axis, and adiponectin expression in fructose-fed rats. Although AGE-aptamer treatment by an osmotic mini pump for 8 weeks did not affect serum insulin levels, it significantly decreased average fasting blood glucose and had a tendency to inhibit body weight gain in fructose-fed rats. Furthermore, AGE-aptamer significantly suppressed the increase in adipocyte size and prevented the elevation in AGEs, RAGE, and an oxidative stress marker, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), levels in adipose tissues of fructose-fed rats at 14-week-old, while it restored the decrease in adiponectin mRNA levels. Our present study suggests that AGE-aptamer could improve glycemic control and prevent adipocyte remodeling in fructose-fed rats partly by suppressing the AGE-RAGE-mediated oxidative stress generation. AGE-aptamer might be a novel therapeutic strategy for fructose-induced metabolic derangements.

  13. Minodronate, a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, inhibits advanced glycation end product-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in endothelial cells by suppressing reactive oxygen species generation.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, S; Matsui, T; Nakamura, K; Takeuchi, M

    2005-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), the senescent macroprotein derivatives that form in increased amounts in diabetes, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications. Indeed, AGEs elicit oxidative stress generation in vascular wall cells through an interaction with their receptor (RAGE), thus playing an important role in vascular inflammation and altered gene expression of growth factors and cytokines. We have previously shown that minodronate, a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, blocked the angiogenic signaling of vascular endothelial growth factor in ECs through its antioxidative properties. However, the effects of minodronate on AGE-exposed ECs remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated whether and how minodronate could inhibit AGE-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and subsequent vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) gene expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Minodronate or an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, diphenylene iodonium, completely inhibited the AGE-induced ROS generation in HUVEC. Geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate reversed the antioxidative properties of minodronate in AGE-exposed ECs. Furthermore, minodronate was found to prevent AGE-induced nuclear factor--KB activation and subsequently suppress VCAM-1 gene expression in HUVEC. These results demonstrate that minodronate could inhibit VCAM- 1 expression in AGE-exposed ECs by suppressing NADPH oxidase-derived ROS generation, probably via inhibition of geranylgeranylation of Rac, a component of endothelial NADPH oxidase. Our present study suggests that minodronate may have a therapeutic potential in the treatment of patients with diabetic vascular complications.

  14. Metformin inhibits advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-induced renal tubular cell injury by suppressing reactive oxygen species generation via reducing receptor for AGEs (RAGE) expression.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Y; Matsui, T; Takeuchi, M; Yamagishi, S

    2012-11-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) play a role in tubulointerstitial damage in diabetic nephropathy. Recently, metformin has been shown to ameliorate tubular injury both in cell culture and diabetic animal model. However, effects of metformin on AGEs-induced tubular cell apoptosis and damage remain unknown. We examined here whether and how metformin could block the AGEs-RAGE-elicited tubular cell injury in vitro. Gene expression level was evaluated by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reactions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured with dihydroethidium staining. Apoptosis was evaluated by DNA fragmentation and annexin V expression level. AGEs upregulated RAGE mRNA levels and subsequently increased ROS generation and intercellular adhesion molecule-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and transforming growth factor-β gene expression in human renal proximal tubular cells, all of which were significantly blocked by the treatment of 0.01 and 0.1 mM metformin. Compound C, an inhibitor of AMP-activated protein kinase significantly blocked the effects of metformin on RAGE gene expression and ROS generation in AGEs-exposed tubular cells. Furthermore, metformin dose-dependently inhibited the AGEs-induced apoptotic cell death of tubular cells; 1 mM metformin completely suppressed the pro-apoptotic effects of AGEs in 2 different assay systems. Our present study suggests that metformin could inhibit the AGEs-induced apoptosis and inflammatory and fibrotic reactions in tubular cells probably by reducing ROS generation via suppression of RAGE expression through AMP-activated protein kinase activation. Metformin may protect against tubular cell injury in diabetic nephropathy by blocking the AGEs-RAGE-ROS axis.

  15. N-butanol extracts of Morinda citrifolia suppress advanced glycation end products (AGE)-induced inflammatory reactions in endothelial cells through its anti-oxidative properties.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yuji; Matsui, Takanori; Isami, Fumiyuki; Abe, Yumi; Sakaguchi, Tatsuya; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi

    2017-03-04

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), senescent macroprotein derivatives formed during a normal aging process and acceleratedly under diabetic conditions, play a role in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. AGEs cause endothelial cell (EC) damage, an initial trigger for atherosclerosis through the interaction with a receptor for AGEs (RAGE). We have previously shown that n-butanol extracts of Morinda citrifolia (noni), a plant belonging to the family Rubiaceae, block the binding of AGEs to RAGE in vitro. In this study, we examined the effects of n-butanol extracts of noni on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and inflammatory reactions on AGE-exposed human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs). HUVECs were treated with 100 μg/ml AGE-bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA) or non-glycated BSA in the presence or absence of 670 ng/ml n-butanol extracts of noni for 4 h. Then ROS generation and inflammatory and gene expression in HUVECs were evaluated by dihydroethidium staining and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses, respectively. THP-1 cell adhesion to HUVECs was measured after 2-day incubation of AGE-BSA or BSA in the presence or absence of 670 ng/ml n-butanol extracts of noni. N-butanol extracts of noni at 670 ng/ml significantly inhibited the AGE-induced ROS generation and RAGE, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene expressions in HUVECs. AGEs significantly increased monocytic THP-1 cell adhesion to HUVECs, which was also prevented by 670 ng/ml n-butanol extracts of noni. The present study demonstrated for the first time that N-butanol extracts of noni could suppress the AGE-induced inflammatory reactions in HUVECs through its anti-oxidative properties via blocking of the interaction of AGEs with RAGE. Inhibition of the AGE-RAGE axis by n-butanol extracts of noni may be a novel nutraceutical strategy for the treatment of cardiovascular disease.

  16. Fibroblast growth factor 21 protects mouse brain against D-galactose induced aging via suppression of oxidative stress response and advanced glycation end products formation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yinhang; Bai, Fuliang; Wang, Wenfei; Liu, Yaonan; Yuan, Qingyan; Qu, Susu; Zhang, Tong; Tian, Guiyou; Li, Siming; Li, Deshan; Ren, Guiping

    2015-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a hormone secreted predominantly in the liver, pancreas and adipose tissue. Recently, it has been reported that FGF21-Transgenic mice can extend their lifespan compared with wild type counterparts. Thus, we hypothesize that FGF21 may play some roles in aging of organisms. In this study d-galactose (d-gal)-induced aging mice were used to study the mechanism that FGF21 protects mice from aging. The three-month-old Kunming mice were subcutaneously injected with d-gal (180mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) for 8weeks and administered simultaneously with FGF21 (1, 2 or 5mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)). Our results showed that administration of FGF21 significantly improved behavioral performance of d-gal-treated mice in water maze task and step-down test, reduced brain cell damage in the hippocampus, and attenuated the d-gal-induced production of MDA, ROS and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). At the same time, FGF21 also markedly renewed the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and total anti-oxidation capability (T-AOC), and decreased the enhanced total cholinesterase (TChE) activity in the brain of d-gal-treated mice. The expression of aldose reductase (AR), sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) and member-anchored receptor for AGEs (RAGE) declined significantly after FGF21 treatment. Furthermore, FGF21 suppressed inflamm-aging by inhibiting IκBα degradation and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. The expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6, decreased significantly. In conclusion, these results suggest that FGF21 protects the aging mice brain from d-gal-induced injury by attenuating oxidative stress damage and decreasing AGE formation.

  17. Advanced Glycation End Products and Diabetic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Varun Parkash; Bali, Anjana; Singh, Nirmal

    2014-01-01

    During long standing hyperglycaemic state in diabetes mellitus, glucose forms covalent adducts with the plasma proteins through a non-enzymatic process known as glycation. Protein glycation and formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications like retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, cardiomyopathy along with some other diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and aging. Glycation of proteins interferes with their normal functions by disrupting molecular conformation, altering enzymatic activity, and interfering with receptor functioning. AGEs form intra- and extracellular cross linking not only with proteins, but with some other endogenous key molecules including lipids and nucleic acids to contribute in the development of diabetic complications. Recent studies suggest that AGEs interact with plasma membrane localized receptors for AGEs (RAGE) to alter intracellular signaling, gene expression, release of pro-inflammatory molecules and free radicals. The present review discusses the glycation of plasma proteins such as albumin, fibrinogen, globulins and collagen to form different types of AGEs. Furthermore, the role of AGEs in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications including retinopathy, cataract, neuropathy, nephropathy and cardiomyopathy is also discussed. PMID:24634591

  18. Endogenous alpha-oxoaldehydes and formation of protein and nucleotide advanced glycation endproducts in tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Thornalley, Paul J

    2007-01-01

    Human and other biological tissues face a continual threat of damage by alpha-oxoaldehydes formed endogenously. Glyoxal, methylglyoxal and 3-deoxyglucosone are formed by the degradation of glycolytic intermediates, glycated proteins and lipid peroxidation. They are potent glycating agents of protein and nucleotides leading to the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). With proteins, they are arginine residue-directed glycating agents forming mainly hydroimidazolones, found at 0.1-1% of total arginine residues in tissues (2-20% of proteins modified). With nucleotides, imidazopurinone- and N2-carboxyalkyl- derivatives of deoxyguanosine are formed, found at 0.1-0.8 per 10(6) nucleotides in DNA. Glycation occurs in all tissues and body fluids. Cellular proteolysis of AGE-modified proteins and DNA releases glycated amino acids and nucleosides. Glycated amino acids and nucleosides are released into plasma, undergo glomerular filtration and are excreted in urine. The damage to tissue protein and nucleotides by alpha-oxoaldehydes is suppressed by the metabolism of alpha-oxoaldehyde glycating agents by the glutathione-dependent enzyme, glyoxalase I, and aldo-keto reductases. These enzymatic activities are part of the enzymatic defence against glycation. Tissue damage by alpha-oxoaldehyde glycation is implicated in diabetic and non-diabetic vascular disease, renal failure, cirrhosis, Alzheimer's disease, arthritis and ageing.

  19. Suppression of antioxidant Nrf-2 and downstream pathway in H9c2 cells by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) via ERK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ko, Shun-Yao; Chang, Shu-Shing; Lin, I-Hsuan; Chen, Hong-I

    2015-11-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is related to oxidative stress and correlated with the presence of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). In a clinical setting, AGEs can be detected in patients presenting diabetic cardiomyopathy; however, the underlying mechanism has yet to be elucidated. In our previous study, AGEs increase cell hypertrophy via ERK phosphorylation in a process closely related to ROS production. Thus, we propose that AGEs regulate the antioxidant gene nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf-2). In H9c2 cells treated with AGEs, the expression of Nrf-2 was reduced; however, ERK phosphorylation was shown to increase. Treatment with H2O2 was also shown to increase Nrf-2 and ERK phosphorylation. In cells pretreatment with ROS scavenger NAC, the effects of H2O2 were reduced; however, the effects of the AGEs remained largely unchanged. Conversely, when cells were pretreated with PD98059 (ERK inhibitor), the expression of Nrf-2 was recovered following treatment with AGEs. Our results suggest that AGEs inhibit Nrf-2 via the ERK pathway; however, this influence is partly associated with ROS. Our finding further indicated that AGEs possess both ROS-dependent and ROS-independent pathways, resulting in a reduction in Nrf-2. This report reveals an important mechanism underlying the regulation of diabetic cardiomyopathy progression by AGEs.

  20. Low molecular weight heparin suppresses receptor for advanced glycation end products-mediated expression of malignant phenotype in human fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Munesue, Seiichi; Harashima, Ai; Watanabe, Takuo; Yonekura, Hideto; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2013-06-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a pattern-recognition receptor and its engagement by ligands such as high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is implicated in tumor growth and metastasis. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) has an antagonistic effect on the RAGE axis and is also reported to exert an antitumor effect beyond the known activity of anticoagulation. However, the link between the anti-RAGE and antitumor activities of LMWH has not yet to be fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated whether LMWH could inhibit tumor cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis by blocking the RAGE axis using in vitro and in vivo assay systems. Stably transformed HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cell lines were obtained, including human full-length RAGE-overexpressing (HT1080(RAGE)), RAGE dominant-negative, intracellular tail-deleted RAGE-overexpressing (HT1080(dnRAGE)), and mock-transfected control (HT1080(mock)) cells. Confocal microscopy showed the expression of HMGB1 and RAGE in HT1080 cells. The LMWH significantly inhibited HMGB1-induced NFκB activation through RAGE using an NFκB-dependent luciferase reporter assay and the HT1080 cell lines. Overexpression of RAGE significantly accelerated, but dnRAGE expression attenuated HT1080 cell proliferation and invasion in vitro, along with similar effects on local tumor mass growth and lung metastasis in vivo. Treatment with LMWH significantly inhibited the migration, invasion, tumor formation, and lung metastasis of HT1080(RAGE) cells, but not of HT1080(mock) or HT1080(dnRAGE) cells. In conclusion, this study revealed that RAGE exacerbated the malignant phenotype of human fibrosarcoma cells, and that this exacerbation could be ameliorated by LMWH. It is suggested that LMWH has therapeutic potential in patients with certain types of malignant tumors. © 2013 Japanese Cancer Association.

  1. Metformin inhibits advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-induced growth and VEGF expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells by suppressing AGEs receptor expression via AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Y; Matsui, T; Takeuchi, M; Yamagishi, S

    2013-05-01

    Metformin use has been reported to decrease breast cancer incidence and mortality in diabetic patients. We have previously shown that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction stimulate growth and/or migration of pancreatic cancer and melanoma cells. However, effects of metformin on AGEs-RAGE axis in breast cancers remain unknown. We examined here whether and how metformin could block the AGEs-induced growth and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Cell proliferation was measured with an electron coupling reagent WST-1 based colorimetric assay. Gene expression level was evaluated by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reactions. AGEs significantly increased cell proliferation of MCF-7 cells, which was completely prevented by the treatment with 0.01 or 0.1 mM metformin or anti-RAGE antibodies. Furthermore, metformin at 0.01 mM completely suppressed the AGEs-induced upregulation of RAGE and VEGF mRNA levels in MCF-7 cells. An inhibitor of AMP-activated protein kinase, compound C significantly blocked the growth-inhibitory and RAGE and VEGF suppressing effects of metformin in AGEs-exposed MCF-7 cells. Our present study suggests that metformin could inhibit the AGEs-induced growth and VEGF expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells by suppressing RAGE gene expression via AMP-activated protein kinase pathway. Metformin may protect against breast cancer expansion in diabetic patients by blocking the AGEs-RAGE axis.

  2. Advanced glycation end product 3 (AGE3) suppresses the mineralization of mouse stromal ST2 cells and human mesenchymal stem cells by increasing TGF-β expression and secretion.

    PubMed

    Notsu, Masakazu; Yamaguchi, Toru; Okazaki, Kyoko; Tanaka, Ken-ichiro; Ogawa, Noriko; Kanazawa, Ippei; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2014-07-01

    In diabetic patients, advanced glycation end products (AGEs) cause bone fragility because of deterioration of bone quality. We previously showed that AGEs suppressed the mineralization of mouse stromal ST2 cells. TGF-β is abundant in bone, and enhancement of its signal causes bone quality deterioration. However, whether TGF-β signaling is involved in the AGE-induced suppression of mineralization during the osteoblast lineage remains unknown. We therefore examined the roles of TGF-β in the AGE-induced suppression of mineralization of ST2 cells and human mesenchymal stem cells. AGE3 significantly (P < .001) inhibited mineralization in both cell types, whereas transfection with small interfering RNA for the receptor for AGEs (RAGEs) significantly (P < .05) recovered this process in ST2 cells. AGE3 increased (P < .001) the expression of TGF-β mRNA and protein, which was partially antagonized by transfection with RAGE small interfering RNA. Treatment with a TGF-β type I receptor kinase inhibitor, SD208, recovered AGE3-induced decreases in osterix (P < .001) and osteocalcin (P < .05) and antagonized the AGE3-induced increase in Runx2 mRNA expression in ST2 cells (P < .001). Moreover, SD208 completely and dose dependently rescued AGE3-induced suppression of mineralization in both cell types. In contrast, SD208 intensified AGE3-induced suppression of cell proliferation as well as AGE3-induced apoptosis in proliferating ST2 cells. These findings indicate that, after cells become confluent, AGE3 partially inhibits the differentiation and mineralization of osteoblastic cells by binding to RAGE and increasing TGF-β expression and secretion. They also suggest that TGF-β adversely affects bone quality not only in primary osteoporosis but also in diabetes-related bone disorder.

  3. Sulforaphane inhibits advanced glycation end product-induced pericyte damage by reducing expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Sayaka; Matsui, Takanori; Ojima, Ayako; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi

    2014-09-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) not only inhibit DNA synthesis but also play a role in diabetic retinopathy by evoking apoptosis and inflammation in retinal pericytes via interaction with a receptor for AGE (RAGE). Similarly, sulforaphane, which is a naturally occurring isothiocyanate that is found in widely consumed cruciferous vegetables, protects against oxidative stress-induced tissue damage. Therefore, we hypothesized that sulforaphane could inhibit AGE-induced pericytes injury through its antioxidative properties. Advanced glycation end product stimulated superoxide generation as well as RAGE gene and protein expression in bovine-cultured retinal pericytes, and these effects were prevented by the treatment with sulforaphane. Antibodies directed against RAGE also blocked AGE-evoked reactive oxygen species generation in pericytes. Sulforaphane and antibodies directed against RAGE significantly inhibited the AGE-induced decrease in DNA synthesis, apoptotic cell death, and up-regulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 messenger RNA levels in pericytes. For the first time, the present study demonstrates that sulforaphane could inhibit DNA synthesis, apoptotic cell death, and inflammatory reactions in AGE-exposed pericytes, partly by suppressing RAGE expression via its antioxidative properties. Blockade of the AGE-RAGE axis in pericytes by sulforaphane might be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Inhibitory effect of leonurine on the formation of advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lianqi; Yang, Xin; Peng, Anlin; Wang, Hui; Lei, Xiang; Zheng, Ling; Huang, Kun

    2015-02-01

    Long-term hyperglycemia is a typical symptom of diabetes mellitus (DM) which can cause a high level of protein glycation and lead to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). The accumulation of AGEs in turn deteriorates DM and its complications. Insulin, the only hormone that directly decreases blood sugar in vivo, is vulnerable to glycation which causes the loss of its biological activity. In this study, we used a porcine insulin (PI)-methylglyoxal (MGO) model to investigate the inhibitory effect of leonurine (LN), a natural alkaloid extracted from Herba leonuri, on AGE formation. Assays including AGE-specific fluorescence, and fructosamine level and carbonyl group content determination showed that LN can dose-dependently suppress PI glycation. A significantly decreased cross-linking level on the glycated PI was also proven by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. A further liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry study suggested that LN may inhibit PI glycation through trapping MGO and keeping it from reacting with PI. Our results thus indicate that LN is a promising anti-glycation agent for the prevention of diabetes and its complications via inhibiting AGE formation.

  5. Advanced glycation end products and diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Milne, Ross; Brownstein, Seymour

    2013-06-01

    Retinopathy is a serious microvascular complication of diabetes and a major cause of blindness in young adults, worldwide. Early diabetic retinopathy is characterized by a loss of pericytes from retinal capillaries, the appearance of acellular capillaries and microaneurysms, and a breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier. In later stages, this can evolve into the proliferative phase in which there is neovascularization of the retina, which greatly increases the probability of vision loss. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) which accumulate under hyperglycemic conditions are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. AGEs arise primarily by the modification of amine groups of proteins by reactive dicarbonyls such as methylglyoxal. Intracellular proteins including anti-oxidant enzymes, transcription factors and mitochondrial proteins are targets of dicarbonyl modification and this can modify their functional properties and thus compromise cellular physiology. Likewise, modification of extracellular proteins by dicarbonyls can impair cell adhesion and can generate ligands that can potentially bind to cell surface AGE receptors that activate pro-inflammatory signaling pathways. AGE inhibitors have been shown to provide protection in animal models of diabetic retinopathy and currently are being evaluated in clinical trials.

  6. Autofluorescence characterization of advanced glycation end products of hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneshwaran, Nadanathangam; Bijukumar, Gopalakrishnapillai; Karmakar, Nivedita; Anand, Sneh; Misra, Anoop

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the analysis of autofluorescence of advanced glycation end products of hemoglobin (Hb-AGE). Formed as a result of slow, spontaneous and non-enzymatic glycation reactions, Hb-AGE possesses a characteristic autofluorescence at 308/345 nm ( λex/ λem). Even in the presence of heme as a quenching molecule, the surface presence of the glycated adduct gave rise to autofluorescence with the quantum yield of 0.19. The specificity of monoclonal antibody developed against common AGE structure with Hb-AGE was demonstrated using reduction in fluorescence polarization value due to increased molecular volume while binding. The formation of fluorescent adduct in hemoglobin in the advanced stage of glycation and the non-fluorescent HbA 1c will be of major use in distinguishing and to know the past status of diabetes mellitus. While autofluorescence correlated highly with HbA 1c value under in vivo condition ( r=0.85), it was moderate in the clinical samples ( r=0.55). The results suggest a non-linear relation between glycemia and glycation, indicating the application of Hb-AGE as a measure of susceptibility to glycation rather than glycation itself.

  7. Nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker, inhibits advanced glycation end product (AGE)-elicited mesangial cell damage by suppressing AGE receptor (RAGE) expression via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Takanori; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Ueda, Seiji; Fukami, Kei; Okuda, Seiya

    2009-07-24

    The interaction between advanced glycation end products (AGE) and their receptor RAGE mediates the progressive alteration in renal architecture and loss of renal function in diabetic nephropathy. Oxidative stress generation and inflammation also play a central role in diabetic nephropathy. This study investigated whether and how nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker (CCB), blocked the AGE-elicited mesangial cell damage in vitro. Nifedipine, but not amlodipine, a control CCB, down-regulated RAGE mRNA levels and subsequently reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in AGE-exposed mesangial cells. AGE increased mRNA levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and induced monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) production in mesangial cells, both of which were prevented by the treatment with nifedipine, but not amlodipine. The beneficial effects of nifedipine on AGE-exposed mesangial cells were blocked by the simultaneous treatment of GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR-{gamma}). Although nifedipine did not affect expression levels of PPAR-{gamma}, it increased the PPAR-{gamma} transcriptional activity in mesangial cells. Our present study provides a unique beneficial aspect of nifedipine on diabetic nephropathy; it could work as an anti-inflammatory agent against AGE by suppressing RAGE expression in cultured mesangial cells via PPAR-{gamma} activation.

  8. Targeting advanced glycation with pharmaceutical agents: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Borg, Danielle J; Forbes, Josephine M

    2016-08-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are the final products of the Maillard reaction, a complex process that has been studied by food chemists for a century. Over the past 30 years, the biological significance of advanced glycation has also been discovered. There is mounting evidence that advanced glycation plays a homeostatic role within the body and that food-related Maillard products, intermediates such as reactive α-dicarbonyl compounds and AGEs, may influence this process. It remains to be understood, at what point AGEs and their intermediates become pathogenic and contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic diseases that inflict current society. Diabetes and its complications have been a major focus of AGE biology due to the abundance of excess sugar and α-dicarbonyls in this family of diseases. While further temporal information is required, a number of pharmacological agents that inhibit components of the advanced glycation pathway have already showed promising results in preclinical models. These therapies appear to have a wide range of mechanistic actions to reduce AGE load. Some of these agents including Alagebrium, have translated successfully to clinical trials, while others such as aminoguanidine, have had undesirable side-effect profiles. This review will discuss different pharmacological agents that have been used to reduce AGE burden in preclinical models of disease with a focus on diabetes and its complications, compare outcomes of those therapies that have reached clinical trials, and provide further rationale for the use of inhibitors of the glycation pathway in chronic diseases.

  9. Advanced glycation end products in renal failure: an overview.

    PubMed

    Noordzij, M J; Lefrandt, J D; Smit, A J

    2008-12-01

    The article aims to present an overview of the existing knowledge on advanced glycation end products (AGE). They are moieties that bind to proteins, but also lipids and nuclear acids. AGE are formed during glycation and oxidative stress. Accumulation of AGE occurs especially in diabetes and chronic renal failure and plays a major pathogenetic role. The deleterious effects of AGE result from cross-linking of proteins and activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products. AGE accumulation can be noninvasively assessed by the skin autofluorescence reader. In diabetics, the skin autofluorescence predicts cardiac mortality and the occurrence of macro- and microvascular complications. In patients on haemodialysis, skin autofluorescence is highly elevated and predicts mortality. After renal transplantation AGE accumulation is lower than during haemodialysis, but still remains elevated and is a strong risk factor for chronic renal transplant dysfunction. Some of the potential methods to intervene with AGE accumulation are discussed in this article.

  10. Advanced Glycation End-products and Bone Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Vashishth, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Bone does not turn over uniformly, and becomes susceptible to post-translational modification by non-enzymatic glycation (NEG). NEG of bone causes the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and this process is accelerated with aging, diabetes and antiresorptive postmenopausal osteoporosis therapy. Due to the elevated incidence of fracture associated with aging and diabetes, several studies have attempted to measure and evaluate AGEs as biomarkers for fracture risk. Here current methods of estimating AGEs in bone by liquid chromatography and fluorometric assay are summarized and the relationships between AGEs and fracture properties at whole bone, apparent tissue and matrix levels are discussed. PMID:27158323

  11. Chemical Reactivity Theory Study of Advanced Glycation Endproduct Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Frau, Juan; Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel

    2017-02-02

    Several compounds with the known ability to perform as inhibitors of advanced glycation endproducts (AGE) have been studied with Density Functional Theory (DFT) through the use of anumberofdensityfunctionalswhoseaccuracyhasbeentestedacrossabroadspectrumofdatabases in Chemistry and Physics. The chemical reactivity descriptors for these systems have been calculated through Conceptual DFT in an attempt to relate their intrinsic chemical reactivity with the ability to inhibit the action of glycating carbonyl compounds on amino acids and proteins. This knowledge could be useful in the design and development of new drugs which can be potential medicines for diabetes and Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Coptis chinensis Polysaccharides Inhibit Advanced Glycation End Product Formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ye; Li, Yun; Yin, Dengke; Chen, Song; Gao, Xiangdong

    2016-06-01

    Coptis chinensis Franch (Huanglian) is commonly used to treat diabetes in China. In this study, the effects of the C. chinensis Franch polysaccharides (CCP) on advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation in vitro and in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice were investigated. CCP significantly inhibited all the three periods of nonenzymatic protein glycation in vitro, including Amadori product, dicarbonyl compound, and AGE formation (P < .01). In diabetic mice, the administration of CCP not only improved both bodyweight and serum insulin and decreased fasting blood glucose and glycated serum protein concentrations but also decreased the AGE accumulations and morphological abnormalities in pancreas and liver. The inhibitory effects of CCP on AGE formation afford a potential therapeutic use in the prevention and treatment of diabetes.

  13. Epicatechin breaks preformed glycated serum albumin and reverses the retinal accumulation of advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junghyun; Kim, Chan-Sik; Moon, Min Kyong; Kim, Jin Sook

    2015-02-05

    The accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is associated with many of the complications of diabetes mellitus, including diabetic retinopathy. AGE-breakers, such as N-phenacylthiazolium and alagebrium, have been proposed as therapeutic agents for reversing the increase in protein crosslinking in diabetes. (-)-Epicatechin is a major dietary flavonoid with a wide range of health-promoting biological activities. The aim of this study was to determine the potential effect of (-)-epicatechin in reducing the burden of AGEs in vitro and in vivo and to evaluate whether the reduced AGE burden could translate into improvement in retinal vascular function in exogenously AGE-injected rats. Glycated human serum albumin was purified from patients with diabetes. The breakdown of the already formed AGEs was studied by treating glycated human serum albumin with (-)-epicatechin. To study the effect of (-)-epicatechin on retinal vascular function, exogenously AGE-injected rats were treated with (-)-epicatechin (50 and 100 mg/kg i.p.) for two weeks. Apoptosis of retinal vascular cells was quantified using TUNEL staining. The AGE load in the retinas was determined via immunohistochemical staining and western blot analysis. (-)-Epicatechin was able to break preformed glycated human serum albumin in vitro as well as reduce AGE accumulation in retinas in vivo in a dose dependent manner. In exogenously AGE-injected rats, treatment with (-)-epicatechin was evidenced by an improved retinal vascular apoptosis. AGE burden in retinas was also reduced upon treatment. This study suggests that (-)-epicatechin could represent a valuable drug for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy by reducing the AGE burden. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), but not high glucose, inhibit the osteoblastic differentiation of mouse stromal ST2 cells through the suppression of osterix expression, and inhibit cell growth and increasing cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Kyoko; Yamaguchi, Toru; Tanaka, Ken-Ichiro; Notsu, Masakazu; Ogawa, Noriko; Yano, Shozo; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2012-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is known to be associated with osteoporotic fractures through a decrease in osteoblastic bone formation rather than an increase in osteoclastic bone resorption. However, its precise mechanism is unknown, and we examined whether or not high glucose or advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which play key roles in the pathogenesis and complications of diabetes, would affect the osteoblastic differentiation, growth, and apoptosis of mouse stromal ST2 cells. Ten to 200 μg/mL AGE2 or AGE3 alone dose-dependently inhibited the mineralization. AGE2 or AGE3 alone (200 μg/mL) significantly inhibited alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities as well as the mineralization of the cells (p < 0.01). In contrast, 22 mM glucose alone or in combination with 200 μg/mL AGE2 or AGE3 did not affect these cellular phenotypes. Real-time PCR showed that AGE2 or AGE3 alone (200 μg/mL) significantly decreased mRNA expressions of osteocalcin as well as osterix on day 14 (p < 0.01). Western blot analysis showed that AGE2 or AGE3 alone (200 μg/mL) also decreased the levels of Runx2 and osterix protein expressions on days 7 and 14. AGE2 or AGE3 significantly suppressed cell growth and increased apoptotic cell death in time- and dose-dependent manners (p < 0.01). Moreover, AGE3 alone (200 μg/mL) significantly increased mRNA expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) on days 2 and 3 (p < 0.01). These results suggest that AGE2 and AGE3, but not high glucose, may inhibit the osteoblastic differentiation of stromal cells by decreasing osterix expression and partly by increasing RAGE expression, as well as inhibiting cell growth and increasing cell apoptosis.

  15. Advanced-glycation-end-product-cholesterol-aggregated-protein accelerates the proliferation of mesangial cells mediated by transforming-growth-factor-beta 1 receptors and the ERK-MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, Yasushi; Sakai, Takayuki; Ito, Masanori; Yoshimura, Hiromitsu; Feng, Yibin; Nagamatsu, Tadashi

    2011-12-15

    Hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia are considered critical to the development of diabetic nephropathy. The aim of this study is to clarify the effect of cholesterol on advanced-glycation-end-products and the mechanisms behind the advanced-glycation-end-product-cholesterol-aggregated bovine serum albumin (BSA)-induced proliferation of mesangial cells. Mesangial cells were treated with advanced-glycation-end-product-cholesterol-aggregated-BSA, and RNA and protein were isolated. Cholesterol caused a 1.5-fold increase in fluorescent intensity and 2-fold increase in advanced-glycation-end-products in vitro. Pyridoxamine, aminoguanidine, and N-acetyl-l-cycteine suppressed the production of advanced-glycation-end-product-cholesterol-aggregated-BSA. Advanced-glycation-end-product-cholesterol-BSA was analyzed by matrix-assisted-laser-desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry, and peaks were found to shift toward a higher mass. Advanced-glycation-end-product-cholesterol-aggregated-BSA induced overexpression of the mRNA of transforming growth factor-beta1, collagen type 1, collagen type 4 and receptor for advanced-glycation-end-products, and the proliferation of mesangial cells. The injection of advanced-glycation-end-product-cholesterol-aggregated-BSA caused glomerular changes and albuminuria in non-diabetic mice. A transforming-growth-factor-beta receptor 1 kinase inhibitor or Mitogen-activated-Protein-Kinase/Extracellular-Signal-regulated-Kinase kinase (ERK) inhibitor (U-0126) suppressed the proliferation of mesangial cells induced by advanced-glycation-end-product-cholesterol-aggregated-BSA dose-dependently. U-0126 inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in advanced-glycation-end-product-cholesterol-aggregated-BSA treated mesangial cells. These findings suggested that cholesterol promotes the formation of advanced-glycation-end-products-protein and that advanced-glycation-end-product-cholesterol-aggregated protein stimulates mesangial cells to proliferate via

  16. Uremic Toxicity of Advanced Glycation End Products in CKD.

    PubMed

    Stinghen, Andréa E M; Massy, Ziad A; Vlassara, Helen; Striker, Gary E; Boullier, Agnès

    2016-02-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), a heterogeneous group of compounds formed by nonenzymatic glycation reactions between reducing sugars and amino acids, lipids, or DNA, are formed not only in the presence of hyperglycemia, but also in diseases associated with high levels of oxidative stress, such as CKD. In chronic renal failure, higher circulating AGE levels result from increased formation and decreased renal clearance. Interactions between AGEs and their receptors, including advanced glycation end product-specific receptor (RAGE), trigger various intracellular events, such as oxidative stress and inflammation, leading to cardiovascular complications. Although patients with CKD have a higher burden of cardiovascular disease, the relationship between AGEs and cardiovascular disease in patients with CKD is not fully characterized. In this paper, we review the various deleterious effects of AGEs in CKD that lead to cardiovascular complications and the role of these AGEs in diabetic nephropathy. We also discuss potential pharmacologic approaches to circumvent these deleterious effects by reducing exogenous and endogenous sources of AGEs, increasing the breakdown of existing AGEs, or inhibiting AGE-induced inflammation. Finally, we speculate on preventive and therapeutic strategies that focus on the AGE-RAGE axis to prevent vascular complications in patients with CKD.

  17. Vascular Effects of Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products

    PubMed Central

    Stirban, Alin; Tschöpe, Diethelm

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated lately demonstrating that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) play an important role in the development of diabetic and cardiovascular complications as well as the development of other chronic diseases. AGEs originating from diet have a significant contribution to the AGEs body pool and therefore dietary interventions aiming at reducing AGEs load are believed to exert health promoting effects. This review summarizes the evidence from clinical studies regarding effects of dietary AGEs on the vascular system, highlighting also the different aspects of vascular tests. It also advocates an extension of dietary recommendations towards the promotion of cooking methods that reduce dietary AGEs in consumed foods. PMID:26089897

  18. Advanced glycation end-products inhibitors isolated from Schisandra grandiflora.

    PubMed

    Poornima, B; Kumar, D Anand; Siva, Bandi; Venkanna, A; Vadaparthi, P R Rao; Kumar, K; Tiwari, Ashok K; Babu, K Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Free radicals scavenging and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) inhibitory potentials in crude chloroform extract of Schisandra grandiflora were evaluated. Bioassay-guided isolation of the chloroform extract led to the identification of 24 compounds. Among the isolates, ( ± ) gomisin M1, arisantetralone C and D, macelignan, saurulignan B and SZ-MO displayed potent-free radical scavenging as well as AGEs inhibitory potentials. This is the first report identifying the presence of AGEs inhibitory activity and assigning AGEs inhibitory activity to these compounds. Therefore, our research finds new application of traditional medicinal plant S. grandiflora having capacity to reduce formation and accumulation of AGEs in diabetes.

  19. Advanced Glycation End-Product Accumulation Reduces Vitreous Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Lee, On-Tat; Good, Samuel D.; Lamy, Ricardo; Kudisch, Max; Stewart, Jay M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effect of nonenzymatic cross-linking (glycation) upon the permeability of the vitreous to small- and large-solute diffusion. Methods. Vitreous from freshly excised porcine eyes was treated for 30 minutes with control or 0.01%, 0.1%, or 1% methylglyoxal (MG) solution. The efficacy of the glycation regimen was verified by measuring nonenzymatic cross-link density by fluorescence in the vitreous samples. Resistance to collagenase digestion as well as Nε-(carboxyethyl) lysine (CEL) content were also measured. The permeability coefficient for fluorescein and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-IgG diffusion through 3 mL of the vitreous samples was determined by using a custom permeability tester. Results. Vitreous cross-linking with MG treatment was confirmed by increased fluorescence, increased CEL concentration, and increased resistance to collagenase digestion. Vitreous glycation resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the permeability coefficient for fluorescein diffusion when either 0.1% or 1% MG solution was used (5.36 ± 5.24 × 10−5 cm s−1, P = 0.04; and 4.03 ± 2.1 × 10−5 cm s−1, P = 0.001; respectively, compared with control, 9.77 ± 5.45 × 10−5 cm s−1). The permeability coefficient for diffusion of FITC-IgG between control (9.9 ± 6.37 × 10−5 cm s−1) and treatment groups was statistically significant at all MG concentrations (0.01% MG: 3.95 ± 3.44 × 10−5 cm s−1, P = 0.003; 0.1% MG: 4.27 ± 1.32 × 10−5 cm s−1, P = 0.004; and 0.1% MG: 3.72 ± 2.49 × 10−5 cm s−1, P = 0.001). Conclusions. Advanced glycation end-product (AGE) accumulation reduces vitreous permeability when glycation is performed in ex vivo porcine vitreous. The permeability change was more pronounced for the larger solute, suggesting a lower threshold for AGE-induced permeability changes to impact the movement of proteins through the vitreous when compared with smaller molecules. PMID:26024075

  20. Methylglyoxal-Derived Advanced Glycation Endproducts in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wetzels, Suzan; Wouters, Kristiaan; Schalkwijk, Casper G.; Vanmierlo, Tim; Hendriks, Jerome J. A.

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). The activation of inflammatory cells is crucial for the development of MS and is shown to induce intracellular glycolytic metabolism in pro-inflammatory microglia and macrophages, as well as CNS-resident astrocytes. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are stable endproducts formed by a reaction of the dicarbonyl compounds methylglyoxal (MGO) and glyoxal (GO) with amino acids in proteins, during glycolysis. This suggests that, in MS, MGO-derived AGEs are formed in glycolysis-driven cells. MGO and MGO-derived AGEs can further activate inflammatory cells by binding to the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE). Recent studies have revealed that AGEs are increased in the plasma and brain of MS patients. Therefore, AGEs might contribute to the inflammatory status in MS. Moreover, the main detoxification system of dicarbonyl compounds, the glyoxalase system, seems to be affected in MS patients, which may contribute to high MGO-derived AGE levels. Altogether, evidence is emerging for a contributing role of AGEs in the pathology of MS. In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge on the involvement of AGEs in MS. PMID:28212304

  1. Methylglyoxal-Derived Advanced Glycation Endproducts in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wetzels, Suzan; Wouters, Kristiaan; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Vanmierlo, Tim; Hendriks, Jerome J A

    2017-02-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). The activation of inflammatory cells is crucial for the development of MS and is shown to induce intracellular glycolytic metabolism in pro-inflammatory microglia and macrophages, as well as CNS-resident astrocytes. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are stable endproducts formed by a reaction of the dicarbonyl compounds methylglyoxal (MGO) and glyoxal (GO) with amino acids in proteins, during glycolysis. This suggests that, in MS, MGO-derived AGEs are formed in glycolysis-driven cells. MGO and MGO-derived AGEs can further activate inflammatory cells by binding to the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE). Recent studies have revealed that AGEs are increased in the plasma and brain of MS patients. Therefore, AGEs might contribute to the inflammatory status in MS. Moreover, the main detoxification system of dicarbonyl compounds, the glyoxalase system, seems to be affected in MS patients, which may contribute to high MGO-derived AGE levels. Altogether, evidence is emerging for a contributing role of AGEs in the pathology of MS. In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge on the involvement of AGEs in MS.

  2. Early- and advanced non-enzymatic glycation in diabetic vascular complications: the search for therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Schalkwijk, Casper G; Miyata, Toshio

    2012-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a common complication of diabetes and the leading cause of death among people with diabetes. Because of the huge premature morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes, prevention of vascular complications is a key issue. Although the exact mechanism by which vascular damage occurs in diabetes in not fully understood, numerous studies support the hypothesis of a causal relationship of non-enzymatic glycation with vascular complications. In this review, data which point to an important role of Amadori-modified glycated proteins and advanced glycation endproducts in vascular disease are surveyed. Because of the potential role of early- and advanced non-enzymatic glycation in vascular complications, we also described recent developments of pharmacological inhibitors that inhibit the formation of these glycated products or the biological consequences of glycation and thereby retard the development of vascular complications in diabetes.

  3. Mangiferin suppressed advanced glycation end products (AGEs) through NF-κB deactivation and displayed anti-inflammatory effects in streptozotocin and high fat diet-diabetic cardiomyopathy rats.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jun; Zheng, Dezhi; Fung, Gabriel; Deng, Haoyu; Chen, Lin; Liang, Jiali; Jiang, Yan; Hu, Yonghe

    2016-03-01

    Given the importance of the aggregation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and cardiac inflammation in the onset and progression of diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM), our objective in this study was to demonstrate the cardioprotective effect of mangiferin, an antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory agent, on diabetic rat model. The DCM model was established by a high-fat diet and a low dose of streptozotocin. DCM rats were treated orally with mangiferin (20 mg/kg) for 16 weeks. Serum and left ventricular myocardium were collected for determination of inflammatory cytokines. AGEs mRNA and protein expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and receptor for AGEs (RAGE) in myocardium were assayed by real-time PCR and Western blot. ROS levels were measured by dihydroethidium fluorescence staining. NF-κB binding activity was assayed by TransAM NF-κB p65 ELISA kit. Chronic treatment with mangiferin decreased the levels of myocardial enzymes (CK-MB, LDH) and inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β). Meanwhile, NF-κB is inhibited by the reduction of nuclear translocation of p65 subunit, and mangiferin reduced AGE production and decreased the mRNA and protein expression of RAGE in DCM rats. Our data indicated that mangiferin could significantly ameliorate DCM by preventing the release of inflammatory cytokines, and inhibiting ROS accumulation, AGE/RAGE production, and NF-κB nuclear translocation, suggesting that mangiferin treatment might be beneficial in DCM.

  4. Mass spectrometric determination of early and advanced glycation in biology.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Naila; Ashour, Amal; Thornalley, Paul J

    2016-08-01

    Protein glycation in biological systems occurs predominantly on lysine, arginine and N-terminal residues of proteins. Major quantitative glycation adducts are found at mean extents of modification of 1-5 mol percent of proteins. These are glucose-derived fructosamine on lysine and N-terminal residues of proteins, methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone on arginine residues and N(ε)-carboxymethyl-lysine residues mainly formed by the oxidative degradation of fructosamine. Total glycation adducts of different types are quantified by stable isotopic dilution analysis liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Metabolism of glycated proteins is followed by LC-MS/MS of glycation free adducts as minor components of the amino acid metabolome. Glycated proteins and sites of modification within them - amino acid residues modified by the glycating agent moiety - are identified and quantified by label-free and stable isotope labelling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) high resolution mass spectrometry. Sites of glycation by glucose and methylglyoxal in selected proteins are listed. Key issues in applying proteomics techniques to analysis of glycated proteins are: (i) avoiding compromise of analysis by formation, loss and relocation of glycation adducts in pre-analytic processing; (ii) specificity of immunoaffinity enrichment procedures, (iii) maximizing protein sequence coverage in mass spectrometric analysis for detection of glycation sites, and (iv) development of bioinformatics tools for prediction of protein glycation sites. Protein glycation studies have important applications in biology, ageing and translational medicine - particularly on studies of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, renal failure, neurological disorders and cancer. Mass spectrometric analysis of glycated proteins has yet to find widespread use clinically. Future use in health screening, disease diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring, and

  5. Glycation of H1 Histone by 3-Deoxyglucosone: Effects on Protein Structure and Generation of Different Advanced Glycation End Products.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Jalaluddin Mohammad; Rabbani, Gulam; Ahmad, Saheem; Hasan, Qambar; Khan, Rizwan Hasan; Alam, Khursheed; Choi, Inho

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) culminate from the non-enzymatic reaction between a free carbonyl group of a reducing sugar and free amino group of proteins. 3-deoxyglucosone (3-DG) is one of the dicarbonyl species that rapidly forms several protein-AGE complexes that are believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases, particularly diabetic complications. In this study, the generation of AGEs (Nε-carboxymethyl lysine and pentosidine) by 3-DG in H1 histone protein was characterized by evaluating extent of side chain modification (lysine and arginine) and formation of Amadori products as well as carbonyl contents using several physicochemical techniques. Results strongly suggested that 3-DG is a potent glycating agent that forms various intermediates and AGEs during glycation reactions and affects the secondary structure of the H1 protein. Structural changes and AGE formation may influence the function of H1 histone and compromise chromatin structures in cases of secondary diabetic complications.

  6. The Mechanisms of Inhibition of Advanced Glycation End Products Formation through Polyphenols in Hyperglycemic Condition.

    PubMed

    Khangholi, Shahpour; Majid, Fadzilah Adibah Abdul; Berwary, Najat Jabbar Ahmed; Ahmad, Farediah; Aziz, Ramlan Bin Abd

    2016-01-01

    Glycation, the non-enzymatic binding of glucose to free amino groups of an amino acid, yields irreversible heterogeneous compounds known as advanced glycation end products. Those products play a significant role in diabetic complications. In the present article we briefly discuss the contribution of advanced glycation end products to the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, such as atherosclerosis, diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, and wound healing. Then we mention the various mechanisms by which polyphenols inhibit the formation of advanced glycation end products. Finally, recent supporting documents are presented to clarify the inhibitory effects of polyphenols on the formation of advanced glycation end products. Phytochemicals apply several antiglycation mechanisms, including glucose metabolism, amelioration of oxidative stress, scavenging of dicarbonyl species, and up/down-regulation of gene expression. To utilize polyphenols in order to remedy diabetic complications, we must explore, examine and clarify the action mechanisms of the components of polyphenols.

  7. Targeting advanced glycation endproducts and mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Ward, Micheal S; Fortheringham, Amelia K; Cooper, Mark E; Forbes, Josephine M

    2013-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of mortality in the Western World. The development and onset of disease can be attributed to many risk factors including genetic susceptibility, diabetes, obesity and atherosclerosis. Numerous studies highlight the production of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and interaction with their receptor (RAGE) as playing a key pathogenic role. The AGEs-RAGE axis is thought to contribute to a proinflammatory environment inducing cellular dysfunction which cascades towards pathology. Mitochondrial dysfunction concurrently plays a role in these proinflammatory responses presenting excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) production under pathological conditions. This ROS release can exacerbate the production of AGEs fuelling the fire somewhat. However, the AGEs-RAGE axis may influence mitochondrial function independently of inflammation. Therefore instigation of the AGEs-RAGE axis may facilitate spiralling towards pathology on many fronts including CVD development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Determination of advanced glycation endproducts in cooked meat products.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gengjun; Smith, J Scott

    2015-02-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), a pathogenic factor implicated in diabetes and other chronic diseases, are produced in cooked meat products. The objective of this study was to determine the AGE content, as measured by Nε-carboxymethyllysine (CML) levels, in cooked chicken, pork, beef and fish (salmon and tilapia) prepared by three common cooking methods used by U.S. consumers: frying, baking, and broiling. The CML was detected in all the cooked samples, but the levels were dependent on types of meat, cooking conditions, and the final internal temperature. Broiling and frying at higher cooking temperature produced higher levels of CML, and broiled beef contained the highest CML content (21.8μg/g). Baked salmon (8.6μg/g) and baked tilapia (9.7μg/g) contained less CML as compared to the other muscle food samples.

  9. Clinical relevance of advanced glycation endproducts for vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, R; van der Vaart, M G; van Dam, G M; Tio, R A; Hillebrands, J-L; Smit, A J; Zeebregts, C J

    2008-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is the main contributor to cardiovascular disease and leads to intimal plaque formation, which may progress to plaque rupture with subsequent thromboembolic events and/or occlusion of the arterial lumen. There is increasing evidence that the development or progression of atherosclerosis is associated with advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). AGEs are a heterogeneous group of compounds formed by the non-enzymatic reaction of reducing sugars with proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. An increased understanding of the mechanisms of formation and interaction of AGEs has allowed the development of several potential anti-AGE strategies. This review summarizes AGE formation and biochemistry, the pathogeneic role of AGEs in cardiovascular disease, anti-AGE therapies and clinical relevance to vascular surgery.

  10. Advanced glycation endproducts and diabetes. Beyond vascular complications.

    PubMed

    Puddu, Alessandra; Viviani, Giorgio L

    2011-06-01

    Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) are a group of heterogeneous compounds formed by the non enzymatic reactions between aldehydic group of reducing sugars with proteins, lipids or nucleic acids. Formation and accumulation of AGEs is related with the aging process and is accelerated in diabetes. Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes, is characterized by hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance associated to a progressive deterioration of beta cell function and mass. The pathogenic role of AGEs in vascular diabetic complications is widely recognised. Recently other aspects of the detrimental effects of AGEs in type 2 diabetes are emerged: AGEs interfere with the complex molecular pathway of insulin signaling, leading to insulin resistance; AGEs modify the insulin molecule, and, consequently, its function; AGEs decrease insulin secretion and insulin content. In this article we review the role of AGEs in type 2 diabetes, beyond their involvement in vascular complications.

  11. Transketolase A from E. coli Significantly Suppresses Protein Glycation by Glycolaldehyde and Glyoxal in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Alexander; Pfirrmann, Thorsten; Glomb, Marcus A

    2017-09-20

    Short-chained carbonyl species such as glycolaldehyde and its oxidized pendant glyoxal are highly reactive Maillard agents, leading to the formation of protein modifications. These advanced glycation endproducts have gained considerable interest as they have been linked to various pathologies in vivo. The ability of transketolase to use glycolaldehyde as a substrate suggested the possibility to modulate carbonyl-driven Maillard reactions. Model incubations with recombinant transketolase A from Escherichia coli in the presence of bovine serum albumin and glycolaldehyde indeed led to a decrease in glycolaldehyde concentrations paralleled by the enzymatic conversion to erythrulose. As a result, reversibly protein-bound glycolaldehyde and the major final endproduct N(6)-carboxymethyl lysine were significantly reduced by approximately 50%, respectively. Glycolaldehyde is easily oxidized to glyoxal in the presence of amines and oxygen. In the presence of transketolase, the lower amounts of glycolaldehyde therefore also strongly suppressed the formation of glyoxal specific arginine modifications, measured as 5-(2-imino-5-oxo-1-imidazolidinyl)norvaline after acid hydrolysis.

  12. Advanced glycation end products increase carbohydrate responsive element binding protein expression and promote cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanbei; Wu, Lifang; Li, Yakui; Meng, Jian; Lin, Ning; Yang, Dianqiang; Zhu, Yemin; Li, Xiaoyong; Li, Minle; Xu, Ye; Wu, Yuchen; Tong, Xuemei; Su, Qing

    2014-09-01

    Diabetic patients have increased levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and the role of AGEs in regulating cancer cell proliferation is unclear. Here, we found that treating colorectal and liver cancer cells with AGEs promoted cell proliferation. AGEs stimulated both the expression and activation of a key transcription factor called carbohydrate responsive element binding protein (ChREBP) which had been shown to promote glycolytic and anabolic activity as well as proliferation of colorectal and liver cancer cells. Using siRNAs or the antagonistic antibody for the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) blocked AGEs-induced ChREBP expression or cell proliferation in cancer cells. Suppressing ChREBP expression severely impaired AGEs-induced cancer cell proliferation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AGEs-RAGE signaling enhances cancer cell proliferation in which AGEs-mediated ChREBP induction plays an important role. These findings may provide new explanation for increased cancer progression in diabetic patients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Preparation of nucleotide advanced glycation endproducts--imidazopurinone adducts formed by glycation of deoxyguanosine with glyoxal and methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Thomas; Rabbani, Naila; Thornalley, Paul J

    2008-04-01

    An analytical procedure was developed for nucleotide advanced glycation endproducts formed by the reaction of glyoxal and methylglyoxal with deoxyguanosine under physiological conditions. For this, the imidazopurinone derivatives, 3-(2'-deoxyribosyl)-6,7-dihydro-6,7-dihydroxyimidazo[2,3-b]purin-9(8)one (dG-G) and 3-(2'-deoxyribosyl)-6,7-dihydro-6,7-dihydroxy-6-methylimidazo-[2,3-b]purine-9(8)one (dG-MG), were prepared. Authentic standard and stable isotope-substituted standard adducts were prepared and an isotopic dilution analysis assay methodology was developed using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and optimized DNA extraction and nuclease digestion procedures. Analysis of dG-G, dG-MG, and the oxidative marker 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine in the DNA of cultured human cells and mononuclear leukocytes showed that nucleotide advanced glycation endproducts are major markers of DNA damage in human cells.

  14. Advanced glycation end products contribute to amyloidosis in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vitek, M P; Bhattacharya, K; Glendening, J M; Stopa, E; Vlassara, H; Bucala, R; Manogue, K; Cerami, A

    1994-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by deposits of an aggregated 42-amino-acid beta-amyloid peptide (beta AP) in the brain and cerebrovasculature. After a concentration-dependent lag period during in vitro incubations, soluble preparations of synthetic beta AP slowly form fibrillar aggregates that resemble natural amyloid and are measurable by sedimentation and thioflavin T-based fluorescence. Aggregation of soluble beta AP in these in vitro assays is enhanced by addition of small amounts of pre-aggregated beta-amyloid "seed" material. We also have prepared these seeds by using a naturally occurring reaction between glucose and protein amino groups resulting in the formation of advanced "glycosylation" end products (AGEs) which chemically crosslink proteins. AGE-modified beta AP-nucleation seeds further accelerated aggregation of soluble beta AP compared to non-modified "seed" material. Over time, nonenzymatic advanced glycation also results in the gradual accumulation of a set of posttranslational covalent adducts on long-lived proteins in vivo. In a standardized competitive ELISA, plaque fractions of AD brains were found to contain about 3-fold more AGE adducts per mg of protein than preparations from healthy, age-matched controls. These results suggest that the in vivo half-life of beta-amyloid is prolonged in AD, resulting in greater accumulation of AGE modifications which in turn may act to promote accumulation of additional amyloid. PMID:8197133

  15. Reduced formation of advanced glycation endproducts via interactions between glutathione peroxidase 3 and dihydroxyacetone kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hana; Chi, Seung Wook; Lee, Phil Young; Kang, Sunghyun; Cho, Sayeon; Lee, Chong-Kil; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Park, Byoung Chul; Park, Sung Goo

    2009-11-06

    Dihydroxyacetone (DHA) induces the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), which are involved in several diseases. Earlier, we identified dihydroxyacetone kinase 1 (Dak1) as a candidate glutathione peroxidase 3 (Gpx3)-interacting protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This finding is noteworthy, as no clear evidence on the involvement of oxidative stress systems in DHA-induced AGE formation has been found to date. Here, we demonstrate that Gpx3 interacts with Dak1, alleviates DHA-mediated stress by upregulating Dak activity, and consequently suppresses AGE formation. Based on these results, we propose that defense systems against oxidative stress and DHA-induced AGE formation are related via interactions between Gpx3 and Dak1.

  16. Study of an Unusual Advanced Glycation End-Product (AGE) Derived from Glyoxal Using Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Clavijo, Andrea F.; Duque-Daza, Carlos A.; Romero Canelon, Isolda; Barrow, Mark P.; Kilgour, David; Rabbani, Naila; Thornalley, Paul J.; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2014-04-01

    Glycation is a post-translational modification (PTM) that affects the physiological properties of peptides and proteins. In particular, during hyperglycaemia, glycation by α-dicarbonyl compounds generate α-dicarbonyl-derived glycation products also called α-dicarbonyl-derived advanced glycation end products. Glycation by the α-dicarbonyl compound known as glyoxal was studied in model peptides by MS/MS using a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. An unusual type of glyoxal-derived AGE with a mass addition of 21.98436 Da is reported in peptides containing combinations of two arginine-two lysine, and one arginine-three lysine amino acid residues. Electron capture dissociation and collisionally activated dissociation results supported that the unusual glyoxal-derived AGE is formed at the guanidino group of arginine, and a possible structure is proposed to illustrate the 21.9843 Da mass addition.

  17. Advanced glycation end-products: modifiable environmental factors profoundly mediate insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ottum, Mona S.; Mistry, Anahita M.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products are toxic by-products of metabolism and are also acquired from high-temperature processed foods. They promote oxidative damage to proteins, lipids and nucleotides. Aging and chronic diseases are strongly associated with markers for oxidative stress, especially advanced glycation end-products, and resistance to peripheral insulin-mediated glucose uptake. Modifiable environmental factors including high levels of refined and simple carbohydrate diets, hypercaloric diets and sedentary lifestyles drive endogenous formation of advanced glycation end-products via accumulation of highly reactive glycolysis intermediates and activation of the polyol/aldose reductase pathway producing high intracellular fructose. High advanced glycation end-products overwhelm innate defenses of enzymes and receptor-mediated endocytosis and promote cell damage via the pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant receptor for advanced glycation end-products. Oxidative stress disturbs cell signal transduction, especially insulin-mediated metabolic responses. Here we review emerging evidence that restriction of dietary advanced glycation end-products significantly reduces total systemic load and insulin resistance in animals and humans in diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome, healthy populations and dementia. Of clinical importance, this insulin sensitizing effect is independent of physical activity, caloric intake and adiposity level. PMID:26236094

  18. An update on advanced glycation endproducts and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Del Turco, Serena; Basta, Giuseppina

    2012-01-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are a group of modified molecular species formed by nonenzymatic reactions between the aldehydic group of reducing sugars with proteins, lipids, or nucleic acids. Formation and accumulation of AGEs are related to the aging process and are accelerated in diabetes. AGEs are generated in hyperglycemia, but their production also occurs in settings characterized by oxidative stress and inflammation. These species promote vascular damage and acceleration of atherosclerotic plaque progression mainly through two mechanisms: directly, altering the functional properties of vessel wall extracellular matrix molecules, or indirectly, through activation of cell receptor-dependent signaling. Interaction between AGEs and the key receptor for AGEs (RAGE), a transmembrane signaling receptor which is present in all cells relevant to atherosclerosis, alters cellular function, promotes gene expression, and enhances the release of proinflammatory molecules. The importance of the AGE-RAGE interaction and downstream pathways, leading to vessel wall injury and plaque development, has been amply established in animal studies. Moreover, the deleterious link of AGEs with diabetic vascular complications has been suggested in many human studies. Blocking the vicious cycle of AGE-RAGE axis signaling may be essential in controlling and preventing cardiovascular complications. In this article, we review the pathogenetic role of AGEs in the development, progression and instability of atherosclerosis, and the potential targets of this biological system for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2012 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Advanced glycation end products in degenerative nucleus pulposus with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Ho, Natalie Yi-Ju; Lin, Ying-Ting; Lai, Po-Liang; Fu, Tsai-Sheng; Niu, Chi-Chien; Chen, Lih-Huei; Chen, Wen-Jer; Pang, Jong-Hwei S

    2014-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) has been clinically proved as a risk factor of disc degeneration, and the accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is known to be potentially involved in diabetes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of AGEs in the degeneration process of diabetic nucleus pulposus (NP) in rats and humans. Diabetic NP cells from rat coccygeal discs were treated with different concentrations of AGEs (0, 50, and 100 µg/ml) for 3 days, and mRNA expressions of MMP-2 and RAGE were measured by real-time RT-PCR. In addition, conditioned medium from NP cells was used to analyze protein expression of MMP-2 activity and ERK by gelatin zymography and Western blot. These experiments were repeated using human intervertebral disc samples. The immunohistochemical expression of AGEs was significantly increased in diabetic discs. In response to AGEs, an increase of MMP-2, RAGE, and ERK at both mRNA and protein expression levels was observed in diabetic NP cells. The findings suggest that AGEs and DM are associated with disc degeneration in both species. Hyperglycemia in diabetes enhances the accumulation of AGEs in the NP and triggers disc degeneration.

  20. Neurite regeneration in adult rat retinas exposed to advanced glycation end-products and regenerative effects of neurotrophin-4.

    PubMed

    Bikbova, Guzel; Oshitari, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Shuichi

    2013-10-09

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of low concentrations of advanced glycation end-products on neurite regeneration in isolated rat retinas, and to determine the effects of neurotrophin-4 on regeneration in advanced glycation end-products exposed retinas. Retinal explants of 4 adult Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured on collagen gel and were incubated in; (1) serum-free control culture media, (2) glucose-advanced glycation end-products-bovine serum albumin media, (3) glycolaldehyde-advanced glycation end-products-bovine serum albumin media, (4) glyceraldehyde-advanced glycation end-products-bovine serum albumin media, (5) glucose-advanced glycation end-products+neurotrophin-4 media, (6) glycolaldehyde-advanced glycation end-products+neurotrophin-4 media, or (7) glyceraldehyde-advanced glycation end-products+neurotrophin-4 supplemented culture media. After 7 days, the number of regenerating neurites from the explants was counted. Then, explants were fixed, cryosectioned, and stained for TUNEL. The ratio of TUNEL-positive cells to all cells in the ganglion cell layer was determined. Immunohistochemical examinations for the active-form of caspase-9 and apoptosis-inducing factor were performed. In retinas incubated with advanced glycation end-products containing media, the number of regenerating neurites were fewer than in retinas without advanced glycation end-products, and the number of TUNEL-positive cells and caspase-9- and apoptosis-inducing factor-immunopositive cells was significantly higher than in control media. Neurotrophin-4 supplementation increased the numbers of regenerating neuritis, and the number of TUNEL-positives, caspase-9-, and apoptosis-inducing factor-immunopositive cells were significantly fewer than that in advanced glycation end-products without neurotrophin-4 media. Low doses of advanced glycation end-products impede neurite regeneration in the rat retinas. Neurotrophin-4 significantly enhances neurite regeneration in

  1. Immunological detection of a novel advanced glycation end-product.

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, M.; Yanase, Y.; Matsuura, N.; Yamagishi Si, S.; Kameda, Y.; Bucala, R.; Makita, Z.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The advanced stage of the Maillard reaction that leads to the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of angiopathy in diabetic patients and in the aging process. Recently, it has been proposed that the intermediates contributing to AGE formation include dicarbonyl intermediates such as glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and 3-deoxyglucosone (3-DG). In the present study, we developed a novel, non-carboxymethyllysine (CML) anti-AGE antibody that recognizes serum proteins and peptides modified by 3-DG in vivo. MATERIALS AND METHODS: AGE-modified serum albumins were prepared by incubation of rabbit serum albumin with 3-DG or D-glucose. After immunization of rabbits, anti-AGE antisera were subjected to affinity chromatography on a Sepharose 4B column coupled with CML-BSA, or AGE-BSA created by incubation with 3-DG (AGE-6) or D-glucose (AGE-1). The AGE-Ab-6 and AGE-Ab-1 thus obtained was used to investigate AGEs in serum from diabetic patients on hemodialysis. RESULTS: Characterization of the novel AGE-Ab-6 obtained by immunoaffinity chromatography was performed with a competitive ELISA and immunoblot analysis. This antibody specifically cross-reacted with proteins modified by 3-DG. AGE-6 was detected in diabetic serum as three peaks with apparent molecular weights of 200, 1.15, and 0.85 kD, while AGE-1 was detected as four peaks with apparent molecular weights of 200, 65, 1.15, and 0.85 kD. CONCLUSION: This study provides new data on the pathways of AGE formation from 3-DG and methods for the immunochemical detection of AGEs. We also provide immunochemical evidence for the existence of six distinct AGEs in vivo among the AGE-modified proteins and peptides in the serum of diabetic patients on hemodialysis. PMID:11788793

  2. Acute insulin resistance mediated by advanced glycation endproducts in severely burned rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xing; Xu, Jie; Cai, Xiaoqing; Ji, Lele; Li, Jia; Cao, Bing; Li, Jun; Hu, Dahai; Li, Yan; Wang, Haichang; Xiong, Lize; Xiao, Ruiping; Gao, Feng

    2014-06-01

    Hyperglycemia often occurs in severe burns; however, the underlying mechanisms and importance of managing postburn hyperglycemia are not well recognized. This study was designed to investigate the dynamic changes of postburn hyperglycemia and the underlying mechanisms and to evaluate whether early glycemic control is beneficial in severe burns. Prospective, randomized experimental study. Animal research laboratory. Sprague-Dawley rats. Anesthetized rats were subjected to a full-thickness burn injury comprising 40% of the total body surface area and were randomized to receive vehicle, insulin, and a soluble form of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts treatments. An in vitro study was performed on cultured H9C2 cells subjected to vehicle or carboxymethyllysine treatment. We found that blood glucose change presented a distinct pattern with two occurrences of hyperglycemia at 0.5- and 3-hour postburn, respectively. Acute insulin resistance evidenced by impaired insulin signaling and glucose uptake occurred at 3-hour postburn, which was associated with the second hyperglycemia and positively correlated with mortality. Mechanistically, we found that serum carboxymethyllysine, a dominant species of advanced glycation endproducts, increased within 1-hour postburn, preceding the occurrence of insulin resistance. More importantly, treatment of animals with soluble form of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts, blockade of advanced glycation endproducts signaling, alleviated severe burn-induced insulin resistance. In addition, early hyperglycemic control with insulin not only reduced serum carboxymethyllysine but also blunted postburn insulin resistance and reduced mortality. These findings suggest that severe burn-induced insulin resistance is partly at least mediated by serum advanced glycation endproducts and positively correlated with mortality. Early glycemic control with insulin or inhibition of advanced glycation endproducts with soluble form of receptor

  3. Advanced glycation endproducts and rat dental implant osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Quintero, David G; Winger, Julia N; Khashaba, Rania; Borke, James L

    2010-01-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are a diverse group of molecular adducts formed in environments high in reducing sugars that accumulate with aging and in diabetes. This study tests the hypothesis that AGEs inhibit the stabile osseointegration of dental implants through tissue interactions that interfere with bone turnover and compromise the biomechanical properties at the bone-implant interface. Maxillary first molars were extracted from 32 rats and allowed to heal for 4 weeks. Titanium implants (1 mm x 3 mm) were placed in the healed sockets of 2 groups of 16 rats consisting of 8 rats injected 3 times/wk for 1 month with AGE (prepared from glucose and lysine) and 8 rats injected with vehicle as a control. AGE injections continued for an additional 14 or 28 days before sacrifice. X-ray images, blood, and tissues were collected to examine bone/implant contact ratio, serum pyridinoline ([PYD] a collagen breakdown marker), osteocalcin ([OSC] a bone formation marker), and for immunohistochemistry with antibodies to AGE and the bone turnover-marker protein matrix metalloproteinase1. Compared with the AGE-treated groups, the controls showed significantly higher bone/implant contact at both 14- and 28-day time points. PYD (P < .05) and OSC (trend) levels from controls showed decreases at 28 days when compared with AGE-treated groups. Immunohistochemistry with AGE-specific and bone turnover marker antibodies showed stronger staining associated with the implant/tissue interface in AGE-treated rats. Our studies indicate an association between AGE and inhibition of bone turnover, suggesting that the formation of AGE in high glycemic conditions, such as diabetes, may contribute to a slower rate of osseointegration that negatively affects implant stability.

  4. Advanced glycation end products in idiopathic frozen shoulders

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Kyu Rim; Murrell, George A.C.; Millar, Neal L.; Bonar, Fiona; Lam, Patrick; Walton, Judie R.

    2017-01-01

    Background The pathophysiologic mechanisms behind proliferation of fibroblasts and deposition of dense collagen matrix in idiopathic frozen shoulder remain unclear. Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) with cross-linking and stabilization of collagen has been hypothesized to contribute to this pathophysiologic process. This study investigated whether the immunoreactivity of AGEs is higher in patients with idiopathic frozen shoulder than in the control groups. Methods Shoulder capsule samples were collected from 8 patients with idiopathic frozen shoulder, 6 with unstable shoulders (control 1), and 8 with rotator cuff tears (control 2). The samples were hematoxylin and eosin stained and analyzed by immunohistochemistry using antibodies against AGEs. Immunoreactivities were rated in a blinded fashion from none (0) to strong (3). Immunohistochemical distribution within the capsule was noted. Results Frozen shoulder patients had greater frequency and severity of self-reported pain (P = .02) than rotator cuff tear patients and more restricted range of motion in all planes (P < .05) than patients of the instability and rotator cuff tear groups. Hematoxylin and eosin–stained capsular tissue from frozen shoulder showed fibroblastic proliferation, increased numbers of adipocytes, and increased subsynovial vascularity. Immunoreactivity of AGEs was stronger in frozen shoulder capsules (2.8) than in instability (0.3; P = .0001) and rotator cuff tear (1.1; P = .016) capsules. Conclusion This study highlights a potential role for AGEs in the pathogenesis of frozen shoulder. The overexpression of AGEs may explain the fibroblastic proliferation and deposition of collagen matrix in idiopathic frozen shoulder. Level of evidence Basic Science Study; Histology PMID:26776943

  5. Genistein inhibits advanced glycation end product formation by trapping methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Lv, Lishuang; Shao, Xi; Chen, Huadong; Ho, Chi-Tang; Sang, Shengmin

    2011-04-18

    Methylglyoxal (MGO) is a highly reactive endogenous metabolite derived from several nonenzymatic and enzymatic reactions, and identified as a well-known precursor of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). In the present study, genistein, a naturally occurring isoflavone derived from soy products, demonstrated significant trapping effects of MGO and consequently formed mono- and di-MGO adducts under physiological conditions (pH 7.4, 37 °C). More than 80.0% of MGO was trapped within 4 h, and the trapping efficiency could be up to 97.7% at 24 h. The reaction adducts formed from genistein and MGO under different ratios were analyzed using LC/MS. We also successfully purified and identified the major mono- and di-MGO conjugated adducts of genistein. The NMR data showed that positions 6 and 8 of the A ring of genistein were the major active sites for trapping MGO. We further demonstrated that genistein could effectively inhibit the formation of AGEs in the human serum albumin (HSA)-MGO assay. Two mono-MGO adducts and one di-MGO adduct of genistein were detected in this assay using LC/MS. The di-MGO adduct of genistein became the dominant reaction product during prolonged incubation. Results from this study, as well as our previous findings on (-)-epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG), phloridzin and phloretin, indicate that dietary flavonoids that have the same A ring structure as genistein, EGCG, phloridzin, and phloretin may have the potential to inhibit the formation of AGEs by trapping reactive dicarbonyl species.

  6. RAGE, Receptor of Advanced Glycation Endoproducts, Negatively Regulates Chondrocytes Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kurosaka, Yuko; Nishimura, Haruka; Tanabe, Motoki; Takakura, Yuuki; Iwai, Keisuke; Waki, Takuya; Fujita, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    RAGE, receptor for advanced glycation endoproducts (AGE), has been characterized as an activator of osteoclastgenesis. However, whether RAGE directly regulates chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation is unclear. Here, we show that RAGE has an inhibitory role in chondrocyte differentiation. RAGE expression was observed in chondrocytes from the prehypertrophic to hypertrophic regions. In cultured cells, overexpression of RAGE or dominant-negative-RAGE (DN-RAGE) demonstrated that RAGE inhibited cartilaginous matrix production, while DN-RAGE promoted production. Additionally, RAGE regulated Ihh and Col10a1 negatively but upregulated PTHrP receptor. Ihh promoter analysis and real-time PCR analysis suggested that downregulation of Cdxs was the key for RAGE-induced inhibition of chondrocyte differentiation. Overexpression of the NF-κB inhibitor I-κB-SR inhibited RAGE-induced NF-κB activation, but did not influence inhibition of cartilaginous matrix production by RAGE. The inhibitory action of RAGE was restored by the Rho family GTPases inhibitor Toxin B. Furthermore, inhibitory action on Ihh, Col10a1 and Cdxs was reproduced by constitutively active forms, L63RhoA, L61Rac, and L61Cdc42, but not by I-κB-SR. Cdx1 induced Ihh and Col10a1 expressions and directly interacted with Ihh promoter. Retinoic acid (RA) partially rescued the inhibitory action of RAGE. These data combined suggests that RAGE negatively regulates chondrocyte differentiation at the prehypertrophic stage by modulating NF-κB-independent and Rho family GTPases-dependent mechanisms. PMID:25275461

  7. Stimulatory effects of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) on fibronectin matrix assembly.

    PubMed

    Pastino, Alexandra K; Greco, Todd M; Mathias, Rommel A; Cristea, Ileana M; Schwarzbauer, Jean E

    2017-05-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are a heterogeneous group of compounds that form via non-enzymatic glycation of proteins throughout our lifespan and at a higher rate in certain chronic diseases such as diabetes. AGEs contribute to the progression of fibrosis, in part by stimulating cellular pathways that affect gene expression. Long-lived ECM proteins are targets for non-enzymatic glycation but the question of whether the AGE-modified ECM leads to excess ECM accumulation and fibrosis remains unanswered. In this study, cellular changes due to AGE accretion in the ECM were investigated. Non-enzymatic glycation of proteins in a decellularized fibroblast ECM was achieved by incubating the ECM in a solution of methylglyoxal (MGO). Mass spectrometry of fibronectin (FN) isolated from the glycated matrix identified twenty-eight previously unidentified MGO-derived AGE modification sites including functional sites such as the RGD integrin-binding sequence. Mesangial cells grown on the glycated, decellularized matrix assembled increased amounts of FN matrix. Soluble AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (BSA) also stimulated FN matrix assembly and this effect was reduced by function-blocking antibodies against the receptor for AGE (RAGE). These results indicate that cells respond to AGEs by increasing matrix assembly and that RAGE is involved in this response. This raises the possibility that the accumulation of ECM during the progression of fibrosis may be enhanced by cell interactions with AGEs on a glycated ECM.

