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Sample records for suppressor mutations affecting

  1. Suppressors of Mutations in the rII Gene of Bacteriophage T4 Affect Promoter Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Dwight H.; Snyder, Ronald D.

    1981-01-01

    Homyk, Rodriguez and Weil (1976) have described T4 mutants, called sip, that partially suppress the inability of T4rII mutants to grow in λ lysogens. We have found that mutants sip1 and sip2 are resistant to folate analogs and overproduce FH2 reductase. The results of recombination and complementation studies indicate that sip mutations are in the mot gene. Like other mot mutations (Mattson, Richardson and Goodin 1974; Chace and Hall 1975; Sauerbier, Hercules and Hall 1976), the sip2 mutation affects the expression of many genes and appears to affect promoter utilization. The mot gene function is not required for T4 growth on most hosts, but we have found that it is required for good growth on E. coli CTr5X. Homyk, Rodriguez and Weil (1976) also described L mutations that reverse the effects of sip mutations. L2 decreases the folate analog resistance and the inability of sip2 to grow on CTr5X. L2 itself is partially resistant to a folate analog, and appears to reverse the effects of sip2 on gene expression. These results suggest that L2 affects another regulatory gene related to the mot gene. PMID:7262547

  2. Interaction between mutations in the suppressor of Hairy wing and modifier of mdg4 genes of Drosophila melanogaster affecting the phenotype of gypsy-induced mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Georgiev, P.; Kozycina, M.

    1996-02-01

    The suppressor of Hairy-wing [su(Hw)] protein mediates the mutagenic effect of the gypsy retrotransposon by repressing the function of transcriptional enhancers located distally from the promoter with respect to the position of the su(Hw)-binding region. Mutations in a second gene, modifier of mdg4, also affect the gypsy-induced phenotype. Two major effects of the mod(mdg4){sup lu1} mutation can be distinguished: the interference with insulation by the su(Hw)-binding region and direct inhibition of gene expression that is not dependent on the su(Hw)-binding region position. The mod(mdg4){sup lu1} mutation partially suppresses ct{sup 6}, sc{sup D1} and Hw{sup 1} mutations, possibly by interfering with the insulation effect of the su(Hw)-binding region. An example of the second effect of mod(mdg4){sup lu1} is a complete inactivation of yellow expression in combination with the y{sup 2} allele. Phenotypic analyses of flies with combinations of mdg(mdg4){sup lu1} and different su(Hw) mutations, or with constructions carrying deletions of the acidic domains of the su(Hw) protein, suggest that the carboxy-terminal acidic domain is important for direct inhibition of yellow transcription in bristles, while the amino-terminal acidic domain is more essential for insulation. 31 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  3. Deletions within a defective suppressor-mutator element in maize affect the frequency and developmental timing of its excision from the bronze locus.

    PubMed Central

    Schiefelbein, J W; Raboy, V; Fedoroff, N V; Nelson, O E

    1985-01-01

    Six independent derivatives of the bz-m13 allele, which contains a 2.2-kilobase-pair defective Suppressor-mutator (dSpm) insertion at the bronze (bz) locus, have been isolated and analyzed. The derivatives were selected for alterations in the frequency and timing of somatic reversion; such derivatives have previously been analyzed genetically and designated "changes in state" by McClintock [McClintock, B. (1955) Carnegie Inst. Washington, Yearb. 54, 245-255]. All of the derivatives analyzed in the present study revert substantially later in development than the original insertion mutation and some show a very low frequency of reversion as well. All of the derivatives contain insertions at the same site as the parent bz-m13 allele. Deletions of 400-1300 base pairs were found in the dSpm elements in four of the six derivatives; the remaining derivatives could not be distinguished structurally from the original mutant allele. The results suggest that changes in the frequency and developmental timing of excision are attributable to alterations in the dSpm element. Furthermore, these data suggest that DNA sequences near the ends of the element are important for responding to the two transacting functions supplied by the transposition-competent Suppressor-mutator (Spm) element. Images PMID:2991894

  4. The sua8 suppressors of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encode replacements of conserved residues within the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II and affect transcription start site selection similarly to sua7 (TFIIB) mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Berroteran, R W; Ware, D E; Hampsey, M

    1994-01-01

    Mutations in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae sua8 gene were found to be suppressors of an aberrant ATG translation initiation codon in the leader region of the cyc1 gene. Analysis of cyc1 transcripts from sua8 mutants revealed that suppression is a consequence of diminished transcription initiation at the normal start sites in favor of initiation at downstream sites, including a site between the aberrant and normal ATG start codons. This effect is not cyc1 gene specific since initiation at other genes, including ADH1, CYC7, and HIS4, was similarly affected, although initiation at HIS3 and SPT15 was unaffected. The SUA8 gene was cloned and partially sequenced, revealing identity to RPB1, which encodes the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. The sua8 suppressors are the result of single amino acid replacements of highly conserved residues. Three replacements were found either within or immediately preceding homology block D, and a fourth was found adjacent to homology block H, indicating that these regions play a role in defining start sites in vivo. Nearly identical effects on start site selection were observed for sua7 suppressors, which encode altered forms of TFIIB. Synthetic lethality was associated with double sua7 sua8 suppressor mutations, and recessive sua7 mutants failed to fully complement recessive sua8 mutants in heterozygous diploids (nonallelic noncomplementation). These data indicate that the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II and TFIIB are important determinants of transcription start site selection in S. cerevisiae and suggest that this function might be conferred by interaction between these two proteins. Images PMID:8264591

  5. Nuclear omnipotent suppressors of premature termination codons in mitochondrial genes affect the 37S mitoribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Boguta, M; Mieszczak, M; Zagórski, W

    1988-02-01

    nam3 and R705, yeast nuclear omnipotent suppressors of mitochondrial mit- mutations, reverse the superimposed spectrum of trans-recessive splicing defects by affecting the protein composition of the small mitoribosomal subunit. Analysis of the suppressor's interaction suggests that suppression results from mutations in the mitoribosomal polypeptides. These data indicate an obligatory connection between mitoribosome function and splicing of introns bI2, bI4 and aI1 in yeast mitochondria.

  6. mim3 and nam3 omnipotent suppressor genes similarly affect the polypeptide composition of yeast mitoribosomes.

    PubMed

    Mieszczak, M; Zagórski, W

    1987-05-01

    Yeast informational suppressors of mit- mutations coded for by nuclear (nam3-1, nam3-2) or by mitochondrial DNA (mim3-1) affect the mitoribosome. Nuclear mutations result in the appearance of an additional polypeptide called SI in the small mitoribosomal subunit. An identical polypeptide, not detected in the wild type 37S subunit, is present in crude preparations of mitoribosomes isolated from a mim3-1 suppressor carrying strain. Traces of the SI polypeptide may be found in highly purified small subunits from the mim3-1 strain. Therefore, mutations affecting either mitochondrial rRNA (mim3-1) or mitochondrial r-proteins (nam3-1, nam3-2) could be followed by similar changes in overall mitoribosome structure. This may explain the functional similarity of nuclear and mitochondrially coded suppressors.

  7. Genetic and Molecular Analysis of Suppressors of Ras Mutations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    mediated signal transduction pathway during C. elegans vulval development. Mutations in sur-8 were identified as suppressors of an activated let-60...positively regulates an RTK-Ras-MAP kinase signaling cascade during Caenorhabditis elegans vulval induction. Although reduction of sur-6 PP2A-B function...Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and also positively regulates an RTK-Ras-MAP kinase signaling cascade during Caenorhabditis elegans vulval induction

  8. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 gene mutation status as a prognostic biomarker in classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lennerz, Jochen K; Hoffmann, Karl; Bubolz, Anna-Maria; Lessel, Davor; Welke, Claudia; Rüther, Nele; Viardot, Andreas; Möller, Peter

    2015-10-06

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) mutations are among the most frequent somatic mutations in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), yet their prognostic relevance in cHL is unexplored. Here, we performed laser-capture microdissection of Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells from tumor samples in a cohort of 105 cHL patients. Full-length SOCS1 gene sequencing showed mutations in 61% of all cases (n = 64/105). Affected DNA-motifs and mutation pattern suggest that many of these SOCS1 mutations are the result of aberrant somatic hypermutation and we confirmed expression of mutant alleles at the RNA level. Contingency analysis showed no significant differences of patient-characteristics with HRS-cells containing mutant vs. wild-type SOCS1. By predicted mutational consequence, mutations can be separated into those with non-truncating point mutations ('minor' n = 49/64 = 77%) and those with length alteration ('major'; n = 15/64 = 23%). Subgroups did not differ in clinicopathological characteristics; however, patients with HRS-cells that contained SOCS1 major mutations suffered from early relapse and significantly shorter overall survival (P = 0.03). The SOCS1 major status retained prognostic significance in uni-(P = 0.016) and multivariate analyses (P = 0.005). Together, our data indicate that the SOCS1 mutation type qualifies as a single-gene prognostic biomarker in cHL.

  9. Tumor suppressor microRNAs are downregulated in myelodysplastic syndrome with spliceosome mutations

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Derya; Garde, Christian; Nygaard, Mette Katrine; Helbo, Alexandra Søgaard; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Hansen, Jakob Werner; Severinsen, Marianne Tang; Treppendahl, Marianne Bach; Sjø, Lene Dissing; Grønbæk, Kirsten; Kristensen, Lasse Sommer

    2016-01-01

    Spliceosome mutations are frequently observed in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, it is largely unknown how these mutations contribute to the disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs, which have been implicated in most human cancers due to their role in post transcriptional gene regulation. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of spliceosome mutations on the expression of miRNAs in a cohort of 34 MDS patients. In total, the expression of 76 miRNAs, including mirtrons and splice site overlapping miRNAs, was accurately quantified using reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR. The majority of the studied miRNAs have previously been implicated in MDS. Stably expressed miRNA genes for normalization of the data were identified using GeNorm and NormFinder algorithms. High-resolution melting assays covering all mutational hotspots within SF3B1, SRSF2, and U2AF1 (U2AF35) were developed, and all detected mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Overall, canonical miRNAs were downregulated in spliceosome mutated samples compared to wild-type (P = 0.002), and samples from spliceosome mutated patients clustered together in hierarchical cluster analyses. Among the most downregulated miRNAs were several tumor-suppressor miRNAs, including several let-7 family members, miR-423, and miR-103a. Finally, we observed that the predicted targets of the most downregulated miRNAs were involved in apoptosis, hematopoiesis, and acute myeloid leukemia among other cancer- and metabolic pathways. Our data indicate that spliceosome mutations may play an important role in MDS pathophysiology by affecting the expression of tumor suppressor miRNA genes involved in the development and progression of MDS. PMID:26848861

  10. Systematic production of inactivating and non-inactivating suppressor mutations at the relA locus that compensate the detrimental effects of complete spot loss and affect glycogen content in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Montero, Manuel; Rahimpour, Mehdi; Viale, Alejandro M; Almagro, Goizeder; Eydallin, Gustavo; Sevilla, Ángel; Cánovas, Manuel; Bernal, Cristina; Lozano, Ana Belén; Muñoz, Francisco José; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Bahaji, Abdellatif; Mori, Hirotada; Codoñer, Francisco M; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2014-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, ppGpp is a major determinant of growth and glycogen accumulation. Levels of this signaling nucleotide are controlled by the balanced activities of the ppGpp RelA synthetase and the dual-function hydrolase/synthetase SpoT. Here we report the construction of spoT null (ΔspoT) mutants obtained by transducing a ΔspoT allele from ΔrelAΔspoT double mutants into relA+ cells. Iodine staining of randomly selected transductants cultured on a rich complex medium revealed differences in glycogen content among them. Sequence and biochemical analyses of 8 ΔspoT clones displaying glycogen-deficient phenotypes revealed different inactivating mutations in relA and no detectable ppGpp when cells were cultured on a rich complex medium. Remarkably, although the co-existence of ΔspoT with relA proficient alleles has generally been considered synthetically lethal, we found that 11 ΔspoT clones displaying high glycogen phenotypes possessed relA mutant alleles with non-inactivating mutations that encoded stable RelA proteins and ppGpp contents reaching 45-85% of those of wild type cells. None of the ΔspoT clones, however, could grow on M9-glucose minimal medium. Both Sanger sequencing of specific genes and high-throughput genome sequencing of the ΔspoT clones revealed that suppressor mutations were restricted to the relA locus. The overall results (a) defined in around 4 nmoles ppGpp/g dry weight the threshold cellular levels that suffice to trigger net glycogen accumulation, (b) showed that mutations in relA, but not necessarily inactivating mutations, can be selected to compensate total SpoT function(s) loss, and (c) provided useful tools for studies of the in vivo regulation of E. coli RelA ppGpp synthetase.

  11. Systematic Production of Inactivating and Non-Inactivating Suppressor Mutations at the relA Locus That Compensate the Detrimental Effects of Complete spoT Loss and Affect Glycogen Content in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Viale, Alejandro M.; Almagro, Goizeder; Eydallin, Gustavo; Sevilla, Ángel; Cánovas, Manuel; Bernal, Cristina; Lozano, Ana Belén; Muñoz, Francisco José; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Bahaji, Abdellatif; Mori, Hirotada; Codoñer, Francisco M.; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2014-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, ppGpp is a major determinant of growth and glycogen accumulation. Levels of this signaling nucleotide are controlled by the balanced activities of the ppGpp RelA synthetase and the dual-function hydrolase/synthetase SpoT. Here we report the construction of spoT null (ΔspoT) mutants obtained by transducing a ΔspoT allele from ΔrelAΔspoT double mutants into relA+ cells. Iodine staining of randomly selected transductants cultured on a rich complex medium revealed differences in glycogen content among them. Sequence and biochemical analyses of 8 ΔspoT clones displaying glycogen-deficient phenotypes revealed different inactivating mutations in relA and no detectable ppGpp when cells were cultured on a rich complex medium. Remarkably, although the co-existence of ΔspoT with relA proficient alleles has generally been considered synthetically lethal, we found that 11 ΔspoT clones displaying high glycogen phenotypes possessed relA mutant alleles with non-inactivating mutations that encoded stable RelA proteins and ppGpp contents reaching 45–85% of those of wild type cells. None of the ΔspoT clones, however, could grow on M9-glucose minimal medium. Both Sanger sequencing of specific genes and high-throughput genome sequencing of the ΔspoT clones revealed that suppressor mutations were restricted to the relA locus. The overall results (a) defined in around 4 nmoles ppGpp/g dry weight the threshold cellular levels that suffice to trigger net glycogen accumulation, (b) showed that mutations in relA, but not necessarily inactivating mutations, can be selected to compensate total SpoT function(s) loss, and (c) provided useful tools for studies of the in vivo regulation of E. coli RelA ppGpp synthetase. PMID:25188023

  12. Suppressors of an Arabidopsis thaliana phyB mutation identify genes that control light signaling and hypocotyl elongation.

    PubMed Central

    Reed, J W; Elumalai, R P; Chory, J

    1998-01-01

    Ambient light controls the development and physiology of plants. The Arabidopsis thaliana photoreceptor phytochrome B (PHYB) regulates developmental light responses at both seedling and adult stages. To identify genes that mediate control of development by light, we screened for suppressors of the long hypocotyl phenotype caused by a phyB mutation. Genetic analyses show that the shy (short hypocotyl) mutations we have isolated fall in several loci. Phenotypes of the mutants suggest that some of the genes identified have functions in control of light responses. Other loci specifically affect cell elongation or expansion. PMID:9539443

  13. Genetic analysis of suppressors of the PF10 mutation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Dutcher, S.K.; Gibbons, W.; Inwood, W.B.

    1988-12-01

    A mutation at the PF10 locus of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii leads to abnormal cell motility. The asymmetric form of the ciliary beat stroke characteristic of wild-type flagella is modified by this mutation to a nearly symmetric beat. We report here that this abnormal motility is a conditional phenotype that depends on light intensity. In the absence of light or under low light intensities, the motility is more severely impaired than at higher light intensities. By UV mutagenesis we obtained 11 intragenic and 70 extragenic strains that show reversion of the pf10 motility phenotype observed in low light. The intragenic events reverted the motility phenotype of the pf10 mutation completely. The extragenic events define at least seven suppressor loci; these map to linkage groups IV, VII, IX, XI, XII and XVII. Suppressor mutations at two of the seven loci (LIS1 and LIS2) require light for their suppressor activity. Forty-eight of the 70 extragenic suppressors were examined in heterozygous diploid cells; 47 of these mutants were recessive to the wild-type allele and one mutant (bop5-1) was dominant to the wild-type allele. Complementation analysis of the 47 recessive mutants showed unusual patterns. Most mutants within a recombinationally defined group failed to complement one another, although there were pairs that showed intra-allelic complementation. Additionally, some of the mutants at each recombinationally defined locus failed to complement mutants at other loci. They define dominant enhancers of one another.

  14. Canine tumour suppressor gene p53--mutation in a case of adenoma of circumanal glands.

    PubMed

    Mayr, B; Schaffner, W; Botto, I; Reifinger, M; Loupal, G

    1997-07-01

    Highly conserved regions of the tumour suppressor gene p53, including the typical human tumour hot spots (codons 175, 245, 248, 249, 273 and 282), were investigated in various canine neoplasms. A mutation CGG-->TGG (arginine-->tryptophan) was detected in codon 249 in an adenoma of the circumanal gland.

  15. Canine tumour suppressor gene p53 mutation in a case of anaplastic carcinoma of the intestine.

    PubMed

    Mayr, B; Reifinger, M

    2002-01-01

    Tumours localised in the large bowel of dogs were subjected to molecular genetic studies. Highly conserved regions of the tumour suppressor gene p53, including typical tumour hot spots (codons 175, 245, 248, 249, 273 and 282), were analysed. A mutation CGG-->TGG (arginine-->tryptophan) was present in codon 249 in an anaplastic carcinoma in the caecum.

  16. Heterozygous Germline Mutations in the CBL Tumor-Suppressor Gene Cause a Noonan Syndrome-like Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Simone; De Luca, Alessandro; Stellacci, Emilia; Rossi, Cesare; Checquolo, Saula; Lepri, Francesca; Caputo, Viviana; Silvano, Marianna; Buscherini, Francesco; Consoli, Federica; Ferrara, Grazia; Digilio, Maria C.; Cavaliere, Maria L.; van Hagen, Johanna M.; Zampino, Giuseppe; van der Burgt, Ineke; Ferrero, Giovanni B.; Mazzanti, Laura; Screpanti, Isabella; Yntema, Helger G.; Nillesen, Willy M.; Savarirayan, Ravi; Zenker, Martin; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Gelb, Bruce D.; Tartaglia, Marco

    2010-01-01

    RAS signaling plays a key role in controlling appropriate cell responses to extracellular stimuli and participates in early and late developmental processes. Although enhanced flow through this pathway has been established as a major contributor to oncogenesis, recent discoveries have revealed that aberrant RAS activation causes a group of clinically related developmental disorders characterized by facial dysmorphism, a wide spectrum of cardiac disease, reduced growth, variable cognitive deficits, ectodermal and musculoskeletal anomalies, and increased risk for certain malignancies. Here, we report that heterozygous germline mutations in CBL, a tumor-suppressor gene that is mutated in myeloid malignancies and encodes a multivalent adaptor protein with E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, can underlie a phenotype with clinical features fitting or partially overlapping Noonan syndrome (NS), the most common condition of this disease family. Independent CBL mutations were identified in two sporadic cases and two families from among 365 unrelated subjects who had NS or suggestive features and were negative for mutations in previously identified disease genes. Phenotypic heterogeneity and variable expressivity were documented. Mutations were missense changes altering evolutionarily conserved residues located in the RING finger domain or the linker connecting this domain to the N-terminal tyrosine kinase binding domain, a known mutational hot spot in myeloid malignancies. Mutations were shown to affect CBL-mediated receptor ubiquitylation and dysregulate signal flow through RAS. These findings document that germline mutations in CBL alter development to cause a clinically variable condition that resembles NS and that possibly predisposes to malignancies. PMID:20619386

  17. Suppressor Mutations for Presenilin 1 Familial Alzheimer Disease Mutants Modulate γ-Secretase Activities.

    PubMed

    Futai, Eugene; Osawa, Satoko; Cai, Tetsuo; Fujisawa, Tomoya; Ishiura, Shoichi; Tomita, Taisuke

    2016-01-01

    γ-Secretase is a multisubunit membrane protein complex containing presenilin (PS1) as a catalytic subunit. Familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) mutations within PS1 were analyzed in yeast cells artificially expressing membrane-bound substrate, amyloid precursor protein, or Notch fused to Gal4 transcriptional activator. The FAD mutations, L166P and G384A (Leu-166 to Pro and Gly-384 to Ala substitution, respectively), were loss-of-function in yeast. We identified five amino acid substitutions that suppress the FAD mutations. The cleavage of amyloid precursor protein or Notch was recovered by the secondary mutations. We also found that secondary mutations alone activated the γ-secretase activity. FAD mutants with suppressor mutations, L432M or S438P within TMD9 together with a missense mutation in the second or sixth loops, regained γ-secretase activity when introduced into presenilin null mouse fibroblasts. Notably, the cells with suppressor mutants produced a decreased amount of Aβ42, which is responsible for Alzheimer disease. These results indicate that the yeast system is useful to screen for mutations and chemicals that modulate γ-secretase activity.

  18. A mutation in the neurofibromatosis type 2 tumor-suppressor gene, giving rise to widely different clinical phenotypes in two unrelated individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Bourn, D.; Carter, S.A.; Goodship, J.; Strachan, T. ); Evans, G.R.; Coakham, H.

    1994-07-01

    The authors have sought mutations in the recently identified neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) tumor-suppressor gene in a large panel of NF2 patients, using PCR-based SSCP and heteroduplex analysis, followed by cloning and sequencing of appropriate PCR products. Two unrelated NF2 patients were found to have identical nonsense mutations caused by a C-to-T transition in a CpG dinucleotide that is a potential mutational hot spot in the NF2 tumor-suppressor gene. Unexpectedly, the two individuals had widely different clinical phenotypes, representing the severe Wishart and mild Gardner clinical subtypes. Analysis of DNA samples from different tissues of the mildly affected patient suggests that he is a somatic mosaic for the mutation. 26 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Impaired suppressor activity in children affected by coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Pignata, C; Troncone, R; Monaco, G; Ciriaco, M; Farris, E; Carminati, G; Auricchio, S

    1985-01-01

    Immunoregulatory cells were enumerated in 19 coeliac disease children on a gluten free diet by means of monoclonal antibodies that define total T lymphocytes (T3), helper/inducer T cells (T4), suppressor/cytotoxic T cells (T8) and monocytes (M1), as well as by means of surface receptors for Fc fragments of IgM and IgG (T mu and T gamma, respectively). In addition, suppressor cell function was assessed in 17 coeliac disease patients by examining the ability of concanavalin-A (Con-A)-activated suppressor cells to inhibit autologous cell response to mitogenic stimulus as compared with age-matched controls. No statistically significant differences were found in the percentages of subsets defined by monoclonal antibodies between coeliac disease patients and age-matched controls, whereas coeliac disease patients had a significant decrease of the subpopulation bearing membrane receptor for Fc fragment of IgG. Mean value was 8.5% in coeliac patients versus 13.4% in age-matched controls. In the functional assay, mononuclear cells from 10 out of 17 coeliac disease patients either totally or partially failed to suppress responder cells after Con-A-activation. This defect is not related to HLA-DR status, because no difference was found between patients-HLA-matched and unmatched normal individuals. In this assay, mononuclear cells of three coeliac disease patients with low suppressor activity were able to inhibit responder cells to the same extent as controls, when indomethacin was used to block prostaglandin production in the induction phase of Con-A-activated suppressor cells. Our results suggest that an abnormality in immunoregulation may play a role in the pathogenesis of coeliac disease. PMID:3156076

  20. Mutations in ADE3 reduce the efficiency of the omnipotent suppressor sup45-2.

    PubMed

    Song, J M; Liebman, S W

    1989-12-01

    Mutations in a known yeast gene, ADE3, were shown to act as an antisuppressor, reducing the efficiency of the omnipotent suppressor, sup45-2. The ADE3 locus encodes the trifunctional enzyme C1-tetrahydrofolate synthase, which is required for the biosynthesis of purines, thymidylate, methionine, histidine, pantothenic acid and formylmethionyl-tRNA(fMet. The role of this enzyme in translational fidelity had not previously been suspected.

  1. A gripping tale of ribosomal frameshifting: extragenic suppressors of frameshift mutations spotlight P-site realignment.

    PubMed

    Atkins, John F; Björk, Glenn R

    2009-03-01

    Mutants of translation components which compensate for both -1 and +1 frameshift mutations showed the first evidence for framing malleability. Those compensatory mutants isolated in bacteria and yeast with altered tRNA or protein factors are reviewed here and are considered to primarily cause altered P-site realignment and not altered translocation. Though the first sequenced tRNA mutant which suppressed a +1 frameshift mutation had an extra base in its anticodon loop and led to a textbook "yardstick" model in which the number of anticodon bases determines codon size, this model has long been discounted, although not by all. Accordingly, the reviewed data suggest that reading frame maintenance and translocation are two distinct features of the ribosome. None of the -1 tRNA suppressors have anticodon loops with fewer than the standard seven nucleotides. Many of the tRNA mutants potentially affect tRNA bending and/or stability and can be used for functional assays, and one has the conserved C74 of the 3' CCA substituted. The effect of tRNA modification deficiencies on framing has been particularly informative. The properties of some mutants suggest the use of alternative tRNA anticodon loop stack conformations by individual tRNAs in one translation cycle. The mutant proteins range from defective release factors with delayed decoding of A-site stop codons facilitating P-site frameshifting to altered EF-Tu/EF1alpha to mutant ribosomal large- and small-subunit proteins L9 and S9. Their study is revealing how mRNA slippage is restrained except where it is programmed to occur and be utilized.

  2. Reversions to respiratory competence of omnipotent sup45 suppressor mutants may be caused by secondary sup45 mutations.

    PubMed

    Mironova, L N; Samsonova, M G; Zhouravleva, G A; Kulikov, V N; Soom, M J

    1995-02-01

    The molecular nature of the sup45 respiratory deficient omnipotent suppressor, and of three reversions to respiratory competence which removed the suppressor effect of the initial mutation, was examined. All reversions were caused by secondary sup45 mutations which indicates a direct connection between sup45 "respiratory" and "translational" functions. Computer analysis showed the local changes of Sup45 protein characteristics in the suppressor strain and revertants in comparison to the wild-type protein. The distribution of mutant sites in relation to evolutionary conserved, and tentatively functional, regions in the Sup45 protein is discussed.

  3. Gain-of-function of mutated C-CBL tumour suppressor in myeloid neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Sanada, Masashi; Suzuki, Takahiro; Shih, Lee-Yung; Otsu, Makoto; Kato, Motohiro; Yamazaki, Satoshi; Tamura, Azusa; Honda, Hiroaki; Sakata-Yanagimoto, Mamiko; Kumano, Keiki; Oda, Hideaki; Yamagata, Tetsuya; Takita, Junko; Gotoh, Noriko; Nakazaki, Kumi; Kawamata, Norihiko; Onodera, Masafumi; Nobuyoshi, Masaharu; Hayashi, Yasuhide; Harada, Hiroshi; Kurokawa, Mineo; Chiba, Shigeru; Mori, Hiraku; Ozawa, Keiya; Omine, Mitsuhiro; Hirai, Hisamaru; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Koeffler, H Phillip; Ogawa, Seishi

    2009-08-13

    Acquired uniparental disomy (aUPD) is a common feature of cancer genomes, leading to loss of heterozygosity. aUPD is associated not only with loss-of-function mutations of tumour suppressor genes, but also with gain-of-function mutations of proto-oncogenes. Here we show unique gain-of-function mutations of the C-CBL (also known as CBL) tumour suppressor that are tightly associated with aUPD of the 11q arm in myeloid neoplasms showing myeloproliferative features. The C-CBL proto-oncogene, a cellular homologue of v-Cbl, encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase and negatively regulates signal transduction of tyrosine kinases. Homozygous C-CBL mutations were found in most 11q-aUPD-positive myeloid malignancies. Although the C-CBL mutations were oncogenic in NIH3T3 cells, c-Cbl was shown to functionally and genetically act as a tumour suppressor. C-CBL mutants did not have E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, but inhibited that of wild-type C-CBL and CBL-B (also known as CBLB), leading to prolonged activation of tyrosine kinases after cytokine stimulation. c-Cbl(-/-) haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) showed enhanced sensitivity to a variety of cytokines compared to c-Cbl(+/+) HSPCs, and transduction of C-CBL mutants into c-Cbl(-/-) HSPCs further augmented their sensitivities to a broader spectrum of cytokines, including stem-cell factor (SCF, also known as KITLG), thrombopoietin (TPO, also known as THPO), IL3 and FLT3 ligand (FLT3LG), indicating the presence of a gain-of-function that could not be attributed to a simple loss-of-function. The gain-of-function effects of C-CBL mutants on cytokine sensitivity of HSPCs largely disappeared in a c-Cbl(+/+) background or by co-transduction of wild-type C-CBL, which suggests the pathogenic importance of loss of wild-type C-CBL alleles found in most cases of C-CBL-mutated myeloid neoplasms. Our findings provide a new insight into a role of gain-of-function mutations of a tumour suppressor associated with aUPD in the pathogenesis of

  4. Identification of new adventitious rooting mutants amongst suppressors of the Arabidopsis thaliana superroot2 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Pacurar, Daniel Ioan; Pacurar, Monica Lacramioara; Schwambach, Joseli; Bellini, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The plant hormone auxin plays a central role in adventitious rooting and is routinely used with many economically important, vegetatively propagated plant species to promote adventitious root initiation and development on cuttings. Nevertheless the molecular mechanisms through which it acts are only starting to emerge. The Arabidopsis superroot2-1 (sur2-1) mutant overproduces auxin and, as a consequence, develops excessive adventitious roots in the hypocotyl. In order to increase the knowledge of adventitious rooting and of auxin signalling pathways and crosstalk, this study performed a screen for suppressors of superroot2-1 phenotype. These suppressors provide a new resource for discovery of genetic players involved in auxin signalling pathways or at the crosstalk of auxin and other hormones or environmental signals. This study reports the identification and characterization of 26 sur2-1 suppressor mutants, several of which were identified as mutations in candidate genes involved in either auxin biosynthesis or signalling. In addition to confirming the role of auxin as a central regulator of adventitious rooting, superroot2 suppressors indicated possible crosstalk with ethylene signalling in this process. PMID:24596172

  5. Tumor-Derived Suppressor of Fused Mutations Reveal Hedgehog Pathway Interactions.

    PubMed

    Urman, Nicole M; Mirza, Amar; Atwood, Scott X; Whitson, Ramon J; Sarin, Kavita Y; Tang, Jean Y; Oro, Anthony E

    2016-01-01

    The Hedgehog pathway is a potent regulator of cellular growth and plays a central role in the development of many cancers including basal cell carcinoma (BCC). The majority of BCCs arise from mutations in the Patched receptor resulting in constitutive activation of the Hedgehog pathway. Secondary driver mutations promote BCC oncogenesis and occur frequently due to the high mutational burden resulting from sun exposure of the skin. Here, we uncover novel secondary mutations in Suppressor of Fused (SUFU), the major negative regulator of the Hedgehog pathway. SUFU normally binds to a Hedgehog transcriptional activator, GLI1, in order to prevent it from initiating transcription of Hedgehog target genes. We sequenced tumor-normal pairs from patients with early sporadic BCCs. This resulted in the discovery of nine mutations in SUFU, which were functionally investigated to determine whether they help drive BCC formation. Our results show that four of the SUFU mutations inappropriately activate the Hedgehog pathway, suggesting they may act as driver mutations for BCC development. Indeed, all four of the loss of function SUFU variants were found to disrupt its binding to GLI, leading to constitutive pathway activation. Our results from functional characterization of these mutations shed light on SUFU's role in Hedgehog signaling, tumor progression, and highlight a way in which BCCs can arise.

  6. Tumor-Derived Suppressor of Fused Mutations Reveal Hedgehog Pathway Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Urman, Nicole M.; Mirza, Amar; Atwood, Scott X.; Whitson, Ramon J.; Sarin, Kavita Y.; Tang, Jean Y.; Oro, Anthony E.

    2016-01-01

    The Hedgehog pathway is a potent regulator of cellular growth and plays a central role in the development of many cancers including basal cell carcinoma (BCC). The majority of BCCs arise from mutations in the Patched receptor resulting in constitutive activation of the Hedgehog pathway. Secondary driver mutations promote BCC oncogenesis and occur frequently due to the high mutational burden resulting from sun exposure of the skin. Here, we uncover novel secondary mutations in Suppressor of Fused (SUFU), the major negative regulator of the Hedgehog pathway. SUFU normally binds to a Hedgehog transcriptional activator, GLI1, in order to prevent it from initiating transcription of Hedgehog target genes. We sequenced tumor-normal pairs from patients with early sporadic BCCs. This resulted in the discovery of nine mutations in SUFU, which were functionally investigated to determine whether they help drive BCC formation. Our results show that four of the SUFU mutations inappropriately activate the Hedgehog pathway, suggesting they may act as driver mutations for BCC development. Indeed, all four of the loss of function SUFU variants were found to disrupt its binding to GLI, leading to constitutive pathway activation. Our results from functional characterization of these mutations shed light on SUFU’s role in Hedgehog signaling, tumor progression, and highlight a way in which BCCs can arise. PMID:28030567

  7. PCR-RFLP to Detect Codon 248 Mutation in Exon 7 of "p53" Tumor Suppressor Gene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouyang, Liming; Ge, Chongtao; Wu, Haizhen; Li, Suxia; Zhang, Huizhan

    2009-01-01

    Individual genome DNA was extracted fast from oral swab and followed up with PCR specific for codon 248 of "p53" tumor suppressor gene. "Msp"I restriction mapping showed the G-C mutation in codon 248, which closely relates to cancer susceptibility. Students learn the concepts, detection techniques, and research significance of point mutations or…

  8. RNF43 is a tumour suppressor gene mutated in mucinous tumours of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Ryland, Georgina L; Hunter, Sally M; Doyle, Maria A; Rowley, Simone M; Christie, Michael; Allan, Prue E; Bowtell, David D L; Gorringe, Kylie L; Campbell, Ian G

    2013-02-01

    Mucinous carcinomas represent a distinct morphological subtype which can arise from several organ sites, including the ovary, and their genetic characteristics are largely under-described. Exome sequencing of 12 primary mucinous ovarian tumours identified RNF43 as the most frequently somatically mutated novel gene, secondary to KRAS and mutated at a frequency equal to that of TP53 and BRAF. Further screening of RNF43 in a larger cohort of ovarian tumours identified additional mutations, with a total frequency of 2/22 (9%) in mucinous ovarian borderline tumours and 6/29 (21%) in mucinous ovarian carcinomas. Seven mutations were predicted to truncate the protein and one missense mutation was predicted to be deleterious by in silico analysis. Six tumours had allelic imbalance at the RNF43 locus, with loss of the wild-type allele. The mutation spectrum strongly suggests that RNF43 is an important tumour suppressor gene in mucinous ovarian tumours, similar to its reported role in mucinous pancreatic precancerous cysts.

  9. Identification of new mutations in the NF2 tumor suppressor gene in schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Guida, M.; Welling, B.; Prior, T.W.

    1994-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is a severe genetic disorder with an incidence of approximately 1 in 40,000 individuals and is characterized by the formation of multiple benign nervous system tumors. The clinical hallmark of NF2 is the bilateral occurrence of schwannomas on the eighth cranial nerve (vestibular schwannomas). Recently, it has been shown that loss or inactivation of a tumor suppressor gene located in chromosome band 22q12 is the molecular cause of NF2 tumorigenesis. Also, mutations in the NF2 gene have now been identified in patients with sporadic vestibular schwannomas (unilateral schwannomas). We have completed the screening of 80% of the NF2 coding sequence of DNA from 13 sporadic schwannomas and 2 schwannomas from NF2 patients. Using heteroduplex analysis and direct sequencing, we found 13 novel mutations located in 7 different exons with a small cluster (46% of the mutations) located in the central portion of the gene. All of the mutations were unique to single patients. In three tumors, both NF2 alleles were mutated. The types of mutations found include: small deletions ranging from 1 to 30 base pairs, nonsense mutations, a single missense mutation and a splice donor site alteration. It appears that small deletions are the most common type of NF2 gene mutation. We also have developed a dosage test based on quantitative PCR and hybridization with specific probes to detect the loss of heterozygosity. We found that 7 out of 15 schwannomas (47%) show loss of heterozygosity. We are currently extending the analysis to all of the NF2 exons and DNA from 60 additional schwannomas.

  10. crl mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae resemble both mutants affecting general control of amino acid biosynthesis and omnipotent translational suppressor mutants.

    PubMed

    McCusker, J H; Haber, J E

    1988-06-01

    Cyocloheximide resistant lethal (crl) mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, defining 22 unlinked complementation groups, are unable to grow at 37 degrees. They are also highly pleiotropic at their permissive temperature of 25 degrees. The mutants are all unable to arrest at the G1 stage of the cell cycle when grown to stationary phase or when starved for a single amino acid, though they do arrest at G1 when deprived of all nitrogen. The crl mutants are also hypersensitive to various amino acid analogs and to 3-aminotriazole. These mutants also "tighten" leaky auxotrophic mutations that permit wild-type cells to grow in the absence of the appropriate amino acid. All of these phenotypes are also exhibited by gcn mutants affecting general control of amino acid biosynthesis. In addition, the crl mutants are all hypersensitive to hygromycin B, an aminoglycoside antibiotic that stimulates translational misreading. The crl mutations also suppress one nonsense mutation which is phenotypically suppressed by hygromycin B. Many crl mutants are also osmotically sensitive. These are phenotypes which the crl mutations have in common with previously isolated omnipotent suppressors. We suggest that the the crl mutations all affect the fidelity of protein translation.

  11. Isolation and characterization of a suppressor mutation that restores Myxococcus xanthus exopolysaccharide production

    PubMed Central

    Black, Wesley P.; Xu, Qian; Cadieux, Christena Linn; Suh, Sang-Jin; Shi, Wenyuan; Yang, Zhaomin

    2009-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus, a Gram-negative soil bacterium, undergoes multicellular development when nutrients become limiting. Aggregation, which is part of the developmental process, requires the surface motility of this organism. One component of M. xanthus motility, the social (S) gliding motility, enables the movement of cells in close physical proximity. Previous studies demonstrated that the cell surface-associated exopolysaccharide (EPS) is essential for S motility and that the Dif proteins form a chemotaxis-like pathway that regulates EPS production in M. xanthus. DifA, a homologue of methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) in the Dif system, is required for EPS production, S motility and development. In this study, a spontaneous extragenic suppressor of a difA deletion was isolated in order to identify additional regulators of EPS production. The suppressor mutation was found to be a single base pair insertion in cheW7 at the che7 chemotaxis gene cluster. Further examination indicated that mutations in cheW7 may lead to the interaction of Mcp7 with DifC (CheW-like) and DifE (CheA-like) to reconstruct a functional pathway to regulate EPS production in the absence of DifA. In addition, the cheW7 mutation was found to partially suppress a pilA mutation in EPS production in a difA+ background. Further deletion of difA from the pilA cheW7 double mutant resulted in a triple mutant that produced wild-type levels of EPS, implying that DifA (MCP-like) and Mcp7 compete for interactions with DifC and DifE in the modulation of EPS production. PMID:19684067

  12. Isolation and characterization of a suppressor mutation that restores Myxococcus xanthus exopolysaccharide production.

    PubMed

    Black, Wesley P; Xu, Qian; Cadieux, Christena Linn; Suh, Sang-Jin; Shi, Wenyuan; Yang, Zhaomin

    2009-11-01

    Myxococcus xanthus, a Gram-negative soil bacterium, undergoes multicellular development when nutrients become limiting. Aggregation, which is part of the developmental process, requires the surface motility of this organism. One component of M. xanthus motility, the social (S) gliding motility, enables the movement of cells in close physical proximity. Previous studies demonstrated that the cell surface-associated exopolysaccharide (EPS) is essential for S motility and that the Dif proteins form a chemotaxis-like pathway that regulates EPS production in M. xanthus. DifA, a homologue of methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) in the Dif system, is required for EPS production, S motility and development. In this study, a spontaneous extragenic suppressor of a difA deletion was isolated in order to identify additional regulators of EPS production. The suppressor mutation was found to be a single base pair insertion in cheW7 at the che7 chemotaxis gene cluster. Further examination indicated that mutations in cheW7 may lead to the interaction of Mcp7 with DifC (CheW-like) and DifE (CheA-like) to reconstruct a functional pathway to regulate EPS production in the absence of DifA. In addition, the cheW7 mutation was found to partially suppress a pilA mutation in EPS production in a difA(+) background. Further deletion of difA from the pilA cheW7 double mutant resulted in a triple mutant that produced wild-type levels of EPS, implying that DifA (MCP-like) and Mcp7 compete for interactions with DifC and DifE in the modulation of EPS production.

  13. Domain Interactions in the Yeast ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Ycf1p: Intragenic Suppressor Analysis of Mutations in the Nucleotide Binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Falcón-Pérez, Juan M.; Martínez-Burgos, Mónica; Molano, Jesús; Mazón, María J.; Eraso, Pilar

    2001-01-01

    The yeast cadmium factor (Ycf1p) is a vacuolar ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter required for heavy metal and drug detoxification. Cluster analysis shows that Ycf1p is strongly related to the human multidrug-associated protein (MRP1) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and therefore may serve as an excellent model for the study of eukaryotic ABC transporter structure and function. Identifying intramolecular interactions in these transporters may help to elucidate energy transfer mechanisms during transport. To identify regions in Ycf1p that may interact to couple ATPase activity to substrate binding and/or movement across the membrane, we sought intragenic suppressors of ycf1 mutations that affect highly conserved residues presumably involved in ATP binding and/or hydrolysis. Thirteen intragenic second-site suppressors were identified for the D777N mutation which affects the invariant Asp residue in the Walker B motif of the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1). Two of the suppressor mutations (V543I and F565L) are located in the first transmembrane domain (TMD1), nine (A1003V, A1021T, A1021V, N1027D, Q1107R, G1207D, G1207S, S1212L, and W1225C) are found within TMD2, one (S674L) is in NBD1, and another one (R1415G) is in NBD2, indicating either physical proximity or functional interactions between NBD1 and the other three domains. The original D777N mutant protein exhibits a strong defect in the apparent affinity for ATP and Vmax of transport. The phenotypic characterization of the suppressor mutants shows that suppression does not result from restoring these alterations but rather from a change in substrate specificity. We discuss the possible involvement of Asp777 in coupling ATPase activity to substrate binding and/or transport across the membrane. PMID:11466279

  14. Brooke-Spiegler syndrome: report of two cases not associated with a mutation in the CYLD and PTCH tumor-suppressor genes.

    PubMed

    Ponti, Giovanni; Nasti, Sabina; Losi, Lorena; Pastorino, Lorenza; Pollio, Annamaria; Benassi, Luisa; Giudice, Stefania; Bertazzoni, Giorgia; Veratti, Eugenia; Azzoni, Paola; Bianchi Scarrà, Giovanna; Seidenari, Stefania

    2012-03-01

    Brooke-Spiegler syndrome represents an autosomal dominant disease characterized by the occurrence of multiple cylindromas, trichoepitheliomas and (sporadically) spiroadenomas. Patients with Brooke-Spiegler syndrome are also at risk of developing tumors of the major and minor salivary glands. Patients with Brooke-Spiegler syndrome have various mutations in the CYLD gene, a tumor-suppressor gene located on chromosome 16q. To date, 68 unique CYLD mutations have been identified. We describe two families with Brooke-Spiegler syndrome, one with familial cylindromatosis and one with multiple familial trichoepithelioma, which showed wide inter-family phenotypic variability. Analysis of germline mutations of the CYLD and PTCH genes was performed using peripheral blood. In addition, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples were analyzed for PTCH somatic mutations and cylindroma cell cultures were obtained directly from patients for further growth and analysis. Clinically, the major features of Brooke-Spiegler syndrome include the presence of heterogeneous skin tumors and wide inter- and intra-familial phenotypic variability. Histopathologically, both cylindromas and trichoepitheliomas were found in affected individuals. Mutations or loss of heterozygosity was not found in CYLD and PTCH genes. In CYLD and PTCH mutation-negative patients, other genes may be affected and further studies are needed to clarify whether these patients may be affected by de novo germline mutations.

  15. Intragenic suppressor mutations restore GTPase and translation functions of a eukaryotic initiation factor 5B switch II mutant.

    PubMed

    Shin, Byung-Sik; Acker, Michael G; Maag, David; Kim, Joo-Ran; Lorsch, Jon R; Dever, Thomas E

    2007-03-01

    Structural studies of GTP-binding proteins identified the Switch I and Switch II elements as contacting the gamma-phosphate of GTP and undergoing marked conformational changes upon GTP versus GDP binding. Movement of a universally conserved Gly at the N terminus of Switch II is thought to trigger the structural rearrangement of this element. Consistently, we found that mutation of this Gly in the Switch II element of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5B (eIF5B) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae impaired cell growth and the guanine nucleotide-binding, GTPase, and ribosomal subunit joining activities of eIF5B. In a screen for mutations that bypassed the critical requirement for this Switch II Gly in eIF5B, intragenic suppressors were identified in the Switch I element and at a residue in domain II of eIF5B that interacts with Switch II. The intragenic suppressors restored yeast cell growth and eIF5B nucleotide-binding, GTP hydrolysis, and subunit joining activities. We propose that the Switch II mutation distorts the geometry of the GTP-binding active site, impairing nucleotide binding and the eIF5B domain movements associated with GTP binding. Accordingly, the Switch I and domain II suppressor mutations induce Switch II to adopt a conformation favorable for nucleotide binding and hydrolysis and thereby reestablish coupling between GTP binding and eIF5B domain movements.

  16. A 168 bp derivative of Suppressor-mutator/Enhancer is responsible for the maize o2-23 mutation.

    PubMed

    Aukerman, M J; Schmidt, R J

    1993-01-01

    From a directed transposon tagging of the maize Opaque-2 gene (O2), we have isolated a stable mutant o2 allele, o2-23. Cloning and molecular analysis of the allele revealed a 168 nucleotide insertion in the third exon of o2. The sequence of this small insertion indicated identity with the 5' and 3' ends of the 8.3 kb Suppressor-mutator/Enhancer (Spm/En) transposable element. This represents the smallest deletion derivative of Spm (dSpm) thus far characterized in maize. Genetic crosses of plants homozygous for o2-23 with plants homozygous for both an o2 null allele (o2-R) and an autonomous Spm produce stable opaque seed having no apparent sectors of vitreous endosperm. DNA fragments of the size expected if the dSpm were to excise were not detectable by Southern analysis, suggesting that this element is unable to transpose. Northern analysis detected an o2-23 mRNA that was much more abundant in o2-23 seeds lacking Spm than in o2-23 seeds containing Spm, consistent with the idea that Spm transacting functions can suppress the accumulation of the o2-23 transcript.

  17. Chemokine-enhanced chemotaxis of lymphangioleiomyomatosis cells with mutations in the tumor suppressor TSC2 gene.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Rodriguez, Gustavo; Kumaki, Fumiyuki; Steagall, Wendy K; Zhang, Yi; Ikeda, Yoshihiko; Lin, Jing-Ping; Billings, Eric M; Moss, Joel

    2009-02-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is characterized by cystic lung destruction caused by LAM cells (smooth-muscle-like cells) that have mutations in the tumor suppressor genes tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) 1 or 2 and have the capacity to metastasize. Since chemokines and their receptors function in chemotaxis of metastatic cells, we hypothesized that LAM cells may be recruited by chemokine(s) in the lung. Quantification of 25 chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from LAM patients and healthy volunteers revealed that concentrations of CCL2, CXCL1, and CXCL5 were significantly higher in samples from LAM patients than those from healthy volunteers. In vitro, CCL2 or MCP-1 induced selective migration of cells, showing loss of heterozygosity of TSC2 from a heterogeneous population of cells grown from explanted LAM lungs. Additionally, the frequencies of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the CCL2 gene promoter region differed significantly in LAM patients and healthy volunteers (p = 0.018), and one polymorphism was associated significantly more frequently with the decline of lung function. The presence (i.e., potential functionality) of chemokine receptors was evaluated using immunohistochemistry in lung sections from 30 LAM patients. Expression of chemokines and these receptors varied among LAM patients and differed from that seen in some cancers (e.g., breast cancer and melanoma cells). These observations are consistent with the notion that chemokines such as CCL2 may serve to determine mobility and specify the site of metastasis of the LAM cell.

  18. Multiple independent defective suppressor-mutator transposon insertions in Arabidopsis: a tool for functional genomics.

    PubMed Central

    Tissier, A F; Marillonnet, S; Klimyuk, V; Patel, K; Torres, M A; Murphy, G; Jones, J D

    1999-01-01

    A new system for insertional mutagenesis based on the maize Enhancer/Suppressor-mutator (En/Spm) element was introduced into Arabidopsis. A single T-DNA construct carried a nonautonomous defective Spm (dSpm) element with a phosphinothricin herbicide resistance (BAR) gene, a transposase expression cassette, and a counterselectable gene. This construct was used to select for stable dSpm transpositions. Treatments for both positive (BAR) and negative selection markers were applicable to soil-grown plants, allowing the recovery of new transpositions on a large scale. To date, a total of 48,000 lines in pools of 50 have been recovered, of which approximately 80% result from independent insertion events. DNA extracted from these pools was used in reverse genetic screens, either by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers from the transposon and the targeted gene or by the display of insertions whereby inverse PCR products of insertions from the DNA pools are spotted on a membrane that is then hybridized with the probe of interest. By sequencing PCR-amplified fragments adjacent to insertion sites, we established a sequenced insertion-site database of 1200 sequences. This database permitted a comparison of the chromosomal distribution of transpositions from various T-DNA locations. PMID:10521516

  19. Mutations in NOTCH1 PEST-domain orchestrate CCL19-driven homing of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia cells by modulating the tumor suppressor gene DUSP22.

    PubMed

    Arruga, F; Gizdic, B; Bologna, C; Cignetto, S; Buonincontri, R; Serra, S; Vaisitti, T; Gizzi, K; Vitale, N; Garaffo, G; Mereu, E; Diop, F; Neri, F; Incarnato, D; Coscia, M; Allan, J; Piva, R; Oliviero, S; Furman, R R; Rossi, D; Gaidano, G; Deaglio, S

    2016-12-26

    Even if NOTCH1 is commonly mutated in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), its functional impact in the disease remains unclear. Using CRISPR/Cas9-generated Mec-1 cell line models, we show that NOTCH1 regulates growth and homing of CLL cells by dictating expression levels of the tumor suppressor gene DUSP22. Specifically, NOTCH1 affects the methylation of DUSP22 promoter by modulating a nuclear complex, which tunes the activity of DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A). These effects are enhanced by PEST-domain mutations, which stabilize the molecule and prolong signaling. CLL patients with a NOTCH1-mutated clone showed low levels of DUSP22 and active chemotaxis to CCL19. Lastly, in xenograft models, NOTCH1-mutated cells displayed a unique homing behavior, localizing preferentially to the spleen and brain. These findings connect NOTCH1, DUSP22, and CCL19-driven chemotaxis within a single functional network, suggesting that modulation of the homing process may provide a relevant contribution to the unfavorable prognosis associated with NOTCH1 mutations in CLL.Leukemia accepted article preview online, 26 December 2016. doi:10.1038/leu.2016.383.

  20. Suppressor mutations in the Glutamine Dumper1 protein dissociate disturbance in amino acid transport from other characteristics of the Gdu1D phenotype.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shi; Pratelli, Réjane; Denbow, Cynthia; Pilot, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular amino acid transport across plant membranes is critical for metabolic pathways which are often split between different organelles. In addition, transport of amino acids across the plasma membrane enables the distribution of organic nitrogen through the saps between leaves and developing organs. Amino acid importers have been studied for more than two decades, and their role in this process is well-documented. While equally important, amino acid exporters are not well-characterized. The over-expression of GDU1, encoding a small membrane protein with one transmembrane domain, leads to enhancement of amino acid export by Arabidopsis cells, glutamine secretion at the leaf margin, early senescence and size reduction of the plant, possibly caused by the stimulation of amino acid exporter(s). Previous work reported the identification of suppressor mutations of the GDU1 over-expression phenotype, which affected the GDU1 and LOG2 genes, the latter encoding a membrane-bound ubiquitin ligase interacting with GDU1. The present study focuses on the characterization of three additional suppressor mutations affecting GDU1. Size, phenotype, glutamine transport and amino acid tolerance were recorded for recapitulation plants and over-expressors of mutagenized GDU1 proteins. Unexpectedly, the over-expression of most mutated GDU1 led to plants with enhanced amino acid export, but failing to display secretion of glutamine and size reduction. The results show that the various effects triggered by GDU1 over-expression can be dissociated from one another by mutagenizing specific residues. The fact that these residues are not necessarily conserved suggests that the diverse biochemical properties of the GDU1 protein are not only born by the characterized transmembrane and VIMAG domains. These data provide a better understanding of the structure/function relationships of GDU1 and may enable modifying amino acid export in plants without detrimental effects on plant fitness.

  1. Suppressors of a Host Range Mutation in the Rabbitpox Virus Serpin SPI-1 Map to Proteins Essential for Viral DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Luttge, Benjamin G.; Moyer, Richard W.

    2005-01-01

    The orthopoxvirus serpin SPI-1 is an intracellular serine protease inhibitor that is active against cathepsin G in vitro. Rabbitpox virus (RPV) mutants with deletions of the SPI-1 gene grow on monkey kidney cells (CV-1) but do not plaque on normally permissive human lung carcinoma cells (A549). This reduced-host-range (hr) phenotype suggests that SPI-1 may interact with cellular and/or other viral proteins. We devised a genetic screen for suppressors of SPI-1 hr mutations by first introducing a mutation into SPI-1 (T309R) at residue P14 of the serpin reactive center loop. The SPI-1 T309R serpin is inactive as a protease inhibitor in vitro. Introduction of the mutation into RPV leads to the same restricted hr phenotype as deletion of the SPI-1 gene. Second-site suppressors were selected by restoration of growth of the RPV SPI-1 T309R hr mutant on A549 cells. Both intragenic and extragenic suppressors of the T309R mutation were identified. One novel intragenic suppressor mutation, T309C, restored protease inhibition by SPI-1 in vitro. Extragenic suppressor mutations were mapped by a new procedure utilizing overlapping PCR products encompassing the entire genome in conjunction with marker rescue. One suppressor mutation, which also rendered the virus temperature sensitive for growth, mapped to the DNA polymerase gene (E9L). Several other suppressors mapped to gene D5R, an NTPase required for DNA replication. These results unexpectedly suggest that the host range function of SPI-1 may be associated with viral DNA replication by an as yet unknown mechanism. PMID:15994811

  2. Suppressors of a host range mutation in the rabbitpox virus serpin SPI-1 map to proteins essential for viral DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Luttge, Benjamin G; Moyer, Richard W

    2005-07-01

    The orthopoxvirus serpin SPI-1 is an intracellular serine protease inhibitor that is active against cathepsin G in vitro. Rabbitpox virus (RPV) mutants with deletions of the SPI-1 gene grow on monkey kidney cells (CV-1) but do not plaque on normally permissive human lung carcinoma cells (A549). This reduced-host-range (hr) phenotype suggests that SPI-1 may interact with cellular and/or other viral proteins. We devised a genetic screen for suppressors of SPI-1 hr mutations by first introducing a mutation into SPI-1 (T309R) at residue P14 of the serpin reactive center loop. The SPI-1 T309R serpin is inactive as a protease inhibitor in vitro. Introduction of the mutation into RPV leads to the same restricted hr phenotype as deletion of the SPI-1 gene. Second-site suppressors were selected by restoration of growth of the RPV SPI-1 T309R hr mutant on A549 cells. Both intragenic and extragenic suppressors of the T309R mutation were identified. One novel intragenic suppressor mutation, T309C, restored protease inhibition by SPI-1 in vitro. Extragenic suppressor mutations were mapped by a new procedure utilizing overlapping PCR products encompassing the entire genome in conjunction with marker rescue. One suppressor mutation, which also rendered the virus temperature sensitive for growth, mapped to the DNA polymerase gene (E9L). Several other suppressors mapped to gene D5R, an NTPase required for DNA replication. These results unexpectedly suggest that the host range function of SPI-1 may be associated with viral DNA replication by an as yet unknown mechanism.

  3. The LKB1 tumor suppressor differentially affects anchorage independent growth of HPV positive cervical cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, Hildegard I.D.; Munger, Karl

    2013-11-15

    Infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses is causally linked to cervical carcinogenesis. However, most lesions caused by high-risk HPV infections do not progress to cancer. Host cell mutations contribute to malignant progression but the molecular nature of such mutations is unknown. Based on a previous study that reported an association between liver kinase B1 (LKB1) tumor suppressor loss and poor outcome in cervical cancer, we sought to determine the molecular basis for this observation. LKB1-negative cervical and lung cancer cells were reconstituted with wild type or kinase defective LKB1 mutants and we examined the importance of LKB1 catalytic activity in known LKB1-regulated processes including inhibition of cell proliferation and elevated resistance to energy stress. Our studies revealed marked differences in the biological activities of two kinase defective LKB1 mutants in the various cell lines. Thus, our results suggest that LKB1 may be a cell-type specific tumor suppressor. - Highlights: • LKB1 is a tumor suppressor that is linked to Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. • Peutz-Jeghers syndrome patients have a high incidence of cervical cancer. • Cervical cancer is caused by HPV infections. • This study investigates LKB1 tumor suppressor activity in cervical cancer.

  4. Mutations affecting enzymatic activity in liver arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Vockley, J.G.; Tabor, D.E.; Goodman, B.K.

    1994-09-01

    The hydrolysis of arginine to ornithine and urea is catalyzed by arginase in the last step of the urea cycle. We examined a group of arginase deficient patients by PCR-SSCP analysis to characterize the molecular basis of this disorder. A heterogeneous population of nonsense mutations, microdeletions, and missense mutations has been identified in our cohort. Microdeletions which introduce premature stop codons downstream of the deletion and nonsense mutations result in no arginase activity. These mutations occur randomly along the gene. The majority of missense mutations identified appear to occur in regions of high cross-species homology. To test the effect of these missense mutations on arginase activity, site-directed mutagenesis was used to re-create the patient mutations for in vivo expression studies in a prokaryotic fusion-protein expression system. Of 4 different missense mutations identified in 6 individuals, only one was located outside of a conserved region. The three substitution mutations within the conserved regions had a significant effect on enzymatic activity (0-3.1 nmole/30min, normal is 1300-1400 nmoles/30min, as determined by in vitro arginase assay), while the fourth mutation, a T to S substitution, did not. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis was utilized to create mutations not in residues postulated to play a significant role in the enzymatic function or active site formation in manganese-binding proteins such as arginase. We have determined that the substitution of glycine for a histidine residue, located in a very highly conserved region of exon 3, and the substitution of a histidine and an aspartic acid residue within a similarly conserved region in exon 4, totally abolishes enzymatic activity. Mutations substituting glycine for an additional histidine and aspartic acid residue in exon 4 and two aspartic acid residues in exon 7 have also been created. We are currently in the process of characterizing these mutations.

  5. Mutation of von Hippel–Lindau Tumour Suppressor and Human Cardiopulmonary Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Thomas G; Brooks, Jerome T; Balanos, George M; Lappin, Terence R; Layton, D. Mark; Leedham, Dawn L; Liu, Chun; Maxwell, Patrick H; McMullin, Mary F; McNamara, Christopher J; Percy, Melanie J; Pugh, Christopher W; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Talbot, Nick P; Treacy, Marilyn; Robbins, Peter A

    2006-01-01

    Background The von Hippel–Lindau tumour suppressor protein–hypoxia-inducible factor (VHL–HIF) pathway has attracted widespread medical interest as a transcriptional system controlling cellular responses to hypoxia, yet insights into its role in systemic human physiology remain limited. Chuvash polycythaemia has recently been defined as a new form of VHL-associated disease, distinct from the classical VHL-associated inherited cancer syndrome, in which germline homozygosity for a hypomorphic VHL allele causes a generalised abnormality in VHL–HIF signalling. Affected individuals thus provide a unique opportunity to explore the integrative physiology of this signalling pathway. This study investigated patients with Chuvash polycythaemia in order to analyse the role of the VHL–HIF pathway in systemic human cardiopulmonary physiology. Methods and Findings Twelve participants, three with Chuvash polycythaemia and nine controls, were studied at baseline and during hypoxia. Participants breathed through a mouthpiece, and pulmonary ventilation was measured while pulmonary vascular tone was assessed echocardiographically. Individuals with Chuvash polycythaemia were found to have striking abnormalities in respiratory and pulmonary vascular regulation. Basal ventilation and pulmonary vascular tone were elevated, and ventilatory, pulmonary vasoconstrictive, and heart rate responses to acute hypoxia were greatly increased. Conclusions The features observed in this small group of patients with Chuvash polycythaemia are highly characteristic of those associated with acclimatisation to the hypoxia of high altitude. More generally, the phenotype associated with Chuvash polycythaemia demonstrates that VHL plays a major role in the underlying calibration and homeostasis of the respiratory and cardiovascular systems, most likely through its central role in the regulation of HIF. PMID:16768548

  6. Factors affecting the nature of induced mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L.B.; Russell, W.L.; Rinchik, E.M.; Hunsicker, P.R.

    1989-01-01

    The recent considerable expansion of specific-locus-mutation data has made possible an examination of the effects of germ-cell stage on both quantity of mutation yield and nature of mutations. For chemicals mutagenic in poststem-cell stages, three patterns have been identified according to the stages in which they elicit maximum response: (1) early spermatozoa and late spermatids; (2) early spermatids; and (3) differentiating spermatogonia. The majority of chemicals tested fall into Pattern 1. Chemicals that are also mutagenic in stem-cell spermatogonia do not preferentially belong to any one of these three categories. For only one chemical (CHL) has an entire set of mutations been analyzed molecularly. However, the results of genetic and molecular analyses of genomic regions surrounding six of the specific-locus markers allow us to conclude that any mutation that causes lethality of homozygotes (in the case of d, prenatal lethality, specifically) must involve one or more loci in addition to the marked one. Such mutations have been classified as large lesions'' (LL), the remainder as other lesions'' (OL). Analysis of the data shows that, regardless of the nature of the chemical (Pattern-1, -2, or -3), (1) LLs constitute a very low proportion of the mutations induced in either stem-cell or differentiating spermatogonia, and (b) LLs constitute a high proportion of mutations induced in postmeiotic stages. Chemicals that are active in both pre- and postmeiotic stages produce LL or OL mutations depending on cell stage.

  7. Tumour suppressor gene p53 mutation in a case of haemangiosarcoma of a dog.

    PubMed

    Mayr, B; Zwetkoff, S; Schaffner, G; Reifinger, M

    2002-01-01

    Haemangiosarcomas of dogs were analysed by molecular genetic techniques. Regions of the tumour suppressor gene p53, including the well-known tumour hot spots (codons 175, 245, 248, 249, 273 and 282) were screened. A 24 bp deletion was detected in exon 5 of the gene.

  8. Nonsense suppressor therapies rescue peroxisome lipid metabolism and assembly in cells from patients with specific PEX gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Dranchak, Patricia K.; Di Pietro, Erminia; Snowden, Ann; Oesch, Nathan; Braverman, Nancy E.; Steinberg, Steven J.; Hacia, Joseph G.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxisome biogenesis disorders (PBDs) are multisystemic autosomal recessive disorders resulting from mutations in PEX genes required for normal peroxisome assembly and metabolic activities. Here, we evaluated the potential effectiveness of aminoglycoside G418 (geneticin) and PTC124 (ataluren) nonsense suppression therapies for the treatment of PBD patients with disease-causing nonsense mutations. PBD patient skin fibroblasts producing stable PEX2 or PEX12 nonsense transcripts and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with a Pex2 nonsense allele all showed dramatic improvements in peroxisomal very long chain fatty acid catabolism and plasmalogen biosynthesis in response to G418 treatments. Cell imaging assays provided complementary confirmatory evidence of improved peroxisome assembly in G418-treated patient fibroblasts. In contrast, we observed no appreciable rescue of peroxisome lipid metabolism or assembly for any patient fibroblast or CHO cell culture treated with various doses of PTC124. Additionally, PTC124 did not show measurable nonsense suppression in immunoblot assays that directly evaluated the read-through of PEX7 nonsense alleles found in PBD patients with rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata type 1 (RCDP1). Overall, our results support the continued development of safe and effective nonsense suppressor therapies that could benefit a significant subset of individuals with PBDs. Furthermore, we suggest that the described cell culture assay systems could be useful for evaluating and screening for novel nonsense suppressor therapies. PMID:21465523

  9. Potential RNA Binding Proteins in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Identified as Suppressors of Temperature-Sensitive Mutations in Npl3

    PubMed Central

    Henry, M.; Borland, C. Z.; Bossie, M.; Silver, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    The NPL3 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a protein with similarity to heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). Npl3p has been implicated in many nuclear-related events including RNA export, protein import, and rRNA processing. Several temperature-sensitive alleles of NPL3 have been isolated. We now report the sequence of these alleles. For one allele, npl3-1, four complementation groups of suppressors have been isolated. The cognate genes for the two recessive mutants were cloned. One of these is the previously known RNA15, which, like NPL3, also encodes a protein with similarity to the vertebrate hnRNP A/B protein family. The other suppressor corresponds to a newly defined gene we term HRP1, which also encodes a protein with similarity to the hnRNP A/B proteins of vertebrates. Mutations in HRP1 suppress all npl3 temperature-sensitive alleles but do not bypass an npl3 null allele. We show that HRP1 is essential for cell growth and that the corresponding protein is located in the nucleus. The discovery of two hnRNP homologues that can partially suppress the function of Np13p, also an RNA binding protein, will be discussed in terms of the possible roles for Npl3p in RNA metabolism. PMID:8770588

  10. A neurodegenerative disease affecting synaptic connections in Drosophila mutant for the tumor suppressor morphogen Patched

    PubMed Central

    Gazi, Michal; Shyamala, Baragur V.; Bhat, Krishna Moorthi

    2009-01-01

    The tumor-suppressor morphogen, Patched (Ptc), has extensive homology to the Niemann-Pick-C 1 (NPC1) protein. The NPC disease is a paediatric, progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disorder thought to be due to an abnormal accumulation of cholesterol in neurons. Here, we report that patched mutant adults develop a progressive neurodegenerative disease and their brain contains membranous and lamellar inclusions. There is also a significant reduction in the number of synaptic terminals in the brain of the mutant adults. Interestingly, feeding cholesterol to wild type flies generates inclusions in the brain, but does not cause the disease. However, feeding cholesterol to mutant flies increases synaptic connections and suppresses the disease. Our results suggest that sequestration of cholesterol in the mutant brain in the form of membranous material and inclusions affects available pool of cholesterol for cellular functions. This, in turn, negatively affects the synaptic number and contributes to the disease-state. Consistent with this, in ptc mutants there is a reduction in the pool of cholesterol esters, and cholesterol-mediated suppression of the disease accompanies an increase in cholesterol esters. We further show that Ptc does not function directly in this process since gain-of-function for Hedgehog also induces the same disease with a reduction in the level of cholesterol esters. We believe that loss of function for ptc causes neurodegeneration via two distinct ways: de-repression of genes that interfere with lipid trafficking, and de-repression of genes outside of the lipid trafficking; the functions of both classes of genes ultimately converge on synaptic connections. PMID:19635474

  11. Mutational and Functional Analysis of the Tumor-Suppressor PTPRD in Human Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Vijay; Prickett, Todd D.; Kim, Jung-Sik; Gartner, Jared J.; Lin, Jimmy C.; Zhou, Ming; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Elble, Randolph C.; Solomon, David A.; Waldman, Todd; Samuels, Yardena

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) tightly regulate tyrosine phosphorylation essential for cell growth, adhesion, migration, and survival. We performed a mutational analysis of the PTP gene family in cutaneous metastatic melanoma and identified 23 phosphatase genes harboring somatic mutations. Among these, receptor-type tyrosine–protein phosphatase delta (PTPRD) was one of the most highly mutated genes, harboring 17 somatic mutations in 79 samples, a prevalence of 21.5%. Functional evaluation of six PTPRD mutations revealed enhanced anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent growth. Interestingly, melanoma cells expressing mutant PTPRD were significantly more migratory than cells expressing wild-type PTPRD or vector alone, indicating a novel gain-of-function associated with mutant PTPRD. To understand the molecular mechanisms of PTPRD mutations, we searched for its binding partners by converting the active PTPRD enzyme into a “substrate trap” form. Using mass spectrometry and coimmunoprecipitation, we report desmoplakin, a desmosomal protein that is implicated in cell–cell adhesion, as a novel PTPRD substrate. Further analysis showed reduced phosphatase activity of mutant PTPRD against desmoplakin. Our findings identify an essential signaling cascade that is disrupted in melanoma. Moreover, because PTPRD is also mutated in glioblastomas and adenocarcinoma of the colon and lung, our data might be applicable to a large number of human cancers. PMID:25113440

  12. Subcellular relocalization of a long-chain fatty acid CoA ligase by a suppressor mutation alleviates a respiration deficiency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Harington, A; Schwarz, E; Slonimski, P P; Herbert, C J

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated an extragenic suppressor, FAM1-1, which is able to restore respiratory growth to a deletion of the CEM1 gene (mitochondrial beta-keto-acyl synthase). The sequence of the suppressor strongly suggests that it encodes a long-chain fatty acid CoA ligase (fatty-acyl-CoA synthetase). We have also cloned and sequenced the wild-type FAM1 gene, which is devoid of suppressor activity. The comparison of the two sequences shows that the suppressor mutation is an A-->T transversion, which creates a new initiation codon and adds 18 amino acids to the N-terminus of the protein. This extension has all the characteristics of a mitochondrial targeting sequence, whilst the N-terminus of the wild-type protein has none of these characteristics. In vitro mitochondrial import experiments show that the N-terminal half of the suppressor protein, but not of the wild-type, is transported into mitochondria. Thus, we hypothesize that the suppressor acts by changing the subcellular localization of the protein and relocating at least some of the enzyme from the cytosol to the mitochondria. These results support the hypothesis that some form of fatty acid synthesis, specific for the mitochondria, is essential for the function of the organelle. Images PMID:7988550

  13. Identification of mutations in Colombian patients affected with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Alfredo; Mateus, Heidi Eliana; Prieto, Juan Carlos; Palacios, Maria Fernanda; Ospina, Sandra Yaneth; Pasqualim, Gabriela; da Silveira Matte, Ursula; Giugliani, Roberto

    2015-12-15

    Fabry Disease (FD) is an X-linked inborn error of glycosphingolipid catabolism, caused by a deficiency of the lisosomal α-galactosidase A (AGAL). The disorder leads to a vascular disease secondary to the involvement of kidney, heart and the central nervous system. The mutation analysis is a valuable tool for diagnosis and genetic counseling. Although more than 600 mutations have been identified, most mutations are private. Our objective was to describe the analysis of nine Colombian patients with Fabry disease by automated sequencing of the seven exons of the GLA gene. Two novel mutations were identified in two patients affected with the classical subtype of FD, in addition to other 6 mutations previously reported. The present study confirms the heterogeneity of mutations in Fabry disease and the importance of molecular analysis for genetic counseling, female heterozygotes detection as well as therapeutic decisions.

  14. Ampullary cancers harbor ELF3 tumor suppressor gene mutations and exhibit frequent WNT dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Gingras, Marie-Claude; Covington, Kyle R.; Chang, David K.; Donehower, Lawrence A.; Gill, Anthony J.; Ittmann, Michael M.; Creighton, Chad J.; Johns, Amber L.; Shinbrot, Eve; Dewal, Ninad; Fisher, William E.; Pilarsky, Christian; Grützmann, Robert; Overman, Michael J.; Jamieson, Nigel B.; Van Buren, George; Drummond, Jennifer; Walker, Kimberly; Hampton, Oliver A.; Xi, Liu; Muzny, Donna M.; Doddapaneni, Harsha; Lee, Sandra L.; Bellair, Michelle; Hu, Jianhong; Han, Yi; Dinh, Huyen H.; Dahdouli, Mike; Samra, Jaswinder S.; Bailey, Peter; Waddell, Nicola; Pearson, John V.; Harliwong, Ivon; Wang, Huamin; Aust, Daniela; Oien, Karin A.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Hodges, Sally E.; McElhany, Amy; Saengboonmee, Charupong; Duthie, Fraser R.; Grimmond, Sean M.; Biankin, Andrew V.; Wheeler, David A.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    The ampulla of Vater is a complex cellular environment from which adenocarcinomas arise to form a group of histopathologically heterogenous tumors. To evaluate the molecular features of these tumors, 98 ampullary adenocarcinomas, were evaluated and compared to 44 distal bile duct and 18 duodenal adenocarcinomas. Genomic analyses revealed mutations in the WNT signaling pathway among half of the patients and in all three adenocarcinomas irrespective of their origin and histological morphology. These tumors were characterized by a high frequency of inactivating mutations of ELF3, a high rate of microsatellite instability, and common focal deletions and amplifications, suggesting common attributes in the molecular pathogenesis are at play in these tumors. The high frequency of WNT pathway activating mutation, coupled with small molecule inhibitors of beta catenin in clinical trials, suggests future treatment decisions for these patients may be guided by genomic analysis. PMID:26804919

  15. Multiple Components of the VHL Tumor Suppressor Complex Are Frequently Affected by DNA Copy Number Loss in Pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Rowbotham, David A.; Enfield, Katey S. S.; Martinez, Victor D.; Thu, Kelsie L.; Vucic, Emily A.; Stewart, Greg L.; Bennewith, Kevin L.; Lam, Wan L.

    2014-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas (PCC) are rare tumors that arise in chromaffin tissue of the adrenal gland. PCC are frequently inherited through predisposing mutations in genes such as the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor. VHL is part of the VHL elongin BC protein complex that also includes CUL2/5, TCEB1, TCEB2, and RBX1; in normoxic conditions this complex targets hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1A) for degradation, thus preventing a hypoxic response. VHL inactivation by genetic mechanisms, such as mutation and loss of heterozygosity, inhibits HIF1A degradation, even in the presence of oxygen, and induces a pseudohypoxic response. However, the described <10% VHL mutation rate cannot account for the high frequency of hypoxic response observed. Indeed, little is known about genetic mechanisms disrupting other complex component genes. Here, we show that, in a panel of 171 PCC tumors, 59.6% harbored gene copy number loss (CNL) of at least one complex component. CNL significantly reduced gene expression and was associated with enrichment of gene targets controlled by HIF1. Interestingly, we show that VHL-related renal clear cell carcinoma harbored disruption of VHL alone. Our results indicate that VHL elongin BC protein complex components other than VHL could be important for PCC tumorigenesis and merit further investigation. PMID:25298778

  16. Multiple Components of the VHL Tumor Suppressor Complex Are Frequently Affected by DNA Copy Number Loss in Pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Rowbotham, David A; Enfield, Katey S S; Martinez, Victor D; Thu, Kelsie L; Vucic, Emily A; Stewart, Greg L; Bennewith, Kevin L; Lam, Wan L

    2014-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas (PCC) are rare tumors that arise in chromaffin tissue of the adrenal gland. PCC are frequently inherited through predisposing mutations in genes such as the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor. VHL is part of the VHL elongin BC protein complex that also includes CUL2/5, TCEB1, TCEB2, and RBX1; in normoxic conditions this complex targets hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1A) for degradation, thus preventing a hypoxic response. VHL inactivation by genetic mechanisms, such as mutation and loss of heterozygosity, inhibits HIF1A degradation, even in the presence of oxygen, and induces a pseudohypoxic response. However, the described <10% VHL mutation rate cannot account for the high frequency of hypoxic response observed. Indeed, little is known about genetic mechanisms disrupting other complex component genes. Here, we show that, in a panel of 171 PCC tumors, 59.6% harbored gene copy number loss (CNL) of at least one complex component. CNL significantly reduced gene expression and was associated with enrichment of gene targets controlled by HIF1. Interestingly, we show that VHL-related renal clear cell carcinoma harbored disruption of VHL alone. Our results indicate that VHL elongin BC protein complex components other than VHL could be important for PCC tumorigenesis and merit further investigation.