  8. Glycation inhibitors extend yeast chronological lifespan by reducing advanced glycation end products and by back regulation of proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Rubina S; Banarjee, Reema M; Deshmukh, Arati B; Patil, Gouri V; Jagadeeshaprasad, Mashanipalya G; Kulkarni, Mahesh J

    2017-03-06

    Advanced Glycation End products (AGEs) are implicated in aging process. Thus, reducing AGEs by using glycation inhibitors may help in attenuating the aging process. In this study using Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast system, we show that Aminoguanidine (AMG), a well-known glycation inhibitor, decreases the AGE modification of proteins in non-calorie restriction (NR) (2% glucose) and extends chronological lifespan (CLS) similar to that of calorie restriction (CR) condition (0.5% glucose). Proteomic analysis revealed that AMG back regulates the expression of differentially expressed proteins especially those involved in mitochondrial respiration in NR condition, suggesting that it switches metabolism from fermentation to respiration, mimicking CR. AMG induced back regulation of differentially expressed proteins could be possibly due to its chemical effect or indirectly by glycation inhibition. To delineate this, Metformin (MET), a structural analog of AMG and a mild glycation inhibitor and Hydralazine (HYD), another potent glycation inhibitor but not structural analog of AMG were used. HYD was more effective than MET in mimicking AMG suggesting that glycation inhibition was responsible for restoration of differentially expressed proteins. Thus glycation inhibitors particularly AMG, HYD and MET extend yeast CLS by reducing AGEs, modulating the expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration and possibly by scavenging glucose.

  9. How Can Diet Affect the Accumulation of Advanced Glycation End-Products in the Human Body?

    PubMed Central

    Guilbaud, Axel; Niquet-Leridon, Celine; Boulanger, Eric; Tessier, Frederic J.

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is associated with the complications of diabetes, kidney disease, metabolic disorders and degenerative diseases. It is recognized that the pool of glycation products found in the human body comes not only from an endogenous formation, but also from a dietary exposure to exogenous AGEs. In recent years, the development of pharmacologically-active ingredients aimed at inhibiting endogenous glycation has not been successful. Since the accumulation of AGEs in the human body appears to be progressive throughout life, an early preventive action against glycation could be effective through dietary adjustments or supplementation with purified micronutrients. The present article provides an overview of current dietary strategies tested either in vitro, in vivo or both to reduce the endogenous formation of AGEs and to limit exposure to food AGEs. PMID:28231179

  10. Beneficial effect of Azadirachta indica on advanced glycation end-product in streptozotocin-diabetic rat.

    PubMed

    Perez Gutierrez, Rosa Martha; de Jesus Martinez Ortiz, Maria

    2014-11-01

    Both oxidation and hyperglycemia cause increased glycation and the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) which underlie the complications of diabetes. The goal of this article is to determine the effect of the chloroform extract from leaves of Azadirachta indica A. Juss; (Meliaceae) (AI) on the formation of glycated protein. Chloroform extract was subjected to in vitro bioassays to evaluate advanced glycation end-products formation. Bovine serum albumin (BSA)-glucose, BSA-methylglyoxal, Amadori-rich protein, glycated hemoglobin, oxidation, and glycation of LDL were determined. Doses of AI of 200 mg/kg/d by oral gavage were administered once daily for 30 d, at streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. After this period, renal damage (TBARS), glucose, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and tail tendon collagen were investigated. AI exhibits protective action in BSA against glycation formation, GHb, protein levels, and LDL against glycation and oxidation. The renal glucose level decreases a 3.9 mg/g wet tissue. TBA-reactive substance showed a significant decrease to 1.82 mmol/mg protein. In addition, AI showed inhibitory activity against AGEs formation, methylglyoxal, and glycolaldehyde levels in kidney. Treatment with AI in rat tail tendon produced a reduction in cross-linking of collagen proteins. The antiglycation activities of A. indica were attributed in part to their antioxidant activity. AI alleviated oxidative stress under diabetic conditions through the inhibition of lipid peroxidation prevents the onset renal damage. We found that A. indica is an inhibitor AGE formation, and oxidative stress with a renoprotective effect, which are considered to play important roles in diabetic kidney disease.

  11. Advanced glycation end products and their relevance in female reproduction.

    PubMed

    Merhi, Z

    2014-01-01

    Do advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptors play a role in female reproduction? AGEs might contribute to the etiology of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and infertility. The endogenous AGEs are produced in the body by chemical reactions. Exogenous sources of AGEs are diet and smoking. AGEs have been proposed to be among the main intermediaries involved in several diseases, such as metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, ovarian aging, inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders and PCOS. A systematic review was performed for all available basic science and clinical peer-reviewed articles published in PubMed from 1987 to date. Abstracts of annual meetings of the Endocrine Society and American Society for Reproductive Medicine were also reviewed. A total of 275 publications and scientific abstracts were identified from the initial search. Sixty-two papers and four published scientific abstracts were selected for full review. The main outcomes were the regulatory effects of AGEs on: (i) granulosa cells, adipocyte physiology, obesity and insulin resistance in women with PCOS and in polycystic ovary animal models and (ii) infertility and measures of ovarian reserve. There is an intricate relationship between the AGE-RAGE (receptor for AGEs) system and some aspects of PCOS, such as granulosa cell dysfunction, adipocyte pathophysiology, obesity and insulin resistance. Additionally, irregular ovarian AGE signaling might in part explain the abnormal ovarian histology observed in women with PCOS. The ovarian dysfunction due to AGEs in women without PCOS suggests a role for the AGE-RAGE system in the ovarian follicular environment, and might relate to assisted reproduction technology outcome and measures of ovarian reserve. The body of literature currently available limits these findings. The results obtained from granulosa cell lines and animal models may not fully extrapolate to humans. This review underscores a critical need

  12. Advanced glycation endproducts in horses with insulin-induced laminitis.

    PubMed

    de Laat, M A; Kyaw-Tanner, M T; Sillence, M N; McGowan, C M; Pollitt, C C

    2012-01-15

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer, inflammatory conditions and diabetic complications. An interaction of AGEs with their receptor (RAGE) results in increased release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS), causing damage to susceptible tissues. Laminitis, a debilitating foot condition of horses, occurs in association with endocrine dysfunction and the potential involvement of AGE and RAGE in the pathogenesis of the disease has not been previously investigated. Glucose transport in lamellar tissue is thought to be largely insulin-independent (GLUT-1), which may make the lamellae susceptible to protein glycosylation and oxidative stress during periods of increased glucose metabolism. Archived lamellar tissue from horses with insulin-induced laminitis (n=4), normal control horses (n=4) and horses in the developmental stages (6h, 12h and 24h) of the disease (n=12) was assessed for AGE accumulation and the presence of oxidative protein damage and cellular lipid peroxidation. The equine-specific RAGE gene was identified in lamellar tissue, sequenced and is now available on GenBank. Lamellar glucose transporter (GLUT-1 and GLUT-4) gene expression was assessed quantitatively with qRT-PCR in laminitic and control horses and horses in the mid-developmental time-point (24 h) of the disease. Significant AGE accumulation had occurred by the onset of insulin-induced laminitis (48 h) but not at earlier time-points, or in control horses. Evidence of oxidative stress was not found in any group. The equine-specific RAGE gene was not expressed differently in treated and control animals, nor was the insulin-dependent glucose transporter GLUT-4. However, the glucose transporter GLUT-1 was increased in lamellar tissue in the developmental stages of insulin-induced laminitis compared to control horses and the insulin-independent nature of the lamellae may facilitate AGE formation. However, due to the lack of

  13. Advanced glycation end-products diminish tendon collagen fiber sliding.

    PubMed

    Li, Yufei; Fessel, Gion; Georgiadis, Marios; Snedeker, Jess G

    2013-04-24

    Connective tissue aging and diabetes related comorbidity are associated with compromised tissue function, increased susceptibility to injury, and reduced healing capacity. This has been partly attributed to collagen cross-linking by advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) that accumulate with both age and disease. While such cross-links are believed to alter the physical properties of collagen structures and tissue behavior, existing data relating AGEs to tendon mechanics is contradictory. In this study, we utilized a rat tail tendon model to quantify the micro-mechanical repercussion of AGEs at the collagen fiber-level. Individual tendon fascicles were incubated with methylglyoxal (MGO), a naturally occurring metabolite known to form AGEs. After incubation in MGO solution or buffer only, tendons were stretched on the stage of a multiphoton confocal microscope and individual collagen fiber stretch and relative fiber sliding were quantified. Treatment by MGO yielded increased fluorescence and elevated denaturation temperatures as found in normally aged tissue, confirming formation of AGEs and related cross-links. No apparent ultrastructural changes were noted in transmission electron micrographs of cross-linked fibrils. MGO treatment strongly reduced tissue stress relaxation (p<0.01), with concomitantly increased tissue yield stress (p<0.01) and ultimate failure stress (p=0.036). MGO did not affect tangential modulus in the linear part of the stress-strain curve (p=0.46). Microscopic analysis of collagen fiber kinematics yielded striking results, with MGO treatment drastically reducing fiber-sliding (p<0.01) with a compensatory increase in fiber-stretch (p<0.01). We thus conclude that the main mechanical effect of AGEs is a loss of tissue viscoelasticity driven by matrix-level loss of fiber-fiber sliding. This has potentially important implications to tissue damage accumulation, mechanically regulated cell signaling, and matrix remodeling. It further highlights the

  14. Sulforaphane reduces advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-induced inflammation in endothelial cells and rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Matsui, T; Nakamura, N; Ojima, A; Nishino, Y; Yamagishi, S-I

    2016-09-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-receptor RAGE interaction evokes oxidative stress and inflammatory reactions, thereby being involved in endothelial cell (EC) damage in diabetes. Sulforaphane is generated from glucoraphanin, a naturally occurring isothiocyanate found in widely consumed cruciferous vegetables, by myrosinase. Sulforaphane has been reported to protect against oxidative stress-mediated cell and tissue injury. However, effects of sulforaphane on AGEs-induced vascular damage remain unclear. In this study, we investigated whether and how sulforaphane could inhibit inflammation in AGEs-exposed human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) and AGEs-injected rat aorta. Sulforaphane treatment for 4 or 24 h dose-dependently inhibited the AGEs-induced increase in RAGE, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecular-1 (VCAM-1) gene expression in HUVECs. AGEs significantly stimulated MCP-1 production by, and THP-1 cell adhesion to, HUVECs, both of which were prevented by 1.6 μM sulforaphane. Sulforaphane significantly suppressed oxidative stress generation and NADPH oxidase activation evoked by AGEs in HUVECs. Furthermore, aortic RAGE, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in AGEs-injected rats were increased, which were suppressed by simultaneous infusion of sulforaphane. The present study demonstrated for the first time that sulforaphane could inhibit inflammation in AGEs-exposed HUVECs and AGEs-infused rat aorta partly by suppressing RAGE expression through its anti-oxidative properties. Inhibition of the AGEs-RAGE axis by sulforaphane might be a novel therapeutic target for vascular injury in diabetes. Copyright © 2016 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Advanced glycation end products and diabetic nephropathy: a comparative study using diabetic and normal rats with methylglyoxal-induced glycation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Lisa; Matafome, Paulo; Crisóstomo, Joana; Santos-Silva, Daniela; Sena, Cristina; Pereira, Paulo; Seiça, Raquel

    2014-03-01

    Hyperglycemia-related advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation is a key mechanism in diabetic nephropathy. Since methylglyoxal (MG) is a potent AGE precursor, we aimed to assess the role of MG-related AGE formation in the progression of renal damages. A comparative study between Wistar (W, normal) and Goto-Kakizaki (GK, nonobese type 2 diabetic) rats was performed at 6 and 14 months old and after 14 weeks of MG administration to 6-month-old rats. Diabetic rats showed progressive structural, biochemical, and functional alterations, including AGE, albuminuria, and tissue hypoxia, which were partially mimicked by MG administration to young GK rats. Aged Wistar rats had an impairment of some parameters, whereas MG administration caused a phenotype similar to young GK rats, including oxidative stress, impaired apoptotic and angiogenic markers, and structural lesions. MG accumulation specifically impaired several of the renal disease markers progressively observed in diabetic rats, and thus, it contributes to the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  16. Advanced glycation end products in human cancer tissues: detection of Nepsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine and argpyrimidine.

    PubMed

    van Heijst, Jeroen W J; Niessen, Hans W M; Hoekman, Klaas; Schalkwijk, Casper G

    2005-06-01

    Tumors are generally characterized by an increased glucose uptake and a high rate of glycolysis. Since one consequence of an elevated glycolysis is the nonenzymatic glycation of proteins, we studied the presence of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in human cancer tissues. We detected the presence of the AGEs N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and argpyrimidine in several human tumors using specific antibodies. Because AGEs have been associated with the etiology of a variety of different diseases, these results suggest that CML and argpyrimidine could be implicated in the biology of human cancer.

  17. Effect of diet-derived advanced glycation end products on inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kellow, Nicole J; Coughlan, Melinda T

    2015-11-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) formed via the Maillard reaction during the thermal processing of food contributes to the flavor, color, and aroma of food. A proportion of food-derived AGEs and their precursors is intestinally absorbed and accumulates within cells and tissues. AGEs have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes-related complications and several chronic diseases via interaction with the receptor for AGEs, which promotes the transcription of genes that control inflammation. The dicarbonyls, highly reactive intermediates of AGE formation, are also generated during food processing and may incite inflammatory responses through 1) the suppression of protective pathways, 2) the incretin axis, 3) the modulation of immune-mediated signaling, and 4) changes in gut microbiota profile and metabolite sensors. In animal models, restriction of dietary AGEs attenuates chronic low-grade inflammation, but current evidence from human studies is less clear. Here, the emerging relationship between excess dietary AGE consumption and inflammation is explored, the utility of dietary AGE restriction as a therapeutic strategy for the attenuation of chronic diseases is discussed, and possible avenues for future investigation are suggested. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Longistatin in tick saliva blocks advanced glycation end-product receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Anisuzzaman; Hatta, Takeshi; Miyoshi, Takeharu; Matsubayashi, Makoto; Islam, M. Khyrul; Alim, M. Abdul; Anas, M. Abu; Hasan, M. Mehedi; Matsumoto, Yasunobu; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Fujisaki, Kozo; Tsuji, Naotoshi

    2014-01-01

    Ticks are notorious hematophagous ectoparasites and vectors of many deadly pathogens. As an effective vector, ticks must break the strong barrier provided by the skin of their host during feeding, and their saliva contains a complex mixture of bioactive molecules that paralyze host defenses. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) mediates immune cell activation at inflammatory sites and is constitutively and highly expressed in skin. Here, we demonstrate that longistatin secreted with saliva of the tick Haemaphysalis longicornis binds RAGE and modulates the host immune response. Similar to other RAGE ligands, longistatin specifically bound the RAGE V domain, and stimulated cultured HUVECs adhered to a longistatin-coated surface; this binding was dramatically inhibited by soluble RAGE or RAGE siRNA. Treatment of HUVECs with longistatin prior to stimulation substantially attenuated cellular oxidative stress and prevented NF-κB translocation, thereby reducing adhesion molecule and cytokine production. Recombinant longistatin inhibited RAGE-mediated migration of mouse peritoneal resident cells (mPRCs) and ameliorated inflammation in mouse footpad edema and pneumonia models. Importantly, tick bite upregulated RAGE ligands in skin, and endogenous longistatin attenuated RAGE-mediated inflammation during tick feeding. Our results suggest that longistatin is a RAGE antagonist that suppresses tick bite–associated inflammation, allowing successful blood-meal acquisition from hosts. PMID:25401185

  19. Sesamin Ameliorates Advanced Glycation End Products-Induced Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiang; Wang, Guo-Dong; Ma, Ming-Zhe; Deng, Ru-Yuan; Guo, Li-Qun; Zhang, Jun-Xiu; Yang, Jie-Ren; Su, Qing

    2015-06-09

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), the direct modulators of β-cells, have been shown to cause insulin-producing β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis through increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Sesamin has been demonstrated to possess antioxidative activity. This study was designed to investigate whether sesamin protects against AGEs-evoked β-cell damage via its antioxidant property. The effects of sesamin were examined in C57BL/6J mice and MIN6 cell line. In in vivo studies, mice were intraperitoneally injected with AGEs (120 mg/kg) and orally treated with sesamin (160 mg/kg) for four weeks. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance and insulin releasing tests were performed. Insulin content, ROS generation and β-cell apoptosis in pancreatic islets were also measured. In in vitro studies, MIN6 cells were pretreated with sesamin (50 or 100 μM) and then exposed to AGEs (200 mg/L) for 24 h. Insulin secretion, β-cell death, ROS production as well as expression and activity of NADPH oxidase were determined. Sesamin treatment obviously ameliorated AGE-induced β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis both in vivo and in vitro. These effects were associated with decreased ROS production, down-regulated expression of p67(phox) and p22(phox), and reduced NADPH oxidase activity. These results suggest that sesamin protects β-cells from damage caused by AGEs through suppressing NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative stress.

  20. Sesamin Ameliorates Advanced Glycation End Products-Induced Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiang; Wang, Guo-Dong; Ma, Ming-Zhe; Deng, Ru-Yuan; Guo, Li-Qun; Zhang, Jun-Xiu; Yang, Jie-Ren; Su, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), the direct modulators of β-cells, have been shown to cause insulin-producing β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis through increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Sesamin has been demonstrated to possess antioxidative activity. This study was designed to investigate whether sesamin protects against AGEs-evoked β-cell damage via its antioxidant property. The effects of sesamin were examined in C57BL/6J mice and MIN6 cell line. In in vivo studies, mice were intraperitoneally injected with AGEs (120 mg/kg) and orally treated with sesamin (160 mg/kg) for four weeks. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance and insulin releasing tests were performed. Insulin content, ROS generation and β-cell apoptosis in pancreatic islets were also measured. In in vitro studies, MIN6 cells were pretreated with sesamin (50 or 100 μM) and then exposed to AGEs (200 mg/L) for 24 h. Insulin secretion, β-cell death, ROS production as well as expression and activity of NADPH oxidase were determined. Sesamin treatment obviously ameliorated AGE-induced β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis both in vivo and in vitro. These effects were associated with decreased ROS production, down-regulated expression of p67phox and p22phox, and reduced NADPH oxidase activity. These results suggest that sesamin protects β-cells from damage caused by AGEs through suppressing NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative stress. PMID:26066015

  1. Inhibition of the formation of advanced glycation end products by thymoquinone.

    PubMed

    Losso, Jack N; Bawadi, Hiba A; Chintalapati, Madhavi

    2011-09-01

    The inhibitory activity of thymoquinone, a major quinone from black seeds (Nigella sativa) against the formation of advanced glycation end products was studied using the hemoglobin-δ-gluconolactone, human serum albumin-glucose, and the N-acetyl-glycyl-lysine methyl ester-ribose assays. A comparison was made with the inhibitory activity of aminoguanidine. The cytotoxicity of thymoquinone was studied by the release of lactate dehydrogenase from platelets and the levels of plasma thiols. At 20μM, thymoquinone inhibited 39% of hemoglobin glycation, 82% of post-Amadori glycation products, reduced methyglyoxal-mediated human serum albumin glycation by 68%, inhibited 78% of late glycation end products. Aminoguanidine at 10mM was less effective than thymoquinone. The IC50 for thymoquinone and aminoguanidine were 7.2μM and 1.25mM, respectively. Thymoquinone at 20-50μM was not toxic to platelet lactate dehydrogenase and plasma thiols. The potential of thymoquinone in food applications is discussed.

  2. Linolenic acid prevents early and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) modification of albumin.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, Govindarajan; Saraswathi, N T

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we report the protective effects of linolenic acid towards the formation of early (HbA1c) and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) based on fluorescence, circular dichroism, confocal microscopy and molecular interaction studies. Linolenic acid was found to be a potent inhibitor of AGEs formed by both glucose and fructose. The HbA1c (early glycation product) level was found to be reduced to 7.4% when compared to glycated control (8.4%). Similarly, linolenic acid also inhibited the methylglyoxal mediated AGEs formation. Circular dichroism spectroscopy studies suggested that the protective effect of linolenic acid for the helical structure of albumin. The molecular interaction studies showed that linolenic acid interacts with arginine residues of albumin with high affinity. Results suggested linolenic acid to be a potent antiglycation compound and also it could be a better lead compound for AGE inhibition.

  3. Advanced Glycation End Products in Extracellular Matrix Proteins Contribute to the Failure of Sensory Nerve Regeneration in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Duran-Jimenez, Beatriz; Dobler, Darin; Moffatt, Sarah; Rabbani, Naila; Streuli, Charles H.; Thornalley, Paul J.; Tomlinson, David R.; Gardiner, Natalie J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The goal of this study was to characterize glycation adducts formed in both in vivo extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins of endoneurium from streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats and in vitro by glycation of laminin and fibronectin with methylglyoxal and glucose. We also investigated the impact of advanced glycation end product (AGE) residue content of ECM on neurite outgrowth from sensory neurons. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Glycation, oxidation, and nitration adducts of ECM proteins extracted from the endoneurium of control and STZ-induced diabetic rat sciatic nerve (3–24 weeks post-STZ) and of laminin and fibronectin that had been glycated using glucose or methylglyoxal were examined by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Methylglyoxal-glycated or unmodified ECM proteins were used as substrata for dissociated rat sensory neurons as in vitro models of regeneration. RESULTS STZ-induced diabetes produced a significant increase in early glycation Nε-fructosyl-lysine and AGE residue contents of endoneurial ECM. Glycation of laminin and fibronectin by methylglyoxal and glucose increased glycation adduct residue contents with methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone and Nε-fructosyl-lysine, respectively, of greatest quantitative importance. Glycation of laminin caused a significant decrease in both neurotrophin-stimulated and preconditioned sensory neurite outgrowth. This decrease was prevented by aminoguanidine. Glycation of fibronectin also decreased preconditioned neurite outgrowth, which was prevented by aminoguanidine and nerve growth factor. CONCLUSIONS Early glycation and AGE residue content of endoneurial ECM proteins increase markedly in STZ-induced diabetes. Glycation of laminin and fibronectin causes a reduction in neurotrophin-stimulated neurite outgrowth and preconditioned neurite outgrowth. This may provide a mechanism for the failure of collateral sprouting and axonal regeneration in diabetic neuropathy. PMID:19720799

  4. Therapeutic interventions for Advanced Glycation-End Products and its Receptor-Mediated Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kailash; Tiwari, Shuchita

    2016-10-06

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are heterogeneous group of molecules formed from non-enzymatic reaction of reducing sugars with amino group of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acid. Interaction of AGEs with its cell-bound receptor (RAGE) results in generation of oxygen radicals, nuclear factor kappa-β, pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell adhesion molecules, and is involved in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Circulating soluble forms of RAGE (sRAGE) and endo-secretory RAGE (esRAGE) compete with RAGE for ligand binding and function as a decoy. This paper describes the endogenous and exogenous (high dietary AGEs, cooking food under high dry heat, elevated pH, and long period) sources of AGEs. AGE-RAGE-mediated CVD includes atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, carotid artery disease, hypertension, peripheral vascular diseases, heart failure, cardiomyopathy, and microangiopathy. The therapeutic intervention with reduction in AGEs and RAGE, and elevation in sRAGE has been reported for the treatment of AGE-RAGE-mediated CVD. Reduction in levels of AGEs can be achieved by reduction in consumption of food containing low amount of AGEs, cooking food at low temperature, moist heat, and shorter duration. AGE formation can be reduced with drugs, vitamins and stoppage of cigarette smoking. Statins, telmisartan, and curcumin have been used for suppression of RAGE. Statins, ACE-inhibitors, Rosiglitazone and vitamin D have been used to increase levels of sRAGE. Finally exogenous administration of sRAGE can be helpful in amelioration of CVD. In conclusion, AGE-RAGE-mediated CVD could be attenuated with reduction in consumption of AGEs, suppression of RAGE and elevation of sRAGE.

  5. Advanced glycation endproducts induce a proliferative response in vascular smooth muscle cells via altered calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    David, Kanola C; Scott, Roderick H; Nixon, Graeme F

    2008-10-30

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are proteins that accumulate in the plasma of diabetics as a result of increased glucose concentrations and are closely linked with vascular disease. The mechanisms involved are still not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether AGE-induced changes in calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis could contribute to these mechanisms. Cultured porcine coronary artery vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells were preincubated with glycated albumin for 96 h. The sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)-induced intracellular Ca2+ increase, although not increased in amplitude, was significantly prolonged in cells preincubated with glycated albumin. Intracellular Ca2+ imaging and electrophysiological recording of ion channel currents following release of caged Ca2+ indicated that this prolonged Ca2+ rise occurred predominantly via changes in Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release. Preincubation with glycated albumin also resulted in a threefold increase in expression of the receptor for AGE. As a consequence of the prolonged intracellular Ca2+ rise following preincubation with glycated albumin, the S1P-induced activation of the Ca2+-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin (CaN) was increased. This resulted in increased S1P-induced activation of the Ca2+-dependent transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc). BrdU incorporation in VSM cells was increased in cells preincubated with glycated albumin and was inhibited by the CaN inhibitor, cyclosporin A. In conclusion, AGE can induce VSM proliferation via a prolonged agonist-induced Ca2+ increase leading to increased activation of CaN and subsequently NFATc. This mechanism may contribute to pathogenesis of vascular disease in diabetes mellitus.

  6. The role of advanced glycation end products in various types of neurodegenerative disease: a therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Salahuddin, Parveen; Rabbani, Gulam; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2014-09-01

    Protein glycation is initiated by a nucleophilic addition reaction between the free amino group from a protein, lipid or nucleic acid and the carbonyl group of a reducing sugar. This reaction forms a reversible Schiff base, which rearranges over a period of days to produce ketoamine or Amadori products. The Amadori products undergo dehydration and rearrangements and develop a cross-link between adjacent proteins, giving rise to protein aggregation or advanced glycation end products (AGEs). A number of studies have shown that glycation induces the formation of the β-sheet structure in β-amyloid protein, α-synuclein, transthyretin (TTR), copper-zinc superoxide dismutase 1 (Cu, Zn-SOD-1), and prion protein. Aggregation of the β-sheet structure in each case creates fibrillar structures, respectively causing Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial amyloid polyneuropathy, and prion disease. It has been suggested that oligomeric species of glycated α-synuclein and prion are more toxic than fibrils. This review focuses on the pathway of AGE formation, the synthesis of different types of AGE, and the molecular mechanisms by which glycation causes various types of neurodegenerative disease. It discusses several new therapeutic approaches that have been applied to treat these devastating disorders, including the use of various synthetic and naturally occurring inhibitors. Modulation of the AGE-RAGE axis is now considered promising in the prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. Additionally, the review covers several defense enzymes and proteins in the human body that are important anti-glycating systems acting to prevent the development of neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Clinical Study of Advanced Glycation End Products in Egyptian Diabetic Obese and Non-Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Mohamed N.; Mosa, Amany A.; El-Shishtawy, Mamdouh M.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are complex, heterogenous molecules generated by glycation and oxidation of proteins in vivo, which are thought to markedly increase in diabetic patients. One of the recently identified AGEs is carboxy methyl lysine (CML), which is the main ligand of receptors for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). The present study aimed to assess the effect of obesity on such pathways in presence and absence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus. CML, soluble receptors for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE), HbA1C, lipid profile, liver function tests and kidney function tests were determined in 29 diabetic obese, 29 diabetic non-obese, 15 non-diabetic obese and 15 non-diabetic non-obese subjects. The study compared obese and non-obese subjects in presence and absence of type 2 diabetes. The results showed a significant increase in CML and a significant decrease in sRAGE in each of the diabetic obese group when compared with the diabetic non-obese group and the non-diabetic obese group when compared with the non-diabetic non-obese group. A significant positive correlation was found between CML and markers of obesity (body mass index and waist/hip ratio). These results suggest that obesity can increase CML independent of diabetes and support the reports that CML could be generated from both sugars and lipids. The present study suggests that treatment using glycation inhibitors like aminoguanidine or recombinant sRAGE will not only retard the diabetic complications, but may also have a prophylactic effect. PMID:23675236

  8. Inhibitory Effect of Metformin and Pyridoxamine in the Formation of Early, Intermediate and Advanced Glycation End-Products

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Saheem; Shahab, Uzma; Baig, Mohd. Hassan; Khan, Mohd. Sajid; Khan, M. Salman; Srivastava, A. K.; Saeed, Mohd; Moinuddin

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-enzymatic glycation is the addition of free carbonyl group of reducing sugar to the free amino groups of proteins, resulting in the formation of a Schiff base and an Amadori product. Dihydroxyacetone (DHA) is one of the carbonyl species which reacts rapidly with the free amino groups of proteins to form advanced glycation end products (AGEs). The highly reactive dihydroxyacetone phosphate is a derivative of dihydroxyacetone (DHA), and a product of glycolysis, having potential glycating effects to form AGEs. The formation of AGEs results in the generation of free radicals which play an important role in the pathophysiology of aging and diabetic complications. While the formation of DHA-AGEs has been demonstrated previously, no extensive studies have been performed to assess the inhibition of AGE inhibitors at all the three stages of glycation (early, intermediate and late) using metformin (MF) and pyridoxamine (PM) as a novel inhibitor. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we report glycation of human serum albumin (HSA) & its characterization by various spectroscopic techniques. Furthermore, inhibition of glycation products at all the stages of glycation was also studied. Spectroscopic analysis suggests structural perturbations in the HSA as a result of modification which might be due to generation of free radicals and formation of AGEs. Conclusion The inhibition in the formation of glycation reaction reveals that Pyridoxamine is a better antiglycating agent than Metformin at all stages of the glycation (early, intermediate and late stages). PMID:24023728

  9. Decrease in fluorescence lifetime by glycation of collagen and its application in determining advanced glycation end-products in human dentin

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Shuichiro; Shimizu, Masato; Miura, Jiro; Matsuda, Yusuke; Kubo, Mizuho; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Aoki, Takuya; Takeshige, Fumio; Araki, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs) are produced by the Maillard reaction, which causes cross-linking of collagen and results in changes in the mechanical properties of collagen tissues. Several types of AGE fluoresce, and measurement of this fluorescence is effective for determining the presence of AGEs. Because fluorescence intensity by steady-state fluorometry is affected by sample surface condition and light source, we focused on fluorescence lifetime measurement (FLM). We found that fluorescence lifetime of collagen gel decreased with glycation progress. In vivo application of FLM for determination of AGEs was confirmed in human dentin. PMID:26137384

  10. Unexpected Crosslinking and Diglycation as Advanced Glycation End-Products from Glyoxal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Clavijo, Andrea F.; Duque-Daza, Carlos A.; Soulby, Andrew; Canelon, Isolda Romero; Barrow, Mark; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2014-12-01

    Glyoxal-derived advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are formed in physiological systems affecting protein/peptide function and structure. These AGEs are generated during aging and chronic diseases such as diabetes and are considered arginine glycating agents. Thus, the study of glyoxal-derived AGEs in lysine residues and amino acid competition is addressed here using acetylated and non-acetylated undecapeptides, with one arginine and one lysine residue available for glycation. Tandem mass spectrometry results from a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer showed glycated species at both the arginine and lysine residues. One species with the mass addition of 116.01096 Da is formed at the arginine residue. A possible structure is proposed to explain this finding (Nδ-[2-(dihydroxymethyl)-2H,3aH,4H,6aH-[1, 3]dioxolo[5,6-d]imidazolin-5-yl]-L-ornithine-derived AGE). The second species corresponded to intramolecular crosslink involving the lysine residue and its presence is checked with ion-mobility mass spectrometry.

  11. Acetoacetate promotes the formation of fluorescent advanced glycation end products (AGEs).

    PubMed

    Bohlooli, Mousa; Ghaffari-Moghaddam, Mansour; Khajeh, Mostafa; Aghashiri, Zohre; Sheibani, Nader; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2016-12-01

    Acetoacetate (AA) is an important ketone body, which produces reactive oxygen species (ROS). Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are defined as final products of glycation process whose production is influenced by the levels of ROS. The accumulation of AGEs in the body contributes to pathogenesis of many diseases including complications of diabetes, and Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Here, we evaluated the impact of AA on production of AGEs upon incubation of human serum albumin (HSA) with glucose. The effect of AA on the AGEs formation of HSA was studied under physiological conditions after incubation with glucose for 35 days. The physical techniques including circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy were used to assess the impact of AA on formation and structural changes of glycated HSA (GHSA). Our results indicated that the secondary and tertiary structural changes of GHSA were increased in the presence of AA. The fluorescence intensity measurements of AGEs also showed an increase in AGEs formation. Acetoacetate has an activator effect in formation of AGEs through ROS production. The presence of AA may result in enhanced glycation in the presence of glucose and severity of complications associated with accumulation of AGEs.

  12. Inhibition of advanced glycation end-product formation on eye lens protein by rutin.

    PubMed

    Muthenna, P; Akileshwari, C; Saraswat, Megha; Bhanuprakash Reddy, G

    2012-04-01

    Formation of advanced glycation end products (AGE) plays a key role in the several pathophysiologies associated with ageing and diabetes, such as arthritis, atherosclerosis, chronic renal insufficiency, Alzheimer's disease, nephropathy, neuropathy and cataract. This raises the possibility of inhibition of AGE formation as one of the approaches to prevent or arrest the progression of diabetic complications. Previously, we have reported that some common dietary sources such as fruits, vegetables, herbs and spices have the potential to inhibit AGE formation. Flavonoids are abundantly found in fruits, vegetables, herbs and spices, and rutin is one of the commonly found dietary flavonols. In the present study, we have demonstrated the antiglycating potential and mechanism of action of rutin using goat eye lens proteins as model proteins. Under in vitro conditions, rutin inhibited glycation as assessed by SDS-PAGE, AGE-fluorescence, boronate affinity chromatography and immunodetection of specific AGE. Further, we provided insight into the mechanism of inhibition of protein glycation that rutin not only scavenges free-radicals directly but also chelates the metal ions by forming complexes with them and thereby partly inhibiting post-Amadori formation. These findings indicate the potential of rutin to prevent and/or inhibit protein glycation and the prospects for controlling AGE-mediated diabetic pathological conditions in vivo.

  13. Advanced glycation end products induce differential structural modifications and fibrillation of albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awasthi, Saurabh; Sankaranarayanan, Kamatchi; Saraswathi, N. T.

    2016-06-01

    Glycation induced amyloid fibrillation is fundamental to the development of many neurodegenerative and cardiovascular complications. Excessive non-enzymatic glycation in conditions such as hyperglycaemia results in the increased accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs are highly reactive pro-oxidants, which can lead to the activation of inflammatory pathways and development of oxidative stress. Recently, the effect of non-enzymatic glycation on protein structure has been the major research area, but the role of specific AGEs in such structural alteration and induction of fibrillation remains undefined. In this study, we determined the specific AGEs mediated structural modifications in albumin mainly considering carboxymethyllysine (CML), carboxyethyllysine (CEL), and argpyrimidine (Arg-P) which are the major AGEs formed in the body. We studied the secondary structural changes based on circular dichroism (CD) and spectroscopic analysis. The AGEs induced fibrillation was determined by Congo red binding and examination of scanning and transmission electron micrographs. The amyloidogenic regions in the sequence of BSA were determined using FoldAmyloid. It was observed that CEL modification of BSA leads to the development of fibrillar structures, which was evident from both secondary structure changes and TEM analysis.

  14. Hormetic modulation of hepatic insulin sensitivity by advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Nelly T; Thieme, Karina; Silva, Karolline S; Catanozi, Sérgio; Cavaleiro, Ana Mercedes; Pinto, Danilo A C; Okamoto, Maristela M; Morais, Mychel Raony P T; Falquetto, Bárbara; Zorn, Telma M; Machado, Ubiratan F; Passarelli, Marisa; Correa-Giannella, Maria Lúcia

    2017-05-15

    Because of the paucity of information regarding metabolic effects of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on liver, we evaluated effects of AGEs chronic administration in (1) insulin sensitivity; (2) hepatic expression of genes involved in AGEs, glucose and fat metabolism, oxidative stress and inflammation and; (3) hepatic morphology and glycogen content. Rats received intraperitoneally albumin modified (AlbAGE) or not by advanced glycation for 12 weeks. AlbAGE induced whole-body insulin resistance concomitantly with increased hepatic insulin sensitivity, evidenced by activation of AKT, inactivation of GSK3, increased hepatic glycogen content, and decreased expression of gluconeogenesis genes. Additionally there was reduction in hepatic fat content, in expression of lipogenic, pro-inflamatory and pro-oxidative genes and increase in reactive oxygen species and in nuclear expression of NRF2, a transcription factor essential to cytoprotective response. Although considered toxic, AGEs become protective when administered chronically, stimulating AKT signaling, which is involved in cellular defense and insulin sensitivity.

  15. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) in Type 1 Diabetes Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Leung, Sherman S; Forbes, Josephine M; Borg, Danielle J

    2016-10-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a novel protein increasingly studied in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). RAGE is expressed by several immune cell types, including T cells, antigen-presenting cells, endothelial cells, and the endocrine cells of the pancreatic islets. RAGE binds various ligands including advanced glycation end products (AGEs), high-mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1), S100 proteins, β-amyloid, β-sheet fibrils, and lipopolysaccharide. AGEs are a particularly interesting ligand because their exogenous introduction into the body can be accelerated by the consumption of AGE-rich processed foods. This review will detail RAGE isoforms and its ligands and discuss how RAGE binding on the aforementioned cells could be linked to T1D pathogenesis.

  16. Advanced glycation end-products and receptor for advanced glycation end-products expression in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and NSIP

    PubMed Central

    Kyung, Sun Young; Byun, Kyung Hee; Yoon, Jin Young; Kim, Yu Jin; Lee, Sang Pyo; Park, Jeong-Woong; Lee, Bong Hee; Park, Jong Sook; Jang, An Soo; Park, Choon Sik; Jeong, Sung Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are associated with the pathogenesis of various diseases. AGEs induce excess accumulation of extracellular matrix and expression of profibrotic cytokines. In addition, studies on receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) have shown that the ligand-RAGE interaction activates several intracellular signaling cascades associated with several fibrotic diseases. We investigated the expression of AGEs and RAGE in samples from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP). Lung tissues and plasma samples from patients with IPF (n=10), NSIP (n=10), and control subjects (n=10) were obtained. Expression of AGEs and RAGE was determined by immunofluorescence assay of lung tissue. Circulating AGEs were measured by Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Lungs with IPF showed strong expression for both AGEs and RAGE compared to that in NSIP and controls. However, no difference in AGE or RAGE expression was observed in lungs with NSIP compared to that in the controls. Levels of circulating AGEs also increased significantly in lungs of patients with IPF compared to those with NSIP and normal control. Increased AGE-RAGE interaction may play an important role in the pathogenesis of IPF. PMID:24427342

  17. Advanced glycation end-products and receptor for advanced glycation end-products expression in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and NSIP.

    PubMed

    Kyung, Sun Young; Byun, Kyung Hee; Yoon, Jin Young; Kim, Yu Jin; Lee, Sang Pyo; Park, Jeong-Woong; Lee, Bong Hee; Park, Jong Sook; Jang, An Soo; Park, Choon Sik; Jeong, Sung Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are associated with the pathogenesis of various diseases. AGEs induce excess accumulation of extracellular matrix and expression of profibrotic cytokines. In addition, studies on receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) have shown that the ligand-RAGE interaction activates several intracellular signaling cascades associated with several fibrotic diseases. We investigated the expression of AGEs and RAGE in samples from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP). Lung tissues and plasma samples from patients with IPF (n=10), NSIP (n=10), and control subjects (n=10) were obtained. Expression of AGEs and RAGE was determined by immunofluorescence assay of lung tissue. Circulating AGEs were measured by Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Lungs with IPF showed strong expression for both AGEs and RAGE compared to that in NSIP and controls. However, no difference in AGE or RAGE expression was observed in lungs with NSIP compared to that in the controls. Levels of circulating AGEs also increased significantly in lungs of patients with IPF compared to those with NSIP and normal control. Increased AGE-RAGE interaction may play an important role in the pathogenesis of IPF.

  18. Genomic damage in end-stage renal failure: potential involvement of advanced glycation end products and carbonyl stress.

    PubMed

    Stopper, Helga; Schupp, Nicole; Bahner, Udo; Sebekova, Katarina; Klassen, Andre; Heidland, August

    2004-09-01

    In patients with chronic renal failure, genomic damage has been shown by numerous biomarkers, such as micronuclei frequency and comet assay (single-cell gel electrophoresis) in peripheral lymphocytes, 8-hydroxy 2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) content in leukocytes, mitochondrial DNA deletions in skeletal muscle tissue and hair follicles, as well as in DNA repair mechanisms in freshly isolated lymphocytes after ultraviolet light exposure. In the pathogenesis of DNA damage--besides genetic influences, enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS), and lipid peroxidation-the genotoxic potential of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and reactive carbonyl compounds deserve special attention. In fact, reactions of glucose with DNA can lead to mutagenic DNA AGEs. In vitro, incubation of tubulus cells with various AGEs and methylglyoxal induces DNA damage, which is suppressed by antioxidants. This underlines the role played by oxidative stress in DNA damage.

  19. Beneficial effects of metformin and irbesartan on advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-RAGE-induced proximal tubular cell injury.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yuji; Matsui, Takanori; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2012-03-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) axis contributes to diabetic nephropathy. An oral hypoglycemic agent, metformin may have a potential effect on the inhibition of glycation reactions. Further, since a pathophysiological crosstalk between renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and AGEs-RAGE axis is involved in diabetic nephropathy, it is conceivable that metformin and irbesartan additively could protect against the AGEs-RAGE-induced tubular cell injury. In this study, we addressed the issues. Metformin dose-dependently inhibited the formation of AGEs modification of bovine serum albumin (BSA). Compared with AGEs-modified BSA prepared without metformin (AGEs-MF0), those prepared in the presence of 30 mM or 100 mM metformin (AGEs-MF30 or AGEs-MF100) significantly reduced RAGE mRNA level, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, apoptosis, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and transforming growth factor-β mRNA level in tubular cells. Irbesartan further inhibited the harmful effects of AGEs-MF0 or AGEs-MF30 on tubular cells. Our present study suggests that combination therapy with metformin and irbesartan may have therapeutic potential in diabetic nephropathy; it could play a protective role against tubular injury in diabetes not only by inhibiting AGEs formation, but also by attenuating the deleterious effects of AGEs via down-regulating RAGE expression and subsequently suppressing ROS generation.

  20. Inflammation-induced chondrocyte hypertrophy is driven by receptor for advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Denise L; Johnson, Kristen; Rediske, John; Lotz, Martin; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Terkeltaub, Robert

    2005-12-15

    The multiligand receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) mediates certain chronic vascular and neurologic degenerative diseases accompanied by low-grade inflammation. RAGE ligands include S100/calgranulins, a class of low-molecular-mass, calcium-binding polypeptides, several of which are chondrocyte expressed. Here, we tested the hypothesis that S100A11 and RAGE signaling modulate osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis by regulating a shift in chondrocyte differentiation to hypertrophy. We analyzed human cartilages and cultured human articular chondrocytes, and used recombinant human S100A11, soluble RAGE, and previously characterized RAGE-specific blocking Abs. Normal human knee cartilages demonstrated constitutive RAGE and S100A11 expression, and RAGE and S100A11 expression were up-regulated in OA cartilages studied by immunohistochemistry. CXCL8 and TNF-alpha induced S100A11 expression and release in cultured chondrocytes. Moreover, S100A11 induced cell size increase and expression of type X collagen consistent with chondrocyte hypertrophy in vitro. CXCL8-induced, IL-8-induced, and TNF-alpha-induced but not retinoic acid-induced chondrocyte hypertrophy were suppressed by treatment with soluble RAGE or RAGE-specific blocking Abs. Last, via transfection of dominant-negative RAGE and dominant-negative MAPK kinase 3, we demonstrated that S100A11-induced chondrocyte type X collagen expression was dependent on RAGE-mediated p38 MAPK pathway activation. We conclude that up-regulated chondrocyte expression of the RAGE ligand S100A11 in OA cartilage, and RAGE signaling through the p38 MAPK pathway, promote inflammation-associated chondrocyte hypertrophy. RAGE signaling thereby has the potential to contribute to the progression of OA.

  1. Do Advanced Glycation End Products and Its Receptor Play a Role in Pathophysiology of Hypertension?

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kailash; Mishra, Manish

    2017-03-01

    There is a close relationship between arterial stiffness and blood pressure. The studies suggest that the advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and its cell receptor (RAGE) are involved in the arterial stiffness in two ways: changes in arterial structure and vascular function. Plasma levels of AGEs and expression of RAGE are elevated, while the levels of soluble RAGE (sRAGE) and endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE) are lowered in patients with hypertension (HTN). There is a positive correlation between plasma levels of AGEs and arterial stiffness, and an inverse association between arterial stiffness/HTN, and serum levels of sRAGE and esRAGE. Various measures can reduce the levels of AGEs and expression of RAGE, and elevate sRAGE. Arterial stiffness and blood pressure could be reduced by lowering the serum levels of AGEs, and increasing the levels of sRAGE. Levels of AGEs can be lowered by reducing the consumption of AGE-rich diet, short duration of cooking in moist heat at low temperature, and cessation of cigarette smoking. Drugs such as aminoguanidine, vitamins, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin-II receptor blockers, statins, and metformin inhibit AGE formation. Alagebrium, an AGE breakers reduces levels of AGEs. Clinical trials with some drugs tend to reduce stiffness. Systemic administration of sRAGE has beneficial effect in animal studies. In conclusion, AGE-RAGE axis is involved in arterial stiffness and HTN. The studies suggest that inhibition of AGEs formation, reduction of AGE consumption, blockade of AGE-RAGE interaction, suppression of RAGE expression, and exogenous administration of sRAGE may be novel therapeutic strategies for treatment of arterial stiffness and HTN.

  2. ERM protein moesin is phosphorylated by advanced glycation end products and modulates endothelial permeability.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaohua; Wang, Lingjun; Chen, Bo; Li, Qiang; Wang, Jiping; Zhao, Ming; Wu, Wei; Zhu, Ping; Huang, Xuliang; Huang, Qiaobing

    2009-07-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulated in different pathological conditions have the potent capacity to alter cellular properties that include endothelial structural and functional regulations. The disruption of endothelial barrier integrity may contribute to AGE-induced microangiopathy and macrovasculopathy. Previous studies have shown that AGEs induced the rearrangement of actin and subsequent hyperpermeability in endothelial cells (ECs). However, the mechanisms involved in this AGE-evoked EC malfunction are not well understood. This study directly evaluated the involvement of moesin phosphorylation in AGE-induced alterations and the effects of the RhoA and p38 MAPK pathways on this process. Using immortalized human dermal microvascular ECs (HMVECs), we first confirmed that the ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) protein moesin is required in AGE-induced F-actin rearrangement and hyperpermeability responses in ECs by knockdown of moesin protein expression with small interfering RNA. We then detected AGE-induced moesin phosphorylation by Western blot analysis. The mechanisms involved in moesin phosphorylation were analyzed by blocking AGE receptor binding and inhibiting Rho and MAPK pathways. AGE-treated HMVECs exhibited time- and dose-dependent increases in the Thr(558) phosphorylation of moesin. The increased moesin phosphorylation was attenuated by preadministrations of AGE receptor antibody, Rho kinase (ROCK), or p38 inhibitor. Suppression of p38 activation via the expression of dominant negative mutants with Ad.MKK6b or Ad.p38alpha also decreased moesin phosphorylation. The activation of the p38 pathway by transfection of HMVECs with an adenoviral construct of dominant active MKK6b resulted in moesin phosphorylation. These results suggest a critical role of moesin phosphorylation in AGE-induced EC functional and morphological regulations. Activation of the ROCK and p38 pathways is required in moesin phosphorylation.

  3. Argpyrimidine, a methylglyoxal-derived advanced glycation end-product in familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    FAP (familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy) is a systemic amyloid disease characterized by the formation of extracellular deposits of transthyretin. More than 80 single point mutations are associated with amyloidogenic behaviour and the onset of this fatal disease. It is believed that mutant forms of transthyretin lead to a decreased stability of the tetramer, which dissociates into monomers that are prone to unfolding and aggregation, later forming β-fibrils in amyloid deposits. This theory does not explain the formation of β-fibrils nor why they are toxic to nearby cells. Age at disease onset may vary by decades for patients with the same mutation. Moreover, non-mutated transthyretin also forms the same deposits in SSA (senile systemic amyloidosis), suggesting that mutations may only accelerate this process, but are not the determinant factor in amyloid fibril formation and cell toxicity. We propose that glycation is involved in amyloidogenesis, since amyloid fibrils present several properties common to glycated proteins. It was shown recently that glycation causes the structural transition from the folded soluble form to β-fibrils in serum albumin. We identified for the first time a methylglyoxal-derived advanced glycation end-product, argpyrimidine [Nδ-(5-hydroxy-4,6-dimethylpyrimidin-2-yl)-L-ornithine] in amyloid fibrils from FAP patients. Unequivocal argpyrimidine identification was achieved chromatographically by amino acid analysis using dabsyl (4-dimethylaminoazobenzene-4′-sulphonyl) chloride. Argpyrimidine was found at a concentration of 162.40±9.05 pmol/mg of protein in FAP patients, and it was not detected in control subjects. The presence of argpyrimidine in amyloid deposits from FAP patients supports the view that protein glycation is an important factor in amyloid diseases. PMID:15281912

  4. Advanced glycation endproducts form during ovalbumin digestion in the presence of fructose: Inhibition by chlorogenic acid.

    PubMed

    Bains, Yasmin; Gugliucci, Alejandro; Caccavello, Russell

    2017-07-01

    One mechanism by which fructose could exert deleterious effects is through intestinal formation and absorption of pro-inflammatory advanced glycation endproducts via the Maillard reaction. We employed simulated stomach and duodenum digestion of ovalbumin (OVA) to test the hypothesis that advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are formed by fructose during simulated digestion of a ubiquitous food protein under model physiological conditions. OVA was subjected to simulated gastric and intestinal digestion using standard models, in presence of fructose or glucose (0-100mM). Peptide fractions were analyzed by fluorescence spectroscopy and intensity at Excitation: λ370nm, Emission: λ 440nm. AGE adducts formed between fructose and OVA, evidenced by the peptide fractions (<5kDa) at times (30min) and concentration ranges (10mM) plausibly found in the intestines, whereas no reaction occurs with glucose. The reaction was inhibited by chlorogenic acid at concentrations compatible with those found in the gut. The reaction was also inhibited by aminoguanidine, a specific antiglycation agent. Our study showed fructose-AGE formation on a ubiquitous dietary protein under model physiological conditions. Our study also suggests ways to decrease the damage: enteral fructose-AGE formation may be partially inhibited by co-intake of beverages, fruits and vegetables with concentrations of phenolics high enough to serve as anti-glycation agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Advanced Glycation End Products, Inflammation, and Chronic Metabolic Diseases: Links in a Chain?

    PubMed

    Davis, Kathleen E; Prasad, Chandan; Vijayagopal, Parakat; Juma, Shanil; Imrhan, Victorine

    2016-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are a diverse group of compounds produced when reducing sugars react with proteins or other compounds to form glycosylated molecules. AGEs may form endogenously, and glycation of molecules may negatively affect their function. AGEs may also be consumed in food form with dietary AGEs reported to be particularly high in foods treated with high heat: baked, broiled, grilled, and fried foods. Whether dietary AGEs are absorbed in significant quantities and whether they are harmful if absorbed is a question under current debate. The American Diabetes Association makes no recommendation regarding avoidance of these foods, but many researchers are concerned that they may be pro-inflammatory and way worsen cardiac function, kidney function, diabetes and its complications and may even contribute to obesity.

  6. Skin autofluorescence, a non-invasive marker of advanced glycation end products: clinical relevance and limitations.

    PubMed

    Da Moura Semedo, Cidila; Webb, M'Balu; Waller, Helen; Khunti, Kamlesh; Davies, Melanie

    2017-01-31

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are protein-bound compounds derived from glycaemic and oxidative stress that contain fluorescent properties, which can be non-invasively measured as skin autofluorescence (SAF) by the AGE Reader. SAF has been demonstrated to be a biomarker of cumulative skin AGEs and potentially may be a better predictor for the development of chronic complications and mortality in diabetes than glycated haemoglobin A1c. However, there are several confounding factors that should be assessed prior to its broader application: these include presence of other fluorescent compounds in the skin that might be measured (eg, fluorophores), skin pigmentation and use of skin creams. The aim of this article is to provide a theoretical background of this newly developed method, evaluate its clinical relevance and discuss the potential confounding factors that need further analysis.

  7. Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs): involvement in aging and in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Grillo, M A; Colombatto, S

    2008-06-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are formed from the so-called Amadori products by rearrangement followed by other reactions giving rise to compounds bound irreversibly. The structure of some of them is shown and the mechanism of formation is described. Several AGE binding molecules (Receptors for AGE, RAGE) are known and it is thought that many of the effects caused by AGEs are mediated by RAGE. Some of these were shown to be toxic, and called TAGE. The mechanism of detoxification of glyoxal and methylglyoxal by the glyoxalase system is described and also the possibility to eliminate glycated proteins by deglycation enzymes. Compounds able to inhibit AGEs formation are also taken into consideration.

  8. Pathologic role of dietary advanced glycation end products in cardiometabolic disorders, and therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi; Matsui, Takanori

    2016-02-01

    Reactive derivatives from nonenzymatic glucose-protein condensation reactions, as well as lipids and nucleic acids exposed to reducing sugars, form a heterogeneous group of irreversible adducts called AGEs (advanced glycation end products). The glycation process begins with the conversion of reversible Schiff base adducts to more stable, covalently bound Amadori rearrangement products. Over the course of days to weeks, these Amadori products undergo further rearrangement and condensation reactions to form irreversibly cross-linked macroprotein derivatives known as AGEs. The formation and accumulation of AGEs have been known to progress in a physiological aging process and at an accelerated rate under hyperglycemic and oxidative stress conditions. There is growing evidence that AGEs play a pathologic role in numerous disorders. Indeed, glycation and/or cross-linking modification of circulating or organic matrix proteins by AGEs the senescence of moieties and deteriorate their physiological function and structural integrity in multiple organ systems. Moreover, AGEs elicit oxidative stress and inflammatory reactions through the interaction with the receptor for advanced glycation products in a variety of cells, thereby contributing to the development and progression of various aging- or diabetes-related disorders, such as cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, insulin resistance, and Alzheimer's disease. Recently, diet has been recognized as a major environmental source of AGEs that could cause proinflammatory reactions and organ damage in vivo. Therefore, this review summarizes the pathophysiological role of dietary AGEs in health and disease, especially focusing on cardiometabolic disorders. We also discuss the potential utility in targeting exogenously derived AGEs for therapeutic intervention.

  9. Advanced glycation end-products: Mechanics of aged collagen from molecule to tissue.

    PubMed

    Gautieri, Alfonso; Passini, Fabian S; Silván, Unai; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Carimati, Giulia; Volpi, Piero; Moretti, Matteo; Schoenhuber, Herbert; Redaelli, Alberto; Berli, Martin; Snedeker, Jess G

    2017-05-01

    Concurrent with a progressive loss of regenerative capacity, connective tissue aging is characterized by a progressive accumulation of Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs). Besides being part of the typical aging process, type II diabetics are particularly affected by AGE accumulation due to abnormally high levels of systemic glucose that increases the glycation rate of long-lived proteins such as collagen. Although AGEs are associated with a wide range of clinical disorders, the mechanisms by which AGEs contribute to connective tissue disease in aging and diabetes are still poorly understood. The present study harnesses advanced multiscale imaging techniques to characterize a widely employed in vitro model of ribose induced collagen aging and further benchmarks these data against experiments on native human tissues from donors of different age. These efforts yield unprecedented insight into the mechanical changes in collagen tissues across hierarchical scales from molecular, to fiber, to tissue-levels. We observed a linear increase in molecular spacing (from 1.45nm to 1.5nm) and a decrease in the D-period length (from 67.5nm to 67.1nm) in aged tissues, both using the ribose model of in vitro glycation and in native human probes. Multiscale mechanical analysis of in vitro glycated tendons strongly suggests that AGEs reduce tissue viscoelasticity by severely limiting fiber-fiber and fibril-fibril sliding. This study lays an important foundation for interpreting the functional and biological effects of AGEs in collagen connective tissues, by exploiting experimental models of AGEs crosslinking and benchmarking them for the first time against endogenous AGEs in native tissue.

  10. Association of peripheral neuropathy with circulating advanced glycation end products, soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products and other risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Aubert, C E; Michel, P-L; Gillery, P; Jaisson, S; Fonfrede, M; Morel, F; Hartemann, A; Bourron, O

    2014-11-01

    The pathogenesis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy remains uncertain and nonenzymatic glycoxidation is one of the contributing mechanisms. The aim of this study was to assess the respective relationship of diabetic peripheral neuropathy with glycoxidation, compared with other identified risk factors, in patients with type 2 diabetes. We included 198 patients with type 2 diabetes and high risk for vascular complications. Circulating concentrations of three advanced glycation end products (carboxymethyllysine, methyl-glyoxal-hydroimidazolone-1, pentosidine) and of their soluble receptor (sRAGE) were measured. Peripheral neuropathy was assessed by the neuropathy disability score and by the monofilament test and defined as either an abnormal monofilament test and/or a neuropathy disability score ≥6. Multivariate regression analyses were performed adjusting for potential confounding factors for neuropathy: age, gender, diabetes duration, current smoking, systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, height, peripheral arterial occlusive disease, glycated haemoglobin, estimated glomerular filtration rate and lipid profile. Prevalence of peripheral neuropathy was 20.7%. sRAGE and carboxymethyllysine were independently and positively associated with the presence of peripheral neuropathy. No significant association was found between peripheral neuropathy and methyl-glyoxal-hydroimidazolone-1 or pentosidine. Waist circumference, height and peripheral arterial occlusive disease were independently associated with peripheral neuropathy. Carboxymethyllysine and sRAGE were independently associated with peripheral neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes. Although the conclusions are limited by the absence of a healthy control population, this study confirms the relationship between advanced glycoxidation and diabetic peripheral neuropathy, independently of other risk factors. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Advanced glycation endproducts alter functions and promote apoptosis in endothelial progenitor cells through receptor for advanced glycation endproducts mediate overpression of cell oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianfei; Song, Minbao; Yu, Shiyong; Gao, Pan; Yu, Yang; Wang, Hong; Huang, Lan

    2010-02-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play an important role in preventing atherosclerosis. The factors that regulate the function of EPCs are not completely clear. Increased formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) is generally regarded as one of the main mechanisms responsible for vascular damage in patients with diabetes and atherosclerosis. AGEs lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and part of the regenerative capacity of EPCs seems to be due to their low baseline ROS levels and reduced sensitivity to ROS-induced cell apoptosis. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that AGEs can alter functions and promote apoptosis in EPCs through overpress cell oxidant stress. EPCs, isolated from bone marrow, were cultured in the absence or presence of AGEs (50, 100, and 200 microg/ml). A modified Boyden's chamber was used to assess the migration of EPCs and the number of recultured EPCs was counted to measure the adhesiveness function. MTT assay was used to determine the proliferation function. ROS were analyzed using the ROS assay kit. A spectrophotometer was used to assess superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) activity, and PCR was used to test mRNA expression of SOD and GSH-PX. SiRNA was used to block receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGEs) expression. Apoptosis was evaluated by Annexin V immunostaining and TUNEL staining. Co-culturing with AGEs increases ROS production, decreases anti-oxidant defenses, overpresses oxidant stress, inhibits the proliferation, migration, and adhesion of EPCs, and induces EPCs apoptosis. In addition, these effects were attenuated during block RAGE protein expression by siRNA. AGEs may serve to impair EPCs functions through RAGE-mediate oxidant stress, and promote EPCs sensitivity toward oxidative-stress-mediated apoptosis, which indicates a new pathophysiological mechanism of disturbed vascular adaptation in atherosclerosis and suggests that lower levels of AGEs might improve the

  12. Skin advanced glycation end-products evaluation in infants according to the type of feeding and mother’s smoking habits

    PubMed Central

    Federico, Giovanni; Gori, Martina; Randazzo, Emioli; Vierucci, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study was conducted to assess whether formula-fed infants had increased skin advanced glycation end-products compared with breastfed ones. We also evaluated the effect of maternal smoke during pregnancy and lactation on infant skin advanced glycation end-products accumulation. Methods: Advanced glycation end-product–linked skin autofluorescence was measured in 101 infants. Results: In infants born from non-smoking mothers, advanced glycation end-products were higher in formula-fed subjects than in breastfed subjects (0.80 (0.65–0.90) vs 1.00 (0.85–1.05), p < 0.001). Advanced glycation end-products in breastfed infants from smoking mothers were higher than in those from non-smoking mothers (0.80 (0.65–0.90) vs 1.00 (0.90–1.17), p = 0.009). Conclusion: Formula-fed infants had increased amounts of advanced glycation end-products compared with the breastfed ones, confirming that breast milk represents the best food for infants. Breastfed infants from mothers smoking during pregnancy and lactation had increased skin advanced glycation end-products, suggesting that smoke-related advanced glycation end-products transfer throughout breast milk. Moreover, advanced glycation end-products may already increase during gestation, possibly affecting fetal development. Thus, we reinforced that smoking must be stopped during pregnancy and lactation. PMID:28210490

  13. Rifampicin reduces advanced glycation end products and activates DAF-16 to increase lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Golegaonkar, Sandeep; Tabrez, Syed S; Pandit, Awadhesh; Sethurathinam, Shalini; Jagadeeshaprasad, Mashanipalya G; Bansode, Sneha; Sampathkumar, Srinivasa-Gopalan; Kulkarni, Mahesh J; Mukhopadhyay, Arnab

    2015-06-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are formed when glucose reacts nonenzymatically with proteins; these modifications are implicated in aging and pathogenesis of many age-related diseases including type II diabetes, atherosclerosis, and neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, pharmaceutical interventions that can reduce AGEs may delay age-onset diseases and extend lifespan. Using LC-MS(E), we show that rifampicin (RIF) reduces glycation of important cellular proteins in vivo and consequently increases lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans by up to 60%. RIF analog rifamycin SV (RSV) possesses similar properties, while rifaximin (RMN) lacks antiglycation activity and therefore fails to affect lifespan positively. The efficacy of RIF and RSV as potent antiglycating agents may be attributed to the presence of a p-dihydroxyl moiety that can potentially undergo spontaneous oxidation to yield highly reactive p-quinone structures, a feature absent in RMN. We also show that supplementing rifampicin late in adulthood is sufficient to increase lifespan. For its effect on longevity, rifampicin requires DAF-18 (nematode PTEN) as well as JNK-1 and activates DAF-16, the FOXO homolog. Interestingly, the drug treatment modulates transcription of a different subset of DAF-16 target genes, those not controlled by the conserved Insulin-IGF-1-like signaling pathway. RIF failed to increase the lifespan of daf-16 null mutant despite reducing glycation, showing thereby that DAF-16 may not directly affect AGE formation. Together, our data suggest that the dual ability to reduce glycation in vivo and activate prolongevity processes through DAF-16 makes RIF and RSV effective lifespan-extending interventions. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Inhibition of advanced glycation endproduct formation by acetaldehyde: role in the cardioprotective effect of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Al-Abed, Y; Mitsuhashi, T; Li, H; Lawson, J A; FitzGerald, G A; Founds, H; Donnelly, T; Cerami, A; Ulrich, P; Bucala, R

    1999-03-02

    Epidemiological studies suggest that there is a beneficial effect of moderate ethanol consumption on the incidence of cardiovascular disease. Ethanol is metabolized to acetaldehyde, a two-carbon carbonyl compound that can react with nucleophiles to form covalent addition products. We have identified a biochemical modification produced by the reaction of acetaldehyde with protein-bound Amadori products. Amadori products typically arise from the nonenzymatic addition of reducing sugars (such as glucose) to protein amino groups and are the precursors to irreversibly bound, crosslinking moieties called advanced glycation endproducts, or AGEs. AGEs accumulate over time on plasma lipoproteins and vascular wall components and play an important role in the development of diabetes- and age-related cardiovascular disease. The attachment of acetaldehyde to a model Amadori product produces a chemically stabilized complex that cannot rearrange and progress to AGE formation. We tested the role of this reaction in preventing AGE formation in vivo by administering ethanol to diabetic rats, which normally exhibit increased AGE formation and high circulating levels of the hemoglobin Amadori product, HbA1c, and the hemoglobin AGE product, Hb-AGE. In this model study, diabetic rats fed an ethanol diet for 4 weeks showed a 52% decrease in Hb-AGE when compared with diabetic controls (P < 0.001). Circulating levels of HbA1c were unaffected by ethanol, pointing to the specificity of the acetaldehyde reaction for the post-Amadori, advanced glycation process. These data suggest a possible mechanism for the so-called "French paradox," (the cardioprotection conferred by moderate ethanol ingestion) and may offer new strategies for inhibiting advanced glycation.

  15. Modulation of high sensitivity C-reactive protein by soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    McNair, Erick D; Wells, Calvin R; Mabood Qureshi, A; Basran, Rashpal; Pearce, Colin; Orvold, Jason; Devilliers, Jacobus; Prasad, Kailash

    2010-08-01

    High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is synthesized mainly by hepatocytes in response to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and interleukin-6 (IL-6). The interaction of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) with the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) increases the expression of the cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-6. Soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) competes with RAGE for binding with AGEs. Hence, low sRAGE levels may increase interaction of AGEs with RAGE resulting in the increased production of cytokines. It is hypothesized that serum levels of sRAGE modulate serum levels of hs-CRP. The objectives are to determine if (i) serum levels of sRAGE are lower and those of TNF-alpha and hs-CRP are higher in non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients compared to control subjects; (ii) serum levels of TNF-alpha and hs-CRP are positively correlated; and (iii) sRAGE is negatively correlated with hs-CRP and TNF-alpha. The study consisted of 36 patients with NSTEMI and 30 age-matched healthy male subjects. Serum levels of sRAGE and TNF-alpha were determined by enzyme-linked immunoassay and hs-CRP was measured using near infrared immunoassay. Serum levels of sRAGE were lower, while those of TNF-alpha and hs-CRP were higher in patients with NSTEMI compared to controls. The levels of sRAGE were negatively correlated with those of TNF-alpha and hs-CRP, while TNF-alpha was positively correlated with hs-CRP in both the control subjects and NSTEMI patients. The data suggest that sRAGE modulates the synthesis of hs-CRP through TNF-alpha.

  16. Hydroxy methoxy benzaldehyde from Sesbania grandilfora inhibits the advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-mediated fibrillation in hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, G; Hari, N; Saraswathi, N T

    2017-03-20

    The present study was aimed to identify the active anti-glycation constituent from the leaves of Sesbania grandiflora. Characterization of the active constituent resulted in the identification of hydroxy methoxy benzaldehyde (HMB). The potential of HMB as anti-glycation lead was analyzed by fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and molecular interaction studies. Our results suggested that HMB inhibited formation of early (HbA1c) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). The amyloid-like fibrillation in hemoglobin was also inhibited by HMB. SEM images indicated the protective effect against the formation of acanthocytes. Molecular docking studies showed that HMB was interacting with hemoglobin through hydrogen bonds with Arg141, Tyr140, and Thr137. Our findings suggest that HMB could be a better anti-glycation lead molecule towards novel AGEs inhibitors.

  17. The clinical relevance of assessing advanced glycation endproducts accumulation in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, Robbert; Links, Thera; Zeebregts, Clark; Tio, Rene; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Smit, Andries

    2008-10-07

    Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes. There is increasing evidence that advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) play a pivotal role in atherosclerosis, in particular in diabetes. AGE accumulation is a measure of cumulative metabolic and oxidative stress, and may so represent the "metabolic memory". Furthermore, increased AGE accumulation is closely related to the development of cardiovascular complications in diabetes. This review article will focus on the clinical relevance of measuring AGE accumulation in diabetic patients by focusing on AGE formation, AGEs as predictors of long-term complications, and interventions against AGEs.

  18. The clinical relevance of assessing advanced glycation endproducts accumulation in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Meerwaldt, Robbert; Links, Thera; Zeebregts, Clark; Tio, Rene; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Smit, Andries

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes. There is increasing evidence that advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) play a pivotal role in atherosclerosis, in particular in diabetes. AGE accumulation is a measure of cumulative metabolic and oxidative stress, and may so represent the "metabolic memory". Furthermore, increased AGE accumulation is closely related to the development of cardiovascular complications in diabetes. This review article will focus on the clinical relevance of measuring AGE accumulation in diabetic patients by focusing on AGE formation, AGEs as predictors of long-term complications, and interventions against AGEs. PMID:18840258

  19. Vascular effects of advanced glycation endproducts: Clinical effects and molecular mechanisms☆

    PubMed Central

    Stirban, Alin; Gawlowski, Thomas; Roden, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The enhanced generation and accumulation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) have been linked to increased risk for macrovascular and microvascular complications associated with diabetes mellitus. AGEs result from the nonenzymatic reaction of reducing sugars with proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, potentially altering their function by disrupting molecular conformation, promoting cross-linking, altering enzyme activity, reducing their clearance, and impairing receptor recognition. AGEs may also activate specific receptors, like the receptor for AGEs (RAGE), which is present on the surface of all cells relevant to atherosclerotic processes, triggering oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis. Understanding the pathogenic mechanisms of AGEs is paramount to develop strategies against diabetic and cardiovascular complications. PMID:24634815

  20. Second generation 2-aminoimidazole based advanced glycation end product inhibitors and breakers.

    PubMed

    Furlani, Robert E; Richardson, Mike A; Podell, Brendan K; Ackart, David F; Haugen, Jessica D; Melander, Roberta J; Basaraba, Randall J; Melander, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) as a result of the action of reducing sugars on host macromolecules plays a role in increased morbidity of diabetic patients. There are currently no clinically available therapeutics for the prevention or eradication of AGEs. Following our previous identification of 2-aminoimidazole (2-AI) based AGE inhibitors and breakers, we now report the use of a rapid, scalable, two-step procedure to access a second generation of 2-AI based anti-AGE compounds from commercially available amino acids. Several second generation compounds exhibit increased AGE inhibition and breaking activty compared to the first generation compounds and to the known AGE inhibitor aminoguanidine.

  1. Lifestyle and Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs) Burden: Its Relevance to Healthy Aging.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Chandan; Imrhan, Victorine; Marotta, Francesco; Juma, Shanil; Vijayagopal, Parakat

    2014-06-01

    Uncontrolled continued exposure to oxidative stress is a precursor to many chronic diseases including cancer, diabetes, degenerative disorders and cardiovascular diseases. Of the many known mediators of oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are the most studied. In the present review, we have summarized current data on the origin of circulating AGEs, discussed issues associated with reliable assessment of its steady state level, and changes in its level with age and select metabolic diseases. Lastly, we have made recommendations about life style changes that may decrease AGEs burden to promote healthy aging.

  2. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products Regulates Leukotriene B4 Receptor 1 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ichiki, Takako; Koga, Tomoaki; Yokomizo, Takehiko

    2016-12-01

    Leukotriene B4 receptor 1 (BLT1), a high-affinity G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for leukotriene B4 (LTB4), plays important roles in inflammatory and immune reactions. Although the LTB4-BLT1 axis is known to promote inflammation, the binding proteins that modulate LTB4-BLT1 signaling have not been identified. Recently, we discovered that receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) interacts with BLT1 and modulates LTB4-BLT1 signaling. We propose RAGE as a new class of GPCR modulator and a new target of future GPCR studies.

  3. Methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone-1 evokes inflammatory reactions in endothelial cells via an interaction with receptor for advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yuji; Matsui, Takanori; Nakamura, Nobutaka; Sotokawauchi, Ami; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi

    2017-09-01

    Glyceraldehyde-derived advanced glycation end products contribute to vascular inflammation in diabetes. However, what advanced glycation end product structure could evoke inflammatory reactions remains unknown. We examined whether and how methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone 1, one of the advanced glycation end products formed from glyceraldehyde, elicits inflammatory reactions in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Glyceraldehyde-advanced glycation end products-aptamer was prepared using a systemic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment. The binding affinities of methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone 1 to receptor for advanced glycation end products or advanced glycation end product-aptamer were measured with a quartz crystal microbalance. Intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and THP-1 cell adhesion were evaluated using fluorescent probes. Gene expression was analysed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone 1 bound to receptor for advanced glycation end products and advanced glycation end product-aptamer with a dissociation constant ( Kd) of 56.7 µM and 1.51 mM, respectively. Methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone 1 at 100 µg/mL significantly increased reactive oxygen species generation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, which were attenuated by anti-receptor for advanced glycation end products antibody or advanced glycation end product-aptamer. In all, 100 µg/mL methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone 1 significantly increased receptor for advanced glycation end products and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 messenger RNA levels in, and THP-1 cell adhesion to, human umbilical vein endothelial cells, all of which were blocked by anti-receptor for advanced glycation end products antibody. Our present results indicate that methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone 1 evokes inflammatory reactions in human umbilical vein endothelial cells via receptor for advanced glycation

  4. Glycative Stress and Its Defense Machinery Glyoxalase 1 in Renal Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Yosuke; Inagi, Reiko

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a major public health problem around the world. Because the kidney plays a role in reducing glycative stress, renal dysfunction results in increased glycative stress. In turn, glycative stress, especially that due to advanced glycated end products (AGEs) and their precursors such as reactive carbonyl compounds, exacerbates chronic kidney disease and is related to premature aging in chronic kidney disease, whether caused by diabetes mellitus or otherwise. Factors which hinder a sufficient reduction in glycative stress include the inhibition of anti-glycation enzymes (e.g., GLO-1), as well as pathogenically activated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and hypoxia in the kidney. Promising strategies aimed at halting the vicious cycle between chronic kidney disease and increases in glycative stress include the suppression of AGE accumulation in the body and the enhancement of GLO-1 to strengthen the host defense machinery against glycative stress. PMID:28106734

  5. Pharmacological Control of Receptor of Advanced Glycation End-Products and its Biological Effects in Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Mezentsev, A. V.; Bruskin, S. A.; Soboleva, A. G.; Sobolev, V. V.; Piruzian, E. S.