  17. Yeast frameshift suppressor mutations in the genes coding for transcription factor Mbf1p and ribosomal protein S3: evidence for autoregulation of S3 synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Hendrick, J L; Wilson, P G; Edelman, I I; Sandbaken, M G; Ursic, D; Culbertson, M R

    2001-01-01

    The SUF13 and SUF14 genes were identified among extragenic suppressors of +1 frameshift mutations. SUF13 is synonymous with MBF1, a single-copy nonessential gene coding for a POLII transcription factor. The suf13-1 mutation is a two-nucleotide deletion in the SUF13/MBF1 coding region. A suf13::TRP1 null mutant suppresses +1 frameshift mutations, indicating that suppression is caused by loss of SUF13 function. The suf13-1 suppressor alters sensitivity to aminoglycoside antibiotics and reduces the accumulation of his4-713 mRNA, suggesting that suppression is mediated at the translational level. The SUF14 gene is synonymous with RPS3, a single-copy essential gene that codes for the ribosomal protein S3. The suf14-1 mutation is a missense substitution in the coding region. Increased expression of S3 limits the accumulation of SUF14 mRNA, suggesting that expression is autoregulated. A frameshift mutation in SUF14 that prevents full-length translation eliminated regulation, indicating that S3 is required for regulation. Using CUP1-SUF14 and SUF14-lacZ fusions, run-on transcription assays, and estimates of mRNA half-life, our results show that transcription plays a minor role if any in regulation and that the 5'-UTR is necessary but not sufficient for regulation. A change in mRNA decay rate may be the primary mechanism for regulation. PMID:11238400

  18. A single mutation in the 15S rRNA gene confers non sense suppressor activity and interacts with mRF1 the release factor in yeast mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Gargouri, Ali; Macadré, Catherine; Lazowska, Jaga

    2015-01-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the mim3-1 mitochondrial ribosomal suppressor, acting on ochre mitochondrial mutations and one frameshift mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The 15s rRNA suppressor gene contains a G633 to C transversion. Yeast mitochondrial G633 corresponds to G517 of the E.coli 15S rRNA, which is occupied by an invariant G in all known small rRNA sequences. Interestingly, this mutation has occurred at the same position as the known MSU1 mitochondrial suppressor which changes G633 to A. The suppressor mutation lies in a highly conserved region of the rRNA, known in E.coli as the 530-loop, interacting with the S4, S5 and S12 ribosomal proteins. We also show an interesting interaction between the mitochondrial mim3-1 and the nuclear nam3-1 suppressors, both of which have the same action spectrum on mitochondrial mutations: nam3-1 abolishes the suppressor effect when present with mim3-1 in the same haploid cell. We discuss these results in the light of the nature of Nam3, identified by 1 as the yeast mitochondrial translation release factor. A hypothetical mechanism of suppression by "ribosome shifting" is also discussed in view of the nature of mutations suppressed and not suppressed. PMID:28357310

  19. A Conserved Suppressor Mutation in a Tryptophan Auxotroph Results in Dysregulation of Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Knoten, Claire A.; Wells, Greg; Coleman, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common nosocomial pathogen that relies on three cell-to-cell signals to regulate multiple virulence factors. The Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone) is one of these signals, and it is known to be important for P. aeruginosa pathogenesis. PQS is synthesized in a multistep reaction that condenses anthranilate and a fatty acid. In P. aeruginosa, anthranilate is produced via the kynurenine pathway and two separate anthranilate synthases, TrpEG and PhnAB, the latter of which is important for PQS synthesis. Others have previously shown that a P. aeruginosa tryptophan auxotroph could grow on tryptophan-depleted medium with a frequency of 10−5 to 10−6. These revertants produced more pyocyanin and had increased levels of phnA transcript. In this study, we constructed similar tryptophan auxotroph revertants and found that the reversion resulted from a synonymous G-to-A nucleotide mutation within pqsC. This change resulted in increased pyocyanin and decreased PQS, along with an increase in the level of the pqsD, pqsE, and phnAB transcripts. Reporter fusion and reverse transcriptase PCR studies indicated that a novel transcript containing pqsD, pqsE, and phnAB occurs in these revertants, and quantitative real-time PCR experiments suggested that the same transcript appears in the wild-type strain under nutrient-limiting conditions. These results imply that the PQS biosynthetic operon can produce an internal transcript that increases anthranilate production and greatly elevates the expression of the PQS signal response protein PqsE. This suggests a novel mechanism to ensure the production of both anthranilate and PQS-controlled virulence factors. PMID:24748618

  20. A conserved suppressor mutation in a tryptophan auxotroph results in dysregulation of Pseudomonas quinolone signal synthesis.

    PubMed

    Knoten, Claire A; Wells, Greg; Coleman, James P; Pesci, Everett C

    2014-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common nosocomial pathogen that relies on three cell-to-cell signals to regulate multiple virulence factors. The Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone) is one of these signals, and it is known to be important for P. aeruginosa pathogenesis. PQS is synthesized in a multistep reaction that condenses anthranilate and a fatty acid. In P. aeruginosa, anthranilate is produced via the kynurenine pathway and two separate anthranilate synthases, TrpEG and PhnAB, the latter of which is important for PQS synthesis. Others have previously shown that a P. aeruginosa tryptophan auxotroph could grow on tryptophan-depleted medium with a frequency of 10(-5) to 10(-6). These revertants produced more pyocyanin and had increased levels of phnA transcript. In this study, we constructed similar tryptophan auxotroph revertants and found that the reversion resulted from a synonymous G-to-A nucleotide mutation within pqsC. This change resulted in increased pyocyanin and decreased PQS, along with an increase in the level of the pqsD, pqsE, and phnAB transcripts. Reporter fusion and reverse transcriptase PCR studies indicated that a novel transcript containing pqsD, pqsE, and phnAB occurs in these revertants, and quantitative real-time PCR experiments suggested that the same transcript appears in the wild-type strain under nutrient-limiting conditions. These results imply that the PQS biosynthetic operon can produce an internal transcript that increases anthranilate production and greatly elevates the expression of the PQS signal response protein PqsE. This suggests a novel mechanism to ensure the production of both anthranilate and PQS-controlled virulence factors.

  1. Diversity of LTR-retrotransposons and Enhancer/Suppressor Mutator-like transposons in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz).

    PubMed

    Gbadegesin, Michael A; Wills, Matthew A; Beeching, John R

    2008-10-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz), though a major world crop with enormous potential, is very under studied. Little is known about its genome structure and organisation. Transposable elements have a key role in the evolution of genome structure, and can be used as important tools in applied genetics. This paper sets out to survey the diversity of members of three major classes of transposable element within the cassava genome and in relation to similar elements in other plants. Members of two classes of LTR-retrotransposons, Ty1/copia-like and Ty3/gypsy-like, and of Enhancer/Suppressor Mutator (En/Spm)-like transposons were isolated and characterised. Analyses revealed 59 families of Ty1/copia, 26 families of Ty3/gypsy retrotransposons, and 40 families of En/Spm in the cassava genome. In the comparative analyses, the predicted amino acid sequences for these transposon classes were compared with those of related elements from other plant species. These revealed that there were multiple lineages of Ty1/copia-like retrotransposons in the genome of cassava and suggested that vertical and horizontal transmission as the source of cassava Mecops may not be mutually exclusive. For the Ty3/gypsy elements network, two groups of cassava Megyps were evident including the Arabidopsis Athila lineage. However, cassava En/Spm-like elements (Meens) constituted a single group within a network of plant En/Spm-like elements. Hybridisation analysis supported the presence of transposons in the genome of cassava in medium (Ty3/gypsy and En/Spm) to high (Ty1/copia) copy numbers. Thus the cassava genome was shown to contain diverse members of three major classes of transposable element; however, the different classes exhibited contrasting evolutionary histories.

  2. NAM9 nuclear suppressor of mitochondrial ochre mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae codes for a protein homologous to S4 ribosomal proteins from chloroplasts, bacteria, and eucaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Boguta, M; Dmochowska, A; Borsuk, P; Wrobel, K; Gargouri, A; Lazowska, J; Slonimski, P P; Szczesniak, B; Kruszewska, A

    1992-01-01

    We report the genetic characterization, molecular cloning, and sequencing of a novel nuclear suppressor, the NAM9 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which acts on mutations of mitochondrial DNA. The strain NAM9-1 was isolated as a respiration-competent revertant of a mitochondrial mit mutant which carries the V25 ochre mutation in the oxi1 gene. Genetic characterization of the NAM9-1 mutation has shown that it is a nuclear dominant omnipotent suppressor alleviating several mutations in all four mitochondrial genes tested and has suggested its informational, and probably ribosomal, character. The NAM9 gene was cloned by transformation of the recipient oxi1-V25 mutant to respiration competence by using a gene bank from the NAM9-1 rho o strain. Orthogonal-field alternation gel electrophoresis analysis and genetic mapping localized the NAM9 gene on the right arm of chromosome XIV. Sequence analysis of the NAM9 gene showed that it encodes a basic protein of 485 amino acids with a presequence that could target the protein to the mitochondrial matrix. The N-terminal sequence of 200 amino acids of the deduced NAM9 product strongly resembles the S4 ribosomal proteins from chloroplasts and bacteria. Significant although less extensive similarity was found with ribosomal cytoplasmic proteins from lower eucaryotes, including S. cerevisiae. Chromosomal inactivation of the NAM9+ gene is not lethal to the cell but leads to respiration deficiency and loss of mitochondrial DNA integrity. We conclude that the NAM9 gene product is a mitochondrial ribosomal counterpart of S4 ribosomal proteins found in other systems and that the suppressor acts through decreasing the fidelity of translation. Images PMID:1729612

  3. Mutations affecting xanthophore pigmentation in the zebrafish, Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Odenthal, J; Rossnagel, K; Haffter, P; Kelsh, R N; Vogelsang, E; Brand, M; van Eeden, F J; Furutani-Seiki, M; Granato, M; Hammerschmidt, M; Heisenberg, C P; Jiang, Y J; Kane, D A; Mullins, M C; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1996-12-01

    In a large-scale screen for mutants with defects in embryonic development we identified 17 genes (65 mutants) specifically required for the development of xanthophores. We provide evidence that these genes are required for three different aspects of xanthophore development. (1) Pigment cell formation and migration (pfeffer and salz); (2) pigment synthesis (edison, yobo, yocca and brie) and (3) pigment translocation (esrom, tilsit and tofu). The number of xanthophore cells that appear in the body is reduced in embryos with mutations in the two genes, salz and pfeffer. In heterozygous and homozygous salz and pfeffer adults, the melanophore stripes are interrupted, indicating that xanthophore cells have an important function in adult melanophore pattern formation. Most other genes affect only larval pigmentation. In embryos mutant for edison, yobo, yocca and brie, differences in pteridine synthesis can be observed under UV light and by thin-layer chromatography. Homozygous mutant females of yobo show a recessive maternal effect. Embryonic development is slowed down and embryos display head and tail truncations. Xanthophores in larvae mutant in the three genes esrom, tilsit and tofu appear less spread out. In addition, these mutants display a defect in retinotectal axon pathfinding. These mutations may affect xanthophore pigment distribution within the cells or xanthophore cell shape. Mutations in seven genes affecting xanthophore pigmentation remain unclassified.

  4. Mutations Affecting Expression of the rosy Locus in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chong Sung; Curtis, Daniel; McCarron, Margaret; Love, Carol; Gray, Mark; Bender, Welcome; Chovnick, Arthur

    1987-01-01

    The rosy locus in Drosophila melanogaster codes for the enzyme xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH). Previous studies defined a "control element" near the 5' end of the gene, where variant sites affected the amount of rosy mRNA and protein produced. We have determined the DNA sequence of this region from both genomic and cDNA clones, and from the ry+10 underproducer strain. This variant strain had many sequence differences, so that the site of the regulatory change could not be fixed. A mutagenesis was also undertaken to isolate new regulatory mutations. We induced 376 new mutations with 1-ethyl-1-nitrosourea (ENU) and screened them to isolate those that reduced the amount of XDH protein produced, but did not change the properties of the enzyme. Genetic mapping was used to find mutations located near the 5' end of the gene. DNA from each of seven mutants was cloned and sequenced through the 5' region. Mutant base changes were identified in all seven; they appear to affect splicing and translation of the rosy mRNA. In a related study (T. P. Keith et al. 1987), the genomic and cDNA sequences are extended through the 3' end of the gene; the combined sequences define the processing pattern of the rosy transcript and predict the amino acid sequence of XDH. PMID:3036645

  5. Mutations affecting expression of the rosy locus in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.S.; Curtis, D.; McCarron, M.; Love, C.; Gray, M.; Bender, W.; Chovnick, A.

    1987-05-01

    The rosy locus in Drosophila melanogaster codes for the enzyme xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH). Previous studies defined a control element near the 5' end of the gene, where variant sites affected the amount of rosy mRNA and protein produced. The authors have determined the DNA sequence of this region from both genomic and cDNA clones, and from the ry/sup +10/ underproducer strain. This variant strain had many sequence differences, so that the site of the regulatory change could not be fixed. A mutagenesis was also undertaken to isolate new regulatory mutations. They induced 376 new mutations with 1-ethyl-1-nitrosourea (ENU) and screened them to isolate those that reduced the amount of XDH protein produced, but did not change the properties of the enzyme. Genetic mapping was used to find mutations located near the 5' end of the gene. DNA from each of seven mutants was cloned and sequenced through the 5' region. Mutant base changes were identified in all seven; they appear to affect splicing and translation of the rosy mRNA. In a related study, the genomic and cDNA sequences are extended through the 3' end of the gene; the combined sequences define the processing pattern of the rosy transcript and predict the amino acid sequence of XDH.

  6. The classical pink-eyed dilution mutation affects angiogenic responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Michael S; Boyartchuk, Victor; Rohan, Richard M; Birsner, Amy E; Dietrich, William F; D'Amato, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the process by which new blood vessels are formed from existing vessels. Mammalian populations, including humans and mice, harbor genetic variations that alter angiogenesis. Angiogenesis-regulating gene variants can result in increased susceptibility to multiple angiogenesis-dependent diseases in humans. Our efforts to dissect the complexity of the genetic diversity that regulates angiogenesis have used laboratory animals due to the availability of genome sequence for many species and the ability to perform high volume controlled breeding. Using the murine corneal micropocket assay, we have observed more than ten-fold difference in angiogenic responsiveness among various mouse strains. This degree of difference is observed with either bFGF or VEGF induced corneal neovascularization. Ongoing mapping studies have identified multiple loci that affect angiogenic responsiveness in several mouse models. In this study, we used F2 intercrosses between C57BL/6J and the 129 substrains 129P1/ReJ and 129P3/J, as well as the SJL/J strain, where we have identified new QTLs that affect angiogenic responsiveness. In the case of AngFq5, on chromosome 7, congenic animals were used to confirm the existence of this locus and subcongenic animals, combined with a haplotype-based mapping approach that identified the pink-eyed dilution mutation as a candidate polymorphism to explain AngFq5. The ability of mutations in the pink-eyed dilution gene to affect angiogenic response was demonstrated using the p-J allele at the same locus. Using this allele, we demonstrate that pink-eyed dilution mutations in Oca2 can affect both bFGF and VEGF-induced corneal angiogenesis.

  7. Genetic Interactions at the Fla10 Locus: Suppressors and Synthetic Phenotypes That Affect the Cell Cycle and Flagellar Function in Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Lux-III, F. G.; Dutcher, S. K.

    1991-01-01

    Through the isolation of suppressors of temperature-sensitive flagellar assembly mutations at the FLA10 locus of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we have identified six other genes involved in flagellar assembly. Mutations at these suppressor loci, termed SUF1-SUF6, display allele specificity with respect to which fla10(-) mutant alleles they suppress. An additional mutation, apm1-122, which confers resistance to the plant herbicides amiprophos-methyl and oryzalin, was also found to interact with mutations at the FLA10 locus. The apm1-122 mutation in combination with three fla10(-) mutant alleles results in synthetic cold-sensitive cell division defects, and in combination with an additional pseudo-wild-type fla10(-) allele yields a synthetic temperature-sensitive flagellar motility phenotype. Based upon the genetic interactions of these loci, we propose that the FLA10 gene product interacts with multiple components of the flagellar apparatus and plays a role both in flagellar assembly and in the cell cycle. PMID:1874415

  8. Identical mutations of the p53 tumor suppressor gene in the gliomatous and the sarcomatous components of gliosarcomas suggest a common origin from glial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Biernat, W.; Aguzzi, A.; Sure, U.

    1995-09-01

    Gliosarcomas are morphologically heterogeneous tumors of the central nervous system composed of gliomatous and sarcomatous components. The histogenesis of the latter is still a matter of debate. As mutations of the p53 tumor suppressor gene represent an early event in the development of gliomas, we attempted to determine whether both components of gliosarcomas share identical alterations of the p53 gene. Using single-strand conformation analysis (SSCA) and direct DNA sequencing of the p53 gene, we analyzed dissected gliomatous and sarcomatous parts of 12 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded gliosarcomas. The two tumors that contained a p53 alteration were found to carry the identical mutation (exon 5; codon 151, CCC {r_arrow} TCC; codon 173, GTG {r_arrow} GTA) in the gliomatous and the sarcomatous components. These findings suggest a common origin of the two cellular components from neoplastic glial cells. 37 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Specific DNA replication mutations affect telomere length in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, A K; Holm, C

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between the DNA replication apparatus and the control of telomere length, we examined the effects of several DNA replication mutations on telomere length in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We report that a mutation in the structural gene for the large subunit of DNA replication factor C (cdc44/rfc1) causes striking increases in telomere length. A similar effect is seen with mutations in only one other DNA replication gene: the structural gene for DNA polymerase alpha (cdc17/pol1) (M.J. Carson and L. Hartwell, Cell 42:249-257, 1985). For both genes, the telomere elongation phenotype is allele specific and appears to correlate with the penetrance of the mutations. Furthermore, fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis reveals that those alleles that cause elongation also exhibit a slowing of DNA replication. To determine whether elongation is mediated by telomerase or by slippage of the DNA polymerase, we created cdc17-1 mutants carrying deletions of the gene encoding the RNA component of telomerase (TLC1). cdc17-1 strains that would normally undergo telomere elongation failed to do so in the absence of telomerase activity. This result implies that telomere elongation in cdc17-1 mutants is mediated by the action of telomerase. Since DNA replication involves transfer of the nascent strand from polymerase alpha to replication factor C (T. Tsurimoto and B. Stillman, J. Biol. Chem. 266:1950-1960, 1991; T. Tsurimoto and B. Stillman, J. Biol. Chem. 266:1961-1968, 1991; S. Waga and B. Stillman, Nature [London] 369:207-212, 1994), one possibility is that this step affects the regulation of telomere length. PMID:8756617

  10. Assessment of the mutations of p53 suppressor gene and Ha- and Ki-ras oncogenes in malignant mesothelioma in relation to asbestos exposure: a study of 12 American patients.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Fumihiko; Araki, Shunichi; Suzuki, Yasunosuke; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Tanigawa, Takeshi; Iwasaki, Ryu

    2002-04-01

    In our previous study, we found no genetic alteration in exons 1 and 2 of Ha- and Ki-ras oncogenes nor in exons 5 to 9 of the p53 suppressor gene in seven Japanese malignant mesothelioma patients exposed to asbestos. To examine further whether malignant mesothelioma due to asbestos has genetic alterations in the p53 suppressor gene and in Ha- and Ki-ras oncogenes, we analyzed point mutations of these genes in paraffin embedded operative open biopsied samples of the primary tumor of malignant mesothelioma in twelve American patients. The genetic analysis was conducted by the PCR-SSCP (polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism) method in all patients and by sequencing analysis of DNA bases in the two patients with suspected gene mutation. The analysis of the p53 suppressor gene showed an amino acid converting mutation of exon 7 in one patient and a polymorphism of exon 6 in another patient; the former patient was a heavy smoker with a biphasic cell type. No genetic alteration was found in exons 1 and 2 of Ha- and Ki-ras oncogenes in any of the patients. The results suggest that the effects of asbestos on the p53 suppressor gene and Ha- and Ki-ras oncogenes in malignant mesothelioma are negligible. Further studies are needed to examine whether the observed mutation of the p53 suppressor gene is due to the combined effects of asbestos and smoking or to other unknown factors.

  11. Functional interactions between p53 and the TFIIH complex are affected by tumour-associated mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Léveillard, T; Andera, L; Bissonnette, N; Schaeffer, L; Bracco, L; Egly, J M; Wasylyk, B

    1996-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor is mutated in the majority of human tumours. p53's proposed role as the guardian of the genome is reflected in its multiple effects on transcription genome stability, cell growth and survival. We show that p53 interacts both physically and functionally with the TFIIH complex. There are multiple protein-protein contacts, involving two regions of p53 and three subunits of TFIIH, ERCC2 (XPD), ERCC3 (XPB) and p62. p53 and its C-terminus (amino acids 320-393) inhibit both of the TFIIH helicases and in vitro transcription in the absence of TFIIH. Transcription inhibition is overcome by TFIIH. The N-terminal region of p53 (1-320), lacking the C-terminus, is inactive on its own, yet apparently affects the activity of the C-terminus in the native protein. Interestingly, mutant p53s that are frequently found in tumours are less efficient inhibitors of the helicases and transcription. We hypothesize that the interactions provide an immediate and direct link for p53 to the multiple functions of TFIIH in transcription, DNA repair and possibly the cell cycle. Images PMID:8612585

  12. Submicroscopic deletion of 5q involving tumor suppressor genes (CTNNA1, HSPA9) and copy neutral loss of heterozygosity associated with TET2 and EZH2 mutations in a case of MDS with normal chromosome and FISH results

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Advances in genome-wide molecular cytogenetics allow identification of novel submicroscopic DNA copy number alterations (aCNAs) and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (cnLOH) resulting in homozygosity for known gene mutations in myeloid neoplasms. We describe the use of an oligo-SNP array for genomic profiling of aCNA and cnLOH, together with sequence analysis of recurrently mutated genes, in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) presenting with normal karyotype and FISH results. Oligo-SNP array analysis revealed a hemizygous deletion of 896 kb at chromosome 5q31.2, representing the smallest 5q deletion reported to date. The deletion involved multiple genes, including two tumor suppressor candidate genes (CTNNA1 and HSPA9) that are associated with MDS/AML. The SNP-array study also detected 3 segments of somatic cnLOH: one involved the entire long arm of chromosome 4; the second involved the distal half of the long arm of chromosome 7, and the third encompassed the entire chromosome 22 (UPD 22). Sequence analysis revealed mutations in TET2 (4q), EZH2 (7q), ASXL1 (20q11.21), and RUNX1 (21q22.3). Coincidently, TET2 and EZH2 were located at segments of cnLOH resulting in their homozygosity. Loss of heterozygosity affecting these two chromosomes and mutations in TET2 and EZH2 are indicative of a myelodysplastic syndrome with a poor prognosis. Deletion of the tumor suppressor genes CTNNA1 and HSPA9 is also likely to contribute to a poor prognosis. Furthermore, the original cnLOHs in multiple chromosomes and additional cnLOH 14q in the follow-up study suggest genetic evolution of the disease and poor prognosis. This study attests to the fact that some patients with a myelodysplastic syndrome who exhibit a normal karyotype may have underlying genetic abnormalities detectable by chromosomal microarray and/or targeted mutation analyses. PMID:25177364

  13. Germ-line mutations in the von Hippel-Lindau tumor-suppressor gene are similar to somatic von Hippel-Lindau aberrations in sporadic renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Whaley, J.M.; Naglich, J.; Gelbert, L.; Laidlaw, J.; Seizinger, B.R.; Kley, N.; Hsia, Y.E.; Lamiell, J.M.; Green, J.S.; Collins, D.

    1994-12-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a hereditary tumor syndrome predisposing to multifocal bilateral renal cell carcinomas (RCCs), pheochromocytomas, and pancreatic tumors, as well as angiomas and hemangioblastomas of the CNS. A candidate gene for VHL was recently identified, which led to the isolation of a partial cDNA clone with extended open reading frame, without significant homology to known genes or obvious functional motifs, except for an acidic pentamer repeat domain. To further characterize the functional domains of the VHL gene and assess its involvement in hereditary and nonhereditary tumors, we performed mutation analyses and studied its expression in normal and tumor tissue. The authors identified germline mutations in 39% of VHL disease families. Moreover, 33% of sporadic RCCs and all (6/6) sporadic RCC cell lines analyzed showed mutations within the VHL gene. Both germ-line and somatic mutations included deletions, insertions, splice-site mutations, and missense and nonsense mutations, all of which clustered at the 3{prime} end of the corresponding partial VHL cDNA open reading frame, including an alternatively spliced exon 123 nt in length, suggesting functionally important domains encoded by the VHL gene in this region. Over 180 sporadic tumors of other types have shown no detectable base changes within the presumed coding sequence of the VHL gene to date. We conclude that the gene causing VHL has an important and specific role in the etiology of sporadic RCCs, acts as a recessive tumor-suppressor gene, and appears to encode important functional domains within the 3{prime} end of the known open reading frame.

  14. [The relationship of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial protein synthesis in yeasts: the mapping of mitochondrial mutations neutralizing the exhibition of nuclear omnipotent suppressors].

    PubMed

    Mironova, L N; Zelenaia, O A; Sudarikov, A B; Ter-Avanesian, M D

    1988-06-01

    The genetic and physical mapping of mitochondrial mutations [CRD] neutralizing respiratory deficiency in sup1 and sup2 mutants was performed. The genetical methods demonstrated improbability of location of these mutations in genes coding for the enzymes of respiratory chain and for 21S rRNA. Southern-blot analysis has shown these mutations to be localized in the Hinc10 fragment of mitochondrial genome. This fact was interpreted as indication that var1 gene is affected by [CRD] mutations. Our results are in agreement with the hypothesis on the participation of sup1(2) proteins in mitochondrial translation.

  15. G673 could be a novel mutational hot spot for intragenic suppressors of pheS5 lesion in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ponmani, Thangaraj; Munavar, M Hussain

    2014-01-01

    The pheS5 Ts mutant of Escherichia coli defined by a G293 → A293 transition, which is responsible for thermosensitive Phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase has been well studied at both biochemical and molecular level but genetic analyses pertaining to suppressors of pheS5 were hard to come by. Here we have systematically analyzed a spectrum of Temperature-insensitive derivatives isolated from pheS5 Ts mutant and identified two intragenic suppressors affecting the same base pair coordinate G673 (pheS19 defines G673 → T673; Gly225 → Cys225 and pheS28 defines G673 → C673; Gly225 → Arg225). In fact in the third derivative, the intragenic suppressor originally named pheS43 (G673 → C673transversion) is virtually same as pheS28. In the fourth case, the very pheS5 lesion itself has got changed from A293 → T293 (named pheS40). Cloning of pheS+, pheS5, pheS5-pheS19, pheS5-pheS28 alleles into pBR322 and introduction of these clones into pheS5 mutant revealed that excess of double mutant protein is not at all good for the survival of cells at 42°C. These results clearly indicate a pivotal role for Gly225 in the structural/functional integrity of alpha subunit of E. coli PheRS enzyme and it is proposed that G673 might define a hot spot for intragenic suppressors of pheS5. PMID:24811065

  16. Therapeutic targeting of tumor suppressor genes.

    PubMed

    Morris, Luc G T; Chan, Timothy A

    2015-05-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistep process attributable to both gain-of-function mutations in oncogenes and loss-of-function mutations in tumor suppressor genes. Currently, most molecular targeted therapies are inhibitors of oncogenes, because inactivated tumor suppressor genes have proven harder to "drug." Nevertheless, in cancers, tumor suppressor genes undergo alteration more frequently than do oncogenes. In recent years, several promising strategies directed at tumor suppressor genes, or the pathways controlled by these genes, have emerged. Here, we describe advances in a number of different methodologies aimed at therapeutically targeting tumors driven by inactivated tumor suppressor genes.

  17. Mutations affecting the chemosensory neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Starich, T.A.; Herman, R.K.; Kari, C.K.

    1995-01-01

    We have identified and characterized 95 mutations that reduce or abolish dye filling of amphid and phasmid neurons and that have little effect on viability, fertility or movement. Twenty-seven mutations occurred spontaneously in strains with a high frequency of transposon insertion. Sixty-eight were isolated after treatment with EMS. All of the mutations result in defects in one or more chemosensory responses, such as chemotaxis to ammonium chloride or formation of dauer larvae under conditions of starvation and overcrowding. Seventy-five of the mutations are alleles of 12 previously defined genes, mutations which were previously shown to lead to defects in amphid ultrastructure. We have assigned 20 mutations to 13 new genes, called dyf-1 through dyf-13. We expect that the genes represented by dye-filling defective mutants are important for the differentiation of amphid and phasmid chemosensilla. 58 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Mutations Affecting the Chemosensory Neurons of Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Starich, T. A.; Herman, R. K.; Kari, C. K.; Yeh, W. H.; Schackwitz, W. S.; Schuyler, M. W.; Collet, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Riddle, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    We have identified and characterized 95 mutations that reduce or abolish dye filling of amphid and phasmid neurons and that have little effect on viability, fertility or movement. Twenty-seven mutations occurred spontaneously in strains with a high frequency of transposon insertion. Sixty-eight were isolated after treatment with EMS. All of the mutations result in defects in one or more chemosensory responses, such as chemotaxis to ammonium chloride or formation of dauer larvae under conditions of starvation and overcrowding. Seventy-five of the mutations are alleles of 12 previously defined genes, mutations which were previously shown to lead to defects in amphid ultrastructure. We have assigned 20 mutations to 13 new genes, called dyf-1 through dyf-13. We expect that the genes represented by dye-filling defective mutants are important for the differentiation of amphid and phasmid chemosensilla. PMID:7705621

  19. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae suppressor of choline sensitivity (SCS2) gene is a multicopy Suppressor of mec1 telomeric silencing defects.

    PubMed Central

    Craven, R J; Petes, T D

    2001-01-01

    Mec1p is a cell cycle checkpoint protein related to the ATM protein kinase family. Certain mec1 mutations or overexpression of Mec1p lead to shortened telomeres and loss of telomeric silencing. We conducted a multicopy suppressor screen for genes that suppress the loss of silencing in strains overexpressing Mec1p. We identified SCS2 (suppressor of choline sensitivity), a gene previously isolated as a suppressor of defects in inositol synthesis. Deletion of SCS2 resulted in decreased telomeric silencing, and the scs2 mutation increased the rate of cellular senescence observed for mec1-21 tel1 double mutant cells. Genetic analysis revealed that Scs2p probably acts through a different telomeric silencing pathway from that affected by Mec1p. PMID:11333225

  20. Dominance of mutations affecting viability in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Fry, James D; Nuzhdin, Sergey V

    2003-01-01

    There have been several attempts to estimate the average dominance (ratio of heterozygous to homozygous effects) of spontaneous deleterious mutations in Drosophila melanogaster, but these have given inconsistent results. We investigated whether transposable element (TE) insertions have higher average dominance for egg-to-adult viability than do point mutations, a possibility suggested by the types of fitness-depressing effects that TEs are believed to have. If so, then variation in dominance estimates among strains and crosses would be expected as a consequence of variation in TE activity. As a first test, we estimated the average dominance of all mutations and of copia insertions in a set of lines that had accumulated spontaneous mutations for 33 generations. A traditional regression method gave a dominance estimate for all mutations of 0.17, whereas average dominance of copia insertions was 0.51; the difference between these two estimates approached significance (P = 0.08). As a second test, we reanalyzed Ohnishi 1974 data on dominance of spontaneous and EMS-induced mutations. Because a considerable fraction of spontaneous mutations are caused by TE insertions, whereas EMS induces mainly point mutations, we predicted that average dominance would decline with increasing EMS concentration. This pattern was observed, but again fell short of formal significance (P = 0.07). Taken together, however, the two results give modest support for the hypothesis that TE insertions have greater average dominance in their viability effects than do point mutations, possibly as a result of deleterious effects of expression of TE-encoded genes. PMID:12702680

  1. The tumour suppressor gene WWOX is mutated in autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia with epilepsy and mental retardation

    PubMed Central

    Mallaret, Martial; Synofzik, Matthis; Lee, Jaeho; Sagum, Cari A.; Mahajnah, Muhammad; Sharkia, Rajech; Drouot, Nathalie; Renaud, Mathilde; Klein, Fabrice A. C.; Anheim, Mathieu; Tranchant, Christine; Mignot, Cyril; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Bedford, Mark; Bauer, Peter; Salih, Mustafa A.; Schüle, Rebecca; Schöls, Ludger; Aldaz, C. Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    We previously localized a new form of recessive ataxia with generalized tonic-clonic epilepsy and mental retardation to a 19 Mb interval in 16q21-q23 by homozygosity mapping of a large consanguineous Saudi Arabian family. We now report the identification by whole exome sequencing of the missense mutation changing proline 47 into threonine in the first WW domain of the WW domain containing oxidoreductase gene, WWOX, located in the linkage interval. Proline 47 is a highly conserved residue that is part of the WW motif consensus sequence and is part of the hydrophobic core that stabilizes the WW fold. We demonstrate that proline 47 is a key amino acid essential for maintaining the WWOX protein fully functional, with its mutation into a threonine resulting in a loss of peptide interaction for the first WW domain. We also identified another highly conserved homozygous WWOX mutation changing glycine 372 to arginine in a second consanguineous family. The phenotype closely resembled the index family, presenting with generalized tonic-clonic epilepsy, mental retardation and ataxia, but also included prominent upper motor neuron disease. Moreover, we observed that the short-lived Wwox knock-out mouse display spontaneous and audiogenic seizures, a phenotype previously observed in the spontaneous Wwox mutant rat presenting with ataxia and epilepsy, indicating that homozygous WWOX mutations in different species causes cerebellar ataxia associated with epilepsy. PMID:24369382

  2. Kem Mutations Affect Nuclear Fusion in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J.; Ljungdahl, P. O.; Fink, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    We have identified mutations in three genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, KEM1, KEM2 and KEM3, that enhance the nuclear fusion defect of kar1-1 yeast during conjugation. The KEM1 and KEM3 genes are located on the left arm of chromosome VII. Kem mutations reduce nuclear fusion whether the kem and the kar1-1 mutations are in the same or in different parents (i.e., in both kem kar1-1 X wild-type and kem X kar1-1 crosses). kem1 X kem1 crosses show a defect in nuclear fusion, but kem1 X wild-type crosses do not. Mutant kem1 strains are hypersensitive to benomyl, lose chromosomes at a rate 10-20-fold higher than KEM(+) strains, and lose viability upon nitrogen starvation. In addition, kem1/kem1 diploids are unable to sporulate. Cells containing a kem1 null allele grow very poorly, have an elongated rod-shape and are defective in spindle pole body duplication and/or separation. The KEM1 gene, which is expressed as a 5.5-kb mRNA transcript, contains a 4.6-kb open reading frame encoding a 175-kD protein. PMID:2076815

  3. Factors affecting mutational specificity induced by ionizing radiation and oxidizing radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, B.S.

    1992-01-01

    We propose to analyze the factors affecting the specificity of mutational change as induced by ionizing radiation and oxidizing radicals. We want to understand not only the rules that affect base substitution, but also the mechanism(s) by which additions and deletions are produced, since detections are a common consequence of radiation. We wish to carry out this analysis in an in vitro mutation system that permits us to analyze the role of base sequence, of polymerase and of mutagenic agent. Our system is designed to screen out most direct breaks as a cause of mutation and should indicate the changes resulting from base damage to the DNA.

  4. Parental Age Affects Somatic Mutation Rates in the Progeny of Flowering Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amit Kumar; Bashir, Tufail; Sailer, Christian; Gurumoorthy, Viswanathan; Ramakrishnan, Anantha Maharasi; Dhanapal, Shanmuhapreya; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Baskar, Ramamurthy

    2015-01-01

    In humans, it is well known that the parental reproductive age has a strong influence on mutations transmitted to their progeny. Meiotic nondisjunction is known to increase in older mothers, and base substitutions tend to go up with paternal reproductive age. Hence, it is clear that the germinal mutation rates are a function of both maternal and paternal ages in humans. In contrast, it is unknown whether the parental reproductive age has an effect on somatic mutation rates in the progeny, because these are rare and difficult to detect. To address this question, we took advantage of the plant model system Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), where mutation detector lines allow for an easy quantitation of somatic mutations, to test the effect of parental age on somatic mutation rates in the progeny. Although we found no significant effect of parental age on base substitutions, we found that frameshift mutations and transposition events increased in the progeny of older parents, an effect that is stronger through the maternal line. In contrast, intrachromosomal recombination events in the progeny decrease with the age of the parents in a parent-of-origin-dependent manner. Our results clearly show that parental reproductive age affects somatic mutation rates in the progeny and, thus, that some form of age-dependent information, which affects the frequency of double-strand breaks and possibly other processes involved in maintaining genome integrity, is transmitted through the gametes. PMID:25810093

  5. Factors affecting mutational specificity induced by ionizing radiation and oxidizing radicals. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, B.

    1992-07-01

    We propose to analyze the factors affecting the specificity of mutational change as induced by ionizing radiation and oxidizing radicals. We want to understand not only the rules the affect base substitution but also the mechanisms(s) by which additions and deletions are produced, since deletions are a common consequence of radiation. We wish to carry out this analysis in an in vitro mutation system that permits us to analyze the role of base sequence, of polymerase and of mutagenic agent. Our system is designed to screen out most direct breaks as a cause of mutation and should indicate the changes resulting from base damage to the DNA. Questions addressed include: 1. What types of base substitution mutations are induced by ionizing radiation and oxidizing radicals? 2. Are deletions and/or additions produced? 3. Is there a difference in type of mutation produced dependent on the polymerase used? Do mammalian polymerase plus their accessory factors result in different patterns of mutation. 4. What is the mechanism by which base damage is converted to mutation. Our proposal was based on utilization of an in vitro system in which mutations generated by the in vitro copying of a reporter gene sequence could be readily scored.

  6. Factors affecting mutational specificity induced by ionizing radiation and oxidizing radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, B.

    1992-01-01

    We propose to analyze the factors affecting the specificity of mutational change as induced by ionizing radiation and oxidizing radicals. We want to understand not only the rules the affect base substitution but also the mechanisms(s) by which additions and deletions are produced, since deletions are a common consequence of radiation. We wish to carry out this analysis in an in vitro mutation system that permits us to analyze the role of base sequence, of polymerase and of mutagenic agent. Our system is designed to screen out most direct breaks as a cause of mutation and should indicate the changes resulting from base damage to the DNA. Questions addressed include: 1. What types of base substitution mutations are induced by ionizing radiation and oxidizing radicals 2. Are deletions and/or additions produced 3. Is there a difference in type of mutation produced dependent on the polymerase used Do mammalian polymerase plus their accessory factors result in different patterns of mutation. 4. What is the mechanism by which base damage is converted to mutation. Our proposal was based on utilization of an in vitro system in which mutations generated by the in vitro copying of a reporter gene sequence could be readily scored.

  7. Dual effect on the RET receptor of MEN 2 mutations affecting specific extracytoplasmic cysteines.

    PubMed

    Chappuis-Flament, S; Pasini, A; De Vita, G; Ségouffin-Cariou, C; Fusco, A; Attié, T; Lenoir, G M; Santoro, M; Billaud, M

    1998-12-03

    The RET gene encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase whose function is essential during the development of kidney and the intestinal nervous system. Germline mutations affecting one of five cysteines (Cys609, 611, 618, 620 and 634) located in the juxtamembrane domain of the RET receptor are responsible for the vast majority of two cancer-prone disorders, multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN 2A) and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC). These mutations lead to the replacement of a cysteine by an alternate amino acid. Mutations of the RET gene are also the underlying genetic cause of Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), a congenital aganglionosis of the hindgut. In a fraction of kindreds, MEN 2A cosegregate with HSCR and affected individuals carry a single mutation at codons 609, 618 or 620. To examine the consequences of cysteine substitution on RET function, we have introduced a Cys to Arg mutation into the wild-type RET at either codons 609, 618, 620, 630 or 634. We now report that each mutation induces a constitutive catalytic activity due to the aberrant disulfide homodimerization of RET. However, mutations 630 and 634 activate RET more strongly than mutations 609, 618 or 620 as demonstrated by quantitative assays in rodent fibroblasts and pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. Biochemical analysis revealed that mutations 618 and 620, and to a lesser extent mutation 609, result in a marked reduction of the level of RET at the cell surface and as a consequence decrease the amount of RET covalent dimer. These findings provide a molecular basis explaining the range of phenotype engendered by alterations of RET cysteines and suggest a novel mechanism whereby mutations of cysteines 609, 618 and 620 exert both activating and inactivating effects.

  8. Tumor-specific mutations in low-frequency genes affect their functional properties.

    PubMed

    Erdem-Eraslan, Lale; Heijsman, Daphne; de Wit, Maurice; Kremer, Andreas; Sacchetti, Andrea; van der Spek, Peter J; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A E; French, Pim J

    2015-05-01

    Causal genetic changes in oligodendrogliomas (OD) with 1p/19q co-deletion include mutations in IDH1, IDH2, CIC, FUBP1, TERT promoter and NOTCH1. However, it is generally assumed that more somatic mutations are required for tumorigenesis. This study aimed to establish whether genes mutated at low frequency can be involved in OD initiation and/or progression. We performed whole-genome sequencing on three anaplastic ODs with 1p/19q co-deletion. To estimate mutation frequency, we performed targeted resequencing on an additional 39 ODs. Whole-genome sequencing identified a total of 55 coding mutations (range 8-32 mutations per tumor), including known abnormalities in IDH1, IDH2, CIC and FUBP1. We also identified mutations in genes, most of which were previously not implicated in ODs. Targeted resequencing on 39 additional ODs confirmed that these genes are mutated at low frequency. Most of the mutations identified were predicted to have a deleterious functional effect. Functional analysis on a subset of these genes (e.g. NTN4 and MAGEH1) showed that the mutation affects the subcellular localization of the protein (n = 2/12). In addition, HOG cells stably expressing mutant GDI1 or XPO7 showed altered cell proliferation compared to those expressing wildtype constructs. Similarly, HOG cells expressing mutant SASH3 or GDI1 showed altered migration. The significantly higher rate of predicted deleterious mutations, the changes in subcellular localization and the effects on proliferation and/or migration indicate that many of these genes functionally may contribute to gliomagenesis and/or progression. These low-frequency genes and their affected pathways may provide new treatment targets for this tumor type.

  9. Diaphanous gene mutation affects spiral cleavage and chirality in snails

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Reiko; Fujikura, Kohei; Abe, Masanori; Hosoiri, Yuji; Asakawa, Shuichi; Shimizu, Miho; Umeda, Shin; Ichikawa, Futaba; Takahashi, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    L-R (left and right) symmetry breaking during embryogenesis and the establishment of asymmetric body plan are key issues in developmental biology, but the onset including the handedness-determining gene locus still remains unknown. Using pure dextral (DD) and sinistral (dd) strains of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis as well as its F2 through to F10 backcrossed lines, the single handedness-determining-gene locus was mapped by genetic linkage analysis, BAC cloning and chromosome walking. We have identified the actin-related diaphanous gene Lsdia1 as the strongest candidate. Although the cDNA and derived amino acid sequences of the tandemly duplicated Lsdia1 and Lsdia2 genes are very similar, we could discriminate the two genes/proteins in our molecular biology experiments. The Lsdia1 gene of the sinistral strain carries a frameshift mutation that abrogates full-length LsDia1 protein expression. In the dextral strain, it is already translated prior to oviposition. Expression of Lsdia1 (only in the dextral strain) and Lsdia2 (in both chirality) decreases after the 1-cell stage, with no asymmetric localization throughout. The evolutionary relationships among body handedness, SD/SI (spiral deformation/spindle inclination) at the third cleavage, and expression of diaphanous proteins are discussed in comparison with three other pond snails (L. peregra, Physa acuta and Indoplanorbis exustus). PMID:27708420

  10. Tumor suppressor KAI1 affects integrin {alpha}v{beta}3-mediated ovarian cancer cell adhesion, motility, and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruseva, Zlatna; Geiger, Pamina Xenia Charlotte; Hutzler, Peter; Kotzsch, Matthias; Luber, Birgit; Schmitt, Manfred; Gross, Eva; Reuning, Ute

    2009-06-10

    The tetraspanin KAI1 had been described as a metastasis suppressor in many different cancer types, a function for which associations of KAI1 with adhesion and signaling receptors of the integrin superfamily likely play a role. In ovarian cancer, integrin {alpha}v{beta}3 correlates with tumor progression and its elevation in vitro provoked enhanced cell adhesion accompanied by significant increases in cell motility and proliferation in the presence of its major ligand vitronectin. In the present study, we characterized integrin {alpha}v{beta}3-mediated tumor biological effects as a function of cellular KAI1 restoration and proved for the first time that KAI1, besides its already known physical crosstalk with {beta}1-integrins, also colocalizes with integrin {alpha}v{beta}3. Functionally, elevated KAI1 levels drastically increased integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-dependent ovarian cancer cell adhesion. Since an intermediate level of cell adhesive strength is required for optimal cell migration, we next studied ovarian cancer cell motility as a function of KAI1 restoration. By time lapse video microscopy, we found impaired integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-mediated cell migration most probably due to strongly enhanced cellular immobilization onto the adhesion-supporting matrix. Moreover, KAI1 reexpression significantly diminished cell proliferation. These data strongly indicate that KAI1 may suppress ovarian cancer progression by inhibiting integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-provoked tumor cell motility and proliferation as important hallmarks of the oncogenic process.

  11. The callipyge mutation and other genes that affect muscle hypertrophy in sheep

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Genetic strategies to improve the profitability of sheep operations have generally focused on traits for reproduction. However, natural mutations exist in sheep that affect muscle growth and development, and the exploitation of these mutations in breeding strategies has the potential to significantly improve lamb-meat quality. The best-documented mutation for muscle development in sheep is callipyge (CLPG), which causes a postnatal muscle hypertrophy that is localized to the pelvic limbs and loin. Enhanced skeletal muscle growth is also observed in animals with the Carwell (or rib-eye muscling) mutation, and a double-muscling phenotype has been documented for animals of the Texel sheep breed. However, the actual mutations responsible for these muscular hypertrophy phenotypes in sheep have yet to be identified, and further characterization of the genetic basis for these phenotypes will provide insight into the biological control of muscle growth and body composition. PMID:15601596

  12. Omnipotent Suppressors Effective in psi Strains of SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE: Recessiveness and Dominance.

    PubMed

    Ono, B; Moriga, N; Ishihara, K; Ishiguro, J; Ishino, Y; Shinoda, S

    1984-06-01

    We have characterized recessive and dominant omnipotent suppressor mutations obtained by conversion of the leu2-1 UAA mutation and the met8-UAG mutation in a psi(+) strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The suppressors that act recessively upon these markers fell into two complementation groups; the sup47 and sup36 suppressors show linkage to the tyr1 locus and the aro1 locus, respectively. Of the suppressors acting dominantly upon both markers, those linked to the tyr1 locus are alleles of the SUP46 ribosomal mutation. The sup47 suppressors differ from the SUP46 suppressors not only in their suppressor activities in heterozygous diploids but also in their map positions relative to the tyr1 locus and their effects on the S11 ribosomal protein. The remaining dominant suppressors are not alleles of sup36 as judged by linkage analysis. The recessive suppressors and the dominant suppressors also differ in their effects on cell growth.

  13. Activating Mutations Affecting the Dbl Homology Domain of SOS2 Cause Noonan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cordeddu, Viviana; Yin, Jiani C; Gunnarsson, Cecilia; Virtanen, Carl; Drunat, Séverine; Lepri, Francesca; De Luca, Alessandro; Rossi, Cesare; Ciolfi, Andrea; Pugh, Trevor J; Bruselles, Alessandro; Priest, James R; Pennacchio, Len A; Lu, Zhibin; Danesh, Arnavaz; Quevedo, Rene; Hamid, Alaa; Martinelli, Simone; Pantaleoni, Francesca; Gnazzo, Maria; Daniele, Paola; Lissewski, Christina; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Stella, Lorenzo; Odent, Sylvie; Philip, Nicole; Faivre, Laurence; Vlckova, Marketa; Seemanova, Eva; Digilio, Cristina; Zenker, Martin; Zampino, Giuseppe; Verloes, Alain; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Roberts, Amy E; Cavé, Hélène; Gelb, Bruce D; Neel, Benjamin G; Tartaglia, Marco

    2015-11-01

    The RASopathies constitute a family of autosomal-dominant disorders whose major features include facial dysmorphism, cardiac defects, reduced postnatal growth, variable cognitive deficits, ectodermal and skeletal anomalies, and susceptibility to certain malignancies. Noonan syndrome (NS), the commonest RASopathy, is genetically heterogeneous and caused by functional dysregulation of signal transducers and regulatory proteins with roles in the RAS/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signal transduction pathway. Mutations in known disease genes account for approximately 80% of affected individuals. Here, we report that missense mutations altering Son of Sevenless, Drosophila, homolog 2 (SOS2), which encodes a RAS guanine nucleotide exchange factor, occur in a small percentage of subjects with NS. Four missense mutations were identified in five unrelated sporadic cases and families transmitting NS. Disease-causing mutations affected three conserved residues located in the Dbl homology (DH) domain, of which two are directly involved in the intramolecular binding network maintaining SOS2 in its autoinhibited conformation. All mutations were found to promote enhanced signaling from RAS to ERK. Similar to NS-causing SOS1 mutations, the phenotype associated with SOS2 defects is characterized by normal development and growth, as well as marked ectodermal involvement. Unlike SOS1 mutations, however, those in SOS2 are restricted to the DH domain.

  14. Loss of Msp1p in Schizosaccharomyces pombe induces a ROS-dependent nuclear mutator phenotype that affects mitochondrial fission genes.

    PubMed

    Delerue, Thomas; Khosrobakhsh, Farnoosh; Daloyau, Marlène; Emorine, Laurent Jean; Dedieu, Adrien; Herbert, Christopher J; Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Arnauné-Pelloquin, Laetitia; Belenguer, Pascale

    2016-10-01

    Mitochondria continually fuse and divide to dynamically adapt to changes in metabolism and stress. Mitochondrial dynamics are also required for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) integrity; however, the underlying reason is not known. In this study, we examined the link between mitochondrial fusion and mtDNA maintenance in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which cannot survive without mtDNA, by screening for suppressors of the lethality induced by loss of the dynamin-related large GTPase Msp1p. Our findings reveal that inactivation of Msp1p induces a ROS-dependent nuclear mutator phenotype that affects mitochondrial fission genes involved in suppressing mitochondrial fragmentation and mtDNA depletion. This indicates that mitochondrial fusion is crucial for maintaining the integrity of both mitochondrial and nuclear genetic information. Furthermore, our study suggests that the primary roles of Msp1p are to organize mitochondrial membranes, thus making them competent for fusion, and maintain the integrity of mtDNA.

  15. Prognostic role and implications of mutation status of tumor suppressor gene ARID1A in cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luchini, Claudio; Veronese, Nicola; Solmi, Marco; Cho, Hanbyoul; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Chou, Angela; Gill, Anthony J.; Faraj, Sheila F.; Chaux, Alcides; Netto, George J.; Nakayama, Kentaro; Kyo, Satoru; Lee, Soo Young; Kim, Duck-Woo; Yousef, George M.; Scorilas, Andreas; Nelson, Gregg S.; Köbel, Martin; Kalloger, Steve E.; Schaeffer, David F.; Yan, Hai-Bo; Liu, Feng; Yokoyama, Yoshihito; Zhang, Xianyu; Pang, Da; Lichner, Zsuzsanna; Sergi, Giuseppe; Manzato, Enzo; Capelli, Paola; Wood, Laura D.; Scarpa, Aldo; Correll, Christoph U.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of the tumor suppressor gene AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein 1A (ARID1A) has been demonstrated in several cancers, but its prognostic role is unknown. We aimed to investigate the risk associated with loss of ARID1A (ARID1A−) for all-cause mortality, cancer-specific mortality and recurrence of disease in subjects with cancer. PubMed and SCOPUS search from database inception until 01/31/2015 without language restriction was conducted, contacting authors for unpublished data. Eligible were prospective studies reporting data on prognostic parameters in subjects with cancer, comparing participants with presence of ARID1A (ARID1A+) vs. ARID1A−, assessed either via immunohistochemistry (loss of expression) or with genetic testing (presence of mutation). Data were summarized using risk ratios (RR) for number of deaths/recurrences and hazard ratios (HR) for time-dependent risk related to ARID1A− adjusted for potential confounders. Of 136 hits, 25 studies with 5,651 participants (28 cohorts; ARID1A−: n = 1,701; ARID1A+: n = 3,950), with a mean follow-up period of 4.7 ± 1.8 years, were meta-analyzed. Compared to ARID1A+, ARID1A− significantly increased cancer-specific mortality (studies = 3; RR = 1.55, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.19–2.00, I2 = 31%). Using HRs adjusted for potential confounders, ARID1A− was associated with a greater risk of cancer-specific mortality (studies = 2; HR = 2.55, 95%CI = 1.19–5.45, I2 = 19%) and cancer recurrence (studies = 10; HR = 1.93, 95%CI = 1.22–3.05, I2 = 76%). On the basis of these results, we have demonstrated that loss of ARID1A shortened time to cancer-specific mortality, and to recurrence of cancer when adjusting for potential confounders. For its role, this gene should be considered as an important potential target for personalized medicine in cancer treatment. PMID:26384299

  16. Prognostic role and implications of mutation status of tumor suppressor gene ARID1A in cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Luchini, Claudio; Veronese, Nicola; Solmi, Marco; Cho, Hanbyoul; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Chou, Angela; Gill, Anthony J; Faraj, Sheila F; Chaux, Alcides; Netto, George J; Nakayama, Kentaro; Kyo, Satoru; Lee, Soo Young; Kim, Duck-Woo; Yousef, George M; Scorilas, Andreas; Nelson, Gregg S; Köbel, Martin; Kalloger, Steve E; Schaeffer, David F; Yan, Hai-Bo; Liu, Feng; Yokoyama, Yoshihito; Zhang, Xianyu; Pang, Da; Lichner, Zsuzsanna; Sergi, Giuseppe; Manzato, Enzo; Capelli, Paola; Wood, Laura D; Scarpa, Aldo; Correll, Christoph U

    2015-11-17

    Loss of the tumor suppressor gene AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein 1A (ARID1A) has been demonstrated in several cancers, but its prognostic role is unknown. We aimed to investigate the risk associated with loss of ARID1A (ARID1A-) for all-cause mortality, cancer-specific mortality and recurrence of disease in subjects with cancer. PubMed and SCOPUS search from database inception until 01/31/2015 without language restriction was conducted, contacting authors for unpublished data. Eligible were prospective studies reporting data on prognostic parameters in subjects with cancer, comparing participants with presence of ARID1A (ARID1A+) vs. ARID1A-, assessed either via immunohistochemistry (loss of expression) or with genetic testing (presence of mutation). Data were summarized using risk ratios (RR) for number of deaths/recurrences and hazard ratios (HR) for time-dependent risk related to ARID1A- adjusted for potential confounders. Of 136 hits, 25 studies with 5,651 participants (28 cohorts; ARID1A-: n = 1,701; ARID1A+: n = 3,950), with a mean follow-up period of 4.7 ± 1.8 years, were meta-analyzed. Compared to ARID1A+, ARID1A- significantly increased cancer-specific mortality (studies = 3; RR = 1.55, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.19-2.00, I(2) = 31%). Using HRs adjusted for potential confounders, ARID1A- was associated with a greater risk of cancer-specific mortality (studies = 2; HR = 2.55, 95%CI = 1.19-5.45, I(2) = 19%) and cancer recurrence (studies = 10; HR = 1.93, 95%CI = 1.22-3.05, I(2) = 76%). On the basis of these results, we have demonstrated that loss of ARID1A shortened time to cancer-specific mortality, and to recurrence of cancer when adjusting for potential confounders. For its role, this gene should be considered as an important potential target for personalized medicine in cancer treatment.

  17. Mutations in arrestin-3 differentially affect binding to neuropeptide Y receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Luis E; Babilon, Stefanie; Wanka, Lizzy; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G; Gurevich, Vsevolod V

    2014-07-01

    Based on the identification of residues that determine receptor selectivity in arrestins and the phylogenetic analysis of the arrestin (arr) family, we introduced fifteen mutations of receptor-discriminator residues in arr-3, which were identified previously using mutagenesis, in vitro binding, and BRET-based recruitment assay in intact cells. The effects of these mutations were tested using neuropeptide Y receptors Y1R and Y2R. NPY-elicited arr-3 recruitment to Y1R was not affected by these mutations, or even alanine substitution of all ten residues (arr-3-NCA), which prevented arr-3 binding to other receptors tested so far. However, NCA and two other mutations prevented agonist-independent arr-3 pre-docking to Y1R. In contrast, eight out of 15 mutations significantly reduced agonist-dependent arr-3 recruitment to Y2R. NCA eliminated arr-3 binding to active Y2R, whereas Tyr239Thr reduced it ~7-fold. Thus, manipulation of key residues on the receptor-binding surface generates arr-3 with high preference for Y1R over Y2R. Several mutations differentially affect arr-3 pre-docking and agonist-induced recruitment. Thus, arr-3 recruitment to the receptor involves several mechanistically distinct steps. Targeted mutagenesis can fine-tune arrestins directing them to specific receptors and particular activation states of the same receptor.

  18. Mutations in arrestin-3 differentially affect binding to neuropeptide Y receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Luis E.; Babilon, Stefanie; Wanka, Lizzy; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2014-01-01

    Based on the identification of residues that determine receptor selectivity in arrestins and the phylogenetic analysis of the arrestin (arr) family, we introduced fifteen mutations of receptor-discriminator residues in arr-3, which were identified previously using mutagenesis, in vitro binding, and BRET-based recruitment assay in intact cells. The effects of these mutations were tested using neuropeptide Y receptors Y1R and Y2R. NPY-elicited arr-3 recruitment to Y1R was not affected by these mutations, or even alanine substitution of all ten residues (arr-3-NCA), which prevented arr-3 binding to other receptors tested so far. However, NCA and two other mutations prevented agonist-independent arr-3 pre-docking to Y1R. In contrast, eight out of 15 mutations significantly reduced agonist-dependent arr-3 recruitment to Y2R. NCA eliminated arr-3 binding to active Y2R, whereas Tyr239Thr reduced it ~7-fold. Thus, manipulation of key residues on the receptor-binding surface generates arr-3 with high preference for Y1R over Y2R. Several mutations differentially affect arr-3 pre-docking and agonist-induced recruitment. Thus, arr-3 recruitment to the receptor involves several mechanistically distinct steps. Targeted mutagenesis can fine-tune arrestins directing them to specific receptors and particular activation states of the same receptor. PMID:24686081

  19. Uner Tan syndrome caused by a homozygous TUBB2B mutation affecting microtubule stability.

    PubMed

    Breuss, Martin W; Nguyen, Thai; Srivatsan, Anjana; Leca, Ines; Tian, Guoling; Fritz, Tanja; Hansen, Andi H; Musaev, Damir; McEvoy-Venneri, Jennifer; James, Kiely N; Rosti, Rasim O; Scott, Eric; Tan, Uner; Kolodner, Richard D; Cowan, Nicholas J; Keays, David A; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2016-12-23

    The integrity and dynamic properties of the microtubule cytoskeleton are indispensable for the development of the mammalian brain. Consequently, mutations in the genes that encode the structural component (the α/β-tubulin heterodimer) can give rise to severe, sporadic neurodevelopmental disorders. These are commonly referred to as the tubulinopathies. Here we report the addition of recessive quadrupedalism, also known as Uner Tan syndrome (UTS), to the growing list of diseases caused by tubulin variants. Analysis of a consanguineous UTS family identified a biallelic TUBB2B mutation, resulting in a p.R390Q amino acid substitution. In addition to the identifying quadrupedal locomotion, all three patients showed severe cerebellar hypoplasia. None, however, displayed the basal ganglia malformations typically associated with TUBB2B mutations. Functional analysis of the R390Q substitution revealed that it did not affect the ability of β-tubulin to fold or become assembled into the α/β-heterodimer, nor did it influence the incorporation of mutant-containing heterodimers into microtubule polymers. The 390Q mutation in S. cerevisiae TUB2 did not affect growth under basal conditions, but did result in increased sensitivity to microtubule-depolymerizing drugs, indicative of a mild impact of this mutation on microtubule function. The TUBB2B mutation described here represents an unusual recessive mode of inheritance for missense-mediated tubulinopathies and reinforces the sensitivity of the developing cerebellum to microtubule defects.

  20. Mutations affecting a putative MutLα endonuclease motif impact multiple mismatch repair functions

    PubMed Central

    Erdeniz, Naz; Nguyen, Megan; Deschênes, Suzanne M.; Liskay, R. Michael

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) lead to increased mutation rates and higher recombination between similar, but not identical sequences, as well as resistance to certain DNA methylating agents. Recently, a component of human MMR machinery, MutLα, has been shown to display a latent endonuclease activity. The endonuclease active site appears to include a conserved motif, DQHA(X)2E(X)4E, within the COOH-terminus of human PMS2. Substitution of the glutamic acid residue (E705) abolished the endonuclease activity and mismatch-dependent excision in vitro. Previously, we showed that the PMS2-E705K mutation and the corresponding mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were both recessive loss of function alleles for mutation avoidance in vivo. Here, we show that mutations impacting this endonuclease motif also significantly affect MMR-dependent suppression of homeologous recombination in yeast and responses to Sn1-type methylating agents in both yeast and mammalian cells. Thus, our in vivo results suggest that the endonuclease activity of MutLα is important not only in MMR-dependent mutation avoidance but also for recombination and damage response functions. PMID:17567544

  1. Mutations of the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein affect protein expression and dictate the clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Hans D

    2009-01-01

    Mutations of the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein (WASP) are responsible for classic Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome (WAS), X-linked thrombocytopenia (XLT), and in rare instances congenital X-linked neutropenia (XLN). WASP is a regulator of actin polymerization in hematopoietic cells with well-defined functional domains that are involved in cell signaling and cell locomotion, immune synapse formation, and apoptosis. Mutations of WASP are located throughout the gene and either inhibit or disregulate normal WASP function. Analysis of a large patient population demonstrates a strong phenotype-genotype correlation. Classic WAS occurs when WASP is absent, XLT when mutated WASP is expressed and XLN when missense mutations occur in the Cdc42-binding site. However, because there are exceptions to this rule it is difficult to predict the long-term prognosis of a given affected boy solely based on the analysis of WASP expression.

  2. Mutations Affecting Potassium Import Restore the Viability of the Escherichia coli DNA Polymerase III holD Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Adeline

    2016-01-01

    Mutants lacking the ψ (HolD) subunit of the Escherichia coli DNA Polymerase III holoenzyme (Pol III HE) have poor viability, but a residual growth allows the isolation of spontaneous suppressor mutations that restore ΔholD mutant viability. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of two suppressor mutations in the trkA and trkE genes, involved in the main E. coli potassium import system. Viability of ΔholD trk mutants is abolished on media with low or high K+ concentrations, where alternative K+ import systems are activated, and is restored on low K+ concentrations by the inactivation of the alternative Kdp system. These findings show that the ΔholD mutant is rescued by a decrease in K+ import. The effect of trk inactivation is additive with the previously identified ΔholD suppressor mutation lexAind that blocks the SOS response indicating an SOS-independent mechanism of suppression. Accordingly, although lagging-strand synthesis is still perturbed in holD trkA mutants, the trkA mutation allows HolD-less Pol III HE to resist increased levels of the SOS-induced bypass polymerase DinB. trk inactivation is also partially additive with an ssb gene duplication, proposed to stabilize HolD-less Pol III HE by a modification of the single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) binding mode. We propose that lowering the intracellular K+ concentration stabilizes HolD-less Pol III HE on DNA by increasing electrostatic interactions between Pol III HE subunits, or between Pol III and DNA, directly or through a modification of the SSB binding mode; these three modes of action are not exclusive and could be additive. To our knowledge, the holD mutant provides the first example of an essential protein-DNA interaction that strongly depends on K+ import in vivo. PMID:27280472

  3. Novel Homozygous Mutation of the Internal Translation Initiation Start Site of VHL is Exclusively Associated with Erythrocytosis: Indications for Distinct Functional Roles of von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Marije; van der Zalm, Marieke M; van Oirschot, Brigitte A; Lee, Frank S; Giles, Rachel H; Kruip, Marieke J H A; Gitz-Francois, Jerney J J M; Van Solinge, Wouter W; Bierings, Marc; van Wijk, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Congenital secondary erythrocytosis is a rare disorder characterized by increased red blood cell production. An important cause involves defects in the oxygen sensing pathway, in particular the PHD2-VHL-HIF axis. Mutations in VHL are also associated with the von Hippel-Lindau tumor predisposition syndrome. The differences in phenotypic expression of VHL mutations are poorly understood. We report on three patients with erythrocytosis, from two unrelated families. All patients show exceptionally high erythropoietin (EPO) levels, and are homozygous for a novel missense mutation in VHL: c.162G>C p.(Met54Ile). The c.162G>C mutation is the most upstream homozygous VHL mutation described so far in patients with erythrocytosis. It abolishes the internal translational start codon, which directs expression of VHLp19, resulting in the production of only VHLp30. The exceptionally high EPO levels and the absence of VHL-associated tumors in the patients suggest that VHLp19 has a role for regulating EPO levels that VHLp30 does not have, whereas VHLp30 is really the tumor suppressor isoform.

  4. Tumor suppressor von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) stabilization of Jade-1 protein occurs through plant homeodomains and is VHL mutation dependent.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mina I; Wang, Hongmei; Foy, Rebecca L; Ross, Jonathan J; Cohen, Herbert T

    2004-02-15

    The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene is the major renal cancer gene in adults. The mechanism of renal tumor suppression by VHL protein is only partly elucidated. VHL loss increases expression of the hypoxia-inducible factor alpha transcription factors. However, clinical and biochemical data indicate that the hypoxia-inducible factors are necessary but not sufficient for renal tumorigenesis, which suggests other VHL effector pathways are involved. Jade-1 protein interacts strongly with VHL and is most highly expressed in renal proximal tubules, precursor cells of renal cancer. Short-lived Jade-1 protein contains plant homeodomain (PHD) and candidate PEST degradation motifs and is substantially stabilized by VHL. The effect of VHL on Jade-1 protein abundance and relative protein stability was further examined in immunoblots and metabolic labeling experiments using two time points. VHL-Jade-1 binding was tested in coimmunoprecipitations. In cotransfection studies with wild-type VHL, the Jade-1 PHD-extended PHD module, not the candidate PEST domain, was required for full VHL-mediated stabilization. This module is also found in leukemia transcription factors AF10 and AF17, as well as closely related Jade-like proteins, which suggests all might be VHL regulated. Intriguingly, naturally occurring truncations and mutations of VHL affected wild-type Jade-1 binding and stabilization. Although the VHL beta domain was sufficient for Jade-1 binding, both the alpha and beta domains were required for Jade-1 stabilization. Thus, truncating VHL mutations, which are severe and associated with renal cancer development, prevented Jade-1 stabilization. Moreover, well-controlled cotransfection and metabolic labeling experiments revealed that VHL missense mutations that cause VHL disease without renal cancer, such as Tyr98His and Tyr112His, stabilized Jade-1 fully. In contrast, like the VHL truncations, VHL missense mutations commonly associated with renal cancer, such as Leu118Pro or Arg167

  5. Mutations Affecting RNA Polymerase I-Stimulated Exchange and Rdna Recombination in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Y. H.; Keil, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    HOT1 is a cis-acting recombination-stimulatory sequence isolated from the rDNA repeat unit of yeast. The ability of HOT1 to stimulate mitotic exchange appears to depend on its ability to promote high levels of RNA polymerase I transcription. A qualitative colony color sectoring assay was developed to screen for trans-acting mutations that alter the activity of HOT1. Both hypo-recombination and hyper-recombination mutants were isolated. Genetic analysis of seven HOT1 recombination mutants (hrm) that decrease HOT1 activity shows that they behave as recessive nuclear mutations and belong to five linkage groups. Three of these mutations, hrm1, hrm2, and hrm3, also decrease rDNA exchange but do not alter recombination in the absence of HOT1. Another mutation, hrm4, decreases HOT1-stimulated recombination but does not affect rDNA recombination or exchange in the absence of HOT1. Two new alleles of RAD52 were also isolated using this screen. With regard to HOT1 activity, rad52 is epistatic to all four hrm mutations indicating that the products of the HRM genes and of RAD52 mediate steps in the same recombination pathway. Finding mutations that decrease both the activity of HOT1 and exchange in the rDNA supports the hypothesis that HOT1 plays a role in rDNA recombination. PMID:2016045

  6. Different inactivating mutations of the mineralocorticoid receptor in fourteen families affected by type I pseudohypoaldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Sartorato, Paola; Lapeyraque, Anne-Laure; Armanini, Decio; Kuhnle, Ursula; Khaldi, Yasmina; Salomon, Rémi; Abadie, Véronique; Di Battista, Eliana; Naselli, Arturo; Racine, Alain; Bosio, Maurizio; Caprio, Massimiliano; Poulet-Young, Véronique; Chabrolle, Jean-Pierre; Niaudet, Patrick; De Gennes, Christiane; Lecornec, Marie-Hélène; Poisson, Elodie; Fusco, Anna Maria; Loli, Paola; Lombès, Marc; Zennaro, Maria-Christina

    2003-06-01

    We have analyzed the human mineralocorticoid receptor (hMR) gene in 14 families with autosomal dominant or sporadic pseudohypoaldosteronism (PHA1), a rare form of mineralocorticoid resistance characterized by neonatal renal salt wasting and failure to thrive. Six heterozygous mutations were detected. Two frameshift mutations in exon 2 (insT1354, del8bp537) and one nonsense mutation in exon 4 (C2157A, Cys645stop) generate truncated proteins due to premature stop codons. Three missense mutations (G633R, Q776R, L979P) differently affect hMR function. The DNA binding domain mutant R633 exhibits reduced maximal transactivation, although its binding characteristics and ED(50) of transactivation are comparable with wild-type hMR. Ligand binding domain mutants R776 and P979 present reduced or absent aldosterone binding, respectively, which is associated with reduced or absent ligand-dependent transactivation capacity. Finally, P979 possesses a transdominant negative effect on wild-type hMR activity, whereas mutations G633R and Q776R probably result in haploinsufficiency in PHA1 patients. We conclude that hMR mutations are a common feature of autosomal dominant PHA1, being found in 70% of our familial cases. Their absence in some families underscores the importance of an extensive investigation of the hMR gene and the role of precise diagnostic procedures to allow for identification of other genes potentially involved in the disease.

  7. A novel mutation in TFL1 homolog affecting determinacy in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata).

    PubMed

    Dhanasekar, P; Reddy, K S

    2015-02-01

    Mutations in the widely conserved Arabidopsis Terminal Flower 1 (TFL1) gene and its homologs have been demonstrated to result in determinacy across genera, the knowledge of which is lacking in cowpea. Understanding the molecular events leading to determinacy of apical meristems could hasten development of cowpea varieties with suitable ideotypes. Isolation and characterization of a novel mutation in cowpea TFL1 homolog (VuTFL1) affecting determinacy is reported here for the first time. Cowpea TFL1 homolog was amplified using primers designed based on conserved sequences in related genera and sequence variation was analysed in three gamma ray-induced determinate mutants, their indeterminate parent "EC394763" and two indeterminate varieties. The analyses of sequence variation exposed a novel SNP distinguishing the determinate mutants from the indeterminate types. The non-synonymous point mutation in exon 4 at position 1,176 resulted from transversion of cytosine (C) to adenine (A) leading to an amino acid change (Pro-136 to His) in determinate mutants. The effect of the mutation on protein function and stability was predicted to be detrimental using different bioinformatics/computational tools. The functionally significant novel substitution mutation is hypothesized to affect determinacy in the cowpea mutants. Development of suitable regeneration protocols in this hitherto recalcitrant crop and subsequent complementation assay in mutants or over-expressing assay in parents could decisively conclude the role of the SNP in regulating determinacy in these cowpea mutants.

  8. Novel mutations affecting LRP5 splicing in patients with osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome (OPPG)

    PubMed Central

    Laine, C M; Chung, B D; Susic, M; Prescott, T; Semler, O; Fiskerstrand, T; D'Eufemia, P; Castori, M; Pekkinen, M; Sochett, E; Cole, W G; Netzer, C; Mäkitie, O

    2011-01-01

    Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma sydrome (OPPG) is an autosomal recessive disorder with early-onset severe osteoporosis and blindness, caused by biallelic loss-of-function mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene. Heterozygous carriers exhibit a milder bone phenotype. Only a few splice mutations in LRP5 have been published. We present clinical and genetic data for four patients with novel LRP5 mutations, three of which affect splicing. Patients were evaluated clinically and by radiography and bone densitometry. Genetic screening of LRP5 was performed on the basis of the clinical diagnosis of OPPG. Splice aberrances were confirmed by cDNA sequencing or exon trapping. The effect of one splice mutation on LRP5 protein function was studied. A novel splice-site mutation c.1584+4A>T abolished the donor splice site of exon 7 and activated a cryptic splice site, which led to an in-frame insertion of 21 amino acids (p.E528_V529ins21). Functional studies revealed severely impaired signal transduction presumably caused by defective intracellular transport of the mutated receptor. Exon trapping was used on two samples to confirm that splice-site mutations c.4112-2A>G and c.1015+1G>T caused splicing-out of exons 20 and 5, respectively. One patient carried a homozygous deletion of exon 4 causing the loss of exons 4 and 5, as demonstrated by cDNA analysis. Our results broaden the spectrum of mutations in LRP5 and provide the first functional data on splice aberrations. PMID:21407258

  9. Identification and Functional Characterization of GAA Mutations in Colombian Patients Affected by Pompe Disease.

    PubMed

    Niño, Mónica Yasmín; Mateus, Heidi Eliana; Fonseca, Dora Janeth; Kroos, Marian A; Ospina, Sandra Yaneth; Mejía, Juan Fernando; Uribe, Jesús Alfredo; Reuser, Arnold J J; Laissue, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Pompe disease (PD) is a recessive metabolic disorder characterized by acid α-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency, which results in lysosomal accumulation of glycogen in all tissues, especially in skeletal muscles. PD clinical course is mainly determined by the nature of the GAA mutations. Although ~400 distinct GAA sequence variations have been described, the genotype-phenotype correlation is not always evident.In this study, we describe the first clinical and genetic analysis of Colombian PD patients performed in 11 affected individuals. GAA open reading frame sequencing revealed eight distinct mutations related to PD etiology including two novel missense mutations, c.1106 T > C (p.Leu369Pro) and c.2236 T > C (p.Trp746Arg). In vitro functional studies showed that the structural changes conferred by both mutations did not inhibit the synthesis of the 110 kD GAA precursor form but affected the processing and intracellular transport of GAA. In addition, analysis of previously described variants located at this position (p.Trp746Gly, p.Trp746Cys, p.Trp746Ser, p.Trp746X) revealed new insights in the molecular basis of PD. Notably, we found that p.Trp746Cys mutation, which was previously described as a polymorphism as well as a causal mutation, displayed a mild deleterious effect. Interestingly and by chance, our study argues in favor of a remarkable Afro-American and European ancestry of the Colombian population. Taken together, our report provides valuable information on the PD genotype-phenotype correlation, which is expected to facilitate and improve genetic counseling of affected individuals and their families.