    2013-01-01

    Receptor for advanced glycation end-products is implicated in a development of chronic inflammatory response. Aim of this paper is to provide a review on commercial and experimental medicines that can interfere with RAGE and signaling through RAGE. We searched three bibliographical databases (PubMed, Web of Science and MEDLINE) for the publications from 2005 to March 2012 and identified 5 major groups of agents that can interfere with RAGE biological effects. In the first part of this paper, we discuss AGE crosslink breakers. These chemicals destroy advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that are crosslinked to the extracellular matrix proteins and can interact with RAGE as ligands. Then, we describe two non-conventional agents SAGEs and KIOM-79 that abolish certain biological effects of RAGE and have a strong anti-inflammatory potential. In the third part, we evaluate the inhibitors of the signaling cascades that underlie RAGE. Particularly, we discuss two groups of kinase inhibitors tyrphostins and the inhibitors of JAK kinases. Considering RAGE as a potential master regulator of processes that are crucial for the pathogenesis of psoriasis, we propose that these medicins may help in controlling the disease by abolishing the chronic inflammation in skin lesions. PMID:24170986

  6. Relationship of Advanced Glycation End Products With Cardiovascular Disease in Menopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Pertynska-Marczewska, Magdalena; Merhi, Zaher

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) represents the most significant cause of death in postmenopausal women. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are formed by nonenzymatic modification of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids by glucose. This review focuses on the contribution of AGEs and their receptors to the development of CVD in menopause. Advanced glycation end products circulate and activate the proinflammatory endothelial cell surface receptor called RAGE, bind to the extracellular matrix of the cardiovascular system, or bind to the circulating anti-inflammatory soluble form of RAGE (sRAGE). Data emerging from human and animal studies suggest that AGEs and both receptors (RAGE and sRAGE) are implicated in the pathophysiology of CVD. Particular emphasis has been given to the role of AGE-RAGE axis in oxidative stress, inflammation, endothelial cell toxicity, and progression of atherosclerosis in menopause. Data accruing from human and animal studies suggest that RAGE expression level and circulating sRAGE level are associated with estradiol and are correlated with CVD risk factors, such as adiposity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. By recognizing the impact of AGEs on atherosclerosis, pharmacological strategies targeting the AGE-RAGE pathway hold therapeutic potential for CVD in menopausal women.

  7. Dietary advanced glycation end products and their role in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Uribarri, Jaime; del Castillo, María Dolores; de la Maza, María Pía; Filip, Rosana; Gugliucci, Alejandro; Luevano-Contreras, Claudia; Macías-Cervantes, Maciste H; Markowicz Bastos, Deborah H; Medrano, Alejandra; Menini, Teresita; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Rojas, Armando; Sampaio, Geni Rodrigues; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Wrobel, Katarzyna; Garay-Sevilla, Ma Eugenia

    2015-07-01

    Over the past 2 decades there has been increasing evidence supporting an important contribution from food-derived advanced glycation end products (AGEs) to the body pool of AGEs and therefore increased oxidative stress and inflammation, processes that play a major role in the causation of chronic diseases. A 3-d symposium (1st Latin American Symposium of AGEs) to discuss this subject took place in Guanajuato, Mexico, on 1-3 October 2014 with the participation of researchers from several countries. This review is a summary of the different presentations and subjects discussed, and it is divided into 4 sections. The first section deals with current general knowledge about AGEs. The second section dwells on mechanisms of action of AGEs, with special emphasis on the receptor for advanced glycation end products and the potential role of AGEs in neurodegenerative diseases. The third section discusses different approaches to decrease the AGE burden. The last section discusses current methodologic problems with measurement of AGEs in different samples. The subject under discussion is complex and extensive and cannot be completely covered in a short review. Therefore, some areas of interest have been left out because of space. However, we hope this review illustrates currently known facts about dietary AGEs as well as pointing out areas that require further research. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  8. Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products and Their Role in Health and Disease12

    PubMed Central

    Uribarri, Jaime; del Castillo, María Dolores; de la Maza, María Pía; Filip, Rosana; Gugliucci, Alejandro; Luevano-Contreras, Claudia; Macías-Cervantes, Maciste H; Markowicz Bastos, Deborah H; Medrano, Alejandra; Menini, Teresita; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Rojas, Armando; Sampaio, Geni Rodrigues; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Wrobel, Katarzyna; Garay-Sevilla, Ma Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades there has been increasing evidence supporting an important contribution from food-derived advanced glycation end products (AGEs) to the body pool of AGEs and therefore increased oxidative stress and inflammation, processes that play a major role in the causation of chronic diseases. A 3-d symposium (1st Latin American Symposium of AGEs) to discuss this subject took place in Guanajuato, Mexico, on 1–3 October 2014 with the participation of researchers from several countries. This review is a summary of the different presentations and subjects discussed, and it is divided into 4 sections. The first section deals with current general knowledge about AGEs. The second section dwells on mechanisms of action of AGEs, with special emphasis on the receptor for advanced glycation end products and the potential role of AGEs in neurodegenerative diseases. The third section discusses different approaches to decrease the AGE burden. The last section discusses current methodologic problems with measurement of AGEs in different samples. The subject under discussion is complex and extensive and cannot be completely covered in a short review. Therefore, some areas of interest have been left out because of space. However, we hope this review illustrates currently known facts about dietary AGEs as well as pointing out areas that require further research. PMID:26178030

  9. Development of Nonalcoholic Hepatopathy: Contributions of Oxidative Stress and Advanced Glycation End Products

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Juliana Célia de F.; Valentim, Iara B.; de Araújo, Orlando R. P.; Ataide, Terezinha da R.; Goulart, Marília O. F.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are generated spontaneously in cells; however, under conditions of hyperglycemia and lipid peroxidation, their levels are higher than usual, which contribute to the development of diseases such as the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is associated with oxidative stress (OS), which is linked to the transition of steatosis to steatohepatitis due to lipid peroxidation. The AGE-receptor interaction in hepatic stellate cells leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species and enhances the proliferation and activation of these cells, worsening liver fibrosis and disease progression. In this vicious cycle, there is production of (carboxymethyl)lysine, a biomarker for products of advanced glycation and lipid peroxidation, being a shared component between the two pathways. In this review, we aim to compile evidence to support the basic molecular mechanisms of AGEs and OS generation and their influence, independently or combined, on the evolution of NAFLD. The deeper understanding of the interrelations of AGEs + OS may help to elucidate the pathogenic pathways of NAFLD and to devise rational therapeutic interventions for this disease, with an expected positive impact on quality of life of patients. PMID:24084729

  10. Screening system of blocking agents of the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts in cells using fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Jung, Dong Ho; Kim, Young Sook; Kim, Jin Sook

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) triggers cellular responses implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications; blockade of RAGE has been shown to inhibit the development of diabetic complications. To develop a screening system to identify novel disruptors of advanced glycation endproducts (AGE)-RAGE binding, we used an AGE-RAGE binding system in RAGE-overexpressing cells; test compounds were screened using this system. To construct human RAGE-overexpressing cells, mouse mesangial cells (MMCs) were stably transfected with the pcDNA-human RAGE (hRAGE) vector and selected under 1 mg/mL gentamicin (G418). RAGE expression in hRAGE-overexpressing MMCs was analyzed by Western blotting with specific RAGE antibody. To identify novel disruptors of AGE-RAGE binding, 50 single compounds and AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA)-Alexa 488 (AGE-BSA labeled with Alexa 488) were treated to the hRAGE-overexpressing MMCs. Nonbinding AGE-BSA-Alexa 488 was washed and fluorescence measured by microtiter plate reader (excitation wavelength, 485 nm; emission wavelength, 528 nm). In hRAGE-overexpressing cells, only treatment with AGE-BSA-Alexa 488 significantly increased fluorescence intensity in a dose-dependent manner. Of 50 compounds tested, genistein disrupted AGE-RAGE binding in a dose-dependent manner. This AGE-RAGE binding system using AGE-BSA-Alexa 488 in hRAGE-overexpressing cells was suitable for screening of agents that disrupt AGE-hRAGE binding.

  11. Internalization of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is required to mediate intracellular responses.

    PubMed

    Sevillano, Natalia; Girón, María D; Salido, Mercedes; Vargas, Alberto M; Vilches, José; Salto, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    To dissect the rat receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) subcellular distribution and trafficking in eukaryotic cells, an expression system coding for a fusion protein between the RAGE and an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) has been used. The RAGE-EGFP protein is expressed at the plasma membrane of CHO-k1 and Neuro-2a (N2a) cells and retains the capacity to bind Texas Red-labelled advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs addition to the cell cultures induced a change in the subcellular distribution of the fluorescent RAGE-EGFP protein compatible with an internalization of the AGEs-RAGE complex. Furthermore, while N2a cells expressing the RAGE-EGFP showed an increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation and NF-kappaB DNA binding in response to AGEs, pre-incubation with dansyl-cadaverine or phenylarsine oxide, inhibitors of receptors internalization, blocked the activation of ERKs and other intracellular responses mediated by AGEs. These results suggest that internalization plays a key role in the signal transduction mediated by RAGE.

  12. [Role of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in inflammation].

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Jesús A

    2010-06-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a transmembrane protein on the cellular surface that recognizes tridimensional molecules, instead of aminoacid sequences, making this molecule capable of interacting with diverse ligands. RAGE represents an important factor in innate immunity against pathogens, but it also interacts with endogenous ligands, resulting in chronic inflammation. RAGE signaling has been implicated in multiple human illnesses, including diabetes, atherosclerosis, arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, atherosclerosis and aging associated diseases. In addition to advanced glycation end products (AGE), RAGE has other important ligands such as: high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1, also termed amphoterin), the group of calcium binding cellular factors S100 (also termed calgranulin), amiloid beta peptides and Mac-1, a beta-2 integrin (CD1lb/CD18). Ligation of RAGE on the cellular surface triggers a series of cellular signaling events, including the activation and translocation to the nucleus of transcription factor NF-kappaB, leading to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, adhesion molecules and oxidative stress and causing inflammation. More recent work has revealed the role of RAGE in inflammatory cell recruitment and extravasation of leukocytes across the endothelial barrier with further inflammatory events. Recent therapeutic strategies show that RAGE is an important target to treat RAGE activation-associated diseases.

  13. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are cross-sectionally associated with insulin secretion in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Josephine M; Sourris, Karly C; de Courten, Maximilian P J; Dougherty, Sonia L; Chand, Vibhasha; Lyons, Jasmine G; Bertovic, David; Coughlan, Melinda T; Schlaich, Markus P; Soldatos, Georgia; Cooper, Mark E; Straznicky, Nora E; Kingwell, Bronwyn A; de Courten, Barbora

    2014-02-01

    It has been postulated that chronic exposure to high levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), in particular from dietary sources, can impair insulin secretion. In the present study, we investigated the cross-sectional relationship between AGEs and acute insulin secretion during an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and following a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in healthy humans. We report the cross-sectional association between circulating AGE concentrations and insulin secretory function in healthy humans (17 F: 27 M, aged 30 ± 10 years) with a wide range of BMI (24.6-31.0 kg/m(2)). Higher circulating concentrations of AGEs were related to increased first phase insulin secretion during IVGTT (r = 0.43; p < 0.05) and lower 2-h glucose concentrations during OGTT (r = -0.31; p < 0.05). In addition, fasting (r = -0.36; p < 0.05) and 2-h glucose concentrations were negatively related to circulating levels of soluble receptor for AGE (RAGE) isoforms (r = -0.39; p < 0.01). In conclusion, in healthy humans, we show a cross-sectional association between advanced glycation end products and acute insulin secretion during glucose tolerance testing.

  14. Advanced Glycation End Products in Foods and a Practical Guide to Their Reduction in the Diet

    PubMed Central

    URIBARRI, JAIME; WOODRUFF, SANDRA; GOODMAN, SUSAN; CAI, WEIJING; CHEN, XUE; PYZIK, RENATA; YONG, ANGIE; STRIKER, GARY E.; VLASSARA, HELEN

    2013-01-01

    Modern diets are largely heat-processed and as a result contain high levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Dietary advanced glycation end products (dAGEs) are known to contribute to increased oxidant stress and inflammation, which are linked to the recent epidemics of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This report significantly expands the available dAGE database, validates the dAGE testing methodology, compares cooking procedures and inhibitory agents on new dAGE formation, and introduces practical approaches for reducing dAGE consumption in daily life. Based on the findings, dry heat promotes new dAGE formation by >10- to 100-fold above the uncooked state across food categories. Animal-derived foods that are high in fat and protein are generally AGE-rich and prone to new AGE formation during cooking. In contrast, carbohydrate-rich foods such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and milk contain relatively few AGEs, even after cooking. The formation of new dAGEs during cooking was prevented by the AGE inhibitory compound aminoguanidine and significantly reduced by cooking with moist heat, using shorter cooking times, cooking at lower temperatures, and by use of acidic ingredients such as lemon juice or vinegar. The new dAGE database provides a valuable instrument for estimating dAGE intake and for guiding food choices to reduce dAGE intake. PMID:20497781

  15. Ligand binding affinity and changes in the lateral diffusion of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE).

    PubMed

    Syed, Aleem; Zhu, Qiaochu; Smith, Emily A

    2016-12-01

    The effect of ligand on the lateral diffusion of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE), a receptor involved in numerous pathological conditions, remains unknown. Single particle tracking experiments that use quantum dots specifically bound to hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged RAGE (HA-RAGE) are reported to elucidate the effect of ligand binding on HA-RAGE diffusion in GM07373 cell membranes. The ligand used in these studies is methylglyoxal modified-bovine serum albumin (MGO-BSA) containing advanced glycation end products modifications. The binding affinity between soluble RAGE and MGO-BSA increases by 1.8 to 9.7-fold as the percent primary amine modification increases from 24 to 74% and with increasing negative charge on the MGO-BSA. Ligand incubation affects the HA-RAGE diffusion coefficient, the radius of confinement, and duration of confinement. There is, however, no correlation between MGO-BSA ligand binding affinity with soluble RAGE and the extent of the changes in HA-RAGE lateral diffusion. The ligand induced changes to HA-RAGE lateral diffusion do not occur when cholesterol is depleted from the cell membrane, indicating the mechanism for ligand-induced changes to HA-RAGE diffusion is cholesterol dependent. The results presented here serve as a first step in unraveling how ligand influences RAGE lateral diffusion. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Dietary Sugars and Endogenous Formation of Advanced Glycation Endproducts: Emerging Mechanisms of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aragno, Manuela; Mastrocola, Raffaella

    2017-01-01

    The rapid increase in metabolic diseases, which occurred in the last three decades in both industrialized and developing countries, has been related to the rise in sugar-added foods and sweetened beverages consumption. An emerging topic in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases related to modern nutrition is the role of Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs). AGEs can be ingested with high temperature processed foods, but also endogenously formed as a consequence of a high dietary sugar intake. Animal models of high sugar consumption, in particular fructose, have reported AGE accumulation in different tissues in association with peripheral insulin resistance and lipid metabolism alterations. The in vitro observation that fructose is one of the most rapid and effective glycating agents when compared to other sugars has prompted the investigation of the in vivo fructose-induced glycation. In particular, the widespread employment of fructose as sweetener has been ascribed by many experimental and observational studies for the enhancement of lipogenesis and intracellular lipid deposition. Indeed, diet-derived AGEs have been demonstrated to interfere with many cell functions such as lipid synthesis, inflammation, antioxidant defences, and mitochondrial metabolism. Moreover, emerging evidence also in humans suggest that this impact of dietary AGEs on different signalling pathways can contribute to the onset of organ damage in liver, skeletal and cardiac muscle, and the brain, affecting not only metabolic control, but global health. Indeed, the most recent reports on the effects of high sugar consumption and diet-derived AGEs on human health reviewed here suggest the need to limit the dietary sources of AGEs, including added sugars, to prevent the development of metabolic diseases and related comorbidities. PMID:28420091

  17. Pathophysiology of diabetic erectile dysfunction: potential contribution of vasa nervorum and advanced glycation endproducts.

    PubMed

    Cellek, S; Cameron, N E; Cotter, M A; Muneer, A

    2013-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) due to diabetes mellitus remains difficult to treat medically despite advances in pharmacotherapeutic approaches in the field. This unmet need has resulted in a recent re-focus on the pathophysiology, in order to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to ED in diabetes. Diabetes-induced ED is often resistant to PDE5 inhibitor treatment, thus there is a need to discover targets that may lead to novel approaches for a successful treatment. The aim of this brief review is to update the reader in some of the latest development on that front, with a particular focus on the role of impaired neuronal blood flow and the formation of advanced glycation endproducts.

  18. Consequences of Advanced Glycation End Products Accumulation in Chronic Kidney Disease and Clinical Usefulness of Their Assessment Using a Non-invasive Technique - Skin Autofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Oleniuc, Mihaela; Secara, Irina; Onofriescu, Mihai; Hogas, Simona; Voroneanu, Luminita; Siriopol, Dimitrie; Covic, Adrian

    2011-10-01

    Accelerated formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end-products occur under circumstances of increased supply of substrates such as hyperglycaemic or oxidative stress and in age-related and chronic diseases like diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure, neurodegenerative diseases, osteoarthritis and also non-diabetic atherosclerosis and chronic heart failure. Advanced glycation end-products accumulation occurs especially on long-lived proteins such as collagen in the skin and in vascular basement membranes leading to vascular damage. Adequate renal clearance capacity is an important factor in the effective removal of advanced glycation end-products. The Autofluorescence Reader was developed as a marker, representative for tissue advanced glycation end-products accumulation, easily applicable in a clinical setting, initially for predicting diabetes related complications. Studies have already shown a relationship between skin autofluorescence and diabetes complications, as well as its predictive value for total and cardiovascular mortality in type 2 diabetes. Moreover skin autofluorescence was demonstrated to be superior to Haemoglobin A1c and other conventional risk factors. Advanced glycation end-products have been proposed as a novel factor involved in the development and progression of chronic heart failure. Assessment of advanced glycation end-products accumulation in end-stage renal disease and undergoing renal replacement therapies patients has become of great importance. Cardiovascular and connective tissue disorders are very common in patients with end-stage renal disease, and the accumulation of advanced glycation end-products is significantly increased in these patients. Mortality is markedly increased in patients with decreased kidney function, particularly in patients with end-stage renal disease. Skin advanced glycation end-products levels are strong predictors of survival in haemodialysis patients independent of other established risk factors

  19. Olive leaf extracts are a natural source of advanced glycation end product inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kontogianni, Vassiliki G; Charisiadis, Pantelis; Margianni, Evangelia; Lamari, Fotini N; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P; Tzakos, Andreas G

    2013-09-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are readily formed and accumulated with sustained hyperglycemia, contribute to the development of diabetic complications. As a consequence, inhibition of AGE formation constitutes an attractive therapeutic/preventive target. In the current study, we explored the phytochemical composition and the in vitro effect of two different olive leaf extracts (an aqueous and a methanolic) on AGE formation. The methanolic olive leaf extract inhibited fluorescent AGE formation in a bovine serum albumin (BSA)-ribose system, whereas the aqueous extract had no effect in both BSA-fructose and BSA-ribose systems. The phytochemical profile was investigated with liquid chromatography-ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) diode array coupled to electrospray ionization multistage mass spectrometry (LC/DAD/ESI-MS(n)). Quantification of the major phenolic compounds was performed with high performance liquid chromatography with UV-Vis diode array detection and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Among the major phenolic components (luteolin, hydroxytyrosol, luteolin-4'-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, and oleuropein), luteolin and luteolin-4'-O-β-D-glucopyranoside were assigned as potent inhibitors of AGE formation. The extraction procedure greatly affects the composition and therefore the anti-glycation potential of olive leaves.

  20. Ameliorating Effect of Akebia quinata Fruit Extracts on Skin Aging Induced by Advanced Glycation End Products.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seoungwoo; Son, Dahee; Kim, Minkyung; Lee, Seungjun; Roh, Kyung-Baeg; Ryu, Dehun; Lee, Jongsung; Jung, Eunsun; Park, Deokhoon

    2015-11-12

    The accumulation of free radicals and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the skin plays a very important role in skin aging. Both are known to interact with each other. Therefore, natural compounds or extracts that possess both antioxidant and antiglycation activities might have great antiageing potential. Akebia quinata fruit extract (AQFE) has been used to treat urinary tract inflammatory disease in traditional Korean and Chinese medicines. In the present study, AQFE was demonstrated to possess antioxidant and antiglycation activity. AQFE protects human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) from oxidative stress and inhibits cellular senescence induced by oxidative stress. We also found that AQFE inhibits glycation reaction between BSA and glucose. The antiglycation activity of AQFE was dose-dependent. In addition, the antiglycation activity of AQFE was confirmed in a human skin explant model. AQFE reduced CML expression and stimulated fibrillin-1 expression in comparison to the methyglyoxal treatment. In addition, the possibility of the extract as an anti-skin aging agent has also been clinically validated. Our analysis of the crow's feet wrinkle showed that there was a decrease in the depth of deep furrows in RI treated with AQFE cream over an eight-week period. The overall results suggest that AQFE may work as an anti-skin aging agent by preventing oxidative stress and other complications associated with AGEs formation.

  1. Ameliorating Effect of Akebia quinata Fruit Extracts on Skin Aging Induced by Advanced Glycation End Products

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seoungwoo; Son, Dahee; Kim, Minkyung; Lee, Seungjun; Roh, Kyung-Baeg; Ryu, Dehun; Lee, Jongsung; Jung, Eunsun; Park, Deokhoon

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of free radicals and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the skin plays a very important role in skin aging. Both are known to interact with each other. Therefore, natural compounds or extracts that possess both antioxidant and antiglycation activities might have great antiageing potential. Akebia quinata fruit extract (AQFE) has been used to treat urinary tract inflammatory disease in traditional Korean and Chinese medicines. In the present study, AQFE was demonstrated to possess antioxidant and antiglycation activity. AQFE protects human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) from oxidative stress and inhibits cellular senescence induced by oxidative stress. We also found that AQFE inhibits glycation reaction between BSA and glucose. The antiglycation activity of AQFE was dose-dependent. In addition, the antiglycation activity of AQFE was confirmed in a human skin explant model. AQFE reduced CML expression and stimulated fibrillin-1 expression in comparison to the methyglyoxal treatment. In addition, the possibility of the extract as an anti-skin aging agent has also been clinically validated. Our analysis of the crow’s feet wrinkle showed that there was a decrease in the depth of deep furrows in RI treated with AQFE cream over an eight-week period. The overall results suggest that AQFE may work as an anti-skin aging agent by preventing oxidative stress and other complications associated with AGEs formation. PMID:26569300

  2. Soft-tissue wound healing by anti-advanced glycation end-products agents.

    PubMed

    Chang, P-C; Tsai, S-C; Jheng, Y-H; Lin, Y-F; Chen, C-C

    2014-04-01

    The blocking of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) has been shown to reduce diabetic complications and control periodontitis. This study investigated the pattern of palatal wound-healing after graft harvesting under the administration of aminoguanidine (AG), an AGE inhibitor, or N-phenacylthiazolium bromide (PTB), a glycated cross-link breaker. Full-thickness palatal excisional wounds (5.0 x 1.5 mm(2)) were created in 72 Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats received daily intraperitoneal injections of normal saline (control), AG, or PTB and were euthanized after 4 to 28 days. The wound-healing pattern was assessed by histology, histochemistry for collagen matrix deposition, immunohistochemistry for AGE and the AGE receptor (RAGE), and the expression of RAGE, as well as inflammation- and recovery-associated genes. In the first 14 days following AG or PTB treatments, wound closure, re-epithelialization, and collagen matrix deposition were accelerated, whereas AGE deposition, RAGE-positive cells, and inflammation were reduced. RAGE and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were significantly down-regulated at day 7, and heme oxygenase-1 was persistently down-regulated until day 14. The levels of vascular endothelial growth factor, periostin, type I collagen, and fibronectin were all increased at day 14. In conclusion, anti-AGE agents appeared to facilitate palatal wound-healing by reducing AGE-associated inflammation and promoting the recovery process.

  3. Accumulation of advanced glycation end products and chronic complications in ESRD treated by dialysis.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, Robbert; Zeebregts, Clark J; Navis, Gerjan; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Lefrandt, Joop D; Smit, Andries J

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular and connective tissue disorders are very common in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and the accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is significantly increased in these patients. Accumulation of AGEs is believed to have a role in tissue protein aging and the pathogenesis of such age-related diseases as diabetes and ESRD. AGEs accumulate in patients with ESRD as a result of nonenzymatic glycation, oxidative stress, and diminished clearance of AGE precursors. Some AGEs show characteristic brown pigmentation and fluorescence, form protein-protein cross-links, and may ligate with AGE-specific receptors, inducing oxidative stress and cytokine production. This review focuses on the clinical relevance of AGE accumulation in patients with ESRD treated by dialysis for the development of long-term complications. The formation and accumulation of AGEs in patients with ESRD are discussed, as well as the relationship between AGE accumulation and such major complications of ESRD as cardiovascular and connective tissue disorders.

  4. Inhibitory effects of hydroxysafflor yellow A on the formation of advanced glycation end products in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ni, Zhenzhen; Zhuge, Zhengbing; Li, Wenlu; Xu, Huimin; Zhang, Zhongmiao; Dai, Haibin

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the inhibitory effects of hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA) on the protein glycation in vitro. Using bovine serum albumin (BSA)-glucose assay, BSA-methylglyoxal (MGO) assay, and N-acetylglycyl-lysine methyl ester (G.K.) peptide-ribose assay, inhibitory effects of HSYA were investigated. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) production was assessed by AGEs-specific fluorescence and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). In BSA-glucose assay, HSYA concentration dependently decreased AGEs formation, with maximum inhibitory effects at 1 mM by 95%. Further more, HSYA also showed significant inhibitory effects on MGO-medicated protein modification and subsequent cross-linking of proteins. Finally, when co-incubated with G.K. peptide and ribose, HSYA exhibited its antiglycation effects, and the maximum inhibitory effects of HSYA at 1 mM were 84%. Overall, our present study provides the first evidence of the antiglycation effects of HSYA on AGEs formation in vitro.

  5. Mangostanaxanthones III and IV: advanced glycation end-product inhibitors from the pericarp of Garcinia mangostana.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Hossam M; El-Bassossy, Hany M; Mohamed, Gamal A; El-Halawany, Ali M; Alshali, Khalid Z; Banjar, Zainy M

    2017-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are associated with a non-enzymatic reaction between the amino group of a protein and the carbonyl group of a sugar during hyperglycemia. The precipitation of AGEs in different tissues leads to many complications, such as endothelial dysfunction, cardiovascular complications, atherosclerosis, retinopathy, neuropathy, and Alzheimer's disease. Garcinia mangostana L. (Clusiaceae) (GM) was selected owing to the ability of its polar and non-polar fractions to inhibit AGE formation. For the first time, the bioguided fractionation of its pericarp MeOH extract (GMT) gave rise to two new xanthones, namely, mangostanaxanthones III (1) and IV (3), in addition to six known compounds, β-mangostin (2), garcinone E (4), rubraxanthone (5), α-mangostin (6), garcinone C (7), and 9-hydroxycalabaxanthone (8), from the non-polar faction. Their structures were verified by various spectroscopic methods, including 1D and 2D NMR studies and high-resolution MS data. All of the isolated xanthones significantly inhibited both sugar (ribose) and dicarbonyl compound (methylglyoxal)-induced protein glycation in a dose-dependent manner. This is explained by the ability of the isolated xanthones to inhibit protein oxidation, as indicated by the decreases in dityrosine and N'-formylkynurenine formation.

  6. Olive Leaf Extracts Are a Natural Source of Advanced Glycation End Product Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Charisiadis, Pantelis; Margianni, Evangelia; Lamari, Fotini N.; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are readily formed and accumulated with sustained hyperglycemia, contribute to the development of diabetic complications. As a consequence, inhibition of AGE formation constitutes an attractive therapeutic/preventive target. In the current study, we explored the phytochemical composition and the in vitro effect of two different olive leaf extracts (an aqueous and a methanolic) on AGE formation. The methanolic olive leaf extract inhibited fluorescent AGE formation in a bovine serum albumin (BSA)-ribose system, whereas the aqueous extract had no effect in both BSA-fructose and BSA-ribose systems. The phytochemical profile was investigated with liquid chromatography-ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) diode array coupled to electrospray ionization multistage mass spectrometry (LC/DAD/ESI-MSn). Quantification of the major phenolic compounds was performed with high performance liquid chromatography with UV-Vis diode array detection and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Among the major phenolic components (luteolin, hydroxytyrosol, luteolin-4′-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, and oleuropein), luteolin and luteolin-4′-O-β-D-glucopyranoside were assigned as potent inhibitors of AGE formation. The extraction procedure greatly affects the composition and therefore the anti-glycation potential of olive leaves. PMID:24044491

  7. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and cardiovascular dysfunction: focus on high molecular weight AGEs.

    PubMed

    Deluyker, Dorien; Evens, Lize; Bito, Virginie

    2017-07-14

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are a group of proteins and lipids becoming glycated and oxidized after persistent contact with reducing sugars or short-chain aldehydes with amino group and/or high degree of oxidative stress. The accumulation of AGEs in the body is a natural process that occurs with senescence, when the turnover rate of proteins is reduced. However, increased circulating AGEs have been described to arise at early lifetime and are associated with adverse outcome and survival, in particular in settings of cardiovascular diseases. AGEs contribute to the development of cardiac dysfunction by two major mechanisms: cross-linking of proteins or binding to their cell surface receptor. Recently, growing evidence shows that high-molecular weight AGEs (HMW-AGEs) might be as important as the characterized low-molecular weight AGEs (LMW-AGEs). Here, we point out the targets of AGEs in the heart and the mechanisms that lead to heart failure with focus on the difference between LMW-AGEs and the less characterized HMW-AGEs. As such, this review is a compilation of relevant papers in the form of a useful resource tool for researchers who want to further investigate the role of HMW-AGEs on cardiac disorders and need a solid base to start on this specific topic.

  8. Detection of Free Advanced Glycation End Products in Vivo during Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Christoph; Liehr, Kristin; Henning, Christian; Fiedler, Roman; Girndt, Matthias; Gebert, Michael; Hulko, Michael; Storr, Markus; Glomb, Marcus A

    2017-02-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are often regarded as glycotoxins, which are normally removed by the kidney. Patients with end-stage renal failure rely on hemodialysis (HD) treatment to eliminate these compounds. In the present work, a highly selective LC-MS/MS method was used for quantitation of AGE levels in plasma and in dialysis fluids of HD patients, with a focus on AGE-free adducts. A broad range of 19 amino acid modifications was identified and quantitated. It was expected that the AGE-free adducts are successfully eliminated by dialysis treatment. Indeed, with a mean elimination rate of 71%, this assumption proved to be valid for all target analytes with the exception of pyrraline, which showed an opposite behavior. Here, plasma and dialysate levels increased during the treatment by about 59%. The notions that pyrraline was formed in high amounts in the patient's bloodstream (I) after intake of the corresponding precursor compound 3-deoxyglucosone with the dialysis fluid or (II) by catalytic effects on the formation by the dialysis membrane were ruled out. In contrast, in a dietary study, the comparison of pyrraline concentrations in plasma before and after food consumption confirmed that the increase in pyrraline originates solely from digestion of glycated food proteins. Additionally, by detailed analyses of the food consumed during dialysis sessions, bread rolls with a pyrraline content of about 21.7 μmol per serving were identified as the main source.

  9. Advanced Glycation End Products: A Molecular Target for Vascular Complications in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi; Nakamura, Nobutaka; Suematsu, Mika; Kaseda, Kuniyoshi; Matsui, Takanori

    2015-10-27

    A nonenzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and amino groups of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids contributes to the aging of macromolecules and subsequently alters their structural integrity and function. This process has been known to progress at an accelerated rate under hyperglycemic and/or oxidative stress conditions. Over a course of days to weeks, early glycation products undergo further reactions such as rearrangements and dehydration to become irreversibly cross-linked, fluorescent and senescent macroprotein derivatives termed advanced glycation end products (AGEs). There is a growing body of evidence indicating that interaction of AGEs with their receptor (RAGE) elicits oxidative stress generation and as a result evokes proliferative, inflammatory, thrombotic and fibrotic reactions in a variety of cells. This evidence supports AGEs' involvement in diabetes- and aging-associated disorders such as diabetic vascular complications, cancer, Alzheimer's disease and osteoporosis. Therefore, inhibition of AGE formation could be a novel molecular target for organ protection in diabetes. This report summarizes the pathophysiological role of AGEs in vascular complications in diabetes and discusses the potential clinical utility of measurement of serum levels of AGEs for evaluating organ damage in diabetes.

  10. Effect of taurine on advanced glycation end products-induced hypertrophy in renal tubular epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.-S. Chuang, L.-Y.; Guh, J.-Y.; Yang, Y.-L.; Hsu, M.-S.

    2008-12-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that advanced glycation end products (AGE) play a major role in the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Taurine is a well documented antioxidant agent. To explore whether taurine was linked to altered AGE-mediated renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis in DN, we examined the molecular mechanisms of taurine responsible for inhibition of AGE-induced hypertrophy in renal tubular epithelial cells. We found that AGE (but not non-glycated BSA) caused inhibition of cellular mitogenesis rather than cell death by either necrosis or apoptosis. There were no changes in caspase 3 activity, bcl-2 protein expression, and mitochondrial cytochrome c release in BSA, AGE, or the antioxidant taurine treatments in these cells. AGE-induced the Raf-1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation was markedly blocked by taurine. Furthermore, taurine, the Raf-1 kinase inhibitor GW5074, and the ERK kinase inhibitor PD98059 may have the ability to induce cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression from AGE-treated cells. The ability of taurine, GW5074, or PD98059 to inhibit AGE-induced hypertrophy was verified by the observation that it significantly decreased cell size, cellular hypertrophy index, and protein levels of RAGE, p27{sup Kip1}, collagen IV, and fibronectin. The results obtained in this study suggest that taurine may serve as the potential anti-fibrotic activity in DN through mechanism dependent of its Raf-1/ERK inactivation in AGE-induced hypertrophy in renal tubular epithelial cells.

  11. Singlet oxygen induced advanced glycation end-product photobleaching of in vivo human fingertip autofluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Bin; Simental, Anabel; Lutz, Patrick; Shaheen, George; Chaiken, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation and oxidation of ubiquitous proteins in vivo leads to irreversible formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Due to their relatively long half life and low clearance rate AGEs tend to accumulate within static tissues and the circulatory system. Spectra obtained using 830 nm near-infrared (NIR) excitation suggest that the so-called "autofluorescence" from all tissues has a finite number of sources but the fact that senior and diabetic subjects produce more than other members of the general population suggests that a significant portion of the total autofluorescence from all sources originates from AGEs. Using pentosidine generated in a reaction mixture as described by Monnier as representative, an in vitro study unveiled very similar fluorescence and photobleaching pattern as observed for autofluorescence in vivo. A series of oxygen, air and argon purging experiments on the pentosidine-generating reaction mixture suggests that pentosidine is a singlet oxygen sensitizer and secondary reactions between the pentosidine itself and/or other fluorophores and the photosensitized singlet oxygen explain the observed photobleaching. Ab initio Gaussian calculations on pentosidine reveal the existence of low-lying triplet excited states required for the sensitization of ground state oxygen. A commercially available product known as singlet oxygen sensor green (SOSG) that specifically serves as a singlet oxygen detection reagent confirms the generation of singlet oxygen from NIR irradiated pentosidine trimixture. This study provides one definite chemical mechanism for understanding in vivo human skin autofluorescence and photobleaching.

  12. DNA aptamer raised against advanced glycation end products inhibits neointimal hyperplasia in balloon-injured rat carotid arteries.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Ayako; Oda, Eriko; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; Matsui, Takanori; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2014-02-15

    Advanced glycation end products (AGE) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction elicit inflammatory and proliferative reactions in arteries, thus playing a role in cardiovascular disease. We have recently found that high-affinity DNA aptamer directed against AGE (AGE-aptamer) prevents the progression of experimental diabetic nephropathy by blocking the harmful actions of AGEs in the kidney. However, effects of AGE-aptamer on vascular injury remain unknown. In this study, we examined whether and how AGE-aptamer inhibits neointimal hyperplasia in balloon-injured rat carotid arteries. Male Wistar rats (weighting ca. 400 g at 11 weeks old) were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital. The left common carotid artery was balloon-injured 3 times with 2F Fogaty catheter inserted through the femoral artery. Then the rats received continuous intraperitoneal infusion (3 μg/day) of either AGE-aptamer or control-aptamer by an osmotic mini pump for 2 weeks. 14 days after the procedure, the left common carotid arteries were excised for morphometric, immunohistochemical and western blot analyses. Compared with control-aptamer, AGE-aptamer significantly suppressed neointima formation after balloon injury and reduced AGE accumulation, oxidative stress generation, proliferation cell nuclear antigen-positive area, macrophage infiltration, RAGE and platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) expression levels in balloon-injured carotid arteries. The present study suggests that AGE-aptamer could prevent balloon injury-induced neointimal hyperplasia by reducing PDGF-BB and macrophage infiltration via suppression of the AGE-RAGE-mediated oxidative stress generation. AGE-aptamer might be a novel therapeutic strategy for suppressing neointima formation after balloon angioplasty. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Collagen advanced glycation inhibits its Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2)-mediated induction of lysyl oxidase in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Roozbeh; Sodek, Katharine L; Faibish, Michael; Trackman, Philip C

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes increases the risk of bone fracture. Organic and inorganic bone extracellular matrix components determine bone strength. Previous studies indicate that in diabetes, glycation of collagen causes abnormal arrangements of collagen molecules and fragile bones. Diabetic bone fragility is additionally attributed to reduced levels of lysyl oxidase enzyme-dependent collagen cross-links. The mechanism underlying the presence of lower enzymatic collagen cross-links in diabetic bone has not been directly investigated. Here we determine in primary osteoblast cultures the regulation of lysyl oxidase protein by type I collagen and collagen modified by carboxymethylation (CML-collagen), a form of advanced glycation endproducts. Data indicate that non-glycated collagen up-regulates lysyl oxidase levels both in primary non-differentiated and in differentiating mouse and rat osteoblast cultures, while CML-collagen fails to regulate lysyl oxidase in these cells. Collagen binding to Discoidin Domain Receptor-2 (DDR2) mediates lysyl oxidase increases, determined in DDR2 shRNA knockdown studies. DDR2 binding and activation were disrupted by collagen glycation, pointing to a mechanism for the diminished levels of lysyl oxidase and consequently low lysyl oxidase-derived cross-links in diabetic bone. Our studies indicate that collagen-integrin interactions may not play a major role in up-regulating lysyl oxidase. Furthermore, non-collagenous ligands for the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) failed to alter lysyl oxidase levels. Taken together with published studies a new understanding emerges in which diabetes- and age-dependent inhibition of normal collagen-stimulated DDR2- and integrin-signaling, and independent advanced glycation-stimulated RAGE-signaling, each contributes to different aspects of diabetic osteopenia.

  14. New advanced glycation end-products inhibitors from Dichrostachys cinerea Wight & Arn.

    PubMed

    Suresh, G; Tiwari, Ashok K; Radha Krishna Murthy, M; Anand Kumar, D; Rajendra Prasad, K; Ranga Rao, R; Zehra Ali, A; Suresh Babu, K

    2012-01-01

    Free radical scavenging and advanced glycation end-product (AGE) inhibitory potential were evaluated in the crude methanol extract of Dichrostachys cinerea. Bioassay-guided isolation led to the identification of four flavan-3-ols, namely (-)-mesquitol (1), oritin (2), (-)-festidinol (3) and (-)-epicatechin (4). Analysis of structure-activity relationships revealed that the presence of 7,8-dihydroxyl groups in the A-ring of flavan-3-ols in conjunction with 3',4'-dihydroxyls in the B-ring (1) is an important criterion for displaying potent AGE inhibitory activity along with free radical scavenging properties. (-)-Mesquitol (1), oritin (2), and (-)-festidinol (3) were found to be new natural AGE inhibitors. (-)-Mesquitol (1) displayed the most potent AGE inhibitory activity. Results suggest that (-)-mesquitol (1) may serve as an important natural organic lead compound for future development of antiglycating agents along with potent antioxidant activity.

  15. The Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Contributes to the Progression of Emphysema in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sambamurthy, Nisha; Leme, Adriana S.; Oury, Tim D.; Shapiro, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Several recent clinical studies have implied a role for the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and its variants in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In this study we have defined a role for RAGE in the pathogenesis of emphysema in mice. RAGE deficient mice (RAGE-/-) exposed to chronic cigarette smoke were significantly protected from smoke induced emphysema as determined by airspace enlargement and had no significant reduction in lung tissue elastance when compared to their air exposed controls contrary to their wild type littermates. The progression of emphysema has been largely attributed to an increased inflammatory cell-mediated elastolysis. Acute cigarette smoke exposure in RAGE-/- mice revealed an impaired early recruitment of neutrophils, approximately a 6-fold decrease compared to wild type mice. Hence, impaired neutrophil recruitment with continued cigarette smoke exposure reduces elastolysis and consequent emphysema. PMID:25781626

  16. Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and heart failure: pathophysiology and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Jasper W L; Voors, Adriaan A; Bakker, Stephan J L; Smit, Andries J; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J

    2007-12-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are molecules formed during a non-enzymatic reaction between proteins and sugar residues, called the Maillard reaction. AGEs accumulate in the human body with age, and accumulation is accelerated in the presence of diabetes mellitus. In patients with diabetes, AGE accumulation is associated with the development of cardiac dysfunction. Enhanced AGE accumulation is not restricted to patients with diabetes, but can also occur in renal failure, enhanced states of oxidative stress, and by an increased intake of AGEs. Several lines of evidence suggest that AGEs are related to the development and progression of heart failure in non-diabetic patients as well. Preliminary small intervention studies with AGE cross-link breakers in heart failure patients have shown promising results. In this review, the role of AGEs in the development of heart failure and the role of AGE intervention as a possible treatment for heart failure are discussed.

  17. Constituents of the roots of Pueraria lobata inhibit formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs).

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Min; Lee, Yun Mi; Lee, Ga Young; Jang, Dae Sik; Bae, Ki Hwan; Kim, Jin Sook

    2006-10-01

    Two isoflavone C-glucosides, puerarin (1) and PG-3 (2), a but-2-enolide, (+/-)-puerol B (3), two isoflavone O-glucosides, daidzin (4) and genistin (5), and three pterocarpans, (-)-medicarpin (6), (-)-glycinol (7) and (-)-tuberosin (8), were isolated from a MeOH extract of the roots of Pueraria lobata, using an in vitro bioassay based on the inhibition of the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) to monitor chromatographic fractionation. The structures of 1-8 were determined by spectroscopic data interpretation, particularly by 1D- and 2D-NMR studies, and by comparison of these data with values in the literature. All of the isolates (1-8) were evaluated for their inhibitory activity on AGEs formation in vitro. Of these, puerarin (1), PG-3 (2), and (+/-)-puerol B (3) exhibited more potent inhibitory activity than the positive control aminoguanidine.

  18. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) specifically recognizes methylglyoxal-derived AGEs.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jing; Ray, Rashmi; Singer, David; Böhme, David; Burz, David S; Rai, Vivek; Hoffmann, Ralf; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2014-05-27

    Diabetes-induced hyperglycemia increases the extracellular concentration of methylglyoxal. Methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolones (MG-H) form advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that accumulate in the serum of diabetic patients. The binding of hydroimidozolones to the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) results in long-term complications of diabetes typified by vascular and neuronal injury. Here we show that binding of methylglyoxal-modified albumin to RAGE results in signal transduction. Chemically synthesized peptides containing hydroimidozolones bind specifically to the V domain of RAGE with nanomolar affinity. The solution structure of an MG-H1-V domain complex revealed that the hydroimidazolone moiety forms multiple contacts with a positively charged surface on the V domain. The high affinity and specificity of hydroimidozolones binding to the V domain of RAGE suggest that they are the primary AGE structures that give rise to AGEs-RAGE pathologies.

  19. Influence of dietary advanced glycation end products on wound healing in nondiabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuanchang; Lan, Feifei; Wei, Jiange; Chong, Boonhor; Chen, Pakho; Huynh, Longquan; Wong, Nganwa; Liu, Yu

    2011-01-01

    The present study was to determine advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in foods from different processes, and the influence of dietary AGEs on wound healing in nondiabetic mice. AGEs mixtures were extracted from local fast foods and foods prepared in lab. A BSA-AGEs mixture made by incubating glucose with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a positive control. Burns were made on the skin of mice. The results showed that foods processed by high temperatures generated higher dietary AGEs. Nonwounded mice showed no observable adverse response to high dietary AGEs. However, high dietary AGEs caused severe inflammatory responses in wounded mice. The plasma level of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and its mRNA in white blood cells were found to be significantly higher in the wounded mice fed with high dietary AGEs than others. We conclude that dietary AGEs worsen inflammation and delay wound healing in nondiabetic burned mice, which might be mediated by HMGB1.

  20. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) regulates sepsis but not the adaptive immune response.

    PubMed

    Liliensiek, Birgit; Weigand, Markus A; Bierhaus, Angelika; Nicklas, Werner; Kasper, Michael; Hofer, Stefan; Plachky, Jens; Gröne, Herman-Josef; Kurschus, Florian C; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Yan, Shi Du; Martin, Eike; Schleicher, Erwin; Stern, David M; Hämmerling G, G ünterJ; Nawroth, Peter P; Arnold, Bernd

    2004-06-01

    While the initiation of the adaptive and innate immune response is well understood, less is known about cellular mechanisms propagating inflammation. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), a transmembrane receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily, leads to perpetuated cell activation. Using novel animal models with defective or tissue-specific RAGE expression, we show that in these animal models RAGE does not play a role in the adaptive immune response. However, deletion of RAGE provides protection from the lethal effects of septic shock caused by cecal ligation and puncture. Such protection is reversed by reconstitution of RAGE in endothelial and hematopoietic cells. These results indicate that the innate immune response is controlled by pattern-recognition receptors not only at the initiating steps but also at the phase of perpetuation.

  1. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) regulates sepsis but not the adaptive immune response

    PubMed Central

    Liliensiek, Birgit; Weigand, Markus A.; Bierhaus, Angelika; Nicklas, Werner; Kasper, Michael; Hofer, Stefan; Plachky, Jens; Gröne, Herman-Josef; Kurschus, Florian C.; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Yan, Shi Du; Martin, Eike; Schleicher, Erwin; Stern, David M.; Hämmerling, Günter J.; Nawroth, Peter P.; Arnold, Bernd

    2004-01-01

    While the initiation of the adaptive and innate immune response is well understood, less is known about cellular mechanisms propagating inflammation. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), a transmembrane receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily, leads to perpetuated cell activation. Using novel animal models with defective or tissue-specific RAGE expression, we show that in these animal models RAGE does not play a role in the adaptive immune response. However, deletion of RAGE provides protection from the lethal effects of septic shock caused by cecal ligation and puncture. Such protection is reversed by reconstitution of RAGE in endothelial and hematopoietic cells. These results indicate that the innate immune response is controlled by pattern-recognition receptors not only at the initiating steps but also at the phase of perpetuation. PMID:15173891

  2. The Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) and the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Stephen T.; Ehrhardt, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell surface molecules. As a pattern-recognition receptor capable of binding a diverse range of ligands, it is typically expressed at low levels under normal physiological conditions in the majority of tissues. In contrast, the lung exhibits high basal level expression of RAGE localised primarily in alveolar type I (ATI) cells, suggesting a potentially important role for the receptor in maintaining lung homeostasis. Indeed, disruption of RAGE levels has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of pulmonary disorders including cancer and fibrosis. Furthermore, its soluble isoforms, sRAGE, which act as decoy receptors, have been shown to be a useful marker of ATI cell injury. Whilst RAGE undoubtedly plays an important role in the biology of the lung, it remains unclear as to the exact nature of this contribution under both physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:20145712

  3. Do advanced glycation end-products play a role in malaria susceptibility?

    PubMed Central

    Traoré, Karim; Arama, Charles; Médebielle, Maurice; Doumbo, Ogobara; Picot, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    There are growing data supporting the differences in susceptibility to malaria described between sympatric populations with different lifestyles. Evidence has also been growing for some time that nutritional status and the host’s metabolism are part of the complex mechanisms underlying these differences. The role of dietary advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) in the modulation of immune responses (innate and adaptive responses) and chronic oxidative stress has been established. But less is known about AGE implication in naturally acquired immunity and susceptibility to malaria. Since inflammatory immune responses and oxidative events have been demonstrated as the hallmark of malaria infection, it seems crucial to investigate the role of AGE in susceptibility or resistance to malaria. This review provides new insight into the relationship between nutrition, metabolic disorders, and infections, and how this may influence the mechanisms of susceptibility or resistance to malaria in endemic areas. PMID:27012162

  4. Skin autofluorescence as marker of tissue advanced glycation end-products accumulation in formerly preeclamptic women.

    PubMed

    Coffeng, Sophie M; Blaauw, Judith; Souwer, Esteban T D; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Smit, Andries J; Graaff, Reindert; van Doormaal, Jasper J; Aarnoudse, Jan G; Faas, Marijke M; van Pampus, Maria G

    2011-01-01

    In women with a history of preeclampsia skin autofluorescence as marker of tissue AGEs accumulation is increased, supporting a common causal metabolic or vascular link between preeclampsia and cardiovascular diseases. To investigate whether skin autofluorescence (AF), as marker of tissue accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), is elevated in women with a 4-year history of severe preeclampsia. About 17 formerly preeclamptic women and 16 controls were included. Skin AF and several traditional cardiovascular risk factors were recorded. In comparison to controls, formerly preeclamptic women had higher skin AF of the legs, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), HbA1C, and triglycerides in serum. Skin AF as well as cardiovascular risk factors is elevated in formerly preeclamptic women. These results suggest a common causal vascular link between preeclampsia and cardiovascular diseases.

  5. Grape seed procyanidin b2 inhibits human aortic smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration induced by advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qian; Li, Bao-ying; Gao, Hai-qing; Zhang, Jian-hua; Wang, Jun-fu; Yu, Fei; Yin, Mei; Zhang, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Advanced glycation end product (AGE)-induced vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation is vital to the progression of diabetic vasculopathy. A grape seed procyanidin extract has been reported to possess anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties and to display a significant cardiovascular protective effect, but little is know about the underlying mechanism. The objective of this present study was to determine whether GSPB2 (grape seed procyanidin B2), which is a dimeric procyanidin and more biologically active, could inhibit AGE-induced VSMC proliferation by affecting the production of ubiquitin COOH-terminal hydrolase 1 (UCH-L1), the degradation of IκB-α and nuclear translocation of NF-κB in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Our data show that GSPB2 preincubation markedly inhibited AGE-induced proliferation and migration of HASMCs in a dose-dependent manner and upregulated the protein level of UCH-L1. Further studies revealed that the GSPB2 pretreatment markedly attenuated the degradation of IκB-α and nuclear translocation of NF-κB by modulating ubiquitination of IκB-α in AGE-exposed HASMCs. These results collectively suggest that AGE-induced HASMC proliferation and migration was suppressed by GSPB2 through regulating UCH-L1 and ubiquitination of IκB-α. GSPB2 may therefore have therapeutic potential in preventing and treating vascular complications of diabetes mellitus.

  6. Monacolin K and monascin attenuated pancreas impairment and hyperglycemia induced by advanced glycation endproducts in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Hsuan; Lu, Si-Shi; Lee, Bao-Hong; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2013-12-01

    Several lines of evidence have implicated high levels of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) in diabetes. Pancreas impairment caused by AGEs has been found in recent studies. Monascin (MS) and monacolin K (MK) are active compounds identified from Monascus-fermented products, which have been reported to inhibit inflammation and improve insulin resistance. In order to confirm the protective effects of MS and MK on pancreatic function, BALB/c mice were treated with AGEs via intraperitoneal injection for 22 weeks to induce hyperglycemia, and the pancreas-protecting mechanism of MS and MK from AGE-induced damage was investigated. We found that the expression of pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) was recovered by MS or MK administration to AGE-treated mice. In addition, MS strongly improved performance in the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and the insulin tolerance test (ITT), suggesting that MS sensitized to insulin in AGE-treated mice. Both MS and MK elevated pancreatic insulin expression when compared to the AGE-treated group, suggesting that MS and MK attenuated AGE-induced pancreatic dysfunction. Histopathology studies showed that intraperitoneal injection of AGEs did not result in pancreas damage. These findings confirm that the potential mechanism of AGEs on pancreatic dysfunction involves the induction of inflammation and the suppression of PDX-1 and GLUT2 expression. Taken together, MS and MK may be developed as an anti-diabetic agent in the future.

  7. Litsea japonica extract inhibits neuronal apoptosis and the accumulation of advanced glycation end products in the diabetic mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junghyun; Kim, Chan-Sik; Lee, Yun Mi; Sohn, Eunjin; Jo, Kyuhyung; Kim, Jin Sook

    2015-07-01

    The retinal accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is a condition, which is found in diabetic retinopathy. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of Litsea japonica extract (LJE) and to elucidate its underlying protective mechanism in model diabetic db/db mice. Male, 7 -week-old db/db mice were treated with LJE (100 or 250 mg/kg body weight) once a day orally for 12 weeks. The expression levels of AGEs and their receptor (RAGE) were subsequently assessed by immunohistochemistry. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay and southwestern histochemistry were used to detect activated nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). The immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that LJE significantly reduced the expression levels of the AGEs and RAGE in the neural retinas of the db/db mice. LJE markedly inhibited the apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells. In addition, LJE suppressed the activation of NF-κB. These results suggested that LJE may be beneficial for the treatment of diabetes-induced retinal neurodegeneration, and the ability of LJE to attenuate retinal ganglion cell loss may be mediated by inhibition of the accumulation of AGEs.

  8. Characterizing harmful advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and ribosylated aggregates of yellow mustard seed phytocystatin: Effects of different monosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Azaj; Shamsi, Anas; Bano, Bilqees

    2017-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are at the core of variety of diseases ranging from diabetes to renal failure and hence gaining wide consideration. This study was aimed at characterizing the AGEs of phytocystatin isolated from mustard seeds (YMP) when incubated with different monosaccharides (glucose, ribose and mannose) using fluorescence, ultraviolet, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and microscopy. Ribose was found to be the most potent glycating agent as evident by AGEs specific fluorescence and absorbance. YMP exists as a molten globule like structure on day 24 as depicted by high ANS fluorescence and altered intrinsic fluorescence. Glycated YMP as AGEs and ribose induced aggregates were observed at day 28 and 32 respectively. In our study we have also examined the anti-aggregative potential of polyphenol, resveratrol. Our results suggested the anti-aggregative behavior of resveratrol as it prevented the in vitro aggregation of YMP, although further studies are required to decode the mechanism by which resveratrol prevents the aggregation.

  9. A quick, simple method for detecting circulating fluorescent advanced glycation end-products: Correlation with in vitro and in vivo non-enzymatic glycation.

    PubMed

    Villa, Marika; Parravano, Mariacristina; Micheli, Arianna; Gaddini, Lucia; Matteucci, Andrea; Mallozzi, Cinzia; Facchiano, Francesco; Malchiodi-Albedi, Fiorella; Pricci, Flavia

    2017-06-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) constitute a highly heterogeneous family of compounds, relevant in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, which could represent efficient biomarkers of disease progression and drug response. Unfortunately, due to their chemical heterogeneity, no method has been validated to faithfully monitor their levels in the course of the disease. In this study, we refine a procedure to quantitatively analyze fluorescent AGEs (fAGEs), a subset considered remarkably representative of the entire AGE family, and measure them in in vitro glycated BSA (gBSA) and in plasma and vitreous of diabetic rats, for testing its use to possibly quantify circulating AGEs in patients, as markers of metabolic control. fAGE levels were evaluated by spectrofluorimetric analysis in in vitro and in vivo experimental models. BSA was glycated in vitro with increasing D-glucose concentrations for a fixed time or with a fixed D-glucose concentration for increasing time. In in vivo experiments, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were studied at 1, 3, 6 and 12weeks to analyze plasma and vitreous. To confirm the presence of AGEs in our models, non-diabetic rat retinal explants were exposed to high glucose (HG), to reproduce short-term effects, or in vitro gBSA, to reproduce long-term effects of elevated glucose concentrations. Rat retinal explants and diabetic retinal tissues were evaluated for the receptor for advanced glycation end-product (RAGE) by Western blot analysis. In in vitro experiments, fluorescence emission showed glucose concentration- and time-dependent increase of fAGEs in gBSA (p≤0.05). In streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, fAGE in plasma and vitrei showed an increase at 6 (p≤0.005) and 12 (p≤0.05) weeks of diabetes, with respect to control. RAGE was time-dependently upregulated in retinas incubated with gBSA, but not with HG, and in diabetic retinal tissue, substantiating exposure to AGEs. Applying the proposed technique, we could show

  10. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Deficiency Attenuates the Development of Atherosclerosis in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Soro-Paavonen, Aino; Watson, Anna M.D.; Li, Jiaze; Paavonen, Karri; Koitka, Audrey; Calkin, Anna C.; Barit, David; Coughlan, Melinda T.; Drew, Brian G.; Lancaster, Graeme I.; Thomas, Merlin; Forbes, Josephine M.; Nawroth, Peter P.; Bierhaus, Angelika; Cooper, Mark E.; Jandeleit-Dahm, Karin A.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in diabetic vasculature is considered to be a key mediator of atherogenesis. This study examines the effects of deletion of RAGE on the development of atherosclerosis in the diabetic apoE−/− model of accelerated atherosclerosis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—ApoE−/− and RAGE−/−/apoE−/− double knockout mice were rendered diabetic with streptozotocin and followed for 20 weeks, at which time plaque accumulation was assessed by en face analysis. RESULTS—Although diabetic apoE−/− mice showed increased plaque accumulation (14.9 ± 1.7%), diabetic RAGE−/−/apoE−/− mice had significantly reduced atherosclerotic plaque area (4.9 ± 0.4%) to levels not significantly different from control apoE−/− mice (4.3 ± 0.4%). These beneficial effects on the vasculature were associated with attenuation of leukocyte recruitment; decreased expression of proinflammatory mediators, including the nuclear factor-κB subunit p65, VCAM-1, and MCP-1; and reduced oxidative stress, as reflected by staining for nitrotyrosine and reduced expression of various NADPH oxidase subunits, gp91phox, p47phox, and rac-1. Both RAGE and RAGE ligands, including S100A8/A9, high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), and the advanced glycation end product (AGE) carboxymethyllysine were increased in plaques from diabetic apoE−/− mice. Furthermore, the accumulation of AGEs and other ligands to RAGE was reduced in diabetic RAGE−/−/apoE−/− mice. CONCLUSIONS—This study provides evidence for RAGE playing a central role in the development of accelerated atherosclerosis associated with diabetes. These findings emphasize the potential utility of strategies targeting RAGE activation in the prevention and treatment of diabetic macrovascular complications. PMID:18511846

  11. Immunological detection of fructose-derived advanced glycation end-products.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Iwaki, Mina; Takino, Jun-ichi; Shirai, Hikari; Kawakami, Mihoko; Bucala, Richard; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2010-07-01

    The advanced stage of non-enzymatic glycation (also called the Maillard reaction) that leads to the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) has an important function in the pathogenesis of angiopathy in diabetic patients. So far, most studies have been focused on the Maillard reaction by glucose. Although an elevated level of glucose had been thought to have a primary function in the Maillard reaction, on a molecular basis, glucose is among the least reactive sugars within biological systems. In addition to the extracellular formation of AGEs, rapid intracellular AGEs formation by various intracellular precursors (fructose, trioses, and dicarbonyl compounds) has recently attached attention. In this study, we considered the Maillard reaction with particular attention to the potential function of fructose. Fructose AGE-modified serum albumins were prepared by incubation of rabbit or bovine serum albumin (RSA or BSA) with D-fructose. After immunization of rabbits, fructose-derived AGEs (Fru-AGE) antiserum was subjected to affinity chromatography on a Sepharose 4B column coupled with Fru-AGE-BSA. Characterization of the novel anti-Fru-AGE antibody was performed with a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblot analysis. The assay of Fru-AGE was established using the immunoaffinity-purified-specific antibody, and the presence of Fru-AGE in healthy and diabetic serum was shown (7.04+/-4.47 vs 29.13+/-18.08 U/ml). We also investigated whether high glucose treatment could stimulate intracellular Fru-AGE production in cultured pericytes, and we analyzed the amount of Fru-AGE contained in some common commercial beverages and condiments. It is possible that Fru-AGE formation by these endogenous and exogenous routes contributes importantly to the tissue pathology of diabetes and aging. This paper provides novel and clinically relevant information on the detection of Fru-AGE between fructose and proteins.

  12. Advanced glycation End-products (AGEs): an emerging concern for processed food industries.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Chetan; Kaur, Amarjeet; Thind, S S; Singh, Baljit; Raina, Shiveta

    2015-12-01

    The global food industry is expected to increase more than US $ 7 trillion by 2014. This rise in processed food sector shows that more and more people are diverging towards modern processed foods. As modern diets are largely heat processed, they are more prone to contain high levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs are a group of complex and heterogeneous compounds which are known as brown and fluorescent cross-linking substances such as pentosidine, non-fluorescent cross-linking products such as methylglyoxal-lysine dimers (MOLD), or non-fluorescent, non-cross linking adducts such as carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pyrraline (a pyrrole aldehyde). The chemistry of the AGEs formation, absorption and bioavailability and their patho-biochemistry particularly in relation to different complications like diabetes and ageing discussed. The concept of AGEs receptor - RAGE is mentioned. AGEs contribute to a variety of microvascular and macrovascular complications through the formation of cross-links between molecules in the basement membrane of the extracellular matrix and by engaging the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Different methods of detection and quantification along with types of agents used for the treatment of AGEs are reviewed. Generally, ELISA or LC-MS methods are used for analysis of foods and body fluids, however lack of universally established method highlighted. The inhibitory effect of bioactive components on AGEs by trapping variety of chemical moieties discussed. The emerging evidence about the adverse effects of AGEs makes it necessary to investigate the different therapies to inhibit AGEs.

  13. Advanced Glycation End Products Activate a Chymase-Dependent Angiotensin II Generating Pathway in Diabetic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Koka, Vijay; Wang, Wansheng; Huang, Xiao Ru; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei; Truong, Luan D.; Lan, Hui Y

    2006-01-01

    Background: Angiotensin II is a key mediator of diabetes-related vascular disease. It is now recognized that in addition to angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), chymase is an important alternative angiotensin II generating enzyme in hypertension and diabetes. However, the mechanism of induction of chymase in diabetes remains unknown. Methods and Results: Here we report that chymase is upregulated in coronary and renal arteries in patients with diabetes by immunohistochemistry. Upregulation of vascular chymase is associated with deposition of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), increase in expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE), and activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinase. In vitro, AGEs can induce chymase expression and chymase-dependent angiotensin II generation in human vascular smooth muscle cells via the RAGE-ERK1/2 MAP kinase-dependent mechanism. This is confirmed by blockade of AGE-induced vascular chymase expression with a neutralizing RAGE antibody and an inhibitor to ERK1/2, and by overexpression of the dominant negative-ERK1/2. Compared to ACE, chymase contributes to the majority of angiotensin II production (more than 70%, p<0.01) in response to AGEs. Further more, AGE-induced Angiotensin II production is blocked by the anti-RAGE antibody and by inhibition of ERK1/2 MAP kinase activities. Conclusions: Advanced glycation end products, a hallmark of diabetes, induce chymase via the RAGE-ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway. Chymase initiates an important alternative angiotensin II generating pathway in diabetes and may play a critical role in diabetic vascular disease. PMID:16520412

  14. Regulatory mechanism of gallic acid against advanced glycation end products induced cardiac remodeling in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Umadevi, Subramanian; Gopi, Venkatachalam; Elangovan, Vellaichamy

    2014-02-05

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) play a major role in the development of cardiovascular disorders in diabetic patients. Recent studies evidenced the beneficial role of phytochemicals in reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Hence the present study was framed to investigate the protective role of Gallic acid (GA) on AGEs induced cardiac fibrosis. Rats were infused with in vitro prepared AGEs (50mg/kg BW-intravenous injection) for 30 days. Further, GA (25mg/kgBW) was administered to rats along with AGEs. On infusion of AGEs, induction of fibrotic markers, collagen deposition, oxidative marker NADPH oxidase (NOX-p47 phox subunit), AGE receptor (RAGE) and cytokines expression was evaluated in the heart tissues using RT-PCR, Western blot and immunostaining methods. AGEs infusion significantly (P<0.01) increased the HW/BW ratio and fibrosis (4-fold) with increased expression of matrix genes MMP-2 and -9 (P<0.01, respectively) in the heart tissues. Whereas, administration of GA along with AGEs infusion prevented the fibrosis induced by AGEs. Further, GA treatment effectively prevented the AGEs mediated up-regulation of pro-fibrotic genes and ECM proteins such as TNF-α, TGF-β, MMP-2 and -9 expression. In addition, the increased expression of NOX (P<0.01), RAGE (P<0.01), NF-κB (P<0.01) and ERK 1/2 on AGEs infusion were normalized by GA treatment. Thus the present study shows the protective effect of GA on the fibrotic response and cardiac remodeling process induced by advanced glycation end products from external sources. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Osseous wound repair under inhibition of the axis of advanced glycation end-products and the advanced glycation end-products receptor.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sheng-Chueh; Jheng, Yi-Han; Wang, Chen-Ying; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lin, Yu-Fang; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Chang, Po-Chun

    2015-10-01

    Blockade of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) is able to reduce diabetic complications and control periodontitis. This study aimed to determine whether the application of aminoguanidine (AG), an AGE inhibitor, or N-phenacylthiazolium bromide (PTB), an AGE breaker, facilitates the healing of an osseous wound in non-diabetic animals. 2.6 mm diameter full-thickness osseous wounds were created bilaterally in 54 healthy Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats received daily normal saline, AG, or PTB injections respectively and were euthanized after 7 days, 14 days, or 28 days (n = 6). The wound healing pattern was assessed by micro-computed tomography, histology, histochemistry for the fiber arrangement, and the gene expression levels of AGE receptor, tumor necrosis factor-α, type I collagen, and fibronectin. Under the AG and PTB administration, osteogenesis was apparently promoted in the early stages of healing, but the union of the osseous wound and the fibril re-arrangement was apparently retarded. No significant difference was found in any of the micro-computed tomography parameters as compared to the control in the first 14 days, whereas the relative bone volume was significantly higher in the control at Day 28. AGE receptor and tumor necrosis factor-α were depressed in the PTB group, but only temporarily at Day 14 in the AG group. Therefore, at Day 14, type I collagen was significantly upregulated in the PTB group, and fibronectin was significantly increased in the AG group. Anti-AGE agents reduced inflammation but did not apparently facilitate osteogenesis during the osseous wound repair. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Release of suppressed oak advance regeneration

    Treesearch

    Dylan Dillaway; Jeffrey W. Stringer

    2006-01-01

    Oaks are not consistently regenerating on intermediate- and high-quality sites due to the lack of well-developed advance regeneration. Studies of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) seedling cohorts have shown that when grown under well-developed canopies and mid-stories, height growth is suppressed, and seedling mortality increases with time resulting in a sparsely...

  17. Drugs of abuse that mediate advanced glycation end product formation: a chemical link to disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Treweek, Jennifer B; Dickerson, Tobin J; Janda, Kim D

    2009-05-19

    Nicotine and methamphetamine are frequently abused in modern society, despite the increasing evidence of their addictive, neuropharmacological, and toxic effects. Tobacco, the most widely abused substance, is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States, killing nearly half a million Americans annually. A methamphetamine epidemic has also spread during the past decade; severe neurotoxicity and addictiveness contribute to the drug's notoriety. Although the majority of research on these two drugs is of pharmacological and neurobiological motivation, further study of these molecules from a chemical perspective may provide novel mechanistic insight into either their addictive potential or their pathological effects. For example, nicotine and methamphetamine share a common structural feature, a secondary amine, suggesting that these molecules could possess similar (or analogous) in vivo reactivity. Discoveries concerning the synthetic requirements for aqueous aldol catalysis and the feasibility of the enamine mechanism under physiological conditions have given rise to the hypothesis that ingested molecules, such as abused drugs, could participate in reactions utilizing an enamine intermediate in vivo. The chemical reactivity of exogenous drugs with amine functionalities was initially examined in the context of the Maillard reaction, or nonenzymatic browning. The heating of reducing sugars with amino acids yields a brown solution; studies of this reaction were originally applied to food chemistry for the production of distinct flavors and aromas. Further research has since revealed numerous instances in which the in vivo production of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) through the Maillard reaction contribute to the pathology of disease states. Specifically, the modification of long-lived proteins by glycation and glycoxidation and the accumulation of these AGEs compromise the original function of such proteins and change the mechanical properties of

  18. Aging induces cardiac diastolic dysfunction, oxidative stress, accumulation of advanced glycation endproducts and protein modification.

    PubMed

    Li, Shi-Yan; Du, Min; Dolence, E Kurt; Fang, Cindy X; Mayer, Gabriele E; Ceylan-Isik, Asli F; LaCour, Karissa H; Yang, Xiaoping; Wilbert, Christopher J; Sreejayan, Nair; Ren, Jun

    2005-04-01

    Evidence suggests that aging, per se, is a major risk factor for cardiac dysfunction. Oxidative modification of cardiac proteins by non-enzymatic glycation, i.e. advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), has been implicated as a causal factor in the aging process. This study was designed to examine the role of aging on cardiomyocyte contractile function, cardiac protein oxidation and oxidative modification. Mechanical properties were evaluated in ventricular myocytes from young (2-month) and aged (24-26-month) mice using a MyoCam system. The mechanical indices evaluated were peak shortening (PS), time-to-PS (TPS), time-to-90% relengthening (TR90) and maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening (+/- dL/dt). Oxidative stress and protein damage were evaluated by glutathione and glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) ratio and protein carbonyl content, respectively. Activation of NAD(P)H oxidase was determined by immunoblotting. Aged myocytes displayed a larger cell cross-sectional area, prolonged TR90, and normal PS, +/- dL/dt and TPS compared with young myocytes. Aged myocytes were less tolerant of high stimulus frequency (from 0.1 to 5 Hz) compared with young myocytes. Oxidative stress and protein oxidative damage were both elevated in the aging group associated with significantly enhanced p47phox but not gp91phox expression. In addition, level of cardiac AGEs was approximately 2.5-fold higher in aged hearts than young ones determined by AGEs-ELISA. A group of proteins with a molecular range between 50 and 75 kDa with pI of 4-7 was distinctively modified in aged heart using one- or two-dimension SDS gel electrophoresis analysis. These data demonstrate cardiac diastolic dysfunction and reduced stress tolerance in aged cardiac myocytes, which may be associated with enhanced cardiac oxidative damage, level of AGEs and protein modification by AGEs.

  19. [Advanced glycation end-products: new markers of renal dysfunction in patients with chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; Rodiño-Janeiro, Bruno K; Grigorian-Shamagian, Lilian; Moure-González, María; Seoane-Blanco, Ana; Varela-Román, Alfonso; Alvarez, Ezequiel; González-Juanatey, José R

    2011-04-30

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGE) are implicated in the physiopathology and prognosis of heart failure (HF) and they accumulate in situations such as kidney failure (KF). Our objective was to analyze the relation between AGE and KF in patients with chronic HF. 102 consecutive patients of our medical center were included. Clinical and analytical data were obtained, with measurement of glycated haemoglobin, brain natriuretic peptide, cystatin C and fluorescent AGE. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was estimated for each patient. 40.2% of patients presented GFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and 11.7% had hidden kidney disease (HKD). AGE correlated positively with creatinine (r=0.685, p<0.001) and cystatin C (r=0.682, p<0.001) and negatively with GFR (r=-0.720, p<0.001). Medium value of fluorescent AGE in patients with KF was higher than those without KF (83.4 [3.3] URF vs 56.8 [2.1] URF, p<0.001). With regard to the diagnostic value for HKD, fluorescent AGE presented an area under the ROC curve higher than other parameters for KD such as cystatin C. In the multivariate analysis, fluorescent AGE were an independent biomarker of KD (OR 1.060; 95% CI 1.024-1.097; p=0.001). AGE act as a biomarker of KD in patients with chronic HF, both diabetics and non diabetics, being better than cystatin C in the detection of HKD. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Inhibitory activity of coumarins from Artemisia capillaris against advanced glycation endproduct formation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun Ah; Park, Jin Ju; Islam, Md Nurul; Jin, Seung Eun; Min, Byung-Sun; Lee, Je-Hyun; Sohn, Hee Sook; Choi, Jae Sue

    2012-06-01

    Since glycation can lead to the onset of diabetic complications due to chronic hyperglycemia, several indigenous Artemisia species were evaluated as potential inhibitors of advanced glycation endproducts (AGE). Among them, the Artemisia capillaris plant demonstrated the highest AGE inhibitory activity. Repeated column chromatography was performed to isolate a new acylated flavonoid glycoside, acacetin-7-O-(6″-O-acetyl)-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl]-(1→6)-β-D-glucopyranoside, along with 11 known flavonoids (acacetin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl]-(1→6)-β-D-glucopyranoside, linarin, quercetin, hyperoside, isorhamnetin, isorhamnetin 3-galactoside, isorhamnetin 3-glucoside, isorhamnetin 3-arabinoside, isorhamnetin 3-robinobioside, arcapillin, and cirsilineol), six coumarins (umbelliferone, esculetin, scopoletin, scopolin, isoscopolin, and scoparone), and two phenolic derivatives (4,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid and chlorogenic acid). In determining the structure-activity relationship (SAR), it was found that the presence and position of hydroxyl group of test coumarins (coumarin, esculin, isoscopoletin, daphnetin, 4-methylcoumarin, and six isolated coumarins) may play a crucial role in AGE inhibition. A free hydroxyl group at C-7 and a glucosyl group instead of a methoxyl group at C-6 are two important parameters for the inhibitory potential of coumarins on AGE formation. A. capillaris and five key AGE inhibitors, including 4,5-di-Ocaffeoylquinic acid, umbelliferone, esculetin, esculin, and scopoletin, were identified as potential candidates for use as therapeutic or preventive agents for diabetic complications and oxidative stress-related diseases. We understand this to be the first detailed study on the SAR of coumarins in AGE inhibition.