  10. A renal metanephric adenoma showing both a 2p16e24 deletion and BRAF V600E mutation: a synergistic role for a tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 2p and BRAF activation?

    PubMed

    Dadone, Bérengère; Ambrosetti, Damien; Carpentier, Xavier; Duranton-Tanneur, Valérie; Burel-Vandenbos, Fanny; Amiel, Jean; Pedeutour, Florence

    2013-01-01

    Metanephric adenomas (MAs) are rare benign tumors that may be difficult to recognize. Specific genetic anomalies might aid in diagnosis, but genomic data are limited and conflicting. Consistent mutations of the BRAF gene have been recently reported in MAs and could become useful as a discriminative marker among renal tumors. We report here a case of MA, showing both a BRAF V600E mutation and a segmental loss within bands 2p16 and 2p24 as the sole quantitative genomic anomaly. We compared the borders and size of the deleted region in our case to those of five cases of MAs previously reported. We identified a common minimal region containing 87 genes, among which several tumor suppressor genes could be candidate actors in the pathogenesis of MA. We ruled out MSH2 and MSH6 as target gene candidates, both located in the deleted region, on the basis of preserved expression and microsatellite sequence stability. Our study confirms the recurrence of a BRAF mutation and of 2p alterations in MAs. This first case showing simultaneous presence of a BRAF mutation and a 2p deletion raises the question of a synergistic role for these two anomalies in the pathogenesis of MAs.

  11. Mapping of the css (chloroplast splicing suppressor) gene(s) to a recombinationally suppressed region of chromosome III in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Luo, Liming; Lee, Jaesung; Herrin, David L

    2012-07-01

    In previous work, three suppressors of defective group I introns (7151, 71N1, 7120) were isolated from a mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that had a splicing-deficient chloroplast large subunit (LSU) rRNA intron. Genetic analysis indicated that the 7151 and 71N1 suppressor mutations each involved single nuclear loci, and that the 7151 mutation was dominant. Here we present genetic evidence that the 7120 suppressor also involves a single nuclear locus and that the mutation is dominant in vegetative diploids. Moreover, we have employed crosses with the S1D2 strain and molecular markers to map the 7120 and 71N1 suppressors. Based on an analysis of 800 progeny from 7120 × S1D2, the 7120 suppressor is located in a region of ~400 kb on chromosome III that is devoid of recombination. The ~400-kb region contains at least 72 genes, about one-third of which (i.e., 22) are predicted to be organelle targeted. Similar analysis of 71N1 × S1D2 using 400 progeny also pointed to the recombination-deficient region of chromosome III, raising the possibility that these mutations could affect the same gene. These efforts lay the foundation for identifying the css (chloroplast splicing suppressor) gene(s), which promotes splicing of multiple chloroplast group I introns.

  12. Mutations affecting mitotic recombination frequency in haploids and diploids of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Parag, Y; Parag, G

    1975-01-01

    A haploid strain of Asp. nidulans with a chromosome segment in duplicate (one in normal position on chromosome I, one translocated to chromosome II) shows mitotic recombination, mostly by conversion, in adE in a frequency slightly higher than in the equivalent diploid. A method has been devised, using this duplication, for the selection of rec and uvs mutations. Six rec mutations have been found which decrease recombination frequency in the haploid. One mutation selected as UV sensitive showed a hundred fold increase in recombination frequency in the haploid (pop mutation) and probably the same in diploids. The increased frequency is both in gene conversion and in crossing over, and the exchanges appear in clusters of two or more. pop is allelic to uvsB (Jansen, 1970) which had been found to affect mitotic but not meiotic recombination. It is suggested that mutations of this type interfere with the control mechanism which determines that high recombination is confirmed to the meiotic nuclei and avoided in somatic nuclei.

  13. Targeting tumor suppressor networks for cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuning Emily; Ngo, Bryan; Modrek, Aram Sandaldjian; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a consequence of mutations in genes that control cell proliferation, differentiation and cellular homeostasis. These genes are classified into two categories: oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Together, overexpression of oncogenes and loss of tumor suppressors are the dominant driving forces for tumorigenesis. Hence, targeting oncogenes and tumor suppressors hold tremendous therapeutic potential for cancer treatment. In the last decade, the predominant cancer drug discovery strategy has relied on a traditional reductionist approach of dissecting molecular signaling pathways and designing inhibitors for the selected oncogenic targets. Remarkable therapies have been developed using this approach; however, targeting oncogenes is only part of the picture. Our understanding of the importance of tumor suppressors in preventing tumorigenesis has also advanced significantly and provides a new therapeutic window of opportunity. Given that tumor suppressors are frequently mutated, deleted, or silenced with loss-of-function, restoring their normal functions to treat cancer holds tremendous therapeutic potential. With the rapid expansion in our knowledge of cancer over the last several decades, developing effective anticancer regimens against tumor suppressor pathways has never been more promising. In this article, we will review the concept of tumor suppression, and outline the major therapeutic strategies and challenges of targeting tumor suppressor networks for cancer therapeutics.

  14. An antisuppressor that acts on omnipotent suppressors in yeast.

    PubMed

    Liebman, S W; Cavenagh, M

    1980-05-01

    Six partially dominant antisuppressors were obtained that reduce the efficiency of two omnipotent yeast suppressors, sup45 and sup35, thought to be ribosomal ambiguity mutations. Each of these six antisuppressors was shown to fall within a single Mendelian locus, named asu9. The asu9 mutations are specific for omnipotent suppressors; they have no effect on several dominant tRNA-like suppressors. In the absence of suppressors, asu9 causes sensitivity to the aminoglycoside antibiotic, paromomycin. The properties of asu9 are consistent with the hypothesis that asu9 alters yeast ribosomal proteins.

  15. Mutations and epimutations in the origin of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Peltomaeki, Paeivi

    2012-02-15

    Cancer is traditionally viewed as a disease of abnormal cell proliferation controlled by a series of mutations. Mutations typically affect oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes thereby conferring growth advantage. Genomic instability facilitates mutation accumulation. Recent findings demonstrate that activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, as well as genomic instability, can be achieved by epigenetic mechanisms as well. Unlike genetic mutations, epimutations do not change the base sequence of DNA and are potentially reversible. Similar to genetic mutations, epimutations are associated with specific patterns of gene expression that are heritable through cell divisions. Knudson's hypothesis postulates that inactivation of tumor suppressor genes requires two hits, with the first hit occurring either in somatic cells (sporadic cancer) or in the germline (hereditary cancer) and the second one always being somatic. Studies on hereditary and sporadic forms of colorectal carcinoma have made it evident that, apart from genetic mutations, epimutations may serve as either hit or both. Furthermore, recent next-generation sequencing studies show that epigenetic genes, such as those encoding histone modifying enzymes and subunits for chromatin remodeling systems, are themselves frequent targets of somatic mutations in cancer and can act like tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. This review discusses genetic vs. epigenetic origin of cancer, including cancer susceptibility, in light of recent discoveries. Situations in which mutations and epimutations occur to serve analogous purposes are highlighted.

  16. Mutations in the putative calcium-binding domain of polyomavirus VP1 affect capsid assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, J. I. 2nd; Chang, D.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Calcium ions appear to play a major role in maintaining the structural integrity of the polyomavirus and are likely involved in the processes of viral uncoating and assembly. Previous studies demonstrated that a VP1 fragment extending from Pro-232 to Asp-364 has calcium-binding capabilities. This fragment contains an amino acid stretch from Asp-266 to Glu-277 which is quite similar in sequence to the amino acids that make up the calcium-binding EF hand structures found in many proteins. To assess the contribution of this domain to polyomavirus structural integrity, the effects of mutations in this region were examined by transfecting mutated viral DNA into susceptible cells. Immunofluorescence studies indicated that although viral protein synthesis occurred normally, infective viral progeny were not produced in cells transfected with polyomavirus genomes encoding either a VP1 molecule lacking amino acids Thr-262 through Gly-276 or a VP1 molecule containing a mutation of Asp-266 to Ala. VP1 molecules containing the deletion mutation were unable to bind 45Ca in an in vitro assay. Upon expression in Escherichia coli and purification by immunoaffinity chromatography, wild-type VP1 was isolated as pentameric, capsomere-like structures which could be induced to form capsid-like structures upon addition of CaCl2, consistent with previous studies. However, although VP1 containing the point mutation was isolated as pentamers which were indistinguishable from wild-type VP1 pentamers, addition of CaCl2 did not result in their assembly into capsid-like structures. Immunogold labeling and electron microscopy studies of transfected mammalian cells provided in vivo evidence that a mutation in this region affects the process of viral assembly.

  17. Mutations in the human adenosine deaminase gene that affect protein structure and RNA splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Akeson, A.L.; Wiginton, D.A.; States, C.J.; Perme, C.M.; Dusing, M.R.; Hutton, J.J.

    1987-08-01

    Adenosine deaminase deficiency is one cause of the genetic disease severe combined immunodeficiency. To identify mutations responsible for ADA deficiency, the authors synthesized cDNAs to ADA mRNAs from two cell lines, GM2756 and GM2825A, derived from ADA-deficient immunodeficient patients. Sequence analysis of GM2756 cDNA clones revealed a different point mutation in each allele that causes amino acid changes of alanine to valine and arginine to histidine. One allele of GM2825A also has a point mutation that causes an alanine to valine substitution. The other allele of GM2825A was found to produce an mRNA in which exon 4 had been spliced out but had no other detrimental mutations. S1 nuclease mapping of GM2825A mRNA showed equal abundance of the full-length ADA mRNA and the ADA mRNA that was missing exon 4. Several of the ADA cDNA clones extended 5' of the major initiation start site, indicating multiple start sites for ADA transcription. The point mutations in GM2756 and GM2825A and the absence of exon 4 in GM2825A appear to be directly responsible for the ADA deficiency. Comparison of a number of normal and mutant ADA cDNA sequences showed a number of changes in the third base of codons. These change do not affect the amino acid sequence. Analyses of ADA cDNAs from different cell lines detected aberrant RNA species that either included intron 7 or excluded exon 7. Their presence is a result of aberrant splicing of pre-mRNAs and is not related to mutations that cause ADA deficiency.

  18. GENETIC MUTATIONS AFFECTING THE FIRST LINE ERADICATION THERAPY OF Helicobacter pylori-INFECTED EGYPTIAN PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    RAMZY, Iman; ELGAREM, Hassan; HAMZA, Iman; GHAITH, Doaa; ELBAZ, Tamer; ELHOSARY, Waleed; MOSTAFA, Gehan; ELZAHRY, Mohammad A. Mohey Eldin

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Introduction: Several genetic mutations affect the first-line triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori. We aimed to study the most common genetic mutations affecting the metronidazole and clarithromycin therapy for H. pylori-infected Egyptian patients. Patients and Methods: In our study, we included 100 successive dyspeptic patients scheduled for diagnosis through upper gastroscopy at Cairo's University Hospital, Egypt. Gastric biopsies were tested for the presence of H. pylori by detection of the 16S rRNA gene. Positive biopsies were further studied for the presence of the rdxA gene deletion by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), while clarithromycin resistance was investigated by the presence of nucleotide substitutions within H. pylori 23S rRNA V domain using MboII and BsaI to carry out a Restricted Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) assay. Results: Among 70 H. pylori positive biopsies, the rdxA gene deletion was detected in 44/70 (62.9%) samples, while predominance of the A2142G mutations within the H. pylori 23S rRNA V domain was evidenced in 39/70 (55.7%) of the positive H. pylori cases. No statistically significant difference was found between the presence of gene mutations and different factors such as patients 'age, gender, geographic distribution, symptoms and endoscopic findings. Conclusion: Infection with mutated H. pylori strains is considerably high, a finding that imposes care in the use of the triple therapy to treat H. pylori in Egypt, since the guidelines recommend to abandon the standard triple therapy when the primary clarithromycin resistance rate is over 20%1. PMID:27982354

  19. WWOX: A fragile tumor suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Schrock, Morgan S

    2015-01-01

    WWOX, the WW domain-containing oxidoreductase gene at chromosome region 16q23.3–q24.1, spanning chromosomal fragile site FRA16D, encodes the 46 kDa Wwox protein, a tumor suppressor that is lost or reduced in expression in a wide variety of cancers, including breast, prostate, ovarian, and lung. The function of Wwox as a tumor suppressor implies that it serves a function in the prevention of carcinogenesis. Indeed, in vitro studies show that Wwox protein interacts with many binding partners to regulate cellular apoptosis, proliferation, and/or maturation. It has been reported that newborn Wwox knockout mice exhibit nascent osteosarcomas while Wwox+/− mice exhibit increased incidence of spontaneous and induced tumors. Furthermore, absence or reduction of Wwox expression in mouse xenograft models results in increased tumorigenesis, which can be rescued by Wwox re-expression, though there is not universal agreement among investigators regarding the role of Wwox loss in these experimental models. Despite this proposed tumor suppressor function, the overlap of the human WWOX locus with FRA16D sensitizes the gene to protein-inactivating deletions caused by replication stress. The high frequency of deletions within the WWOX locus in cancers of various types, without the hallmark protein inactivation-associated mutations of “classical” tumor suppressors, has led to the proposal that WWOX deletions in cancers are passenger events that occur in early cancer progenitor cells due to fragility of the genetic locus, rather than driver events which provide the cancer cell a selective advantage. Recently, a proposed epigenetic cause of chromosomal fragility has suggested a novel mechanism for early fragile site instability and has implications regarding the involvement of tumor suppressor genes at chromosomal fragile sites in cancer. In this review, we provide an overview of the evidence for WWOX as a tumor suppressor gene and put this into the context of fragility

  20. Assessment of mutations of Ha- and Ki-ras oncogenes and the p53 suppressor gene in seven malignant mesothelioma patients exposed to asbestos--PCR-SSCP and sequencing analyses of paraffin-embedded primary tumors.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, F; Araki, S; Tanigawa, T; Miura, H; Akabane, H; Iwasaki, R

    1998-01-01

    To examine whether malignant mesothelioma due to asbestos has genetic alterations in the Ha- and Ki-ras oncogenes or in the p53 suppressor gene, we analyzed the point mutations of these genes in paraffin-embedded autopsy samples of the primary tumors of malignant mesothelioma in seven asbestos patients who died from malignant mesothelioma. The genetic analysis was conducted by the polymerase chain reaction-single strand comformation polymorphysms (PCR-SSCP) method in all patients, and through the sequencing of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) bases in one patient. No genetic alterations were found in exons 1 or 2 of Ha- and Ki-ras oncogenes, or in exons 5 to 9 of the p53 gene, in any of the patients. Further studies on a larger number of patients are required to reach a definite conclusion concerning the genetic effects of asbestos on malignant mesothelioma.

  1. Dynamics of a Recurrent Buchnera Mutation That Affects Thermal Tolerance of Pea Aphid Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Gaelen R.; McLaughlin, Heather J.; Simon, Jean-Christophe; Moran, Nancy A.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in maternally transmitted symbionts can affect host fitness. In this study we investigate a mutation in an obligate bacterial symbiont (Buchnera), which has dramatic effects on the heat tolerance of pea aphid hosts (Acyrthosiphon pisum). The heat-sensitive allele arises through a single base deletion in a homopolymer within the promoter of ibpA, which encodes a universal small heat-shock protein. In laboratory cultures reared under cool conditions (20°), the rate of fixation (1.4 × 10−3 substitutions per Buchnera replication) is much higher than the previously estimated mutation rate for single base deletions in homopolymers in the Buchnera genome, implying a strong selective benefit. This mutation recurs in natural populations, but seldom reaches high frequencies, implying that it is only rarely favored by selection. Another potential source of physiological stress in pea aphids is infection by other microorganisms, including facultative bacterial symbionts, which occur in a majority of pea aphids in field populations. Frequency of the heat-sensitive Buchnera allele is negatively correlated with presence of facultative symbionts in both laboratory colonies and field populations, suggesting that these infections impose stress that is ameliorated by ibpA expression. This single base polymorphism in Buchnera has the potential to allow aphid populations to adapt quickly to prevailing conditions. PMID:20610410

  2. Mutations in the West Nile prM protein affect VLP and virion secretion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Calvert, Amanda E; Huang, Claire Y-H; Blair, Carol D; Roehrig, John T

    2012-11-10

    Mutation of the West Nile virus-like particle (WN VLP) prM protein (T20D, K31A, K31V, or K31T) results in undetectable VLP secretion from transformed COS-1 cells. K31 mutants formed intracellular prM-E heterodimers; however these proteins remained in the ER and ER-Golgi intermediary compartments of transfected cells. The T20D mutation affected glycosylation, heterodimer formation, and WN VLP secretion. When infectious viruses bearing the same mutations were used to infect COS-1 cells, K31 mutant viruses exhibited delayed growth and reduced infectivity compared to WT virus. Epitope maps of WN VLP and WNV prM were also different. These results suggest that while mutations in the prM protein can reduce or eliminate secretion of WN VLPs, they have less effect on virus. This difference may be due to the quantity of prM in WN VLPs compared to WNV or to differences in maturation, structure, and symmetry of these particles.

  3. Leukocyte adhesion deficiency-III is caused by mutations in KINDLIN3 affecting integrin activation

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Lena; Howarth, Kimberley; McDowall, Alison; Patzak, Irene; Evans, Rachel; Ussar, Siegfried; Moser, Markus; Metin, Ayse; Fried, Mike; Tomlinson, Ian; Hogg, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Integrins are the major adhesion receptors of leukocytes and platelets. β1 and β2 integrin function on leukocytes is crucial for a successful immune response and the platelet integrin αIIbβ3 initiates the process of blood clotting through binding fibrinogen1-3. Integrins on circulating cells bind poorly to their ligands but become active after ‘inside-out’ signaling through other membrane receptors4,5. Subjects with leukocyte adhesion deficiency-1 (LAD-I) do not express β2 integrins because of mutations in the gene specifying the β2 subunit, and they suffer recurrent bacterial infections6,7. Mutations affecting αIIbβ3 integrin cause the bleeding disorder termed Glanzmann’s thrombasthenia3. Subjects with LAD-III show symptoms of both LAD-I and Glanzmann’s thrombasthenia. Their hematopoietically-derived cells express β1, β2 and β3 integrins, but defective inside-out signaling causes immune deficiency and bleeding problems8. The LAD-III lesion has been attributed to a C→A mutation in the gene encoding calcium and diacylglycerol guanine nucleotide exchange factor (CALDAGGEF1; official symbol RASGRP2) specifying the CALDAG-GEF1 protein9, but we show that this change is not responsible for the LAD-III disorder. Instead, we identify mutations in the KINDLIN3 (official symbol FERMT3) gene specifying the KINDLIN-3 protein as the cause of LAD-III in Maltese and Turkish subjects. Two independent mutations result in decreased KINDLIN3 messenger RNA levels and loss of protein expression. Notably, transfection of the subjects’ lymphocytes with KINDLIN3 complementary DNA but not CALDAGGEF1 cDNA reverses the LAD-III defect, restoring integrin-mediated adhesion and migration. PMID:19234463

  4. Epilepsy due to PNPO mutations: genotype, environment and treatment affect presentation and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Philippa B.; Camuzeaux, Stephane S.M.; Footitt, Emma J.; Mills, Kevin A.; Gissen, Paul; Fisher, Laura; Das, Krishna B.; Varadkar, Sophia M.; Zuberi, Sameer; McWilliam, Robert; Stödberg, Tommy; Plecko, Barbara; Baumgartner, Matthias R.; Maier, Oliver; Calvert, Sophie; Riney, Kate; Wolf, Nicole I.; Livingston, John H.; Bala, Pronab; Morel, Chantal F.; Feillet, François; Raimondi, Francesco; Del Giudice, Ennio; Chong, W. Kling; Pitt, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The first described patients with pyridox(am)ine 5’-phosphate oxidase deficiency all had neonatal onset seizures that did not respond to treatment with pyridoxine but responded to treatment with pyridoxal 5’-phosphate. Our data suggest, however, that the clinical spectrum of pyridox(am)ine 5’-phosphate oxidase deficiency is much broader than has been reported in the literature. Sequencing of the PNPO gene was undertaken for a cohort of 82 individuals who had shown a reduction in frequency and severity of seizures in response to pyridoxine or pyridoxal 5’-phosphate. Novel sequence changes were studied using a new cell-free expression system and a mass spectrometry-based assay for pyridoxamine phosphate oxidase. Three groups of patients with PNPO mutations that had reduced enzyme activity were identified: (i) patients with neonatal onset seizures responding to pyridoxal 5’-phosphate (n = 6); (ii) a patient with infantile spasms (onset 5 months) responsive to pyridoxal 5’-phosphate (n = 1); and (iii) patients with seizures starting under 3 months of age responding to pyridoxine (n = 8). Data suggest that certain genotypes (R225H/C and D33V) are more likely to result in seizures that to respond to treatment with pyridoxine. Other mutations seem to be associated with infertility, miscarriage and prematurity. However, the situation is clearly complex with the same combination of mutations being seen in patients who responded and did not respond to pyridoxine. It is possible that pyridoxine responsiveness in PNPO deficiency is affected by prematurity and age at the time of the therapeutic trial. Other additional factors that are likely to influence treatment response and outcome include riboflavin status and how well the foetus has been supplied with vitamin B6 by the mother. For some patients there was a worsening of symptoms on changing from pyridoxine to pyridoxal 5’-phosphate. Many of the mutations in PNPO affected residues involved in binding flavin

  5. A Point Mutation in Suppressor of Cytokine Signalling 2 (Socs2) Increases the Susceptibility to Inflammation of the Mammary Gland while Associated with Higher Body Weight and Size and Higher Milk Production in a Sheep Model

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Rachel; Senin, Pavel; Sarry, Julien; Allain, Charlotte; Tasca, Christian; Ligat, Laeticia; Portes, David; Woloszyn, Florent; Bouchez, Olivier; Tabouret, Guillaume; Lebastard, Mathieu; Caubet, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Mastitis is an infectious disease mainly caused by bacteria invading the mammary gland. Genetic control of susceptibility to mastitis has been widely evidenced in dairy ruminants, but the genetic basis and underlying mechanisms are still largely unknown. We describe the discovery, fine mapping and functional characterization of a genetic variant associated with elevated milk leukocytes count, or SCC, as a proxy for mastitis. After implementing genome-wide association studies, we identified a major QTL associated with SCC on ovine chromosome 3. Fine mapping of the region, using full sequencing with 12X coverage in three animals, provided one strong candidate SNP that mapped to the coding sequence of a highly conserved gene, suppressor of cytokine signalling 2 (Socs2). The frequency of the SNP associated with increased SCC was 21.7% and the Socs2 genotype explained 12% of the variance of the trait. The point mutation induces the p.R96C substitution in the SH2 functional domain of SOCS2 i.e. the binding site of the protein to various ligands, as well-established for the growth hormone receptor GHR. Using surface plasmon resonance we showed that the p.R96C point mutation completely abrogates SOCS2 binding affinity for the phosphopeptide of GHR. Additionally, the size, weight and milk production in p.R96C homozygote sheep, were significantly increased by 24%, 18%, and 4.4%, respectively, when compared to wild type sheep, supporting the view that the point mutation causes a loss of SOCS2 functional activity. Altogether these results provide strong evidence for a causal mutation controlling SCC in sheep and highlight the major role of SOCS2 as a tradeoff between the host’s inflammatory response to mammary infections, and body growth and milk production, which are all mediated by the JAK/STAT signaling pathway. PMID:26658352

  6. A Point Mutation in Suppressor of Cytokine Signalling 2 (Socs2) Increases the Susceptibility to Inflammation of the Mammary Gland while Associated with Higher Body Weight and Size and Higher Milk Production in a Sheep Model.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Rachel; Senin, Pavel; Sarry, Julien; Allain, Charlotte; Tasca, Christian; Ligat, Laeticia; Portes, David; Woloszyn, Florent; Bouchez, Olivier; Tabouret, Guillaume; Lebastard, Mathieu; Caubet, Cécile; Foucras, Gilles; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola

    2015-12-01

    Mastitis is an infectious disease mainly caused by bacteria invading the mammary gland. Genetic control of susceptibility to mastitis has been widely evidenced in dairy ruminants, but the genetic basis and underlying mechanisms are still largely unknown. We describe the discovery, fine mapping and functional characterization of a genetic variant associated with elevated milk leukocytes count, or SCC, as a proxy for mastitis. After implementing genome-wide association studies, we identified a major QTL associated with SCC on ovine chromosome 3. Fine mapping of the region, using full sequencing with 12X coverage in three animals, provided one strong candidate SNP that mapped to the coding sequence of a highly conserved gene, suppressor of cytokine signalling 2 (Socs2). The frequency of the SNP associated with increased SCC was 21.7% and the Socs2 genotype explained 12% of the variance of the trait. The point mutation induces the p.R96C substitution in the SH2 functional domain of SOCS2 i.e. the binding site of the protein to various ligands, as well-established for the growth hormone receptor GHR. Using surface plasmon resonance we showed that the p.R96C point mutation completely abrogates SOCS2 binding affinity for the phosphopeptide of GHR. Additionally, the size, weight and milk production in p.R96C homozygote sheep, were significantly increased by 24%, 18%, and 4.4%, respectively, when compared to wild type sheep, supporting the view that the point mutation causes a loss of SOCS2 functional activity. Altogether these results provide strong evidence for a causal mutation controlling SCC in sheep and highlight the major role of SOCS2 as a tradeoff between the host's inflammatory response to mammary infections, and body growth and milk production, which are all mediated by the JAK/STAT signaling pathway.

  7. ramR mutations affecting fluoroquinolone susceptibility in epidemic multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky ST198.

    PubMed

    Baucheron, Sylvie; Le Hello, Simon; Doublet, Benoît; Giraud, Etienne; Weill, François-Xavier; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2013-01-01

    A screening for non-target mutations affecting fluoroquinolone susceptibility was conducted in epidemic multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky ST198. Among a panel of representative isolates (n = 27), covering the epidemic, only three showed distinct mutations in ramR resulting in enhanced expression of genes encoding the AcrAB-TolC efflux system and low increase in ciprofloxacin MIC. No mutations were detected in other regulatory regions of this efflux system. Ciprofloxacin resistance in serovar Kentucky ST198 is thus currently mainly due to multiple target gene mutations.

  8. Recombination affects accumulation of damaging and disease-associated mutations in human populations.

    PubMed

    Hussin, Julie G; Hodgkinson, Alan; Idaghdour, Youssef; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; Goulet, Jean-Philippe; Gbeha, Elias; Hip-Ki, Elodie; Awadalla, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Many decades of theory have demonstrated that, in non-recombining systems, slightly deleterious mutations accumulate non-reversibly, potentially driving the extinction of many asexual species. Non-recombining chromosomes in sexual organisms are thought to have degenerated in a similar fashion; however, it is not clear the extent to which damaging mutations accumulate along chromosomes with highly variable rates of crossing over. Using high-coverage sequencing data from over 1,400 individuals in the 1000 Genomes and CARTaGENE projects, we show that recombination rate modulates the distribution of putatively deleterious variants across the entire human genome. Exons in regions of low recombination are significantly enriched for deleterious and disease-associated variants, a signature varying in strength across worldwide human populations with different demographic histories. Regions with low recombination rates are enriched for highly conserved genes with essential cellular functions and show an excess of mutations with demonstrated effects on health, a phenomenon likely affecting disease susceptibility in humans.

  9. [Parallelism and paradoxes on viability and the life span of two loss-of-function mutations: heat shock protein transcriptional regulator hsf(1) and l(2)gl tumor suppressor in D. melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Vaĭsman, N Ia; Evgen'ev, M B; Golubovskiĭ, M D

    2012-01-01

    In this study we analyzed how a dosage decrease in mono- and diheterozygotes on both lethal alleles of the lgl-gene and hsfheat shock regulator influences viability and life span at optimal and high temperature 29 degrees C conditions. We found that hsf(1) (1 dosage of active hsf-factor) heterozygote animals had significantly increased viability (up to 30-39%) in case of its development from egg to imago under the stress of 29 degrees C. However, this stress-protective effect of a decreased dosage of HSF1 was suppressed in diheterozygotes, while the dosage of tumor suppressor lgl was simultaneously decreased. Under stress temperature conditions, a decrease in dosage of one of the alleles also increased the average life span and delayed aging, especially in the case of maternal inheritance of each of the loss-of-function mutations. In diheterozygotes the average life span had intermediate meanings. However, in diheterozygote males under stress conditions the positive longevity effect of hsf was suppressed in the presence of the lgl-mutation. Paradoxically, that decrease of expression of each of the studied vital genes provided a positive effect on both viability and life span under stress conditions. However, a simultaneous dosage decrease of two loss-of-function alleles in diheterozygotes resulted in disbalanced effects on the organism level. The received data indicate interaction between HSF1 and LGL gene products during ontogenesis and stress-defending processes.

  10. Mutations affecting catabolite repression of the L-arabinose regulon in Escherichia coli B/r.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, L; Bass, R; Englesberg, E

    1976-06-01

    Expression of the L-arabinose regulon in Escherichia coli B/r requires, among other things, cyclic adenosine-3', 5'-monophosphate (cAMP) and the cAMP receptor protein (CRP). Mutants deficient in adenyl cyclase (cya-), the enzyme which synthesizes cAMP, or CRP (crp-) are unable to utilize a variety of carbohydrates, including L-arabinose. Ara+ revertants of a cya-crp- strain were isolated on 0.2% minimal L-arabinose plates, conditions which require the entire ara regulon to be activated in the absence of cAMP and CRP. Evidence from genetic and physiological studies is consistent with placing these mutations in the araC regulatory gene. Deletion mapping with one mutant localized the site within either araO or araC, and complementation tests indicated the mutants acted trans to confer the ability to utilize L-arabinose in a cya-crp- genetic background. Since genetic analysis supports the conclusion, that the mutant sites are in the araC regulatory gene, the mutants were designated araCi, indicating a mutation in the regulatory gene affecting the cAMP-CRP requirement. Physiological analysis of one mutant, araCi1, illustrates the trans-acting nature of the mutation. In a cya-crp- genetic background, araCi1 promoted synthesis of both isomerase, a product of the araBAD operon, and permease, a product of the araE operon. Isomerase and permease levels in araCi1 cya+ crp+ were hyperinducible, and the sensitivity of each to cAMP was altered. Two models are presented that show the possible mutational lesion in the araCi strains.

  11. Factors affecting mutational specificity induced by ionizing radiation and oxidizing radicals. Technical progress report, February 1, 1992--October 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, B.S.

    1992-01-01

    We propose to analyze the factors affecting the specificity of mutational change as induced by ionizing radiation and oxidizing radicals. We want to understand not only the rules that affect base substitution, but also the mechanism(s) by which additions and deletions are produced, since detections are a common consequence of radiation. We wish to carry out this analysis in an in vitro mutation system that permits us to analyze the role of base sequence, of polymerase and of mutagenic agent. Our system is designed to screen out most direct breaks as a cause of mutation and should indicate the changes resulting from base damage to the DNA.

  12. Mutations in SGOL1 cause a novel cohesinopathy affecting heart and gut rhythm.

    PubMed

    Chetaille, Philippe; Preuss, Christoph; Burkhard, Silja; Côté, Jean-Marc; Houde, Christine; Castilloux, Julie; Piché, Jessica; Gosset, Natacha; Leclerc, Séverine; Wünnemann, Florian; Thibeault, Maryse; Gagnon, Carmen; Galli, Antonella; Tuck, Elizabeth; Hickson, Gilles R; El Amine, Nour; Boufaied, Ines; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; de Santa Barbara, Pascal; Faure, Sandrine; Jonzon, Anders; Cameron, Michel; Dietz, Harry C; Gallo-McFarlane, Elena; Benson, D Woodrow; Moreau, Claudia; Labuda, Damian; Zhan, Shing H; Shen, Yaoqing; Jomphe, Michèle; Jones, Steven J M; Bakkers, Jeroen; Andelfinger, Gregor

    2014-11-01

    The pacemaking activity of specialized tissues in the heart and gut results in lifelong rhythmic contractions. Here we describe a new syndrome characterized by Chronic Atrial and Intestinal Dysrhythmia, termed CAID syndrome, in 16 French Canadians and 1 Swede. We show that a single shared homozygous founder mutation in SGOL1, a component of the cohesin complex, causes CAID syndrome. Cultured dermal fibroblasts from affected individuals showed accelerated cell cycle progression, a higher rate of senescence and enhanced activation of TGF-β signaling. Karyotypes showed the typical railroad appearance of a centromeric cohesion defect. Tissues derived from affected individuals displayed pathological changes in both the enteric nervous system and smooth muscle. Morpholino-induced knockdown of sgol1 in zebrafish recapitulated the abnormalities seen in humans with CAID syndrome. Our findings identify CAID syndrome as a novel generalized dysrhythmia, suggesting a new role for SGOL1 and the cohesin complex in mediating the integrity of human cardiac and gut rhythm.

  13. Novel frameshifting mutations of the ZMPSTE24 gene in two siblings affected with restrictive dermopathy and review of the mutations described in the literature.

    PubMed

    Smigiel, Robert; Jakubiak, Aleksandra; Esteves-Vieira, Vera; Szela, Katarzyna; Halon, Agnieszka; Jurek, Tomasz; Lévy, Nicolas; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara

    2010-02-01

    Restrictive dermopathy (RD) is a rare, severe, lethal genodermatosis in which tautness of the skin causes fetal akinesia or hypokinesia deformation sequence. To date, about 60 cases of RD were described. The signs of the disease are very characteristic and include intrauterine growth retardation, thin, tightly adherent translucent skin, superficial vessels, typical facial dysmorphism as well as generalized joint contractures. The syndrome is caused in most cases by ZMPSTE24 autosomal recessive mutations, or, less frequently, by LMNA autosomal dominant mutations. We report on two brothers affected with RD, who died in the neonatal period. Molecular analyses were performed in the second child, for whom biological material was available, and both parents. Compound heterozygous frameshifting mutations were identified in exon 1 (c.50delA) and exon 5 (c.584_585delAT) of the ZMPSTE24 gene. The autosomal recessive inheritance was confirmed by the parents' genomic analysis. Besides, a review of the mutations causing RD is made.

  14. A Novel Forward Genetic Screen for Identifying Mutations Affecting Larval Neuronal Dendrite Development in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Paul Mark B.; Swick, Lance L.; Andersen, Ryan; Blalock, Zachary; Brenman, Jay E.

    2006-01-01

    Vertebrate and invertebrate dendrites are information-processing compartments that can be found on both central and peripheral neurons. Elucidating the molecular underpinnings of information processing in the nervous system ultimately requires an understanding of the genetic pathways that regulate dendrite formation and maintenance. Despite the importance of dendrite development, few forward genetic approaches have been used to analyze the latest stages of dendrite development, including the formation of F-actin-rich dendritic filopodia or dendritic spines. We developed a forward genetic screen utilizing transgenic Drosophila second instar larvae expressing an actin, green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein (actin∷GFP) in subsets of sensory neurons. Utilizing this fluorescent transgenic reporter, we conducted a forward genetic screen of >4000 mutagenized chromosomes bearing lethal mutations that affected multiple aspects of larval dendrite development. We isolated 13 mutations on the X and second chromosomes composing 11 complementation groups affecting dendrite outgrowth/branching, dendritic filopodia formation, or actin∷GFP localization within dendrites in vivo. In a fortuitous observation, we observed that the structure of dendritic arborization (da) neuron dendritic filopodia changes in response to a changing environment. PMID:16415365

  15. Factors affecting germline mutations in a hypervariable microsatellite: a comparative analysis of six species of swallows (Aves: Hirundinidae).

    PubMed

    Anmarkrud, Jarl A; Kleven, Oddmund; Augustin, Jakob; Bentz, Kristofer H; Blomqvist, Donald; Fernie, Kim J; Magrath, Michael J L; Pärn, Henrik; Quinn, James S; Robertson, Raleigh J; Szép, Tibor; Tarof, Scott; Wagner, Richard H; Lifjeld, Jan T

    2011-03-15

    Microsatellites mutate frequently by replication slippage. Empirical evidence shows that the probability of such slippage mutations may increase with the length of the repeat region as well as exposure to environmental mutagens, but the mutation rate can also differ between the male and female germline. It has been hypothesized that more intense sexual selection or sperm competition can also lead to elevated mutation rates, but the empirical evidence is inconclusive. Here, we analyzed the occurrence of germline slippage mutations in the hypervariable pentanucleotide microsatellite locus HrU10 across six species of swallow (Aves: Hirundinidae). These species exhibit marked differences in the length range of the microsatellite, as well as differences in the intensity of sperm competition. We found a strong effect of microsatellite length on the probability of mutation, but no residual effect of species or their level of sperm competition when the length effect was accounted for. Neither could we detect any difference in mutation rate between tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) breeding in Hamilton Harbour, Ontario, an industrial site with previous documentation of elevated mutation rates for minisatellite DNA, and a rural reference population. However, our cross-species analysis revealed two significant patterns of sex differences in HrU10 germline mutations: (1) mutations in longer alleles occurred typically in the male germline, those in shorter alleles in the female germline, and (2) male germline mutations were more often expansions than contractions, whereas no directional bias was evident in the female germline. These results indicate some fundamental differences in male and female gametogenesis affecting the probability of slippage mutations. Our study also reflects the value of a comparative, multi-species approach for locus-specific mutation analyses, through which a wider range of influential factors can be assessed than in single-species studies.

  16. Tumor suppressors: enhancers or suppressors of regeneration?

    PubMed Central

    Pomerantz, Jason H.; Blau, Helen M.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor suppressors are so named because cancers occur in their absence, but these genes also have important functions in development, metabolism and tissue homeostasis. Here, we discuss known and potential functions of tumor suppressor genes during tissue regeneration, focusing on the evolutionarily conserved tumor suppressors pRb1, p53, Pten and Hippo. We propose that their activity is essential for tissue regeneration. This is in contrast to suggestions that tumor suppression is a trade-off for regenerative capacity. We also hypothesize that certain aspects of tumor suppressor pathways inhibit regenerative processes in mammals, and that transient targeted modification of these pathways could be fruitfully exploited to enhance processes that are important to regenerative medicine. PMID:23715544

  17. SLC30A9 mutation affecting intracellular zinc homeostasis causes a novel cerebro-renal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Perez, Yonatan; Shorer, Zamir; Liani-Leibson, Keren; Chabosseau, Pauline; Kadir, Rotem; Volodarsky, Michael; Halperin, Daniel; Barber-Zucker, Shiran; Shalev, Hanna; Schreiber, Ruth; Gradstein, Libe; Gurevich, Evgenia; Zarivach, Raz; Rutter, Guy A; Landau, Daniel; Birk, Ohad S

    2017-02-09

    A novel autosomal recessive cerebro-renal syndrome was identified in consanguineous Bedouin kindred: neurological deterioration was evident as of early age, progressing into severe intellectual disability, profound ataxia, camptocormia and oculomotor apraxia. Brain MRI was normal. Four of the six affected individuals also had early-onset nephropathy with features of tubulo-interstitial nephritis, hypertension and tendency for hyperkalemia, though none had rapid deterioration of renal function. Genome wide linkage analysis identified an ∼18 Mb disease-associated locus on chromosome 4 (maximal logarithm of odds score 4.4 at D4S2971; θ = 0). Whole exome sequencing identified a single mutation in SLC30A9 within this locus, segregating as expected within the kindred and not found in a homozygous state in 300 Bedouin controls. We showed that SLC30A9 (solute carrier family 30 member 9; also known as ZnT-9) is ubiquitously expressed with high levels in cerebellum, skeletal muscle, thymus and kidney. Confocal analysis of SH-SY5Y cells overexpressing SLC30A9 fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein demonstrated vesicular cytosolic localization associated with the endoplasmic reticulum, not co-localizing with endosomal or Golgi markers. SLC30A9 encodes a putative zinc transporter (by similarity) previously associated with Wnt signalling. However, using dual-luciferase reporter assay in SH-SY5Y cells we showed that Wnt signalling was not affected by the mutation. Based on protein modelling, the identified mutation is expected to affect SLC30A9's highly conserved cation efflux domain, putatively disrupting its transmembrane helix structure. Cytosolic Zn2+ measurements in HEK293 cells overexpressing wild-type and mutant SLC30A9 showed lower zinc concentration within mutant rather than wild-type SLC30A9 cells. This suggests that SLC30A9 has zinc transport properties affecting intracellular zinc homeostasis, and that the molecular mechanism of the disease is through

  18. Rare Mutations of CACNB2 Found in Autism Spectrum Disease-Affected Families Alter Calcium Channel Function

    PubMed Central

    Breitenkamp, Alexandra F. S.; Matthes, Jan; Nass, Robert Daniel; Sinzig, Judith; Lehmkuhl, Gerd; Nürnberg, Peter; Herzig, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are complex neurodevelopmental diseases clinically defined by dysfunction of social interaction. Dysregulation of cellular calcium homeostasis might be involved in ASD pathogenesis, and genes coding for the L-type calcium channel subunits CaV1.2 (CACNA1C) and CaVβ2 (CACNB2) were recently identified as risk loci for psychiatric diseases. Here, we present three rare missense mutations of CACNB2 (G167S, S197F, and F240L) found in ASD-affected families, two of them described here for the first time (G167S and F240L). All these mutations affect highly conserved regions while being absent in a sample of ethnically matched controls. We suggest the mutations to be of physiological relevance since they modulate whole-cell Ba2+ currents through calcium channels when expressed in a recombinant system (HEK-293 cells). Two mutations displayed significantly decelerated time-dependent inactivation as well as increased sensitivity of voltage-dependent inactivation. In contrast, the third mutation (F240L) showed significantly accelerated time-dependent inactivation. By altering the kinetic parameters, the mutations are reminiscent of the CACNA1C mutation causing Timothy Syndrome, a Mendelian disease presenting with ASD. In conclusion, the results of our first-time biophysical characterization of these three rare CACNB2 missense mutations identified in ASD patients support the hypothesis that calcium channel dysfunction may contribute to autism. PMID:24752249

  19. A novel p53 mutant found in iatrogenic urothelial cancers is dysfunctional and can be rescued by a second-site global suppressor mutation.

    PubMed

    Odell, Adam F; Odell, Luke R; Askham, Jon M; Alogheli, Hiba; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan; Hollstein, Monica

    2013-06-07

    Exposure to herbal remedies containing the carcinogen aristolochic acid (AA) has been widespread in some regions of the world. Rare A→T TP53 mutations were recently discovered in AA-associated urothelial cancers. The near absence of these mutations among all other sequenced human tumors suggests that they could be biologically silent. There are no cell banks with established lines derived from human tumors with which to explore the influence of the novel mutants on p53 function and cellular behavior. To investigate their impact, we generated isogenic mutant clones by integrase-mediated cassette exchange at the p53 locus of platform (null) murine embryonic fibroblasts and kidney epithelial cells. Common tumor mutants (R248W, R273C) were compared with the AA-associated mutants N131Y, R249W, and Q104L. Assays of cell proliferation, migration, growth in soft agar, apoptosis, senescence, and gene expression revealed contrasting outcomes on cellular behavior following introduction of N131Y or Q104L. The N131Y mutant demonstrated a phenotype akin to common tumor mutants, whereas Q104L clone behavior resembled that of cells with wild-type p53. Wild-type p53 responses were restored in double-mutant cells harboring N131Y and N239Y, a second-site rescue mutation, suggesting that pharmaceutical reactivation of p53 function in tumors expressing N131Y could have therapeutic benefit. N131Y is likely to contribute directly to tumor phenotype and is a promising candidate biomarker of AA exposure and disease. Rare mutations thus do not necessarily point to sites where amino acid exchanges are phenotypically neutral. Encounter with mutagenic insults targeting cryptic sites can reveal specific signature hotspots.

  20. TRNA mutations that affect decoding fidelity deregulate development and the proteostasis network in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Reverendo, Marisa; Soares, Ana R; Pereira, Patrícia M; Carreto, Laura; Ferreira, Violeta; Gatti, Evelina; Pierre, Philippe; Moura, Gabriela R; Santos, Manuel A

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in genes that encode tRNAs, aminoacyl-tRNA syntheases, tRNA modifying enzymes and other tRNA interacting partners are associated with neuropathies, cancer, type-II diabetes and hearing loss, but how these mutations cause disease is unclear. We have hypothesized that levels of tRNA decoding error (mistranslation) that do not fully impair embryonic development can accelerate cell degeneration through proteome instability and saturation of the proteostasis network. To test this hypothesis we have induced mistranslation in zebrafish embryos using mutant tRNAs that misincorporate Serine (Ser) at various non-cognate codon sites. Embryo viability was affected and malformations were observed, but a significant proportion of embryos survived by activating the unfolded protein response (UPR), the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) and downregulating protein biosynthesis. Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage and disruption of the mitochondrial network, were also observed, suggesting that mistranslation had a strong negative impact on protein synthesis rate, ER and mitochondrial homeostasis. We postulate that mistranslation promotes gradual cellular degeneration and disease through protein aggregation, mitochondrial dysfunction and genome instability.

  1. Mutations in cadherin 23 affect tip links in zebrafish sensory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Söllner, Christian; Rauch, Gerd-Jörg; Siemens, Jan; Geisler, Robert; Schuster, Stephan C; Müller, Ulrich; Nicolson, Teresa

    2004-04-29

    Hair cells have highly organized bundles of apical projections, or stereocilia, that are deflected by sound and movement. Displacement of stereocilia stretches linkages at the tips of stereocilia that are thought to gate mechanosensory channels. To identify the molecular machinery that mediates mechanotransduction in hair cells, zebrafish mutants were identified with defects in balance and hearing. In sputnik mutants, stereociliary bundles are splayed to various degrees, with individuals displaying reduced or absent mechanotransduction. Here we show that the defects in sputnik mutants are caused by mutations in cadherin 23 (cdh23). Mutations in Cdh23 also cause deafness and vestibular defects in mice and humans, and the protein is present in hair bundles. We show that zebrafish Cdh23 protein is concentrated near the tips of hair bundles, and that tip links are absent in homozygous sputnik(tc317e) larvae. Moreover, tip links are absent in larvae carrying weak alleles of cdh23 that affect mechanotransduction but not hair bundle integrity. We conclude that Cdh23 is an essential tip link component required for hair-cell mechanotransduction.

  2. P-element mutations affecting embryonic peripheral nervous system development in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Kania, A.; Salzberg, A.; Bhat, M.

    1995-04-01

    The Drosophila embryonic peripheral nervous system (PNS) is an excellent model system to study the molecular mechanisms governing neural development. To identify genes controlling PNS development, we screened 2000 lethal P-element insertion strains. The PNS of mutant embryos was examined using the neural specific marker MAb 22C10, and 92 mutant strains were retained for further analysis. Genetic and cytological analysis of these strains shows that 42 mutations affect previously isolated genes that are known to be required for PNS development: longitudinals lacking (19), mastermind (15), numb (4), big brain (2), and spitz (2). The remaining 50 mutations were classified into 29 complementation groups and the P-element insertions were cytologically mapped. The mutants were classified in five major classes on the basis of their phenotype: gain of neurons, loss of neurons, organizational defects, pathfinding defects and morphological defects. Herein we report the preliminary phenotypic characterization of each of these complementation groups as well as the embryonic lacZ expression pattern of each P-element strain. Our analysis indicates that in most of the P-element insertion strains, the lacZ reporter gene is not expressed in the developing PNS. 52 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Glutamine synthetase-constitutive mutation affecting the glnALG upstream promoter of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    León, P; Romero, D; Garciarrubio, A; Bastarrachea, F; Covarrubias, A A

    1985-12-01

    The spontaneous gln-76 mutation of Escherichia coli (Osorio et al., Mol. Gen. Genet. 194:114-123, 1984) was previously shown to be responsible for the cis-dominant constitutive expression of the glnA gene in the absence of a glnG-glnF activator system. Nucleotide sequence analysis has now revealed that gln-76 is a single transversion T.A to A.T, an up-promoter mutation affecting the -10 region of glnAp1, the upstream promoter of the glnALG control region. Both, wild-type and gln-76 DNA control regions were cloned into the promoter-probe plasmid pKO1. Galactokinase activity determinations of cells carrying the fused plasmids showed 10-fold more effective expression mediated by gln-76 than by the glnA wild-type control region. Primer extension experiments with RNA from strains carrying the gln-76 control region indicated that the transcription initiation sites were the same in both the gln-76 mutant and the wild type.

  4. Glutamine synthetase-constitutive mutation affecting the glnALG upstream promoter of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    León, P; Romero, D; Garciarrubio, A; Bastarrachea, F; Covarrubias, A A

    1985-01-01

    The spontaneous gln-76 mutation of Escherichia coli (Osorio et al., Mol. Gen. Genet. 194:114-123, 1984) was previously shown to be responsible for the cis-dominant constitutive expression of the glnA gene in the absence of a glnG-glnF activator system. Nucleotide sequence analysis has now revealed that gln-76 is a single transversion T.A to A.T, an up-promoter mutation affecting the -10 region of glnAp1, the upstream promoter of the glnALG control region. Both, wild-type and gln-76 DNA control regions were cloned into the promoter-probe plasmid pKO1. Galactokinase activity determinations of cells carrying the fused plasmids showed 10-fold more effective expression mediated by gln-76 than by the glnA wild-type control region. Primer extension experiments with RNA from strains carrying the gln-76 control region indicated that the transcription initiation sites were the same in both the gln-76 mutant and the wild type. Images PMID:2866175

  5. Social defeat interacts with Disc1 mutations in the mouse to affect behavior.

    PubMed

    Haque, F Nipa; Lipina, Tatiana V; Roder, John C; Wong, Albert H C

    2012-08-01

    DISC1 (Disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1) is a strong candidate susceptibility gene for psychiatric disease that was originally discovered in a family with a chromosomal translocation severing this gene. Although the family members with the translocation had an identical genetic mutation, their clinical diagnosis and presentation varied significantly. Gene-environment interactions have been proposed as a mechanism underlying the complex heritability and variable phenotype of psychiatric disorders such as major depressive disorder and schizophrenia. We hypothesized that gene-environment interactions would affect behavior in a mutant Disc1 mouse model. We examined the effect of chronic social defeat (CSD) as an environmental stressor in two lines of mice carrying different Disc1 point mutations, on behaviors relevant to psychiatric illness: locomotion in a novel open field (OF), pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response, latent inhibition (LI), elevated plus maze (EPM), forced swim test (FST), sucrose consumption (SC), and the social interaction task for sociability and social novelty (SSN). We found that Disc1-L100P +/- and wild-type mice have similar anxiety responses to CSD, while Q31L +/- mice had a very different response. We also found evidence of significant gene-environment interactions in the OF, EPM and SSN.

  6. Mutation in fucose synthesis gene of Klebsiella pneumoniae affects capsule composition and virulence in mice.

    PubMed

    Pan, Po-Chang; Chen, Hui-Wen; Wu, Po-Kuan; Wu, Yu-Yang; Lin, Chun-Hung; Wu, June H

    2011-02-01

    The emerging pathogenicity of Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP) is evident by the increasing number of clinical cases of liver abscess (LA) due to KP infection. A unique property of KP is its thick mucoid capsule. The bacterial capsule has been found to contain fucose in KP strains causing LA but not in those causing urinary tract infections. The products of the gmd and wcaG genes are responsible for converting mannose to fucose in KP. A KP strain, KpL1, which is known to have a high death rate in infected mice, was mutated by inserting an apramycin-resistance gene into the gmd. The mutant expressed genes upstream and downstream of gmd, but not gmd itself, as determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The DNA mapping confirmed the disruption of the gmd gene. This mutant decreased its ability to kill infected mice and showed decreased virulence in infected HepG2 cells. Compared with wild-type KpL1, the gmd mutant lost fucose in capsular polysaccharides, increased biofilm formation and interacted more readily with macrophages. The mutant displayed morphological changes with long filament forms and less uniform sizes. The mutation also converted the serotype from K1 of wild-type to K2 and weak K3. The results indicate that disruption of the fucose synthesis gene affected the pathophysiology of this bacterium and may be related to the virulence of this KpL1 strain.

  7. Functional and splicing defect analysis of 23 ACVRL1 mutations in a cohort of patients affected by Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Alaa el Din, Ferdos; Patri, Sylvie; Thoreau, Vincent; Rodriguez-Ballesteros, Montserrat; Hamade, Eva; Bailly, Sabine; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Abou Merhi, Raghida; Kitzis, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia syndrome (HHT) or Rendu-Osler-Weber (ROW) syndrome is an autosomal dominant vascular disorder. Two most common forms of HHT, HHT1 and HHT2, have been linked to mutations in the endoglin (ENG) and activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ACVRL1or ALK1) genes respectively. This work was designed to examine the pathogenicity of 23 nucleotide variations in ACVRL1 gene detected in more than 400 patients. Among them, 14 missense mutations and one intronic variant were novels, and 8 missense mutations were previously identified with questionable implication in HHT2. The functionality of missense mutations was analyzed in response to BMP9 (specific ligand of ALK1), the maturation of the protein products and their localization were analyzed by western blot and fluorescence microscopy. The splicing impairment of the intronic and of two missense mutations was examined by minigene assay. Functional analysis showed that 18 out of 22 missense mutations were defective. Splicing analysis revealed that one missense mutation (c.733A>G, p.Ile245Val) affects the splicing of the harboring exon 6. Similarly, the intronic mutation outside the consensus splicing sites (c.1048+5G>A in intron 7) was seen pathogenic by splicing study. Both mutations induce a frame shift creating a premature stop codon likely resulting in mRNA degradation by NMD surveillance mechanism. Our results confirm the haploinsufficiency model proposed for HHT2. The affected allele of ACVRL1 induces mRNA degradation or the synthesis of a protein lacking the receptor activity. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that functional and splicing analyses together, represent two robust diagnostic tools to be used by geneticists confronted with novel or conflicted ACVRL1 mutations. PMID:26176610

  8. Four novel cystic fibrosis mutations in splice junction sequences affecting the CFTR nucleotide binding folds

    SciTech Connect

    Doerk, T.; Wulbrand, U.; Tuemmler, B. )

    1993-03-01

    Single cases of the four novel splice site mutations 1525[minus]1 G [r arrow] A (intron 9), 3601[minus]2 A [r arrow] G (intron 18), 3850[minus]3 T [r arrow] G (intron 19), and 4374+1 G [r arrow] T (intron 23) were detected in the CFTR gene of cystic fibrosis patients of Indo-Iranian, Turkish, Polish, and Germany descent. The nucleotide substitutions at the +1, [minus]1, and [minus]2 positions all destroy splice sites and lead to severe disease alleles associated with features typical of gastrointestinal and pulmonary cystic fibrosis disease. The 3850[minus]3 T-to-G change was discovered in a very mildly affected 33-year-old [Delta]F508 compound heterozygote, suggesting that the T-to-G transversion at the less conserved [minus]3 position of the acceptor splice site may retain some wildtype function. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. Error-prone and error-restrictive mutations affecting ribosomal protein S12.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Deepali; Gregory, Steven T; O'Connor, Michael

    2011-07-01

    Ribosomal protein S12 plays a pivotal role in decoding functions on the ribosome. X-ray crystallographic analyses of ribosomal complexes have revealed that S12 is involved in the inspection of codon-anticodon pairings in the ribosomal A site, as well as in the succeeding domain rearrangements of the 30S subunit that are essential for accommodation of aminoacyl-tRNA. A role for S12 in tRNA selection is also well supported by classical genetic analyses; mutations affecting S12 are readily isolated in bacteria and organelles, since specific alterations in S12 confer resistance to the error-inducing antibiotic streptomycin, and the ribosomes from many such streptomycin-resistant S12 mutants display decreased levels of miscoding. However, substitutions that confer resistance to streptomycin likely represent a very distinct class of all possible S12 mutants. Until recently, the technical difficulties in generating random, unselectable mutations in essential genes in complex operons have generally precluded the analysis of other classes of S12 alterations. Using a recombineering approach, we have targeted the Escherichia coli rpsL gene, encoding S12, for random mutagenesis and screened the resulting mutants for effects on decoding fidelity. We have recovered over 40 different substitutions located throughout the S12 protein that alter the accuracy of translation without substantially affecting the sensitivity to streptomycin. Moreover, this collection includes mutants that promote miscoding, as well as those that restrict decoding errors. These results affirm the importance of S12 in decoding processes and indicate that alterations in this essential protein can have diverse effects on the accuracy of decoding.

  10. A Promoter Region Mutation Affecting Replication of the Tetrahymena Ribosomal DNA Minichromosome

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Renata C.; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.

    1998-01-01

    In the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) minichromosome replicates partially under cell cycle control and is also subject to a copy number control mechanism. The relationship between rDNA replication and rRNA gene transcription was investigated by the analysis of replication, transcription, and DNA-protein interactions in a mutant rDNA, the rmm3 rDNA. The rmm3 (for rDNA maturation or maintenance mutant 3) rDNA contains a single-base deletion in the rRNA promoter region, in a phylogenetically conserved sequence element that is repeated in the replication origin region of the rDNA minichromosome. The multicopy rmm3 rDNA minichromosome has a maintenance defect in the presence of a competing rDNA allele in heterozygous cells. No difference in the level of rRNA transcription was found between wild-type and rmm3 strains. However, rmm3 rDNA replicating intermediates exhibited an enhanced pause in the region of the replication origin, roughly 750 bp upstream from the rmm3 mutation. In footprinting of isolated nuclei, the rmm3 rDNA lacked the wild-type dimethyl sulfate (DMS) footprint in the promoter region adjacent to the base change. In addition, a DMS footprint in the origin region was lost in the rmm3 rDNA minichromosome. This is the first reported correlation in this system between an rDNA minichromosome maintenance defect and an altered footprint in the origin region. Our results suggest that a promoter region mutation can affect replication without detectably affecting transcription. We propose a model in which interactions between promoter and origin region complexes facilitate replication and maintenance of the Tetrahymena rDNA minichromosome. PMID:9566921

  11. A family with a dystrophin gene mutation specifically affecting dystrophin expression in the heart

    SciTech Connect

    Muntoni, F.; Davies, K.; Dubowitz, V.

    1994-09-01

    We recently described a family with X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy where a large deletion in the muscle promoter region of the dystrophin gene was associated with a severe dilated cardiomyopathy in absence of clinical skeletal muscle involvement. The deletion removed the entire muscle promoter region, the first muscle exon and part of intron 1. The brain and Purkinje cell promoters were not affected by the deletion. Despite the lack of both the muscle promoter and the first muscle exon, dystrophin was detected immunocytochemically in relative high levels in the skeletal muscle of the affected males. We have now found that both the brain and Purkinje cell promoters were transcribed at high levels in the skeletal muscle of these individuals. This phenomenon, that does not occur in normal skeletal muscle, indicates that these two isoforms, physiologically expressed mainly in the central nervous system, can be transcribed and be functionally active in skeletal muscle under specific circumstances. Contrary to what is observed in skeletal muscle, dystrophin was not detected in the heart of one affected male using immunocytochemistry and an entire panel of anti-dystrophin antibodies. This was most likely the cause for the pronounced cardiac fibrosis observed and eventually responsible for the severe cardiac involvement invariably seen in seven affected males. In conclusion, the mutation of the muscle promoter, first muscle exon and part of intron 1 specifically affected expression of dystrophin in the heart. We believe that this deletion removes sequences involved in regulation of dystrophin expression in the heart and are at the moment characterizing other families with X-linked cardiomyopathy secondary to a dystrophinopathy.

  12. An initiator protein for plasmid R6K DNA replication. Mutations affecting the copy-number control.

    PubMed

    Inuzuka, M; Wada, Y

    1988-02-08

    Two kinds of mutations affecting the copy-number control of plasmid R6K were isolated and identified in an initiator pi protein by DNA sequencing. Firstly, a temperature-sensitive replication mutation, ts22, with decreased copy number results in a substitution of threonine to isoleucine at position 138 of the 305-amino-acid pi protein. Secondly, a high-copy-number (cop21) mutant was isolated from this ts mutant and was identified by an alteration of alanine to serine at position 162. This cop21 mutation suppressed the Ts character and was recessive to the wild-type allele in the copy control.

  13. Subcortical band heterotopia in rare affected males can be caused by missense mutations in DCX (XLIS) or LIS1.

    PubMed

    Pilz, D T; Kuc, J; Matsumoto, N; Bodurtha, J; Bernadi, B; Tassinari, C A; Dobyns, W B; Ledbetter, D H

    1999-09-01

    Subcortical band heterotopia (SBH) are bilateral and symmetric ribbons of gray matter found in the central white matter between the cortex and the ventricular surface, which comprises the less severe end of the lissencephaly (agyria-pachygyria-band) spectrum of malformations. Mutations in DCX (also known as XLIS ) have previously been described in females with SBH. We have now identified mutations in either the DCX or LIS1 gene in three of 11 boys studied, demonstrating for the first time that mutations of either DCX or LIS1 can cause SBH or mixed pachygyria-SBH (PCH-SBH) in males. All three changes detected are missense mutations, predicted to be of germline origin. They include a missense mutation in exon 4 of DCX in a boy with PCH-SBH (R78H), a different missense mutation in exon 4 of DCX in a boy with mild SBH and in his mildly affected mother (R89G) and a missense mutation in exon 6 of LIS1 in a boy with SBH (S169P). The missense mutations probably account for the less severe brain malformations, although other patients with missense mutations in the same exons have had diffuse lissencephaly. Therefore, it appears likely that the effect of the specific amino acid change on the protein determines the severity of the phenotype, with some mutations enabling residual protein function and allowing normal migration in a larger proportion of neurons. However, we expect that somatic mosaic mutations of both LIS1 and DCX will also prove to be an important mechanism in causing SBH in males.

  14. Using yeast to determine the functional consequences of mutations in the human p53 tumor suppressor gene: An introductory course-based undergraduate research experience in molecular and cell biology.

    PubMed

    Hekmat-Scafe, Daria S; Brownell, Sara E; Seawell, Patricia Chandler; Malladi, Shyamala; Imam, Jamie F Conklin; Singla, Veena; Bradon, Nicole; Cyert, Martha S; Stearns, Tim

    2017-03-04

    The opportunity to engage in scientific research is an important, but often neglected, component of undergraduate training in biology. We describe the curriculum for an innovative, course-based undergraduate research experience (CURE) appropriate for a large, introductory cell and molecular biology laboratory class that leverages students' high level of interest in cancer. The course is highly collaborative and emphasizes the analysis and interpretation of original scientific data. During the course, students work in teams to characterize a collection of mutations in the human p53 tumor suppressor gene via expression and analysis in yeast. Initially, student pairs use both qualitative and quantitative assays to assess the ability of their p53 mutant to activate expression of reporter genes, and they localize their mutation within the p53 structure. Through facilitated discussion, students suggest possible molecular explanations for the transactivation defects displayed by their p53 mutants and propose experiments to test these hypotheses that they execute during the second part of the course. They use a western blot to determine whether mutant p53 levels are reduced, a DNA-binding assay to test whether recognition of any of three p53 target sequences is compromised, and fluorescence microscopy to assay nuclear localization. Students studying the same p53 mutant periodically convene to discuss and interpret their combined data. The course culminates in a poster session during which students present their findings to peers, instructors, and the greater biosciences community. Based on our experience, we provide recommendations for the development of similar large introductory lab courses. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(2):161-178, 2017.

  15. Balancing protein stability and activity in cancer: a new approach for identifying driver mutations affecting CBL ubiquitin ligase activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minghui; Kales, Stephen C.; Ma, Ke; Shoemaker, Benjamin A.; Crespo-Barreto, Juan; Cangelosi, Andrew L.; Lipkowitz, Stanley; Panchenko, Anna R.

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic mutations in the monomeric Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (Cbl) gene have been found in many tumors, but their significance remains largely unknown. Several human c-Cbl (CBL) structures have recently been solved depicting the protein at different stages of its activation cycle and thus provide mechanistic insight underlying how stability-activity tradeoffs in cancer-related proteins may influence disease onset and progression. In this study, we computationally modeled the effects of missense cancer mutations on structures representing four stages of the CBL activation cycle to identify driver mutations that affect CBL stability, binding, and activity. We found that recurrent, homozygous, and leukemia-specific mutations had greater destabilizing effects on CBL states than did random non-cancer mutations. We further tested the ability of these computational models assessing the changes in CBL stability and its binding to ubiquitin conjugating enzyme E2, by performing blind CBL-mediated EGFR ubiquitination assays in cells. Experimental CBL ubiquitin ligase activity was in agreement with the predicted changes in CBL stability and, to a lesser extent, with CBL-E2 binding affinity. Two-thirds of all experimentally tested mutations affected the ubiquitin ligase activity by either destabilizing CBL or disrupting CBL-E2 binding, whereas about one-third of tested mutations were found to be neutral. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that computational methods incorporating multiple protein conformations and stability and binding affinity evaluations can successfully predict the functional consequences of cancer mutations on protein activity, and provide a proof of concept for mutations in CBL. PMID:26676746

  16. Alterations of the portal protein, gpB, of bacteriophage lambda suppress mutations in cosQ, the site required for termination of DNA packaging.

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorek, Douglas J; Didion, Lisa; Feiss, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The cosQ site of bacteriophage lambda is required for DNA packaging termination. Previous studies have shown that cosQ mutations can be suppressed in three ways: by a local suppressor within cosQ, an increase in the length of the lambda chromosome, and missense mutations affecting the prohead's portal protein, gpB. In the present work, revertants of a set of lethal cosQ mutants were screened for suppressors. Seven new cosQ suppressors affected gene B, which encodes the portal protein of the prohead. All seven were allele-nonspecific suppressors of cosQ mutations. Experiments with several phages having two cosQ suppressors showed that the suppression effects were additive. Furthermore, these double suppressors had minimal effects on the growth of cosQ(+) phages. These trans-acting suppressors affecting the portal protein are proposed to allow the mutant cosQ site to be more efficiently recognized, due to the slowing of the rate of translocation. PMID:12019220

  17. Functional Assessment of Human Coding Mutations Affecting Skin Pigmentation Using Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Tsetskhladze, Zurab R.; Canfield, Victor A.; Ang, Khai C.; Wentzel, Steven M.; Reid, Katherine P.; Berg, Arthur S.; Johnson, Stephen L.; Kawakami, Koichi; Cheng, Keith C.

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge in personalized medicine is the lack of a standard way to define the functional significance of the numerous nonsynonymous, single nucleotide coding variants that are present in each human individual. To begin to address this problem, we have used pigmentation as a model polygenic trait, three common human polymorphisms thought to influence pigmentation, and the zebrafish as a model system. The approach is based on the rescue of embryonic zebrafish mutant phenotypes by “humanized” zebrafish orthologous mRNA. Two hypomorphic polymorphisms, L374F in SLC45A2, and A111T in SLC24A5, have been linked to lighter skin color in Europeans. The phenotypic effect of a second coding polymorphism in SLC45A2, E272K, is unclear. None of these polymorphisms had been tested in the context of a model organism. We have confirmed that zebrafish albino fish are mutant in slc45a2; wild-type slc45a2 mRNA rescued the albino mutant phenotype. Introduction of the L374F polymorphism into albino or the A111T polymorphism into slc24a5 (golden) abolished mRNA rescue of the respective mutant phenotypes, consistent with their known contributions to European skin color. In contrast, the E272K polymorphism had no effect on phenotypic rescue. The experimental conclusion that E272K is unlikely to affect pigmentation is consistent with a lack of correlation between this polymorphism and quantitatively measured skin color in 59 East Asian humans. A survey of mutations causing human oculocutaneous albinism yielded 257 missense mutations, 82% of which are theoretically testable in zebrafish. The developed approach may be extended to other model systems and may potentially contribute to our understanding the functional relationships between DNA sequence variation, human biology, and disease. PMID:23071798

  18. Ionic leakage underlies a gain-of-function effect of dominant disease mutations affecting diverse P-type ATPases.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Maki; Desai, Bela S; Cook, Boaz

    2014-02-01

    Type II P-type ATPases (PAIIs) constitute a family of conserved proteins that actively generate ionic gradients across membranes. Mutations in genes encoding PAIIs can cause heritable dominant diseases, with suggested etiology of haploinsufficiency. Using a Drosophila melanogaster genetic screen, we identified a dominant mutation altering the PAII member sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA). This mutation conferred temperature-sensitive uncoordination in a gain-of-function manner. We established that this gain-of-function phenotype is linked to dominant disease-causing mutations affecting various human PAIIs. We further found that heterologous expression of mutant PAIIs elicited ion leakage that was exacerbated at elevated temperatures. Therefore, these dominant mutations result in ionic leakage and render PAIIs susceptible to deleterious effects from elevated temperatures. Accordingly, it was recently reported that missense mutations affecting the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase can elicit ionic leakage. We propose that ionic leakage is a pervasive gain-of-function mechanism that can underlie a variety of dominant PAII-related diseases.

  19. Mutations Affecting the SAND Domain of DEAF1 Cause Intellectual Disability with Severe Speech Impairment and Behavioral Problems

    PubMed Central

    Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; Rajamanickam, Shivakumar; Jensik, Philip J.; Vergult, Sarah; de Rocker, Nina; Newhall, Kathryn J.; Raghavan, Ramya; Reardon, Sara N.; Jarrett, Kelsey; McIntyre, Tara; Bulinski, Joseph; Ownby, Stacy L.; Huggenvik, Jodi I.; McKnight, G. Stanley; Rose, Gregory M.; Cai, Xiang; Willaert, Andy; Zweier, Christiane; Endele, Sabine; de Ligt, Joep; van Bon, Bregje W.M.; Lugtenberg, Dorien; de Vries, Petra F.; Veltman, Joris A.; van Bokhoven, Hans; Brunner, Han G.; Rauch, Anita; de Brouwer, Arjan P.M.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Hoischen, Alexander; Mefford, Heather C.; Eichler, Evan E.; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Menten, Björn; Collard, Michael W.; de Vries, Bert B.A.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we identified in two individuals with intellectual disability (ID) different de novo mutations in DEAF1, which encodes a transcription factor with an important role in embryonic development. To ascertain whether these mutations in DEAF1 are causative for the ID phenotype, we performed targeted resequencing of DEAF1 in an additional cohort of over 2,300 individuals with unexplained ID and identified two additional individuals with de novo mutations in this gene. All four individuals had severe ID with severely affected speech development, and three showed severe behavioral problems. DEAF1 is highly expressed in the CNS, especially during early embryonic development. All four mutations were missense mutations affecting the SAND domain of DEAF1. Altered DEAF1 harboring any of the four amino acid changes showed impaired transcriptional regulation of the DEAF1 promoter. Moreover, behavioral studies in mice with a conditional knockout of Deaf1 in the brain showed memory deficits and increased anxiety-like behavior. Our results demonstrate that mutations in DEAF1 cause ID and behavioral problems, most likely as a result of impaired transcriptional regulation by DEAF1. PMID:24726472

  20. Mutations affecting the SAND domain of DEAF1 cause intellectual disability with severe speech impairment and behavioral problems.

    PubMed

    Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Rajamanickam, Shivakumar; Jensik, Philip J; Vergult, Sarah; de Rocker, Nina; Newhall, Kathryn J; Raghavan, Ramya; Reardon, Sara N; Jarrett, Kelsey; McIntyre, Tara; Bulinski, Joseph; Ownby, Stacy L; Huggenvik, Jodi I; McKnight, G Stanley; Rose, Gregory M; Cai, Xiang; Willaert, Andy; Zweier, Christiane; Endele, Sabine; de Ligt, Joep; van Bon, Bregje W M; Lugtenberg, Dorien; de Vries, Petra F; Veltman, Joris A; van Bokhoven, Hans; Brunner, Han G; Rauch, Anita; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Carvill, Gemma L; Hoischen, Alexander; Mefford, Heather C; Eichler, Evan E; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Menten, Björn; Collard, Michael W; de Vries, Bert B A

    2014-05-01

    Recently, we identified in two individuals with intellectual disability (ID) different de novo mutations in DEAF1, which encodes a transcription factor with an important role in embryonic development. To ascertain whether these mutations in DEAF1 are causative for the ID phenotype, we performed targeted resequencing of DEAF1 in an additional cohort of over 2,300 individuals with unexplained ID and identified two additional individuals with de novo mutations in this gene. All four individuals had severe ID with severely affected speech development, and three showed severe behavioral problems. DEAF1 is highly expressed in the CNS, especially during early embryonic development. All four mutations were missense mutations affecting the SAND domain of DEAF1. Altered DEAF1 harboring any of the four amino acid changes showed impaired transcriptional regulation of the DEAF1 promoter. Moreover, behavioral studies in mice with a conditional knockout of Deaf1 in the brain showed memory deficits and increased anxiety-like behavior. Our results demonstrate that mutations in DEAF1 cause ID and behavioral problems, most likely as a result of impaired transcriptional regulation by DEAF1.

  1. Psychological Distress, Anxiety, and Depression of Cancer-Affected BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ringwald, Johanna; Wochnowski, Christina; Bosse, Kristin; Giel, Katrin Elisabeth; Schäffeler, Norbert; Zipfel, Stephan; Teufel, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the intermediate- and long-term psychological consequences of genetic testing for cancer patients has led to encouraging research, but a clear consensus of the psychosocial impact and clinical routine for cancer-affected BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers is still missing. We performed a systematic review of intermediate- and long-term studies investigating the psychological impact like psychological distress, anxiety, and depression in cancer-affected BRCA mutation carriers compared to unaffected mutation carriers. This review included the screening of 1243 studies. Eight intermediate- and long-term studies focusing on distress, anxiety, and depression symptoms among cancer-affected mutation carriers at least six months after the disclosure of genetic testing results were included. Studies reported a great variety of designs, methods, and patient outcomes. We found evidence indicating that cancer-affected mutation carriers experienced a negative effect in relation to psychological well-being in terms of an increase in symptoms of distress, anxiety, and depression in the first months after test disclosure. In the intermediate- and long-term, no significant clinical relevant symptoms occurred. However, none of the included studies used specific measurements, which can clearly identify psychological burdens of cancer-affected mutation carriers. We concluded that current well-implemented distress screening instruments are not sufficient for precisely identifying the psychological burden of genetic testing. Therefore, future studies should implement coping strategies, specific personality structures, the impact of genetic testing, supportive care needs and disease management behaviour to clearly screen for the possible intermediate- and long-term psychological impact of a positive test disclosure.

  2. Cancer-associated noncoding mutations affect RNA G-quadruplex-mediated regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zeraati, Mahdi; Moye, Aaron L; Wong, Jason W H; Perera, Dilmi; Cowley, Mark J; Christ, Daniel U; Bryan, Tracy M; Dinger, Marcel E

    2017-04-06

    Cancer is a multifactorial disease driven by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Many cancer driver mutations have been characterised in protein-coding regions of the genome. However, mutations in noncoding regions associated with cancer have been less investigated. G-quadruplex (G4) nucleic acids are four-stranded secondary structures formed in guanine-rich sequences and prevalent in the regulatory regions. In this study, we used published whole cancer genome sequence data to find mutations in cancer patients that overlap potential RNA G4-forming sequences in 5' UTRs. Using RNAfold, we assessed the effect of these mutations on the thermodynamic stability of predicted RNA G4s in the context of full-length 5' UTRs. Of the 217 identified mutations, we found that 33 are predicted to destabilise and 21 predicted to stabilise potential RNA G4s. We experimentally validated the effect of destabilising mutations in the 5' UTRs of BCL2 and CXCL14 and one stabilising mutation in the 5' UTR of TAOK2. These mutations resulted in an increase or a decrease in translation of these mRNAs, respectively. These findings suggest that mutations that modulate the G4 stability in the noncoding regions could act as cancer driver mutations, which present an opportunity for early cancer diagnosis using individual sequencing information.

  3. Interaction of UAG suppressors and omnipotent suppressors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Song, J M; Liebman, S W

    1985-02-01

    Haploids bearing the dominant UAG suppressor, SUP7-a, and various alleles of the omnipotent suppressor sup35 were examined. The presence of the UAG suppressor reduced the efficiency of some alleles of sup35, and caused other sup35 alleles to be lethal. A nonclassical interaction of the dominant suppressor tRNA and the ribosome is proposed to explain these observations.