  1. Detection of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on human skin by in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. A.; Pereira, L.; Ali, S. M.; Pizzol, C. D.; Tellez, C. A.; Favero, P. P.; Santos, L.; da Silva, V. V.; Praes, C. E. O.

    2016-03-01

    The aging process involves the reduction in the production of the major components of skin tissue. During intrinsic aging and photoaging processes, in dermis of human skin, fibroblasts become senescent and have decreased activity, which produce low levels of collagen. Moreover, there is accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs have incidence in the progression of age-related diseases, principally in diabetes mellitus and in Alzheimer's diseases. AGEs causes intracellular damage and/or apoptosis leading to an increase of the free radicals, generating a crosslink with skin proteins and oxidative stress. The aim of this study is to detect AGEs markers on human skin by in vivo Confocal Raman spectroscopy. Spectra were obtained by using a Rivers Diagnostic System, 785 nm laser excitation and a CCD detector from the skin surface down to 120 μm depth. We analyzed the confocal Raman spectra of the skin dermis of 30 women volunteers divided into 3 groups: 10 volunteers with diabetes mellitus type II, 65-80 years old (DEW); 10 young healthy women, 20-33 years old (HYW); and 10 elderly healthy women, 65-80 years old (HEW). Pentosidine and glucosepane were the principally identified AGEs in the hydroxyproline and proline Raman spectral region (1000-800 cm-1), in the 1.260-1.320 cm-1 region assignable to alpha-helical amide III modes, and in the Amide I region. Pentosidine and glucosepane calculated vibrational spectra were performed through Density Functional Theory using the B3LYP functional with 3-21G basis set. Difference between the Raman spectra of diabetic elderly women and healthy young women, and between healthy elderly women and healthy young women were also obtained with the purpose of identifying AGEs Raman bands markers. AGEs peaks and collagen changes have been identified and used to quantify the glycation process in human skin.

  2. Survey of the Distribution of a Newly Characterized Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products in Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Brett, Jerold; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Yan, Shi Du; Zou, Yu Shan; Weidman, Elliott; Pinsky, David; Nowygrod, Roman; Neeper, Michael; Przysiecki, Craig; Shaw, Alan; Migheli, Antonio; Stern, David

    1993-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), the final products of nonenzymatic glycation and oxidation of proteins, are found in the plasma and accumulate in the tissues during aging and at an accelerated rate in diabetes. A novel integral membrane protein, termed receptor for AGE (RAGE), forms a central part of the cell surface binding site for AGEs. Using monospecific, polyclonal antibody raised to human recombinant and bovine RAGE, immunostaining of bovine tissues showed RAGE in the vasculature, endothelium, and smooth muscle cells and in mononuclear cells in the tissues. Consistent with these data, RAGE antigen and mRNA were identified in cultured bovine endothelium, vascular smooth muscle, and monocyte-derived macrophages. RAGE antigen was also visualized in bovine cardiac myocytes as well as in cultures of neonatal rat cardiac myocytes and in neural tissue where motor neurons, peripheral nerves, and a population of cortical neurons were positive. In situ hybridization confirmed the presence of RAGE mRNA in the tissues, and studies with rat PC12 pheochromocytes indicated that they provide a neuronal-related cell culture model for examining RAGE expression. Pathological studies of human atherosclerotic plaques showed infiltration of RAGE-expressing cells in the expanded intima. These results indicate that RAGE is present in multiple tissues and suggest the potential relevance of AGE-RAGE interactions for modulating properties of the vasculature as well as neural and cardiac function, prominent areas of involvement in diabetes and in the normal aging process. ImagesFigure 9Figure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 10 PMID:8256857

  3. Gingival advanced glycation end-products in diabetes mellitus-associated chronic periodontitis: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Zizzi, A; Tirabassi, G; Aspriello, S D; Piemontese, M; Rubini, C; Lucarini, G

    2013-06-01

    The accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) seems to play an important role in the development of diabetes mellitus (DM)-associated periodontitis; however, some aspects of this issue are still scarcely known, such as the expression of AGEs in type 1 DM-associated periodontitis and the clinical factors able to affect their accumulation. This study aimed to clarify these points by evaluating the expression of AGEs in DM-associated periodontitis. Sixteen systemically and periodontally healthy subjects and 48 subjects suffering from generalized, severe, chronic periodontitis (16 with type 1 DM, 16 with type 2 DM and 16 systemically healthy subjects) were studied clinically, periodontally and metabolically. The immunohistochemical expression of AGEs in gingival tissues was also evaluated. Subjects affected with type 1 DM presented a significantly higher percentage of AGE-positive cells than did subjects affected with type 2 DM, not only in the epithelium, but also in vessels and fibroblasts. A positive and significant correlation was found between gingival expression of AGEs and length of time affected with DM both in type 1 and type 2 DM; glycated hemoglobin, lipid profile, body mass index and age did not correlate significantly with gingival AGEs in any of the classes of subjects studied. Gingival AGEs are increased in both type 1 and type 2 DM-associated periodontitis; however, the clinical parameter that determines their accumulation, and therefore their degree of influence on the development of DM-associated periodontitis, may be the duration of DM. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Advanced glycation end products mediated cellular and molecular events in the pathology of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kumar Pasupulati, Anil; Chitra, P Swathi; Reddy, G Bhanuprakash

    2016-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients and a leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Degenerative changes such as glomerular hypertrophy, hyperfiltration, widening of basement membranes, tubulointerstitial fibrosis, glomerulosclerosis and podocytopathy manifest in various degrees of proteinuria in DN. One of the key mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of DN is non-enzymatic glycation (NEG). NEG is the irreversible attachment of reducing sugars onto free amino groups of proteins by a series of events, which include the formation of Schiff's base and an Amadori product to yield advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGE modification of client proteins from the extracellular matrix induces crosslinking, which is often associated with thickening of the basement membrane. AGEs activate several intracellular signaling cascades upon interaction with receptor for AGEs (RAGE), which manifest in aberrant cellular responses such as inflammation, apoptosis and autophagy, whereas other receptors such as AGE-R1, AGE-R3 and scavenger receptors also bind to AGEs and ensue endocytosis and degradation of AGEs. Elevated levels of both serum and tissue AGEs are associated with adverse renal outcome. Increased evidence supports that attenuation of AGE formation and/or inhibition of RAGE activation manifest(s) in improving renal function. This review provides insights of NEG, discusses the cellular and molecular events triggered by AGEs, which manifest in the pathogenesis of DN including renal fibrosis, podocyte epithelial-mesenchymal transition and activation of renin-angiotensin system. Therapies designed to target AGEs, such as inhibitors of AGEs formation and crosslink breakers, are discussed.

  5. Effect of nicotine on advanced glycation end product-induced immune response in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideo Kohka; Liu, Keyue; Wake, Hidenori; Mori, Shuji; Zhang, Jiyong; Liu, Rui; Yoshino, Tadashi; Nishibori, Masahiro

    2010-03-01

    The up-regulation of adhesion molecule expressions on monocytes enhances cell-to-cell interactions with T cells, leading to cytokine production. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are modifications of proteins/lipids that become nonenzymatically glycated after contact with aldose sugars. Among various subtypes of AGEs, glyceraldehyde-derived AGE (AGE-2) and glycolaldehyde-derived AGE (AGE-3) induce the expressions of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, B7.1, B7.2, and CD40 on monocytes, the production of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and the lymphocyte proliferation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Nicotine is reported to inhibit the activation of monocytes via nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha7 subunit (alpha7-nAChR). In the present study, we found that nicotine inhibited the actions of AGE-2 and AGE-3. A nonselective and selective alpha7-nAChR antagonist, mecamylamine and alpha-bungarotoxin, reversed the inhibitory effects of nicotine, suggesting the involvement of alpha7-nAChR stimulation. Nicotine induced the expression of cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), and cAMP in the presence and absence of AGE-2 and AGE-3. PGE(2) is known to activate the EP(2)/EP(4) receptor, increasing the cAMP level and protein kinase A (PKA) activity. The actions of nicotine were reversed in part by an EP(2)-receptor antagonist, AH6809, an EP(4)-receptor antagonist, AH23848, and a PKA inhibitor, N-[2-(p-bromocinnamyl-amino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide dihydrochloride (H89). These results indicate that the mechanism of action of nicotine may be partially via endogenous PGE(2) production.

  6. Bio-optic signatures for advanced glycation end products in the skin in streptozotocin (STZ) Induced Diabetes (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidian, Mayer; Ponticorvo, Adrien; Rowland, Rebecca A.; Balbado, Melisa L.; Lentsch, Griffin; Balu, Mihaela; Alexander, Micheal; Shiri, Li; Lakey, Jonathan R. T.; Durkin, Anthony J.; Kohen, Roni; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2017-02-01

    Type 1diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disorder that occurs due to the rapid destruction of insulin-producing beta cells, leading to insulin deficiency and the inability to regulate blood glucose levels and leads to destructive secondary complications. Advanced glycation end (AGEs) products, the result of the cross-linking of reducing sugars and proteins within the tissues, are one of the key causes of major complications associated with diabetes such as renal failure, blindness, nerve damage and vascular changes. Non-invasive techniques to detect AGEs are important for preventing the harmful effects of AGEs during diabetes mellitus. In this study, we utilized multiphoton microscopy to image biopsies taken from control rats and compared them to biopsies taken from streptozotocin (STZ) induced adult male diabetic rats. This was done at two and four weeks after the induction of hyperglycemia (>400 mg/dL) specifically to evaluate the effects of glycation on collagen. We chose to use an in-situ multiphoton microscopy method that combines multiphoton auto-florescence (AF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) to detect the microscopic influence of glycation. Initial results show high auto-florescence levels were present on the collagen, as a result of the accumulation of AGEs only two weeks after the STZ injection and considerably higher levels were present four weeks after the STZ injection. Future projects could involve evaluating advanced glycation end products in a clinical trial of diabetic patients.

  7. [Effect of compound Chinese sour taste herbs on advanced glycation end products content and gene expression of their receptors in aorta of rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Yin, Gui-Xiang; Cao, Yu-Li; Zhu, De-Zeng

    2009-08-01

    To investigate the possible mechanism of compound Chinese sour taste herbs (CS) in preventing and ameliorating diabetic macroangiopathy by analyzing the effects of CS on the deposition of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and gene expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in the aorta tissue of rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Rat model of T2DM was established by peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) and high caloric diet feeding. Experimental SD rats were divided into the normal group, the model group, the aminoguanidine (AG) group, and the CS group. At the end of the 8th and 12th week, the fasting blood glucose (FBG) was measured by glucose oxidase method; content of AGEs and collagen in aorta detected by fluorescent method and gene expression of RAGE in aorta determined by Real-time PCR method. FBG, AGEs and collagen contents and RAGE expression in aorta of model rats were all higher than those in the normal control group (P <0.05), while all these indices were lower in the CS group than in the model group (P<0.05). CS could realize the goal for preventing and ameliorating diabetic macroangiopathy by way of suppressing the production of AGEs and down-regulating the gene expression of RAGE in aorta of T2DM rats.

  8. Effects of monascin on anti-inflammation mediated by Nrf2 activation in advanced glycation end product-treated THP-1 monocytes and methylglyoxal-treated wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bao-Hong; Hsu, Wei-Hsuan; Huang, Tao; Chang, Yu-Ying; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2013-02-13

    Hyperglycemia is associated with advanced glycation end products (AGEs). This study was designed to evaluate the inhibitory effects of monascin on receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE) signal and THP-1 monocyte inflammation after treatment with S100b, a specific ligand of RAGE. Monascin inhibited cytokine production by S100b-treated THP-1 monocytes via up-regulation of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) and alleviated p47phox translocation to the membrane. Methylglyoxal (MG, 600 mg/kg bw) was used to induce diabetes in Wistar rats. Inhibitions of RAGE and p47phox by monascin were confirmed by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of MG-induced rats. Silymarin (SM) was used as a positive control group. It was found that monascin promoted heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression mediated by Nrf2. Suppressions of AGEs, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-1β (IL-β) in serum of MG-induced rats were attenuated in the monascin administration group treated with retinoic acid (RA). RA treatment resulted in Nrf2 inactivation by increasing RA receptor-α (RARα) activity, suggesting that RA acts as an inhibitor of Nrf2. The results showed that monascin exerted anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects mediated by Nrf2 to prevent the development of diseases such as type 2 diabetes caused by inflammation.

  9. Circulating advanced glycation peptides in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats: evidence for preferential modification of IgG light chains.

    PubMed

    Gugliucci, A; Menini, T

    1998-01-01

    As the glycation/glycoxidation hypothesis for the genesis of diabetic complications is achieving widespread acceptance, much attention is being paid to the role of low molecular weight advanced glycation (AGE) adducts, as second generation glycating agents. We set out a study with the objective of attesting the presence of increased amounts of AGE-peptides in the circulation of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and to determine the nature of the plasma proteins which are main targets for advanced glycation. AGE (Ex 370/Em 440 nm) and pentosidine fluorescence (Ex 335/Em 385 nm) were significantly higher in plasma from diabetic rats after only one month of hyperglycemia as compared to controls (35 +/- 7 vs 25 +/- 2 AU, p< 0.05 and 54 +/- 14 vs 27 +/- 3 AU, p< 0.01 respectively). AGE-peptides (<10 kDa) were more than two-fold higher in diabetic animals. Immunoblots after SDS-PAGE of plasma proteins showed that AGE-IgG displayed a selective predominant increment in the same animals. When native rat IgG was incubated in the presence of AGE-peptides isolated from diabetic animals, AGE modification was already apparent after only 24 h of incubation, and was particularly important for light chains. AGE-immunoreactive light chains displayed an apparent increase in molecular weight. Aminoguanidine prevented, while copper enhanced AGE binding to IgG light chains. Our data validate the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat as a model reproducing the presence of circulating AGE-peptides, give evidence that IgG are preferential targets for advanced glycation in plasma and suggest that this modification, mediated by AGE-peptides, can be prevented by aminoguanidine.

  10. Inhibitory actions of selected natural substances on formation of advanced glycation endproducts and advanced oxidation protein products.

    PubMed

    Grzebyk, Ewa; Piwowar, Agnieszka

    2016-09-29

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGE) and advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) arise as a result of excessive glycation and oxidation processes of proteins in hyperglycemia and oxidative stress conditions respectively, both in vivo and in vitro. In vivo these processes are especially intensified in patients with diabetes, and the adverse effects of AGE and AOPP are particularly unfavorable for the pathogenesis and aggravate the biochemical disturbances and clinical complications of diabetes. Total AGE and AOPP (T-AGE and T-AOPP) are heterogeneous groups of compounds, and they can be divided into two main fractions: high- and low-molecular-weight, i.e. HMW-AGE and HMW-AOPP as well as LMW-AGE and LMW-AOPP. Therefore it is important to find natural substances that will prevent formation of total AGE and AOPP and their high- and low-molecular-weight fractions and thereby reduce their adverse effects on tissues and organs. Selected natural substances and dietary supplements such as vitamin C, aminoguanidine, quercetin and green tea as well as the multicompound formulations Padma Circosan and Padma 28 were tested in an in vitro model using bovine serum albumin (BSA). Fluorescence of T-, HMW- and LMW-AGE and concentration of T-, HMW- and LMW-AOPP were measured after incubation with these substances. In the examined concentrations quercetin showed the greatest degree of inhibition for T-AGE (60.5 %) as well as for HMW-AGE (79.5 %), while in the case of LMW-AGE the greatest degree of glycation inhibition was shown by Padma Circosan (74.9 %). T-AOPP and HMW-AOPP were best inhibited by vitamin C (87.3 and 89.1 % respectively). The results obtained for LMW-AOPP are atypical, but the lowest concentration was observed in a sample with Padma 28. The results show that all tested natural compounds have inhibitory activity towards the formation of total and low- and high-molecular-weight forms of AGE and AOPP in vitro. That suggest a possible role in the prevention of

  11. Potential Dual Role of Eugenol in Inhibiting Advanced Glycation End Products in Diabetes: Proteomic and Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Priyanka; Jayaramaiah, Ramesha H.; Agawane, Sachin B.; Vannuruswamy, Garikapati; Korwar, Arvind M.; Anand, Atul; Dhaygude, Vitthal S.; Shaikh, Mahemud L.; Joshi, Rakesh S.; Boppana, Ramanamurthy; Kulkarni, Mahesh J.; Thulasiram, Hirekodathakallu V.; Giri, Ashok P.

    2016-01-01

    Medicinally important genus Ocimum harbors a vast pool of chemically diverse metabolites. Current study aims at identifying anti-diabetic candidate compounds from Ocimum species. Major metabolites in O. kilimandscharicum, O. tenuiflorum, O. gratissimum were purified, characterized and evaluated for anti-glycation activity. In vitro inhibition of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) by eugenol was found to be highest. Preliminary biophysical analysis and blind docking studies to understand eugenol-albumin interaction indicated eugenol to possess strong binding affinity for surface exposed lysines. However, binding of eugenol to bovine serum albumin (BSA) did not result in significant change in secondary structure of protein. In vivo diabetic mice model studies with eugenol showed reduction in blood glucose levels by 38% likely due to inhibition of α-glucosidase while insulin and glycated hemoglobin levels remain unchanged. Western blotting using anti-AGE antibody and mass spectrometry detected notably fewer AGE modified peptides upon eugenol treatment both in vivo and in vitro. Histopathological examination revealed comparatively lesser lesions in eugenol-treated mice. Thus, we propose eugenol has dual mode of action in combating diabetes; it lowers blood glucose by inhibiting α-glucosidase and prevents AGE formation by binding to ε-amine group on lysine, protecting it from glycation, offering potential use in diabetic management. PMID:26739611

  12. Potential Dual Role of Eugenol in Inhibiting Advanced Glycation End Products in Diabetes: Proteomic and Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Singh, Priyanka; Jayaramaiah, Ramesha H; Agawane, Sachin B; Vannuruswamy, Garikapati; Korwar, Arvind M; Anand, Atul; Dhaygude, Vitthal S; Shaikh, Mahemud L; Joshi, Rakesh S; Boppana, Ramanamurthy; Kulkarni, Mahesh J; Thulasiram, Hirekodathakallu V; Giri, Ashok P

    2016-01-07

    Medicinally important genus Ocimum harbors a vast pool of chemically diverse metabolites. Current study aims at identifying anti-diabetic candidate compounds from Ocimum species. Major metabolites in O. kilimandscharicum, O. tenuiflorum, O. gratissimum were purified, characterized and evaluated for anti-glycation activity. In vitro inhibition of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) by eugenol was found to be highest. Preliminary biophysical analysis and blind docking studies to understand eugenol-albumin interaction indicated eugenol to possess strong binding affinity for surface exposed lysines. However, binding of eugenol to bovine serum albumin (BSA) did not result in significant change in secondary structure of protein. In vivo diabetic mice model studies with eugenol showed reduction in blood glucose levels by 38% likely due to inhibition of α-glucosidase while insulin and glycated hemoglobin levels remain unchanged. Western blotting using anti-AGE antibody and mass spectrometry detected notably fewer AGE modified peptides upon eugenol treatment both in vivo and in vitro. Histopathological examination revealed comparatively lesser lesions in eugenol-treated mice. Thus, we propose eugenol has dual mode of action in combating diabetes; it lowers blood glucose by inhibiting α-glucosidase and prevents AGE formation by binding to ε-amine group on lysine, protecting it from glycation, offering potential use in diabetic management.

  13. Ability of resveratrol to inhibit advanced glycation end product formation and carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzyme activity, and to conjugate methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yixiao; Xu, Zhimin; Sheng, Zhanwu

    2017-02-01

    Glycation can generate advanced glycation end products (AGE) and its intermediates methylglyoxal (MGO) and glyoxal in foods, which increase the risk of developing diabetes diseases. In this study, the effect of resveratrol against AGE formation, carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzyme activity and trapping MGO capability were evaluated. Resveratrol showed a significant inhibition capability against AGE formation in bovine serum albumin (BSA)-fructose, BSA-MGO and arginine-MGO models with inhibition percentages of 57.94, 85.95 and 99.35%, respectively. Furthermore, resveratrol acted as a competitive inhibitor for α-amylase with IC50 3.62μg/ml, while it behaved in an uncompetitive manner for α-glucosidase with an IC50 of 17.54μg/l. A prevention of BSA protein glycation was observed in the BSA-fructose model with addition of resveratrol. Three types of resveratrol-MGO adducts were identified in the model consisting of MGO and resveratrol. The results demonstrated that resveratrol has potential in reducing glycation in foods and retarding carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzyme activities.

  14. Activation of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products System in Women with Severe Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Emily A.; Buhimschi, Catalin S.; Dulay, Antonette T.; Baumbusch, Margaret A.; Abdel-Razeq, Sonya S.; Lee, Sarah Y.; Zhao, Guomao; Jing, Shichu; Pettker, Christian M.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) mediates cellular injury. Soluble forms of RAGE [soluble RAGE (sRAGE), endogenous secretory (esRAGE)] bind RAGE ligands, thereby preventing downstream signaling and damage. Objectives: The objective of the study was to characterize the changes in maternal serum, amniotic fluid, and cord blood soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) during physiological gestation and to provide insight into mechanisms responsible for RAGE activation in preeclampsia. Design and Settings: This was a cross-sectional study at a tertiary university hospital. Patients: We studied 135 women in the following groups: nonpregnant controls (n = 16), healthy pregnant controls (n = 68), pregnant women with chronic hypertension (n = 13), or pregnant women with severe preeclampsia (sPE; n = 38). Interventions and Main Outcome Measures: sRAGE and esRAGE levels were evaluated in vivo by ELISA in maternal serum, amniotic fluid, and cord blood and in vitro after stimulation of the amniochorion and placental explants with lipopolysaccharide or xanthine/xanthine oxidase. Placenta and amniochorion were immunostained for RAGE. Real-time quantitative PCR measured RAGE mRNA. Results: Pregnant women had significantly decreased serum sRAGE compared with nonpregnant subjects (P < 0.001). sPE women had higher serum and amniotic fluid sRAGE and esRAGE relative to those expected for gestational age (P < 0.001). Cord blood sRAGE remained unaffected by sPE. RAGE immunoreactivity and mRNA expression appeared elevated in the amniochorion of sPE women. Xanthine/xanthine oxidase (but not lipopolysaccharide) significantly up-regulated the release of sRAGE (P < 0.001) in the amniochorion explant system. Conclusions: Fetal membranes are a rich source of sRAGE. Elevated maternal serum and amniotic fluid sRAGE and esRAGE, paralleled by increased RAGE expression in the amniochorion, suggest activation of this system in s

  15. Detection of noncarboxymethyllysine and carboxymethyllysine advanced glycation end products (AGE) in serum of diabetic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, M.; Makita, Z.; Yanagisawa, K.; Kameda, Y.; Koike, T.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The advanced stage of the Maillard reaction, which leads to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGE), plays an important role in the pathogenesis of angiopathy in diabetic patients and in the aging process. N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) is thought to be an important epitope for many of currently available AGE antibodies. However, recent findings have indicated that a major source of CML may be by pathways other than glycation. A distinction between CML and non-CML AGE may increase our understanding of AGE formation in vivo. In the present study, we prepared antibodies directed against CML and non-CML AGE. MATERIALS AND METHODS: AGE-rabbit serum albumin prepared by 4, 8, and 12 weeks of incubation with glucose was used to immunize rabbits, and a high-titer AGE-specific antiserum was obtained without affinity for the carrier protein. To separate CML and non-CML AGE antibodies, the anti-AGE antiserum was subjected to affinity chromatography on a column coupled with AGE-BSA and CML-BSA. Two different antibodies were obtained, one reacting specifically with CML and the other reacting with non-CML AGE. Circulating levels of CML and non-CML AGE were measured in 66 type 2 diabetic patients without uremia by means of the competitive ELISA. Size distribution and clearance by hemodialysis detected by non-CML AGE and CML were assessed in serum from diabetic patients on hemodialysis. RESULTS: The serum non-CML AGE level in type 2 diabetic patients was significantly correlated with the mean fasting blood glucose level over the previous 2 months (r = 0.498, p < 0.0001) or the previous 1 month (r = 0.446, p = 0. 0002) and with HbA(1c) (r = 0.375, p = 0.0019), but the CML AGE level was not correlated with these clinical parameters. The CML and non-CML AGE were detected as four peaks with apparent molecular weights of 200, 65, 1.15, and 0.85 kD. The hemodialysis treatment did not affect the high-molecular-weight protein fractions. Although the low

  16. Advanced glycation end-products inhibition improves endothelial dysfunction in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Syngle, Ashit; Vohra, Kanchan; Garg, Nidhi; Kaur, Ladbans; Chand, Prem

    2012-02-01

    Chronic inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis is associated with vascular endothelial dysfunction. The objective was to study the efficacy and safety of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) inhibitor (benfotiamine 50 mg + pyridoxamine 50 mg + methylcobalamin 500 μg, Vonder(®) (ACME Lifescience, Baddi, Himachal Pradesh, India)) on endothelial function in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Twenty-four patients with established active RA with high disease activity (Disease Activity Score of 28 joints [DAS28 score] > 5.1) despite treatment with stable doses of conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs were investigated. Inflammatory disease activity (DAS28 and Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index [HAQ-DI] scores, erythrocyte sedimentation rate [ESR] and C-reactive protein [CRP]), markers of endothelial dysfunction, serum nitrite concentration and endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation of the brachial artery were measured before and after 12 weeks therapy with twice a day oral AGEs inhibitor. After treatment, flow-mediated vasodilation improved from 9.64 ± 0.65% to 15.82 ± 1.02% (P < 0.01), whereas there was no significant change in endothelium-independent vasodilation with nitroglycerin and baseline diameter; serum nitrite concentration significantly reduced from 5.6 ± 0.13 to 5.1 ± 0.14 μmol/L (P = 0.004), ESR from 63.00 ± 3.5 to 28.08 ± 1.5 mm in the first h (P < 0.01) and CRP levels from 16.7 ± 4.1 to 10.74 ± 2.9 mg/dL (P < 0.01). DAS28 and HAQ-DI scores were significantly reduced, from 5.9 ± 0.17 to 3.9 ± 0.17 (P < 0.01) and 4.6 ± 0.17 to 1.7 ± 0.22 (P < 0.01), respectively. Advanced glycation end products inhibitor improves endothelial dysfunction and inflammatory disease activity in RA. In RA, endothelial dysfunction is part of the disease process and is mediated by AGEs-induced inflammation. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2011 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and

  17. Advanced glycation end products accelerate rat vascular calcification through RAGE/oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qin; Ren, Xiaomei; Jiang, Yibo; Jin, Hong; Liu, Naifeng; Li, Jie

    2013-03-05

    Arterial media calcification (AMC) is highly prevalent and is a major cause of morbidity, mortality, stroke and amputation in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Previous research suggests that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are responsible for vascular calcification in diabetic patients. The potential link between oxidative stress and AGEs-induced vascular calcification, however, has not been examined. Male Wistar rats received a high fat diet for 8 weeks followed by a single dose of streptozotocin to induce DM (DM). Calcification was induced with Vitamin D3 and nicotine (VDN). We started VDN treatment at 1 week after the initial streptozotocin injection (DM+VDN). Age-matched rats were used as controls (CON). Metabolic parameters, aortic calcium content, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) protein, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, aorta receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and aorta AGEs levels were measured. In vitro, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were cultured with AGEs in DMEM containing 10 mmol·L(-1) ß -glycerophosphate (ß-GP). Calcium content and ALP activity were used to identify osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization. Western blots were used to examine protein expression of Cu/Zn SOD, NADPH oxidase Nox1 and RAGE. In addition, the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was evaluated using fluorescent techniques with dihydroethidine (DHE) method. The DM+VDN group showed a significant increase in aortic calcium content, levels of aorta AGEs, MDA content, ALP protein levels and RAGE expression, although Cu/Zn SOD activity decreased significantly. In vitro, enhanced Nox1, RAGE expression as well as the production of intracellular superoxide anions, and reduced expression of Cu/Zn SOD induced by AGEs were attenuated by the anti-RAGE antibody or a ROS inhibitor. Furthermore, the AGEs-stimulated ROS increase was also significantly inhibited by a SOD mimetic. Increased ALP

  18. Comparative LC-MS/MS profiling of free and protein-bound early and advanced glycation-induced lysine modifications in dairy products.

    PubMed

    Hegele, Jörg; Buetler, Timo; Delatour, Thierry

    2008-06-09

    Free and protein-bound forms of early and advanced glycation-induced lysine (Lys) modifications were quantified in dairy products by LC-MS/MS using a stable isotope dilution assay. The glycation profiles for N(epsilon)-fructoselysine (FL), N(epsilon)-carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pyrraline (Pyr) were monitored in raw and processed cow milk to investigate whether free glycation products could serve as fast and simple markers to assess the extent of protein glycation in dairy products. In all milk samples, the fraction of free glycation adducts was predominantly composed of advanced modifications, e.g. 8.34+/-3.81 nmol CML per micromol of free Lys (Lys(free)) and 81.5+/-87.8 nmol Pyr micromol(-1) Lys(free)(-1) vs. 3.72+/-1.29 nmol FL micromol(-1) Lys(free)(-1). In contrast, the protein-bound early glycation product FL considerably outweighed the content of CML and Pyr in milk proteins of raw and processed cow milk, whereas severely heat treated milk products, e.g. condensed milk, contained a higher amount of protein-bound advanced glycation adducts. Typical values recorded for milk samples processed under mild conditions were 0.47+/-0.08 nmol FL micromol(-1) of protein-bound Lys (Lys(p-b)), 0.04+/-0.03 nmol CML micromol(-1) Lys(p-b)(-1) and 0.06+/-0.02 nmol Pyr micromol(-1)Lys(p-b)(-1). It was particularly noticeable, however, that mild heat treatment of raw milk, i.e. pasteurization and UHT treatment, did not significantly increase the amount of both free and protein-bound Lys modifications. In conclusion, the profiles of free and protein-bound glycation-induced Lys modifications were found to be different and a screening of free glycation adducts does, therefore, not allow for a conclusion about the protein glycation status of dairy products.

  19. Beneficial effect of Corni Fructus, a constituent of Hachimi-jio-gan, on advanced glycation end-product-mediated renal injury in Streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Yamabe, Noriko; Kang, Ki Sung; Goto, Eiko; Tanaka, Takashi; Yokozawa, Takako

    2007-03-01

    Previous investigations have demonstrated that Hachimi-jio-gan, a Chinese prescription consisting of eight crude drugs, has a therapeutic potential in diabetes and diabetic nephropathy, using these model rats. To add to these findings, we performed this study to assess whether one of the crude drugs, Corni Fructus (Cornus officinalis SIEB. et ZUCC.), had an effect on streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats as a major active constituent, compared with an inhibitor of advanced glycation end-product (AGE) formation, aminoguanidine. Diabetic rats were orally administrated Corni Fructus extract (50, 100, 200 mg/kg body weight/d) or aminoguanidine (100 mg/kg body weight/d). Treatment with Corni Fructus for 10 d suppressed hyperglycemia, proteinuria, renal AGE formation, and related protein expressions, i.e., receptor for AGEs, nuclear factor-kappaB, transforming growth factor-beta1, and Nepsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine, in the same way as with aminoguanidine. However, improvement of renal function, shown via serum creatinine (Cr) and Cr clearance, was superior to aminoguanidine treatment. In conclusion, the present study supported the hypothesis that Corni Fructus plays an important role against diabetic pathogenesis, i.e., reducing glucose toxicities, up-regulating renal function, and consequently ameliorating glycation-associated renal damage; thus, this study may provide a new recognition of crude drugs to clarify the mechanisms of Chinese prescriptions.

  20. Effects of plant-derived polyphenols on TNF-alpha and nitric oxide production induced by advanced glycation endproducts.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Dave; Woldu, Ameha; Rahmadi, Anton; Shanmugam, Kirubakaran; Steiner, Nicole; Wright, Elise; Benavente-García, Obdulio; Schulz, Oliver; Castillo, Julián; Münch, Gerald

    2010-07-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) accumulate on protein deposits including the beta-amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease. AGEs interact with the "receptor for advanced glycation endproducts", and transmit their signals using intracellular reactive oxygen species as second messengers. Ultimately, AGEs induce the expression of a variety of pro-inflammatory markers including the tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) and inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase. Antioxidants that act intracellularly, including polyphenols, have been shown to scavenge these "signaling" reactive oxygen species, and thus perform in an anti-inflammatory capacity. This study tested the pure compounds apigenin and diosmetin as well as extracts from silymarin, uva ursi (bearberry) and green olive leaf for their ability to attenuate AGE-induced NO and TNF-alpha production. All five tested samples inhibited BSA-AGE-induced NO production in a dose-dependent manner. Apigenin and diosmetin were most potent, and exhibited EC(50) values approximately 10 microM. In contrast, TNF-alpha expression was only reduced by apigenin, diosmetin and silymarin; not by the bearberry and green olive leaf extracts. In addition, the silymarin and bearberry extracts caused significant cell death at concentrations >or=10 microg/mL and >or=50 microg/mL, respectively. In conclusion, we suggest that plant-derived polyphenols might offer therapeutic opportunities to delay the progression of AGE-mediated and receptor for advanced glycation endproducts-mediated neuro-inflammatory diseases including Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products Improves Stromal Cell–Derived Factor-1 Activity in Model Diabetic Environments

    PubMed Central

    Olekson, Melissa Przyborowski; Faulknor, Renea A.; Hsia, Henry C.; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Berthiaume, François

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In diabetes, hyperglycemia causes the accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that trigger reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation through binding the receptor for AGEs (RAGE). Because exogenous growth factors have had little success in enhancing chronic wound healing, we investigated whether hyperglycemia-induced AGEs interfere with cellular responses to extracellular signals. We used stromal cell–derived factor-1 (SDF-1), an angiogenic chemokine also known to promote stem cell recruitment in skin wounds. Approach: Human leukemia-60 (HL-60) cells and mouse peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), which express the SDF-1 receptor CXCR-4, were incubated for 24 h in medium supplemented with 25 mM d-glucose. Soluble RAGE (sRAGE) was used to block RAGE activation. Response to SDF-1 was measured in cellular migration and ROS assays. A diabetic murine excisional wound model measured SDF-1 liposome and sRAGE activity in vivo. Results: Hyperglycemia led to significant accumulation of AGEs, decreased SDF-1–directed migration, and elevated baseline ROS levels; it suppressed the ROS spike normally triggered by SDF-1. sRAGE decreased the ROS baseline and restored both the SDF-1–mediated spike and cell migration. Topically applied sRAGE alone promoted healing and enhanced the effect of exogenous SDF-1 on diabetic murine wounds. Innovation: While there is interest in using growth factors to improve wound healing, this strategy is largely ineffective in diabetic wounds. We show that sRAGE may restore signaling, thus potentiating the effect of exogenously applied growth factors. Conclusion: Blocking RAGE with sRAGE restores SDF-1–mediated cellular responses in hyperglycemic environments and may potentiate the effectiveness of SDF-1 applied in vivo. PMID:28078186

  2. Advanced Glycation End-Products Induce Apoptosis of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells: A Mechanism for Vascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Sayo; Yano, Shozo; Tanaka, Sayuri; Sheikh, Abdullah M.; Nagai, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification, especially medial artery calcification, is associated with cardiovascular death in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease (CKD). To determine the underlying mechanism of vascular calcification, we have demonstrated in our previous report that advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) stimulated calcium deposition in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) through excessive oxidative stress and phenotypic transition into osteoblastic cells. Since AGEs can induce apoptosis, in this study we investigated its role on VSMC apoptosis, focusing mainly on the underlying mechanisms. A rat VSMC line (A7r5) was cultured, and treated with glycolaldehyde-derived AGE-bovine serum albumin (AGE3-BSA). Apoptotic cells were identified by Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. To quantify apoptosis, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for histone-complexed DNA fragments was employed. Real-time PCR was performed to determine the mRNA levels. Treatment of A7r5 cells with AGE3-BSA from 100 µg/mL concentration markedly increased apoptosis, which was suppressed by Nox inhibitors. AGE3-BSA significantly increased the mRNA expression of NAD(P)H oxidase components including Nox4 and p22phox, and these findings were confirmed by protein levels using immunofluorescence. Dihydroethidisum assay showed that compared with cBSA, AGE3-BSA increased reactive oxygen species level in A7r5 cells. Furthermore, AGE3-induced apoptosis was significantly inhibited by siRNA-mediated knockdown of Nox4 or p22phox. Double knockdown of Nox4 and p22phox showed a similar inhibitory effect on apoptosis as single gene silencing. Thus, our results demonstrated that NAD(P)H oxidase-derived oxidative stress are involved in AGEs-induced apoptosis of VSMCs. These findings might be important to understand the pathogenesis of vascular calcification in diabetes and CKD. PMID:27649164

  3. Pentosidine in advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) during UVA irradiation generates active oxygen species and impairs human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Okano, Y; Masaki, H; Sakurai, H

    2001-08-01

    Our previous study reported that advanced glycation end-products (AGE)-modified BSA produced active oxygen species, *O2-, H2O2, and *OH under UVA irradiation and enhanced the cytotoxicity of UVA light. We examined whether pentosidine in AGE-modified BSA was involved in one of the mechanisms generating the active oxygen species. In biological investigations, fibroblasts exposed to UVA (20 J/cm2) in the presence of pentosidine-rich compounds (PRCs), which were prepared with L-arginine, L-lysine and glucose, showed a time-dependent leakage of the cytosolic enzyme LDH. In addition, release of LDH was suppressed by addition of DMSO and deferoxamine under UVA irradiation. From these results, it was determined that PRCs exposed to UVA damaged the plasma membrane of human dermal fibroblasts due to the conversion of *OH from H2O2 via a Fenton-like reaction. These features of PRCs exposed to UVA were consistent with those of AGE-modified BSA. In an ESR study, PRCs under UVA irradiation yielded DMPO-OH (DMPO-OH adduct) using DMPO as a spin-trapping reagent. *O2- generation from UVA-irradiated PRCs was also indicated by the combination of NBT reduction and SOD. When PRCs were exposed to UVA light controlled with a long-pass filter, WG-360, it was found that their production of *O2- was prohibited less than 50% in the NBT reduction assay. The *O2- production profile of PRCs depending on the wavelength of UVA light was similar to that of AGE-modified BSA. Furthermore, it was found that the H2O2 level was increased by PRCs exposed to UVA. These results indicated that pentosidine is an important factor of AGE-modified BSA in active oxygen generation under UVA irradiation.

  4. Advanced glycation endproducts in 35 types of seafood products consumed in eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Li, Zhenxing; Pavase, Ramesh Tushar; Lin, Hong; Zou, Long; Wen, Jie; Lv, Liangtao

    2016-08-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) have been recognized as hazards in processed foods that can induce chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we investigated the AGEs contents of 35 types of industrial seafood products that are consumed frequently in eastern China. Total fluorescent AGEs level and Nɛ-carboxymethyl-lysine (CML) content were evaluated by fluorescence spectrophotometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), respectively. The level of total fluorescent AGEs in seafood samples ranged from 39.37 to 1178.3 AU, and was higher in canned and packaged instant aquatic products that were processed at high temperatures. The CML content in seafood samples ranged from 44.8 to 439.1 mg per kg dried sample, and was higher in roasted seafood samples. The total fluorescent AGEs and CML content increased when seafood underwent high-temperature processing, but did not show an obvious correlation. The present study suggested that commonly consumed seafood contains different levels of AGEs, and the seafood processed at high temperatures always displays a high level of either AGEs or CML.

  5. Advanced glycation end products upregulate the endoplasmic reticulum stress in human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Xiong, Ming; Huang, Bin; Chen, Huangqin

    2015-03-01

    The accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) appears to be the main factor responsible for modulating periodontal inflammation in diabetes. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of AGEs on inflammation in human periodontal ligament cells and to investigate the mechanism with a specific emphasis on the role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway. Cytotoxicity was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The protein expressions of ER markers and NF-κB were examined by Western blot analysis. The translocation of NF-κB was observed by immunofluorescence assay. Proinflammatory chemokine production was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Treatment with AGEs reduced cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. AGEs induced ER stress, as evidenced by survival molecules, such as glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase-like ER kinase (PERK), and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF-6), and apoptotic molecules, such as CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) and caspase 12. AGEs upregulated the nucleoprotein expression of NF-κB, enhanced translocation of NF-κB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, and increased the production of proinflammatory chemokines interleukin-6 and interleukin-8. AGEs mediate inflammation of human periodontal ligament cells via the ER stress-induced NF-κB pathway.

  6. Advanced glycation end-products: a biological consequence of lifestyle contributing to cancer disparity

    PubMed Central

    Turner, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Low income, poor diet, obesity and a lack of exercise are inter-related lifestyle factors that can profoundly alter our biological make-up to increase cancer risk, growth and development. We recently reported a potential mechanistic link between carbohydrate derived metabolites and cancer which may provide a biological consequence of lifestyle that can directly impact tumor biology. Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are reactive metabolites produced as a by-product of sugar metabolism. Failure to remove these highly reactive metabolites can lead to protein damage, aberrant cell signaling, increased stress responses, and decreased genetic fidelity. Critically, AGE accumulation is also directly affected by our lifestyle choices and shows a race specific, tumor dependent pattern of accumulation in cancer patients. This review will discuss the contribution of AGEs to the cancer phenotype with a particular emphasis on their biological links with the socioeconomic and environmental risk factors that drive cancer disparity. Given the potential benefits of lifestyle changes and the potential biological role of AGEs in promoting cancer, opportunities exist for collaborations impacting basic, translational, epidemiological and cancer prevention initiatives. PMID:25920350

  7. Advanced Glycation End Products (AGE) and Diabetes: Cause, Effect, or Both?

    PubMed Central

    Vlassara, Helen; Uribarri, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Despite new and effective drug therapies, insulin resistance (IR), type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) and its complications remain major medical challenges. It is accepted that IR, often associated with over-nutrition and obesity, results from chronically elevated oxidant stress (OS) and chronic inflammation. Less acknowledged is that a major cause for this inflammation is excessive consumption of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) with the standard western diet. AGEs, which were largely thought as oxidative derivatives resulting from diabetic hyperglycemia, are increasingly seen as a potential risk for islet β-cell injury, peripheral IR and diabetes. Here we discuss the relationships between exogenous AGEs, chronic inflammation, IR, and T2D. We propose that under chronic exogenous oxidant AGE pressure the depletion of innate defense mechanisms is an important factor, which raises susceptibility to inflammation, IR, T2D and its complications. Finally we review evidence on dietary AGE restriction as a non-pharmacologic intervention, which effectively lowers AGEs, restores innate defenses and improves IR, thus, offering new perspectives on diabetes etiology and therapy. PMID:24292971

  8. Advanced glycation end products: A link between metabolic and endothelial dysfunction in polycystic ovary syndrome?

    PubMed

    Pertynska-Marczewska, Magdalena; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Zhang, John; Merhi, Zaher

    2015-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a heterogeneous syndrome of reproductive and metabolic alterations, is associated with increased long-term risk of cardiovascular complications. This phenomenon has been linked to an increase in oxidative stress and inflammatory markers. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are pro-inflammatory molecules that trigger a state of intracellular oxidative stress and inflammation after binding to their cell membrane receptors RAGE. The activation of the AGE-RAGE axis has been well known to play a role in atherosclerosis in both men and women. Women with PCOS have systemic chronic inflammatory condition even at the ovarian level as represented by elevated levels of serum/ovarian AGEs and increased expression of the pro-inflammatory RAGE in ovarian tissue. Data also showed the presence of sRAGE in the follicular fluid and its potential protective role against the harmful effect of AGEs on ovarian function. Thus, whether AGE-RAGE axis constitutes a link between metabolic and endothelial dysfunction in women with PCOS is addressed in this review. Additionally, we discuss the role of hormonal changes observed in PCOS and how they are linked with the AGE-RAGE axis in order to better understand the nature of this complex syndrome whose consequences extend well beyond reproduction.

  9. Advanced Glycation End Products: Link between Diet and Ovulatory Dysfunction in PCOS?

    PubMed

    Garg, Deepika; Merhi, Zaher

    2015-12-04

    PCOS is the most common cause of anovulation in reproductive-aged women with 70% experiencing ovulatory problems. Advanced glycation end products are highly reactive molecules that are formed by non-enzymatic reactions of sugars with proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. AGEs are also present in a variety of diet where substantial increase in AGEs can result due to thermal processing and modifications of food. Elevation in bodily AGEs, produced endogenously or absorbed exogenously from high-AGE diets, is further exaggerated in women with PCOS and is associated with ovulatory dysfunction. Additionally, increased expression of AGEs as pro-inflammatory receptors in the ovarian tissue has been observed in women with PCOS. In this review, we summarize the role of dietary AGEs as mediators of metabolic and reproductive alterations in PCOS. Once a mechanistic understanding of the relationship between AGEs and anovulation is established, there is a promise that such knowledge will contribute to the subsequent development of targeted pharmacological therapies that will treat anovulation and improve ovarian health in women with PCOS.

  10. Association between advanced glycation end-products and functional performance in Alzheimer's disease and mixed dementia.

    PubMed

    Drenth, Hans; Zuidema, Sytse U; Krijnen, Wim P; Bautmans, Ivan; van der Schans, Cees; Hobbelen, Hans

    2017-09-01

    People with Alzheimer's disease (AD) experience, in addition to the progressive loss of cognitive functions, a decline in functional performance such as mobility impairment and disability in activities of daily living (ADL). Functional decline in dementia is mainly linked to the progressive brain pathology. Peripheral biomechanical changes by advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) have been suggested but have yet to be thoroughly studied. A multi-center, longitudinal, one-year follow-up cohort study was conducted in 144 people with early stage AD or mixed Alzheimer's/Vascular dementia. Linear mixed model analyses was used to study associations between AGE-levels (AGE reader) and mobility (Timed Up and Go), and ADL (Groningen Activity Restriction Scale and Barthel index), respectively. A significant association between AGE levels and mobility (β = 3.57, 95%CI: 1.43-5.73) was revealed; however, no significant association between AGE levels and ADL was found. Over a one-year time span, mean AGE levels significantly increased, and mobility and ADL performance decreased. Change in AGE levels was not significantly correlated with change in mobility. This study indicates that high AGE levels could be a contributing factor to impaired mobility but lacks evidence for an association with ADL decline in people with early stage AD or mixed dementia. Future research is necessary on the reduction of functional decline in dementia regarding the effectiveness of interventions such as physical activity programs and dietary advice possibly in combination with pharmacologic strategies targeting AGE accumulation.

  11. Statins stimulate the production of a soluble form of the receptor for advanced glycation end products

    PubMed Central

    Quade-Lyssy, Patricia; Kanarek, Anna Maria; Baiersdörfer, Markus; Postina, Rolf; Kojro, Elzbieta

    2013-01-01

    The beneficial effects of statin therapy in the reduction of cardiovascular pathogenesis, atherosclerosis, and diabetic complications are well known. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays an important role in the progression of these diseases. In contrast, soluble forms of RAGE act as decoys for RAGE ligands and may prevent the development of RAGE-mediated disorders. Soluble forms of RAGE are either produced by alternative splicing [endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE)] or by proteolytic shedding mediated by metalloproteinases [shed RAGE (sRAGE)]. Therefore we analyzed whether statins influence the production of soluble RAGE. Lovastatin treatment of either mouse alveolar epithelial cells endogenously expressing RAGE or HEK cells overexpressing RAGE caused induction of RAGE shedding, but did not influence secretion of esRAGE from HEK cells overexpressing esRAGE. Lovastatin-induced secretion of sRAGE was also evident after restoration of the isoprenylation pathway, demonstrating a correlation of sterol biosynthesis and activation of RAGE shedding. Lovastatin-stimulated induction of RAGE shedding was completely abolished by a metalloproteinase ADAM10 inhibitor. We also demonstrate that statins stimulate RAGE shedding at low physiologically relevant concentrations. Our results show that statins, due to their cholesterol-lowering effects, increase the soluble RAGE level by inducing RAGE shedding, and by doing this, might prevent the development of RAGE-mediated pathogenesis. PMID:23966666

  12. Collagen modifications in postmenopausal osteoporosis: advanced glycation endproducts may affect bone volume, structure and quality.

    PubMed

    Willett, Thomas L; Pasquale, Julia; Grynpas, Marc D

    2014-09-01

    The classic model of postmenopausal osteoporosis (PM-OP) starts with the depletion of estrogen, which in turn stimulates imbalanced bone remodeling, resulting in loss of bone mass/volume. Clinically, this leads to fractures because of structural weakness. Recent work has begun to provide a more complete picture of the mechanisms of PM-OP involving oxidative stress and collagen modifications known as advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). On one hand, AGEs may drive imbalanced bone remodeling through signaling mediated by the receptor for AGEs (RAGE), stimulating resorption and inhibiting formation. On the other hand, AGEs are associated with degraded bone material quality. Oxidative stress promotes the formation of AGEs, inhibits normal enzymatically derived crosslinking and can degrade collagen structure, thereby reducing fracture resistance. Notably, there are multiple positive feedback loops that can exacerbate the mechanisms of PM-OP associated with oxidative stress and AGEs. Anti-oxidant therapies may have the potential to inhibit the oxidative stress based mechanisms of this disease.

  13. Advanced Glycation End Products: Link between Diet and Ovulatory Dysfunction in PCOS?

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Deepika; Merhi, Zaher

    2015-01-01

    PCOS is the most common cause of anovulation in reproductive-aged women with 70% experiencing ovulatory problems. Advanced glycation end products are highly reactive molecules that are formed by non-enzymatic reactions of sugars with proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. AGEs are also present in a variety of diet where substantial increase in AGEs can result due to thermal processing and modifications of food. Elevation in bodily AGEs, produced endogenously or absorbed exogenously from high-AGE diets, is further exaggerated in women with PCOS and is associated with ovulatory dysfunction. Additionally, increased expression of AGEs as pro-inflammatory receptors in the ovarian tissue has been observed in women with PCOS. In this review, we summarize the role of dietary AGEs as mediators of metabolic and reproductive alterations in PCOS. Once a mechanistic understanding of the relationship between AGEs and anovulation is established, there is a promise that such knowledge will contribute to the subsequent development of targeted pharmacological therapies that will treat anovulation and improve ovarian health in women with PCOS. PMID:26690206

  14. Vascular hypertrophy in experimental diabetes. Role of advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed Central

    Rumble, J R; Cooper, M E; Soulis, T; Cox, A; Wu, L; Youssef, S; Jasik, M; Jerums, G; Gilbert, R E

    1997-01-01

    The accelerated formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and the overexpression of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) have both been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications. Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that the vascular changes in diabetes include hypertrophy of the mesenteric vasculature. To examine the role of AGEs in this process, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and control animals were randomized to receive aminoguanidine, an inhibitor of AGE formation, or no treatment. Animals were studied at 7 d, 3 wk, and 8 mo after induction of diabetes. When compared with control animals, diabetes was associated with an increase in mesenteric vascular weight and an increase in media wall/lumen area. By Northern analysis, TGF-beta1 gene expression was increased 100-150% (P < 0.01) and alpha1 (IV) collagen gene expression was similarly elevated to 30-110% compared to controls (P < 0.05). AGEs and extracellular matrix were present in abundance in diabetic but not in control vessels. Treatment of diabetic rats with aminoguanidine resulted in significant amelioration of the described pathological changes including overexpression of TGF-beta1 and alpha1 (IV) collagen. These data implicate the formation of AGEs in TGF-beta overexpression and tissue changes which accompany the diabetic state. PMID:9062360

  15. Receptor for advanced glycation end products is detrimental during influenza A virus pneumonia☆

    PubMed Central

    van Zoelen, Marieke A.D; van der Sluijs, Koenraad F.; Achouiti, Ahmed; Florquin, Sandrine; Braun-Pater, Jennie M.; Yang, Huan; Nawroth, Peter P.; Tracey, Kevin J.; Bierhaus, Angelika; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia caused by influenza A virus (IAV) can have devastating effects, resulting in respiratory failure and death. The idea that a new influenza pandemic might occur in the near future has triggered renewed interests in IAV infection. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is expressed on different cell types and plays a key role in diverse inflammatory processes. We here investigated the role of RAGE in the host response to IAV pneumonia using wild-type (wt) and RAGE deficient (−/−) mice. Whereas strong RAGE was constitutively expressed in the lungs of uninfected wt mice, in particular on endothelium, IAV pneumonia was associated with enhanced expression on endothelium and de novo expression on bronchial epithelium. Additionally, the high-affinity RAGE ligand high mobility group box 1 was upregulated during IAV pneumonia. RAGE−/− mice were relatively protected from IAV induced mortality and showed an improved viral clearance and enhanced cellular T cell response and activation of neutrophils. These data suggest that RAGE is detrimental during IAV pneumonia. PMID:19592063

  16. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products and Its Involvement in Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Talib, Herni; Tie, Tung Hing; Nordin, Norshariza

    2013-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a transmembrane receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily, capable of binding a broad repertoire of ligands. RAGE-ligands interaction induces a series of signal transduction cascades and lead to the activation of transcription factor NF-κB as well as increased expression of cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules. These effects endow RAGE with the role in the signal transduction from pathogen substrates to cell activation during the onset and perpetuation of inflammation. RAGE signaling and downstream pathways have been implicated in a wide spectrum of inflammatory-related pathologic conditions such as arteriosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, arthritis, acute respiratory failure, and sepsis. Despite the significant progress in other RAGE studies, the functional importance of the receptor in clinical situations and inflammatory diseases still remains to be fully realized. In this review, we will summarize current understandings and lines of evidence on the molecular mechanisms through which RAGE signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of the aforementioned inflammation-associated conditions. PMID:24102034

  17. Assessment of advanced glycated end product accumulation in skin using auto fluorescence multispectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Marcus; Favilla, Riccardo; Strömberg, Tomas

    2016-04-12

    Several studies have shown that advanced glycation end products (AGE) play a role in both the microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes and are closely linked to inflammation and atherosclerosis. AGEs accumulate in skin and can be detected using their auto fluorescence (AF). A significant correlation exists between AGE AF and the levels of AGEs as obtained from skin biopsies. A commercial device, the AGE Reader, has become available to assess skin AF for clinical purposes but, while displaying promising results, it is limited to single-point measurements performed in contact to skin tissue. Furthermore, in vivo imaging of AGE accumulation is virtually unexplored. We proposed a non-invasive, contact-less novel technique for quantifying fluorescent AGE deposits in skin tissue using a multispectral imaging camera setup (MSI) during ultraviolet (UV) exposure. Imaging involved applying a region-of-interest mask, avoiding specular reflections and a simple calibration. Results of a study conducted on 16 subjects with skin types ranging from fair to deeply pigmented skin, showed that AGE measured with MSI in forearm skin was significantly correlated with the AGE reference method (AGE Reader on forearm skin, R=0.68, p=0.005). AGE measured in facial skin was borderline significantly related to AGE Reader on forearm skin (R=0.47, p=0.078). These results support the use of the technique in devices for non-touch measurement of AGE content in either facial or forearm skin tissue over time.

  18. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Serves a Protective Role during Klebsiella pneumoniae - Induced Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Achouiti, Ahmed; de Vos, Alex F; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Florquin, Sandrine; Tanck, Michael W; Nawroth, Peter P; Bierhaus, Angelika; van der Poll, Tom; van Zoelen, Marieke A D

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella species is the second most commonly isolated gram-negative organism in sepsis and a frequent causative pathogen in pneumonia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is expressed on different cell types and plays a key role in diverse inflammatory responses. We here aimed to investigate the role of RAGE in the host response to Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae pneumonia and intransally inoculated rage gene deficient (RAGE-/-) and normal wild-type (Wt) mice with K. pneumoniae. Klebsiella pneumonia resulted in an increased pulmonary expression of RAGE. Furthermore, the high-affinity RAGE ligand high mobility group box-1 was upregulated during K. pneumoniae pneumonia. RAGE deficiency impaired host defense as reflected by a worsened survival, increased bacterial outgrowth and dissemination in RAGE-/- mice. RAGE-/- neutrophils showed a diminished phagocytosing capacity of live K. pneumoniae in vitro. Relative to Wt mice, RAGE-/- mice demonstrated similar lung inflammation, and slightly elevated-if any-cytokine and chemokine levels and unchanged hepatocellular injury. In addition, RAGE-/- mice displayed an unaltered response to intranasally instilled Klebsiella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with respect to pulmonary cell recruitment and local release of cytokines and chemokines. These data suggest that (endogenous) RAGE protects against K. pneumoniae pneumonia. Also, they demonstrate that RAGE contributes to an effective antibacterial defense during K. pneumoniae pneumonia, at least partly via its participation in the phagocytic properties of professional granulocytes. Additionally, our results indicate that RAGE is not essential for the induction of a local and systemic inflammatory response to either intact Klebsiella or Klebsiella LPS.

  19. A neutralizing antibody against receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) reduces atherosclerosis in uremic mice.

    PubMed

    Bro, Susanne; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Binder, Christoph J; Bang, Christian A; Denner, Larry; Olgaard, Klaus; Nielsen, Lars B

    2008-12-01

    Chronic renal failure markedly accelerates atherogenesis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE(-/-)) mice. To study the putative role of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in development of uremic atherosclerosis, apoE(-/-) mice received intraperitoneal injections thrice weekly of a neutralizing murine RAGE-antibody (RAGE-ab) (n=21) or an isotype-matched control antibody (placebo-ab) (n=23). Treatment was started 4 weeks after surgical 5/6 nephrectomy in 16 weeks old mice and continued for 12 weeks. The RAGE-ab did not affect blood pressure, plasma cholesterol or measures of uremia. However, the aortic plaque area fraction was reduced by 59% in RAGE-ab compared with placebo-ab-treated mice (0.016 +/- 0.002 versus 0.039 +/- 0.005, P<0.001). In plasma, the RAGE-ab reduced concentrations of oxidized phospholipid neo-epitopes in plasma as detected by the specific monoclonal antibody EO6 (P<0.05) and titers of IgG antibodies against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (P<0.001). In the aorta of treated mice, the RAGE-ab did not affect the mRNA expression of eight selected genes associated with inflammation. The results suggest that blockade of RAGE reduces the proatherogenic effects of uremia, possibly through a systemic decrease in oxidative stress.

  20. Sinomenine inhibits activation of rat retinal microglia induced by advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ai Ling; Li, Zhengbin; Yuan, Ming; Yu, Albert C H; Zhu, Xiu'An; Tso, Mark O M

    2007-12-05

    Diabetic retinopathy involves an inflammatory response in the retina characterized by an increase in inflammatory cytokines and activation of microglia. The degree of microglia activation may influence the extent of retina injury following an inflammatory stimulus. Cytokines, released by activated microglia, regulate the influx of inflammatory cells to the damaged area. Thus, therapeutic strategy to reduce cytokine expression in microglia would be neuroprotective. Sinomenine, an alkaloid isolated from the stem and root of Sinomenium acutum, has long been recognized as an anti-inflammatory drug for rheumatoid arthritis and also inhibits macrophage activation. In this study, we activated retinal microglia in culture with advanced glycation end products (AGEs) treatment and attempted to determine whether sinomenine could reduce the production of cytokines from the activated microglia at both gene and protein levels. Changes in inflammatory cytokines, TNF alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6, were measured by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) both in the presence and absence of AGEs. The effect of sinomenine on levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the nuclear translocation of NF-kB p65 were studied with a laser confocal scanning microscope. AGEs treatment induced a significant release of TNF alpha, IL-1 beta, and IL-6 from retinal microglia. Sinomenine could inhibit release of these cytokines. Sinomenine attenuated ROS production in a dose-dependent fashion and reduced the nuclear translocation of NF-kB p65 in AGEs-activated retinal microglia in culture.

  1. Pentosidine, an Advanced Glycation End-Product, May Reflect Clinical and Morphological Features of Hand Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Martin; Hulejová, Hana; Gatterová, Jindřiška; Filková, Mária; Pavelková, Andrea; Šléglová, Olga; Kaspříková, Nikola; Vencovský, Jiří; Pavelka, Karel; Šenolt, Ladislav

    2012-01-01

    The study investigates pentosidine levels, an advanced glycation end-product, in patients with erosive and non-erosive hand osteoarthritis (HOA) and determine its potential association with clinical findings and imaging-defined joint damage. Pentosidine was measured by HPLC in serum and urine of 53 females with HOA (31 erosive and 22 non-erosive HOA) and normalised to the total serum protein or urinary creatinine, respectively. Pain, joint stiffness and disability were assessed by the Australian/Canadian OA hand index (AUSCAN). The hand radiographs scored according to the Kallman grading scale were assessed to determine a baseline value and reassessed after two years. The levels of urine pentosidine, but not of serum pentosidine, were higher in patients with erosive HOA than in non-erosive HOA (p=0.039). Urinary pentosidine correlated with CRP (r=0.302, p=0.031), ESR (r=0.288, p=0.041) and AUSCAN (r=0.408, p=0.003). Serum pentosidine, but not in urine, significantly correlated with the Kallman radiographic score in erosive HOA at the baseline (r=0.409, p=0.022) and after 2 years (r=0.385, p=0.032). However, when corrected for age and disease duration, only correlation between urine pentosidine and AUSCAN remained significant (r=0.397, p=0.004). Our data suggest that serum and urine pentosidine levels may relate to the distinctive clinical and morphological features of HOA. PMID:22715350

  2. Hydrogen Sulfide Prevents Advanced Glycation End-Products Induced Activation of the Epithelial Sodium Channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiushi; Song, Binlin; Jiang, Shuai; Liang, Chen; Chen, Xiao; Shi, Jing; Li, Xinyuan; Sun, Yingying; Wu, Mingming; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Ma, He-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are complex and heterogeneous compounds implicated in diabetes. Sodium reabsorption through the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) at the distal nephron plays an important role in diabetic hypertension. Here, we report that H2S antagonizes AGEs-induced ENaC activation in A6 cells. ENaC open probability (P O ) in A6 cells was significantly increased by exogenous AGEs and that this AGEs-induced ENaC activity was abolished by NaHS (a donor of H2S) and TEMPOL. Incubating A6 cells with the catalase inhibitor 3-aminotriazole (3-AT) mimicked the effects of AGEs on ENaC activity, but did not induce any additive effect. We found that the expression levels of catalase were significantly reduced by AGEs and both AGEs and 3-AT facilitated ROS uptake in A6 cells, which were significantly inhibited by NaHS. The specific PTEN and PI3K inhibitors, BPV(pic) and LY294002, influence ENaC activity in AGEs-pretreated A6 cells. Moreover, after removal of AGEs from AGEs-pretreated A6 cells for 72 hours, ENaC P O remained at a high level, suggesting that an AGEs-related "metabolic memory" may be involved in sodium homeostasis. Our data, for the first time, show that H2S prevents AGEs-induced ENaC activation by targeting the ROS/PI3K/PTEN pathway.

  3. Short-term effects of dietary advanced glycation end products in rats.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Malene W; Andersen, Jeanette M; Hedegaard, Rikke V; Madsen, Andreas N; Krath, Britta N; Monošík, Rastislav; Bak, Monika J; Nielsen, John; Holst, Birgitte; Skibsted, Leif H; Larsen, Lesli H; Dragsted, Lars O

    2016-02-28

    Dietary advanced glycation end products (AGE) formed during heating of food have gained interest as potential nutritional toxins with adverse effects on inflammation and glucose metabolism. In the present study, we investigated the short-term effects of high and low molecular weight (HMW and LMW) dietary AGE on insulin sensitivity, expression of the receptor for AGE (RAGE), the AGE receptor 1 (AGER1) and TNF-α, F2-isoprostaglandins, body composition and food intake. For 2 weeks, thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a diet containing 20% milk powder with different proportions of this being given as heated milk powder (0, 40 or 100%), either native (HMW) or hydrolysed (LMW). Gene expression of RAGE and AGER1 in whole blood increased in the group receiving a high AGE LMW diet, which also had the highest urinary excretion of the AGE, methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone 1 (MG-H1). Urinary excretion of N ε-carboxymethyl-lysine increased with increasing proportion of heat-treated milk powder in the HMW and LMW diets but was unrelated to gene expression. There was no difference in insulin sensitivity, F2-isoprostaglandins, food intake, water intake, body weight or body composition between the groups. In conclusion, RAGE and AGER1 expression can be influenced by a high AGE diet after only 2 weeks in proportion to MG-H1 excretion. No other short-term effects were observed.

  4. Quercetin inhibits advanced glycation end product formation by trapping methylglyoxal and glyoxal.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoming; Zheng, Tiesong; Sang, Shengmin; Lv, Lishuang

    2014-12-17

    Methylglyoxal (MGO) and glyoxal (GO) not only are endogenous metabolites but also exist in exogenous resources, such as foods, beverages, urban atmosphere, and cigarette smoke. They have been identified as reactive dicarbonyl precursors of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which have been associated with diabetes-related long-term complications. In this study, quercetin, a natural flavonol found in fruits, vegetables, leaves, and grains, could effectively inhibit the formation of AGEs in a dose-dependent manner via trapping reactive dicarbonyl compounds. More than 50.5% of GO and 80.1% of MGO were trapped at the same time by quercetin within 1 h under physiological conditions. Quercetin and MGO (or GO) were combined at different ratios, and the products generated from this reaction were analyzed with LC-MS. Both mono-MGO and di-MGO adducts of quercetin were detected in this assay using LC-MS, but only tiny amounts of mono-GO adducts of quercetin were found. Additionally, di-MGO adducts were observed as the dominant product with prolonged incubation time. In the bovine serum albumin (BSA)-MGO/GO system, quercetin traps MGO and GO directly and then significantly inhibits the formation of AGEs.

  5. Hepatocyte growth factor protects human endothelial cells against advanced glycation end products-induced apoposis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Yijun . E-mail: zhou-yijun@hotmail.com; Wang Jiahe; Zhang Jin

    2006-06-02

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) form by a non-enzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and biological proteins, which play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, we assessed AGEs effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) growth, proliferation and apoptosis. Additionally, we investigated whether hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), an anti-apoptotic factor for endothelial cells, prevents AGEs-induced apoptosis of HUVECs. HUVECs were treated with AGEs in the presence or absence of HGF. Treatment of HUVECs with AGEs changed cell morphology, decreased cell viability, and induced DNA fragmentation, leading to apoptosis. Apoptosis was induced by AGEs in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. AGEs markedly elevated Bax and decreased NF-{kappa}B, but not Bcl-2 expression. Additionally, AGEs significantly inhibited cell growth through a pro-apoptotic action involving caspase-3 and -9 activations in HUVECs. Most importantly, pretreatment with HGF protected against AGEs-induced cytotoxicity in the endothelial cells. HGF significantly promoted the expression of Bcl-2 and NF-{kappa}B, while decreasing the activities of caspase-3 and -9 without affecting Bax level. Our data suggest that AGEs induce apoptosis in endothelial cells. HGF effectively attenuate AGEs-induced endothelial cell apoptosis. These findings provide new perspectives in the role of HGF in cardiovascular disease.

  6. Role of advanced glycation end-products in obesity-related ovarian dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Merhi, Z; Mcgee, E A; Buyuk, E

    2014-09-01

    Obesity affects ovarian function, one of the main regulators of female fertility. Tissue levels of the proinflammatory advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and their receptors (RAGE) are elevated in obesity. AGEs are key contributors to perturbations in the ovarian microenvironment. On this basis, the present review focuses on clinical and experimental studies supporting the role of AGE-RAGE system as a contributor to obesity-related ovarian dysfunction. Particular emphasis has been given to changes in AGEs, RAGE and the anti-inflammatory soluble receptor (sRAGE) levels in obesity state and following dietary interventions (high-fat diet and weight loss). Ovarian sensitivity, in particular granulosa cell function and oocyte meiosis, to the pro-inflammatory AGE-RAGE system as well as the relationship of follicular fluid AGEs and sRAGE to in vitro fertilization outcome are also discussed. Overall, obesity, with its alterations in the AGE-RAGE system, can disrupt the ovarian microenvironment potentially compromising oocyte competence and fertility. This review underscores a critical need to uncover the mechanistic actions of AGE-RAGE system in obesity-related ovarian dysfunction. Clinical and basic studies focusing on elucidating the patterns of accumulation and role of the AGE-RAGE system in human ovarian follicles are key steps in understanding their contribution to the health of human oocytes and embryos.

  7. Receptor for advanced glycation end as drug targets in diabetes-induced skin lesion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiang-Fang; Tang, Wei; Lin, Wei-Dong; Liu, Zi-Yu; Lu, Xiao-Xiao; Zhang, Bei; Ye, Fei; Liu, Zhi-Min; Zou, Jun-Jie; Liao, Wan-Qing

    2017-01-01

    The involvement of the receptor for advanced glycation end (RAGE) in different diseases has been reviewed in great detail, previously, but the effects of diabetic drugs on RAGE-induced skin lesion during long course diabetes remains poorly understood. In the present study, we have shown that RAGE was overexpressed in both diabetic rats and human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells). Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis as well as alternations of relative protein levels were also found in diabetic rats and HaCaT cells with overexpression of RAGE that were rectified by metformin (Met) treatment. Moreover, overexpression of RAGE was also found to induce secretions of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, ICAM-1 and COX-2 in HaCaT cells, and Met treatment corrected these inflammatory factor secretions. In addition, treatment with Met markedly reduced RAGE overexpression-induced p38 and NF-κB activation. Taken together, the findings of the present study have demonstrated, for the first time that Met protects HaCaT cells against diabetes-induced injuries and inflammatory responses through inhibiting activated RAGE. PMID:28337263

  8. Limited role of the receptor for advanced glycation end products during Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Achouiti, Ahmed; de Vos, Alex F; de Beer, Regina; Florquin, Sandrine; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of sepsis. Sepsis is associated with the release of 'damage-associated molecular patterns' (DAMPs). The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand receptor, abundantly expressed in the lungs, that recognizes several of these DAMPs. Triggering of RAGE leads to activation of the NF-κB pathway and perpetuation of inflammation. Earlier investigations have shown that the absence of RAGE reduces inflammation and bacterial dissemination and increases survival in sepsis caused by S. pneumoniae pneumonia. We hypothesized that the detrimental role of RAGE depends on the level of RAGE expression in the primary organ of infection. By directly injecting S. pneumoniae intravenously, thereby circumventing the extensive RAGE-expressing lung, we here determined whether RAGE contributes to an adverse outcome of bacteremia or whether its role is restricted to primary lung infection. During late-stage infection (48 h), rage(-/-) mice had an attenuated systemic inflammatory response, as reflected by lower plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines, reduced endothelial cell activation (as measured by E-selectin levels) and less neutrophil accumulation in lung tissue. However, RAGE deficiency did not influence bacterial loads or survival in this model. In accordance, plasma markers for cell injury were similar in both mouse strains. These results demonstrate that while RAGE plays a harmful part in S. pneumoniae sepsis originating from the respiratory tract, this receptor has a limited role in the outcome of primary bloodstream infection by this pathogen.

  9. Receptor for advanced glycation end products is protective during murine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    van Zoelen, Marieke A D; Wieland, Catharina W; van der Windt, Gerritje J W; Florquin, Sandrine; Nawroth, Peter P; Bierhaus, Angelika; van der Poll, Tom

    2012-10-01

    The development of active tuberculosis after infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is almost invariably associated with a persistent or transient state of relative immunodeficiency. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a promiscuous receptor that is involved in pulmonary inflammation and infection. To investigate the role of RAGE in tuberculosis, we intranasally infected wild-type (Wt) and RAGE deficient (RAGE(-/-)) mice with live virulent M. tuberculosis. While lungs of uninfected Wt mice expressed RAGE, in particular on endothelium, M. tuberculosis pneumonia was associated with an enhanced pulmonary expression of RAGE. Lung inflammation was increased in RAGE(-/-) mice, as indicated by histopathology, percentage of inflamed area, lung weight and cytokine and chemokine levels. In addition, lung lymphocyte and neutrophil numbers were increased in the RAGE(-/-) mice. RAGE(-/-) mice had modestly higher mycobacterial loads in the lungs after 3 weeks but not after 6 weeks of infection. Moreover, RAGE(-/-) mice displayed more body weight loss and enhanced mortality. In summary, pulmonary RAGE expression is increased during tuberculosis. In addition, these data suggest that RAGE plays a beneficial role in the host response to pulmonary tuberculosis.

  10. Advanced glycation end products facilitate bacterial adherence in urinary tract infection in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Ahmet; Altuntas, Cengiz Z; Izgi, Kenan; Bicer, Fuat; Hultgren, Scott J; Liu, Guiming; Daneshgari, Firouz

    2015-07-01

    Diabetic individuals have increased susceptibility to urinary tract infection (UTI), a common, painful condition. During diabetes mellitus, non-enzymatic reactions between reducing sugars and protein amine groups result in excessive production of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that accumulate in tissues. Since bacteria adhere to cell surfaces by binding to carbohydrates, we hypothesized that adherence of bacteria to the bladder in diabetics may be enhanced by accumulation of AGEs on urothelial surface proteins. Using a murine model of UTI, we observed increased adherence of type 1 fimbriated uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) to the bladder in streptozotocin-induced diabetic female mice compared with age-matched controls, along with increased concentrations of two common AGEs in superficial urothelial cells from diabetic bladders. Several lectins with different specificities exhibited increased binding to urothelial homogenates from diabetic mice compared with controls, and two of those lectins also bound to AGEs. Furthermore, mannose-binding type 1 fimbriae isolated from UPEC bound to different AGEs, and UPEC adherence to the bladder in diabetic mice, were inhibited by pretreatment of mice with the AGE inhibitor pyridoxamine. These results strongly suggest a role for urothelial AGE accumulation in increased bacterial adherence during UTI in diabetes.