  4. Mutation-induced protein interaction kinetics changes affect apoptotic network dynamic properties and facilitate oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Linjie; Sun, Tanlin; Pei, Jianfeng; Ouyang, Qi

    2015-07-28

    It has been a consensus in cancer research that cancer is a disease caused primarily by genomic alterations, especially somatic mutations. However, the mechanism of mutation-induced oncogenesis is not fully understood. Here, we used the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway as a case study and performed a systematic analysis of integrating pathway dynamics with protein interaction kinetics to quantitatively investigate the causal molecular mechanism of mutation-induced oncogenesis. A mathematical model of the regulatory network was constructed to establish the functional role of dynamic bifurcation in the apoptotic process. The oncogenic mutation enrichment of each of the protein functional domains involved was found strongly correlated with the parameter sensitivity of the bifurcation point. We further dissected the causal mechanism underlying this correlation by evaluating the mutational influence on protein interaction kinetics using molecular dynamics simulation. We analyzed 29 matched mutant-wild-type and 16 matched SNP--wild-type protein systems. We found that the binding kinetics changes reflected by the changes of free energy changes induced by protein interaction mutations, which induce variations in the sensitive parameters of the bifurcation point, were a major cause of apoptosis pathway dysfunction, and mutations involved in sensitive interaction domains show high oncogenic potential. Our analysis provided a molecular basis for connecting protein mutations, protein interaction kinetics, network dynamics properties, and physiological function of a regulatory network. These insights provide a framework for coupling mutation genotype to tumorigenesis phenotype and help elucidate the logic of cancer initiation.

  5. Mutation-induced protein interaction kinetics changes affect apoptotic network dynamic properties and facilitate oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Linjie; Sun, Tanlin; Pei, Jianfeng; Ouyang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    It has been a consensus in cancer research that cancer is a disease caused primarily by genomic alterations, especially somatic mutations. However, the mechanism of mutation-induced oncogenesis is not fully understood. Here, we used the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway as a case study and performed a systematic analysis of integrating pathway dynamics with protein interaction kinetics to quantitatively investigate the causal molecular mechanism of mutation-induced oncogenesis. A mathematical model of the regulatory network was constructed to establish the functional role of dynamic bifurcation in the apoptotic process. The oncogenic mutation enrichment of each of the protein functional domains involved was found strongly correlated with the parameter sensitivity of the bifurcation point. We further dissected the causal mechanism underlying this correlation by evaluating the mutational influence on protein interaction kinetics using molecular dynamics simulation. We analyzed 29 matched mutant–wild-type and 16 matched SNP—wild-type protein systems. We found that the binding kinetics changes reflected by the changes of free energy changes induced by protein interaction mutations, which induce variations in the sensitive parameters of the bifurcation point, were a major cause of apoptosis pathway dysfunction, and mutations involved in sensitive interaction domains show high oncogenic potential. Our analysis provided a molecular basis for connecting protein mutations, protein interaction kinetics, network dynamics properties, and physiological function of a regulatory network. These insights provide a framework for coupling mutation genotype to tumorigenesis phenotype and help elucidate the logic of cancer initiation. PMID:26170328

  6. Oakleaf: an S locus-linked mutation of Primula vulgaris that affects leaf and flower development.

    PubMed

    Cocker, Jonathan M; Webster, Margaret A; Li, Jinhong; Wright, Jonathan; Kaithakottil, Gemy; Swarbreck, David; Gilmartin, Philip M

    2015-10-01

    In Primula vulgaris outcrossing is promoted through reciprocal herkogamy with insect-mediated cross-pollination between pin and thrum form flowers. Development of heteromorphic flowers is coordinated by genes at the S locus. To underpin construction of a genetic map facilitating isolation of these S locus genes, we have characterised Oakleaf, a novel S locus-linked mutant phenotype. We combine phenotypic observation of flower and leaf development, with classical genetic analysis and next-generation sequencing to address the molecular basis of Oakleaf. Oakleaf is a dominant mutation that affects both leaf and flower development; plants produce distinctive lobed leaves, with occasional ectopic meristems on the veins. This phenotype is reminiscent of overexpression of Class I KNOX-homeodomain transcription factors. We describe the structure and expression of all eight P. vulgaris PvKNOX genes in both wild-type and Oakleaf plants, and present comparative transcriptome analysis of leaves and flowers from Oakleaf and wild-type plants. Oakleaf provides a new phenotypic marker for genetic analysis of the Primula S locus. We show that none of the Class I PvKNOX genes are strongly upregulated in Oakleaf leaves and flowers, and identify cohorts of 507 upregulated and 314 downregulated genes in the Oakleaf mutant.

  7. Mutations affecting the cAMP transduction pathway modify olfaction in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Martín, F; Charro, M J; Alcorta, E

    2001-06-01

    The rutabaga and dunce genes, encode two enzymes of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate transduction pathway in Drosophila, adenylyl cyclase and cyclic adenosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase, respectively. Two main second messenger systems, depending on inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate and cyclic adenosine monophosphate, have been associated with olfaction in vertebrates as well as invertebrates. A relationship between the cyclic adenosine monophosphate signaling pathway and olfactory reception in Drosophila is suggested by the presence of cyclic nucleotide gated channels and cyclic-nucleotide modulated K+ channels in the antennae, the main olfactory organs. In this report, molecular, electrophysiological and behavioral data support the role of cyclic adenosine monophosphate in olfactory function for this species. Expression of both genes in the antennae has been shown by messenger ribonucleic acid analysis. Changes in the electroantennogram kinetics have been observed specifically on the slope of the initial rising phase, as predicted for processes that affect cyclic adenosine monophosphate concentration. Olfactory behavior changes due to both mutations were coherent with a functional meaning of the reported electrophysiological phenotype in olfactory perception. Sensitivity level increases or decreases for the mutants compared to the control line depending on the odorant. These results are compatible with some olfactory coding at the reception level by differential activation of a dual transduction system involving the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate and cyclic adenosine monophosphate cascades.

  8. Mutations in TSPEAR, Encoding a Regulator of Notch Signaling, Affect Tooth and Hair Follicle Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Samuelov, Liat; Bertolini, Marta; Weissglas-Volkov, Daphna; Eskin-Schwartz, Marina; Malchin, Natalia; Bochner, Ron; Fainberg, Gilad; Goldberg, Ilan; Sugawara, Koji; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Morasso, Maria; Shalev, Stavit; Gallo, Richard L.; Shomron, Noam; Paus, Ralf; Sprecher, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of ectodermal dysplasias (EDs), the molecular basis of many of these disorders remains unknown. In the present study, we aimed at elucidating the genetic basis of a new form of ED featuring facial dysmorphism, scalp hypotrichosis and hypodontia. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified 2 frameshift and 2 missense mutations in TSPEAR segregating with the disease phenotype in 3 families. TSPEAR encodes the thrombospondin-type laminin G domain and EAR repeats (TSPEAR) protein, whose function is poorly understood. TSPEAR knock-down resulted in altered expression of genes known to be regulated by NOTCH and to be involved in murine hair and tooth development. Pathway analysis confirmed that down-regulation of TSPEAR in keratinocytes is likely to affect Notch signaling. Accordingly, using a luciferase-based reporter assay, we showed that TSPEAR knock-down is associated with decreased Notch signaling. In addition, NOTCH1 protein expression was reduced in patient scalp skin. Moreover, TSPEAR silencing in mouse hair follicle organ cultures was found to induce apoptosis in follicular epithelial cells, resulting in decreased hair bulb diameter. Collectively, these observations indicate that TSPEAR plays a critical, previously unrecognized role in human tooth and hair follicle morphogenesis through regulation of the Notch signaling pathway. PMID:27736875

  9. Detection of three nonsense mutations and one missense mutation in the interleukin-2 receptor [gamma] chain gene in SCIDX1 that differently affect the mRNA processing

    SciTech Connect

    Markiewicz, S.; Fischer, A.; Saint Basile, G. de ); Subtil, A.; Dautry-Varsat, A. )

    1994-05-01

    The interleukin-2 receptor [gamma] (IL-2R[gamma]) chain gene encodes a 64-kDa protein that not only composes the high-affinity form of the IL-2 binding receptor in association with the 2R [alpha] and [beta] chains, but also participates in at least the IL-4 and IL-7 receptor complexes. Mutations in this gene have recently been shown to cause X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCIDX1). This disease of the immune system results from an early block of T lymphocyte and natural killer (NK) cell differentiation, which leads to a severe cellular and humoral immune defect that is lethal unless treated by bone marrow transplantation. Analysis of the IL-2R[gamma] gene in SCIDX1 patients has revealed the presence of heterogeneous mutations principally located in the extracellular domain of the molecule. We report here three intraexonic mutations and one deletion in the IL-2R[gamma] gene in four SCIDX1 patients. These mutations appear to differentially affect RNA processing, either by decreasing IL-2R[gamma] mRNA level or by the skipping of a constitutive exon. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Mutations affecting export and activity of cytolysin A from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Albrecht; Völkerink, Guido; von Rhein, Christine; Bauer, Susanne; Maier, Elke; Bergmann, Birgit; Goebel, Werner; Benz, Roland

    2010-08-01

    Cytolysin A (known as ClyA, HlyE, and SheA) is a cytolytic pore-forming protein toxin found in several Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica strains. The structure of its water-soluble monomeric form and that of dodecameric ClyA pores is known, but the mechanisms of ClyA export from bacterial cells and of pore assembly are only partially understood. Here we used site-directed mutagenesis to study the importance of different regions of the E. coli ClyA protein for export and activity. The data indicate that ClyA translocation to the periplasm requires several protein segments located closely adjacent to each other in the "tail" domain of the ClyA monomer, namely, the N- and C-terminal regions and the hydrophobic sequence ranging from residues 89 to 101. Deletion of most of the "head" domain of the monomer (residues 181 to 203), on the other hand, did not strongly affect ClyA secretion, suggesting that the tail domain plays a particular role in export. Furthermore, we found that the N-terminal amphipathic helix alphaA1 of ClyA is crucial for the formation and the properties of the transmembrane channel, and hence for hemolytic activity. Several mutations affecting the C-terminal helix alphaG, the "beta-tongue" region in the head domain, or the hydrophobic region in the tail domain of the ClyA monomer strongly impaired the hemolytic activity and reduced the activity toward planar lipid bilayer membranes but did not totally prevent formation of wild-type-like channels in these artificial membranes. The latter regions thus apparently promote membrane interaction without being directly required for pore formation in a lipid bilayer.

  11. Allosuppressors that enhance the efficiency of omnipotent suppressors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Song, J M; Liebman, S W

    1987-03-01

    Two recessive Mendelian-allosuppressors have been isolated and have been shown to enhance the efficiency of omnipotent suppressors thought to be translational ambiguity mutations. These allosuppressors are unlinked to each other or to the omnipotent suppressors on which they act. They also increase the efficiency of the serine-inserting UAA-suppressor, SUP16. One allosuppressor is allelic or tightly linked to the previously isolated sal2. Another allosuppressor, called sal6, represents a new locus, unlinked to the previously isolated sal1-sal5 that enhance the efficiency of the UAA-suppressors. When present singly in the absence of suppressors or other modifiers the sal2 and sal6 mutations do not have suppressor activity. However, when sal2 and sal6 are combined together in a haploid cell they do suppress weakly. In addition sal2 becomes a weak suppressor in the presence of the [eta +] modifying factor.

  12. Germline mutations affecting the proofreading domains of POLE and POLD1 predispose to colorectal adenomas and carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Palles, Claire; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Howarth, Kimberley M; Domingo, Enric; Jones, Angela M; Broderick, Peter; Kemp, Zoe; Spain, Sarah L; Guarino, Estrella; Guarino Almeida, Estrella; Salguero, Israel; Sherborne, Amy; Chubb, Daniel; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis G; Ma, Yusanne; Kaur, Kulvinder; Dobbins, Sara; Barclay, Ella; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Kovac, Michal B; Humphray, Sean; Lucassen, Anneke; Holmes, Christopher C; Bentley, David; Donnelly, Peter; Taylor, Jenny; Petridis, Christos; Roylance, Rebecca; Sawyer, Elinor J; Kerr, David J; Clark, Susan; Grimes, Jonathan; Kearsey, Stephen E; Thomas, Huw J W; McVean, Gilean; Houlston, Richard S; Tomlinson, Ian

    2013-02-01

    Many individuals with multiple or large colorectal adenomas or early-onset colorectal cancer (CRC) have no detectable germline mutations in the known cancer predisposition genes. Using whole-genome sequencing, supplemented by linkage and association analysis, we identified specific heterozygous POLE or POLD1 germline variants in several multiple-adenoma and/or CRC cases but in no controls. The variants associated with susceptibility, POLE p.Leu424Val and POLD1 p.Ser478Asn, have high penetrance, and POLD1 mutation was also associated with endometrial cancer predisposition. The mutations map to equivalent sites in the proofreading (exonuclease) domain of DNA polymerases ɛ and δ and are predicted to cause a defect in the correction of mispaired bases inserted during DNA replication. In agreement with this prediction, the tumors from mutation carriers were microsatellite stable but tended to acquire base substitution mutations, as confirmed by yeast functional assays. Further analysis of published data showed that the recently described group of hypermutant, microsatellite-stable CRCs is likely to be caused by somatic POLE mutations affecting the exonuclease domain.

  13. High prevalence of mutations affecting the splicing process in a Spanish cohort with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ezquerra-Inchausti, Maitane; Barandika, Olatz; Anasagasti, Ander; Irigoyen, Cristina; López de Munain, Adolfo; Ruiz-Ederra, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is the most frequent group of inherited retinal dystrophies. It is highly heterogeneous, with more than 80 disease-causing genes 27 of which are known to cause autosomal dominant RP (adRP), having been identified. In this study a total of 29 index cases were ascertained based on a family tree compatible with adRP. A custom panel of 31 adRP genes was analysed by targeted next-generation sequencing using the Ion PGM platform in combination with Sanger sequencing. This allowed us to detect putative disease-causing mutations in 14 out of the 29 (48.28%) families analysed. Remarkably, around 38% of all adRP cases analysed showed mutations affecting the splicing process, mainly due to mutations in genes coding for spliceosome factors (SNRNP200 and PRPF8) but also due to splice-site mutations in RHO. Twelve of the 14 mutations found had been reported previously and two were novel mutations found in PRPF8 in two unrelated patients. In conclusion, our results will lead to more accurate genetic counselling and will contribute to a better characterisation of the disease. In addition, they may have a therapeutic impact in the future given the large number of studies currently underway based on targeted RNA splicing for therapeutic purposes. PMID:28045043

  14. High prevalence of mutations affecting the splicing process in a Spanish cohort with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Ezquerra-Inchausti, Maitane; Barandika, Olatz; Anasagasti, Ander; Irigoyen, Cristina; López de Munain, Adolfo; Ruiz-Ederra, Javier

    2017-01-03

    Retinitis pigmentosa is the most frequent group of inherited retinal dystrophies. It is highly heterogeneous, with more than 80 disease-causing genes 27 of which are known to cause autosomal dominant RP (adRP), having been identified. In this study a total of 29 index cases were ascertained based on a family tree compatible with adRP. A custom panel of 31 adRP genes was analysed by targeted next-generation sequencing using the Ion PGM platform in combination with Sanger sequencing. This allowed us to detect putative disease-causing mutations in 14 out of the 29 (48.28%) families analysed. Remarkably, around 38% of all adRP cases analysed showed mutations affecting the splicing process, mainly due to mutations in genes coding for spliceosome factors (SNRNP200 and PRPF8) but also due to splice-site mutations in RHO. Twelve of the 14 mutations found had been reported previously and two were novel mutations found in PRPF8 in two unrelated patients. In conclusion, our results will lead to more accurate genetic counselling and will contribute to a better characterisation of the disease. In addition, they may have a therapeutic impact in the future given the large number of studies currently underway based on targeted RNA splicing for therapeutic purposes.

  15. Genetic and biochemical characterization of mutations affecting the ability of the yeast Pachysolen tannophilus to metabolize D-xylose

    SciTech Connect

    James, A.P.; Zahab, D.M.; Mahmourides, G.; Maleszka, R.; Schneider, H. )

    1989-11-01

    Induced mutants, selected for their defective growth on D-xylose while retaining the ability to grow normally on D-glucose, were studied in Pachysolen tannophilus, a yeast capable of converting D-xylose to ethanol. Fourteen of the mutations were found to occur at nine distinct loci, and data indicated that many more loci remain to be detected. Most of the mutations were pleiotropic in character, and the expression of some of them was much affected by nutritional conditions and by genetic background. Mutations at several loci resulted in poor growth on at least one compound that was either an intermediate of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, succinate or {alpha}-ketoglutarate, or on compounds metabolizable via this cycle, ethanol or glycerol. An initial biochemical characterization of the mutants was undertaken. Analysis for xylose reductase, xylitol dehydrogenase, and xylulose kinase activity showed that one or more of these activities was affected in 12 of 13 mutants. However, drastic reduction in activity of a single enzyme was confined to that of xylitol dehydrogenase by mutations at three different loci and to that of D-xylose reductase by mutation at another locus. Growth of these latter four mutants was normal on all carbon sources tested that were not five-carbon sugars.

  16. A Mutator Affecting the Region of the Iso-1-Cytochrome c Gene in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Liebman, Susan W.; Singh, Arjun; Sherman, Fred

    1979-01-01

    The mutator gene DEL1 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae causes a high rate of formation of multisite mutations that encompass the following three adjacent genes: CYC1, which determines the structure of iso-1-cytochrome c; RAD7, which controls UV sensitivity; and OSM1, which controls osomotic sensitivity. The simplest hypothesis is that these multisite mutations are deletions, although it has not been excluded that they may involve other types of gross chromosomal aberrations. In contrast, normal strains do not produce such multisite mutations even after mutagenic treatments.—The multisite mutations arise at a rate of approximately 10-5 to 10-6 per cell per division in DEL1 strains, which is much higher than rates observed for mutation of genes in normal strains. For example, normal strains produce all types of cyc1 mutants at a low rate of approximately 10-8 to 10-9. No evidence for multisite mutations was obtained upon analysis of numerous spontaneous ade1, ade2, met2 and met15 mutants isolated in a DEL1 strain. DEL1 segregates as a single Mendelian gene closely linked to the CYC1 locus. DEL1 appears to be both cis- and trans-dominant. The location of the DEL1 gene and the lack of effect on other genes suggest that the mutator acts only on a region adjacent to itself. PMID:231539

  17. Identification of a single ancestral CYP1B1 mutation in Slovak Gypsies (Roms) affected with primary congenital glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Plasilova, M.; Stoilov, I.; Sarfarazi, M.; Kadasi, L.; Ferakova, E.; Ferak, V.

    1999-01-01

    Primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) is an autosomal recessive eye disease that occurs at an unusually high frequency in the ethnic isolate of Roms (Gypsies) in Slovakia. Recently, we linked the disease in this population to the GLC3A locus on 2p21. At this locus, mutations in the cytochrome P4501B1 (CYP1B1) gene have been identified as a molecular basis for this condition. Here, we report the results of CYP1B1 mutation screening of 43 PCG patients from 26 Slovak Rom families. A homozygous G→A transition at nucleotide 1505 in the highly conserved region of exon 3 was detected in all families. This mutation results in the E387K substitution, which affects the conserved K helix region of the cytochrome P450 molecule. Determination of the CYP1B1 polymorphic background showed a common DNA haplotype in all patients, thus indicating that the E387K mutation in Roms has originated from a single ancestral mutational event. The Slovak Roms represent the first population in which PCG is found to result from a single mutation in the CYP1B1 gene, so that a founder effect is the most plausible explanation of its increased incidence. An ARMS-PCR assay has been developed for fast detection of this mutation, thus allowing direct DNA based prenatal diagnosis as well as gene carrier detection in this particular population. Screening of 158 healthy Roms identified 17 (10.8%) mutation carriers, indicating that the frequency of PCG in this population may be even higher than originally estimated.


Keywords: primary congenital glaucoma (PCG); cytochrome P4501B1; Roms (Gypsies); founder effect PMID:10227395

  18. Biallelic mutations in huntington disease: A new case with just one affected parent, review of the literature and terminology.

    PubMed

    Uhlmann, Wendy R; Peñaherrera, Maria S; Robinson, Wendy P; Milunsky, Jeff M; Nicholson, Jane M; Albin, Roger L

    2015-05-01

    Patients with biallelic mutations for Huntington disease (HD) are rare. We present a 46-year-old female with two expanded Huntingtin (HTT) alleles with just one known affected parent. This is the first reported patient with molecular studies performed to exclude HTT uniparental disomy (UPD). The proband had biparental inheritance of HTT alleles (42/44 CAG repeats). Given the negative UPD results, the proband's unaffected mother either had a reduced penetrance allele that expanded into the full mutation range during transmission to our patient or an unknown full HTT mutation and died before symptom onset, unlikely given no family history of HD and asymptomatic at age 59. We made the novel observation in our literature review that most patients with biallelic HD did not have two full HTT mutations. Most had one HTT allele that was in the intermediate or reduced penetrance ranges or 40 CAG repeats, the lowest limit of the full mutation range. Although the number of patients is small, when an allele in these size ranges was present, generally the age of HD onset was in the 50s. If the second HTT allele had >45 repeats, then onset was typically 20s-30s. While similar ages of onset have been reported for patients with one or two HTT mutations, patients with biallelic mutations may have later onset if an expanded HTT allele has ≤40 CAG repeats. Finally, we propose that "biallelic mutations" or "compound heterozygosity" are more accurate descriptive terms than "homozygosity" when there are two non-identical expanded HTT alleles.

  19. Isolation of Mutations Affecting Neural Circuitry Required for Grooming Behavior in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Phillis, R. W.; Bramlage, A. T.; Wotus, C.; Whittaker, A.; Gramates, L. S.; Seppala, D.; Farahanchi, F.; Caruccio, P.; Murphey, R. K.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a screen for the isolation of mutations that produce neural defects in adult Drosophila melanogaster. In this screen, we identify mutants as flies unable to remove a light coating of applied dust in a 2-hr period. We have recovered and characterized six mutations and have found that they produce coordination defects and some have reduced levels of reflex responsiveness to the stimulation of single tactile sensory bristles. The grooming defects produced by all six of the mutations are recessive, and each of the mutations has been genetically mapped. We have also used our assay to test the grooming ability of stocks containing mutations that produce known neural defects. PMID:8454205

  20. Temperature Sensitivity Caused by Mutant Release Factor 1 Is Suppressed by Mutations That Affect 16S rRNA Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kaczanowska, Magdalena; Rydén-Aulin, Monica

    2004-01-01

    To study the effect of slow termination on the protein synthesizing machinery, we isolated suppressors to a temperature-sensitive release factor 1 (RF1). Of 26 independent clones, five complementation groups have been identified, two of which are presented here. The first mutation disrupts a base pair in the transcription terminator stem for the rplM-rpsI operon, which encodes ribosomal proteins L13 and S9. We have found that this leads to readthrough of the terminator and that lower levels of transcript (compared to the results seen with the wild type) are found in the cell. This probably leads to decreased expression of the two proteins. The second mutation is a small deletion of the yrdC open reading frame start site, and it is not likely that the protein is expressed. Both mutant strains show an increased accumulation of 17S rRNA (immature 16S rRNA). Maturation of 16S rRNA is dependent on proper assembly of the ribosomal proteins, a process that is disturbed when proteins are missing. The function of the YrdC protein is not known, but it is able to bind to double-stranded RNA; therefore, we suggest that it is an assembly factor important for 30S subunit biogenesis. On the basis of our findings, we propose that lesser amounts of S9 or a lack of YrdC causes the maturation defect. We have shown that as a consequence of the maturation defect, fewer 70S ribosomes and polysomes are formed. This and other results suggest that it is the lowered concentration of functional ribosomes that suppresses the temperature sensitivity caused by the mutant RF1. PMID:15126466

  1. Identification of a novel mutation in the PAX9 gene in a family affected by oligodontia and other dental anomalies.

    PubMed

    Tallón-Walton, Victòria; Manzanares-Céspedes, Maria Cristina; Arte, Sirpa; Carvalho-Lobato, Patricia; Valdivia-Gandur, Ivan; Garcia-Susperregui, Antonio; Ventura, Francesc; Nieminen, Pekka

    2007-12-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the phenotype and the genotype of three generations of a family affected by oligodontia and other dental anomalies. These family members also presented systemic conditions such as hypercholesterolemia, hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus, scoliosis, and congenital cardiovascular anomalies. Clinical evaluation, panoramic radiographs, and anamnestic data were used for dental analysis. DNA extraction was carried out from gum samples or buccal swabs. A mutation was identified in six subjects across three generations affected by oligodontia, as well as different phenotypical manifestations, both systemic and oral. The previously undescribed PAX9 mutation was observed in the paired box (exon 2); this was a heterozygote transition of C175 to T, implying the change of arginine 59 for a termination codon. These results strongly suggested that the identified mutation was the etiological cause of the oligodontia. However, in two family members affected by both hypodontia and peg-shaped upper lateral incisors, no mutations in the PAX9 and MSX1 genes were identified. This fact underscores the importance that other presently unknown genes and developmental factors have in tooth development and in the etiology of dental anomalies.

  2. Identification of novel mutations in HEXA gene in children affected with Tay Sachs disease from India.

    PubMed

    Mistri, Mehul; Tamhankar, Parag M; Sheth, Frenny; Sanghavi, Daksha; Kondurkar, Pratima; Patil, Swapnil; Idicula-Thomas, Susan; Gupta, Sarita; Sheth, Jayesh

    2012-01-01

    Tay Sachs disease (TSD) is a neurodegenerative disorder due to β-hexosaminidase A deficiency caused by mutations in the HEXA gene. The mutations leading to Tay Sachs disease in India are yet unknown. We aimed to determine mutations leading to TSD in India by complete sequencing of the HEXA gene. The clinical inclusion criteria included neuroregression, seizures, exaggerated startle reflex, macrocephaly, cherry red spot on fundus examination and spasticity. Neuroimaging criteria included thalamic hyperdensities on CT scan/T1W images of MRI of the brain. Biochemical criteria included deficiency of hexosaminidase A (less than 2% of total hexosaminidase activity for infantile patients). Total leukocyte hexosaminidase activity was assayed by 4-methylumbelliferyl-N-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine lysis and hexosaminidase A activity was assayed by heat inactivation method and 4-methylumbelliferyl-N-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine-6-sulphate lysis method. The exons and exon-intron boundaries of the HEXA gene were bidirectionally sequenced using an automated sequencer. Mutations were confirmed in parents and looked up in public databases. In silico analysis for mutations was carried out using SIFT, Polyphen2, MutationT@ster and Accelrys Discovery Studio softwares. Fifteen families were included in the study. We identified six novel missense mutations, c.340 G>A (p.E114K), c.964 G>A (p.D322N), c.964 G>T (p.D322Y), c.1178C>G (p.R393P) and c.1385A>T (p.E462V), c.1432 G>A (p.G478R) and two previously reported mutations. c.1277_1278insTATC and c.508C>T (p.R170W). The mutation p.E462V was found in six unrelated families from Gujarat indicating a founder effect. A previously known splice site mutation c.805+1 G>C and another intronic mutation c.672+30 T>G of unknown significance were also identified. Mutations could not be identified in one family. We conclude that TSD patients from Gujarat should be screened for the common mutation p.E462V.

  3. Targeting tumor suppressor genes for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunhua; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Han, Cecil; Wang, Liana; Zhang, Xinna; He, Xiaoming; Lu, Xiongbin

    2015-12-01

    Cancer drugs are broadly classified into two categories: cytotoxic chemotherapies and targeted therapies that specifically modulate the activity of one or more proteins involved in cancer. Major advances have been achieved in targeted cancer therapies in the past few decades, which is ascribed to the increasing understanding of molecular mechanisms for cancer initiation and progression. Consequently, monoclonal antibodies and small molecules have been developed to interfere with a specific molecular oncogenic target. Targeting gain-of-function mutations, in general, has been productive. However, it has been a major challenge to use standard pharmacologic approaches to target loss-of-function mutations of tumor suppressor genes. Novel approaches, including synthetic lethality and collateral vulnerability screens, are now being developed to target gene defects in p53, PTEN, and BRCA1/2. Here, we review and summarize the recent findings in cancer genomics, drug development, and molecular cancer biology, which show promise in targeting tumor suppressors in cancer therapeutics.

  4. Recurrent somatic mutations affecting B-cell receptor signaling pathway genes in follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Matlock, Matthew; Trani, Lee; Fronick, Catrina C.; Fulton, Robert S.; Kreisel, Friederike; Cashen, Amanda F.; Carson, Kenneth R.; Bartlett, Nancy L.

    2017-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is the most common form of indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma, yet it remains only partially characterized at the genomic level. To improve our understanding of the genetic underpinnings of this incurable and clinically heterogeneous disease, whole-exome sequencing was performed on tumor/normal pairs from a discovery cohort of 24 patients with FL. Using these data and mutations identified in other B-cell malignancies, 1716 genes were sequenced in 113 FL tumor samples from 105 primarily treatment-naive individuals. We identified 39 genes that were mutated significantly above background mutation rates. CREBBP mutations were associated with inferior PFS. In contrast, mutations in previously unreported HVCN1, a voltage-gated proton channel-encoding gene and B-cell receptor signaling modulator, were associated with improved PFS. In total, 47 (44.8%) patients harbor mutations in the interconnected B-cell receptor (BCR) and CXCR4 signaling pathways. Histone gene mutations were more frequent than previously reported (identified in 43.8% of patients) and often co-occurred (17.1% of patients). A novel, recurrent hotspot was identified at a posttranslationally modified residue in the histone H2B family. This study expands the number of mutated genes described in several known signaling pathways and complexes involved in lymphoma pathogenesis (BCR, Notch, SWitch/sucrose nonfermentable (SWI/SNF), vacuolar ATPases) and identified novel recurrent mutations (EGR1/2, POU2AF1, BTK, ZNF608, HVCN1) that require further investigation in the context of FL biology, prognosis, and treatment. PMID:28064239

  5. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (SOCS2) negatively regulates the expression of antimicrobial peptides by affecting the Stat transcriptional activity in shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie-Jie; Lan, Jiang-Feng; Xu, Ji-Dong; Niu, Guo-Juan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2016-09-01

    The suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family is a kind of negative regulators in the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (Jak/Stat) pathway in mammals and Drosophila. In kuruma shrimp, Marsupenaeus japonicus, SOCS2 is identified and its expression can be stimulated by peptidoglycan and polycytidylic acid. However, if SOCS2 participates in regulating Jak/Stat pathway in shrimp still needs further study. In this study, SOCS2 with Src homology 2 domain and SOCS box was identified in kuruma shrimp, M. japonicus. SOCS2 existed in hemocytes, heart, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach, and intestine, the expression of SOCS2 was upregulated significantly in the hemocytes and intestine of shrimp challenged with Vibrio anguillarum at 6 h. To analyze SOCS2 function in shrimp immunity, bacterial clearance and survival rate were analyzed after knockdown of SOCS2 in shrimp challenged with V. anguillarum. Results showed that bacterial clearance increased, and the survival rate improved significantly comparing with controls. The SOCS2 was expressed in Escherichia coli and the recombinant SOCS2 was injected into shrimp, and Stat phosphorylation and translocation were analyzed. The result showed that "overexpression" of SOCS2 declined Stat phosphorylation level and inhibited Stat translocation into the nucleus. After knockdown of SOCS2 in shrimp prior to V. anguillarum infection, the expression level of antimicrobial peptides, including anti-lipopolysaccharide factors C1, C2 and D1, and Crustin I was upregulated significantly, and the expression of the AMPs was declined after recombinant SOCS2 injection. The SOCS2 expression was also decreased in Stat-knockdown shrimp challenged by V. anguillarum at 6 and 12 h. Therefore, SOCS2 negatively regulates the AMP expression by inhibiting Stat phosphorylation and translocation into nucleus in shrimp, meanwhile, SOCS2 expression was also regulated by Jak/Stat pathway.

  6. Identification of polymerase gene mutations that affect viral replication in H5N1 influenza viruses isolated from pigeons.

    PubMed

    Elgendy, Emad Mohamed; Arai, Yasuha; Kawashita, Norihito; Daidoji, Tomo; Takagi, Tatsuya; Ibrahim, Madiha Salah; Nakaya, Takaaki; Watanabe, Yohei

    2017-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 infects a wide range of host species, with a few cases of sporadic pigeon infections reported in the Middle East and Asia. However, the role of pigeons in the ecology and evolution of H5N1 viruses remains unclear. We previously reported two H5N1 virus strains, isolated from naturally infected pigeons in Egypt, that have several unique mutations in their viral polymerase genes. Here, we investigated the effect of these mutations on H5N1 polymerase activity and viral growth and identified three mutations that affected viral polymerase activity. The results showed that the PB1-V3D mutation significantly decreased polymerase activity and viral growth in both mammalian and avian cells. In contrast, the PB2-K627E and PA-K158R mutations had moderate effects: PB2-K627E decreased and PA-K158R increased polymerase activity. Structural homology modelling indicated that the PB1-V3D residue was located in the PB1 core region that interacts with PA, predicting that the PB1 mutation would produce a stronger interaction between PB1 and PA that results in decreased replication of pigeon-derived H5N1 viruses. Our results identified several unique mutations responsible for changes in polymerase activity in H5N1 virus strains isolated from infected pigeons, emphasizing the importance of avian influenza surveillance in pigeons and in studying the possible role of pigeon-derived H5N1 viruses in avian influenza virus evolution.

  7. Identification of a novel synonymous mutation in the human β -Ureidopropionase Gene UPB1 affecting pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Meijer, J; Nakajima, Y; Zhang, C; Meinsma, R; Ito, T; Van Kuilenburg, A B P

    2013-01-01

    β-Ureidopropionase is the third enzyme of the pyrimidine degradation pathway and it catalyzes the conversion of N-carbamyl-β-alanine and N-carbamyl-β-aminoisobutyric acid to β-alanine and β-aminoisobutyric acid, respectively, and ammonia and CO2. To date, only 16 genetically confirmed patients with a complete ß-ureidopropionase deficiency have been reported. Here, we report the clinical, biochemical, and molecular analysis of a newly identified patient with β-ureidopropionase deficiency. Mutation analysis of the UPB1 gene showed that the patient was compound heterozygous for a novel synonymous mutation c.93C >T (p.Gly31Gly) in exon 1 and a previously described missense mutation c.977G >A (p.Arg326Gln) in exon 9. The in silico predicted effect of the synonymous mutation p.Gly31Gly on pre-mRNA splicing was investigated using a minigene approach. Wild-type and the mutated minigene constructs, containing the entire exon 1, intron 1, and exon 2 of UPB1, yielded different splicing products after expression in HEK293 cells. The c.93C >T (p.Gly31Gly) mutation resulted in altered pre-mRNA splicing of the UPB1 minigene construct and a deletion of the last 13 nucleotides of exon 1. This deletion (r.92_104delGCAAGGAACTCAG) results in a frame shift and the generation of a premature stop codon (p.Lys32SerfsX31). Using a minigene approach, we have thus identified the first synonymous mutation in the UPB1 gene, creating a cryptic splice-donor site affecting pre-mRNA splicing.

  8. Search for mutations affecting protein structure in children of atomic bomb survivors: preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Neel, J.V.; Satoh, C.; Hamilton, H.B.; Otake, M.; Goriki, K.; Kageoka, T.; Fujita, M.; Neriishi, S.; Asakawa J.

    1980-07-01

    A total of 289,868 locus tests, based on 28 different protein phenotypes and using one-dimensional electrophoresis to detect variant proteins, has yielded one probable mutation in the offspring of proximally exposed parents, who received an estimated average gonadal exposure of 31 to 39 rem in the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. There were no mutations in 208,196 locus tests involving children of distally exposed parents, who had essentially no radiation exposure.

  9. Search for mutations affecting protein structure in children of atomic bomb survivors: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Neel, J V; Satoh, C; Hamilton, H B; Otake, M; Goriki, K; Kageoka, T; Fujita, M; Neriishi, S; Asakawa, J

    1980-07-01

    A total of 289,868 locus tests, based on 28 different protein phenotypes and using one-dimensional electrophoresis to detect variant proteins, has yielded one probable mutation in the offspring of "proximally exposed" parents, who received an estimated average gonadal exposure of 31 to 39 rem in the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. There were no mutations in 208,196 locus tests involving children of "distally exposed" parents, who had essentially no radiation exposure.

  10. Mutations in MCT8 in patients with Allan-Herndon-Dudley-syndrome affecting its cellular distribution.

    PubMed

    Kersseboom, Simone; Kremers, Gert-Jan; Friesema, Edith C H; Visser, W Edward; Klootwijk, Wim; Peeters, Robin P; Visser, Theo J

    2013-05-01

    Monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) is a thyroid hormone (TH)-specific transporter. Mutations in the MCT8 gene are associated with Allan-Herndon-Dudley Syndrome (AHDS), consisting of severe psychomotor retardation and disturbed TH parameters. To study the functional consequences of different MCT8 mutations in detail, we combined functional analysis in different cell types with live-cell imaging of the cellular distribution of seven mutations that we identified in patients with AHDS. We used two cell models to study the mutations in vitro: 1) transiently transfected COS1 and JEG3 cells, and 2) stably transfected Flp-in 293 cells expressing a MCT8-cyan fluorescent protein construct. All seven mutants were expressed at the protein level and showed a defect in T3 and T4 transport in uptake and metabolism studies. Three mutants (G282C, P537L, and G558D) had residual uptake activity in Flp-in 293 and COS1 cells, but not in JEG3 cells. Four mutants (G221R, P321L, D453V, P537L) were expressed at the plasma membrane. The mobility in the plasma membrane of P537L was similar to WT, but the mobility of P321L was altered. The other mutants studied (insV236, G282C, G558D) were predominantly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. In essence, loss of function by MCT8 mutations can be divided in two groups: mutations that result in partial or complete loss of transport activity (G221R, P321L, D453V, P537L) and mutations that mainly disturb protein expression and trafficking (insV236, G282C, G558D). The cell type-dependent results suggest that MCT8 mutations in AHDS patients may have tissue-specific effects on TH transport probably caused by tissue-specific expression of yet unknown MCT8-interacting proteins.

  11. Molecular modeling studies demonstrate key mutations that could affect the ligand recognition by influenza AH1N1 neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Salinas, Gema L; García-Machorro, J; Quiliano, Miguel; Zimic, Mirko; Briz, Verónica; Rojas-Hernández, Saul; Correa-Basurto, J

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this study was to identify neuraminidase (NA) residue mutants from human influenza AH1N1 using sequences from 1918 to 2012. Multiple alignment studies of complete NA sequences (5732) were performed. Subsequently, the crystallographic structure of the 1918 influenza (PDB ID: 3BEQ-A) was used as a wild-type structure and three-dimensional (3-D) template for homology modeling of the mutated selected NA sequences. The 3-D mutated NAs were refined using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (50 ns). The refined 3-D models were used to perform docking studies using oseltamivir. Multiple sequence alignment studies showed seven representative mutations (A232V, K262R, V263I, T264V, S367L, S369N, and S369K). MD simulations applied to 3-D NAs showed that each NA had different active-site shapes according to structural surface visualization and docking results. Moreover, Cartesian principal component analyses (cPCA) show structural differences among these NA structures caused by mutations. These theoretical results suggest that the selected mutations that are located outside of the active site of NA could affect oseltamivir recognition and could be associated with resistance to oseltamivir.

  12. A critical functional missense mutation (H173R) in the bovine PROP1 gene significantly affects growth traits in cattle.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chuanying; Wu, Chongyang; Jia, Wenchao; Xu, Yao; Lei, Chuzhao; Hu, Shenrong; Lan, Xianyong; Chen, Hong

    2013-12-01

    The PROP1 protein, encoded by the prophet of Pit-1 (PROP1) gene, exhibits both DNA-binding and transcriptional activation abilities. Its expression leads to the ontogenesis of growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and pituitary hormone. The missense mutation H173R in PROP1 may result in deficiencies of GH, PRL, TSH, and Pit-1, thereby affecting growth traits. The objective of this study was to characterize the H173R mutation within the PROP1 gene and examine its associations with growth traits in cattle. Accordingly, the H173R mutation was genotyped in 1207 cows belonging to five Chinese native breeds. Three genotypes were identified among the specimens, with genotype AA being the major one. Consequently, the "G" allele was the minor allele. Association testing revealed that the H173R mutation was significantly associated with body weight, average daily weight gain and physical parameters in the analyzed breeds. Interestingly, the cows with genotype AG and/or AA had superior growth traits compared with those expressing the GG genotype, in all tested breeds. These findings revealed that the "A" allele had positive effects on growth traits, which was consistent with the increasing binding ability and enhanced activation capacity associated with the bovine isoform PROP1-173H, representing the "A" allele. Therefore, the H173R mutation can be considered as a DNA marker for selecting individuals with superior growth traits, thereby contributing to research on breeding and genetics in the beef industry.

  13. Tumor Suppressors Status in Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia

    PubMed Central

    Sonkin, Dmitriy; Hassan, Mehedi; Murphy, Denis J.; Tatarinova, Tatiana V.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor suppressors play a major role in the etiology of human cancer, and typically achieve a tumor promoting effect upon complete functional inactivation. Bi-allelic inactivation of tumor suppressors may occur through genetic mechanisms (such as loss-of-function mutation, copy number (CN) loss, or loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH)), epigenetic mechanisms (such as promoter methylation or histone modification), or a combination of the two. We report systematically derived status of 69 known or putative tumor suppressors, across 799 samples of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia. In order to generate such resource we constructed a novel comprehensive computational framework for the assessment of tumor suppressor functional “status”. This approach utilizes several orthogonal genomic data types, including mutation data, copy number, LOH and expression. Through correlation with additional data types (compound sensitivity and gene set activity) we show that this integrative method provides a more accurate assessment of tumor suppressor status than can be inferred by expression, copy number, or mutation alone. This approach has the potential for a more realistic assessment of tumor suppressor genes for both basic and translational oncology research. PMID:23639312

  14. Tumor suppressors status in cancer cell line Encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Sonkin, Dmitriy; Hassan, Mehedi; Murphy, Denis J; Tatarinova, Tatiana V

    2013-08-01

    Tumor suppressors play a major role in the etiology of human cancer, and typically achieve a tumor-promoting effect upon complete functional inactivation. Bi-allelic inactivation of tumor suppressors may occur through genetic mechanisms (such as loss of function mutation, copy number (CN) loss, or loss of heterozygosity (LOH)), epigenetic mechanisms (such as promoter methylation or histone modification), or a combination of the two. We report systematically derived status of 69 known or putative tumor suppressors, across 799 samples of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia. In order to generate such resource we constructed a novel comprehensive computational framework for the assessment of tumor suppressor functional "status". This approach utilizes several orthogonal genomic data types, including mutation data, copy number, LOH and expression. Through correlation with additional data types (compound sensitivity and gene set activity) we show that this integrative method provides a more accurate assessment of tumor suppressor status than can be inferred by expression, copy number, or mutation alone. This approach has the potential for a more realistic assessment of tumor suppressor genes for both basic and translational oncology research.

  15. HERC 1 Ubiquitin Ligase Mutation Affects Neocortical, CA3 Hippocampal and Spinal Cord Projection Neurons: An Ultrastructural Study

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Rocío; Pérez-Villegas, Eva María; Bachiller, Sara; Rosa, José Luis; Armengol, José Angel

    2016-01-01

    The spontaneous mutation tambaleante is caused by the Gly483Glu substitution in the highly conserved N terminal RCC1-like domain of the HERC1 protein, which leads to the increase of mutated protein levels responsible for cerebellar Purkinje cell death by autophagy. Until now, Purkinje cells have been the only central nervous neurons reported as being targeted by the mutation, and their degeneration elicits an ataxic syndrome in adult mutant mice. However, the ultrastructural analysis performed here demonstrates that signs of autophagy, such as autophagosomes, lysosomes, and altered mitochondria, are present in neocortical pyramidal, CA3 hippocampal pyramidal, and spinal cord motor neurons. The main difference is that the reduction in the number of neurons affected in the tambaleante mutation in the neocortex, the hippocampus, and the spinal cord is not so evident as the dramatic loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Interestingly, signs of autophagy are absent in both interneurons and neuroglia cells. Affected neurons have in common that they are projection neurons which receive strong and varied synaptic inputs, and possess the highest degree of neuronal activity. Therefore, because the integrity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is essential for protein degradation and hence, for normal protein turnover, it could be hypothesized that the deleterious effects of the misrouting of these pathways would depend directly on the neuronal activity. PMID:27147983

  16. Novel missense mutation in the GALNS gene in an affected patient with severe form of mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA.

    PubMed

    Seyedhassani, Seyed Mohammad; Hashemi-Gorji, Feyzollah; Yavari, Mahdieh; Mirfakhraie, Reza

    2015-10-23

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA), also known as Morquio A, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS), which causes major skeletal and connective tissue abnormalities and affects multiple organ systems. In this study, one MPS IVA patient with a severe form from consanguine large Iranian family has been investigated. To find a mutation, all of the 14 exons and intron-exon junctions of GALNS gene were sequenced. Sequencing results were analyzed using bioinformatic analysis in order to predict probable pathogenic effect of the variant. One novel homozygous missense mutation in exon 5, c.542A>G (p.Y181C), was found in the proband. That was predicted as being probably pathogenic by bioinformatics analysis. Segregation and familial study confirmed this pathogenic mutation. In conclusion, we have identified the novel mutation responsible for MPS IVA in an Iranian patient to assist in the diagnosis, genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis of the affected families.

  17. HERC 1 Ubiquitin Ligase Mutation Affects Neocortical, CA3 Hippocampal and Spinal Cord Projection Neurons: An Ultrastructural Study.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Rocío; Pérez-Villegas, Eva María; Bachiller, Sara; Rosa, José Luis; Armengol, José Angel

    2016-01-01

    The spontaneous mutation tambaleante is caused by the Gly483Glu substitution in the highly conserved N terminal RCC1-like domain of the HERC1 protein, which leads to the increase of mutated protein levels responsible for cerebellar Purkinje cell death by autophagy. Until now, Purkinje cells have been the only central nervous neurons reported as being targeted by the mutation, and their degeneration elicits an ataxic syndrome in adult mutant mice. However, the ultrastructural analysis performed here demonstrates that signs of autophagy, such as autophagosomes, lysosomes, and altered mitochondria, are present in neocortical pyramidal, CA3 hippocampal pyramidal, and spinal cord motor neurons. The main difference is that the reduction in the number of neurons affected in the tambaleante mutation in the neocortex, the hippocampus, and the spinal cord is not so evident as the dramatic loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Interestingly, signs of autophagy are absent in both interneurons and neuroglia cells. Affected neurons have in common that they are projection neurons which receive strong and varied synaptic inputs, and possess the highest degree of neuronal activity. Therefore, because the integrity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is essential for protein degradation and hence, for normal protein turnover, it could be hypothesized that the deleterious effects of the misrouting of these pathways would depend directly on the neuronal activity.

  18. C-Nap1 mutation affects centriole cohesion and is associated with a Seckel-like syndrome in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Floriot, Sandrine; Vesque, Christine; Rodriguez, Sabrina; Bourgain-Guglielmetti, Florence; Karaiskou, Anthi; Gautier, Mathieu; Duchesne, Amandine; Barbey, Sarah; Fritz, Sébastien; Vasilescu, Alexandre; Bertaud, Maud; Moudjou, Mohammed; Halliez, Sophie; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; E.L. Hokayem, Joyce; Nigg, Erich A.; Manciaux, Luc; Guatteo, Raphaël; Cesbron, Nora; Toutirais, Geraldine; Eggen, André; Schneider-Maunoury, Sylvie; Boichard, Didier; Sobczak-Thépot, Joelle; Schibler, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Caprine-like Generalized Hypoplasia Syndrome (SHGC) is an autosomal-recessive disorder in Montbéliarde cattle. Affected animals present a wide range of clinical features that include the following: delayed development with low birth weight, hind limb muscular hypoplasia, caprine-like thin head and partial coat depigmentation. Here we show that SHGC is caused by a truncating mutation in the CEP250 gene that encodes the centrosomal protein C-Nap1. This mutation results in centrosome splitting, which neither affects centriole ultrastructure and duplication in dividing cells nor centriole function in cilium assembly and mitotic spindle organization. Loss of C-Nap1-mediated centriole cohesion leads to an altered cell migration phenotype. This discovery extends the range of loci that constitute the spectrum of autosomal primary recessive microcephaly (MCPH) and Seckel-like syndromes. PMID:25902731

  19. Mutations in the passenger polypeptide can affect its partitioning between mitochondria and cytoplasm: mutations can impair the mitochondrial import of DsRed.

    PubMed

    Pastukh, Viktoriya; Shokolenko, Inna N; Wilson, Glenn L; Alexeyev, Mikhail F

    2008-06-01

    In this study, we report that the partitioning between mitochondria and cytoplasm of two variants, mCherry and DsRed Express (DRE), of the red fluorescent protein, DsRed, fused to one of the six matrix targeting sequences (MTSs) can be affected by both MTS and amino acid substitutions in DsRed. Of the six MTSs tested, MTSs from superoxide dismutase and DNA polymerase gamma failed to direct mCherry, but not DRE to mitochondria. By evaluating a series of chimeras between mCherry and DRE fused to the MTS of superoxide dismutase, we attribute the differences in the mitochondrial partitioning to differences in the primary amino acid sequence of the passenger polypeptide. The impairment of mitochondrial partitioning closely parallels the number of mCherry-specific mutations, and is not specific to mutations located in any particular region of the polypeptide. These observations suggest that both MTS and the passenger polypeptide affect the efficiency of mitochondrial import and provide a rationale for the observed diversity in the primary amino acid sequences of natural MTSs.

  20. The shiverer mutation affects the persistence of Theiler's virus in the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Bihl, F; Pena-Rossi, C; Guénet, J L; Brahic, M; Bureau, J F

    1997-01-01

    Theiler's virus persists in the white matter of the spinal cord of genetically susceptible mice and causes primary demyelination. The virus persists in macrophages/microglial cells, but also in oligodendrocytes, the myelin-forming cells. Susceptibility/resistance to this chronic infection has been mapped to several loci including one tentatively located in the telomeric region of chromosome 18, close to the myelin basic protein locus (Mbp locus). To determine if the MBP gene influences viral persistence, we inoculated C3H mice bearing the shiverer mutation, a 20-kb deletion in the gene. Whereas control C3H mice were of intermediate susceptibility, C3H mice heterozygous for the mutation were very susceptible, and those homozygous for the mutation were completely resistant. This resistance was not immune mediated. Furthermore, C3H/101H mice homozygous for a point mutation in the gene coding for the proteolipid protein of myelin, the rumpshaker mutation, were resistant. These results strongly support the view that oligodendrocytes are a necessary viral target for the establishment of a persistent infection by Theiler's virus. PMID:9188567

  1. Dispersion suppressors with bending

    SciTech Connect

    Garren, A.

    1985-10-01

    Dispersion suppressors of two main types are usually used. In one the cell quadrupole focussing structure is the same as in normal cells but some of the dipoles are replaced by drifts. In the other, the quadrupole strengths and/or spacings are different from those of the normal cells, but the bending is about the same as it is in the cells. In SSC designs to date, dispersion suppressors of the former type have been used, consisting of two cells with bending equivalent to one. In this note a suppressor design with normal bending and altered focussing is presented. The advantage of this scheme is that circumference is reduced. The disadvantages are that additional special quadrupoles must be provided (however, they need not be adjustable), and the maximum beta values within them are about 30% higher than the cell maxima.

  2. Accumulation of trehalose by Escherichia coli K-12 at high osmotic pressure depends on the presence of amber suppressors

    SciTech Connect

    Rod, M.L. Alam, K.Y.; Cunningham, P.R.; Clark, D.P. )

    1988-08-01

    When grown at high osmotic pressure, some strains of Escherichia coli K-12 synthesized substantial levels of free sugar and accumulated proline if it was present in the growth medium. The sugar was identified as trehalose. Strains of E. coli K-12 could be divided into two major classes with respect of osmoregulation. Those of class A showed a large increase in trehalose levels with increasing medium osmolarity and also accumulated proline from the medium, whereas those in class B showed no accumulation of trehalose or proline. Most class A strains carried suppressor mutations which arose during their derivation from the wild type, whereas the osmodefective strains of class B were suppressor free. When amber suppressor mutations at the supD, supE, or supF loci were introduced into such sup{sup o} osmodefective strains, they became osmotolerant and gained the ability to accumulate trehalose in response to elevated medium osmolarity. It appears that the original K-12 strain of E. coli carries an amber mutation in a gene affecting osmoregulation. Mutants lacking ADP-glucose synthetase (glgC) accumulated trehalose normally, whereas mutants lacking UDP-glucose synthetase (galU) did not make trehalose and grew poorly in medium of high osmolarity. Trehalose synthesis was repressed by exogenous glycine betaine but not by proline.

  3. Oncogenic Mutations Differentially Affect Bax Monomer, Dimer, and Oligomeric Pore Formation in the Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mingzhen; Zheng, Jie; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2016-09-01

    Dysfunction of Bax, a pro-apoptotic regulator of cellular metabolism is implicated in neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. We have constructed the first atomistic models of the Bax oligomeric pore consisting with experimental residue-residue distances. The models are stable, capturing well double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy measurements and provide structural details in line with the DEER data. Comparison with the latest experimental results revealed that our models agree well with both Bax and Bak pores, pointed to a converged structural arrangement for Bax and Bak pore formation. Using multi-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we probed mutational effects on Bax transformation from monomer → dimer → membrane pore formation at atomic resolution. We observe that two cancer-related mutations, G40E and S118I, allosterically destabilize the monomer and stabilize an off-pathway swapped dimer, preventing productive pore formation. This observation suggests a mechanism whereby the mutations may work mainly by over-stabilizing the monomer → dimer transformation toward an unproductive off-pathway swapped-dimer state. Our observations point to misfolded Bax states, shedding light on the molecular mechanism of Bax mutation-elicited cancer. Most importantly, the structure of the Bax pore facilitates future study of releases cytochrome C in atomic detail.

  4. Characterization of novel Brown midrib 6 mutations affecting lignin biosynthesis in sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of lignin reduces the quality of lignocellulosic biomass for forage materials and feedstock for biofuels. In C4 grasses, the brown midrib phenotype has been linked to mutations to genes in the monolignol biosynthesis pathway. For example, the Bmr6 gene in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) has b...

  5. The glabra1 mutation affects cuticle formation and plant responses to microbes.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ye; Yu, Keshun; Navarre, Duroy; Seebold, Kenneth; Kachroo, Aardra; Kachroo, Pradeep

    2010-10-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a form of defense that provides resistance against a broad spectrum of pathogens in plants. Previous work indicates a role for plastidial glycerolipid biosynthesis in SAR. Specifically, mutations in FATTY ACID DESATURASE7 (FAD7), which lead to reduced trienoic fatty acid levels and compromised plastidial lipid biosynthesis, have been associated with defective SAR. We show that the defective SAR in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) fad7-1 plants is not associated with a mutation in FAD7 but rather with a second-site mutation in GLABRA1 (GL1), a gene well known for its role in trichome formation. The compromised SAR in gl1 plants is associated with impairment in their cuticles. Furthermore, mutations in two other components of trichome development, GL3 and TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1, also impaired cuticle development and SAR. This suggests an overlap in the biochemical pathways leading to cuticle and trichome development. Interestingly, exogenous application of gibberellic acid (GA) not only enhanced SAR in wild-type plants but also restored SAR in gl1 plants. In contrast to GA, the defense phytohoromes salicylic acid and jasmonic acid were unable to restore SAR in gl1 plants. GA application increased levels of cuticular components but not trichome formation on gl1 plants, thus implicating cuticle, but not trichomes, as an important component of SAR. Our findings question the prudence of using mutant backgrounds for genetic screens and underscore a need to reevaluate phenotypes previously studied in the gl1 background.

  6. Oncogenic Mutations Differentially Affect Bax Monomer, Dimer, and Oligomeric Pore Formation in the Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingzhen; Zheng, Jie; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of Bax, a pro-apoptotic regulator of cellular metabolism is implicated in neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. We have constructed the first atomistic models of the Bax oligomeric pore consisting with experimental residue-residue distances. The models are stable, capturing well double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy measurements and provide structural details in line with the DEER data. Comparison with the latest experimental results revealed that our models agree well with both Bax and Bak pores, pointed to a converged structural arrangement for Bax and Bak pore formation. Using multi-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we probed mutational effects on Bax transformation from monomer → dimer → membrane pore formation at atomic resolution. We observe that two cancer-related mutations, G40E and S118I, allosterically destabilize the monomer and stabilize an off-pathway swapped dimer, preventing productive pore formation. This observation suggests a mechanism whereby the mutations may work mainly by over-stabilizing the monomer → dimer transformation toward an unproductive off-pathway swapped-dimer state. Our observations point to misfolded Bax states, shedding light on the molecular mechanism of Bax mutation-elicited cancer. Most importantly, the structure of the Bax pore facilitates future study of releases cytochrome C in atomic detail. PMID:27630059

  7. Structural analysis of tissues affected by cytochrome C oxidase deficiency due to mutations in the SCO2 gene.

    PubMed

    Vesela, Katerina; Hulkova, Helena; Hansikova, Hana; Zeman, Jiri; Elleder, Milan

    2008-01-01

    Structural and histochemical studies carried out in a series of seven cases (from five families) with isolated cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency caused by mutations in the SCO2 gene (1, 2) disclosed changes concentrated in the nervous system, skeletal muscle and myocardium. In five patients homozygous for the E140K mutation, the phenotype was predominantly neuromuscular and the average life span ranged between 9 and 15 months. In two cases, the course was more rapid (death at 7 and 11 weeks of life) and featured marked cardiac hypertrophy (3- and 4-fold increase in heart weight). This predominantly cardiomyopathic phenotype was associated with compound heterozygosity (E140K with another nonsense mutation) in the SCO2 gene. Polioencephalopathy with neurodegeneration and neuronal drop out was present in all cases with evidence that retinal neurons might be seriously affected too. Involvement of spinal motoneurons together with cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in muscle represents a "double hit" for the skeletal muscle. The mitochondrial population was not found to be significantly increased or structurally altered, with the exception of two compound heterozygotes in which the cardiac mitochondria were increased in number and size. Our report extends knowledge of the pathology of COX deficiency caused by mutations in the SCO2 gene.

  8. Hypertension-associated point mutations in the adducin alpha and beta subunits affect actin cytoskeleton and ion transport.

    PubMed Central

    Tripodi, G; Valtorta, F; Torielli, L; Chieregatti, E; Salardi, S; Trusolino, L; Menegon, A; Ferrari, P; Marchisio, P C; Bianchi, G

    1996-01-01

    The adducin heterodimer is a protein affecting the assembly of the actin-based cytoskeleton. Point mutations in rat adducin alpha (F316Y) and beta (Q529R) subunits are involved in a form of rat primary hypertension (MHS) associated with faster kidney tubular ion transport. A role for adducin in human primary hypertension has also been suggested. By studying the interaction of actin with purified normal and mutated adducin in a cell-free system and the actin assembly in rat kidney epithelial cells (NRK-52E) transfected with mutated rat adducin cDNA, we show that the adducin isoforms differentially modulate: (a) actin assembly both in a cell-free system and within transfected cells; (b) topography of alpha V integrin together with focal contact proteins; and (c) Na-K pump activity at V(max) (faster with the mutated isoforms, 1281 +/- 90 vs 841 +/- 30 nmol K/h.mg pt., P < 0.0001). This co-modulation suggests a role for adducin in the constitutive capacity of the epithelia both to transport ions and to expose adhesion molecules. These findings may also lead to the understanding of the relation between adducin polymorphism and blood pressure and to the development of new approaches to the study of hypertension-associated organ damage. PMID:8675693

  9. Congenital hypothyroidism mutations affect common folding and trafficking in the α/β-hydrolase fold proteins.

    PubMed

    De Jaco, Antonella; Dubi, Noga; Camp, Shelley; Taylor, Palmer

    2012-12-01

    The α/β-hydrolase fold superfamily of proteins is composed of structurally related members that, despite great diversity in their catalytic, recognition, adhesion and chaperone functions, share a common fold governed by homologous residues and conserved disulfide bridges. Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms within the α/β-hydrolase fold domain in various family members have been found for congenital endocrine, metabolic and nervous system disorders. By examining the amino acid sequence from the various proteins, mutations were found to be prevalent in conserved residues within the α/β-hydrolase fold of the homologous proteins. This is the case for the thyroglobulin mutations linked to congenital hypothyroidism. To address whether correct folding of the common domain is required for protein export, we inserted the thyroglobulin mutations at homologous positions in two correlated but simpler α/β-hydrolase fold proteins known to be exported to the cell surface: neuroligin3 and acetylcholinesterase. Here we show that these mutations in the cholinesterase homologous region alter the folding properties of the α/β-hydrolase fold domain, which are reflected in defects in protein trafficking, folding and function, and ultimately result in retention of the partially processed proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Accordingly, mutations at conserved residues may be transferred amongst homologous proteins to produce common processing defects despite disparate functions, protein complexity and tissue-specific expression of the homologous proteins. More importantly, a similar assembly of the α/β-hydrolase fold domain tertiary structure among homologous members of the superfamily is required for correct trafficking of the proteins to their final destination.

  10. Inactivation of X-linked tumor suppressor genes in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Runhua; Kain, Mandy; Wang, Lizhong

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells silence autosomal tumor suppressor genes by Knudson’s two-hit mechanism in which loss-of-function mutations and then loss of heterozygosity occur at the tumor suppressor gene loci. However, the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes has challenged the traditional theory of “two-hit inactivation” in tumor suppressor genes, introducing the novel concept that a single genetic hit can cause loss of tumor suppressor function. The mechanism through which these genes are silenced in human cancer is unclear, but elucidating the details will greatly enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of human cancer. Here, we review the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes and discuss the potential mechanisms of their inactivation. In addition, we also discuss how the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes can potentially lead to new approaches to cancer therapy. PMID:22515449

  11. Inactivation of X-linked tumor suppressor genes in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runhua; Kain, Mandy; Wang, Lizhong

    2012-04-01

    Cancer cells silence autosomal tumor suppressor genes by Knudson's two-hit mechanism in which loss-of-function mutations and then loss of heterozygosity occur at the tumor suppressor gene loci. However, the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes has challenged the traditional theory of 'two-hit inactivation' in tumor suppressor genes, introducing the novel concept that a single genetic hit can cause loss of tumor suppressor function. The mechanism through which these genes are silenced in human cancer is unclear, but elucidating the details will greatly enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of human cancer. Here, we review the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes and discuss the potential mechanisms of their inactivation. In addition, we also discuss how the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes can potentially lead to new approaches in cancer therapy.

  12. Mutations in Nonconserved Domains of Ty3 Integrase Affect Multiple Stages of the Ty3 Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Nymark-McMahon, M. Henrietta; Sandmeyer, Suzanne B.

    1999-01-01

    Ty3, a retroviruslike element of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transposes into positions immediately upstream of RNA polymerase III-transcribed genes. The Ty3 integrase (IN) protein is required for integration of the replicated, extrachromosomal Ty3 DNA. In retroviral IN, a conserved core region is sufficient for strand transfer activity. In this study, charged-to-alanine scanning mutagenesis was used to investigate the roles of the nonconserved amino- and carboxyl-terminal regions of Ty3 IN. Each of the 20 IN mutants was defective for transposition, but no mutant was grossly defective for capsid maturation. All mutations affecting steady-state levels of mature IN protein resulted in reduced levels of replicated DNA, even when polymerase activity was not grossly defective as measured by exogenous reverse transcriptase activity assay. Thus, IN could contribute to nonpolymerase functions required for DNA production in vivo or to the stability of the DNA product. Several mutations in the carboxyl-terminal domain resulted in relatively low levels of processed 3′ ends of the replicated DNA, suggesting that this domain may be important for binding of IN to the long terminal repeat. Another class of mutants produced wild-type amounts of DNA with correctly processed 3′ ends. This class could include mutants affected in nuclear entry and target association. Collectively, these mutations demonstrate that in vivo, within the preintegration complex, IN performs a central role in coordinating multiple late stages of the retrotransposition life cycle. PMID:9847351

  13. Missense mutations in Otopetrin 1 affect subcellular localization and inhibition of purinergic signaling in vestibular supporting cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Euysoo; Hyrc, Krzysztof L; Speck, Judith; Salles, Felipe T; Lundberg, Yunxia W; Goldberg, Mark P; Kachar, Bechara; Warchol, Mark E; Ornitz, David M

    2011-03-01

    Otopetrin 1 (Otop1) encodes a protein that is essential for the development of otoconia. Otoconia are the extracellular calcium carbonate containing crystals that are important for vestibular mechanosensory transduction of linear motion and gravity. There are two mutant alleles of Otop1 in mice, titled (tlt) and mergulhador (mlh), which result in non-syndromic otoconia agenesis and a consequent balance defect. Biochemically, Otop1 has been shown to modulate purinergic control of intracellular calcium in vestibular supporting cells, which could be one of the mechanisms by which Otop1 participates in the mineralization of otoconia. To understand how tlt and mlh mutations affect the biochemical function of Otop1, we examined the purinergic response of COS7 cells expressing mutant Otop1 proteins, and dissociated sensory epithelial cells from tlt and mlh mice. We also examined the subcellular localization of Otop1 in whole sensory epithelia from tlt and mlh mice. Here we show that tlt and mlh mutations uncouple Otop1 from inhibition of P2Y receptor function. Although the in vitro biochemical function of the Otop1 mutant proteins is normal, in vivo they behave as null alleles. We show that in supporting cells the apical membrane localization of the mutant Otop1 proteins is lost. These data suggest that the tlt and mlh mutations primarily affect the localization of Otop1, which interferes with its ability to interact with other proteins that are important for its cellular and biochemical function.

  14. Constitutional ring chromosomes and tumour suppressor genes.

    PubMed Central

    Tommerup, N; Lothe, R

    1992-01-01

    The types of malignancy reported in carriers of constitutional ring chromosomes r(11), r(13), and r(22) are concordant with the chromosomal assignment of tumour suppressor loci associated with Wilms' tumour, retinoblastoma, and meningioma. It is suggested that the somatic instability of ring chromosomes may play a role in this association and that constitutional ring chromosomes may be a source for mapping of tumour suppressor loci with the potential for covering most or all of the human genome. The hypothesis predicts the presence of a locus on chromosome 10 associated with follicular carcinoma of the thyroid, in line with previous cytogenetic findings of rearrangements involving chromosome 10 in thyroid tumours, and a locus on chromosome 22 associated with testicular cancer. Development of neurofibromatoses (NF) that do not fulfil the clinical criteria of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) in carriers with r(22) suggests either the presence of an additional NF locus on chromosome 22 or that ring chromosome mediated predisposition to somatic mutation of a specific tumour suppressor may be associated with atypical development of features usually associated with germline mutations. PMID:1336057

  15. Altered 40 S ribosomal subunits in omnipotent suppressors of yeast.

    PubMed

    Eustice, D C; Wakem, L P; Wilhelm, J M; Sherman, F

    1986-03-20

    The five suppressors SUP35, SUP43, SUP44, SUP45 and SUP46, each mapping at a different chromosomal locus in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suppress a wide range of mutations, including representatives of all three types of nonsense mutations, UAA, UAG and UGA. We have demonstrated that ribosomes from the four suppressors SUP35, SUP44, SUP45 and SUP46 translate polyuridylate templates in vitro with higher errors than ribosomes from the normal stain, and that this misreading is substantially enhanced by the antibiotic paromomycin. Furthermore, ribosomal subunit mixing experiments established that the 40 S ribosomal subunit, and this subunit only, is responsible for the higher levels of misreading. Thus, the gene products of SUP35, SUP44, SUP45 and SUP46 are components of the 40 S subunit or are enzymes that modify the subunit. In addition, a protein from the 40 S subunit of the SUP35 suppressor has an altered electrophoretic mobility; this protein is distinct from the altered protein previously uncovered in the 40 S subunit of the SUP46 suppressor. In contrast to the ribosomes from the four suppressors SUP35, SUP44, SUP45 and SUP46, the ribosomes from the SUP43 suppressor do not significantly misread polyuridylate templates in vitro, suggesting that this locus may not encode a ribosomal component or that the misreading is highly specific.

  16. Paxillin mutations affect focal adhesions and lead to altered mitochondrial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Ichiro; Hasina, Rifat; Lennon, Frances E; Bindokas, Vytautas P; Usatyuk, Peter; Tan, Yi-Hung C; Krishnaswamy, Soundararajan; Arif, Qudsia; Carey, George; Hseu, Robyn D; Robinson, Matthew; Tretiakova, Maria; Brand, Toni M; Iida, Mari; Ferguson, Mark K; Wheeler, Deric L; Husain, Aliya N; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Vokes, Everett E; Singleton, Patrick A; Salgia, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Cytoskeletal and focal adhesion abnormalities are observed in several types of cancer, including lung cancer. We have previously reported that paxillin (PXN) was mutated, amplified, and overexpressed in a significant number of lung cancer patient samples, that PXN protein was upregulated in more advanced stages of lung cancer compared with lower stages, and that the PXN gene was also amplified in some pre-neoplastic lung lesions. Among the mutations investigated, we previously found that PXN variant A127T in lung cancer cells enhanced cell proliferation and focal adhesion formation and colocalized with the anti-apoptotic protein B Cell Lymphoma 2 (BCL-2), which is known to localize to the mitochondria, among other sites. To further explore the effects of activating mutations of PXN on mitochondrial function, we cloned and expressed wild-type PXN and variants containing the most commonly occurring PXN mutations (P46S, P52L, G105D, A127T, P233L, T255I, D399N, E423K, P487L, and K506R) in a GFP-tagged vector using HEK-293 human embryonic kidney cells. Utilizing live-cell imaging to systematically study the effects of wild-type PXN vs. mutants, we created a model that recapitulates the salient features of the measured dynamics and conclude that compared with wild-type, some mutant clones confer enhanced focal adhesion and lamellipodia formation (A127T, P233L, and P487L) and some confer increased association with BCL-2, Dynamin-related Protein-1 (DRP-1), and Mitofusion-2 (MFN-2) proteins (P233L and D399N). Further, PXN mutants, through their interactions with BCL-2 and DRP-1, could regulate cisplatin drug resistance in human lung cancer cells. The data reported herein suggest that mutant PXN variants play a prominent role in mitochondrial dynamics with direct implications on lung cancer progression and hence, deserve further exploration as therapeutic targets. PMID:23792636

  17. A new Gsdma3 mutation affecting anagen phase of first hair cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Shigekazu; Tamura, Masaru; Aoki, Aya; Fujii, Tomoaki; Komiyama, Hiromitsu; Sagai, Tomoko; Shiroishi, Toshihiko . E-mail: tshirois@lab.nig.ac.jp

    2007-08-10

    Recombination-induced mutation 3 (Rim3) is a spontaneous mouse mutation that exhibits dominant phenotype of hyperkeratosis and hair loss. Fine linkage analysis of Rim3 and sequencing revealed a novel single point mutation, G1124A leading to Ala348Thr, in Gsdma3 in chromosome 11. Transgenesis with BAC DNA harboring the Rim3-type Gsdma3 recaptured the Rim3 phenotype, providing direct evidence that Gsdma3 is the causative gene of Rim3. We examined the spatial expression of Gsdma3 and characterized the Rim3 phenotype in detail. Gsdma3 is expressed in differentiated epidermal cells in the skin, but not in the proliferating epidermal cells. Histological analysis of Rim3 mutant showed hyperplasia of the epidermal cells in the upper hair follicles and abnormal anagen phase at the first hair cycle. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis revealed hyperproliferation and misdifferentiation of the upper follicular epidermis in Rim3 mutant. These results suggest that Gsdma3 is involved in the proliferation and differentiation of epidermal stem cells.

  18. Mutations in Durum Wheat SBEII Genes affect Grain Yield Components, Quality, and Fermentation Responses in Rats.

    PubMed

    Hazard, Brittany; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Naemeh, Mahmoudreza; Hamilton, M Kristina; Rust, Bret; Raybould, Helen E; Newman, John W; Martin, Roy; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Increased amylose in wheat (Triticum ssp.) starch is associated with increased resistant starch, a fermentable dietary fiber. Fermentation of resistant starch in the large intestine produces short-chain fatty acids that are associated with human health benefits. Since wheat foods are an important component of the human diet, increases in amylose and resistant starch in wheat grains have the potential to deliver health benefits to a large number of people. In three replicated field trials we found that mutations in starch branching enzyme II genes (SBEIIa and SBEIIb) in both A and B genomes (SBEIIa/b-AB) of durum wheat [T. turgidum L. subsp. durum (Desf.) Husn.] resulted in large increases of amylose and resistant starch content. The presence of these four mutations was also associated with an average 5% reduction in kernel weight (P = 0.0007) and 15% reduction in grain yield (P = 0.06) compared to the wild type. Complete milling and pasta quality analysis showed that the mutant lines have an acceptable quality with positive effects on pasta firmness and negative effects on semolina extraction and pasta color. Positive fermentation responses were detected in rats (Rattus spp.) fed with diets incorporating mutant wheat flour. This study quantifies benefits and limitations associated with the deployment of the SBEIIa/b-AB mutations in durum wheat and provides the information required to develop realistic strategies to deploy durum wheat varieties with increased levels of amylose and resistant starch.

  19. Myotonia congenita-associated mutations in chloride channel-1 affect zebrafish body wave swimming kinematics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Tian, Jing; Burgunder, Jean-Marc; Hunziker, Walter; Eng, How-Lung

    2014-01-01

    Myotonia congenita is a human muscle disorder caused by mutations in CLCN1, which encodes human chloride channel 1 (CLCN1). Zebrafish is becoming an increasingly useful model for human diseases, including muscle disorders. In this study, we generated transgenic zebrafish expressing, under the control of a muscle specific promoter, human CLCN1 carrying mutations that have been identified in human patients suffering from myotonia congenita. We developed video analytic tools that are able to provide precise quantitative measurements of movement abnormalities in order to analyse the effect of these CLCN1 mutations on adult transgenic zebrafish swimming. Two new parameters for body-wave kinematics of swimming reveal changes in body curvature and tail offset in transgenic zebrafish expressing the disease-associated CLCN1 mutants, presumably due to their effect on muscle function. The capability of the developed video analytic tool to distinguish wild-type from transgenic zebrafish could provide a useful asset to screen for compounds that reverse the disease phenotype, and may be applicable to other movement disorders besides myotonia congenita.