  11. Advanced glycation end-products: a biological consequence of lifestyle contributing to cancer disparity.

    PubMed

    Turner, David P

    2015-05-15

    Low income, poor diet, obesity, and a lack of exercise are interrelated lifestyle factors that can profoundly alter our biologic make up to increase cancer risk, growth, and development. We recently reported a potential mechanistic link between carbohydrate-derived metabolites and cancer, which may provide a biologic consequence of lifestyle that can directly affect tumor biology. Advanced glycation end-products (AGE) are reactive metabolites produced as a by-product of sugar metabolism. Failure to remove these highly reactive metabolites can lead to protein damage, aberrant cell signaling, increased stress responses, and decreased genetic fidelity. Critically, AGE accumulation is also directly affected by our lifestyle choices and shows a race-specific, tumor-dependent pattern of accumulation in cancer patients. This review will discuss the contribution of AGEs to the cancer phenotype, with a particular emphasis on their biologic links with the socioeconomic and environmental risk factors that drive cancer disparity. Given the potential benefits of lifestyle changes and the potential biologic role of AGEs in promoting cancer, opportunities exist for collaborations affecting basic, translational, epidemiologic, and cancer prevention initiatives. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) promote melanogenesis through receptor for AGEs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Ji Young; Oh, Sang Ho

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is linked with development or aggravation of many degenerative processes or disorders, including aging and atherosclerosis. AGEs production in skin cells is known to promote stiffness and loss of elasticity through their buildup in connective tissue. However, the impact of AGEs has yet to be fully explored in melanocytes. In this study, we confirmed the existence of receptor for AGE (RAGE) in melanocytes in western blot and immunofluorescence along with increased melanin production in ex vivo skin organ culture and in vitro melanocyte culture following AGEs treatment. Cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 are considered as key regulatory proteins in AGEs-induced melanogenesis. In addition, blockage experiment using anti-RAGE blocking antibody has indicated that RAGE plays a pivotal role in AGE-mediated melanogenesis. Therefore, it is apparent that AGEs, known markers of aging, promote melanogenesis via RAGE. In addition, AGEs could be implicated in pigmentation associated with photoaging according to the results of increased secretion of AGEs from keratinocytes following UV irradiation. AGE-mediated melanogenesis may thus hold promise as a novel mean of altering skin pigmentation. PMID:27293210

  13. Generation and characterization of antibodies against arginine-derived advanced glycation endproducts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tina; Streeter, Matthew D; Spiegel, David A

    2015-11-01

    Although antibodies reagents have been widely employed for studying advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), these materials have been produced using complex mixtures of immunogens. Consequently, their epitope specificity remains unknown. Here we have generated the first antibodies capable of recognizing each of the three isomers of the methylglyoxal hydroimidazolones (MG-Hs) by using chemical synthesis to create homogenous immunogens. Furthermore, we have thoroughly characterized the epitope specificity of both our antibodies and that of two existing monoclonals by implementing a direct ELISA protocol employing synthetic MG-H antigens. Finally, we employed the reported anti-MG-H antibodies to the detection of MG-Hs in cellular systems using immunofluorescence microscopy. These studies have demonstrated that anti-MG-H1 and anti-MG-H3 staining is concentrated within the nucleus, while anti-MG-H2 affords only minimal signal. These observations are consistent with reported formation preferences for MG-Hs, and may suggest novel nuclear targets for non-enzymatic posttranslational modification. The antibody reagents reported herein, as well as the strategy employed for their creation, are likely to prove useful for the immunochemical study of AGEs in biological systems.

  14. Metformin reverts deleterious effects of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) on osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Schurman, L; McCarthy, A D; Sedlinsky, C; Gangoiti, M V; Arnol, V; Bruzzone, L; Cortizo, A M

    2008-06-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are implicated in the complications of diabetes and ageing, affecting several tissues, including bone. Metformin, an insulin-sensitizer drug, reduces the risk of life-threatening macrovascular complications. We have evaluated the hypothesis that metformin can abrogate AGE-induced deleterious effects in osteoblastic cells in culture. In two osteoblast-like cell lines (UMR106 and MC3T3E1), AGE-modified albumin induced cell death, caspase-3 activity, altered intracellular oxidative stress and inhibited alkaline phosphatase activity. Metformin-treatment of osteoblastic cells prevented these AGE-induced alterations. We also assessed the expression of AGE receptors as a possible mechanism by which metformin could modulate the action of AGEs. AGEs-treatment of osteoblast-like cells enhanced RAGE protein expression, and this up-regulation was prevented in the presence of metformin. Although the precise mechanisms involved in metformin signaling are still elusive, our data implicate the AGE-RAGE interaction in the modulation of growth and differentiation of osteoblastic cells.

  15. Two new prenylflavonoids from Epimedii Herba and their inhibitory effects on advanced glycation end-products.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Keisuke; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Yoshimitsu, Hitoshi; Fujiwara, Yukio; Nagai, Ryoji; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi

    2016-04-01

    Because inhibitors of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), for example pyridoxamine, significantly inhibit the development of retinopathy and neuropathy in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes, treatment with AGE inhibitors is believed to be a potential strategy for the prevention of lifestyle-related diseases such as diabetic complications. In the present study, the MeOH extract of Epimedii Herba (EH; aerial parts of Epimedium spp.) was found to inhibit the formation of N (ε) -(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and N (ω) -(carboxymethyl)arginine (CMA) during incubation of collagen-derived gelatin with ribose. Furthermore, compounds with inhibitory effects against CML and CMA formation were isolated from EH. Two new prenylflavonoids (compounds 1 and 2) and two known compounds (3 and 4) were found to significantly inhibit the formation of both CML and CMA; compound 4 (epimedokoreanin B) had the strongest inhibitory effect of the isolated compounds. These data suggest that epimedokoreanin B could prevent clinical complications of diabetes by inhibiting AGEs.

  16. Advanced glycation end products increase retinal vascular endothelial growth factor expression.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, M; Kuroki, M; Amano, S; Tolentino, M; Keough, K; Kim, I; Bucala, R; Adamis, A P

    1998-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are linked with the development of diabetic retinopathy; however, the pathogenic mechanisms are poorly defined. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels are increased in ischemic and nonischemic diabetic retina, and VEGF is required for the development of retinal and iris neovascularization. Moreover, VEGF alone can induce much of the concomitant pathology of diabetic retinopathy. In this study, we found that AGEs increased VEGF mRNA levels in the ganglion, inner nuclear, and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell layers of the rat retina. In vitro, AGEs increased VEGF mRNA and secreted protein in human RPE and bovine vascular smooth muscle cells. The AGE-induced increases in VEGF expression were dose- and time-dependent, inhibited by antioxidants, and additive with hypoxia. Use of an anti-VEGF antibody blocked the capillary endothelial cell proliferation induced by the conditioned media of AGE-treated cells. AGEs may participate in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy through their ability to increase retinal VEGF gene expression. PMID:9502762

  17. Advanced glycation end products: a link between periodontitis and diabetes mellitus?

    PubMed

    Gurav, Abhijit N

    2013-09-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are synthesized via the non enzymaticglycation and oxidation of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. The production of AGEs is particularly enhanced in chronic hyperglycemia, as in diabetes mellitus (DM). The formation of irreversible AGEs affects the tissues by compromising the physiologic and mechanical functions, as a result of defective constitution of the extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of microbial origin, resulting in devastation of the tooth supporting apparatus. This disease condition has severe implicationsin subjects with DM, since the tooth supporting tissuescontain ECM targeted by AGE. There is miniscule literature regarding the contribution of AGE to periodontal disease in patients with DM. The purpose of this review is to address the prejudicial role of AGEs in relation to various tissue components. This paper is an attempt to elucidatethe possible link of AGEs between periodontitis and DM. The exploration of novel therapeutic strategies to target AGEs for the treatment of periodontitis in DM subjects is certainly intriguing.

  18. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species and Advanced Glycation End Products in the Malfunctioning of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Guo, M; Liu, L; Zhang, J; Liu, M

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: In the last decade, dental implants have emerged as a crucial modality and serve as an individual form of therapy for dental failure. However, disparities in host responses have led to peri-implantitis and implant failure. The pathological mechanisms driving peri-implantitis remain largely unknown. In this study, we evaluated the role of oxidative stress and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the progression of peri-implantitis and dental implants failure, compared with chronic periodontal disease. Subjects and Methods: Three patient groups (peri-implantitis, chronic periodontal disease and control), each with 10 subjects (7M/3F) and average age ranging from 40–60 years were selected for analysis. Salivary oxidative stress and tissue AGE levels were analysed by probing for reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Maillard reaction-related fluorescence, respectively. Results: We observed significant increase (> 2-fold) in oxidative stress and AGE levels in patients with peri-implantitis and chronic periodontal disease compared to controls, with chronic periodontal disease having the highest levels. In addition, we observed a strong positive correlation (r = 0.94) between oxidative stress and AGE levels in the patients. Conclusion: We propose that increased AGE levels and oxidative stress, although not the only pathway, are significant mediators in the pathogenesis of peri-implantitis. Altering them may potentially be used in combination with other modalities to manage peri-implantitis. PMID:26624598

  19. Age-Related Effects of Advanced Glycation End Products (Ages) in Bone Matrix on Osteoclastic Resorption.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao; Gandhi, Chintan; Rahman, Md Mizanur; Appleford, Mark; Sun, Lian-Wen; Wang, Xiaodu

    2015-12-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulate in bone extracellular matrix as people age. Previous studies have shown controversial results regarding the role of in situ AGEs accumulation in osteoclastic resorption. To address this issue, this study cultured human osteoclast cells directly on human cadaveric bone slices from different age groups (young and elderly) to warrant its relevance to in vivo conditions. The cell culture was terminated on the 3rd, 7th, and 10th day, respectively, to assess temporal changes in the number of differentiated osteoclasts, the number and size of osteoclastic resorption pits, the amount of bone resorbed, as well as the amount of matrix AGEs released in the medium by resorption. In addition, the in situ concentration of matrix AGEs at each resorption pit was also estimated based on its AGEs autofluorescent intensity. The results indicated that (1) osteoclastic resorption activities were significantly correlated with the donor age, showing larger but shallower resorption pits on the elderly bone substrates than on the younger ones; (2) osteoclast resorption activities were not significantly dependent on the in situ AGEs concentration in bone matrix, and (3) a correlation was observed between osteoclast activities and the concentration of AGEs released by the resorption. These results suggest that osteoclasts tend to migrate away from initial anchoring sites on elderly bone substrate during resorption compared to younger bone substrates. However, such behavior is not directly related to the in situ concentration of AGEs in bone matrix at the resorption sites.

  20. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) induce apoptosis of periodontal ligament fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Li, D X; Deng, T Z; Lv, J; Ke, J

    2014-12-01

    Diabetics have an increased prevalence of periodontitis, and diabetes is one of the causative factors of severe periodontitis. Apoptosis is thought to be involved in this pathogenic relationship. The aim of this study was to investigate apoptosis in human periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE). We examined the roles of apoptosis, AGEs, and RAGE during periodontitis in diabetes mellitus using cultured PDL fibroblasts that were treated by AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) alone, or given no treatment (control). Microscopy and real-time quantitative PCR indicated that PDL fibroblasts treated with AGE-BSA were deformed and expressed higher levels of RAGE and caspase 3. Cell viability assays and flow cytometry indicated that AGE-BSA reduced cell viability (69.80 ± 5.50%, P<0.01) and increased apoptosis (11.31 ± 1.73%, P<0.05). Hoechst 33258 staining and terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling revealed that AGE-BSA significantly increased apoptosis of PDL fibroblasts. The results showed that the changes in PDL fibroblasts induced by AGE-BSA may explain how AGE-RAGE participates in and exacerbates periodontium destruction.

  1. RAGE (Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts), RAGE Ligands, and their role in Cancer and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sparvero, Louis J; Asafu-Adjei, Denise; Kang, Rui; Tang, Daolin; Amin, Neilay; Im, Jaehyun; Rutledge, Ronnye; Lin, Brenda; Amoscato, Andrew A; Zeh, Herbert J; Lotze, Michael T

    2009-01-01

    The Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts [RAGE] is an evolutionarily recent member of the immunoglobulin super-family, encoded in the Class III region of the major histocompatability complex. RAGE is highly expressed only in the lung at readily measurable levels but increases quickly at sites of inflammation, largely on inflammatory and epithelial cells. It is found either as a membrane-bound or soluble protein that is markedly upregulated by stress in epithelial cells, thereby regulating their metabolism and enhancing their central barrier functionality. Activation and upregulation of RAGE by its ligands leads to enhanced survival. Perpetual signaling through RAGE-induced survival pathways in the setting of limited nutrients or oxygenation results in enhanced autophagy, diminished apoptosis, and (with ATP depletion) necrosis. This results in chronic inflammation and in many instances is the setting in which epithelial malignancies arise. RAGE and its isoforms sit in a pivotal role, regulating metabolism, inflammation, and epithelial survival in the setting of stress. Understanding the molecular structure and function of it and its ligands in the setting of inflammation is critically important in understanding the role of this receptor in tumor biology. PMID:19292913

  2. Advanced glycation endproducts regulate smooth muscle cells calcification in cultured HSMCs.

    PubMed

    He, Hu-Qiang; Liu, Yong; Zeng, Hong; Sun, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xue-Lin; Liao, Wen-Jun; Zhou, Xiang-Yu; He, Yan-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism of Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) promoting the calcification of smooth muscle cells. The successfully cultured smooth muscle cells were divided into three groups: normal culture group (group A), calcified culture group (group B), calcification + AGEs group (group C); the concentration of intracellular calcium ion was detected in each group; the promotion of AGEs on the calcification of HSMCs was confirmed by VON KOSSA staining; and the expressions of β-catenin, RAGE, β-catenin, OPG and E-cadherin protein were detected by immunofluorescence and western blot. The morphology of the cells in each group showed that the amount of calcified plaques in calcification + AGES group were significantly higher than the calcification group. VON KOSSA staining showed that with increasing concentrations of AGE-BSA, the amount of its calcification gradually increased. Calcium concentration in Calcification + 20 mg/L AGEs group was significantly higher, followed by 40 mg/L AGEs group. The expression of β-catenin increased with the increasing concentrations of AGEs. AGEs can promote the calcification of human femoral artery smooth muscle cells, with a concentration gradient effect. With increasing concentrations of AGEs, the expression of RAGE increased, indicating that AGEs-induced HSMCs proliferation was correlated with RAGE expression.

  3. Advanced Glycation End Products are Increased in the Skin and Blood of Patients with Severe Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Papagrigoraki, Anastasia; Del Giglio, Micol; Cosma, Chiara; Maurelli, Martina; Girolomoni, Giampiero; Lapolla, Annunziata

    2017-03-30

    Psoriasis is frequently associated with metabolic comorbidities. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are highly oxidant, biologically active compounds that accumulate in tissues in association with hyperglycaemia, hyperlipidaemia and oxidative stress. This is a cross-sectional case-control study involving 80 patients with mild/severe psoriasis and 80 controls matched for age, sex and body mass index (40 with severe eczema, 40 healthy individuals). Patients and healthy individuals with a smoking habit, diabetes, dyslipidaemia, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertension or who were under systemic treatment were excluded from the study. Skin AGEs were measured in normal-appearing skin by a standard fluorescence technique, and blood AGEs (total AGEs, pentosidine and AGEs receptor) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Levels of cutaneous AGEs (p < 0.04), serum AGEs (p < 0.03) and pentosidine (p < 0.05) were higher in patients with severe psoriasis. Cutaneous AGEs correlated well with serum AGEs (r = 0.93, p < 0.0001) and with Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score (r = 0.91, p < 0.0001). Receptor levels were lower (p < 0.001) in severe psoriasis, and inversely correlated with disease severity (r = -0.71, p < 0.0002). Patients with severe psoriasis have accumulation of skin and serum AGEs, independent of associated metabolic disorders.

  4. Receptor for advanced glycation end as drug targets in diabetes-induced skin lesion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang-Fang; Tang, Wei; Lin, Wei-Dong; Liu, Zi-Yu; Lu, Xiao-Xiao; Zhang, Bei; Ye, Fei; Liu, Zhi-Min; Zou, Jun-Jie; Liao, Wan-Qing

    2017-01-01

    The involvement of the receptor for advanced glycation end (RAGE) in different diseases has been reviewed in great detail, previously, but the effects of diabetic drugs on RAGE-induced skin lesion during long course diabetes remains poorly understood. In the present study, we have shown that RAGE was overexpressed in both diabetic rats and human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells). Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis as well as alternations of relative protein levels were also found in diabetic rats and HaCaT cells with overexpression of RAGE that were rectified by metformin (Met) treatment. Moreover, overexpression of RAGE was also found to induce secretions of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, ICAM-1 and COX-2 in HaCaT cells, and Met treatment corrected these inflammatory factor secretions. In addition, treatment with Met markedly reduced RAGE overexpression-induced p38 and NF-κB activation. Taken together, the findings of the present study have demonstrated, for the first time that Met protects HaCaT cells against diabetes-induced injuries and inflammatory responses through inhibiting activated RAGE.

  5. The Role of Advanced Glycation End-Products in Cancer Disparity.

    PubMed

    Turner, D P

    2017-01-01

    While the socioeconomic and environmental factors associated with cancer disparity have been well documented, the contribution of biological factors is an emerging field of research. Established disparity factors such as low income, poor diet, drinking alcohol, smoking, and a sedentary lifestyle may have molecular effects on the inherent biological makeup of the tumor itself, possibly altering cell signaling events and gene expression profiles to profoundly alter tumor development and progression. Our understanding of the molecular and biological consequences of poor lifestyle is lacking, but such information may significantly change how we approach goals to reduce cancer incidence and mortality rates within minority populations. In this review, we will summarize the biological, socioeconomic, and environmental associations between a group of reactive metabolites known as advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and cancer health disparity. Due to their links with lifestyle and the activation of disease-associated pathways, AGEs may represent both a biological consequence and a bio-behavioral indicator of poor lifestyle which may be targeted within specific populations to reduce disparities in cancer incidence and mortality.

  6. Increased levels of circulating advanced glycation end-products in menopausal women with osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Deng-Ho; Chiang, Tsay-I; Chang, I-Chang; Lin, Fu-Huang; Wei, Cheng-Chung; Cheng, Ya-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) can accumulate in organs and tissues during ageing and diabetes. Increased levels of AGEs are found in the bone tissue of patients with osteoporosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate circulating AGEs in patients with osteoporosis. We evaluated plasma AGEs, osteoporosis-related biomarkers, and bone mass in 82 menopausal women with osteoporosis or osteopenia, 16 young women with osteopenia, and 43 healthy women without osteoporosis or osteopenia. Higher levels of serum AGEs were found in the osteoporosis or osteopenia group compared to healthy women (P < 0.0001). A negative correlation was observed between serum AGEs and lumbar spine bone density (BMD of lumbar spine, r = -0.249, P = 0.028; T-score of lumbar spine, r = -0.261, P = 0.021). Women with a increased level of serum AGEs (> 8.12 U/mL) had a 5.34-fold risk of osteopenia regarding lumbar spine T-score and a 3.31-fold risk of osteopenia regarding the hip T-score. Serum AGEs could be used to monitor the severity and progression of osteoporosis. An increased serum level of AGEs was associated with impaired bone formation and was a risk factor for the development of osteoporosis. Targeting AGEs may represent a novel therapeutic approach for primary or secondary osteoporosis.

  7. Increased advanced glycation end product specific fluorescence in repeatedly heated used cooking oil.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Anupriya; Bhatia, Alka; Ram, Anil Kumar; Goel, Sumit

    2017-07-01

    Repeated heating of cooking oils is known to cause their degradation and generation of toxins. Dietary Advanced glycation end products (dAGEs) are formed when the foods are cooked in dry heat at very high temperatures. dAGEs are believed to contribute significantly to total pool of AGEs in body. In this study, cooking oil samples used for frying snacks were collected from 102 shops. AGEs were extracted using Aqueous-TCA-chloroform method. Fluorescent AGE levels were determined using a fluorescence spectrophotometer and compared with AGEs in corresponding fresh oil samples collected from same shops. Palm oil was most commonly (62.5%) used for cooking. Most of the samples were subjected to several rounds of heating (1-6). AGE specific fluorescence (ASF) in used oil (range = 8.5-745.11) samples was found to be significantly higher in 88/102 as compared to the corresponding fresh oil samples. Treatment with inhibitors like lime concentrate and vitamin C decreased ASF (10/14 and 10/11 samples respectively) of the used oils. The results suggest that cooking oil subjected to repeated heating can contribute to increase in fluorescent AGEs in diet. Simple practices like liberal use of common household substances like lime concentrate may help to reduce these in fried food.

  8. Protection effect of endomorphins on advanced glycation end products induced injury in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Yan, Liping; Niu, Ruilan; Tian, Limin; Zhang, Qi; Quan, Jinxing; Liu, Hua; Wei, Suhong; Guo, Qian

    2013-01-01

    Endomorphins (EMs) have a very important bridge-function in cardiovascular, endocrinological, and neurological systems. This study is to investigate the effects of EMs on the synthesis and secretion of vasoactive substances induced by advanced glycation end products in primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Firstly, HUVECs were stimulated with AGEs-bovine serum albumin (AGEs-BSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA), or both AGEs-BSA and EMs together, respectively. Then, HUVEC survival rate was calculated by MTT assay, the levels of NO, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were detected by colorimetric analysis, and the contents of endothelin-1 (ET-1) were detected by ELISA. The mRNA levels of eNOS and ET-1 were measured by RT-PCR. The expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) was detected by immunofluorescence assay. The results showed that the mRNA expression and secretion of eNOS were significantly enhanced after incubation with EMs compared to those with AGEs-BSA, while the secretion of NO and iNOS, mRNA expression, and secretion of ET-1 had opposite changes. The fluorescence intensity of p38MAPK in nuclear was decreased after pretreatment with EMs compared to incubation with AGEs-BSA. Conclusion. The present study suggests that EMs have certain protection effect on AGEs-BSA-induced injury in HUVEC.

  9. Overexpression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Farzaneh; Karimi, Jamshid; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi; Saidijam, Massoud; Khodadadi, Iraj; Razavi, Amir Nader Emami; Nankali, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the important challenges in the field of gynecologic oncology because of some problems in understanding its etiology and pathogenesis. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand trans-membranous receptor which is upregulated in some human cancers. Mechanisms of RAGE involvement in carcinogenesis of ovarian cancer are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the expression of RAGE in ovarian cancers and its association with clinicopathological characteristics. The RAGE expression level in ovarian cancer and corresponding noncancerous tissues were analyzed by real time quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry techniques. Results indicated that RAGE gene was overexpressed in ovarian cancer tissue compared with adjacent noncancerous tissue (p < 0.001). A significant association between RAGE expression and tumor size (p = 0.04), depth of stromal invasion (p = 0.031), lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.041) and stage of cancer (p = 0.041) was observed. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses yielded the area under the curve (AUC) values of 0.86 for RAGE in discriminating ovarian cancer samples from non-cancer controls. In conclusion overexpression of RAGE in ovarian cancer may be a useful biomarker to predict tumor progression.

  10. Receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) maintains pulmonary structure and regulates the response to cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Lisa; Herr, Christian; Niederstraßer, Julia; Beisswenger, Christoph; Bals, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) is highly expressed in the lung but its physiological functions in this organ is still not completely understood. To determine the contribution of RAGE to physiological functions of the lung, we analyzed pulmonary mechanics and structure of wildtype and RAGE deficient (RAGE-/-) mice. RAGE deficiency spontaneously resulted in a loss of lung structure shown by an increased mean chord length, increased respiratory system compliance, decreased respiratory system elastance and increased concentrations of serum protein albumin in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Pulmonary expression of RAGE was mainly localized on alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages. Primary murine alveolar epithelial cells isolated from RAGE-/- mice revealed an altered differentiation and defective barrier formation under in vitro conditions. Stimulation of interferone-y (IFNy)-activated alveolar macrophages deficient for RAGE with Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands resulted in significantly decreased release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Exposure to chronic cigarette smoke did not affect emphysema-like changes in lung parenchyma in RAGE-/- mice. Acute cigarette smoke exposure revealed a modified inflammatory response in RAGE-/- mice that was characterized by an influx of macrophages and a decreased keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) release. Our data suggest that RAGE regulates the differentiation of alveolar epithelial cells and impacts on the development and maintenance of pulmonary structure. In cigarette smoke-induced lung pathology, RAGE mediates inflammation that contributes to lung damage. PMID:28678851

  11. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) knockout reduces fetal dysmorphogenesis in murine diabetic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ejdesjö, Andreas; Brings, Sebastian; Fleming, Thomas; Fred, Rikard G; Nawroth, Peter P; Eriksson, Ulf J

    2016-07-01

    The receptor for Advanced Glycation End products (RAGE) is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, but its importance in diabetic embryopathy is unclear. We therefore investigated the role of RAGE in diabetic embryopathy using streptozotocin induced diabetes in female wild type (WT) C57Bl/6N and RAGE knockout C57Bl/6N (RAGE(-/-)) mice, mated with control males of the same genotype. Maternal diabetes induced more fetal resorption and malformation (facial skeleton, neural tube) in the WT than in the RAGE(-/-) fetuses. Maternal plasma glucose and methylgyoxal concentrations, as well as embryonic N(ε)-carboxymethyl-lysine (CML) levels were increased to the same extent in diabetic WT and RAGE(-/-) pregnancy. However, maternal diabetes induced increased fetal hepatic isoprostane 8-iso-PGF2α levels (oxidative stress marker) and embryonic activation of NFκB in WT only (not in RAGE(-/-) embryos). The association between RAGE knockout and diminished embryonic dysmorphogenesis in diabetic pregnancy suggests that embryonic RAGE activation is involved in diabetic embryopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) maintains pulmonary structure and regulates the response to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Lisa; Herr, Christian; Niederstraßer, Julia; Beisswenger, Christoph; Bals, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) is highly expressed in the lung but its physiological functions in this organ is still not completely understood. To determine the contribution of RAGE to physiological functions of the lung, we analyzed pulmonary mechanics and structure of wildtype and RAGE deficient (RAGE-/-) mice. RAGE deficiency spontaneously resulted in a loss of lung structure shown by an increased mean chord length, increased respiratory system compliance, decreased respiratory system elastance and increased concentrations of serum protein albumin in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Pulmonary expression of RAGE was mainly localized on alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages. Primary murine alveolar epithelial cells isolated from RAGE-/- mice revealed an altered differentiation and defective barrier formation under in vitro conditions. Stimulation of interferone-y (IFNy)-activated alveolar macrophages deficient for RAGE with Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands resulted in significantly decreased release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Exposure to chronic cigarette smoke did not affect emphysema-like changes in lung parenchyma in RAGE-/- mice. Acute cigarette smoke exposure revealed a modified inflammatory response in RAGE-/- mice that was characterized by an influx of macrophages and a decreased keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) release. Our data suggest that RAGE regulates the differentiation of alveolar epithelial cells and impacts on the development and maintenance of pulmonary structure. In cigarette smoke-induced lung pathology, RAGE mediates inflammation that contributes to lung damage.

  13. Effects of chebulic acid on advanced glycation endproducts-induced collagen cross-links.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Young; Oh, Jun-Gu; Kim, Jin Sook; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2014-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) have been implicated in the development of diabetic complications. We report the antiglycating activity of chebulic acid (CA), isolated from Terminalia chebula on breaking the cross-links of proteins induced by AGEs and inhibiting the formation of AGEs. Aminoguanidine (AG) reduced 50% of glycated bovine serum albumin (BSA) with glycolaldehyde (glycol-BSA)-induced cross-links of collagen at a concentration of 67.8 ± 2.5 mM, the level of CA required for exerting a similar antiglycating activity was 38.8 ± 0.5 µM. Also, the breaking activity on collagen cross-links induced by glycol-BSA was potent with CA (IC50=1.46 ± 0.05 mM), exhibiting 50-fold stronger breaking activity than with ALT-711, a well-known cross-link breaker (IC50=72.2 ± 2.4 mM). IC50 values of DPPH· scavenging activity for CA and ascorbic acid (AA) were 39.2 ± 4.9 and 19.0 ± 1.2 µg dry matter (DM) mL(-1), respectively, and ferric reducing and antioxidant power (FRAP) activities for CA and AA were 4.70 ± 0.06 and 11.4 ± 0.1 mmol/FeSO4·7H2O/g DM, respectively. The chelating activities of CA, AG and ALT711 on copper-catalyzed oxidation of AA were compared, and in increasing order, ALT-711 (IC50 of 1.92 ± 0.20 mM)

  14. [Advanced glycation and lipoxidation end products--amplifiers of inflammation: the role of food].

    PubMed

    Gil, A; Bengmark, S

    2007-01-01

    Chronic diseases (CD) represent the main cause of mortality in developed countries. The increase in the prevalence of of CD is associated with changes in lifestyle habits, including those related to the consumption of processed foodstuffs. In these foods advanced glycation end products (AGE) and advanced lipoperoxydation products (ALE) are formed as a consequence of the reactivity of proteins, carbohydrates, lipid and other components. The aim of the present review is to offer a perspective of how AGE and ALE affect the physiology and development of CD. Continous intake of AGE and ALE contributes to the exccesive accumulation of these products into body tissues, which in turn negatively influence the innate immune system, inflammatory responses, and resistance to diseases. This is achieved by direct interaction of AGE and ALE with specific cell AGE receptors (RAGE) that have a key role as master switches regulating the development of CD. Long-life molecules, namely collagen and myelin, and low-turnover tissues, e.g. connective, bone and neural tissues, are the main targets of AGE and ALE. In these tissues, AGE and ALE lead to the synthesis of insoluble compounds that severely alter cellular functionality. It has been reported associations of AGE and ALE with allergic and autoimmune diseases, Alzheimer disease and other degenerative disorders, catarats, atherosclerosis, cancer, and diabetes mellitus type 2, as well as a number of endocrine, gastrointestinal, skeleton-muscle, and urogenital alterations. Controlling all those pathologies would need further dietary recommendations aiming to limit the intake of processed foods rich in AGE and ALE, as well as to reduce the formation of those products by improving technological processes applicable to foods.

  15. Chemo-enzymatic synthesis of vinyl and l-ascorbyl phenolates and their inhibitory effects on advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seung Hwan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Lim, Soon Sung

    2017-01-01

    This study successfully established the feasibility of a two-step chemo-enzymatic synthesis of l-ascorbyl phenolates. Intermediate vinyl phenolates were first chemically produced and then underwent trans-esterification with l-ascorbic acid in the presence of Novozyme 435® (Candida Antarctica lipase B) as a catalyst. Twenty vinyl phenolates and 11 ascorbyl phenolates were subjected to in vitro bioassays to investigate their inhibitory activity against advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Among them, vinyl 4-hydroxycinnamate (17VP), vinyl 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamate (18VP), vinyl 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxycinnamate (20VP), ascorbyl 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamate (18AP) and ascorbyl 3,4-dimethoxycinnamate (19AP) showed 2-10 times stronger inhibitory activities than positive control (aminoguanidine and its precursors). These results indicated that chemo-enzymatically synthesized compounds have AGE inhibitory effect and thus are effective in either preventing or retarding glycation protein formation.

  16. A comparison of dicarbonyl stress and advanced glycation endproducts in lifelong endurance athletes vs. sedentary controls.

    PubMed

    Maessen, Martijn F H; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Verheggen, Rebecca J H M; Aengevaeren, Vincent L; Hopman, Maria T E; Eijsvogels, Thijs M H

    2017-10-01

    Dicarbonyl stress and high concentrations of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) relate to an elevated risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Exercise training lowers the risk for future CVD. We tested the hypothesis that lifelong endurance athletes have lower dicarbonyl stress and AGEs compared to sedentary controls and that these differences relate to a better cardiovascular health profile. Cross-sectional study. We included 18 lifelong endurance athletes (ATH, 61±7years) and 18 sedentary controls (SED, 58±7years) and measured circulating glyoxal (GO), methylglyoxal (MGO) and 3-deoxyglucosone (3DG) as markers of dicarbonyl stress. Furthermore, we measured serum levels of protein-bound AGEs N(Ɛ)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), N(Ɛ)-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL), methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone-1 (MG-H1), and pentosidine. Additionally, we measured cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2peak) and cardiovascular health markers. ATH had lower concentrations of MGO (196 [180-246] vs. 242 [207-292] nmol/mmol lysine, p=0.043) and 3DG (927 [868-972] vs. 1061 [982-1114] nmol/mmol lysine, p<0.01), but no GO compared to SED. ATH demonstrated higher concentrations CML and CEL compared to SED. Pentosidine did not differ across groups and MG-H1 was significantly lower in ATH compared to SED. Concentrations of MGO en 3DG were inversely correlated with cardiovascular health markers, whereas CML and CEL were positively correlated with VO2peak and cardiovascular health markers. Lifelong exercise training relates to lower dicarbonyl stress (MGO and 3DG) and the AGE MG-H1. The underlying mechanism and (clinical) relevance of higher CML and CEL concentrations among lifelong athletes warrants future research, since it conflicts with the idea that higher AGE concentrations relate to poor cardiovascular health outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products and Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Ejtahed, Hanieh-Sadat; Angoorani, Pooneh; Asghari, Golaleh; Mirmiran, Parvin; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the longitudinal association between dietary advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in a population-based study. In a longitudinal design study, participants were evaluated after approximately 3 years. Daily consumption of carboxymethyl lysine, a major type of dietary AGEs, was determined using a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Estimated glomerular filtration rate in this study was calculated by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) based on the national kidney foundation guidelines. A total of 1,692 participants, free of baseline CKD with complete follow-up data, out of 3,462 subjects, age ≥27 years of the third phase of Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. The association between dietary AGEs and CKD was assessed using the multivariate logistic regression models. The mean age of participants was 43.4 ± 11.4 years. The mean dietary intake of energy-adjusted AGEs was 8,336 ± 1,532 kU/day. By increasing trend of AGE consumption, the percentage of fat intake increased (P < .001), whereas the percentage of carbohydrates and total fiber intake decreased (P < .001). Longitudinal analysis indicated that compared to the first quartile category of AGE intakes from fat, in participants of the fourth quartile category, the risk of CKD increased (odds ratio: 2.02; 95% confidence interval: 1.16-3.54). The odds of CKD had increasing trends across increasing categories of AGE intakes from fat (P for trend <.05). Higher consumption of AGEs through dietary fat was associated with higher risk of CKD incidence. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Advanced Glycation End-Products affect transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Puddu, A.; Storace, D.; Odetti, P.; Viviani, G.L.

    2010-04-23

    Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs) are generated by the covalent interaction of reducing sugars with proteins, lipids or nucleic acids. AGEs are implicated in diabetic complications and pancreatic {beta}-cell dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that exposure of the pancreatic islet cell line HIT-T15 to high concentrations of AGEs leads to a significant decrease of insulin secretion and content. Insulin gene transcription is positively regulated by the beta cell specific transcription factor PDX-1 (Pancreatic and Duodenal Homeobox-1). On the contrary, the forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 inhibits PDX-1 gene transcription. Activity of FoxO1 is regulated by post-translational modifications: phosphorylation deactivates FoxO1, and acetylation prevents FoxO1 ubiquitination. In this work we investigated whether AGEs affect expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1 and FoxO1. HIT-T15 cells were cultured for 5 days in presence of AGEs. Cells were then lysed and processed for subcellular fractionation. We determined intracellular insulin content, then we assessed the expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1, FoxO1, phosphoFoxO1 and acetylFoxO1. As expected intracellular insulin content was lower in HIT-T15 cells cultured with AGEs. The results showed that AGEs decreased expression and nuclear localization of PDX-1, reduced phosphorylation of FoxO1, and increased expression and acetylation of FoxO1. These results suggest that AGEs decrease insulin content unbalancing transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression.

  19. Dietary advanced glycation end-products aggravate non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Christopher; Herath, Chandana B; Jia, Zhiyuan; Andrikopoulos, Sof; Brown, Bronwyn E; Davies, Michael J; Rivera, Leni R; Furness, John B; Forbes, Josephine M; Angus, Peter W

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine if manipulation of dietary advanced glycation end product (AGE), intake affects non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) progression and whether these effects are mediated via RAGE. METHODS Male C57Bl6 mice were fed a high fat, high fructose, high cholesterol (HFHC) diet for 33 wk and compared with animals on normal chow. A third group were given a HFHC diet that was high in AGEs. Another group was given a HFHC diet that was marinated in vinegar to prevent the formation of AGEs. In a second experiment, RAGE KO animals were fed a HFHC diet or a high AGE HFHC diet and compared with wildtype controls. Hepatic biochemistry, histology, picrosirius red morphometry and hepatic mRNA were determined. RESULTS Long-term consumption of the HFHC diet generated significant steatohepatitis and fibrosis after 33 wk. In this model, hepatic 4-hydroxynonenal content (a marker of chronic oxidative stress), hepatocyte ballooning, picrosirius red staining, α-smooth muscle actin and collagen type 1A gene expression were all significantly increased. Increasing the AGE content of the HFHC diet by baking further increased these markers of liver damage, but this was abrogated by pre-marination in acetic acid. In response to the HFHC diet, RAGE-/- animals developed NASH of similar severity to RAGE+/+ animals but were protected from the additional harmful effects of the high AGE containing diet. Studies in isolated Kupffer cells showed that AGEs increase cell proliferation and oxidative stress, providing a likely mechanism through which these compounds contribute to liver injury. CONCLUSION In the HFHC model of NAFLD, manipulation of dietary AGEs modulates liver injury, inflammation, and liver fibrosis via a RAGE dependent pathway. This suggests that pharmacological and dietary strategies targeting the AGE/RAGE pathway could slow the progression of NAFLD. PMID:27672297

  20. Advanced glycation end products are associated with arterial stiffness in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Llauradó, Gemma; Ceperuelo-Mallafré, Victòria; Vilardell, Carme; Simó, Rafael; Gil, Pilar; Cano, Albert; Vendrell, Joan; González-Clemente, José-Miguel

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and arterial stiffness (AS) in subjects with type 1 diabetes without clinical cardiovascular events. A set of 68 patients with type 1 diabetes and 68 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were evaluated. AGEs were assessed using serum concentrations of N-carboxy-methyl-lysine (CML) and using skin autofluorescence. AS was assessed by aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV), using applanation tonometry. Patients with type 1 diabetes had higher serum concentrations of CML (1.18 vs 0.96 μg/ml; P=0.008) and higher levels of skin autofluorescence (2.10 vs 1.70; P<0.001) compared with controls. These differences remained significant after adjustment for classical cardiovascular risk factors. Skin autofluorescence was positively associated with aPWV in type 1 diabetes (r=0.370; P=0.003). No association was found between CML and aPWV. Skin autofluorescence was independently and significantly associated with aPWV in subjects with type 1 diabetes (β=0.380; P<0.001) after adjustment for classical cardiovascular risk factors. Additional adjustments for HbA1c, disease duration, and low-grade inflammation did not change these results. In conclusion, skin accumulation of autofluorescent AGEs is associated with AS in subjects with type 1 diabetes and no previous cardiovascular events. These findings indicate that determination of tissue AGE accumulation may be a useful marker for AS in type 1 diabetes. © 2014 Society for Endocrinology.

  1. Advanced glycation end products, oxidative stress and metalloproteinases are altered in the cerebral microvasculature during aging.

    PubMed

    Safciuc, Florentina; Constantin, Alina; Manea, Adrian; Nicolae, Manuela; Popov, Doina; Raicu, Monica; Alexandru, Dorin; Constantinescu, Elena

    2007-11-01

    Biological aging is associated with an increased incidence of cerebrovascular disease. Recent findings indicate that oxidative stress promoting age-related changes of cerebral circulation are involved in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of cerebral microvessels to the oxidative stress during brain aging, by: (i) assessment of precursors for advanced glycation end products (AGE) formation, (ii) activities of antioxidant enzymes, namely superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione disulfide reductase (GR), and (iii) the activities of metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP-2 and MMP-9, involved in synaptogenesis and memory consolidation. The experiments were performed on two groups of male Wistar rats: 15 young (3-6 months old) and 15 aged (18-24 months old) animals. The cerebral microvessels were isolated by mechanical homogenization, the concentration of protein carbonyls and the activity of antioxidant enzymes were evaluated by spectrophotometry, and gelatin SDS-PAGE zymography was employed to evaluate MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities. The results showed that, by comparison with young rats, aged brain microvessels contain: (i) approximately 106 % increase of protein carbonyls production; (ii) approximately 68% higher GPx activity, unmodified activities of SOD and GR; (iii) approximately 30% diminishment in MMP-2 activity, and the specific occurrence of MMP-9 enzyme. The data suggest that the age-related changes of microvessels could increase the propensity for cerebral diseases and might represent, at least in part, a prerequisite for the deterioration of mental and physical status in the elderly.

  2. Multispecificity of Immunoglobulin M Antibodies Raised against Advanced Glycation End Products

    PubMed Central

    Chikazawa, Miho; Otaki, Natsuki; Shibata, Takahiro; Miyashita, Hiroaki; Kawai, Yoshichika; Maruyama, Shoichi; Toyokuni, Shinya; Kitaura, Yasuyuki; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Uchida, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are a heterogeneous and complex group of compounds that are formed when reducing sugars, such as dehydroascorbic acid, react in a nonenzymatic way with amino acids in proteins and other macromolecules. AGEs are prevalent in the diabetic vasculature and contribute to the development of atherosclerosis. The presence and accumulation of AGEs in many different cell types affect the extracellular and intracellular structure and function. In the present study, we studied the immune response to the dehydroascorbic acid-derived AGEs and provide multiple lines of evidence suggesting that the AGEs could be an endogenous source of innate epitopes recognized by natural IgM antibodies. Prominent IgM titers to the AGEs were detected in the sera of normal mice and were significantly accelerated by the immunization with the AGEs. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a potentially fatal systemic autoimmune disease characterized by the increased production of autoantibodies, showed significantly higher serum levels of the IgM titer against the AGEs than healthy individuals. A progressive increase in the IgM response against the AGEs was also observed in the SLE-prone mice. Strikingly, a subset of monoclonal antibodies, showing a specificity toward the AGEs, prepared from normal mice immunized with the AGEs and from the SLE mice cross-reacted with the double-stranded DNA. Moreover, they also cross-reacted with several other modified proteins, including the acetylated proteins, suggesting that the multiple specificity of the antibodies might be ascribed, at least in part, to the increased electronegative potential of the proteins. These findings suggest that the protein modification by the endogenous carbonyl compounds, generating electronegative proteins, could be a source of multispecific natural antibodies. PMID:23543734

  3. Advanced glycation end product (AGE) modified proteins in tears of diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenjun; Liu, Jingfang; Shi, Bingyin; He, Shuixiang; Yao, Xiaoli; Willcox, Mark D P

    2010-08-11

    High glucose level in diabetic patients may lead to advanced glycation end product (AGE) modified proteins. This study investigated AGE modified proteins in tears and compared their levels in diabetic patients (DM) with non-diabetic controls (CTL). Basal tears were collected from DM with (DR) or without (DNR) retinopathy and CTL. Total AGE modified proteins were detected quantitatively by a dot immunobinding assay. The AGE modified proteins were separated in 1D- and 2D-SDS gels and detected by western-blotting. The individual AGE modified proteins were also compared between groups using densitometry. Compared with the CTL group, tear concentrations of AGE modified proteins were significantly elevated in DR and DNR groups. The concentration of AGE modified proteins in diabetic tears were positively correlated with AGE modified hemoglobin (HbA1c) and postprandial blood glucose level (PBG). Western blotting of AGE modified proteins from 1D-SDS gels showed several bands, the major one at around 60 kDa. The intensities of AGE modified protein bands were higher in DM tears than in CTL tears. Western blotting from 2D-SDS gels showed a strongly stained horizontal strip, which corresponded to the major band in 1D-SDS gels. Most of the other AGE modified protein species were within molecular weight of 30-60 kDa, PI 5.2-7.0. Densitometry analysis demonstrated several AGE modified proteins were elevated in DR or DNR tears. Total and some individual AGE modified proteins were elevated in DM tears. AGE modified proteins in tears may be used as biomarkers to diagnose diabetes and/or diabetic retinopathy.

  4. Advanced glycation end product (AGE) modified proteins in tears of diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingfang; Shi, Bingyin; He, Shuixiang; Yao, Xiaoli; Willcox, Mark D.P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose High glucose level in diabetic patients may lead to advanced glycation end product (AGE) modified proteins. This study investigated AGE modified proteins in tears and compared their levels in diabetic patients (DM) with non-diabetic controls (CTL). Methods Basal tears were collected from DM with (DR) or without (DNR) retinopathy and CTL. Total AGE modified proteins were detected quantitatively by a dot immunobinding assay. The AGE modified proteins were separated in 1D- and 2D-SDS gels and detected by western-blotting. The individual AGE modified proteins were also compared between groups using densitometry. Results Compared with the CTL group, tear concentrations of AGE modified proteins were significantly elevated in DR and DNR groups. The concentration of AGE modified proteins in diabetic tears were positively correlated with AGE modified hemoglobin (HbA1c) and postprandial blood glucose level (PBG). Western blotting of AGE modified proteins from 1D-SDS gels showed several bands, the major one at around 60 kDa. The intensities of AGE modified protein bands were higher in DM tears than in CTL tears. Western blotting from 2D-SDS gels showed a strongly stained horizontal strip, which corresponded to the major band in 1D-SDS gels. Most of the other AGE modified protein species were within molecular weight of 30–60 kDa, PI 5.2–7.0. Densitometry analysis demonstrated several AGE modified proteins were elevated in DR or DNR tears. Conclusions Total and some individual AGE modified proteins were elevated in DM tears. AGE modified proteins in tears may be used as biomarkers to diagnose diabetes and/or diabetic retinopathy. PMID:20806041

  5. Blockade of advanced glycation end-product formation restores ischemia-induced angiogenesis in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Tamarat, Radia; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Huijberts, Maya; Benessiano, Joelle; Ebrahimian, Teni G.; Duriez, Micheline; Wautier, Marie-Paule; Wautier, Jean Luc; Lévy, Bernard I.

    2003-01-01

    We hypothesized that formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) associated with diabetes reduces matrix degradation by metalloproteinases (MMPs) and contributes to the impairment of ischemia-induced angiogenesis. Mice were treated or not with streptozotocin (40 mg/kg) and streptozotocin plus aminoguanidine (AGEs formation blocker, 50 mg/kg). After 8 weeks of treatment, hindlimb ischemia was induced by right femoral artery ligature. Plasma AGE levels were strongly elevated in diabetic mice when compared with control mice (579 ± 21 versus 47 ± 4 pmol/ml, respectively; P < 0.01). Treatment with aminoguanidine reduced AGE plasma levels when compared with untreated diabetic mice (P < 0.001). After 28 days of ischemia, ischemic/nonischemic leg angiographic score, capillary density, and laser Doppler skin-perfusion ratios were 1.4-, 1.5-, and 1.4-fold decreased in diabetic mice in reference to controls (P < 0.01). Treatment with aminoguanidine completely normalized ischemia-induced angiogenesis in diabetic mice. We next analyzed the role of proteolysis in AGE formation-induced hampered neovascularization process. After 3 days of ischemia, MMP-2 activity and MMP-3 and MMP-13 protein levels were increased in untreated and aminoguanidine-treated diabetic mice when compared with controls (P < 0.05). Despite this activation of the MMP pathway, collagenolysis was decreased in untreated diabetic mice. Conversely, treatment of diabetic mice with aminoguanidine restored collagenolysis toward levels found in control mice. In conclusion, blockade of AGE formation by aminoguanidine normalizes impaired ischemia-induced angiogenesis in diabetic mice. This effect is probably mediated by restoration of matrix degradation processes that are disturbed as a result of AGE accumulation. PMID:12805564

  6. Blockade of advanced glycation end-product formation restores ischemia-induced angiogenesis in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Tamarat, Radia; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Huijberts, Maya; Benessiano, Joelle; Ebrahimian, Teni G; Duriez, Micheline; Wautier, Marie-Paule; Wautier, Jean Luc; Lévy, Bernard I

    2003-07-08

    We hypothesized that formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) associated with diabetes reduces matrix degradation by metalloproteinases (MMPs) and contributes to the impairment of ischemia-induced angiogenesis. Mice were treated or not with streptozotocin (40 mg/kg) and streptozotocin plus aminoguanidine (AGEs formation blocker, 50 mg/kg). After 8 weeks of treatment, hindlimb ischemia was induced by right femoral artery ligature. Plasma AGE levels were strongly elevated in diabetic mice when compared with control mice (579 +/- 21 versus 47 +/- 4 pmol/ml, respectively; P < 0.01). Treatment with aminoguanidine reduced AGE plasma levels when compared with untreated diabetic mice (P < 0.001). After 28 days of ischemia, ischemic/nonischemic leg angiographic score, capillary density, and laser Doppler skin-perfusion ratios were 1.4-, 1.5-, and 1.4-fold decreased in diabetic mice in reference to controls (P < 0.01). Treatment with aminoguanidine completely normalized ischemia-induced angiogenesis in diabetic mice. We next analyzed the role of proteolysis in AGE formation-induced hampered neovascularization process. After 3 days of ischemia, MMP-2 activity and MMP-3 and MMP-13 protein levels were increased in untreated and aminoguanidine-treated diabetic mice when compared with controls (P < 0.05). Despite this activation of the MMP pathway, collagenolysis was decreased in untreated diabetic mice. Conversely, treatment of diabetic mice with aminoguanidine restored collagenolysis toward levels found in control mice. In conclusion, blockade of AGE formation by aminoguanidine normalizes impaired ischemia-induced angiogenesis in diabetic mice. This effect is probably mediated by restoration of matrix degradation processes that are disturbed as a result of AGE accumulation.

  7. Accumulation of advanced glycation end products, measured as skin autofluorescence, in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Jasper W L; de Vries, Aiko P J; Lutgers, Helen L; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Huisman, Roel M; van Son, Willem J; de Jong, Paul E; Smit, Andries J

    2005-06-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulate during renal failure and dialysis. Kidney transplantation is thought to reverse this accumulation by restoring renal function. Using a noninvasive and validated autofluorescence reader, we evaluated AGE levels in 285 transplant recipients (mean age, 52 years; range, 41 to 60 years), 32 dialysis patients (mean age, 56 years; range, 43 to 65 years), and 231 normal control subjects (mean age, 51 years; range, 40 to 65 years). Measurements in transplant recipients were performed for a mean of 73 months (range, 32 to 143 months) after transplantation. Dialysis patients were on dialysis therapy for a mean of 42 months (range, 17 to 107 months). Fluorescence was significantly increased in dialysis patients compared with normal control subjects (2.8 vs. 2.0 arbitrary units [a.u.], P < .0001). Although fluorescence levels were significantly decreased in transplant recipients compared with dialysis patients (2.5 vs. 2.8 a.u., P < .0001), fluorescence in transplant recipients was higher than in controls (2.5 vs. 2.0 a.u., P < .0001). In transplant recipients, fluorescence correlated positively with the duration of dialysis prior to transplantation (R = 0.21, P < .0001), and negatively with creatinine clearance (R = -0.34, P < .0001). No correlation was found between time after transplantation and fluorescence in transplant recipients (R = -0.10, P = .10). Fluorescence in dialysis patients was positively correlated with duration of dialysis (R = 0.36, P = .042). Our results, like those of others, suggest that kidney transplantation does not fully correct increased AGE levels found in dialysis patients. The increased AGE levels in kidney transplant recipients cannot be explained by the differences in renal function alone. The availability of a simple, noninvasive method (AGE-Reader) to measure AGE accumulation may be used to monitor AGE accumulation in a clinical setting as well as in a study setting.

  8. Advanced glycation end products measured by skin autofluorescence in a population with central obesity.

    PubMed

    den Engelsen, Corine; van den Donk, Maureen; Gorter, Kees J; Salomé, Philippe L; Rutten, Guy E

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is enhanced by chronic hyperglycemia and oxidative stress and this process may contribute to the pathogenesis of vascular disease. Skin autofluorescence (AF), a measure of accumulation of AGEs in skin collagen, is associated with vascular disease in patients with diabetes.   Because central obesity enhances oxidative stress people with central obesity might already have increased accumulation of AGEs before diabetes or cardiovascular disease become manifest. To test this hypothesis, we compared the distribution of skin AF and its association with clinical and biochemical parameters in individuals with and without central obesity. Skin AF was measured by a validated AGE Reader in 816 persons with and 431 persons without central obesity, aged 20-70 y. Mean skin AF increased with age and smoking and was higher in centrally obese individuals compared with non-obese individuals (p = 0.001, after adjustment for age and smoking p = 0.13). Mean skin AF in the subgroups without central obesity and without other risk factors (n = 106), central obesity without other risk factors (n = 74) and central obesity with other risk factors (n = 742) was 1.63 ± 0.37, 1.74 ± 0.44 and 1.87 ± 0.43 AU, respectively (p for trend < 0.001, after adjustment for age and smoking p for trend = 0.12). In the group with central obesity age, current smoking, alcohol consumption, waist circumference, creatinine clearance and hs-CRP were independently associated with skin AF (R(2) = 29.4%). Waist circumference hardly contributed to the explained variance. The relationship between waist circumference and skin AF is not as obvious as we hypothesized.

  9. Advanced glycation end product associated skin autofluorescence: a mirror of vascular function?

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Britt; Adam, Anne-Catrin; Jacobs, Kathleen; Riemer, Marcus; Erbs, Christian; Bushnaq, Hasan; Simm, Andreas; Silber, Rolf-Edgar; Santos, Alexander Navarrete

    2013-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) seem to be involved in aging as well as in the development of cardiovascular diseases. During aging, AGEs accumulate in extracellular matrix proteins like collagen and contribute to vessel stiffness. Whether non-invasive measurement of AGE accumulation in the skin may reflect vessel function and vessel protein modification is unknown. Herein we set out to analyze the AGE-modifications in the collagens extracted from residual bypass graft material, the skin autofluorescence reflecting the accumulation of AGEs in the body as well as the pulse wave velocity reflecting vessel stiffness. Collagen types I and III (pepsin digestible collagen fraction) were isolated from the veins of 52 patients by proteolysis. The residual collagen fraction was further extracted by collagenase digestion. Collagen was quantified by hydroxyproline assay and AGEs by the AGE intrinsic fluorescence. Skin autofluorescence was measured with an autofluorescence reader; pulse wave velocity with the VICORDER. The collagen AGE autofluorescence in patient vein graft material increased with patient age. The pepsin digestible collagen fraction was significantly less modified in comparison to the collagenase digestible fraction. Decreasing amounts of extracted collagenase digestible collagen correspond with increasing AGE autofluorescence. Skin autofluorescence and vessel stiffness were significantly linked to the AGE autofluorescence of the collagenase digestible collagen fraction from graft material. In conclusion we have found that skin autofluorescence and pulse wave velocity as non-invasive parameters significantly correlate with the AGE contained in graft material and therefore are strong predictors of vessel AGE modifications in patients with coronary heart disease. Whether the analysis of the skin autofluorescence leads to an improvement of the risk stratification in patients suffering from cardiovascular disease has to be further tested.

  10. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Serves a Protective Role during Klebsiella pneumoniae - Induced Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Achouiti, Ahmed; de Vos, Alex F.; van ‘t Veer, Cornelis; Florquin, Sandrine; Tanck, Michael W.; Nawroth, Peter P.; Bierhaus, Angelika; van der Poll, Tom; van Zoelen, Marieke A. D.

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella species is the second most commonly isolated gram-negative organism in sepsis and a frequent causative pathogen in pneumonia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is expressed on different cell types and plays a key role in diverse inflammatory responses. We here aimed to investigate the role of RAGE in the host response to Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae pneumonia and intransally inoculated rage gene deficient (RAGE-/-) and normal wild-type (Wt) mice with K. pneumoniae. Klebsiella pneumonia resulted in an increased pulmonary expression of RAGE. Furthermore, the high-affinity RAGE ligand high mobility group box-1 was upregulated during K. pneumoniae pneumonia. RAGE deficiency impaired host defense as reflected by a worsened survival, increased bacterial outgrowth and dissemination in RAGE-/- mice. RAGE-/- neutrophils showed a diminished phagocytosing capacity of live K. pneumoniae in vitro. Relative to Wt mice, RAGE-/- mice demonstrated similar lung inflammation, and slightly elevated—if any—cytokine and chemokine levels and unchanged hepatocellular injury. In addition, RAGE-/- mice displayed an unaltered response to intranasally instilled Klebsiella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with respect to pulmonary cell recruitment and local release of cytokines and chemokines. These data suggest that (endogenous) RAGE protects against K. pneumoniae pneumonia. Also, they demonstrate that RAGE contributes to an effective antibacterial defense during K. pneumoniae pneumonia, at least partly via its participation in the phagocytic properties of professional granulocytes. Additionally, our results indicate that RAGE is not essential for the induction of a local and systemic inflammatory response to either intact Klebsiella or Klebsiella LPS. PMID:26824892

  11. Depletion of reactive advanced glycation endproducts from diabetic uremic sera using a lysozyme-linked matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuhashi, T; Li, Y M; Fishbane, S; Vlassara, H

    1997-01-01

    Diabetic uremic sera contain excessive amounts of reactive advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), which accelerate the vasculopathy of diabetes and end-stage renal disease. To capture in vivo-derived toxic AGEs, high affinity AGE-binding protein lysozyme (LZ) was linked to a Sepharose 4B matrix. Initial studies showed that > 80% of 125I-AGE-BSA was retained by the LZ matrix, compared with < 10% retained by a control matrix. More than 60% of AGE-lysine was captured by the LZ matrix, and the LZ-bound fraction retained immunoreactivity and cross-linking activity, but had little intrinsic fluorescence (370/440 nm). After passage through the LZ matrix, AGE levels in diabetic sera (0.37+/-0.04 U/mg) were significantly reduced to a level (0.09+/-0.01 U/mg; n = 10; P < 0. 0001) comparable with the level of normal human serum, whereas total protein absorption was < 3%. The AGE-enriched serum fraction exhibited cross-linking activity, which was completely prevented by aminoguanidine. Among numerous LZ-bound proteins in diabetic uremic sera, three major proteins "susceptible" to AGE modification were identified: the immunoglobulin G light chain, apolipoprotein J (clusterin/SP-40,40), and the complement 3b beta chain. These findings indicate that the LZ-linked AGE affinity column may serve as an efficient method for the depletion of toxic AGEs from sera, including specific AGE-modified proteins that may be linked to altered immunity, lipoprotein metabolism, and accelerated vasculopathy in renal failure patients with or without diabetes. PMID:9259584

  12. Effects of ginger on serum glucose, advanced glycation end products, and inflammation in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Imani, Hossein; Tabibi, Hadi; Najafi, Iraj; Atabak, Shahnaz; Hedayati, Mehdi; Rahmani, Leila

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ginger supplementation on serum glucose, advanced glycation end products, oxidative stress, and systemic and vascular inflammatory markers in patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD). In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 36 patients on PD were randomly assigned to either the ginger or the placebo group. The patients in the ginger group received 1000 mg/d ginger for 10 wk, whereas the placebo group received corresponding placebos. At baseline and the end of week 10, serum concentrations of glucose, carboxymethyl lysine, pentosidine, malondialdehyde (MDA), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule type 1 (sICAM-1), soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule type 1 (sVCAM-1), and sE-selectin were measured after a 12- to 14-h fast. Serum fasting glucose decreased significantly up to 20% in the ginger group at the end of week 10 compared with baseline (P < 0.05), and the reduction was significant in comparison with the placebo group (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences between the two groups in mean changes of serum carboxymethyl lysine, pentosidine, MDA, hs-CRP, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, and sE-selectin. This study indicated that daily administration of 1000 mg ginger reduces serum fasting glucose, which is a risk factor for hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, peritoneal membrane fibrosis, and cardiovascular disease, in patients on PD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Hydrogen Sulfide Prevents Advanced Glycation End-Products Induced Activation of the Epithelial Sodium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiushi; Song, Binlin; Jiang, Shuai; Liang, Chen; Chen, Xiao; Shi, Jing; Li, Xinyuan; Sun, Yingying; Wu, Mingming; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Ma, He-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are complex and heterogeneous compounds implicated in diabetes. Sodium reabsorption through the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) at the distal nephron plays an important role in diabetic hypertension. Here, we report that H2S antagonizes AGEs-induced ENaC activation in A6 cells. ENaC open probability (P O) in A6 cells was significantly increased by exogenous AGEs and that this AGEs-induced ENaC activity was abolished by NaHS (a donor of H2S) and TEMPOL. Incubating A6 cells with the catalase inhibitor 3-aminotriazole (3-AT) mimicked the effects of AGEs on ENaC activity, but did not induce any additive effect. We found that the expression levels of catalase were significantly reduced by AGEs and both AGEs and 3-AT facilitated ROS uptake in A6 cells, which were significantly inhibited by NaHS. The specific PTEN and PI3K inhibitors, BPV(pic) and LY294002, influence ENaC activity in AGEs-pretreated A6 cells. Moreover, after removal of AGEs from AGEs-pretreated A6 cells for 72 hours, ENaC P O remained at a high level, suggesting that an AGEs-related “metabolic memory” may be involved in sodium homeostasis. Our data, for the first time, show that H2S prevents AGEs-induced ENaC activation by targeting the ROS/PI3K/PTEN pathway. PMID:26078825

  14. Methylglyoxal, advanced glycation end products and autism: is there a connection?

    PubMed

    Maher, P

    2012-04-01

    Autism is a complex and heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder of unknown etiology but very likely resulting from both genetic and environmental factors. Recent estimates suggest that it affects 1 in 100-150 individuals in the US. Oxidative stress, inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction have all been suggested to play key roles in autism and may be linked via alterations in cellular redox homeostasis. The glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) redox pair forms the major redox couple in cells and as such plays a critical role in regulating redox-dependent cellular functions. A number of studies have shown that variations in genes involved in GSH metabolism are associated with autism. GSH also modulates the activity of glyoxalase 1 (Glo-1), the rate-limiting enzyme for the removal of reactive dicarbonyls such as methylglyoxal (MG). MG is the major precursor for the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Both MG and AGEs can induce oxidative stress, inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction and are implicated in diabetic complications and multiple, age-related neurological diseases. Dietary consumption of AGEs and MG correlates with food intake which has increased 20-30% over the past 20 years. Both MG and AGEs are orally absorbed, leading to increased levels in the blood. Furthermore, in humans, increased MG and AGE levels in maternal blood correlate with increased MG and AGE levels in newborn blood, potentially exposing infants to high oxidative stress and inflammation. It is hypothesized that diet derived MG and AGEs in combination with inborn genetic vulnerabilities that affect the cellular redox status are major contributors to the development of autism and provide a causal link between oxidative stress, inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction. If future research supports this hypothesis, then by reducing the exposure to these diet-derived factors, it might be possible to decrease the prevalence of at least a subset of autism cases.

  15. Dysfunctional protection against advanced glycation due to thiamine metabolism abnormalities in gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bartáková, Vendula; Pleskačová, Anna; Kuricová, Katarína; Pácal, Lukáš; Dvořáková, Veronika; Bělobrádková, Jana; Tomandlová, Marie; Tomandl, Josef; Kaňková, Kateřina

    2016-08-01

    While the pathogenic role of dicarbonyl stress and accelerated formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) to glucose intolerance and to the development of diabetic complications is well established, little is known about these processes in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a condition pathogenically quite similar to type 2 diabetes. The aims of the present study were (i) to determine plasma thiamine and erythrocyte thiamine diphosphate (TDP) and transketolase (TKT) activity in pregnant women with and without GDM, (ii) to assess relationships between thiamine metabolism parameters and selected clinical, biochemical and anthropometric characteristics and, finally, (iii) to analyse relationship between variability in the genes involved in the regulation of transmembrane thiamine transport (i.e. SLC19A2 and SLC19A3) and relevant parameters of thiamine metabolism. We found significantly lower plasma BMI adjusted thiamine in women with GDM (P = 0.002, Mann-Whitney) while levels of erythrocyte TDP (an active TKT cofactor) in mid-trimester were significantly higher in GDM compared to controls (P = 0.04, Mann-Whitney). However, mid-gestational TKT activity - reflecting pentose phosphate pathway activity - did not differ between the two groups (P > 0.05, Mann-Whitney). Furthermore, we ascertained significant associations of postpartum TKT activity with SNPs SLC19A2 rs6656822 and SLC19A3 rs7567984 (P = 0.03 and P = 0.007, resp., Kruskal-Wallis). Our findings of increased thiamine delivery to the cells without concomitant increase of TKT activity in women with GDM therefore indicate possible pathogenic role of thiamine mishandling in GDM. Further studies are needed to determine its contribution to maternal and/or neonatal morbidity.

  16. A receptor-based bioadsorbent to target advanced glycation end products in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yangrong; Lapidos, Karen A; Gal-Moscovici, Anca; Sprague, Stuart M; Ameer, Guillermo A

    2014-06-01

    The accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) has been reported to be a major contributor to chronic systemic inflammation. AGEs are not efficiently removed by hemodialysis or the kidney of a chronic kidney disease (CKD) patient. The goal of this study was to develop a receptor for AGEs (RAGE)-based bioadsorbent device that was capable of removing endogenous AGEs from human blood. The extracellular domain of RAGE was immobilized onto agarose beads to generate the bioadsorbent. The efficacy of AGE removal from saline, serum, and whole blood; biological effects of AGE reduction; and hemocompatibility and stability of the bioadsorbent were investigated. The bioadsorbent bound AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA) with a binding capacity of 0.73 ± 0.07 mg AGE-BSA/mL bioadsorbent. The bioadsorbent significantly reduced the concentration of total AGEs in serum isolated from end-stage kidney disease patients by 57%. AGE removal resulted in a significant reduction of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in human endothelial cells and abolishment of osteoclast formation in osteoclast progenitor cells. A hollow fiber device loaded with bioadsorbent-reduced endogenous AGEs from recirculated blood to 36% of baseline levels with no significant changes in total protein or albumin concentration. The bioadsorbent maintained AGE-specific binding capacity after freeze-drying and storage for 1 year. This approach provides the foundation for further development of soluble RAGE-based extracorporeal therapies to selectively deplete serum AGEs from human blood and decrease inflammation in patients with diabetes and/or CKD. Copyright © 2013 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Association between Advanced Glycation End Products and Impaired Fasting Glucose: Results from the SALIA Study

    PubMed Central

    Teichert, Tom; Hellwig, Anne; Peßler, Annette; Hellwig, Michael; Vossoughi, Mohammad; Sugiri, Dorothea; Vierkötter, Andrea; Schulte, Thomas; Freund, Juliane; Roden, Michael; Hoffmann, Barbara; Schikowski, Tamara; Luckhaus, Christian; Krämer, Ursula; Henle, Thomas; Herder, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) may contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes and related complications, whereas their role in the early deterioration of glycaemia is unknown. While previous studies used antibody-based methods to quantify AGEs, data from tandem mass spectrometry coupled liquid chromatography (LC-MS/MS)-based measurements are limited to patients with known diabetes. Here, we used the LC-MS/MS method to test the hypothesis that plasma AGE levels are higher in individuals with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) than in those with normal fasting glucose (NFG). Secondary aims were to assess correlations of plasma AGEs with quantitative markers of glucose metabolism and biomarkers of subclinical inflammation. This study included on 60 women with NFG or IFG (n = 30 each, mean age 74 years) from the German SALIA cohort. Plasma levels of free metabolites (3-deoxyfructose, 3-deoxypentosone, 3-deoxypentulose), two hydroimidazolones, oxidised adducts (carboxymethyllysine, carboxyethyllysine, methionine sulfoxide) and Nε-fructosyllysine were measured using LC-MS/MS. Plasma concentrations of all tested AGEs did not differ between the NFG and IFG groups (all p>0.05). Associations between plasma levels of AGEs and fasting glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR as a measure of insulin resistance were weak (r between -0.2 and 0.2, all p>0.05). The association between 3-deoxyglucosone-derived hydroimidazolone with several proinflammatory biomarkers disappeared upon adjustment for multiple testing. In conclusion, plasma AGEs assessed by LC-MS/MS were neither increased in IFG nor associated with parameters of glucose metabolism and subclinical inflammation in our study. Thus, these data argue against strong effects of AGEs in the early stages of deterioration of glucose metabolism. PMID:26018950

  18. Clinical and prognostic value of advanced glycation end-products in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Jasper W L; Voors, Adriaan A; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Scheijen, Jean; Smilde, Tom D J; Damman, Kevin; Bakker, Stephan J L; Smit, Andries J; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J

    2007-12-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) have been proposed as a novel factor involved in the development and progression of chronic heart failure (CHF). We aimed to determine whether plasma levels of N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and N(epsilon)-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL), two well-known AGEs, are related to the severity and prognosis of CHF. A total of 102 CHF patients, aged 58 +/- 12 years, with an average left ventricular ejection fraction of 28 +/- 9% were followed for 1.7 (1.2-1.9) years. NYHA functional class and NT-pro-BNP were used as estimates of the severity of CHF. CML and CEL were determined by LC-MS/MS. CML levels were associated with NYHA functional class (P < 0.001) and NT-pro-BNP levels (P < 0.001). Survival analysis for the combined end-point of death, heart transplantation, ischaemic cardiovascular event, and hospitalization for heart failure revealed that CML levels predicted outcome, even after adjustment for age, gender, aetiology of CHF, identified risk modifiers, and several known predictors of outcome in CHF. The predictive value of CML subsided after correction for renal function. CEL was not associated with the severity or prognosis of CHF. Plasma AGEs, in particular CML levels, are related to the severity and prognosis of CHF. The fact that the relation between CML and prognosis subsided after correction for renal function may suggest that AGE accumulation in renal failure explains part of the prognostic value of renal function in CHF. However, further investigation is warranted to exclude the possibility that CML is just an innocent marker of renal function.

  19. A receptor-based bioadsorbent to target advanced glycation end products in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yangrong; Lapidos, Karen A.; Gal-Moscovici, Anca; Sprague, Stuart M.; Ameer, Guillermo A.

    2013-01-01

    The accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) has been reported to be a major contributor to chronic systemic inflammation. AGEs are not efficiently removed by hemodialysis or the kidney of a chronic kidney disease (CKD) patient. The goal of this study was to develop a receptor for AGEs (RAGE)-based bioadsorbent device that was capable of removing endogenous AGEs from human blood. The extracellular domain of RAGE was immobilized onto agarose beads to generate the bioadsorbent. The efficacy of AGE removal from saline, serum, and whole blood; biological effects of AGE reduction; and hemocompatibility and stability of the bioadsorbent were investigated. The bioadsorbent bound AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA) with a binding capacity of 0.73 ± 0.07 mg AGE-BSA/ml bioadsorbent. The bioadsorbent significantly reduced the concentration of total AGEs in serum isolated from end stage kidney disease (ESKD) patients by 57%. AGE removal resulted in a significant reduction of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression in human endothelial cells and abolishment of osteoclast formation in osteoclast progenitor cells. A hollow fiber device loaded with bioadsorbent reduced endogenous AGEs from recirculated blood to 36% of baseline levels with no significant changes in total protein and albumin concentration. The bioadsorbent maintained AGE-specific binding capacity after freeze-drying and storage for 1 year. This approach provides the foundation for further development of sRAGE-based extracorporeal therapies to selectively deplete serum AGEs from human blood and decrease inflammation in patients with diabetes and/or CKD. PMID:24206165

  20. Dietary advanced glycation end-products aggravate non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Leung, Christopher; Herath, Chandana B; Jia, Zhiyuan; Andrikopoulos, Sof; Brown, Bronwyn E; Davies, Michael J; Rivera, Leni R; Furness, John B; Forbes, Josephine M; Angus, Peter W

    2016-09-21

    To determine if manipulation of dietary advanced glycation end product (AGE), intake affects non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) progression and whether these effects are mediated via RAGE. Male C57Bl6 mice were fed a high fat, high fructose, high cholesterol (HFHC) diet for 33 wk and compared with animals on normal chow. A third group were given a HFHC diet that was high in AGEs. Another group was given a HFHC diet that was marinated in vinegar to prevent the formation of AGEs. In a second experiment, RAGE KO animals were fed a HFHC diet or a high AGE HFHC diet and compared with wildtype controls. Hepatic biochemistry, histology, picrosirius red morphometry and hepatic mRNA were determined. Long-term consumption of the HFHC diet generated significant steatohepatitis and fibrosis after 33 wk. In this model, hepatic 4-hydroxynonenal content (a marker of chronic oxidative stress), hepatocyte ballooning, picrosirius red staining, α-smooth muscle actin and collagen type 1A gene expression were all significantly increased. Increasing the AGE content of the HFHC diet by baking further increased these markers of liver damage, but this was abrogated by pre-marination in acetic acid. In response to the HFHC diet, RAGE(-/-) animals developed NASH of similar severity to RAGE(+/+) animals but were protected from the additional harmful effects of the high AGE containing diet. Studies in isolated Kupffer cells showed that AGEs increase cell proliferation and oxidative stress, providing a likely mechanism through which these compounds contribute to liver injury. In the HFHC model of NAFLD, manipulation of dietary AGEs modulates liver injury, inflammation, and liver fibrosis via a RAGE dependent pathway. This suggests that pharmacological and dietary strategies targeting the AGE/RAGE pathway could slow the progression of NAFLD.