  20. Mutations in Durum Wheat SBEII Genes affect Grain Yield Components, Quality, and Fermentation Responses in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hazard, Brittany; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Naemeh, Mahmoudreza; Hamilton, M. Kristina; Rust, Bret; Raybould, Helen E.; Newman, John W.; Martin, Roy; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Increased amylose in wheat (Triticum ssp.) starch is associated with increased resistant starch, a fermentable dietary fiber. Fermentation of resistant starch in the large intestine produces short-chain fatty acids that are associated with human health benefits. Since wheat foods are an important component of the human diet, increases in amylose and resistant starch in wheat grains have the potential to deliver health benefits to a large number of people. In three replicated field trials we found that mutations in starch branching enzyme II genes (SBEIIa and SBEIIb) in both A and B genomes (SBEIIa/b-AB) of durum wheat [T. turgidum L. subsp. durum (Desf.) Husn.] resulted in large increases of amylose and resistant starch content. The presence of these four mutations was also associated with an average 5% reduction in kernel weight (P = 0.0007) and 15% reduction in grain yield (P = 0.06) compared to the wild type. Complete milling and pasta quality analysis showed that the mutant lines have an acceptable quality with positive effects on pasta firmness and negative effects on semolina extraction and pasta color. Positive fermentation responses were detected in rats (Rattus spp.) fed with diets incorporating mutant wheat flour. This study quantifies benefits and limitations associated with the deployment of the SBEIIa/b-AB mutations in durum wheat and provides the information required to develop realistic strategies to deploy durum wheat varieties with increased levels of amylose and resistant starch. PMID:27134286

  1. Mutations in two regions upstream of the A gamma globin gene canonical promoter affect gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, J A; Lee, R F; Lingrel, J B

    1989-01-01

    Two regions upstream of the human fetal (A gamma) globin gene, which interact with protein factors from K562 and HeLa nuclear extracts, have functional significance in gene expression. One binding site (site I) is at a position -290 to -267 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site, the other (site II) is at -182 to -168 bp. Site II includes the octamer sequence (ATGCAAAT) found in an immunoglobulin enhancer and the histone H2b gene promoter. A point mutation (T----C) at -175, within the octamer sequence, is characteristic of a naturally occurring HPFH (hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin), and decreases factor binding to an oligonucleotide containing the octamer motif. Expression assays using a A gamma globin promoter-CAT (chloramphenicol acetyl transferase) fusion gene show that the point mutation at -175 increases expression in erythroid, but not non-erythroid cells when compared to a wild-type construct. This correlates with the actual effect of the HPFH mutation in humans. This higher expression may result from a mechanism more complex than reduced binding of a negative regulator. A site I clustered-base substitution gives gamma-CAT activity well below wild-type, suggesting that this factor is a positive regulator. Images PMID:2472607

  2. Colon cancer metastasis in mouse liver is not affected by hypercoagulability due to Factor V Leiden mutation

    PubMed Central

    Klerk, CPW; Smorenburg, SM; Spek, CA; Van Noorden, CJF

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Clinical trials have shown life-prolonging effects of antithrombotics in cancer patients, but the molecular mechanisms remain unknown due to the multitude of their effects. We investigated in a mouse model whether one of the targets of antithrombotic therapy, fibrin deposition, stimulates tumour development. Fibrin may provide either protection of cancer cells in the circulation against mechanical stress and the immune system, or form a matrix for tumours and/or angiogenesis in tumours to develop. Mice homozygous for Factor V Leiden (FVL), a mutation in one of the coagulation factors that facilitates fibrin formation, were used to investigate whether hypercoagulability affects tumour development in an experimental metastasis model. Liver metastases of colon cancer were induced in mice with the FVL mutation and wild-type littermates. At day 21, number and size of tumours at the liver surface, fibrin/fibrinogen distribution, vessel density and the presence of newly formed vessels in tumours were analysed. Number and size of tumours did not differ between mice with and without the FVL mutation. Fibrin/fibrinogen was found in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes and cancer cells, in blood vessels in liver and tumour tissue and diffusely distributed outside vessels in tumours, indicating leaky vessels. Vessel density and angiogenesis varied widely between tumours, but a pre-dominance for vessel-rich or vessel-poor tumours or vessel formation could not be found in either genotype. In conclusion, the FVL mutation has no effect on the development of secondary tumours of colon cancer in livers of mice. Fibrin deposition and thus inhibition of fibrin formation by anticoagulants do not seem to affect tumour development in this model. PMID:17635646

  3. Transient congenital hypothyroidism caused by compound heterozygous mutations affecting the NADPH-oxidase domain of DUOX2.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa-Ogasawara, Atsuko; Abe, Kiyomi; Ogikubo, Sayaka; Narumi, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Satoh, Mari

    2016-03-01

    Here, we describe three cases of loss-of-function mutations in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-oxidase (NOX) domain of dual oxidase 2 (DUOX2) occurring along with concurrent missense mutations in thyroid peroxidase (TPO), leading to transient congenital hypothyroidism (CH). Three Japanese boys with nonconsanguineous parents were diagnosed with CH during their neonatal screenings. All patients presented with moderate-to-severe neonatal hypothyroidism and were diagnosed with transient CH after re-evaluation of thyroid function. Two siblings were compound heterozygous for p.[R1110Q]+[Y1180X] in DUOX2; one of them was also heterozygous for p.[R361L] in TPO. The third patient was compound heterozygous for p.[L1160del]+[R1334W] in DUOX2 and heterozygous for p.[P883S] in TPO. This is the first report of a de novo L1160del mutation affecting the DUOX2 gene and of the novel mutations Y1180X in DUOX2 and R361L in TPO. R1110Q and L1160del were found to reduce H2O2 production (5%-9%, p<0.01), while Y1180X, which introduces a premature stop codon, did not confer detectable H2O2 production (-0.7%±0.6%, p<0.01). Moreover, R1334W, a missense mutation possibly affecting electron transfer, led to reduced H2O2 production (24%±0.9%, p<0.01) in vitro, and R1110Q and R1334W resulted in reduced protein expression. Y1180X was detected in a 120 kDa truncated form, whereas L1160del expression was maintained. Further, R361L, a novel missense mutation in TPO, caused partial reduction in peroxidase activity (20.6%±0.8%, p=0.01), whereas P883S, a missense variant, increased it (133.7%±2.8%, p=0.02). The protein expression levels in the case of R361L and P883S were maintained. In conclusion, we provide clinical and in vitro demonstrations of different functional defects and phenotypic heterogeneity in the same thyroid hormonogenesis pathway.

  4. Suppressor System in Bacillus subtilis 168

    PubMed Central

    Georgopoulos, C. P.

    1969-01-01

    Multiple auxotrophic strains of Bacillus subtilis 168 were tested for joint one-step reversion of two or more auxotrophic markers to the wild-type phenotype. Mu8u5u5, a strain requiring leucine, methionine, and threonine, yielded revertants that grew without added methionine or threonine and proved to have a suppressor gene. When transferred by transformation with deoxyribonucleic acid, this suppressor gene also suppressed the adenine mutation in another strain, Mu8u5u6. The one-step double revertants fell into two distinct classes: strains of class su+I grow well in broth; strains of class su+II grow poorly. Strains su+II tend to revert frequently to the su+I or su− state. Conditional lethal mutants of phage φe were isolated which can grow on the su+ and not on the su− strains. PMID:4975748

  5. A novel COL11A1 mutation affecting splicing in a patient with Stickler syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Naruto, Takuya; Kobayashi, Haruka; Watanabe, Miki; Okamoto, Nana; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei; Okamoto, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous collagenopathy characterized by ocular, auditory, skeletal and orofacial abnormalities, commonly occurring as an autosomal dominant trait. We conducted target resequencing to analyze candidate genes associated with known clinical phenotypes from a 4-year-old girl with Stickler syndrome. We detected a novel heterozygous intronic mutation (NM_001854.3:c.3168+5G>A) in COL11A1 that may impair splicing, which was suggested by in silico prediction and a minigene assay. PMID:27081549

  6. A novel COL11A1 mutation affecting splicing in a patient with Stickler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Naruto, Takuya; Kobayashi, Haruka; Watanabe, Miki; Okamoto, Nana; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei; Okamoto, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous collagenopathy characterized by ocular, auditory, skeletal and orofacial abnormalities, commonly occurring as an autosomal dominant trait. We conducted target resequencing to analyze candidate genes associated with known clinical phenotypes from a 4-year-old girl with Stickler syndrome. We detected a novel heterozygous intronic mutation (NM_001854.3:c.3168+5G>A) in COL11A1 that may impair splicing, which was suggested by in silico prediction and a minigene assay.

  7. Mutations altering the gammaretrovirus endoproteolytic motif affect glycosylation of the envelope glycoprotein and early events of the virus life cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Argaw, Takele; Wilson, Carolyn A.

    2015-01-15

    Previously, we found that mutation of glutamine to proline in the endoproteolytic cleavage signal of the PERV-C envelope (RQKK to RPKK) resulted in non-infectious vectors. Here, we show that RPKK results in a non-infectious vector when placed in not only a PERV envelope, but also the envelope of a related gammaretrovirus, FeLV-B. The amino acid substitutions do not prevent envelope precursor cleavage, viral core and genome assembly, or receptor binding. Rather, the mutations result in the formation of hyperglycosylated glycoprotein and a reduction in the reverse transcribed minus strand synthesis and undetectable 2-LTR circular DNA in cells exposed to vectors with these mutated envelopes. Our findings suggest novel functions associated with the cleavage signal sequence that may affect trafficking through the glycosylation machinery of the cell. Further, the glycosylation status of the envelope appears to impact post-binding events of the viral life cycle, either membrane fusion, internalization, or reverse transcription. - Highlights: • Env cleavage signal impacts infectivity of gammaretroviruses. • Non-infectious mutants have hyper-glycosylated envelope that bind target cells. • Non-infectious mutants have defects in the formation of the double-stranded DNA. • Env cleavage motif has functions beyond cleavage of the env precursor.

  8. Skeletal muscle sodium channel is affected by an epileptogenic beta1 subunit mutation.

    PubMed

    Moran, O; Conti, F

    2001-03-23

    The syndrome of generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus type 1 (GEFS+) has been associated to the gene SCN1B coding for the sodium channel beta1 subunit (Wallace, R. H. et al. (1998) Nature Genetics 19, 366-370). In patients, a mutation of the cysteine 121 to trpyptophane (C121W) would cause a lack of modulatory activity of the beta1 subunit on sodium channels expressed in the brain, rendering neurons hyperexcitable. We have confirmed that the normal beta1-modulation of type-IIA adult brain alpha subunits (BIIA) expressed in frog oocytes is defective in C121W. We observed that the mixture of wild-type and mutant beta1 subunits is less effective than wild-type alone, suggesting that the mutant beta1 subunit does bind the alpha subunit. However, we also observed a similar lack of modulation by C121W of the in adult skeletal muscle alpha subunit (SkM1). This finding is in contrast with the simple idea that the mutational effect observed in the oocyte expression system is the principal physiopathological correlate of GEFS+, because no skeletal muscle symptoms have been reported in GEFS+ patients. We conclude that the manifestation of the pathological phenotype is conditioned by the presence of susceptibility genes and/or that the frog oocyte expression system is inadequate for the study of the mutant beta1 subunit physiopathology.

  9. pigk Mutation underlies macho behavior and affects Rohon-Beard cell excitability

    PubMed Central

    Carmean, V.; Yonkers, M. A.; Tellez, M. B.; Willer, J. R.; Willer, G. B.; Gregg, R. G.; Geisler, R.; Neuhauss, S. C.

    2015-01-01

    The study of touch-evoked behavior allows investigation of both the cells and circuits that generate a response to tactile stimulation. We investigate a touch-insensitive zebrafish mutant, macho (maco), previously shown to have reduced sodium current amplitude and lack of action potential firing in sensory neurons. In the genomes of mutant but not wild-type embryos, we identify a mutation in the pigk gene. The encoded protein, PigK, functions in attachment of glycophosphatidylinositol anchors to precursor proteins. In wild-type embryos, pigk mRNA is present at times when mutant embryos display behavioral phenotypes. Consistent with the predicted loss of function induced by the mutation, knock-down of PigK phenocopies maco touch insensitivity and leads to reduced sodium current (INa) amplitudes in sensory neurons. We further test whether the genetic defect in pigk underlies the maco phenotype by overexpressing wild-type pigk in mutant embryos. We find that ubiquitous expression of wild-type pigk rescues the touch response in maco mutants. In addition, for maco mutants, expression of wild-type pigk restricted to sensory neurons rescues sodium current amplitudes and action potential firing in sensory neurons. However, expression of wild-type pigk limited to sensory cells of mutant embryos does not allow rescue of the behavioral touch response. Our results demonstrate an essential role for pigk in generation of the touch response beyond that required for maintenance of proper INa density and action potential firing in sensory neurons. PMID:26133798

  10. pigk Mutation underlies macho behavior and affects Rohon-Beard cell excitability.

    PubMed

    Carmean, V; Yonkers, M A; Tellez, M B; Willer, J R; Willer, G B; Gregg, R G; Geisler, R; Neuhauss, S C; Ribera, A B

    2015-08-01

    The study of touch-evoked behavior allows investigation of both the cells and circuits that generate a response to tactile stimulation. We investigate a touch-insensitive zebrafish mutant, macho (maco), previously shown to have reduced sodium current amplitude and lack of action potential firing in sensory neurons. In the genomes of mutant but not wild-type embryos, we identify a mutation in the pigk gene. The encoded protein, PigK, functions in attachment of glycophosphatidylinositol anchors to precursor proteins. In wild-type embryos, pigk mRNA is present at times when mutant embryos display behavioral phenotypes. Consistent with the predicted loss of function induced by the mutation, knock-down of PigK phenocopies maco touch insensitivity and leads to reduced sodium current (INa) amplitudes in sensory neurons. We further test whether the genetic defect in pigk underlies the maco phenotype by overexpressing wild-type pigk in mutant embryos. We find that ubiquitous expression of wild-type pigk rescues the touch response in maco mutants. In addition, for maco mutants, expression of wild-type pigk restricted to sensory neurons rescues sodium current amplitudes and action potential firing in sensory neurons. However, expression of wild-type pigk limited to sensory cells of mutant embryos does not allow rescue of the behavioral touch response. Our results demonstrate an essential role for pigk in generation of the touch response beyond that required for maintenance of proper INa density and action potential firing in sensory neurons.

  11. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbers, C.; DeLong, A.; Deruere, J.; Bernasconi, P.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

  12. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Garbers, C; DeLong, A; Deruére, J; Bernasconi, P; Söll, D

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis. Images PMID:8641277

  13. pH-sensitive residues in the p19 RNA silencing suppressor protein from carnation Italian ringspot virus affect siRNA binding stability

    PubMed Central

    Law, Sean M; Zhang, Bin W; Brooks, Charles L

    2013-01-01

    Tombusviruses, such as Carnation Italian ringspot virus (CIRV), encode a protein homodimer called p19 that is capable of suppressing RNA silencing in their infected hosts by binding to and sequestering short-interfering RNA (siRNA) away from the RNA silencing pathway. P19 binding stability has been shown to be sensitive to changes in pH but the specific amino acid residues involved have remained unclear. Using constant pH molecular dynamics simulations, we have identified key pH-dependent residues that affect CIRV p19–siRNA binding stability at various pH ranges based on calculated changes in the free energy contribution from each titratable residue. At high pH, the deprotonation of Lys60, Lys67, Lys71, and Cys134 has the largest effect on the binding stability. Similarly, deprotonation of several acidic residues (Asp9, Glu12, Asp20, Glu35, and/or Glu41) at low pH results in a decrease in binding stability. At neutral pH, residues Glu17 and His132 provide a small increase in the binding stability and we find that the optimal pH range for siRNA binding is between 7.0 and 10.0. Overall, our findings further inform recent experiments and are in excellent agreement with data on the pH-dependent binding profile. PMID:23450521

  14. pH-sensitive residues in the p19 RNA silencing suppressor protein from carnation Italian ringspot virus affect siRNA binding stability.

    PubMed

    Law, Sean M; Zhang, Bin W; Brooks, Charles L

    2013-05-01

    Tombusviruses, such as Carnation Italian ringspot virus (CIRV), encode a protein homodimer called p19 that is capable of suppressing RNA silencing in their infected hosts by binding to and sequestering short-interfering RNA (siRNA) away from the RNA silencing pathway. P19 binding stability has been shown to be sensitive to changes in pH but the specific amino acid residues involved have remained unclear. Using constant pH molecular dynamics simulations, we have identified key pH-dependent residues that affect CIRV p19-siRNA binding stability at various pH ranges based on calculated changes in the free energy contribution from each titratable residue. At high pH, the deprotonation of Lys60, Lys67, Lys71, and Cys134 has the largest effect on the binding stability. Similarly, deprotonation of several acidic residues (Asp9, Glu12, Asp20, Glu35, and/or Glu41) at low pH results in a decrease in binding stability. At neutral pH, residues Glu17 and His132 provide a small increase in the binding stability and we find that the optimal pH range for siRNA binding is between 7.0 and 10.0. Overall, our findings further inform recent experiments and are in excellent agreement with data on the pH-dependent binding profile.

  15. Novel Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy Mutation in MYL2 Affects the Structure and Function of Myosin Regulatory Light Chain

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenrui; Liang, Jingsheng; Yuan, Chen-Ching; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Zhou, Zhiqun; Morales, Ana; McBride, Kim L.; Fitzgerald-Butt, Sara M.; Hershberger, Ray E.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2015-01-01

    Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a disease of the myocardium characterized by left ventricular dilatation and diminished contractile function. In this report we describe a novel DCM mutation identified for the first time in the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC), replacing Aspartic Acid at position 94 with Alanine (D94A). The mutation was identified by exome sequencing of three adult first-degree relatives who met formal criteria for idiopathic DCM. To gain insight into the functional significance of this pathogenic MYL2 variant, we have cloned and purified the human ventricular RLC wild-type (WT) and D94A-mutant proteins and performed in vitro experiments using RLC-exchanged porcine cardiac preparations. The mutation was observed to induce a reduction in the α-helical content of the RLC and imposed intra-molecular rearrangements. The Ca2+-calmodulin-activated myosin light chain kinase phosphorylation of RLC was not affected by D94A. The mutation was seen to impair the binding of RLC to the MHC (myosin heavy chain), and its incorporation into the RLC-depleted porcine myosin. The actin-activated ATPase activity of mutant-reconstituted porcine cardiac myosin was significantly higher compared to ATPase of WT. No changes in myofibrillar ATPase-pCa relationship were observed in WT- or D94A-reconstituted preparations. Measurements of contractile force showed a slightly reduced maximal tension per cross-section of muscle with no change in calcium sensitivity of force in D94A-reconstituted skinned porcine papillary muscle strips compared with WT. Our data indicate that subtle structural rearrangements in the RLC molecule followed by its impaired interaction with the MHC may trigger functional abnormalities contributing to the DCM phenotype. PMID:25825243

  16. Two novel pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting organelle number and protein synthesis. Is the tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene an etiologic hot spot?

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, C T; Ciacci, F; Bonilla, E; Jansen, C; Hirano, M; Rao, N; Lovelace, R E; Rowland, L P; Schon, E A; DiMauro, S

    1993-01-01

    We identified two patients with pathogenic single nucleotide changes in two different mitochondrial tRNA genes: the first mutation in the tRNA(Asn) gene, and the ninth known mutation in the tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene. The mutation in tRNA(Asn) was associated with isolated ophthalmoplegia, whereas the mutation in tRNA(Leu(UUR)) caused a neurological syndrome resembling MERRF (myoclonus epilepsy and ragged-red fibers) plus optic neuropathy, retinopathy, and diabetes. Both mutations were heteroplasmic, with higher percentages of mutant mtDNA in affected tissues, and undetectable levels in maternal relatives. Analysis of single muscle fibers indicated that morphological and biochemical alterations appeared only when the proportions of mutant mtDNA exceeded 90% of the total cellular mtDNA pool. The high incidence of mutations in the tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene suggests that this region is an "etiologic hot spot" in mitochondrial disease. Images PMID:8254046

  17. Mutations of Arabidopsis TBL32 and TBL33 Affect Xylan Acetylation and Secondary Wall Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Youxi; Teng, Quincy; Zhong, Ruiqin; Haghighat, Marziyeh; Richardson, Elizabeth A.; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Xylan is a major acetylated polymer in plant lignocellulosic biomass and it can be mono- and di-acetylated at O-2 and O-3 as well as mono-acetylated at O-3 of xylosyl residues that is substituted with glucuronic acid (GlcA) at O-2. Based on the finding that ESK1, an Arabidopsis thaliana DUF231 protein, specifically mediates xylan 2-O- and 3-O-monoacetylation, we previously proposed that different acetyltransferase activities are required for regiospecific acetyl substitutions of xylan. Here, we demonstrate the functional roles of TBL32 and TBL33, two ESK1 close homologs, in acetyl substitutions of xylan. Simultaneous mutations of TBL32 and TBL33 resulted in a significant reduction in xylan acetyl content and endoxylanase digestion of the mutant xylan released GlcA-substituted xylooligomers without acetyl groups. Structural analysis of xylan revealed that the tbl32 tbl33 mutant had a nearly complete loss of 3-O-acetylated, 2-O-GlcA-substituted xylosyl residues. A reduction in 3-O-monoacetylated and 2,3-di-O-acetylated xylosyl residues was also observed. Simultaneous mutations of TBL32, TBL33 and ESK1 resulted in a severe reduction in xylan acetyl level down to 15% of that of the wild type, and concomitantly, severely collapsed vessels and stunted plant growth. In particular, the S2 layer of secondary walls in xylem vessels of tbl33 esk1 and tbl32 tbl33 esk1 exhibited an altered structure, indicating abnormal assembly of secondary wall polymers. These results demonstrate that TBL32 and TBL33 play an important role in xylan acetylation and normal deposition of secondary walls. PMID:26745802

  18. Mutations of Arabidopsis TBL32 and TBL33 affect xylan acetylation and secondary wall deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Yuan, Youxi; Teng, Quincy; Zhong, Ruiqin; ...

    2016-01-08

    Xylan is a major acetylated polymer in plant lignocellulosic biomass and it can be monoand di-acetylated at O-2 and O-3 as well as mono-acetylated at O-3 of xylosyl residues that is substituted with glucuronic acid (GlcA) at O-2. Based on the finding that ESK1, an Arabidopsis thaliana DUF231 protein, specifically mediates xylan 2-O- and 3-O-monoacetylation, we previously proposed that different acetyltransferase activities are required for regiospecific acetyl substitutions of xylan. Here, we demonstrate the functional roles of TBL32 and TBL33, two ESK1 close homologs, in acetyl substitutions of xylan. Simultaneous mutations of TBL32 and TBL33 resulted in a significant reductionmore » in xylan acetyl content and endoxylanase digestion of the mutant xylan released GlcA-substituted xylooligomers without acetyl groups. Structural analysis of xylan revealed that the tbl32 tbl33 mutant had a nearly complete loss of 3-O-acetylated, 2-O-GlcA-substituted xylosyl residues. A reduction in 3-Omonoacetylated and 2,3-di-O-acetylated xylosyl residues was also observed. Simultaneous mutations of TBL32, TBL33 and ESK1 resulted in a severe reduction in xylan acetyl level down to 15% of that of the wild type, and concomitantly, severely collapsed vessels and stunted plant growth. In particular, the S2 layer of secondary walls in xylem vessels of tbl33 esk1 and tbl32 tbl33 esk1 exhibited an altered structure, indicating abnormal assembly of secondary wall polymers. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that TBL32 and TBL33 play an important role in xylan acetylation and normal deposition of secondary walls.« less

  19. Experimental and molecular dynamics studies showed that CBP KIX mutation affects the stability of CBP:c-Myb complex.

    PubMed

    Odoux, Anne; Jindal, Darren; Tamas, Tamara C; Lim, Benjamin W H; Pollard, Drake; Xu, Wu

    2016-06-01

    The coactivators CBP (CREBBP) and its paralog p300 (EP300), two conserved multi-domain proteins in eukaryotic organisms, regulate gene expression in part by binding DNA-binding transcription factors. It was previously reported that the CBP/p300 KIX domain mutant (Y650A, A654Q, and Y658A) altered both c-Myb-dependent gene activation and repression, and that mice with these three point mutations had reduced numbers of platelets, B cells, T cells, and red blood cells. Here, our transient transfection assays demonstrated that mouse embryonic fibroblast cells containing the same mutations in the KIX domain and without a wild-type allele of either CBP or p300, showed decreased c-Myb-mediated transcription. Dr. Wright's group solved a 3-D structure of the mouse CBP:c-Myb complex using NMR. To take advantage of the experimental structure and function data and improved theoretical calculation methods, we performed MD simulations of CBP KIX, CBP KIX with the mutations, and c-Myb, as well as binding energy analysis for both the wild-type and mutant complexes. The binding between CBP and c-Myb is mainly mediated by a shallow hydrophobic groove in the center where the side-chain of Leu302 of c-Myb plays an essential role and two salt bridges at the two ends. We found that the KIX mutations slightly decreased stability of the CBP:c-Myb complex as demonstrated by higher binding energy calculated using either MM/PBSA or MM/GBSA methods. More specifically, the KIX mutations affected the two salt bridges between CBP and c-Myb (CBP-R646 and c-Myb-E306; CBP-E665 and c-Myb-R294). Our studies also revealed differing dynamics of the hydrogen bonds between CBP-R646 and c-Myb-E306 and between CBP-E665 and c-Myb-R294 caused by the CBP KIX mutations. In the wild-type CBP:c-Myb complex, both of the hydrogen bonds stayed relatively stable. In contrast, in the mutant CBP:c-Myb complex, hydrogen bonds between R646 and E306 showed an increasing trend followed by a decreasing trend, and hydrogen

  20. TFIIB/SUA7(E202G) is an allele-specific suppressor of TBP1(E186D)

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Boon Shang; Lehming, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    The TBP (TATA-box-binding protein), Tbp1p, plays a vital role in all three classes of transcription by RNA polymerases I–III. A TBP1(E186D) mutation had been described that affected interaction of Tbp1p with TFIIB (transcription factor IIB) and that caused slow-growth, temperature-sensitivity, 3-aminotriazole-sensitivity as well as a gal− phenotype. We used the TBP1(E186D) mutant for suppressor screens, and we isolated TFIIB/SUA7(E202G) as an allele-specific suppressor of all phenotypes caused by the TBP1(E186D) mutation. Our results show that the SUA7(E202G) mutation restored binding of TFIIB to Tbp1(E186D)p. In addition, we observed that Tbp1(E186D)p was expressed at a lower level than wild-type Tbp1p, and that SUA7(E202G) restored the protein level of Tbp1(E186D)p. This suggested that the TBP1(E186D) mutation might have generated its phenotypes by making Tbp1p the limiting factor for activated transcription. DNA microarray analysis indicated that the TBP1(E186D) temperature-sensitivity and slow-growth phenotypes might have been caused by insufficient amounts of Tbp1p for efficient transcription of the rRNA genes by RNA polymerase I. PMID:17680779

  1. Translocation domain mutations affecting cellular toxicity identify the Clostridium difficile toxin B pore.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhifen; Park, Minyoung; Tam, John; Auger, Anick; Beilhartz, Greg L; Lacy, D Borden; Melnyk, Roman A

    2014-03-11

    Disease associated with Clostridium difficile infection is caused by the actions of the homologous toxins TcdA and TcdB on colonic epithelial cells. Binding to target cells triggers toxin internalization into acidified vesicles, whereupon cryptic segments from within the 1,050-aa translocation domain unfurl and insert into the bounding membrane, creating a transmembrane passageway to the cytosol. Our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying pore formation and the subsequent translocation of the upstream cytotoxic domain to the cytosol is limited by the lack of information available regarding the identity and architecture of the transmembrane pore. Here, through systematic perturbation of conserved sites within predicted membrane-insertion elements of the translocation domain, we uncovered highly sensitive residues--clustered between amino acids 1,035 and 1,107--that when individually mutated, reduced cellular toxicity by as much as >1,000-fold. We demonstrate that defective variants are defined by impaired pore formation in planar lipid bilayers and biological membranes, resulting in an inability to intoxicate cells through either apoptotic or necrotic pathways. These findings along with the unexpected similarities uncovered between the pore-forming "hotspots" of TcdB and the well-characterized α-helical diphtheria toxin translocation domain provide insights into the structure and mechanism of formation of the translocation pore for this important class of pathogenic toxins.

  2. Mutations Affecting Donor Preference during Mating Type Interconversion in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, K. S.; Szeto, L.; Broach, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    Homothallic strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae can convert mating type from a to α or α to a as often as every generation, by replacing genetic information specifying one mating type at the expressor locus, MAT, with information specifying the opposite mating type. The cryptic mating type information that is copied and inserted at MAT is contained in either of two loci, HML or HMR. The particular locus selected as donor during mating type interconversion is regulated by the allele expressed at MAT. MATa cells usually select HML, and MATα cells usually select HMR, a process referred to as donor preference. To identify factors required for donor preference, we isolated and characterized a number of mutants that frequently selected the nonpreferred donor locus during mating type interconversion. Many of these mutants were found to harbor chromosome rearrangements or mutations at MAT or HML that interfered with the switching process. However, one mutant carried a recessive allele of CHL1, a gene previously shown to be required for efficient chromosome segregation during mitosis. Homothallic strains of yeast containing a null allele of CHL1 exhibited almost random selection of the donor locus in a MATa background but were normal in their ability to select HMR in a MATα background. Our results indicate that Chl1p participates in the process of donor selection and are consistent with a model in which Chl1p helps establish an intrinsic bias in donor preference. PMID:7789755

  3. Characterization and genetic mapping of a mutation affecting apurinic endonuclease activity in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Tam, J E; Pattee, P A

    1986-01-01

    Protoplast fusion between the Rec- mutant RN981 (L. Wyman, R. V. Goering, and R. P. Novick, Genetics 76:681-702, 1974) of Staphylococcus aureus NCTC 8325 and a Rec+ NCTC 8325 derivative yielded Rec+ recombinants that exhibited the increased sensitivity to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine characteristic of RN981. Transformation analyses identified a specific mutation, designated ngr-374, that was responsible not only for N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine sensitivity, but also sensitivity to methyl methanesulfonate, ethyl methanesulfonate, nitrous acid, and UV irradiation. However, ngr-374-carrying recombinants showed no significant increase in their sensitivity to mitomycin C or 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide and were unaffected in recombination proficiency. In vitro assays showed that ngr-374-carrying strains had lower apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease activities than the wild type. The chromosomal locus occupied by ngr-374 was shown to exist in the gene order omega(Chr::Tn551)40-ngr-374-thrB106. PMID:2430940

  4. Lethal Factor Active-Site Mutations Affect Catalytic Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S. E.; Hanna, P. C.

    1998-01-01

    The lethal factor (LF) protein of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin contains the thermolysin-like active-site and zinc-binding consensus motif HEXXH (K. R. Klimpel, N. Arora, and S. H. Leppla, Mol. Microbiol. 13:1093–1100, 1994). LF is hypothesized to act as a Zn2+ metalloprotease in the cytoplasm of macrophages, but no proteolytic activities have been previously shown on any target substrate. Here, synthetic peptides are hydrolyzed by LF in vitro. Mass spectroscopy and peptide sequencing of isolated cleavage products separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography indicate that LF seems to prefer proline-containing substrates. Substitution mutations within the consensus active-site residues completely abolish all in vitro catalytic functions, as does addition of 1,10-phenanthroline, EDTA, and certain amino acid hydroxamates, including the novel zinc metalloprotease inhibitor ZINCOV. In contrast, the protease inhibitors bestatin and lysine CMK, previously shown to block LF activity on macrophages, did not block LF activity in vitro. These data provide the first direct evidence that LF may act as an endopeptidase. PMID:9573135

  5. Point mutation of H3/H4 histones affects acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangyong; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Zhaojie

    2014-10-10

    The molecular mechanism of acetic acid tolerance in yeast remains unclear despite of its importance for efficient cellulosic ethanol production. In this study, we examined the effects of histone H3/H4 point mutations on yeast acetic acid tolerance by comprehensively screening a histone H3/H4 mutant library. A total of 24 histone H3/H4 mutants (six acetic acid resistant and 18 sensitive) were identified. Compared to the wild-type strain, the histone acetic acid-resistant mutants exhibited improved ethanol fermentation performance under acetic acid stress. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis revealed that changes in the gene expression in the acetic acid-resistant mutants H3 K37A and H4 K16Q were mainly related to energy production, antioxidative stress. Our results provide novel insights into yeast acetic acid tolerance on the basis of histone, and suggest a novel approach to improve ethanol production by altering the histone H3/H4 sequences.

  6. Interactions between chromosomal omnipotent suppressors and extrachromosomal effectors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ono, B; Chernoff, Y O; Ishino-Arao, Y; Yamagishi, N; Shinoda, S; Inge-Vechtomov, S G

    1991-04-01

    Chromosomal omnipotent suppressor mutations recovered in psi+ strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were brought into psi- cytoplasm. SUP46, SUP138 and SUP139 acted as dominant omnipotent suppressors in the psi- cytoplasm though their suppressor activity was substantially reduced. SUP46 and SUP138 conferred recessive thermosensitivity and antibiotic sensitivity in psi- cytoplasm as in psi+ cytoplasm. On the other hand, sup111 through sup115, which acted as recessive omnipotent suppressors in the psi+ cytoplasm, manifested no, or very low, suppressor activity in the psi- cytoplasm. They, however, still enhanced the efficiency of the SUP29 tRNA suppressor in psi- cytoplasm. A multicopy plasmid carrying the wild-type SUP35 gene enhanced the efficiency of sup111 in psi- cytoplasm.

  7. Mutations that affect phosphorylation of the adenovirus DNA-binding protein alter its ability to enhance its own synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Morin, N; Delsert, C; Klessig, D F

    1989-01-01

    The multifunctional adenovirus single-strand DNA-binding protein (DBP) is highly phosphorylated. Its phosphorylation sites are located in the amino-terminal domain of the protein, and its DNA- and RNA-binding activity resides in the carboxy-terminal half of the polypeptide. We have substituted cysteine or alanine for up to 10 of these potential phosphorylation sites by using oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. Alteration of one or a few of these sites had little effect on the viability of virus containing the mutated DBP. However, when eight or more sites were altered, viral growth decreased significantly. This suggests that the overall phosphorylation state of the protein was more important than whether any particular site was modified. The reduction in growth correlated with both depressed DNA replication and expression of late genes. This reduction was probably the result of lower DBP accumulation in mutant-infected cells. Interestingly, although the stability of the mutated DBP was not affected, DBP synthesis and the level of its mRNA were depressed 5- to 10-fold for the underphosphorylated protein. These results suggest that DBP enhances its own expression and imply that phosphorylation of the DBP may be important for this function. Similarities to several eucaryotic transcriptional activators, which are composed of negatively charged activating domains and separate binding domains, are discussed. Images PMID:2585602

  8. Mutation increasing β-carotene concentrations does not adversely affect concentrations of essential mineral elements in pepper fruit

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Jacqueline A.; Penchev, Emil A.; Nielen, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin and mineral deficiencies are prevalent in human populations throughout the world. Vitamin A deficiency affects hundreds of millions of pre-school age children in low income countries. Fruits of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) can be a major dietary source of precursors to Vitamin A biosynthesis, such as β-carotene. Recently, pepper breeding programs have introduced the orange-fruited (of) trait of the mutant variety Oranzheva kapiya, which is associated with high fruit β-carotene concentrations, to the mutant variety Albena. In this manuscript, concentrations of β-carotene and mineral elements (magnesium, phosphorus, sulphur, potassium, zinc, calcium, manganese, iron and copper) were compared in fruit from P31, a red-fruited genotype derived from the variety Albena, and M38, a genotype developed by transferring the orange-fruited mutation (of) into Albena. It was observed that fruit from M38 plants had greater β-carotene concentration at both commercial and botanical maturity (4.9 and 52.7 mg / kg fresh weight, respectively) than fruit from P31 plants (2.3 and 30.1 mg / kg fresh weight, respectively). The mutation producing high β-carotene concentrations in pepper fruits had no detrimental effect on the concentrations of mineral elements required for human nutrition. PMID:28207797

  9. Mutation increasing β-carotene concentrations does not adversely affect concentrations of essential mineral elements in pepper fruit.

    PubMed

    Tomlekova, Nasya B; White, Philip J; Thompson, Jacqueline A; Penchev, Emil A; Nielen, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin and mineral deficiencies are prevalent in human populations throughout the world. Vitamin A deficiency affects hundreds of millions of pre-school age children in low income countries. Fruits of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) can be a major dietary source of precursors to Vitamin A biosynthesis, such as β-carotene. Recently, pepper breeding programs have introduced the orange-fruited (of) trait of the mutant variety Oranzheva kapiya, which is associated with high fruit β-carotene concentrations, to the mutant variety Albena. In this manuscript, concentrations of β-carotene and mineral elements (magnesium, phosphorus, sulphur, potassium, zinc, calcium, manganese, iron and copper) were compared in fruit from P31, a red-fruited genotype derived from the variety Albena, and M38, a genotype developed by transferring the orange-fruited mutation (of) into Albena. It was observed that fruit from M38 plants had greater β-carotene concentration at both commercial and botanical maturity (4.9 and 52.7 mg / kg fresh weight, respectively) than fruit from P31 plants (2.3 and 30.1 mg / kg fresh weight, respectively). The mutation producing high β-carotene concentrations in pepper fruits had no detrimental effect on the concentrations of mineral elements required for human nutrition.

  10. Interleukin-6 Deficiency Does Not Affect Motor Neuron Disease Caused by Superoxide Dismutase 1 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yongmei; Ripley, Barry; Serada, Satoshi; Naka, Tetsuji; Fujimoto, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aim Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is an adult-onset, progressive, motor neuron degenerative disease. Recent evidence indicates that inflammation is associated with many neurodegenerative diseases including ALS. Previously, abnormal levels of inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were described in ALS patients and/or in mouse ALS models. In addition, one study showed that blocking IL-1β could slow down progression of ALS-like symptoms in mice. In this study, we examined a role for IL-6 in ALS, using an animal model for familial ALS. Methods Mice with mutant SOD1 (G93A) transgene, a model for familial ALS, were used in this study. The expression of the major inflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α, in spinal cords of these SOD1 transgenic (TG) mice were assessed by real time PCR. Mice were then crossed with IL-6(-/-) mice to generate SOD1TG/IL-6(-/-) mice. SOD1 TG/IL-6(-/-) mice (n = 17) were compared with SOD1 TG/IL-6(+/-) mice (n = 18), SOD1 TG/IL-6(+/+) mice (n = 11), WT mice (n = 15), IL-6(+/-) mice (n = 5) and IL-6(-/-) mice (n = 8), with respect to neurological disease severity score, body weight and the survival. We also histologically compared the motor neuron loss in lumber spinal cords and the atrophy of hamstring muscles between these mouse groups. Results Levels of IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α in spinal cords of SOD1 TG mice was increased compared to WT mice. However, SOD1 TG/IL-6(-/-) mice exhibited weight loss, deterioration in motor function and shortened lifespan (167.55 ± 11.52 days), similarly to SOD1 TG /IL-6(+/+) mice (164.31±12.16 days). Motor neuron numbers and IL-1β and TNF-α levels in spinal cords were not significantly different in SOD1 TG /IL-6(-/-) mice and SOD1 TG /IL-6 (+/+) mice. Conclusion These results provide compelling preclinical evidence indicating that IL-6 does not directly contribute to motor neuron disease caused by SOD1 mutations. PMID:27070121

  11. Mutations that affect structure and assembly of light-harvesting proteins in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain 6701

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.K.; Rayner, M.C.; Eiserling, F.A.

    1987-01-01

    The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain 6701 was mutagenized with UV irradiation and screened for pigment changes that indicated genetic lesions involving the light-harvesting proteins of the phycobilisome. A previous examination of the pigment mutant UV16 showed an assembly defect in the phycocyanin component of the phycobilisome. Mutagenesis of UV16 produced an additional double mutant, UV16-40, with decreased phycoerythrin content. Phycocyanin and phycoerythrin were isolated from UV16-40 and compared with normal biliproteins. The results suggested that the UV16 mutation affected the alpha subunit of phycocyanin, while the phycoerythrin beta subunit from UV16-40 had lost one of its three chromophores. Characterization of the unassembled phycobilisome components in these mutants suggests that these strains will be useful for probing in vivo the regulated expression and assembly of phycobilisomes.

  12. Systematic screening for mutations in the human serotonin 1F receptor gene in patients with bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Shimron-Abarbanell, D.; Harms, H.; Erdmann, J.; Propping, P.; Noethen, M.M.

    1996-04-09

    Using single strand conformational analysis we screened the complete coding sequence of the serotonin 1F (5-HT{sub 1F}) receptor gene for the presence of DNA sequence variation in a sample of 137 unrelated individuals including 45 schizophrenic patients, 46 bipolar patients, as well as 46 healthy controls. We detected only three rare sequence variants which are characterized by single base pair substitutions, namely a silent T{r_arrow}A transversion in the third position of codon 261 (encoding isoleucine), a silent C{r_arrow}T transition in the third position of codon 176 (encoding histidine), and a C{r_arrow}T transition in position -78 upstream from the start codon. The lack of significant mutations in patients suffering from schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder indicates that the 5-HT{sub 1F} receptor is not commonly involved in the etiology of these diseases. 12 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  13. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status and cancer family history of Danish women affected with multifocal or bilateral breast cancer at a young age

    PubMed Central

    Bergthorsson, J; Ejlertsen, B; Olsen, J; Borg, A; Nielsen, K; Barkardottir, R; Klausen, S; Mouridsen, H; Winther, K; Fenger, K; Niebuhr, A; Harboe, T; Niebuhr, E

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION—A small fraction of breast cancer is the result of germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 cancer susceptibility genes. Mutation carriers frequently have a positive family history of breast and ovarian cancer, are often diagnosed at a young age, and may have a higher incidence of double or multiple primary breast tumours than breast cancer patients in general.
OBJECTIVES—To estimate the prevalence and spectrum of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in young Danish patients affected with bilateral or multifocal breast cancer and to determine the relationship of mutation status to family history of cancer.
SUBJECTS—From the files of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG), we selected 119 breast cancer patients diagnosed before the age of 46 years with either bilateral (n=59) or multifocal (n=61) disease.
METHODS—DNA from the subjects was screened for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations using single strand conformation analysis (SSCA) and the protein truncation test (PTT). Observed and expected cancer incidence in first degree relatives of the patients was estimated using data from the Danish Cancer Registry.
RESULTS—Twenty four mutation carriers were identified (20%), of whom 13 had a BRCA1 mutation and 11 carried a BRCA2 mutation. Two mutations in BRCA1 were found repeatedly in the material and accounted for seven of the 24 (29%) mutation carriers. The mutation frequency was about equal in patients with bilateral (22%) and multifocal breast cancer (18%). The incidence of breast and ovarian cancer was greatly increased in first degree relatives of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, but to a much lesser degree in relatives of non-carriers. An increased risk of cancer was also noted in brothers of non-carriers.
CONCLUSIONS—A relatively broad spectrum of germline mutations was observed in BRCA1 and BRCA2 and most of the mutations are present in other populations. Our results indicate that a diagnosis of bilateral and multifocal breast

  14. A genome wide dosage suppressor network reveals genomic robustness

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Biranchi; Kon, Yoshiko; Yadav, Gitanjali; Sevold, Anthony W.; Frumkin, Jesse P.; Vallabhajosyula, Ravishankar R.; Hintze, Arend; Østman, Bjørn; Schossau, Jory; Bhan, Ashish; Marzolf, Bruz; Tamashiro, Jenna K.; Kaur, Amardeep; Baliga, Nitin S.; Grayhack, Elizabeth J.; Adami, Christoph; Galas, David J.; Raval, Alpan; Phizicky, Eric M.; Ray, Animesh

    2017-01-01

    Genomic robustness is the extent to which an organism has evolved to withstand the effects of deleterious mutations. We explored the extent of genomic robustness in budding yeast by genome wide dosage suppressor analysis of 53 conditional lethal mutations in cell division cycle and RNA synthesis related genes, revealing 660 suppressor interactions of which 642 are novel. This collection has several distinctive features, including high co-occurrence of mutant-suppressor pairs within protein modules, highly correlated functions between the pairs and higher diversity of functions among the co-suppressors than previously observed. Dosage suppression of essential genes encoding RNA polymerase subunits and chromosome cohesion complex suggests a surprising degree of functional plasticity of macromolecular complexes, and the existence of numerous degenerate pathways for circumventing the effects of potentially lethal mutations. These results imply that organisms and cancer are likely able to exploit the genomic robustness properties, due the persistence of cryptic gene and pathway functions, to generate variation and adapt to selective pressures. PMID:27899637

  15. An affective disorder in zebrafish with mutation of the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Ziv, L; Muto, A; Schoonheim, P J; Meijsing, S H; Strasser, D; Ingraham, H A; Schaaf, M J M; Yamamoto, K R; Baier, H

    2013-06-01

    Upon binding of cortisol, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) regulates the transcription of specific target genes, including those that encode the stress hormones corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and adrenocorticotropic hormone. Dysregulation of the stress axis is a hallmark of major depression in human patients. However, it is still unclear how glucocorticoid signaling is linked to affective disorders. We identified an adult-viable zebrafish mutant in which the negative feedback on the stress response is disrupted, due to abolition of all transcriptional activity of GR. As a consequence, cortisol is elevated, but unable to signal through GR. When placed into an unfamiliar aquarium ('novel tank'), mutant fish become immobile ('freeze'), show reduced exploratory behavior and do not habituate to this stressor upon repeated exposure. Addition of the antidepressant fluoxetine to the holding water and social interactions restore normal behavior, followed by a delayed correction of cortisol levels. Fluoxetine does not affect the overall transcription of CRH, the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), the serotonin transporter (Serta) or GR itself. Fluoxetine, however, suppresses the stress-induced upregulation of MR and Serta in both wild-type fish and mutants. Our studies show a conserved, protective function of glucocorticoid signaling in the regulation of emotional behavior and reveal novel molecular aspects of how chronic stress impacts vertebrate brain physiology and behavior. Importantly, the zebrafish model opens up the possibility of high-throughput drug screens in search of new classes of antidepressants.

  16. Inflammatory cytokines induce phosphorylation and ubiquitination of prostate suppressor protein NKX3.1.

    PubMed

    Markowski, Mark C; Bowen, Cai; Gelmann, Edward P

    2008-09-01

    Inflammation of the prostate is a risk factor for the development of prostate cancer. In the aging prostate, regions of inflammatory atrophy are foci for prostate epithelial cell transformation. Expression of the suppressor protein NKX3.1 is reduced in regions of inflammatory atrophy and in preinvasive prostate cancer. Inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin-1beta accelerate NKX3.1 protein loss by inducing rapid ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. The effect of TNF-alpha is mediated via the COOH-terminal domain of NKX3.1 where phosphorylation of serine 196 is critical for cytokine-induced degradation. Mutation of serine 196 to alanine abrogates phosphorylation at that site and the effect of TNF-alpha on NKX3.1 ubiquitination and protein loss. This is in contrast to control of steady-state NKX3.1 turnover, which is mediated by serine 185. Mutation of serine 185 to alanine increases NKX3.1 protein stability by inhibiting ubiquitination and doubling the protein half-life. A third COOH-terminal serine at position 195 has a modulating effect on both steady-state protein turnover and on ubiquitination induced by TNF-alpha. Thus, cellular levels of the NKX3.1 tumor suppressor are affected by inflammatory cytokines that target COOH-terminal serine residues to activate ubiquitination and protein degradation. Our data suggest that strategies to inhibit inflammation or to inhibit effector kinases may be useful approaches to prostate cancer prevention.

  17. Epigenetics provides a new generation of oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes

    PubMed Central

    Esteller, M

    2006-01-01

    Cancer is nowadays recognised as a genetic and epigenetic disease. Much effort has been devoted in the last 30 years to the elucidation of the ‘classical' oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes involved in malignant cell transformation. However, since the acceptance that major disruption of DNA methylation, histone modification and chromatin compartments are a common hallmark of human cancer, epigenetics has come to the fore in cancer research. One piece is still missing from the story: are the epigenetic genes themselves driving forces on the road to tumorigenesis? We are in the early stages of finding the answer, and the data are beginning to appear: knockout mice defective in DNA methyltransferases, methyl-CpG-binding proteins and histone methyltransferases strongly affect the risk of cancer onset; somatic mutations, homozygous deletions and methylation-associated silencing of histone acetyltransferases, histone methyltransferases and chromatin remodelling factors are being found in human tumours; and the first cancer-prone families arising from germline mutations in epigenetic genes, such as hSNF5/INI1, have been described. Even more importantly, all these ‘new' oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes provide novel molecular targets for designed therapies, and the first DNA-demethylating agents and inhibitors of histone deacetylases are reaching the bedside of patients with haematological malignancies. PMID:16404435

  18. Identification of MEDIATOR16 as the Arabidopsis COBRA suppressor MONGOOSE1.

    PubMed

    Sorek, Nadav; Szemenyei, Heidi; Sorek, Hagit; Landers, Abigail; Knight, Heather; Bauer, Stefan; Wemmer, David E; Somerville, Chris R

    2015-12-29

    We performed a screen for genetic suppressors of cobra, an Arabidopsis mutant with defects in cellulose formation and an increased ratio of unesterified/esterified pectin. We identified a suppressor named mongoose1 (mon1) that suppressed the growth defects of cobra, partially restored cellulose levels, and restored the esterification ratio of pectin to wild-type levels. mon1 was mapped to the MEDIATOR16 (MED16) locus, a tail mediator subunit, also known as SENSITIVE TO FREEZING6 (SFR6). When separated from the cobra mutation, mutations in MED16 caused resistance to cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors, consistent with their ability to suppress the cobra cellulose deficiency. Transcriptome analysis revealed that a number of cell wall genes are misregulated in med16 mutants. Two of these genes encode pectin methylesterase inhibitors, which, when ectopically expressed, partially suppressed the cobra phenotype. This suggests that cellulose biosynthesis can be affected by the esterification levels of pectin, possibly through modifying cell wall integrity or the interaction of pectin and cellulose.

  19. Interacting genes that affect microtubule function in Drosophila melanogaster: Two classes of mutation revert the failure to complement between hay sup nc2 and mutations in tubulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, C.L.; Fuller, M.T. )

    1990-05-01

    The recessive male sterile mutation hay{sup nc2} of Drosophila melanogaster fails to complement certain {beta}{sub 2}-tubulin and {alpha}-tubulin mutations, suggesting that the haywire product plays a role in microtubule function, perhaps as a structural component of microtubules. The genetic interaction appears to require the presence of the aberrant product encoded by hay{sup nc2}, which may act as a structural poison. Based on this observation, the authors have isolated ten new mutations with EMS that revert the failure to complement between hay{sup nc2} and B2t{sup n}. The revertants tested behaved as intragenic mutations of hay in recombination tests, and feel into two phenotypic classes, suggesting two functional domains of the hay gene product. Some revertants were hemizygous viable and less severe than hay{sup nc2} in their recessive phenotype. These mutations might revert the poison by restoring the aberrant product encoded by the hay{sup nc2} allele to more wild-type function. Most of the revertants were recessive lethal mutations, indicating that the hay gene product is essential for viability. These more extreme mutations could revert the poison by destroying the ability of the aberrant haywire{sup nc2} product to interact structurally with microtubules. Flies heterozygous for the original hay{sup nc2} allele and an extreme revertant show defects in both the structure and the function of the male meiotic spindle.

  20. Interacting Genes That Affect Microtubule Function in Drosophila Melanogaster: Two Classes of Mutation Revert the Failure to Complement between Hay(nc2) and Mutations in Tubulin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Regan, C. L.; Fuller, M. T.

    1990-01-01

    The recessive male sterile mutation hay(nc2) of Drosophila melanogaster fails to complement certain β(2)-tubulin and α-tubulin mutations, suggesting that the haywire product plays a role in microtubule function, perhaps as a structural component of microtubules. The genetic interaction appears to require the presence of the aberrant product encoded by hay(nc2), which may act as a structural poison. Based on this observation, we have isolated ten new mutations that revert the failure to complement between hay(nc2) and B2t(n). The revertants tested behaved as intragenic mutations of hay in recombination tests, and fell into two phenotypic classes, suggesting two functional domains of the hay gene product. Some revertants were hemizygous viable and less severe than hay(nc2) in their recessive phenotype. These mutations might revert the poison by restoring the aberrant product encoded by the hay(nc2) allele to more wild-type function. Most of the revertants were recessive lethal mutations, indicating that the hay gene product is essential for viability. These more extreme mutations could revert the poison by destroying the ability of the aberrant haywire(nc2) product to interact structurally with microtubules. Flies heterozygous for the original hay(nc2) allele and an extreme revertant show defects in both the structure and the function of the male meiotic spindle. PMID:2111265

  1. Molecular analysis of HEXA gene in Argentinean patients affected with Tay-Sachs disease: possible common origin of the prevalent c.459+5A>G mutation.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Stefania; Montalvo, Annalisa; Blanco, Mariana; Zanin, Irene; Amartino, Hernan; Vlahovicek, Kristian; Szlago, Marina; Schenone, Andrea; Pittis, Gabriela; Bembi, Bruno; Dardis, Andrea

    2012-05-15

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a recessively inherited disorder caused by the deficient activity of hexosaminidase A due to mutations in the HEXA gene. Up to date there is no information regarding the molecular genetics of TSD in Argentinean patients. In the present study we have studied 17 Argentinean families affected by TSD, including 20 patients with the acute infantile form and 3 with the sub-acute form. Overall, we identified 14 different mutations accounting for 100% of the studied alleles. Eight mutations were novel: 5 were single base changes leading to drastic residue changes or truncated proteins, 2 were small deletions and one was an intronic mutation that may cause a splicing defect. Although the spectrum of mutations was highly heterogeneous, a high frequency of the c.459+5G>A mutation, previously described in different populations was found among the studied cohort. Haplotype analysis suggested that in these families the c.459+5G>A mutation might have arisen by a single mutational event.

  2. Characterization of a disease-associated mutation affecting a putative splicing regulatory element in intron 6b of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene.

    PubMed

    Faà, Valeria; Incani, Federica; Meloni, Alessandra; Corda, Denise; Masala, Maddalena; Baffico, A Maria; Seia, Manuela; Cao, Antonio; Rosatelli, M Cristina

    2009-10-30

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common recessive disorder caused by >1600 mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. About 13% of CFTR mutations are classified as "splicing mutations," but for almost 40% of these, their role in affecting the pre-mRNA splicing of the gene is not yet defined. In this work, we describe a new splicing mutation detected in three unrelated Italian CF patients. By DNA analyses and mRNA studies, we identified the c.1002-1110_1113delTAAG mutation localized in intron 6b of the CFTR gene. At the mRNA level, this mutation creates an aberrant inclusion of a sequence of 101 nucleotides between exons 6b and 7. This sequence corresponds to a portion of intron 6b and resembles a cryptic exon because it is characterized by an upstream ag and a downstream gt sequence, which are most probably recognized as 5'- and 3'-splice sites by the spliceosome. Through functional analysis of this splicing defect, we show that this mutation abolishes the interaction of the splicing regulatory protein heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 with an intronic splicing regulatory element and creates a new recognition motif for the SRp75 splicing factor, causing activation of the cryptic exon. Our results show that the c.1002-1110_1113delTAAG mutation creates a new intronic splicing regulatory element in intron 6b of the CFTR gene exclusively recognized by SRp75.

  3. NF1 mutation rather than individual genetic variability is the main determinant of the NF1-transcriptional profile of mutations affecting splicing.

    PubMed

    Pros, Eva; Larriba, Sara; López, Eva; Ravella, Anna; Gili, M Lluïsa; Kruyer, Helena; Valls, Joan; Serra, Eduard; Lázaro, Conxi

    2006-11-01

    A significant number of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) mutations result in exon skipping. The majority of these mutations do not occur in the canonical splice sites and can produce different aberrant transcripts whose proportions have not been well studied. It has been hypothesized that differences in the mutation-determined NF1-transcriptional profile could partially explain disease variability among patients bearing the same NF1 splice defect. In order to gain insight into these aspects, we analyzed the proportion of the different transcripts generated by nine NF1-splicing mutations in 30 patients. We assessed the influence of the mutation in the NF1-related transcriptional profiles and investigated the existence of individual differences in a global manner. We analyzed potential differences in tissue-specific transcriptional profiles and evaluated the influence of sample processing and mRNA nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). Small transcriptional differences were found in neurofibromas and neurofibroma-derived Schwann cells (SC) compared to blood. We also detected a higher cell culture-dependent NMD. We observed that mutation per se explains 93.5% of the profile variability among mutations studied. However, despite the importance of mutation in determining the proportion of NF1 transcripts generated, we found certain variability among patients with the same mutation. From our results, it seems that genetic factors influencing RNA processing play a minor role in determining the NF1-transcriptional profile. Nevertheless neurofibromin studies would clarify whether these small differences translate into significant functional changes that could explain the great clinical expressivity observed in the disease or any of the disease-related traits.

  4. X chromosome exome sequencing reveals a novel ALG13 mutation in a nonsyndromic intellectual disability family with multiple affected male siblings.

    PubMed

    Bissar-Tadmouri, Nesrine; Donahue, Whithey L; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Nelson, Stanley F; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Kantarci, Sibel

    2014-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is a heterogeneous condition associated with mutations in >100 genes, accounting for over 10% of all cases of intellectual impairment. The majority of XLID cases show nonsyndromic forms (NSXLID), in which intellectual disability is the sole clinically consistent manifestation. Here we performed X chromosome exome (X-exome) sequencing to identify the causative mutation in an NSXLID family with four affected male siblings and five unaffected female siblings. The X-exome sequencing at 88× coverage in one affected male sibling revealed a novel missense mutation (p.Tyr1074Cys) in the asparagine-linked glycosylation 13 homolog (ALG13) gene. Segregation analysis by Sanger sequencing showed that the all affected siblings were hemizygous and the mother was heterozygous for the mutation. Recently, a de novo missense mutation in ALG13 has been reported in a patient with X-linked congenital disorders of glycosylation type I. Our study reports the first case of NSXLID caused by a mutation in ALG13 involved in protein N-glycosylation.

  5. Mutations of the p53 and PTCH gene in basal cell carcinomas: UV mutation signature and strand bias.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Yeon; Park, Hyun Jeong; Baek, Seung-Cheol; Byun, Dae Gyoo; Houh, Dong

    2002-05-01

    Mutations of p53 and PTCH gene, two candidate tumor suppressor genes for basal cell carcinoma (BCC), were screened in 15 cases of sporadic BCCs that developed in sun-exposed skin region in a Korean population. p53 and PTCH mutations were detected at a frequency of 33 and 40%, respectively, and the mutations were predominantly UV-signature transition, C-->T transitions at dipyrimidine sites and CC-->TT tandem mutations. In both genes, the most common mutations were missense mutations resulting in amino acid substitution, which is different than the results from Caucasian BCCs where mutations are frequently predicted to make truncated or absent proteins. All mutations, except for one, occurred on the nontranscribed strand where is little efficient removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers relative to the transcribed strand. Loss of heterozygocity (LOH) of 9q22 for PTCH loci was found in eight of 15 informative cases of BCCs (53%), but none of the cases were informative for LOH of 17p13 for p53 loci. Not only do our data indicate the key role played by p53 and PTCH in the development of BCCs, these findings also suggest that UVB may significantly contribute to BCC tumorigenesis. Moreover, molecular epidemiology composed of incidence of p53 and PTCH mutations, difference in the type of mutation and repair bias of UV-induced DNA lesions might affect the distinct features of BCCs between different racial population.

  6. Functional analysis reveals that RBM10 mutations contribute to lung adenocarcinoma pathogenesis by deregulating splicing

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiawei; Sun, Yue; Huang, Yin; Song, Fan; Huang, Zengshu; Bao, Yufang; Zuo, Ji; Saffen, David; Shao, Zhen; Liu, Wen; Wang, Yongbo

    2017-01-01

    RBM10 is an RNA splicing regulator that is frequently mutated in lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD) and has recently been proposed to be a cancer gene. How RBM10 mutations observed in LUAD affect its normal functions, however, remains largely unknown. Here integrative analysis of RBM10 mutation and RNA expression data revealed that LUAD-associated RBM10 mutations exhibit a mutational spectrum similar to that of tumor suppressor genes. In addition, this analysis showed that RBM10 mutations identified in LUAD patients lacking canonical oncogenes are associated with significantly reduced RBM10 expression. To systematically investigate RBM10 mutations, we developed an experimental pipeline for elucidating their functional effects. Among six representative LUAD-associated RBM10 mutations, one nonsense and one frameshift mutation caused loss-of-function as expected, whereas four missense mutations differentially affected RBM10-mediated splicing. Importantly, changes in proliferation rates of LUAD-derived cells caused by these RBM10 missense mutants correlated with alterations in RNA splicing of RBM10 target genes. Together, our data implies that RBM10 mutations contribute to LUAD pathogenesis, at least in large part, by deregulating splicing. The methods described in this study should be useful for analyzing mutations in additional cancer-associated RNA splicing regulators. PMID:28091594

  7. Mutation of AREA affects growth, sporulation, nitrogen regulation, and pathogenicity in Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    PubMed

    Bi, Fangcheng; Ment, Dana; Luria, Neta; Meng, Xiangchun; Prusky, Dov

    2017-02-01

    The GATA transcription factor AreA is a global nitrogen regulator that restricts the utilization of complex and poor nitrogen sources in the presence of good nitrogen sources in microorganisms. In this study, we report the biological function of an AreA homolog (the CgareA gene) in the fruit postharvest pathogen Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. Targeted gene deletion mutants of areA exhibited significant reductions in vegetative growth, increases in conidia production, and slight decreases in conidial germination rates. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed that the expression of AreA was highly induced under nitrogen-limiting conditions. Moreover, compared to wild-type and complemented strains, nitrogen metabolism-related genes were misregulated in ΔareA mutant strains. Pathogenicity assays indicated that the virulence of ΔareA mutant strains were affected by the nitrogen content, but not the carbon content, of fruit hosts. Taken together, our results indicate that CgareA plays a critical role in fungal development, conidia production, regulation of nitrogen metabolism and virulence in Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

  8. Ribosomal mutations promote the evolution of antibiotic resistance in a multidrug environment.

    PubMed

    Gomez, James E; Kaufmann-Malaga, Benjamin B; Wivagg, Carl N; Kim, Peter B; Silvis, Melanie R; Renedo, Nikolai; Ioerger, Thomas R; Ahmad, Rushdy; Livny, Jonathan; Fishbein, Skye; Sacchettini, James C; Carr, Steven A; Hung, Deborah T

    2017-02-21

    Antibiotic resistance arising via chromosomal mutations is typically specific to a particular antibiotic or class of antibiotics. We have identified mutations in genes encoding ribosomal components in Mycobacterium smegmatis that confer resistance to several structurally and mechanistically unrelated classes of antibiotics and enhance survival following heat shock and membrane stress. These mutations affect ribosome assembly and cause large-scale transcriptomic and proteomic changes, including the downregulation of the catalase KatG, an activating enzyme required for isoniazid sensitivity, and upregulation of WhiB7, a transcription factor involved in innate antibiotic resistance. Importantly, while these ribosomal mutations have a fitness cost in antibiotic-free medium, in a multidrug environment they promote the evolution of high-level, target-based resistance. Further, suppressor mutations can then be easily acquired to restore wild-type growth. Thus, ribosomal mutations can serve as stepping-stones in an evolutionary path leading to the emergence of high-level, multidrug resistance.

  9. High Incidence of Noonan Syndrome Features Including Short Stature and Pulmonic Stenosis in Patients carrying NF1 Missense Mutations Affecting p.Arg1809: Genotype–Phenotype Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Rojnueangnit, Kitiwan; Xie, Jing; Gomes, Alicia; Sharp, Angela; Callens, Tom; Chen, Yunjia; Liu, Ying; Cochran, Meagan; Abbott, Mary‐Alice; Atkin, Joan; Babovic‐Vuksanovic, Dusica; Barnett, Christopher P.; Crenshaw, Melissa; Bartholomew, Dennis W.; Basel, Lina; Bellus, Gary; Ben‐Shachar, Shay; Bialer, Martin G.; Bick, David; Blumberg, Bruce; Cortes, Fanny; David, Karen L.; Destree, Anne; Duat‐Rodriguez, Anna; Earl, Dawn; Escobar, Luis; Eswara, Marthanda; Ezquieta, Begona; Frayling, Ian M.; Frydman, Moshe; Gardner, Kathy; Gripp, Karen W.; Hernández‐Chico, Concepcion; Heyrman, Kurt; Ibrahim, Jennifer; Janssens, Sandra; Keena, Beth A; Llano‐Rivas, Isabel; Leppig, Kathy; McDonald, Marie; Misra, Vinod K.; Mulbury, Jennifer; Narayanan, Vinodh; Orenstein, Naama; Galvin‐Parton, Patricia; Pedro, Helio; Pivnick, Eniko K.; Powell, Cynthia M.; Randolph, Linda; Raskin, Salmo; Rosell, Jordi; Rubin, Karol; Seashore, Margretta; Schaaf, Christian P.; Scheuerle, Angela; Schultz, Meredith; Schorry, Elizabeth; Schnur, Rhonda; Siqveland, Elizabeth; Tkachuk, Amanda; Tonsgard, James; Upadhyaya, Meena; Verma, Ishwar C.; Wallace, Stephanie; Williams, Charles; Zackai, Elaine; Zonana, Jonathan; Lazaro, Conxi; Claes, Kathleen; Korf, Bruce; Martin, Yolanda; Legius, Eric

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most frequent genetic disorders, affecting 1:3,000 worldwide. Identification of genotype–phenotype correlations is challenging because of the wide range clinical variability, the progressive nature of the disorder, and extreme diversity of the mutational spectrum. We report 136 individuals with a distinct phenotype carrying one of five different NF1 missense mutations affecting p.Arg1809. Patients presented with multiple café‐au‐lait macules (CALM) with or without freckling and Lisch nodules, but no externally visible plexiform neurofibromas or clear cutaneous neurofibromas were found. About 25% of the individuals had Noonan‐like features. Pulmonic stenosis and short stature were significantly more prevalent compared with classic cohorts (P < 0.0001). Developmental delays and/or learning disabilities were reported in over 50% of patients. Melanocytes cultured from a CALM in a segmental NF1‐patient showed two different somatic NF1 mutations, p.Arg1809Cys and a multi‐exon deletion, providing genetic evidence that p.Arg1809Cys is a loss‐of‐function mutation in the melanocytes and causes a pigmentary phenotype. Constitutional missense mutations at p.Arg1809 affect 1.23% of unrelated NF1 probands in the UAB cohort, therefore this specific NF1 genotype–phenotype correlation will affect counseling and management of a significant number of patients. PMID:26178382

  10. High Incidence of Noonan Syndrome Features Including Short Stature and Pulmonic Stenosis in Patients carrying NF1 Missense Mutations Affecting p.Arg1809: Genotype-Phenotype Correlation.

    PubMed

    Rojnueangnit, Kitiwan; Xie, Jing; Gomes, Alicia; Sharp, Angela; Callens, Tom; Chen, Yunjia; Liu, Ying; Cochran, Meagan; Abbott, Mary-Alice; Atkin, Joan; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Barnett, Christopher P; Crenshaw, Melissa; Bartholomew, Dennis W; Basel, Lina; Bellus, Gary; Ben-Shachar, Shay; Bialer, Martin G; Bick, David; Blumberg, Bruce; Cortes, Fanny; David, Karen L; Destree, Anne; Duat-Rodriguez, Anna; Earl, Dawn; Escobar, Luis; Eswara, Marthanda; Ezquieta, Begona; Frayling, Ian M; Frydman, Moshe; Gardner, Kathy; Gripp, Karen W; Hernández-Chico, Concepcion; Heyrman, Kurt; Ibrahim, Jennifer; Janssens, Sandra; Keena, Beth A; Llano-Rivas, Isabel; Leppig, Kathy; McDonald, Marie; Misra, Vinod K; Mulbury, Jennifer; Narayanan, Vinodh; Orenstein, Naama; Galvin-Parton, Patricia; Pedro, Helio; Pivnick, Eniko K; Powell, Cynthia M; Randolph, Linda; Raskin, Salmo; Rosell, Jordi; Rubin, Karol; Seashore, Margretta; Schaaf, Christian P; Scheuerle, Angela; Schultz, Meredith; Schorry, Elizabeth; Schnur, Rhonda; Siqveland, Elizabeth; Tkachuk, Amanda; Tonsgard, James; Upadhyaya, Meena; Verma, Ishwar C; Wallace, Stephanie; Williams, Charles; Zackai, Elaine; Zonana, Jonathan; Lazaro, Conxi; Claes, Kathleen; Korf, Bruce; Martin, Yolanda; Legius, Eric; Messiaen, Ludwine

    2015-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most frequent genetic disorders, affecting 1:3,000 worldwide. Identification of genotype-phenotype correlations is challenging because of the wide range clinical variability, the progressive nature of the disorder, and extreme diversity of the mutational spectrum. We report 136 individuals with a distinct phenotype carrying one of five different NF1 missense mutations affecting p.Arg1809. Patients presented with multiple café-au-lait macules (CALM) with or without freckling and Lisch nodules, but no externally visible plexiform neurofibromas or clear cutaneous neurofibromas were found. About 25% of the individuals had Noonan-like features. Pulmonic stenosis and short stature were significantly more prevalent compared with classic cohorts (P < 0.0001). Developmental delays and/or learning disabilities were reported in over 50% of patients. Melanocytes cultured from a CALM in a segmental NF1-patient showed two different somatic NF1 mutations, p.Arg1809Cys and a multi-exon deletion, providing genetic evidence that p.Arg1809Cys is a loss-of-function mutation in the melanocytes and causes a pigmentary phenotype. Constitutional missense mutations at p.Arg1809 affect 1.23% of unrelated NF1 probands in the UAB cohort, therefore this specific NF1 genotype-phenotype correlation will affect counseling and management of a significant number of patients.

  11. Culture Volume and Vessel Affect Long-Term Survival, Mutation Frequency, and Oxidative Stress of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kram, Karin E.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria such as Escherichia coli are frequently studied during exponential- and stationary-phase growth. However, many strains can survive in long-term stationary phase (LTSP), without the addition of nutrients, from days to several years. During LTSP, cells experience a variety of stressors, including reactive oxidative species, nutrient depletion, and metabolic toxin buildup, that lead to physiological responses and changes in genetic stability. In this study, we monitored survival during LTSP, as well as reporters of genetic and physiological change, to determine how the physical environment affects E. coli during long-term batch culture. We demonstrate differences in yield during LTSP in cells incubated in LB medium in test tubes versus Erlenmeyer flasks, as well as growth in different volumes of medium. We determined that these differences are only partially due to differences in oxygen levels by incubating the cells in different volumes of media under anaerobic conditions. Since we hypothesized that differences in long-term survival are the result of changes in physiological outputs during the late log and early stationary phases, we monitored alkalization, mutation frequency, oxidative stress response, and glycation. Although initial cell yields are essentially equivalent under each condition tested, physiological responses vary greatly in response to culture environment. Incubation in lower-volume cultures leads to higher oxyR expression but lower mutation frequency and glycation levels, whereas incubation in high-volume cultures has the opposite effect. We show here that even under commonly used experimental conditions that are frequently treated as equivalent, the stresses experienced by cells can differ greatly, suggesting that culture vessel and incubation conditions should be carefully considered in the planning or analysis of experiments. PMID:24375138

  12. DHPLC Screening of ATM Gene in Italian Patients Affected by Ataxia-Telangiectasia: Fourteen Novel ATM Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Magliozzi, Monia; Piane, Maria; Torrente, Isabella; Sinibaldi, Lorenzo; Rizzo, Giovanni; Savio, Camilla; Lulli, Patrizia; De Luca, Alessandro; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Chessa, Luciana

    2006-01-01

    The gene for ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T:MIM:#208900), ATM, spans about 150~kb of genomic DNA and is composed of 62 coding exons. ATM mutations are found along the entire coding sequence of the gene, without evidence of mutational hot spots. Using DNA as the starting material, we used denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) technique to search for ATM gene mutations. Initially, DHPLC was validated in a retrospective study of 16 positive control samples that included 19 known mutations; 100% of mutations were detected. Subsequently, DHPLC was used to screen for mutations a cohort of 22 patients with the classical form of A-T. A total of 27 different mutations were identified on 38 of the 44 alleles, corresponding to a 86% detection rate. Fourteen of the mutations were novel. In addition, 15 different variants and polymorphisms of unknown functional significance were found. The high incidence of new and individual A-T mutations in our cohort of patients demonstrates marked mutational heterogeneity of A-T in Italy and corroborate the efficiency of DHPLC as a method for the mutation screening of A-T patients. PMID:17124347

  13. Helical mutations in type I collagen that affect the processing of the amino-propeptide result in an Osteogenesis Imperfecta/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Whereas mutations affecting the helical domain of type I procollagen classically cause Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI), helical mutations near the amino (N)-proteinase cleavage site have been suggested to result in a mixed OI/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS)-phenotype. Methods We performed biochemical and molecular analysis of type I (pro-) collagen in a cohort of seven patients referred with a clinical diagnosis of EDS and showing only subtle signs of OI. Transmission electron microscopy of the dermis was available for one patient. Results All of these patients harboured a COL1A1 / COL1A2 mutation residing within the most N-terminal part of the type I collagen helix. These mutations affect the rate of type I collagen N-propeptide cleavage and disturb normal collagen fibrillogenesis. Importantly, patients with this type of mutation do not show a typical OI phenotype but mainly present as EDS patients displaying severe joint hyperlaxity, soft and hyperextensible skin, abnormal wound healing, easy bruising, and sometimes signs of arterial fragility. In addition, they show subtle signs of OI including blue sclerae, relatively short stature and osteopenia or fractures. Conclusion Recognition of this distinct phenotype is important for accurate genetic counselling, clinical management and surveillance, particularly in relation to the potential risk for vascular rupture associated with these mutations. Because these patients present clinical overlap with other EDS subtypes, biochemical collagen analysis is necessary to establish the correct diagnosis. PMID:23692737

  14. Whole-Genome Sequencing and iPLEX MassARRAY Genotyping Map an EMS-Induced Mutation Affecting Cell Competition in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Rimesso, Gerard; Reynolds, David M.; Cai, Jinlu; Baker, Nicholas E.

    2016-01-01

    Cell competition, the conditional loss of viable genotypes only when surrounded by other cells, is a phenomenon observed in certain genetic mosaic conditions. We conducted a chemical mutagenesis and screen to recover new mutations that affect cell competition between wild-type and RpS3 heterozygous cells. Mutations were identified by whole-genome sequencing, making use of software tools that greatly facilitate the distinction between newly induced mutations and other sources of apparent sequence polymorphism, thereby reducing false-positive and false-negative identification rates. In addition, we utilized iPLEX MassARRAY for genotyping recombinant chromosomes. These approaches permitted the mapping of a new mutation affecting cell competition when only a single allele existed, with a phenotype assessed only in genetic mosaics, without the benefit of complementation with existing mutations, deletions, or duplications. These techniques expand the utility of chemical mutagenesis and whole-genome sequencing for mutant identification. We discuss mutations in the Atm and Xrp1 genes identified in this screen. PMID:27574103

  15. A Naturally Occurring Mutation of the Opsin Gene (T4R) in Dogs Affects Glycosylation and Stability of the G Protein-coupled Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li; Jang, Geeng-Fu; Jastrzebska, Beata; Filipek, Sławomir; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Stenkamp, Ronald E.; Acland, Gregory M.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2005-01-01

    Rho (rhodopsin; opsin plus 11-cis-retinal) is a prototypical G protein-coupled receptor responsible for the capture of a photon in retinal photoreceptor cells. A large number of mutations in the opsin gene associated with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa have been identified. The naturally occurring T4R opsin mutation in the English mastiff dog leads to a progressive retinal degeneration that closely resembles human retinitis pigmentosa caused by the T4K mutation in the opsin gene. Using genetic approaches and biochemical assays, we explored the properties of the T4R mutant protein. Employing immunoaffinity-purified Rho from affected RHOT4R/T4R dog retina, we found that the mutation abolished glycosylation at Asn2, whereas glycosylation at Asn15 was unaffected, and the mutant opsin localized normally to the rod outer segments. Moreover, we found that T4R Rho* lost its chromophore faster as measured by the decay of meta-rhodopsin II and that it was less resistant to heat denaturation. Detergent-solubilized T4R opsin regenerated poorly and interacted abnormally with the G protein transducin (Gt). Structurally, the mutation affected mainly the “plug” at the intradiscal (extracellular) side of Rho, which is possibly responsible for protecting the chromophore from the access of bulk water. The T4R mutation may represent a novel molecular mechanism of degeneration where the unliganded form of the mutant opsin exerts a detrimental effect by losing its structural integrity. PMID:15459196

  16. A naturally occurring mutation of the opsin gene (T4R) in dogs affects glycosylation and stability of the G protein-coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; Jang, Geeng-Fu; Jastrzebska, Beata; Filipek, Slawomir; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Stenkamp, Ronald E; Acland, Gregory M; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2004-12-17

    Rho (rhodopsin; opsin plus 11-cis-retinal) is a prototypical G protein-coupled receptor responsible for the capture of a photon in retinal photoreceptor cells. A large number of mutations in the opsin gene associated with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa have been identified. The naturally occurring T4R opsin mutation in the English mastiff dog leads to a progressive retinal degeneration that closely resembles human retinitis pigmentosa caused by the T4K mutation in the opsin gene. Using genetic approaches and biochemical assays, we explored the properties of the T4R mutant protein. Employing immunoaffinity-purified Rho from affected RHO(T4R/T4R) dog retina, we found that the mutation abolished glycosylation at Asn(2), whereas glycosylation at Asn(15) was unaffected, and the mutant opsin localized normally to the rod outer segments. Moreover, we found that T4R Rho(*) lost its chromophore faster as measured by the decay of meta-rhodopsin II and that it was less resistant to heat denaturation. Detergent-solubilized T4R opsin regenerated poorly and interacted abnormally with the G protein transducin (G(t)). Structurally, the mutation affected mainly the "plug" at the intradiscal (extracellular) side of Rho, which is possibly responsible for protecting the chromophore from the access of bulk water. The T4R mutation may represent a novel molecular mechanism of degeneration where the unliganded form of the mutant opsin exerts a detrimental effect by losing its structural integrity.

  17. G364R mutation of MCM4 detected in human skin cancer cells affects DNA helicase activity of MCM4/6/7 complex.

    PubMed

    Ishimi, Yukio; Irie, Daiki

    2015-06-01

    A number of gene mutations are detected in cells derived from human cancer tissues, but roles of these mutations in cancer cell development are largely unknown. We examined G364R mutation of MCM4 detected in human skin cancer cells. Formation of MCM4/6/7 complex is not affected by the mutation. Consistent with this notion, the binding to MCM6 is comparable between the mutant MCM4 and wild-type MCM4. Nuclear localization of this mutant MCM4 expressed in HeLa cells supports this conclusion. Purified MCM4/6/7 complex containing the G364R MCM4 exhibited similar levels of single-stranded DNA binding and ATPase activities to the complex containing wild-type MCM4. However, the mutant complex showed only 30-50% of DNA helicase activity of the wild-type complex. When G364R MCM4 was expressed in HeLa cells, it was fractionated into nuclease-sensitive chromatin fraction, similar to wild-type MCM4. These results suggest that this mutation does not affect assembly of MCM2-7 complex on replication origins but it interferes some step at function of MCM2-7 helicase. Thus, this mutation may contribute to cancer cell development by disturbing DNA replication.

  18. Exclusion of PAX9 and MSX1 mutation in six families affected by tooth agenesis. A genetic study and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Manzanares-Céspedes, Maria C.; Carvalho-Lobato, Patricia; Valdivia-Gandur, Ivan; Arte, Sirpa; Nieminen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: In the present study, it is described the phenotypical analysis and the mutational screening, for genes PAX9 and MSX1, of six families affected by severe forms of tooth agenesis associated with other dental anomalies and systemic entities. Study Design: Six families affected by severe tooth agenesis associated with other dental anomalies and systemic entities were included. Oral exploration, radiological examination, medical antecedents consideration and mutational screening for PAX9 and MSX1 were carried out. Results: No mutations were discovered despite the fact that numerous teeth were missing. An important phenotypical variability was observed within the probands, not being possible to establish a parallelism with the patterns associated to previously described PAX9 and MSX1 mutations. Conclusions: These results bring us to conclude that probably other genes can determine phenotypical patterns of dental agenesis in the families studied, different than the ones described in the mutations of PAX9 and MSX1. Moreover, epigenetic factors can be involved, as those that can reduce gene dosage and other post-transcriptional modulation agents, causing dental agenesis associated or not with systemic anomalies. Key words:Maxillofacial development, tooth agenesis, PAX9 gene, MSX1 gene, gene mutation. PMID:24316698

  19. Key Importance of Small RNA Binding for the Activity of a Glycine-Tryptophan (GW) Motif-containing Viral Suppressor of RNA Silencing*

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Cañamás, Miryam; Hernández, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Viruses express viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs) to counteract RNA silencing-based host defenses. Although virtually all stages of the antiviral silencing pathway can be inhibited by VSRs, small RNAs (sRNAs) and Argonaute (AGO) proteins seem to be the most frequent targets. Recently, GW/WG motifs of some VSRs have been proposed to dictate their suppressor function by mediating interaction with AGO(s). Here we have studied the VSR encoded by Pelargonium line pattern virus (family Tombusviridae). The results show that p37, the viral coat protein, blocks RNA silencing. Site-directed mutagenesis of some p37 sequence traits, including a conserved GW motif, allowed generation of suppressor-competent and -incompetent molecules and uncoupling of the VSR and particle assembly capacities. The engineered mutants were used to assess the importance of p37 functions for viral infection and the relative contribution of diverse molecular interactions to suppressor activity. Two main conclusions can be drawn: (i) the silencing suppression and encapsidation functions of p37 are both required for systemic Pelargonium line pattern virus infection, and (ii) the suppressor activity of p37 relies on the ability to bind sRNAs rather than on interaction with AGOs. The data also caution against potential misinterpretations of results due to overlap of sequence signals related to distinct protein properties. This is well illustrated by mutation of the GW motif in p37 that concurrently affects nucleolar localization, efficient interaction with AGO1, and sRNA binding capability. These concomitant effects could have been overlooked in other GW motif-containing suppressors, as we exemplify with the orthologous p38 of turnip crinkle virus. PMID:25505185

  20. Self-association of the WT1 tumor suppressor gene product

    SciTech Connect

    Bruening, W.; Nakagama, H.: Bardessy, N.

    1994-09-01

    Wilms` tumor (WT), an embryonal malignancy of the kidney, occurs most frequently in children under the age of 5 years, affecting {approximately}1 in 10,000 individuals. The WT1 tumor suppressor gene, residing at 11p13, is structurally altered in {approximately}10-15% of WT cases. Individuals with germline mutations within the WT1 gene suffer from predisposition to WT and developmental defects of the urogenital system. Patients with heterozygous deletions of the WT1 gene, or mutations predicted to cause inactivation of one WT1 allele, suffer relatively mild genital system defects (notably hypospadias and cryptorchidism in males) and a predisposition to WT. These results suggest that developing genital system development is sensitive to the absolute concentrations of the WT1 gene products. Patients with missense mutations within the WT1 gene, however, can suffer from a much more severe disorder known as Denys-Drash syndrome (DDS). This syndrome is characterized by intersex disorders, renal nephropathy, and a predisposition to WTs. The increased severity of the developmental defects associated with DDS, compared to those individuals with mild genital system anomalies and WTs, suggests that mutations defined in patients with DDS behave in a dominant-negative fashion. We have identified a novel WT1 mutation in a patient with DDS. This mutation, predicted to produce a truncated WT1 polypeptide encompassing exons 1, 2, and 3, defines a domain capable of behaving as an antimorph. We have also demonstrated that WT1 can self-associate in vivo using yeast two-hybrid systems. Deletion analysis have mapped the interacting domains to the amino terminus of the WT1 polypeptide, within exons 1 and 2. These results provide a molecular mechanism to explain how WT1 mutations can function in a dominant-negative fashion to eliminate wild-type WT1 activity, leading to DDS.

  1. Use of advanced recombinant lines to study the impact and potential of mutations affecting starch synthesis in barley☆

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Thomas P.; Fahy, Brendan; Leigh, Fiona; Howell, Phil; Powell, Wayne; Greenland, Andy; Trafford, Kay; Smith, Alison M.

    2014-01-01

    The effects on barley starch and grain properties of four starch synthesis mutations were studied during the introgression of the mutations from diverse backgrounds into an elite variety. The lys5f (ADPglucose transporter), wax (granule-bound starch synthase), isa1 (debranching enzyme isoamylase 1) and sex6 (starch synthase IIa) mutations were introgressed into NFC Tipple to give mutant and wild-type BC2F4 families with different genomic contributions of the donor parent. Comparison of starch and grain properties between the donor parents, the BC2F4 families and NFC Tipple allowed the effects of the mutations to be distinguished from genetic background effects. The wax and sex6 mutations had marked effects on starch properties regardless of genetic background. The sex6 mutation conditioned low grain weight and starch content, but the wax mutation did not. The lys5 mutation conditioned low grain weight and starch content, but exceptionally high β-glucan contents. The isa1 mutation promotes synthesis of soluble α-glucan (phytoglycogen). Its introgression into NFC Tipple increased grain weight and total α-glucan content relative to the donor parent, but reduced the ratio of phytoglycogen to starch. This study shows that introgression of mutations into a common, commercial background provides new insights that could not be gained from the donor parent. PMID:24748716

  2. Use of advanced recombinant lines to study the impact and potential of mutations affecting starch synthesis in barley.

    PubMed

    Howard, Thomas P; Fahy, Brendan; Leigh, Fiona; Howell, Phil; Powell, Wayne; Greenland, Andy; Trafford, Kay; Smith, Alison M

    2014-03-01

    The effects on barley starch and grain properties of four starch synthesis mutations were studied during the introgression of the mutations from diverse backgrounds into an elite variety. The lys5f (ADPglucose transporter), wax (granule-bound starch synthase), isa1 (debranching enzyme isoamylase 1) and sex6 (starch synthase IIa) mutations were introgressed into NFC Tipple to give mutant and wild-type BC2F4 families with different genomic contributions of the donor parent. Comparison of starch and grain properties between the donor parents, the BC2F4 families and NFC Tipple allowed the effects of the mutations to be distinguished from genetic background effects. The wax and sex6 mutations had marked effects on starch properties regardless of genetic background. The sex6 mutation conditioned low grain weight and starch content, but the wax mutation did not. The lys5 mutation conditioned low grain weight and starch content, but exceptionally high β-glucan contents. The isa1 mutation promotes synthesis of soluble α-glucan (phytoglycogen). Its introgression into NFC Tipple increased grain weight and total α-glucan content relative to the donor parent, but reduced the ratio of phytoglycogen to starch. This study shows that introgression of mutations into a common, commercial background provides new insights that could not be gained from the donor parent.

  3. Isolation and characterization of antisuppressor mutations in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, M A; Bock, R M

    1985-01-01

    Nonsense mutations in lacI have been shown to be useful as indicators of the efficiency of nonsense suppression. From strains containing supE and a lacI nonsense mutation, selection for LacI- mutants has resulted in the isolation of four antisuppressor mutations. Tn10 insertions linked to these mutations were isolated and used to group the four mutations into three loci. The asuA1 and asuA2 mutations are linked to trp, reduce suppression by supE approximately twofold, and affect a variety of suppressors. The asuB3 mutation was mapped by P1 cotransduction to rpsL but does not confer resistance to streptomycin. The asuC4 mutation reduced suppression by supE by 95% and was shown biochemically to result in the loss of two pseudouridine modifications from the 3' side of the anticodon stem and loop of tRNA2Gln. This mutation is linked to purF, suggesting that it is a new allele of hisT. Images PMID:3918006

  4. Tumor suppressor molecules and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Peter J.; Barber, Jack R.

    2004-09-07

    The invention provides substantially pure tumor suppressor nucleic acid molecules and tumor suppressor polypeptides. The invention also provides hairpin ribozymes and antibodies selective for these tumor suppressor molecules. Also provided are methods of detecting a neoplastic cell in a sample using detectable agents specific for the tumor suppressor nucleic acids and polypeptides.

  5. Molecular characterization of a mutation affecting abscisic acid biosynthesis and consequently stomatal responses to humidity in an agriculturally important species

    PubMed Central

    McAdam, Scott A. M.; Sussmilch, Frances C.; Brodribb, Timothy J.; Ross, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Mutants deficient in the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) have been instrumental in determining not only the biosynthetic pathway for this hormone, but also its physiological role in land plants. The wilty mutant of Pisum sativum is one of the classical, well-studied ABA-deficient mutants; however, this mutant remains uncharacterized at a molecular level. Using a candidate gene approach, we show that the wilty mutation affects the xanthoxin dehydrogenase step in ABA biosynthesis. To date, this step has only been represented by mutants in the ABA2 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana. Functional ABA biosynthesis appears to be critical for normal stomatal responses to changes in humidity in angiosperms, with wilty mutant plants having no increase in foliar ABA levels in response to a doubling in vapour pressure deficit, and no closure of stomata. Phylogenetic analysis of the ABA2 gene family from diverse land plants indicates that an ABA-biosynthesis-specific short-chain dehydrogenase (ABA2) evolved in the earliest angiosperms. The relatively recent origin of specificity in this step has important implications for both the evolution of ABA biosynthesis and action in land plants. PMID:26216469

  6. Is PML a Tumor Suppressor?

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, Massimiliano; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The role of the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein has been widely tested in many different contexts, as attested by the hundreds of papers present in the literature. In most of these studies, PML is regarded as a tumor suppressor, a notion on the whole accepted by the scientific community. In this review, we examine how the concept of tumor-suppressor gene has evolved until now and then systematically assess whether this assumption for PML is supported by unambiguous experimental evidence. PMID:23847764

  7. Suppressors of the Unc-73 Gene of Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Run, J. Q.; Steven, R.; Hung, M. S.; van-Weeghel, R.; Culotti, J. G.; Way, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    The unc-73 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans is necessary for proper axon guidance. Animals mutant in this gene are severely uncoordinated and also exhibit defects in cell migration and cell lineages. We have isolated coordinated revertants of unc-73(e936). These fall into three classes: intragenic revertants, extragenic dominant suppressors (sup-39), and a single apparently intragenic mutation that is a dominant suppressor with a linked recessive lethal phenotype. sup-39 mutations cause early embryonic lethality, but escapers have a wild-type movement phenotype as larvae and adults. Gonads of sup-39 mutant animals show a novel defect: normal gonads have a single row of oocytes, but sup-39 gonads often have two rows of oocytes. This result suggests that the mutant gonad is defective in choosing on its surface only a single site from which nuclei will emerge to form oocytes. These results are interpreted in terms of an effect of unc-73 on determination of cell polarity. PMID:8722777

  8. The co-occurrence of mtDNA mutations on different oxidative phosphorylation subunits, not detected by haplogroup analysis, affects human longevity and is population specific.

    PubMed

    Raule, Nicola; Sevini, Federica; Li, Shengting; Barbieri, Annalaura; Tallaro, Federica; Lomartire, Laura; Vianello, Dario; Montesanto, Alberto; Moilanen, Jukka S; Bezrukov, Vladyslav; Blanché, Hélène; Hervonen, Antti; Christensen, Kaare; Deiana, Luca; Gonos, Efstathios S; Kirkwood, Tom B L; Kristensen, Peter; Leon, Alberta; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Poulain, Michel; Rea, Irene M; Remacle, Josè; Robine, Jean Marie; Schreiber, Stefan; Sikora, Ewa; Eline Slagboom, Peternella; Spazzafumo, Liana; Antonietta Stazi, Maria; Toussaint, Olivier; Vaupel, James W; Rose, Giuseppina; Majamaa, Kari; Perola, Markus; Johnson, Thomas E; Bolund, Lars; Yang, Huanming; Passarino, Giuseppe; Franceschi, Claudio

    2014-06-01

    To re-examine the correlation between mtDNA variability and longevity, we examined mtDNAs from samples obtained from over 2200 ultranonagenarians (and an equal number of controls) collected within the framework of the GEHA EU project. The samples were categorized by high-resolution classification, while about 1300 mtDNA molecules (650 ultranonagenarians and an equal number of controls) were completely sequenced. Sequences, unlike standard haplogroup analysis, made possible to evaluate for the first time the cumulative effects of specific, concomitant mtDNA mutations, including those that per se have a low, or very low, impact. In particular, the analysis of the mutations occurring in different OXPHOS complex showed a complex scenario with a different mutation burden in 90+ subjects with respect to controls. These findings suggested that mutations in subunits of the OXPHOS complex I had a beneficial effect on longevity, while the simultaneous presence of mutations in complex I and III (which also occurs in J subhaplogroups involved in LHON) and in complex I and V seemed to be detrimental, likely explaining previous contradictory results. On the whole, our study, which goes beyond haplogroup analysis, suggests that mitochondrial DNA variation does affect human longevity, but its effect is heavily influenced by the interaction between mutations concomitantly occurring on different mtDNA genes.

  9. Molecular characterization of 7 patients affected by dys- or hypo-dysfibrinogenemia: Identification of a novel mutation in the fibrinogen Bbeta chain causing a gain of glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Asselta, Rosanna; Robusto, Michela; Platé, Manuela; Santoro, Cristina; Peyvandi, Flora; Duga, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    Fibrinogen is a hexameric glycoprotein consisting of two sets of three polypeptides (the Aα, Bβ, and γ chains, encoded by the three genes FGA, FGB, and FGG). It is involved in the final phase of the coagulation process, being the precursor of the fibrin monomers necessary for the formation of the hemostatic plug. Rare inherited fibrinogen disorders can manifest as quantitative deficiencies, qualitative defects, or both. In particular, dysfibrinogenemia and hypo-dysfibrinogenemia are characterized by reduced functional activity associated with normal or reduced antigen levels, and are usually determined by heterozygous mutations affecting any of the three fibrinogen genes. In this study, we investigated the genetic basis of dys- and hypo-dysfibrinogenemia in seven unrelated patients. Mutational screening disclosed six different variants, two of which novel (FGB-p.Asp185Asn and FGG-p.Asn230Lys). The molecular characterization of the FGG-p.Asn230Lys mutation, performed by transient expression experiments of the recombinant mutant protein, demonstrated that it induces an almost complete impairment in fibrinogen secretion, according to a molecular mechanism often associated with quantitative fibrinogen disorders. Conversely, the FGB-p.Asp185Asn variant was demonstrated to be a gain-of-glycosylation mutation leading to a hyperglycosylation of the Bβ chain, not affecting fibrinogen assembly and secretion. To our knowledge, this is the second gain-of-glycosylation mutation involving the FGB gene.

  10. A suppressor locus for MODY3-diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel A.; Carette, Claire; Bagattin, Alessia; Chiral, Magali; Makinistoglu, Munevver Parla; Garbay, Serge; Prévost, Géraldine; Madaras, Cécile; Hérault, Yann; Leibovici, Michel; Pontoglio, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young type 3 (MODY3), linked to mutations in the transcription factor HNF1A, is the most prevalent form of monogenic diabetes mellitus. HNF1alpha-deficiency leads to defective insulin secretion via a molecular mechanism that is still not completely understood. Moreover, in MODY3 patients the severity of insulin secretion can be extremely variable even in the same kindred, indicating that modifier genes may control the onset of the disease. With the use of a mouse model for HNF1alpha-deficiency, we show here that specific genetic backgrounds (C3H and CBA) carry a powerful genetic suppressor of diabetes. A genome scan analysis led to the identification of a major suppressor locus on chromosome 3 (Moda1). Moda1 locus contains 11 genes with non-synonymous SNPs that significantly interacts with other loci on chromosomes 4, 11 and 18. Mechanistically, the absence of HNF1alpha in diabetic-prone (sensitive) strains leads to postnatal defective islets growth that is remarkably restored in resistant strains. Our findings are relevant to human genetics since Moda1 is syntenic with a human locus identified by genome wide association studies of fasting glycemia in patients. Most importantly, our results show that a single genetic locus can completely suppress diabetes in Hnf1a-deficiency. PMID:27667715

  11. Factors that affect the molecular nature of germ-line mutations recovered in the mouse specific-locus test

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L.B. )

    1991-01-01

    The morphological specific locus test (SLT), which allows the scoring of 2,000 loci/hr/person, has been in use for four decades for measuring mammalian germ-line mutation rates under various conditions of exposure. More recently, the SLT's capabilities for the qualitative characterization of mutations have been exploited. The large sets of mutations centered on specific loci that have been accumulated over the years, including sets of nested deletions, have provided prime material for fine-structure genetic analyses. Subsequent molecular entry to these regions has led to intensive physical/functional mapping of megabase segments of the genome. In turn, these investigations have generated genetic and molecular tools for analyzing individual mutations as to extent and nature of the genomic lesion. These and related quantitative findings now make it possible to optimize conditions for the use of mutagens in providing desired types of mutations as tools.

  12. Variable Autosomal and X Divergence Near and Far from Genes Affects Estimates of Male Mutation Bias in Great Apes.

    PubMed

    Narang, Pooja; Wilson Sayres, Melissa A

    2016-12-31

    Male mutation bias, when more mutations are passed on via the male germline than via the female germline, is observed across mammals. One common way to infer the magnitude of male mutation bias, α, is to compare levels of neutral sequence divergence between genomic regions that spend different amounts of time in the male and female germline. For great apes, including human, we show that estimates of divergence are reduced in putatively unconstrained regions near genes relative to unconstrained regions far from genes. Divergence increases with increasing distance from genes on both the X chromosome and autosomes, but increases faster on the X chromosome than autosomes. As a result, ratios of X/A divergence increase with increasing distance from genes and corresponding estimates of male mutation bias are significantly higher in intergenic regions near genes versus far from genes. Future studies in other species will need to carefully consider the effect that genomic location will have on estimates of male mutation bias.

  13. Tumour suppressors hamartin and tuberin: intracellular signalling.

    PubMed

    Krymskaya, Vera P

    2003-08-01

    Tumour suppressors hamartin and tuberin, encoded by tuberous sclerosis complex 1(TSC1) and TSC2 genes, respectively, are critical regulators of cell growth and proliferation. Mutations in TSC1 and TSC2 genes are the cause of an autosomal dominant disorder known as tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Another genetic disorder, lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), is also associated with mutations in the TSC2 gene. Hamartin and tuberin control cell growth by negatively regulating S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), potentially through their upstream modulator mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Growth factors and insulin promote Akt/PKB-dependent phosphorylation of tuberin, which in turn, releases S6K1 from negative regulation by tuberin and results in the activation of S6K1. Although much has been written regarding the molecular genetics of TSC and LAM, which is associated with either the loss of or mutation in the TSC1 and TSC2 genes, few reviews have addressed the intracellular signalling pathways regulated by hamartin and tuberin. The current review will fill the gap in our understanding of their role in cellular signalling networks, and by improving this understanding, an integrated picture regarding the normal function of tuberin and hamartin is beginning to emerge.

  14. Single site suppressors of a fission yeast temperature-sensitive mutant in cdc48 identified by whole genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Marinova, Irina N; Engelbrecht, Jacob; Ewald, Adrian; Langholm, Lasse L; Holmberg, Christian; Kragelund, Birthe B; Gordon, Colin; Nielsen, Olaf; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    The protein called p97 in mammals and Cdc48 in budding and fission yeast is a homo-hexameric, ring-shaped, ubiquitin-dependent ATPase complex involved in a range of cellular functions, including protein degradation, vesicle fusion, DNA repair, and cell division. The cdc48+ gene is essential for viability in fission yeast, and point mutations in the human orthologue have been linked to disease. To analyze the function of p97/Cdc48 further, we performed a screen for cold-sensitive suppressors of the temperature-sensitive cdc48-353 fission yeast strain. In total, 29 independent pseudo revertants that had lost the temperature-sensitive growth defect of the cdc48-353 strain were isolated. Of these, 28 had instead acquired a cold-sensitive phenotype. Since the suppressors were all spontaneous mutants, and not the result of mutagenesis induced by chemicals or UV irradiation, we reasoned that the genome sequences of the 29 independent cdc48-353 suppressors were most likely identical with the exception of the acquired suppressor mutations. This prompted us to test if a whole genome sequencing approach would allow us to map the mutations. Indeed genome sequencing unambiguously revealed that the cold-sensitive suppressors were all second site intragenic cdc48 mutants. Projecting these onto the Cdc48 structure revealed that while the original temperature-sensitive G338D mutation is positioned near the central pore in the hexameric ring, the suppressor mutations locate to subunit-subunit and inter-domain boundaries. This suggests that Cdc48-353 is structurally compromized at the restrictive temperature, but re-established in the suppressor mutants. The last suppressor was an extragenic frame shift mutation in the ufd1 gene, which encodes a known Cdc48 co-factor. In conclusion, we show, using a novel whole genome sequencing approach, that Cdc48-353 is structurally compromized at the restrictive temperature, but stabilized in the suppressors.

  15. The E89K Mutation in the Matrix Protein of the Measles Virus Affects In Vitro Cell Death and Virus Replication Efficiency in Human PBMC

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jianbao; Zhu, Wei; Saito, Akatsuki; Goto, Yoshitaka; Iwata, Hiroyuki; Haga, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    Matrix protein is known to have an important role in the process of virus assembly and virion release during measles virus replication. In the present in vitro study, a single mutation of E89K in the matrix protein was shown to affect cell death and virus replication efficiency in human PBMC. One strain with this mutation caused less cell death than the parental virus, and possessed high virus replication efficiency. Moreover, by Annexin V-FITC staining, polycaspase FLICA staining, and double labeling with poly-caspase FLICA and the Hoechst stain, the cell death seen was shown to be apoptosis. PMID:22715352

  16. The yeast omnipotent suppressor SUP46 encodes a ribosomal protein which is a functional and structural homolog of the Escherichia coli S4 ram protein.

    PubMed

    Vincent, A; Liebman, S W

    1992-10-01

    The accurate synthesis of proteins is crucial to the existence of a cell. In yeast, several genes that affect the fidelity of translation have been identified (e.g., omnipotent suppressors, antisuppressors and allosuppressors). We have found that the dominant omnipotent suppressor SUP46 encodes the yeast ribosomal protein S13. S13 is encoded by two similar genes, but only the sup46 copy of the gene is able to fully complement the recessive phenotypes of SUP46 mutations. Both copies of the S13 genes contain introns. Unlike the introns of other duplicated ribosomal protein genes which are highly diverged, the duplicated S13 genes have two nearly identical DNA sequences of 25 and 31 bp in length within their introns. The SUP46 protein has significant homology to the S4 ribosomal protein in prokaryotic-type ribosomes. S4 is encoded by one of the ram (ribosomal ambiguity) genes in Escherichia coli which are the functional equivalent of omnipotent suppressors in yeast. Thus, SUP46 and S4 demonstrate functional as well as sequence conservation between prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosomal proteins. SUP46 and S4 are most similar in their central amino acid sequences. Interestingly, the alterations resulting from the SUP46 mutations and the segment of the S4 protein involved in binding to the 16S rRNA are within this most conserved region.

  17. Location of glycine mutations within a bacterial collagen protein affects degree of disruption of triple-helix folding and conformation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Haiming; Rashid, Shayan; Yu, Zhuoxin; Yoshizumi, Ayumi; Hwang, Eileen; Brodsky, Barbara

    2011-01-21

    The hereditary bone disorder osteogenesis imperfecta is often caused by missense mutations in type I collagen that change one Gly residue to a larger residue and that break the typical (Gly-Xaa-Yaa)(n) sequence pattern. Site-directed mutagenesis in a recombinant bacterial collagen system was used to explore the effects of the Gly mutation position and of the identity of the residue replacing Gly in a homogeneous collagen molecular population. Homotrimeric bacterial collagen proteins with a Gly-to-Arg or Gly-to-Ser replacement formed stable triple-helix molecules with a reproducible 2 °C decrease in stability. All Gly replacements led to a significant delay in triple-helix folding, but a more dramatic delay was observed when the mutation was located near the N terminus of the triple-helix domain. This highly disruptive mutation, close to the globular N-terminal trimerization domain where folding is initiated, is likely to interfere with triple-helix nucleation. A positional effect of mutations was also suggested by trypsin sensitivity for a Gly-to-Arg replacement close to the triple-helix N terminus but not for the same replacement near the center of the molecule. The significant impact of the location of a mutation on triple-helix folding and conformation could relate to the severe consequences of mutations located near the C terminus of type I and type III collagens, where trimerization occurs and triple-helix folding is initiated.

  18. Loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 5q in ovarian cancer is frequently accompanied by TP53 mutation and identifies a tumour suppressor gene locus at 5q13.1-21.

    PubMed Central

    Tavassoli, M.; Steingrimsdottir, H.; Pierce, E.; Jiang, X.; Alagoz, M.; Farzaneh, F.; Campbell, I. G.

    1996-01-01

    Forty-nine ovarian tumours were examined for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome 5 using eight microsatellite markers spanning both arms, including one at the APC locus. LOH on 5q was a frequent event, detectable in 23 of 49 (47%) tumours, whereas 5p LOH was detected in only 1 of 22 tumours (5%). Six tumours showed partial LOH on 5q, enabling the candidate region to be localised to a 22 cM region proximal to APC, flanked by D5S424 and D5S644. An association was found between 5q LOH and TP53 mutation, with 18 of 23 (78%) tumours with LOH on 5q also harbouring a TP53 mutation. LOH on 5q was observed in 6 of 18 (33%) stage I tumours, suggesting that it may be an early event in the molecular pathogenesis of certain ovarian carcinomas. Images Figure 1 PMID:8679443

  19. Mutations in epidermis-specific HD-ZIP IV genes affect floral organ identity in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kamata, Naoko; Okada, Hitomi; Komeda, Yoshibumi; Takahashi, Taku

    2013-08-01

    Development of the epidermis involves members of the class-IV homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-ZIP IV) transcription factors. The Arabidopsis HD-ZIP IV family consists of 16 members, among which PROTODERMAL FACTOR 2 (PDF2) and ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA MERISTEM LAYER 1 (ATML1) play an indispensable role in the differentiation of shoot epidermal cells; however, the functions of other HD-ZIP IV genes that are also expressed specifically in the shoot epidermis remain to be fully elucidated. We constructed double mutant combinations of these HD-ZIP IV mutant alleles and found that the double mutants of pdf2-1 with homeodomain glabrous1-1 (hdg1-1), hdg2-3, hdg5-1 and hdg12-2 produced abnormal flowers with sepaloid petals and carpelloid stamens in association with the reduced expression of the petal and stamen identity gene APETALA 3 (AP3). Expression of another petal and stamen identity gene PISTILATA (PI) was less affected in these mutants. We confirmed that AP3 expression in pdf2-1 hdg2-3 was normally induced at the initial stages of flower development, but was attenuated both in the epidermis and internal cell layers of developing flowers. As the expression of PDF2 and these HD-ZIP IV genes during floral organ formation is exclusively limited to the epidermal cell layer, these double mutations may have non-cell-autonomous effects on AP3 expression in the internal cell layers. Our results suggest that cooperative functions of PDF2 and other members of the HD-ZIP IV family in the epidermis are crucial for normal development of floral organs in Arabidopsis.

  20. Mutations in exons of the CYP17-II gene affect sex steroid concentration in male Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ruiqin; He, Feng; Wen, Haishen; Li, Jifang; Shi, Bao; Shi, Dan; Liu, Miao; Mu, Weijie; Zhang, Yuanqing; Hu, Jian; Han, Weiguo; Zhang, Jianan; Wang, Qingqing; Yuan, Yuren; Liu, Qun

    2012-03-01

    As a specific gene of fish, cytochrome P450c17-II ( CYP17-II) gene plays a key role in the growth, development an reproduction level of fish. In this study, the single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) technique was used to characterize polymorphisms within the coding region of CYP17-II gene in a population of 75 male Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus). Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in CYP17-II gene of Japanese flounder. They were c.G594A (p.G188R), c.G939A and c.G1502A (p.G490D). SNP1 (c.G594A), located in exon 4 of CYP17-II gene, was significantly associated with gonadosomatic index (GSI). Individuals with genotype GG of SNP1 had significantly lower GSI ( P < 0.05) than those with genotype AA or AG. SNP2 (c.G939A) located at the CpG island of CYP17-II gene. The mutation changed the methylation of exon 6. Individuals with genotype AA of SNP2 had significantly lower serum testosterone (T) level and hepatosomatic index (HSI) compared to those with genotype GG. The results suggested that SNP2 could influence the reproductive endocrine of male Japanese flounder. However, the SNP3 (c.G1502A) located in exon 9 did not affect the four measured reproductive traits. This study showed that CYP17-II gene could be a potentially useful candidate gene for the research of genetic breeding and physiological aspects of Japanese flounder.

  1. Fastest Time to Cancer by Loss of Tumor Suppressor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Tapia, Cynthia; Wan, Frederic Y.M.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic instability promotes cancer progression (by increasing the probability of cancerous mutations) as well as hinders it (by imposing a higher cell death rate for cells susceptible to cancerous mutation). With the loss of tumor suppressor gene function known to be responsible for a high percentage of breast and colorectal cancer (and a good fraction of lung and other types as well), it is important to understand how genetic instability can be orchestrated toward carcinogenesis. In this context, this paper gives a complete characterization of the optimal (time-varying) cell mutation rate for the fastest time to a target cancerous cell population through the loss of both copies of a tumor suppressor gene (TSG). Similar to the (1-step) oncogene activation model previously analyzed, the optimal mutation rate of the present 2-step model changes qualitatively with the convexity of the (mutation rate dependent) cell death rate. However, the structure of the Hamiltonian for the new model differs significantly and intrinsically from that of the 1-step model and a completely new approach is needed for the solution of the present 2-step problem. Considerable insight on the biology of optimal switching (between corner controls) is extracted from numerical results for cases with nonconvex death rates. PMID:25338553

  2. Tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system PCR (T-ARMS-PCR) rapidly identified a critical missense mutation (P236T) of bovine ACADVL gene affecting growth traits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sihuan; Dang, Yonglong; Zhang, Qingfeng; Qin, Qiaomei; Lei, Chuzhao; Chen, Hong; Lan, Xianyong

    2015-04-01

    Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, very long chain (ACADVL), encoding ACADVL protein, targets the inner mitochondrial membrane where it catalyzes the first step of the mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation pathway and plays an important role in body metabolism and oxidation of long chain fatty acid releasing energy. Tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system PCR (T-ARMS-PCR) is an easy-to-operate, rapid, inexpensive, and exact method for SNP genotyping. Herein, T-ARMS-PCR was carried out to detect a critical missense mutation (AC_000176:g.2885C>A; Pro236Thr) within the ACADVL gene in 644 individuals from two cattle breeds. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the T-ARMS-PCR at this locus, the genotype of the sampled individuals was also identified by PCR-RFLP. The concordance between these two methods was 98.76%. Statistical analysis showed that the bovine ACADVL gene had a significant effect on chest width (P<0.05), chest depth (P<0.05), and hip width (P<0.05) in the Qinchuan breed. The cattle with AA genotype had superior growth traits compared to cattle with AC and/or CC genotypes. The "A" allele had positive effects on growth traits. Therefore, T-ARMS-PCR can replace PCR-RFLP for rapid genotyping of this mutation, which could be used as a DNA marker for selecting individuals with superior growth traits in the Qinchuan breed. These findings contribute to breeding and genetics in beef cattle industry.

  3. Severe fluoropyrimidine toxicity due to novel and rare DPYD missense mutations, deletion and genomic amplification affecting DPD activity and mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    van Kuilenburg, André B P; Meijer, Judith; Maurer, Dirk; Dobritzsch, Doreen; Meinsma, Rutger; Los, Maartje; Knegt, Lia C; Zoetekouw, Lida; Jansen, Rob L H; Dezentjé, Vincent; van Huis-Tanja, Lieke H; van Kampen, Roel J W; Hertz, Jens Michael; Hennekam, Raoul C M

    2017-03-01

    Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) is the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in the catabolism of 5-fluorouracil (5FU). Genetic variations in DPD have emerged as predictive risk factors for severe fluoropyrimidine toxicity. Here, we report novel and rare genetic variants underlying DPD deficiency in 9 cancer patients presenting with severe fluoropyrimidine-associated toxicity. All patients possessed a strongly reduced DPD activity, ranging from 9 to 53% of controls. Analysis of the DPD gene (DPYD) showed the presence of 21 variable sites including 4 novel and 4 very rare aberrations: 3 missense mutations, 2 splice-site mutations, 1 intronic mutation, a deletion of 21 nucleotides and a genomic amplification of exons 9-12. Two novel/rare variants (c.2843T>C, c.321+1G>A) were present in multiple, unrelated patients. Functional analysis of recombinantly-expressed DPD mutants carrying the p.I948T and p.G284V mutation showed residual DPD activities of 30% and 0.5%, respectively. Analysis of a DPD homology model indicated that the p.I948T and p.G284V mutations may affect electron transfer and the binding of FAD, respectively. cDNA analysis showed that the c.321+1G>A mutation in DPYD leads to skipping of exon 4 immediately upstream of the mutated splice-donor site in the process of DPD pre-mRNA splicing. A lethal toxicity in two DPD patients suggests that fluoropyrimidines combined with other therapies such as radiotherapy might be particularly toxic for DPD deficient patients. Our study advocates a more comprehensive genotyping approach combined with phenotyping strategies for upfront screening for DPD deficiency to ensure the safe administration of fluoropyrimidines.

  4. Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 and Liddle’s syndrome mutations that affect the single-channel properties of the epithelial Na+ channel

    PubMed Central

    Boiko, Nina; Kucher, Volodymyr; Stockand, James D

    2015-01-01

    These studies test whether three disease-causing mutations in genes (SCNN1A and SCNN1G) encoding subunits of the epithelial Na+ channel, ENaC, affect the biophysical and gating properties of this important renal ion channel. The S562P missense mutation in αENaC and the K106_S108delinsN mutation in γENaC are associated with pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA1). The N530S missense mutation in γENaC causes Liddle’s syndrome. Incorporation of S562P into αENaC and K106_S108N into γENaC resulted in significant decreases in macroscopic ENaC currents. Conversely, incorporation of N530S into γENaC increased macroscopic ENaC current. The S562P substitution resulted in a nonfunctional channel. The K106_S108N mutation produced a functional channel having a normal macroscopic current–voltage relation, there was a slight but significant decrease in unitary conductance and a marked decrease in single-channel open probability. The N530S substitution increased single-channel open probability having no effect on the macroscopic current–voltage relation or unitary conductance of the channel. These findings are consistent with mutation of residues at 562 in αENaC and 530 in γENaC, and a 3′ splice site in SCNN1G (318-1 G→A; K106_108SdelinsN) resulting in aberrant ENaC activity due to changes in the biophysical and gating properties of the channel. Such changes likely contribute to the cellular mechanism underpinning the PHA1 and Liddle’s syndrome caused by these mutations in ENaC subunits. PMID:26537344

  5. Publisher's note. Identification of a novel synonymous mutation in the human β-ureidopropionase gene UPB1 affecting pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Meijer, J; Nakajima, Y; Zhang, C; Meinsma, R; Ito, T; Van Kuilenburg, A B P

    2014-01-01

    β-Ureidopropionase is the third enzyme of the pyrimidine degradation pathway and it catalyzes the conversion of N-carbamyl-β-alanine and N-carbamyl-β-aminoisobutyric acid to β-alanine and β-aminoisobutyric acid, respectively, and ammonia and CO2. To date, only 16 genetically confirmed patients with a complete ß-ureidopropionase deficiency have been reported. Here, we report the clinical, biochemical, and molecular analysis of a newly identified patient with β-ureidopropionase deficiency. Mutation analysis of the UPB1 gene showed that the patient was compound heterozygous for a novel synonymous mutation c.93C>T (p.Gly31Gly) in exon 1 and a previously described missense mutation c.977G>A (p.Arg326Gln) in exon 9. The in silico predicted effect of the synonymous mutation p.Gly31Gly on pre-mRNA splicing was investigated using a minigene approach. Wild-type and the mutated minigene constructs, containing the entire exon 1, intron 1, and exon 2 of UPB1, yielded different splicing products after expression in HEK293 cells. The c.93C>T (p.Gly31Gly) mutation resulted in altered pre-mRNA splicing of the UPB1 minigene construct and a deletion of the last 13 nucleotides of exon 1. This deletion (r.92 104delGCAAGGAACTCAG) results in a frame shift and the generation of a premature stop codon (p.Lys32SerfsX31). Using a minigene approach, we have thus identified the first synonymous mutation in the UPB1 gene, creating a cryptic splice-donor site affecting pre-mRNA splicing.

  6. Correspondence regarding Ballana et al., "Mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene mutations affect RNA secondary structure and lead to variable penetrance in hearing impairment".

    PubMed

    Abreu-Silva, R S; Batissoco, A C; Lezirovitz, K; Romanos, J; Rincon, D; Auricchio, M T B M; Otto, P A; Mingroni-Netto, R C

    2006-05-12

    Ballana et al. [E. Ballana, E. Morales, R. Rabionet, B. Montserrat, M. Ventayol, O. Bravo, P. Gasparini, X. Estivill, Mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene mutations affect RNA secondary structure and lead to variable penetrance in hearing impairment, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 341 (2006) 950-957] detected a T1291C mutation segregating in a Cuban pedigree with hearing impairment. They interpreted it as probably pathogenic, based on family history, RNA conformation prediction and its absence in a control group of 95 Spanish subjects. We screened a sample of 203 deaf subjects and 300 hearing controls (110 "European-Brazilians" and 190 "African-Brazilians") for the mitochondrial mutations A1555G and T1291C. Five deaf subjects had the T1291C substitution, three isolated cases and two familial cases. In the latter, deafness was paternally inherited or segregated with the A1555G mutation. This doesn't support the hypothesis of T1291C mutation being pathogenic. Two "African-Brazilian" controls also had the T1291C substitution. Six of the seven T1291C-carriers (five deaf and two controls) had mitochondrial DNA of African origin, belonging to macrohaplogroup L1/L2. Therefore, these data point to T1291C substitution as most probably an African non-pathogenic polymorphism.

  7. Relationship between a point mutation S97C in CK1δ protein and its affect on ATP-binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ambuj; Rajendran, Vidya; Sethumadhavan, Rao; Purohit, Rituraj

    2014-01-01

    CK1δ (Casein kinase I isoform delta) is a member of CK1 kinase family protein that mediates neurite outgrowth and the function as brain-specific microtubule-associated protein. ATP binding kinase domain of CK1δ is essential for regulating several key cell cycle signal transduction pathways. Mutation in CK1δ protein is reported to cause cancers and affects normal brain development. S97C mutation in kinase domain of CK1δ protein has been involved to induce breast cancer and ductal carcinoma. We performed molecular docking studies to examine the effect of this mutation on its ATP-binding affinity. Further, we conducted molecular dynamics simulations to understand the structural consequences of S97C mutation over the kinase domain of CK1δ protein. Docking results indicated the loss of ATP-binding affinity of mutant structure, which were further rationalized by molecular dynamics simulations, where a notable loss in 3-D conformation of CK1δ kinase domain was observed in mutant as compared to native. Our results explained the underlying molecular mechanism behind the observed cancer associated phenotype caused by S97C mutation in CK1δ protein.

  8. Patient affected by neurofibromatosis type 1 and thyroid C-cell hyperplasia harboring pathogenic germ-line mutations in both NF1 and RET genes.

    PubMed

    Ercolino, Tonino; Lai, Roberta; Giachè, Valentino; Melchionda, Salvatore; Carella, Massimo; Delitala, Alessandro; Mannelli, Massimo; Fanciulli, Giuseppe

    2014-02-25

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a rare autosomal dominant disease with an estimated incidence of 1 in 3000/3500 live births. NF1 is caused by a mutation in a gene which encodes a protein known as neurofibromin. In up to 5% of cases, NF1 is associated with pheochromocytomas. RET proto-oncogene encodes a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family involved in the normal development or the neoplastic growth of neural crest cell lineages. Germ-line RET mutations account for cases of Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2 (MEN2), an autosomal dominant genetic syndrome where medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is the major and more clinically severe feature, with nearly complete penetrance. C-cell hyperplasia (CCH) is described in MEN2 patients, and it has been implicated as the precursor of in situ MTC. Patients with RET mutations develop pheochromocytomas in 50% of cases. Rarely, patients with NF1 have been found to present, in addition to the NF1 clinical picture, other lesions, such as parathyroid hyperplasia/adenoma and/or medullary thyroid carcinoma. In spite of the presence of these MEN2 lesions, in none of these patients mutations of gene RET have been found so far. In this report, we describe the first case of a patient affected by a germ-line mutation in both NF1 and RET genes.

  9. Characterization of an acromesomelic dysplasia, Grebe type case: novel mutation affecting the recognition motif at the processing site of GDF5.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Garcia, Monica; Garcia-Canto, Eva; Fenollar-Cortes, Maria; Aytes, Antonio Perez; Trujillo-Tiebas, María José

    2016-09-01

    Acromesomelic dysplasia, Grebe type is a very rare skeletal dysplasia characterized by severe dwarfism with marked micromelia and deformation of the upper and lower limbs, with a proximodistal gradient of severity. CDMP1 gene mutations have been associated with Grebe syndrome, Hunter-Thompson syndrome, Du Pan syndrome and brachydactyly type C. The proband is a 4-year-old boy, born of consanguineous Pakistani parents. Radiographic imaging revealed features typical of Grebe syndrome: severe shortening of the forearms with an acromesomelic pattern following a proximodistal gradient, with distal parts more severely affected than medial parts; hypoplastic hands, with the phalangeal zone more affected than the metacarpal zone; and severe hypoplastic tibial/femoral zones in both limbs. After molecular analyses, the p.Arg377Trp variant in a homozygous pattern was identified in the CDMP1 gene in the affected child. In silico and structural analyses predicted the p.Arg377Trp amino acid change to be pathogenic. Of the 34 mutations described in the CDMP1 gene, four different missense mutations have been associated with Grebe syndrome. The CDMP1 gene encodes growth differentiation factor 5 (GDF5), which plays a role in regulation of limb patterning, joint formation and distal bone growth. Homozygous mutations in the mature domain of GDF5 result in severe limb malformations such as the Grebe type or the Hunter-Thompson type of acromesomelic chondrodysplasia. The p.Arg377Trp mutation is located within the recognition motif at the processing site of GDF5 where the sequence RRKRR changes to WRKRR. The genotype-phenotype correlation allowed not only confirmation of the clinical diagnosis but also appropriate genetic counselling to be offered to this family.

  10. Dominant-negative mutation in the beta2 and beta6 proteasome subunit genes affect alternative cell fate decisions in the Drosophila sense organ lineage.

    PubMed

    Schweisguth, F

    1999-09-28

    In Drosophila, dominant-negative mutations in the beta2 and beta6 proteasome catalytic subunit genes have been identified as dominant temperature-sensitive (DTS) mutations. At restrictive temperature, beta2 and beta6 DTS mutations confer lethality at the pupal stage. I investigate here the role of proteasome activity in regulating cell fate decisions in the sense organ lineage at the early pupal stage. Temperature-shift experiments in beta2 and beta6 DTS mutant pupae occasionally resulted in external sense organs with two sockets and no shaft. This double-socket phenotype was strongly enhanced in conditions in which Notch signaling was up-regulated. Furthermore, conditional overexpression of the beta6 dominant-negative mutant subunit led to shaft-to-socket and to neuron-to-sheath cell fate transformations, which are both usually associated with increased Notch signaling activity. Finally, expression of the beta6 dominant-negative mutant subunit led to the stabilization of an ectopically expressed nuclear form of Notch in imaginal wing discs. This study demonstrates that mutations affecting two distinct proteasome catalytic subunits affect two alternative cell fate decisions and enhance Notch signaling activity in the sense organ lineage. These findings raise the possibility that the proteasome targets an active form of the Notch receptor for degradation in Drosophila.

  11. Mutations in the helper component protease gene of zucchini yellow mosaic virus affect its ability to mediate aphid transmissibility.

    PubMed

    Huet, H; Gal-On, A; Meir, E; Lecoq, H; Raccah, B

    1994-06-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the helper component protease (HC-Pro) genes of three zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) strains has been compared with that of a helper-deficient strain of ZYMV-HC. The comparisons revealed three unique deduced amino acid differences. Two of these mutations were located in regions which are conserved in other potyviruses. The role of these mutations in aphid transmissibility was examined by exchanging DNA fragments of part of the deficient HC-Pro gene with the respective section within the gene of the infectious full-length clone of the aphid-transmissible ZYMV. The first exchange included two of the three mutations, the first coding for a change from Asp to Gly (in a non-conserved region) and the second coding for a change from Arg to Ile [within the Phe-Arg-Asp-Lys (FRNK) conserved box]. This exchange resulted in a reduced transmission (20.6% for the mutated virus compared with 57.4% in the normal ZYMV when acquired from plants and 37.2% compared with 83.1%, respectively, when acquired from membranes). The second exchange incorporated a single mutation [conferring a change from Thr to Ala within the Pro-Thr-Lys (PTK) conserved box]. This single mutation resulted in almost total loss of HC activity in aphid transmission both from plants and from membranes. The Lys residue in the conserved Lys-Ile-Thr-Cys (KITC) box, which is related to loss of HC activity in potato virus Y, tobacco vein mottling virus and in the Michigan strain of ZYMV, is unchanged in the helper-deficient ZYMV. It is therefore proposed that more than one site in HC-Pro may be functionally related to aphid transmissibility. The possible reasons for the role of these mutations in helper activity in aphid transmission of ZYMV are discussed.

  12. NS1 Protein Mutation I64T Affects Interferon Responses and Virulence of Circulating H3N2 Human Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    DeDiego, Marta L.; Nogales, Aitor; Lambert-Emo, Kris; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza NS1 protein is the main viral protein counteracting host innate immune responses, allowing the virus to efficiently replicate in interferon (IFN)-competent systems. In this study, we analyzed NS1 protein variability within influenza A (IAV) H3N2 viruses infecting humans during the 2012-2013 season. We also evaluated the impact of the mutations on the ability of NS1 proteins to inhibit host innate immune responses and general gene expression. Surprisingly, a previously unidentified mutation in the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding domain (I64T) decreased NS1-mediated general inhibition of host protein synthesis by decreasing its interaction with cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 (CPSF30), leading to increased innate immune responses after viral infection. Notably, a recombinant A/Puerto Rico/8/34 H1N1 virus encoding the H3N2 NS1-T64 protein was highly attenuated in mice, most likely because of its ability to induce higher antiviral IFN responses at early times after infection and because this virus is highly sensitive to the IFN-induced antiviral state. Interestingly, using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected at the acute visit (2 to 3 days after infection), we show that the subject infected with the NS1-T64 attenuated virus has diminished responses to interferon and to interferon induction, suggesting why this subject could be infected with this highly IFN-sensitive virus. These data demonstrate the importance of influenza virus surveillance in identifying new mutations in the NS1 protein, affecting its ability to inhibit innate immune responses and, as a consequence, the pathogenicity of the virus. IMPORTANCE Influenza A and B viruses are one of the most common causes of respiratory infections in humans, causing 1 billion infections and between 300,000 and 500,000 deaths annually. Influenza virus surveillance to identify new mutations in the NS1 protein affecting innate immune responses and, as a consequence

  13. Variable Autosomal and X Divergence Near and Far from Genes Affects Estimates of Male Mutation Bias in Great Apes

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Pooja; Wilson Sayres, Melissa A.

    2016-01-01

    Male mutation bias, when more mutations are passed on via the male germline than via the female germline, is observed across mammals. One common way to infer the magnitude of male mutation bias, α, is to compare levels of neutral sequence divergence between genomic regions that spend different amounts of time in the male and female germline. For great apes, including human, we show that estimates of divergence are reduced in putatively unconstrained regions near genes relative to unconstrained regions far from genes. Divergence increases with increasing distance from genes on both the X chromosome and autosomes, but increases faster on the X chromosome than autosomes. As a result, ratios of X/A divergence increase with increasing distance from genes and corresponding estimates of male mutation bias are significantly higher in intergenic regions near genes versus far from genes. Future studies in other species will need to carefully consider the effect that genomic location will have on estimates of male mutation bias. PMID:27702816

  14. An F1 genetic screen for maternal-effect mutations affecting embryonic pattern formation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Luschnig, Stefan; Moussian, Bernard; Krauss, Jana; Desjeux, Isabelle; Perkovic, Josip; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2004-01-01

    Large-scale screens for female-sterile mutations have revealed genes required maternally for establishment of the body axes in the Drosophila embryo. Although it is likely that the majority of components involved in axis formation have been identified by this approach, certain genes have escaped detection. This may be due to (1) incomplete saturation of the screens for female-sterile mutations and (2) genes with essential functions in zygotic development that mutate to lethality, precluding their identification as female-sterile mutations. To overcome these limitations, we performed a genetic mosaic screen aimed at identifying new maternal genes required for early embryonic patterning, including zygotically required ones. Using the Flp-FRT technique and a visible germline clone marker, we developed a system that allows efficient screening for maternal-effect phenotypes after only one generation of breeding, rather than after the three generations required for classic female-sterile screens. We identified 232 mutants showing various defects in embryonic pattern or morphogenesis. The mutants were ordered into 10 different phenotypic classes. A total of 174 mutants were assigned to 86 complementation groups with two alleles on average. Mutations in 45 complementation groups represent most previously known maternal genes, while 41 complementation groups represent new loci, including several involved in dorsoventral, anterior-posterior, and terminal patterning. PMID:15166158

  15. SUMF1 mutations affecting stability and activity of formylglycine generating enzyme predict clinical outcome in multiple sulfatase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schlotawa, Lars; Ennemann, Eva Charlotte; Radhakrishnan, Karthikeyan; Schmidt, Bernhard; Chakrapani, Anupam; Christen, Hans-Jürgen; Moser, Hugo; Steinmann, Beat; Dierks, Thomas; Gärtner, Jutta

    2011-03-01

    Multiple Sulfatase Deficiency (MSD) is caused by mutations in the sulfatase-modifying factor 1 gene encoding the formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE). FGE post translationally activates all newly synthesized sulfatases by generating the catalytic residue formylglycine. Impaired FGE function leads to reduced sulfatase activities. Patients display combined clinical symptoms of single sulfatase deficiencies. For ten MSD patients, we determined the clinical phenotype, FGE expression, localization and stability, as well as residual FGE and sulfatase activities. A neonatal, very severe clinical phenotype resulted from a combination of two nonsense mutations leading to almost fully abrogated FGE activity, highly unstable FGE protein and nearly undetectable sulfatase activities. A late infantile mild phenotype resulted from FGE G263V leading to unstable protein but high residual FGE activity. Other missense mutations resulted in a late infantile severe phenotype because of unstable protein with low residual FGE activity. Patients with identical mutations displayed comparable clinical phenotypes. These data confirm the hypothesis that the phenotypic outcome in MSD depends on both residual FGE activity as well as protein stability. Predicting the clinical course in case of molecularly characterized mutations seems feasible, which will be helpful for genetic counseling and developing therapeutic strategies aiming at enhancement of FGE.

  16. The Genetics of a Small Autosomal Region of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER Containing the Structural Gene for Alcohol Dehydrogenase. III. Hypomorphic and Hypermorphic Mutations Affecting the Expression of Hairless

    PubMed Central

    Ashburner, Michael

    1982-01-01

    A lethal locus (l(2)br7;35B6-10), near Adh on chromosome arm 2L of D. melanogaster, is identified with Plunkett's dominant suppressor of Hairless (H). Of eight new alleles, seven act as dominant suppressors of H, the eighth is a dominant enhancer of H. One of the suppressor alleles is both a leaky lethal and a weak suppressor of H. Confirming Nash (1970), deletions of l(2)br7 are dominant suppressors, and duplications are dominant enhancers of H. A simple model is proposed to account for the interaction of l(2)br7 and H, assuming that amorphic (or hypomorphic) alleles of l(2)br7 suppress H and that hypermorphic alleles enhance H. PMID:6816670

  17. Robust homology-directed repair within mouse mammary tissue is not specifically affected by Brca2 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Kass, Elizabeth M.; Lim, Pei Xin; Helgadottir, Hildur R.; Moynahan, Mary Ellen; Jasin, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The mammary gland undergoes significant proliferative stages after birth, but little is known about how the developmental changes impact DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Mutations in multiple genes involved in homology-directed repair (HDR), considered a particularly accurate pathway for repairing DSBs, are linked to breast cancer susceptibility, including BRCA2. Using reporter mice that express an inducible endonuclease, we find that HDR is particularly robust in mammary tissue during puberty and pregnancy, accounting for 34–40% of detected repair events, more than in other tissues examined. Brca2 hypomorphic mutation leads to HDR defects in mammary epithelium during puberty and pregnancy, including in different epithelial lineages. Notably, a similar dependence on Brca2 is observed in other proliferative tissues, including small intestine epithelium. Our results suggest that the greater reliance on HDR in the proliferating mammary gland, rather than a specific dependence on BRCA2, may increase its susceptibility to tumorigenesis incurred by BRCA2 mutation. PMID:27779185

  18. The site-directed mutation I(L177)H in Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center affects coordination of P(A) and B(B) bacteriochlorophylls.

    PubMed

    Vasilieva, L G; Fufina, T Y; Gabdulkhakov, A G; Leonova, M M; Khatypov, R A; Shuvalov, V A

    2012-08-01

    To explore the influence of the I(L177)H single mutation on the properties of the nearest bacteriochlorophylls (BChls), three reaction centers (RCs) bearing double mutations were constructed in the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, and their properties and pigment content were compared with those of the correspondent single mutant RCs. Each pair of the mutations comprised the amino acid substitution I(L177)H and another mutation altering histidine ligand of BChl P(A) or BChl B(B). Contrary to expectations, the double mutation I(L177)H+H(L173)L does not bring about a heterodimer RC but causes a 46nm blue shift of the long-wavelength P absorbance band. The histidine L177 or a water molecule were suggested as putative ligands for P(A) in the RC I(L177)H+H(L173)L although this would imply a reorientation of the His backbone and additional rearrangements in the primary donor environment or even a repositioning of the BChl dimer. The crystal structure of the mutant I(L177)H reaction center determined to a resolution of 2.9Å shows changes at the interface region between the BChl P(A) and the monomeric BChl B(B). Spectral and pigment analysis provided evidence for β-coordination of the BChl B(B) in the double mutant RC I(L177)H+H(M182)L and for its hexacoordination in the mutant reaction center I(L177)H. Computer modeling suggests involvement of two water molecules in the β-coordination of the BChl B(B). Possible structural consequences of the L177 mutation affecting the coordination of the two BChls P(A) and B(B) are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability: from Natural to Artificial.

  19. Systematic analyses of rpm-1 suppressors reveal roles for ESS-2 in mRNA splicing in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Noma, Kentaro; Goncharov, Alexandr; Jin, Yishi

    2014-11-01

    The PHR (Pam/Highwire/RPM-1) family of ubiquitin E3 ligases plays conserved roles in axon patterning and synaptic development. Genetic modifier analysis has greatly aided the discovery of the signal transduction cascades regulated by these proteins. In Caenorhabditis elegans, loss of function in rpm-1 causes axon overgrowth and aberrant presynaptic morphology, yet the mutant animals exhibit little behavioral deficits. Strikingly, rpm-1 mutations strongly synergize with loss of function in the presynaptic active zone assembly factors, syd-1 and syd-2, resulting in severe locomotor deficits. Here, we provide ultrastructural evidence that double mutants, between rpm-1 and syd-1 or syd-2, dramatically impair synapse formation. Taking advantage of the synthetic locomotor defects to select for genetic suppressors, previous studies have identified the DLK-1 MAP kinase cascade negatively regulated by RPM-1. We now report a comprehensive analysis of a large number of suppressor mutations of this screen. Our results highlight the functional specificity of the DLK-1 cascade in synaptogenesis. We also identified two previously uncharacterized genes. One encodes a novel protein, SUPR-1, that acts cell autonomously to antagonize RPM-1. The other affects a conserved protein ESS-2, the homolog of human ES2 or DGCR14. Loss of function in ess-2 suppresses rpm-1 only in the presence of a dlk-1 splice acceptor mutation. We show that ESS-2 acts to promote accurate mRNA splicing when the splice site is compromised. The human DGCR14/ES2 resides in a deleted chromosomal region implicated in DiGeorge syndrome, and its mutation has shown high probability as a risk factor for schizophrenia. Our findings provide the first functional evidence that this family of proteins regulate mRNA splicing in a context-specific manner.

  20. TET2 mutations affect non-CpG island DNA methylation at enhancers and transcription factor binding sites in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Jumpei; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Lu, Yue; Cesaroni, Matteo; Madzo, Jozef; Neumann, Frank; He, Rong; Taby, Rodolphe; Vasanthakumar, Aparna; Macrae, Trisha; Ostler, Kelly R.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Liang, Shoudan; Estecio, Marcos R.; Godley, Lucy A.; Issa, Jean-Pierre J.

    2015-01-01

    TET2 enzymatically converts 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine as well as other covalently-modified cytosines and its mutations are common in myeloid leukemia. However, the exact mechanism and the extent to which TET2 mutations affect DNA methylation remain in question. Here we report on DNA methylomes in TET2 wild type (TET2-WT) and mutant (TET2-MT) cases of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). We analyzed 85,134 CpG sites (28,114 sites in CpG islands (CGIs) and 57,020 in non-CpG islands (NCGIs)). TET2 mutations do not explain genome-wide differences in DNA methylation in CMML, and we found few and inconsistent differences at CGIs between TET2-WT and TET2-MT cases. By contrast, we identified 409 (0.71%) TET2-specific differentially methylated CpGs (tet2-DMCs) in NCGIs, 86% of which were hypermethylated in TET2-MT cases, suggesting a strikingly different biology of the effects of TET2 mutations at CGIs and NCGIs. DNA methylation of tet2-DMCs at promoters and non-promoters repressed gene expression. Tet2-DMCs showed significant enrichment at hematopoietic-specific enhancers marked by H3K4me1, and at binding sites for the transcription factor p300. Tet2-DMCs showed significantly lower 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in TET2-MT cases. We conclude that leukemia-associated TET2 mutations affect DNA methylation at NCGI regions containing hematopoietic-specific enhancers and transcription factor binding sites. PMID:25972343

  1. Segregation of the fragile-X mutation from an affected male: Evidence of unusual somatic instability in the FMR-1 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Kambouris, M.; Bluhm, D.; Feldman, G.L.

    1994-09-01

    Fragile X syndrome is associated with an unstable CGG-repeat in the FMR-1 gene. There are few reports of affected males transmitting the FMR-1 gene to offspring. We report a family in which the paternal grandfather has an unusual FMR-1 pattern, with allele sizes ranging from premutation to full mutation. The family was initially ascertained because of a diagnosis of fragile X syndrome in this individual`s grandson. For Southern blot analyses, the samples were digested with Pst 1 and hybridized to the pE5.1 probe or digested with HindIII and hybridized to the StB12.3 probe. The proband had a high molecular weight allele, indicating significant amplifications, and an abnormal methylation pattern, consistent with a full mutation. His twin sister, who also had features of fragile X syndrome, had a similar pattern in addition to her normal allele (30 repeats). Their mother had one normal allele (33 repeats) and a premutation allele (>130 CGG repeats), with a normal methylation pattern. The maternal grandmother had alleles of 32 and 33 CGG repeats. These findings support the hypothesis that transmission of a full fragile-X mutation does not occur through a male, even if that male has clincial and molecular evidence of a full mutation. Gonadal mosaicism is an alternative explanation. Thus, an affected male with extensive FMR-1 somatic mosaicism transmitted a large premutation to his daughter, who in turn transmitted a full mutation to both of her offspring. FMR-1 protein studies on this individual, which are in progress, should help to determine the correlation, if any, of the molecular findings with the phenotypic effects.

  2. Tumor suppressor genes in familial adenomatous polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Eshghifar, Nahal; Farrokhi, Naser; Naji, Tahereh; Zali, Mohammadreza

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is mostly due to a series of genetic alterations that are being greatly under the influence of the environmental factors. These changes, mutational or epigenetic modifications at transcriptional forefront and/or post-transcriptional effects via miRNAs, include inactivation and the conversion of proto-oncogene to oncogenes, and/or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes (TSG). Here, a thorough review was carried out on the role of TSGs with the focus on the APC as the master regulator, mutated genes and mal-/dysfunctional pathways that lead to one type of hereditary form of the CRC; namely familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). This review provides a venue towards defining candidate genes that can be used as new PCR-based markers for early diagnosis of FAP. In addition to diagnosis, defining the modes of genetic alterations will open door towards genome editing to either suppress the disease or reduce its progression during the course of action. PMID:28331559

  3. Carcinogen-specific mutational and epigenetic alterations in INK4A, INK4B and p53 tumour-suppressor genes drive induced senescence bypass in normal diploid mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Yasaei, H; Gilham, E; Pickles, J C; Roberts, T P; O'Donovan, M; Newbold, R F

    2013-01-10

    Immortalization (senescence bypass) is a critical rate-limiting step in the malignant transformation of mammalian somatic cells. Human cells must breach at least two distinct senescence barriers to permit unfettered clonal evolution during cancer development: (1) stress- or oncogene-induced premature senescence (SIPS/OIS), mediated via the p16-Rb and/or ARF-p53-p21 tumour-suppressive pathways, and (2) replicative senescence triggered by telomere shortening. In contrast, because their telomerase is constitutively active, cells from small rodents possess only the SIPS/OIS barrier, and are therefore useful for studying SIPS/OIS bypass in isolation. Dermal fibroblasts from the Syrian hamster (SHD cells) are exceptionally resistant to spontaneous SIPS bypass, but it can be readily induced following exposure to a wide range of chemical and physical carcinogens. Here we show that a spectrum of carcinogen-specific mutational and epigenetic alterations involving the INK4A (p16), p53 and INK4B (p15) genes are associated with induced SIPS bypass. With ionizing radiation, immortalization is invariably accompanied by efficient biallelic deletion of the complete INK4/CDKN2 locus. In comparison, SHD cells immortalized by the powerful polycyclic hydrocarbon carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene display transversion point mutations in the DNA-binding domain of p53 coupled with INK4 alterations such as loss of expression of p15. Epimutational silencing of p16 is the primary event associated with immortalization by nickel, a human non-genotoxic carcinogen. As SIPS/OIS bypass is a prerequisite for the immortalization of normal diploid human epithelial cells, our results with the SHD model will provide a basis for delineating combinations of key molecular changes underpinning this important event in human carcinogenesis.

  4. The Lack of the Essential LptC Protein in the Trans-Envelope Lipopolysaccharide Transport Machine Is Circumvented by Suppressor Mutations in LptF, an Inner Membrane Component of the Escherichia coli Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Benedet, Mattia; Falchi, Federica A.; Puccio, Simone; Di Benedetto, Cristiano; Peano, Clelia; Polissi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) transport (Lpt) system is responsible for transferring LPS from the periplasmic surface of the inner membrane (IM) to the outer leaflet of the outer membrane (OM), where it plays a crucial role in OM selective permeability. In E. coli seven essential proteins are assembled in an Lpt trans-envelope complex, which is conserved in γ-Proteobacteria. LptBFG constitute the IM ABC transporter, LptDE form the OM translocon for final LPS delivery, whereas LptC, an IM-anchored protein with a periplasmic domain, interacts with the IM ABC transporter, the periplasmic protein LptA, and LPS. Although essential, LptC can tolerate several mutations and its role in LPS transport is unclear. To get insights into the functional role of LptC in the Lpt machine we searched for viable mutants lacking LptC by applying a strong double selection for lptC deletion mutants. Genome sequencing of viable ΔlptC mutants revealed single amino acid substitutions at a unique position in the predicted large periplasmic domain of the IM component LptF (LptFSupC). In complementation tests, lptFSupC mutants suppress lethality of both ΔlptC and lptC conditional expression mutants. Our data show that mutations in a specific residue of the predicted LptF periplasmic domain can compensate the lack of the essential protein LptC, implicate such LptF domain in the formation of the periplasmic bridge between the IM and OM complexes, and suggest that LptC may have evolved to improve the performance of an ancestral six-component Lpt machine. PMID:27529623

  5. Aerodynamic Noise and Suppressors,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-29

    not only disturbs people, it also excites the chickens and dogs, causes milk cows to stop producing milk , and pigs, horses, and cows to be affected...Figure 3.34, when the distance between holes is greater than the diameter of the holes, the acoustic impedance per area a is ZA - r, + llaMA , (3. 1)9

  6. Identification and Characterization of a Mutation Affecting the Division Arrest Signaling of the Pheromone Response Pathway in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, H. A.

    1990-01-01

    Mating pheromones, a- and α-factors, arrest the division of cells of opposite mating types, α and a cells, respectively. I have isolated a sterile mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is defective in division arrest in response to α-factor but not defective in morphological changes and agglutinin induction. The mutation was designated dac2 for division arrest control by mating pheromones. The dac2 mutation was closely linked to gal1 and was different from the previously identified cell type nonspecific sterile mutations (ste4, ste5, ste7, ste11, ste12, ste18 and dac1). Although dac2 cells had no phenotype in the absence of pheromones, they showed morphological alterations and divided continuously in the presence of pheromones. As a result, dac2 cells had a mating defect. The dac2 mutation could suppress the lethality caused by the disruption of the GPA1 gene (previously shown to encode a protein with similarity to the α subunit of mammalian G proteins). In addition, dac2 cells formed prezygotes with wild-type cells of opposite mating types, although they could not undergo cell fusion. These results suggest that the DAC2 product may control the signal for G-protein-mediated cell-cycle arrest and indicate that the synchronization of haploid yeast cell cycles by mating pheromones is essential for cell fusion during conjugation. PMID:2407613

  7. Differential secretion of the mutated protein is a major component affecting phenotypic severity in CRLF1-associated disorders

    PubMed Central

    Herholz, Jana; Meloni, Alessandra; Marongiu, Mara; Chiappe, Francesca; Deiana, Manila; Herrero, Carmen Roche; Zampino, Giuseppe; Hamamy, Hanan; Zalloum, Yusra; Waaler, Per Erik; Crisponi, Giangiorgio; Crisponi, Laura; Rutsch, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Crisponi syndrome (CS) and cold-induced sweating syndrome type 1 (CISS1) are disorders caused by mutations in CRLF1. The two syndromes share clinical characteristics, such as dysmorphic features, muscle contractions, scoliosis and cold-induced sweating, with CS patients showing a severe clinical course in infancy involving hyperthermia, associated with death in most cases in the first years of life. To evaluate a potential genotype/phenotype correlation and whether CS and CISS1 represent two allelic diseases or manifestations at different ages of the same disorder, we carried out a detailed clinical analysis of 19 patients carrying mutations in CRLF1. We studied the functional significance of the mutations found in CRLF1, providing evidence that phenotypic severity of the two disorders mainly depends on altered kinetics of secretion of the mutated CRLF1 protein. On the basis of these findings, we believe that the two syndromes, CS and CISS1, represent manifestations of the same disorder, with different degrees of severity. We suggest renaming the two genetic entities CS and CISS1 with the broader term of Sohar–Crisponi syndrome. PMID:21326283

  8. The hunt for a functional mutation affecting conformation and calving traits on chromosome 18 in Holstein cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequence data from 11 US Holstein bulls were analyzed to identify putative causal mutations associated with calving and conformation traits. The SNP ARS-BFGL-NGS-109285 at 57,589,121 bp (UMD 3.1 assembly) on BTA18 has large effects on 4 measures of body shape and size, 2 measures of dystocia, longev...

  9. Mutations Affecting Starch Synthase III in Arabidopsis Alter Leaf Starch Structure and Increase the Rate of Starch Synthesis1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Myers, Alan M.; James, Martha G.

    2005-01-01

    The role of starch synthase (SS) III (SSIII) in the synthesis of transient starch in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) was investigated by characterizing the effects of two insertion mutations at the AtSS3 gene locus. Both mutations, termed Atss3-1 and Atss3-2, condition complete loss of SSIII activity and prevent normal gene expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. The mutations cause a starch excess phenotype in leaves during the light period of the growth cycle due to an apparent increase in the rate of starch synthesis. In addition, both mutations alter the physical structure of leaf starch. Significant increases were noted in the mutants in the frequency of linear chains in amylopectin with a degree of polymerization greater than approximately 60, and relatively small changes were observed in chains of degree of polymerization 4 to 50. Furthermore, starch in the Atss3-1 and Atss3-2 mutants has a higher phosphate content, approximately two times that of wild-type leaf starch. Total SS activity is increased in both Atss3 mutants and a specific SS activity appears to be up-regulated. The data indicate that, in addition to its expected direct role in starch assembly, SSIII also has a negative regulatory function in the biosynthesis of transient starch in Arabidopsis. PMID:15908598

  10. Reciprocal mouse and human limb phenotypes caused by gain- and loss-of-function mutations affecting Lmbr1.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R M; Marker, P C; Roessler, E; Dutra, A; Schimenti, J C; Muenke, M; Kingsley, D M

    2001-01-01

    The major locus for dominant preaxial polydactyly in humans has been mapped to 7q36. In mice the dominant Hemimelic extra toes (Hx) and Hammertoe (Hm) mutations map to a homologous chromosomal region and cause similar limb defects. The Lmbr1 gene is entirely within the small critical intervals recently defined for both the mouse and human mutations and is misexpressed at the exact time that the mouse Hx phenotype becomes apparent during limb development. This result suggests that Lmbr1 may underlie preaxial polydactyly in both mice and humans. We have used deletion chromosomes to demonstrate that the dominant mouse and human limb defects arise from gain-of-function mutations and not from haploinsufficiency. Furthermore, we created a loss-of-function mutation in the mouse Lmbr1 gene that causes digit number reduction (oligodactyly) on its own and in trans to a deletion chromosome. The loss of digits that we observed in mice with reduced Lmbr1 activity is in contrast to the gain of digits observed in Hx mice and human polydactyly patients. Our results suggest that the Lmbr1 gene is required for limb formation and that reciprocal changes in levels of Lmbr1 activity can lead to either increases or decreases in the number of digits in the vertebrate limb. PMID:11606546

  11. The regulatory gene areA mediating nitrogen metabolite repression in Aspergillus nidulans. Mutations affecting specificity of gene activation alter a loop residue of a putative zinc finger.

    PubMed Central

    Kudla, B; Caddick, M X; Langdon, T; Martinez-Rossi, N M; Bennett, C F; Sibley, S; Davies, R W; Arst, H N

    1990-01-01

    The regulatory gene areA mediating nitrogen metabolite repression in Aspergillus nidulans has been sequenced and its transcript mapped and orientated. A single ORF can encode a protein of 719 amino acids. A 52 amino acid region including a putative 'zinc finger' strongly resembles putative DNA binding regions of the major regulatory protein of erythroid cells. The derived protein sequence also contains a highly acidic region possibly involved in gene activation and 22 copies of the motif S(T)PXX, abundant in DNA binding proteins. Analysis of chromosomal rearrangements and transformation with deletion clones identified 342 N-terminal and 124 C-terminal residues as inessential and localized a C-terminal region required for nitrogen metabolite repressibility. A -1 frameshift eliminating the inessential 122 C-terminal amino acids is a surprising loss-of-function mutation. Extraordinary basicity of the replacement C terminus might explain its phenotype. Mutant sequencing also identified a polypeptide chain termination and several missense mutations, but most interesting are sequence changes associated with specificity mutations. A mutation elevating expression of some structural genes under areA control whilst reducing or not affecting expression of others is a leucine to valine change in the zinc finger loop. It reverts to a partly reciprocal phenotype by replacing the mutant valine by methionine. Images Fig.2 Fig.4 Fig.5 Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:1970293

  12. Four-base codons ACCA, ACCU and ACCC are recognized by frameshift suppressor sufJ.

    PubMed

    Bossi, L; Roth, J R

    1981-08-01

    The frameshift suppressor sufJ acts to correct a set of +1 frameshift mutations having very different sequences at their mutant sites. This suppressor acts by reading a 4 base codon located near, but not at, the site of each suppressible mutation. Suppression thus necessitates out-of-phase translation of the short stretch of mRNA between the site of action of the suppressor tRNA and the site of the frameshift mutation. We have identified the site read by sufJ by mutationally creating a series of such sites in the neighborhood of a previously nonsuppressible frameshift mutation. Each of the newly generated sites was formed by base substitution. Four independently generated sites were analyzed by DNA sequencing. At each site the quadruplet codon ACCX was generated (where X is A, U or C). Thus sufJ is able to read a 4 base codon in which any of three bases is acceptable in the fourth position. This is the first frameshift suppressor that does not read a run of three repeated bases in the first three positions of its codon.