  1. Genetic predisposition to advanced glycation end products toxicity is related to prognosis of chronic hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kalousová, Marta; Jáchymová, Marie; Germanová, Alexandra; Kubena, Ales Antonín; Tesar, Vladimír; Zima, Tomás

    2010-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) belong to uremic toxins and some pathological effects of AGEs are linked to RAGE (receptor for AGEs). Their precursors are detoxified by the glyoxalase (GLO) system. The A419C (E111A) polymorphism of the GLO I gene is associated with vascular disease in hemodialysis (HD) patients and some RAGE gene polymorphisms are implicated in various pathological states. To study the relationship of A419C GLO I and four RAGE polymorphisms (-429T/C, -374T/A, 2184A/G and Gly82Ser) in the prognosis of HD patients. The group studied consisted of 214 chronic HD patients prospectively followed up for 43 months. 100 patients died, 48 due to cardiovascular causes. The Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a higher mortality rate in patient-mutated homozygotes for RAGE -429CC, RAGE 2184GG and GLO I 419CC. A higher hazard risk was confirmed by the Cox proportional hazards model when wild-type homozygotes were taken as reference: RAGE -429CC 2.28 (95% CI 1.04-4.99), RAGE 2184GG 3.16 (95% CI 1.44-6.93), and GLO I 419CC 1.75 (95% CI 1.08-2.86). Both RAGE polymorphisms were also associated with cardiovascular mortality: RAGE -429CC 3.54 (95% CI 1.37-9.14) and RAGE 2184GG 5.04 (95% CI 1.93-13.11). In summary, our study shows for the first time a link between RAGE and GLO polymorphisms in the prognosis of HD patients. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Targeting receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) expression induces apoptosis and inhibits prostate tumor growth

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, Indira; Thirugnanam, Sivasakthivel; Chen, Aoshuang; Zheng, Guoxing; Bosland, Maarten C.; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Gnanasekar, Munirathinam

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeting RAGE by RNAi induces apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing RAGE expression abrogates rHMGB1 mediated cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down regulation of RAGE by RNAi inhibits PSA secretion of prostate cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knock down of RAGE abrogates prostate tumor growth in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disruption of RAGE expression in prostate tumor activates death receptors. -- Abstract: Expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays a key role in the progression of prostate cancer. However, the therapeutic potential of targeting RAGE expression in prostate cancer is not yet evaluated. Therefore in this study, we have investigated the effects of silencing the expression of RAGE by RNAi approach both in vitro and in vivo. The results of this study showed that down regulation of RAGE expression by RNAi inhibited the cell proliferation of androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and androgen-independent (DU-145) prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, targeting RAGE expression resulted in apoptotic elimination of these prostate cancer cells by activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 death signaling. Of note, the levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA) were also reduced in LNCaP cells transfected with RAGE RNAi constructs. Importantly, the RAGE RNAi constructs when administered in nude mice bearing prostate tumors, inhibited the tumor growth by targeting the expression of RAGE, and its physiological ligand, HMGB1 and by up regulating death receptors DR4 and DR5 expression. Collectively, the results of this study for the first time show that targeting RAGE by RNAi may be a promising alternative therapeutic strategy for treating prostate cancer.

  3. Ferulsinaic acid attenuation of advanced glycation end products extends the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Ahmed A R

    2011-03-01

    Ferulsinaic acid is the first member of a new rearranged class of sesquiterpene coumarins of the genus Ferula. The genus Ferula can be used for the treatment of skin infections, hysteria and for stomach disorders, such as a febrifuge and a carminative agent. The effect of ferulsinaic acid on the lifespan of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been examined. Novel data explaining the effect of ferulsinaic acid on the lifespan of C. elegans and its antioxidant power were obtained. C. elegans was cultivated under standard laboratory conditions in absence and presence of different ferulsinaic acid. Also, animals were cultivated under heat and chemical stress conditions in absence and presence of ferulsinaic acid. Life span assay, determination of protein concentration, assay of malondialdehyde and ELISA for determination of AGEs were performed. Under standard laboratory conditions and in presence of ferulsinaic acid (500 nm, 10 µm and 100 µm), mean life span of wild type animals was significantly lengthened in a dose-dependent manner from 18.64 ± 0.19 days (control) to 19 ± 0.19 (P = 0.695), 20.76 ± 0.25 (P = 0.043) and 22.3 ± 0.29 (P = 0.0291), respectively. Interestingly, in C. elegans resistance for heat stress at 35°C and oxidative stress induced by paraquat were significantly improved with ferulsinaic acid. Ferulsinaic acid was found to significantly attenuate both lipid peroxidation and the formation of advanced glycation end products in the wild-type animals under standard laboratory conditions. Ferulsinaic acid had therapeutic efficacy as an antioxidant with the possibility of its use as an antioxidant drug. © 2011 The Author. JPP © 2011 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  4. Contribution of dietary advanced glycation end products (AGE) to circulating AGE: role of dietary fat.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kathleen E; Prasad, Chandan; Vijayagopal, Parakat; Juma, Shanil; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Imrhan, Victorine

    2015-12-14

    The purpose of this pilot study was to determine whether macronutrient content (low-fat v. high-fat diet) influences an indicator of advanced glycation end products (AGE), N(ε) carboxymethyl-lysine (CML), in the context of a 1-d, high-AGE diet. The effect of the diets on inflammatory markers was also assessed. A total of nineteen overweight and obese adults (nine men and ten women) without known disease were recruited to participate in a crossover challenge of a high-fat, high-AGE (HFHA) and low-fat, high-AGE (LFHA) diet. In each phase patients had fasting blood drawn, followed by consumption of a high-fat or low-fat breakfast test meal, then three postprandial blood draws at 1, 2 and 3 h after consuming the test meal. After consuming high-AGE meals for the remainder of the day, participants returned the next day for a follow-up analysis. A different pattern in the 3-h post-meal CML and soluble receptor for AGE response to the two diets was observed (P=0·01 and 0·05, respectively). No change in serum CML was observed following consumption of a LFHA breakfast (535 (25th-75th percentile 451-790) to 495 (25th-75th percentile 391-682) ng/ml; P=0·36), whereas a rise in CML occurred after the HFHA breakfast (463 (25th-75th percentile 428-664) to 578 (25th-75th percentile 474-865) ng/ml; P=0·05). High sensitivity C-reactive protein and high molecular weight adiponectin were not affected by either diet. These findings suggest that dietary CML may not be as important in influencing serum CML as other dietary factors. In addition, acute exposure to dietary CML may not influence inflammation in adults without diabetes or kidney disease. This is contrary to previous findings.

  5. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and its receptors in the pathogenesis of hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Caspar-Bell, Gudrun; Dhar, Indu; Prasad, Kailash

    2016-03-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hyperthyroidism and its complications. Interaction of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) with receptor RAGE (receptor for AGEs) generates reactive oxygen species. Soluble receptor for AGEs (sRAGE) competes with RAGE for binding with AGEs and attenuates the generation of ROS. Low levels sRAGE and high levels AGEs would generate more ROS leading to hyperthyroidism and its complications. The objectives are to determine if levels of serum sRAGE are low and the levels of AGEs and AGEs/sRAGE are high in patients with hyperthyroidism. The study subjects comprised of 33 patients with hyperthyroidism and 20 controls. Levels of serum sRAGE were lower, while that of AGEs and AGEs/sRAGE were higher in patients compared to controls, being significant only for sRAGE and AGEs/sRAGE. When the levels of sRAGE, AGEs, and AGEs/sRAGE were assessed for hyperthyroidism associated with different diseases, the levels of sRAGE were lower in Hashimoto disease, and levels of AGEs were higher in patients with Graves' disease compared to control. The levels of AGEs/sRAGE were elevated in an all except patients with Hashimoto disease. The levels of AGEs, sRAGE, or AGEs/RAGE were not correlated with age, weight, and blood pressures except systolic pressure which was inversely correlated with sRAGE. The levels of sRAGE were negatively correlated with AGEs and AGEs/sRAGE. The levels of AGEs/sRAGE were positively correlated with AGEs. In conclusion, low levels of sRAGE, and high levels of AGEs and AGEs/sRAGE are risk biomarkers in the pathogenesis hyperthyroidism and its complications.

  6. Dietary fat quantity and quality modifies advanced glycation end products metabolism in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Moreno, Javier; Quintana-Navarro, Gracia M; Camargo, Antonio; Jimenez-Lucena, Rosa; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Marin, Carmen; Tinahones, Francisco J; Striker, Gary E; Roche, Helen M; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Lopez-Miranda, Jose; Yubero-Serrano, Elena M

    2017-08-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) increase in dysmetabolic conditions. Lifestyle, including diet, has shown be effective in preventing the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS). We investigated whether AGE metabolism is affected by diets with different fat quantity and quality in MetS patients. A randomized, controlled trial assigned 75 MetS patients to one of four diets: high SFA (HSFA), high MUFA (HMUFA), and two low-fat, high-complex carbohydrate diets (LFHCC) supplemented with long-chain n-3 PUFA or placebo for 12-weeks each. Dietary and serum AGE [methylglyoxal (MG: lysine-MG-H1) and N-carboxymethyllysine] levels and gene expression related to AGE metabolism in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (AGER1, RAGE, GloxI, and Sirt1 mRNA) were determined. HMUFA diet reduced serum AGE (sAGE) and RAGE mRNA, increased AGER1 and GloxI mRNA levels compared to the other diets. LFHCC n-3 diet reduced sAGE levels and increased AGER1 mRNA levels compared to LFHCC and HSFA diets. Multiple regression analyses showed that sMG and AGER1 mRNA appeared as significant predictors of oxidative stress/inflammation-related parameters. Low AGE content in HMUFA diet reduces sAGEs and modulates the gene expression related to AGE metabolism in MetS patients, which may be used as a therapeutic approach to reduce the incidence of MetS and related chronic diseases. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Advanced glycation end products induce moesin phosphorylation in murine retinal endothelium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingjun; Li, Qiaoqin; Du, Jing; Chen, Bo; Li, Qiang; Huang, Xuliang; Guo, Xiaohua; Huang, Qiaobing

    2012-02-01

    Increase in vascular permeability is the most important pathological event during the development of diabetic retinopathy. Deposition of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) plays a crucial role in the process of diabetes. This study was to investigate the role of moesin and its underlying signal transduction in retinal vascular hyper-permeability induced by AGE-modified mouse serum albumin (AGE-MSA). Female C57BL/6 mice were used to produce an AGE-treated model by intraperitoneal administration of AGE-MSA for seven consecutive days. The inner blood-retinal barrier was quantified by Evans blue leakage assay. Endothelial F-actin cytoskeleton in retinal vasculature was visualized by fluorescence probe staining. The expression and phosphorylation of moesin in retinal vessels were detected by RT-PCR and western blotting. Further studies were performed to explore the effects of Rho kinase (ROCK) and p38 MAPK pathway on the involvement of moesin in AGE-induced retinal vascular hyper-permeability response. Treatment with AGE-MSA significantly increased the permeability of the retinal microvessels and induced the disorganization of F-actin in retinal vascular endothelial cells. The threonine (T558) phosphorylation of moesin in retinal vessels was enhanced remarkably after AGE administration. The phosphorylation of moesin was attenuated by inhibitions of ROCK and p38 MAPK, while this treatment also prevented the dysfunction of inner blood-retinal barrier and the reorganization of F-actin in retinal vascular endothelial cells. These results demonstrate that moesin is involved in AGE-induced retinal vascular endothelial dysfunction and the phosphorylation of moesin is triggered via ROCK and p38 MAPK activation.

  8. Advanced glycation end products induce moesin phosphorylation in murine brain endothelium.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiaoqin; Liu, Hongxia; Du, Jing; Chen, Bo; Li, Qiang; Guo, Xiaohua; Huang, Xuliang; Huang, Qiaobing

    2011-02-10

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have been found to play an important role in the development of diabetes, and AGE levels are correlated with the severity of diabetic complications. We have demonstrated that moesin, a protein linker between actin filaments and the plasma membrane, undergoes phosphorylation of its threonine 558 residue by AGE stimulation in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells through activation of p38 and Rho kinase (ROCK) pathways. In this study, we observed in situ whether AGEs caused phosphorylation of vascular endothelial cells in the brains of AGE-stimulated mice. The animals were injected with AGE-modified mouse serum albumin (AGE-MSA) for 7 consecutive days. Immunohistochemistry was conducted to assess the phosphorylation of moesin in brain vessels. The level of moesin protein phosphorylation was also assessed in cerebral microvessels by western blotting. The effects of p38 and ROCK activation were determined by application of a p38 inhibitor (SB203580) and a ROCK inhibitor (Y27632) at 30 min before each AGE administration. The results showed specific expression of moesin in murine brain vascular endothelial cells. AGE treatment induced a significant increase of threonine 558 phosphorylation in moesin, while inhibition of p38 and ROCK remarkably attenuated the phosphorylation of moesin. The level of moesin protein phosphorylation was also increased in cerebral microvessels, along with an increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier, while inhibition of the p38 and ROCK attenuated these responses. These results demonstrate that AGEs cause the phosphorylation of moesin in murine brain microvascular endothelial cells, with p38 and ROCK being involved in this process.

  9. An advanced glycation endproduct (AGE)-rich diet promotes accumulation of AGEs in Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Svensson, Rene B; Scheijen, Jean; Eliasson, Pernilla; Mogensen, Pernille; Hag, Anne Mette F; Kjær, Michael; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Schjerling, Peter; Magnusson, Stig P; Couppé, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) accumulate in long-lived tissue proteins like collagen in bone and tendon causing modification of the biomechanical properties. This has been hypothesized to raise the risk of orthopedic injury such as bone fractures and tendon ruptures. We evaluated the relationship between AGE content in the diet and accumulation of AGEs in weight-bearing animal Achilles tendon. Two groups of mice (C57BL/6Ntac) were fed with either high-fat diet low in AGEs high-fat diet (HFD) (n = 14) or normal diet high in AGEs (ND) (n = 11). AGE content in ND was six to 50-fold higher than HFD The mice were sacrificed at week 40 and Achilles and tail tendons were carefully excised to compare weight and nonweight-bearing tendons. The amount of the AGEs carboxymethyllysine (CML), methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone (MG-H1) and carboxyethyllysine (CEL) in Achilles and tail tendon was measured using ultraperformance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) and pentosidine with high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescent detection. AGEs in Achilles tendon were higher than in tail tendon for CML (P < 0.0001), CEL (P < 0.0001), MG-H1 and pentosidine (for both ND and HFD) (P < 0.0001). The AGE-rich diet (ND) resulted in an increase in CML (P < 0.0001), MG-H1 (P < 0.001) and pentosidine (P < 0.0001) but not CEL, in Achilles and tail tendon. This is the first study to provide evidence for AGE accumulation in injury-prone, weight-bearing Achilles tendon associated with intake of an AGE-rich diet. This indicates that food-derived AGEs may alter tendon properties and the development of tendon injuries.

  10. Advanced Glycation Endproducts Impair Endothelial Progenitor Cell Migration and Homing via Syndecan 4 Shedding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun; Li, Ran; Wu, Han; Chen, Jianzhou; Li, Guannan; Chen, Qinhua; Wei, Zhonghai; He, Guixin; Wang, Lian; Ferro, Albert; Xu, Biao

    2017-02-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are a subtype of bone marrow-derived progenitor cells. Stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1)-mediated EPC mobilization from bone marrow to areas of ischemia plays an important role in angiogenesis. Previous studies have reported that advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), which are important mediators of diabetes-related vascular pathology, may impair EPC migration and homing, but the mechanism is unclear. Syndecan-4 (synd4) is a ubiquitous heparan sulfate proteoglycan receptor on the cell surface, involved in SDF-1-dependent cell migration. The extracellular domain of synd4 (ext-synd4) is shed in the context of acute inflammation, but the shedding of ext-synd4 in response to AGEs is undefined. Here we investigated changes in ext-synd4 on EPCs in response to AGEs, focusing on the influence of impaired synd4 signaling on EPC migration and homing. We found decreased full length and increased residue of synd4 in cells incubated with AGEs, with concomitant increase in the soluble fragment of ext-synd4 in the cell medium. EPCs from patients with type 2 diabetes expressed less ext-synd4 as assessed by Western blotting. Flow cytometry analysis showed less ext-synd4 on circulating CD34(+) peripheral blood mononuclear cells, of which EPCs form a subgroup. We then explored the role of synd4 in EPC migration and homing. Impaired migration of synd4-deficient EPCs was observed by a 2D-chemotaxis slide. Furthermore, poor homing of synd4-/- EPCs was observed in a mouse model of lower limb ischemia. This study demonstrates that the shedding of synd4 from EPCs plays a key role in AGE-mediated dysfunction of EPC migration and homing. Stem Cells 2017;35:522-531.

  11. Increased levels of advanced glycation endproducts in the lenses and blood vessels of cigarette smokers.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholl, I. D.; Stitt, A. W.; Moore, J. E.; Ritchie, A. J.; Archer, D. B.; Bucala, R.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) arise from the spontaneous reaction of reducing sugars with the amino groups of macromolecules. AGEs accumulate in tissue as a consequence of diabetes and aging and have been causally implicated in the pathogenesis of several of the end-organ complications of diabetes and aging, including cataract, atherosclerosis, and renal insufficiency. It has been recently proposed that components in mainstream cigarette smoke can react with plasma and extracellular matrix proteins to form covalent adducts with many of the properties of AGEs. We wished to ascertain whether AGEs or immunochemically related molecules are present at higher levels in the tissues of smokers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Lens and coronary artery specimens from nondiabetic smokers and nondiabetic nonsmokers were examined by immunohistochemistry, immunoelectron microscopy, and ELISA employing several distinct anti-AGE antibodies. In addition, lenticular extracts were tested for AGE-associated fluorescence by fluorescence spectroscopy. RESULTS: Immunoreactive AGEs were present at significantly higher levels in the lenses and lenticular extracts of nondiabetic smokers (p < 0.003). Anti-AGE immunogold staining was diffusely distributed throughout lens fiber cells. AGE-associated fluorescence was significantly increased in the lenticular extracts of nondiabetic smokers (p = 0.005). AGE-immunoreactivity was significantly elevated in coronary arteries from nondiabetic smokers compared with nondiabetic nonsmokers (p = 0.015). CONCLUSIONS: AGEs or immunochemically related molecules are present at higher levels in the tissues of smokers than in nonsmokers, irrespective of diabetes. In view of previous reports implicating AGEs in a causal association with numerous pathologies, these findings have significant ramifications for understanding the etiopathology of diseases associated with smoking, the single greatest preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in the

  12. Imaging receptor for advanced glycation end product expression in mouse model of hind limb ischemia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to image the effect of diabetes on expression of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) in limb ischemia in live animals. Methods Male wild-type C57BL/6 mice were either made diabetic or left as control. Two months later, diabetic and non-diabetic mice underwent left femoral artery ligation. The right leg served as lesion control. Five days later, mice were injected with 15.1 ± 4.4 MBq 99mTc-anti-RAGE F(ab’)2 and 4 to 5 h later (blood pool clearance) underwent SPECT/CT imaging. At the completion of imaging, mice were euthanized, hind limbs counted and sectioned, and scans reconstructed. Regions of interest were drawn on serial transverse sections comprising the hind limbs and activity in millicuries summed and divided by the injected dose (ID). Quantitative histology was performed for RAGE staining and angiogenesis. Results Uptake of 99mTc-anti-RAGE F(ab')2 as %ID × 10−3 was higher in the left (ischemic) limbs for the diabetic mice (n = 8) compared to non-diabetic mice (n = 8) (1.20 ± 0.44% vs. 0.49 ± 0.40%; P = 0.0007) and corresponded to less angiogenesis in the diabetic mice. Uptake was also higher in the right limbs of diabetic compared to non-diabetic animals (0.82 ± 0.33% vs. 0.40 ± 0.14%; P = 0.0004). Conclusions These data show the feasibility of imaging and quantifying the effect of diabetes on RAGE expression in limb ischemia. PMID:23663412

  13. Molten Globule of Hemoglobin Proceeds into Aggregates and Advanced Glycated End Products

    PubMed Central

    Iram, Afshin; Alam, Tauqeer; Khan, Javed M.; Khan, Taqi A.; Khan, Rizwan H.; Naeem, Aabgeena

    2013-01-01

    Conformational alterations of bovine hemoglobin (Hb) upon sequential addition of glyoxal over a range of 0–90% v/v were investigated. At 20% v/v glyoxal, molten globule (MG) state of Hb was observed by altered tryptophan fluorescence, high ANS binding, existence of intact heme, native-like secondary structure as depicted by far-UV circular dichroism (CD) and ATR-FTIR spectra as well as loss in tertiary structure as confirmed by near-UV CD spectra. In addition, size exclusion chromatography analysis depicted that MG state at 20% v/v glyoxal corresponded to expanded pre-dissociated dimers. Aggregates of Hb were detected at 70% v/v glyoxal. These aggregates of Hb had altered tryptophan environment, low ANS binding, exposed heme, increased β-sheet secondary structure, loss in tertiary structure, enhanced thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and red shifted Congo Red (CR) absorbance. On incubating Hb with 30% v/v glyoxal for 0–20 days, advanced glycation end products (AGEs) were detected on day 20. These AGEs were characterised by enhanced tryptophan fluorescence at 450 nm, exposure of heme, increase in intermolecular β-sheets, enhanced ThT fluorescence and red shift in CR absorbance. Comet assay revealed aggregates and AGEs to be genotoxic in nature. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the amorphous structure of aggregates and branched fibrils of AGEs. The transformation of α-helix to β-sheet usually alters the normal protein to amyloidogenic resulting in a variety of protein conformational disorders such as diabetes, prion and Huntington's. PMID:23991043

  14. Advanced glycation inhibition and protection against endothelial dysfunction induced by coumarins and procyanidins from Mammea neurophylla.

    PubMed

    Dang, Bach Tai; Gény, Charlotte; Blanchard, Patricia; Rouger, Caroline; Tonnerre, Pierre; Charreau, Béatrice; Rakolomalala, Gilbertine; Randriamboavonjy, Joseph Iharinjaka; Loirand, Gervaise; Pacaud, Pierre; Litaudon, Marc; Richomme, Pascal; Séraphin, Denis; Derbré, Séverine

    2014-07-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are associated with many pathogenic disorders such as pathogenesis of diabetes or endothelial dysfunction leading to cardiovascular events. Therefore, the identification of new anti-AGE molecules or extracts aims at preventing such pathologies. Many Clusiaceae and Calophyllaceae species are used in traditional medicines to treat arterial hypertension as well as diabetes. Focusing on these plant families, an anti-AGE plant screening allowed us to select Mammea neurophylla for further phytochemical and biological studies. Indeed, both DCM and MeOH stem bark extracts demonstrated in vitro their ability to prevent inflammation in endothelial cells and to reduce vasoconstriction. A bioguided fractionation of these extracts allowed us to point out 4-phenyl- and 4-(1-acetoxypropyl)coumarins and procyanidins as potent inhibitors of AGE formation, potentially preventing endothelial dysfunction. The fractionation steps also led to the isolation of two new compounds, namely neurophyllols A and B from the DCM bark extract together with thirteen known mammea A and E coumarins (mammea A/AA, mammea A/AB, mammea A/BA, mammea A/BB, mammea A/AA cycloD, mammea A/AB cycloD, disparinol B, mammea A/AB cycloE, ochrocarpin A, mammea A/AA cycloF, mammea A/AB cycloF, mammea E/BA, mammea E/BB) as well as δ-tocotrienol, xanthones (1-hydroxy-7-methoxyxanthone, 2-hydroxyxanthone) and triterpenes (friedelin and betulinic acid). During this study, R,S-asperphenamate, previously described from fungal origin was also purified.

  15. The receptor for advanced glycation end products RAGE is involved in corneal healing.

    PubMed

    Nass, Norbert; Trau, Stefanie; Paulsen, Friedrich; Kaiser, Delia; Kalinski, Thomas; Sel, Saadettin

    2017-05-01

    Impaired corneal healing is still a major cause of blindness. As RAGE (receptor for advanced glycation endproducts) is involved in inflammation and wound healing in other tissues, we here investigated its relevance for corneal wound healing. Corneal re-epithelialization after alkaline injury was analysed in an ex-vivo approach with cultured, enucleated eyes from mice either of the C57Bl/6 NChR genotype (RAGE+/+) and mice of the same strain lacking the RAGE gene (RAGE-/-). The wound area was determined time dependently by fluorescence imaging using fluorescein staining. The eyes of RAGE-/- mice showed a significantly slower re-epithelialization than eyes of the RAGE+/- and the RAGE+/+ genotype. In immunohistochemistry, RAGE expression was increased in wounded corneas whereas the abundance of the RAGE ligand HMGB1 was unaffected, but an increase in S100b-like proteins was revealed upon injury. However, neither the addition of the RAGE agonist HMGB1 or an HMGB1 antagonising antibody nor bovine S100b protein to the culture medium of the wounded eyes had an effect on corneal wound closure in ex-vivo. Further gene expression analysis by RT-PCR demonstrated an increase in RAGE expression on the mRNA level, no significant regulation of HMGB1 and a differential regulation of the S100 gene family after alkaline burn of the cornea. In conclusion, RAGE is clearly involved in corneal re-epithelialization most probably mediated by signalling via S100 proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Expression of receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) in thymus from myasthenia patients.

    PubMed

    Bouchikh, M; Zouaidia, F; Benhaddou, E H A; Mahassini, N; Achir, A; El Malki, H O

    2017-06-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is a membranous immunoglobulin involved in the pathogenesis of numerous autoimmune diseases and tumors. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible involvement of RAGE in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis. This prospective study included 41 cases of myasthenia gravis treated at our institution between 2010 and 2015. There were 18 men and 23 women, with an average age of 36.44±14.47 years. The majority of patients (24.4%) were classified as IIb, according to MGFA scoring, and 21 of them required corticosteroid and/or immunosuppressive treatment. Assessment of RAGE in thymus specimens was done by immunohistochemistry using RAGE antibody (C-term). RAGE expression was assessed according to various clinical, paraclinical and pathological parameters. Histopathological studies found 18 thymomas, 17 hyperplasias and six other types of pathology. Expression of RAGE was negative/weak in 19 cases and moderate/strong in 22 cases. It was more important in thymoma type B2 (P<0.001) and when the duration of myasthenia was short (P=0.04), and was not significantly related to either myasthenia clinical severity or preoperative treatment. Our results suggest that the RAGE pathway is involved in myasthenia gravis pathophysiology, especially at disease onset, and in forms with thymomas. Further studies would be indispensable to explore other aspects of this signaling pathway, especially the potential role of different ligands and soluble forms of RAGE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Pathological Significance of Mitochondrial Glycation

    PubMed Central

    Pun, Pamela Boon Li; Murphy, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Glycation, the nonenzymatic glycosylation of biomolecules, is commonly observed in diabetes and ageing. Reactive dicarbonyl species such as methylglyoxal and glyoxal are thought to be major physiological precursors of glycation. Because these dicarbonyls tend to be formed intracellularly, the levels of advanced glycation end products on cellular proteins are higher than on extracellular ones. The formation of glycation adducts within cells can have severe functional consequences such as inhibition of protein activity and promotion of DNA mutations. Although several lines of evidence suggest that there are specific mitochondrial targets of glycation, and mitochondrial dysfunction itself has been implicated in disease and ageing, it is unclear if glycation of biomolecules specifically within mitochondria induces dysfunction and contributes to disease pathology. We discuss here the possibility that mitochondrial glycation contributes to disease, focussing on diabetes, ageing, cancer, and neurodegeneration, and highlight the current limitations in our understanding of the pathological significance of mitochondrial glycation. PMID:22778743

  18. Phlorotannins from brown algae (Fucus vesiculosus) inhibited the formation of advanced glycation endproducts by scavenging reactive carbonyls.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyan; Gu, Liwei

    2012-02-08

    Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in vivo is associated with aging, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, renal failure, etc. The objective of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of brown algae Fucus vesiculosus phlorotannins on the formation of AGEs. F. vesiculosus phlorotannins were extracted using 70% acetone. The resultant extract was fractionated into dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, butanol, and water fractions. The ethyl acetate fraction was further fractionated into four subfractions (Ethyl-F1 to -F4) using a Sephadex LH-20 column. F. vesiculosus acetone extract or fractions significantly inhibited the formation of AGEs mediated by glucose and methylglyoxal in a concentration-dependent manner. The concentrations of F. vesiculosus extracts required to inhibit 50% of albumin glycation (EC(50)) in the bovine serum albumin (BSA)-methylglyoxal assay were lower than those of aminoguanidine (a drug candidate for diabetic complication), except for F. vesiculosus acetone extract and dichloromethane fraction. In the BSA-glucose assay, F. vesiculosus extracts inhibited BSA glycation more than or as effectively as aminoguanidine, except for Ethyl-F3 and -F4. The ethyl acetate fraction and its four subfractions scavenged more than 50% of methylglyoxal in two hours. The hypothesis whether F. vesiculosus phlorotannins scavenged reactive carbonyls by forming adducts was tested. Phloroglucinol, the constituent unit of phlorotannins, reacted with glyoxal and methylglyoxal. Five phloroglucinol-carbonyl adducts were detected and tentatively identified using HPLC-ESI-MS(n).

  19. Inhibition of fluorescent advanced glycation end products (AGEs) of human serum albumin upon incubation with 3-β-hydroxybutyrate.

    PubMed

    Bohlooli, M; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A; Taghavi, F; Saboury, A A; Maghami, P; Seyedarabi, A; Moosavi-Movahedi, F; Ahmad, F; Shockravi, A; Habibi-Rezaei, M

    2014-06-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are the final products of glycation, have a major role in diabetic complication and neurodegenerative disorders. The 3-β-hydroxybutyrate (3BHB), a ketone body which is produced by the liver, can be detected in increased concentrations in individuals post fasting and prolonged exercises and in diabetic (type I) patients. In this study, the inhibitory effect of 3BHB on AGEs formation by glucose from the human serum albumin (HSA) was studied at physiological conditions after 35 days of incubation, using physical techniques such as circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy, as well as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The fluorescence intensity measurements of glycated HSA by glucose (GHSA) in the presence of 3BHB indicate a decrease in AGEs formation. The DSC deconvolution profile results also confirm the protective role of 3BHB on incubated with glucose by preventing the enthalpy reduction of the HSA tail segment, compared with the deconvolution profile seen for incubated with glucose alone. The concentration of 3BHB used in this study is in accordance with the concentration detected in the body of individuals post fasting and prolonged exercises.

  20. Clinical Value of High Mobility Group Box 1 and the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products in Head and Neck Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Austin; Bhavsar, Sheila; Riley, Erinn; Caponetti, Gabriel; Agrawal, Devendra

    2016-10-01

    Introduction High mobility group box 1 is a versatile protein involved in gene transcription, extracellular signaling, and response to inflammation. Extracellularly, high mobility group box 1 binds to several receptors, notably the receptor for advanced glycation end-products. Expression of high mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products has been described in many cancers. Objectives To systematically review the available literature using PubMed and Web of Science to evaluate the clinical value of high mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Data synthesis A total of eleven studies were included in this review. High mobility group box 1 overexpression is associated with poor prognosis and many clinical and pathological characteristics of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas patients. Additionally, the receptor for advanced glycation end-products demonstrates potential value as a clinical indicator of tumor angiogenesis and advanced staging. In diagnosis, high mobility group box 1 demonstrates low sensitivity. Conclusion High mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products are associated with clinical and pathological characteristics of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Further investigation of the prognostic and diagnostic value of these molecules is warranted.

  1. The impact of salsalate treatment on serum levels of advanced glycation end products in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Barzilay, Joshua I; Jablonski, Kathleen A; Fonseca, Vivian; Shoelson, Steven E; Goldfine, Allison B; Strauch, Christopher; Monnier, Vincent M

    2014-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Salsalate is a nonacetylated salicylate that lowers glucose levels in people with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Here we examined whether salsalate also lowered serum-protein-bound levels of early and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that have been implicated in diabetic vascular complications. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Participants were from the Targeting Inflammation Using Salsalate for Type 2 Diabetes (TINSAL-T2D) study, which examined the impact of salsalate treatment on hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and a wide variety of other parameters. One hundred eighteen participants received salsalate, 3.5 g/day for 48 weeks, and 109 received placebo. Early glycation product levels (HbA1c and fructoselysine [measured as furosine]) and AGE levels (glyoxal and methylglyoxal hydroimidazolones [G-(1)H, MG-(1)H], carboxymethyllysine [CML], carboxyethyllysine [CEL], pentosidine) were measured in patient serum samples. RESULTS Forty-eight weeks of salsalate treatment lowered levels of HbA1c and serum furosine (P < 0.001) and CML compared with placebo. The AGEs CEL and G-(1)H and MG-(1)H levels were unchanged, whereas pentosidine levels increased more than twofold (P < 0.001). Among salsalate users, increases in adiponectin levels were associated with lower HbA1c levels during follow-up (P < 0.001). Changes in renal and inflammation factor levels were not associated with changes in levels of early or late glycation factors. Pentosidine level changes were unrelated to changes in levels of renal function, inflammation, or cytokines. CONCLUSIONS Salsalate therapy was associated with a reduction in early but not late glycation end products. There was a paradoxical increase in serum pentosidine levels suggestive of an increase in oxidative stress or decreased clearance of pentosidine precursor.

  2. Aspartic acid functions as carbonyl trapper to inhibit the formation of advanced glycation end products by chemical chaperone activity.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, Govindarajan; Saraswathi, N T

    2016-05-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) were implicated in pathology of numerous diseases. In this study, we present the bioactivity of aspartic acid (Asp) to inhibit the AGEs. Hemoglobin and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were glycated with glucose, fructose, and ribose in the presence and absence of Asp (100-200 μM). HbA1c inhibition was investigated using human blood and characterized by micro-column ion exchange chromatography. The effect of methyl glyoxal (MG) on hemoglobin and BSA was evaluated by fluorescence spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis. The effect of MG on red blood cells morphology was characterized by scanning electron micrographs. Molecular docking was performed on BSA with Asp. Asp is capable of inhibiting the formation of fluorescent AGEs by reacting with the reducing sugars. The presence of Asp as supplement in whole blood reduced the HbA1c% from 8.8 to 6.1. The presence of MG showed an increase in fluorescence and the presence of Asp inhibited the glycation thereby the fluorescence was quenched. MG also affected the electrophoretic mobility of hemoglobin and BSA by forming high molecular weight aggregates. Normal RBCs showed typical biconcave shape. MG modified RBCs showed twisted and elongated shape whereas the presence of ASP tends to protect RBC from twisting. Asp interacted with arginine residues of bovine serum albumin particularly ARG 194, ARG 198, and ARG 217 thereby stabilized the protein complex. We conclude that Asp has dual functions as a chemical chaperone to stabilize protein and as a dicarbonyl trapper, and thereby it can prevent the complications caused by glycation.

  3. Advanced glycation products' levels and mechanical properties of vaginal tissue in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Weli, Homayemem K; Akhtar, Riaz; Chang, Zhuo; Li, Wen-Wu; Cooper, Jason; Yang, Ying

    2017-07-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation is closely associated with altered mechanical properties of connective tissue. Pregnancy, marked with high levels of female hormones, confers unique alteration to the mechanical properties of pelvic connective tissues in order to meet their physiological demands. However, there are few studies on glycation content and its influence on the mechanical properties of pelvic connective tissues during pregnancy. We hypothesise that the glycation content in pelvic tissues will change with a corresponding alteration in their mechanical properties, and that these changes are influenced by hormone levels. This study aims to investigate the correlation of vaginal tissue glycation content and mechanical property changes during pregnancy in association with the expression of a key pregnancy hormone (oestrogen) receptor, and an antioxidant enzyme, glyoxalase I. A rat vaginal tissue model (tissues from non-pregnant and E15-E18 (last trimester) pregnant rats) was used in this study. Mechanical characteristics of vaginal tissues were analysed by a ball-indentation technique while modulus and morphology of the collagen fibrils within the tissues were measured with atomic force microscopy. A glycation marker, pentosidine, was quantified by a high performance liquid chromatography. The expression of oestrogen receptor and glyoxalase I in the tissue was qualified by immunochemical staining. The glycosaminoglycan (GAG) concentration difference in the tissues were quantified by a biochemical assay. Pregnant rat vaginal tissue was characterised by significantly lower amounts of pentosidine, higher oestrogen receptor and glyoxalase I expression with larger creep, lower elastic modulus, larger fibril diameter and higher GAG content than their non-pregnant counterpart. There was a negative correlation between pentosidine and vaginal tissue creep. There was a reduction in vaginal tissue pentosidine in pregnancy with an associated increase in oestrogen receptor and

  4. Advanced Glycation End Products Evolution after Pancreas-Kidney Transplantation: Plasmatic and Cutaneous Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, José C.; Vizcaíno, José Ramón; Gouveia, Carlos; Silva, Donzília; Henriques, António C.; Noronha, Irene L.; Rodrigues, Anabela

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus leads to increased Advanced Glycation End Products (AGE) production, which has been associated with secondary diabetic complications. Type 1 diabetic patients undergoing pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPKT) can restore normoglycemia and renal function, eventually decreasing AGE accumulation. We aimed to prospectively study AGE evolution after SPKT. Circulating AGE were assessed in 20 patients, at time 0 (T0), 3 months (T3), 6 months (T6), and 12 months (T12) after successful SPKT. Global AGE and carboxymethyllysine (CML) were analyzed, as well as advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP). Skin biopsies were obtained at T0 and T12. Immunohistochemistry with anti-AGE antibody evaluated skin AGE deposition. AGE mean values were 16.8 ± 6.4 μg/mL at T0; 17.1 ± 3.8 μg/mL at T3; 17.5 ± 5.6 μg/mL at T6; and 16.0 ± 5.2 μg/mL at T12. CML mean values were 0.94 ± 0.36 ng/mL at T0; 1.11 ± 0.48 ng/mL at T3; 0.99 ± 0.42 ng/mL at T6; and 0.78 ± 0.38 ng/mL at T12. AOPP mean values were 130.1 ± 76.8 μMol/L at T0; 137.3 ± 110.6 μMol/L at T3; 116.4 ± 51.2 μMol/L at T6; and 106.4 ± 57.9 μMol/L at T12. CML variation was significant (P = 0.022); AOPP variation was nearly significant (P = 0.076). Skin biopsies evolved mostly from a cytoplasmic diffuse to a peripheral interkeratinocytic immunoreaction pattern; in 7 cases, a reduction in AGE immunoreaction intensity was evident at T12. In conclusion, glycoxidation markers decrease, plasmatic and on tissues, may start early after SPKT. Studies with prolonged follow-up may confirm these data. PMID:26881017

  5. Proteomic characterization of intermediate and advanced glycation end-products in commercial milk samples.

    PubMed

    Renzone, Giovanni; Arena, Simona; Scaloni, Andrea

    2015-03-18

    The Maillard reaction consists of a number of chemical processes affecting the structure of the proteins present in foods. We previously accomplished the proteomic characterization of the lactosylation targets in commercial milk samples. Although characterizing the early modification derivatives, this analysis did not describe the corresponding advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), which may be formed from the further oxidation of former ones or by reaction of oxidized sugars with proteins, when high temperatures are exploited. To fill this gap, we have used combined proteomic procedures for the systematic characterization of the lactosylated and AGE-containing proteins from the soluble and milk fat globule membrane fraction of various milk products. Besides to confirm all lactulosyl-lysines described previously, 40 novel lactosylation sites were identified. More importantly, 308 additional intermediate and advanced glyco-oxidation derivatives (including cross-linking adducts) were characterized in 31 proteins, providing the widest qualitative inventory of modified species ascertained in commercial milk samples so far. Amadori adducts with glucose/galactose, their dehydration products, carboxymethyllysine and glyoxal-, 3-deoxyglucosone/3-deoxygalactosone- and 3-deoxylactosone-derived dihydroxyimidazolines and/or hemiaminals were the most frequent derivatives observed. Depending on thermal treatment, a variable number of modification sites was identified within each protein; their number increased with harder food processing conditions. Among the modified proteins, species involved in assisting the delivery of nutrients, defense response against pathogens and cellular proliferation/differentiation were highly affected by AGE formation. This may lead to a progressive decrease of the milk nutritional value, as it reduces the protein functional properties, abates the bioavailability of the essential amino acids and eventually affects food digestibility. These aspects

  6. Advanced glycation endproducts are increased in rheumatoid arthritis patients with controlled disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are produced and can accumulate during chronic inflammation, as might be present in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). AGEs are involved in the development of cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether AGEs are increased in patients with long-standing RA and whether AGE accumulation is related to disease activity, disease severity and measures of (premature) atherosclerosis, such as endothelial activation, endothelial dysfunction and intima media thickness (IMT). Methods In a cross-sectional study, 49 consecutive RA patients with longstanding disease (median disease duration of 12.3 years (range 9.3 to 15.1)), receiving standard of care, were included and compared with 49 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC). AGEs were determined by skin autofluorescence. Disease activity was evaluated by the Disease Activity Score of 28 joints (DAS-28) score and joint damage by modified Sharp-v.d. Heijde score. Endothelial activation (soluble vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1) sVCAM-1, von Willebrand factor (vWF), thrombomodulin), endothelial dysfunction (determined by small artery elasticity (SAE)) and IMT were measured and related to AGE accumulation. Results AGEs were increased in RA patients (median 2.4 arbitrary units (a.u.), range 1.6 to 4.2) compared to HC (2.2, 1.3 to 3.8). RA patients had a DAS-28 score of 2.9 (0.8 to 6.9) and a modified Sharp-v.d. Heijde score of 19 (0 to 103). sVCAM-1 and vWF levels were higher in RA patients. SAE was significantly decreased in RA (3.9 ml/mmHg (1.4 to 12.2) vs. 6.1 in HC (1.7 to 12.9). IMT did not differ between the two groups. Combining both groups' AGEs correlated with vWF, sVCAM-1 and IMT, and was inversely related to SAE. In RA, AGEs had an inverse relation with SAE, but did not relate to disease activity or radiological damage. In multivariate analysis for both groups, smoking, glucose levels, vWF, SAE and male gender were significantly

  7. Association of genetic variants in the receptor for advanced glycation end products gene with diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Weihong; Yang, Jingyun; Sui, Wenda; Qu, Bin; Huang, Ping; Chen, Youxin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a major sight-threatening diabetic complication. Previous studies have examined the association of DR with multiple genetic variants in the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) gene, with inconsistent results. Objective: To perform a systematic literature search and conduct meta-analyses to examine the association of genetic variants in RAGE with DR. Data sources: PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, Google Scholar, and HuGE. Study eligibility criteria and participants: Studies were on human subjects; the studies were case–control ones and included subjects who had DR and those who did not have DR; and the studies provided genotype data for genetic variants in RAGE, separately for subjects who had and did not have DR, or provided odds ratios (ORs) and the 95% confidence intervals (CIs), or provided sufficient data for the calculation of OR and the 95% CI. Study appraisal and synthesis methods: We used OR as a measure of association, and used random-effects model in all the meta-analyses. Between-study heterogeneity was assessed using I2, and publication bias was evaluated using Egger test. Results: A total of 13 studies met the eligibility criteria and were included in our analyses. We found that Gly82Ser was significantly associated with DR (OR = 2.40, 95% CI: 1.46–3.97; P = 0.001) using a recessive model. -374T/A also showed significant association with DR under a dominant model (OR = 1.21, 95% CI: 1.03–1.43; P = 0.023). We did not find a significant association of DR with other genetic variants in RAGE. Limitations: The number of included studies is small for some genetic variants; duration of diabetes varied across studies; most studies were conducted in Asia; and it is not clear whether the observed association can be generalized to other ethnicities; and we could not control for other potential confounding factors. Conclusions and implications of key findings: We found that Gly82Ser in RAGE

  8. Soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products and risk of liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moy, Kristin A.; Jiao, Li; Freedman, Neal D.; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Sinha, Rashmi; Virtamo, Jarmo; Albanes, Demetrius; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.

    2013-01-01

    Binding of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) to their receptor (RAGE) increases oxidative stress and inflammation, and may be involved in liver injury and subsequent carcinogenesis. Soluble RAGE (sRAGE) may neutralize the effects mediated by AGEs/RAGE complex. Epidemiologic studies examining sRAGE or AGEs in association with liver cancer are lacking. We examined the associations between prediagnostic serum concentrations of sRAGE or Nε-(carboxymethyl)-lysine (CML)-AGE and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a case-cohort study within a cohort of 29,133 Finnish male smokers who completed questionnaires and provided a fasting blood sample in 1985–1988. During follow-up beginning 5 years after enrollment through April 2006, 145 liver cancers occurred. Serum concentrations of sRAGE, CML-AGE, glucose, and insulin were measured in cases and 485 randomly sampled cohort participants. Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) were available on most cases and a subset of the study population. Weighted Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusted for age, years of smoking, and body mass index. sRAGE and CML-AGE concentrations were inversely associated with liver cancer (sRAGE: RR, highest versus lowest tertile, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.48–1.24; Ptrend=0.28; continuous RR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.75–0.99; CML-AGE: RR, highest versus lowest tertile, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.10–0.35; Ptrend <0.0001; continuous RR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.65–0.84). Further adjustment for glucose and insulin, or exclusion of cases with chronic HBV or HCV, did not change the associations. Conclusion Our results support the hypothesis that sRAGE is inversely associated with liver cancer. The findings need confirmation, particularly in populations that include women and non-smokers. PMID:23325627

  9. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) increase renal lipid accumulation: a pathogenic factor of diabetic nephropathy (DN).

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yang; Sun, Hong; Sun, Zilin

    2017-06-28

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are pathogenic factors of diabetic nephropathy (DN), causing renal damage in various ways. The aim of this study is to investigate the ectopic lipid accumulation caused by AGEs in human renal tubular epithelial cell line (HK-2) cells and the kidney of type 2 diabetic rats. In vivo study, diabetes was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats through intraperitoneal injection of high-fat/high-sucrose diet and low-dose streptozocin (STZ). Two weeks after STZ injection, the diabetic rats were randomly divided into two groups, namely, untreated diabetic and Aminoguanidine Hydrochloride (AG, an AGEs formation inhibitor)-treated (100 mg/Kg/day, i.g., for 8 weeks) group. In vitro study, according to the different treatments, HK-2 were divided into 6 groups. Intracellular cholesterol content was assessed by Oil Red O staining and cholesterol enzymatic assay. Expression of mRNA and protein of molecules controlling cholesterol homeostasis in the treated cells was examined by real-time quantitative PCR and western blotting, respectively. SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP) translocation was detected by confocal microscopy. Here we found Nε-(carboxymethyl) lysine (CML, a member of the AGEs family) increased Oil Red O staining and intracellular cholesterol ester (CE) in HK-2 cells; Anti-RAGE (AGEs receptor) reduced lipid droplets and the CE level. A strong staining of Oil Red O was also found in the renal tubules of the diabetic rats, which could be alleviated by AG. CML upregulated both mRNA and protein expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR), LDL receptor (LDLr), sterol regulatory element binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) and SCAP, which were inhibited by anti-RAGE. The upregulation of these molecules in the kidney of the diabetic rats was also ameliorated by AG. Furthermore, AG reduced serum and renal CML deposition, and improved urine protein and u-NGAL in type 2 diabetic rats. Overall, these results

  10. FEEL-1 and FEEL-2 are endocytic receptors for advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Yoshiaki; Adachi, Hideki; Osuga, Jun-ichi; Ohashi, Ken; Yahagi, Naoya; Sekiya, Motohiro; Okazaki, Hiroaki; Tomita, Sachiko; Iizuka, Yoko; Shimano, Hitoshi; Nagai, Ryozo; Kimura, Satoshi; Tsujimoto, Masafumi; Ishibashi, Shun

    2003-04-11

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are nonenzymatically glycosylated proteins, which accumulate in vascular tissues in aging and diabetes. Receptors for AGEs include scavenger receptors, which recognize acetylated low density lipoproteins (Ac-LDL) such as scavenger receptor class AI/AII (SR-A), cell surface glycoprotein CD36, scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI), and lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor-1. The broad ligand repertoire of these receptors as well as the diversity of the receptors for AGEs have prompted us to examine whether AGEs are also recognized by the novel scavenger receptors, which we have recently isolated from a cDNA library prepared from human umbilical vein endothelial cells, such as the scavenger receptor expressed by endothelial cells-I (SREC-I); the fasciclin EGF-like, laminin-type EGF-like, and link domain-containing scavenger receptor-1 (FEEL-1); and its paralogous protein, FEEL-2. At 4 degrees C, (125)I-AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA) exhibited high affinity specific binding to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells overexpressing FEEL-1 (CHO-FEEL-1) and FEEL-2 (CHO-FEEL-2) with K(d) of 2.55 and 1.68 microg/ml, respectively, but not to CHO cells expressing SREC (CHO-SREC) and parent CHO cells. At 37 degrees C, (125)I-AGE-BSA was taken up and degraded by CHO-FEEL-1 and CHO-FEEL-2 cells but not by CHO-SREC and parent CHO cells. Thus, the ability to bind Ac-LDL is not necessarily a prerequisite to bind AGEs. The (125)I-AGE-BSA binding to CHO-FEEL-1 and CHO-FEEL-2 cells was effectively inhibited by Ac-LDL and polyanionic SR-A inhibitors such as fucoidan, polyinosinic acids, and dextran sulfate but not by native LDL, oxidized LDL, or HDL. FEEL-1, which is expressed by the liver and vascular tissues, may recognize AGEs, thereby contributing to the development of diabetic vascular complications and atherosclerosis.

  11. The Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Is Associated with Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Lancefield, Terase F.; Patel, Sheila K.; Freeman, Melanie; Velkoska, Elena; Wai, Bryan; Srivastava, Piyush M.; Horrigan, Mark; Farouque, Omar; Burrell, Louise M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Upregulation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) has been proposed as a pathophysiological mechanism underlying the development of atrial fibrillation (AF). We sought to investigate if soluble RAGE levels are associated with AF in Caucasian patients. Methods Patients (n = 587) were prospectively recruited and serum levels of soluble RAGE (sRAGE) and endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE) measured. The patients included 527 with sinus rhythm, 32 with persistent AF (duration >7 days, n = 32) and 28 with paroxysmal AF (duration <7 days, n = 28). Results Patients with AF were older and had a greater prevalence of heart failure than patients in sinus rhythm. Circulating RAGE levels were higher in patients with persistent AF [median sRAGE 1190 (724–2041) pg/ml and median esRAGE 452 (288–932) pg/ml] compared with paroxysmal AF [sRAGE 799 (583–1033) pg/ml and esRAGE 279 (201–433) pg/ml, p ≤ 0.01] or sinus rhythm [sRAGE 782 (576–1039) pg/ml and esRAGE 289 (192–412) pg/ml, p < 0.001]. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, independent predictors of persistent AF were age, heart failure, sRAGE [odds ratio 1.1 per 100 pg/ml, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0–1.1, p = 0.001] and esRAGE [odds ratio 1.3 per 100 pg/ml, 95% CI 1.1–1.4, p < 0.001]. Heart failure and age were the only independent predictors of paroxysmal AF. In AF patients, sRAGE [odds ratio 1.1 per 100 pg/ml, 95% CI 1.1–1.2, p = 0.007] and esRAGE [odds ratio 1.3 per 100 pg/ml, 95% CI 1.0–1.5, p = 0.017] independently predicted persistent compared with paroxysmal AF. Conclusions Soluble RAGE is elevated in Caucasian patients with AF, and both sRAGE and esRAGE predict the presence of persistent AF. PMID:27627677

  12. SOCS3 overexpression inhibits advanced glycation end product-induced EMT in proximal tubule epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Huimin; Li, Yingtao

    2017-06-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is among the most severe complications of diabetes mellitus, and may lead to end-stage renal disease. Sustained exposure to advanced glycation end products (AGEs) typically causes renal tubular epithelial cells (TECs) to suffer from an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, there remains no consensus regarding the mechanism underlying the cause of EMT in TECs as induced by AGEs. In the present study, we investigated the promotion of EMT in TECs by AGEs, and the activation of Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling. In addition, we constructed a recombinant adenovirus (Ad) that overexpressed suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3), and examined the regulatory role of SOCS3 in the activation of JAK/STAT signaling and the promotion of EMT in TECs. The results demonstrated that AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA) treatment significantly promoted the expression of EMT-associated proteins, while reducing the expression of the epithelial cell marker, E-cadherin. Furthermore, the Ad-mediated SOCS3 overexpression markedly inhibited the AGE-BSA-induced JAK2/STAT3 activation; phosphorylated JAK2 and phosphorylated STAT3 expression levels were reduced by the Ad-SOCS3 infection, compared with the control Ad (Ad-con) infection, in HK-2 cells subject to AGE-BSA. Moreover, the overexpression of SOCS3 markedly inhibited the AGE-BSA-promoted EMT in HK-2 cells. AGE-BSA-promoted EMT-associated proteins, such as α-smooth muscle actin and collagen I, were reduced by the Ad-SOCS3 virus infection, in contrast to the Ad-con virus infection. Furthermore, reduced E-cadherin expression was reversed by the Ad-SOCS3 virus infection, in contrast to the Ad-con virus infection, in epithelial HK-2 cells. In conclusion, the present study confirmed the inhibitory role of SOCS3 in the AGE-induced EMT in renal TECs, implying the protective role of SOCS3 in DN.

  13. Effect of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) oligosaccharides on the formation of advanced glycation end-products

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiadong; Liu, Weixi; Ma, Hang; Marais, Jannie P. J.; Khoo, Christina; Dain, Joel A.; Rowley, David C.; Seeram, Navindra P.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are implicated in several chronic human illnesses including type-2 diabetes, renal failure, and neurodegenerative diseases. The cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) fruit has been previously reported to show anti-AGEs effects, attributed primarily to its phenolic constituents. However, there is lack of similar data on the non-phenolic constituents found in the cranberry fruit, in particular, its carbohydrate constituents. Herein, a chemically characterized oligosaccharide-enriched fraction purified from the cranberry fruit was evaluated for its potential anti-AGEs and free radical scavenging effects. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro anti-AGEs and free radical scavenging effects of a chemically characterized oligosaccharide-enriched fraction purified from the North American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) fruit. METHOD: The cranberry oligosaccharide-enriched fraction was purified from cranberry hull powder and characterized based on spectroscopic and spectrometric (NMR, MALDI-TOF-MS, and HPAEC-PAD) data. The oligosaccharide-enriched fraction was evaluated for its anti-AGEs and free radical scavenging effects by the bovine serum albumin-fructose, and DPPH assays, respectively. RESULTS: Fractionation of cranberry hull material yielded an oligosaccharide-enriched fraction named Cranf1b-CL. The 1H NMR and MALDI-TOF-MS revealed that Cranf1b-CL consists of oligosaccharides ranging primarily from 6-mers to 9-mers. The monosaccharide composition of Cranf1b-CL was arabinose (25%), galactose (5%), glucose (47%) and xylose (23%). In the bovine serum albumin-fructose assay, Cranf1b-CL inhibited AGEs formation in a concentration-dependent manner with comparable activity to the synthetic antiglycating agent, aminoguanidine, used as the positive control (57 vs. 75%; both at 500μg/mL). In the DPPH free radical scavenging assay, Cranf1b-CL showed superior activity to the

  14. Effect of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) oligosaccharides on the formation of advanced glycation end-products.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiadong; Liu, Weixi; Ma, Hang; Marais, Jannie P J; Khoo, Christina; Dain, Joel A; Rowley, David C; Seeram, Navindra P

    2016-06-16

    BACKGROUND: The formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are implicated in several chronic human illnesses including type-2 diabetes, renal failure, and neurodegenerative diseases. The cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) fruit has been previously reported to show anti-AGEs effects, attributed primarily to its phenolic constituents. However, there is lack of similar data on the non-phenolic constituents found in the cranberry fruit, in particular, its carbohydrate constituents. Herein, a chemically characterized oligosaccharide-enriched fraction purified from the cranberry fruit was evaluated for its potential anti-AGEs and free radical scavenging effects. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro anti-AGEs and free radical scavenging effects of a chemically characterized oligosaccharide-enriched fraction purified from the North American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) fruit. METHOD: The cranberry oligosaccharide-enriched fraction was purified from cranberry hull powder and characterized based on spectroscopic and spectrometric (NMR, MALDI-TOF-MS, and HPAEC-PAD) data. The oligosaccharide-enriched fraction was evaluated for its anti-AGEs and free radical scavenging effects by the bovine serum albumin-fructose, and DPPH assays, respectively. RESULTS: Fractionation of cranberry hull material yielded an oligosaccharide-enriched fraction named Cranf1b-CL. The (1)H NMR and MALDI-TOF-MS revealed that Cranf1b-CL consists of oligosaccharides ranging primarily from 6-mers to 9-mers. The monosaccharide composition of Cranf1b-CL was arabinose (25%), galactose (5%), glucose (47%) and xylose (23%). In the bovine serum albumin-fructose assay, Cranf1b-CL inhibited AGEs formation in a concentration-dependent manner with comparable activity to the synthetic antiglycating agent, aminoguanidine, used as the positive control (57 vs. 75%; both at 500μg/mL). In the DPPH free radical scavenging assay, Cranf1b-CL showed superior activity to

  15. Effect of green tea extract on advanced glycation and cross-linking of tail tendon collagen in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Babu, Pon Velayutham Anandh; Sabitha, Kuruvimalai Ekambaram; Shyamaladevi, Chennam Srinivasulu

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes leads to modification of collagen such as advanced glycation and cross-linking which play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. We have investigated the effect of green tea on modification of collagen in streptozotocin (60 mg/kg body weight) induced diabetic rats. To investigate the therapeutic effect of green tea, treatment was begun six weeks after the onset of diabetes and green tea extract (300 mg/kg body weight) was given orally for 4 weeks. The collagen content, extent of advanced glycation, advanced glycation end products (AGE) and cross-linking of tail tendon collagen were investigated. Green tea reduced the tail tendon collagen content which increased in diabetic rats. Accelerated advanced glycation and AGE in diabetic animals, as detected by Ehrlich's-positive material and collagen linked fluorescence respectively were reduced significantly by green tea. The solubility of tail tendon collagen decreased significantly in diabetic rats indicating a remarkable increase in the cross-linking, whereas green tea increases the solubility of collagen in diabetic rats. The present study reveals that green tea is effective in reducing the modification of tail tendon collagen in diabetic rats. Thus green tea may have a therapeutic effect in the treatment of glycation induced complications of diabetes.

  16. Cinnamaldehyde and nitric oxide attenuate advanced glycation end products-induced the Jak/STAT signaling in human renal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jau-Shyang; Lee, Ying-Ho; Chuang, Lea-Yea; Guh, Jinn-Yuh; Hwang, Jean-Yu

    2015-06-01

    Cinnamaldehyde is a major and a bioactive compound isolated from the leaves of Cinnamomum osmophloeum kaneh. It possesses anti-diabetic properties in vitro and in vivo and has anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. To explore whether cinnamaldehyde was linked to altered advanced glycation end products (AGE)-mediated diabetic nephropathy, the molecular mechanisms of cinnamaldehyde responsible for inhibition of AGE-reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity in human renal proximal tubular cells were examined. We found that raising the ambient AGE concentration causes a dose-dependent decrease in NO generation. Cinnamaldehyde significantly reverses AGE-inhibited NO generation and induces high levels of cGMP synthesis and PKG activation. Treatments with cinnamaldehyde, the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, and the JAK2 inhibitor AG490 markedly attenuated AGE-inhibited NOS protein levels and NO generation. Moreover, AGE-induced the JAK2-STAT1/STAT3 activation, RAGE/p27(Kip1) /collagen IV protein levels, and cellular hypertrophy were reversed by cinnamaldehyde. The ability of cinnamaldehyde to suppress STAT activation was also verified by the observation that it significantly increased SCOS-3 protein level. These findings indicate for the first time that in the presence of cinnamaldehyde, the suppression of AGE-induced biological responses is probably mediated by inactivating the JAK2-STAT1/STAT3 cascade or activating the NO pathway.

  17. Advanced Glycation End Products (AGE) Potently Induce Autophagy through Activation of RAF Protein Kinase and Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB).

    PubMed

    Verma, Neeharika; Manna, Sunil K

    2016-01-15

    Advanced glycation end products (AGE) accumulate in diabetic patients and aging people because of high amounts of three- or four-carbon sugars derived from glucose, thereby causing multiple consequences, including inflammation, apoptosis, obesity, and age-related disorders. It is important to understand the mechanism of AGE-mediated signaling leading to the activation of autophagy (self-eating) that might result in obesity. We detected AGE as one of the potent inducers of autophagy compared with doxorubicin and TNF. AGE-mediated autophagy is inhibited by suppression of PI3K and potentiated by the autophagosome maturation blocker bafilomycin. It increases autophagy in different cell types, and that correlates with the expression of its receptor, receptor for AGE. LC3B, the marker for autophagosomes, is shown to increase upon AGE stimulation. AGE-mediated autophagy is partially suppressed by inhibitor of NF-κB, PKC, or ERK alone and significantly in combination. AGE increases sterol regulatory element binding protein activity, which leads to an increase in lipogenesis. Although AGE-mediated lipogenesis is affected by autophagy inhibitors, AGE-mediated autophagy is not influenced by lipogenesis inhibitors, suggesting that the turnover of lipid droplets overcomes the autophagic clearance. For the first time, we provide data showing that AGE induces several cell signaling cascades, like NF-κB, PKC, ERK, and MAPK, that are involved in autophagy and simultaneously help with the accumulation of lipid droplets that are not cleared effectively by autophagy, therefore causing obesity.

  18. Advanced Glycation End Products (AGE) Potently Induce Autophagy through Activation of RAF Protein Kinase and Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB)*

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Neeharika; Manna, Sunil K.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGE) accumulate in diabetic patients and aging people because of high amounts of three- or four-carbon sugars derived from glucose, thereby causing multiple consequences, including inflammation, apoptosis, obesity, and age-related disorders. It is important to understand the mechanism of AGE-mediated signaling leading to the activation of autophagy (self-eating) that might result in obesity. We detected AGE as one of the potent inducers of autophagy compared with doxorubicin and TNF. AGE-mediated autophagy is inhibited by suppression of PI3K and potentiated by the autophagosome maturation blocker bafilomycin. It increases autophagy in different cell types, and that correlates with the expression of its receptor, receptor for AGE. LC3B, the marker for autophagosomes, is shown to increase upon AGE stimulation. AGE-mediated autophagy is partially suppressed by inhibitor of NF-κB, PKC, or ERK alone and significantly in combination. AGE increases sterol regulatory element binding protein activity, which leads to an increase in lipogenesis. Although AGE-mediated lipogenesis is affected by autophagy inhibitors, AGE-mediated autophagy is not influenced by lipogenesis inhibitors, suggesting that the turnover of lipid droplets overcomes the autophagic clearance. For the first time, we provide data showing that AGE induces several cell signaling cascades, like NF-κB, PKC, ERK, and MAPK, that are involved in autophagy and simultaneously help with the accumulation of lipid droplets that are not cleared effectively by autophagy, therefore causing obesity. PMID:26586913

  19. Crosstalk between advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-receptor RAGE axis and dipeptidyl peptidase-4-incretin system in diabetic vascular complications.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Fukami, Kei; Matsui, Takanori

    2015-01-13

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) consist of heterogenous group of macroprotein derivatives, which are formed by non-enzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and amino groups of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids, and whose process has progressed at an accelerated rate under diabetes. Non-enzymatic glycation and cross-linking of protein alter its structural integrity and function, contributing to the aging of macromolecules. Furthermore, engagement of receptor for AGEs (RAGE) with AGEs elicits oxidative stress generation and subsequently evokes proliferative, inflammatory, and fibrotic reactions in a variety of cells. Indeed, accumulating evidence has suggested the active involvement of accumulation of AGEs in diabetes-associated disorders such as diabetic microangiopathy, atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases, Alzheimer's disease and osteoporosis. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) are incretins, gut hormones secreted from the intestine in response to food intake, both of which augment glucose-induced insulin release, suppress glucagon secretion, and slow gastric emptying. Since GLP-1 and GIP are rapidly degraded and inactivated by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4), inhibition of DPP-4 and/or DPP-4-resistant GLP-1 analogues have been proposed as a potential target for the treatment of diabetes. Recently, DPP-4 has been shown to cleave multiple peptides, and blockade of DPP-4 could exert diverse biological actions in GLP-1- or GIP-independent manner. This article summarizes the crosstalk between AGEs-RAGE axis and DPP-4-incretin system in the development and progression of diabetes-associated disorders and its therapeutic intervention, especially focusing on diabetic vascular complications.

  20. Effects of combined lipoic acid and pyridoxine on albuminuria, advanced glycation end-products, and blood pressure in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Noori, Nazanin; Tabibi, Hadi; Hosseinpanah, Farhad; Hedayati, Mehdi; Nafar, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of combined administration of lipoic acid and pyridoxine on albuminuria, oxidative stress, blood pressure, serum advanced glycation end-products, nitric oxide (NO), and endothelin-1 in patients with diabetic nephropathy. Thirty-four patients were randomly assigned to either a supplement group or a placebo group. The patients in the supplement group received 800 mg lipoic acid and 80 mg pyridoxine daily for 12 weeks, whereas the placebo group received corresponding placebos. Urinary albumin, serum malondialdehyde (MDA), and systolic blood pressure decreased significantly in the supplement group compared to the placebo group (p < 0.05). Serum NO increased in the supplement group compared to the placebo group (p < 0.05). Serum pentosidine and carboxymethyl lysine decreased significantly in the supplement group at the end of week 12 compared to baseline (p < 0.05). No statistically significant differences were observed between the two groups in mean changes of serum endothelin-1, glucose, and diastolic blood pressure. The present study indicates that combined administration of lipoic acid and pyridoxine improves albuminuria in patients with diabetic nephropathy by reducing oxidative stress, advanced glycation end-products, and systolic blood pressure. The reduction in microalbuminuria may be of benefit in retarding the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  1. Inhibition of human muscle-specific enolase by methylglyoxal and irreversible formation of advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Pietkiewicz, Jadwiga; Gamian, Andrzej; Staniszewska, Magdalena; Danielewicz, Regina

    2009-04-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) was studied as an inhibitor and effective glycating factor of human muscle-specific enolase. The inhibition was carried out by the use of a preincubation procedure in the absence of substrate. Experiments were performed in anionic and cationic buffers and showed that inhibition of enolase by methylglyoxal and formation of enolase-derived glycation products arose more effectively in slight alkaline conditions and in the presence of inorganic phosphate. Incubation of 15 micromolar solutions of the enzyme with 2 mM, 3.1 mM and 4.34 mM MG in 100 mM phosphate buffer pH 7.4 for 3 h caused the loss a 32%, 55% and 82% of initial specific activity, respectively. The effect of MG on catalytic properties of enolase was investigated. The enzyme changed the K(M) value for glycolytic substrate 2-phospho-D-glycerate (2-PGA) from 0.2 mM for native enzyme to 0.66 mM in the presence of MG. The affinity of enolase for gluconeogenic substrate phosphoenolpyruvate altered after preincubation with MG in the same manner, but less intensively. MG has no effect on V(max) and optimal pH values. Incubation of enolase with MG for 0-48 h generated high molecular weight protein derivatives. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) were resistant to proteolytic degradation by trypsin. Magnesium ions enhanced the enzyme inactivation by MG and facilitated AGEs formation. However, the protection for this inhibition in the presence of 2-PGA as glycolytic substrate was observed and AGEs were less effectively formed under these conditions.

  2. Formation of Fructose-Mediated Advanced Glycation End Products and Their Roles in Metabolic and Inflammatory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Gugliucci, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Fructose is associated with the biochemical alterations that promote the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and type 2 diabetes. Its consumption has increased in parallel with MetS. It is metabolized by the liver, where it stimulates de novo lipogenesis. The triglycerides synthesized lead to hepatic insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Fructose-derived advanced glycation end products (AGEs) may be involved via the Maillard reaction. Fructose has not been a main focus of glycation research because of the difficulty in measuring its adducts, and, more importantly, because although it is 10 times more reactive than glucose, its plasma concentration is only 1% of that of glucose. In this focused review, I summarize exogenous and endogenous fructose metabolism, fructose glycation, and in vitro, animal, and human data. Fructose is elevated in several tissues of diabetic patients where the polyol pathway is active, reaching the same order of magnitude as glucose. It is plausible that the high reactivity of fructose, directly or via its metabolites, may contribute to the formation of intracellular AGEs and to vascular complications. The evidence, however, is still unconvincing. Two areas that have been overlooked so far and should be actively explored include the following: 1) enteral formation of fructose AGEs, generating an inflammatory response to the receptor for AGEs (which may explain the strong association between fructose consumption and asthma, chronic bronchitis, and arthritis); and 2) inactivation of hepatic AMP-activated protein kinase by a fructose-mediated increase in methylglyoxal flux (perpetuating lipogenesis, fatty liver, and insulin resistance). If proven correct, these mechanisms would put the fructose-mediated Maillard reaction in the limelight again as a contributing factor in chronic inflammatory diseases and MetS.

  3. Advanced glycation end-products produced systemically and by macrophages: A common contributor to inflammation and degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Byun, Kyunghee; Yoo, YongCheol; Son, Myeongjoo; Lee, Jaesuk; Jeong, Goo-Bo; Park, Young Mok; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Lee, Bonghee

    2017-02-13

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor have been implicated in the progressions of many intractable diseases, such as diabetes and atherosclerosis, and are also critical for pathologic changes in chronic degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and alcoholic brain damage. Recently activated macrophages were found to be a source of AGEs, and the most abundant form of AGEs, AGE-albumin excreted by macrophages has been implicated in these diseases and to act through common pathways. AGEs inhibition has been shown to prevent the pathogenesis of AGEs-related diseases in human, and therapeutic advances have resulted in several agents that prevent their adverse effects. Recently, anti-inflammatory molecules that inhibit AGEs have been shown to be good candidates for ameliorating diabetic complications as well as degenerative diseases. This review was undertaken to present, discuss, and clarify current understanding regarding AGEs formation in association with macrophages, different diseases, therapeutic and diagnostic strategy and links with RAGE inhibition.

  4. Stilbene glucoside from Polygonum multiflorum Thunb.: a novel natural inhibitor of advanced glycation end product formation by trapping of methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Lv, Lishuang; Shao, Xi; Wang, Liyan; Huang, Derong; Ho, Chi-Tang; Sang, Shengmin

    2010-02-24

    Methylglyoxal (MGO), the reactive dicarbonyl intermediate generated during the nonenzymatic glycation between reducing sugars and amino groups of proteins, lipids, and DNA, is the precursor of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Many studies have shown that AGEs play a major pathogenic role in diabetes and its complications. This study found that 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene 2-O-beta-D-glucoside (THSG), the major bioactive compound from Polygonum multiflorum Thunb., can efficiently inhibit the formation of AGEs in a dose-dependent manner by trapping reactive MGO under physiological conditions (pH 7.4, 37 degrees C). More than 60% MGO was trapped by THSG within 24 h, which was much more effective than resveratrol and its methylated derivative, pterostilbene, the two major bioactive dietary stilbenes. The major mono- and di-MGO adducts of THSG were successfully purified and found to be mixtures of tautomers. LC-MS and NMR data showed that positions 4 and 6 of the A ring were the major active sites for trapping MGO. It was also found that THSG could significantly inhibit the formation of AGEs in the human serum albumin (HSA)-MGO assay and both mono- and di-MGO adducts of THSG were detected in this assay using LC-MS. The results suggest that the ability of THSG to trap reactive dicarbonyl species makes it a potential natural inhibitor of AGEs.

  5. Predictive value of advanced glycation end products for the development of post-infarction heart failure: a preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Since post-infarction heart failure (HF) determines a great morbidity and mortality, and given the physiopathology implications of advanced glycation end products (AGE) in the genesis of myocardial dysfunction, it was intended to analyze the prognostic value of these molecules in order to predict post-infarction HF development. Methods A prospective clinical study in patients after first acute coronary syndrome was conducted. The follow-up period was consisted in 1 year. In 194 patients consecutively admitted in the coronary unit for myocardial infarct fluorescent AGE levels were measured. The association between glycaemic parameters and the development of post-infarction HF were analyzed in those patients. Finally, we identified the variables with independent predictor value by performing a multivariate analysis of Hazard ratio for Cox regression. Results Eleven out of 194 patients (5.6%) developed HF during follow-up (median: 1.0 years [0.8 - 1.5 years]). Even though basal glucose, fructosamine and glycated haemoglobin were significant predictive factors in the univariate analysis, after being adjusted by confounding variables and AGE they lost their statistical signification. Only AGE (Hazard Ratio 1.016, IC 95%: 1.006-1.026; p<0,001), together with NT-proBNP and the infarct extension were predictors for post-infarction HF development, where AGE levels over the median value 5-fold increased the risk of HF development during follow-up. Conclusions AGE are an independent marker of post-infarction HF development risk. PMID:22909322

  6. Role of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and receptor for AGEs (RAGE) in vascular damage in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2011-04-01

    A non-enzymatic reaction between ketones or aldehydes and the amino groups of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids contributes to the aging of macromolecules and to the development and progression of various age-related disorders such as vascular complications of diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, cancer growth and metastasis, insulin resistance and degenerative bone disease. Under hyperglycemic and/or oxidative stress conditions, this process begins with the conversion of reversible Schiff base adducts, and then to more stable, covalently-bound Amadori rearrangement products. Over a course of days to weeks, these early glycation products undergo further reactions and rearrangements to become irreversibly crossed-linked, fluorescent protein derivatives termed advanced glycation end products (AGEs). There is a growing body of evidence that AGE and their receptor RAGE (receptor for AGEs) interaction elicits oxidative stress, inflammatory reactions and thrombosis, thereby being involved in vascular aging and damage. These observations suggest that the AGE-RAGE system is a novel therapeutic target for preventing diabetic vascular complications. In this paper, we review the pathophysiological role of the AGE-RAGE-oxidative stress system and its therapeutic intervention in vascular damage in diabetes. We also discuss here the potential utility of the restriction of food-derived AGEs in diabetic vascular complications.

  7. Formation of Pentosidine Cross-Linking in Myoglobin by Glyoxal: Detection of Fluorescent Advanced Glycation End Product.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sauradipta

    2017-03-15

    Glyoxal, a reactive α-oxoaldehyde, increases in diabetic condition and reacts with proteins to form advanced glycation end products (AGEs) following Maillard-like reaction. Considering the significance of protein modification by glyoxal-derived AGEs, we investigated the in vitro effect of glyoxal (200 μM) on the monomeric heme protein myoglobin (Mb) (100 μM) after incubation for one week at 25 °C. Glyoxal-treated Mb exhibited increased absorbance around the Soret region, decreased α-helicity and thermal stability compared to control Mb. Intrinsic fluorescence spectrum of the treated Mb showed an additional signal in the 400-500 nm region on excitation at 280 nm that was absent in control Mb. When excited at 335 nm, the glyoxal-treated sample gave a strong fluorescence indicating AGE formation. Mass spectrometric studies revealed formation of glyoxal-derived fluorescent AGE adduct pentosidine between Lys-145 and Arg-139 residues of Mb. Other than pentosidine, additional AGE adducts, namely, carboxymethyllysine at Lys-133, hydroimidazolone at Arg-31 and pyrrolidone-carboxymethyllysine at Lys-145 were also detected. Lys-145 was thus found to contain two different types of AGE adducts, indicating the heterogeneous nature of in vitro glycation reaction. AGE-induced protein modifications might be associated with complications in disease conditions.