  13. Exome and deep sequencing of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma reveal somatic mutations that affect key pathways involved in cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Lasorsa, Vito Alessandro; Formicola, Daniela; Pignataro, Piero; Cimmino, Flora; Calabrese, Francesco Maria; Mora, Jaume; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Pantile, Marcella; Zanon, Carlo; De Mariano, Marilena; Longo, Luca; Hogarty, Michael D.; de Torres, Carmen; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Iolascon, Achille; Capasso, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of somatic mutation of the most aggressive forms of neuroblastoma is not completely determined. We sought to identify potential cancer drivers in clinically aggressive neuroblastoma. Whole exome sequencing was conducted on 17 germline and tumor DNA samples from high-risk patients with adverse events within 36 months from diagnosis (HR-Event3) to identify somatic mutations and deep targeted sequencing of 134 genes selected from the initial screening in additional 48 germline and tumor pairs (62.5% HR-Event3 and high-risk patients), 17 HR-Event3 tumors and 17 human-derived neuroblastoma cell lines. We revealed 22 significantly mutated genes, many of which implicated in cancer progression. Fifteen genes (68.2%) were highly expressed in neuroblastoma supporting their involvement in the disease. CHD9, a cancer driver gene, was the most significantly altered (4.0% of cases) after ALK. Other genes (PTK2, NAV3, NAV1, FZD1 and ATRX), expressed in neuroblastoma and involved in cell invasion and migration were mutated at frequency ranged from 4% to 2%. Focal adhesion and regulation of actin cytoskeleton pathways, were frequently disrupted (14.1% of cases) thus suggesting potential novel therapeutic strategies to prevent disease progression. Notably BARD1, CHEK2 and AXIN2 were enriched in rare, potentially pathogenic, germline variants. In summary, whole exome and deep targeted sequencing identified novel cancer genes of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma. Our analyses show pathway-level implications of infrequently mutated genes in leading neuroblastoma progression. PMID:27009842

  14. HIV-1 Nef mutations abrogating downregulation of CD4 affect other Nef functions and show reduced pathogenicity in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, Zaher . E-mail: Zaher.Hanna@ircm.qc.ca; Priceputu, Elena; Hu, Chunyan; Vincent, Patrick; Jolicoeur, Paul

    2006-03-01

    pathologies) in respectively Nef{sup RD35/36AA} and Nef{sup D174K} Tg mice, relative to those developing in Nef{sup Wt} Tg mice. Our data suggest that the RD35/36AA and D174K mutations affect other Nef functions, namely those involved in the development of lung and kidney diseases, in addition to their known role in CD4 downregulation. Similarly, in HIV-1-infected individuals, loss of CD4 downregulation by Nef alleles may reflect their lower intrinsic pathogenicity, independently of their effects on virus replication.

  15. HIV-1 Nef mutations abrogating downregulation of CD4 affect other Nef functions and show reduced pathogenicity in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Zaher; Priceputu, Elena; Hu, Chunyan; Vincent, Patrick; Jolicoeur, Paul

    2006-03-01

    mice. Our data suggest that the RD35/36AA and D174K mutations affect other Nef functions, namely those involved in the development of lung and kidney diseases, in addition to their known role in CD4 downregulation. Similarly, in HIV-1-infected individuals, loss of CD4 downregulation by Nef alleles may reflect their lower intrinsic pathogenicity, independently of their effects on virus replication.

  16. Spinocerebellar ataxia-13 Kv3.3 potassium channels: arginine-to-histidine mutations affect both functional and protein expression on the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Zhu, Jing; Thornhill, William B

    2013-09-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel Kv3.3 is the causative gene of SCA13 (spinocerebellar ataxia type 13), an autosomal dominant neurological disorder. The four dominant mutations identified to date cause Kv3.3 channels to be non-functional or have altered gating properties in Xenopus oocytes. In the present paper, we report that SCA13 mutations affect functional as well as protein expression of Kv3.3 channels in a mammalian cell line. The reduced protein level of SCA13 mutants is caused by a shorter protein half-life, and blocking the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway increases the total protein of SCA13 mutants more than wild-type. SCA13 mutated amino acids are highly conserved, and the side chains of these residues play a critical role in the stable expression of Kv3.3 proteins. In addition, we show that mutant Kv3.3 protein levels could be partially rescued by treatment with the chemical chaperone TMAO (trimethylamine N-oxide) and to a lesser extent with co-expression of Kv3.1b. Thus our results suggest that amino acid side chains of SCA13 positions affect the protein half-life and/or function of Kv3.3, and the adverse effect on protein expression cannot be fully rescued.

  17. Detection of a novel mutation in the ryanodine receptor gene in an Irish malignant hyperthermia pedigree: correlation of the IVCT response with the affected and unaffected haplotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Keating, K E; Giblin, L; Lynch, P J; Quane, K A; Lehane, M; Heffron, J J; McCarthy, T V

    1997-01-01

    Defects in the ryanodine receptor (RYR1) gene are associated with malignant hyperthermia (MH), an autosomal dominant disorder of skeletal muscle and one of the main causes of death resulting from anaesthesia. Susceptibility to MH (MHS) is determined by the level of tension generated in an in vitro muscle contracture test (IVCT) in response to caffeine and halothane. To date, mutation screening of the RYR1 gene in MH families has led to the identification of eight mutations. We describe here the identification of a novel mutation, Arg552Trp, in the RYR1 gene, which is clearly linked to the MHS phenotype in a large, well characterised Irish pedigree. Considering that the RYR1 protein functions as a tetramer, correlation of the IVCT with the affected and unaffected haplotypes was performed on the pedigree to investigate if the normal RYR1 allele in affected subjects contributes to the variation in the IVCT. The results show that the normal RYR1 allele is unlikely to play a role in IVCT variation. Images PMID:9138151

  18. MECP2e1 isoform mutation affects the form and function of neurons derived from Rett syndrome patient iPS cells.

    PubMed

    Djuric, Ugljesa; Cheung, Aaron Y L; Zhang, Wenbo; Mok, Rebecca S; Lai, Wesley; Piekna, Alina; Hendry, Jason A; Ross, P Joel; Pasceri, Peter; Kim, Dae-Sung; Salter, Michael W; Ellis, James

    2015-04-01

    MECP2 mutations cause the X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder Rett Syndrome (RTT) by consistently altering the protein encoded by the MECP2e1 alternative transcript. While mutations that simultaneously affect both MECP2e1 and MECP2e2 isoforms have been widely studied, the consequence of MECP2e1 deficiency on human neurons remains unknown. Here we report the first isoform-specific patient induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) model of RTT. RTTe1 patient iPS cell-derived neurons retain an inactive X-chromosome and express only the mutant allele. Single-cell mRNA analysis demonstrated they have a molecular signature of cortical neurons. Mutant neurons exhibited a decrease in soma size, reduced dendritic complexity and decreased cell capacitance, consistent with impaired neuronal maturation. The soma size phenotype was rescued cell-autonomously by MECP2e1 transduction in a level-dependent manner but not by MECP2e2 gene transfer. Importantly, MECP2e1 mutant neurons showed a dysfunction in action potential generation, voltage-gated Na(+) currents, and miniature excitatory synaptic current frequency and amplitude. We conclude that MECP2e1 mutation affects soma size, information encoding properties and synaptic connectivity in human neurons that are defective in RTT.

  19. Dnmt3a Is a Haploinsufficient Tumor Suppressor in CD8+ Peripheral T Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Opavska, Jana; Klinkebiel, David; Roy, Sohini; Dutta, Samikshan; Datta, Kaustubh; Opavsky, Rene

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) is an enzyme involved in DNA methylation that is frequently mutated in human hematologic malignancies. We have previously shown that inactivation of Dnmt3a in hematopoietic cells results in chronic lymphocytic leukemia in mice. Here we show that 12% of Dnmt3a-deficient mice develop CD8+ mature peripheral T cell lymphomas (PTCL) and 29% of mice are affected by both diseases. 10% of Dnmt3a+/- mice develop lymphomas, suggesting that Dnmt3a is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor in PTCL. DNA methylation was deregulated genome-wide with 10-fold more hypo- than hypermethylated promoters and enhancers, demonstrating that hypomethylation is a major event in the development of PTCL. Hypomethylated promoters were enriched for binding sites of transcription factors AML1, NF-κB and OCT1, implying the transcription factors potential involvement in Dnmt3a-associated methylation. Whereas 71 hypomethylated genes showed an increased expression in PTCL, only 3 hypermethylated genes were silenced, suggesting that cancer-specific hypomethylation has broader effects on the transcriptome of cancer cells than hypermethylation. Interestingly, transcriptomes of Dnmt3a+/- and Dnmt3aΔ/Δ lymphomas were largely conserved and significantly overlapped with those of human tumors. Importantly, we observed downregulation of tumor suppressor p53 in Dnmt3a+/- and Dnmt3aΔ/Δ lymphomas as well as in pre-tumor thymocytes from 9 months old but not 6 weeks old Dnmt3a+/- tumor-free mice, suggesting that p53 downregulation is chronologically an intermediate event in tumorigenesis. Decrease in p53 is likely an important event in tumorigenesis because its overexpression inhibited proliferation in mouse PTCL cell lines, suggesting that low levels of p53 are important for tumor maintenance. Altogether, our data link the haploinsufficient tumor suppressor function of Dnmt3a in the prevention of mouse mature CD8+ PTCL indirectly to a bona fide tumor suppressor of T cell

  20. Cellular interference in craniofrontonasal syndrome: males mosaic for mutations in the X-linked EFNB1 gene are more severely affected than true hemizygotes

    PubMed Central

    Twigg, Stephen R.F.; Babbs, Christian; van den Elzen, Marijke E.P.; Goriely, Anne; Taylor, Stephen; McGowan, Simon J.; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Lonie, Lorne; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Akha, Elham Sadighi; Knight, Samantha J.L.; Zechi-Ceide, Roseli M.; Hoogeboom, Jeannette A.M.; Pober, Barbara R.; Toriello, Helga V.; Wall, Steven A.; Rita Passos-Bueno, M.; Brunner, Han G.; Mathijssen, Irene M.J.; Wilkie, Andrew O.M.

    2013-01-01

    Craniofrontonasal syndrome (CFNS), an X-linked disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations of EFNB1, exhibits a paradoxical sex reversal in phenotypic severity: females characteristically have frontonasal dysplasia, craniosynostosis and additional minor malformations, but males are usually more mildly affected with hypertelorism as the only feature. X-inactivation is proposed to explain the more severe outcome in heterozygous females, as this leads to functional mosaicism for cells with differing expression of EPHRIN-B1, generating abnormal tissue boundaries—a process that cannot occur in hemizygous males. Apparently challenging this model, males occasionally present with a more severe female-like CFNS phenotype. We hypothesized that such individuals might be mosaic for EFNB1 mutations and investigated this possibility in multiple tissue samples from six sporadically presenting males. Using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography, massively parallel sequencing and multiplex-ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to increase sensitivity above standard dideoxy sequencing, we identified mosaic mutations of EFNB1 in all cases, comprising three missense changes, two gene deletions and a novel point mutation within the 5′ untranslated region (UTR). Quantification by Pyrosequencing and MLPA demonstrated levels of mutant cells between 15 and 69%. The 5′ UTR variant mutates the stop codon of a small upstream open reading frame that, using a dual-luciferase reporter construct, was demonstrated to exacerbate interference with translation of the wild-type protein. These results demonstrate a more severe outcome in mosaic than in constitutionally deficient males in an X-linked dominant disorder and provide further support for the cellular interference mechanism, normally related to X-inactivation in females. PMID:23335590

  1. Mutations associated with Dent's disease affect gating and voltage dependence of the human anion/proton exchanger ClC-5.

    PubMed

    Alekov, Alexi K

    2015-01-01

    Dent's disease is associated with impaired renal endocytosis and endosomal acidification. It is linked to mutations in the membrane chloride/proton exchanger ClC-5; however, a direct link between localization in the protein and functional phenotype of the mutants has not been established until now. Here, two Dent's disease mutations, G212A and E267A, were investigated using heterologous expression in HEK293T cells, patch-clamp measurements and confocal imaging. WT and mutant ClC-5 exhibited mixed cell membrane and vesicular distribution. Reduced ion currents were measured for both mutants and both exhibited reduced capability to support endosomal acidification. Functionally, mutation G212A was capable of mediating anion/proton antiport but dramatically shifted the activation of ClC-5 toward more depolarized potentials. The shift can be explained by impeded movements of the neighboring gating glutamate Gluext, a residue that confers major part of the voltage dependence of ClC-5 and serves as a gate at the extracellular entrance of the anion transport pathway. Cell surface abundance of E267A was reduced by ~50% but also dramatically increased gating currents were detected for this mutant and accordingly reduced probability to undergoing cycles associated with electrogenic ion transport. Structurally, the gating alternations correlate to the proximity of E267A to the proton glutamate Gluin that serves as intracellular gate in the proton transport pathway and regulates the open probability of ClC-5. Remarkably, two other mammalian isoforms, ClC-3 and ClC-4, also differ from ClC-5 in gating characteristics affected by the here investigated disease-causing mutations. This evolutionary specialization, together with the functional defects arising from mutations G212A and E267A, demonstrate that the complex gating behavior exhibited by most of the mammalian CLC transporters is an important determinant of their cellular function.

  2. Characterization of a Spontaneous Novel Mutation in the NPC2 Gene in a Cat Affected by Niemann Pick Type C Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Stefania; Bianchi, Ezio; Cantile, Carlo; Saleri, Roberta; Bembi, Bruno; Dardis, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Niemann-Pick C disease (NPC) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by accumulation of unesterified cholesterol and other lipids within the lysosomes due to mutation in NPC1 or NPC2 genes. A feline model of NPC carrying a mutation in NPC1 gene has been previously described. We have identified two kittens affected by NPC disease due to a mutation in NPC2 gene. They manifested with tremors at the age of 3 months, which progressed to dystonia and severe ataxia. At 6 months of age cat 2 was unable to stand without assistance and had bilaterally reduced menace response. It died at the age of 10 months. Post-mortem histological analysis of the brain showed the presence of neurons with cytoplasmic swelling and vacuoles, gliosis of the substantia nigra and degeneration of the white matter. Spheroids with accumulation of ubiquitinated aggregates were prominent in the cerebellar cortex. Purkinje cells were markedly reduced in number and they showed prominent intracytoplasmic storage. Scattered perivascular aggregates of lymphocytes and microglial cells proliferation were present in the thalamus and midbrain. Proliferation of Bergmann glia was also observed. In the liver, hepatocytes were swollen because of accumulation of small vacuoles and foamy Kupffer cells were also detected. Foamy macrophages were observed within the pulmonary interstitium and alveoli as well. At 9 months cat 1 was unable to walk, developed seizures and it was euthanized at 21 months. Filipin staining of cultured fibroblasts showed massive storage of unesterified cholesterol. Molecular analysis of NPC1 and NPC2 genes showed the presence of a homozygous intronic mutation (c.82+5G>A) in the NPC2 gene. The subsequent analysis of the mRNA showed that the mutation causes the retention of 105 bp in the mature mRNA, which leads to the in frame insertion of 35 amino acids between residues 28 and 29 of NPC2 protein (p.G28_S29ins35). PMID:25396745

  3. The diageotropica mutation and synthetic auxins differentially affect the expression of auxin-regulated genes in tomato.

    PubMed Central

    Mito, N; Bennett, A B

    1995-01-01

    The effect of a tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) mutation, diageotropica (dgt), on the accumulation of mRNA corresponding to tomato homologs of three auxin-regulated genes, LeAux, LeSAUR, and Lepar, was examined. The dgt mutation inhibited the induction of LeAux and LeSAUR mRNA accumulation by naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) but had no effect on NAA-induced Lepar mRNA accumulation. The effect of two synthetic auxins, NAA and 3,7-dichloro-8-quinoline carboxylic acid (quinclorac), on the accumulation of LeAux, LeSAUR, and Lepar mRNA was also examined. Quinclorac induced the expression of each of the auxin-regulated genes, confirming its proposed mode of herbicidal action as an auxin-type herbicide. Concentrations of quinclorac at least 100-fold higher than NAA were required to induce LeAux and LeSAUR mRNA accumulation to similar levels, whereas Lepar mRNA accumulation was induced by similar concentrations of NAA and quinclorac. Collectively, these data suggest the presence of two auxin-dependent signal transduction pathways: one that regulates LeSAUR and LeAux mRNA accumulation and is interrupted by the dgt mutation and a second that regulates Lepar mRNA accumulation and is not defective in dgt tomato hypocotyls. These two auxin-regulated signal transduction pathways can be further discriminated by the action of two synthetic auxins, NAA and quinclorac. PMID:7480327

  4. CADASIL mutations and shRNA silencing of NOTCH3 affect actin organization in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Tikka, Saara; Ng, Yan Peng; Di Maio, Giuseppe; Mykkänen, Kati; Siitonen, Maija; Lepikhova, Tatiana; Pöyhönen, Minna; Viitanen, Matti; Virtanen, Ismo; Kalimo, Hannu; Baumann, Marc

    2012-12-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is the most common hereditary vascular dementia caused by mutations in NOTCH3 gene. Pathology is manifested in small- and middle-sized arteries throughout the body, though primarily in cerebral white matter. Hemodynamics is altered in CADASIL and NOTCH3 is suggested to regulate actin filament polymerization and thereby vascular tone. We analyzed NOTCH3 expression and morphology of actin cytoskeleton in genetically genuine cultured human CADASIL vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) (including a cell line homozygous for p.Arg133Cys mutation) derived from different organs, and in control VSMCs with short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-silenced NOTCH3. NOTCH3 protein level was higher in VSMCs derived from adult than newborn arteries in both CADASIL and control VSMCs. CADASIL VSMCs showed altered actin cytoskeleton including increased branching and node formation, and more numerous and smaller adhesion sites than control VSMCs. Alterations in actin cytoskeleton in shRNA-silenced VSMCs were similar as in CADASIL VSMCs. Severity of the alterations in actin filaments corresponded to NOTCH3 expression level being most severe in VSMCs derived from adult cerebral arteries. These observations suggest that hypomorphic NOTCH3 activity causes alterations in actin organization in CADASIL. Furthermore, arteries from different organs have specific characteristics, which modify the effects of the NOTCH3 mutation and which is one explanation for the exceptional susceptibility of cerebral white matter arteries.

  5. Myosin light chain-2 mutation affects flight, wing beat frequency, and indirect flight muscle contraction kinetics in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have used a combination of classical genetic, molecular genetic, histological, biochemical, and biophysical techniques to identify and characterize a null mutation of the myosin light chain-2 (MLC-2) locus of Drosophila melanogaster. Mlc2E38 is a null mutation of the MLC-2 gene resulting from a nonsense mutation at the tenth codon position. Mlc2E38 confers dominant flightless behavior that is associated with reduced wing beat frequency. Mlc2E38 heterozygotes exhibit a 50% reduction of MLC-2 mRNA concentration in adult thoracic musculature, which results in a commensurate reduction of MLC-2 protein in the indirect flight muscles. Indirect flight muscle myofibrils from Mlc2E38 heterozygotes are aberrant, exhibiting myofilaments in disarray at the periphery. Calcium-activated Triton X-100-treated single fiber segments exhibit slower contraction kinetics than wild type. Introduction of a transformed copy of the wild type MLC-2 gene rescues the dominant flightless behavior of Mlc2E38 heterozygotes. Wing beat frequency and single fiber contraction kinetics of a representative rescued line are not significantly different from those of wild type. Together, these results indicate that wild type MLC-2 stoichiometry is required for normal indirect flight muscle assembly and function. Furthermore, these results suggest that the reduced wing beat frequency and possibly the flightless behavior conferred by Mlc2E38 is due in part to slower contraction kinetics of sarcomeric regions devoid or partly deficient in MLC-2. PMID:1469046

  6. A Genetic Screen for Mutations Affecting Cell Division in the Arabidopsis thaliana Embryo Identifies Seven Loci Required for Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Gillmor, C. Stewart; Roeder, Adrienne H. K.; Sieber, Patrick; Somerville, Chris; Lukowitz, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis in plants involves the formation of unique cellular structures such as the phragmoplast and the cell plate, both of which are required to divide the cell after nuclear division. In order to isolate genes that are involved in de novo cell wall formation, we performed a large-scale, microscope-based screen for Arabidopsis mutants that severely impair cytokinesis in the embryo. We recovered 35 mutations that form abnormally enlarged cells with multiple, often polyploid nuclei and incomplete cell walls. These mutants represent seven genes, four of which have previously been implicated in phragmoplast or cell plate function. Mutations in two loci show strongly reduced transmission through the haploid gametophytic generation. Molecular cloning of both corresponding genes reveals that one is represented by hypomorphic alleles of the kinesin-5 gene RADIALLY SWOLLEN 7 (homologous to tobacco kinesin-related protein TKRP125), and that the other gene corresponds to the Arabidopsis FUSED ortholog TWO-IN-ONE (originally identified based on its function in pollen development). No mutations that completely abolish the formation of cross walls in diploid cells were found. Our results support the idea that cytokinesis in the diploid and haploid generations involve similar mechanisms. PMID:26745275

  7. The human ARF tumor suppressor senses blastema activity and suppresses epimorphic tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Robert G; Kouklis, Gayle K; Ahituv, Nadav; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2015-11-17

    The control of proliferation and differentiation by tumor suppressor genes suggests that evolution of divergent tumor suppressor repertoires could influence species' regenerative capacity. To directly test that premise, we humanized the zebrafish p53 pathway by introducing regulatory and coding sequences of the human tumor suppressor ARF into the zebrafish genome. ARF was dormant during development, in uninjured adult fins, and during wound healing, but was highly expressed in the blastema during epimorphic fin regeneration after amputation. Regenerative, but not developmental signals resulted in binding of zebrafish E2f to the human ARF promoter and activated conserved ARF-dependent Tp53 functions. The context-dependent activation of ARF did not affect growth and development but inhibited regeneration, an unexpected distinct tumor suppressor response to regenerative versus developmental environments. The antagonistic pleiotropic characteristics of ARF as both tumor and regeneration suppressor imply that inducing epimorphic regeneration clinically would require modulation of ARF -p53 axis activation.

  8. The ataxia related G1107D mutation of the plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase isoform 3 affects its interplay with calmodulin and the autoinhibition process.

    PubMed

    Calì, Tito; Frizzarin, Martina; Luoni, Laura; Zonta, Francesco; Pantano, Sergio; Cruz, Carlos; Bonza, Maria Cristina; Bertipaglia, Ilenia; Ruzzene, Maria; De Michelis, Maria Ida; Damiano, Nunzio; Marin, Oriano; Zanni, Ginevra; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Brini, Marisa; Lopreiato, Raffaele; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2017-01-01

    The plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPases (PMCA pumps) have a long, cytosolic C-terminal regulatory region where a calmodulin-binding domain (CaM-BD) is located. Under basal conditions (low Ca(2+)), the C-terminal tail of the pump interacts with autoinhibitory sites proximal to the active center of the enzyme. In activating conditions (i.e., high Ca(2+)), Ca(2+)-bound CaM displaces the C-terminal tail from the autoinhibitory sites, restoring activity. We have recently identified a G1107D replacement within the CaM-BD of isoform 3 of the PMCA pump in a family affected by X-linked congenital cerebellar ataxia. Here, we investigate the effects of the G1107D replacement on the interplay of the mutated CaM-BD with both CaM and the pump core, by combining computational, biochemical and functional approaches. We provide evidence that the affinity of the isolated mutated CaM-BD for CaM is significantly reduced with respect to the wild type (wt) counterpart, and that the ability of CaM to activate the pump in vitro is thus decreased. Multiscale simulations support the conclusions on the detrimental effect of the mutation, indicating reduced stability of the CaM binding. We further show that the G1107D replacement impairs the autoinhibition mechanism of the PMCA3 pump as well, as the introduction of a negative charge perturbs the contacts between the CaM-BD and the pump core. Thus, the mutation affects both the ability of the pump to optimally transport Ca(2+) in the activated state, and the autoinhibition mechanism in its resting state.

  9. Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1): a protein truncation assay yielding identification of mutations in 73% of patients.

    PubMed Central

    Park, V M; Pivnick, E K

    1998-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is caused by mutations in a tumour suppressor gene located on chromosome 17 (17q11.2). Disease causing mutations are dispersed throughout the gene, which spans 350 kilobases and includes 59 exons. A common consequence of NF1 mutations is introduction of a premature stop codon, and the majority of mutant genes encode truncated forms of neurofibromin. We used a protein truncation assay to screen for mutations in 15 NF1 patients and obtained positive results in 11 of them (73%). Sequencing of cDNA and genomic DNA yielded identification of 10 different mutations, including four splicing errors, three small deletions, two nonsense mutations, and one small insertion. Nine mutations were predicted to cause premature termination of translation, while one mutation caused in frame deletion as a result ofexon skipping. In one other case involving abnormal splicing, five different aberrantly spliced transcripts were detected. One germline nonsense mutation (R1306X, 3916C>T) corresponded to the same base change that occurs by mRNA editing in normal subjects. The second nonsense mutation (R2496X) was the sole germline mutation that has been previously described. The subjects studied represented typically affected NF1 patients and no correlations between genotype and phenotype were apparent. A high incidence of ocular hypertelorism was observed. Images PMID:9783703

  10. Synonymous mutations frequently act as driver mutations in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Supek, Fran; Miñana, Belén; Valcárcel, Juan; Gabaldón, Toni; Lehner, Ben

    2014-03-13

    Synonymous mutations change the sequence of a gene without directly altering the sequence of the encoded protein. Here, we present evidence that these "silent" mutations frequently contribute to human cancer. Selection on synonymous mutations in oncogenes is cancer-type specific, and although the functional consequences of cancer-associated synonymous mutations may be diverse, they recurrently alter exonic motifs that regulate splicing and are associated with changes in oncogene splicing in tumors. The p53 tumor suppressor (TP53) also has recurrent synonymous mutations, but, in contrast to those in oncogenes, these are adjacent to splice sites and inactivate them. We estimate that between one in two and one in five silent mutations in oncogenes have been selected, equating to ~6%- 8% of all selected single-nucleotide changes in these genes. In addition, our analyses suggest that dosage-sensitive oncogenes have selected mutations in their 3' UTRs.

  11. Identification of Genetic Loci Affecting the Severity of Symptoms of Hirschsprung Disease in Rats Carrying Ednrbsl Mutations by Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Torigoe, Daisuke; Lei, Chuzhao; Lan, Xianyong; Chen, Hong; Sasaki, Nobuya; Wang, Jinxi; Agui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR) is a congenital disease in neonates characterized by the absence of the enteric ganglia in a variable length of the distal colon. This disease results from multiple genetic interactions that modulate the ability of enteric neural crest cells to populate developing gut. We previously reported that three rat strains with different backgrounds (susceptible AGH-Ednrbsl/sl, resistant F344-Ednrbsl/sl, and LEH-Ednrbsl/sl) but the same null mutation of Ednrb show varying severity degrees of aganglionosis. This finding suggests that strain-specific genetic factors affect the severity of HSCR. Consistent with this finding, a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for the severity of HSCR on chromosome (Chr) 2 was identified using an F2 intercross between AGH and F344 strains. In the present study, we performed QTL analysis using an F2 intercross between the susceptible AGH and resistant LEH strains to identify the modifier/resistant loci for HSCR in Ednrb-deficient rats. A significant locus affecting the severity of HSCR was also detected within the Chr 2 region. These findings strongly suggest that a modifier gene of aganglionosis exists on Chr 2. In addition, two potentially causative SNPs (or mutations) were detected upstream of a known HSCR susceptibility gene, Gdnf. These SNPs were possibly responsible for the varied length of gut affected by aganglionosis. PMID:25790447

  12. RB1: a prototype tumor suppressor and an enigma

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    The retinoblastoma susceptibility gene (RB1) was the first tumor suppressor gene to be molecularly defined. RB1 mutations occur in almost all familial and sporadic forms of retinoblastoma, and this gene is mutated at variable frequencies in a variety of other human cancers. Because of its early discovery, the recessive nature of RB1 mutations, and its frequency of inactivation, RB1 is often described as a prototype for the class of tumor suppressor genes. Its gene product (pRB) regulates transcription and is a negative regulator of cell proliferation. Although these general features are well established, a precise description of pRB's mechanism of action has remained elusive. Indeed, in many regards, pRB remains an enigma. This review summarizes some recent developments in pRB research and focuses on progress toward answers for the three fundamental questions that sit at the heart of the pRB literature: What does pRB do? How does the inactivation of RB change the cell? How can our knowledge of RB function be exploited to provide better treatment for cancer patients? PMID:27401552

  13. RB1: a prototype tumor suppressor and an enigma.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Nicholas J

    2016-07-01

    The retinoblastoma susceptibility gene (RB1) was the first tumor suppressor gene to be molecularly defined. RB1 mutations occur in almost all familial and sporadic forms of retinoblastoma, and this gene is mutated at variable frequencies in a variety of other human cancers. Because of its early discovery, the recessive nature of RB1 mutations, and its frequency of inactivation, RB1 is often described as a prototype for the class of tumor suppressor genes. Its gene product (pRB) regulates transcription and is a negative regulator of cell proliferation. Although these general features are well established, a precise description of pRB's mechanism of action has remained elusive. Indeed, in many regards, pRB remains an enigma. This review summarizes some recent developments in pRB research and focuses on progress toward answers for the three fundamental questions that sit at the heart of the pRB literature: What does pRB do? How does the inactivation of RB change the cell? How can our knowledge of RB function be exploited to provide better treatment for cancer patients?

  14. Dictyostelium myosin II G680V suppressors exhibit overlapping spectra of biochemical phenotypes including facilitated phosphate release.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Y; Nejad, M; Patterson, B

    1999-01-01

    We have biochemically characterized 13 intragenic suppressors of the G680V mutation of Dictyostelium myosin II. In the absence of the G680V mutation, the suppressors result in a number of deviant behaviors, most commonly an increase in the basal (actin-independent) ATPase of the motor. This phenotype is complementary to that of the G680V mutant and supports our proposal that the latter impairs phosphate release. Different subsets of the mutants also suffer from poor ATPase enhancement by 1 mg/ml actin, failure to release from actin in the presence of ATPgammaS (or ADP and salt), and excessive release from actin in the presence of ADP. The patterns of suppressor behaviors suggest that, in general, they are facilitating P(i)-releasing state(s) of the motor, but that different individual suppressors may secondarily perturb other states or actions of the motor. PMID:10471704

  15. Mutations affecting the development of the peripheral nervous system in Drosophila: a molecular screen for novel proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Prokopenko, S N; He, Y; Lu, Y; Bellen, H J

    2000-01-01

    In our quest for novel genes required for the development of the embryonic peripheral nervous system (PNS), we have performed three genetic screens using MAb 22C10 as a marker of terminally differentiated neurons. A total of 66 essential genes required for normal PNS development were identified, including 49 novel genes. To obtain information about the molecular nature of these genes, we decided to complement our genetic screens with a molecular screen. From transposon-tagged mutations identified on the basis of their phenotype in the PNS we selected 31 P-element strains representing 26 complementation groups on the second and third chromosomes to clone and sequence the corresponding genes. We used plasmid rescue to isolate and sequence 51 genomic fragments flanking the sites of these P-element insertions. Database searches using sequences derived from the ends of plasmid rescues allowed us to assign genes to one of four classes: (1) previously characterized genes (11), (2) first mutations in cloned genes (1), (3) P-element insertions in genes that were identified, but not characterized molecularly (1), and (4) novel genes (13). Here, we report the cloning, sequence, Northern analysis, and the embryonic expression pattern of candidate cDNAs for 10 genes: astray, chrowded, dalmatian, gluon, hoi-polloi, melted, pebble, skittles, sticky ch1, and vegetable. This study allows us to draw conclusions about the identity of proteins required for the development of the nervous system in Drosophila and provides an example of a molecular approach to characterize en masse transposon-tagged mutations identified in genetic screens. PMID:11102367

  16. Sweat chloride and immunoreactive trypsinogen in infants carrying two CFTR mutations and not affected by cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Carlo; Tridello, Gloria; Tamanini, Anna; Assael, Baroukh M

    2016-01-11

    Newborns with raised immunotrypsinogen levels who have non-pathological sweat chloride values and carry two cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) mutations of which at least one is not acknowledged to be cystic fibrosis (CF)-causing are at risk of developing clinical manifestations consistent with CFTR-related disorders or even CF. It is not known whether newborns with similar genotypes and normal immunoreactive trypsinogen (IRT) may share the same risk. This study found that newborns with these characteristics and normal IRT have lower sweat chloride values than those with raised IRT (p=0.007).

  17. Lenz-Majewski mutations in PTDSS1 affect phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate metabolism at ER-PM and ER-Golgi junctions

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Mira; Ivanova, Pavlina; Brown, H. Alex; Varnai, Peter; Kim, Yeun Ju; Balla, Tamas

    2016-01-01

    Lenz-Majewski syndrome (LMS) is a rare disease characterized by complex craniofacial, dental, cutaneous, and limb abnormalities combined with intellectual disability. Mutations in the PTDSS1 gene coding one of the phosphatidylserine (PS) synthase enzymes, PSS1, were described as causative in LMS patients. Such mutations render PSS1 insensitive to feedback inhibition by PS levels. Here we show that expression of mutant PSS1 enzymes decreased phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P) levels both in the Golgi and the plasma membrane (PM) by activating the Sac1 phosphatase and altered PI4P cycling at the PM. Conversely, inhibitors of PI4KA, the enzyme that makes PI4P in the PM, blocked PS synthesis and reduced PS levels by 50% in normal cells. However, mutant PSS1 enzymes alleviated the PI4P dependence of PS synthesis. Oxysterol-binding protein–related protein 8, which was recently identified as a PI4P-PS exchanger between the ER and PM, showed PI4P-dependent membrane association that was significantly decreased by expression of PSS1 mutant enzymes. Our studies reveal that PS synthesis is tightly coupled to PI4P-dependent PS transport from the ER. Consequently, PSS1 mutations not only affect cellular PS levels and distribution but also lead to a more complex imbalance in lipid homeostasis by disturbing PI4P metabolism. PMID:27044099

  18. Parathyroid Hormone Receptor Type 1/Indian Hedgehog Expression Is Preserved in the Growth Plate of Human Fetuses Affected with Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Type 3 Activating Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Cormier, Sarah; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Benoist-Lasselin, Catherine; Legeai-Mallet, Laurence; Bonaventure, Jacky; Silve, Caroline

    2002-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor type 3 (FGFR3) and Indian hedgehog (IHH)/parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide receptor type 1 (PTHR1) systems are both essential regulators of endochondral ossification. Based on mouse models, activation of the FGFR3 system is suggested to regulate the IHH/PTHR1 pathway. To challenge this possible interaction in humans, we analyzed the femoral growth plates from fetuses carrying activating FGFR3 mutations (9 achondroplasia, 21 and 8 thanatophoric dysplasia types 1 and 2, respectively) and 14 age-matched controls by histological techniques and in situ hybridization using riboprobes for human IHH, PTHR1, type 10 and type 1 collagen transcripts. We show that bone-perichondrial ring enlargement and growth plate increased vascularization in FGFR3-mutated fetuses correlate with the phenotypic severity of the disease. PTHR1 and IHH expression in growth plates, bone-perichondrial rings and vascular canals is not affected by FGFR3 mutations, irrespective of the mutant genotype and age, and is in keeping with cell phenotypes. These results indicate that in humans, FGFR3 signaling does not down-regulate the main players of the IHH/PTHR1 pathway. Furthermore, we show that cells within the bone-perichondrial ring in controls and patients express IHH, PTHR1, and type 10 and type 1 collagen transcripts, suggesting that bone-perichondrial ring formation involves cells of both chondrocytic and osteoblastic phenotypes. PMID:12368206

  19. A mutation in the RET proto-oncogene in Hirschsprung's disease affects the tyrosine kinase activity associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A and 2B.

    PubMed Central

    Cosma, M P; Panariello, L; Quadro, L; Dathan, N A; Fattoruso, O; Colantuoni, V

    1996-01-01

    We demonstrate that a Hirschsprung (HSCR) mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain of the RET proto-oncogene abolishes in cis the tyrosine-phosphorylation associated with the activating mutation in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A) in transiently transfected Cos cells. Yet the double mutant RET2AHS retains the ability to form stable dimers, thus dissociating the dimerization from the phosphorylation potential. Co-transfection experiments with single and double mutants carrying plasmids RET2A and RET2AHS in different ratios drastically reduced the phosphorylation levels of the RET2A protein, suggesting a dominant-negative effect of the HSCR mutation. Also, the phosphorylation associated with the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (MEN2B) allele was affected in experiments with single and double mutants carrying plasmids co-transfected under the same conditions. Finally, analysis of the enzymic activity of MEN2A and MEN2B tumours confirmed the relative levels of tyrosine phosphorylation observed in Cos cells, indicating that this condition, in vivo, may account for the RET transforming potential. PMID:8670046

  20. The RetC620R Mutation Affects Renal and Enteric Development in a Mouse Model of Hirschsprung’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carniti, Cristiana; Belluco, Sara; Riccardi, Elena; Cranston, Aaron N.; Mondellini, Piera; Ponder, Bruce A.J.; Scanziani, Eugenio; Pierotti, Marco A.; Bongarzone, Italia

    2006-01-01

    In rare families RET tyrosine kinase receptor substitutions located in exon 10 (especially at positions 609, 618, and 620) can concomitantly cause the MEN 2A (multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A) or FMTC (familial medullary thyroid carcinoma) cancer syndromes, and Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR). No animal model mimicking the co-existence of the MEN 2 pathology and HSCR is available, and the association of these activating mutations with a developmental defect still represents an unresolved problem. The aim of this work was to investigate the significance of the RETC620R substitution in the pathogenesis of both gain- and loss-of-function RET-associated diseases. We report the generation of a line of mice carrying the C620R mutation in the Ret gene. Although RetC620R homozygotes display severe defects in kidney organogenesis and enteric nervous system development leading to perinatal lethality. RetC620R heterozygotes recapitulate features characteristic of HSCR including hypoganglionosis of the gastrointestinal tract. Surprisingly, heterozygotes do not show any defects in the thyroid that might be attributable to a gain-of-function mutation. The RetC620R allele is responsible for HSCR and affects the development of kidneys and the enteric nervous system (ENS). These mice represent an interesting model for studying new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of HSCR disease. PMID:16565500

  1. Germline mutations in MEN1 and BRCA1 genes in a woman with familial multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and inherited breast-ovarian cancer syndromes: a case report.

    PubMed

    Papi, Laura; Palli, Domenico; Masi, Laura; Putignano, Anna Laura; Congregati, Caterina; Zanna, Ines; Marini, Francesca; Giusti, Francesca; Luzi, Ettore; Tonelli, Francesco; Genuardi, Maurizio; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Falchetti, Alberto

    2009-11-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of mutations in two different tumor suppressor genes in the same individual is a very rare event. Here we report the case of a woman in whom germline mutations in both MEN1 and BRCA1 were identified. The severity of MEN1-related biochemical and clinical findings did not significantly differ from that for other affected family members lacking the BRCA1 mutation, except for the development of an extremely large visceral lipoma; the proband has not developed any BRCA1-related malignancies. We explore genetic and molecular rationales for an association between these neoplastic processes.

  2. Mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana genes involved in the tryptophan biosynthesis pathway affect root waving on tilted agar surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, R.; Gallois, P.; Masson, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana roots grow in a wavy pattern upon a slanted surface. A novel mutation in the anthranilate synthase alpha 1 (ASA1) gene, named trp5-2wvc1, and mutations in the tryptophan synthase alpha and beta 1 genes (trp3-1 and trp2-1, respectively) confer a compressed root wave phenotype on tilted agar surfaces. When trp5-2wvc1 seedlings are grown on media supplemented with anthranilate metabolites, their roots wave like wild type. Genetic and pharmacological experiments argue that the compressed root wave phenotypes of trp5-2wvc1, trp2-1 and trp3-1 seedlings are not due to reduced IAA biosynthetic potential, but rather to a deficiency in L-tryptophan (L-Trp), or in a L-Trp derivative. Although the roots of 7-day-old seedlings possess higher concentrations of free L-Trp than the shoot as a whole, trp5-2wvc1 mutants show no detectable alteration in L-Trp levels in either tissue type, suggesting that a very localized shortage of L-Trp, or of a L-Trp-derived compound, is responsible for the observed phenotype.

  3. Mutations in the hormone regulatory element of mouse mammary tumor virus differentially affect the response to progestins, androgens, and glucocorticoids.

    PubMed Central

    Gowland, P L; Buetti, E

    1989-01-01

    Transcription of the mouse mammary tumor virus DNA is known to be induced by several steroid hormones. Using chimeric MMTV plasmids containing mutations within the hormone regulatory element, we have previously studied the regions required for the glucocorticoid response in mouse fibroblasts. Here we report the characterization of elements essential for the stimulation by progestins and androgens as compared with glucocorticoids. The same set of mutant plasmids was transfected into the human mammary tumor cell line T47D, and the specific transcripts were analyzed by an S1 nuclease protection assay. Androgen-mediated stimulation, although weak, showed an extended sensitivity to mutations, with a slight preference for the proximal region. The results with progestin suggest that sequences within all the described sites protected by the receptor in vitro are required and that the promoter-proximal region (-128 to -78 from the RNA start site) is more important than the distal one (-190 to -160). Moreover, a binding site for nuclear factor I was not required for the progestin response, whereas it was required for glucocorticoids. Thus, the various steroid receptors play a role in the differential regulation of mouse mammary tumor virus transcription by recognizing distinct sequence differences in the hormone regulatory element and interacting with different factors bound to the promoter. Images PMID:2550809

  4. The cancer-associated K351N mutation affects the ubiquitination and the translocation to mitochondria of p53 protein.

    PubMed

    Muscolini, Michela; Montagni, Elisa; Palermo, Vanessa; Di Agostino, Silvia; Gu, Wei; Abdelmoula-Souissi, Salma; Mazzoni, Cristina; Blandino, Giovanni; Tuosto, Loretta

    2011-11-18

    Stress-induced monoubiquitination of p53 is a crucial event for the nuclear-cytoplasm-mitochondria trafficking and transcription-independent pro-apoptotic functions of p53. Although an intact ubiquitination pathway and a functional nuclear export sequence are required for p53 nuclear export, the role of specific residues within this region in regulating both processes remains largely unknown. Here we characterize the mechanisms accounting for the nuclear accumulation of a new point mutation (Lys-351 to Asn) in the nuclear export sequence of p53 identified in a cisplatin-resistant ovarian carcinoma cell line (A2780 CIS). We found that K351N substitution abrogates the monoubiquitination of p53 induced by both Mdm2 and MSL2 E3-ligases. As a consequence, cells expressing p53 K351N mutant showed defects in cisplatin-induced translocation of p53 to mitochondria, Bax oligomerization, and mitochondrial membrane depolarization. These data identify K351N as a critical mutation of p53 that contributes to the development and maintenance of resistance to cisplatin.

  5. The A1555G mutation in the 12S rRNA gene of human mtDNA: recurrent origins and founder events in families affected by sensorineural deafness.

    PubMed

    Torroni, A; Cruciani, F; Rengo, C; Sellitto, D; López-Bigas, N; Rabionet, R; Govea, N; López De Munain, A; Sarduy, M; Romero, L; Villamar, M; del Castillo, I; Moreno, F; Estivill, X; Scozzari, R

    1999-11-01

    The mtDNA variation of 50 Spanish and 4 Cuban families affected by nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness due to the A1555G mutation in the 12S rRNA gene was studied by high-resolution RFLP analysis and sequencing of the control region. Phylogenetic analyses of haplotypes and detailed survey of population controls revealed that the A1555G mutation can be attributed to >/=30 independent mutational events among the 50 Spanish families and that it occurs on mtDNA haplogroups that are common in all European populations. This indicates that the relatively high detection rate of this mutation in Spain is not due to sampling biases or to a single major founder event. Moreover, the distribution of these mutational events on different haplogroups is compatible with a random occurrence of the A1555G mutation and tends to support the conclusion that mtDNA backgrounds do not play a significant role in the expression of the mutation. Overall, these findings appear to indicate that the rare detection of this mutation in other populations is most likely due to inadequacy in patient ascertainment and molecular screening. This probable lack of identification of the A1555G mutation in subjects affected by sensorineural hearing loss implies that their maternally related relatives are not benefiting from presymptomatic detection and information concerning their increased risk of ototoxicity due to aminoglycoside treatments.

  6. The A1555G Mutation in the 12S rRNA Gene of Human mtDNA: Recurrent Origins and Founder Events in Families Affected by Sensorineural Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Torroni, Antonio; Cruciani, Fulvio; Rengo, Chiara; Sellitto, Daniele; López-Bigas, Núria; Rabionet, Raquel; Govea, Nancy; López de Munain, Adolfo; Sarduy, Maritza; Romero, Lourdes; Villamar, Manuela; del Castillo, Ignacio; Moreno, Felipe; Estivill, Xavier; Scozzari, Rosaria

    1999-01-01

    Summary The mtDNA variation of 50 Spanish and 4 Cuban families affected by nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness due to the A1555G mutation in the 12S rRNA gene was studied by high-resolution RFLP analysis and sequencing of the control region. Phylogenetic analyses of haplotypes and detailed survey of population controls revealed that the A1555G mutation can be attributed to ⩾30 independent mutational events among the 50 Spanish families and that it occurs on mtDNA haplogroups that are common in all European populations. This indicates that the relatively high detection rate of this mutation in Spain is not due to sampling biases or to a single major founder event. Moreover, the distribution of these mutational events on different haplogroups is compatible with a random occurrence of the A1555G mutation and tends to support the conclusion that mtDNA backgrounds do not play a significant role in the expression of the mutation. Overall, these findings appear to indicate that the rare detection of this mutation in other populations is most likely due to inadequacy in patient ascertainment and molecular screening. This probable lack of identification of the A1555G mutation in subjects affected by sensorineural hearing loss implies that their maternally related relatives are not benefiting from presymptomatic detection and information concerning their increased risk of ototoxicity due to aminoglycoside treatments. PMID:10521300

  7. Limited proteolysis differentially modulates the stability and subcellular localization of domains of RPGRIP1 that are distinctly affected by mutations in Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinrong; Guruju, Mallikarjuna; Oswald, John; Ferreira, Paulo A

    2005-05-15

    The retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) protein interacts with the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein-1 (RPGRIP1). Genetic lesions in the cognate genes lead to distinct and severe human retinal dystrophies. The biological role of these proteins in retinal function and pathogenesis of retinal diseases is elusive. Here, we present the first physiological assay of the role of RPGRIP1 and mutations therein. We found that the monoallelic and homozygous mutations, DeltaE1279 and D1114G, in the RPGR-interacting domain (RID) of RPGRIP1, enhance and abolish, respectively, its interaction in vivo with RPGR without affecting the stability of RID. In contrast to RID(WT) and RID(D1114G), chemical genetics shows that the interaction of RID(DeltaE1279) with RPGR is resistant to various stress treatments such as osmotic, pH and heat-shock stimuli. Hence, RID(D1114G) and RID(DeltaE1279) constitute loss- and gain-of-function mutations. Moreover, we find that the isoforms, bRPGRIP1 and bRPGRIP1b, undergo limited proteolysis constitutively in vivo in the cytoplasm compartment. This leads to the relocation and accumulation of a small and stable N-terminal domain of approximately 7 kDa to the nucleus, whereas the cytosolic C-terminal domain of RPGRIP1 is degraded and short-lived. The RID(D1114G) and RID(DeltaE1279) mutations exhibit strong cis-acting and antagonistic biological effects on the nuclear relocation, subcellular distribution and proteolytic cleavage of RPGRIP1 and/or domains thereof. These data support distinct and spatiotemporal subcellular-specific roles to RPGRIP1. A novel RPGRIP1-mediated nucleocytoplasmic crosstalk and transport pathway regulated by RID, and hence by RPGR, emerges with implications in the molecular pathogenesis of retinopathies, and a model to other diseases.

  8. Mutations affecting transport of the hexitols D-mannitol, D-glucitol, and galactitol in Escherichia coli K-12: isolation and mapping.

    PubMed Central

    Lengeler, J

    1975-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 unable to grow on any of the three naturally occurring hexitols D-manitol, D-glucitol, and galactitol and, among these specifically, mutants with altered transport and phosphorylating activity have been isolated. Different isolation procedures have been utilized, including suicide by D-[3H]mannitol, chemotaxis, and resistance to the toxic hexitol analogue 2-deoxy-arabino-hexitol. Mutations thus obtained have been mapped in four distinct operons. (i) Mutations affecting an enzyme II-complexmt1 activity of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system all map in gene mtlA. This gene has previously been shown (Solomon and Lin, 1972) to be part of an operon, mtl, located at 71 min on the E. coli linkage map containing, in addition to mtlA, the cis-dominant regulatory gene mtlC and mtlD, the structural gene for the enzyme D-mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase. The gene order in this operon, induced by D-mannitol, is mtlC A D. (ii) Mutations in gene gutA affecting a second enzyme II-complexgut of the phosphotransferase system map at 51 min, clustered in operon gutC A D together with the cis-dominant regulatory gene gutC and the structural gene gutD for the enzyme D-glucitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. The gut operon, previously called sbl or srl, is induced by D-glucitol. (iii) Mutations affecting the transport and catabolism of galactitol are clustered in a third operon, gatC A D, located at 40.5 min. This operon again contains a cis-dominant regulatory gene, gatC, the structural gene gatD for galactitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase, and gene gatA coding for a thrid hexitol-specific enzyme II-complexgat. Other genes coding for two additional enzymes involved in galactitol catabolism apparently are not linked to gatC A D. (iv) A fourth class of mutants pleiotropically negative for hexitol growth and transport maps in the pts operon. Triple-negative mutants (mtlA gutA gatA) do not have further transport or phosphorylating activity

  9. Tumor suppressor Nf2/merlin drives Schwann cell changes following electromagnetic field exposure through Hippo-dependent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Colciago, A; Melfi, S; Giannotti, G; Bonalume, V; Ballabio, M; Caffino, L; Fumagalli, F; Magnaghi, V

    2015-01-01

    Previous evidence showed mutations of the neurofibromin type 2 gene (Nf2), encoding the tumor suppressor protein merlin, in sporadic and vestibular schwannomas affecting Schwann cells (SCs). Accordingly, efforts have been addressed to identify possible factors, even environmental, that may regulate neurofibromas growth. In this context, we investigated the exposure of SC to an electromagnetic field (EMF), which is an environmental issue modulating biological processes. Here, we show that SC exposed to 50 Hz EMFs changes their morphology, proliferation, migration and myelinating capability. In these cells, merlin is downregulated, leading to activation of two intracellular signaling pathways, ERK/AKT and Hippo. Interestingly, SC changes their phenotype toward a proliferative/migrating state, which in principle may be pathologically relevant for schwannoma development. PMID:27551454

  10. Point mutations in Staphylococcus aureus PBP 2 gene affect penicillin-binding kinetics and are associated with resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Hackbarth, C J; Kocagoz, T; Kocagoz, S; Chambers, H F

    1995-01-01

    In Staphylococcus aureus, penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP 2) has been implicated in non-PBP 2a-mediated methicillin resistance. The PBP 2 gene (pbpB) was cloned from an expression library of a methicillin-susceptible strain of S. aureus (209P), and its entire sequence was compared with that of the pbpB gene from strains BB255, BB255R, and CDC6. Point mutations that resulted in amino acid substitutions near the conserved penicillin-binding motifs were detected in BB255R and CDC6, two low-level methicillin-resistant strains. Penicillin binding to PBP 2 in both BB255R and CDC6 is altered, and kinetic analysis indicated that altered binding of PBP 2 by penicillin was due to both lower binding affinity and more rapid release of bound drug. These structural and biochemical changes may contribute to the strains' resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. PMID:7695289

  11. Mutations in ampG and Lytic Transglycosylase Genes Affect the Net Release of Peptidoglycan Monomers from Vibrio fischeri▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Adin, Dawn M.; Engle, Jacquelyn T.; Goldman, William E.; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J.; Stabb, Eric V.

    2009-01-01

    The light-organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri releases N-acetylglucosaminyl-1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramylalanyl-γ-glutamyldiaminopimelylalanine, a disaccharide-tetrapeptide component of peptidoglycan that is referred to here as “PG monomer.” In contrast, most gram-negative bacteria recycle PG monomer efficiently, and it does not accumulate extracellularly. PG monomer can stimulate normal light-organ morphogenesis in the host squid Euprymna scolopes, resulting in regression of ciliated appendages similar to that triggered by infection with V. fischeri. We examined whether the net release of PG monomers by V. fischeri resulted from lytic transglycosylase activity or from defects in AmpG, the permease through which PG monomers enter the cytoplasm for recycling. An ampG mutant displayed a 100-fold increase in net PG monomer release, indicating that AmpG is functional. The ampG mutation also conferred the uncharacteristic ability to induce light-organ morphogenesis even when placed in a nonmotile flaJ mutant that cannot infect the light-organ crypts. We targeted five potential lytic transglycosylase genes singly and in specific combinations to assess their role in PG monomer release. Combinations of mutations in ltgA, ltgD, and ltgY decreased net PG monomer release, and a triple mutant lacking all three of these genes had little to no accumulation of PG monomers in culture supernatants. This mutant colonized the host as well as the wild type did; however, the mutant-infected squid were more prone to later superinfection by a second V. fischeri strain. We propose that the lack of PG monomer release by this mutant results in less regression of the infection-promoting ciliated appendages, leading to this propensity for superinfection. PMID:19074387

  12. Noise suppressor for turbo fan jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, D. Y. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A noise suppressor is disclosed for installation on the discharge or aft end of a turbo fan engine. Within the suppressor are fixed annular airfoils which are positioned to reduce the relative velocity between the high temperature fast moving jet exhaust and the low temperature slow moving air surrounding it. Within the suppressor nacelle is an exhaust jet nozzle which constrains the shape of the jet exhaust to a substantially uniform elongate shape irrespective of the power setting of the engine. Fixed ring airfoils within the suppressor nacelle therefore have the same salutary effects irrespective of the power setting at which the engine is operated.

  13. Suppressors made from intermetallic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Klett, James W; Muth, Thomas R; Cler, Dan L

    2014-11-04

    Disclosed are several examples of apparatuses for suppressing the blast and flash produced as a projectile is expelled by gases from a firearm. In some examples, gases are diverted away from the central chamber to an expansion chamber by baffles. The gases are absorbed by the expansion chamber and desorbed slowly, thus decreasing pressure and increasing residence time of the gases. In other examples, the gases impinge against a plurality of rods before expanding through passages between the rods to decrease the pressure and increase the residence time of the gases. These and other exemplary suppressors are made from an intermetallic material composition for enhanced strength and oxidation resistance at high operational temperatures.

  14. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Dinesh; Gravekamp, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    While conventional anticancer therapies, including surgical resection, radiotherapy, and/or chemotherapy, are relatively efficient at eliminating primary tumors, these treatment modalities are largely ineffective against metastases. At least in part, this reflects the rather inefficient delivery of conventional anticancer agents to metastatic lesions. We have recently demonstrated that myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) can be used as cellular missiles to selectively deliver a radioisotope-coupled attenuated variant of Listeria monocytogenes to both primary and metastatic neoplastic lesions in mice with pancreatic cancer. This novel immunotherapeutic intervention robustly inhibited tumor growth while promoting a dramatic decrease in the number of metastases. PMID:24427545

  15. The tumor suppressor protein Fhit. A novel interaction with tubulin.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, A R; Khan, I A; Prasad, V; Robinson, A K; Ludueña, R F; Barnes, L D

    1999-08-20

    FHIT (fragile histidine triad) is a candidate human tumor suppressor gene located at chromosome 3p14.2, a location that encompasses the FRA3B chromosomal fragile site. Aberrant transcripts have been detected in a variety of primary tumors, and homozygous deletions in the FHIT locus have been detected in different tumor cell lines. The gene product Fhit in vitro possesses the ability to hydrolyze diadenosine 5',5"'-P(1),P(3)-triphosphate (Ap(3)A). The mechanism of action of Fhit as a tumor suppressor is unknown. Because the tubulin-microtubule system plays an important role in cell division and cell proliferation, we investigated the interaction between wild-type Fhit or mutant Fhit (H96N) and tubulin in vitro. The mutant form of Fhit (H96N) lacks Ap(3)A hydrolase activity but retains tumor suppressor activity. We found that both wild-type and mutated forms of Fhit bind to tubulin strongly and specifically with K(d) values of 1.4 and 2.1 microM, respectively. Neither wild-type nor mutant Fhit cause nucleation or formation of microtubules, but in the presence of microtubule-associated proteins, both wild-type and mutant Fhit promote assembly to a greater extent than do microtubule-associated proteins alone, and the microtubules formed appear normal by electron microscopy. Our results suggest the possibility that Fhit may exert its tumor suppressor activity by interacting with microtubules and also indicate that the interaction between Fhit and tubulin is not related to the Ap(3)A hydrolase activity of Fhit.

  16. Tumour suppressor gene p53 in the horse: identification, cloning, sequencing and a possible role in the pathogenesis of equine sarcoid.

    PubMed

    Bucher, K; Szalai, G; Marti, E; Griot-Wenk, M E; Lazary, S; Pauli, U

    1996-09-01

    The tumour suppressor protein p53 enhances the genetic stability of the cell and plays a critical role in tumour suppression. Equine p53 was analysed by sequencing exons 5 to 9, a region which includes most known mutations and all the mutational hotspots in the species that have been investigated. The fragment was amplified, cloned and sequenced from genomic and complementary DNA. A comparison of the predicted amino acid sequences between the horse and other species resulted in identities between 66 per cent with the clawed frog and 92 per cent with the cat. Using the single strand conformation polymorphism technique, exons 5 to 8 amplified from sarcoid tissue and peripheral leucocytes of 28 sarcoid-affected and 11 healthy horses were screened for mutations. No mutations were identified, suggesting that the frequency of p53 mutations in equine sarcoid might be low. However, the high incidence of bovine papillomavirus (BPV) infection in equine sarcoid may indicate the functional inactivation of p53 by BPV-encoded E6 protein.

  17. Crossover Suppressors and Balanced Recessive Lethals in CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Robert K.

    1978-01-01

    Two dominant suppressors of crossing over have been identified following X-ray treatment of the small nematode C. elegans. They suppress crossing over in linkage group II (LGII) about 100-fold and 50-fold and are both tightly linked to LGII markers. One, called C1, segregates independently of all other linkage groups and is homozygous fertile. The other is a translocation involving LGII and X. The translocation also suppresses crossing over along the right half of X and is homozygous lethal. C1 has been used as a balancer of LGII recessive lethal and sterile mutations induced by EMS. The frequencies of occurrence of lethals and steriles were approximately equal. Fourteen mutations were assigned to complementation groups and mapped. They tended to map in the same region where LGII visibles are clustered. PMID:631558

  18. Novel BRCA1 and BRCA2 pathogenic mutations in Slovene hereditary breast and ovarian cancer families

    PubMed Central

    NOVAKOVIĆ, SRDJAN; MILATOVIĆ, MAŠA; CERKOVNIK, PETRA; STEGEL, VIDA; KRAJC, MATEJA; HOČEVAR, MARKO; ŽGAJNAR, JANEZ; VAKSELJ, ALEŠ

    2012-01-01

    The estimated proportion of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers among all breast and ovarian cancer cases is 5–10%. According to the literature, inherited mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumour-suppressor genes, account for the majority of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer cases. The aim of this report is to present novel mutations that have not yet been described in the literature and pathogenic BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations which have been detected in HBOC families for the first time in the last three years. In the period between January 2009 and December 2011, 559 individuals from 379 families affected with breast and/or ovarian cancer were screened for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Three novel mutations were detected: one in BRCA1 - c.1193C>A (p.Ser398*) and two in BRCA2 - c.5101C>T (p.Gln1701*) and c.5433_5436delGGAA (p.Glu1811Aspfs*3). These novel mutations are located in the exons 11 of BRCA1 or BRCA2 and encode truncated proteins. Two of them are nonsense while one is a frameshift mutation. Also, 11 previously known pathogenic mutations were detected for the first time in the HBOC families studied here (three in BRCA1 and eight in BRCA2). All, except one cause premature formation of stop codons leading to truncation of the respective BRCA1 or BRCA2 proteins. PMID:22923021

  19. Therapeutic Targets in the ARF Tumor Suppressor Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Saporita, Anthony J.; Maggi, Leonard B.; Apicelli, Anthony J.; Weber, Jason D.

    2008-01-01

    One of the outstanding fundamental questions in cancer cell biology concerns how cells coordinate cellular growth (or macromolecular synthesis) with cell cycle progression and mitosis. Intuitively, rapidly dividing cells must have some control over these processes; otherwise cells would continue to shrink in volume with every passing cycle, similar to the cytoreductive divisions seen in the very early stages of embryogenesis. The problem is easily solved in unicellular organisms, such as yeast, as their growth rates are entirely dependent on nutrient availability. Multicellular organisms such as mammals, however, must have acquired additional levels of control, as nutrient availability is seldom an issue and the organism has a prodigious capacity to store necessary metabolites in the form of glycogen, lipids, and protein. Furthermore, the specific needs and specialized architecture of tissues must constrain growth for growth’s sake; if not, the necessary function of the organ could be lost. While certainly a myriad of mechanisms for preventing this exist via initiating cell death (e.g. apoptosis, autophagy, necrosis), these all depend on some external cue, such as death signals, hypoxia, lack of nutrients or survival signals. However there must also be some cell autonomous method for surveying against inappropriate growth signals (such as oncogenic stress) that occur in a stochastic fashion, possibly as a result of random mutations. The ARF tumor suppressor seems to fulfill that role, as its expression is near undetectable in normal tissues, yet is potently induced by oncogenic stress (such as overexpression of oncogenic Ras or myc). As a result of induced expression of ARF, the tumor suppressor protein p53 is stabilized and promotes cell cycle arrest. Mutations or epigenetic alterations of the INK4a/Arf locus are second only to p53 mutations in cancer cells, and in some cancers, alterations in both Arf and p53 observed, suggesting that these two tumor

  20. LTBP2 mutations cause Weill-Marchesani and Weill-Marchesani-like syndrome and affect disruptions in the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Haji-Seyed-Javadi, Ramona; Jelodari-Mamaghani, Sahar; Paylakhi, Seyed Hassan; Yazdani, Shahin; Nilforushan, Naveed; Fan, Jian-Bing; Klotzle, Brandy; Mahmoudi, Mohammad Jafar; Ebrahimian, Mohammad Jafar; Chelich, Noori; Taghiabadi, Ehsan; Kamyab, Kambiz; Boileau, Catherine; Paisan-Ruiz, Coro; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Elahi, Elahe

    2012-08-01

    Latent transforming growth factor (TGF) beta-binding protein 2 (LTBP2) is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that associates with fibrillin-1 containing microfibrils. Various factors prompted considering LTBP2 in the etiology of isolated ectopia lentis and associated conditions such as Weill-Marchesani syndrome (WMS) and Marfan syndrome (MFS). LTBP2 was screened in 30 unrelated Iranian patients. Mutations were found only in one WMS proband and one MFS proband. Homozygous c.3529G>A (p.Val1177Met) was shown to cause autosomal recessive WMS or WM-like syndrome by several approaches, including homozygosity mapping. Light, fluorescent, and electron microscopy evidenced disruptions of the microfibrillar network in the ECM of the proband's skin. In conjunction with recent findings regarding other ECM proteins, the results presented strongly support the contention that anomalies in WMS patients are due to disruptions in the ECM. Heterozygous c.1642C >T (p.Arg548*) possibly contributed to MFS-related phenotypes, including ocular manifestations, mitral valve prolapse, and pectus excavatum, but was not cause of MFS.

  1. Mutation in the xpsD gene of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri affects cellulose degradation and virulence.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Juliana Cristina; Machado, Marcos Antonio; Homem, Rafael Augusto; Torres, Pablo Sebastián; Vojnov, Adrian Alberto; do Amaral, Alexandre Morais

    2010-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, the causal agent of citrus canker, is a major threat to the citrus industry worldwide. Although this is a leaf spot pathogen, it bears genes highly related to degradation of plant cell walls, which are typically found in plant pathogens that cause symptoms of tissue maceration. Little is known on Xac capacity to cause disease and hydrolyze cellulose. We investigated the contribution of various open reading frames on degradation of a cellulose compound by means of a global mutational assay to selectively screen for a defect in carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase) secretion in X. axonopodis pv. citri. Screening on CMC agar revealed one mutant clone defective in extracellular glycanase activity, out of nearly 3,000 clones. The insertion was located in the xpsD gene, a component of the type II secretion system (T2SS) showing an influence in the ability of Xac to colonize tissues and hydrolyze cellulose. In summary, these data show for the first time, that X. axonopodis pv. citri is capable of hydrolyzing cellulose in a T2SS-dependent process. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the ability to degrade cellulose contributes to the infection process as a whole.

  2. A Protein Kinase C phosphorylation motif in GLUT1 affects glucose transport and is mutated in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunice E.; Ma, Jing; Sacharidou, Anastasia; Mi, Wentao; Salato, Valerie K.; Nguyen, Nam; Jiang, Youxing; Pascual, Juan M.; North, Paula E.; Shaul, Philip W.; Mettlen, Marcel; Wang, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Protein Kinase C has been implicated in the phosphorylation of the erythrocyte/brain glucose transporter, GLUT1, without a clear understanding of the site(s) of phosphorylation and the possible effects on glucose transport. Through in-vitro kinase assays, mass spectrometry, and phosphospecific antibodies, we identify Serine 226 in GLUT1 as a PKC phosphorylation site. Phosphorylation of S226 is required for the rapid increase in glucose uptake and enhanced cell surface localization of GLUT1 induced by the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Endogenous GLUT1 is phosphorylated on S226 in primary endothelial cells in response to TPA or VEGF. Several naturally-occurring, pathogenic mutations that cause GLUT1 deficiency syndrome disrupt this PKC phosphomotif, impair the phosphorylation of S226 in vitro, and block TPA-mediated increases in glucose uptake. We demonstrate that the phosphorylation of GLUT1 on S226 regulates glucose transport and propose that this modification is important in the physiological regulation of glucose transport. PMID:25982116

  3. A Protein Kinase C Phosphorylation Motif in GLUT1 Affects Glucose Transport and is Mutated in GLUT1 Deficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunice E; Ma, Jing; Sacharidou, Anastasia; Mi, Wentao; Salato, Valerie K; Nguyen, Nam; Jiang, Youxing; Pascual, Juan M; North, Paula E; Shaul, Philip W; Mettlen, Marcel; Wang, Richard C

    2015-06-04

    Protein kinase C has been implicated in the phosphorylation of the erythrocyte/brain glucose transporter, GLUT1, without a clear understanding of the site(s) of phosphorylation and the possible effects on glucose transport. Through in vitro kinase assays, mass spectrometry, and phosphospecific antibodies, we identify serine 226 in GLUT1 as a PKC phosphorylation site. Phosphorylation of S226 is required for the rapid increase in glucose uptake and enhanced cell surface localization of GLUT1 induced by the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Endogenous GLUT1 is phosphorylated on S226 in primary endothelial cells in response to TPA or VEGF. Several naturally occurring, pathogenic mutations that cause GLUT1 deficiency syndrome disrupt this PKC phosphomotif, impair the phosphorylation of S226 in vitro, and block TPA-mediated increases in glucose uptake. We demonstrate that the phosphorylation of GLUT1 on S226 regulates glucose transport and propose that this modification is important in the physiological regulation of glucose transport.

  4. Point mutations in EBV gH that abrogate or differentially affect B cell and epithelial cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Liguo; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M. . E-mail: lhuttf@lsuhsc.edu

    2007-06-20

    Cell fusion mediated by Epstein-Barr virus requires three conserved glycoproteins, gB and gHgL, but activation is cell type specific. B cell fusion requires interaction between MHC class II and a fourth virus glycoprotein, gp42, which complexes non-covalently with gHgL. Epithelial cell fusion requires interaction between gHgL and a novel epithelial cell coreceptor and is blocked by excess gp42. We show here that gp42 interacts directly with gH and that point mutations in the region of gH recognized by an antibody that differentially inhibits epithelial and B cell fusion significantly impact both the core fusion machinery and cell-specific events. Substitution of alanine for glycine at residue 594 completely abrogates fusion with either B cells or epithelial cells. Substitution of alanine for glutamic acid at residue 595 reduces fusion with epithelial cells, greatly enhances fusion with B cells and allows low levels of B cell fusion even in the absence of gL.

  5. Alteration of seed fatty acid composition by an ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutation in Arabidopsis thaliana affecting diacylglycerol acyltransferase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Katavic, V; Reed, D W; Taylor, D C; Giblin, E M; Barton, D L; Zou, J; Mackenzie, S L; Covello, P S; Kunst, L

    1995-01-01

    In characterizing the enzymes involved in the formation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) in the Brassicaceae, we have generated a series of mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana that have reduced VLCFA content. Here we report the characterization of a seed lipid mutant, AS11, which, in comparison to wild type (WT), has reduced levels of 20:1 and 18:1 and accumulates 18:3 as the major fatty acid in triacylglycerols. Proportions of 18:2 remain similar to WT. Genetic analyses indicate that the fatty acid phenotype is caused by a semidominant mutation in a single nuclear gene, designated TAG1, located on chromosome 2. Biochemical analyses have shown that the AS11 phenotype is not due to a deficiency in the capacity to elongate 18:1 or to an increase in the relative delta 15 or delta 12 desaturase activities. Indeed, the ratio of desaturase/elongase activities measured in vitro is virtually identical in developing WT and AS11 seed homogenates. Rather, the fatty acid phenotype of AS11 is the result of reduced diacylglycerol acyltransferase activity throughout development, such that triacylglycerol biosynthesis is reduced. This leads to a reduction in 20:1 biosynthesis during seed development, leaving more 18:1 available for desaturation. Thus, we have demonstrated that changes to triacylglycerol biosynthesis can result in dramatic changes in fatty acid composition and, in particular, in the accumulation of VLCFAs in seed storage lipids. PMID:7784510

  6. Mutation in the xpsD gene of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri affects cellulose degradation and virulence

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, the causal agent of citrus canker, is a major threat to the citrus industry worldwide. Although this is a leaf spot pathogen, it bears genes highly related to degradation of plant cell walls, which are typically found in plant pathogens that cause symptoms of tissue maceration. Little is known on Xac capacity to cause disease and hydrolyze cellulose. We investigated the contribution of various open reading frames on degradation of a cellulose compound by means of a global mutational assay to selectively screen for a defect in carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase) secretion in X. axonopodis pv. citri. Screening on CMC agar revealed one mutant clone defective in extracellular glycanase activity, out of nearly 3,000 clones. The insertion was located in the xpsD gene, a component of the type II secretion system (T2SS) showing an influence in the ability of Xac to colonize tissues and hydrolyze cellulose. In summary, these data show for the first time, that X. axonopodis pv. citri is capable of hydrolyzing cellulose in a T2SS-dependent process. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the ability to degrade cellulose contributes to the infection process as a whole. PMID:21637619

  7. Novel and recurrent mutations in the TAT gene in Tunisian families affected with Richner-Hanhart syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bouyacoub, Yosra; Zribi, Hela; Azzouz, Hatem; Nasrallah, Fehmi; Abdelaziz, Rim Ben; Kacem, Monia; Rekaya, Ben; Messaoud, Olfa; Romdhane, Lilia; Charfeddine, Cherine; Bouziri, Mustapha; Bouziri, Sonia; Tebib, Neji; Mokni, Mourad; Kaabachi, Naziha; Boubaker, Samir; Abdelhak, Sonia

    2013-10-15

    Tyrosinemia type II, also designated as oculocutaneous tyrosinemia or Richner-Hanhart syndrome (RHS), is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder. In the present study, we report clinical features and molecular genetic investigation of the tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene in two young patients, both born to consanguineous unions between first-degree cousins. These two unrelated families originated from Northern and Southern Tunisia. The clinical diagnosis was based on the observation of several complications related to Richner-Hanhart syndrome: recurrent eye redness, tearing and burning pain, photophobia, bilateral pseudodendritic keratitis, an erythematous and painful focal palmo-plantar hyperkeratosis and a mild delay of mental development. The diagnosis was confirmed by biochemical analysis. Sequencing of the TAT gene revealed the presence of a previously reported missense mutation (c.452G>A, p.Cys151Tyr) in a Tunisian family, and a novel G duplication (c.869dupG, p.Trp291Leufs 6). Early diagnosis of RHS and protein-restricted diet are crucial to reduce the risk and the severity of long-term complications of hypertyrosinemia such as intellectual disability.

  8. Starch-branching enzyme I-deficient mutation specifically affects the structure and properties of starch in rice endosperm.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Hikaru; Nishi, Aiko; Yamashita, Kazuhiro; Takemoto, Yoko; Tanaka, Yasumasa; Hosaka, Yuko; Sakurai, Aya; Fujita, Naoko; Nakamura, Yasunori

    2003-11-01

    We have isolated a starch mutant that was deficient in starch-branching enzyme I (BEI) from the endosperm mutant stocks of rice (Oryza sativa) induced by the treatment of fertilized egg cells with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. The deficiency of BEI in this mutant was controlled by a single recessive gene, tentatively designated as starch-branching enzyme mutant 1 (sbe1). The mutant endosperm exhibited the normal phenotype and contained the same amount of starch as the wild type. However, the mutation apparently altered the fine structure of amylopectin. The mutant amylopectin was characterized by significant decrease in both long chains with degree of polymerization (DP) > or = 37 and short chains with DP 12 to 21, marked increase in short chains with DP < or = 10 (A chains), and slight increase in intermediate chains with DP 24 to 34, suggesting that BEI specifically synthesizes B1 and B2-3 chains. The endosperm starch from the sbe1 mutant had a lower onset concentration for urea gelatinization and a lower onset temperature for thermo-gelatinization compared with the wild type, indicating that the genetic modification of amylopectin fine structure is responsible for changes in physicochemical properties of sbe1 starch.

  9. Heterozygous Cylindromatosis Gene Mutation c.1628_1629delCT in a Family with Brook-Spiegler Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Cintia Arjona; De la Varga Martínez, Raquel; García, Lidia Ossorio; Jiménez-Gallo, David; Planelles, Cristina Albarrán; Barrios, Mario Linares

    2016-01-01

    Brooke–Spiegler Syndrome (BSS) is a rare genodermatosis characterized by the progressive formation of adnexal skin tumors in the scalp and face, mainly trichoepitheliomas, cylindromas, and spiradenomas. It has also been associated with salivary glands neoplasms. It is due to mutations in the tumor suppressor gene cylindromatosis (CYLD gene) localized on chromosome 16q12−q13. Around 93 mutations have been described. The study of CYLD gene in patients and their relatives is of vital importance to establish the molecular diagnosis and offer appropriate genetic counseling. There is a low risk of malignancy and patients require long-term follow-up. A case of BSS in a family is described. The existence of the genetic mutation at the CYLD gene c. 1628_1629delCT in three of the women affected was demonstrated. This mutation has only been described once in a previous study. PMID:27688459

  10. NS1 Protein Mutation I64T Affects Interferon Responses and Virulence of Circulating H3N2 Human Influenza A Viruses.

    PubMed

    DeDiego, Marta L; Nogales, Aitor; Lambert-Emo, Kris; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Topham, David J

    2016-11-01

    Influenza NS1 protein is the main viral protein counteracting host innate immune responses, allowing the virus to efficiently replicate in interferon (IFN)-competent systems. In this study, we analyzed NS1 protein variability within influenza A (IAV) H3N2 viruses infecting humans during the 2012-2013 season. We also evaluated the impact of the mutations on the ability of NS1 proteins to inhibit host innate immune responses and general gene expression. Surprisingly, a previously unidentified mutation in the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding domain (I64T) decreased NS1-mediated general inhibition of host protein synthesis by decreasing its interaction with cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 (CPSF30), leading to increased innate immune responses after viral infection. Notably, a recombinant A/Puerto Rico/8/34 H1N1 virus encoding the H3N2 NS1-T64 protein was highly attenuated in mice, most likely because of its ability to induce higher antiviral IFN responses at early times after infection and because this virus is highly sensitive to the IFN-induced antiviral state. Interestingly, using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected at the acute visit (2 to 3 days after infection), we show that the subject infected with the NS1-T64 attenuated virus has diminished responses to interferon and to interferon induction, suggesting why this subject could be infected with this highly IFN-sensitive virus. These data demonstrate the importance of influenza virus surveillance in identifying new mutations in the NS1 protein, affecting its ability to inhibit innate immune responses and, as a consequence, the pathogenicity of the virus.