  8. Antihyperglycemic activity and inhibition of advanced glycation end product formation by Cuminum cyminum in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Jagtap, A G; Patil, P B

    2010-01-01

    Cuminum cyminum is widely used as a spice in many countries. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of methanolic extract of seeds of C. cyminum (CC) on diabetes, oxidative stress and formation of advanced glycated end products (AGE) and obtain comparison with glibenclamide. In vitro studies indicated that CC inhibited free radicals and AGE formation. Treatment of streptozotocin-diabetic rats with CC and glibenclamide for 28 days caused a reduction in blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and improved serum insulin and glycogen (liver and skeletal muscle) content when compared to diabetic control rats. Significant reduction in renal oxidative stress and AGE was observed with CC when compared to diabetic control and glibenclamide. CC and glibenclamide improved antioxidant status in kidney and pancreas of diabetic rats. Diabetic rats showed increase in rat tail tendon collagen, glycated collagen, collagen linked fluorescence and reduction in pepsin digestion. Treatment with CC significantly improved these parameters when compared to diabetic control and glibenclamide group. Though the antidiabetic effect of CC was comparable to glibenclamide it had better effect in controlling oxidative stress and inhibiting the AGE formation, which are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic microvascular complications.

  9. Receptor for advanced glycation end product blockade enhances the chemotherapeutic effect of cisplatin in tongue squamous cell carcinoma by reducing autophagy and modulating the Wnt pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ziming; Wang, Hongyu; Zhang, Liao; Mei, Xifan; Hu, Jing; Huang, Keqiang

    2017-02-01

    Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) is one of the most severe types of cancer with poor outcomes. Cisplatin is used widely to treat cancer cells, but many patients develop acquired drug resistance. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is expressed widely in TSCC and associated with drug-induced chemotherapy resistance. However, the effect of RAGE and cisplatin on Tca-8113 cells remains unknown. We assayed the combined use of RAGE blockade and cisplatin effect on Tca-8113 cells' viability by MTT and apoptosis rate of Tca-8113 cells on RAGE blockade+cisplatin treatment; cisplatin alone; or RAGE blockade alone by flow cytometry. We observed the expressions of autophagy-related proteins beclin1, LC3II, p62; Wnt signaling-related proteins β-catenin, GSK3β, WNT5A, ROR-2; and apoptosis-related protein cleaved caspase-3, bcl-2-associated X proteins using western blot. We determined WNT5A and beclin1 expression on Tca-8113 cells by immunofluorescence. We further observed autophagy vacuoles by monodansylcadaverine staining. We found that RAGE blockade and cisplatin significantly decreased cell viability and increased the cell apoptosis rate compared with cisplatin alone. Furthermore, RAGE blockade suppressed the canonical Wnt pathway proteins β-catenin and GSK-3β, but upregulated noncanonical WNT5A and receptor ROR-2. We show that RAGE blockade suppressed the levels of autophagy-related protein LC3II/I, beclin1, accelerated degradation of autophagy for the increasing p62 expression, and increased cell apoptosis for the increasing expressions of cleaved caspase-3 and bcl-2-associated X proteins. We observed the location of WNT5A and beclin1 expressions on cells by immunofluorescence and their trends were consistent with western blotting. Taken together, our findings suggested that RAGE blockade+cisplatin improved chemotherapeutic effects by reducing autophagy and regulating Wnt/β-catenin to suppress the progression of TSCC.

  10. Hyperoside Downregulates the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) and Promotes Proliferation in ECV304 Cells via the c-Jun N-Terminal Kinases (JNK) Pathway Following Stimulation by Advanced Glycation End-Products In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhengyu; Sethiel, Mosha Silas; Shen, Weizhi; Liao, Sentai; Zou, Yuxiao

    2013-01-01

    Hyperoside is a major active constituent in many medicinal plants which are traditionally used in Chinese medicines for their neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects. The molecular mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. In this study, quiescent ECV304 cells were treated in vitro with advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the presence or absence of hyperoside. The results demonstrated that AGEs induced c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) activation and apoptosis in ECV304 cells. Hyperoside inhibited these effects and promoted ECV304 cell proliferation. Furthermore, hyperoside significantly inhibited RAGE expression in AGE-stimulated ECV304 cells, whereas knockdown of RAGE inhibited AGE-induced JNK activation. These results suggested that AGEs may promote JNK activation, leading to viability inhibition of ECV304 cells via the RAGE signaling pathway. These effects could be inhibited by hyperoside. Our findings suggest a novel role for hyperoside in the treatment and prevention of diabetes. PMID:24252909

  11. Anti-Advanced Glycation End-product and Free Radical Scavenging Activity of Plants from the Yucatecan Flora.

    PubMed

    Dzib-Guerra, Wendy Del C; Escalante-Erosa, Fabiola; García-Sosa, Karlina; Derbré, Séverine; Blanchard, Patricia; Richomme, Pascal; Peña-Rodríguez, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) is recognized as a major pathogenic process in diabetic complications, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. In addition, reactive oxygen species and free radicals have also been reported to participate in AGE formation and in cell damage. Natural products with antioxidant and antiAGE activity have great therapeutic potential in the treatment of diabetes, hypertension and related complications. Objective: to test ethanolic extracts and aqueous-traditional preparations of plants used to treat diabetes, hypertension and obesity in Yucatecan traditional medicine for their anti-AGE and free radical scavenging activities. ethanolic extracts of leaves, stems and roots of nine medicinal plants, together with their traditional preparations, were prepared and tested for their anti-AGE and antioxidant activities using the inhibition of advanced glycation end products and DPPH radical scavenging assays, respectively. the root extract of C. fistula (IC50= 0.1 mg/mL) and the leaf extract of P. auritum (IC50= 0.35 mg/mL) presented significant activity against vesperlysine and pentosidine-like AGE. Although none of the aqueous traditional preparations showed significant activity in the anti-AGE assay, both the traditional preparations and the ethanolic extracts of E. tinifolia, M. zapota, O. campechianum and P. auritum showed significant activity in the DPPH reduction assay. the results suggest that the metabolites responsible for the detected radical-scavenging activity are different to those involved in inhibiting AGE formation; however, the extracts with antioxidant activity may contain other metabolites which are able to prevent AGE formation through a different mechanism. Ethanolic extracts from nine plants used to treat diabetes, hypertension and obesity in Yucatecan traditional medicine were tested for their anti-AGE and free radical scavenging activities.Significant activity against vesperlysine

  12. Plasma Levels of Pentosidine, Carboxymethyl-Lysine, Soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products, and Metabolic Syndrome: The Metformin Effect

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Mohamed; Knani, Ines; Bouzidi, Hsan; Berriche, Olfa; Hammami, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is considered one of the most important public health problems. Several and controversial studies showed that the role of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor in the development of metabolic syndrome and therapeutic pathways is still unsolved. We have investigated whether plasma pentosidine, carboxymethyl-lysine (CML), and soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) levels were increased in patients with MetS and the effect of metformin in plasma levels of pentosidine, CML, and sRAGE. 80 control subjects and 86 patients were included in this study. Pentosidine, CML, and sRAGE were measured in plasma by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Plasma pentosidine, CML, and sRAGE levels were significantly increased in patients compared to control subjects (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, and P = 0.014, resp.). Plasma levels of pentosidine were significantly decreased in patients who received metformin compared to untreated patients (P = 0.01). However, there was no significant difference between patients treated with metformin and untreated patients in plasma CML levels. Plasma levels of sRAGE were significantly increased in patients who received metformin and ACE inhibitors (P < 0.001 and P = 0.002, resp.). However, in a multiple stepwise regression analysis, pentosidine, sRAGE, and drugs treatments were not independently associated. Patients with metabolic syndrome showed increased levels of AGEs such as pentosidine and CML. Metformin treatment showed a decreased level of pentosidine but not of CML. Therapeutic pathways of AGEs development should be taken into account and further experimental and in vitro studies merit for advanced research. PMID:27829696

  13. Receptor for advanced glycation end-product (RAGE) gene polymorphism 2245G/A is associated with pro-inflammatory, oxidative-glycation markers and sRAGE in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Ng, Zhi Xiang; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani; Iqbal, Tajunisah; Chua, Kek Heng

    2013-06-01

    Receptor for advanced glycation end-product (RAGE) gene polymorphism 2245G/A is associated with diabetic retinopathy (DR). However, the mechanism on how it affects the disease development is still unclear. This study aims to investigate the relationship between 2245G/A RAGE gene polymorphism and selected pro-inflammatory, oxidative-glycation markers in DR patients. A total of 371 unrelated type 2 diabetic patients [200 with retinopathy, 171 without retinopathy (DNR)] and 235 healthy subjects were recruited. Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method followed by DNA sequencing. The nuclear and cytosolic extracts from peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used for nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 and superoxide dismutase activity measurement respectively. Plasma was used for glutathione peroxidase activity, advanced oxidation protein product (AOPP), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, pentosidine and soluble RAGE (sRAGE) measurements. DR patients with 2245GA genotype had significantly elevated levels of activated NF-κB p65, plasma MCP-1, AOPP and pentosidine but lower level of sRAGE when compared to DR patients with wild-type 2245GG. The RAGE gene polymorphism 2245G/A is associated with pro-inflammatory, oxidative-glycation markers and circulating sRAGE in DR patients. Patients with 2245GA RAGE genotype could aggravate DR possibly via NF-κB mediated inflammatory pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Dietary intake of advanced glycation end products did not affect endothelial function and inflammation in healthy adults in a randomized controlled trial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    When food is heated to high temperatures, the characteristic “browning” generates advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that result from the reaction of reducing sugars with proteins. AGEs have been implicated in an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and other adverse aging-relate...

  15. Isolation and characterization of a new advanced glycation endproduct of dehydroascorbic acid and lysine.

    PubMed

    Argirov, Ognyan K; Lin, Bin; Olesen, Paul; Ortwerth, Beryl J

    2003-03-17

    Proteins are subject of posttranslational modification by sugars and their degradation products in vivo. The process is often referred as glycation. L-Dehydroascorbic acid (DHA), an oxidation product of L-ascorbic acid (vitamin C), is known as a potent glycation agent. A new product of modification of lysine epsilon -amino group by DHA was discovered as a result of the interaction between Boc-Lys and dehydroascorbic acid. The chromatographic and spectral analyses revealed that the structure of the product was 1-(5-ammonio-5-carboxypentyl)-3-oxido-4-(hydroxymethyl)pyridinium. The same compound was isolated from DHA modified calf lens protein after hydrolysis and chromatographic separation. The study confirmed that L-erythrulose is an important intermediate of modification of proteins by DHA. The structure of the reported product and in vitro experiments suggested that L-erythrulose could further transform to L-threose, L-erythrose and glycolaldehyde under conditions similar to physiological. The present study revealed that the modification of epsilon -amino groups of lysine residues by DHA is a complex process and could involve a number of reactive carbonyl species.

  16. Increased receptor for advanced glycation end products in spermatozoa of diabetic men and its association with sperm nuclear DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Karimi, J; Goodarzi, M T; Tavilani, H; Khodadadi, I; Amiri, I

    2012-05-01

    Although the majority of patients with diabetes have disorders in sexual function, associations between diabetes mellitus and sperm function at the molecular level are largely unknown. As receptor for advanced glycation end products plays a key role in many diabetic complications, we hypothesised that it may be involved in sperm nuclear DNA fragmentation. RAGE levels were determined using ELISA and western blot analysis in sperm samples from 32 diabetic and 35 nondiabetic men. Sperm DNA fragmentation was assessed using TUNEL assay. Diabetic men had significantly higher mean levels of RAGE protein (P < 0.001) and DNA fragmentation (P < 0.001) in spermatozoa. Sperm RAGE was directly correlated to sperm DNA fragmentation in diabetic men (r = 0.81, P < 0.001). The high positive correlation between RAGE levels and nuclear DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa of diabetic men suggests a central role of RAGE in disturbances in sexual function of diabetic men. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. Current perspectives on the health risks associated with the consumption of advanced glycation end products: recommendations for dietary management

    PubMed Central

    Palimeri, Sotiria; Palioura, Eleni; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) constitute a complex group of compounds produced endogenously during the aging process and under conditions of hyperglycemia and oxidative stress. AGEs also have an emerging exogenous origin. Cigarette smoke and diet are the two main exogenous sources of AGEs (glycotoxins). Modern Western diets are rich in AGEs which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several metabolic and degenerative disorders. Accumulating evidence underlies the beneficial effect of the dietary restriction of AGEs not only in animal studies but also in patients with diabetic complications and metabolic diseases. This article reviews the evidence linking dietary glycotoxins to several disorders from diabetic complications and renal failure to liver dysfunction, female reproduction, eye and cognitive disorders as well as cancer. Furthermore, strategies for AGE reduction are discussed with a focus on dietary modification. PMID:26366100

  18. The receptor for advanced glycation end products promotes bacterial growth at distant body sites in Staphylococcus aureus skin infection.

    PubMed

    Achouiti, Ahmed; Van't Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-09-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) has been implicated in the regulation of skin inflammation. We here sought to study the role of RAGE in host defense during skin infection caused by Staphylococcus (S.) aureus, the most common pathogen in this condition. Wild-type (Wt) and RAGE deficient (rage(-/-)) mice were infected subcutaneously with S. aureus and bacterial loads and local inflammation were quantified at regular intervals up to 8 days after infection. While bacterial burdens were similar in both mouse strains at the primary site of infection, rage(-/-) mice had lower bacterial counts in lungs and liver. Skin cytokine and chemokine levels did not differ between groups. In accordance with the skin model, direct intravenous infection with S. aureus was associated with lower bacterial loads in lungs and liver of rage(-/-) mice. Together these data suggest that RAGE does not impact local host defense during S. aureus skin infection, but facilitates bacterial growth at distant body sites.

  19. Intestinal transepithelial permeability of oxytocin into the blood is dependent on the receptor for advanced glycation end products in mice.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Haruhiro; Furuhara, Kazumi; Yamauchi, Agnes-Mikiko; Deguchi, Kisaburo; Harashima, Ai; Munesue, Seiichi; Lopatina, Olga; Gerasimenko, Maria; Salmina, Alla B; Zhang, Jia-Sheng; Kodama, Hikari; Kuroda, Hironori; Tsuji, Chiharu; Suto, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko

    2017-08-11

    Plasma oxytocin (OT) originates from secretion from the pituitary gland into the circulation and from absorption of OT in mother's milk into the blood via intestinal permeability. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the absorption of OT remains unclear. Here, we report that plasma OT concentrations increased within 10 min after oral delivery in postnatal day 1-7 mice. However, in Receptors for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) knockout mice after postnatal day 3, an identical OT increase was not observed. In adult mice, plasma OT was also increased in a RAGE-dependent manner after oral delivery or direct administration into the intestinal tract. Mass spectrometry evaluated that OT was absorbed intact. RAGE was abundant in the intestinal epithelial cells in both suckling pups and adults. These data highlight that OT is transmitted via a receptor-mediated process with RAGE and suggest that oral OT supplementation may be advantageous in OT drug development.

  20. Cell signaling and receptors in toxicity of advanced glycation end products (AGEs): α-dicarbonyls, radicals, oxidative stress and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter; Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2011-10-01

    Considerable attention has been paid to the toxicity of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), including relation to various illnesses. AGEs, generated nonenzymatically from carbohydrates and proteins, comprises large numbers of simple and more complicated compounds. Many reports deal with a role for receptors (RAGE) and cell signaling, including illnesses and aging. Reactive oxygen species appear to participate in signaling. RAGE include angiotensin II type 1 receptors. Many signaling pathways are involved, such as kinases, p38, p21, TGF-β, NF-κβ, TNF-α, JNK and STAT. A recent review puts focus on α-dicarbonyl metabolites, formed by carbohydrate oxidation, and imine derivatives from protein condensation, as a source via electron transfer (ET) of ROS and oxidative stress (OS). The toxic species have been related to illnesses and aging. Antioxidants alleviate the adverse effects.

  1. Blockade of receptor for advanced glycation end products protects against systolic overload-induced heart failure after transverse aortic constriction in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Yu, Manli; Zhang, Zhigang; Yu, Yunhua; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Xianxian

    2016-11-15

    Heart failure is the consequence of sustained, abnormal neurohormonal and mechanical stress and remains a leading cause of death worldwide. The aim of this work was to identify whether blockade of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) protected against systolic overload-induced heart failure and investigate the possible underlying mechanism. It was found that RAGE mRNA and protein expression was up-regulated in cardiac tissues from mice subjected to pressure overload by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Importantly, inhibition of RAGE by treatment with soluble RAGE (sRAGE) or FPS-ZM1 (a high-affinity RAGE-specific inhibitor) for 8 weeks attenuated cardiac remodeling (including cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis), and dysfunction in mice exposed to TAC. Furthermore, treatment of TAC mice with sRAGE or FPS-ZM1 enhanced phosphorylation of AMPK and reduced phosphorylation of mTOR and protein expression of NFκB p65 in cardiac tissues. In addition, treatment of TAC mice with sRAGE or FPS-ZM1 abated oxidative stress, attenuated endoplasmic reticulum stress, and suppressed inflammation in cardiac tissues. These data demonstrated the benefits of blocking RAGE on the progression of systolic overload-induced heart failure in mice, which was possibly through modulating AMPK/mTOR and NFκB pathways.

  2. Kinetics of advanced glycation end products formation on bovine serum albumin with various reducing sugars and dicarbonyl compounds in equimolar ratios.

    PubMed

    Luers, Lars; Rysiewski, Karolina; Dumpitak, Christian; Birkmann, Eva

    2012-04-01

    Reducing sugars and reactive dicarbonyl compounds play a major role in glycation of proteins in vivo. Glycation of proteins is the first step in of a nonenzymatic reaction, resulting in advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs can inactivate proteins or modify their biological activities. Therefore, it is important to understand the mechanism of AGE formation. Here, we systematically analyzed the kinetics of AGE formation in vitro by fluorescence and absorption measurements utilizing a microplate reader system and bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein. Comparing different concentrations of BSA, we applied various reducing sugars and reactive dicarbonyl compounds as AGE-inducing agents at different concentrations. In summary, this experimental setup enabled us to measure the kinetics of AGE formation in an efficient and defined way.

  3. Advanced glycation end products, carotid atherosclerosis, and circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiroki; Koyama, Hidenori; Fukumoto, Shinya; Tanaka, Shinji; Shoji, Takuhito; Shoji, Tetsuo; Emoto, Masanori; Tahara, Hideki; Inaba, Masaaki; Kakiya, Ryusuke; Tabata, Tsutomu; Miyata, Toshio; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2011-04-01

    Numbers of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been shown to be decreased in subjects with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the mechanism of which remained poorly understood. In this study, mutual association among circulating EPC levels, carotid atherosclerosis, serum pentosidine, and skin autofluorescence, a recently established noninvasive measure of advanced glycation end products accumulation, was examined in 212 ESRD subjects undergoing hemodialysis. Numbers of circulating EPCs were measured as CD34+ CD133+ CD45(low) VEGFR2+ cells and progenitor cells as CD34+ CD133+ CD45(low) fraction by flow cytometry. Skin autofluorescence was assessed by the autofluorescence reader; and serum pentosidine, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Carotid atherosclerosis was determined as intimal-medial thickness (IMT) measured by ultrasound. Circulating EPCs were significantly and inversely correlated with skin autofluorescence in ESRD subjects (R = -0.216, P = .002), but not with serum pentosidine (R = -0.079, P = .25). Circulating EPCs tended to be inversely associated with IMT (R = -0.125, P = .069). Intimal-medial thickness was also tended to be correlated positively with skin autofluorescence (R = 0.133, P = .054) and significantly with serum pentosidine (R = 0.159, P = .019). Stepwise multiple regression analyses reveal that skin autofluorescence, but not serum pentosidine and IMT, was independently associated with low circulating EPCs. Of note, skin autofluorescence was also inversely and independently associated with circulating progenitor cells. Thus, tissue accumulated, but not circulating, advanced glycation end products may be a determinant of a decrease in circulating EPCs in ESRD subjects.

  4. Skin advanced glycation end products in HIV infection are increased and predictive of development of cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Sprenger, Herman G; Bierman, Wouter F; Martes, Melanie I; Graaff, Reindert; van der Werf, Tjip S; Smit, Andries J

    2017-01-14

    HIV-1 infection is associated with an increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Advanced glycation end products are formed as stable markers of glycaemic and oxidative stress. Skin autofluorescence (SAF) as marker of accumulated advanced glycation end products is increased and predictive of CVD events in diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and preexisting CVD. We determined SAF levels in HIV-1 infected patients, testing the hypothesis that SAF predicts CVD events in HIV infection. Single-centre prospective cohort study. In 2010-2011, SAF was measured in 91 patients. Development of CVD events was monitored during a median follow-up of 4.8 years. SAF values of the patients were expressed as a ratio (rSAF) to expected SAF levels in age-matched healthy volunteers. Seventy-nine men and 12 women were included, mean age 47 years; 81 patients were on combination antiretroviral therapy. With a mean rSAF of 1.155, SAF levels in patients were 15.5% higher than predicted for their age (95% confidence interval, 10.0-20.0; P < 0.001). In multivariate regression analysis, rSAF was associated with nadir CD4 cell count less than 200 cells/μl (β -0.274; P = 0.01), smoking (β 0.240; P = 0.03), and men who have sex with men (MSM) (β 0.202; P = 0.07). CVD events occurred in six patients (7%). In Cox regression analysis including age, SAF, smoking, diabetes, hypertension and CKD, SAF (P = 0.01), and (Wet Medisch-wetenschappelijk Onderzoek met mensen; WMO) CKD (P = 0.03) remained as independent predictors of CVD events. SAF is increased in HIV-infected patients, and related with smoking, low nadir CD4 cell count, and MSM. Larger studies are needed to confirm whether SAF is an independent predictor of CVD events.

  5. Effects of alagebrium, an advanced glycation endproduct breaker, on exercise tolerance and cardiac function in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Jasper W L; Willemsen, Suzan; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Posma, Jan L; van Wijk, Leen M; Hummel, Yoran M; Hillege, Hans L; Voors, Adriaan A

    2011-08-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) have been associated with the development and progression of chronic heart failure (CHF). Advanced glycation endproducts-crosslink breakers might be of benefit in HF, but only small-scale and uncontrolled data are available. Our aim was to conduct a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to examine the effects of the AGE-breaker alagebrium on exercise capacity and cardiac function in patients with HF. One hundred and two patients with HF (78% male, aged 62 ± 11 years), and a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤0.45, were randomized to either 200 mg alagebrium twice daily or placebo. After 36 weeks, the primary efficacy end-point peak VO(2) had changed by (mean ± SEM) -2.1 ± 0.5 mL/min/kg in alagebrium vs. -0.5 ± 0.7 mL/min/kg in placebo-treated patients (P= 0.06). No significant changes were observed in a number of secondary end-points, including diastolic function (mean E': P= 0.32; E/E': P= 0.81), systolic function (LVEF: P= 0.43), AGE accumulation (skin-autofluorescence: P= 0.42), N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide, P= 0.20); New York Heart Association functional class (P= 0.73), patient global assessment (P= 0.32), physicians global assessment (P= 0.76), and the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire score (P= 0.38). Overall alagebrium was reasonably well tolerated. In the present proof-of-concept study, the AGE-breaker alagebrium did not improve exercise tolerance in patients with HF and systolic dysfunction, and no changes were observed in a number of secondary endpoints. The present data therefore do not support earlier data which suggested a beneficial effect of alagebrium in systolic HF. NCT00516646 (http://clinicaltrials.gov).

  6. Exercise training initiated in late middle age attenuates cardiac fibrosis and advanced glycation end-product accumulation in senescent rats.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kathryn J; Thomas, Melissa M; Betik, Andrew C; Belke, Darrell; Hepple, Russell T

    2014-02-01

    While it has long been postulated that exercise training attenuates the age-related decline in heart function normally associated with increased fibrosis and collagen cross-linking, the potential benefits associated with exercise training initiated later in life are currently unclear. To address this question, Fischer 344 × Brown Norway F1 rats underwent treadmill-based exercise training starting in late middle age and continued into senescence (35 mo) and were compared with age-matched sedentary rats. Hearts were examined for fibrosis and advanced glycation end-products in the subendocardial layer of left ventricular cross-sections. Genes for collagen synthesis and degradation were assessed by polymerase chain reaction, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity was assessed by EnzChek® Gelatinase/Collagenase Assay Kit. Exercise training of late middle-aged rats attenuated fibrosis and collagen cross-linking, while also reducing age-related mortality between late middle age and senescence. This training was also associated with an attenuated advanced glycation end-product (AGE) accumulation with aging, suggesting a decrease in collagen cross-linking. Conversely, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP1) gene expression, TIMP and MMP1 protein expression, and MMP activity increased with age but were not significantly impacted by exercise training. While our results demonstrate that exercise training in late middle age attenuates age-related mortality and cardiac fibrosis and is accompanied by attenuated AGE accumulation indicative of less collagen cross-linking, the mechanisms explaining this attenuated replacement fibrosis did not appear to involve altered TIMP1 expression, or MMP protein and activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The receptor for advanced glycation end products impairs collateral formation in both diabetic and non-diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Laura M; Gupta, Divya; Joseph, Giji; Weiss, Daiana; Taylor, W Robert

    2017-01-01

    Diabetics often have poor perfusion in their limbs as a result of peripheral artery disease and an impaired ability to generate collateral vessels. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is one protein that is thought to play a detrimental role in collateral development in diabetics due to increased levels of advanced glycation end products (AGE), one of its ligands, in diabetes. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAGE in both diabetic and non-diabetic settings in a model of collateral formation in mice. Streptozotocin was used to induce diabetes in both wild type and RAGE knockout mice. Increased levels of the AGE, N(ɛ)-(carboxymethyl) lysine (CML), were confirmed via an ELISA. A hindlimb ischemia model, in which the femoral artery is ligated, was used to drive collateral growth and reperfusion was assessed using laser Doppler perfusion imaging and histological analysis of vessels in the muscle. Both of these measurements showed impaired collateral growth in diabetic compared with wild-type mice as well as improved collateral growth in both diabetic and non-diabetic RAGE knockout mice when compared their wild-type counterparts. Distance on a freely accessed running wheel, used as a measure of perfusion recovery, showed that wild-type diabetic mice had functionally impaired recovery compared with their wild-type counterparts. Immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting showed that HMGB-1 (high-mobility group box 1), another RAGE ligand, was increased in the ischemic leg compared with the non-ischemic leg in all mice. This increase in HMGB-1 may explain improvement in animals lacking RAGE and its subsequent signaling. In conclusion, this study shows that RAGE impairs collateral growth in a diabetic setting and also in a non-diabetic setting. This demonstrates the importance of RAGE and alternate RAGE ligands in the setting of collateral vessel growth.

  8. Relationship between advanced glycation end-product accumulation and low skeletal muscle mass in Japanese men and women.

    PubMed

    Kato, Michitaka; Kubo, Akira; Sugioka, Yosuke; Mitsui, Rie; Fukuhara, Nobuki; Nihei, Fumi; Takeda, Yoshihiko

    2017-05-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between advanced glycation end-product accumulation and skeletal muscle mass among middle-aged and older Japanese men and women. A total of 132 participants enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Skin autofluorescence was assessed as a measure of advanced glycation-end products. Appendicular skeletal muscle mass was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and skeletal muscle index was calculated by dividing appendicular skeletal muscle mass by height squared. Participants were divided into two groups (low skeletal muscle index and normal skeletal muscle index) using the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia's skeletal muscle index criteria for diagnosing sarcopenia. Multivariate logistic regression analysis and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve were used to determine significant factors associated with low skeletal muscle index. Participants consisted of 70 men (mean age 57 ± 10 years) and 62 women (mean age 60 ± 11 years). There were 31 and 101 participants in the low and normal skeletal muscle index groups, respectively. Skin autofluorescence was significantly higher in the low skeletal muscle index group compared with the normal skeletal muscle index group (P < 0.01). Skin autofluorescence was a significant independent factor associated with low skeletal muscle index based on multivariate logistic regression analysis (odds ratio 15.7, 95% confidence interval 1.85-133.01; P = 0.012). The cut-off for skin autofluorescence was 2.45 arbitrary units, with a sensitivity of 0.75 and specificity of 0.91. Skin autofluorescence was an independent factor associated with low skeletal muscle index among middle-aged and older Japanese men and women. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 785-790. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  9. Advanced glycation end products and their receptor in age-related, non-communicable chronic inflammatory diseases; Overview of clinical evidence and potential contributions to disease.

    PubMed

    Reynaert, Niki L; Gopal, Poornima; Rutten, Erica P A; Wouters, Emiel F M; Schalkwijk, Casper G

    2016-12-01

    Age-related, non-communicable chronic inflammatory diseases represent the major 21st century health problem. Especially in Western countries, the prevalence of non-communicable diseases like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis are exponentially rising as the population ages. These diseases are determined by common risk factors and share an age-related onset. The affected organs display evidence of accelerated ageing, and are hallmarked by chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) has been implicated in a number of inflammatory diseases and plays a central role in amplifying inflammatory responses. Advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation and accumulation is accelerated under these conditions. Advanced glycation end products are not only linked to RAGE signaling and inflammation, but to various hallmarks of the ageing process. In addition to these biological functions, circulating levels of the soluble form of RAGE and of advanced glycation end products are candidate biomarkers for many age-related inflammatory diseases. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the mechanistic connections between RAGE and advanced glycation end products and the processes of inflammation and ageing. Furthermore, through the presented overview of AGE-RAGE alterations that have been described in clinical studies in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis, and insight obtained from mechanistic in vitro and animal studies, it can be concluded that these AGE-RAGE disturbances are a common contributing factor to the inflammatory state and pathogenesis of these various conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Advanced Glycation End Products Modulate Structure and Drug Binding Properties of Albumin.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Saurabh; Murugan, N Arul; Saraswathi, N T

    2015-09-08

    The extraordinary ligand binding properties of albumin makes it a key player in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many vital drugs. Albumin is highly susceptible for nonenzymatic glycation mediated structural modifications, and there is a need to determine structural and functional impact of specific AGEs modifications. The present study was aimed toward determining the AGE mediated structure and function changes, primarily looking into the effect on binding affinity of drugs in the two major drug binding sites of albumin. The impact of the two most predominant AGEs modifications, i.e., carboxyethyllysine (CEL) and argpyrimidine (Arg-P), was studied on the basis of the combination of in vitro and in silico experiments. In vitro studies were carried out by AGEs modification of bovine serum albumin (BSA) for the formation of Arg-P and CEL followed by drug interaction studies. In silico studies involved molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and docking studies for native and AGEs modified BSAs. In particular the side chain modification was specifically carried out for the residues in the drug binding sites, i.e., Arg-194, Arg-196, Arg-198, and Arg-217, and Lys-204 (site I) and Arg-409 and Lys-413 (site II). The equilibrated structures of native BSA (n-BSA) and glycated BSA (G-BSA) as obtained from MD were used for drug binding studies using molecular docking approach. It was evident from the results of both in vitro and in silico drug interaction studies that AGEs modification results in the reduced drug binding affinity for tolbutamide (TLB) and ibuprofen (IBP) in sites I and II. Moreover, the AGEs modification mediated conformational changes resulted in the shallow binding pockets with reduced accessibility for drugs.

  11. Angiogenesis impairment in diabetes: role of methylglyoxal-induced receptor for advanced glycation endproducts, autophagy and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongtao; Yu, Shujie; Zhang, Hua; Xu, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes impairs physiological angiogenesis by molecular mechanisms that are not fully understood. Methylglyoxal (MGO), a metabolite of glycolysis, is increased in patients with diabetes. This study defined the role of MGO in angiogenesis impairment and tested the mechanism in diabetic animals. Endothelial cells and mouse aortas were subjected to Western blot analysis of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) protein levels and angiogenesis evaluation by endothelial cell tube formation/migration and aortic ring assays. Incubation with MGO reduced VEGFR2 protein, but not mRNA, levels in a time and dose dependent manner. Genetic knockdown of the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) attenuated the reduction of VEGFR2. Overexpression of Glyoxalase 1, the enzyme that detoxifies MGO, reduced the MGO-protein adducts and prevented VEGFR2 reduction. The VEGFR2 reduction was associated with impaired angiogenesis. Suppression of autophagy either by inhibitors or siRNA, but not of the proteasome and caspase, normalized both the VEGFR2 protein levels and angiogenesis. Conversely, induction of autophagy either by rapamycin or overexpression of LC3 and Beclin-1 reduced VEGFR2 and angiogenesis. MGO increased endothelial LC3B and Beclin-1, markers of autophagy, which were accompanied by an increase of both autophagic flux (LC3 punctae) and co-immunoprecipitation of VEGFR2 with LC3. Pharmacological or genetic suppression of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) generation not only blocked the autophagy but also reversed the reduction of VEGFR2 and angiogenesis. Like MGO-treated aortas from normglycemic C57BL/6J mice, aortas from diabetic db/db and Akita mice presented reductions of angiogenesis or VEGFR2. Administration of either autophagy inhibitor ex vivo or superoxide scavenger in vivo abolished the reductions. Taken together, MGO reduces endothelial angiogenesis through RAGE-mediated, ONOO(-)dependent and autophagy-induced VEGFR2 degradation, which may represent

  12. Identification of Maillard reaction products on peanut allergens that influence binding to the receptor for advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Mueller, G A; Maleki, S J; Johnson, K; Hurlburt, B K; Cheng, H; Ruan, S; Nesbit, J B; Pomés, A; Edwards, L L; Schorzman, A; Deterding, L J; Park, H; Tomer, K B; London, R E; Williams, J G

    2013-12-01

    Recent immunological data demonstrated that dendritic cells preferentially recognize advanced glycation end product (AGE)-modified proteins, upregulate expression of the receptor for AGE (RAGE), and consequently bias the immune response toward allergy. Peanut extract was characterized by mass spectrometry (MS) to elucidate the specific residues and specific AGE modifications found in raw and roasted peanuts and on rAra h 1 that was artificially glycated by incubation with glucose or xylose. The binding of the RAGE-V1C1 domain to peanut allergens was assessed by PAGE and Western analysis with anti-Ara h 1, 2, and 3 antibodies. IgE binding to rAra h 1 was also assessed using the same methods. AGE modifications were found on Ara h 1 and Ara h 3 in both raw and roasted peanut extract. No AGE modifications were found on Ara h 2. Mass spectrometry and Western blot analysis demonstrated that RAGE binds selectively to Ara h 1 and Ara h 3 derived from peanut extract, whereas the analysis failed to demonstrate Ara h 2 binding to RAGE. rAra h 1 with no AGE modifications did not bind RAGE; however, after AGE modification with xylose, rAra h 1 bound to RAGE. AGE modifications to Ara h 1 and Ara h 3 can be found in both raw and roasted peanuts. Receptor for AGE was demonstrated to selectively interact with AGE-modified rAra h 1. If sensitization to peanut allergens occurs in dendritic cells via RAGE interactions, these cells are likely interacting with modified Ara h 1 and Ara h 3, but not Ara h 2. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA.

  13. Diet-derived advanced glycation end products or lipofuscin disrupts proteostasis and reduces life span in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Tsakiri, Eleni N; Iliaki, Kalliopi K; Höhn, Annika; Grimm, Stefanie; Papassideri, Issidora S; Grune, Tilman; Trougakos, Ioannis P

    2013-12-01

    Advanced glycation end product (AGE)-modified proteins are formed by the nonenzymatic glycation of free amino groups of proteins and, along with lipofuscin (a highly oxidized aggregate of covalently cross-linked proteins, sugars, and lipids), have been found to accumulate during aging and in several age-related diseases. As the in vivo effects of diet-derived AGEs or lipofuscin remain elusive, we sought to study the impact of oral administration of glucose-, fructose-, or ribose-modified albumin or of artificial lipofuscin in a genetically tractable model organism. We report herein that continuous feeding of young Drosophila flies with culture medium enriched in AGEs or in lipofuscin resulted in reduced locomotor performance and in accelerated rates of AGE-modified proteins and carbonylated proteins accumulation in the somatic tissues and hemolymph of flies, as well as in a significant reduction of flies health span and life span. These phenotypic effects were accompanied by reduced proteasome peptidase activities in both the hemolymph and the somatic tissues of flies and higher levels of oxidative stress; furthermore, oral administration of AGEs or lipofuscin in flies triggered an upregulation of the lysosomal cathepsin B, L activities. Finally, RNAi-mediated cathepsin D knockdown reduced flies longevity and significantly augmented the deleterious effects of AGEs and lipofuscin, indicating that lysosomal cathepsins reduce the toxicity of diet-derived AGEs or lipofuscin. Our in vivo studies demonstrate that chronic ingestion of AGEs or lipofuscin disrupts proteostasis and accelerates the functional decline that occurs with normal aging. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Detection of an aging-related increase in advanced glycation end products in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthy, B; Larsson, L

    2013-06-01

    Glycation, a non-enzymatic addition of reducing sugars to ε-amino groups of proteins, is a post-translational modification that results in the formation of irreversible advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Ageing related decline in myofibrillar protein function is effected by a number of structural and functional modifications including glycation. Functional properties of skeletal muscles, such as maximum velocity of unloaded shortening, are known to be profoundly affected by ageing at the motor unit, cellular and tissue levels. However, the contribution of protein modifications to a decline in muscle function is not well understood. In this study we measured AGEs of intracellular and sarcolemmal proteins, using an anti-AGE antibody in soleus (SOL) and extensor digiotorum longus (EDL) muscles of male and female rats of five different age groups. Using a fluorescent secondary antibody to visualize AGEs in the confocal microscope, we found that myosin is glycated in both fiber types in all age groups; an ageing related increase in AGEs was observed in both intracellular and sarcolemmal regions in all age groups, with the exception of sarcolemma of SOL (unchanged) and EDL (reduced) in female rats; the greatest concentration of AGEs was found intracellularly in the SOL of the oldest age group (27-30) of females. While an ageing related decline in motor properties can be partially attributed to the observed increase in myofibrillar protein glycation, our results also indicate that intracellular and the less well studied sarcolemmal protein modification likely contribute to an aging-related decline in muscle function. Further studies are required to establish a link between the observed ageing related increase in glycation and muscle function at the motor unit, cellular and tissue levels.

  15. Advanced glycation end products as an upstream molecule triggers ROS-induced sFlt-1 production in extravillous trophoblasts: a novel bridge between oxidative stress and preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Q T; Zhang, M; Zhong, M; Yu, Y H; Liang, W Z; Hang, L L; Gao, Y F; Huang, L P; Wang, Z J

    2013-12-01

    Although abnormal soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) production is thought to be an important factor in the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia, the mechanisms that regulate the production of sFlt-1 during pre-eclampsia are unclear. Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is prevalent in obesity, advanced maternal age, diabetes mellitus, and polycystic ovary syndrome. Alterations in the regulation and signaling of angiogenic pathways have been considered as a link between these conditions and pre-eclampsia. The purpose of this study was to explore the possible effects of AGEs on sFlt-1 secretion in extravillous trophoblasts (EVT). A EVT cell line (HRT-8/SVneo) was treated with various concentrations of AGEs-BSA. The mRNA expression of sFlt-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and placental growth factor (PlGF) in EVT were detected with real-time polymerase chain reaction. The secretion of sFlt-1, VEGF, and PlGF protein from EVT was measured with ELISA. The levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production were determined by DCFH-DA. Exposure of EVT to AGEs-BSA induced increased intracellular ROS generation and overexpression of sFlt-1 at mRNA and protein levels in a dose dependent manner. Anti-RAGE immunoglobulin G or apocynin (an inhibitors of NADPH oxidase) could decrease the intracellular ROS generation and subsequently suppressed the production of sFlt-1 at mRNA and protein levels. Our data suggested that AGEs may be a new class of important mediator in the regulation of angiogenic pathways of EVT. Accumulation of AGEs might contribute to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia by promoting sFlt-1 production through activation of RAGE/NADPH oxidase dependent pathway in EVT.

  16. Suppression cost forecasts in advance of wildfire seasons

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey P. Prestemon; Karen Abt; Krista Gebert

    2008-01-01

    Approaches for forecasting wildfire suppression costs in advance of a wildfire season are demonstrated for two lead times: fall and spring of the current fiscal year (Oct. 1–Sept. 30). Model functional forms are derived from aggregate expressions of a least cost plus net value change model. Empirical estimates of these models are used to generate advance-of-season...

  17. Age-related accumulation of advanced glycation end-products-albumin, S100β, and the expressions of advanced glycation end product receptor differ in visceral and subcutaneous fat

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Kuk Hui; Son, Myeongjoo; Ahn, Hyosang; Oh, Seyeon; Yum, Yoonji; Choi, Chang Hu; Park, Kook Yang; Byun, Kyunghee

    2016-08-19

    Visceral fat induces more inflammation by activating macrophages than subcutaneous fat, and inflammation is an underlying feature of the pathogeneses of various diseases, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), S100β, and their receptors, the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), lead to macrophage activation. However, little information is available regarding the differential accumulations of AGE-albumin (serum albumin modified by AGEs), S100β, or expressions of RAGE in different adipocyte types in fat tissues. In this study, the authors investigated whether age-related AGE-albumin accumulations S100β level, and RAGE expressions differ in subcutaneous and visceral fat tissues. Subcutaneous and visceral fat were harvested from 3- and 28-week-old rats. Macrophage activation was confirmed by Iba1 staining, and AGE-albumin accumulations and RAGE expressions were assessed by confocal microscopy. S100β were analyzed by immunoblotting. It was found that activated macrophage infiltration, AGE-albumin accumulation, and S100β in visceral fat was significantly greater in 28-week-old rats than in 3-week-old rats, but similar in subcutaneous fat. The expression of RAGE in visceral fat was much greater in 28-week-old rats, but its expression in subcutaneous fat was similar in 3- and 28-week-old rats. Furthermore, inflammatory signal pathways (NFκB, TNF-α) and proliferation pathways (FAK) in visceral fat were more activated in 28-week-old rats. These results imply that age-related AGE-albumin accumulation, S100β, and RAGE expression are more prominent in visceral than in subcutaneous fat, suggesting that visceral fat is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammation-induced diseases in the elderly. - Highlights: • The age-related AGE-albumin accumulation and S100β were more prominent in visceral than subcutaneous fat. • The age-related RAGE expression were more prominent in visceral than subcutaneous fat.

  18. Advanced glycation end products: possible link between metabolic syndrome and periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Pietropaoli, D; Monaco, A; Del Pinto, R; Cifone, M G; Marzo, G; Giannoni, M

    2012-01-01

    On a planetary scale, Metabolic Syndrome (MetS)is the third cause of inability after malnutrition and nicotinism, even higher than water shortage and sedentariness. In the USA, the prevalence is estimated at over 25 percent of the population; in Italy, it involves approximately 25 percent of men and even 27 percent of women. These are very high figures, corresponding to approximately 14 million affected individuals. The prevalence is alarming and must not be underestimated, particularly in the dental field, where more than one patient out of four sitting in a dentist chair is affected. The etiology of periodontal disease has not yet been clarified, and recently the idea to consider it as a multifactor pathology has been developed. Cofactors such as the formation of free radicals of oxygen (ROS), oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, and formation of glycation end-products (AGEs) probably play an important role in the onset of periodontal disease. The AGEs are compounds physiologically produced by the cells. However, they accumulate and cause pro-inflammatory conditions, when the cellular clearance fails, or in hyperglycemic and oxidative states. All these conditions can be clinically summarized as Metabolic Syndrome. The purpose of this literature review is to establish a relationship between two pathologies with very high prevalence: Metabolic Syndrome and Periodontal Disorder. The literature seems to have clarified that MetS involves a pro-oxidation status, which induces AGE formation. AGEs play a very important role in the course and severity of periodontal diseases.

  19. Basic and Clinical Research Against Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs): New Compounds to Tackle Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetic Complications.

    PubMed

    Nenna, Antonio; Spadaccio, Cristiano; Lusini, Mario; Ulianich, Luca; Chello, Massimo; Nappi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and recent advances in research indicate that a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology of its effects is mandatory to reduce diabetes-related mortality and morbidity. Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs) play a central role in the genesis and progression of complications of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus, and have been found to be important even in non-diabetic patients as a marker of cardiovascular disease. AGEs have a profound impact on patient's prognosis regardless of the glycemic control, and therefore pharmacologic approaches against AGEs accumulation have been proposed over the years to treat cardiovascular diseases, parallel to a more detailed understanding of AGEs pathophysiology. Compounds with anti-AGEs effects are currently under investigation in both pre-clinical and clinical scenarios, and many of the drugs previously used to treat specific diseases have been found to have AGE-inhibitory effects. Some products are still in "bench evaluation", whereas others have been already investigated in clinical trials with conflicting evidences. This review aims at summarizing the mechanisms of AGEs formation and accumulation, and the most relevant issues in pre-clinical and clinical experiences in anti-AGEs treatment in cardiovascular research.

  20. Receptor for advanced glycation end products and neuronal deficit in the fatal brain edema of diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, William H; Artlett, Carol M; Zhang, Weixian; Kreipke, Christian W; Passmore, Gregory G; Rafols, Jose A; Sima, Anders A F

    2008-10-31

    Radiologic and neuropsychologic studies suggest that diabetes mellitus causes structural changes in the brain and adversely effects cognitive development. Experimental animal models of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) have advanced these findings by demonstrating duration-related neuronal and cognitive deficits in T1DM BB/Wor rats. We studied the expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and neuronal densities in the brains of two patients who died as the result of clinical brain edema(BE)that developed during the treatment of severe diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). RAGE was markedly and diffusely expressed in blood vessels, neurons, and the choroid plexus and co-localized with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in astrocytes. Significant neuronal loss was seen in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Astrocytosis was present and white matter was atrophied in both cases when compared to age-matched controls. Our data supports that a neuroinflammatory response occurs in the BE associated with DKA, and that even after a relatively short duration of poorly controlled T1DM, the pathogenesis of primary diabetic encephalopathy can be initiated.

  1. Anti-Advanced Glycation End-product and Free Radical Scavenging Activity of Plants from the Yucatecan Flora

    PubMed Central

    Dzib-Guerra, Wendy del C.; Escalante-Erosa, Fabiola; García-Sosa, Karlina; Derbré, Séverine; Blanchard, Patricia; Richomme, Pascal; Peña-Rodríguez, Luis M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) is recognized as a major pathogenic process in diabetic complications, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. In addition, reactive oxygen species and free radicals have also been reported to participate in AGE formation and in cell damage. Natural products with antioxidant and antiAGE activity have great therapeutic potential in the treatment of diabetes, hypertension and related complications. Objective: to test ethanolic extracts and aqueous-traditional preparations of plants used to treat diabetes, hypertension and obesity in Yucatecan traditional medicine for their anti-AGE and free radical scavenging activities. Materials and Methods: ethanolic extracts of leaves, stems and roots of nine medicinal plants, together with their traditional preparations, were prepared and tested for their anti-AGE and antioxidant activities using the inhibition of advanced glycation end products and DPPH radical scavenging assays, respectively. Results: the root extract of C. fistula (IC50= 0.1 mg/mL) and the leaf extract of P. auritum (IC50= 0.35 mg/mL) presented significant activity against vesperlysine and pentosidine-like AGE. Although none of the aqueous traditional preparations showed significant activity in the anti-AGE assay, both the traditional preparations and the ethanolic extracts of E. tinifolia, M. zapota, O. campechianum and P. auritum showed significant activity in the DPPH reduction assay. Conclusions: the results suggest that the metabolites responsible for the detected radical-scavenging activity are different to those involved in inhibiting AGE formation; however, the extracts with antioxidant activity may contain other metabolites which are able to prevent AGE formation through a different mechanism. SUMMARY Ethanolic extracts from nine plants used to treat diabetes, hypertension and obesity in Yucatecan traditional medicine were tested for their anti-AGE and free radical

  2. N-acetylcysteine Counteracts Adipose Tissue Macrophage Infiltration and Insulin Resistance Elicited by Advanced Glycated Albumin in Healthy Rats

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Karolline S.; Pinto, Paula R.; Fabre, Nelly T.; Gomes, Diego J.; Thieme, Karina; Okuda, Ligia S.; Iborra, Rodrigo T.; Freitas, Vanessa G.; Shimizu, Maria H. M.; Teodoro, Walcy R.; Marie, Suely K. N.; Woods, Tom; Brimble, Margaret A.; Pickford, Russell; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Okamoto, Maristela; Catanozi, Sergio; Correa-Giannela, Maria L.; Machado, Ubiratan F.; Passarelli, Marisa

    2017-01-01

    Background: Advanced glycation endproducts elicit inflammation. However, their role in adipocyte macrophage infiltration and in the development of insulin resistance, especially in the absence of the deleterious biochemical pathways that coexist in diabetes mellitus, remains unknown. We investigated the effect of chronic administration of advanced glycated albumin (AGE-albumin) in healthy rats, associated or not with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) treatment, on insulin sensitivity, adipose tissue transcriptome and macrophage infiltration and polarization. Methods: Male Wistar rats were intraperitoneally injected with control (C) or AGE-albumin alone, or, together with NAC in the drinking water. Biochemical parameters, lipid peroxidation, gene expression and protein contents were, respectively, determined by enzymatic techniques, reactive thiobarbituric acid substances, RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry or immunoblot. Carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pyrraline (PYR) were determined by LC/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and ELISA. Results: CML and PYR were higher in AGE-albumin as compared to C. Food consumption, body weight, systolic blood pressure, plasma lipids, glucose, hepatic and renal function, adipose tissue relative weight and adipocyte number were similar among groups. In AGE-treated animals, insulin resistance, adipose macrophage infiltration and Col12a1 mRNA were increased with no changes in M1 and M2 phenotypes as compared to C-albumin-treated rats. Total GLUT4 content was reduced by AGE-albumin as compared to C-albumin. NAC improved insulin sensitivity, reduced urine TBARS, adipose macrophage number and Itgam and Mrc mRNA and increased Slc2a4 and Ppara. CD11b, CD206, Ager, Ddost, Cd36, Nfkb1, Il6, Tnf, Adipoq, Retn, Arg, and Il12 expressions were similar among groups. Conclusions: AGE-albumin sensitizes adipose tissue to inflammation due to macrophage infiltration and reduces GLUT4, contributing to insulin resistance in healthy rats. NAC antagonizes AGE-albumin and

  3. Advanced glycation end-products accelerate the cardiac aging process through the receptor for advanced glycation end-products/transforming growth factor-β-Smad signaling pathway in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fang, Min; Wang, Junhong; Li, Shiling; Guo, Yan

    2016-04-01

    The current study was carried out to evaluate the effect of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) on cardiac aging and to explore its underlying mechanisms. Neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts were cultured and divided into four groups: control; AGE; AGE + receptor for AGE antibody and AGE + SB431542 (transforming growth factor-β [TGF-β]/Smad signaling pathway inhibitor, 10 μmol/L) group. After being cultured for 48 h, the cells were harvested and the senescence-associated beta-galactosidase expression was analyzed. Then the level of p16, TGF-β, Smad/p-smad and matrix metalloproteinases-2 was evaluated by western blot. Significantly increased senescence-associated beta-galactosidase activity as well as p16 level was observed in the AGE group. Furthermore, AGE also significantly increased the TGF-β1, p-smad2/3 and metalloproteinases-2 expression in cardiac fibroblasts (all P < 0.01). Meanwhile, either pretreatment with receptor for AGE-Ab or SB431542 significantly inhibited the upregulated cardiac senescence (beta-galactosidase activity and P16) and fibrosis-associated (TGF-β1, p-smad2/3 and metalloproteinases-2) markers induced by AGE. Taken together, all these results suggested that AGE are an important factor for cardiac aging and fibrosis, whereas the receptor for AGE and TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway might be involved in the AGE-induced cardiac aging process. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  4. All the "RAGE" in lung disease: The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) is a major mediator of pulmonary inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Oczypok, Elizabeth A; Perkins, Timothy N; Oury, Tim D

    2017-06-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) is a pro-inflammatory pattern recognition receptor (PRR) that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous inflammatory diseases. It was discovered in 1992 on endothelial cells and was named for its ability to bind advanced glycation endproducts and promote vascular inflammation in the vessels of patients with diabetes. Further studies revealed that RAGE is most highly expressed in lung tissue and spurred numerous explorations into RAGE's role in the lung. These studies have found that RAGE is an important mediator in allergic airway inflammation (AAI) and asthma, pulmonary fibrosis, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), acute lung injury, pneumonia, cystic fibrosis, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. RAGE has not yet been targeted in the lungs of paediatric or adult clinical populations, but the development of new ways to inhibit RAGE is setting the stage for the emergence of novel therapeutic agents for patients suffering from these pulmonary conditions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Activation of the high-mobility group box 1 protein-receptor for advanced glycation end-products signaling pathway in rats during neurogenesis after intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lei, Chunyan; Wu, Bo; Cao, Tian; Zhang, Shuting; Liu, Ming

    2015-02-01

    Following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) may promote neurogenesis that supports functional recovery. How HMGB1 regulates or participates in this process is unclear, as are the pattern recognition receptors and signaling pathways involved. ICH was induced by injection of collagenase in Sprague-Dawley rats, which were treated 3 days later with saline, with the HMGB1 inhibitor ethyl pyruvate or with FPS-ZM1, an antagonist of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products. A Sham group was treated with saline solution instead of collagenase and then treated 3 days later with saline again or with ethyl pyruvate or N-benzyl-4-chloro-N-cyclohexylbenzamide (FPS-ZM1). Expression of the following proteins was measured by Western blot, immunohistochemistry, or immunofluorescence: HMGB1, receptor for advanced glycation end-products, toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, TLR4, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and matrix metalloproteinase-9. The number of cells positive for 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine or doublecortin was determined by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Levels of HMGB1, receptor for advanced glycation end-products, TLR4, TLR2, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were significantly higher 14 days after ICH than at baseline, as were the numbers of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine- or doublecortin-positive cells. At the same time, HMGB1 moved from the nucleus into the cytoplasm. Administering ethyl pyruvate significantly reduced all these ICH-induced increases, except the increase in TLR4 and TLR2. Administering FPS-ZM1 reduced the ICH-induced increases in the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and matrix metalloproteinase-9 and in the numbers of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine- or doublecortin-positive cells. These findings suggest that HMGB1 acts via the receptor for advanced glycation end-products signaling pathway to promote neurogenesis in later phases of ICH. © 2014 American Heart Association

  6. Advanced glycation end products promote human aortic smooth muscle cell calcification in vitro via activating NF-κB and down-regulating IGF1R expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Zhang, Zhen-yu; Chen, Xiao-qing; Wang, Xiang; Cao, Heng; Liu, Shao-wen

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the effects of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on calcification in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) in vitro and the underlying mechanisms. AGEs were artificially prepared. Calcification of HASMCs was induced by adding inorganic phosphate (Pi, 2 mmol/L) in the media, and observed with Alizarin red staining. The calcium content in the supernatant was measured using QuantiChrome Calcium Assay Kit. Expression of the related mRNAs and proteins was analyzed using real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay was used to detect the binding of NF-κB to the putative IGF1R promoter. AGEs (100 μg/mL) significantly enhanced Pi-induced calcification and the levels of osteocalcin and Cbfα1 in HASMCs. Furthermore, the treatment decreased the expression of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R). Over-expression of IGF1R in HASMCs suppressed the AGEs-induced increase in calcium deposition. When IGF1R expression was knocked down in HASMCs, AGEs did not enhance the calcium deposition. Meanwhile, AGEs time-dependently decreased the amounts of IκBα and Flag-tagged p65 in the cytoplasmic extracts, and increased the amount of nuclear p65 in HASMCs. In the presence of NF-κB inhibitor PDTC (50 μmol/L), the AGEs-induced increase in calcium deposition was blocked. Over-expression of p65 significantly enhanced Pi-induced mineralization, but suppressed IGF1R mRNA level. Knockdown of p65 suppressed the AGEs-induced increase in calcium deposition, and rescued the IGF1R expression. The ChIP analysis revealed that NF-κB bound the putative IGF1R promoter at position -230 to -219 bp. The inhibition of IGF1R by NF-κB was abolished when IGF1R reporter plasmid contained mutated binding sequence for NF-κB or an NF-κB reporter vector. The results demonstrate that AGEs promote calcification of human aortic smooth muscle cells in vitro via activation of NF-κB and down-regulation of IGF1R expression.

  7. Inhibition of advanced glycation end products by red grape skin extract and its antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Jariyapamornkoon, Nattha; Yibchok-anun, Sirintorn; Adisakwattana, Sirichai

    2013-07-12

    The objective of the present study was to determine the phytochemical content and the protective effect of red grape skin extract (RGSE) against fructose-mediated protein oxidation. In addition, RGSE was screened for its potential as an antioxidant using various in vitro models. Antioxidant activity was measured by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, superoxide radical scavenging activity, trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), ferrous ion chelating power. The total phenols content was measured by Folin-Ciocalteu assay, the flavonoids content by the AlCl3 colorimetric method. Antiglycation activity was determined using the formation of AGE fluorescence intensity, Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine, and the level of fructosamine. The protein oxidation was examined using the level of protein carbonyl content and thiol group. The results showed that the content of total phenolics, flavonoids and total anthocyanins in RGSE was 246.3 ± 0.9 mg gallic acid equivalent/g dried extract, 215.9 ± 1.3 mg catechin equivalent/g dried extract, and 36.7 ± 0.8 mg cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalent/g dried extract, respectively. In the DPPH radical scavenging activity, hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, and superoxide radical scavenging activity, RGSE had the IC50 values of 0.03 ± 0.01 mg/ml, 5.40 ± 0.01 mg/ml, and 0.58 ± 0.01 mg/ml, respectively. In addition, RGSE had trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity assay (395.65 ± 1.61 mg trolox equivalent/g dried extract), ferric reducing antioxidant power (114.24 ± 0.03 mM FeSO4/g dried extract), and ferrous ion chelating power (3,474.05 ± 5.55 mg EDTA/g dried extract), respectively. The results showed that RGSE at different concentrations (0.031-0.500 mg/ml) has significantly inhibited the formation of AGEs in terms of the fluorescence intensity of glycated BSA during 4 weeks of study. The RGSE markedly decreased the level of fructosamine, which is directly

  8. Contrasting roles for the receptor for advanced glycation end-products on structural cells in allergic airway inflammation vs. airway hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Akihiko; Miyahara, Nobuaki; Waseda, Koichi; Kurimoto, Etsuko; Fujii, Utako; Tanimoto, Yasushi; Kataoka, Mikio; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Gelfand, Erwin W; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kanehiro, Arihiko

    2015-10-15

    The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is a multiligand receptor that belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily. RAGE is reported to be involved in various inflammatory disorders; however, studies that address the role of RAGE in allergic airway disease are inconclusive. RAGE-sufficient (RAGE+/+) and RAGE-deficient (RAGE-/-) mice were sensitized to ovalbumin, and airway responses were monitored after ovalbumin challenge. RAGE-/- mice showed reduced eosinophilic inflammation and goblet cell metaplasia, lower T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokine production from spleen and peribronchial lymph node mononuclear cells, and lower numbers of group 2 innate lymphoid cells in the lung compared with RAGE+/+ mice following sensitization and challenge. Experiments using irradiated, chimeric mice showed that the mice expressing RAGE on radio-resistant structural cells but not hematopoietic cells developed allergic airway inflammation; however, the mice expressing RAGE on hematopoietic cells but not structural cells showed reduced airway inflammation. In contrast, absence of RAGE expression on structural cells enhanced innate airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). In the absence of RAGE, increased interleukin (IL)-33 levels in the lung were detected, and blockade of IL-33 receptor ST2 suppressed innate AHR in RAGE-/- mice. These data identify the importance of RAGE expressed on lung structural cells in the development of allergic airway inflammation, T helper type 2 cell activation, and group 2 innate lymphoid cell accumulation in the airways. RAGE on lung structural cells also regulated innate AHR, likely through the IL-33-ST2 pathway. Thus manipulating RAGE represents a novel therapeutic target in controlling allergic airway responses. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Dimerumic acid attenuates receptor for advanced glycation endproducts signal to inhibit inflammation and diabetes mediated by Nrf2 activation and promotes methylglyoxal metabolism into d-lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bao-Hong; Hsu, Wei-Hsuan; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2013-07-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of dimerumic acid (DMA) on receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) signal activation and THP-1 monocyte inflammation treated with S100b, a specific ligand of RAGE. We found that DMA inhibited inflammatory cytokine production via upregulation of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and alleviated oxidative stress through attenuation of p47phox translocation to the membrane of S100b-treated THP-1 monocytes. We found that DMA activated Nrf2 mediated by the p38 kinase pathway in THP-1 monocytes. However, anti-inflammatory activity of DMA was attenuated by Nrf2 siRNA treatment. In an animal model, methylglyoxal (MG; 200mg/kg bw) was chosen to induce diabetes in Balb/C mice (6 weeks) in this work. The in vivo verification of anti-inflammation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by DMA treatment was confirmed by tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β measurements. Oral glucose tolerance test, insulin tolerance test, hyperinsulinemia, and hyperglycemia were improved in MG-treated mice by DMA treatment and these effects were greater than those of silymarin and N-acetylcysteine. Furthermore, DMA increased hepatic glyoxalase mRNA and glutathione mediated by Nrf2 activation to metabolize MG into d-lactic acid, thereby reducing serum and hepatic AGE levels and suppressing inflammatory factor generation in MG-treated mice. However, DMA did not exert the antiglycation activity in MG-bovine serum albumin incubation. Taken together, the results indicate that DMA is a novel antioxidant and Nrf2 activator that lowers AGE levels and may prove to be an effective treatment for diabetes.

  10. Pravastatin inhibits advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-induced proximal tubular cell apoptosis and injury by reducing receptor for AGEs (RAGE) level.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yuji; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Matsui, Takanori; Ohta, Keisuke; Tanoue, Ryuichiro; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Ueda, Seiji; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Okuda, Seiya

    2012-08-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) axis play a role in diabetic nephropathy. Statins have been shown to ameliorate renal function and reduce proteinuria in patients with chronic kidney disease. However, the effects of statin on AGEs-induced tubular cell damage remain unknown. We examined here whether and how pravastatin could block the AGEs-RAGE-elicited tubular cell injury in vitro. Gene expression level was evaluated by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reactions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured with dihydroethidium staining. Apoptosis was analyzed in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) expression was evaluated by immunostaining. Pravastatin dose-dependently inhibited the AGEs-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA level, ROS generation and apoptosis in human renal proximal tubular cells. Further, AGEs decreased mRNA level of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase-2, an enzyme that mainly degrades asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase and subsequently increased ADMA generation in tubular cells, both of which were also prevented by pravastatin. Geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) treatment blocked all of the effects of pravastatin on tubular cells. We found that rosuvastatin also significantly blocked the AGEs-induced increase in RAGE mRNA level and ROS generation, both of which were prevented by GGPP. Our present study suggests that pravastatin could inhibit the AGEs-induced apoptosis and ADMA generation in tubular cells by suppressing RAGE expression probably via inhibition of GGPP synthesis. Pravastatin may exert beneficial effects on tubular damage in diabetic nephropathy by blocking the AGEs-RAGE axis.

  11. Bazedoxifene Ameliorates Homocysteine-Induced Apoptosis and Accumulation of Advanced Glycation End Products by Reducing Oxidative Stress in MC3T3-E1 Cells.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Ippei; Tomita, Tsutomu; Miyazaki, Shun; Ozawa, Eiji; Yamamoto, Luis A; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2017-03-01

    Elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy) level increases the risk of osteoporotic fracture by deteriorating bone quality. However, little is known about the effects of Hcy on osteoblast and collagen cross-links. This study aimed to investigate whether Hcy induces apoptosis of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells as well as affects enzymatic and nonenzymatic collagen cross-links and to determine the effects of bazedoxifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, on the Hcy-induced apoptosis and deterioration of collagen cross-links in the cells. Hcy treatments (300 μM, 3 mM, and 10 mM) increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in a dose-dependent manner. Propidium iodide staining showed that 3 and 10 mM Hcy induced apoptosis of MC3T3-E1 cells. Moreover, the activities of caspases-8, 9, and 3 were increased by 3 mM Hcy. The detrimental effects of 3 mM Hcy on apoptosis and ROS production were partly reversed by bazedoxifene and 17β estradiol. In addition, real-time PCR, immunostaining and Western blot showed that 300 μM Hcy decreased the expression of lysyl oxidase (Lox). Furthermore, 300 μM Hcy increased extracellular accumulation of pentosidine, an advanced glycation end product. Treatment with bazedoxifene ameliorated Hcy-induced suppression of Lox expression and increase in pentosidine accumulation. These findings suggest that high-dose Hcy induces apoptosis of osteoblasts by increasing oxidative stress, and low-dose Hcy decreases enzymatic collagen cross-links and increases pentosidine accumulation, resulting in the deterioration of bone quality. Bazedoxifene treatment effectively prevents the Hcy-induced detrimental reactions of osteoblasts. Thus, bazedoxifene may be a potent therapeutic drug for preventing Hcy-induced bone fragility.

  12. Nifedipine inhibits advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction-mediated proximal tubular cell injury via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Takanori; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Ueda, Seiji; Fukami, Kei; Okuda, Seiya

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} Nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells, which was prevented by GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}. {yields} GW9662 treatment alone increased RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells. {yields} Nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced reactive oxygen species generation, NF-{kappa}B activation and increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and transforming growth factor-{beta} gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were blocked by GW9662. -- Abstract: There is a growing body of evidence that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction evokes oxidative stress generation and subsequently elicits inflammatory and fibrogenic reactions, thereby contributing to the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. We have previously found that nifedipine, a calcium-channel blocker (CCB), inhibits the AGE-induced mesangial cell damage in vitro. However, effects of nifedipine on proximal tubular cell injury remain unknown. We examined here whether and how nifedipine blocked the AGE-induced tubular cell damage. Nifedipine, but not amlodipine, a control CCB, inhibited the AGE-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells, which was prevented by the simultaneous treatment of GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}). GW9662 treatment alone was found to increase RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells. Further, nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced reactive oxygen species generation, NF-{kappa}B activation and increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and transforming growth factor-beta gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were blocked by GW9662. Our present study provides a unique beneficial aspect of nifedipine on diabetic nephropathy; it could work as an anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory agent against AGEs in tubular cells by suppressing RAGE expression

  13. Modeling the Interaction between Quinolinate and the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE): Relevance for Early Neuropathological Processes

    PubMed Central

    Serratos, Iris N.; Castellanos, Pilar; Pastor, Nina; Millán-Pacheco, César; Rembao, Daniel; Pérez-Montfort, Ruy; Cabrera, Nallely; Reyes-Espinosa, Francisco; Díaz-Garrido, Paulina; López-Macay, Ambar; Martínez-Flores, Karina; López-Reyes, Alberto; Sánchez-García, Aurora; Cuevas, Elvis; Santamaria, Abel

    2015-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a pattern-recognition receptor involved in neurodegenerative and inflammatory disorders. RAGE induces cellular signaling upon binding to a variety of ligands. Evidence suggests that RAGE up-regulation is involved in quinolinate (QUIN)-induced toxicity. We investigated the QUIN-induced toxic events associated with early noxious responses, which might be linked to signaling cascades leading to cell death. The extent of early cellular damage caused by this receptor in the rat striatum was characterized by image processing methods. To document the direct interaction between QUIN and RAGE, we determined the binding constant (Kb) of RAGE (VC1 domain) with QUIN through a fluorescence assay. We modeled possible binding sites of QUIN to the VC1 domain for both rat and human RAGE. QUIN was found to bind at multiple sites to the VC1 dimer, each leading to particular mechanistic scenarios for the signaling evoked by QUIN binding, some of which directly alter RAGE oligomerization. This work contributes to the understanding of the phenomenon of RAGE-QUIN recognition, leading to the modulation of RAGE function. PMID:25757085

  14. The promoter polymorphisms of receptor for advanced glycation end products were associated with the susceptibility and progression of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Y; Shao, X; He, J; Cai, Y; Zhao, J; Chen, F; Tao, H; Yin, Z; Tan, X; He, Y; Lin, Y; Li, K; Cui, L

    2017-04-01

    Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is considered a major pattern recognition receptor, which plays an important role in the development of sepsis. Increasing evidence showed an association between RAGE polymorphisms and the susceptibility to several inflammatory-related diseases. However, little is known about the clinical relationship between RAGE polymorphisms and sepsis. In this study, we analyzed the association of sepsis with three functional RAGE gene polymorphisms (rs1800624, rs1800625 and rs2070600) in a Chinese Han population (372 sepsis cases and 400 healthy controls). Significant differences were observed in the rs1800624 and rs1800625 genotype/allele distributions between the sepsis and controls, but no significant difference was observed in the rs2070600 genotype/allele. Moreover, our results also revealed a significant difference in the genotype/allele frequencies of the rs1800624 and rs1800625 polymorphisms between the sepsis and severe sepsis subtypes, the rs1800624 TT or rs1800625 TT genotype carriers exhibited a significant increase in RAGE mRNA, sRAGE, TNF-α and IL-6 expression compared with the rs1800624 AT/AA or rs1800625 CT/CC carriers in sepsis patients. Overall, this study might provide valuable clinical evidence between the RAGE gene polymorphisms and the risk or the development of sepsis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Advanced Glycation End Products Enhance Macrophages Polarization into M1 Phenotype through Activating RAGE/NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xian; Yao, Tongqing; Zhou, Zhong'e; Zhu, Jian; Zhang, Song; Hu, Wei; Shen, Chengxing

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions are accelerated in patients with diabetes. M1 (classically activated in contrast to M2 alternatively activated) macrophages play key roles in the progression of atherosclerosis. Since advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are major pathogenic factors and active inflammation inducers in diabetes mellitus, this study assessed the effects of AGEs on macrophage polarization. The present study showed that AGEs significantly promoted macrophages to express IL-6 and TNF-α. M1 macrophage markers such as iNOS and surface markers including CD11c and CD86 were significantly upregulated while M2 macrophage markers such as Arg1 and CD206 remained unchanged after AGEs stimulation. AGEs significantly increased RAGE expression in macrophages and activated NF-κB pathway, and the aforementioned effects were partly abolished by administration of anti-RAGE antibody or NF-κB inhibitor PDTC. In conclusion, our results suggest that AGEs enhance macrophage differentiation into proinflammatory M1 phenotype at least partly via RAGE/NF-κB pathway activation. PMID:26114112

  16. Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products and Risk Factors for Chronic Disease: A Systematic Review of Randomised Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Rachel E.; Dordevic, Aimee L.; Tan, Sih Min; Ryan, Lisa; Coughlan, Melinda T.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) form during heating and processing of food products and are widely prevalent in the modern Western diet. Recent systematic reviews indicate that consumption of dietary AGEs may promote inflammation, oxidative stress and insulin resistance. Experimental evidence indicates that dietary AGEs may also induce renal damage, however, this outcome has not been considered in previous systematic reviews. The purpose of this review was to examine the effect of consumption of a high AGE diet on biomarkers of chronic disease, including chronic kidney disease (CKD), in human randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Six databases (SCOPUS, CINHAL, EMBASE, Medline, Biological abstracts and Web of Science) were searched for randomised controlled dietary trials that compared high AGE intake to low AGE intake in adults with and without obesity, diabetes or CKD. Twelve dietary AGE interventions were identified with a total of 293 participants. A high AGE diet increased circulating tumour necrosis factor-alpha and AGEs in all populations. A high AGE diet increased 8-isoprostanes in healthy adults, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in patients with diabetes. Markers of CKD were not widely assessed. The evidence presented indicates that a high AGE diet may contribute to risk factors associated with chronic disease, such as inflammation and oxidative stress, however, due to a lack of high quality randomised trials, more research is required. PMID:26938557

  17. Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Autophagy, and Apoptosis in Advanced Glycation End Products-Induced Glomerular Mesangial Cell Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chih-Kang; Wang, Ching-Chia; Lu, Tien-Fong; Huang, Kuo-How; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs)-induced mesangial cell death is one of major causes of glomerulus dysfunction in diabetic nephropathy. Both endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy are adaptive responses in cells under environmental stress and participate in the renal diseases. The role of ER stress and autophagy in AGEs-induced mesangial cell death is still unclear. Here, we investigated the effect and mechanism of AGEs on glomerular mesangial cells. AGEs dose-dependently decreased mesangial cell viability and induced cell apoptosis. AGEs also induced ER stress signals in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of ER stress with 4-phenylbutyric acid effectively inhibited the activation of eIF2α and CHOP signals and reversed AGEs-induced cell apoptosis. AGEs also activated LC-3 cleavage, increased Atg5 expression, and decreased p62 expression, which indicated the autophagy induction in mesangial cells. Inhibition of autophagy by Atg5 siRNAs transfection aggravated AGEs-induced mesangial cell apoptosis. Moreover, ER stress inhibition by 4-phenylbutyric acid significantly reversed AGEs-induced autophagy, but autophagy inhibition did not influence the AGEs-induced ER stress-related signals activation. These results suggest that AGEs induce mesangial cell apoptosis via an ER stress-triggered signaling pathway. Atg5-dependent autophagy plays a protective role. These findings may offer a new strategy against AGEs toxicity in the kidney. PMID:27665710

  18. Overexpression of receptor for advanced glycation end products and high-mobility group box 1 in human dental pulp inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tancharoen, Salunya; Tengrungsun, Tassanee; Suddhasthira, Theeralaksna; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Vechvongvan, Nuttavun; Tokuda, Masayuki; Maruyama, Ikuro

    2014-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a nonhistone DNA-binding protein, is released into the extracellular space and promotes inflammation. HMGB1 binds to related cell signaling transduction receptors, including receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), which actively participate in vascular and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to examine whether RAGE and HMGB1 are involved in the pathogenesis of pulpitis and investigate the effect of Prevotella intermedia (P. intermedia) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on RAGE and HMGB1 expression in odontoblast-like cells (OLC-1). RAGE and HMGB1 expression levels in clinically inflamed dental pulp were higher than those in healthy dental pulp. Upregulated expression of RAGE was observed in odontoblasts, stromal pulp fibroblasts-like cells, and endothelial-like cell lining human pulpitis tissue. Strong cytoplasmic HMGB1 immunoreactivity was noted in odontoblasts, whereas nuclear HMGB1 immunoreactivity was seen in stromal pulp fibroblasts-like cells in human pulpitis tissue. LPS stimulated OLC-1 cells produced HMGB1 in a dose-dependent manner through RAGE. HMGB1 translocation towards the cytoplasm and secretion from OLC-1 in response to LPS was inhibited by TPCA-1, an inhibitor of NF-κB activation. These findings suggest that RAGE and HMGB1 play an important role in the pulpal immune response to oral bacterial infection.

  19. Receptor for advanced glycation end products Glycine 82 Serine polymorphism and risk of cardiovascular events in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Lisa; Frazer, Ian H; Turner, Malcolm; Marwick, Thomas H; Thomas, Ranjeny

    2007-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at risk of excess mortality, predominantly owing to cardiovascular (CV) events. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) has been implicated in the perpetuation of the chronic inflammatory response in vascular disease. A Gly82-->Ser polymorphism in the RAGE gene, which is associated with enhanced RAGE signaling, is present more frequently in patients with RA than the general population. To investigate whether RAGE Gly82-->Ser polymorphism is associated with CV events in RA, we examined CV events, CV risk factors, features of RA and RAGE Gly82-->Ser polymorphism in 232 patients with RA attending a tertiary referral hospital. CV events, the duration and severity of RA, and risk factors for CV disease were determined using patient questionnaires, chart review, laboratory analysis and radiographs. DNA was typed for HLA-DRB1 genes and RAGE Gly82-->Ser polymorphism. The RAGE Ser82 allele, which is in linkage disequilibrium with the RA susceptibility allele HLA-DRB1*0401, was carried by 20% of patients. More than 20% of the cohort had suffered a vascular event; a shorter duration of RA, but not the RAGE genotype, was significantly associated with CV events. However, a history of statin use was protective. Thus, the RAGE Ser82 allele, associated with enhanced RAGE signaling, does not predispose to CV events in RA. However, treatment of hyperlipidemia with statins reduces the probability of a CV event.

  20. Differential Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products Expression in Preeclamptic, Intrauterine Growth Restricted, and Gestational Diabetic Placentas.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Kristen L; Mejia, Camilo A; Jordan, Clinton; Nelson, Michael B; Howell, Brian M; Jones, Cameron M; Reynolds, Paul R; Arroyo, Juan A

    2016-02-01

    Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a receptor implicated in the modulation of inflammation. Inflammation has been associated with pregnancy pathologies including preeclampsia (PE), intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Our objective was to examine placental RAGE expression in PE, IUGR, and GDM complications. Human placental tissues were obtained for RAGE determination using Q-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot. Invasive trophoblast cells were cultured and treated with AGES for RAGE activation studies. Compared to control placenta, we observed: (i) decreased RAGE gene expression during GDM, (ii) increased RAGE protein in the PE placenta, and (iii) decreased RAGE protein in the IUGR placenta. In trophoblast cells exposed AGEs, we observed: (i) decreased trophoblast invasion, (ii) increased c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) and Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and (iii) increased TNF-α and IL-1β secretion. We conclude that placental RAGE is activated during PE and that RAGE-mediated inflammation in the trophoblast involves increased pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Comprehensive analyses of how tubule occlusion and advanced glycation end-products diminish strength of aged dentin

    PubMed Central

    Shinno, Yuko; Ishimoto, Takuya; Saito, Mitsuru; Uemura, Reo; Arino, Masumi; Marumo, Keishi; Nakano, Takayoshi; Hayashi, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    In clinical dentistry, since fracture is a major cause of tooth loss, better understanding of mechanical properties of teeth structures is important. Dentin, the major hard tissue of teeth, has similar composition to bone. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of human dentin not only in terms of mineral density but also using structural and quality parameters as recently accepted in evaluating bone strength. Aged crown and root dentin (age ≥ 40) exhibited significantly lower flexural strength and toughness than young dentin (age < 40). Aged dentin, in which the dentinal tubules were occluded with calcified material, recorded the highest mineral density; but showed significantly lower flexural strength than young dentin. Dentin with strong alignment of the c-axis in hydroxyapatite exhibited high fracture strength, possibly because the aligned apatite along the collagen fibrils may reinforce the intertubular dentin. Aged dentin, showing a high advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) level in its collagen, recorded low flexural strength. We first comprehensively identified significant factors, which affected the inferior mechanical properties of aged dentin. The low mechanical strength of aged dentin is caused by the high mineral density resulting from occlusion of dentinal tubules and accumulation of AGEs in dentin collagen. PMID:26797297

  2. Comprehensive analyses of how tubule occlusion and advanced glycation end-products diminish strength of aged dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinno, Yuko; Ishimoto, Takuya; Saito, Mitsuru; Uemura, Reo; Arino, Masumi; Marumo, Keishi; Nakano, Takayoshi; Hayashi, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    In clinical dentistry, since fracture is a major cause of tooth loss, better understanding of mechanical properties of teeth structures is important. Dentin, the major hard tissue of teeth, has similar composition to bone. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of human dentin not only in terms of mineral density but also using structural and quality parameters as recently accepted in evaluating bone strength. Aged crown and root dentin (age ≥ 40) exhibited significantly lower flexural strength and toughness than young dentin (age < 40). Aged dentin, in which the dentinal tubules were occluded with calcified material, recorded the highest mineral density; but showed significantly lower flexural strength than young dentin. Dentin with strong alignment of the c-axis in hydroxyapatite exhibited high fracture strength, possibly because the aligned apatite along the collagen fibrils may reinforce the intertubular dentin. Aged dentin, showing a high advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) level in its collagen, recorded low flexural strength. We first comprehensively identified significant factors, which affected the inferior mechanical properties of aged dentin. The low mechanical strength of aged dentin is caused by the high mineral density resulting from occlusion of dentinal tubules and accumulation of AGEs in dentin collagen.

  3. Association of Polymorphisms of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts Gene with Schizophrenia in a Han Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jiawu; Zuo, Xiang; Yin, Jingwen; Luo, Xudong; Li, Zheng; Lin, Juda

    2017-01-01

    Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (RAGE) is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily that binds diverse ligands involved in the development of inflammatory damage and diverse chronic diseases including schizophrenia. Here, three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (G82S, -374T/A, and -429T/C) in the RAGE gene were genotyped in 923 patients with schizophrenia and 874 healthy-matched controls in a Han Chinese population using the SNaPshot technique. Additionally, we investigated the association among aforementioned SNPs with the clinical psychotic symptoms of the patients and neurocognitive function. Our study demonstrated that the frequencies of the TC + CC genotypes and the C allele in the -429T/C polymorphism were significantly lower in the patients compared with the controls (p = 0.031 and p = 0.034, resp.). However, the significant effect disappeared when using Bonferroni correction (p = 0.093 and p = 0.102, resp.). And there were no significant differences in the genotype and allele frequencies between the patients and the controls for G82S and -374T/A polymorphisms. Additionally, the -429T/C C allele carriers had marginally higher Symbol coding scores than the subjects with the TT genotypes [p = 0.031 and p (corr) = 0.093]. Our data indicate that the RAGE -429T/C polymorphism may be associated with the susceptibility of schizophrenia. PMID:28373983

  4. Advanced glycation end products impair function of late endothelial progenitor cells through effects on protein kinase Akt and cyclooxygenase-2

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qin; Dong Li; Wang Lian; Kang Lina; Xu Biao

    2009-04-03

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) exhibit impaired function in the context of diabetes, and advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which accumulate in diabetes, may contribute to this. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism by which AGEs impair late EPC function. EPCs from human umbilical cord blood were isolated, and incubated with AGE-modified albumin (AGE-albumin) at different concentrations found physiologically in plasma. Apoptosis, migration, and tube formation assays were used to evaluate EPC function including capacity for vasculogenesis, and expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE), Akt, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) were determined. Anti-RAGE antibody was used to block RAGE function. AGE-albumin concentration-dependently enhanced apoptosis and depressed migration and tube formation, but did not affect proliferation, of late EPCs. High AGE-albumin increased RAGE mRNA and protein expression, and decreased Akt and COX-2 protein expression, whilst having no effect on eNOS mRNA or protein in these cells. These effects were inhibited by co-incubation with anti-RAGE antibody. These results suggest that RAGE mediates the AGE-induced impairment of late EPC function, through down-regulation of Akt and COX-2 in these cells.

  5. Contribution of the toxic advanced glycation end-products-receptor axis in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Takino, Jun-ichi; Nagamine, Kentaro; Hori, Takamitsu; Sakasai-Sakai, Akiko; Takeuchi, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. The main etiologies of HCC are hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus (HCV), and non-hepatitis B/non-hepatitis C HCC (NBNC-HCC) has also been identified as an etiological factor. Although the incidence of HCV-related HCC in Japan has decreased slightly in recent years, that of NBNC-HCC has increased. The onset mechanism of NBNC-HCC, which has various etiologies, remains unclear; however, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a severe form of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, is known to be an important risk factor for NBNC-HCC. Among the different advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) formed by the Maillard reaction, glyceraldehyde-derived AGEs, the predominant components of toxic AGEs (TAGE), have been associated with NASH and NBNC-HCC, including NASH-related HCC. Furthermore, the expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) has been correlated with the malignant progression of HCC. Therefore, TAGE induce oxidative stress by binding with RAGE may, in turn, lead to adverse effects, such as fibrosis and malignant transformation, in hepatic stellate cells and tumor cells during NASH or NASH-related HCC progression. The aim of this review was to examine the contribution of the TAGE-RAGE axis in NASH-related HCC. PMID:26483867

  6. Modeling the interaction between quinolinate and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE): relevance for early neuropathological processes.

    PubMed

    Serratos, Iris N; Castellanos, Pilar; Pastor, Nina; Millán-Pacheco, César; Rembao, Daniel; Pérez-Montfort, Ruy; Cabrera, Nallely; Reyes-Espinosa, Francisco; Díaz-Garrido, Paulina; López-Macay, Ambar; Martínez-Flores, Karina; López-Reyes, Alberto; Sánchez-García, Aurora; Cuevas, Elvis; Santamaria, Abel

    2015-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a pattern-recognition receptor involved in neurodegenerative and inflammatory disorders. RAGE induces cellular signaling upon binding to a variety of ligands. Evidence suggests that RAGE up-regulation is involved in quinolinate (QUIN)-induced toxicity. We investigated the QUIN-induced toxic events associated with early noxious responses, which might be linked to signaling cascades leading to cell death. The extent of early cellular damage caused by this receptor in the rat striatum was characterized by image processing methods. To document the direct interaction between QUIN and RAGE, we determined the binding constant (Kb) of RAGE (VC1 domain) with QUIN through a fluorescence assay. We modeled possible binding sites of QUIN to the VC1 domain for both rat and human RAGE. QUIN was found to bind at multiple sites to the VC1 dimer, each leading to particular mechanistic scenarios for the signaling evoked by QUIN binding, some of which directly alter RAGE oligomerization. This work contributes to the understanding of the phenomenon of RAGE-QUIN recognition, leading to the modulation of RAGE function.

  7. Autophagy Protects Advanced Glycation End Product-Induced Apoptosis and Expression of MMP-3 and MMP-13 in Rat Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tianlong

    2017-01-01

    Aging is one of the most prominent risk factors for the pathological progression of osteoarthritis (OA). One feature of age-related changes in OA is advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulation in articular cartilage. Autophagy plays a cellular housekeeping role by removing dysfunctional cellular organelles and proteins. However, the relationship between autophagy and AGE-associated OA is unknown. The aim of this study is to determine whether autophagy participates in the pathology of AGE-treated chondrocytes and to investigate the exact role of autophagy in AGE-induced cell apoptosis and expression of matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP-) 3 and MMP-13. AGEs induced notable apoptosis that was detected by Annexin V/PI double-staining, and the upregulation of MMP-3 and MMP-13 was confirmed by Western blotting. Autophagy-related proteins were also determined by Western blotting, and chondrocytes were transfected with mCherry-GFP-LC3B-adenovirus to monitor autophagic flux. As a result, autophagy significantly increased in chondrocytes and peaked at 6 h. Furthermore, rapamycin (RA) attenuated AGE-induced apoptosis and expression of MMP-3 and MMP-13 by autophagy activation. In contrast, pretreatment with autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) enhanced the abovementioned effects of AGEs. We therefore demonstrated that autophagy is linked with AGE-related pathology in rat chondrocytes and plays a protective role in AGE-induced apoptosis and expression of MMP-3 and MMP-13. PMID:28265573

  8. The downregulation of thioredoxin accelerated Neuro2a cell apoptosis induced by advanced glycation end product via activating several pathways.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiang; Ma, Haiying; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Bo; Qi, Hui; Li, Zeyu; Kong, Hui; Kong, Li

    2015-08-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx), a 12 kDa protein, has different functions in different cellular environments, playing important anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic roles and regulating the expression of transcription factors. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are a heterogeneous group of irreversible adducts from glucose-protein condensation reactions and are considered crucial to the development of diabetic nephropathy, retinopathy, neurodegeneration and atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to use a Trx inhibitor to investigate the effects and mechanism of Trx down-regulation on AGE-induced Neuro2a cell apoptosis. Neuro2a cells were cultured in vitro and treated with different conditions. The apoptosis and proliferation of Neuro2a cells were detected using flow cytometry, DNA-Ladder and CCK8 assays. Rho 123 was used to detect the mitochondrial membrane potential. ROS generation and caspase3 activity were detected using a DCFH-DA probe and micro-plate reader. Western blotting and real-time PCR were used to detect the expression of proteins and genes. We found that the down-regulation of thioredoxin could accelerate AGE-induced apoptosis in Neuro2a cells. A possible underlying mechanism is that the down-regulation of thioredoxin stimulated the up-regulation of ASK1, p-JNK, PTEN, and Txnip, as well as the down-regulation of p-AKT, ultimately increasing ROS levels and caspase3 activity.

  9. Dihydroxyacetone-induced death is accompanied by advanced glycation endproduct formation in selected proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Molin, Mikael; Pilon, Marc; Blomberg, Anders

    2007-10-01

    Advanced glycation endproduct (AGE) formation is an important mechanism for protein deterioration during diabetic complications and ageing. The effects on AGE formation following dihydroxyacetone (DHA) stress were studied in two model organisms, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Total protein AGEs, detected using an anti-N(epsilon)-carboxyalkyllysine-specific monoclonal antibody, displayed a strong correlation to DHA-induced yeast cell mortality in the wild-type and hypersensitive as well as resistant mutant strains. During DHA-induced cell death we also detected AGEs as the formation of acidic protein modifications by 2-D PAGE. Furthermore, we confirmed AGE targets immunologically on 2-D gel-separated protein extracted from DHA-treated cells. AGE modification of several metabolic enzymes (Eno2p, Adh1p, Met6 and Pgk1p) and actin (Act1p) displayed a strong correlation to DHA-induced cell death. DHA was toxic to C. elegans even at low concentration and also in this organism AGE formation accompanied death. We propose the use of DHA as a model AGE-generating substance for its apparent lack of a clear oxidative stress connection, and yeast and worm as model organisms to identify genetic determinants of protein AGE formation.

  10. Determination of advanced glycation endproducts by LC-MS/MS in raw and roasted almonds (Prunus dulcis).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gong; Huang, Guangwei; Xiao, Lu; Mitchell, Alyson E

    2011-11-23

    A sensitive and reliable LC-(ESI)MS/MS method was developed and validated for the simultaneous analysis of five common advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) after enzymatic digestion in raw and roasted almonds. AGEs included carboxymethyl-lysine (CML), carboxyethyl-lysine (CEL), pyralline (Pyr), argpyrimidine (Arg-p), and pentosidine (Pento-s). This method allows accurate quantitation of free and AGE-protein adducts of target AGEs. Results indicate that CML and CEL are found in both raw and roasted almonds. Pyr was identified for the first time in roasted almonds and accounted for 64.4% of free plus bound measured AGEs. Arg-p and Pento-s were below the limit of detection in all almond samples tested. Free AGEs accounted for 1.3-26.8% of free plus bound measured AGEs, indicating that protein-bound forms predominate. The roasting process significantly increased CML, CEL, and Pyr formation, but no significant correlation was observed between these AGEs and roasting temperature.

  11. Phytochemicals from Camellia nitidissima Chi inhibited the formation of advanced glycation end-products by scavenging methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weixin; Liu, Haiyan; Wang, Zhennan; Qi, Jing; Yuan, Shengtao; Zhang, Weijie; Chen, Hongjuan; Finley, John W; Gu, Liwei; Jia, Ai-Qun

    2016-08-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of Camellia nitidissima Chi (CNC) on the advanced glycation end-product (AGE) formation. CNC was extracted with ethanol and further separated into dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, n-butanol, and water soluble fractions. Ethyl acetate fraction had the highest total phenolic and quercetin content compared with other fractions. Sixteen phenolic compounds were identified using HPLC Triple TOF MS/MS. Bovine serum albumin (BSA)-glucose assay showed that dichloromethane and ethyl acetate fraction inhibited AGE formation by 88.1% and 87.5% at 2.5mg/mL. BSA-methylglyoxal assay showed that ethyl acetate fraction inhibited 54.1% AGE formation while dichloromethane fraction inhibited 28.1%. Over 96.0% of methylglyoxal was scavenged by different fractions within 12h. Both mono- and di-methylglyoxal quercetin adducts were identified after incubating quercetin with methylglyoxal using HPLC-ESI-MS(n). The results in this study suggest that CNC extracts inhibited AGEs formation in part through scavenging methylglyoxal by phenolic compounds.

  12. Genotoxicity of Advanced Glycation End Products: Involvement of Oxidative Stress and of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schupp, Nicole; Schinzel, Reinhard; Heidland, August; Stopper, Helga

    2005-06-01

    In patients with chronic renal failure, cancer incidence is increased. This may be related to an elevated level of genomic damage, which has been demonstrated by micronuclei formation as well as by comet assay analysis. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are markedly elevated in renal failure. In the comet assay, the model AGEs methylglyoxal- and carboxy(methyl)lysine-modified bovine serum albumin (BSA) induced significant DNA damage in colon, kidney, and liver cells. The addition of antioxidants prevented AGE-induced DNA damage, suggesting enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The coincubation with dimethylfumarate (DMF), an inhibitor of NF-κB translocation, reduced the genotoxic effect, thereby underscoring the key role of NF-κB in this process. One of the genes induced by NF-κB is angiotensinogen. The ensuing proteolytic activity yields angiotensin II, which evokes oxidative stress as well as proinflammatory responses. A modulator of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), the angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor 1 antagonist, candesartan, yielded a reduction of the AGE-induced DNA damage, connecting the two signal pathways, RAS and AGE signaling. We were able to identify important participants in AGE-induced DNA damage: ROS, NF-κB, and Ang II, as well as modulators to prevent this DNA damage: antioxidants, DMF, and AT1 antagonists.

  13. Genotoxicity and immunogenicity of DNA-advanced glycation end products formed by methylglyoxal and lysine in presence of Cu2+.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saheem; Moinuddin; Dixit, Kiran; Shahab, Uzma; Alam, Khursheed; Ali, Asif

    2011-04-15

    The highly reactive electrophile, methylglyoxal (MG), a break down product of carbohydrates, is a major environmental mutagen having potential genotoxic effects. Previous studies have suggested the reaction of MG with free amino groups of proteins forming advanced glycation end products (AGEs). This results in the generation of free radicals which play an important role in pathophysiology of aging and diabetic complications. MG also reacts with free amino group of nucleic acids resulting in the formation of DNA-AGEs. While the formation of nucleoside AGEs has been demonstrated previously, no extensive studies have been performed to assess the genotoxicity and immunogenicity of DNA-AGEs. In this study we report both the genotoxicity and immunogenicity of AGEs formed by MG-Lys-Cu(2+) system. Genotoxicity of the experimentally generated AGEs was confirmed by comet-assay. Spectroscopical analysis and melting temperature studies suggest structural perturbations in the DNA as a result of modification. This might be due to generation of single-stranded regions and destabilization of hydrogen bonds. Immunogenicity of native and MG-Lys-Cu(2+)-DNA was probed in female rabbits. The modified DNA was highly immunogenic eliciting high titre immunogen specific antibodies, while the unmodified form was almost non-immunogenic. The results show structural perturbations in MG-Lys-Cu(2+)-DNA generating new epitopes that render the molecule immunogenic.

  14. Advanced glycation end products as biomarkers and gerontotoxins - A basis to explore methylglyoxal-lowering agents for Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Krautwald, Martina; Münch, Gerald

    2010-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common dementing disorder of late life. Although there might be various different triggering events in the early stages of the disease, they seem to converge on a few characteristic final pathways in the late stages, characterized by inflammation and neurodegeneration. In this review, we put forward the hypothesis that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their precursors, including methylglyoxal, are both biomarkers and causative agents ("gerontotoxins") characteristic for this disorder. Accumulation of AGEs is a normal feature of aging, but is accelerated in AD, where AGEs can be detected in amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. AGE modification may explain many of the neuropathological and biochemical features of AD such as extensive protein cross-linking, inflammation, oxidative stress and neuronal cell death. We suggest that methylglyoxal is one of the major carbonyl species responsible for the formation of AGEs. We propose that one promising pharmacological approach to prevent the formation of AGEs would be to lower the methylglyoxal concentration. This can be achieved, for example, by decreasing the concentration of methylglyoxal precursors such as d-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate by allowing a higher flux through the pentose phosphate pathway or by increasing methylglyoxal detoxification through the glyoxalase system. Alternatively, methylglyoxal could be scavenged by various types of carbonyl scavengers.

  15. Cardiomyocyte mitochondrial respiration is reduced by receptor for advanced glycation end-product signaling in a ceramide-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michael B; Swensen, Adam C; Winden, Duane R; Bodine, Jared S; Bikman, Benjamin T; Reynolds, Paul R

    2015-07-01

    Cigarette smoke exposure is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular complications. The role of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is already well established in numerous comorbidities, including cardiomyopathy. Given the role of AGEs and their receptor, RAGE, in activating inflammatory pathways, we sought to determine whether ceramides could be a mediator of RAGE-induced altered heart mitochondrial function. Using an in vitro model, we treated H9C2 cardiomyocytes with the AGE carboxy-methyllysine before mitochondrial respiration assessment. We discovered that mitochondrial respiration was significantly impaired in AGE-treated cells, but not when cotreated with myriocin, an inhibitor of de novo ceramide biosynthesis. Moreover, we exposed wild-type and RAGE knockout mice to secondhand cigarette smoke and found reduced mitochondrial respiration in the left ventricular myocardium from wild-type mice, but RAGE knockout mice were protected from this effect. Finally, conditional overexpression of RAGE in the lungs of transgenic mice elicited a robust increase in left ventricular ceramides in the absence of smoke exposure. Taken together, these findings suggest a RAGE-ceramide axis as an important contributor to AGE-mediated disrupted cardiomyocyte mitochondrial function.

  16. Production of bioactive recombinant rat soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (rrsRAGE) in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Xia, Peng; Gao, Jin; Guan, Wen; Li, Jingjing; Yu, Xiaolan; Wang, Fangyuan; He, Honglin; Deng, Qing; Zhou, Liang; Yuan, Yunsheng; Han, Wei; Yu, Yan

    2017-10-01

    Soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE), a natural inhibitor of RAGE, is considered to be a putative therapeutic molecule for a variety of diseases and a biomarker for certain conditions. To further study the function of sRAGE, recombinant rat sRAGE (rrsRAGE) was expressed and produced in a eukaryotic system. The open reading frame of rat sRAGE was cloned downstream of the methanol-inducible alcohol oxidase promoter of pPICZαA vector, and Pichia pastoris strain X-33 was used as the host strain. The expression of rrsRAGE was achieved by fermentation in a 15-L bioreactor and the resulting fermentation broth was subjected to purification on a cation exchange chromatography column. The purification of rrsRAGE reached 95% after size exclusion chromatography(SEC). The bioactivity of the purified protein was confirmed in a SH-SY5Y cell proliferation assay. The biological function of the purified rrsRAGE protein rat CCl4-induced model was then examined. Treatment with rrsRAGE resulted in significantly lower liver fibrosis and lower serum level of ALT, suggesting that sRAGE prevent liver from injury and fibrosis. In conclusion, we achieved high-efficiency production of bioactive rrsRAGE in P. pastoris. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Association between circulating soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products and atherosclerosis: observations from the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Jason B; de Lemos, James A; Cipollone, Francesco; Ayers, Colby R; Rohatgi, Anand; Morrow, David A; Khera, Amit; McGuire, Darren K

    2009-07-01

    To determine the association between circulating soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) and coronary atherosclerosis. Using data from the Dallas Heart Study, a probability-based population sample, the association between plasma levels of sRAGE and coronary artery calcium (CAC) was assessed among 2,571 subjects with complete imaging and sRAGE data. An inverse graded association was observed between sRAGE quartiles and CAC, with CAC prevalence of 28.5% in quartile 1 compared with 15.7% in quartile 4 (P < 0.0001). After multivariable adjustment, the associations between sRAGE levels in the first and second quartiles (versus fourth quartile) and CAC remained statistically significant (adjusted odds ratio 1.71 [95% CI 1.2-2.4] and 1.5 [1.0-2.1], respectively). sRAGE is a novel biomarker that is inversely associated with coronary atherosclerosis. The role of sRAGE in the pathobiology of atherosclerosis and its potential prognostic and therapeutic implications warrant further investigation.

  18. Endogenous secretory receptor for advanced glycation end-products inhibits amyloid-β1-42 uptake into mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Takahiro; Munesue, Seiichi; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Sakurai, Shigeru; Akhter, Nasima; Kitamura, Yoji; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Takuo; Yonekura, Hideto; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Hamada, Jun-Ichiro; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The cell-surface receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) has been implicated in the development of diabetic vascular complications and Alzheimer's disease. RAGE has been considered to be involved in amyloid-β1-42 (Aβ1-42) uptake into brain. In the present study, we demonstrate that endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE), a decoy form of RAGE generated by alternative RNA processing, is able to inhibit Aβ1-42 influx into mouse brain. Surface plasmon resonance and competitive binding assays revealed that human Aβ1-42 interacted with human esRAGE within the immunoglobulin V type region. We next examined the uptake and distribution of 125I-labeled human Aβ1-42 in various organs and body fluids of newly created mice overexpressing human esRAGE as well as RAGE-null and wild-type (WT) mice. The transition of the 125I-labeled Aβ1-42 from circulation to brain parenchyma peaked at 30 min after the injection into WT mice, but this was significantly blunted in esRAGE-overexpressing and RAGE-null mice. Significant reduction in 125I-labeled Aβ1-42-derived photo-stimulated luminescence were marked in ventricles, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, especially CA1 and CA3 regions, putamen, and thalamus. The results thus suggest the potential of esRAGE in protection against the development of Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Development of a monoclonal antibody-based ELISA system for glyceraldehyde-derived advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takanori; Joo, Hoo Don; Lee, Jae Min; Ju, Sung Mi; Tao, Wang Hong; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; Fukami, Kei; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2015-10-01

    We have previously found that glyceraldehyde-derived advanced glycation end products (glycer-AGEs) elicit oxidative stress generation and evoke inflammatory and thrombotic reactions through their higher binding affinity to RAGE (receptor for AGEs), thereby playing a role in vascular complications in diabetes. Furthermore, circulating levels of glycer-AGEs are elevated in diabetes. We characterized a monoclonal antibody (mAb) raised against glycer-AGEs and prepared its specific ELISA system in human serum. We developed here mAb reacted specifically with glycer-AGEs or glyceraldehyde-derived pyridinium, but not other structurally identified AGEs or AGE precursors. The mAb not only completely neutralized the deleterious effects of glycer-AGEs on endothelial cells, but also detected glycer-AGEs in the aorta of type 2 diabetic rats. Intra and inter-assay coefficient variations of the ELISA were 6 and 2.6%, respectively. ELISA linearity was shown intact within 5-fold dilution, and recovery ratio of added glycer-AGEs was 88-117%. Results of serum and plasma were comparable, and repeated freeze-thawing of samples did not affect the results (90.1-112.4%). Serum glycer-AGEs levels in 30 healthy subjects evaluated by the ELISA were strongly correlated with those by polyclonal Ab-based one (r=0.82). Our present study suggests the clinical utility of mAb for evaluating glycer-AGE levels in both tissue and serum.

  20. Advanced Glycation End Products Enhance Macrophages Polarization into M1 Phenotype through Activating RAGE/NF-κB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xian; Yao, Tongqing; Zhou, Zhong'e; Zhu, Jian; Zhang, Song; Hu, Wei; Shen, Chengxing

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions are accelerated in patients with diabetes. M1 (classically activated in contrast to M2 alternatively activated) macrophages play key roles in the progression of atherosclerosis. Since advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are major pathogenic factors and active inflammation inducers in diabetes mellitus, this study assessed the effects of AGEs on macrophage polarization. The present study showed that AGEs significantly promoted macrophages to express IL-6 and TNF-α. M1 macrophage markers such as iNOS and surface markers including CD11c and CD86 were significantly upregulated while M2 macrophage markers such as Arg1 and CD206 remained unchanged after AGEs stimulation. AGEs significantly increased RAGE expression in macrophages and activated NF-κB pathway, and the aforementioned effects were partly abolished by administration of anti-RAGE antibody or NF-κB inhibitor PDTC. In conclusion, our results suggest that AGEs enhance macrophage differentiation into proinflammatory M1 phenotype at least partly via RAGE/NF-κB pathway activation.

  1. Food-advanced glycation end products aggravate the diabetic vascular complications via modulating the AGEs/RAGE pathway.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xing; Lv, Gao-Hong; Dai, Guo-Ying; Sun, Hong-Mei; Xu, Hui-Qin

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of high-advanced glycation end products (AGEs) diet on diabetic vascular complications. The Streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice were fed with high-AGEs diet. Diabetic characteristics, indicators of renal and cardiovascular functions, and pathohistology of pancreas, heart and renal were evaluated. AGEs/RAGE/ROS pathway parameters were determined. During the experiments, the diabetic mice exhibited typical characteristics including weight loss, polydipsia, polyphagia, polyuria, high-blood glucose, and low-serum insulin levels. However, high-AGEs diet effectively aggravated these diabetic characteristics. It also increased the 24-h urine protein levels, serum levels of urea nitrogen, creatinine, c-reactive protein (CRP), low density lipoprotein (LDL), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the diabetic mice. High-AGEs diet deteriorated the histology of pancreas, heart, and kidneys, and caused structural alterations of endothelial cells, mesangial cells and podocytes in renal cortex. Eventually, high-AGEs diet contributed to the high-AGE levels in serum and kidneys, high-levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and low-levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in serum, heart, and kidneys. It also upregulated RAGE mRNA and protein expression in heart and kidneys. Our results showed that high-AGEs diet deteriorated vascular complications in the diabetic mice. The activation of AGEs/RAGE/ROS pathway may be involved in the pathogenesis of vascular complications in diabetes.

  2. Glucagon-like peptide-1 protects hippocampal neurons against advanced glycation end product-induced tau hyperphosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; An, F-M; Yin, L; Liu, A-R; Yin, D-K; Yao, W-B; Gao, X-D

    2014-01-03

    We have previously demonstrated that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist ameliorated neurodegenerative changes in rat models of diabetes-related Alzheimer's disease (AD), and protected neurons from glucose toxicity in vitro. Herein, we investigated the effects of GLP-1 receptor mediates on cell toxicity and tau hyperphosphorylation induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are associated with glucose toxicity, and the molecular mechanism in PC12 cells and the primary hippocampal neurons. Our study demonstrated that the similar protection effects of GLP-1 existed in PC12 cells treated with glucose-bovine serum albumin (BSA) in hyperglycemic conditions or with glycoaldehyde-BSA alone. Additionally, glucose-BSA alone did not induce significant cytotoxicity in PC12 cells, but resulted in tau hyperphosphorylation in primary hippocampal neurons in 24h. And we found that GLP-1 could reduce cell tau phosphorylation induced by high glucose or glucose-BSA. Furthermore, our data in the present study suggested that GLP-1 regulated tau phosphorylation induced by AGEs through a signaling pathway involving glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β), similarly to the GSK-3β inhibitor, lithium chloride. Our findings suggest that GLP-1 can protect neurons from diabetes-associated AGE insults in vitro, and provide new evidence for a potential therapeutic value of GLP-1 receptor agonist in the treatment of AD especially diabetes-related AD.

  3. Morphological changes induced by advanced glycation endproducts in osteoblastic cells: effects of co-incubation with alendronate.

    PubMed

    Gangoiti, María Virginia; Anbinder, Pablo Sebastián; Cortizo, Ana María; McCarthy, Antonio Desmond

    2013-09-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) accumulate with age in various tissues, and are further increased in patients with Diabetes mellitus, in which they are believed to contribute to the development and progression of chronic complications that include a decrease in bone quality. Bisphosphonates are anti-osteoporotic drugs that have been used for the treatment of patients with diabetic bone alterations, although with contradictory results. In the present study, we have evaluated the in vitro alterations on osteoblastic morphology by environmental scanning electron microscopy, in actin cytoskeleton and apoptosis induced by AGEs, as well as the modulation of these effects by alendronate (an N-containing bisphosphonate). Our present results provide evidence for disruption induced by AGEs of the osteoblastic actin cytoskeleton (geodesic domes) and significant alterations in cell morphology with a decrease in cell-substratum interactions leading to an increase in apoptosis of osteoblasts and a decrease in osteoblastic proliferation. High concentrations of alendronate (10(-5)M, such as could be expected in an osteoclastic lacuna) further increase osteoblastic morphological and cytoskeletal alterations. However, low doses of alendronate (10(-8)M, compatible with extracellular fluid levels to which an osteoblast could be exposed for most of its life cycle) do not affect cell morphology, and in addition are able to prevent AGEs-induced alterations and consequently apoptosis of osteoblasts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Systemic activation of NF-κB driven luciferase activity in transgenic mice fed advanced glycation end products modified albumin.

    PubMed

    Nass, Norbert; Bayreuther, Kristina; Simm, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are stable end products of the Maillard reaction and accumulate with progressing ageing and degenerative diseases. Significant amounts of AGE-modified peptides are also consumed with processed food. AGEs bind to specific receptors, especially the receptor of AGEs (RAGE). Activation of RAGE then evokes intracellular signalling, finally resulting in the activation of the NF-κB transcription factor and therefore a proinflammatory state. We here analysed, whether NF-κB is activated in short term upon feeding an AGE-modified protein in-vivo. Transgenic mice expressing firefly luciferase under the control of an NF-κB responsive promoter were intraperitoneally injected or fed with AGE-modified- or control albumin and luciferase expression was analysed by in-vivo imaging and by in-vitro by determination of luciferase enzyme activity in heart, lung, gut, spleen, liver and kidney. In all organs, an activation of the luciferase reporter gene was observed in response to AGE-BSA feeding, however with different intensity and timing. The gut exhibited highest luciferase activity and this activity peaked 6-8 h post AGE-feeding. In heart and kidney, luciferase activity increased for up to 12 h post feeding. All other organs tested, exhibited highest activity at 10 h after AGE-consumption. Altogether, these data demonstrate that feeding AGE-modified protein resulted in a transient and systemic activation of the NF-κB reporter.

  5. Misconceptions about high-fructose corn syrup: is it uniquely responsible for obesity, reactive dicarbonyl compounds, and advanced glycation endproducts?

    PubMed

    White, John S

    2009-06-01

    Misconceptions about high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) abound in the scientific literature, the advice of health professionals to their patients, media reporting, product advertising, and the irrational behavior of consumers. Foremost among these is the misconception that HFCS has a unique and substantive responsibility for the current obesity crisis. Inaccurate information from ostensibly reliable sources and selective presentation of research data gathered under extreme experimental conditions, representing neither the human diet nor HFCS, have misled the uninformed and created an atmosphere of distrust and avoidance for what, by all rights, should be considered a safe and innocuous sweetener. In the first part of this article, common misconceptions about the composition, functionality, metabolism, and use of HFCS and its purported link to obesity are identified and corrected. In the second part, an emerging misconception, that HFCS in carbonated soft drinks contributes materially to physiological levels of reactive dicarbonyl compounds and advanced glycation endproducts, is addressed in detail, and evidence is presented that HFCS does not pose a unique dietary risk in healthy individuals or diabetics.

  6. Phenolics from Garcinia mangostana Inhibit Advanced Glycation Endproducts Formation: Effect on Amadori Products, Cross-Linked Structures and Protein Thiols.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Hossam M; El-Bassossy, Hany; Mohamed, Gamal A; El-Halawany, Ali M; Alshali, Khalid Z; Banjar, Zainy M

    2016-02-22

    Accumulation of Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) in body tissues plays a major role in the development of diabetic complications. Here, the inhibitory effect of bioactive metabolites isolated from fruit hulls of Garcinia mangostana on AGE formation was investigated through bio-guided approach using aminoguanidine (AG) as a positive control. Including G. mangostana total methanol extract (GMT) in the reaction mixture of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glucose or ribose inhibited the fluorescent and non-fluorescent AGEs formation in a dose dependent manner. The bioassay guided fractionation of GMT revealed isolation of four bioactive constituents from the bioactive fraction; which were identified as: garcimangosone D (1), aromadendrin-8-C-glucopyranoside (2), epicatechin (3), and 2,3',4,5',6-pentahydroxybenzophenone (4). All the tested compounds significantly inhibited fluorescent and non-fluorescent AGEs formation in a dose dependent manner whereas compound 3 (epicatechin) was found to be the most potent. In search for the level of action, addition of GMT, and compounds 2-4 inhibited fructosamine (Amadori product) and protein aggregation formation in both glucose and ribose. To explore the mechanism of action, it was found that addition of GMT and only compound (3) to reaction mixture increased protein thiol in both glucose and ribose while compounds 1, 2 and 4 only increased thiol in case of ribose. In conclusion, phenolic compounds 1-4 inhibited AGEs formation at the levels of Amadori product and protein aggregation formation through saving protein thiol.

  7. [Hematopoietic stem cell exhaustion and advanced glycation end-products in the unexplained anemia of the elderly].

    PubMed

    Sestier, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    More than 10% of the aged 65 years and over in the western world suffers anemia and in one third of them the cause of the anemia remains obscure. The unexplained anemia of the elderly (UAE) is considered an exclusion diagnosis, without the existence of a clear consensus to its clinical or experimental approach. There is an association between aging and anemia in studies performed in animals and in humans. To determine if there is evidence in the literature that supports hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) exhaustion and the advanced glycation end-products (AGE's) as a cause of UAE. A total of 32 combined texts (28 for HSC exhaustion and 4 for AGEs) were selected after an intensive review. Conclusions were associated with causes and effects of the HSC exhaustion and circulating AGE's over aging and anemia. Only three works try to establish an association between UAE and HSC exhaustion, two of them disagreed in their conclusions, with the third one differing in the type of study. There is a relationship between anemia and AGEs increase and accumulation. There is evidence in the literature that links the aging molecular and cellular mechanisms with the HSC exhaustion and the increase of AGE's. Furthermore; there is some evidence that both conditions determine the emergence of anemia associated with age in animals and in humans. There is little evidence in the literature to clarify the relationship between aging and UAE. Copyright © 2014 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Lateral diffusion and signaling of receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE): a receptor involved in chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Syed, Aleem; Zhu, Qiaochu; Smith, Emily A

    2017-06-16

    Membrane diffusion is one of the key mechanisms in the cellular function of receptors. The signaling of receptors for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) has been extensively studied in the context of several pathological conditions, however, very little is known about RAGE diffusion. To fill this gap, RAGE lateral diffusion is probed in native, cholesterol-depleted, and cytoskeleton-altered cellular conditions. In native GM07373 cellular conditions, RAGE has a 90% mobile fraction and an average diffusion coefficient of 0.3 μm(2)/s. When depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton is inhibited with the small molecule jasplakinolide (Jsp), the RAGE mobile fraction and diffusion coefficient decrease by 22 and 37%, respectively. In contrast, depolymerizing the filamentous actin cytoskeleton using the small molecule cytochalasin D (CD) does not alter the RAGE diffusion properties. There is a 70 and 50% decrease in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) when the actin cytoskeleton is disrupted by CD or Jsp, respectively, in RAGE-expressing GM07373 cells. Disrupting the actin cytoskeleton in GM07373 cells that do not express detectable amounts of RAGE results in no change in p-ERK. Cholesterol depletion results in no statistically significant change in the diffusion properties of RAGE or p-ERK. This work presents a strong link between the actin cytoskeleton and RAGE diffusion and downstream signaling, and serves to further our understanding of the factors influencing RAGE lateral diffusion.

  9. Regulation of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Ectodomain Shedding and Its Role in Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Braley, Alex; Kwak, Taekyoung; Jules, Joel; Harja, Evis; Landgraf, Ralf; Hudson, Barry I

    2016-06-03

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand transmembrane receptor that can undergo proteolysis at the cell surface to release a soluble ectodomain. Here we observed that ectodomain shedding of RAGE is critical for its role in regulating signaling and cellular function. Ectodomain shedding of both human and mouse RAGE was dependent on ADAM10 activity and induced with chemical activators of shedding (ionomycin, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate) and endogenous stimuli (serum and RAGE ligands). Ectopic expression of the splice variant of RAGE (RAGE splice variant 4), which is resistant to ectodomain shedding, inhibited RAGE ligand dependent cell signaling, actin cytoskeleton reorganization, cell spreading, and cell migration. We found that blockade of RAGE ligand signaling with soluble RAGE or inhibitors of MAPK or PI3K blocked RAGE-dependent cell migration but did not affect RAGE splice variant 4 cell migration. We finally demonstrated that RAGE function is dependent on secretase activity as ADAM10 and γ-secretase inhibitors blocked RAGE ligand-mediated cell migration. Together, our data suggest that proteolysis of RAGE is critical to mediate signaling and cell function and may therefore emerge as a novel therapeutic target for RAGE-dependent disease states. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Regulation of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Ectodomain Shedding and Its Role in Cell Function*

    PubMed Central

    Braley, Alex; Kwak, Taekyoung; Jules, Joel; Harja, Evis; Landgraf, Ralf; Hudson, Barry I.

    2016-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand transmembrane receptor that can undergo proteolysis at the cell surface to release a soluble ectodomain. Here we observed that ectodomain shedding of RAGE is critical for its role in regulating signaling and cellular function. Ectodomain shedding of both human and mouse RAGE was dependent on ADAM10 activity and induced with chemical activators of shedding (ionomycin, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate) and endogenous stimuli (serum and RAGE ligands). Ectopic expression of the splice variant of RAGE (RAGE splice variant 4), which is resistant to ectodomain shedding, inhibited RAGE ligand dependent cell signaling, actin cytoskeleton reorganization, cell spreading, and cell migration. We found that blockade of RAGE ligand signaling with soluble RAGE or inhibitors of MAPK or PI3K blocked RAGE-dependent cell migration but did not affect RAGE splice variant 4 cell migration. We finally demonstrated that RAGE function is dependent on secretase activity as ADAM10 and γ-secretase inhibitors blocked RAGE ligand-mediated cell migration. Together, our data suggest that proteolysis of RAGE is critical to mediate signaling and cell function and may therefore emerge as a novel therapeutic target for RAGE-dependent disease states. PMID:27022018

  11. Inhibition of advanced glycation end product formation by medicinal plant extracts correlates with phenolic metabolites and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Harris, Cory S; Beaulieu, Louis-Philippe; Fraser, Marie-Hélène; McIntyre, Kristina L; Owen, Patrick L; Martineau, Louis C; Cuerrier, Alain; Johns, Timothy; Haddad, Pierre S; Bennett, Steffany A L; Arnason, John T

    2011-01-01

    Nonenzymatic formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is accelerated under hyperglycemic conditions characteristic of type 2 diabetes mellitus and contributes to the development of vascular complications. As such, inhibition of AGE formation represents a potential therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of diabetic complications. In the present study, ethanolic extracts of 17 medicinal plants were assessed for inhibitory effects on in vitro AGE formation through fluorometric and immunochemical detection of fluorescent AGEs and N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)lysine adducts of albumin (CML-BSA), respectively. Most extracts inhibited fluorescent AGE formation with IC (50) values ranging from 0.4 to 38.6 µg/mL and all extracts reduced CML-BSA formation but to differing degrees. Results obtained through both methods were highly correlated. Antiglycation activities were positively correlated with total phenolic content, free radical scavenging activity and reduction in malonyldiadehyde levels following oxidation of low-density lipoprotein, but negatively correlated with lag time to formation of conjugated dienes. Together, these results provide evidence that antioxidant phenolic metabolites mediate the antiglycation activity of our medicinal plant collection, a relationship that likely extends to other medicinal and food plants. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Overexpression of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products and High-Mobility Group Box 1 in Human Dental Pulp Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tancharoen, Salunya; Tengrungsun, Tassanee; Suddhasthira, Theeralaksna; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Vechvongvan, Nuttavun; Maruyama, Ikuro

    2014-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a nonhistone DNA-binding protein, is released into the extracellular space and promotes inflammation. HMGB1 binds to related cell signaling transduction receptors, including receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), which actively participate in vascular and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to examine whether RAGE and HMGB1 are involved in the pathogenesis of pulpitis and investigate the effect of Prevotella intermedia (P. intermedia) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on RAGE and HMGB1 expression in odontoblast-like cells (OLC-1). RAGE and HMGB1 expression levels in clinically inflamed dental pulp were higher than those in healthy dental pulp. Upregulated expression of RAGE was observed in odontoblasts, stromal pulp fibroblasts-like cells, and endothelial-like cell lining human pulpitis tissue. Strong cytoplasmic HMGB1 immunoreactivity was noted in odontoblasts, whereas nuclear HMGB1 immunoreactivity was seen in stromal pulp fibroblasts-like cells in human pulpitis tissue. LPS stimulated OLC-1 cells produced HMGB1 in a dose-dependent manner through RAGE. HMGB1 translocation towards the cytoplasm and secretion from OLC-1 in response to LPS was inhibited by TPCA-1, an inhibitor of NF-κB activation. These findings suggest that RAGE and HMGB1 play an important role in the pulpal immune response to oral bacterial infection. PMID:25114379

  13. Levels of Soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products in Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid in Patients with Various Inflammatory Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kamo, Tetsuro; Tasaka, Sadatomo; Tokuda, Yuriko; Suzuki, Shoji; Asakura, Takanori; Yagi, Kazuma; Namkoong, Ho; Ishii, Makoto; Hasegawa, Naoki; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand receptor of S100/calgranulins, high-mobility group box 1, and others, and it is associated with the pathogenesis of various inflammatory and circulatory diseases. The soluble form of RAGE (sRAGE) is a decoy receptor and competitively inhibits membrane-bound RAGE activation. In this study, we measured sRAGE levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of 78 patients, including 41 with interstitial pneumonia, 11 with sarcoidosis, 9 with respiratory infection, 7 with ARDS, 5 with lung cancer, and 5 with vasculitis. Among them, sRAGE was detectable in BALF of 73 patients (94%). In patients with ARDS and vasculitis, the sRAGE levels were significantly higher than in the control subjects and those with interstitial pneumonia. The sRAGE levels were positively correlated with total cell counts in BALF and serum levels of surfactant protein-D, lactate dehydrogenase, and C-reactive protein. There was an inverse correlation between PaO2/FIO2 ratio and sRAGE levels. These results indicate that sRAGE in BALF might be considered as a biomarker of lung inflammatory disorders, especially ARDS and vasculitis. PMID:27147899

  14. Inhibition of advanced glycation end products by red grape skin extract and its antioxidant activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of the present study was to determine the phytochemical content and the protective effect of red grape skin extract (RGSE) against fructose-mediated protein oxidation. In addition, RGSE was screened for its potential as an antioxidant using various in vitro models. Methods Antioxidant activity was measured by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, superoxide radical scavenging activity, trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), ferrous ion chelating power. The total phenols content was measured by Folin–Ciocalteu assay, the flavonoids content by the AlCl3 colorimetric method. Antiglycation activity was determined using the formation of AGE fluorescence intensity, Nϵ-(carboxymethyl)lysine, and the level of fructosamine. The protein oxidation was examined using the level of protein carbonyl content and thiol group. Results The results showed that the content of total phenolics, flavonoids and total anthocyanins in RGSE was 246.3 ± 0.9 mg gallic acid equivalent/g dried extract, 215.9 ± 1.3 mg catechin equivalent/g dried extract, and 36.7 ± 0.8 mg cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalent/g dried extract, respectively. In the DPPH radical scavenging activity, hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, and superoxide radical scavenging activity, RGSE had the IC50 values of 0.03 ± 0.01 mg/ml, 5.40 ± 0.01 mg/ml, and 0.58 ± 0.01 mg/ml, respectively. In addition, RGSE had trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity assay (395.65 ± 1.61 mg trolox equivalent/g dried extract), ferric reducing antioxidant power (114.24 ± 0.03 mM FeSO4/g dried extract), and ferrous ion chelating power (3,474.05 ± 5.55 mg EDTA/g dried extract), respectively. The results showed that RGSE at different concentrations (0.031–0.500 mg/ml) has significantly inhibited the formation of AGEs in terms of the fluorescence intensity of glycated BSA during 4 weeks of study. The

  15. Advanced oxidation protein products induce chondrocyte apoptosis via receptor for advanced glycation end products-mediated, redox-dependent intrinsic apoptosis pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Zhong, Zhao-Ming; Zhu, Si-Yuan; Liao, Cong-Rui; Pan, Ying; Zeng, Ji-Huan; Zheng, Shuai; Ding, Ruo-Ting; Lin, Qing-Song; Ye, Qing; Ye, Wen-Bin; Li, Wei; Chen, Jian-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced chondrocyte apoptosis is a primary cause of cartilage destruction in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs), a novel pro-inflammatory mediator, have been confirmed to accumulate in patients with RA. However, the effect of AOPPs accumulation on chondrocyte apoptosis and the associated cellular mechanisms remains unclear. The present study demonstrated that the plasma formation of AOPPs was enhanced in RA rats compared with normal. Then, chondrocyte were treated with AOPPs-modified rat serum albumin (AOPPs-RSA) in vitro. Exposure of chondrocyte to AOPPs activated nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase and increased expression of NADPH oxidase subunits, which was mediated by receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), but not scavenger receptor CD36. Moreover, AOPPs challenge triggered NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS generation which induced mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress resulted in activation of caspase family that eventually lead to apoptosis. Lastly, blockade of RAGE, instead of CD36, largely attenuated these signals. Our study demonstrated first time that AOPPs induce chondrocyte apoptosis via RAGE-mediated and redox-dependent intrinsic apoptosis pathway in vitro. These data implicates that AOPPs may represent a novel pathogenic factor that contributes to RA progression. Targeting AOPPs-triggered cellular mechanisms might emerge as a promising therapeutic option for patients with RA.

  16. Impact of Oxidative Stress Biomarkers and Carboxymethyllysine (An Advanced Glycation End Product) on Prostate Cancer: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuman; Pinney, Susan M.; Mallick, Palash; Ho, Shuk-Mei; Bracken, Bruce; Wu, Tianying

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Biomarkers of oxidative stress and advanced glycation end products (AGE) have been linked to the development of prostate cancer, but evidence from human studies is either scarce or controversial. Materials and Methods We conducted a prospective nested case-control study among 48 men (24 prostate cancer cases and 24 controls) aged 48–76 years at baseline. The participants of our study were a part of the Fernald Community Cohort (FCC). Prostate cancer cases and controls were matched individually on age (± 3 years) with 1:1 ratio. Biomarkers included urine F2-isoprostanes (markers of lipid oxidation), plasma fluorescent oxidation products (FlOPs; markers of global oxidation) and carboxymethyllysine (CML; a major end-stage AGE). Results At baseline, cases had similar age, body mass index, proportion of family history of prostate cancer, history of benign prostatic hyperplasia, history of hypertension, history of diabetes, smokers and plasma glucose levels as compared to controls. Levels of plasma CML were significantly higher in cases than in controls (182 vs. 152 μg/ml, P < 0.05). In the conditional logistic regression model, an increase in CML equivalent to one standard deviation was associated with increased risk of incident prostate cancer (Relative risk = 1.79, 95% confidence interval = 1.00–3.21), and accounted for ~8% variance of prostate cancer liability. Urine F2-isoprostanes and plasma FlOPs were not associated with prostate cancer incidence. Conclusion Higher levels of plasma CML were associated with increased risk of prostate cancer. This suggests a potential new pathway for prostate cancer prediction and treatment. PMID:25972296

  17. Impact of Oxidative Stress Biomarkers and Carboxymethyllysine (an Advanced Glycation End Product) on Prostate Cancer: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuman; Pinney, Susan M; Mallick, Palash; Ho, Shuk-Mei; Bracken, Bruce; Wu, Tianying

    2015-10-01

    Biomarkers of oxidative stress and advanced glycation end products (AGE) have been linked to the development of prostate cancer, but evidence from human studies is scarce or controversial. We conducted a prospective nested case-control study among 48 men (24 prostate cancer cases and 24 controls) aged 48 to 76 years at baseline. The participants of our study were a part of the Fernald Community Cohort. Prostate cancer cases and controls were matched individually on age (± 3 years) with a 1:1 ratio. Biomarkers included urine F2-isoprostanes (markers of lipid oxidation), plasma fluorescent oxidation products (markers of global oxidation), and carboxymethyllysine (CML) (a major end-stage AGE). At baseline, cases had similar age, body mass index, proportion of family history of prostate cancer, history of benign prostatic hyperplasia, history of hypertension, history of diabetes, number of smokers, and plasma glucose levels compared with controls. Levels of plasma CML were significantly higher in cases than in controls (182 vs. 152 μg/mL, P < .05). In the conditional logistic regression model, an increase in CML equivalent to 1 standard deviation was associated with an increased risk of incident prostate cancer (relative risk, 1.79; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-3.21) and accounted for approximately 8% variance of prostate cancer liability. Urine F2-isoprostanes and plasma fluorescent oxidation products were not associated with prostate cancer incidence. Higher levels of plasma CML were associated with increased risk of prostate cancer. This suggests a potential new pathway for prostate cancer prediction and treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Skin Autofluorescence Relates to Soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-Products and Albuminuria in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Škrha, J.; Šoupal, J.; Loni Ekali, G.; Prázný, M.; Kalousová, M.; Kvasnička, J.; Landová, L.; Zima, T.; Škrha, J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare skin autofluorescence caused by advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) with biochemical markers of endothelial dysfunction and soluble receptor for AGEs (sRAGE) in patients with diabetes. Skin autofluorescence (AF) assessed by AGE-Reader was evaluated with sRAGE and other biochemical parameters in 88 patients with diabetes (47 Type 1/T1DM/ and 41 Type 2/T2DM/) and 20 controls. Skin AF was significantly higher in T1DM and T2DM in comparison to controls (2.39 ± 0.54, 2.63 ± 0.73 versus 1.96 ± 0.33 AU; P < 0.0001). Positive correlation of AF with sRAGE was detected in T1DM and T2DM (r = 0.37, P < 0.02 and r = 0.60, P < 0.0001), but not in controls. Significantly higher AF values were found in patients with positive albuminuria as compared to those with normal albuminuria. Similarly, higher AF was detected in patients with endothelial dysfunction expressed by vWF, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1. Multiple regression analysis revealed independent association of skin AF with age, sRAGE, and albumin-creatinine ratio in patients with diabetes (R2 = 0.38). Our study confirms that AF is elevated in patients with diabetes, especially with positive albuminuria and endothelial dysfunction. The strong and independent relationship between AF and sRAGE supports the idea that AF may reflect AGEs/RAGE interactions. The exact mechanism remains to be established. PMID:23671885

  19. Skin advanced glycation end product accumulation is poorly reflected by glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients (ZODIAC-9).

    PubMed

    Gerrits, Esther G; Lutgers, Helen L; Kleefstra, Nanne; Groenier, Klaas H; Smit, Andries J; Gans, Rijk O B; Bilo, Henk J G

    2008-07-01

    Glycemic memory can be reflected by tissue accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). In type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels over various time periods poorly predicted the accumulation of different AGEs in skin biopsies. Our aim was to investigate whether HbA1c assessments can predict the change in skin AGEs during time in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We included 452 T2DM patients participating in a shared-care setting, who are screened annually for HbA1c and diabetic complications. Baseline and follow-up levels of skin AGEs were assessed with a validated noninvasive autofluorescence (AF) method, which is based on the fluorescence characteristics of certain AGEs. Our study population had a mean age of 65 years and 54% were female. After a mean follow-up duration of 3.3 years, linear regression analyses showed weak relationships among different assessments of HbA1c (baseline, maximum, mean, and variance of HbA1c) and skin AF at follow-up. Baseline skin AF and age were predictors of skin AF at follow-up, but diabetes duration, smoking, and creatinine were of less or no predictive value for skin AF at follow-up. In our T2DM population, integrated HbA1c assessments over years poorly predict the change in skin AGE level measured by skin AF. These findings agree with results in patients with T1DM. This suggests either the need for longer exposure to glucose disturbances to change tissue AGEs or other mechanisms, such as oxidative stress, leading to AGE accumulation.

  20. Skin Advanced Glycation End Product Accumulation Is Poorly Reflected by Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetic Patients (ZODIAC-9)

    PubMed Central

    Gerrits, Esther G.; Lutgers, Helen L.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Groenier, Klaas H.; Smit, Andries J.; Gans, Rijk O. B.; Bilo, Henk J. G.

    2008-01-01

    Background Glycemic memory can be reflected by tissue accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). In type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels over various time periods poorly predicted the accumulation of different AGEs in skin biopsies. Our aim was to investigate whether HbA1c assessments can predict the change in skin AGEs during time in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods We included 452 T2DM patients participating in a shared-care setting, who are screened annually for HbA1c and diabetic complications. Baseline and follow-up levels of skin AGEs were assessed with a validated noninvasive autofluorescence (AF) method, which is based on the fluorescence characteristics of certain AGEs. Results Our study population had a mean age of 65 years and 54% were female. After a mean follow-up duration of 3.3 years, linear regression analyses showed weak relationships among different assessments of HbA1c (baseline, maximum, mean, and variance of HbA1c) and skin AF at follow-up. Baseline skin AF and age were predictors of skin AF at follow-up, but diabetes duration, smoking, and creatinine were of less or no predictive value for skin AF at follow-up. Conclusions In our T2DM population, integrated HbA1c assessments over years poorly predict the change in skin AGE level measured by skin AF. These findings agree with results in patients with T1DM. This suggests either the need for longer exposure to glucose disturbances to change tissue AGEs or other mechanisms, such as oxidative stress, leading to AGE accumulation. PMID:19885232

  1. Dietary advanced glycation end products restriction diminishes inflammation markers and oxidative stress in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Luévano-Contreras, Claudia; Garay-Sevilla, Ma Eugenia; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Malacara, Juan M; Wrobel, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    The augmented consumption of dietary advanced glycation end products (dAGEs) has been associated with increased oxidative stress and inflammation, however, there is insufficient information over the effect on insulin resistance. The objective of the present study is to investigate the effect of dAGEs restriction on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), malondialdehyde, C-reactive protein (CRP), and insulin resistance in DM2 patients. We carried out a randomized 6 weeks prospective study in two groups of patients: subjects with a standard diet (n = 13), vs low dAGEs (n = 13). At the beginning and the end of study, we collected anthropometric measurements, and values of circulating glucose, HbA1c, lipids, insulin, serum AGEs, CRP, TNF-α and malondialdehyde. Anthropometric measurements, glucose, and lipids were similar in both groups at base line and at the end of the study. Estimation of basal dAGEs was similar in both groups; after 6 weeks it was unchanged in the standard group but in the low dAGEs group decreased by 44% (p<0.0002). Changes in TNF-α levels were different under standard diet (12.5 ± 14.7) as compared with low dAGEs (-18.36 ± 17.1, p<0.00001); changes in malondialdehyde were different in the respective groups (2.0 ± 2.61 and -0.83 ± 2.0, p<0.005) no changes were found for insulin levels or HOMA-IR. In conclusion, The dAGEs restriction decreased significantly TNF-α and malondialdehyde levels.

  2. Protective effects of physiological testosterone on advanced glycation end product-induced injury in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yaping; Yu, Dan; Wu, Jiahua; Li, Lin

    2017-01-01

    The effect of testosterone, a sex steroid, on endothelial cells is controversial as it is uncertain if it has a protective effect on them. Whether physiological testosterone can inhibit the deleterious effects of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on endothelial cells remains to be elucidated. The present study focused on elucidating the effect of testosterone on the injury of endothelial cells induced by AGEs. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured in vitro and treated with AGEs in the presence or absence of various concentrations of testosterone. The cell viability in each group was measured using an MTS assay. Early-stage apoptosis was detected using flow cytometry with Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide double staining, and the expression levels of apoptosis-associated proteins, B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and caspase-3, were determined using western blot analysis. Oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory parameters in the medium were evaluated using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The MTS results showed that AGEs significantly decreased the proliferation of HUVECs, whereas a physiological concentration of testosterone alleviated this damage. Physiological concentrations of testosterone protected the HUVECs from AGE-induced apoptosis, mediated by caspase-3 and Bax/Bcl-2. In addition, treatment of the HUVECs with AGEs caused a significant decrease in anti-oxidative parameters, but increased the concentrations of malondialdehyde and tumor necrosis factor-α. The activation of Janus kinase 2 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 was significantly increased by incubation with AGEs. However, pre-incubation with a physiological concentration of testosterone attenuated these changes. Therefore, the data obtained in the present study established the potential role of physiological testosterone in ameliorating AGE-induced damage in HUVECs. PMID:28112379

  3. Advanced glycation end-products, anti-hypertensive treatment and diastolic function in patients with hypertension and diastolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Jasper W L; van de Wal, Ruud M; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Miyata, Toshio; Jaarsma, Wybren; Plokker, H W Thijs; van Wijk, Leen M; Smit, Andries J; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Voors, Adriaan A

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the relationship between advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and diastolic function and the response to blood pressure treatment in patients with hypertension and diastolic dysfunction. Data were analysed from 97 patients (aged 65 +/- 10 years, 36% male) who were randomly assigned to 6 months open-label treatment with either eprosartan on top of other anti-hypertensive drugs (n = 47) or other anti-hypertensive drugs alone (n = 50). Tissue AGE accumulation was measured using a validated skin-autofluorescence (skin-AF) reader (n = 26). Plasma N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), N(epsilon)-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL), and pentosidine were measured by LC-MS/MS and HPLC. Diastolic function was assessed using echocardiography. Blood pressure was reduced from 157/91 to 145/84 mmHg (P < 0.001) in the eprosartan group and from 158/91 to 141/83 mmHg (P < 0.001) in the control group. No effect of eprosartan was found on AGE levels. In patients with baseline skin-AF < median, E/A ratio (P = 0.04) and the mean peak early-diastolic filling velocity (E') improved (P = 0.001). In contrast, in patients with skin-AF levels > median, E/A ratio (P = 0.84) and mean E' (P = 0.32) remained unchanged. Although eprosartan did not decrease levels of AGEs, patients with lower skin-AF at baseline showed a larger improvement in diastolic function in response to either anti-hypertensive treatment compared with patients with higher skin-AF.

  4. IN SITU ACCUMULATION OF ADVANCED GLYCATION ENDPRODUCTS (AGES) IN BONE MATRIX AND ITS CORRELATION WITH OSTEOCLASTIC BONE RESORPTION

    PubMed Central

    Dong, X. Neil; Qin, An; Xu, Jiake; Wang, Xiaodu

    2011-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have been observed to accumulate in bone with increasing age and may impose effects on bone resorption activities. However, the underlying mechanism of AGEs accumulation in bone is still poorly understood. In this study, human cortical bone specimens from young (31±6 years old), middle-aged (51±3 years old) and elderly (76±4 years old) groups were examined to determine the spatial-temporal distribution of AGEs in bone matrix and its effect on bone resorption activities by directly culturing osteoclastic cells on bone slices. The results of this study indicated that the fluorescence intensity (excitation wave length 360 nm and emission wave length 470±40 nm) could be used to estimate the relative distribution of AGEs in bone (pentosidine as its marker) under an epifluorescence microscope. Using the fluorescence intensity as the relative measure of AGEs concentration, it was found that the concentration of AGEs varied with biological tissue ages, showing the greatest amount in the interstitial tissue, followed by the old osteons, and the least amount in newly formed osteons. In addition, AGEs accumulation was found to be dependent on donor ages, suggesting that the younger the donor the less AGEs were accumulated in the tissue. Most interestingly, AGEs accumulation appeared to initiate from the region of cement lines, and spread diffusively to the other parts as the tissue aged. Finally, it was observed that the bone resorption activities of osteoclasts were positively correlated with the in situ concentration of AGEs and such an effect was enhanced with increasing donor age. These findings may help elucidate the mechanism of AGEs accumulation in bone and its association with bone remodeling process. PMID:21530698

  5. Effects of Sevelamer on HbA1c, Inflammation, and Advanced Glycation End Products in Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vlassara, Helen; Uribarri, Jaime; Cai, Weijing; Goodman, Susan; Pyzik, Renata; Post, James; Grosjean, Fabrizio; Woodward, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Increased inflammation and oxidative stress may be caused by proteins and lipids modified by cytotoxic advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in food. Restricting food containing elevated AGEs improves these risk factors in diabetic CKD. Because diet adherence can be problematic, this study aimed to remove cytotoxic AGEs from food already ingested and to determine whether sevelamer carbonate sequesters cytotoxic AGEs in the gut, preventing their uptake and thereby reducing AGE-induced abnormalities. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This single-center, randomized, 2-month, open-label, intention-to-treat, crossover study compared sevelamer carbonate with calcium carbonate treatment in stage 2–4 diabetic CKD. Participants received 2 months of treatment with one drug, had a 1-week washout, and then received the opposite drug for 2 months. Results Sevelamer carbonate reduced HbA1c, serum methylglyoxal, serum εN-carboxymethyl-lysine, triglycerides, and 8-isoprostanes. Total cholesterol and fibroblast growth factor 23 were reduced by sevelamer carbonate, relative to calcium carbonate. AGE receptor 1 and sirtuin 1 mRNA were increased and PMNC TNFα levels were decreased by sevelamer carbonate, but not calcium carbonate. Medications and caloric and AGE intake remained unchanged. Sevelamer carbonate reversibly bound AGE-BSA at intestinal, but not stomach, pH. Conclusions Sevelamer carbonate significantly reduces HbA1c, fibroblast growth factor 23, lipids, and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, and markedly increases antioxidant markers, independently of phosphorus in patients with diabetes and early kidney disease. These novel actions of sevelamer carbonate on metabolic and inflammatory abnormalities in type 2 diabetes mellitus may affect progression of early diabetic CKD. PMID:22461535

  6. Effects of Prolyl Hydroxylase Inhibitor L-mimosine on Dental Pulp in the Presence of Advanced Glycation End Products.

    PubMed

    Müller, Heinz-Dieter; Cvikl, Barbara; Janjić, Klara; Nürnberger, Sylvia; Moritz, Andreas; Gruber, Reinhard; Agis, Hermann

    2015-11-01

    Proangiogenic prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) inhibitors represent a novel approach to stimulate tissue regeneration. Diabetes mellitus involves the accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Here we evaluated the impact of AGEs on the response of human pulp tissue to the PHD inhibitor L-mimosine (L-MIM) in monolayer cultures of dental pulp-derived cells (DPCs) and tooth slice organ cultures. In monolayer cultures, DPCs were incubated with L-MIM and AGEs. Viability was assessed based on formazan formation, live-dead staining, annexin V/propidium iodide, and trypan blue exclusion assay. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-8 production was evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoassays. Furthermore, expression levels of odontoblast markers were assessed, and alizarin red staining was performed. Tooth slice organ cultures were performed, and VEGF, IL-6, and IL8 levels in their supernatants were measured by immunoassays. Pulp tissue vitality and morphology were assessed by MTT assay and histology. In monolayer cultures of DPCs, L-MIM at nontoxic concentrations increased the production of VEGF and IL-8 in the presence of AGEs. Stimulation with L-MIM decreased alkaline phosphatase levels and matrix mineralization also in the presence of AGEs, whereas no significant changes in dentin matrix protein 1 and dentin sialophosphoprotein expression were observed. In tooth slice organ cultures, L-MIM increased VEGF but not IL-6 and IL-8 production in the presence of AGEs. The pulp tissue was vital, and no signs of apoptosis or necrosis were observed. Overall, in the presence of AGEs, L-MIM increases the proangiogenic capacity, but decreases alkaline phosphatase expression and matrix mineralization. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of an advanced glycation end product-restricted diet and exercise on metabolic parameters in adult overweight men.

    PubMed

    Macías-Cervantes, Maciste Habacuc; Rodríguez-Soto, Juana María Dolores; Uribarri, Jaime; Díaz-Cisneros, Francisco José; Cai, Weijingi; Garay-Sevilla, Ma Eugenia

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to review the effect of a low advanced glycation end product (AGEs) diet, exercise, and a combination of both on circulating AGE levels as well as on plasma lipids and anthropometric parameters. Forty-three overweight or obese men (body mass index [BMI] >25 kg/m(2)), 30 to 55 y, participated in a 12-wk study and were randomly assigned to one of three groups: low AGE diet, exercise with habitual food intake, or exercise plus low AGE diet. Exercise was for 45 min at 65% to 75% of their maximum heart rate three times a week. We measured somatometric variables (BMI and waist circumference), blood glucose, lipids, and serum AGEs (N(ε)-[Carboxymethyl]Lysine [CML] and methylglyoxal [MG]) at baseline and at 12 wk. Exercise alone was associated with decreased somatometric variables; the low AGE diet had the same effects and decreased serum CML and MG and when combined with exercise reproduced all these effects, but also decreased triacylglycerols and increased high-density lipoprotein. Correlation analysis showed that both changes of CML and MG correlated with changes in dietary AGEs (P < 0.020 and P < 0.038, respectively); change in maximum oxygen consumption correlated inversely with change in weight and triacylglycerols. Regression analyses, including change in dietary AGEs and in dietary calories, showed that change in dietary AGEs was the independent determinant of change in CML (P < 0.020) and MG (P < 0.038). An AGE-restricted diet reduces serum AGE and indices of body fat. The addition of exercise to the restricted diet has the same effects but also improves lipid profile. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Receptor for advanced glycation end products contributes to postnatal pulmonary development and adult lung maintenance program in mice.

    PubMed

    Fineschi, Silvia; De Cunto, Giovanna; Facchinetti, Fabrizio; Civelli, Maurizio; Imbimbo, Bruno P; Carnini, Chiara; Villetti, Gino; Lunghi, Benedetta; Stochino, Stefania; Gibbons, Deena L; Hayday, Adrian; Lungarella, Giuseppe; Cavarra, Eleonora

    2013-02-01

    The role of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in promoting the inflammatory response through activation of NF-κB pathway is well established. Recent findings indicate that RAGE may also have a regulative function in apoptosis, as well as in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and adhesion. Unlike other organs, lung tissue in adulthood and during organ development shows relatively high levels of RAGE expression. Thus a role for the receptor in lung organogenesis and homeostasis may be proposed. To evaluate the role of RAGE in lung development and adult lung homeostasis, we generated hemizygous and homozygous transgenic mice overexpressing human RAGE, and analyzed their lungs from the fourth postnatal day to adulthood. Moderate RAGE hyperexpression during lung development influenced secondary septation, resulting in an impairment of alveolar morphogenesis and leading to significant changes in morphometric parameters such as airspace number and the size of alveolar ducts. An increase in alveolar cell apoptosis and a decrease in cell proliferation were demonstrated by the terminal deoxy-nucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling reaction, active caspase-3, and Ki-67 immunohistochemistry. Alterations in elastin organization and deposition and in TGF-β expression were observed. In homozygous mice, the hyperexpression of RAGE resulted in histological changes resembling those changes characterizing human bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). RAGE hyperexpression in the adult lung is associated with an increase of the alveolar destructive index and persistent inflammatory status leading to "destructive" emphysema. These results suggest an important role for RAGE in both alveolar development and lung homeostasis, and open new doors to working hypotheses on the pathogenesis of BPD and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  9. Association of serum soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products with subclinical cerebrovascular disease: the Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS)

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Barry I; Moon, Yeseon Park; Kalea, Anastasia Z; Khatri, Minesh; Marquez, Chensy; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Paik, Myunghee C; Yoshita, Mitsuhiro; Sacco, Ralph L; DeCarli, Charles; Wright, Clinton B; Elkind, Mitchell SV

    2011-01-01

    Objective Serum levels of the soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products (sRAGE) have been associated with risk of cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that sRAGE levels are associated with subclinical cerebrovascular disease in an ethnically diverse population. Methods Clinically stroke-free participants in the multi-ethnic Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS) underwent brain MRI to quantify subclinical brain infarcts (SBI) and white matter hyperintensity volume (WMHV) (n=1102). Serum levels of sRAGE were measured by ELISA. Logistic and multiple linear regression were employed to estimate associations of sRAGE with SBI and WMHV, after adjusting for demographics and vascular risk factors. Results Median sRAGE levels were significantly lower in Hispanics (891.9 pg/ml; n=708) and non-Hispanic blacks (757.4 pg/ml; n=197) than in non-Hispanic whites (1120.5 pg/ml; n=170), and these differences remained after adjusting for other risk factors. Interactions were observed by race-ethnicity between sRAGE levels and MRI measurements, including for SBI in Hispanics (p=0.04) and WMHV among blacks (p=0.03). In Hispanics, increasing sRAGE levels were associated with a lower odds of SBI, with those in the upper sRAGE quartile displaying a 50% lower odds of SBI after adjusting for sociodemographic and vascular risk factors (p=0.05). Among blacks, those in the upper quartile of sRAGE had a similarly reduced increased risk of SBI (p=0.06) and greater WMHV (p=0.04). Conclusion Compared to whites, Hispanics and blacks have significantly lower sRAGE levels, and these levels were associated with more subclinical brain disease. Taken together, these findings suggest sRAGE levels may be significantly influence by ethnicity. Further studies of sRAGE and stroke risk, particularly in minoritie