  11. Suppressor Effects of Coping Strategies on Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Jae ho; Lee, Ji hae; Lee, Chae Yeon; Cho, Minhee; Lee, Sang Min

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to demonstrate a significant suppressor effect among coping strategies on resilience. Two different samples were used to replicate the suppressor effect. Participants in the first example were 391 adolescents (middle school students) in Korea, and participants in the second example were 282 young adults…

  12. Discovery of Tumor Suppressor Gene Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppenheimer, Steven B.

    1995-01-01

    This is an update of a 1991 review on tumor suppressor genes written at a time when understanding of how the genes work was limited. A recent major breakthrough in the understanding of the function of tumor suppressor genes is discussed. (LZ)

  13. Two Replicable Suppressor Situations in Personality Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulhus, Delroy L.; Robins, Richard W.; Trzesniewski, Kali H.; Tracy, Jessica L.

    2004-01-01

    Suppressor situations occur when the simultaneous inclusion of two predictors improves one or both validities. A common allegation is that suppressor effects rarely replicate and have little substantive import. We present substantive examples from two established research domains to counter this skepticism. In the first domain, we show how…

  14. Mutational specificity analysis: assay for mutations in the yeast SUP4-o gene.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Bernard A

    2014-01-01

    Mutational specificity analysis can yield valuable insights into processes that generate genetic change or maintain genetic stability. Powerful diagnostic tools for such analysis have been created by combining genetic assays for mutation with DNA sequencing. Here, steps for isolating spontaneous mutations in the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) suppressor tRNA gene SUP4-o as a prelude to sequence characterization are described (modifications of this protocol can be used to study induction of mutations by various physical or chemical agents). Mutations in SUP4-o are selected on drug-containing medium by virtue of their inactivation of suppressor activity. The small size, detailed knowledge of detectably mutable sites, and other features of the target gene facilitate subsequent analysis of these mutations.

  15. A novel mutation in the N-terminal domain of Drosophila BubR1 affects the spindle assembly checkpoint function of BubR1

    PubMed Central

    Duranteau, Marie; Montagne, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a surveillance mechanism that ensures accurate segregation of chromosomes into two daughter cells. BubR1, a key component of the SAC, also plays a role in the mitotic timing since depletion of BubR1 leads to accelerated mitosis. We previously found that mutation of the KEN1-box domain of Drosophila BubR1 (bubR1-KEN1 mutant) affects the binding of BubR1 to Cdc20, the activating co-factor of the APC/C, and does not accelerate the mitotic timing despite resulting in a defective SAC, which was unlike what was reported in mammalian cells. Here, we show that a mutation in a novel Drosophila short sequence (bubR1-KAN mutant) leads to an accelerated mitotic timing as well as SAC failure. Moreover, our data indicate that the level of Fzy, the Drosophila homolog of Cdc20, recruited to kinetochores is diminished in bubR1-KEN1 mutant cells and further diminished in bubR1-KAN mutant cells. Altogether, our data show that this newly identified Drosophila BubR1 KAN motif is required for a functional SAC and suggest that it may play an important role on Cdc20/Fzy kinetochore recruitment. PMID:27742609

  16. Mutations within the LINC-HELLP non-coding RNA differentially bind ribosomal and RNA splicing complexes and negatively affect trophoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Marie; Visser, Allerdien; Buabeng, Kwadwo M L; Poutsma, Ankie; van der Schors, Roel C; Oudejans, Cees B M

    2015-10-01

    LINC-HELLP, showing chromosomal linkage with the pregnancy-specific HELLP syndrome in Dutch families, reduces differentiation from a proliferative to an invasive phenotype of first-trimester extravillous trophoblasts. Here we show that mutations in LINC-HELLP identified in HELLP families negatively affect this trophoblast differentiation either by inducing proliferation rate or by causing cell cycle exit as shown by a decrease in both proliferation and invasion. As LincRNAs predominantly function through interactions with proteins, we identified the directly interacting proteins using chromatin isolation by RNA purification followed by protein mass spectrometry. We found 22 proteins predominantly clustering in two functional networks, i.e. RNA splicing and the ribosome. YBX1, PCBP1, PCBP2, RPS6 and RPL7 were validated, and binding to these proteins was influenced by the HELLP mutations carried. Finally, we show that the LINC-HELLP transcript levels are significantly upregulated in plasma of women in their first trimester of pregnancy compared with non-pregnant women, whereas this upregulation seems absent in a pilot set of patients later developing pregnancy complications, indicative of its functional significance in vivo.

  17. A mutation in VPS15 (PIK3R4) causes a ciliopathy and affects IFT20 release from the cis-Golgi

    PubMed Central

    Stoetzel, Corinne; Bär, Séverine; De Craene, Johan-Owen; Scheidecker, Sophie; Etard, Christelle; Chicher, Johana; Reck, Jennifer R.; Perrault, Isabelle; Geoffroy, Véronique; Chennen, Kirsley; Strähle, Uwe; Hammann, Philippe; Friant, Sylvie; Dollfus, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    Ciliopathies are a group of diseases that affect kidney and retina among other organs. Here, we identify a missense mutation in PIK3R4 (phosphoinositide 3-kinase regulatory subunit 4, named VPS15) in a family with a ciliopathy phenotype. Besides being required for trafficking and autophagy, we show that VPS15 regulates primary cilium length in human fibroblasts, as well as ciliary processes in zebrafish. Furthermore, we demonstrate its interaction with the golgin GM130 and its localization to the Golgi. The VPS15-R998Q patient mutation impairs Golgi trafficking functions in humanized yeast cells. Moreover, in VPS15-R998Q patient fibroblasts, the intraflagellar transport protein IFT20 is not localized to vesicles trafficking to the cilium but is restricted to the Golgi. Our findings suggest that at the Golgi, VPS15 and GM130 form a protein complex devoid of VPS34 to ensure the IFT20-dependent sorting and transport of membrane proteins from the cis-Golgi to the primary cilium. PMID:27882921

  18. Splicing mutants and their second-site suppressors at the dihydrofolate reductase locus in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Carothers, A M; Urlaub, G; Grunberger, D; Chasin, L A

    1993-08-01

    Point mutants induced with a variety of mutagens at the dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) locus in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were screened for aberrantly spliced dhfr mRNA by RNase protection and/or reverse transcriptase coupled with cDNA amplification by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Of 115 mutants screened, 28 were found to be affected in splicing. All exhibited less than 1% correct splicing, probably because the selection procedure was stringent. All 26 unique mutations were located within the consensus splice sequences; changes were found at 9 of 10 possible sites in this 25-kb six-exon gene. Mutations at the sites flanking the first and last exons resulted in the efficient recruitment of a cryptic site within each exon. In contrast, mutations bordering internal exons caused predominantly exon skipping. In many cases, multiple exons were skipped, suggesting the clustering of adjacent exons prior to actual splicing. Six mutations fell outside the well-conserved GU and AG dinucleotides. All but one were donor site single-base substitutions that decreased the agreement with the consensus and resulted in little or no correct splicing. Starting with five of these donor site mutants, we isolated 31 DHFR+ revertants. Most revertants carried a single-base substitution at a site other than that of the original mutation, and most had only partially regained the ability to splice correctly. The second-site suppression occurred through a variety of mechanisms: (i) a second change within the consensus sequence that produced a better agreement with the consensus; (ii) a change close to but beyond the consensus boundaries, as far as 8 bases upstream in the exon or 28 bases downstream in the intron; (iii) mutations in an apparent pseudo 5' site in the intron, 84 and 88 bases downstream of a donor site; and (iv) mutations that improved the upstream acceptor site of the affected exon. Taken together, these second-site suppressor mutations extend the definition of a

  19. [Effects of monorecessive and double recessive mutations affecting coat color on the monoamine content of the brain of the American mink (Mustela vison Schreber, 1777)].

    PubMed

    Trapezov, O V; Trapezova, L I; alekhina, T A; Klochkov, D V; Ivanov, Iu N

    2009-12-01

    The effects of mutations affecting the coat color on the dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin contents of the hypothalamus and brainstem of the American mink have been studied. The sample comprised standard (+/+) and mutant minks, including the monorecessive pastel (b/b), silver-blue (p/p), and white hedlund (h/h) and the combination double recessive sapphire (a/a p/p) and pearl (k/k p/p) ones. The dopamine content of the brainstem of the monorecessive pastel (b/b) and silver-blue (p/p) minks has been found to be higher than in standard (+/+) minks. Conversely, the homozigosity for two coat color loci in double recessive pearl minks (k/k p/p) significantly decreases the noradrenaline and serotonin contents of the hypothalamus. In addition, monorecessive and double recessive minks differ from each other in the serotonin contents of the midbrain and medulla.

  20. NF1 gene mutations and loss of heterozygosity in constitutional and tumor tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Abernathy, C.R.; Colman, S.D.; Ho, V.T.

    1994-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common autosomal dominant disorder characterized by neurofibromas, cafe-au-lait spots, and Lisch nodules. NF1 patients are at increased risk for certain types of malignancies such as brain tumors, sarcomas, and leukemias. NF1 is caused by disrupting mutations of the NF1 gene (17q11.2), with half of cases caused by new mutation. Less than 50 constitutional mutations have thus far been reported, with only one recurring. We are pursuing mutation analysis in germline and tumor tissues from NF1 patients (and non-NF1 tumors) by heteroduplex analysis (HDA) and SSCP, simultaneously testing for large deletions by Southern blots and loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) studies. HDA has so far identified 18 exon mutations/variants in 110 unrelated patients (3/4 of exons tested), including splice mutations, insertions, deletions, and point changes. RT-PCR analysis in our four clearly-inactivating mutations showed that all four mutant alleles are expressed. This suggests that aberrant forms of the protein (neurofibromin) may be produced, which may shed light on yet-unknown functions. In a study of 10 new-mutations parent-child sets, one very mildly-affected patient showed LOH of an entire NF1 allele, in contrast to other patients reported who have similar deletions and a severe phenotype. This mutation is materally-derived, which is unusual given that over 90% of new mutations are thought to be of paternal origin. Preliminary LOH studies in one new-mutation patient indicate large independent somatic deletions involving the maternal NF1 allele in several neurofibromas, implicating the two-hit tumor suppressor system in neurofibroma formation. no other losses on chromosome 17 are evident, and blood and tumor karyotypes are normal. We are attempting to identify the germline mutation, confirm the somatic findings, and find the boundaries of the deletions.

  1. Suppressors of spindle checkpoint defect (such) mutants identify new mdf-1/MAD1 interactors in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Tarailo, Maja; Kitagawa, Risa; Rose, Ann M

    2007-04-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) governs the timing of metaphase-to-anaphase transition and is essential for genome stability. The Caenorhabditis elegans mutant strain gk2 carries a deletion within the mdf-1/MAD1 gene that results in death of the homozygous strain after two or three generations. Here we describe 11 suppressors of the mdf-1(gk2) lethality, 10 identified in an ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis screen and 1 isolated using the dog-1(gk10) (deletions of guanine-rich DNA) mutator strain. Using time-lapse imaging of early embryonic cells and germline mitotic division, we demonstrate that there are two classes of suppressors. Eight suppressors compensate for the loss of the checkpoint by delaying mitotic progression, which coincides with securin (IFY-1/Pds1) accumulation; three suppressors have normal IFY-1/Pds1 levels and normal anaphase onset. Furthermore, in the class of suppressors with delayed mitotic progression, we have identified four alleles of known suppressors emb-30/APC4 and fzy-1/CDC20, which are components of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). In addition, we have identified another APC/C component capable of bypassing the checkpoint requirement that has not previously been described in C. elegans. The such-1/APC5-like mutation, h1960, significantly delays anaphase onset both in germline and in early embryonic cells.

  2. Common Fragile Site Tumor Suppressor Genes and Corresponding Mouse Models of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Drusco, Alessandra; Pekarsky, Yuri; Costinean, Stefan; Antenucci, Anna; Conti, Laura; Volinia, Stefano; Aqeilan, Rami I.; Huebner, Kay; Zanesi, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal common fragile sites (CFSs) are specific mammalian genomic regions that show an increased frequency of gaps and breaks when cells are exposed to replication stress in vitro. CFSs are also consistently involved in chromosomal abnormalities in vivo related to cancer. Interestingly, several CFSs contain one or more tumor suppressor genes whose structure and function are often affected by chromosomal fragility. The two most active fragile sites in the human genome are FRA3B and FRA16D where the tumor suppressor genes FHIT and WWOX are located, respectively. The best approach to study tumorigenic effects of altered tumor suppressors located at CFSs in vivo is to generate mouse models in which these genes are inactivated. This paper summarizes our present knowledge on mouse models of cancer generated by knocking out tumor suppressors of CFS. PMID:21318118

  3. Common fragile site tumor suppressor genes and corresponding mouse models of cancer.

    PubMed

    Drusco, Alessandra; Pekarsky, Yuri; Costinean, Stefan; Antenucci, Anna; Conti, Laura; Volinia, Stefano; Aqeilan, Rami I; Huebner, Kay; Zanesi, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal common fragile sites (CFSs) are specific mammalian genomic regions that show an increased frequency of gaps and breaks when cells are exposed to replication stress in vitro. CFSs are also consistently involved in chromosomal abnormalities in vivo related to cancer. Interestingly, several CFSs contain one or more tumor suppressor genes whose structure and function are often affected by chromosomal fragility. The two most active fragile sites in the human genome are FRA3B and FRA16D where the tumor suppressor genes FHIT and WWOX are located, respectively. The best approach to study tumorigenic effects of altered tumor suppressors located at CFSs in vivo is to generate mouse models in which these genes are inactivated. This paper summarizes our present knowledge on mouse models of cancer generated by knocking out tumor suppressors of CFS.

  4. The potential for tumor suppressor gene therapy in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Birkeland, Andrew C; Ludwig, Megan L; Spector, Matthew E; Brenner, J Chad

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma remains a highly morbid and fatal disease. Importantly, genomic sequencing of head and neck cancers has identified frequent mutations in tumor suppressor genes. While targeted therapeutics increasingly are being investigated in head and neck cancer, the majority of these agents are against overactive/overexpressed oncogenes. Therapy to restore lost tumor suppressor gene function remains a key and under-addressed niche in trials for head and neck cancer. Recent advances in gene editing have captured the interest of both the scientific community and the public. As our technology for gene editing and gene expression modulation improves, addressing lost tumor suppressor gene function in head and neck cancers is becoming a reality. This review will summarize new techniques, challenges to implementation, future directions, and ethical ramifications of gene therapy in head and neck cancer.

  5. The Potential for Tumor Suppressor Gene Therapy in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Birkeland, Andrew C.; Ludwig, Megan L.; Spector, Matthew E.; Brenner, J. Chad

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma remains a highly morbid and fatal disease. Importantly, genomic sequencing of head and neck cancers has identified frequent mutations in tumor suppressor genes. While targeted therapeutics increasingly are being investigated in head and neck cancer, the majority of these agents are against overactive/overexpressed oncogenes. Therapy to restore lost tumor suppressor gene function remains a key and under-addressed niche in trials for head and neck cancer. Recent advances in gene editing have captured the interest of both the scientific community and the public. As our technology for gene editing and gene expression modulation improves, addressing lost tumor suppressor gene function in head and neck cancers is becoming a reality. This review will summarize new techniques, challenges to implementation, future directions, and ethical ramifications of gene therapy in head and neck cancer. PMID:26896601

  6. Structure-Based Analysis Reveals Cancer Missense Mutations Target Protein Interaction Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Engin, H. Billur; Kreisberg, Jason F.; Carter, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that cancer mutations selectively target protein-protein interactions. We hypothesized that mutations affecting distinct protein interactions involving established cancer genes could contribute to tumor heterogeneity, and that novel mechanistic insights might be gained into tumorigenesis by investigating protein interactions under positive selection in cancer. To identify protein interactions under positive selection in cancer, we mapped over 1.2 million nonsynonymous somatic cancer mutations onto 4,896 experimentally determined protein structures and analyzed their spatial distribution. In total, 20% of mutations on the surface of known cancer genes perturbed protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and this enrichment for PPI interfaces was observed for both tumor suppressors (Odds Ratio 1.28, P-value < 10−4) and oncogenes (Odds Ratio 1.17, P-value < 10−3). To study this further, we constructed a bipartite network representing structurally resolved PPIs from all available human complexes in the Protein Data Bank (2,864 proteins, 3,072 PPIs). Analysis of frequently mutated cancer genes within this network revealed that tumor-suppressors, but not oncogenes, are significantly enriched with functional mutations in homo-oligomerization regions (Odds Ratio 3.68, P-Value < 10−8). We present two important examples, TP53 and beta-2-microglobulin, for which the patterns of somatic mutations at interfaces provide insights into specifically perturbed biological circuits. In patients with TP53 mutations, patient survival correlated with the specific interactions that were perturbed. Moreover, we investigated mutations at the interface of protein-nucleotide interactions and observed an unexpected number of missense mutations but not silent mutations occurring within DNA and RNA binding sites. Finally, we provide a resource of 3,072 PPI interfaces ranked according to their mutation rates. Analysis of this list highlights 282 novel candidate cancer

  7. Structure-Based Analysis Reveals Cancer Missense Mutations Target Protein Interaction Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Engin, H Billur; Kreisberg, Jason F; Carter, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that cancer mutations selectively target protein-protein interactions. We hypothesized that mutations affecting distinct protein interactions involving established cancer genes could contribute to tumor heterogeneity, and that novel mechanistic insights might be gained into tumorigenesis by investigating protein interactions under positive selection in cancer. To identify protein interactions under positive selection in cancer, we mapped over 1.2 million nonsynonymous somatic cancer mutations onto 4,896 experimentally determined protein structures and analyzed their spatial distribution. In total, 20% of mutations on the surface of known cancer genes perturbed protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and this enrichment for PPI interfaces was observed for both tumor suppressors (Odds Ratio 1.28, P-value < 10(-4)) and oncogenes (Odds Ratio 1.17, P-value < 10(-3)). To study this further, we constructed a bipartite network representing structurally resolved PPIs from all available human complexes in the Protein Data Bank (2,864 proteins, 3,072 PPIs). Analysis of frequently mutated cancer genes within this network revealed that tumor-suppressors, but not oncogenes, are significantly enriched with functional mutations in homo-oligomerization regions (Odds Ratio 3.68, P-Value < 10(-8)). We present two important examples, TP53 and beta-2-microglobulin, for which the patterns of somatic mutations at interfaces provide insights into specifically perturbed biological circuits. In patients with TP53 mutations, patient survival correlated with the specific interactions that were perturbed. Moreover, we investigated mutations at the interface of protein-nucleotide interactions and observed an unexpected number of missense mutations but not silent mutations occurring within DNA and RNA binding sites. Finally, we provide a resource of 3,072 PPI interfaces ranked according to their mutation rates. Analysis of this list highlights 282 novel candidate cancer

  8. An Alpha Tubulin Mutation Suppresses Nuclear Migration Mutations in Aspergillus Nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Willins, D. A.; Xiang, X.; Morris, N. R.

    1995-01-01

    Microtubules and cytoplasmic dynein, a microtubule-dependent motor, are required for nuclei to move along the hyphae of filamentous fungi. Nuclear migration in Aspergillus nidulans is blocked by heat-sensitive (hs(-)) mutations in the nudA gene, which encodes dynein heavy chain, and the nudF gene, which encodes a G protein β-subunit-like protein. Hs(-) mutations in the nudC and nudG genes also prevent nuclear migration. We have isolated extragenic suppressor mutations that reverse the hs(-) phenotypes caused by these mutations. Here we show that one nudF suppressor also suppresses hs(-) mutations in nudA, nudC, and nudG and deletions in nudA and nudF. This suppressor mutation is in the tubA alpha tubulin gene, and its characteristics suggest that it destabilizes microtubules. The mutation alters microtubule staining and confers sensitivity to cold and benomyl, two treatments that destabilize microtubules. Treatment with low concentrations of benomyl also suppresses the hs(-) nudA, nudC, nudF, and nudG mutations and the nudA and nudF deletions. Suppression of the hs(-) nudA mutation and the nudA deletion is especially interesting because these strains lack active dynein heavy chain. Together, these results suggest that microtubule destabilization allows nuclei to migrate even in the absence of cytoplasmic dynein motor function. PMID:8601474

  9. Structure of the Wilms Tumor Suppressor

    SciTech Connect

    Stoll, R.; Lee, B.M.; Debler, E.W.; Laity, J.H.; Wilson, I.A.; Dyson, H.J.; Wright, P.E.

    2009-06-04

    The zinc finger domain of the Wilms tumor suppressor protein (WT1) contains four canonical Cys{sub 2}His{sub 2} zinc fingers. WT1 binds preferentially to DNA sequences that are closely related to the EGR-1 consensus site. We report the structure determination by both X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy of the WT1 zinc finger domain in complex with DNA. The X-ray structure was determined for the complex with a cognate 14 base-pair oligonucleotide, and composite X-ray/NMR structures were determined for complexes with both the 14 base-pair and an extended 17 base-pair DNA. This combined approach allowed unambiguous determination of the position of the first zinc finger, which is influenced by lattice contacts in the crystal structure. The crystal structure shows the second, third and fourth zinc finger domains inserted deep into the major groove of the DNA where they make base-specific interactions. The DNA duplex is distorted in the vicinity of the first zinc finger, with a cytidine twisted and tilted out of the base stack to pack against finger 1 and the tip of finger 2. By contrast, the composite X-ray/NMR structures show that finger 1 continues to follow the major groove in the solution complexes. However, the orientation of the helix is non-canonical, and the fingertip and the N terminus of the helix project out of the major groove; as a consequence, the zinc finger side-chains that are commonly involved in base recognition make no contact with the DNA. We conclude that finger 1 helps to anchor WT1 to the DNA by amplifying the binding affinity although it does not contribute significantly to binding specificity. The structures provide molecular level insights into the potential consequences of mutations in zinc fingers 2 and 3 that are associated with Denys-Drash syndrome and nephritic syndrome. The mutations are of two types, and either destabilize the zinc finger structure or replace key base contact residues.

  10. Pyrosequencing-Based Assays for Rapid Detection of HER2 and HER3 Mutations in Clinical Samples Uncover an E332E Mutation Affecting HER3 in Retroperitoneal Leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    González-Alonso, Paula; Chamizo, Cristina; Moreno, Víctor; Madoz-Gúrpide, Juan; Carvajal, Nerea; Daoud, Lina; Zazo, Sandra; Martín-Aparicio, Ester; Cristóbal, Ion; Rincón, Raúl; García-Foncillas, Jesús; Rojo, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors (HER) are associated with poor prognosis of several types of solid tumors. Although HER-mutation detection methods are currently available, such as Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS), alternative pyrosequencing allow the rapid characterization of specific mutations. We developed specific PCR-based pyrosequencing assays for identification of most prevalent HER2 and HER3 mutations, including S310F/Y, R678Q, L755M/P/S/W, V777A/L/M, 774-776 insertion, and V842I mutations in HER2, as well as M91I, V104M/L, D297N/V/Y, and E332E/K mutations in HER3. We tested 85 Formalin Fixed and Paraffin Embbeded (FFPE) samples and we detected three HER2-V842I mutations in colorectal carcinoma (CRC), ovarian carcinoma, and pancreatic carcinoma patients, respectively, and a HER2-L755M mutation in a CRC specimen. We also determined the presence of a HER3-E332K mutation in an urothelial carcinoma sample, and two HER3-D297Y mutations, in both gastric adenocarcinoma and CRC specimens. The D297Y mutation was previously detected in breast and gastric tumors, but not in CRC. Moreover, we found a not-previously-described HER3-E332E synonymous mutation in a retroperitoneal leiomyosarcoma patient. The pyrosequencing assays presented here allow the detection and characterization of specific HER2 and HER3 mutations. These pyrosequencing assays might be implemented in routine diagnosis for molecular characterization of HER2/HER3 receptors as an alternative to complex NGS approaches. PMID:26287187

  11. Pyrosequencing-Based Assays for Rapid Detection of HER2 and HER3 Mutations in Clinical Samples Uncover an E332E Mutation Affecting HER3 in Retroperitoneal Leiomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    González-Alonso, Paula; Chamizo, Cristina; Moreno, Víctor; Madoz-Gúrpide, Juan; Carvajal, Nerea; Daoud, Lina; Zazo, Sandra; Martín-Aparicio, Ester; Cristóbal, Ion; Rincón, Raúl; García-Foncillas, Jesús; Rojo, Federico

    2015-08-17

    Mutations in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors (HER) are associated with poor prognosis of several types of solid tumors. Although HER-mutation detection methods are currently available, such as Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS), alternative pyrosequencing allow the rapid characterization of specific mutations. We developed specific PCR-based pyrosequencing assays for identification of most prevalent HER2 and HER3 mutations, including S310F/Y, R678Q, L755M/P/S/W, V777A/L/M, 774-776 insertion, and V842I mutations in HER2, as well as M91I, V104M/L, D297N/V/Y, and E332E/K mutations in HER3. We tested 85 Formalin Fixed and Paraffin Embbeded (FFPE) samples and we detected three HER2-V842I mutations in colorectal carcinoma (CRC), ovarian carcinoma, and pancreatic carcinoma patients, respectively, and a HER2-L755M mutation in a CRC specimen. We also determined the presence of a HER3-E332K mutation in an urothelial carcinoma sample, and two HER3-D297Y mutations, in both gastric adenocarcinoma and CRC specimens. The D297Y mutation was previously detected in breast and gastric tumors, but not in CRC. Moreover, we found a not-previously-described HER3-E332E synonymous mutation in a retroperitoneal leiomyosarcoma patient. The pyrosequencing assays presented here allow the detection and characterization of specific HER2 and HER3 mutations. These pyrosequencing assays might be implemented in routine diagnosis for molecular characterization of HER2/HER3 receptors as an alternative to complex NGS approaches.

  12. Mutations in domain a′ of protein disulfide isomerase affect the folding pathway of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A

    PubMed Central

    Ruoppolo, Margherita; Orrù, Stefania; Talamo, Fabio; Ljung, Johanna; Pirneskoski, Annamari; Kivirikko, Kari I.; Marino, Gennaro; Koivunen, Peppi

    2003-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI, EC 5.3.4.1), an enzyme and chaperone, catalyses disulfide bond formation and rearrangements in protein folding. It is also a subunit in two proteins, the enzyme collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylase and the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein. It consists of two catalytically active domains, a and a′, and two inactive ones, b and b′, all four domains having the thioredoxin fold. Domain b′ contains the primary peptide binding site, but a′ is also critical for several of the major PDI functions. Mass spectrometry was used here to follow the folding pathway of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A) in the presence of three PDI mutants, F449R, Δ455–457, and abb′, and the individual domains a and a′. The first two mutants contained alterations in the last α helix of domain a′, while the third lacked the entire domain a′. All mutants produced genuine, correctly folded RNase A, but the appearance rate of 50% of the product, as compared to wild-type PDI, was reduced 2.5-fold in the case of PDI Δ455–457, 7.5-fold to eightfold in the cases of PDI F449R and PDI abb′, and over 15-fold in the cases of the individual domains a and a′. In addition, PDI F449R and PDI abb′ affected the distribution of folding intermediates. Domains a and a′ catalyzed the early steps in the folding but no disulfide rearrangements, and therefore the rate observed in the presence of these individual domains was similar to that of the spontaneous process. PMID:12717017

  13. Monocyte-Derived Suppressor Cells in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ochando, Jordi; Conde, Patricia; Bronte, Vincenzo

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are cells of myeloid origin with enhanced suppressive function. They are negative regulators of the immune responses and comprise a heterogeneous mixture of immunosuppressive cells of monocytic (M-MDSC) and granulocytic (G-MDSC) origin. A more recent nomenclature proposes the term "suppressive monocyte derived cells" (suppressive MCs) to define CSF1/CSF2-dependent mouse suppressor cells that develop from common monocyte progenitors (cMoPs) after birth. Here, we review the literature about monocytic-derived cells with demonstrated suppressor function in vitro and in vivo within the context of solid organ transplantation.

  14. Uncoupling the Pleiotropic Phenotypes of clk-1 with tRNA Missense Suppressors in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Branicky, Robyn; Nguyen, Phuong Anh Thi; Hekimi, Siegfried

    2006-01-01

    clk-1 encodes a demethoxyubiquinone (DMQ) hydroxylase that is necessary for ubiquinone biosynthesis. When Caenorhabditis elegans clk-1 mutants are grown on bacteria that synthesize ubiquinone (UQ), they are viable but have a pleiotropic phenotype that includes slowed development, behaviors, and aging. However, when grown on UQ-deficient bacteria, the mutants arrest development transiently before growing up to become sterile adults. We identified nine suppressors of the missense mutation clk-1(e2519), which harbors a Glu-to-Lys substitution. All suppress the mutant phenotypes on both UQ-replete and UQ-deficient bacteria. However, each mutant suppresses a different subset of phenotypes, indicating that most phenotypes can be uncoupled from each other. In addition, all suppressors restore the ability to synthesize exceedingly small amounts of UQ, although they still accumulate the precursor DMQ, suggesting that the presence of DMQ is not responsible for the Clk-1 phenotypes. We cloned six of the suppressors, and all encode tRNAGlu genes whose anticodons are altered to read the substituted Lys codon of clk-1(e2519). To our knowledge, these suppressors represent the first missense suppressors identified in any metazoan. The pattern of suppression we observe suggests that the individual members of the tRNAGlu family are expressed in different tissues and at different levels. PMID:16648490

  15. A point mutation in the EGF-4 domain of β(3) integrin is responsible for the formation of the Sec(a) platelet alloantigen and affects receptor function.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Ulrich J; Bakchoul, Tamam; Eva, Olga; Giptner, Astrid; Bein, Gregor; Aster, Richard H; Gitter, Maria; Peterson, Julie; Santoso, Sentot

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT) is caused by fetomaternal platelet incompatibility with maternal antibodies crossing the placenta and destroying fetal platelets. Antibodies against human platelet antigen-1a (HPA-1a) and HPA-5b are responsible for the majority of NAIT cases. We observed a suspected NAIT in a newborn with a platelet count of 25 G/l and petechial haemorrhages. Serological analysis of maternal serum revealed an immunisation against αIIbβ3 on paternal platelets only, indicating the presence of an antibody against a new rare alloantigen (Sec(a)) residing on αIIbβ3. The location of Sec(a) on αIIbβ3 was confirmed by immunoprecipitation. Nucleotide sequence analysis of paternal β3 revealed a single nucleotide exchange (G(1818)T) in exon 11 of the β3 gene (ITGB3), changing Lys(580) (wild-type) to Asn(580) (Sec(a)). Two additional members of the family Sec were typed Sec(a) positive, but none of 300 blood donors. Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing Asn(580), but not Lys(580) αIIbβ3, bound anti-Sec(a), which was corroborated by immunoprecipitation. Adhesion of transfected cells onto immobilised fibrinogen showed reduced binding of the Asn(580) variant compared to wild-type αIIbβ3. Analysis of transfected cells with anti-LIBS and PAC-1 antibody showed reduced binding when compared to the wild-type. No such effects were observed with Sec(a) positive platelets, which, however, are heterozygous for the Lys(580)Asn mutation. In this study, we describe a NAIT case caused by maternal alloimmunisation against a new antigen on αIIbβ3. Analysis with mutant transfected cells showed that the Lys(580)Asn mutation responsible for the formation of the Sec(a) antigenic determinant affects αIIbβ3 receptor function.

  16. Mutations proximal to the minor groove-binding track of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase differentially affect utilization of RNA versus DNA as template.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Timothy S; Darden, Tom; Prasad, Vinayaka R

    2003-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT), like all retroviral RTs, is a versatile DNA polymerase that can copy both RNA and DNA templates. In spite of extensive investigations into the structure-function of this enzyme, the structural basis for this dual template specificity is poorly understood. Biochemical studies with two mutations in HIV-1 RT that affect residues contacting the template-primer now provide some insight into this specialized property. The mutations are N255D and N265D, both adjoining the minor groove-binding track, in the thumb region. The N265D substitution led to a loss of processive polymerization on DNA but not on RNA, whereas N255D drastically reduced processive synthesis on both templates. This differential template usage was accompanied by a rapid dissociation of the N265D variant on DNA but not RNA templates, whereas the N255D variant rapidly dissociated from both templates. Molecular dynamics modeling suggested that N265D leads to a loss of template strand-specific hydrogen bonding, indicating that this is a key determinant of the differential template affinity. The N255D substitution caused local changes in conformation and a consequent loss of interaction with the primer, leading to a loss of processive synthesis with both templates. We conclude that N265 is part of a subset of template-enzyme contacts that enable RT to utilize DNA templates in addition to RNA templates and that such residues play an important role in facilitating processive DNA synthesis on both RNA and DNA templates.

  17. A Deficiency Screen for Dominant Suppressors of Telomeric Silencing in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Mason, James M.; Ransom, Joshua; Konev, Alexander Y.

    2004-01-01

    Heterochromatin is a specialized chromatin structure in chromosomal regions associated with repeated DNA sequences and low concentrations of genes. Formation of heterochromatin is determined in large part by enzymes that modify histones and structural proteins that bind to these modified histones in a cooperative fashion. In Drosophila, mutations in genes that encode heterochromatic proteins are often dominant and increase expression of genes placed into heterochromatic positions. To find components of telomeric heterochromatin in Drosophila, we screened a collection of autosomal deficiencies for dominant suppressors of silencing of a transgene at the telomere of chromosome 2L. While many deficiency chromosomes are associated with dominant suppressors, in the cases tested on chromosome 2 the suppressor mapped to the 2L telomere, rather than the deficiency. We infer that background effects may hamper the search for genes that play a role in telomeric heterochromatin formation and that either very few genes participate in this pathway or mutations in these genes are not dominant suppressors of telomeric position effect. The data also suggest that the 2L telomere region plays a major role in telomeric silencing. PMID:15579690

  18. Structures of oncogenic, suppressor and rescued p53 core-domain variants: mechanisms of mutant p53 rescue

    SciTech Connect

    Wallentine, Brad D.; Wang, Ying; Tretyachenko-Ladokhina, Vira; Tan, Martha; Senear, Donald F.; Luecke, Hartmut

    2013-10-01

    X-ray crystallographic structures of four p53 core-domain variants were determined in order to gain insights into the mechanisms by which certain second-site suppressor mutations rescue the function of a significant number of cancer mutations of the tumor suppressor protein p53. To gain insights into the mechanisms by which certain second-site suppressor mutations rescue the function of a significant number of cancer mutations of the tumor suppressor protein p53, X-ray crystallographic structures of four p53 core-domain variants were determined. These include an oncogenic mutant, V157F, two single-site suppressor mutants, N235K and N239Y, and the rescued cancer mutant V157F/N235K/N239Y. The V157F mutation substitutes a smaller hydrophobic valine with a larger hydrophobic phenylalanine within strand S4 of the hydrophobic core. The structure of this cancer mutant shows no gross structural changes in the overall fold of the p53 core domain, only minor rearrangements of side chains within the hydrophobic core of the protein. Based on biochemical analysis, these small local perturbations induce instability in the protein, increasing the free energy by 3.6 kcal mol{sup −1} (15.1 kJ mol{sup −1}). Further biochemical evidence shows that each suppressor mutation, N235K or N239Y, acts individually to restore thermodynamic stability to V157F and that both together are more effective than either alone. All rescued mutants were found to have wild-type DNA-binding activity when assessed at a permissive temperature, thus pointing to thermodynamic stability as the critical underlying variable. Interestingly, thermodynamic analysis shows that while N239Y demonstrates stabilization of the wild-type p53 core domain, N235K does not. These observations suggest distinct structural mechanisms of rescue. A new salt bridge between Lys235 and Glu198, found in both the N235K and rescued cancer mutant structures, suggests a rescue mechanism that relies on stabilizing the

  19. Properties of the SIRS suppressor pathway.

    PubMed

    Aune, T M; Pierce, C W

    1983-01-01

    The SIRS suppressor pathway is initiated by activation of Ly 2+ T lymphocytes by either con A or IFN beta. SIRS is a protein which has been purified and exists as two species with mol. wts. of 14,000 and 21,500. The target of SIRS is the macrophage and macrophages appear to oxidize or activate SIRS in a peroxide dependent process. Catalase blocks SIRS or IFN beta action by consuming H2O2 and levamisole blocks SIRS or IFN beta by preventing activation or oxidation of SIRS by H2O2. Other agents which block SIRS or IFN beta action include electron donors which can inactivate SIRSox. SIRSox is a potent inhibitor of immune responses and proliferation of normal and neoplastic cells. The mechanism of SIRSox-mediated inhibition of proliferation appears to involve oxidation or modification of protein sulfhydryls. Although the applicability of this pathway to the regulation of immune responses and cellular proliferation remains to be determined, both IFN beta and levamisole have been found to affect a wide variety of cellular processes. The involvement of both IFN beta and levamisole in the SIRS pathway suggests that this pathway may be an important host mechanism for regulating both immune responses and cellular proliferation in general.

  20. A CRISPR/Cas9 Functional Screen Identifies Rare Tumor Suppressors

    PubMed Central

    Katigbak, Alexandra; Cencic, Regina; Robert, Francis; Sénécha, Patrick; Scuoppo, Claudio; Pelletier, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    An enormous amount of tumor sequencing data has been generated through large scale sequencing efforts. The functional consequences of the majority of mutations identified by such projects remain an open, unexplored question. This problem is particularly complicated in the case of rare mutations where frequency of occurrence alone or prediction of functional consequences are insufficient to distinguish driver from passenger or bystander mutations. We combine genome editing technology with a powerful mouse cancer model to uncover previously unsuspected rare oncogenic mutations in Burkitt’s lymphoma. We identify two candidate tumor suppressors whose loss cooperate with MYC over-expression to accelerate lymphomagenesis. Our results highlight the utility of in vivo CRISPR/Cas9 screens combined with powerful mouse models to identify and validate rare oncogenic modifier events from tumor mutational data. PMID:27982060

  1. Structure and Function of p53-DNA Complexes with Inactivation and Rescue Mutations: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Kamaraj, Balu; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 can lose its function upon DNA-contact mutations (R273C and R273H) in the core DNA-binding domain. The activity can be restored by second-site suppressor or rescue mutations (R273C_T284R, R273H_T284R, and R273H_S240R). In this paper, we elucidate the structural and functional consequence of p53 proteins upon DNA-contact mutations and rescue mutations and the underlying mechanisms at the atomic level by means of molecular dynamics simulations. Furthermore, we also apply the docking approach to investigate the binding phenomena between the p53 protein and DNA upon DNA-contact mutations and rescue mutations. This study clearly illustrates that, due to DNA-contact mutants, the p53 structure loses its stability and becomes more rigid than the native protein. This structural loss might affect the p53-DNA interaction and leads to inhibition of the cancer suppression. Rescue mutants (R273C_T284R, R273H_T284R and R273H_S240R) can restore the functional activity of the p53 protein upon DNA-contact mutations and show a good interaction between the p53 protein and a DNA molecule, which may lead to reactivate the cancer suppression function. Understanding the effects of p53 cancer and rescue mutations at the molecular level will be helpful for designing drugs for p53 associated cancer diseases. These drugs should be designed so that they can help to inhibit the abnormal function of the p53 protein and to reactivate the p53 function (cell apoptosis) to treat human cancer. PMID:26244575

  2. Structure and Function of p53-DNA Complexes with Inactivation and Rescue Mutations: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Kamaraj, Balu; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 can lose its function upon DNA-contact mutations (R273C and R273H) in the core DNA-binding domain. The activity can be restored by second-site suppressor or rescue mutations (R273C_T284R, R273H_T284R, and R273H_S240R). In this paper, we elucidate the structural and functional consequence of p53 proteins upon DNA-contact mutations and rescue mutations and the underlying mechanisms at the atomic level by means of molecular dynamics simulations. Furthermore, we also apply the docking approach to investigate the binding phenomena between the p53 protein and DNA upon DNA-contact mutations and rescue mutations. This study clearly illustrates that, due to DNA-contact mutants, the p53 structure loses its stability and becomes more rigid than the native protein. This structural loss might affect the p53-DNA interaction and leads to inhibition of the cancer suppression. Rescue mutants (R273C_T284R, R273H_T284R and R273H_S240R) can restore the functional activity of the p53 protein upon DNA-contact mutations and show a good interaction between the p53 protein and a DNA molecule, which may lead to reactivate the cancer suppression function. Understanding the effects of p53 cancer and rescue mutations at the molecular level will be helpful for designing drugs for p53 associated cancer diseases. These drugs should be designed so that they can help to inhibit the abnormal function of the p53 protein and to reactivate the p53 function (cell apoptosis) to treat human cancer.

  3. Frequent germline deleterious mutations in DNA repair genes in familial prostate cancer cases are associated with advanced disease

    PubMed Central

    Leongamornlert, D; Saunders, E; Dadaev, T; Tymrakiewicz, M; Goh, C; Jugurnauth-Little, S; Kozarewa, I; Fenwick, K; Assiotis, I; Barrowdale, D; Govindasami, K; Guy, M; Sawyer, E; Wilkinson, R; Antoniou, A C; Eeles, R; Kote-Jarai, Z

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer (PrCa) is one of the most common diseases to affect men worldwide and among the leading causes of cancer-related death. The purpose of this study was to use second-generation sequencing technology to assess the frequency of deleterious mutations in 22 tumour suppressor genes in familial PrCa and estimate the relative risk of PrCa if these genes are mutated. Methods: Germline DNA samples from 191 men with 3 or more cases of PrCa in their family were sequenced for 22 tumour suppressor genes using Agilent target enrichment and Illumina technology. Analysis for genetic variation was carried out by using a pipeline consisting of BWA, Genome Analysis Toolkit (GATK) and ANNOVAR. Clinical features were correlated with mutation status using standard statistical tests. Modified segregation analysis was used to determine the relative risk of PrCa conferred by the putative loss-of-function (LoF) mutations identified. Results: We discovered 14 putative LoF mutations in 191 samples (7.3%) and these mutations were more frequently associated with nodal involvement, metastasis or T4 tumour stage (P=0.00164). Segregation analysis of probands with European ancestry estimated that LoF mutations in any of the studied genes confer a relative risk of PrCa of 1.94 (95% CI: 1.56–2.42). Conclusions: These findings show that LoF mutations in DNA repair pathway genes predispose to familial PrCa and advanced disease and therefore warrants further investigation. The clinical utility of these findings will become increasingly important as targeted screening and therapies become more widespread. PMID:24556621

  4. Mutations affecting the BHLHA9 DNA-binding domain cause MSSD, mesoaxial synostotic syndactyly with phalangeal reduction, Malik-Percin type.

    PubMed

    Malik, Sajid; Percin, Ferda E; Bornholdt, Dorothea; Albrecht, Beate; Percesepe, Antonio; Koch, Manuela C; Landi, Antonio; Fritz, Barbara; Khan, Rizwan; Mumtaz, Sara; Akarsu, Nurten A; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz

    2014-12-04

    Mesoaxial synostotic syndactyly, Malik-Percin type (MSSD) (syndactyly type IX) is a rare autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic digit anomaly with only two affected families reported so far. We previously showed that the trait is genetically distinct from other syndactyly types, and through autozygosity mapping we had identified a locus on chromosome 17p13.3 for this unique limb malformation. Here, we extend the number of independent pedigrees from various geographic regions segregating MSSD to a total of six. We demonstrate that three neighboring missense mutations affecting the highly conserved DNA-binding region of the basic helix-loop-helix A9 transcription factor (BHLHA9) are associated with this phenotype. Recombinant BHLHA9 generated by transient gene expression is shown to be located in the cytoplasm and the cell nucleus. Transcription factors 3, 4, and 12, members of the E protein (class I) family of helix-loop-helix transcription factors, are highlighted in yeast two-hybrid analysis as potential dimerization partners for BHLHA9. In the presence of BHLHA9, the potential of these three proteins to activate expression of an E-box-regulated target gene is reduced considerably. BHLHA9 harboring one of the three substitutions detected in MSSD-affected individuals eliminates entirely the transcription activation by these class I bHLH proteins. We conclude that by dimerizing with other bHLH protein monomers, BHLHA9 could fine tune the expression of regulatory factors governing determination of central limb mesenchyme cells, a function made impossible by altering critical amino acids in the DNA binding domain. These findings identify BHLHA9 as an essential player in the regulatory network governing limb morphogenesis in humans.

  5. Differences in the transcriptome of medullary thyroid cancer regarding the status and type of RET gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Oczko-Wojciechowska, Malgorzata; Swierniak, Michal; Krajewska, Jolanta; Kowalska, Malgorzata; Kowal, Monika; Stokowy, Tomasz; Wojtas, Bartosz; Rusinek, Dagmara; Pawlaczek, Agnieszka; Czarniecka, Agnieszka; Szpak-Ulczok, Sylwia; Gawlik, Tomasz; Chmielik, Ewa; Tyszkiewicz, Tomasz; Nikiel, Barbara; Lange, Dariusz; Jarzab, Michal; Wiench, Malgorzata; Jarzab, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) can be caused by germline mutations of the RET proto-oncogene or occurs as a sporadic form. It is well known that RET mutations affecting the cysteine-rich region of the protein (MEN2A-like mutations) are correlated with different phenotypes than those in the kinase domain (MEN2B-like mutations). Our aim was to analyse the whole-gene expression profile of MTC with regard to the type of RET gene mutation and the cancer genetic background (hereditary vs sporadic). We studied 86 MTC samples. We demonstrated that there were no distinct differences in the gene expression profiles of hereditary and sporadic MTCs. This suggests a homogeneous nature of MTC. We also noticed that the site of the RET gene mutation slightly influenced the gene expression profile of MTC. We found a significant association between the localization of RET mutations and the expression of three genes: NNAT (suggested to be a tumour suppressor gene), CDC14B (involved in cell cycle control) and NTRK3 (tyrosine receptor kinase that undergoes rearrangement in papillary thyroid cancer). This study suggests that these genes are significantly deregulated in tumours with MEN2A-like and MEN2B-like mutations; however, further investigations are necessary to demonstrate any clinical impact of these findings. PMID:28181547

  6. Notch as a tumour suppressor.

    PubMed

    Nowell, Craig S; Radtke, Freddy

    2017-03-01

    The Notch signalling cascade is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that has a crucial role in regulating development and homeostasis in various tissues. The cellular processes and events that it controls are diverse, and continued investigation over recent decades has revealed how the role of Notch signalling is multifaceted and highly context dependent. Consistent with the far-reaching impact that Notch has on development and homeostasis, aberrant activity of the pathway is also linked to the initiation and progression of several malignancies, and Notch can in fact be either oncogenic or tumour suppressive depending on the tissue and cellular context. The Notch pathway therefore represents an important target for therapeutic agents designed to treat many types of cancer. In this Review, we focus on the latest developments relating specifically to the tumour-suppressor activity of Notch signalling and discuss the potential mechanisms by which Notch can inhibit carcinogenesis in various tissues. Potential therapeutic strategies aimed at restoring or augmenting Notch-mediated tumour suppression will also be highlighted.

  7. Genes affected by mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) proviral insertions in mouse mammary tumors are deregulated or mutated in primary human mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Robert; Mudunuri, Uma; Bargo, Sharon; Raafat, Ahmed; McCurdy, David; Boulanger, Corinne; Lowther, William; Stephens, Robert; Luke, Brian T.; Stewart, Claudia; Wu, Xiaolin; Munroe, David; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2012-01-01

    The accumulation of mutations is a contributing factor in the initiation of premalignant mammary lesions and their progression to malignancy and metastasis. We have used a mouse model in which the carcinogen is the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) which induces clonal premalignant mammary lesions and malignant mammary tumors by insertional mutagenesis. Identification of the genes and signaling pathways affected in MMTV-induced mouse mammary lesions provides a rationale for determining whether genetic alteration of the human orthologues of these genes/pathways may contribute to human breast carcinogenesis. A high-throughput platform for inverse PCR to identify MMTV-host junction fragments and their nucleotide sequences in a large panel of MMTV-induced lesions was developed. Validation of the genes affected by MMTV-insertion was carried out by microarray analysis. Common integration site (CIS) means that the gene was altered by an MMTV proviral insertion in at least two independent lesions arising in different hosts. Three of the new genes identified as CIS for MMTV were assayed for their capability to confer on HC11 mouse mammary epithelial cells the ability for invasion, anchorage independent growth and tumor development in nude mice. Analysis of MMTV induced mammary premalignant hyperplastic outgrowth (HOG) lines and mammary tumors led to the identification of CIS restricted to 35 loci. Within these loci members of the Wnt, Fgf and Rspo gene families plus two linked genes (Npm3 and Ddn) were frequently activated in tumors induced by MMTV. A second group of 15 CIS occur at a low frequency (2-5 observations) in mammary HOGs or tumors. In this latter group the expression of either Phf19 or Sdc2 was shown to increase HC11 cells invasion capability. Foxl1 expression conferred on HC11 cells the capability for anchorage-independent colony formation in soft agar and tumor development in nude mice. The published transcriptome and nucleotide sequence analysis of gene

  8. Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes Affect the Outcome of Patients with Operable Triple-Negative Breast Cancer in Combination with Mutated Amino Acid Classes

    PubMed Central

    Kotoula, Vassiliki; Lakis, Sotiris; Vlachos, Ioannis S.; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Zagouri, Flora; Alexopoulou, Zoi; Gogas, Helen; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Aravantinos, Gerasimos; Efstratiou, Ioannis; Pentheroudakis, George; Papadopoulou, Kyriaki; Chatzopoulos, Kyriakos; Papakostas, Pavlos; Sotiropoulou, Maria; Nicolaou, Irene; Razis, Evangelia; Psyrri, Amanda; Kosmidis, Paris; Papadimitriou, Christos; Fountzilas, George

    2016-01-01

    Background Stromal tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) density is an outcome predictor in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Herein we asked whether TILs are related to coding mutation load and to the chemical class of the resulting mutated amino acids, i.e., charged, polar, and hydrophobic mutations. Methods We examined paraffin tumors from TNBC patients who had been treated with adjuvant chemotherapy mostly within clinical trials (training cohort, N = 133; validation, N = 190) for phenotype concordance; TILs density; mutation load and types. Results Concordance of TNBC phenotypes was 42.1% upon local / central, and 72% upon central / central pathology assessment. TILs were not associated with mutation load, type and class of mutated amino acids. Polar and charged mutation patterns differed between TP53 and PIK3CA (p<0.001). Hydrophobic mutations predicted for early relapse in patients with high nodal burden and <50% TILs tumors (training: HR 3.03, 95%CI 1.11–8.29, p = 0.031; validation: HR 2.90, 95%CI 0.97–8.70, p = 0.057), especially if compared to patients with >50% TILs tumors (training p = 0.003; validation p = 0.015). Conclusions TILs density is unrelated to mutation load in TNBC, which may be regarded as an unstable phenotype. If further validated, hydrophobic mutations along with TILs density may help identifying TNBC patients in higher risk for relapse. PMID:27685159

  9. Myeloid derived suppressor cells in human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Greten, Tim F.; Manns, Michael P.; Korangy, Firouzeh

    2012-01-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have been described as a heterogeneous cell population with potent immune suppressor function in mice. Limited data are available on MDSC in human diseases. Interpretation of these data is complicated by the fact that different markers have been used to analyze human MDSC subtypes in various clinical settings. Human MDSC are CD11b+, CD33+, HLA-DRneg/low and can be divided into granulocytic CD14− and monocytic CD14+ subtypes. Interleukin 4Rα, VEGFR, CD15 and CD66b have been suggested to be more specific markers for human MDSC, however these markers can only be found on some MDSC subsets. Until today the best marker for human MDSC remains their suppressor function, which can be either direct or indirect through the induction of regulatory T cells. Immune suppressor activity has been associated with high arginase 1 and iNOS activity as well as ROS production by MDSC. Not only in murine models, but even more importantly in patients with cancer, different drugs have been shown to either reverse the immune suppressor function of MDSC or directly target these cells. Systemic treatment with all-trans-retinoic acid has been shown to mature human MDSC and reverse their immune suppressor function. Alternatively, MDSC can be targeted by treatment with the multi-targeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib. In this review will provide a comprehensive summary of the recent literature on human MDSC. PMID:21237299

  10. ETV1 positively regulates transcription of tumor suppressor ARF

    PubMed Central

    Zynda, Evan; Jackson, Mark W; Bhattacharya, Partho; Kandel, Eugene S

    2013-01-01

    ETV1 (ETS variant 1) is a transcription factor from the ETS family and an oncogene in several types of human malignancies. Paradoxically, a predicted inactivating mutation in ETV1 was previously found in a clone of HT1080 cells with reduced activity of p53. We report that elevated expression of ETV1 makes p53-null tumor cells hypersensitive to restoration of said tumor suppressor. Furthermore, elevated levels of either wild-type ETV1 or its truncated derivative, dETV1, which mimics the product of an oncogenic rearrangement in certain tumors, results in increased expression of mRNA for p14ARF, a known activator of p53. Accordingly, expression of a luciferase reporter, which is driven by a putative ARF promoter, was elevated by concomitant expression of either ETV1 or dETV1. Our observations point to yet another example of a tumor suppressor gene being activated by a potentially oncogenic signal. A better understanding of the mechanisms that allow a cell to bypass such safeguards is needed in order to predict and prevent the development of an oncogene-tolerant state during cancer evolution. PMID:24157551

  11. Identification of Novel Candidate Tumor Suppressor Genes Using C. elegans as a Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    Breast Cancer, Tumor Suppressors, Growth Factor Receptors, Model System, Molecular Cloning , Proto-Oncogenes, Genetic Analysis 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 26...its molecular cloning in any case since it represents a new locus. sy542 is being analyzed now to determine if it is worthy of pursuit. rok-2(sy317...allow its molecular cloning this year, rot-1 appears to act downstream oflin-25 as indicated by its suppression oflin-25 null mutation (Table 6

  12. The role of PHD2 mutations in the pathogenesis of erythrocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Gardie, Betty; Percy, Melanie J; Hoogewijs, David; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Bento, Celeste; Arsenault, Patrick R; Richard, Stéphane; Almeida, Helena; Ewing, Joanne; Lambert, Frédéric; McMullin, Mary Frances; Schofield, Christopher J; Lee, Frank S

    2014-01-01

    The transcription of the erythropoietin (EPO) gene is tightly regulated by the hypoxia response pathway to maintain oxygen homeostasis. Elevations in serum EPO level may be reflected in an augmentation in the red cell mass, thereby causing erythrocytosis. Studies on erythrocytosis have provided insights into the function of the oxygen-sensing pathway and the critical proteins involved in the regulation of EPO transcription. The α subunits of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor are hydroxylated by three prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD) enzymes, which belong to the iron and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent oxygenase superfamily. Sequence analysis of the genes encoding the PHDs in patients with erythrocytosis has revealed heterozygous germline mutations only occurring in Egl nine homolog 1 (EGLN1, also known as PHD2), the gene that encodes PHD2. To date, 24 different EGLN1 mutations comprising missense, frameshift, and nonsense mutations have been described. The phenotypes associated with the patients carrying these mutations are fairly homogeneous and typically limited to erythrocytosis with normal to elevated EPO. However, exceptions exist; for example, there is one case with development of concurrent paraganglioma (PHD2-H374R). Analysis of the erythrocytosis-associated PHD2 missense mutations has shown heterogeneous results. Structural studies reveal that mutations can affect different domains of PHD2. Some are close to the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor α/2-oxoglutarate or the iron binding sites for PHD2. In silico studies demonstrate that the mutations do not always affect fully conserved residues. In vitro and in cellulo studies showed varying effects of the mutations, ranging from mild effects to severe loss of function. The exact mechanism of a potential tumor-suppressor role for PHD2 still needs to be elucidated. A knockin mouse model expressing the first reported PHD2-P317R mutation recapitulates the phenotype observed in humans (erythrocytosis with

  13. Isolation of Su(var)3-7 mutations by homologous recombination in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Seum, Carole; Pauli, Daniel; Delattre, Marion; Jaquet, Yannis; Spierer, Anne; Spierer, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    The Su(var)3-7 gene, a haplo-suppressor and triplo-enhancer of position-effect variegation (PEV), encodes a zinc finger heterochromatin-associated protein. To understand the role of this protein in heterochromatin and genomic silencing, mutations were generated by homologous recombination. The donor fragment contained a yellow(+) gene and 7.6 kb of the Su(var)3-7 gene inserted between two FRTs. The Su(var)3-7 sequence contained three stop codons flanking an I-SceI cut site located in the 5' half of the gene. Using two different screening approaches, we obtained an allelic series composed of three mutant alleles. The three mutations are dominant suppressors of PEV. One behaves as a null mutation and results in a maternal-effect recessive lethal phenotype that can be rescued by a zygotic paternal wild-type gene. A P transposon zygotically expressing a Su(var)3-7 full-length cDNA also rescues the mutant phenotype. One hypomorphic allele is viable and the pleiotropic phenotype showed by adult flies indicates that rapidly and late dividing cells seem the most affected by reduced amounts of Su(var)3-7 protein. All three mutants were characterized at the molecular level. Each expresses a portion of the Su(var)3-7 protein that is unable to enter the nucleus and bind chromatin. PMID:12136016

  14. Three intragenic suppressors of a GTPase-deficient allele of GNAS associated with McCune-Albright syndrome.

    PubMed

    Turcic, Kyle; Tobar-Rubin, Raquel; Janevska, Daniela; Carroll, Julie; Din, Eraj; Alvarez, Rebecca; Haick, Jennifer; Pals-Rylaarsdam, Robin

    2014-06-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in heterotrimeric G-protein α subunits are associated with a variety of human diseases. McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is caused by mutations in GNAS, the gene encoding Gs. Alterations at Arg201 significantly reduce the GTPase activity of the protein, rendering it constitutively active. In this study, we have constructed a library of random mutations in a constitutively active yeast GPA1 gene carrying a mutation homologous to the McCune-Albright allele (Arg297His). Intragenic suppressors found at sites with homology to the human Gs protein were tested for their ability to suppress the constitutive activity of an Arg201His mutation in Gs. Three intragenic suppressors, at Phe142, Arg231, and Leu266, were able to suppress elevated basal cAMP responses caused by Arg201His when expressed in HEK293 cells. A range of amino acid substitutions was introduced at each of these sites to investigate the chemical requirements for intragenic suppression. The ability of Gs proteins carrying the suppressor mutations alone to mediate receptor-induced cAMP production was measured. These results offer potential sites on Gs that could serve as drug targets for MAS therapies.

  15. SUPPRESSOR OF FRIGIDA3 Encodes a Nuclear ACTIN-RELATED PROTEIN6 Required for Floral Repression in ArabidopsisW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyuha; Kim, Sanghee; Kim, Sang Yeol; Kim, Minsoo; Hyun, Youbong; Lee, Horim; Choe, Sunghwa; Kim, Sang-Gu; Michaels, Scott; Lee, Ilha

    2005-01-01

    Flowering traits in winter annual Arabidopsis thaliana are conferred mainly by two genes, FRIGIDA (FRI) and FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). FLC acts as a flowering repressor and is regulated by multiple flowering pathways. We isolated an early-flowering mutant, suppressor of FRIGIDA3 (suf3), which also shows leaf serration, weak apical dominance, and infrequent conversion of the inflorescence shoot to a terminal flower. The suf3 mutation caused a decrease in the transcript level of FLC in both a FRI-containing line and autonomous pathway mutants. However, suf3 showed only a partial reduction of FLC transcript level, although it largely suppressed the late-flowering phenotype. In addition, the suf3 mutation caused acceleration of flowering in both 35S-FLC and a flc null mutant, indicating that SUF3 regulates additional factor(s) for the repression of flowering. SUF3 is highly expressed in the shoot apex, but the expression is not regulated by FRI, autonomous pathway genes, or vernalization. SUF3 encodes the nuclear ACTIN-RELATED PROTEIN6 (ARP6), the homolog of which in yeast is a component of an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling SWR1 complex. Our analyses showed that SUF3 regulates FLC expression independent of vernalization, FRI, and an autonomous pathway gene, all of which affect the histone modification of FLC chromatin. Subcellular localization using a green fluorescent protein fusion showed that Arabidopsis ARP6 is located at distinct regions of the nuclear periphery. PMID:16155178

  16. Structural Motif-Based Homology Modeling of CYP27A1 and Site-Directed Mutational Analyses Affecting Vitamin D Hydroxylation

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, David E.; Guo, YuDing; Jia, Zongchao; Jones, Glenville

    2006-01-01

    Human CYP27A1 is a mitochondrial cytochrome P450, which is principally found in the liver and plays important roles in the biological activation of vitamin D3 and in the biosynthesis of bile acids. We have applied a systematic analysis of hydrogen bonding patterns in 11 prokaryotic and mammalian CYP crystal structures to construct a homology-based model of CYP27A1. Docking of vitamin D3 structures into the active site of this model identified potential substrate contact residues in the F-helix, the β-3 sheet, and the β-5 sheet. Site-directed mutagenesis and expression in COS-1 cells confirmed that these positions affect enzymatic activity, in some cases shifting metabolism of 1α-hydroxyvitamin D3 to favor 25- or 27-hydroxylation. The results suggest that conserved hydrophobic residues in the β-5 hairpin help define the shape of the substrate binding cavity and that this structure interacts with Phe-248 in the F-helix. Mutations directed toward the β-3a strand suggested a possible heme-binding interaction centered on Asn-403 and a structural role for substrate contact residues Thr-402 and Ser-404. PMID:16500955

  17. Mutation of the Rice Narrow leaf1 Gene, Which Encodes a Novel Protein, Affects Vein Patterning and Polar Auxin Transport1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Jing; Qian, Qian; Bu, Qingyun; Li, Shuyu; Chen, Qian; Sun, Jiaqiang; Liang, Wenxing; Zhou, Yihua; Chu, Chengcai; Li, Xugang; Ren, Fugang; Palme, Klaus; Zhao, Bingran; Chen, Jinfeng; Chen, Mingsheng; Li, Chuanyou

    2008-01-01

    The size and shape of the plant leaf is an important agronomic trait. To understand the molecular mechanism governing plant leaf shape, we characterized a classic rice (Oryza sativa) dwarf mutant named narrow leaf1 (nal1), which exhibits a characteristic phenotype of narrow leaves. In accordance with reduced leaf blade width, leaves of nal1 contain a decreased number of longitudinal veins. Anatomical investigations revealed that the culms of nal1 also show a defective vascular system, in which the number and distribution pattern of vascular bundles are altered. Map-based cloning and genetic complementation analyses demonstrated that Nal1 encodes a plant-specific protein with unknown biochemical function. We provide evidence showing that Nal1 is richly expressed in vascular tissues and that mutation of this gene leads to significantly reduced polar auxin transport capacity. These results indicate that Nal1 affects polar auxin transport as well as the vascular patterns of rice plants and plays an important role in the control of lateral leaf growth. PMID:18562767

  18. Arsenic affects expression and processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in primary neuronal cells overexpressing the Swedish mutation of human APP.

    PubMed

    Zarazúa, Sergio; Bürger, Susanne; Delgado, Juan M; Jiménez-Capdeville, Maria E; Schliebs, Reinhard

    2011-06-01

    Arsenic poisoning due to contaminated water and soil, mining waste, glass manufacture, select agrochemicals, as well as sea food, affects millions of people world wide. Recently, an involvement of arsenic in Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been hypothesized (Gong and O'Bryant, 2010). The present study stresses the hypothesis whether sodium arsenite, and its main metabolite, dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), may affect expression and processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), using the cholinergic cell line SN56.B5.G4 and primary neuronal cells overexpressing the Swedish mutation of APP, as experimental approaches. Exposure of cholinergic SN56.B5.G4 cells with either sodium arsenite or DMA decreased cell viability in a concentration- and exposure-time dependent manner, and affected the activities of the cholinergic enzymes acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase. Both sodium arsenite and DMA exposure of SN56.B5.G4 cells resulted in enhanced level of APP, and sAPP in the membrane and cytosolic fractions, respectively. To reveal any effect of arsenic on APP processing, the amounts of APP cleavage products, sAPPβ, and β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, released into the culture medium of primary neuronal cells derived from transgenic Tg2576 mice, were assessed by ELISA. Following exposure of neuronal cells by sodium arsenite for 12h, the membrane-bound APP level was enhanced, the amount of sAPPβ released into the culture medium was slightly higher, while the levels of Aβ peptides in the culture medium were considerably lower as compared to that assayed in the absence of any drug. The sodium arsenite-induced reduction of Aβ formation suggests an inhibition of the APP γ-cleavage step by arsenite. In contrast, DMA exposure of neuronal cells considerably increased formation of Aβ and sAPPβ, accompanied by enhanced membrane APP level. The DMA-induced changes in APP processing may be the result of the enhanced APP expression. Alternatively, increased Aβ production

  19. Activation and activities of the p53 tumour suppressor protein

    PubMed Central

    Bálint, É; Vousden, K H

    2001-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor protein inhibits malignant progression by mediating cell cycle arrest, apoptosis or repair following cellular stress. One of the major regulators of p53 function is the MDM2 protein, and multiple forms of cellular stress activate p53 by inhibiting the MDM2-mediated degradation of p53. Mutations in p53, or disruption of the pathways that allow activation of p53, seem to be a general feature of all cancers. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the pathways that regulate p53 and the pathways that are induced by p53, as well as their implications for cancer therapy. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11747320

  20. Tumor-Induced Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    De Sanctis, Francesco; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ugel, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent a heterogeneous, immune-suppressive leukocyte population that develops systemically and infiltrates tumors. MDSCs can restrain the immune response through different mechanisms including essential metabolite consumption, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production, as well as display of inhibitory surface molecules that alter T-cell trafficking and viability. Moreover, MDSCs play a role in tumor progression, acting directly on tumor cells and promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. Many biological and pharmaceutical drugs affect MDSC expansion and functions in preclinical tumor models and patients, often reversing host immune dysfunctions and allowing a more effective tumor immunotherapy.

  1. Therapeutic targeting of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Ugel, Stefano; Delpozzo, Federica; Desantis, Giacomo; Papalini, Francesca; Simonato, Francesca; Sonda, Nada; Zilio, Serena; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2009-08-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent a subset of myeloid cells that expand under pathological conditions, such as cancer development, acute and chronic infections, trauma, bone marrow transplantations, and some autoimmune diseases. MDSCs mediate a negative regulation of the immune response by affecting different T lymphocyte subsets. Potential mechanisms, which underlie this inhibitory activity range from those requiring direct cell-to-cell contact with others, more indirect, and mediated by the modification of the microenvironment. Pharmacological inhibition of MDSC suppressive pathways is a promising strategy to overcome disease-induced immune defects, which might be a key step in enhancing the effectiveness of immune-based therapies.

  2. Clonal analysis of delayed karyotypic abnormalities and gene mutations in radiation-induced genetic instability.

    PubMed Central

    Grosovsky, A J; Parks, K K; Giver, C R; Nelson, S L

    1996-01-01

    Many tumors exhibit extensive chromosomal instability, but karyotypic alterations will be significant in carcinogenesis only by influencing specific oncogenes or tumor suppressor loci within the affected chromosomal segments. In this investigation, the specificity of chromosomal rearrangements attributable to radiation-induced genomic instability is detailed, and a qualitative and quantitative correspondence with mutagenesis is demonstrated. Chromosomal abnormalities preferentially occurred near the site of prior rearrangements, resulting in complex abnormalities, or near the centromere, resulting in deletion or translocation of the entire chromosome arm, but no case of an interstitial chromosomal deletion was observed. Evidence for chromosomal instability in the progeny of irradiated cells also included clonal karyotypic heterogeneity. The persistence of instability was demonstrated for at least 80 generations by elevated mutation rates at the heterozygous, autosomal marker locus tk. Among those TK- mutants that showed a loss of heterozygosity, a statistically significant increase in mutation rate was observed only for those in which the loss of heterozygosity encompasses the telomeric region. This mutational specificity corresponds with the prevalence of terminal deletions, additions, and translocations, and the absence of interstitial deletions, in karyotypic analysis. Surprisingly, the elevated rate of TK- mutations is also partially attributable to intragenic base substitutions and small deletions, and DNA sequence analysis of some of these mutations is presented. Complex chromosomal abnormalities appear to be the most significant indicators of a high rate of persistent genetic instability which correlates with increased rates of both intragenic and chromosomal-scale mutations at tk. PMID:8887655

  3. Ribosomal mutations promote the evolution of antibiotic resistance in a multidrug environment

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, James E; Kaufmann-Malaga, Benjamin B; Wivagg, Carl N; Kim, Peter B; Silvis, Melanie R; Renedo, Nikolai; Ioerger, Thomas R; Ahmad, Rushdy; Livny, Jonathan; Fishbein, Skye; Sacchettini, James C; Carr, Steven A; Hung, Deborah T

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance arising via chromosomal mutations is typically specific to a particular antibiotic or class of antibiotics. We have identified mutations in genes encoding ribosomal components in Mycobacterium smegmatis that confer resistance to several structurally and mechanistically unrelated classes of antibiotics and enhance survival following heat shock and membrane stress. These mutations affect ribosome assembly and cause large-scale transcriptomic and proteomic changes, including the downregulation of the catalase KatG, an activating enzyme required for isoniazid sensitivity, and upregulation of WhiB7, a transcription factor involved in innate antibiotic resistance. Importantly, while these ribosomal mutations have a fitness cost in antibiotic-free medium, in a multidrug environment they promote the evolution of high-level, target-based resistance. Further, suppressor mutations can then be easily acquired to restore wild-type growth. Thus, ribosomal mutations can serve as stepping-stones in an evolutionary path leading to the emergence of high-level, multidrug resistance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20420.001 PMID:28220755

  4. Differential radiosensitivity phenotypes of DNA-PKcs mutations affecting NHEJ and HRR systems following irradiation with gamma-rays or very low fluences of alpha particles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Fen; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Little, John B; Kato, Takamitsu A; Shih, Hung-Ying; Xie, Xian-Jin; Wilson, Paul F; Brogan, John R; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Chen, David J; Bedford, Joel S; Chen, Benjamin P C

    2014-01-01

    We have examined cell-cycle dependence of chromosomal aberration induction and cell killing after high or low dose-rate γ irradiation in cells bearing DNA-PKcs mutations in the S2056 cluster, the T2609 cluster, or the kinase domain. We also compared sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) production by very low fluences of α-particles in DNA-PKcs mutant cells, and in homologous recombination repair (HRR) mutant cells including Rad51C, Rad51D, and Fancg/xrcc9. Generally, chromosomal aberrations and cell killing by γ-rays were similarly affected by mutations in DNA-PKcs, and these mutant cells were more sensitive in G1 than in S/G2 phase. In G1-irradiated DNA-PKcs mutant cells, both chromosome- and chromatid-type breaks and exchanges were in excess than wild-type cells. For cells irradiated in late S/G2 phase, mutant cells showed very high yields of chromatid breaks compared to wild-type cells. Few exchanges were seen in DNA-PKcs-null, Ku80-null, or DNA-PKcs kinase dead mutants, but exchanges in excess were detected in the S2506 or T2609 cluster mutants. SCE induction by very low doses of α-particles is resulted from bystander effects in cells not traversed by α-particles. SCE seen in wild-type cells was completely abolished in Rad51C- or Rad51D-deficient cells, but near normal in Fancg/xrcc9 cells. In marked contrast, very high levels of SCEs were observed in DNA-PKcs-null, DNA-PKcs kinase-dead and Ku80-null mutants. SCE induction was also abolished in T2609 cluster mutant cells, but was only slightly reduced in the S2056 cluster mutant cells. Since both non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and HRR systems utilize initial DNA lesions as a substrate, these results suggest the possibility of a competitive interference phenomenon operating between NHEJ and at least the Rad51C/D components of HRR; the level of interaction between damaged DNA and a particular DNA-PK component may determine the level of interaction of such DNA with a relevant HRR component.

  5. The effect of age at exposure on the inactivating mechanisms and relative contributions of key tumor suppressor genes in radiation-induced mouse T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Sunaoshi, Masaaki; Amasaki, Yoshiko; Hirano-Sakairi, Shinobu; Blyth, Benjamin J; Morioka, Takamitsu; Kaminishi, Mutsumi; Shang, Yi; Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya; Tachibana, Akira; Kakinuma, Shizuko

    2015-09-01

    Children are considered more sensitive to radiation-induced cancer than adults, yet any differences in genomic alterations associated with age-at-exposure and their underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We assessed genome-wide DNA copy number and mutation of key tumor suppressor genes in T-cell lymphomas arising after weekly irradiation of female B6C3F1 mice with 1.2Gy X-rays for 4 consecutive weeks starting during infancy (1 week old), adolescence (4 weeks old) or as young adults (8 weeks old). Although T-cell lymphoma incidence was similar, loss of heterozygosity at Cdkn2a on chromosome 4 and at Ikaros on chromosome 11 was more frequent in the two older groups, while loss at the Pten locus on chromosome 19 was more frequent in the infant-irradiated group. Cdkn2a and Ikaros mutation/loss was a common feature of the young adult-irradiation group, with Ikaros frequently (50%) incurring multiple independent hits (including deletions and mutations) or suffering a single hit predicted to result in a dominant negative protein (such as those lacking exon 4, an isoform we have designated Ik12, which lacks two DNA binding zinc-finger domains). Conversely, Pten mutations were more frequent after early irradiation (60%) than after young adult-irradiation (30%). Homozygous Pten mutations occurred without DNA copy number change after irradiation starting in infancy, suggesting duplication of the mutated allele by chromosome mis-segregation or mitotic recombination. Our findings demonstrate that while deletions on chromosomes 4 and 11 affecting Cdkn2a and Ikaros are a prominent feature of young adult irradiation-induced T-cell lymphoma, tumors arising after irradiation from infancy suffer a second hit in Pten by mis-segregation or recombination. This is the first report showing an influence of age-at-exposure on genomic alterations of tumor suppressor genes and their relative involvement in radiation-induced T-cell lymphoma. These data are important for considering the risks

  6. Generation of KCL017 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a mutation in VHL gene

    PubMed Central

    Hewitson, Heema; Wood, Victoria; Kadeva, Neli; Cornwell, Glenda; Codognotto, Stefano; Stephenson, Emma; Ilic, Dusko

    2016-01-01

    The KCL017 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from an embryo donated for research that carried an autosomal dominant mutation affecting splicing site of the VHL gene encoding von Hippel–Lindau tumor suppressor E3 ubiquitin protein ligase (676 + 3 A > T). The ICM was isolated using laser microsurgery and plated on γ-irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts. Both the derivation and cell line propagation were performed in an animal product-free environment. Pluripotent state and differentiation potential were confirmed by in vitro assays. PMID:27345980

  7. Generation of KCL016 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a mutation in VHL gene.

    PubMed

    Miere, Cristian; Hewitson, Heema; Wood, Victoria; Kadeva, Neli; Cornwell, Glenda; Codognotto, Stefano; Stephenson, Emma; Ilic, Dusko

    2016-01-01

    The KCL016 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from an embryo donated for research that carried an autosomal dominant mutation affecting splicing site of the VHL gene encoding von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor E3 ubiquitin protein ligase (676+3A>T). The ICM was isolated using laser microsurgery and plated on γ-irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts. Both the derivation and cell line propagation were performed in an animal product-free environment. Pluripotent state and differentiation potential were confirmed by in vitro assays.

  8. Generation of KCL016 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a mutation in VHL gene

    PubMed Central

    Miere, Cristian; Hewitson, Heema; Wood, Victoria; Kadeva, Neli; Cornwell, Glenda; Codognotto, Stefano; Stephenson, Emma;